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Sample records for precious metals institute

  1. 41 CFR 109-45.1004 - Recovery and use of precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program. 109-45.1004 Section 109-45.1004 Public... PERSONAL PROPERTY 45.10-Recovery of Precious Metals § 109-45.1004 Recovery and use of precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program. DOE operates its own precious metals pool and therefore...

  2. 41 CFR 109-45.1004 - Recovery and use of precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program. 109-45.1004 Section 109-45.1004 Public... PERSONAL PROPERTY 45.10-Recovery of Precious Metals § 109-45.1004 Recovery and use of precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program. DOE operates its own precious metals pool and...

  3. 41 CFR 109-45.1004 - Recovery and use of precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program. 109-45.1004 Section 109-45.1004 Public... PERSONAL PROPERTY 45.10-Recovery of Precious Metals § 109-45.1004 Recovery and use of precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program. DOE operates its own precious metals pool and...

  4. 41 CFR 109-45.1004 - Recovery and use of precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program. 109-45.1004 Section 109-45.1004 Public... PERSONAL PROPERTY 45.10-Recovery of Precious Metals § 109-45.1004 Recovery and use of precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program. DOE operates its own precious metals pool and...

  5. 41 CFR 109-45.1004 - Recovery and use of precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program. 109-45.1004 Section 109-45.1004 Public... PERSONAL PROPERTY 45.10-Recovery of Precious Metals § 109-45.1004 Recovery and use of precious metals through the DOD Precious Metals Recovery Program. DOE operates its own precious metals pool and...

  6. 48 CFR 945.607-2 - Recovering precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recovering precious metals... Recovering precious metals. (b) Contractors generating contractor inventory containing precious metals shall... the DOE precious metals pool. This includes all precious metals in any form, including shapes,...

  7. 48 CFR 945.607-2 - Recovering precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recovering precious metals... Recovering precious metals. (b) Contractors generating contractor inventory containing precious metals shall... the DOE precious metals pool. This includes all precious metals in any form, including shapes,...

  8. 41 CFR 109-27.5103 - Precious Metals Control Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Precious Metals Control... PROCUREMENT 27-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.51-Management of Precious Metals § 109-27.5103 Precious Metals Control Officer. Each DOE organization and contractor holding precious metals shall designate in writing a...

  9. 41 CFR 109-27.5103 - Precious Metals Control Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Precious Metals Control... PROCUREMENT 27-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.51-Management of Precious Metals § 109-27.5103 Precious Metals Control Officer. Each DOE organization and contractor holding precious metals shall designate in writing...

  10. 41 CFR 109-27.5103 - Precious Metals Control Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Precious Metals Control... PROCUREMENT 27-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.51-Management of Precious Metals § 109-27.5103 Precious Metals Control Officer. Each DOE organization and contractor holding precious metals shall designate in writing...

  11. 48 CFR 208.7304 - Refined precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Refined precious metals... Government-Owned Precious Metals 208.7304 Refined precious metals. See PGI 208.7304 for a list of refined precious metals managed by DSCP....

  12. 48 CFR 245.607-2 - Recovering precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recovering precious metals... Disposal of Contractor Inventory 245.607-2 Recovering precious metals. (b) Precious metals are silver, gold... office with disposition instructions for certain categories of precious metals-bearing...

  13. 48 CFR 208.7304 - Refined precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Refined precious metals... Government-Owned Precious Metals 208.7304 Refined precious metals. See PGI 208.7304 for a list of refined precious metals managed by DSCP....

  14. 48 CFR 208.7304 - Refined precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Refined precious metals... Government-Owned Precious Metals 208.7304 Refined precious metals. See PGI 208.7304 for a list of refined precious metals managed by DSCP....

  15. 41 CFR 109-27.5103 - Precious Metals Control Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Precious Metals Control... PROCUREMENT 27-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.51-Management of Precious Metals § 109-27.5103 Precious Metals Control Officer. Each DOE organization and contractor holding precious metals shall designate in writing...

  16. 48 CFR 208.7304 - Refined precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Refined precious metals... Government-Owned Precious Metals 208.7304 Refined precious metals. See PGI 208.7304 for a list of refined precious metals managed by DSCP....

  17. 41 CFR 109-27.5103 - Precious Metals Control Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Precious Metals Control... PROCUREMENT 27-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.51-Management of Precious Metals § 109-27.5103 Precious Metals Control Officer. Each DOE organization and contractor holding precious metals shall designate in writing...

  18. 48 CFR 208.7304 - Refined precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Refined precious metals... Government-Owned Precious Metals 208.7304 Refined precious metals. See PGI 208.7304 for a list of refined precious metals managed by DSCP....

  19. Recovery of Precious Metals from Lead Bullion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Volker

    1981-10-01

    An improved technique for recovering precious metals from secondary sources, using a blast furnace to separate and slag the nonmetallic components of these materials, is discussed. The composition of the blast furnace products (lead bullion, matte, slag, and flue dust) is presented. The non-precious metals in the lead bullion are oxidized in an oxygen top-blown rotary converter. Design and functioning of the blast furnace and the converter are described. Some results and the most important changes of the converter process are reported compared to the normally used rever-beratory furnace process.

  20. Effect of the combination of dithiooctanoate monomers and acidic adhesive monomers on adhesion to precious metals, precious metal alloys and non-precious metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Kojima, Katsunori; Endo, Takeshi; Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the combination of a dithiooctanoate monomer and an acidic adhesive monomer on adhesion to precious metals, precious and non-precious metal alloys. From a selection of four dithiooctanoate monomers and six acidic adhesive monomers, 14 experimental primers containing a combination of 5.0 wt% of a dithiooctanoate monomer and 1.0 wt% of an acidic adhesive monomer in acetone were prepared. Tensile bond strengths (TBSs) of MMA-PMMA/TBBO resin to nine kinds of precious metals, precious metal alloys, and non-precious metal alloys after 2,000 thermal cycles were measured. Results showed that there were no significant differences in TBS among the primers to all the precious and non-precious metal adherends tested (p>0.05). Highest TBS values (46.5-55.8 MPa) for bonding to Au alloy, Au-Ag-Pd alloy, Co-Cr alloy, and Ni-Cr alloy were achieved with the primer which contained 5.0 wt% 10-methacryloyloxydecyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (10-MDDT) and 1.0 wt% 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl phosphonoacetate (6-MHPA). Therefore, 5.0 wt% 10-MDDT and 1.0 wt% 6-MHPA was determined as the optimal combination for bonding to precious metals, precious and non-precious metal alloys.

  1. 41 CFR 109-1.5108-4 - Precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Precious metals. 109-1....51-Personal Property Management Standards and Practices § 109-1.5108-4 Precious metals. Perpetual inventory records are to be maintained for precious metals....

  2. 41 CFR 109-1.5108-4 - Precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Precious metals. 109-1....51-Personal Property Management Standards and Practices § 109-1.5108-4 Precious metals. Perpetual inventory records are to be maintained for precious metals....

  3. 41 CFR 109-27.5106 - Precious metals pool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Precious metals pool. 109-27.5106 Section 109-27.5106 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.51-Management of Precious Metals § 109-27.5106 Precious metals pool....

  4. 41 CFR 109-27.5106 - Precious metals pool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Precious metals pool. 109-27.5106 Section 109-27.5106 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.51-Management of Precious Metals § 109-27.5106 Precious metals pool....

  5. 41 CFR 109-27.5106 - Precious metals pool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Precious metals pool. 109-27.5106 Section 109-27.5106 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.51-Management of Precious Metals § 109-27.5106 Precious metals pool....

  6. 41 CFR 109-1.5108-4 - Precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Precious metals. 109-1....51-Personal Property Management Standards and Practices § 109-1.5108-4 Precious metals. Perpetual inventory records are to be maintained for precious metals....

  7. 41 CFR 109-27.5106 - Precious metals pool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Precious metals pool. 109-27.5106 Section 109-27.5106 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.51-Management of Precious Metals § 109-27.5106 Precious metals pool....

  8. 41 CFR 109-1.5108-4 - Precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Precious metals. 109-1....51-Personal Property Management Standards and Practices § 109-1.5108-4 Precious metals. Perpetual inventory records are to be maintained for precious metals....

  9. 41 CFR 109-27.5106 - Precious metals pool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Precious metals pool. 109-27.5106 Section 109-27.5106 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.51-Management of Precious Metals § 109-27.5106 Precious metals pool....

  10. 41 CFR 109-1.5108-4 - Precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Precious metals. 109-1....51-Personal Property Management Standards and Practices § 109-1.5108-4 Precious metals. Perpetual inventory records are to be maintained for precious metals....

  11. Abundant Metals Give Precious Hydrogenation Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, R. Morris

    2013-11-29

    Homogeneous catalysts based on precious (noble) metals have had a profound influence on modern synthetic methods, enabling highly selective synthesis of organic compounds but typically require precious metal catalysts (Ru, Rh, Ir, Pt, and Pd). Increasing efforts have been devoted to the design and discovery of homogeneous catalysts using base metals (e.g., Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Mo). Morris et al. report Fe catalysts for asymmetric hydrogenation of C=O bonds. Cobalt catalysts for asymmetric hydrogenation of C=C bonds are described by Chirik et al., and Beller et al. report new nanoscale iron catalysts for synthesis of functionalized anilines through hydrogenation of nitroarenes. The author’s work in this area is supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  12. Stylized facts of intraday precious metals

    PubMed Central

    Batten, Jonathan; McGroarty, Frank; Peat, Maurice; Urquhart, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the stylized facts, correlation and interaction between volatility and returns at the 5-minute frequency for gold, silver, platinum and palladium from May 2000 to April 2015. We study the full sample period, as well as three subsamples to determine how high-frequency data of precious metals have developed over time. We find that over the full sample, the number of trades has increased substantially over time for each precious metal, while the bid-ask spread has narrowed over time, indicating an increase in liquidity and price efficiency. We also find strong evidence of periodicity in returns, volatility, volume and bid-ask spread. Returns and volume both experience strong intraday periodicity linked to the opening and closing of major markets around the world while the bid-ask spread is at its lowest when European markets are open. We also show a bilateral Granger causality between returns and volatility of each precious metal, which holds for the vast majority subsamples. PMID:28448492

  13. Biosorbents for recovery of precious metals.

    PubMed

    Won, Sung Wook; Kotte, Pratap; Wei, Wei; Lim, Areum; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2014-05-01

    Biosorption is a promising technology not only for the removal of heavy metals and dyes but also for the recovery of precious metals (PMs) from solution phases. The biosorptive recovery of PMs from waste solutions and secondary resources is recently getting paid attractive attention because their price is increasing or fluctuating, their available deposit is limited and maldistributed, and high-tech industries need more consumption of PMs. The biosorbents for recovery of PMs require specifications which differ from those for the treatment of wastewaters containing heavy metals and dyes. In this review, the previous works on biosorbents and biosorption for recovery of PMs were summarized. Especially, we discuss and suggest the required specifications of biosorbents for recovery of PMs and strategies to give the required properties to the biosorbents. We believe this review will provide useful information to scientists and engineers and hope to give insights into this research frontier.

  14. Precious Metal Recovery from Fuel Cell MEA's

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, Lawrence

    2004-04-27

    In 2003, Engelhard Corporation received a DOE award to develop a cost-effective, environmentally friendly approach to recover Pt from fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies (MEA’s). The most important precious metal used in fuel cells is platinum, but ruthenium is also added to the anode electrocatalyst if CO is present in the hydrogen stream. As part of the project, a large number of measurements of Pt and Ru need to be made. A low-cost approach to measuring Pt is using the industry standard spectrophotometric measurement of Pt complexed with stannous chloride. The interference of Ru can be eliminated by reading the Pt absorbance at 450 nm. Spectrophotometric methods for measuring Ru, while reported in the literature, are not as robust. These slides will discuss the options for measuring Pt and Ru using the method of UV-VIS spectrophotometry

  15. Pentannulation of Heterocycles by Virtue of Precious Metal Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Petrović, Martina; Occhiato, Ernesto G

    2016-03-04

    Pentannulated heterocycles are the key structural subunit of many natural and biologically active compounds. Over the last decades, many precious metal-assisted pentannulations have been described as a consequence of an extensive research. This Focus Review gives an overview of precious metal-catalyzed reactions applied to the synthesis of cyclopenta-fused heterocycles in the last five years.

  16. Chalcopyrite—bearer of a precious, non-precious metal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimball, Bryn E.

    2013-01-01

    The mineral chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) is the world's most abundant source of copper, a metal component in virtually every piece of electrical equipment. It is the main copper mineral in several different ore deposit types, the most important of which are porphyry deposits. Chalcopyrite is unstable at the Earth's surface, so it weathers from sulphide outcrops and mine waste piles, contributing acid and dissolved copper to what is known as acid rock drainage. If not prevented, dissolved copper from chalcopyrite weathering will be transported downstream, potentially harming ecosystems along the way. Pristine areas are becoming targets for future copper supply as we strive to meet ever-increasing demands for copper by developed and developing nations. Additionally, our uses for copper are expanding to include technology such as solar energy production. This has lead to the processing of increasingly lower grade ores, which is possible, in part, due to advances in bio-leaching (i.e. metal extraction catalysed by micro-organisms). Although copper is plentiful, it is still a nonrenewable resource. Future copper supply promises to fall short of demand and the volatility of the copper market may continue if we do not prioritize copper use and improve copper recycling and ore extraction efficiency.

  17. 31 CFR 103.140 - Anti-money laundering programs for dealers in precious metals, precious stones, or jewels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... market-recognized beauty, rarity, and value, and includes pearl, amber, and coral. (4) Precious metal...) Precious stone means a substance with gem quality market-recognized beauty, rarity, and value, and...

  18. Recovery of precious metals from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freiser, Henry

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective is to develop efficient and economical separation and recovery methods for the platinum group and other precious metals. The separation of Pd(II) from Pt(II), Ir(III), and Rh(III) with trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in heptane using centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) was investigated. Activities to achieve this objective focussed on selection and evaluation of extraction systems for the PGM and modification of selected systems for multistage operation with a view to scaling up to desired macro levels. On the basis of preliminary evaluation of a series of simple metal complexing agents and chelating agents, the TOPO in heptane was selected as a likely system for isolating of Pd(II) and Pt(II) from the other PGM. A multistage apparatus capable of configuration as a simple rugged device, a centrifugal partition chromatograph (CPC), was shown to be effective. The extraction of Pd(II) was studied by CPC and batch solvent extraction. The distribution ratios for Pd(II) determined by both methods agree well. In low HCl concentrations (less than 0.1 M), the extracted species was PdCl2.(TOPO)2, irrespective of the chloride concentration, while at acid concentrations above 0.1 M, the Pd was extracted as the ion pair, 2(TOPO.H+).(PdCl4)2-. Base line separation of Pd(II) and Pt(II) in CPC was obtained under a variety of chloride and HCl concentration. It was demonstrated that the efficiency of CPC for metal separation was limited by chemical kinetic factors rather than instrumental factors, strongly suggesting that dramatic improvements can be achieved by studying reaction kinetics of formation and dissociation of the extractable metal complex.

  19. Concentration of precious metals during their recovery from electronic waste.

    PubMed

    Cayumil, R; Khanna, R; Rajarao, R; Mukherjee, P S; Sahajwalla, V

    2016-11-01

    The rapid growth of electronic devices, their subsequent obsolescence and disposal has resulted in electronic waste (e-waste) being one of the fastest increasing waste streams worldwide. The main component of e-waste is printed circuit boards (PCBs), which contain substantial quantities of precious metals in concentrations significantly higher than those typically found in corresponding ores. The high value and limited reserves of minerals containing these metals makes urban mining of precious metals very attractive. This article is focused on the concentration and recovery of precious metals during pyro-metallurgical recycling of waste PCBs. High temperature pyrolysis was carried out for ten minutes in a horizontal tube furnace in the temperature range 800-1350°C under Argon gas flowing at 1L/min. These temperatures were chosen to lie below and above the melting point (1084.87°C) of copper, the main metal in PCBs, to study the influence of its physical state on the recovery of precious metals. The heat treatment of waste PCBs resulted in two different types of solid products, namely a carbonaceous non-metallic fraction (NMFs) and metallic products, composed of copper rich foils and/or droplets and tin-lead rich droplets and some wires. Significant proportions of Ag, Au, Pd and Pt were found concentrated within two types of metallic phases, with very limited quantities retained by the NMFs. This process was successful in concentrating several precious metals such as Ag, Au, Pd and Pt in a small volume fraction, and reduced volumes for further processing/refinement by up to 75%. The amounts of secondary wastes produced were also minimised to a great extent. The generation of precious metals rich metallic phases demonstrates high temperature pyrolysis as a viable approach towards the recovery of precious metals from e-waste.

  20. Metalliferous asteroids as potential sources of precious metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargel, Jeffrey S.

    1994-10-01

    Recent discoveries of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) and chemical analyses of fragments of asteroids (meteorites) suggest that there may be a gold mine, literally, in near-Earth space. Judged from meteorite analyses, two types of asteroids offer particularly bright prospects for recovery of large quantities of precious metals (defined as Au, Pt, Ir, Os, Pd, Rh, and Ru), the ordinary LL chondrites, which contain 1.2-5.3% Fe-Ni metal containing 50-220 ppm of precious metals, and metallic asteroids, which consist almost wholly of Fe-Ni phases and contain variable amounts of precious metals up to several hundred ppm. The pulverized regolith of LL chondrite asteroids could be electromagnetically raked to separate the metallic grains. Suitable metallic asteroids could be processed in their entirety. Statistically, there should be approximately six metallic NEAs larger than 1 km in diameter that contain over 100 ppm of precious metals. Successful recovery of 400,000 tons or more of precious metals contained in the smallest and least rich of these metallic NEAs could yield products worth $5.1 trillion (US) at recent market prices.

  1. Methods for recovering precious metals from industrial waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canda, L.; Heput, T.; Ardelean, E.

    2016-02-01

    The accelerated rate of industrialization increases the demand for precious metals, while high quality natural resources are diminished quantitatively, with significant operating costs. Precious metals recovery can be successfully made from waste, considered to be secondary sources of raw material. In recent years, concerns and interest of researchers for more increasing efficient methods to recover these metals, taking into account the more severe environmental protection legislation. Precious metals are used in a wide range of applications, both in electronic and communications equipment, spacecraft and jet aircraft engines and for mobile phones or catalytic converters. The most commonly recovered precious metals are: gold from jewellery and electronics, silver from X- ray films and photographic emulsions, industrial applications (catalysts, batteries, glass/mirrors), jewellery; platinum group metals from catalytic converters, catalysts for the refining of crude oil, industrial catalysts, nitric acid manufacturing plant, the carbon-based catalyst, e-waste. An important aspect is the economic viability of recycling processes related to complex waste flows. Hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical routes are the most important ways of processing electrical and electronic equipment waste. The necessity of recovering precious metals has opened new opportunities for future research.

  2. 40 CFR 471.40 - Applicability; description of the precious metals forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... precious metals forming subcategory. 471.40 Section 471.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) NONFERROUS METALS FORMING AND METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Precious Metals Forming Subcategory § 471.40...

  3. 40 CFR 471.40 - Applicability; description of the precious metals forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... precious metals forming subcategory. 471.40 Section 471.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) NONFERROUS METALS FORMING AND METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Precious Metals Forming Subcategory § 471.40...

  4. Current advances in precious metal core–shell catalyst design

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohong; He, Beibei; Hu, Zhiyu; Zeng, Zhigang; Han, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Precious metal nanoparticles are commonly used as the main active components of various catalysts. Given their high cost, limited quantity, and easy loss of catalytic activity under severe conditions, precious metals should be used in catalysts at low volumes and be protected from damaging environments. Accordingly, reducing the amount of precious metals without compromising their catalytic performance is difficult, particularly under challenging conditions. As multifunctional materials, core–shell nanoparticles are highly important owing to their wide range of applications in chemistry, physics, biology, and environmental areas. Compared with their single-component counterparts and other composites, core–shell nanoparticles offer a new active interface and a potential synergistic effect between the core and shell, making these materials highly attractive in catalytic application. On one hand, when a precious metal is used as the shell material, the catalytic activity can be greatly improved because of the increased surface area and the closed interfacial interaction between the core and the shell. On the other hand, when a precious metal is applied as the core material, the catalytic stability can be remarkably improved because of the protection conferred by the shell material. Therefore, a reasonable design of the core–shell catalyst for target applications must be developed. We summarize the latest advances in the fabrications, properties, and applications of core–shell nanoparticles in this paper. The current research trends of these core–shell catalysts are also highlighted. PMID:27877695

  5. Current advances in precious metal core-shell catalyst design.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; He, Beibei; Hu, Zhiyu; Zeng, Zhigang; Han, Sheng

    2014-08-01

    Precious metal nanoparticles are commonly used as the main active components of various catalysts. Given their high cost, limited quantity, and easy loss of catalytic activity under severe conditions, precious metals should be used in catalysts at low volumes and be protected from damaging environments. Accordingly, reducing the amount of precious metals without compromising their catalytic performance is difficult, particularly under challenging conditions. As multifunctional materials, core-shell nanoparticles are highly important owing to their wide range of applications in chemistry, physics, biology, and environmental areas. Compared with their single-component counterparts and other composites, core-shell nanoparticles offer a new active interface and a potential synergistic effect between the core and shell, making these materials highly attractive in catalytic application. On one hand, when a precious metal is used as the shell material, the catalytic activity can be greatly improved because of the increased surface area and the closed interfacial interaction between the core and the shell. On the other hand, when a precious metal is applied as the core material, the catalytic stability can be remarkably improved because of the protection conferred by the shell material. Therefore, a reasonable design of the core-shell catalyst for target applications must be developed. We summarize the latest advances in the fabrications, properties, and applications of core-shell nanoparticles in this paper. The current research trends of these core-shell catalysts are also highlighted.

  6. A precious-metal free micro fuel cell accumulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretthauer, C.; Müller, C.; Reinecke, H.

    2011-05-01

    In recent years, integrated fuel cell (FC) type primary and secondary batteries attracted a great deal of attention as integrated on-chip power sources due to their high theoretical power densities. Unfortunately, the costs of these devices have been rather high. This is partially due to the involved clean-room processes, but also due to the fact that these devices generally rely on expensive precious-metals such as Pd and Pt. Therefore we developed a novel integrated FC type accumulator that is based on non-precious-metals only. The key component of the presented accumulator is its alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane that allows not only the usage of a low-cost AB5 type hydrogen storage electrode, but also the usage of La0.6Ca0.4CoO3 as a precious-metal free bifunctional catalyst for the air-breathing electrode. Additionally the presented design requires only comparatively few cleanroom processes which further reduces the overall production costs. Although abdicating precious-metals, the presented accumulator shows an open circuit voltage of 0.81 V and a maximum power density of 0.66 mW cm-2 which is comparable or even superior to former precious-metal based cells.

  7. Characterisation of the surface of freshly prepared precious metal catalysts.

    PubMed

    Parker, Stewart F; Adroja, Devashibhai; Jiménez-Ruiz, Mónica; Tischer, Markus; Möbus, Konrad; Wieland, Stefan D; Albers, Peter

    2016-07-14

    A combination of electron microscopy, X-ray and neutron spectroscopies and computational methods has provided new insights into the species present on the surface of freshly prepared precious metal catalysts. The results show that in all cases, at least half of the surface is metallic or nearly so, with the remainder covered by oxygen, largely as hydroxide. Water is also present and is strongly held; weeks of pumping under high vacuum is insufficient to remove it. The hydroxyls are reactive as shown by their reaction with or displacement by CO and can be removed by hydrogenation. This clearly has implications for how precious metal catalysts are activated after preparation.

  8. 40 CFR 421.260 - Applicability: Description of the secondary precious metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... secondary precious metals subcategory. 421.260 Section 421.260 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Secondary Precious Metals Subcategory § 421.260 Applicability: Description of the...

  9. 40 CFR 421.260 - Applicability: Description of the secondary precious metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... secondary precious metals subcategory. 421.260 Section 421.260 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Secondary Precious Metals Subcategory § 421.260 Applicability: Description of the...

  10. 40 CFR 421.260 - Applicability: Description of the secondary precious metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... secondary precious metals subcategory. 421.260 Section 421.260 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Secondary Precious Metals Subcategory § 421.260 Applicability: Description of the...

  11. 40 CFR 421.250 - Applicability: Description of the primary precious metals and mercury subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary precious metals and mercury subcategory. 421.250 Section 421.250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Precious Metals and Mercury Subcategory § 421.250...

  12. 40 CFR 421.250 - Applicability: Description of the primary precious metals and mercury subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary precious metals and mercury subcategory. 421.250 Section 421.250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Precious Metals and Mercury Subcategory § 421.250...

  13. 40 CFR 421.250 - Applicability: Description of the primary precious metals and mercury subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary precious metals and mercury subcategory. 421.250 Section 421.250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Precious Metals and Mercury Subcategory § 421.250...

  14. 40 CFR 421.260 - Applicability: Description of the secondary precious metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... secondary precious metals subcategory. 421.260 Section 421.260 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Secondary Precious Metals Subcategory § 421.260 Applicability: Description of the...

  15. Precious-Metal Salt Coatings for Detecting Hydrazines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dee, Louis A.; Greene, Benjamin

    2004-01-01

    Substrates coated with a precious-metal salt KAuCl4 have been found to be useful for detecting hydrazine vapors in air at and above a concentration of the order of 0.01 parts per million (ppm). Upon exposure to air containing a sufficient amount of hydrazine for a sufficient time, the coating material undergoes a visible change in color.

  16. Recovery of precious metals from military electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Gundiler, I.H.; Lutz, J.D.; Neiswander, P.G.

    1996-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories developed a process to identify and remove the hazardous sub-components from dismantled weapons components utilizing real-time radiography and abrasive water-jet cutting. The components were then crushed, granulated, screened, and separated into an aluminium and a precious-and-base-metals fraction using air-tables. Plastics were further cleaned for disposal as non- hazardous waste.

  17. 48 CFR 945.607-2 - Recovering precious metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recovering precious metals. 945.607-2 Section 945.607-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACT... or radioactively contaminated, except for silver. Only high grade nonradioactively contaminated...

  18. 41 CFR 109-45.1003 - Recovery of silver from precious metals bearing materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Recovery of silver from precious metals bearing materials. 109-45.1003 Section 109-45.1003 Public Contracts and Property Management... of Precious Metals § 109-45.1003 Recovery of silver from precious metals bearing materials. The...

  19. 41 CFR 109-45.1003 - Recovery of silver from precious metals bearing materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recovery of silver from precious metals bearing materials. 109-45.1003 Section 109-45.1003 Public Contracts and Property Management... of Precious Metals § 109-45.1003 Recovery of silver from precious metals bearing materials. The...

  20. 41 CFR 109-45.1003 - Recovery of silver from precious metals bearing materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recovery of silver from precious metals bearing materials. 109-45.1003 Section 109-45.1003 Public Contracts and Property Management... of Precious Metals § 109-45.1003 Recovery of silver from precious metals bearing materials. The...

  1. 41 CFR 109-45.1003 - Recovery of silver from precious metals bearing materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Recovery of silver from precious metals bearing materials. 109-45.1003 Section 109-45.1003 Public Contracts and Property Management... of Precious Metals § 109-45.1003 Recovery of silver from precious metals bearing materials....

  2. 40 CFR 413.20 - Applicability: Description of the electroplating of precious metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... electroplating of precious metals subcategory. 413.20 Section 413.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Electroplating of Precious Metals Subcategory § 413.20 Applicability: Description of the electroplating of precious metals subcategory. The provisions of this subpart apply to discharges of process...

  3. 41 CFR 109-45.1002-3 - Precious metals recovery program monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Precious metals recovery program monitor. 109-45.1002-3 Section 109-45.1002-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... Metals § 109-45.1002-3 Precious metals recovery program monitor. The DPMO shall be the precious...

  4. 41 CFR 109-45.1002-3 - Precious metals recovery program monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Precious metals recovery program monitor. 109-45.1002-3 Section 109-45.1002-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... Metals § 109-45.1002-3 Precious metals recovery program monitor. The DPMO shall be the precious...

  5. 40 CFR 413.20 - Applicability: Description of the electroplating of precious metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... electroplating of precious metals subcategory. 413.20 Section 413.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Electroplating of Precious Metals Subcategory § 413.20 Applicability: Description of the electroplating of precious metals subcategory. The provisions of this subpart apply to discharges of process...

  6. 41 CFR 109-45.1002-3 - Precious metals recovery program monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Precious metals recovery program monitor. 109-45.1002-3 Section 109-45.1002-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... Metals § 109-45.1002-3 Precious metals recovery program monitor. The DPMO shall be the precious...

  7. 77 FR 50056 - Guides for the Jewelry, Precious Metals, and Pewter Industries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... CFR PART 23 Guides for the Jewelry, Precious Metals, and Pewter Industries AGENCY: Federal Trade... Jewelry, Precious Metals, and Pewter Industries. DATES: Comments must be received on or before September... Guides for the Jewelry, Precious Metals, and Pewter Industries (``Jewelry Guides'' or ``Guides).\\1\\...

  8. 41 CFR 109-45.1002-3 - Precious metals recovery program monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Precious metals recovery program monitor. 109-45.1002-3 Section 109-45.1002-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... Metals § 109-45.1002-3 Precious metals recovery program monitor. The DPMO shall be the precious...

  9. 40 CFR 413.20 - Applicability: Description of the electroplating of precious metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... electroplating of precious metals subcategory. 413.20 Section 413.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Electroplating of Precious Metals Subcategory § 413.20 Applicability: Description of the electroplating of precious metals subcategory. The provisions of this subpart apply to discharges of process...

  10. 40 CFR 413.20 - Applicability: Description of the electroplating of precious metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... electroplating of precious metals subcategory. 413.20 Section 413.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Electroplating of Precious Metals Subcategory § 413.20 Applicability: Description of the electroplating of precious metals subcategory. The provisions of this subpart apply to discharges of process...

  11. 41 CFR 109-45.1002-3 - Precious metals recovery program monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Precious metals recovery program monitor. 109-45.1002-3 Section 109-45.1002-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... Metals § 109-45.1002-3 Precious metals recovery program monitor. The DPMO shall be the precious...

  12. 40 CFR 421.250 - Applicability: Description of the primary precious metals and mercury subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary precious metals and mercury subcategory. 421.250 Section 421.250 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Precious Metals and Mercury Subcategory § 421.250 Applicability: Description of the primary precious metals and mercury subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  13. 40 CFR 421.250 - Applicability: Description of the primary precious metals and mercury subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary precious metals and mercury subcategory. 421.250 Section 421.250 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Precious Metals and Mercury Subcategory § 421.250 Applicability: Description of the primary precious metals and mercury subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  14. Chemistry of precious metal oxides relevant to heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kurzman, Joshua A; Misch, Lauren M; Seshadri, Ram

    2013-10-01

    The platinum group metals (PGMs) are widely employed as catalysts, especially for the mitigation of automotive exhaust pollutants. The low natural abundance of PGMs and increasing demand from the expanding automotive sector necessitates strategies to improve the efficiency of PGM use. Conventional catalysts typically consist of PGM nanoparticles dispersed on high surface area oxide supports. However, high PGM loadings must be used to counter sintering, ablation, and deactivation of the catalyst such that sufficient activity is maintained over the operating lifetime. An appealing strategy for reducing metal loading is the substitution of PGM ions into oxide hosts: the use of single atoms (ions) as catalytic active sites represents a highly atom-efficient alternative to the use of nanoparticles. This review addresses the crystal chemistry and reactivity of oxide compounds of precious metals that are, or could be relevant to developing an understanding of the role of precious metal ions in heterogeneous catalysis. We review the chemical conditions that facilitate stabilization of the notoriously oxophobic precious metals in oxide environments, and survey complex oxide hosts that have proven to be amenable to reversible redox cycling of PGMs.

  15. EXPLORATION STRATEGY FOR HOT-SPRING PRECIOUS-METAL DEPOSITS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, Byron R.; Adams, Samuel S.

    1984-01-01

    The discovery of economic precious-metal deposits related to physical-chemical processes in the near-surface portions of high-temperature hot-spring systems has led to intensive exploration efforts for this deposit type. To increase the probability of success, these exploration programs should (1) be based on the most important visually recognizable or readily measurable deposit-model criteria; (2) be able to identify specific targets within the best search areas; and (3) be able to rank the order of priority among the targets. We propose a process-recognition exploration strategy for hot-spring deposits that has been developed from data from precious-metal occurrences at several localities in the western United States. The exploration model is based on the degree to which recognizable geologic and geochemical criteria are favorable or unfavorable to the occurrence of an economic deposit, either through their presence or absence.

  16. Recovery and separation of precious metals from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freiser, H.; Muralidharan, S.

    1992-01-01

    During the past year a viable procedure centered around centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC), a multistage liquid-liquid partitioning technique for the separation of precious metals (Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, Ru), was developed. Stable and inexpensive ligands that can be readily recycled to achieve the separations of the precious metals were identified. The separation methods developed so far yield three separate fractions: Pt, Pd, and Rh-Ir. The Rh-Ir pair can be separated in a subsequent run. The total amount of precious metals separated in a single experiment varied from 1 to 50 mg. The factors affecting the efficiencies of these separations were studied. The kinetics of the decomposition of the complex and the ion pair have a major bearing on these efficiencies, with slow kinetics resulting in poor efficiencies. The methods for the improvement of the efficiencies were also investigated. For example, significant improvement in the efficiencies and separation times for Pt and Pd were achieved by the use of chloride gradient in the mobile phase. Two papers were published and talks were presented on our work at the FACSS meeting in Anaheim, Oct. 1991, and at the Pittsburgh Conference in New Orleans, Mar. 1992.

  17. Phase Behavior of Pseudobinary Precious Metal-Carbide Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoire, John M.; Tague, Michele E.; Smith, Eva H.; Dale, Darren; DiSalvo, Francis J.; Abruña, Héctor D.; Hennig, Richard G.; van Dover, R. Bruce

    2010-11-15

    Transition metal carbides exhibit a variety of interesting material properties, including electrochemical stability. When combined with precious metals, Ta and W carbides have shown promise as fuel cell electrode materials; yet, the phase behavior of these precious metal-carbide systems is largely unexplored. We investigated P-M-C phase behavior with P = Pt, Pd, and Ru and M = Ta and W using composition spread thin films. We attained limited control of the deposited carbide phase through variation of the sputter atmosphere and demonstrated decreased corrosion of W-C materials with increasing C content. A high-throughput X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence experiment was employed for thin film characterization, which revealed solubility of Pt, Pd, and Ru in cubic WC. Density functional calculations of the lattice parameter dependence on carbon concentration enabled the determination of carbon concentration from the X-ray data as a function of transition metal stoichiometry. Our measurement of variations in the C stoichiometry and evolution of thin film texture with transition metal composition yielded surprising results. We detail how the combination of the composition spread technique, the high-throughput thin film characterization, and the density functional modeling of ternary carbide alloys provided a deep understanding of the chemical systems.

  18. 40 CFR 471.40 - Applicability; description of the precious metals forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... precious metals forming subcategory. 471.40 Section 471.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS FORMING AND METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Precious Metals Forming Subcategory § 471.40 Applicability; description of...

  19. Impact of global financial crisis on precious metals returns: An application of ARCH and GARCH methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Mohd Tahir; Abdullah, Nurul Ain; Abdul Karim, Samsul Ariffin

    2013-04-01

    This paper is focusing on seeing the resilient of precious metals returns in facing the global financial crisis and provides a new guide for the investors before making investment decisions on precious metals. Four types of precious metals returns which are the variables selected in this study. The precious metals are gold, silver, bronze and platinum. All the variables are transferred to natural logarithm (ln). Daily data over the period 2 January 1995 to 30 December 2011 is used. Unit root tests that involve Augmented Dickey-Fuller (ADF) and Kwiatkowski-Phillips-Schmidt-Shin (KPSS) tests have been employed in determining the stationarity of the variables. Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity (ARCH) and Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity (GARCH) methods have been applied in measuring the impact of global financial crisis on precious metals returns. The result shows that investing in platinum is less risky compared to the other precious metals because it is not influence by the crisis period.

  20. 48 CFR 252.208-7000 - Intent to furnish precious metals as Government-furnished material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Contractor furnishing precious metals. Award will be made on the basis which is in the best interest of the... metals as Government-furnished material. 252.208-7000 Section 252.208-7000 Federal Acquisition... precious metals as Government-furnished material. As prescribed in 208.7305(a), use the following clause...

  1. 48 CFR 1845.607-2 - Recovering precious metals. (NASA supplements paragraph (b)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Recovering precious metals..., Redistribution, and Disposal of Contractor Inventory 1845.607-2 Recovering precious metals. (NASA supplements... bearing such metals; and items containing recoverable quantities of them shall be reported to the...

  2. 48 CFR 1845.607-2 - Recovering precious metals. (NASA supplements paragraph (b)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recovering precious metals..., Redistribution, and Disposal of Contractor Inventory 1845.607-2 Recovering precious metals. (NASA supplements... bearing such metals; and items containing recoverable quantities of them shall be reported to the...

  3. 48 CFR 1845.607-2 - Recovering precious metals. (NASA supplements paragraph (b)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recovering precious metals..., Redistribution, and Disposal of Contractor Inventory 1845.607-2 Recovering precious metals. (NASA supplements... bearing such metals; and items containing recoverable quantities of them shall be reported to the...

  4. 48 CFR 1845.607-2 - Recovering precious metals. (NASA supplements paragraph (b)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recovering precious metals..., Redistribution, and Disposal of Contractor Inventory 1845.607-2 Recovering precious metals. (NASA supplements... bearing such metals; and items containing recoverable quantities of them shall be reported to the...

  5. 48 CFR 1845.607-2 - Recovering precious metals. (NASA supplements paragraph (b)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recovering precious metals..., Redistribution, and Disposal of Contractor Inventory 1845.607-2 Recovering precious metals. (NASA supplements... bearing such metals; and items containing recoverable quantities of them shall be reported to the...

  6. 48 CFR 252.208-7000 - Intent to furnish precious metals as Government-furnished material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... metals as Government-furnished material. 252.208-7000 Section 252.208-7000 Federal Acquisition... precious metals as Government-furnished material. As prescribed in 208.7305(a), use the following clause: Intent To Furnish Precious Metals as Government-Furnished Material (DEC 1991) (a) The Government...

  7. The removal of precious metals by conductive polymer filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, M.E.

    1996-10-01

    The growing demand for platinum-group metals (PGM) within the DOE complex and in industry, the need for modern and clean processes, and the increasing volume of low-grade material for secondary PGM recovery has a direct impact on the industrial practice of recovering and refining precious metals. There is a tremendous need for advanced metal ion recovery and waste minimization techniques, since the currently used method of precipitation-dissolution is inadequate. Los Alamos has an integrated program in ligand-design and separations chemistry which has developed and evaluated a series of water- soluble metal-binding polymers for recovering actinides and toxic metals from variety of process streams. A natural extension of this work is to fabricate these metal-selective polymers into membrane based separation unites, i.e., hollow-fiber membranes. In the present investigation, the material for a novel hollow-fiber membrane is characterized and its selectivity for PGM reported. Energy and waste savings and economic competitiveness are also described.

  8. Relationship between amorphous silica and precious metal in quartz veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrichhausen, N.; Rowe, C. D.; Board, W. S.; Greig, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Super-saturation of silica is common in fault fluids, due to pressure changes associated with fracture, fault slip, or temperature gradients in hydrothermal systems. These mechanisms lead to precipitation of amorphous silica, which will recrystallize to quartz under typical geologic conditions. These conditions may also promote the saturation of precious metals, such as gold, and the precipitation of nanoparticles. Previous experiments show that charged nanoparticles of gold can attach to the surface of amorphous silica nanoparticles. Thus, gold and silica may be transported as a colloid influencing mineralization textures during amorphous silica recrystallization to quartz. This may enrich quartz vein hosted gold deposits, but the instability of hydrous silica during subsequent deformation means that the microstructural record of precipitation of gold is lost. We investigate a recent, shallow auriferous hydrothermal system at Dixie Valley, Nevada to reveal the nano- to micro-scale relationships between gold and silica in fresh veins. Fault slip surfaces at Dixie Valley exhibit layers of amorphous silica with partial recrystallization to quartz. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) show amorphous silica can contain a few wt. % gold while areas recrystallized to quartz are barren. At the Jurassic Brucejack deposit in British Columbia, Canada we observe the cryptocrystalline quartz textures that may indicate recrystallization from amorphous silica within quartz-carbonate veins containing high grade gold. Comb quartz within syntaxial veins, vugs, and coating breccia clasts indicate structural dilation. Vein geometry is investigated to determine relative importance of fault slip in creating dilational sites. By comparing quartz-carbonate veins from the Dixie Valley to Brucejack, we can determine whether amorphous silica formed in different environments show similar potential to affect precious metal mineralization.

  9. 41 CFR 109-45.1003 - Recovery of silver from precious metals bearing materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Recovery of silver from... of Precious Metals § 109-45.1003 Recovery of silver from precious metals bearing materials. The... establishment and maintenance of a program for silver recovery from used hypo solution and scrap film. ...

  10. Simplified process for leaching precious metals from fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Shore, Lawrence; Matlin, Ramail

    2009-12-22

    The membrane electrode assemblies of fuel cells are recycled to recover the catalyst precious metals from the assemblies. The assemblies are cryogenically embrittled and pulverized to form a powder. The pulverized assemblies are then mixed with a surfactant to form a paste which is contacted with an acid solution to leach precious metals from the pulverized membranes.

  11. Single-Atom Catalysts of Precious Metals for Electrochemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiwhan; Kim, Hee-Eun; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2017-09-11

    Single-atom catalysts (SACs), in which metal atoms are dispersed on the support without forming nanoparticles, have been used for various heterogeneous reactions and most recently for electrochemical reactions. In this Minireview, recent examples of single-atom electrocatalysts used for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR), and methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) are introduced. Many density functional theory (DFT) simulations have predicted that SACs may be effective for CO2 reduction to methane or methanol production while suppressing H2 evolution, and those cases are introduced here as well. Single atoms, mainly Pt single atoms, have been deposited on TiN or TiC nanoparticles, defective graphene nanosheets, N-doped covalent triazine frameworks, graphitic carbon nitride, S-doped zeolite-templated carbon, and Sb-doped SnO2 surfaces. Scanning transmission electron microscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurement, and in situ infrared spectroscopy have been used to detect the single-atom structure and confirm the absence of nanoparticles. SACs have shown high mass activity, minimizing the use of precious metal, and unique selectivity distinct from nanoparticle catalysts owing to the absence of ensemble sites. Additional features that SACs should possess for effective electrochemical applications were also suggested. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Bio-extraction of precious metals from urban solid waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Subhabrata; Natarajan, Gayathri; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2017-01-01

    Reduced product lifecycle and increasing demand for electronic devices have resulted in the generation of huge volumes of electronic waste (e-waste). E-wastes contain high concentrations of toxic heavy metals, which have detrimental effects on health and the environment. However, e-wastes also contain significant concentrations of precious metals such as gold, silver and palladium, which can be a major driving force for recycling of urban waste. Cyanogenic bacteria such as Chromobacterium violaceum generate cyanide as a secondary metabolite which mobilizes gold into solution via a soluble gold-cyanide complex. However, compared to conventional technology for metal recovery, this approach is not effective, owing largely to the low concentration of lixiviants produced by the bacteria. To overcome the challenges of bioleaching of gold from e-waste, several strategies were adopted to enhance gold recovery rates. These included (i) pretreatment of e-waste to remove competing metal ions, (ii) mutation to adapt the bacteria to high pH environment, (iii) metabolic engineering to produce higher cyanide lixiviant, and (iv) spent medium leaching with adjusted initial pH. Compared to 7.1 % recovery by the wild type bacteria, these strategies achieved gold recoveries of 11.3%, 22.5%, 30% and 30% respectively at 0.5% w/v pulp density respectively. Bioleached gold was finally mineralized and precipitated as gold nanoparticles using the bacterium Delftia acidovorans. This study demonstrates the potential for enhancement of biocyanide production and gold recovery from electronic waste through different strategies, and extraction of solid gold from bioleached leachate.

  13. Replacing precious metals with carbide catalysts for hydrogenation reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Ruijun, Hou; Chen, Jingguang G.; Chang, Kuan; ...

    2015-03-03

    Molybdenum carbide (Mo₂C and Ni/Mo₂C) catalysts were compared with Pd/SiO₂ for the hydrogenation of several diene molecules, 1,3- butadiene, 1,3- and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (CHD). Compared to Pd/SiO₂, Mo₂C showed similar hydrogenation rate for 1,3-butadiene and 1,3-CHD and even higher rate for 1,4-CHD, but with significant deactivation rate for 1,3-CHD hydrogenation. However, the hydrogenation activity of Mo₂C could be completely regenerated by H₂ treatment at 723 K for the three molecules. The Ni modified Mo₂C catalysts retained similar activity for 1,3-butadiene hydrogenation with significantly enhanced selectivity for 1-butene production. The 1-butene selectivity increased with increasing Ni loading below 15%. Among the Nimore » modified Mo₂C catalysts, 8.6%Ni/Mo₂C showed the highest selectivity to 1-butene, which was even higher selectivity than that over Pd/SiO₂. Compared to Pd/SiO₂, both Mo₂C and Ni/Mo₂C showed combined advantages in hydrogenation activity and catalyst cost reduction, demonstrating the potential to use less expensive carbide catalysts to replace precious metals for hydrogenation reactions.« less

  14. Replacing precious metals with carbide catalysts for hydrogenation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ruijun, Hou; Chen, Jingguang G.; Chang, Kuan; Wang, Tiefeng

    2015-03-03

    Molybdenum carbide (Mo₂C and Ni/Mo₂C) catalysts were compared with Pd/SiO₂ for the hydrogenation of several diene molecules, 1,3- butadiene, 1,3- and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (CHD). Compared to Pd/SiO₂, Mo₂C showed similar hydrogenation rate for 1,3-butadiene and 1,3-CHD and even higher rate for 1,4-CHD, but with significant deactivation rate for 1,3-CHD hydrogenation. However, the hydrogenation activity of Mo₂C could be completely regenerated by H₂ treatment at 723 K for the three molecules. The Ni modified Mo₂C catalysts retained similar activity for 1,3-butadiene hydrogenation with significantly enhanced selectivity for 1-butene production. The 1-butene selectivity increased with increasing Ni loading below 15%. Among the Ni modified Mo₂C catalysts, 8.6%Ni/Mo₂C showed the highest selectivity to 1-butene, which was even higher selectivity than that over Pd/SiO₂. Compared to Pd/SiO₂, both Mo₂C and Ni/Mo₂C showed combined advantages in hydrogenation activity and catalyst cost reduction, demonstrating the potential to use less expensive carbide catalysts to replace precious metals for hydrogenation reactions.

  15. 48 CFR 252.208-7000 - Intent to furnish precious metals as Government-furnished material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... precious metals required for any first article or production sample), and shall specify the national stock... sponge or granules are required. (c) Offerors shall submit two prices for each deliverable item which...

  16. 48 CFR 252.208-7000 - Intent to furnish precious metals as Government-furnished material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... precious metals required for any first article or production sample), and shall specify the national stock... sponge or granules are required. (c) Offerors shall submit two prices for each deliverable item which...

  17. 48 CFR 252.208-7000 - Intent to furnish precious metals as Government-furnished material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... precious metals required for any first article or production sample), and shall specify the national stock... sponge or granules are required. (c) Offerors shall submit two prices for each deliverable item which...

  18. Recovery processes for precious metals. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the recovery and recycling of gold, silver, and other precious metals from industrial wastes. Procedures adapted to electroplating baths, anode sludges, mine tailings, electronic scrap, and photographic processing effluent are considered. Techniques are described, including precipitation, microbial leaching, ultrafiltration, and electrochemical processes. The citations examine the efficiency, operational difficulties, cost effectiveness, and optimization of specific precious metal recovery methods. (Contains a minimum of 62 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Effective and selective recovery of precious metals by thiourea modified magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tai-Lin; Lien, Hsing-Lung

    2013-05-08

    Adsorption of precious metals in acidic aqueous solutions using thiourea modified magnetic magnetite nanoparticle (MNP-Tu) was examined. The MNP-Tu was synthesized, characterized and examined as a reusable adsorbent for the recovery of precious metals. The adsorption kinetics were well fitted with pseudo second-order equation while the adsorption isotherms were fitted with both Langmuir and Freundlich equations. The maximum adsorption capacity of precious metals for MNP-Tu determined by Langmuir model was 43.34, 118.46 and 111.58 mg/g for Pt(IV), Au(III) and Pd(II), respectively at pH 2 and 25 °C. MNP-Tu has high adsorption selectivity towards precious metals even in the presence of competing ions (Cu(II)) at high concentrations. In addition, the MNP-Tu can be regenerated using an aqueous solution containing 0.7 M thiourea and 2% HCl where precious metals can be recovered in a concentrated form. It was found that the MNP-Tu undergoing seven consecutive adsorption-desorption cycles still retained the original adsorption capacity of precious metals. A reductive adsorption resulting in the formation of elemental gold and palladium at the surface of MNP-Tu was observed.

  20. Effective and Selective Recovery of Precious Metals by Thiourea Modified Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tai-Lin; Lien, Hsing-Lung

    2013-01-01

    Adsorption of precious metals in acidic aqueous solutions using thiourea modified magnetic magnetite nanoparticle (MNP-Tu) was examined. The MNP-Tu was synthesized, characterized and examined as a reusable adsorbent for the recovery of precious metals. The adsorption kinetics were well fitted with pseudo second-order equation while the adsorption isotherms were fitted with both Langmuir and Freundlich equations. The maximum adsorption capacity of precious metals for MNP-Tu determined by Langmuir model was 43.34, 118.46 and 111.58 mg/g for Pt(IV), Au(III) and Pd(II), respectively at pH 2 and 25 °C. MNP-Tu has high adsorption selectivity towards precious metals even in the presence of competing ions (Cu(II)) at high concentrations. In addition, the MNP-Tu can be regenerated using an aqueous solution containing 0.7 M thiourea and 2% HCl where precious metals can be recovered in a concentrated form. It was found that the MNP-Tu undergoing seven consecutive adsorption-desorption cycles still retained the original adsorption capacity of precious metals. A reductive adsorption resulting in the formation of elemental gold and palladium at the surface of MNP-Tu was observed. PMID:23698770

  1. Corrosion behaviour of cobalt-chromium dental alloys doped with precious metals.

    PubMed

    Reclaru, Lucien; Lüthy, Heinz; Eschler, Pierre-Yves; Blatter, Andreas; Susz, Christian

    2005-07-01

    Precious metal based dental alloys generally exhibit a superior corrosion resistance, in particular enhanced resistance to pitting and crevice corrosion, compared to non-precious metal based alloys such as CoCr alloys. A new generation of Co-Cr alloys enriched with precious metals (Au, Pt, Ru) have now appeared on the market. The goal of this study was to clarify the effect of the precious metals additions on the corrosion behaviour of such alloys. Various commercial alloys with different doping levels were tested by electrochemical techniques in two different milieus based on the Fusayama artificial saliva and an electrolyte containing NaCl. Open circuit potentials, corrosion currents, polarization resistances, and crevices potentials were determined for the various alloys and completed by a coulometric analysis of the potentiodynamic curves. In addition, the microstructures were characterised by metallography and phase compositions analysed by EDX. The results show that the presence of precious metals can deteriorate the corrosion behaviour of Co-Cr alloys in a significant way. Gold doping, in particular, produces heterogeneous microstructures that are vulnerable to corrosive attack.

  2. High performance, high durability non-precious metal fuel cell catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Thomas E.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Schmoeckel, Alison K.

    2016-03-15

    This invention relates to non-precious metal fuel cell cathode catalysts, fuel cells that contain these catalysts, and methods of making the same. The fuel cell cathode catalysts are highly nitrogenated carbon materials that can contain a transition metal. The highly nitrogenated carbon materials can be supported on a nanoparticle substrate.

  3. Adsorption of precious metals in water by dendrimer modified magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chia-Hsin; Lien, Hsing-Lung; Chung, Jung-Shing; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2017-01-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles modified by third-generation dendrimers (MNP-G3) and MNP-G3 further modified by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) (MNP-G3-EDTA) were conducted to investigate their ability for recovery of precious metals (Pd(IV), Au(III), Pd(II) and Ag(I)) in water. Experiments were carried out using batch reactors for the studies of adsorption kinetics, adsorption isotherms, competitive adsorption and regeneration. The pseudo second-order model is the best-fit model among others suggesting that the adsorption of precious metals by MNP-G3 in water is a chemisorption process. Three adsorption isotherms namely Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm were examined and the results showed the similarities and consistency of both linear and nonlinear analyses. Pd(IV) and Au(III) with higher valence exhibited relatively better adsorption efficiency than Pd(II) and Ag(I) with lower valence suggesting that the adsorption of precious metals by MNP-G3 is a function of valence. In the presence of the competing ion Zn(II), the adsorption efficiency of MNP-G3 for all four precious metals was declined significantly. The use of MNP-G3-EDTA revealed an increase in the adsorption efficiency for all four precious metals. However, the low selectivity of MNP-G3 towards precious metals was not enhanced by the modification of EDTA onto the MNP-G3. The regeneration of metal-laden MNP-G3 can be readily performed by using 1.0% HCl solution as a desorbent solution.

  4. Process for the removal of mercury from precious metal-cyanide liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Touro, F.J.

    1988-02-23

    A process for removing mercury from a cyanide solution is described comprising: (a) reacting solubilized mercury with a sulfide ion-providing compound in a precious metal-containing, cyanide leach solution to produce mercuric sulfide, the sulfide ion-providing compound being a member selected from the group consisting of sodium sulfide, sodium hydrosulfide, and hydrogen sulfide; (b) flocculating the mercuric sulfide with a flocculating agent, the flocculating agent being an anionic, high molecular polyacrylamide polymer, whereby flocs of mercuric sulfide are formed to produce a mercury-free precious metal-containing, cyanide solution; and (c) separating the mercuric sulfide flocs from the mercury-free precious metal-containing, cyanide solution.

  5. [Effect of precious metal loaded on LaMnO3 on catalytic oxidation of soot].

    PubMed

    Ming, Cai-Bing; Ye, Dai-Qi; Liu, Yan-Li; Yang, Li

    2008-03-01

    Perovskite-type LaMnO3 catalysts were prepared by co-precipitation, and a series of precious metal-coating LaMnO3 catalysts were obtained by impregnation. The activity of catalysts on soot was tested by temperature-programmed reaction. Catalysts were characterized by techniques such as H2-TPR, BET, XRD, SEM and FT-IR. The activity of Pd/LaMnO3 coating 0.5% (weight) Pd is the optimal, and the maximum combustion rate temperature decreases about 40 degrees C , as compared with LaMnO3. When the coating amount is more or less than 0.5%, the ignition temperature is higher than that of pure LaMnO3. The activity of Pd/LaMnO3 is the highest among 5 precious metals-loading catalysts, and the sequence is Au,Ru,Pt and Rh. TPR experiments indicate precious metal can help the transformation of Mn4+ to Mn3+, but has less influence on reduction of Mn3+ to Mn2+ of LaMnO3. The downshift of diffraction angle of XRD indicates some precious metals enter crystal lattice of LaMnO3, the crystal sizes of catalysts become larger after precious metal loading; BET and SEM results show sintering happened to catalysts after catalytic reaction. No obvious changes occur in the IR spectra of catalysts between after and before reaction, indicating catalysts have good structural stability. In conclusion, proper amount precious metal coating on LaMnO3 effectively improve the catalytic activity of LaMnO3 on soot.

  6. 78 FR 26289 - Guides for the Jewelry, Precious Metals, and Pewter Industries: Public Roundtable

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... publish an agenda and further information on its Web site. Comments will be accepted until June 5, 2013... unfair or deceptive in violation of Section 5 of the FTC Act. B. Jewelry Guides Regulatory Review The... contain precious metals in amounts below the Guides' thresholds.\\5\\ These commenters generally...

  7. 76 FR 67793 - Notification of Expanded Pricing Grid for Precious Metals Products Containing Platinum and Gold...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Notification of Expanded Pricing Grid for Precious Metals Products Containing Platinum and Gold--Excluding Commemorative Gold Coins AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the...

  8. Dimethylamine-modified waste paper for the recovery of precious metals.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Chaitanya Raj; Parajuli, Durga; Kawakita, Hidetaka; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Ohto, Keisuke; Harada, Hiroyuki

    2008-08-01

    Waste newsprint paper was modified with dimethylamine (DMA) to obtain a tertiary amine type adsorption gel called DMA-paper gel. This new derivative was investigated for adsorption, from hydrochloric acid medium, of gold, palladium, and platinum as well as some base metals. The gel exhibited selectivity only for precious metals with a remarkably high capacity for Au(III), i.e., 4.6 mol/kg dry gel and comparable capacities, i.e., 2.1 and 0.9 mol/kg for Pd(II) and Pt(IV), respectively. Also, Au(III) was reduced to the elemental form during adsorption. Furthermore, column adsorption and subsequent elution of the adsorbed metal ions by acidic thiourea revealed encouraging recoveries (approximately 90%), thus enhancing the scope of the gel for effective preconcentration, separation, and recovery of precious metals. The effectiveness of recovery of precious metals from real industrial liquor was also tested, and it showed highly encouraging results with respect to the stability of the gel in the harsh medium, and selectivity for the targeted metal ions in the presence of excess of other metal ions.

  9. Graphene supported non-precious metal-macrocycle catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyun-Jung; Ashok Kumar, Nanjundan; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2015-04-01

    Fuel cells are promising alternative energy devices owing to their high efficiency and eco-friendliness. While platinum is generally used as a catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in a typical fuel cell, limited reserves and prohibitively high costs limit its future use. The development of non-precious and durable metal catalysts is being constantly conceived. Graphene has been widely used as a substrate for metal catalysts due to its unique properties, thus improving stability and ORR activities. In this feature, we present an overview on the electrochemical characteristics of graphene supported non-precious metal containing macrocycle catalysts that include metal porphyrin and phthalocyanine derivatives. Suggested research and future development directions are discussed.

  10. Mercury retorts for the processing of precious metals and hazardous wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, Charles; Hill, Eldan

    2003-04-01

    In this paper, the authors describe some of the considerations for the design and operation of mercury retort facilities. These retort facilities are used for precious metals processing and for the treatment of mercury-bearing hazardous wastes. The relevant properties and characteristics of mercury and mercury vapor are presented, as well as facility engineering with respect to industrial hygiene, area ventilation, and material handling.

  11. Non-precious metal catalysts prepared from precursor comprising cyanamide

    DOEpatents

    Chung, Hoon Taek; Zelenay, Piotr

    2015-10-27

    Catalyst comprising graphitic carbon and methods of making thereof; said graphitic carbon comprising a metal species, a nitrogen-containing species and a sulfur containing species. A catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction for an alkaline fuel cell was prepared by heating a mixture of cyanamide, carbon black, and a salt selected from an iron sulfate salt and an iron acetate salt at a temperature of from about 700.degree. C. to about 1100.degree. C. under an inert atmosphere. Afterward, the mixture was treated with sulfuric acid at elevated temperature to remove acid soluble components, and the resultant mixture was heated again under an inert atmosphere at the same temperature as the first heat treatment step.

  12. Key factors in chemical reduction by hydrazine for recovery of precious metals.

    PubMed

    Chen, J Paul; Lim, L L

    2002-10-01

    Most of the commonly used metal waste treatment approaches only allow removal of metals which are ultimately discarded as sludge and do not permit the reuse of the metals, resulting in a waste of raw materials. In this study, the recovery of precious metals of sliver and copper in a synthesized wastewater in batch reactors was investigated using a reduction method by hydrazine as the reducing agent. Recovery of metal ions was greatest at pH > 11. The presence of humic acid did not have negative effects on the recovery process. Varying dissolved oxygen levels in the hydrazine solution did not significantly affect the recovery of both metals while seeding and ageing processes resulted in an increase in the particle size of the solid obtained. Under competitive conditions between Cu2+ and Ag+ ions, the recovery of silver remained the same, while that of copper was enhanced.

  13. Market value of asteroidal precious metals in an age of diminishing terrestrial resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kargel, Jeffrey S.; ,

    1996-01-01

    In the next century Mankind may have to choose from two options for our supply and usage of some nonrenewable natural resources, such as gold, platinum metals, and fossil fuels: learn to live with diminishing supplies of these materials obtained at ever increasing economic and environmental cost, or reach into difficult places and develop new technologies to give us what we need to sustain economic growth. Either prospect faces formidable technological and economic challenges. Exploitation of asteroids for precious and strategic metals is a possible environmentally friendly remedy for impending shortages of some resources. Certain types of asteroids could completely replace terrestrial sources of platinum metals. Asteroid metal mining may become a 21st-century space industry worth ten to fifty billion dollars annually (1995 dollars). Asteroids could make the United States and other countries self sufficient in many strategic metals, and it could usher new technologies and increase our applications of existing technologies that depend on these metals.

  14. A general mechanism for stabilizing the small sizes of precious metal nanoparticles on oxide supports

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei-Zhen; Kovarik, Libor; Mei, Donghai; Engelhard, Mark H.; Gao, Feng; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles HF

    2014-09-02

    We recently discovered that MgAl2O4 spinel {111} nano-facets optimally stabilize the small sizes of platinum nanoparticles even after severe high temperature aging treatments. Here we report the thermal stabilities of other precious metals with various physical and chemical properties on the MgAl2O4 spinel {111} facets, providing important new insights into the stabilization mechanisms. Besides Pt, Rh and Ir can also be successfully stabilized as small (1-3 nm) nanoparticles and even as single atomic species after extremely severe (800 °C, 1 week) oxidative aging. However, other metals either aggregate (Ru, Pd, Ag, and Au) or sublimate (Os) even during initial catalyst synthesis. On the basis of ab initio theoretical calculations and experimental observations, we rationalize that the exceptional stabilization originates from lattice matching, and the correspondingly strong attractive interactions at interfaces between the spinel {111} surface oxygens and epitaxial metals\\metal oxides. On this basis, design principles for catalyst support oxide materials that are capable in stabilizing precious metals are proposed.

  15. Electrocatalytic hydrogenation using precious metal microparticles in redox-active polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Coche, L.; Ehui, B.; Limosin, D.; Moutet, J.C. )

    1990-11-09

    Glassy carbon felt electrodes have been modified by electrodeposition of poly(pyrrole-viologen) films (derived from N,N{prime}-dialkyl-4,4{prime}-bipyridinium salts), followed by electroprecipitation of precious metal (Pt, Pd, Rh, or Ru) microparticles. The resulting electrodes have been proved to be active for the electrocatalytic hydrogenation of conjugated enones (2-cyclohexen-1-one, cryptone, carvone, isophorone), styrene, and benzonitrile in aqueous media (pH 1). Despite low loadings of metal catalysts, high electric and products yields and a long term stability of these cathodes have been observed. The influence of the metal loading and the polymer structure on the catalytic efficiency as well as the selectivity obtained according to the metal catalyst used have been studied. Comparison with results previously reported for other catalytic cathodes like Pt/Pt, Pd/C, or Raney nickel electrodes proves the high efficiency of these metal microparticles within redox polymer film based electrodes.

  16. Non-precious metal complexes with an anionic PCP pincer architecture.

    PubMed

    Murugesan, Sathiyamoorthy; Kirchner, Karl

    2016-01-14

    This perspective article provides an overview of the advancements in the field of non-precious metal complexes featuring anionic PCP pincer ligands with the inclusion of aliphatic systems. It covers research from the beginning in 1976 until late 2015 and provides a summary of key developments in this area, which is, to date, limited to the metals nickel, cobalt, iron, and molybdenum. While the research in nickel PCP complexes is already quite extensive, the chemistry of cobalt, iron, and molybdenum PCP complexes is comparatively sparse. With other non-precious metals such as copper, manganese, chromium or vanadium no PCP complexes are known as yet. In the case of nickel PCP complexes already many catalytic applications such as Suzuki-Miyaura coupling, C-S cross coupling, Kharasch and Michael additions, hydrosilylation of aldehydes and ketones, cyanomethylation of aldehydes, and hydroamination of nitriles were reported. While iron PCP complexes were found to be active catalysts for the hydrosilylation of aldehydes and ketones as well as the dehydrogenation of ammonia-borane, cobalt PCP complexes were not applied to any catalytic reactions. Surprisingly, only one molybdenum PCP complex is reported, which was capable of cleaving dinitrogen to give a nitride complex. This perspective underlines that the combination of cheap and abundant metals such as nickel, cobalt, and iron with PCP pincer ligands may result in the development of novel, versatile, and efficient catalysts for atom-efficient catalytic reactions.

  17. Selective recovery of precious metals by persimmon waste chemically modified with dimethylamine.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ying; Adhikari, Chaitanya Raj; Kawakita, Hidetaka; Ohto, Keisuke; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Harada, Hiroyuki

    2009-09-01

    Persimmon waste was chemically modified with dimethylamine (DMA) to obtain a tertiary-amine-type gel, named DMA persimmon waste gel (DMA-PW). It was found to be effective for the adsorption of Au(III), Pd(II), and Pt(IV) in hydrochloric acid medium. In contrast, base metals such as Cu(II), Zn(II), Fe(III), and Ni(II) were not practically adsorbed. The formation of ion pairs of the metal chloro complex anions with the protonated adsorption gels was proposed as the main adsorption process. The gel exhibited selectivity only for precious metals with a remarkably high capacity for Au(III), i.e., 5.63 mol/kg dry gel and comparable capacities, i.e., 0.42 and 0.28 mol/kg for Pd(II) and Pt(IV), respectively. According to the kinetic and electrochemical studies, the adsorption rate of Au(III) was greatly enhanced by the chemical modification. Also, its excellent adsorption characteristics for the precious metals were confirmed by adsorption and elution tests using a column packed with the DMA-PW gel.

  18. Chemical Analyses of Geothermal Waters and Strategic Petroleum Reserve Brines for Strategic and Precious Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Harrar, Jackson E.; Raber, Ellen

    1983-06-01

    Water form seven hydrothermal-geothermal, one geopressured-geothermal, and six Strategic Petroleum Reserve wells have been surveyed for twelve metals of special strategic and economic importance using trace chemical analysis techniques. The elements sought were Cr, Co, Mn, Ta, Sn, V, Nb, Li, Sr, Pt, Au, and Ag. Platinum was found at a concentration of ~50 ppb in a brine from the Salton Sea geothermal area. Brine from this region, as has been known from previous studies, is also rich in Li, Sr, and Mn. Higher concentrations (~900) of Sr are found in the high-salinity geopressured brines. None of the fluids contained interesting concentrations of the other metals. Good recovery of precious metals at sub-ppm concentrations from synthetic high salinity brines was achieved using Amborane resin, but similar recovery in the laboratory using real brines could not be demonstrated. Several analytical techniques were compared in sensitivity for the determination of the precious metals; neutron activation analysis with carrier separation is the best for gold and platinum in geothermal brines. (DJE-2005)

  19. Analysis of precious metals at parts-per-billion levels in industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tickner, James; O'Dwyer, Joel; Roach, Greg; Smith, Michael; Van Haarlem, Yves

    2015-11-01

    Precious metals, including gold and the platinum group metals (notable Pt, Pd and Rh), are mined commercially at concentrations of a few parts-per-million and below. Mining and processing operations demand sensitive and rapid analysis at concentrations down to about 100 parts-per-billion (ppb). In this paper, we discuss two technologies being developed to meet this challenge: X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and gamma-activation analysis (GAA). We have designed on-stream XRF analysers capable of measuring targeted elements in slurries with precisions in the 35-70 ppb range. For the past two years, two on-stream analysers have been in continuous operation at a precious metals concentrator plant. The simultaneous measurement of feed and waste stream grades provides real-time information on metal recovery, allowing changes in operating conditions and plant upsets to be detected and corrected more rapidly. Separately, we have been developing GAA for the measurement of gold as a replacement for the traditional laboratory fire-assay process. High-energy Bremsstrahlung X-rays are used to excite gold via the 197Au(γ,γ‧)197Au-M reaction, and the gamma-rays released in the decay of the meta-state are then counted. We report on work to significantly improve accuracy and detection limits.

  20. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  1. The direct reduction of sulfide minerals for the recovery of precious metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczygiel, Z.; Lara, C.; Escobedo, S.; Mendoza, O.

    1998-04-01

    A direct smelting method has been tested on a pilot-scale for the recovery of silver from sulfide minerals. The charge may be processed with iron as a reducing agent and soda as a fluxing agent or with soda ash as an oxidizer and carbon. Precious metals are gathered with lead, which can be added as metallic lead if it exists in the technological cycle or may be available in the form of battery powder or lead concentrate. The behavior of silver and its sulfides in the system are described, and some fluctuations observed in the short rotary furnace are explained. Further, the kinetics of metal removal, a thermodynamic analysis, metal-loss phenomena, and a coordinated mass balance are presented.

  2. Photochemical changes in cyanide speciation in drainage from a precious metal ore heap

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.A.; Leinz, R.W.; Grimes, D.J.; Rye, R.O.

    2002-01-01

    In drainage from an inactive ore heap at a former gold mine, the speciation of cyanide and the concentrations of several metals were found to follow diurnal cycles. Concentrations of the hexacyanoferrate complex, iron, manganese, and ammonium were higher at night than during the day, whereas weak-acid-dissociable cyanide, silver, gold, copper, nitrite, and pH displayed the reverse behavior. The changes in cyanide speciation, iron, and trace metals can be explained by photodissociation of iron and cobalt cyanocomplexes as the solutions emerged from the heap into sunlight-exposed channels. At midday, environmentally significant concentrations of free cyanide were produced in a matter of minutes, causing trace copper, silver, and gold to be mobilized as cyanocomplexes from solids. Whether rapid photodissociation is a general phenomenon common to other sites will be important to determine in reaching a general understanding of the environmental risks posed by routine or accidental water discharges from precious metal mining facilities.

  3. A Novel Designed Bioreactor for Recovering Precious Metals from Waste Printed Circuit Boards

    PubMed Central

    Jujun, Ruan; Jie, Zheng; Jian, Hu; Zhang, Jianwen

    2015-01-01

    For recovering precious metals from waste printed circuit boards (PCBs), a novel hybrid technology including physical and biological methods was developed. It consisted of crushing, corona-electrostatic separation, and bioleaching. Bioleaching process is the focus of this paper. A novel bioreactor for bioleaching was designed. Bioleaching was carried out using Pseudomonas chlororaphis. Bioleaching experiments using mixed particles of Au and Cu were performed and leachate contained 0.006 mg/L, 2823 mg/L Au+ and Cu2+ respectively. It showed when Cu existed, the concentrations of Au were extremely small. This provided the feasibility to separate Cu from Au. The method of orthogonal experimental design was employed in the simulation bioleaching experiments. Experimental results showed the optimized parameters for separating Cu from Au particles were pH 7.0, temperature 22.5 °C, and rotation speed 80 r/min. Based on the optimized parameters obtained, the bioreactor was operated for recovering mixed Au and Cu particles. 88.1 wt.% of Cu and 76.6 wt.% of Au were recovered. The paper contributed important information to recover precious metals from waste PCBs. PMID:26316021

  4. A Novel Designed Bioreactor for Recovering Precious Metals from Waste Printed Circuit Boards.

    PubMed

    Jujun, Ruan; Jie, Zheng; Jian, Hu; Zhang, Jianwen

    2015-08-28

    For recovering precious metals from waste printed circuit boards (PCBs), a novel hybrid technology including physical and biological methods was developed. It consisted of crushing, corona-electrostatic separation, and bioleaching. Bioleaching process is the focus of this paper. A novel bioreactor for bioleaching was designed. Bioleaching was carried out using Pseudomonas chlororaphis. Bioleaching experiments using mixed particles of Au and Cu were performed and leachate contained 0.006 mg/L, 2823 mg/L Au(+) and Cu(2+) respectively. It showed when Cu existed, the concentrations of Au were extremely small. This provided the feasibility to separate Cu from Au. The method of orthogonal experimental design was employed in the simulation bioleaching experiments. Experimental results showed the optimized parameters for separating Cu from Au particles were pH 7.0, temperature 22.5 °C, and rotation speed 80 r/min. Based on the optimized parameters obtained, the bioreactor was operated for recovering mixed Au and Cu particles. 88.1 wt.% of Cu and 76.6 wt.% of Au were recovered. The paper contributed important information to recover precious metals from waste PCBs.

  5. Recovery and recycling of aluminum, copper, and precious metals from dismantled weapon components

    SciTech Connect

    Gundiler, I.H.; Lutz, J.D.; Wheelis, W.T.

    1994-03-03

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is tasked to support The Department of Energy in the dismantlement and disposal of SNL designed weapon components. These components are sealed in a potting compound, and contain heavy metals, explosive, radioactive, and toxic materials. SNL developed a process to identify and remove the hazardous sub-components utilizing real-time radiography and abrasive water-jet cutting. The components were then crushed, granulated, screened, and separated into an aluminum and a precious-and-base-metals fraction using air-tables. Plastics were further cleaned for disposal as non-hazardous waste. New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources assisted SNL in investigation of size-reduction and separation technologies.

  6. Recovery and recycling of aluminum, copper, and precious metals from dismantled weapon components

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, J.D.; Wheelis, W.T.; Gundiler, I.H.

    1995-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is tasked to support the Department of Energy in the dismantlement and disposal of SNL designed weapon components. These components are sealed in a potting compound, and contain heavy metals, explosive, radioactive, and toxic materials in discrete sub-components. SNL developed and demonstrated a process to identify and remove the hazardous sub-components utilizing real-time radiography and abrasive water-jet cutting. The remaining components were then crushed, granulated, screened, and separated into an aluminum and a precious-and-base-metals fraction using air-tables. Plastics were further cleaned for disposal as non-hazardous waste. The New Mexico Bureau of Mines & Mineral Resources assisted SNL in investigation of size-reduction and separation technologies and in the development of a conceptual design for a mechanical separation system.

  7. Durability study of transition metal based non-precious cathode in PEFC

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Gang; Zelenay, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on performance durability of newly developed polyaniline (PANI)-derived non-precious cathode catalyst, whose high oxygen-reduction activity was verified in electrochemical and fuel cell testing, exhibiting onset and half-wave potential (E{sup 1/2}) of oxygen reduction at 0.90 V and 0.77 V, respectively, as well as an insignificant H{sub 2}O{sub 2} yields below 1%. It was found catalyst durability in fuel cell life tests is greatly dependent on the catalyst synthesis including nitrogen precursors, employed transition metals, and supporting materials. Importantly, the working voltages in fuel cell testing have a profound impact on the stability, which much more stable performance can be observed at lower voltage such as 0.4 V when compared with higher voltage, 0.6 V. Preliminary physical and electrochemical characterization present to provide insight into the origin of the possible degradation mechanism for the non-precious active sites.

  8. Modification and characterization of cellulose cotton fibers for fast extraction of some precious metal ions.

    PubMed

    Monier, M; Akl, M A; Ali, Wael M

    2014-05-01

    In this work, native cellulose cotton fibers were first modified through graft copolymerization of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and then by insertion of phenyl thiosemicarbazide moieties to finally produce C-PTS chelating fibers, which were fully characterized using various instrumental techniques such as SEM, FTIR, EDX and XRD spectra. The obtained C-PTS were employed in removal and extraction of Au(3+), Pd(2+) and Ag(+) precious metal ions from their aqueous solutions using batch experiments. The kinetic studies showed that the pseudo-second-order model exhibited the best fit for the experimental data. In addition, the adsorption isotherm studies indicated that the adsorption follows the Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacities for Au(3+), Pd(2+) and Ag(+) were 198.31, 87.43 and 71.14 mg/g respectively.

  9. Antimicrobial precious-metal nanoparticles and their use in novel materials.

    PubMed

    Senior, Katharina; Müller, Stefanie; Schacht, Veronika J; Bunge, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Nanotechnology offers powerful new approaches to controlling unwanted microorganisms and other potential biohazards. Engineered nanoparticles with antifungal, antimicrobial, and antiviral properties are now being developed for a variety of applications, including manufacture and maintenance of sterile surfaces, prevention and control of biological contamination, food and water safety, and treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. The great potential of antimicrobial precious-metal nanoparticles is reflected by the high number of recent publications and patent applications, which is summarized, at least in part, in this paper. This review should provide an overview and offer guidance to the scientific community interested in nano(bio)technology, nanomedicine, and nanotoxicology, and may also be of interest to a broader scientific audience. Furthermore, this review covers specific topics in research and development addressing the effects of nanoparticles on microorganisms as well as novel nanotechnology-based approaches for controlling potentially pathogenic microorganisms.

  10. Occurrence forms and distribution of precious and base metals in ferromanganese crusts from the Sea of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astakhova, N. V.

    2013-11-01

    The examination of polished sections of ferromanganese crusts from the Sea of Japan revealed abundant inclusions of small grains of base and precious metals: Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Cu, Zn, Sn, P, Ni, Cr, Ti, Sb, As, W, and Mo. The metals occur in the form of native elements or intermetallic compounds, subordinate sulfides, sulfates, oxides, tungstates, and phosphides. The data on contents, occurrence forms, and distribution of these metals in the ore crusts from this region are discussed.

  11. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites. PMID:27538720

  12. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Varnell, Jason A; Tse, Edmund C M; Schulz, Charles E; Fister, Tim T; Haasch, Richard T; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-08-19

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  13. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-08-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  14. Non-precious metal electrocatalysts with high activity for hydrogen oxidation reaction in alkaline electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, WC; Bivens, AP; Myint, M; Zhuang, ZB; Forest, RV; Fang, QR; Chen, JG; Yan, YS

    2014-05-01

    A ternary metallic CoNiMo catalyst is electrochemically deposited on a polycrystalline gold (Au) disk electrode using pulse voltammetry, and characterized for hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) activity by temperature-controlled rotating disk electrode measurements in 0.1 M potassium hydroxide (KOH). The catalyst exhibits the highest HOR activity among all non-precious metal catalysts (e.g., 20 fold higher than Ni). At a sufficient loading, the CoNiMo catalyst is expected to outperform Pt and thus provides a promising low cost pathway for alkaline or alkaline membrane fuel cells. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and parallel H-2-temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments on structurally much simpler model alloy systems show a trend that CoNiMo has a hydrogen binding energy (HBE) similar to Pt and much lower than Ni, suggesting that the formation of multi-metallic bonds modifies the HBE of Ni and is likely a significant contributing factor for the enhanced HOR activity.

  15. LEAD, TIN, AND PRECIOUS-METAL MINERALIZATION IN THE U. S. VIRGIN ISLANDS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alminas, H.V.; Tucker, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This regional geochemical study of the U. S. Virgin Islands demonstrates the presence of a widespread base-metal (primarily Pb, Sn, Cu) and precious-metal (primarily Ag) mineralization on all three of the islands. The overall association: Au, Ag, Te, Sn, Pb, Cu, Zn, Sb, Bi, Mo, As and Ba shows a great similarity to that of the Bolivian silver-tin district. The single divergence from the Bolivian association is tungsten, which is totally lacking in the U. S. Virgin Islands. The delineated geochemical patterns transect all exposed rock types on the islands, including the Kingshill Marl of late Miocene age, on St. Croix. Some relationship between the geochemical patterns and the major mapped faults can be seen - especially on St. Croix. K-Ar age dating of rocks from St. Thomas and St. John indicates that they are of Tertiary rather than Cretaceous age. This and the apparent contemporaneity of the mineralization with the St. Croix graben infilling indicate a very late Miocene age for the mineralization.

  16. Precious metals associated with Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary igneous rocks of southwestern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bundtzen, Thomas K.; Miller, Marti L.; Goldfarb, Richard J.; Miller, Lance D.

    1997-01-01

    Placer gold and precious metal-bearing lode deposits of southwestern Alaska lie within a region 550 by 350 km, herein referred to as the Kuskokwim mineral belt. This mineral belt has yielded 100,240 kg (3.22 Moz) of gold, 12, 813 kg (412,000 oz) of silver, 1,377,412 kg (39,960 flasks) of mercury, and modest amounts of antimony and tungsten derived primarily from the late Cretaceous-early Tertiary igneous complexes of four major types: (1) alkali-calcic, comagmatic volcanic-plutonic complexes and isolated plutons, (2) calc-alkaline, meta-aluminous reduced plutons, (3) peraluminous alaskite or granite-porphyry sills and dike swarms, and (4) andesite-rhyolite subaerial volcanic rocks.About 80 percent of the 77 to 52 Ma intrusive and volcanic rocks intrude or overlie the middle to Upper Cretaceous Kuskokwim Group sedimentary and volcanic rocks, as well as the Paleozoic-Mesozoic rocks of the Nixon Fork, Innoko, Goodnews, and Ruby preaccretionary terranes.The major precious metal-bearing deposit types related to Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary igneous complexes of the Kuskokwim mineral belt are subdivided as follows: (1) plutonic-hosted copper-gold polymetallic stockwork, skarn, and vein deposits, (2) peraluminous granite-porphory-hosted gold polymetallic deposits, (3) plutonic-related, boron-enriched silver-tin polymetallic breccia pipes and replacement deposits, (4) gold and silver mineralization in epithermal systems, and (5) gold polymetallic heavy mineral placer deposits. Ten deposits genetically related to Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary intrusions contain minimum, inferred reserves amounting to 162,572 kg (5.23 Moz) of gold, 201,015 kg (6.46 Moz) silver, 12,160 metric tons (t) of tin, and 28,088 t of copper.The lodes occur in veins, stockworks, breccia pipes, and replacement deposits that formed in epithermal to mesothermal temperature-pressure conditions. Fluid inclusion, isotopic age, mineral assemblage, alteration assemblage, and structural data indicate that

  17. Iron Cycling in Low pH Environments - Potential Application for the Recovery of Precious Metals from Industrial Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehe, E. M.; Helle, T.; Kappler, A.

    2014-12-01

    The use of many different precious metals (gold, platinum…) and Rare Earth Elements (lanthanum, neodymium…) in the production of electronic products is drastically increasing. To meet this demand, not only mining activities but recently also the recovery of these elements from industrial waste is in the focus of research. It has been shown that the application of extracting solutions with pH values lower than 4 lead to an economically feasible recovery of industrially precious metals. This abiotic extraction efficiency can potentially be increased by using microorganisms capable of dissolving more stable minerals at low pH. In collaboration with industry, a waste incineration plant, and governmental authorities, we investigate the extraction and recovery of strategically important metals and Rare Earth Elements from industrial waste. We optimize the (bio)-geochemical conditions for the extraction of these elements. To this end, a variety of microorganisms are evaluated for efficient metal extraction. We focus on known laboratory cultures capable of oxidizing and reducing Fe minerals and S compounds. Additionally, unknown microbial communities able to increase the efficiency of precious metal extraction from the industrial waste are enriched from environments with comparable geochemical conditions found in the extraction solutions.

  18. Effects of composition and age hardening on precious metal electrical contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, L.E.; Peebles, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Precious metal alloys are commonly used for wiper electrical contacts in electromechanical devices which operate in dry and inert atmospheres. A pin-on-plate experimental configuration has been used to evaluate two different palladium alloy pins (ASTM B540 and ASTM B563) sliding on a gold alloy plate (ASTM B541) age hardened at two temperatures. For all combinations of test conditions except the higher palladium content alloy (ASTM B563), two stages of wear were observed: (1) a prow of Au alloy was formed on the palladium alloy pin and (2) work hardening and roughening of the wear track occurred with transfer and backtransfer of Au alloy material. With the higher palladium alloy pin (ASTM B563) a friction polymer was formed for laboratory air testing. The prow formed on the pin was a mechanical mixture of gold alloy plate and palladium alloy pin materials; palladium was found in the wear track for this experimental condition, while no palladium was found in wear tracks for the other test conditions. Segregation of zinc, silver and copper in wear tracks occurred for all test conditions, but the extent of segregation was dependent on contact couple combination and heat treatment of the gold alloy plate. The least amount of segregation was observed when the gold alloy plate was age hardened at 426 /degree/C. More segregation occurred for testing in helium than for testing in vacuum with a low partial pressure of oxygen. The largest segregation of metallic elements occurred for laboratory air testing, but the total metallic content of wear tracks was low; the wear tracks consisted primarily of carbon. Segregation was slightly larger with the higher palladium alloy (ASTM B563) pin.

  19. Precious-metal-modified nickel-based superalloys: Motivation and potential industry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolcavage, A.; Helmink, R. C.

    2010-10-01

    Nickel-based superalloys are extensively used in the hot sections of gas turbine engines and other propulsive power machines because they possess an excellent combination of high-temperature strength and resistance to oxidation and hot corrosion degradation. The γ-γ' microstructure inherent in nickel-based superalloys is designed with respect to composition and morphology so as to achieve a balance of strength versus environmental resistance. Often, aluminide and platinum-modified aluminide coatings are applied to the component surface to further improve the resistance to environmental degradation by supporting the formation of a protective aluminum oxide scale. The potential exists to utilize alloying concepts from novel platinum and hafnium-modified γ-γ' diffusion coatings so as to create in-situ a new class of superalloy that combines enhanced environmental resistance while maintaining sufficient strength at high temperatures. This paper describes how precious-metal-modified superalloys can offer advantages for structural applications in gas turbine engines. Several examples that illustrate component performance benefits are also presented.

  20. Cross-sectional study of platinum salts sensitization among precious metals refinery workers.

    PubMed

    Baker, D B; Gann, P H; Brooks, S M; Gallagher, J; Bernstein, I L

    1990-01-01

    A cross-sectional medical evaluation was conducted to determine respiratory and dermatological effects of platinum salts sensitization among workers in a secondary refinery of precious metals. Fifteen of 107 current employees and eight (28%) of 29 former employees, who had been terminated from employment on average for 5 years because of respiratory symptoms, had positive skin reactivity to platinum salts. Platinum salts skin reactivity was significantly associated with average air concentrations of platinum salts in employees' present work area. Workers with positive platinum salts skin tests had significantly higher prevalences of reported rhinitis, asthma, and dermatitis than negative skin test workers. They also had increased bronchial response to cold air challenge and elevated levels of total serum IgE. Platinum salts sensitization was not associated with atopic tendency as measured by sensitivity to common aeroallergens, but was strongly associated with cigarette smoking status. The findings indicate that cigarette smoking may be a risk factor for the development of platinum salts allergy. The persistence of platinum salts sensitization and high prevalence of adverse health outcomes among former workers demonstrate the importance of regular medical monitoring so that sensitized workers can be removed from exposure before they develop long-term health problems.

  1. Autothermal reforming of dimethyl ether with CGO-based precious metal catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seunghyeon; Bae, Joongmyeon

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we investigated the DME ATR reaction with different types of precious metal (Pt, Rh, Ru)-supported CGO catalysts. We also evaluated the reaction characteristics of DME ATR reaction by modifying certain reforming conditions, including the temperature, the amount of air and water, and the flow rate. The Ru-added CGO catalyst showed the best performance in DME ATR. The operating condition that produced the greatest effect on conversion efficiency was temperature; however the amounts of steam and air were also important with regard to conversion efficiency and the reaction heat. In case higher GHSV conditions the methane yields are increased. To maximize conversion efficiency with thermal neutral operating conditions, we suggest an SCR of 1.5, OCR of 0.45, over temperature of 700 °C, and a GHSV of less than 20,000/h. Under harsh conditions, such as low temperature and high GHSV, the methane yield increases. Therefore, the high temperature DME ATR reaction seems to consist of two main steps: the DME decomposition to methane and the methane autothermal reforming reaction.

  2. Characterization of Continuous and Discontinuous Precipitation Phases in Pd-Rich Precious Metal Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susan, Donald F.; Ghanbari, Zahra; Kotula, Paul G.; Michael, Joseph R.; Rodriguez, Mark A.

    2014-08-01

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (AC-STEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron backscatter diffraction, and electron probe microanalysis were applied to characterize continuous and discontinuous phase formation in precious metal alloys used in electrical contacts. The Pd-rich Paliney® (®Paliney is tradename of Deringer-Ney Inc., Bloomfield, CT) alloys contain Pd, Ag, Cu, Au, Pt (and Zn or Ni). With aging at 755 K (482 °C), nanometer-scale chemistry modulation was observed indicating spinodal decomposition. An ordered body-centered tetragonal (bct) structure was also observed with AC-STEM after the 755 K (482 °C) aging treatment and another phase, tentatively identified as β-Cu3Pd4Zn, was found by microscopy and XRD after prolonged holds at higher temperatures. During slow cooling or isothermal holds at high temperature [755 K to 973 K (482 °C to 700 °C)], a two-phase lamellar structure develops along grain boundaries by discontinuous precipitation. XRD and AC-STEM showed that the lamellar structure was comprised of Ag-rich and Cu-rich fcc phases ( α 1 and α 2). The phases are discussed in relation to a pseudo-ternary diagram based on Ag-Cu-Pd, which provides a simplified representation of the discontinuous phase compositions in the multi-component alloy system.

  3. A unique class of alternative catalysts for fuel cell applications that replace the need for precious metals

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, P.G.

    1995-12-31

    A method has been found that allows the replacement of precious metals with nonmetallic alternative materials for use as the required catalysts in various fuel cell applications. The amount of the precious metal currently used for the catalyst per fuel cell is substantial, and is a significant fraction of the non-variable cost of the entire fuel cell unit. Through the use of a recently developed trade-secret process, a class of nonmetal materials can be manufactured into a metal-like polymer that behaves electrically in an similar manner as do the precious metals during normal fuel cell operation. Samples of these alternative catalysts have been manufactured using an inexpensive process developed and protected under trade secret agreements. Actual small-scale fuel cell demonstration tests have been successfully conducted that verify the operational capabilities of these low-cost alternative catalysts in place of platinum and rhodium. The cost savings of using these alternative catalysts within large scale fuel cell power units may be large.

  4. Advanced Sorbent Structure Recovery of REEs, Precious Metals and Other Valuable Metals from Geothermal Waters and Its Associated Technoeconomics

    DOE Data Explorer

    Addleman, Shane; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Palo, Daniel; Dunn, Brad M.; Brann, Michelle; Billingsley, Gary; Johnson, Darren; Nell, Kara M.

    2017-05-25

    This work evaluates, develops and demonstrates flexible, scalable mineral extraction technology for geothermal brines based upon solid phase sorbent materials with a specific focus upon rare earth elements (REEs). The selected organic and inorganic sorbent materials demonstrated high performance for collection of trace REEs, precious and valuable metals beyond commercially available sorbents. This report details the organic and inorganic sorbent uptake, performance, and collection efficiency results for La, Eu, Ho, Ag, Cu and Zn, as well as the characterization of these select sorbent materials. The report also contains estimated costs from an in-depth techno-economic analysis of a scaled up separation process. The estimated financial payback period for installing this equipment varies between 3.3 to 5.7 years depending on the brine flow rate of the geothermal resource.

  5. Recovery of Rare Earths, Precious Metals and Other Critical Materials from Geothermal Waters with Advanced Sorbent Structures

    DOE Data Explorer

    Pamela M. Kinsey

    2015-09-30

    The work evaluates, develops and demonstrates flexible, scalable mineral extraction technology for geothermal brines based upon solid phase sorbent materials with a specific focus upon rare earth elements (REEs). The selected organic and inorganic sorbent materials demonstrated high performance for collection of trace REEs, precious and valuable metals. The nanostructured materials typically performed better than commercially available sorbents. Data contains organic and inorganic sorbent removal efficiency, Sharkey Hot Springs (Idaho) water chemsitry analysis, and rare earth removal efficiency from select sorbents.

  6. Precious-Metal-Free Heteroarylation of Azlactones: Direct Synthesis of α-Pyridyl, α-Substituted Amino Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tarn C; Marsden, Stephen P

    2016-10-21

    A one-pot, three-component synthesis of α-pyridyl, α-substituted amino acid derivatives is described. The key transformation is a direct, precious-metal-free heteroarylation of readily available, amino acid derived azlactones with electrophilically activated pyridine N-oxides. The resulting intermediates can be used directly as efficient acylating agents for a range of nucleophiles, leading to the heteroarylated amino acid derivatives in a single vessel.

  7. Non-precious metal catalysis for proton-exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Nathaniel Dean

    Non-precious metal catalysts (NPMC) for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are explored. Research into NPMCs is motivated by the growing need for cleaner, more efficient energy options. NPMCs are one option to make fuel cells more commercially viable. To this end, the present work studies and simulates the morphology and function of metal-nitrogen-carbon (MNC) oxygen reduction catalysts. A porosity study finds that mesoporosity is critical to high performance of autogenic pressure metal-nitrogen-carbon (APMNC) oxygen reduction catalysts. Various carbon materials are used as precursors to synthesis APMNC catalysts. The catalysts and the associated porous carbon materials are characterized morphologically, chemically, and electrochemically. The results indicated that substrates adsorbing the most nitrogen and iron show the highest activity. Furthermore, a relationship is found between mesoporosity and nitrogen content indicating the importance of transport to active site creation. A correlation is found between surface alkalinity and catalytic activity for APMNC catalysts. The basic site strength and quantity were calculated by two different methods, and it was shown that increased Bronsted- Lowry basicity correlates to more active catalysts. The relationship between alkalinity and catalytic activity could be the result of the impact of alkalinity on the electron density of the metal centers or basic sites could encourage active site formation. It is found that the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) proceeds both via a direct four-electron pathway to water at high potentials and an indirect peroxide pathway at low potentials on an APMNC catalyst. At higher potential, site availability inhibits peroxide generation causing the direct four-electron reduction pathway to dominate. Oxygen reduction begins to shift to the indirect peroxide pathway due to fast kinetics and higher site availability around 0.6 V vs RHE. The net peroxide generation remains relatively low

  8. Design of a metal primer containing a dithiooctanoate monomer and a phosphonic acid monomer for bonding of prosthetic light-curing resin composite to gold, dental precious and non-precious metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Fujii, Toshihide; Negoro, Noriyuki; Endo, Takeshi; Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    The effect of metal primers on adhesion of a resin composite to dental metal alloys was investigated. Experimental primers containing a dithiooctanoate monomer [10-methacryloyloxydecyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (10-MDDT) or 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (6-MHDT)] and a phosphonic acid monomer [6-methacryloyloxyhexyl phosphonoacetate (6-MHPA) or 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl 3-phosphonopropionate (6-MHPP)] were prepared. After treating Au, Au alloy, Ag alloy, Au-Ag-Pd alloy, and Ni-Cr alloy with the experimental primers, their shear bond strengths (SBSs) with a prosthetic light-curing resin composite (Solidex, Shofu Inc., Japan) were measured after 1-day storage followed by 5,000 thermal cycles. The SBSs between Solidex and the primer-treated metals which were incubated in air at 50°C for 2 months were further measured. Results showed that the SBSs [mean (SD)] of all metal adherends treated with primer DT-PA-1 (5.0 wt% 10-MDDT, 1.0 wt% 6-MHPA) ranged between 31.2 (5.2) and 34.5 (5.8) MPa. The SBSs of the primer-treated metals did not degrade after 2-month incubation at 50°C. Therefore, a combined primer application consisting of a dithiooctanoate monomer and a phosphonic acid monomer provided efficacious bonding to Au as well as precious and non-precious metal alloys.

  9. Precious metals and rare earth elements in municipal solid waste--sources and fate in a Swiss incineration plant.

    PubMed

    Morf, Leo S; Gloor, Rolf; Haag, Olaf; Haupt, Melanie; Skutan, Stefan; Di Lorenzo, Fabian; Böni, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    In Switzerland many kinds of waste, e.g. paper, metals, electrical and electronic equipment are separately collected and recycled to a large extent. The residual amount of municipal solid waste (MSW) has to be thermally treated before final disposal. Efforts to recover valuable metals from incineration residues have recently increased. However, the resource potential of critical elements in the waste input (sources) and their partitioning into recyclable fractions and residues (fate) is unknown. Therefore, a substance flow analysis (SFA) for 31 elements including precious metals (Au, Ag), platinum metal group elements (Pt, Rh) and rare earth elements (La, Ce, etc.) has been conducted in a solid waste incinerator (SWI) with a state-of-the-art bottom ash treatment according to the Thermo-Re® concept. The SFA allowed the determination of the element partitioning in the SWI, as well as the elemental composition of the MSW by indirect analysis. The results show that the waste-input contains substantial quantities of precious metals, such as 0.4 ± 0.2mg/kg Au and 5.3 ± 0.7 mg/kg Ag. Many of the valuable substances, such as Au and Ag are enriched in specific outputs (e.g. non-ferrous metal fractions) and are therefore recoverable. As the precious metal content in MSW is expected to rise due to its increasing application in complex consumer products, the results of this study are essential for the improvement of resource recovery in the Thermo-Re® process.

  10. Metallic cobalt nanoparticles imbedded into ordered mesoporous carbon: A non-precious metal catalyst with excellent hydrogenation performance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangyong; Wang, Zihao; Yan, Xiaodong; Jian, Panming

    2017-11-01

    Ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC)-metal composites have attracted great attention owing to their combination of high surface area, controlled pore size distribution and physicochemical properties of metals. Herein, we report the cobalt nanoparticles/ordered mesoporous carbon (CoNPs@OMC) composite prepared by a one-step carbonization/reduction process assisted by a hydrothermal pre-reaction. The CoNPs@OMC composite presents a high specific surface area of 544m(2)g(-1), and the CoNPs are uniformly imbedded or confined in the ordered mesoporous carbon matrix. When used as a non-precious metal-containing catalyst for hydrogenation reduction of p-nitrophenol and nitrobenzene, it demonstrates high efficiency and good cycling stability. Furthermore, the CoNPs@OMC composite can be directly used to catalyze the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis for the high-pressure CO hydrogenation, and presents a good catalytic selectivity for C5(+) hydrocarbons. The excellent catalytic performance of the CoNPs@OMC composite can be ascribed to synergistic effect between the high specific surface area, mesoporous structure and well-imbedded CoNPs in the carbon matrix. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Deselenization and detellurization of precious-metal ore concentrates by swelling oxidizing roasting and successive alkaline leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fu-yuan; Zheng, Ya-jie; Peng, Guo-min

    2017-02-01

    A new technique of swelling oxidizing roasting and alkaline leaching was proposed for deselenization and detellurization of precious-metal ore concentrates. Alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal chlorides and carbonates were preliminarily selected as swelling agents. The roasting removal rate and alkaline leaching rate of selenium and tellurium were investigated, and NaCl was selected as an appropriate swelling agent. Furthermore, the effects of various factors on the selenium gasification rate and leaching rate of selenium and tellurium were investigated. The results show that the selenium gasification rate reaches 88.41% after swelling oxidizing roasting for 2 h at 510°C using an NaCl dosage coefficient of 100 and a sulfuric acid dosage coefficient of 1.3; the amorphous elemental tellurium is completely transformed into TiO2. The roasted product is subjected to alkaline leaching using a 100 g/L NaOH solution, which results in a selenium leaching rate of 10.51%, a total selenium removal rate of 98.92%, and a tellurium leaching rate of 97.64%. In the alkaline leaching residue, the contents of selenium, tellurium, gold, platinum, and palladium are 0.7825%, 5.492%, 8.333%, 0.2587%, and 1.113%, respectively; the precious metals are enriched approximately sixfold.

  12. High pressure pyrolyzed non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts for alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Sanetuntikul, Jakkid; Shanmugam, Sangaraju

    2015-05-07

    Non-precious metal catalysts, such as metal-coordinated to nitrogen doped-carbon, have shown reasonable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performances in alkaline fuel cells. In this report, we present the development of a highly active, stable and low-cost non-precious metal ORR catalyst by direct synthesis under autogenic-pressure conditions. Transmission electron microscopy studies show highly porous Fe-N-C and Co-N-C structures, which were further confirmed by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurements. The surface areas of the Fe-N-C and Co-N-C catalysts were found to be 377.5 and 369.3 m(2) g(-1), respectively. XPS results show the possible existence of N-C and M-Nx structures, which are generally proposed to be the active sites in non-precious metal catalysts. The Fe-N-C electrocatalyst exhibits an ORR half-wave potential 20 mV higher than the reference Pt/C catalyst. The cycling durability test for Fe-N-C over 5000 cycles shows that the half-wave potential lost only 4 mV, whereas the half-wave potential of the Pt/C catalyst lost about 50 mV. The Fe-N-C catalyst exhibited an improved activity and stability compared to the reference Pt/C catalyst and it possesses a direct 4-electron transfer pathway for the ORR process. Further, the Fe-N-C catalyst produces extremely low HO2(-) content, as confirmed by the rotating ring-disk electrode measurements. In the alkaline fuel single cell tests, maximum power densities of 75 and 80 mW cm(-2) were observed for the Fe-N-C and Pt/C cathodes, respectively. Durability studies (100 h) showed that decay of the fuel cell current was more prominent for the Pt/C cathode catalyst compared to the Fe-N-C cathode catalyst. Therefore, the Fe-N-C catalyst appears to be a promising new class of non-precious metal catalysts prepared by an autogenic synthetic method.

  13. Elucidating Oxygen Reduction Active Sites in Pyrolyzed Metal-Nitrogen Coordinated Non-Precious-Metal Electrocatalyst Systems.

    PubMed

    Tylus, Urszula; Jia, Qingying; Strickland, Kara; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Serov, Alexey; Atanassov, Plamen; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2014-05-01

    Detailed understanding of the nature of the active centers in non-precious-metal-based electrocatalyst, and their role in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanistic pathways will have a profound effect on successful commercialization of emission-free energy devices such as fuel cells. Recently, using pyrolyzed model structures of iron porphyrins, we have demonstrated that a covalent integration of the Fe-N x sites into π-conjugated carbon basal plane modifies electron donating/withdrawing capability of the carbonaceous ligand, consequently improving ORR activity. Here, we employ a combination of in situ X-ray spectroscopy and electrochemical methods to identify the various structural and functional forms of the active centers in non-heme Fe/N/C catalysts. Both methods corroboratively confirm the single site 2e(-) × 2e(-) mechanism in alkaline media on the primary Fe(2+)-N4 centers and the dual-site 2e(-) × 2e(-) mechanism in acid media with the significant role of the surface bound coexisting Fe/Fe x O y nanoparticles (NPs) as the secondary active sites.

  14. Precious-metal deposits in relation to volcanic and sedimentary stratigraphy: Examples from the Oregon Plateau, U. S. A

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, M.L. )

    1990-06-01

    Miocene to Recent volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Oregon Plateau host precious-metal deposits. The deposits, formed within an extensional tectonic setting, illustrate the relation among volcanic and sedimentary stratigraphy, regional structural development, and hydrothermal systems. Gold deposits hosted in felsic volcaniclastic sediments in the Owyhee region formed during or shortly after sedimentation. Uniformly silicified tuffaceous mudstone and siltstone interbedded with siliceous and sulfide-rich sediments and bedded hydrathermal breccia, hydrothermal explosion craters infilled by breccia fragments, and stacked buried sinter deposits attest to mineralization near the time of sedimentation. The regional structures that controlled the distribution of volcanic activity and location of sedimentary basins changed through time. In the middle Miocene, basin-and range faults controlled the location of basalt and rhyolitic volcanism and fluvial and lacustrine basins. In the late Miocene and Pliocene, faults parallel to those of the Western Snake River Plain are more prominent and interfingering volcanic and volcaniclastic sedimentary deposits characterize the stratigraphic section. Fault-controlled mercury mineralization in quartz within opalized high-silica rhyolite flow-domes produces an obscure precious-metal prospect at Glass Buttes in the High Lava Plains. Glassy high-silica rhyolite flow-domes were erupted between 5.8 and 5.0 ma but alteration and mineralization occur along faults of the Brothers fault zone that cut the high-silica rhyolite sequence. Younger porphyritic rhyolite to dacite domes, spines, and intrusions controlled by faults of the Brothers fault zone are believed to be the heat source for the hydrothermal system. Precious-metal mineralization may occur in the subsurface where hydrothermal solutions boiled beneath the paleowater table.

  15. Precious metals in magnesian low-Ti lavas: Implications for metallogenesis and sulfur saturation in primary magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlyn, Paul R.; Keays, Reid R.; Cameron, Warrington E.; Crawford, Anthony J.; Waldron, Helen M.

    1985-08-01

    Boninites and related magnesian low-Ti magmas are generally regarded as partial melts of a moderately to severely depleted peridotite source. Incompatible lithophile element abundances indicate that this source was variably enriched in LREE, Zr, Sr, Ba and alkalis by some mantle metasomatic process. Low-Ti lavas from the Bonin-Mariana arc system, Cape Vogel, New Caledonia, Cyprus, Newfoundland and SE Australia have been analysed for Pd, Ir, Au, Cu, S and Se. Comparison of fresh glassy material with variably altered samples suggests sporadic loss of Au and Cu and essentially inert behaviour for Pd, Ir and Se during seawater and subsequent alteration. They are uniformly enriched in Pd (mean 15 ppb) and depleted in Cu (mean 20 ppm), S (mean < 54 ppm) and Se (mean 53 ppb) compared to average MORB (<0.8 ppb Pd, 72 ppm Cu, 800 ppm S and 196 ppb Se) and exhibit incompatible-like behaviour for these elements and Au. The data are compatible with fractionation of the chalcophile elements during multi-stage mantle melting. Primary MORB liquids are S-saturated in their mantle source and an immiscible sulfide component is retained in the mantle residue. This results in the preferential removal of metals having low DS/L- values (base metals) and concentration of those metals with high DS/L values (precious metals) in the residual mantle sulfide fraction. Subsequent remelting of this refractory source produces S-deficient precious metal-enriched magmas, as exemplified by boninites. The absence of correlation between incompatible lithophile element enrichment and chalcophile element abundances suggests that the latter were not added to the source during mantle metasomatism. The constraints imposed by the nature of the source region result in two fundamentally contrasting patterns of behaviour for exclusively chalcophile elements. Magmas generated in mildly depleted to undepleted source regions by low to moderate degrees of partial melting (e.g. MORB) are S-saturated and become

  16. Precious metals and rare earth elements in municipal solid waste – Sources and fate in a Swiss incineration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Morf, Leo S.; Gloor, Rolf; Haag, Olaf; Haupt, Melanie; Skutan, Stefan; Lorenzo, Fabian Di; Böni, Daniel

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► We carefully addressed all the very valuable comments and suggestions of the reviewers. ► We also have shortened the size of the paper and tried simplify it substantially, as requested by the reviewers (introduction 25% reduced!). ► We have decided to take the chance and have replaced the data for the “additional” elements (Cu, Cd, Zn, Pb, Sn, Cr, Ni, Fe, Al) of the earlier MFA (Morf, 2011) with data that belong to the samples of this study. ► We are convinced that with the revision the paper has significantly improved in quality and attractiveness. - Abstract: In Switzerland many kinds of waste, e.g. paper, metals, electrical and electronic equipment are separately collected and recycled to a large extent. The residual amount of municipal solid waste (MSW) has to be thermally treated before final disposal. Efforts to recover valuable metals from incineration residues have recently increased. However, the resource potential of critical elements in the waste input (sources) and their partitioning into recyclable fractions and residues (fate) is unknown. Therefore, a substance flow analysis (SFA) for 31 elements including precious metals (Au, Ag), platinum metal group elements (Pt, Rh) and rare earth elements (La, Ce, etc.) has been conducted in a solid waste incinerator (SWI) with a state-of-the-art bottom ash treatment according to the Thermo-Re® concept. The SFA allowed the determination of the element partitioning in the SWI, as well as the elemental composition of the MSW by indirect analysis. The results show that the waste-input contains substantial quantities of precious metals, such as 0.4 ± 0.2 mg/kg Au and 5.3 ± 0.7 mg/kg Ag. Many of the valuable substances, such as Au and Ag are enriched in specific outputs (e.g. non-ferrous metal fractions) and are therefore recoverable. As the precious metal content in MSW is expected to rise due to its increasing application in complex consumer products, the results of this study are

  17. High pressure pyrolyzed non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts for alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanetuntikul, Jakkid; Shanmugam, Sangaraju

    2015-04-01

    Non-precious metal catalysts, such as metal-coordinated to nitrogen doped-carbon, have shown reasonable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performances in alkaline fuel cells. In this report, we present the development of a highly active, stable and low-cost non-precious metal ORR catalyst by direct synthesis under autogenic-pressure conditions. Transmission electron microscopy studies show highly porous Fe-N-C and Co-N-C structures, which were further confirmed by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurements. The surface areas of the Fe-N-C and Co-N-C catalysts were found to be 377.5 and 369.3 m2 g-1, respectively. XPS results show the possible existence of N-C and M-Nx structures, which are generally proposed to be the active sites in non-precious metal catalysts. The Fe-N-C electrocatalyst exhibits an ORR half-wave potential 20 mV higher than the reference Pt/C catalyst. The cycling durability test for Fe-N-C over 5000 cycles shows that the half-wave potential lost only 4 mV, whereas the half-wave potential of the Pt/C catalyst lost about 50 mV. The Fe-N-C catalyst exhibited an improved activity and stability compared to the reference Pt/C catalyst and it possesses a direct 4-electron transfer pathway for the ORR process. Further, the Fe-N-C catalyst produces extremely low HO2- content, as confirmed by the rotating ring-disk electrode measurements. In the alkaline fuel single cell tests, maximum power densities of 75 and 80 mW cm-2 were observed for the Fe-N-C and Pt/C cathodes, respectively. Durability studies (100 h) showed that decay of the fuel cell current was more prominent for the Pt/C cathode catalyst compared to the Fe-N-C cathode catalyst. Therefore, the Fe-N-C catalyst appears to be a promising new class of non-precious metal catalysts prepared by an autogenic synthetic method.Non-precious metal catalysts, such as metal-coordinated to nitrogen doped-carbon, have shown reasonable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performances in alkaline fuel cells. In

  18. Methodology for the design of accelerated stress tests for non-precious metal catalysts in fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharabi, Ronit; Wijsboom, Yair Haim; Borchtchoukova, Nino; Finkelshtain, Gennadi; Elbaz, Lior

    2016-12-01

    In this work we propose systematic methods for testing non-precious group metal catalysts and support degradation alkaline fuel cell cathodes. In this case study, we used a cathode composed of a pyrolyzed non-precious metal catalyst (NPMC) on activated carbon. The vulnerabilities of the cathode components were studied in order to develop the methodology and design an accelerated stress test (AST) for NPMC-based cathode in alkaline environment. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA) and impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to characterize the electrochemical behavior of the cathode and to follow the changes that occur as a result of exposing the cathodes to extreme operating conditions. Rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) was used to study the cathodes kinetics; Raman spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) were used to study the structural changes in the electrode surface as well as depletion of the catalysts' active sites from the electrode. The changes in the composition of the electrode and catalyst were detected using X-ray diffraction (XRD). For the first time, we show that NPMC degrade rapidly at low operating potentials whereas the support degrades at high operating potentials and developed a tailor-made AST to take these into account.

  19. Precious metal recovery from waste printed circuit boards using cyanide and non-cyanide lixiviants--A review.

    PubMed

    Akcil, Ata; Erust, Ceren; Gahan, Chandra Sekhar; Ozgun, Mehmet; Sahin, Merve; Tuncuk, Aysenur

    2015-11-01

    Waste generated by the electrical and electronic devices is huge concern worldwide. With decreasing life cycle of most electronic devices and unavailability of the suitable recycling technologies it is expected to have huge electronic and electrical wastes to be generated in the coming years. The environmental threats caused by the disposal and incineration of electronic waste starting from the atmosphere to the aquatic and terrestrial living system have raised high alerts and concerns on the gases produced (dioxins, furans, polybrominated organic pollutants, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) by thermal treatments and can cause serious health problems if the flue gas cleaning systems are not developed and implemented. Apart from that there can be also dissolution of heavy metals released to the ground water from the landfill sites. As all these electronic and electrical waste do posses richness in the metal values it would be worth recovering the metal content and protect the environmental from the pollution. Cyanide leaching has been a successful technology worldwide for the recovery of precious metals (especially Au and Ag) from ores/concentrates/waste materials. Nevertheless, cyanide is always preferred over others because of its potential to deliver high recovery with a cheaper cost. Cyanidation process also increases the additional work of effluent treatment prior to disposal. Several non-cyanide leaching processes have been developed considering toxic nature and handling problems of cyanide with non-toxic lixiviants such as thiourea, thiosulphate, aqua regia and iodine. Therefore, several recycling technologies have been developed using cyanide or non-cyanide leaching methods to recover precious and valuable metals.

  20. A new approach to precious metals recovery from brown coals: Correlation of recovery efficacy with the mechanism of metal-humic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratskaya, Svetlana Yu.; Volk, Alexandra S.; Ivanov, Vladimir V.; Ustinov, Alexander Yu.; Barinov, Nikolay N.; Avramenko, Valentin A.

    2009-06-01

    The presence of gold and platinum group elements (PGE) in low-rank brown coals around the world has promoted interest in the industrial exploitation of this alternative source of precious metals. However, due to low efficacy of the methods traditionally used for the processing of mineral ores, there exists a high demand for new strategies of precious metal recovery from refractory carbonaceous materials that could significantly increase the economic potential of gold- and PGE-bearing organic resources. Here we discuss the possibility of gold and PGE recovery from alkaline extracts of brown coals using the difference in colloidal stability of bulk organic matter and its fractions enriched with precious metals. This approach enables one to avoid complete oxidation or combustion of brown coals prior to gold recovery, to minimize organic content in gold concentrate, and to obtain a valuable by-product - humic extracts. Using gold-bearing brown coals from several deposits located in the South Far East of Russia, we show that up to 95% of gold can be transferred to alkaline extracts of humic acids (HA) and up to 85% of this gold can be recovered by centrifugation at pH 4.0-6.0, when only 5-15% of HA precipitated simultaneously. We have shown that the high efficacy of gold recovery can be attributed to the occurrence of fine-dispersed elemental gold particles stabilized by HA, which differ significantly in colloidal stability from the bulk organic matter and, thus, can be separated by centrifugation.

  1. Bioreduction of Precious Metals by Microorganism: Efficient Gold@N-Doped Carbon Electrocatalysts for the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weijia; Xiong, Tanli; Shi, Chaohong; Zhou, Jian; Zhou, Kai; Zhu, Nengwu; Li, Ligui; Tang, Zhenghua; Chen, Shaowei

    2016-07-11

    The uptake of precious metals from electronic waste is of environmental significance and potential commercial value. A facile bioreductive synthesis is described for Au nanoparticles (ca. 20 nm) supported on N-doped carbon (Au@NC), which was derived from Au/Pycnoporus sanguineus cells. The interface and charge transport between Au and N-doped carbon were confirmed by HRTEM and XPS. Au@NC was employed as an electrocatalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), exhibiting a small onset potential of -54.1 mV (vs. RHE), a Tafel slope of 76.8 mV dec(-1) , as well as robust stability in acidic medium. Au@NC is a multifunctional electrocatalyst, which demonstrates high catalytic activity in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), as evidenced by an onset potential of +0.97 V, excellent tolerance toward methanol, and long-term stability. This work exemplifies dual recovery of precious Au and fabrication of multifunctional electrocatalysts in an environmentally benign and application-oriented manner.

  2. Nuclear fuel and precious-metal occurrences in Precambrian rocks of southeast Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Graff, P.

    1986-08-01

    Studies done on Precambrian metasediments in southeast Wyoming show the occurrence of quartz-pebble conglomerates containing subeconomic amounts of uranium and thorium. These conglomerates were marginal deposits in the late 1970s when uranium prices reached $50/lb. Fuel minerals occur in silicate phases and complicate milling operations. Because of the additional cost of processing and underground mining, no attempt to develop these resources was made. Additional studies show a favorable comparison of the rocks in Wyoming to the auriferous Witwatersrand section of South Africa. Exploration for gold in the Wyoming conglomerates has been done in a preliminary manner, but assay values to 10 ppm are reported. Both fuel minerals and gold are deposited as fossil placers by fluvial systems operating in an anoxic environment. Lag gravel and meander deposits contain heavy-mineral suites formed of coffinite, pyrite, thorite, gold, and uraninite. Available studies have not considered producing fuel and precious minerals as coproducts of surface mining methods.

  3. Oxidation of Aliphatic Alcohols by Using Precious Metals Supported on Hydrotalcite under Solvent- and Base-Free Conditions.

    PubMed

    He, Yufei; Feng, Junting; Brett, Gemma L; Liu, Yanan; Miedziak, Peter J; Edwards, Jennifer K; Knight, David W; Li, Dianqing; Hutchings, Graham J

    2015-10-12

    Precious metal nanoparticles supported on magnesium-aluminum hydrotalcite (HT), TiO2 , and MgO were prepared by sol immobilization and assessed for the catalytic oxidation of octanol, which is a relatively unreactive aliphatic alcohol, with molecular oxygen as the oxidant under solvent- and base-free conditions. Compared with the TiO2 - and MgO-supported catalysts, platinum HT gave the highest activity and selectivity towards the aldehyde. The turnover number achieved for the platinum HT catalyst was >3700 after 180 min under mild reaction conditions. Moreover, the results for the oxidation of different substrates indicate that a specific interaction of octanal with the platinum HT catalyst could lead to deactivation of the catalyst.

  4. Manganese Oxide Nanorod-Decorated Mesoporous ZSM-5 Composite as a Precious-Metal-Free Electrode Catalyst for Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiangzhi; Hua, Zile; Chen, Lisong; Zhang, Xiaohua; Chen, Hangrong; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-05-10

    A precious-metal-free cathode catalyst, MnO2 nanorod-decorated mesoporous ZSM-5 zeolite nanocomposite (MnO2 / m-ZSM-5), has been successfully synthesized by a hydrothermal and electrostatic interaction approach for efficient electrochemical catalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The active MnOOH species, that is, Mn(4+) /Mn(3+) redox couple and Brønsted acid sites on the mesoporous ZSM-5 matrix facilitate an approximately 4 e(-) process for the catalysis of the ORR comparable to commercial 20 wt % Pt/C. Stable electrocatalytic activity with 90 % current retention after 5000 cycles, and more importantly, excellent methanol tolerance is observed. Synergetic catalytic effects between the MnO2 nanorods and the mesoporous ZSM-5 matrix are proposed to account for the high electrochemical catalytic performance.

  5. Modeling Hierarchical Non-Precious Metal Catalyst Cathodes for PEFCs Using Multi-Scale X-ray CT Imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Komini Babu, S.; Chung, H. T.; Wu, G.; ...

    2014-08-18

    This paper reports the development of a model for simulating polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) with non-precious metal catalyst (NPMC) cathodes. NPMCs present an opportunity to dramatically reduce the cost of PEFC electrodes by removing the costly Pt catalyst. To address the significant transport losses in thick NPMC cathodes (ca. >60 µm), we developed a hierarchical electrode model that resolves the unique structure of the NPMCs we studied. A unique feature of the approach is the integration of the model with morphology data extracted from nano-scale resolution X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT) imaging of the electrodes. A notable finding is themore » impact of the liquid water accumulation in the electrode and the significant performance improvement possible if electrode flooding is mitigated.« less

  6. Modeling Hierarchical Non-Precious Metal Catalyst Cathodes for PEFCs Using Multi-Scale X-ray CT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Komini Babu, S.; Chung, H. T.; Wu, G.; Zelenay, P.; Litster, S.

    2014-08-18

    This paper reports the development of a model for simulating polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) with non-precious metal catalyst (NPMC) cathodes. NPMCs present an opportunity to dramatically reduce the cost of PEFC electrodes by removing the costly Pt catalyst. To address the significant transport losses in thick NPMC cathodes (ca. >60 µm), we developed a hierarchical electrode model that resolves the unique structure of the NPMCs we studied. A unique feature of the approach is the integration of the model with morphology data extracted from nano-scale resolution X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT) imaging of the electrodes. A notable finding is the impact of the liquid water accumulation in the electrode and the significant performance improvement possible if electrode flooding is mitigated.

  7. In situ electrochemical quantification of active sites in Fe-N/C non-precious metal catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malko, Daniel; Kucernak, Anthony; Lopes, Thiago

    2016-10-01

    The economic viability of low temperature fuel cells as clean energy devices is enhanced by the development of inexpensive oxygen reduction reaction catalysts. Heat treated iron and nitrogen containing carbon based materials (Fe-N/C) have shown potential to replace expensive precious metals. Although significant improvements have recently been made, their activity and durability is still unsatisfactory. The further development and a rational design of these materials has stalled due to the lack of an in situ methodology to easily probe and quantify the active site. Here we demonstrate a protocol that allows the quantification of active centres, which operate under acidic conditions, by means of nitrite adsorption followed by reductive stripping, and show direct correlation to the catalytic activity. The method is demonstrated for two differently prepared materials. This approach may allow researchers to easily assess the active site density and turnover frequency of Fe-N/C catalysts.

  8. In situ electrochemical quantification of active sites in Fe–N/C non-precious metal catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Malko, Daniel; Kucernak, Anthony; Lopes, Thiago

    2016-01-01

    The economic viability of low temperature fuel cells as clean energy devices is enhanced by the development of inexpensive oxygen reduction reaction catalysts. Heat treated iron and nitrogen containing carbon based materials (Fe–N/C) have shown potential to replace expensive precious metals. Although significant improvements have recently been made, their activity and durability is still unsatisfactory. The further development and a rational design of these materials has stalled due to the lack of an in situ methodology to easily probe and quantify the active site. Here we demonstrate a protocol that allows the quantification of active centres, which operate under acidic conditions, by means of nitrite adsorption followed by reductive stripping, and show direct correlation to the catalytic activity. The method is demonstrated for two differently prepared materials. This approach may allow researchers to easily assess the active site density and turnover frequency of Fe–N/C catalysts. PMID:27796287

  9. Molybdenum carbide as alternative catalysts to precious metals for highly selective reduction of CO2 to CO.

    PubMed

    Porosoff, Marc D; Yang, Xiaofang; Boscoboinik, J Anibal; Chen, Jingguang G

    2014-06-23

    Rising atmospheric CO2 is expected to have negative effects on the global environment from its role in climate change and ocean acidification. Utilizing CO2 as a feedstock to make valuable chemicals is potentially more desirable than sequestration. A substantial reduction of CO2 levels requires a large-scale CO2 catalytic conversion process, which in turn requires the discovery of low-cost catalysts. Results from the current study demonstrate the feasibility of using the non-precious metal material molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) as an active and selective catalyst for CO2 conversion by H2. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Rapid Computer Aided Ligand Design and Screening of Precious Metal Extractants from TRUEX Raffinate with Experimental Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Aurora Sue; Wall, Nathalie; Benny, Paul

    2015-11-16

    Rhodium is the most extensively used metal in catalytic applications; it occurs in mixed ores with platinum group metals (PGMs) in the earth’s crust in low concentrations (0.4 - 10 ppb). It is resistant to aerial oxidation and insoluble in all acids, including aqua regia, making classical purification methods time-consuming and inefficient. To ensure adequate purity, several precipitation and dissolution steps are necessary during separation. Low abundance, high demand, and extensive processing make rhodium the most expensive of all PGMs. From alternative sources, rhodium is also produced in sufficient quantities (0.47 kg per ton initial heavy metal (tIHM)) during the fission of U-235 in nuclear reactors along with other PGMs (i.e., Ag, Pd, Ru). A typical power water reactor operating with UO2 fuel after cooling can generate PGMs in quantities greater than found in the earth’s crust (0.5-2 kg/tIHM). This currently untapped supply of PGMs has the potential to yield $5,000-30,000/tIHM. It is estimated that by the year 2030, the amount of rhodium generated in reactors could exceed natural reserves. Typical SNF processing removes the heavier lanthanides and actinides and can leave PGMs at ambient temperatures in aqueous acidic (Cl⁻ or NO3⁻; pH < 1) solutions at various activities. While the retrieval of these precious metals from SNF would minimize waste generation and improve resource utilization, it has been difficult to achieve thus far. Two general strategies have been utilized to extract Rh(III) from chloride media: ion pairing and coordination complexation. Ion pairing mechanisms have been studied primarily with the tertiary and quaternary amines. Additionally, mixed mechanism extractions have been observed in which ion pairing is the initial mechanism, and longer extraction equilibrium time generated coordination complexes. Very few coordination complexation extraction ligands have been studied. This project approached this problem

  11. Sequestration of precious and pollutant metals in biomass of cultured water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes).

    PubMed

    Newete, Solomon W; Erasmus, Barend F N; Weiersbye, Isabel M; Byrne, Marcus J

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the overall root/shoot allocation of metal contaminants, the amount of metal removal by absorption and adsorption within or on the external root surfaces, the dose-response of water hyacinth metal uptake, and phytotoxicity. This was examined in a single-metal tub trial, using arsenic (As), gold (Au), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), mercury (Hg), manganese (Mn), uranium (U), and zinc (Zn). Iron and Mn were also used in low-, medium-, and high-concentration treatments to test their dose effect on water hyacinth's metal uptake. Water hyacinth was generally tolerant to metallotoxicity, except for Cu and Hg. Over 80 % of the total amount of metals removed was accumulated in the roots, of which 30-52 % was adsorbed onto the root surfaces. Furthermore, 73-98 % of the total metal assimilation by water hyacinth was located in the roots. The bioconcentration factor (BCF) of Cu, Hg, Au, and Zn exceeded the recommended index of 1000, which is used in selection of phytoremediating plants, but those of U, As, and Mn did not. Nevertheless, the BCF for Mn increased with the increase of Mn concentration in water. This suggests that the use of BCF index alone, without the consideration of plant biomass and metal concentration in water, is inadequate to determine the potential of plants for phytoremediation accurately. Thus, this study confirms that water hyacinth holds potential for a broad spectrum of phytoremediation roles. However, knowing whether these metals are adsorbed on or assimilated within the plant tissues as well as knowing their allocation between roots and shoots will inform decisions how to re-treat biomass for metal recovery, or the mode of biomass reduction for safe disposal after phytoremediation.

  12. Properties of low power spark ablation in aqueous solution for dissolution of precious metals and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goltz, Douglas; Boileau, Michael; Plews, Ian; Charleton, Kimberly; Hinds, Michael W.

    2006-07-01

    Spark ablation or electric dispersion of metal samples in aqueous solution can be a useful approach for sample preparation. The ablated metal forms a stable suspension that has been described as colloidal, which is easily dissolved with a small amount of concentrated (16 M) HNO 3. In this study, we have examined some of the properties of the spark ablation process for a variety of metals (Rh and Au) and alloys (stainless steel) using a low power spark (100-300 W). Particle size distributions and conductivity measurements were carried out on selected metals to characterize the stable suspensions. A LASER diffraction particle size analyzer was useful for showing that ablated particles varied in size from 1 to 30 μm for both the silver and the nickel alloy, Inconel. In terms of weight percent most of the particles were between 10 and 30 μm. Conductivity of the spark ablation solution was found to increase linearly for approximately 3 min before leveling off at approximately 300 S cm 3. These measurements suggest that a significant portion of the ablated metal is also ionic in nature. Scanning electron microscope measurements revealed that a low power spark is much less damaging to the metal surface than a high power spark. Crater formation of the low power spark was found in a wider area than expected with the highest concentration where the spark was directed. The feasibility of using spark ablation for metal dissolution of a valuable artifact such as gold was also performed. Determinations of Ag (4-12%) and Cu (1-3%) in Bullion Reference Material (BRM) gave results that were in very good agreement with the certified values. The precision was ± 0.27% for Ag at 4.15% (RSD = 6.5%) and ± 0.09% for Cu at 1% (RSD = 9.0%).

  13. Adsorption of precious and coinage metals on Rh (111), Ru (0001) and W (110) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Quanxi; Wang, Shao-qing

    2017-07-01

    Bimetallic surface alloys have been considered as an effective strategy to achieve better catalytic performance and to modify the work function of the substrate toward metal-gate electrode application. We perform a systematical investigation of Group 10 and Group 11 transition metals adsorption on Rh (111), Ru (0001) and W (110) surfaces with various coverages using first-principles method. Through comparing the Bader charge results and the plots of work function shift, it is found that the polarization effect plays an important role in modification of the bimetallic surface work functions rather than the charge transfer effect especially at low coverages. The coverage-dependent work function behavior gives a general feature: as it has a large negative shift at 0.25ML coverage, then increases almost linearly with the coverage and followed by a saturation value which is controlled by the lattice strain. It is also found that the metal over-layer growth modes are correlated with the specific features of the coverage-dependent metal-substrate adhesion energy. All these findings may give some guidelines for the bimetallic catalysts design in terms of growth, stability and activity.

  14. 78 FR 32477 - ASA Gold and Precious Metals Limited; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... Metals Limited (``ASA''), a Bermuda closed-end management investment company registered under section 7(d... South Africa and currently organized in Bermuda. ASA is registered under the Act.\\1\\ ASA had $591... the United States or Bermuda would be the same with respect to ASA as with a U.S. Fund....

  15. Technological features of metal-ceramic prosthesis frameworks manufactured from domestic alloys of precious and base metals.

    PubMed

    Parunov, V A; Yurkovets, P V; Lebedenko, I Yu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine changes in physical and mechanical properties of dental alloys depending of the initial composition at re-casting. Russianc precious alloys: Plagodent (AuPtPd) and Palladent (PdAu) and base alloys: Vitiriy-N (NiCrMo) and Vitiriy-C (CoCrMo) were used as study samples, which were divided in three groups: a primary casting from the granules; 50% of re-casting; 100% of re-casting. We investigated the yield strength in bending, coefficient of thermal expansion and hardness. Changing in the composition of the alloys has led to changes of all physical and mechanical properties.

  16. New insights into non-precious metal catalyst layer designs for proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Improving performance and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banham, Dustin; Kishimoto, Takeaki; Sato, Tetsutaro; Kobayashi, Yoshikazu; Narizuka, Kumi; Ozaki, Jun-ichi; Zhou, Yingjie; Marquez, Emil; Bai, Kyoung; Ye, Siyu

    2017-03-01

    The activity of non-precious metal catalysts (NPMCs) has now reached a stage at which they can be considered as possible alternatives to Pt for some proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) applications. However, despite significant efforts over the past 50 years on catalyst development, only limited studies have been performed on NPMC-based cathode catalyst layer (CCL) designs. In this work, an extensive ionomer study is performed to investigate the impact of ionomer equivalent weight on performance, which has uncovered two crucial findings. Firstly, it is demonstrated that beyond a critical CCL conductance, no further improvement in performance is observed. The procedure used to determine this critical conductance can be used by other researchers in this field to aid in their design of high performing NPMC-based CCLs. Secondly, it is shown that the stability of NPMC-based CCLs can be improved through the use of low equivalent weight ionomers. This represents a completely unexplored pathway for further stability improvements, and also provides new insights into the possible degradation mechanisms occurring in NPMC-based CCLs. These findings have broad implications on all future NPMC-based CCL designs.

  17. In-Situ through-Plane Measurements of Ionic Potential Distributions in Non-Precious Metal Catalyst Electrode for PEFC

    SciTech Connect

    Komini Babu, S.; Chung, H. T.; Zelenay, P.; Litster, S.

    2015-09-14

    This manuscript presents micro-scale experimental diagnostics and nano-scale resolution X-ray imaging applied to the study of proton conduction in non-precious metal catalyst (NPMC) fuel cell cathodes. NPMC’s have the potential to reduce the cost of the fuel cell for multiple applications. But, NPMC electrodes are inherently thick compared to the convention Pt/C electrode due to the lower volumetric activity. Thus, the electric potential drop through the Nafion across the electrode thickness can yield significant performance loss. Ionomer distributions in the NPMC electrodes with different ionomer loading are extracted from morphological data using nanoscale X-ray computed tomography (nano-XCT) imaging of the cathode. Microstructured electrode scaffold (MES) diagnostics are used to measure the electrolyte potential at discrete points across the thickness of the catalyst layer. When using that apparatus, the electrolyte potential drop, the through-thickness reaction distribution, and the proton conductivity are measured and correlated with the corresponding Nafion morphology and cell performance.

  18. Elucidating Oxygen Reduction Active Sites in Pyrolyzed Metal–Nitrogen Coordinated Non-Precious-Metal Electrocatalyst Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Detailed understanding of the nature of the active centers in non-precious-metal-based electrocatalyst, and their role in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanistic pathways will have a profound effect on successful commercialization of emission-free energy devices such as fuel cells. Recently, using pyrolyzed model structures of iron porphyrins, we have demonstrated that a covalent integration of the Fe–Nx sites into π-conjugated carbon basal plane modifies electron donating/withdrawing capability of the carbonaceous ligand, consequently improving ORR activity. Here, we employ a combination of in situ X-ray spectroscopy and electrochemical methods to identify the various structural and functional forms of the active centers in non-heme Fe/N/C catalysts. Both methods corroboratively confirm the single site 2e– × 2e– mechanism in alkaline media on the primary Fe2+–N4 centers and the dual-site 2e– × 2e– mechanism in acid media with the significant role of the surface bound coexisting Fe/FexOy nanoparticles (NPs) as the secondary active sites. PMID:24817921

  19. In-Situ through-Plane Measurements of Ionic Potential Distributions in Non-Precious Metal Catalyst Electrode for PEFC

    DOE PAGES

    Komini Babu, S.; Chung, H. T.; Zelenay, P.; ...

    2015-09-14

    This manuscript presents micro-scale experimental diagnostics and nano-scale resolution X-ray imaging applied to the study of proton conduction in non-precious metal catalyst (NPMC) fuel cell cathodes. NPMC’s have the potential to reduce the cost of the fuel cell for multiple applications. But, NPMC electrodes are inherently thick compared to the convention Pt/C electrode due to the lower volumetric activity. Thus, the electric potential drop through the Nafion across the electrode thickness can yield significant performance loss. Ionomer distributions in the NPMC electrodes with different ionomer loading are extracted from morphological data using nanoscale X-ray computed tomography (nano-XCT) imaging of themore » cathode. Microstructured electrode scaffold (MES) diagnostics are used to measure the electrolyte potential at discrete points across the thickness of the catalyst layer. When using that apparatus, the electrolyte potential drop, the through-thickness reaction distribution, and the proton conductivity are measured and correlated with the corresponding Nafion morphology and cell performance.« less

  20. In situ analysis of precious metals in polished mineral samples and sulphido "standards" by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at concentrations of parts-per-billion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Graham C.; Kilius, Linas R.; Rucklidge, John C.

    1991-08-01

    This article addresses the analysis of eight precious metals (Au and Ag, plus the six Platinum Group Elements (PGE): Pt, Ir, Os, Ru, Rh, and Pd). The metals are measured in Fe-Ni-(Cu) sulphidos by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). Samples are analysed in the form of small polished cores, derived from sulphido- and oxide-rich rocks, and from Ni-S-dominated fire assay beads. The chosen analytical strategies are shown to have essentially zero background for Au, Ag, and the PGE, with the notable result that detection limits, like precision, are limited only by the time available for analysis. Sensitivities for monatomic negative ions are in the order Au ≈ Ag > Pt ≈ Rh > Pd ≈ Ir > Ru > Os, with nominal detection limits (quoted on the basis of equal counting times of 100 sec) ranging from 0.1 ppb for Au to <600 ppb for Os. The utility of the method is exemplified in terms of analysis of specific sulphidic precious-metal ores. Although optical and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) studies reveal substantial heterogeneities in the NiS beads, on scales varying from 1 μm to 100 μm, reproducible results to a precision of < 10% can be obtained because the probing beam of Cs, ≈ 500 μm in diameter, averages out these inhomogeneities, but still has the spatial resolution to provide grain-by-grain analysis of coarse ore samples. The magnitudes of PGE partition coefficients between the sulphido components of the beads, which await determination with a collimated probing beam, provide a limiting factor in the attainable precision of the results. These samples have become the reference material of choice for precious metal analysis within this laboratory. The technique permits direct measurement of the partitioning of precious metals between coexisting ore minerals, and of PGE patterns within single crystals of such phases as pyrite and chromite.

  1. Empirical Approach for Estimating Reference Material Heterogeneity and Sample Minimum Test Portion Mass for "Nuggety" Precious Metals (Au, Pd, Ir, Pt, Ru).

    PubMed

    Bédard, L Paul; Esbensen, Kim H; Barnes, Sarah-Jane

    2016-04-05

    Quantification of precious metal content is important for studies of ore deposits, basalt petrogenesis, and precious metal geology, mineralization, mining, and processing. However, accurate determination of metal concentrations can be compromised by microheterogeneity commonly referred to as the "nugget effect", i.e., spatially significant variations in the distribution of precious metal minerals at the scale of instrumental analytical beam footprints. There are few studies focused on the spatial distribution of such minerals and its detrimental effects on quantification of the existing suite of relevant reference materials (RM). In order to assess the nugget effect in RM, pressed powder pellets of MASS-1, MASS-3, WMS-1a, WMS-1, and KPT-1 (dominantly sulfides) as well as CHR-Pt+ and CHR-Bkg (chromite-bearing) were mapped with micro-XRF. The number of verified nuggets observed was used to recalculate an effective concentration of precious metals for the analytical aliquot, allowing for an empirical estimate of a minimum mass test portion. MASS-1, MASS-3, and WMS-1a did not contain any nuggets; therefore, a convenient small test portion could be used here (<0.1 g), while CHR-Pt+ would require 0.125 g and WMS-1 would need 23 g to be representative. For CHR-Bkg and KPT-1, the minimum test portion mass would have to be ∼80 and ∼342 g, respectively. Minimum test portions masses may have to be greater still in order to provide detectable analytical signals. Procedures for counteracting the detrimental manifestations of microheterogeneity are presented. It is imperative that both RM and pristine samples are treated in exactly the same way in the laboratory, lest powders having an unknown nugget status (in effect all field samples for analysis) can not be documented to be representing a safe minimum mass basis.

  2. Phytoremediation of the toxic effluent generated during recovery of precious metals from polymetallic sea nodules.

    PubMed

    Vaseem, Huma; Banerjee, T K

    2012-01-01

    Recovery of metals from the polymetallic sea nodules at the pilot plant at National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur, India has generated a highly toxic effluent. This effluent contains several metals like Mn, Cu, Zn, Fe, Pb, Cr, and Cd that pollute the neighboring water bodies when discharged. Hence detoxification of this effluent was practiced using two plants: Lemna minor and Azolla pinnata for 7 days. During investigation A. pinnata removed 96% of Mn, 97% of Cu, 98% of Zn, 70% of Fe, 96% of Pb, 93% of Cr, 78% of Cd, and was comparatively more effective than L. minor which removed 94% of Mn, 86% of Cu, 62% of Zn, 74% of Fe, 84% of Pb, 63% of Cr, 78% of Cd. During the 7 days of experiment chlorophyll content decreased by 51% and 59% in A. pinnata and L. minor respectively. Based on our findings we can suggest that these two plants have wide range of metal retention potentialities hence can be of routine use for purification of toxic effluents.

  3. Selenium, tellurium and precious metal mineralogy in Uchalinsk copper-zinc-pyritic district, the Urals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikentev, I.

    2016-04-01

    During processing the most of Au, Ag, Se, Te, Pb, Bi, Sb, Hg as well as notable part of Cu, Zn and Cd fail for tailings and became heavy metal pollutants. Modes of occurrence of Au, Ag, Te and Se covers two giant VMS deposits: Uchaly (intensively deformed) and Uzelginsk (altered by late hydrothermal processes) as well as middle-sized Molodezn and West Ozern deposits (nondeformed) have been studied. Mineral forms of these elements as well as their presence in disperse mode in common ore minerals (pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite) have been studied using SEM, EPMA, INAA, ICP-MS and LA-ICP-MS.

  4. Precious Metals In SDSS QSOs: The Hunt For Intergalactic CIV In DR7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooksey, Kathy; Kao, M.; Simcoe, R.; O'Meara, J.; Prochaska, J.; Seyffert, E.

    2012-01-01

    The CIV doublet has proven to be an important tracer of the IGM and its evolution from z = 6 to 0. These transitions have been well-studied at high redshifts because: they are strong transitions of common metals; they are observable outside the Ly-alpha forest, where they become easier to identify; they redshift into optical passbands for 1.5 < z < 4.5; and they are resonant doublets, which give them distinctive characteristics and enable the survey to be largely automated. However, the 1.5 < z < 4.5 results can be vastly improved by surveying the thousands of SDSS DR7 QSOs. Having done this, we now present early results on the over 15,000 CIV systems that we identified. We are constructing a uniform 0 < z < 6 dataset by combining the SDSS survey with the z < 1 HST results (Cooksey et al. 2010) and the new z > 5 FIRE results (Simcoe et al. 2011). Thus, we can compare apples-to-apples: the absorber line density over time and the CIV mass density evolution. This is the first in a series on our surveys for various metal-line absorption systems in SDSS DR7 QSOs.

  5. The Genesis of Precious and Base Metal Mineralization at the Miguel Auza Deposit, Zacatecas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findley, A. A.; Olivo, G. R.; Godin, L.

    2009-05-01

    The Miguel Auza mine located in Zacatecas State, Mexico, is a vein-type polymetallic epithermal deposit hosted in deformed argillite, siltstone and, greywacke of the Cretaceous Caracol Formation. Silver-rich base metal veins (0.2 m to >1.5 m wide) are spatially associated with the NE-striking, steeply SE- dipping (70-80°) Miguel Auza fault over a strike length of 1.6 km and a depth of 460 m. A 2 km2 monzonitic stock located in the proximity of the mineralized zones, has previously been interpreted as the source of the mineralizing fluids. Four distinct structural stages are correlated with hydrothermal mineral deposition: (I) The Pre-ore stage is characterized by normal faulting, fracturing of host rock, and rotation of bedding planes. This stage consists of quartz, illite, chlorite, +/- pyrite alteration of sedimentary wall rocks. (II) The Pyrite-vein stage is associated with reverse-sense reactivation of early normal faults, dilation of bedding planes/fractures, and deposition of generally barren calcite + pyrite veinlets. (III) The Main-ore stage is related to the development of reverse-fault- hosted massive sulphide veins. During this stage three phases of mineral deposition are recorded: early pyrite and arsenopyrite, intermediate chalcopyrite, pyrite, arsenopyrite, and base metals, and late base metals and Ag-bearing minerals. Associated gangue minerals during the main ore stage are quartz, muscovite, calcite and chlorite. (IV) The Post-ore stage involves late NW-SE striking block faulting, brecciation and calcite veining. Later supergene oxidation of veins led to deposition of Fe-oxides and hydroxides, commonly filling fractures or replacing early-formed sulphide assemblages. The various vein types display classic epithermal textures including open space filling, banding, comb quartz and brecciation. The Ag-bearing minerals comprise pyrargyrite [Ag3(Sb,As)S3], argentotennantite [(Cu,Ag)10(Zn,Fe)2(Sn,As)4S13], polybasite-pearceite [(Ag,Cu)16(Sb,As)2S11], and

  6. Selective Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols over Atomically-Dispersed Non-Precious Metal Catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Jiahan; Yin, Kehua; Serov, Alexey; ...

    2016-12-15

    Catalytic oxidation of alcohols often requires the presence of expensive transition metals. We show that earth-abundant Fe atoms dispersed throughout a nitrogen-containing carbon matrix catalyze the oxidation of benzyl alcohol and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural by O2 in the aqueous phase. Furthermore, the activity of the catalyst can be regenerated by a mild treatment in H2. An observed kinetic isotope effect indicates that β-H elimination from the alcohol is the kinetically relevant step in the mechanism, which can be accelerated by substituting Fe with Cu. Dispersed Cr, Co, and Ni also convert alcohols, demonstrating the general utility of metal–nitrogen–carbon materials for alcohol oxidationmore » catalysis. Oxidation of aliphatic alcohols is substantially slower than that of aromatic alcohols, but adding 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy as a co-catalyst with Fe can significantly improve the reaction rate.« less

  7. Selective Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols over Atomically-Dispersed Non-Precious Metal Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Jiahan; Yin, Kehua; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Pham, Hien N.; Sang, Xiahan; Unocic, Raymond R.; Atanassov, Plamen; Datye, Abhaya K.; Davis, Robert J.

    2016-12-15

    Catalytic oxidation of alcohols often requires the presence of expensive transition metals. We show that earth-abundant Fe atoms dispersed throughout a nitrogen-containing carbon matrix catalyze the oxidation of benzyl alcohol and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural by O2 in the aqueous phase. Furthermore, the activity of the catalyst can be regenerated by a mild treatment in H2. An observed kinetic isotope effect indicates that β-H elimination from the alcohol is the kinetically relevant step in the mechanism, which can be accelerated by substituting Fe with Cu. Dispersed Cr, Co, and Ni also convert alcohols, demonstrating the general utility of metal–nitrogen–carbon materials for alcohol oxidation catalysis. Oxidation of aliphatic alcohols is substantially slower than that of aromatic alcohols, but adding 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy as a co-catalyst with Fe can significantly improve the reaction rate.

  8. The Cuenca de Oro, a Pull-Apart Basin Hosting Precious Metal Deposits Along the Re- Activated Seri-Tahue Terrane Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinstein, M. N.; Goodell, P. C.

    2007-05-01

    At the intersection of Chihuahua, Sonora, and Sinaloa a boundary between the Seri and Tahue terranes has been hypothesized, and further refined as the Sinforosa Lineament. Near the western termination of the Sinforosa Lineament lies a topographic basin. Part of this study will be to better define this pull-apart basin, informally named the Cuenca de Oro due to its numerous precious metal deposits. The intention of this study is to test that the Seri-Tahue terrane boundary was re-energized during the beginning of extension related to the opening of the Sea of Cortez (~30ma). It is probable that the precious metal occurrences are related to the initiation of extension(alunite at El Sauzal has been dated at ~30ma). Five field excursions totaling sixty days of field work have been completed and a first draft of a regional geologic map has been made. Large shear zones support the hypothesis of a pull-apart basin. A study of the alteration and lineament intersections determine the location of many known precious metal deposits. By creating multiple cross-sections the basin can be modeled in three dimensions and a tectonic history can be interpreted. This study will present a structural analysis of the Cuenca de Oro and develop a tectonic history related temporally with the epithermal mineralization events.

  9. Highly stable precious metal-free cathode catalyst for fuel cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serov, Alexey; Workman, Michael J.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; McCool, Geoffrey; McKinney, Sam; Romero, Henry; Halevi, Barr; Stephenson, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst engineered for stability has been synthesized using the sacrificial support method (SSM). This catalyst was comprehensively characterized by physiochemical analyses and tested for performance and durability in fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). This catalyst, belonging to the family of Fe-N-C materials, is easily scalable and can be manufactured in batches up to 200 g. The fuel cell durability tests were performed in a single cell configuration at realistic operating conditions of 0.65 V, 1.25 atmgauge air, and 90% RH for 100 h. In-depth characterization of surface chemistry and morphology of the catalyst layer before and after durability tests were performed. The failure modes of the PGM-free electrodes were derived from structure-to-property correlations. It is suggested that under constant voltage operation, the performance loss results from degradation of the electrode pore structure, while under carbon corrosion accelerated test protocols the failure mode is catalyst corrosion.

  10. Electron-band theory inspired design of magnesium-precious metal bulk metallic glasses with high thermal stability and extended ductility.

    PubMed

    Laws, Kevin J; Shamlaye, Karl F; Granata, Davide; Koloadin, Leah S; Löffler, Jörg F

    2017-06-13

    Magnesium-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) exhibit high specific strengths and excellent glass-forming ability compared to other metallic systems, making them suitable candidates for next-generation materials. However, current Mg-based BMGs tend to exhibit low thermal stability and are prone to structural relaxation and brittle failure. This study presents a range of new magnesium-precious metal-based BMGs from the ternary Mg-Ag-Ca, Mg-Ag-Yb, Mg-Pd-Ca and Mg-Pd-Yb alloy systems with Mg content greater than 67 at.%. These alloys were designed for high ductility by utilising atomic bond-band theory and a topological efficient atomic packing model. BMGs from the Mg-Pd-Ca alloy system exhibit high glass-forming ability with critical casting sizes of up to 3 mm in diameter, the highest glass transition temperatures (>200 °C) of any reported Mg-based BMG to date, and sustained compressive ductility. Alloys from the Mg-Pd-Yb family exhibit critical casting sizes of up to 4 mm in diameter, and the highest compressive plastic (1.59%) and total (3.78%) strain to failure of any so far reported Mg-based glass. The methods and theoretical approaches presented here demonstrate a significant step forward in the ongoing development of this extraordinary class of materials.

  11. Transition-Metal-Controlled Inorganic Ligand-Supported Non-Precious Metal Catalysts for the Aerobic Oxidation of Amines to Imines.

    PubMed

    Yu, Han; Zhai, Yongyan; Dai, Guoyong; Ru, Shi; Han, Sheng; Wei, Yongge

    2017-08-21

    Most state-of-art transition-metal catalysts usually require organic ligands, which are essential for controlling the reactivity and selectivity of reactions catalyzed by transition metals. However, organic ligands often suffer from severe problems including cost, toxicity, air/moisture sensitivity, and being commercially unavailable. Herein, we show a simple, mild, and efficient aerobic oxidation procedure of amines using inorganic ligand-supported non-precious metal catalysts 1, (NH4 )n [MMo6 O18 (OH)6 ] (M=Cu(2+) ; Fe(3+) ; Co(3+) ; Ni(2+) ; Zn(2+) , n=3 or 4), synthesized by a simple one-step method in water at 100 °C, demonstrating that the catalytic activity and selectivity can be significantly improved by changing the central metal atom. In the presence of these catalysts, the catalytic oxidation of primary and secondary amines, as well as the coupling of alcohols and amines, can smoothly proceed to afford various imines with O2 (1 atm) as the sole oxidant. In particular, the catalysts 1 have transition-metal ion core, and the planar arrangement of the six Mo(VI) centers at their highest oxidation states around the central heterometal can greatly enhance the Lewis acidity of catalytically active sites, and also enable the electrons in the center to delocalize onto the six edge-sharing MO6 units, in the same way as ligands in traditional organometallic complexes. The versatility of this methodology maybe opens a path to catalytic oxidation through inorganic ligand-coordinated metal catalysis. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Precious metals of Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hausel, W. Dan; Hausen, Donald M.; Halbe, Douglas N.; Petersen, Erich U.; Tafuri, William J.

    1990-01-01

    Within the State boundaries are numerous gold deposits and anomalies scattered throughout the geological record. Many examples occur in rocks ranging in age from Archean to Tertiary, and in Quaternary to Recent unconsolidated gravels and sands. Yet relatively few of these deposits and anomalies have been explored and only a handful have been drilled. Since much of Wyoming is underlain by an Archean craton similar to the Superior Province of Canada, the eastern and southern African craton, and the Pilbara and Yilgarn blocks of Western Australia, one would expect Wyoming to also have significant mineralization.

  13. Rhenium hydride/boron Lewis acid cocatalysis of alkene hydrogenations: activities comparable to those of precious metal systems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanfeng; Hess, Jeannine; Fox, Thomas; Berke, Heinz

    2010-12-29

    ) addition. The active rhenium(I) monohydride species is assumed to be formed via reversible bromide abstraction with the "cocatalytic" Lewis acid. Homogeneity of the hydrogenations was tested with filtration and mercury poisoning experiments. These "rhenium(I) hydride/boron Lewis acid" systems demonstrate catalytic activities comparable to those of Wilkinson- or Schrock-Osborn-type hydrogenations accomplished with precious metal catalysts.

  14. N, S co-doped carbon spheres with highly dispersed CoO as non-precious metal catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Linlin; Guo, Xingpeng; Zhang, Guoan

    2017-08-01

    It is still a great challenge in preparing non-precious metal catalysts with high activity and long-term stability to substitute for precious metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells. Herein, we report a novel and facile catalyst-N, S co-doped carbon spheres with highly dispersed CoO (CoO@NS-CSs), where biomass glucose spheres act as carbon precursor and H2S, NH3 derived from the decomposition of thiourea not only provide N, S sources but also can etch carbon spheres to produce nanoporous structure. CoO@NS-CSs catalyst exhibits excellent ORR activity with a high onset potential of 0.946 V vs. RHE (reversible hydrogen electrode) and a half-wave potential of 0.821 V vs. RHE through a four-electron pathway in alkaline solution, which is comparable to commercial Pt/C catalyst (onset potential: 0.926 V vs. RHE, half-wave potential: 0.827 V vs. RHE). Furthermore, both the long-term stability and methanol-tolerance of CoO@NS-CSs catalyst are superior to those of commercial Pt/C catalyst. The excellent ORR performance of CoO@NS-CSs catalyst can be attributed to its micro-mesopore structure, high specific surface area (667 m2 g-1), and highly dispersed CoO. This work manifests that the obtained CoO@NS-CSs catalyst is promising to be applied to fuel cells.

  15. Maps showing mineral resource assessment for vein and replacement deposits of base and precious metals, barite, and fluorspar, Dillon 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Idaho and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, R.C.; Trautwein, C.M.; Berger, B.R.; Hanna, W.F.; Jenson, S.K.; Loen, J.S.; Moll, S.H.; Purdy, T.L.; Rowan, L.C.; Ruppel, E.T.; Segal, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report is one of several that assess the mineral resources in the Dillon quadrangle. For the purpose of the assessment, the deposits that are known in the quadrangle, or suspected to be present from a knowledge of the geologic setting, have been grouped into 30 deposit types on the basis of the mineralogy or commodity in the ore and the structural or depositional setting of the deposit. The emphasis in these assessment reports is on metallic minerals, but some important nonmetallic minerals are also considered. Fossil fuels are beyond the scope of this investigation, phosphate and uranium have been investigated previously (Swanson, 1970; Wodzicki and Krason, 1981 ), and certain nonmetallic minerals, including bulk commodities such as sand and gravel, are in large supply and thus are not considered. The mineral resource assessment discussed in this report concentrates on a single deposit type (of the total of 30 types) that we call "vein and replacement deposits of base and precious metals." Base and precious metals produced from such deposits are copper, lead, zinc, gold, and silver. Vein deposits of barite and fluorspar are also discussed, but because they seem to be of minor importance, they are treated briefly. Vein and replacement deposits of base and precious metals are classified as a single deposit type rather than as numerous possible subordinate types that might be distinguished on the basis of mineralogy, metal content, or other factors, because the characteristics of the ore, the ore bodies, and the structural setting are not sufficiently well known to yield a consistent detailed classification for the entire quadrangle. Furthermore, the criteria used here to explain the localization of deposits are too general to allow discrimination among subordinate types at a scale of 1 :250,000 or smaller. In assessing mineral resources, we have adopted a general philosophy similar to that of Harrison and others ( 1986). We attempt to identify parts of the

  16. Hierarchical nanostructured NiCo2O4 as an efficient bifunctional non-precious metal catalyst for rechargeable zinc-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Prabu, Moni; Ketpang, Kriangsak; Shanmugam, Sangaraju

    2014-03-21

    A nickel-doped cobalt oxide spinel structure is a promising non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction in rechargeable metal-air batteries and water electrolyzers operating with alkaline electrolytes. One dimensional NiCo2O4 (NCO) nanostructures were prepared by using a simple electrospinning technique with two different metal precursors (metal nitrate/PAN and metal acetylacetonate/PAN). The effect of precursor concentration on the morphologies was investigated. Single-phase, NCO with an average diameter of 100 nm, porous interconnected fibrous morphology was revealed by FESEM and FETEM analysis. The hierarchical nanostructured 1D-spinel NiCo2O4 materials showed a remarkable electrocatalytic activity towards oxygen reduction and evolution in an aqueous alkaline medium. The extraordinary bi-functional catalytic activity towards both ORR and OER was observed by the low over potential (0.84 V), which is better than that of noble metal catalysts [Pt/C (1.16 V), Ru/C (1.01 V) and Ir/C (0.92 V)], making them promising cathode materials for metal-air batteries. Furthermore, the rechargeable zinc-air battery with NCO-A1 as a bifunctional electrocatalyst displays high activity and stability during battery discharge, charge, and cycling processes.

  17. Mineral Deposit Data for Epigenetic Base- and Precious-metal and Uranium-thorium Deposits in South-central and Southwestern Montana and Southern and Central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, T.L.

    2004-01-01

    Metal deposits spatially associated with the Cretaceous Boulder and Idaho batholiths of southwestern Montana and southern and central Idaho have been exploited since the early 1860s. Au was first discovered in placer deposits; exploitation of vein deposits in bedrock soon followed. In 1865, high-grade Ag vein deposits were discovered and remained economically important until the 1890s. Early high-grade deposits of Au, Ag and Pb were found in the weathered portions of the veins systems. As mining progressed to deeper levels, Ag and Pb grades diminished. Exploration for and development of these vein deposits in this area have continued until the present. A majority of these base- and precious-metal vein deposits are classified as polymetallic veins (PMV) and polymetallic carbonate-replacement (PMR) deposits in this compilation. Porphyry Cu and Mo, epithermal (Au, Ag, Hg and Sb), base- and precious-metal and W skarn, W vein, and U and Th vein deposits are also common in this area. The world-class Butte Cu porphyry and the Butte high-sulfidation Cu vein deposits are in this study area. PMV and PMR deposits are the most numerous in the region and constitute about 85% of the deposit records compiled. Several types of syngenetic/diagenetic sulfide mineral deposits in rocks of the Belt Supergroup or their equivalents are common in the region and they have been the source of a substantial metal production over the last century. These syngenetic deposits and their metamorphosed/structurally remobilized equivalents were not included in this database; therefore, deposits in the Idaho portion of the Coeur d'Alene district and the Idaho Cobalt belt, for example, have not been included because many of them are believed to be of this type.

  18. Recovery of precious metals from low-grade automobile shredder residue: A novel approach for the recovery of nanozero-valent copper particles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jiwan; Lee, Byeong-Kyu

    2016-02-01

    The presence of precious metals (PMs) in low-grade automobile shredder residue (ASR) makes it attractive for recycling. This study investigated the leaching and recovery characteristics of two PMs (Cu and Ag) and two heavy metals (Mn and Co) from ASR. The effects of H2O2, leaching temperature, liquid to solid (L/S) ratio, and particle size on metal leaching were determined in an aqueous solution of 0.5M nitric acid. The metal leaching rate was increased with increasing nitric acid concentration, amount of H2O2, L/S ratio and temperature. The leaching kinetics was analyzed by using a second-order reaction model. In the analysis of leaching kinetics, the metal leaching data were well fitted (R(2)⩾0.99) with the second-order reaction model. The activation energy (kJ/mol) for metal leaching was 39.6 for Cu, 17.1 for Ag, 17.3 for Mn and 29.2 for Co. Metal recovery was carried out by fractional precipitation with the addition of advanced Fenton's regent. Metal recovery efficiency was increased to 99.95% for Cu, 99.8% for Mn, 90.0% for Ag and 96.46% for Co with the advanced Fenton's regent. In particular, a novel finding of the PM recovery is that Cu can also be recovered directly from the leachate of ASR in the form of zero-valent copper (ZVC) nanoparticles (NPs). Hydrometallurgical recovery of the metals from ASR using nitric acid is highly efficient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hierarchical nanostructured NiCo2O4 as an efficient bifunctional non-precious metal catalyst for rechargeable zinc-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabu, Moni; Ketpang, Kriangsak; Shanmugam, Sangaraju

    2014-02-01

    A nickel-doped cobalt oxide spinel structure is a promising non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction in rechargeable metal-air batteries and water electrolyzers operating with alkaline electrolytes. One dimensional NiCo2O4 (NCO) nanostructures were prepared by using a simple electrospinning technique with two different metal precursors (metal nitrate/PAN and metal acetylacetonate/PAN). The effect of precursor concentration on the morphologies was investigated. Single-phase, NCO with an average diameter of 100 nm, porous interconnected fibrous morphology was revealed by FESEM and FETEM analysis. The hierarchical nanostructured 1D-spinel NiCo2O4 materials showed a remarkable electrocatalytic activity towards oxygen reduction and evolution in an aqueous alkaline medium. The extraordinary bi-functional catalytic activity towards both ORR and OER was observed by the low over potential (0.84 V), which is better than that of noble metal catalysts [Pt/C (1.16 V), Ru/C (1.01 V) and Ir/C (0.92 V)], making them promising cathode materials for metal-air batteries. Furthermore, the rechargeable zinc-air battery with NCO-A1 as a bifunctional electrocatalyst displays high activity and stability during battery discharge, charge, and cycling processes.A nickel-doped cobalt oxide spinel structure is a promising non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction in rechargeable metal-air batteries and water electrolyzers operating with alkaline electrolytes. One dimensional NiCo2O4 (NCO) nanostructures were prepared by using a simple electrospinning technique with two different metal precursors (metal nitrate/PAN and metal acetylacetonate/PAN). The effect of precursor concentration on the morphologies was investigated. Single-phase, NCO with an average diameter of 100 nm, porous interconnected fibrous morphology was revealed by FESEM and FETEM analysis. The hierarchical nanostructured 1D-spinel NiCo2O4 materials showed a

  20. Ages and sources of components of Zn-Pb, Cu, precious metal, and platinum group element deposits in the goodsprings district, Clark County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vikre, Peter G.; Browne, Quentin J.; Fleck, Robert J.; Hofstra, Albert H.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    The Goodsprings district, Clark County, Nevada, includes zinc-dominant carbonate replacement deposits of probable late Paleozoic age, and lead-dominant carbonate replacement deposits, copper ± precious metal-platinum group element (PGE) deposits, and gold ± silver deposits that are spatially associated with Late Triassic porphyritic intrusions. The district encompasses ~500 km2 although the distribution of all deposits has been laterally condensed by late Mesozoic crustal contraction. Zinc, Pb, and Cu production from about 90 deposits was ~160,000 metric tons (t) (Zn > Pb >> Cu), 2.1 million ounces (Moz) Ag, 0.09 Moz Au, and small amounts of PGEs—Co, V, Hg, Sb, Ni, Mo, Mn, Ir, and U—were also recovered.Zinc-dominant carbonate replacement deposits (Zn > Pb; Ag ± Cu) resemble Mississippi Valley Type (MVT) Zn-Pb deposits in that they occur in karst and fault breccias in Mississippian limestone where the southern margin of the regional late Paleozoic foreland basin adjoins Proterozoic crystalline rocks of the craton. They consist of calcite, dolomite, sphalerite, and galena with variably positive S isotope compositions (δ34S values range from 2.5–13‰), and highly radiogenic Pb isotope compositions (206Pb/204Pb >19), typical of MVT deposits above crystalline Precambrian basement. These deposits may have formed when southward flow of saline fluids, derived from basinal and older sedimentary rocks, encountered thinner strata and pinch-outs against the craton, forcing fluid mixing and mineral precipitation in karst and fault breccias. Lead-dominant carbonate replacement deposits (Pb > Zn, Ag ± Cu ± Au) occur among other deposit types, often near porphyritic intrusions. They generally contain higher concentrations of precious metals than zinc-dominant deposits and relatively abundant iron oxides after pyrite. They share characteristics with copper ± precious metal-PGE and gold ± silver deposits including fine-grained quartz replacement of carbonate minerals

  1. Design of a non-precious metal electrocatalyst for alkaline electrolyte oxygen reduction by using soybean biomass as the nitrogen source of electrocatalytically active center structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chao-Zhong; Liao, Wen-Li; Chen, Chang-Guo

    2014-12-01

    The development of less expensive, more active, and more stable catalyst substitute for Pt/C catalysts for oxygen reduction has recently become a hot topic. In this paper, we report a new strategy to design nitrogen-doped non-precious metal catalysts via the copyrolysis of metallic iron, soybean biomass, and carbon support at high temperatures. The results show that the nitrogen in electrocatalysts is mainly in the form of pyridinic and pyrrolic N species. The metallic Fe in the precursor can facilitate the transformation of quaternary N with a three-dimensional structure to planar pyridinic and pyrrolic N inside carbon matrix during pyrolysis, thereby improving the electrocatalytic activity of the prepared catalysts. We suggest that the planar N species may be the catalytically active center structures and may contribute to the enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction performance in an alkaline electrolyte. The prepared catalyst has superior tolerance against methanol crossover effect and outstanding stability compared with commercial Pt/C catalysts.

  2. A review of the stability and durability of non-precious metal catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banham, Dustin; Ye, Siyu; Pei, Katie; Ozaki, Jun-ichi; Kishimoto, Takeaki; Imashiro, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    A major hurdle to the widespread commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is the high loading of noble metal (Pt/Pt-alloy) catalyst at the cathode, which is necessary to facilitate the inherently sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). To eliminate the use of Pt/Pt-alloy catalysts at the cathode of PEMFCs and thus significantly reduce the cost, extensive research on non-precious metal catalysts (NPMCs) has been carried out over the past decade. Major advances in improving the ORR activity of NPMCs, particularly Fe- and Co-based NPMCs, have elevated these materials to a level at which they can start to be considered as potential alternatives to Pt/Pt-alloy catalysts. Unfortunately, the stability (performance loss following galvanostatic experiments) of these materials is currently unacceptably low and the durability (performance loss following voltage cycling) remains uncertain. The three primary mechanisms of instability are: (a) Leaching of the metal site, (b) Oxidative attack by H2O2, and (c) Protonation followed by possible anion adsorption of the active site. While (a) has largely been solved, further work is required to understand and prevent losses from (b) and/or (c). Thus, this review is focused on historical progress in (and possible future strategies for) improving the stability/durability of NPMCs.

  3. Retrieval of Au, Ag, Cu precious metals coupled with electric energy production via an unconventional coupled redox fuel cell reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-Min; Fan, Zheng; Xu, Wei; Feng, Xiao; Wu, Zu-Cheng

    2017-09-15

    The recovery of heavy metals from aqueous solutions or e-wastes is of upmost importance. Retrieval of Au, Ag, and Cu with electricity generation through building an ethanol-metal coupled redox fuel cells (CRFCs) is demonstrated. The cell was uniquely assembled on PdNi/C anode the electro-oxidation of ethanol takes place to give electrons and then go through the external circuit reducing metal ions to metallic on the cathode, metals are recovered. Taking an example of removal of 100mgL(-1) gold in 0.5M HAc-NaAc buffer solution as the catholyte, 2.0M ethanol in 1.0M alkaline solution as the anolyte, an open circuit voltage of 1.4V, more than 96% of gold removal efficiency in 20h, and equivalent energy production of 2.0kWhkg(-1) of gold can be readily achieved in this system. When gold and copper ions coexist, it was confirmed that metallic Cu is formed on the cathodic electrode later than metallic Au formation by XPS analysis. Thus, this system can achieve step by step electrodeposition of gold and copper while the two metal ions coexisting. This work develops a new approach to retrieve valuable metals from aqueous solution or e-wastes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Polymer-Supported Optically Active fac(S)-Tris(thiotato)rhodium(III) Complex for Sulfur-Bridging Reaction With Precious Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Sen-Ichi; Tsubosaka, Soshi

    2016-01-01

    The optically active mixed-ligand fac(S)-tris(thiolato)rhodium(III) complexes, ΔL -fac(S)-[Rh(aet)2 (L-cys-N,S)](-) (aet = 2-aminoethanethiolate, L-cys = L-cysteinate) () and ΔLL -fac(S)-[Rh(aet)(L-cys-N,S)2 ](2-) were newly prepared by the equatorial preference of the carboxyl group in the coordinated L-cys ligand. The amide formation reaction of with 1,10-diaminodecane and polyallylamine gave the diamine-bridged dinuclear Rh(III) complex and the single-chain polymer-supported Rh(III) complex with retention of the ΔL configuration of , respectively. These Rh(III) complexes reacted with Co(III) or Co(II) to give the linear-type trinuclear structure with the S-bridged Co(III) center and the two Δ-Rh(III) terminal moieties. The polymer-supported Rh(III) complex was applied not only to the CD spectropolarimetric detection and determination of a trace of precious metal ions such as Au(III), Pt(II), and Pd(II) but also to concentration and extraction of these metal ions into the solid polymer phase. Chirality 28:85-91, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cobalt and precious metals in sulphides of peridotite xenoliths and inferences concerning their distribution according to geodynamic environment: A case study from the Scottish lithospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Hannah S. R.; McDonald, Iain; Faithfull, John W.; Upton, Brian G. J.; Loocke, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Abundances of precious metals and cobalt in the lithospheric mantle are typically obtained by bulk geochemical analyses of mantle xenoliths. These elements are strongly chalcophile and the mineralogy, texture and trace element composition of sulphide phases in such samples must be considered. In this study we assess the mineralogy, textures and trace element compositions of sulphides in spinel lherzolites from four Scottish lithospheric terranes, which provide an ideal testing ground to examine the variability of sulphides and their precious metal endowments according to terrane age and geodynamic environment. Specifically we test differences in sulphide composition from Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic cratonic sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) in northern terranes vs. Palaeozoic lithospheric mantle in southern terranes, as divided by the Great Glen Fault (GGF). Cobalt is consistently elevated in sulphides from Palaeozoic terranes (south of the GGF) with Co concentrations > 2.9 wt.% and Co/Ni ratios > 0.048 (chondrite). In contrast, sulphides from Archaean cratonic terranes (north of the GGF) have low abundances of Co (< 3600 ppm) and low Co/Ni ratios (< 0.030). The causes for Co enrichment remain unclear, but we highlight that globally significant Co mineralisation is associated with ophiolites (e.g., Bou Azzer, Morocco and Outokumpu, Finland) or in oceanic peridotite-floored settings at slow-spreading ridges. Thus we suggest an oceanic affinity for the Co enrichment in the southern terranes of Scotland, likely directly related to the subduction of Co-enriched oceanic crust during the Caledonian Orogeny. Further, we identify a distinction between Pt/Pd ratio across the GGF, such that sulphides in the cratonic SCLM have Pt/Pd ≥ chondrite whilst Palaeozoic sulphides have Pt/Pd < chondrite. We observe that Pt-rich sulphides with discrete Pt-minerals (e.g., PtS) are associated with carbonate and phosphates in two xenolith suites north of the GGF. This three

  6. An investigation of trends in precious metal and copper content of RAM modules in WEEE: Implications for long term recycling potential.

    PubMed

    Charles, Rhys Gareth; Douglas, Peter; Hallin, Ingrid Liv; Matthews, Ian; Liversage, Gareth

    2017-02-01

    Precious metal (PM) and copper content of dynamic-RAM modules placed on the market during 1991-2008 has been analysed by AAS following comminution and acid digestion. Linear regression analysis of compositional data ordered according to sample chronology was used to identify historic temporal trends in module composition resulting from changes in manufacturing practices, and to project future trends for use in more accurate assessment of future recycling potential. DRAM was found to be 'high grade' waste with: stable levels of gold and silver over time; 80% reduction in palladium content during 1991-2008; and 0.23g/module/year increase in copper content with a 75% projected increase from 2008 by 2020. The accuracy of future recycling potential projections for WEEE using current methods based on static compositional data from current devices is questionable due to likely changes in future device composition. The impact on recycling potential projections of waste laptops, smart phones, cell phones and tablets arising in Europe in 2020 resulting from a 75% increase in copper content is considered against existing projections using static compositional data. The results highlight that failing to consider temporal variations in PM content may result in significant discrepancies between projections and future recycling potential. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Reduced graphene oxide supported MnS nanotubes hybrid as a novel non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction with high performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongfu; Chen, Teng; Guo, Wenfeng; Chen, Shunji; Li, Yanshuai; Song, Jianzheng; Chang, Limin; Mu, Shichun; Zhao, Yufeng; Gao, Faming

    2017-09-01

    Electronic structure of Mn cations, electric conductivity of active materials and three dimensional structure for mass transport play vital roles in the electrocatalytic activity of Mn-based electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). To construct efficient and robust Mn-based electrocatalysts, MnS nanotubes anchored on reduced graphene oxide (MnS-NT@rGO) hybrid was synthesized and used as a novel non-precious metal electrocatalyst for ORR. The formation of nano-tubular structure, which offers more active sites and suitable channels for mass transport to enhance the electrocatalytic activity towards ORR, are carefully illustrated based on the core-dissolution/shell-recrystallization type Ostwald ripening effect. Tuned electronic structure of Mn cations, enhanced electric conductivity and suitable nano-tubular structure endow MnS-NT@rGO electrocatalyst comparative catalytic activity to commercial 20 wt % Pt/C in alkaline electrolyte. The MnS-NT@rGO electrocatalyst exhibits higher catalytic activity than rGO supported MnS nanoparticles (MnS-NP@rGO) and MnS nanotubes without rGO substrate (MnS-NT), as well as rGO supported Mn(OH)2 (Mn(OH)2@rGO) and rGO supported MnO (MnO@rGO). Moreover, the MnS-NT@rGO electrocatalyst shows superior durability and methanol tolerance to commercial Pt/C.

  8. Non-Precious Metals Catalyze Formal [4 + 2] Cycloaddition Reactions of 1,2-Diazines and Siloxyalkynes under Ambient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Copper(I) and nickel(0) complexes catalyze the formal [4 + 2] cycloaddition reactions of 1,2-diazines and siloxyalkynes, a reaction hitherto best catalyzed by silver salts. These catalysts based on earth abundant metals are not only competent, but the copper catalyst, in particular, promotes cycloadditions of pyrido[2,3-d]pyridazine and pyrido[3,4-d]pyridazine, enabling a new synthesis of quinoline and isoquinoline derivatives, as well as the formal [2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction of cyclohexenone with a siloxyalkyne. PMID:24911346

  9. Geology and K-Ar geochronology of the Paradise Peak Mine and the relationship of pre-Basin and Range extension to Early Miocene precious metal mineralization in west-central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, D.A.; Thomason, R.E.; McKee, E.H.

    1989-01-01

    The Paradise Peak mine is a major gold-silver-mercury deposit located in the southwestern part of the Paradise Range near the eastern edge of the Walker Lane in the western Great Basin, Nevada. Regional stratigraphic relations and K-Ar ages indicate that volcanism changed from silicic ash-flow tuffs to intermediate lavas at about 20 to 19 Ma. Regionally extensive angular unconformities indicate that a period of "pre-Basin and Range' crustal extension occurred between about 22 to 19 Ma. This extension was penecontemporaneous with the shift in the style of volcanism and with gold-silver mineralization in the Paradise Peak mine and in the Goldfield and Tonopah districts of western Nevada. The close temporal and spatial relationships of precious metal mineralization with pre-Basin and Range extension suggest that extension was a major factor in the genesis of early Miocene precious metal deposits in the western Great Basin. -from Authors

  10. A facile synthetic strategy for iron, aniline-based non-precious metal catalysts for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunjoon; Kim, Min Jeong; Lim, Taeho; Sung, Yung-Eun; Kim, Hyun-Jong; Lee, Ho-Nyun; Kwon, Oh Joong; Cho, Yong-Hun

    2017-07-14

    The development of a low cost and highly active alternative to the commercial Pt/C catalysts used in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) requires a facile and environmentally-friendly synthesis process to facilitate large-scale production and provide an effective replacement. Transition metals, in conjunction with nitrogen-doped carbon, are among the most promising substitute catalysts because of their high activity, inexpensive composition, and high carbon monoxide tolerance. We prepared a polyaniline-derived Fe-N-C catalyst for oxygen reduction using a facile one-pot process with no additional reagents. This process was carried out by ultrasonicating a mixture containing an iron precursor, an aniline monomer, and carbon black. The half-wave potential of the synthesized Fe-N-C catalyst for the ORR was only 10 mV less than that of a commercial Pt/C catalyst. The optimized Fe-N-C catalyst showed outstanding performance in a practical anion exchange membrane fuel cell (AEMFC), suggesting its potential as an alternative to commercial Pt/C catalysts for the ORR.

  11. Modeling Electrochemical Performance of the Hierarchical Morphology of Precious Group Metal-free Cathode for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    DOE PAGES

    Komini Babu, Siddharth; Chung, Hoon Taek; Zelenay, Piotr; ...

    2017-08-04

    Here, this paper presents a two-dimensional (2D) computational model of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) with a platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) catalyst cathode that can significantly reduce PEFC costs by eliminating the need for expensive platinum catalysts. Due to their comparatively low volumetric activity, PGM-free cathodes are an order of magnitude thicker than their Pt-based counterpart. The resulting need for greater electrode thickness to achieve sufficient power density requires careful attention to the transport losses across the thicker cathodes. The presented model is used to correlate the composition and morphology of the cathode to PEFC performance. The model ismore » a complete cell, continuum model that includes an advanced agglomerate model for a microstructurally consistent representation of the cathode. A unique feature of the approach is the integration of morphology and transport parameter statistics extracted from nano-scale resolution X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT) imaging of PGM-free cathodes. The model was validated with experimental results of PGM-free cathodes with varying Nafion loading. Lastly, our key findings are a need for increased cathode hydrophobicity and increased ionomer conductivity through either reduced tortuosity or increased bulk conductivity. We further use the model to evaluate targets for the volumetric activity and active site density for future catalysts.« less

  12. Age and origin of base and precious metal veins of the Coeur d'Alene mining district, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, R.J.; Criss, R.E.; Eaton, G.F.; Cleland, R.W.; Wavra, C.S.; Bond, W.D.

    2002-01-01

    Ore-bearing quartz-carbonate veins of the Coeur d'Alene mining district yield 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.74 to >1.60 for low Rb/Sr, carbonate gangue minerals, similar to current ranges measured in Middle Proterozoic, high Rb/Sr rocks of the Belt Supergroup. Stable isotope and fluid inclusion studies establish a genetic relationship between vein formation and metamorphic-hydrothermal systems of the region. These extraordinary 87Sr/86Sr ratios require accumulation of radiogenic 87Sr in a high Rb/Sr system over an extended period prior to incorporation of Sr into the hydrothermal veins. Evaluation of the age and composition of potential sources of highly radiogenic Sr indicates that the ore-bearing veins of the Coeur d'Alene district formed during the Cretaceous from components scavenged from rocks of the Belt Supergroup, the primary host rocks of the district. Proterozoic Pb isotope ratios observed in galena from many Coeur d'Alene veins were established when Pb separated from uranium during deposition or diagenesis of the Belt Supergroup at 1400 to 1500 Ma, possibly as disseminated syngenetic deposits. K-Ar and Rb-Sr apparent ages and ??18O values of Belt Supergroup rocks decrease from the Coeur d'Alene district toward the Idaho and Kaniksu batholiths, approximately normal to the trends of metamorphic isograds, fold axes, foliation, and the major reverse faults of the district. Isoclinal folding, thrust faulting, high-temperature metamorphism, granitic plutonism, and regional-scale metamorphic-hydrothermal activity is documented in the region between 140 and 45 Ma, representing the only such combination of events in the Coeur d'Alene region subsequent to about 1300 Ma. The Sr and oxygen results and geologic evidence favor formation of the ore-bearing carbonate veins by fluids related to a complex metamorphic-hydrothermal system during the Cretaceous. Pb with Proterozoic isotopic compositions was probably mobilized and incorporated like other metals into the hydrothermal

  13. Homogeneous deposition-assisted synthesis of iron-nitrogen composites on graphene as highly efficient non-precious metal electrocatalysts for microbial fuel cell power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Jin, Xiao-Jun; Dionysiou, Dionysios D.; Liu, Hong; Huang, Yu-Ming

    2015-03-01

    This work proposed a novel strategy for synthesizing highly efficient non-precious metal oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysts. Fe complexes were homogeneously deposited (HD) on graphene oxide through in situ hydrolysis of urea, followed by two-step pyrolysis under Ar and NH3 atmospheres, resulting in formation of Fe- and N-functionalized graphene (HD-FeN/G). The morphology, crystalline structure and elemental composition of HD-FeN/G were characterized. ORR activity was evaluated by using a rotary disk electrode (RDE) electrochemical system. HD improved the loading and distribution of the Fe-Nx composites on graphene. The ORR activity of the as-prepared HD-FeN/G in neutral medium was comparable to that of the state-of-the-art commercial Pt/C and significantly superior to a FeN/G counterpart produced via traditional approach. The ORR electron transfer number of HD-FeN/G was as high as 3.83 ± 0.08, which suggested that ORR catalysis proceeds through a four-electron pathway. HD-FeN/G was used as a cathodic electrocatalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), and the resultant HD-FeN/G-MFC showed comparable voltage output and maximum power density to those of Pt/C-MFC. The HD-FeN/G-MFC achieved a maximum power density of 885 mW m-2, which was much higher than that of FeN/G-MFC (708 mW m-2). These findings demonstrate that HD-FeN/G produced through the novel synthesis strategy proposed in this work would be a good candidate as cathodic electrocatalyst in MFCs.

  14. Evaluation of pulsed radiofrequency glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry for precious metal determination in lead fire assay buttons.

    PubMed

    Compernolle, Sien; Pisonero, Jorge; Bordel, Nerea; Wambeke, Dorine; De Raedt, Ine; Kimpe, Kristof; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2011-09-09

    In this paper, an exploration of the capabilities and limitations of pulsed radiofrequency glow discharge time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GD-TOFMS) for the determination of the precious metals Ag, Au, Pd, Pt and Rh in lead buttons obtained by Pb fire assay is reported on. Since the matrix consists almost entirely of lead (>99%), the occurrence of doubly charged Pb (Pb(2+)) ions can hinder accurate determination of Rh. This problem was counteracted by relying on the time-resolved formation of different ion types over the pulse period of the glow discharge, which allows discrimination against the Pb(2+) ions. The formation of ArCu(+) ions as a result of the use of a copper anode was assessed to pose no threat to the accuracy of the results obtained for the set of samples analyzed as its contribution to the total signal at m/z=103 could be adequately corrected for. The method developed was evaluated in terms of accuracy and precision using a set of Pb button standards with analyte concentrations between 5 and 100 μg g(-1). For the purpose of validation, a 10 μg g(-1) standard was considered as a sample. Overall, an acceptable accuracy was obtained with a bias of <5% between the experimental results and the corresponding reference values, except for Au, for which a larger deviation occurred. Precision values (repeatability) of typically <5% relative standard deviation (RSD) (for N=3) were obtained and the limits of detection (LODs) vary from ~0.020 μg g(-1) for Ag to ~0.080 μg g(-1) for Pt. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Our Hidden Past: Precious Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Ray; Larson, Clarence E.; Banic, George M.; Keim, Chris P.

    2017-01-01

    Y-12's calutrons required electrical conductor material, but during the war, copper was in short supply. The U.S. Treasury loaned Y-12 14,700 tons of silver, valued at $600M. All but 67 tons was returned after the war, and those 67 tons remained in Building 9731 until 1970 for use in separating isotopes for medical research.

  16. Textural, mineralogical and stable isotope studies of hydrothermal alteration in the main sulfide zone of the Great Dyke, Zimbabwe and the precious metals zone of the Sonju Lake Intrusion, Minnesota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, C.; Ripley, E.M.; Oberthur, T.; Miller, J.D.; Joslin, G.D.

    2008-01-01

    Stratigraphic offsets in the peak concentrations of platinum-group elements (PGE) and base-metal sulfides in the main sulfide zone of the Great Dyke and the precious metals zone of the Sonju Lake Intrusion have, in part, been attributed to the interaction between magmatic PGE-bearing base-metal sulfide assemblages and hydrothermal fluids. In this paper, we provide mineralogical and textural evidence that indicates alteration of base-metal sulfides and mobilization of metals and S during hydrothermal alteration in both mineralized intrusions. Stable isotopic data suggest that the fluids involved in the alteration were of magmatic origin in the Great Dyke but that a meteoric water component was involved in the alteration of the Sonju Lake Intrusion. The strong spatial association of platinum-group minerals, principally Pt and Pd sulfides, arsenides, and tellurides, with base-metal sulfide assemblages in the main sulfide zone of the Great Dyke is consistent with residual enrichment of Pt and Pd during hydrothermal alteration. However, such an interpretation is more tenuous for the precious metals zone of the Sonju Lake Intrusion where important Pt and Pd arsenides and antimonides occur as inclusions within individual plagioclase crystals and within alteration assemblages that are free of base-metal sulfides. Our observations suggest that Pt and Pd tellurides, antimonides, and arsenides may form during both magmatic crystallization and subsolidus hydrothermal alteration. Experimental studies of magmatic crystallization and hydrothermal transport/deposition in systems involving arsenides, tellurides, antimonides, and base metal sulfides are needed to better understand the relative importance of magmatic and hydrothermal processes in controlling the distribution of PGE in mineralized layered intrusions of this type. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  17. Secondary precious metal enrichment by steam-heated fluids in the Crofoot-Lewis hot spring gold-silver deposit and relation to paleoclimate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebert, S.W.; Rye, R.O.

    1997-01-01

    controlled largely by basin and range fractures and a high geothermal gradient with H2S for Au complexing derived from organic matter in basin sediments. A wet climate resulted in the formation of a large inland lake which provided abundant recharge water for the hydrothermal system. A fluctuating water table controlled by changing climatic conditions enabled steam-heated acid sulfate fluids to overprint lower grade mineralization resulting in ore-grade precious metal enrichment.

  18. Public release of optimization of metallization scheme for thin emitter wrap-through solar cells for higher efficiency, reduced precious metal costs, and reduced stress.

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby, Douglas Scott; Murphy, Brian; Meakin, David; Dominguez, Jason; Hacke, Peter

    2008-08-01

    Back-contact crystalline-silicon photovoltaic solar cells and modules offer a number of advantages, including the elimination of grid shadowing losses, reduced cost through use of thinner silicon substrates, simpler module assembly, and improved aesthetics. While the existing edge tab method for interconnecting and stringing edge-connected back contact cells is acceptably straightforward and reliable, there are further gains to be exploited when you have both contact polarities on one side of the cell. In this work, we produce 'busbarless' emitter wrap-through solar cells that use 41% of the gridline silver (Ag) metallization mass compared to the edge tab design. Further, series resistance power losses are reduced by extraction of current from more places on the cell rear, leading to a fill factor improvement of about 6% (relative) on the module level. Series resistance and current-generation losses associated with large rear bondpads and busbars are eliminated. Use of thin silicon (Si) wafers is enabled because of the reduced Ag metallization mass and by interconnection with conductive adhesives leading to reduced bow. The busbarless cell design interconnected with conductive adhesives passes typical International Electrotechnical Commission damp heat and thermal cycling test.

  19. Biorecovered precious metals from industrial wastes: single-step conversion of a mixed metal liquid waste to a bioinorganic catalyst with environmental application.

    PubMed

    Mabbett, Amanda N; Sanyahumbi, Douglas; Yong, Ping; Macaskie, Lynne E

    2006-02-01

    The complete and continuous reduction of 1 mM Cr(VI) to Cr(III) was achieved in a flow-through reactor using a novel bioinorganic catalyst ("MM-bio-Pd(0)"), which was produced by single-step reduction of platinum group metals (PGM) from industrial waste solution onto biomass of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 29577. Two flow-through reactor systems were compared using both "MM-bioPd(0)" and chemically reduced Pd(0). Reactors containing the latter removed Cr(VI) for 1 week only at the expense of formate as the electron donor, whereas the former gave complete Cr(VI) removal for 3 months of continuous operation. Mass balance analysis showed 100% reduction of Cr(VI) to soluble Cr(III) in the bioreactor exit solution. With the use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) no intermediate Cr(V) species could be detected. Pd(0) was biodeposited similarly using Escherichia coliMC4100 and "bio-Pd(0)". The latter was used to recover Pd(II) from two acidic industrial waste leachates to generate two types of "MM-bio-Pd(0)": "SI-bio-Pd(0)" and "SII-bio-Pd(0)", respectively. The biomaterial composition was comparable in both cases, and the catalytic activity was related inversely to the amount of chloride in the waste leachate from which it was derived.

  20. Non-precious bimetallic catalysts for selective dehydrogenation of an organic chemical hydride system.

    PubMed

    Al-ShaikhAli, Anaam H; Jedidi, Abdesslem; Cavallo, Luigi; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-21

    Methylcyclohexane (MCH)-toluene (TOL) chemical hydride cycles as hydrogen carrier systems are successful with the selective dehydrogenation of MCH to TOL, which has been achieved only using precious Pt-based catalysts. Herein, we report improved selectivity using non-precious metal nickel-based bimetallic catalysts, where the second metal occupies the unselective step sites.

  1. Geology and geochemistry of epithermal precious metal vein systems in the intra-oceanic arcs of Palau and Yap, western Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, J.J.; Miller, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Palau and Yap arcs are part of an intra-oceanic island-arc-trench system which separates the Pacific and Philippine plates in the western Pacific Ocean. The 350-km-long Palau arc consists of over 200 islands while the 400-km-long Yap arc located to the north has only four major islands exposed. Four of the largest islands in Palau are composed primarily of early Eocene to mid-Miocene volcanic rocks and the four islands comprising Yap contain only Miocene volcanic rocks. Basalt and basaltic andesites of the Babelthuap Formation are the oldest volcanic rocks in Palau and are characterized by high MgO, Ni and Cr and low TiO2 and have a boninitic affinity. They form the central and southeastern parts of Babelthuap Island. Oligocene arc tholeiite flows having an age of 34-35.5 Ma comprise most of the three smaller volcanic islands in Palau and the western part of Babelthuap. The youngest volcanic rocks are dacitic intrusions having an age of 22.7-23.2 Ma. The Yap arc is unusual in that metamorphic rocks up to amphibolite grade form most of the islands. These are underlain by a melange composed of igneous and volcanic clasts as well as clasts from a dismembered copper-gold skarn deposit. Miocene volcanic rocks consisting of flows and volcaniclastic deposits overlie the melange and metamorphic complex. An epithermal precious-metal vein system hosted by flows and flow breccias of the Babelthuap Formation occurs in an area 1.5 km by 1 km on the southeast side of Babelthuap Island. Over 50 veins and mineralized breccias ranging up to 2 m in width and having a strike length up to 500 m contain from trace to 13.0 ppm gold. The veins consist of quartz with varying amounts of sulfides and iron oxides after sulfides and the mineralized breccias consist of brecciated country rock cemented by quartz and iron oxides after sulfides. The veins and mineralized breccias generally dip within 15?? of vertical and have two preferred orientations, north-northwest and north

  2. 3D textural evidence for the formation of ultra-high tenor precious metal bearing sulphide microdroplets in offset reefs: An extreme example from the Platinova Reef, Skaergaard Intrusion, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwell, David A.; Barnes, Stephen J.; Le Vaillant, Margaux; Keays, Reid R.; Fisher, Louise A.; Prasser, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The Platinova Reef in the Skaergaard Intrusion, east Greenland, is an example of a type of layered-intrusion-hosted, precious metal-enriched, stratiform, disseminated sulphide deposit referred to as ;offset reefs;. These typically show platinum-group element (PGE) enrichment immediately below a major increase in the abundance of Cu-rich sulphides, with a prominent peak in Au enrichment exactly at that transition between the PGE-rich and the Cu-sulphide-rich zones. The reasons for the relative sequence of offsets in metal peaks, and the occasionally very high metal tenors have been subject to great debate. Here we use an integrated approach of high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT), SEM, synchrotron and desktop microbeam XRF mapping, and thin section petrography to comprehensively classify the textural relations of the precious metal-bearing sulphides of the Platinova Reef as an extreme end member example of an exceedingly high tenor offset deposit. Our results show that in the zones of PGE enrichment, precious metal minerals (PMMs) are intimately associated with Cu sulphide globules, mostly located at, or close to, silicate and oxide boundaries. The textures are identical in zones enriched in Pd and Au, and thus we do not see any evidence for different processes forming the different zones. The PMM:Cu sulphide ratio in each globule varies significantly but overall the size of the globules increases from the Pd-rich, through the Au-rich, and into the Cu zone, with a significant corresponding decrease in PM tenor. As such, this records a progression of exceedingly high tenor, microdroplets of sulphide, which progressively get larger up through the section, and decrease in tenor proportionally to their size. Cumulus droplets of Cu sulphide became enriched in metals, and were trapped in situ without significant transport from their point of nucleation. The transition to larger sulphides represents a change from sulphides nucleated and trapped in situ, to

  3. Cumulative effect of transition metals on nitrogen and fluorine co-doped graphite nanofibers: an efficient and highly durable non-precious metal catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Peera, S Gouse; Arunchander, A; Sahu, A K

    2016-08-14

    Nitrogen and fluorine co-doped graphite nanofibers (N/F-GNF) and their cumulative effect with Fe and Co have been developed as an alternative non-precious metal catalyst for efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic media. The synergistic effect between the doped hetero atoms and the co-ordinated Fe and Co towards ORR activity and durability of the catalyst is deeply investigated. A high ORR onset potential comparable with commercial Pt/C catalyst is observed with the Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst, which indicates that this catalyst is a potential alternative to Pt/C. A fivefold increase in mass activity is achieved by the Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst compared to the simple N/F-GNF catalyst, which endorses the significant role of transition metal atoms in enhancing ORR activity. The advanced Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst also exhibits complete tolerance to CH3OH and CO. The Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst also exhibits excellent durability towards the ORR with only a 10 mV negative shift in its half wave potential after a 10 000 repeated potential cycling test, whereas in the case of a commercial Pt/C catalyst there was an ∼110 mV negative shift under similar environmental conditions. More stringent corrosive test cycles were also performed by maintaining the cell as high as 1.4 V with a later decrease to 0.6 V vs. RHE for 300 cycles, which showed the excellent durability of the Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst in comparison with the Pt/C catalyst. XPS analysis of the Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst presents the ORR active chemical states of N (pyridinic-N and graphitic-N) and F (semi-ionic-F) and the co-ordinated sites of Fe and Co species with the dopants. The excellent performance and durability of the Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst is due to the synergistic effect between the hetero atoms dopants (N and F) and strong co-ordinating bonds of M-N-C, which protect the graphene layers around the metallic species and greatly mitigates the leaching of Co and Fe during the long term cycling test. The high activity

  4. Use of urchin-like NixCo3-xO4 hierarchical nanostructures based on non-precious metals as bifunctional electrocatalysts for anion-exchange membrane alkaline alcohol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manivasakan, Palanisamy; Ramasamy, Parthiban; Kim, Jinkwon

    2014-07-01

    Bifunctional electrocatalysts based on non-precious metals were developed for the dioxygen reduction and methanol oxidation reactions. These electrocatalysts can be considered as candidate cathode and anode materials for anion-exchange membrane (AEM) alkaline alcohol fuel cells. A series of Ni-doped cobalt oxide (NixCo3-xO4) hierarchical nanostructures composed of one-dimensional nanorods was prepared by an inexpensive hydrothermal method. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the NixCo3-xO4 crystallized in a cubic spinel phase. The electrochemical performance of the catalysts was investigated using a conventional cyclic voltammetry technique. The electrocatalytic behaviour of the NixCo3-xO4 hierarchical nanostructures was compared with the behaviour of Co3O4 and Co0.33Ni0.67O. The synergistic behaviour of the Ni in the NixCo3-xO4 nanostructures was established with respect to the Ni content. NixCo3-xO4 hierarchical nanostructures show a better catalytic behaviour than Co3O4 and Co0.33Ni0.67O. Although the NixCo3-xO4 compositions all showed good catalytic behaviour, Ni1Co2O4 was identified as a superior bifunctional electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation reactions in alkaline media. The effect of the Ni content on the electrocatalytic properties of the NixCo3-xO4 hierarchical nanostructures was clearly shown. The use of these electrocatalysts based on non-precious metals could have a commercial impact on the development of non-platinum electrocatalysts for application in AEM alkaline alcohol fuel cells.Bifunctional electrocatalysts based on non-precious metals were developed for the dioxygen reduction and methanol oxidation reactions. These electrocatalysts can be considered as candidate cathode and anode materials for anion-exchange membrane (AEM) alkaline alcohol fuel cells. A series of Ni-doped cobalt oxide (NixCo3-xO4) hierarchical nanostructures composed of one-dimensional nanorods was prepared by an inexpensive hydrothermal method. X

  5. Cumulative effect of transition metals on nitrogen and fluorine co-doped graphite nanofibers: an efficient and highly durable non-precious metal catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peera, S. Gouse; Arunchander, A.; Sahu, A. K.

    2016-07-01

    Nitrogen and fluorine co-doped graphite nanofibers (N/F-GNF) and their cumulative effect with Fe and Co have been developed as an alternative non-precious metal catalyst for efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic media. The synergistic effect between the doped hetero atoms and the co-ordinated Fe and Co towards ORR activity and durability of the catalyst is deeply investigated. A high ORR onset potential comparable with commercial Pt/C catalyst is observed with the Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst, which indicates that this catalyst is a potential alternative to Pt/C. A fivefold increase in mass activity is achieved by the Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst compared to the simple N/F-GNF catalyst, which endorses the significant role of transition metal atoms in enhancing ORR activity. The advanced Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst also exhibits complete tolerance to CH3OH and CO. The Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst also exhibits excellent durability towards the ORR with only a 10 mV negative shift in its half wave potential after a 10 000 repeated potential cycling test, whereas in the case of a commercial Pt/C catalyst there was an ~110 mV negative shift under similar environmental conditions. More stringent corrosive test cycles were also performed by maintaining the cell as high as 1.4 V with a later decrease to 0.6 V vs. RHE for 300 cycles, which showed the excellent durability of the Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst in comparison with the Pt/C catalyst. XPS analysis of the Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst presents the ORR active chemical states of N (pyridinic-N and graphitic-N) and F (semi-ionic-F) and the co-ordinated sites of Fe and Co species with the dopants. The excellent performance and durability of the Fe-Co/NF-GNF catalyst is due to the synergistic effect between the hetero atoms dopants (N and F) and strong co-ordinating bonds of M-N-C, which protect the graphene layers around the metallic species and greatly mitigates the leaching of Co and Fe during the long term cycling test. The high activity and

  6. DOE Award No. DE-FC36-03GO13108 NOVEL NON-PRECIOUS METAL CATALYSTS FOR PEMFC: CATALYST SELECTION THROUGH MOLECULAR MODELING AND DURABILITY STUDIES Final Report (September 2003 – October 2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Branko N. Popov

    2009-03-03

    The objective of this project is to develop novel non-precious metal electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and demonstrate the potential of the catalysts to perform at least as good as conventional Pt catalysts currently in use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a cost at least 50 % less than a target of 0.2 g (Pt loading)/peak kW and with durability > 2,000 h operation with less than 10 % power degradation. A novel nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst was obtained by modifying carbon black with nitrogen-containing organic precursor in the absence of transition metal precursor. The catalyst shows the onset potential of approximately 0.76 V (NHE) for ORR and the amount of H2O2 of approximately 3% at 0.5 V (NHE). Furthermore, a carbon composite catalyst was achieved through the high-temperature pyrolysis of the precursors of transition metal (Co and Fe) and nitrogen supported on the nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst, followed by chemical post-treatment. This catalyst showed an onset potential for ORR as high as 0.87 V (NHE), and generated less than 1 % of H2O2. The PEM fuel cell exhibited a current density of 2.3 A cm-2 at 0.2 V for a catalyst loading of 6.0 mg cm-2. No significant performance degradation was observed for 480 h continuous operation. The characterization studies indicated that the metal-nitrogen chelate complexes decompose at the temperatures above 800 oC. During the pyrolysis, the transition metals facilitate the incorporation of pyridinic and graphitic nitrogen groups into the carbon matrix, and the carbon surface modified with nitrogen is active for ORR. In order to elucidate the role of transition metal precursor played in the formation of active sites in the non-precious metal catalysts, a novel ruthenium-based chelate (RuNx) catalyst was synthesized by using RuCl3 and propylene diammine as the Ru and N precursors, respectively, followed by high-temperature pyrolysis. This catalyst exhibited comparable

  7. DOE Award No. DE-FC36-03GO13108 NOVEL NON-PRECIOUS METAL CATALYSTS FOR PEMFC: CATALYST SELECTION THROUGH MOLECULAR MODELING AND DURABILITY STUDIES Final Report (September 2003 – October 2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Branko N. Popov

    2009-02-20

    The objective of this project is to develop novel non-precious metal electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and demonstrate the potential of the catalysts to perform at least as good as conventional Pt catalysts currently in use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a cost at least 50 % less than a target of 0.2 g (Pt loading)/peak kW and with durability > 2,000 h operation with less than 10 % power degradation. A novel nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst was obtained by modifying carbon black with nitrogen-containing organic precursor in the absence of transition metal precursor. The catalyst shows the onset potential of approximately 0.76 V (NHE) for ORR and the amount of H2O2 of approximately 3% at 0.5 V (NHE). Furthermore, a carbon composite catalyst was achieved through the high-temperature pyrolysis of the precursors of transition metal (Co and Fe) and nitrogen supported on the nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst, followed by chemical post-treatment. This catalyst showed an onset potential for ORR as high as 0.87 V (NHE), and generated less than 1 % of H2O2. The PEM fuel cell exhibited a current density of 2.3 A cm-2 at 0.2 V for a catalyst loading of 6.0 mg cm-2. No significant performance degradation was observed for 480 h continuous operation. The characterization studies indicated that the metal-nitrogen chelate complexes decompose at the temperatures above 800 oC. During the pyrolysis, the transition metals facilitate the incorporation of pyridinic and graphitic nitrogen groups into the carbon matrix, and the carbon surface modified with nitrogen is active for ORR. In order to elucidate the role of transition metal precursor played in the formation of active sites in the non-precious metal catalysts, a novel ruthenium-based chelate (RuNx) catalyst was synthesized by using RuCl3 and propylene diammine as the Ru and N precursors, respectively, followed by high-temperature pyrolysis. This catalyst exhibited comparable

  8. Accumulation of the precious metals platinum, palladium and rhodium from automobile catalytic converters in Paratenuisentis ambiguus as compared with its fish host, Anguilla anguilla.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, S; von Bohlen, A; Messerschmidt, J; Sures, B

    2005-03-01

    The platinum group metals (PGM) Pt, Pd and Rh are emitted into the environment mainly by catalytic exhaust gas converters of cars. As PGM accumulate in sediments of aquatic ecosystems, the study was focused on the uptake of the noble metals by European eels, Anguilla anguilla infected with the acanthocephalan Paratenuisentis ambiguus. Eels were exposed to ground catalytic converter material for six weeks. After exposure Pt and Pd were detected in the liver and kidney of the eels and in the parasites. Palladium was also found in fish muscle and intestine. No Rh uptake by the eel tissues and the parasites occurred. Paratenuisentis ambiguus contained the highest levels of both metals with 40 times higher Pt concentrations and four times higher Pd concentrations than the liver of its host. Due to its accumulation capacity for PGM, P. ambiguus can be applied as a sensitive accumulation indicator in field studies to assess the degree of environmental PGM contamination in aquatic ecosystems.

  9. Mineralogical and geochemical controls on the release of trace elements from slag produced by base- and precious-metal smelting at abandoned mine sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatak, N.M.; Seal, R.R.; Hammarstrom, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Slag collected from smelter sites associated with historic base-metal mines contains elevated concentrations of trace elements such as Cu, Zn and Pb. Weathering of slag piles, many of which were deposited along stream banks, potentially may release these trace elements into the environment. Slags were sampled from the Ely and Elizabeth mines in the Vermont copper belt, from the copper Basin mining district at Ducktown, Tennessee and from the Clayton silver mine in the Bayhorse mining district, Idaho, in the USA. Primary phases in the slags include: olivine-group minerals, glass, spinels, sulfide minerals and native metals for Vermont samples; glass, sulfide minerals and native metals for the Ducktown sample; and olivine-group minerals, clinopyroxenes, spinels, sulfide minerals, native metals and other unidentified metallic compounds for Clayton slag. Olivine-group minerals and pyroxenes are dominantly fayalitic and hedenbergitic in composition, respectively and contain up to 1.25 wt.% ZnO. Spinel minerals range between magnetite and hercynite in composition and contain Zn (up to 2.07 wt.% ZnO), Ti (up to 4.25 wt.% TiO2) and Cr (up to 1.39 wt.% Cr2O3). Cobalt, Ni, Cu, As, Ag, Sb and Pb occur in the glass phase, sulfides, metallic phases and unidentified metallic compounds. Bulk slag trace-element chemistry shows that the metals of the Vermont and Tennessee slags are dominated by Cu (1900-13,500 mg/kg) and Zn (2310-10,200 mg/kg), whereas the Clayton slag is dominated by Pb (63,000 mg/kg), Zn (19,700 mg/kg), Cu (7550 mg/kg), As (555 mg/kg), Sn (363 mg/kg) and Ag (200 mg/kg). Laboratory-based leach tests indicate metals can be released under simulated natural conditions. Leachates from most slags were found to contain elevated concentrations of Cu and Zn (up to 1800 and 470 ??g/l, respectively), well in excess of the acute toxicity guidelines for aquatic life. For the Idaho slag, the concentration of Pb in the leachate (11,000 ??g/l) is also in excess of the acute

  10. Comparative anatomy of epithermal precious- and base-metal districts hosted by volcanic rocks: A talk presented at the GAC/MSC/GGU Joint Annual Meeting, May 11-13, 1983, Victoria, British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heald-Wetlaufer, Pamela; Hayba, Daniel O.; Foley, Nora K.; Goss, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    In order to distinguish dissimilar from similar features of epithermal districts, lithotectonic, mineralogical and geochemical traits are compiled for 15 such districts. The districts occur in structurally complex settings associated with silicic to intermediate volcanics. Affiliation with subduction environments on a continental scale and caldera settings on a regional scale is common but is not demonstrable for all districts. Most deposits formed near the end of major volcanism, but some formed considerably later. Paleodepth to the top of the ore is 300-600m for most districts, although Au-rich districts appear to be shallower. The lateral extent of the ore zone is highly variable and far exceeds the limited vertical range (300-800m). Most ore was deposited from dominantly meteoric fluids ranging in temperature from 220°-290°C. Salinities ranged from 0-13 wt% NaCl equiv., and typical values were 1-3 wt%. Although noted for eight deposits, boiling is clearly associated with precious-metal deposition in only two deposits. Four districts, typified by Goldfield, Nev., are characterized by a highly sulfidized mineral assemblage, advanced argillic alteration, and ore deposition closely following emplacement of the host rock. The remaining eleven districts highlight a second, discrete type of deposit. They contain adularia, exhibit sericitic ± argillic alteration, and were mineralized significantly after emplacement of the host rock. The latter category includes two subgroups: Ag- and base-metal-rich deposits (e.g., Creede, Colo.), and Au-rich, base-metal-poor deposits (e.g., Round Mtn., Nev.).

  11. Enzyme leaching of surficial geochemical samples for detecting hydromorphic trace-element anomalies associated with precious-metal mineralized bedrock buried beneath glacial overburden in northern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Robert J.; Meier, A.L.; Riddle, G.; ,

    1990-01-01

    One objective of the International Falls and Roseau, Minnesota, CUSMAP projects was to develop a means of conducting regional-scale geochemical surveys in areas where bedrock is buried beneath complex glacially derived overburden. Partial analysis of B-horizon soils offered hope for detecting subtle hydromorphic trace-element dispersion patterns. An enzyme-based partial leach selectively removes metals from oxide coatings on the surfaces of soil materials without attacking their matrix. Most trace-element concentrations in the resulting solutions are in the part-per-trillion to low part-per-billion range, necessitating determinations by inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry. The resulting data show greater contrasts for many trace elements than with other techniques tested. Spatially, many trace metal anomalies are locally discontinuous, but anomalous trends within larger areas are apparent. In many instances, the source for an anomaly seems to be either basal till or bedrock. Ground water flow is probably the most important mechanism for transporting metals toward the surface, although ionic diffusion, electrochemical gradients, and capillary action may play a role in anomaly dispersal. Sample sites near the Rainy Lake-Seine River fault zone, a regional shear zone, often have anomalous concentrations of a variety of metals, commonly including Zn and/or one or more metals which substitute for Zn in sphalerite (Cd, Ge, Ga, and Sn). Shifts in background concentrations of Bi, Sb, and As show a trend across the area indicating a possible regional zoning of lode-Au mineralization. Soil anomalies of Ag, Co, and Tl parallel basement structures, suggesting areas that may have potential for Cobalt/Thunder Baytype silver viens. An area around Baudette, Minnesota, which is underlain by quartz-chlorite-carbonate-altered shear zones, is anomalous in Ag, As, Bi, Co, Mo, Te, Tl, and W. Anomalies of Ag, As, Bi, Te, and W tend to follow the fault zones, suggesting potential

  12. Surface-Specific Nucleation and Deposition (?) of Heavy and Precious Metals on Minerals and Fibers Exposed to Fumarole Gas - FESEM/EDS Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obenholzner, J. H.; Poelt, P.; Reichmann, A.

    2004-12-01

    Mineral grains, glass fibers and diatoms had been exposed to the F0 fumarole at Vulcano (Italy) between 2001 and 2004. On quartz grains patches of Pb-(Tl)-Cl (max.l=50 µm), Tl-(Fe)-(Br)-Cl, Al-S-Cl-(O), Al-Cl-(F)-(S)-(Mg)-(K)-(Ca)-(Fe) and needle-like Ca sulphate (+Cl-F) are growing. Pb-S nucleated on K feldspar, Ba-S-O and As-S on the surface of diatoms. Desert dust interacting with volcanic gases might transport heavy metals to environments far away from volcanoes. Si-rich glass fibers are the substratum for Tl-Cl, Hg-, As-, Tl- and Pb-bearing and Al-(S)-(O) crystals. Au-Ag alloys (l= ca. 3 µm) are detected on Si-rich fibers. These anhedral grains are embedded in an Al-O-(S)-(Ca) matrix. Available data do not indicate if deposition or nucleation are the responsible processes. Ba-S-O particles nucleated on borosilicate glass fibers. Rock wool of basaltic composition (Na-Mg-Al-Si-K-Ca-Ti-Fe-O) collected only S and shows surface modification. These preliminary results indicate that Si-rich surfaces might be useful in i.e. air conditioning systems to detoxicate volcanically polluted air. Quartz sand deployed on top of lava flows might reduce the release of heavy metals to the environment. According to the experiments utilizing glass fibers of different composition the eruptions of basaltic magma should release more heavy metals to the atmosphere relatively compared to the eruptions of rhyolitic magma.

  13. Precious metal enrichment at low-redox in terrestrial native Fe-bearing basalts investigated using laser-ablation ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, Geoffrey H.; Day, James M. D.; Pernet-Fisher, John F.; Goodrich, Cyrena A.; Pearson, D. Graham; Luo, Yan; Ryabov, Viktor V.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2017-04-01

    Primary native Fe is a rare crystallizing phase from terrestrial basaltic magmas, requiring highly reducing conditions (fO2 metal and cohenite) and sulfide, for all three known global occurrences of native Fe bearing basalt. Total HSE abundances in metal grains, obtained by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), are lowest in the Bühl basalt, (∼0.05 ppm), intermediate in the Disko Island basalts (4-8 ppm), and highest the Siberian Khungtukun and Dzhaltul intrusions (10-30 ppm). These differences demonstrate that, while native Fe formation is the result of carbonaceous crustal assimilation, HSE enrichment is not ubiquitous during this process. The Siberian occurrences are characterized by Pt PGE (PPGE: Pt, Pd) enrichment relative to the Ir PGE (IPGE: Rh, Ru, Ir, Os), consistent with models of early stage fractionation of olivine, chromite and metallic IPGE in staging magma reservoirs, prior to the addition of C-rich crustal materials in the shallow crust. Relative to Noril'sk Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide ores

  14. Carbon-, binder-, and precious metal-free cathodes for non-aqueous lithium-oxygen batteries: nanoflake-decorated nanoneedle oxide arrays.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Ahmer; Jung, Kyu-Nam; Chang, Wonyoung; Shin, Kyung-Hee; Lee, Jong-Won

    2014-10-22

    Rechargeable lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries have higher theoretical energy densities than today's lithium-ion batteries and are consequently considered to be an attractive energy storage technology to enable long-range electric vehicles. The main constituents comprising a cathode of a lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) battery, such as carbon and binders, suffer from irreversible decomposition, leading to significant performance degradation. Here, carbon- and binder-free cathodes based on nonprecious metal oxides are designed and fabricated for Li-O2 batteries. A novel structure of the oxide-only cathode having a high porosity and a large surface area is proposed that consists of numerous one-dimensional nanoneedle arrays decorated with thin nanoflakes. These oxide-only cathodes with the tailored architecture show high specific capacities and remarkably reduced charge potentials (in comparison with a carbon-only cathode) as well as excellent cyclability (250 cycles).

  15. The role of water management on the oxygen transport resistance in polymer electrolyte fuel cell with ultra-low precious metal loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srouji, A. K.; Zheng, L. J.; Dross, R.; Aaron, D.; Mench, M. M.

    2017-10-01

    Limiting current measurements are used to evaluate oxygen transport resistance in the catalyst layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). The pressure independent oxygen transport resistance in the electrode is quantified for two cell architectures and two cathode Pt loadings (0.4 and 0.07 mgPt.cm-2). The compounded effect of the flow field and Pt loading is used to shed light on the nature of the observed transport resistance, especially its response to fundamentally different flow fields, which is shown to directly or indirectly scale with Pt loading in the open literature. By varying gas pressure and using low oxygen concentrations, the total oxygen transport resistance is divided into intermolecular gas diffusion (a pressure-dependent component) and a pressure independent component, which can be attributed to Knudsen diffusion or dissolution film resistance. The pressure-independent oxygen transport resistance in the catalyst layer varies between 13.3 and 34.4 s/m. It is shown that the pressure independent oxygen transport resistance increases with reduced Pt loading, but that effect is greatly exacerbated by using conventional channel/lands. The results indicate that open metallic element architecture improves the oxygen transport resistance in ultra-low Pt loading electrodes, likely due to enhanced water management at the catalyst layer.

  16. Precious-metal-free Co-Fe-O/rGO synergetic electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction by a facile hydrothermal route.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jing; Kuai, Long; Kan, Erjie; Wang, Qing; Geng, Baoyou

    2015-02-01

    Abundant iron group metal oxides and their composites possess great potential in the application of electrochemical energy storage and conversion. In this work, we obtained Co-Fe-O composites/reduced graphene oxides (CFO/rGO) hybrid structures, engineered their compositions, phase, and structures by a facile hydrothermal route, and studied their composition-dependent activity for electrochemical oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline media. It is found that synergetic effects bring a clear decrease in overpotential and Tafel slope for CFO/rGO catalysts in comparison with monometallic composition/rGO catalysts. OER charge-transfer resistance is significantly reduced after Fe addition, indicating that the reaction barriers of CFO/rGO are reduced. The optimal CFO/rGO with Co-Fe ratio of 2:1 was identified. Our results on the synergetic effects of CFO/rGO enrich the understanding of iron-group composites for electrocatalytic applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Simulation of substrate erosion and sulphate assimilation by Martian low-viscosity lava flows: implications for the genesis of precious metal-rich sulphide mineralisation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Raphael; Baratoux, David; Gaillard, Fabrice; Fiorentini, Marco

    2016-04-01

    On Earth, high temperature mafic to ultramafic lava flows, such as komatiites and ferropicrites of the Archean and Proterozic eons, can be hosts to Ni-Cu-PGE sulphide mineralisation. Mechanical/thermo-mechanical erosion and assimilation of sulphur-rich crustal rocks is ascribed as the principal mechanism that leads to sulphide supersaturation, batch segregation and subsequent accumulation of metal-enriched magmatic sulphides (e.g., Bekker et al., Science, 2009). In order to investigate the likelihood of the occurrence of similar sulphide mineralisation in extraterrestrial magmatic systems, we numerically modelled erosion and assimilation during the turbulent emplacement of Martian lavas, some of which display chemical and rheological analogies with terrestrial komatiites and ferropicrites, on a variety of consolidated sedimentary sulphate-rich substrates. The modelling approach relies on the integration of i) mathematical lava erosion models for turbulent flows (Williams et al., J. Geophys. Res., 1998), ii) thermodynamic volatile degassing models (Gaillard et al., Space Sci. Rev., 2013), and iii) formulations on the stability of sulphides (Fortin et al., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2015). A series of scenarios are examined in which various Martian mafic to ultramafic mantle-derived melts emplace over, and assimilate consolidated sulphate-rich substrates, such as the sedimentary lithologies (i.e., conglomerates, sandstones and mudstones) recently discovered at the Gale Crater landing site. Our modellings show that lavas emplacing over consolidated sedimentary substrate rather than stiff basaltic crust, are governed by relatively high cooling and substrate erosion rates. The rapid assimilation of sulphate, which serves as a strongly oxidising agent, could result in dramatic sulphur loss due to increased volatile degassing rates at fO2 ≳QFM-1. This effect is further enhanced with increased temperature. Nevertheless, sulphide supersaturation in the way of sulphate

  18. Evaluation of a combination of isotope dilution and single standard addition as an alternative calibration method for the determination of precious metals in lead fire assay buttons by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compernolle, Sien; Wambeke, Dorine; De Raedt, Ine; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on an evaluation of the application of isotope dilution (for Pt, Pd and Ag) and single standard addition and internal standardization (for the mono-isotopic elements Au and Rh) in the analysis of lead buttons obtained by fire assay using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry as an attempt to improve and evaluate the ultimate accuracy and precision of the analytical method. For this purpose, first, a spike lead button, containing the elements of interest in an altered isotopic composition, was prepared. Subsequently, the spike button thus obtained was checked for its homogeneity in terms of element contents and isotope ratios. Additional inductive melting was shown to further improve its homogeneity. In a next step, appropriate portions of this spike button were melted together with an adequate amount of every sample (lead button) to be analyzed and the resulting 'blend' lead buttons were then analyzed using either isotope dilution or single standard addition/internal standardization for quantification. Also external calibration versus matrix-matched lead standards was performed to determine the precious metal concentrations in the same samples, thus allowing comparison of the figures of merit with those of the combined isotope dilution and standard addition/internal standardization approach. Isotope dilution was shown to provide results for the determination of Pt, Pd, and Ag in lead buttons that are more accurate (average deviation between ID result and reference value of < 2%) than those obtained by external calibration (average deviation between experimental result and reference value ≈ 8%). For the mono-isotopic elements Au and Rh, determined via single standard addition and internal standardization, no significant difference was observed between the results provided by the three methods investigated.

  19. SEDIMENT-HOSTED PRECIOUS METAL DEPOSITS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bagby, W.C.; Pickthorn, W.J.; Goldfarb, R.; Hill, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Dee mine is a sediment-hosted, disseminated gold deposit in the Roberts Mountains allochthon of north central Nevada. Soil samples were collected from the C-horizon in undisturbed areas over the deposit in order to investigate the usefulness of soil geochemistry in identifying this type of deposit. Each sample was sieved to minus 80 mesh and analyzed quantitatively for Au, Ag, As, Sb, Hg, Tl and semi-quantitative data for an additional 31 elements. Rank sum analysis is successful for the Au, Ag, As, Sb, Hg, Tl suite, even though bedrock geology is disregarded. This method involves data transformation into a total element signature by ranking the data in ascending order and summing the element ranks for each sample. The rank sums are then divided into percentile groups and plotted. The rank sum plot for the Dee soils unequivocally identifies three of four known ore zones.

  20. 78 FR 33064 - Silicon Metal From Russia; Institution of a Five-Year Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... COMMISSION Silicon Metal From Russia; Institution of a Five-Year Review AGENCY: United States International... whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on silicon metal from Russia would be likely to lead to... order on imports of silicon metal from Russia (68 FR 14578). Following the five-year reviews by...

  1. The Administration of Tibetan Precious Pills

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Precious pills represent a special kind of Tibetan drug that once was, and still is, highly sought after by Tibetan, Chinese, and Mongolian patients. Such pills are generally taken as a potent prophylactic remedy, and can be used to cure various diseases. The present study seeks to discuss the dispensation and efficacy of precious pills according to the presentations of historical Tibetan medical scholars. Several treatises dealing with these instructions will be analysed, thereby revealing their underlying concepts, and highlighting their points of both general consensus and disagreement. The analysis of these detailed instructions will reveal the fact that these precious pills were not merely given to a patient but, in order to ensure their full efficacy, involved an elaborate regimen concerning three chronological periods: (1) the time of preparation, (2) the time of dispensation, and (3) the time after dispensation. Thus the present study surveys not only the ritual empowerment of drugs in Tibetan medicine, but also the importance of social relationships between doctors and patients in Tibetan medical history. PMID:27980504

  2. The myth of the precious baby.

    PubMed

    Minkoff, Howard L; Berkowitz, Richard

    2005-09-01

    Each year tens of thousands of pregnancies are conceived through assisted reproductive technologies, and increasing numbers of pregnant women are aged older than 40 years. The obstetric management of these pregnancies, including more liberal recourse to cesarean delivery, has at times reflected the belief of providers that they are dealing with "precious babies". A leitmotif in discussions of the "precious child" is the concept that precious equates to irreplaceable (ie, mother who has tried harder to conceive may well have less chance to succeed again in the future). We believe that the obstetrician who decides to modify obstetric care because of these factors is, in fact, substituting physician assumption for patient autonomy. Although it is not counterintuitive to believe that a woman who has gone through assisted reproductive technologies would willingly (perhaps even eagerly) undergo cesarean delivery to avoid even remote risks, it is not safe to assume that women who conceived naturally would not. It is our contention that ultimately all women are best served if every pregnancy were treated as although it had preeminent value.

  3. 76 FR 67476 - Silicon Metal From China; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... COMMISSION Silicon Metal From China; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Silicon Metal From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice... antidumping duty order on silicon metal from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence...

  4. 77 FR 59975 - Certain Folding Metal Tables and Chairs From China; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... COMMISSION Certain Folding Metal Tables and Chairs From China; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Certain Folding Metal Tables and Chairs From China AGENCY: United States... determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on certain folding metal tables and chairs...

  5. 50 CFR 665.460 - Mariana precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mariana precious coral fisheries. 665.460 Section 665.460 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... Archipelago Fisheries § 665.460 Mariana precious coral fisheries. ...

  6. 50 CFR 665.660 - PRIA precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false PRIA precious coral fisheries. 665.660 Section 665.660 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... Island Area Fisheries § 665.660 PRIA precious coral fisheries. ...

  7. 50 CFR 665.660 - PRIA precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false PRIA precious coral fisheries. 665.660 Section 665.660 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... Island Area Fisheries § 665.660 PRIA precious coral fisheries. ...

  8. 50 CFR 665.460 - Mariana precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mariana precious coral fisheries. 665.460 Section 665.460 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... Archipelago Fisheries § 665.460 Mariana precious coral fisheries. ...

  9. 50 CFR 665.660 - PRIA precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false PRIA precious coral fisheries. 665.660 Section 665.660 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... Island Area Fisheries § 665.660 PRIA precious coral fisheries. ...

  10. 50 CFR 665.460 - Mariana precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mariana precious coral fisheries. 665.460 Section 665.460 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... Archipelago Fisheries § 665.460 Mariana precious coral fisheries. ...

  11. 50 CFR 665.660 - PRIA precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false PRIA precious coral fisheries. 665.660 Section 665.660 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... Island Area Fisheries § 665.660 PRIA precious coral fisheries. ...

  12. 50 CFR 665.460 - Mariana precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mariana precious coral fisheries. 665.460 Section 665.460 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... Archipelago Fisheries § 665.460 Mariana precious coral fisheries. ...

  13. 50 CFR 665.260 - Hawaii precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hawaii precious coral fisheries. 665.260... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Hawaii Fisheries § 665.260 Hawaii precious coral fisheries. ...

  14. 50 CFR 665.260 - Hawaii precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hawaii precious coral fisheries. 665.260... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Hawaii Fisheries § 665.260 Hawaii precious coral fisheries. ...

  15. 50 CFR 665.260 - Hawaii precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hawaii precious coral fisheries. 665.260... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Hawaii Fisheries § 665.260 Hawaii precious coral fisheries. ...

  16. 50 CFR 665.260 - Hawaii precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hawaii precious coral fisheries. 665.260... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Hawaii Fisheries § 665.260 Hawaii precious coral fisheries. ...

  17. 16 CFR 23.24 - Misuse of the words “real,” “genuine,” “natural,” “precious,” etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Misuse of the words âreal,â âgenuine,â ânatural,â âprecious,â etc. 23.24 Section 23.24 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.24 Misuse of...

  18. 16 CFR 23.24 - Misuse of the words “real,” “genuine,” “natural,” “precious,” etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Misuse of the words âreal,â âgenuine,â ânatural,â âprecious,â etc. 23.24 Section 23.24 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.24 Misuse of...

  19. 16 CFR 23.24 - Misuse of the words “real,” “genuine,” “natural,” “precious,” etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Misuse of the words âreal,â âgenuine,â ânatural,â âprecious,â etc. 23.24 Section 23.24 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.24 Misuse of...

  20. Incorporation of platinum-group elements and cobalt into subsidiary pyrite in alkalic Cu-Au porphyry deposits: significant implications for precious metal distribution in felsic magmatic-hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, J. J.; MacKenzie, M. K.

    2009-05-01

    Certain alkalic porphyry Cu-Au systems contain significant concentrations of the platinum-group elements (PGE) Pd and Pt, and may serve as important unconventional resources for these metals. Bulk rock analyses of ore styles from these deposits show no correlation between the PGE and Cu-Au abundance, suggesting that the timing/mechanisms of introduction and precipitation for the PGE and Cu-Au were not the same. To elucidate some uncertainties concerning PGE enrichment, we have performed a mineralogical evaluation of two PGE-bearing porphyry systems in British Columbia (the Afton and Mount Milligan deposits) with the aid of a variety of microanalytical techniques (LA-ICPMS, SEM, EMP). Discrete PGE mineralogy in these systems is predominantly represented by Hg-rich Pd-Pt-As-Sb species (naldrettite-stibiopalladinite-sperrylite) and Pd-Te-Hg species (kotulskite-temagamite). However, these mineral phases are unambiguously late- stage (with carbonate-chlorite alteration) and contribute insignificantly (<5-10%) to the total Pd+Pt grade based on mass balance calculations. Similarly, LA-ICPMS analyses of chalcopyrite, bornite, oxides and various common sulfosalts show that these do not contribute any Pd+Pt to the bulk grades. Suprisingly, pyrite is the predominant carrier of PGE. It occurs in trace to minor abundances and predates both the Cu-Au mineralising event and the late stage carbonate-chlorite alteration. LA-ICPMS analyses of pyrite show that at least 90% of the bulk Pd+Pt occurs within this atypical host mineral. The PGE are highly enriched in the cores of the pyrite grains (up to 90 ppm and 20 ppm, respectively) and their abundance correlates well with Co (up to 4 wt%). The rims of the pyrite grains are Co-PGE-poor but Ni-rich. Early Co- PGE enrichment in these deposits may implicate a mafic contributor to the PGE tenor of the deposits, but also a potential crystallographic (substitutional) control on Pd partitioning into pyrite. At Afton, the former is supported

  1. GOLD NANOPARTICLES: A REVIVAL IN PRECIOUS METAL ADMINISTRATION TO PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Thakor, AS; Jokerst, J; Zaveleta, C; Massoud, TF; Gambhir, SS

    2011-01-01

    Gold has been used as a therapeutic agent to treat a wide variety of rheumatic diseases including psoriatic arthritis, juvenile arthritis and discoid lupus erythematosus. Although the use of gold has been largely superseded by newer drugs, gold nanoparticles are being used effectively in laboratory based clinical diagnostic methods whilst concurrently showing great promise in vivo either as a diagnostic imaging agent or a therapeutic agent. For these reasons, gold nanoparticles are therefore well placed to enter mainstream clinical practice in the near future. Hence, the present review summarizes the chemistry, pharmacokinetics, bio-distribution, metabolism and toxicity of bulk gold in humans based on decades of clinical observation and experiments in which gold was used to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The beneficial attributes of gold nanoparticles, such as their ease of synthesis, functionalization and shape control are also highlighted demonstrating why gold nanoparticles are an attractive target for further development and optimization. The importance of controlling the size and shape of gold nanoparticles to minimize any potential toxic side effects is also discussed. PMID:21846107

  2. Mineral resource of the month: platinum-group metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hilliard, Henry

    2003-01-01

    The precious metals commonly referred to as platinum-group metals (PGM) include iridium, osmium, palladium, platinum, rhodium and ruthenium. PGM are among the rarest of elements, and their market values — particularly for palladium, platinum and rhodium — are the highest of all precious metals.

  3. 50 CFR 665.460 - Mariana precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mariana precious coral fisheries. 665.460 Section 665.460 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC...

  4. 50 CFR 665.260 - Hawaii precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hawaii precious coral fisheries. 665.260 Section 665.260 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC...

  5. 50 CFR 665.660 - PRIA precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false PRIA precious coral fisheries. 665.660 Section 665.660 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Pacific...

  6. Summary of Dissimilar Metal Joining Trials Conducted by Edison Welding Institute

    SciTech Connect

    MJ Lambert

    2005-11-18

    Under the direction of the NASA-Glenn Research Center, the Edison Welding Institute (EWI) in Columbus, OH performed a series of non-fusion joining experiments to determine the feasibility of joining refractory metals or refractory metal alloys to Ni-based superalloys. Results, as reported by EWI, can be found in the project report for EWI Project 48819GTH (Attachment A, at the end of this document), dated October 10, 2005. The three joining methods used in this investigation were inertia welding, magnetic pulse welding, and electro-spark deposition joining. Five materials were used in these experiments: Mo-47Re, T-111, Hastelloy X, Mar M-247 (coarse-grained, 0.5 mm to several millimeter average grain size), and Mar M-247 (fine-grained, approximately 50 {micro}m average grain size). Several iterative trials of each material combination with each joining method were performed to determine the best practice joining method. Mo-47Re was found to be joined easily to Hastelloy X via inertia welding, but inertia welding of the Mo-alloy to both Mar M-247 alloys resulted in inconsistent joint strength and large reaction layers between the two metals. T-111 was found to join well to Hastelloy X and coarse-grained Mar M-247 via inertia welding, but joining to fine-grained Mar M-247 resulted in low joint strength. Magnetic pulse welding (MPW) was only successful in joining T-111 tubing to Hastelloy X bar stock. The joint integrity and reaction layer between the metals were found to be acceptable. This single joining trial, however, caused damage to the electromagnetic concentrators used in this process. Subsequent design efforts to eliminate the problem resulted in a loss of power imparted to the accelerating work piece, and results could not be reproduced. Welding trials of Mar M-247 to T-111 resulted in catastrophic failure of the bar stock, even at lower power. Electro-spark deposition joining of Mo-47Re, in which the deposited material was Hastelloy X, did not have a

  7. Polyaniline-derived non-precious catalyst for the polymer electrolyte fuel cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Gang; Chen, Zhongwei; Garzon, Fernando; Zelenay, Piotr

    2008-01-01

    A novel polyaniline (PANI)-derived non-precious cathode catalyst was developed in this work, exhibiting remarkable activity (onset potential: 0.9 V, half-wave potential: 0.77 V) and selectivity (0.4 % H20 2 at 0.4 V). As a result, the generated current densities at high voltages associated with electrochemically kinetic activity can be achieved to 0.04 Acm-2 for 0.80V and 0.21 Acm-2 for 0.6 V, when air was used in fuel cell tests. MEA life test at a constant voltage of 0.4 V demonstrated a promising stability up to 450 hours, without obvious degradation. The current density during the test was measured around 0.32 A cm-2, a respectable performance for a cell with non-precious cathode, operated on air rather than oxygen. The possible active sites, related to pyridine- and pyrrole-like metal species were discussed according to presented XPS and XRD analysis.

  8. Hydrogel-derived non-precious electrocatalysts for efficient oxygen reduction

    PubMed Central

    You, Bo; Yin, Peiqun; Zhang, Junli; He, Daping; Chen, Gaoli; Kang, Fei; Wang, Huiqiao; Deng, Zhaoxiang; Li, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    The development of highly active, cheap and robust oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysts to replace precious metal platinum is extremely urgent and challenging for renewable energy devices. Herein we report a novel, green and especially facile hydrogel strategy to construct N and B co-doped nanocarbon embedded with Co-based nanoparticles as an efficient non-precious ORR catalyst. The agarose hydrogel provides a general host matrix to achieve a homogeneous distribution of key precursory components including cobalt (II) acetate and buffer salts, which, upon freeze-drying and carbonization, produces the highly active ORR catalyst. The gel buffer containing Tris base, boric acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, commonly adopted for pH and ionic strength control, plays distinctively different roles here. These include a green precursor for N- and B-doping, a salt porogen and a Co2+ chelating agent, all contributing to the excellent ORR activity. This hydrogel-based process is potentially generalizable for many other catalytic materials. PMID:26130371

  9. Hydrogel-derived non-precious electrocatalysts for efficient oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Bo; Yin, Peiqun; Zhang, Junli; He, Daping; Chen, Gaoli; Kang, Fei; Wang, Huiqiao; Deng, Zhaoxiang; Li, Yadong

    2015-07-01

    The development of highly active, cheap and robust oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysts to replace precious metal platinum is extremely urgent and challenging for renewable energy devices. Herein we report a novel, green and especially facile hydrogel strategy to construct N and B co-doped nanocarbon embedded with Co-based nanoparticles as an efficient non-precious ORR catalyst. The agarose hydrogel provides a general host matrix to achieve a homogeneous distribution of key precursory components including cobalt (II) acetate and buffer salts, which, upon freeze-drying and carbonization, produces the highly active ORR catalyst. The gel buffer containing Tris base, boric acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, commonly adopted for pH and ionic strength control, plays distinctively different roles here. These include a green precursor for N- and B-doping, a salt porogen and a Co2+ chelating agent, all contributing to the excellent ORR activity. This hydrogel-based process is potentially generalizable for many other catalytic materials.

  10. 31 CFR 1027.210 - Anti-money laundering programs for dealers in precious metals, precious stones, or jewels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... laundering and the financing of terrorist activities through the purchase and sale of covered goods. The program must be approved by senior management. A dealer shall make its anti-money laundering program... intergovernmental group or organization of which the United States is a member and with which designation the...

  11. 31 CFR 1027.210 - Anti-money laundering programs for dealers in precious metals, precious stones, or jewels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... laundering and the financing of terrorist activities through the purchase and sale of covered goods. The program must be approved by senior management. A dealer shall make its anti-money laundering program... intergovernmental group or organization of which the United States is a member and with which designation the...

  12. Biomedical informatics: precious scientific resource and public policy dilemma.

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Donald A. B.

    2003-01-01

    Biomedical informatics includes the application of computers, information networks and systems, and a growing body of scientific understanding to a range of problems. As skill in this field increases and as progress in virtually all modern biomedical science becomes more data intensive, informatics becomes a precious resource. Applications areas include access to knowledge, discovery in genomics, medical records, mathematical modeling, and bioengineering. At the same time, progress in informatics is deeply dependent on resolution of four major public policy issues: digital intellectual property rights, genetic testing protection, medical data privacy, and the role of biomedical data in the context of information warfare and homeland security. PMID:12813915

  13. Biomedical informatics: precious scientific resource and public policy dilemma.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Donald A B

    2003-01-01

    Biomedical informatics includes the application of computers, information networks and systems, and a growing body of scientific understanding to a range of problems. As skill in this field increases and as progress in virtually all modern biomedical science becomes more data intensive, informatics becomes a precious resource. Applications areas include access to knowledge, discovery in genomics, medical records, mathematical modeling, and bioengineering. At the same time, progress in informatics is deeply dependent on resolution of four major public policy issues: digital intellectual property rights, genetic testing protection, medical data privacy, and the role of biomedical data in the context of information warfare and homeland security.

  14. National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Volume 4, Plan for technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Griffee, W.B.; Davis, S.

    1994-04-01

    This project was developed because of growing concern over the decline of the US metal casting industry; it springs from the Public Law 101-425 ``Department of Energy Metal Casting Competitiveness Research Act of 1990.`` The project sought the opinion of two groups in the metal casting industry: the operating users (foundries, other producers), and information purveyors. They were asked what was working, what was not, and what were some promising, innovative programs that are taking place or should be tried. Results and recommendations are given.

  15. Cobalt/copper-decorated carbon nanofibers as novel non-precious electrocatalyst for methanol electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakat, Nasser A. M.; El-Newehy, Mohamed; Al-Deyab, Salem S.; Kim, Hak Yong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Co/Cu-decorated carbon nanofibers are introduced as novel electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation. The introduced nanofibers have been prepared based on graphitization of poly(vinyl alcohol) which has high carbon content compared to many polymer precursors for carbon nanofiber synthesis. Typically, calcination in argon atmosphere of electrospun nanofibers composed of cobalt acetate tetrahydrate, copper acetate monohydrate, and poly(vinyl alcohol) leads to form carbon nanofibers decorated by CoCu nanoparticles. The graphitization of the poly(vinyl alcohol) has been enhanced due to presence of cobalt which acts as effective catalyst. The physicochemical characterization affirmed that the metallic nanoparticles are sheathed by thin crystalline graphite layer. Investigation of the electrocatalytic activity of the introduced nanofibers toward methanol oxidation indicates good performance, as the corresponding onset potential was small compared to many reported materials; 310 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl electrode) and a current density of 12 mA/cm2 was obtained. Moreover, due to the graphite shield, good stability was observed. Overall, the introduced study opens new avenue for cheap and stable transition metals-based nanostructures as non-precious catalysts for fuel cell applications.

  16. Cobalt/copper-decorated carbon nanofibers as novel non-precious electrocatalyst for methanol electrooxidation.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Nasser A M; El-Newehy, Mohamed; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Kim, Hak Yong

    2014-01-03

    In this study, Co/Cu-decorated carbon nanofibers are introduced as novel electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation. The introduced nanofibers have been prepared based on graphitization of poly(vinyl alcohol) which has high carbon content compared to many polymer precursors for carbon nanofiber synthesis. Typically, calcination in argon atmosphere of electrospun nanofibers composed of cobalt acetate tetrahydrate, copper acetate monohydrate, and poly(vinyl alcohol) leads to form carbon nanofibers decorated by CoCu nanoparticles. The graphitization of the poly(vinyl alcohol) has been enhanced due to presence of cobalt which acts as effective catalyst. The physicochemical characterization affirmed that the metallic nanoparticles are sheathed by thin crystalline graphite layer. Investigation of the electrocatalytic activity of the introduced nanofibers toward methanol oxidation indicates good performance, as the corresponding onset potential was small compared to many reported materials; 310 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl electrode) and a current density of 12 mA/cm2 was obtained. Moreover, due to the graphite shield, good stability was observed. Overall, the introduced study opens new avenue for cheap and stable transition metals-based nanostructures as non-precious catalysts for fuel cell applications.

  17. Cobalt/copper-decorated carbon nanofibers as novel non-precious electrocatalyst for methanol electrooxidation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Co/Cu-decorated carbon nanofibers are introduced as novel electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation. The introduced nanofibers have been prepared based on graphitization of poly(vinyl alcohol) which has high carbon content compared to many polymer precursors for carbon nanofiber synthesis. Typically, calcination in argon atmosphere of electrospun nanofibers composed of cobalt acetate tetrahydrate, copper acetate monohydrate, and poly(vinyl alcohol) leads to form carbon nanofibers decorated by CoCu nanoparticles. The graphitization of the poly(vinyl alcohol) has been enhanced due to presence of cobalt which acts as effective catalyst. The physicochemical characterization affirmed that the metallic nanoparticles are sheathed by thin crystalline graphite layer. Investigation of the electrocatalytic activity of the introduced nanofibers toward methanol oxidation indicates good performance, as the corresponding onset potential was small compared to many reported materials; 310 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl electrode) and a current density of 12 mA/cm2 was obtained. Moreover, due to the graphite shield, good stability was observed. Overall, the introduced study opens new avenue for cheap and stable transition metals-based nanostructures as non-precious catalysts for fuel cell applications. PMID:24387682

  18. 50 CFR 665.160 - American Samoa precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false American Samoa precious coral fisheries. 665.160 Section 665.160 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC... American Samoa Fisheries § 665.160 American Samoa precious coral fisheries. ...

  19. 50 CFR 665.160 - American Samoa precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false American Samoa precious coral fisheries. 665.160 Section 665.160 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC... American Samoa Fisheries § 665.160 American Samoa precious coral fisheries. ...

  20. 50 CFR 665.160 - American Samoa precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false American Samoa precious coral fisheries. 665.160 Section 665.160 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC... American Samoa Fisheries § 665.160 American Samoa precious coral fisheries. ...

  1. 50 CFR 665.160 - American Samoa precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false American Samoa precious coral fisheries. 665.160 Section 665.160 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC... American Samoa Fisheries § 665.160 American Samoa precious coral fisheries. ...

  2. Size control of noble metal clusters and metallic heterostructures through the reduction kinetics of metal precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevonkaev, Igor V.; Herein, Daniel; Jeske, Gerald; Goia, Dan V.

    2014-07-01

    Eight precious metal salts/complexes were reduced in propylene glycol at temperatures ranging between 110 and 170 °C. We found that the reduction temperature and the size of precipitated metallic nanoparticles formed were significantly affected by the structure and reactivity of the metal precursors. The choice of noble metal precursor offers flexibility for designing, fabricating and controlling the size of metallic heterostructures with tunable properties.Eight precious metal salts/complexes were reduced in propylene glycol at temperatures ranging between 110 and 170 °C. We found that the reduction temperature and the size of precipitated metallic nanoparticles formed were significantly affected by the structure and reactivity of the metal precursors. The choice of noble metal precursor offers flexibility for designing, fabricating and controlling the size of metallic heterostructures with tunable properties. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03045a

  3. Mimicking Catalytic Properties of Precious Metals by Using Common Metal Nanostructured Particles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-19

    Professor Renzo Rosei Consorzio per la Fisica Department of Physics Strada Costiera 11 Trieste, Italy 34151 EOARD Grant 10-3060...3060 Grant 10-3060 61102F Prof Renzo Rosei Consorzio per la Fisica Department of Physics Strada Costiera 11 Trieste, Italy 34151 N/A European Office...Physics Department, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy and Consorzio per la Fisica , Trieste, Italy 1. Project motivation and Synopsis of

  4. International Conference on Rapidly Quenched Metals, 2nd, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass., November 17-19, 1975, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The range of topics covered by the papers includes: rapid quenching (and specifically splat quenching) of metals, spin quenching, levitation melting, rapid quenching from liquid state; amorphous metal phases and metastable phases, metallic glasses, ribbons, splats, films, metal ribbon reinforced resins; crystallization of metallic glasses, and ferromagnetic amorphous alloys. Structural models for amorphous metals, splat-quenching equipment, and measurements of the properties of amorphous and noncrystalline metals and metallic glasses are also discussed, in addition to: fatigue events (crack propagation) in amorphous metals, fracture behavior in rapidly quenched metals, ductile superconducting Cu-Nb-Sn alloys, and semiconducting amorphous V205 alloy. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  5. Liquefied metal jet program Automation and Robotics Research Institute (ARRI). Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Terrill, R.E.; Dringenburg, N.; Smith, C.; DuBois, P.; Priest, J.

    1995-12-15

    Department of Defense (DoD) agencies are major users of electronics and are responsible for much of the current printing wiring board (PWB) manufacturing. Current manufacturing of PWBs utilizes photolithography and chemical etchings which are subtractive processing techniques creating tons of hazardous waste materials and waste water each year. The current processing techniques apply photoresist to the surface of a copper clad board only to remove more than 90 percent of both copper and resist in the next phase of processing. The subtractive process is, by design, a wasteful processing technique. Current manufacturing processes limit the line size and spaces which determine the circuit density and number of PWB layers. The proposed alternative manufacturing technology is Liquid Metal Jetting (LMJ). While offering significant reductions in hazardous waste produced and reduced overall processing cost, LMJ can also excel in one-of-a-kind and replication type PWB board production. The proposed process can produce extremely fine PWB patterns with circuit lines much smaller than existing technologies. With a direct Computer Aided Design (CAD) interface, the LMJ process is especially compatible with one-of-a-kind and rapid prototyping applications.

  6. Process for making a noble metal on tin oxide catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A quantity of reagent grade tin metal or compound, chloride-free, and high-surface-area silica spheres are placed in deionized water, followed by deaerating the mixture by boiling and adding an oxidizing agent, such as nitric acid. The nitric acid oxidizes the tin to metastannic acid which coats the spheres because the acid is absorbed on the substrate. The metastannic acid becomes tin oxide upon drying and calcining. The tin-oxide coated silica spheres are then placed in water and boiled. A chloride-free precious metal compound in aqueous solution is then added to the mixture containing the spheres, and the precious metal compound is reduced to a precious metal by use of a suitable reducing agent such as formic acid. Very beneficial results were obtained using the precious metal compound tetraammine platinum(II) hydroxide.

  7. [Rapid multi-elemental analysis on four precious Tibetan medicines based on LIBS technique].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-na; Shi, Xin-yuan; Jia, Shuai-yun; Zhao, Na; Wu, Zhi-sheng; Qiao, Yan-jiang

    2015-06-01

    The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied to perform a qualitative elementary analysis on four precious Tibetan medicines, i. e. Renqing Mangjue, Renqing Changjue, 25-herb coral pills and 25-herb pearl pills. The specific spectra of the four Tibetan medicines were established. In the experiment, Nd: YAG and 1 064 nm-baseband pulse laser were adopted to collect the spectra. A laser beam focused on the surface of the samples to generate plasma. Its spectral signal was detected by using spectrograph. Based on the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) database, LIBS spectral lines were indentified. The four Tibetan medicines mainly included Ca, Na, K, Mg and other elements and C-N molecular band. Specifically, Fe was detected in Renqing Changjue and 25-herb pearl pills; heavy mental elements Hg and Cu were shown in Renqing Mangjue and Renqing Changjue; Ag was found in Renqing Changjue. The results demonstrated that LIBS is a reliable and rapid multi-element analysis on the four Tibetan medicines. With Real-time, rapid and nondestructive advantages, LIBS has a wide application prospect in the element analysis on ethnic medicines.

  8. Zinc: A precious trace element for oral health care?

    PubMed

    Fatima, Tayyaba; Haji Abdul Rahim, Zubaidah Binti; Lin, Chai Wen; Qamar, Zeeshan

    2016-08-01

    This review will discuss the importance of Zinc in the maintenance of oral health. Zinc (Zn) is a trace element of valuable importance. In the oral cavity, it is naturally present at various sites such as dental plaque, dental hard tissues and saliva. It is proven to be effective against common prevalent oral health problems such as dental caries, gingivitis, periodontitis and malodour. It is being used in various oral health care products to control the formation of dental plaque and inhibiting the formation of dental calculus. It has the potential to sustain and maintain its elevated concentrations for a longer time particularly in the dental plaque and saliva on delivery from the mouth rinses and toothpastes. It has been reported that low concentrations of zinc have the capability to reduce dissolution and promote remineralization under caries simulating conditions. Most importantly low Zn2+ levels in the serum are useful as a tumour marker. Thus taking a note of its potentials, it can be concluded that zinc is a precious element for the maintenance of oral health.

  9. Highly porous non-precious bimetallic electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Qi; Hutchings, Gregory S.; Yu, Weiting; Zhou, Yang; Forest, Robert V.; Tao, Runzhe; Rosen, Jonathan; Yonemoto, Bryan T.; Cao, Zeyuan; Zheng, Haimei; Xiao, John Q.; Jiao, Feng; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2015-03-16

    One of the key components of carbon dioxide-free hydrogen production is a robust and efficient non-precious metal catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction. We report that a hierarchical nanoporous copper-titanium bimetallic electrocatalyst is able to produce hydrogen from water under a mild overpotential at more than twice the rate of state-of-the- art carbon-supported platinum catalyst. Although both copper and titanium are known to be poor hydrogen evolution catalysts, the combination of these two elements creates unique copper-copper-titanium hollow sites, which have a hydrogen-binding energy very similar to that of platinum, resulting in an exceptional hydrogen evolution activity. Moreover, the hierarchical porosity of the nanoporous-copper titanium catalyst also contributes to its high hydrogen evolution activity, because it provides a large-surface area for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution, and improves the mass transport properties. Moreover, the catalyst is self-supported, eliminating the overpotential associated with the catalyst/support interface.

  10. Highly porous non-precious bimetallic electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Qi; Hutchings, Gregory S.; Yu, Weiting; ...

    2015-03-16

    One of the key components of carbon dioxide-free hydrogen production is a robust and efficient non-precious metal catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction. We report that a hierarchical nanoporous copper-titanium bimetallic electrocatalyst is able to produce hydrogen from water under a mild overpotential at more than twice the rate of state-of-the- art carbon-supported platinum catalyst. Although both copper and titanium are known to be poor hydrogen evolution catalysts, the combination of these two elements creates unique copper-copper-titanium hollow sites, which have a hydrogen-binding energy very similar to that of platinum, resulting in an exceptional hydrogen evolution activity. Moreover, the hierarchicalmore » porosity of the nanoporous-copper titanium catalyst also contributes to its high hydrogen evolution activity, because it provides a large-surface area for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution, and improves the mass transport properties. Moreover, the catalyst is self-supported, eliminating the overpotential associated with the catalyst/support interface.« less

  11. Highly porous non-precious bimetallic electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen evolution

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qi; Hutchings, Gregory S.; Yu, Weiting; Zhou, Yang; Forest, Robert V.; Tao, Runzhe; Rosen, Jonathan; Yonemoto, Bryan T.; Cao, Zeyuan; Zheng, Haimei; Xiao, John Q.; Jiao, Feng; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2015-01-01

    A robust and efficient non-precious metal catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction is one of the key components for carbon dioxide-free hydrogen production. Here we report that a hierarchical nanoporous copper-titanium bimetallic electrocatalyst is able to produce hydrogen from water under a mild overpotential at more than twice the rate of state-of-the-art carbon-supported platinum catalyst. Although both copper and titanium are known to be poor hydrogen evolution catalysts, the combination of these two elements creates unique copper-copper-titanium hollow sites, which have a hydrogen-binding energy very similar to that of platinum, resulting in an exceptional hydrogen evolution activity. In addition, the hierarchical porosity of the nanoporous copper-titanium catalyst also contributes to its high hydrogen evolution activity, because it provides a large-surface area for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution, and improves the mass transport properties. Moreover, the catalyst is self-supported, eliminating the overpotential associated with the catalyst/support interface. PMID:25910892

  12. Fundraising for Student Affairs at Comprehensive Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arminio, Jan; Folmer Clinton, Leslie; Harpster, George

    2010-01-01

    Continued competition for precious resources in higher education, along with the simultaneous increasing expectations of higher education by parents, students, and other stakeholders, has forced institution administrators to look for significant alternatives for funding. In conjunction with these pressures, the U.S. Congress is pressing colleges…

  13. First analytical evidences of precious colourants on Mediterranean illuminated manuscripts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aceto, M.; Agostino, A.; Fenoglio, G.; Baraldi, P.; Zannini, P.; Hofmann, C.; Gamillscheg, E.

    2012-09-01

    Two Byzantine VI century manuscripts known as Vienna Dioskurides and Vienna Genesis, held in the Austrian National Library at Vienna, were analysed with in situ non-invasive techniques. Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectrophotometry with optic fibres and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry were used to characterise the palette of these early Middle Ages manuscripts. The analytical study was performed to have a better knowledge on the colourants used by ancient miniature painters, a subject known more on the basis of traditional sources (i.e. medieval treatises) than of analytical evidences. Indeed these illuminated manuscripts are, to the authors' knowledge, among the oldest ever being analysed, so that the colourants found in them can be considered among the oldest evidences of their use. The main feature of Vienna Dioskurides and Vienna Genesis palettes is their richness, exemplified by the simultaneous presence of gold and ultramarine blue; in Vienna Dioskurides cinnabar is also present. Information regarding ultramarine blue is surprising, being the analytical evidence of the use of this precious pigment at least three centuries before its use in Western manuscripts, a feature justified by the fact that the Byzantine Empire was the dominant culture in early Middle Ages in the Mediterranean World. Other colourants include azurite and indigo, red lead, orpiment, red and yellow ochres, while a mixture of blue and yellow colourants, known as vergaut, was used to render green hues. Organic colourants were also used, such as madder and Tyrian purple, the latter employed to dye the parchment of Vienna Genesis.

  14. Recovery of Seamount Precious Coral Beds From Heavy Trawling Disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, N.; Baco-Taylor, A.; Roark, B.

    2016-02-01

    Resilience and the related concept of recovery provide insights into ecosystem function, connectivity, and succession. Most marine resilience studies have focused on shallow-water ecosystems. However, increasing anthropogenic impacts in the deep sea make studies of resilience and recovery in the deep sea time-critical, with deep-sea hard-substrate habitats and large-scale disturbances having received the least attention. Ironically one of the key anthropogenic impacts to the seafloor, trawling, provides an ideal experimental design to understand processes of recovery from large-scale disturbance in the deep sea. Seamount hard-substrate habitats in particular are thought to have low resilience due to the slow growth rates and recruitment limitations of key structure-forming taxa. The goal of our project is to test the hypothesis of low resilience by examining a series of locations in the far Northwestern Hawaiian Islands and the Emperor Seamount Chain. These sites have had some of the heaviest trawl impacts in the world, from both fish and precious coral fisheries, and include sites that are still trawled as well as ones that have been protected since the establishment of the US Exclusive Economic Zone in 1977. We compare these to untrawled sites as part of a three "treatment" design. During two cruises in 2014 and 2015 we used the AUV Sentry to image nine features (three per treatment). CTD data were also collected. Images were analyzed for all visible megafauna as well as substrate parameters (rugosity, slope, composition, relief). Yuryaku, in the "still trawled" treatment was characterized by extensive areas of bare substrate with abundant trawl scars. This feature also had lower diversity and lower abundance of megafauna compared to the recovering and never trawled locations. Preliminary data suggest recovering and never trawled features have overlapping species, but not in comparable abundances.

  15. Highly Dispersed Metal Catalyst for Fuel Cell Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a study that will bring industrial catalyst experience to fuel cell research. Specifically, industrial catalysts, such as those used in platforming, utilize precious metal platinum as an active component in a finely dispersed form.

  16. Ni-BaTiO3-Based Base-Metal Electrode (BME) Ceramic Capacitors for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Donhang; Fetter, Lula; Meinhold, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    A multi-layer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) is a high-temperature (1350C typical) co-fired ceramic monolithic that is composed of many layers of alternately stacked oxide-based dielectric and internal metal electrodes. To make the dielectric layers insulating and the metal electrode layers conducting, only highly oxidation-resistant precious metals, such as platinum, palladium, and silver, can be used for the co-firing of insulating MLCCs in a regular air atmosphere. MLCCs made with precious metals as internal electrodes and terminations are called precious-metal electrode (PME) capacitors. Currently, all military and space-level applications only address the use of PME capacitors.

  17. Leadership and Strategic Management: Keys to Institutional Priorities and Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, James S.; de Lourdes Machado, Maria; Peterson, Marvin W.

    2008-01-01

    Allocating and managing resources have always been important cornerstones of institutional leadership. Institutional resources include financial, physical and human components. Even in the best of times, it is a challenge to do this effectively. In times of diminished and shrinking resources, distributing these precious commodities across the…

  18. Leadership and Strategic Management: Keys to Institutional Priorities and Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, James S.; de Lourdes Machado, Maria; Peterson, Marvin W.

    2008-01-01

    Allocating and managing resources have always been important cornerstones of institutional leadership. Institutional resources include financial, physical and human components. Even in the best of times, it is a challenge to do this effectively. In times of diminished and shrinking resources, distributing these precious commodities across the…

  19. Pressure pyrolysed non-precious oxygen reduction catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallathambi, Vijayadurga

    2011-12-01

    Worldwide energy demand has driven long-term efforts towards developing a clean, hydrogen-based energy economy. Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are low emissions and high efficiency devices that utilize the power of hydrogen and are a key enabling technology for the hydrogen economy. Carbon supported platinum-black is the state-of the art catalyst for oxygen reduction in a PEMFC because it can withstand the acidic environment. However, the high cost and low abundance of this precious metal has limited large-scale commercialization of PEMFCs. Current efforts focus on developing alternative inexpensive, non-noble metal-based catalysts for oxygen reduction with performance comparable to conventional platinum based electrocatalysts. In this work, inexpensive metal-nitrogen-carbon (MNC) catalysts have been synthesized by pyrolyzing transition metal and nitrogen precursors together with high surface area carbon materials in a closed, constant-volume quartz tube. High pressure generated due to nitrogen precursor evaporation lead to increased surface nitrogen content in the catalysts post-pyrolysis. Electrochemical oxygen reduction activity of MNC catalysts was analyzed using half-cell Rotating Ring Disc Electrode (RRDE) studies. The effect of nitrogen precursor morphology on the generation of active sites has been explored in detail. By increasing the Nitrogen/Carbon ratio of the nitrogen precursor, the accessible active site density increased by reducing carbon deposition in the pores of the carbon support during pyrolysis. The most active catalysts were obtained using melamine, having a N/C ratio of 2. Single PEMFC measurements employing MNC catalysts as cathodes indicated kinetic current density as high as 15 A cm-3 at 0.8 ViR-free and over 100 h of stable current at 0.5 V were observed. Effects of carbon free ammonia generating solid nitrogen precursors such as urea and ammonium carbamate were also studied. These precursors etched the carbon support

  20. Characterization of the proteinaceous skeletal organic matrix from the precious coral Corallium konojoi.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Azizur; Karl, Kristian; Nonaka, Masanori; Fujimura, Hiroyuki; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Oomori, Tamotsu; Wörheide, Gert

    2014-11-01

    The Japanese red and pink corals are known to be precious because of their commercial value resulting from their use in ornaments, jewelry, and medicine. Precious corals are very interesting models for biomineralization studies and possess two different skeletal structures: an axial skeleton and an endoskeleton (sclerites). Although it has long been known that the organic matrix proteins existing in coral skeletons are critical for the oriented precipitation of CaCO3 crystals, these proteins in moderate deep-sea Japanese precious corals remain uncharacterized. Therefore, in this study, we performed skeletal whole proteome analyses using 1D and 2D electrophoresis, nano-LC, and MALDI-TOF-TOF MS. We identified a total of 147 functional coral skeletal organic matrix proteins (120 from the sclerites and 36 from the axial skeleton), including two calcium-binding calmodulin. Among the organic matrix proteins identified, nine key proteins are highly typical and common in both skeletons. Strong glycosylation activity, which is essential for skeletal formation in calcifying organisms, was detected in both skeletons. This work demonstrates unique biomineralization-related proteins in precious corals and provides the first description of the major proteinaceous components of CaCO3 minerals in precious corals, enabling the comparative investigation of biocalcification in other octocorals.

  1. High temperature, oxidation resistant noble metal-Al alloy thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Gedwill, Michael G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A thermocouple is disclosed. The thermocouple is comprised of an electropositive leg formed of a noble metal-Al alloy and an electronegative leg electrically joined to form a thermocouple junction. The thermocouple provides for accurate and reproducible measurement of high temperatures (600 - 1300 C) in inert, oxidizing or reducing environments, gases, or vacuum. Furthermore, the thermocouple circumvents the need for expensive, strategic precious metals such as rhodium as a constituent component. Selective oxidation of rhodium is also thereby precluded.

  2. Metal, mineral waste processing and secondary recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, R.G.

    1987-04-01

    Approximately 40 million tons of precious metals chemical wastes are produced in the United States every year. An estimated five percent of these wastes are being reused/recycled to recover the precious and critical metals they contain. The rest of these chemical wastes are disposed of by the methods incineration, dumping at sea and dumping on land. In this paper, an attempt is made to review the research work published during 1985-1986 on metal, mineral waste processing, secondary recovery and safe disposal.

  3. Metallurgical recovery of metals from electronic waste: a review.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jirang; Zhang, Lifeng

    2008-10-30

    Waste electric and electronic equipment, or electronic waste, has been taken into consideration not only by the government but also by the public due to their hazardous material contents. In the detailed literature survey, value distributions for different electronic waste samples were calculated. It is showed that the major economic driver for recycling of electronic waste is from the recovery of precious metals. The state of the art in recovery of precious metals from electronic waste by pyrometallurgical processing, hydrometallurgical processing, and biometallurgical processing are highlighted in the paper. Pyrometallurgical processing has been a traditional technology for recovery of precious metals from waste electronic equipment. However, state-of-the-art smelters are highly depended on investments. Recent research on recovery of energy from PC waste gives an example for using plastics in this waste stream. It indicates that thermal processing provides a feasible approach for recovery of energy from electronic waste if a comprehensive emission control system is installed. In the last decade, attentions have been removed from pyrometallurgical process to hydrometallurgical process for recovery of metals from electronic waste. In the paper, hydrometallurgical processing techniques including cyanide leaching, halide leaching, thiourea leaching, and thiosulfate leaching of precious metals are detailed. In order to develop an environmentally friendly technique for recovery of precious metals from electronic scrap, a critical comparison of main leaching methods is analyzed for both economic feasibility and environmental impact. It is believed that biotechnology has been one of the most promising technologies in metallurgical processing. Bioleaching has been used for recovery of precious metals and copper from ores for many years. However, limited research was carried out on the bioleaching of metals from electronic waste. In the review, initial researches on the

  4. 50 CFR 665.160 - American Samoa precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false American Samoa precious coral fisheries. 665.160 Section 665.160 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN...

  5. Precious bits: frame synchronization in Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Advanced Multi-Mission Operations System (AMMOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, E.

    2001-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Advanced Multi-Mission Operations System (AMMOS) system processes data received from deep-space spacecraft, where error rates are high, bit rates are low, and every bit is precious. Frame synchronization and data extraction as performed by AMMOS enhanced data acquisition and reliability for maximum data return and validity.

  6. Rare and Precious Books and Documents Section. Collections and Services Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on rare and precious books and documents, which were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference, include: (1) "Report on the State of Work on the Union Catalogue of Incunabula (GW) and Progress in the International Cataloguing of Incunabula" by Ursula Altmann (East Germany); (2)…

  7. IFLA General Conference, 1986. Collections and Services Division. Section: Rare and Precious Books. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on rare and precious books which were presented at the 1986 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Compiling of 'The Union Catalogue of Japanese Old Books'--Investigating and Research of Old Books of Japanese Literature and Its Microfilming" (Yasuo Honda, Japan); (2) "The Rare and…

  8. IFLA General Conference, 1986. Collections and Services Division. Section: Rare and Precious Books. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on rare and precious books which were presented at the 1986 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Compiling of 'The Union Catalogue of Japanese Old Books'--Investigating and Research of Old Books of Japanese Literature and Its Microfilming" (Yasuo Honda, Japan); (2) "The Rare and…

  9. Effects of repeated baking on the mechanical and physical properties of metal-ceramic systems.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Sakae; Yoshida, Takamitsu; Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Terashima, Nobuyoshi; Kamijyo, Kuni; Ito, Michio; Oshida, Yoshiki

    2004-06-01

    This study evaluates effects of repeated baking processes on the mechanical and physical properties of single and triple applications of opaque, body and enamel porcelains fused to three different metal substrates (precious metal, semi-precious metal and non-precious metal). The vintage halo porcelain system was employed and fused to metals. Fused samples were subjected to three-point bend tests to evaluate bend strength and modulus of elasticity. It was found that, by increasing repeated baking cycles, (1) body and enamel porcelains increased bend strengths but opaque porcelain did not show any changes, (2) all triple-layered porcelains fired to metals increased bend strengths, and (3) all three porcelains and metal substrates did not exhibit changes in thermal expansion percentage. It was concluded that repeating baking procedures up to 10 cycles did not exhibit any adverse effects on the final properties of porcelain-fired to metals, rather it was noticed that mechanical strengths increased by increasing cycles.

  10. Base and precious metal occurrences along the San Andreas Fault, Point Delgada, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, Robert J.; Sorg, D.H.; Ohlin, H.N.; Heropoulos, Chris

    1979-01-01

    Previously unrecognized veins containing lead, zinc, and copper sulfide minerals at Point Delgada, Calif., are associated with late Mesozoic(?) and Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Franciscan assemblage. Sulfide minerals include pyrite, sphalerite, galena, and minor chalcopyrite, and galena-rich samples contain substantial amounts of silver. These minerals occur in a quartz-carbonate gangue along northeast-trending faults and fractures that exhibit (left?) lateral and vertical slip. The sense of fault movement and the northeasterly strike are consistent with predicted conjugate fault sets of the present San Andreas fault system. The sulfide mineralization is younger than the Franciscan rocks of Point Delgada and King Range, and it may have accompanied or postdated the inception of San Andreas faulting. Mineralization largely preceded uplift, the formation of a marine terrace, and the emplacement of landslide-related debris-flow breccias that overlie the mineralized rocks and truncate the sulfide veins. These field relations indicate that the sulfide mineralization and inception of San Andreas faulting were clearly more recent than the early Miocene and that the mineralization could be younger than about 1.2 m.y. The sulfide veins at Point Delgada may be of economic significance. However, prior to any exploitation of the occurrence, economic and environmental conflicts of interest involving private land ownership, the Shelter Cove home development, and proximity of the coast must be resolved.

  11. Integrated Water Gas Shift Membrane Reactors Utilizing Novel, Non Precious Metal Mixed Matrix Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraris, John

    2013-09-30

    Nanoparticles of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks and other related hybrid materials were prepared by modifying published synthesis procedures by introducing bases, changing stoichiometric ratios, or adjusting reaction conditions. These materials were stable at temperatures >300 °C and were compatible with the polymer matrices used to prepare mixed- matrix membranes (MMMs). MMMs tested at 300 °C exhibited a >30 fold increase in permeability, compared to those measured at 35 °C, while maintaining H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity. Measurements at high pressure (up to 30 atm) and high temperature (up to 300 °C) resulted in an increase in gas flux across the membrane with retention of selectivity. No variations in permeability were observed at high pressures at either 35 or 300 °C. CO{sub 2}-induced plasticization was not observed for Matrimid®, VTEC, and PBI polymers or their MMMs at 30 atm and 300 °C. Membrane surface modification by cross-linking with ethanol diamine resulted in an increase in H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity at 35 °C. Spectrometric analysis showed that the cross-linking was effective to temperatures <150 °C. At higher temperatures, the cross-linked membranes exhibit a H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity similar to the uncross-linked polymer. Performance of the polybenzimidazole (PBI) hollow fibers prepared at Santa Fe Science and Technology (SFST, Inc.) showed increased flux o to a flat PBI membrane. A water-gas shift reactor has been built and currently being optimized for testing under DOE conditions.

  12. The Replacement of Precious Metal Thick Film Inks Using Conductive Polymer Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-28

    materials investigated: Material Source Lab Form Intercalated Graphite Intercal Corporation Powder Pyrolyzed Polyacrylonitrile (PPAN) University of Florida...e.g. ethyl cellulose/ terpineol ), screen printed per standard practice, and cured. A summary of the application methods is given in Table II. The PPV

  13. The Study and Application of Hydrometallurgical Gold Leaching in the Analysis of Refractory Precious Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Geng, X.; Wang, Y. L.; Li, D. X.

    2017-05-01

    Three orthogonal tests are separately designed for each hydrometallurgical gold leaching process to finding the optimum reaction conditions of melting gold and palladium in each process. Under the optimum condition, the determination amount of gold and palladium in aqua regia—hydrofluoric acid, Sodium thiosulfate, and potassium iodide reaches 2.87g/kg and 8.34 g/kg, 2.39g/kg and 8.12 g/kg, 2.51g/kg and 7.84g/kg. From the result, the content of gold and palladium using the leaching process of combining Aqua regia, hydrofluoric acid and hydrogen peroxide is relatively higher than the other processes. In addition, the experiment procedure of aqua regia digestion operates easily, using less equipment, and its period is short.

  14. Use of Precious Metal-Modifed Nickel-Base Superalloys for Thin Gage Applications (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    surface in the intermediate and final rolled products. Future work will include evaluating alloys with a combination of rhenium and tantalum (up to 2...final rolled products. Future work will include evaluating alloys with a combination of rhenium and tantalum (up to 2 atomic % total) in place of

  15. Enterprise systems in financial sector - an application in precious metal trading forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaozhu; Fang, Yiwei

    2013-11-01

    The use of enterprise systems has become increasingly popular in the financial service industry. This paper discusses the applications of enterprise systems in the financial sectors and presents an application in gold price forecasting. We carefully examine the impacts of a few most widely assumed factors that have significant impact on the long-term gold price using statistical regression techniques. The analysis on our proposed linear regression mode indicates that the United States ultra scale of M2 money supply has been the most important catalyst for the rising price of gold, and the CRB index upward trend has also been the weighty factor for pushing up the gold price. In addition, the gold price has a low negative correlation with the Dow Jones Industrial Average, and low positive correlations with the US dollar index and the gold ETFs holdings.

  16. Highly efficient non-precious metal electrocatalysts prepared from one-pot synthesized zeolitic imidazolate frameworks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dan; Shui, Jiang-Lan; Grabstanowicz, Lauren R; Chen, Chen; Commet, Sean M; Xu, Tao; Lu, Jun; Liu, Di-Jia

    2014-02-01

    A facile synthesis of non-PGM ORR electrocatalysts through thermolysis of one-pot synthesized ZIF is demonstrated. The electrocatalysts exhibit excellent activity, with a maximum volumetric current density of 88.1 A cm(-3) measured at 0.8 V in PEFC tests. This approach not only makes ZIFs-based electrocatalysts easy to scale up, but also paves the way for the tailored synthesis of electrocatalysts.

  17. Stable Te isotope fractionation in tellurium-bearing minerals from precious metal hydrothermal ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornadel, Andrew P.; Spry, Paul G.; Haghnegahdar, Mojhgan A.; Schauble, Edwin A.; Jackson, Simon E.; Mills, Stuart J.

    2017-04-01

    The tellurium isotope compositions of naturally-occurring tellurides, native tellurium, and tellurites were measured by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) and compared to theoretical values for equilibrium mass-dependent isotopic fractionation of representative Te-bearing species estimated with first-principles thermodynamic calculations. Calculated fractionation models suggest that 130/125Te fractionations as large as 4‰ occur at 100 °C between coexisting tellurates (Te VI) and tellurides (Te -II) or or native tellurium Te(0), and smaller, typically <1‰, fractionations occur between coexisting Te(-I) or Te(-II) (Au,Ag)Te2 minerals (i.e., calaverite, krennerite) and (Au,Ag)2Te minerals (i.e., petzite, hessite). In general, heavyTe/lightTe is predicted to be higher for more oxidized species, and lower for reduced species. Tellurides in the system Au-Ag-Te and native tellurium analyzed in this study have values of δ130/125Te = -1.54‰ to 0.44‰ and δ130/125Te = -0.74‰ to 0.16‰, respectively, whereas those for tellurites (tellurite, paratellurite, emmonsite and poughite) range from δ130/125Te = -1.58‰ to 0.59‰. Thus, the isotopic composition for both oxidized and reduced species are broadly coincident. Calculations of per mil isotopic variation per amu for each sample suggest that mass-dependent processes are responsible for fractionation. In one sample of coexisting primary native tellurium and secondary emmonsite, δ130/125Te compositions were identical. The coincidence of δ130/125Te between all oxidized and reduced species in this study and the apparent lack of isotopic fractionation between native tellurium and emmonsite in one sample suggest that oxidation processes cause little to no fractionation. Because Te is predominantly transported as an oxidized aqueous phase or as a reduced vapor phase under hydrothermal conditions, either a reduction of oxidized Te in hydrothermal liquids or deposition of Te from a reduced vapor to a solid is necessary to form the common tellurides and native tellurium in ore-forming systems. Our data suggest that these sorts of reactions during mineralization may account for a ∼3‰ range of δ130/125Te values. Based on the data ranges for Te minerals from various ore deposits, the underpinning geologic processes responsible for mineralization seem to have primary control on the magnitude of fractionation, with tellurides in epithermal gold deposits showing a narrower range of isotope values than those in orogenic gold and volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits.

  18. Excavation of Precious-Metal-Based Alloy Nanoparticles for Efficient Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Franklin Feng

    2016-12-05

    Methods have recently been developed for the synthesis of excavated alloy nanoparticles. However, various challenges still need to be overcome for a broad range of excavated nanoparticles with different sizes, surface structures, compositions, and constituent elements to be available for chemical and energy transformations through thermal catalysis and electrocatalysis.

  19. 75 FR 81443 - Guides for the Jewelry, Precious Metals, and Pewter Industries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... business makes marketing claims inconsistent with the Guides. In any such enforcement action, the... the Guides did not address the marketing of this product, and providing guidance.\\6\\ \\6\\ The request.../index.shtm . \\10\\ Currently the Guides specifically address the marketing of products containing: (1) At...

  20. 16 CFR 23.24 - Misuse of the words “real,” “genuine,” “natural,” “precious,” etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the words “real,” “genuine,” “natural,” “precious,” etc. It is unfair or deceptive to use the word “real,” “genuine,” “natural,” “precious,” “semi-precious,” or similar terms to describe any industry...

  1. 16 CFR 23.24 - Misuse of the words “real,” “genuine,” “natural,” “precious,” etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the words “real,” “genuine,” “natural,” “precious,” etc. It is unfair or deceptive to use the word “real,” “genuine,” “natural,” “precious,” “semi-precious,” or similar terms to describe any industry...

  2. Self-Assembled Coral-like Hierarchical Architecture Constructed by NiSe2 Nanocrystals with Comparable Hydrogen-Evolution Performance of Precious Platinum Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bo; Wang, Xinqiang; Qi, Fei; Zheng, Binjie; He, Jiarui; Lin, Jie; Zhang, Wanli; Li, Yanrong; Chen, Yuanfu

    2017-03-01

    For the first time, self-assembled coral-like hierarchical architecture constructed by NiSe2 nanocrystals has been synthesized via a facile one-pot DMF-solvothermal method. Compared with hydrothermally synthesized NiSe2 (H-NiSe2), the DMF-solvothermally synthesized nanocrystalline NiSe2 (DNC-NiSe2) exhibits superior performance of hydrogen evolution reaction (HER): it has a very low onset overpotential of ∼136 mV (vs RHE), a very high cathode current density of 40 mA/cm(2) at ∼200 mV (vs RHE), and an excellent long-term stability; most importantly, it delivers an ultrasmall Tafel slope of 29.4 mV dec(-1), which is the lowest ever reported for NiSe2-based catalysts, and even lower than that of precious platinum (Pt) catalyst (30.8 mV dec(-1)). The superior HER performance of DNC-NiSe2 is attributed to the unique self-assembled coral-like network, which is a benefit to form abundant active sites and facilitates the charge transportation due to the inherent high conductivity of NiSe2 nanocrystals. The DNC-NiSe2 is promising to be a viable alternative to precious metal catalysts for hydrogen evolution.

  3. Galvanic corrosion between dental precious alloys and magnetic stainless steels used for dental magnetic attachments.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Noriko; Takada, Yukyo; Okuno, Osamu

    2008-03-01

    In this study, we examined the corrosion behavior of dental precious alloys and magnetic stainless steels, namely SUS 444, SUS XM27, and SUS 447J1, used for dental magnetic attachments. Their galvanic corrosion behavior was evaluated from the viewpoint of corrosion potentials when they were in contact with each other. Rest potentials of the precious alloys were constantly higher than those of magnetic stainless steels. Since most gold alloys raised the corrosion potential more significantly than silver alloys did, silver alloys seemed to be better suited than gold alloys for combination with magnetic stainless steels. However, all corrosion potential values were sufficiently lower than the breakdown potentials of the stainless steels and existed within their passive regions. Based on the findings of this study, SUS XM27 and SUS 447J1--which exhibited higher breakdown potentials than SUS 444--emerged as the preferred choices for combination with gold alloys.

  4. Virtual Institute of Microbial Stress and Survival: Deduction of Stress Response Pathways in Metal and Radionuclide Reducing Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    2004-04-17

    The projects application goals are to: (1) To understand bacterial stress-response to the unique stressors in metal/radionuclide contamination sites; (2) To turn this understanding into a quantitative, data-driven model for exploring policies for natural and biostimulatory bioremediation; (3) To implement proposed policies in the field and compare results to model predictions; and (4) Close the experimental/computation cycle by using discrepancies between models and predictions to drive new measurements and construction of new models. The projects science goals are to: (1) Compare physiological and molecular response of three target microorganisms to environmental perturbation; (2) Deduce the underlying regulatory pathways that control these responses through analysis of phenotype, functional genomic, and molecular interaction data; (3) Use differences in the cellular responses among the target organisms to understand niche specific adaptations of the stress and metal reduction pathways; (4) From this analysis derive an understanding of the mechanisms of pathway evolution in the environment; and (5) Ultimately, derive dynamical models for the control of these pathways to predict how natural stimulation can optimize growth and metal reduction efficiency at field sites.

  5. The Administration of Tibetan Precious Pills: Efficacy in Historical and Ritual Contexts.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Precious pills represent a special kind of Tibetan drug that once was, and still is, highly sought after by Tibetan, Chinese, and Mongolian patients. Such pills are generally taken as a potent prophylactic remedy, and can be used to cure various diseases. The present study seeks to discuss the dispensation and efficacy of precious pills according to the presentations of historical Tibetan medical scholars. Several treatises dealing with these instructions will be analysed, thereby revealing their underlying concepts, and highlighting their points of both general consensus and disagreement. The analysis of these detailed instructions will reveal the fact that these precious pills were not merely given to a patient but, in order to ensure their full efficacy, involved an elaborate regimen concerning three chronological periods: (1) the time of preparation, (2) the time of dispensation, and (3) the time after dispensation. Thus the present study surveys not only the ritual empowerment of drugs in Tibetan medicine, but also the importance of social relationships between doctors and patients in Tibetan medical history.

  6. Development of an Automated All-Teflon HPLC System for the Analysis of Precious Geological and Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, T. J.; Dauphas, N.; Tissot, F. L. H.

    2012-03-01

    We outline the development and progress toward building an automated all-Teflon HPLC system for the analysis of precious geological and extraterrestrial samples. Our system has several traits that distinguish it from traditional column setups.

  7. Method for extracting copper, silver and related metals

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Bruce A.; McDowell, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    A process for selectively extracting precious metals such as silver and gold concurrent with copper extraction from aqueous solutions containing the same. The process utilizes tetrathiamacrocycles and high molecular weight organic acids that exhibit a synergistic relationship when complexing with certain metal ions thereby removing them from ore leach solutions.

  8. Method for extracting copper, silver and related metals

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, B.A.; McDowell, W.J.

    1987-10-23

    A process for selectively extracting precious metals such as silver and gold concurrent with copper extraction from aqueous solutions containing the same. The process utilizes tetrathiamacrocycles and high molecular weight organic acids that exhibit a synergistic relationship when complexing with certain metal ions thereby removing them from ore leach solutions.

  9. Challenges in metal recycling.

    PubMed

    Reck, Barbara K; Graedel, T E

    2012-08-10

    Metals are infinitely recyclable in principle, but in practice, recycling is often inefficient or essentially nonexistent because of limits imposed by social behavior, product design, recycling technologies, and the thermodynamics of separation. We review these topics, distinguishing among common, specialty, and precious metals. The most beneficial actions that could improve recycling rates are increased collection rates of discarded products, improved design for recycling, and the enhanced deployment of modern recycling methodology. As a global society, we are currently far away from a closed-loop material system. Much improvement is possible, but limitations of many kinds--not all of them technological--will preclude complete closure of the materials cycle.

  10. Effective and selective recovery of gold and palladium ions from metal wastewater using a sulfothermophilic red alga, Galdieria sulphuraria.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xiaohui; Igarashi, Kensuke; Miyashita, Shin-Ichi; Mitsuhashi, Hiroaki; Inagaki, Kazumi; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Sawada, Hitomi; Kuwabara, Tomohiko; Minoda, Ayumi

    2016-07-01

    The demand for precious metals has increased in recent years. However, low concentrations of precious metals dissolved in wastewater are yet to be recovered because of high operation costs and technical problems. The unicellular red alga, Galdieria sulphuraria, efficiently absorbs precious metals through biosorption. In this study, over 90% of gold and palladium could be selectively recovered from aqua regia-based metal wastewater by using G. sulphuraria. These metals were eluted from the cells into ammonium solutions containing 0.2M ammonium salts without other contaminating metals. The use of G. sulphuraria is an eco-friendly and cost-effective way of recovering low concentrations of gold and palladium discarded in metal wastewater. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Highly durable and active non-precious air cathode catalyst for zinc air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhu; Choi, Ja-Yeon; Wang, Haijiang; Li, Hui; Chen, Zhongwei

    The electrochemical stability of non-precious FeCo-EDA and commercial Pt/C cathode catalysts for zinc air battery have been compared using accelerated degradation test (ADT) in alkaline condition. Outstanding oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) stability of the FeCo-EDA catalyst was observed compared with the commercial Pt/C catalyst. The FeCo-EDA catalyst retained 80% of the initial mass activity for ORR whereas the commercial Pt/C catalyst retained only 32% of the initial mass activity after ADT. Additionally, the FeCo-EDA catalyst exhibited a nearly three times higher mass activity compared to that of the commercial Pt/C catalyst after ADT. Furthermore, single cell test of the FeCo-EDA and Pt/C catalysts was performed where both catalysts exhibited pseudolinear behaviour in the 12-500 mA cm -2 range. In addition, 67% higher peak power density was observed from the FeCo-EDA catalyst compared with commercial Pt/C. Based on the half cell and single cell tests the non-precious FeCo-EDA catalyst is a very promising ORR electrocatalyst for zinc air battery.

  12. Hydrothermal fluids responsible for the formation of precious minerals in the Nigerian Younger Granite Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abaa, S. I.

    1991-04-01

    Preliminary investigations in the Younger Granite Province of Nigeria have revealed that precious and semi-precious minerals like rubies, sapphires, emeralds, aquamarine, zircon and fluorite can be found in the region. The gem minerals are shown to have been produced either by direct deposition along fissures, veins and greisens by hydrothermal fluids or as a result of hydrothermal fluids reacting with wall-rocks. These wall rocks are either biotite granites from which the hydrothermal fluids originated or basement rocks or any other rocks which the biotite granites intrude and their residual hydrothermal fluids have invaded. The hydrothermal fluids appear to have been rich in alkalis (Na+, K+, etc.), rare elements (Be, Zr, F, REE, etc.) and siliceous. As these fluids rose through fractures and channel ways through the rocks, they either deposited the gem minerals in the fractures at the appropriate stability conditions or reacted with the wall-rocks producing the gem minerals at the expense of elements like Ca and A1 in the minerals of these rocks.

  13. The Radial Growth Rate of Japanese Precious Corals Using Pb-210 Dating Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, M.; Iwasaki, N.; Suzuki, A.; Aono, T.

    2014-12-01

    Precious corals belong to the subclass Octocorallia of the class Anthozoa. Its major component is calcium carbonate and the crystal structure is high-Mg calcite. Their skeletal axes are used for jewellery, rosary, amulet, etc. They are found mainly in the Japanese coast, the Mediterranean and off the Midway Islands and they are distributed at a depth of 100 m to 1500m. The growing skeletons of precious corals have potential for recording environmental change. Pb-210 is a naturally occurring radionuclide with a half-life of 22.3 years. Pb-210 is a natural sediment marker suitable for dating events that have occurred over the past 100 years and has been used to measure the sedimentation rates of lake and coastal marine sediments. The objectives of this study were to measure the Pb-210 concentration in the skeletons of Japanese red coral, pink coral and white coral and to estimate the radial growth rate using Pb-210 dating method. The radial growth rate of the skeleton can be estimated by the gradual decrease in Pb-210 concentrations measured from the surface inwards. The radial growth rate of the pink coral skeleton (Corallium elatius), collected at depths of 200 to 300 m off the coast of the Ryukyu Islands, Japan, was 0.15 mm/year, so slow that it would take as long as 50 years for a colony to grow to 15 mm in diameter.

  14. Supply and demand of some critical metals and present status of their recycling in WEEE.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengen; Ding, Yunji; Liu, Bo; Chang, Chein-Chi

    2017-07-01

    New development and technological innovations make electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) more functional by using an increasing number of metals, particularly the critical metals (e.g. rare and precious metals) with specialized properties. As millions of people in emerging economies adopt a modern lifestyle, the demand for critical metals is soaring. However, the increasing demand causes the crisis of their supply because of their simple deficiency in the Earth's crust or geopolitical constraints which might create political issues for their supply. This paper focuses on the sustainable supply of typical critical metals (indium, rare earth elements (REEs), lithium, cobalt and precious metals) through recycling waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). To illuminate this issue, the production, consumption, expected future demand, current recycling situation of critical metals, WEEE management and their recycling have been reviewed. We find that the demand of indium, REEs, lithium and cobalt in EEE will continuously increasing, while precious metals are decreasing because of new substitutions with less or even without precious metals. Although the generation of WEEE in 2014 was about 41.9 million tons (Mt), just about 15% (6.5 Mt) was treated environmentally. The inefficient collection of WEEE is the main obstacle to relieving the supply risk of critical metals. Furthermore, due to the widespread use in low concentrations, such as indium, their recycling is not just technological problem, but economic feasibility is. Finally, relevant recommendations are point out to address these issues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area, Technical Report 2000-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Kozusko, Shana

    2003-12-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) currently manages a 15,325 acre parcel of land known as the Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area that was purchased as mitigation for losses incurred by construction of the four lower Snake River dams. The Management Area is located in northern Wallowa County, Oregon and southern Asotin County, Washington (Figure 1). It is divided into three management parcels--the Buford parcel is located on Buford Creek and straddles the WA-OR state line, and the Tamarack and Basin parcels are contiguous to each other and located between the Joseph Creek and Cottonwood Creek drainages in Wallowa County, OR. The project was developed under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501), with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The acreage protected under this contract will be credited to BPA as habitat permanently dedicated to wildlife and wildlife mitigation. A modeling strategy known as Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and adopted by BPA as a habitat equivalency accounting system. Nine wildlife species models were used to evaluate distinct cover type features and provide a measure of habitat quality. Models measure a wide range of life requisite variables for each species and monitor overall trends in vegetation community health and diversity. One product of HEP is an evaluation of habitat quality expressed in Habitat Units (HUs). This HU accounting system is used to determine the amount of credit BPA receives for mitigation lands. After construction of the four lower Snake River dams, a HEP loss assessment was conducted to determine how many Habitat Units were inundated behind the dams. Twelve target species were used in that evaluation: Canada goose, mallard, river otter, downy woodpecker, song sparrow, yellow warbler, marsh wren, western meadowlark, chukar, ring-necked pheasant, California quail, and mule deer. The U.S. Army Corp of

  16. IFLA General Conference, 1985. Division on Collections and Services. Section on Rare and Precious Books and Documents. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on rare books and precious documents which were presented at the 1985 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "The Planned Census of Incunabula in Libraries in the FRG (Federal Republic of Germany): A Contribution to Retrospective Bibliographic Control" (Franz Georg Kaltwasser, West…

  17. Population Genetic Structure of the Deep-Sea Precious Coral Corallium secundum from the Hawaiian Archipelago Based on Microsatellites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baco-Taylor, A.

    2006-12-01

    Deep-sea precious corals (Gerardia sp., Corallium lauuense, and Corallium secundum) on the Islands and seamounts of the Hawaiian Archipelago have supported an extremely profitable fishery, yet little is known about the life history and dispersal of the exploited species. Recent studies indicate significant genetic structure between shallow-water coral populations, including several species capable of long distance dispersal. If significant genetic structure exists in seamount and Island populations of precious corals, this could suggest that the elimination (through overharvesting) of a bed of precious corals would result in loss of overall genetic diversity in the species. Here I discuss results based on microsatellite studies of the precious coral, Corallium secundum, from 11 sites in the Hawaiian Archipelago collected between 1998 and 2004, and compare the population genetic structure and dispersal capabilities of Corallium secundum to the results for Corallium lauuense. Microsatellite studies of Corallium lauuense indicated significant heterozygote deficiency in most populations, suggesting recruitment in most populations is from local sources with only occasional long-distance dispersal events. Also, two populations appear to be significantly isolated from other populations of Corallium lauuense and may be separate stocks. In contrast, Corallium secundum populations have little heterozygote deficiency and separate into 3 distinct regions. In addition to having fisheries management implications for these corals, the results of these studies also have implications for the management and protection of seamount fauna.

  18. Peculiarities of the irisation in precious opals in view of their mosaic-cluster (frustumation) inner fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povarennykh, M. Yu.; Knot'ko, A. V.; Matvienko, E. N.; Plechov, P. Yu.; Burmistrov, A. A.; Luksha, V. L.

    2016-04-01

    A direct correlation was shown for the first time between mosaic irisation patterns in synthetic and natural precious opals (from Australia, Ethiopia, Honduras, Slovakia, and Russia) and their frustumational (lump or mosaic-cluster) inner structure by means of photoluminescence, X-ray phase analysis, IR and Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy.

  19. Supported molten-metal catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Datta, Ravindra; Singh, Ajeet; Halasz, Istvan; Serban, Manuela

    2001-01-01

    An entirely new class of catalysts called supported molten-metal catalysts, SMMC, which can replace some of the existing precious metal catalysts used in the production of fuels, commodity chemicals, and fine chemicals, as well as in combating pollution. SMMC are based on supporting ultra-thin films or micro-droplets of the relatively low-melting (<600.degree. C.), inexpensive, and abundant metals and semimetals from groups 1, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16, of the periodic table, or their alloys and intermetallic compounds, on porous refractory supports, much like supported microcrystallites of the traditional solid metal catalysts. It thus provides orders of magnitude higher surface area than is obtainable in conventional reactors containing molten metals in pool form and also avoids corrosion. These have so far been the chief stumbling blocks in the application of molten metal catalysts.

  20. Separating and recycling metals from mixed metallic particles of crushed electronic wastes by vacuum metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Lu; Xu, Zhenming

    2009-09-15

    During the treatment of electronic wastes, a crushing process is usually used to strip metals from various base plates. Several methods have been applied to separate metals from nonmetals. However, mixed metallic particles obtained from these processes are still a mixture of various metals, including some toxic heavy metals such as lead and cadmium. With emphasis on recovering copper and other precious metals, there have hitherto been no satisfactory methods to recover these toxic metals. In this paper, the criterion of separating metals from mixed metallic particles by vacuum metallurgy is built. The results show that the metals with high vapor pressure have been almost recovered completely, leading to a considerable reduction of environmental pollution. In addition, the purity of copper in mixed particles has been improved from about 80 wt % to over 98 wt %.

  1. Formation of the metal and energy-carrier price clusters on the world market of nonferrous metals in the postcrisis period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, S. V.; Shevelev, I. M.; Chernyi, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    The laws of formation of price clusters are revealed upon statistical processing of the data on changing the quotation prices of nonferrous and precious metals, oil, black oil, gasoline, and natural gas in the postcrisis period from January 1, 2009 to November 1, 2013. It is found that the metal prices entering in the price cluster of nonferrous metals most strongly affect the formation of the nonferrous metal price and that the prices of precious metals and energy carriers correct the exchange price of the metal to some extent but do not determine its formation. Equations are derived to calculate the prices. The results of calculation by these equations agree well with the real nonferrous metal prices in the near future.

  2. Cyanobacteria: A Precious Bio-resource in Agriculture, Ecosystem, and Environmental Sustainability

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jay Shankar; Kumar, Arun; Rai, Amar N.; Singh, Devendra P.

    2016-01-01

    Keeping in view, the challenges concerning agro-ecosystem and environment, the recent developments in biotechnology offers a more reliable approach to address the food security for future generations and also resolve the complex environmental problems. Several unique features of cyanobacteria such as oxygenic photosynthesis, high biomass yield, growth on non-arable lands and a wide variety of water sources (contaminated and polluted waters), generation of useful by-products and bio-fuels, enhancing the soil fertility and reducing green house gas emissions, have collectively offered these bio-agents as the precious bio-resource for sustainable development. Cyanobacterial biomass is the effective bio-fertilizer source to improve soil physico-chemical characteristics such as water-holding capacity and mineral nutrient status of the degraded lands. The unique characteristics of cyanobacteria include their ubiquity presence, short generation time and capability to fix the atmospheric N2. Similar to other prokaryotic bacteria, the cyanobacteria are increasingly applied as bio-inoculants for improving soil fertility and environmental quality. Genetically engineered cyanobacteria have been devised with the novel genes for the production of a number of bio-fuels such as bio-diesel, bio-hydrogen, bio-methane, synga, and therefore, open new avenues for the generation of bio-fuels in the economically sustainable manner. This review is an effort to enlist the valuable information about the qualities of cyanobacteria and their potential role in solving the agricultural and environmental problems for the future welfare of the planet. PMID:27148218

  3. Cyanobacteria: A Precious Bio-resource in Agriculture, Ecosystem, and Environmental Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jay Shankar; Kumar, Arun; Rai, Amar N; Singh, Devendra P

    2016-01-01

    Keeping in view, the challenges concerning agro-ecosystem and environment, the recent developments in biotechnology offers a more reliable approach to address the food security for future generations and also resolve the complex environmental problems. Several unique features of cyanobacteria such as oxygenic photosynthesis, high biomass yield, growth on non-arable lands and a wide variety of water sources (contaminated and polluted waters), generation of useful by-products and bio-fuels, enhancing the soil fertility and reducing green house gas emissions, have collectively offered these bio-agents as the precious bio-resource for sustainable development. Cyanobacterial biomass is the effective bio-fertilizer source to improve soil physico-chemical characteristics such as water-holding capacity and mineral nutrient status of the degraded lands. The unique characteristics of cyanobacteria include their ubiquity presence, short generation time and capability to fix the atmospheric N2. Similar to other prokaryotic bacteria, the cyanobacteria are increasingly applied as bio-inoculants for improving soil fertility and environmental quality. Genetically engineered cyanobacteria have been devised with the novel genes for the production of a number of bio-fuels such as bio-diesel, bio-hydrogen, bio-methane, synga, and therefore, open new avenues for the generation of bio-fuels in the economically sustainable manner. This review is an effort to enlist the valuable information about the qualities of cyanobacteria and their potential role in solving the agricultural and environmental problems for the future welfare of the planet.

  4. Ornamental Stones and Gemstones: The limits of heritage stone designation: The case for and against Australian Precious Opal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Barry

    2015-04-01

    When the international designation of natural stone types was first mooted in 2007, stones that were utilised in building and construction were the primary focus of attention. However following public discussion it soon became apparent that sculptural stones, stone used for utilitarian purposes such as millstones, as well as archaeological materials including stones used by early man could all be positively assessed as a potential Global Heritage Stone Resource (GHSR). Over the past 2 years it has been realised there is also a range of ornamental and semi-precious stones that may also be considered in the same international context. Examples in this respect include Imperial Porphyry sourced from Egypt that was much prized in the ancient world and "Derbyshire Blue John" a variety of fluorspar from central England that was used for vases, chalices, urns, candle sticks, jars, bowls door, jewellery and fire-place surrounds, especially in the 18th and 19th centuries. It is at this point that rock materials, sometimes used as gemstones, impinge on the domain of typical heritage stones. In Australia, the gemstone most identifiable with the country is precious opal formed by sedimentary processes in the Great Artesian Basin. In this paper the question is asked whether "Australian Precious Opal" could be or should be considered as a heritage stone of international significance. Immediately Australian Precious Opal satisfies several GHSR criteria including historic use for more than 50 years and wide-ranging utilisation for prestige jewellery around the world. It is also recognised as a cultural icon including association with national identity in Australia as it is legally defined as Australia's "National Gemstone" as well as being the "Gemstone Emblem" for the State of South Australia. Opal continues to be mined. Designation of Australian Precious Opal as a Global Heritage Stone Resource would likely involve formal international recognition of Australian opal in the

  5. Omics for Precious Rare Biosamples: Characterization of Ancient Human Hair by a Proteomic Approach.

    PubMed

    Fresnais, Margaux; Richardin, Pascale; Sepúlveda, Marcela; Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle; Charrié-Duhaut, Armelle

    2017-07-01

    Omics technologies have far-reaching applications beyond clinical medicine. A case in point is the analysis of ancient hair samples. Indeed, hair is an important biological indicator that has become a material of choice in archeometry to study the ancient civilizations and their environment. Current characterization of ancient hair is based on elemental and structural analyses, but only few studies have focused on the molecular aspects of ancient hair proteins-keratins-and their conservation state. In such cases, applied extraction protocols require large amounts of raw hair, from 30 to 100 mg. In the present study, we report an optimized new proteomic approach to accurately identify archeological hair proteins, and assess their preservation state, while using a minimum of raw material. Testing and adaptation of three protocols and of nano liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS) parameters were performed on modern hair. On the basis of mass spectrometry data quality, and of the required initial sample amount, the most promising workflow was selected and applied to an ancient archeological sample, dated to about 3880 years before present. Finally, and importantly, we were able to identify 11 ancient hair proteins and to visualize the preservation state of mummy's hair from only 500 μg of raw material. The results presented here pave the way for new insights into the understanding of hair protein alteration processes such as those due to aging and ecological exposures. This work could enable omics scientists to apply a proteomic approach to precious and rare samples, not only in the context of archeometrical studies but also for future applications that would require the use of very small amounts of sample.

  6. Novel comprehensive approach for accessible biomarker identification and absolute quantification from precious human tissues.

    PubMed

    Turtoi, Andrei; Dumont, Bruno; Greffe, Yannick; Blomme, Arnaud; Mazzucchelli, Gabriel; Delvenne, Philippe; Mutijima, Eugène Nzaramba; Lifrange, Eric; De Pauw, Edwin; Castronovo, Vincent

    2011-07-01

    The identification of specific biomarkers obtained directly from human pathological lesions remains a major challenge, because the amount of tissue available is often very limited. We have developed a novel, comprehensive, and efficient method permitting the identification and absolute quantification of potentially accessible proteins in such precious samples. This protein subclass comprises cell membrane associated and extracellular proteins, which are reachable by systemically deliverable substances and hence especially suitable for diagnosis and targeted therapy applications. To isolate such proteins, we exploited the ability of chemically modified biotin to label ex vivo accessible proteins and the fact that most of these proteins are glycosylated. This approach consists of three successive steps involving first the linkage of potentially accessible proteins to biotin molecules followed by their purification. The remaining proteins are then subjected to glycopeptide isolation. Finally, the analysis of the nonglycosylated peptides and their involvement in an in silico method increased the confident identification of glycoproteins. The value of the technique was demonstrated on human breast cancer tissue samples originating from 5 individuals. Altogether, the method delivered quantitative data on more than 400 potentially accessible proteins (per sample and replicate). In comparison to biotinylation or glycoprotein analysis alone, the sequential method significantly increased the number (≥30% and ≥50% respectively) of potentially therapeutically and diagnostically valuable proteins. The sequential method led to the identification of 93 differentially modulated proteins, among which several were not reported to be associated with the breast cancer. One of these novel potential biomarkers was CD276, a cell membrane-associated glycoprotein. The immunohistochemistry analysis showed that CD276 is significantly differentially expressed in a series of breast cancer

  7. Biogenic metals in advanced water treatment.

    PubMed

    Hennebel, Tom; De Gusseme, Bart; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2009-02-01

    Microorganisms can change the oxidation state of metals and concomitantly deposit metal oxides and zerovalent metals on or into their cells. The microbial mechanisms involved in these processes have been extensively studied in natural environments, and researchers have recently gained interest in the applications of microbe-metal interactions in biotechnology. Because of their specific characteristics, such as high specific surface areas and high catalytic reactivity, biogenic metals offer promising perspectives for the sorption and (bio)degradation of contaminants. In this review, the precipitation of biogenic manganese and iron species and the microbial reduction of precious metals, such as palladium, platinum, silver and gold, are discussed with specific attention to the application of these biogenic metals in innovative remediation technologies in advanced water treatment.

  8. Evolutionary institutionalism.

    PubMed

    Fürstenberg, Dr Kai

    Institutions are hard to define and hard to study. Long prominent in political science have been two theories: Rational Choice Institutionalism (RCI) and Historical Institutionalism (HI). Arising from the life sciences is now a third: Evolutionary Institutionalism (EI). Comparative strengths and weaknesses of these three theories warrant review, and the value-to-be-added by expanding the third beyond Darwinian evolutionary theory deserves consideration. Should evolutionary institutionalism expand to accommodate new understanding in ecology, such as might apply to the emergence of stability, and in genetics, such as might apply to political behavior? Core arguments are reviewed for each theory with more detailed exposition of the third, EI. Particular attention is paid to EI's gene-institution analogy; to variation, selection, and retention of institutional traits; to endogeneity and exogeneity; to agency and structure; and to ecosystem effects, institutional stability, and empirical limitations in behavioral genetics. RCI, HI, and EI are distinct but complementary. Institutional change, while amenable to rational-choice analysis and, retrospectively, to criticaljuncture and path-dependency analysis, is also, and importantly, ecological. Stability, like change, is an emergent property of institutions, which tend to stabilize after change in a manner analogous to allopatric speciation. EI is more than metaphorically biological in that institutional behaviors are driven by human behaviors whose evolution long preceded the appearance of institutions themselves.

  9. Institution Closures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on the need to accelerate the closing of institutions for people with mental retardation. Articles are by both current and former residents of institutions and by professionals, and include: "The Realities of Institutions" (Tia Nelis); "I Cry Out So That I Won't Go Insane" (Mary F. Hayden); "Trends in…

  10. Paragenesis and tectonic significance of base and precious metal occurrences along the San Andreas fault at Point Delgada, California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, R.J.; Sorg, D.H.; Morton, J.L.; Theodore, T.G.; Meyer, C.E.; Delevaux, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The mineralogy, geochemistry and origin of sulphide veins along cross faults in the San Andreas fault system are described and cited for a natural history of local plate tectonics and for 'a detailed understanding of the role of major strike-slip faults in the formation and tectonic translation of hydrothermal ore deposits'. -G.J.N.

  11. Potential precious and strategic metals as by-products of uranium mineralized breccia pipes in northern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Wenrich, K.J.; Silberman, M.L.

    1984-07-01

    The development of caves within the Mississippian Redwall Limestone, accompanied by later upward stoping of overlying Paleozoic and Triassic rock, resulted in the formation of breccia pipes. Despite the depressed uranium market, some of these pipes are presently being mined for uranium. No brecciated rock within pipes has been observed above its normal stratigraphic position, nor is any volcanic rock associated in space or time with these pipes. Mineralized rock transects any strata from the Redwall Limestone to the Triassic Chinle Formation. Over 400 collapse structures, believed to represent breccia pipes (many with exposed breccia), have been mapped. Those with gamma radiation exceeding 2.5 times background (57 pipes) have been sampled (155 samples). Of these oxidized surface samples collected solely on the basis of radioactivity, 30% have Ag exceeding 10 ppm, some with up to 1150 ppm. Two samples of brecciated, oxidized sandstone with radioactivity exceeding 20 and 40 times background from this adit, and another sample of hematite-, malachite-, and chalcocite-impregnated sandstone from a higher level adit contained high concentrations of Au, Hg, Cd, and W, along with many elements commonly anomalous in mineralized breccia pipes from northern Arizona: Ag, As, Co, Cu, Mo, Ni, and Pb. The potential for economic recovery from breccia pipes of elements other than U, such as Ag, Au, Co, and Ni, should not be ignored as their concentrations are even more enhanced in unoxidized samples.

  12. The Role of Silica in Precious Metal Supported Titania Hybrid Mesoporous Materials for Remediation and Energy Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibombo, Harrison S.

    Semiconductor photocatalysis is an advanced oxidation process (AOP) that continues to show promise for the concomitant mineralization of non--biodegradable noxious and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to environmentally benign products, and the splitting of water. This work examined the use of sol--gel chemistry as a viable approach for the incorporation of transparent silica (SiO2) matrix and/or platinum onto titania (TiO2) so as to optimize physico-chemical properties such as charge separation, crystallinity, surface area, and particle size. It was determined that crystallinity of anatase in the mixed oxide photocatalyst can be improved by the addition of simple non-polar aromatic co-solvents in the sol-gel route, and subsequently enhance the photocatalytic degradation of phenol under UV--light irradiation. The Pt of smaller particle sizes in Pt--TiO2--SiO 2 resulted in higher phenol degradation efficiencies under solar simulated conditions, irrespective of the synthesis method employed. The presence of Pt in the lowest oxidation state, Pt0, is crucial for enhanced phenol degradation whereas PtO2 (Pt4+) serves as a mild recombination center for photogenerated charge carriers rather than demonstrating total inactivity. The production of ·OH radicals was shown to be imperative for sustaining the degradation process. In the water splitting reaction for hydrogen production, the role of the crystallinity of anatase is reaffirmed when TiO2--SiO2 is used, as the surface defects present in the silica phase seem to serve as recombination centers. However, in Pt--TiO2 photocatalysts, the presence of Pt 0 or PtO2 in close contact with TiO2 (heterojunction) allows for more efficient electron propagation and facilitates minimization of electron--hole recombination, hence improved solar simulated photocatalytic hydrogen evolution. Extensive characterization of the photocatalysts were carried out by powder X--ray Diffraction (XRD), Nitrogen Physisorption Studies, Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS), Fourier Transform Infrared (FT--IR), Raman spectroscopy, CO-pulse chemisorption, X--ray Photoelectron Microscopy (XPS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), and Energy Dispersive X--ray (EDX) spectroscopy. These techniques proved vital for establishing structure activity relationships, and as such provide insight to practitioners with simple techniques for the preparation of improved and economically viable photocatalysts for energy and environmental sustainability.

  13. Non-Precious Metal Catalysts Prepared By Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks: The Ligand Influence to Morphology and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Barkholtz, H. M.; Chong, L.; Kaiser, Z. B.; Liu, D. -J

    2016-08-01

    A new, “one-pot” synthesis to produce highly active non-PGM electrocatalysts for PEM fuel cells was previously developed by pyrolyzing Fe doped zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF) materials prepared by solid-state interaction. Excellent catalytic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities were found through rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) and single fuel cell tests. In this study, we compared the ORR activities and structural properties of two catalysts derived from ZIFs containing imidazole and methyl imidazole ligands, respectively. Our results indicate that alkyl group substitution in the imidazolate ligand has a profound effect on the final catalyst performance.

  14. Geology and hydrothermal alteration at the Madh adh Dhahab epithermal precious-metal deposit, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doebrich, J.L.; LeAnderson, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Vein-related alteration consisting of quartz-sericite-pyrite, chloritic, argillic, and silicic halos was superimposed on broad zones of pervasive silicic, potassic, and argillic alteration that surrounds the rhyolite intrusive body. Quartz-sericite-pyrite alteration associated with the earliest stage of mineralization was followed by broad, pervasive, stratigraphically controlled potassic alteration. Subsequent mineralization was accompanied by quartz-sericitepyrite alteration and was followed by the main stage of mineralization that formed strong chloritic alteration halos. Development of broad zones and halos of argillic alteration also may have been related to the main stage of mineralization. Development of silicic halos was characteristic of the late stages of mineralization. Broad, pervasive propylitic alteration was then superimposed on all alteration types and represents cooling and inward encroachment of the hydrothermal system. All alteration, except the early silicic alteration is interpreted to have been related to circulating meteoric fluids heated by the rhyolite.

  15. AGE AND ORIGIN OF BASE- AND PRECIOUS-METAL VEINS OF THE COEUR D'ALENE MINING DISTRICT, IDAHO

    SciTech Connect

    Fleck, R J; Criss, R E; Eaton, G F; Cleland, R W; Wavra, C S; Bond, W D

    2000-11-07

    Ore-bearing quartz-carbonate veins of the Coeur d'Alene mining district yield {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios of 0.74 to >1.60 for low-Rb/Sr, carbonate gangue minerals, similar to current ranges measured in Middle Proterozoic, high-Rb/Sr rocks of the Belt Supergroup. Stable-isotope and fluid-inclusion studies establish a genetic relationship between vein formation and metamorphic-hydrothermal systems of the region. These extraordinary {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios require accumulation of radiogenic {sup 87}Sr in a high Rb/Sr system over an extended period prior to incorporation of Sr into the veins by hydrothermal processes. Evaluation of the age and composition of potential sources of highly radiogenic Sr indicates that the ore-bearing veins of the Coeur d'Alene district formed within the last 200 Ma from components scavenged from sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks of the Belt Supergroup, the primary host-rocks of the district. These results are consistent with a Cretaceous or Early Tertiary age for these veins. Pb-Zn deposits that yield Pb isotope, K-Ar, and Ar-Ar results indicative of a Proterozoic age probably formed during deposition or diagenesis of the Belt Supergroup at 1350-1500 Ma, possibly as Sullivan-type syngenetic deposits. K-Ar and Rb-Sr apparent ages and {delta}{sup 18}O values of Belt Supergroup rocks decrease southward from the Coeur d'Alene district toward the Idaho batholith, normal to the trends of metamorphic isograds, fold axes, foliation, and the major reverse faults of the district. Isoclinal folding, thrust faulting, high-temperature metamorphism, granitic plutonism, and regional-scale metamorphic-hydrothermal activity is documented in the region between 140 Ma and 45 Ma, but no similar combination of events is recognized for Late Proterozoic time. Combined with Sr results from the veins, the evidence strongly favors formation of the ore-bearing carbonate veins of the district by fluids related to a complex metamorphic-hydrothermal system during Cretaceous and/or early Tertiary time. Proterozoic Pb-Zn deposits were probably deformed, remobilized along younger structures, and incorporated into the younger hydrothermal deposits during this event.

  16. Anomalous base and precious metals at oil-water contact in 1 Teague Well, Smackover Formation, southwest Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.E.; Lamore, F.E.; Kyle, J.R.; Kurtz, J.P.

    1988-02-01

    A core sample containing visible sulfide concentrations in an ooid grainstone unit of the Smackover Formation was collected from 8373 ft in the 1 Teague well, outpost McKamie field, Lafayette County, Arkansas. The sulfides are concentrated beneath a well-developed, high-amplitude stylolite that appears to have acted as a permeability barrier limiting sulfide development in the upper carbonate. Examination of the electric and descriptive log information for the interval revealed that: (1) the top of the sulfide zone corresponds to the existing oil-water contact, (2) scattered sulfides occur over an 84-ft interval beginning at 8373 ft, (3) an interval of greater than 10% porosity roughly coincides with the sulfide interval, and (4) an interval of hydrogen sulfide begins about 30 ft below the top of the sulfide interval and extends well below the last described sulfides. Assay results from a 1-ft composite sample showed that the core contains 36% zinc, 12% lead, and 888 ppm silver. The silver value equals about 26 oz/ton which is a high-grade ore in a mineable setting. The Zn/(Zn + Pb) ratio of 0.75 is typical of Gulf Coast salt dome hosted mineralization with ratios of 0.68 to 0.90. The Fe/(Fe + Zn) ratio on the other hand is 0.02 which is far below the 0.87 to 0.97 range of salt dome hosted sulfides. Petrographic examination indicates complex replacement and pore-filling mineralization. Minerals forming the late-stage mineralization assemblage include fine-grained replacement sphalerite-galena-acanthite-chalcopyrite-pyrite/marcasite-dolomite-coarse-grained sphalerite-calcite.

  17. Stable isotope study of water-rock interaction and ore formation, Bayhorse base and precious metal district, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seal, R.R.; Rye, R.O.

    1992-01-01

    Whole-rock ??18O and ??D values from the Garden Creek Phyllite define an isotopically depleted zone (60 km2) around the Nevada Mountain stock and are the result of high-temperature interactions with ancient meteoric waters at water/rock ratios ranging from 0.002 to 0.09. Comparison of the ore fluid ??18OH2O and ??DH2O values with hypothetical waters equilibrated with the Garden Creek Phyllite indicates that the hydrothermal fluids must have also interacted with the basal dolomite of Bayhorse Creek, which underlies the phyllite. The ?? 13CCO2 values for the hydrothermal fluids also record a transition from early water/rock interactions that were dominated by the Garden Creek Phyllite to later interactions that were influenced significantly by the basal dolomite of Bayhorse Creek. The range of ??34S values may be interpreted as either a heterogeneous sedimentary source or mixed sedimentary-magmatic sources. -from Authors

  18. NGR, XRD and TEM/SAED investigations on waste dumps materials with a view to recover precious metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udubasa, S. S.; Constantinescu, S.; Popescu-Pogrion, N.; Feder, M.; Udubasa, G.

    2010-03-01

    Two types of ores were selected for the investigation of the fate of the ore minerals during relatively long time of residence in the waste dumps (active mining: 25 years ago in the Badeanca Valley and some 50 years ago in the Valea lui Stan area). The pentametallic ores (Co-Ni-Bi-Ag-U) in the Leaota Mts. contain a great number of primary minerals of Cu, As etc. Although the waste dumps materials have whitish-yellowish colors their NGR spectra show the presence of iron minerals very finely dispersed. In the gold ores of Valea lui Stan deposit numerous minerals were identified, such as arsenopyrite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, etc., as major gold bearing sulfides. The waste dumps materials naturally show different mineral constituents, with clay minerals as major phases. Detailed NGR investigations show however Mössbauer spectra pointing out the presence of finely dispersed iron or iron-bearing minerals. Under supergene conditions gold is commonly sequestrated by iron hydroxydes; further TEM/SAED and XRD investigations are contributing to localize the gold. In some samples Mössbauer spectra resembling those of greigite have been obtained. Greigite is also a principal concentrator of gold under supergene conditions.

  19. Effect of market factors on the short-time pricing of stock-exchange metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, S. V.; Shevelev, I. M.; Chernyi, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    The open trade on the world market is estimated using information of one-day exchange prices of nonferrous and precious metals, oil, reduced crude, and gasoline and the main world stock indices in the time period from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2015. It is found that the short-term changes in the prices of nonferrous metals are determined by the prices on the metal market. The changes in the prices of energy carriers and the stock trade on the stock market weakly influence the pricing of nonferrous and precious metals. The prices of metals depend on the situation during trade on commodity exchanges, and the stock market indirectly influences the exchange prices of metals through changes in the share prices of the companies that produce copper, aluminum, and zinc.

  20. Institutional paranoia.

    PubMed

    Kulenović, M

    1995-01-01

    Taken separately, the concepts of institution and paranoia have no bearing on this work. They acquire their full new meaning as "institutional paranoia" only when they are taken together. Institutional paranoia is not a mental illness in the ordinary sense. It is a state, a condition, which exists in all associations and communities which have the same goal and concurrent intentions. The author's analysis of the problem is based on observation and monitoring of circumstances, discussions and content analysis, as well as on the use of questionnaires in several health institutions over a long period of time. He focuses his attention primarily on health, political, and economic institutions. The results of observation and analysis point to some interesting phenomena which require further study, regardless of their positive or negative outcome. With additional interventions, the content and dynamics of this process in institutions can contribute to the gradual diminishing of institutional paranoia, and sometimes its complete disappearance over a long time.

  1. Recycling metal scrap. (Latest citations from the EI compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the processes, techniques, and benefits of recycling metal scrap. The recycling processes for aluminum, chromium, nickel, cobalt, lead, copper, and precious metals scrap are discussed. Recycling in the jewelry, electronics, milling, beverage, automotive, and aircraft industries is considered. Analyses of the current global scrap metal recycling trends are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. Recovery of Seamount Precious Coral Beds From Heavy Trawling Disturbance with Links to Carbonate Chemistry Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roark, E. B.; Baco-Taylor, A.; Morgan, N. B.; Shamberger, K.; Miller, K.; Brooks, J.

    2016-12-01

    Increasing anthropogenic impacts in the deep sea make studies of resilience and recovery time critical, with deep-sea hard-substrate habitats and large-scale disturbances having received little attention. Seamount hard-substrate habitats in particular are thought to have low resilience due to the slow growth rates and recruitment limitations of key structure-forming taxa. Seamounts of the far Northwestern Hawaiian Islands and Emperor Chain have had some of the heaviest trawl impacts in the world, from both fish and precious coral fisheries, and include sites that are still trawled and recovering ones that have been protected since establishment of the EEZ in 1977. To test the hypothesis of low resilience we compare these impacted seamounts to untrawled sites. We used the AUV Sentry in 2014 and 2015 to image nine features (three per "treatment") and analyze for substrate and visible megafauna. Sites in the "still trawled" treatment were characterized by extensive areas of bare substrate with abundant trawl scars. Sites in the "recovering" and "never trawled" locations had abundant megafauna in hard substrate areas. Initial comparisons of transects at 700m depth for three sites indicate that Yuryaku in the "still trawled" treatment had lower diversity and abundance of megafauna compared to the "recovering" and "never trawled" locations with a dominance of sea urchins. The "recovering" and "never trawled" sites were dominated by cnidarians, fishes, and echinoderms, but differed in dominant species, diversity, abundances and occurrence of dead coral skeletons. These preliminary results suggest that the recovering sites have not returned to a pre-impact community type in the 38 years since they were trawled. The megafauna distribution, in particular that of deep-sea corals, was compared to environmental water column variables at the study sites across the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Deep-sea corals with calcium carbonate skeletons were found living below the

  3. Safe disposal of metal values in slag

    SciTech Connect

    Halpin, P.T.; Zarur, G.L.

    1982-10-26

    The method of safely disposing of sludge containing metal values capable of displaying toxic ecological properties includes the steps of deriving from an organic or inorganic sludge an intermediate product such as a dewatered sludge or an incinerated ash, and adding this intermediate product to a metal smelting step of a type producing a slag such that most of the metal values become encapsulated in the slag. Some precious metal values may be recovered with the metal being smelted, and may be subsequently separated therefrom by appropriate metal winning steps. The sludge product brings to the smelting process certain additives needed therein such as silica and phosphates for the slag, alumina and magnesium to lower the viscosity of the molten slag, and organic matter serving as reducing agents.

  4. Preparing Future Geoscientists at the Critical High School-to-College Junction: Project METALS and the Value of Engaging Diverse Institutions to Serve Underrepresented Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, L. D.; Maygarden, D.; Serpa, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2010, the Minority Education Through Traveling and Learning in the Sciences (METALS) program, a collaboration among San Francisco State Univ., the Univ. of Texas at El Paso, the Univ. of New Orleans, and Purdue Univ., has created meaningful, field-based geoscience experiences for underrepresented minority high school students. METALS activities promote excitement about geoscience in field settings and foster mutual respect and trust among participants of different backgrounds and ethnicities. These gains are strengthened by the collective knowledge of the university partners and by faculty, graduate and undergraduate students, scientists, and science teachers who guide the field trips and who are committed to encouraging diversity in the geosciences. Through the student experiences it provides, METALS has helped shape and shift student attitudes and orientation toward geoscience, during and beyond their field experience, just as these students are poised at the critical juncture from high school to college. A review of the METALS findings and summative evaluation shows a distinct pattern of high to moderately high impact on most students in the various cohorts of the program. METALS, overall, was perceived by participants as a program that: (1) opens up opportunities for individuals who might not typically be able to experience science in outdoor settings; (2) offers high-interest geology content in field contexts, along with social and environmental connections; (3) promotes excitement about geology while encouraging the development of mutual respect, interdependence, and trust among individuals of different ethnicities; (4) influences the academic choices of students, in particular their choice of major and course selection in college. Summative data show that multiple aspects of this program were highly effective. Cross-university collaborations create a dynamic forum and a high-impact opportunity for students from different backgrounds to meet and develop

  5. A Study of the Transformation of Xinjiang Higher Education Institutions from the Minority-Han Dual-Track System to the Minority-Han Unification Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simayi, Zuliyati

    2015-01-01

    "Minority-Han unified education" has already made some progress in the reform and practice of higher education in Xinjiang and accumulated precious experience. But presently minority-Han unified education in Xinjiang higher education institutions is still stuck in the trial stage in which there are many Han students and few minority…

  6. A Study of the Transformation of Xinjiang Higher Education Institutions from the Minority-Han Dual-Track System to the Minority-Han Unification Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simayi, Zuliyati

    2015-01-01

    "Minority-Han unified education" has already made some progress in the reform and practice of higher education in Xinjiang and accumulated precious experience. But presently minority-Han unified education in Xinjiang higher education institutions is still stuck in the trial stage in which there are many Han students and few minority…

  7. Activation and discovery of earth-abundant metal catalysts using sodium tert-butoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docherty, Jamie H.; Peng, Jingying; Dominey, Andrew P.; Thomas, Stephen P.

    2017-06-01

    First-row, earth-abundant metals offer an inexpensive and sustainable alternative to precious-metal catalysts. As such, iron and cobalt catalysts have garnered interest as replacements for alkene and alkyne hydrofunctionalization reactions. However, these have required the use of air- and moisture-sensitive catalysts and reagents, limiting both adoption by the non-expert as well as applicability, particularly in industrial settings. Here, we report a simple method for the use of earth-abundant metal catalysts by general activation with sodium tert-butoxide. Using only robust air- and moisture-stable reagents and pre-catalysts, both known and, significantly, novel catalytic activities have been successfully achieved, covering hydrosilylation, hydroboration, hydrovinylation, hydrogenation and [2π+2π] alkene cycloaddition. This activation method allows for the easy use of earth-abundant metals, including iron, cobalt, nickel and manganese, and represents a generic platform for the discovery and application of non-precious metal catalysis.

  8. [Institutional Renewal].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Peggy, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The theme of this journal issue is "Institutional Renewal." Projects designed to address the issues of the 1980s at 18 colleges are described, and 15 definitions of institutional renewal are presented. Participating colleges were provided expert advice through the Association of American College's (AAC) Project Lodestar (renamed…

  9. Inclusions in precious Australian opals offer a unique access to Martian-like weathering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Gemma; Rey, Patrice; Carter, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    Spectral signatures of the surface of Mars indicate a variety of hydrated minerals, including Al- and Fe/Mg-rich phyllosilicates, iron oxides, sulfates, and opaline silica. Their formation has been attributed to a long-lived low-temperature aqueous weathering history (e.g. Bishop et al., 2008; Ehlmann et al., 2013) followed by a period of intense acidic oxidative weathering (e.g. Carter et al., 2013). Very acidic weathering, driven by volcanic-derived sulfuric acid, is possible on a regional scale on Mars because of the lack of carbonate. On Earth, however, low-pH weathering on a regional scale is unusual because of the abundance of carbonate. Finding regional-scale Martian analogues on Earth is therefore a challenge. The Great Artesian Basin (GAB) in central Australia formed during the Early Cretaceous from the deposition of pyrite-rich volcaniclastic sediments in a cold, muddy, anoxic and shallow continental sea. Following mid-Cretaceous sea regression, a deep (~100 m) weathering profile recorded a protracted episode (~from 97 to 60 Ma) of oxidative weathering during continuous uplift and denudation, which stopped 60 myr ago. Since then, the weathering profile, which consists of Al- and Fe-rich phyllosilicates, iron oxides, and sulfates, has been constantly reworked. Interestingly, this profile hosts the bulk of the world's precious opal deposits. Since no opal deposit can be found in post-60 Ma rock formations, it is most likely that opal is part of the weathering profile developed during the drying out of central Australia. We analysed the mineral inclusions from six opal samples from the GAB to better document the early oxidative weathering. Using VNIR and Raman spectroscopy we were able to identify a variety of minerals including ferrihydrite, barite, gypsum and alunite replaced by goethite. This mineralogical assemblage is indicative of acidic oxidative conditions that points to Martian-like acidic weathering. We propose that acidity was derived from the

  10. A hydrometallurgical process for recovering total metal values from waste monolithic ceramic capacitors.

    PubMed

    Prabaharan, G; Barik, S P; Kumar, B

    2016-06-01

    A hydrometallurgical process for recovering the total metal values from waste monolithic ceramic capacitors was investigated. The process parameters such as time, temperature, acid concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration and other reagents (amount of zinc dust and sodium formate) were optimized. Base metals such as Ba, Ti, Sn, Cu and Ni are leached out in two stages using HCl in stage 1 and HCl with H2O2 in stage 2. More than 99% of leaching efficiency for base metals (Cu, Ni, Ba, Ti and Sn) was achieved. Precious metals such as Au and Pd are leached out using aquaregia and nitric acid was used for the leaching of Ag. Base metals (Ba, Ti, Sn, Cu and Ni) are recovered by selective precipitation using H2SO4 and NaOH solution. In case of precious metals, Au and Pd from the leach solution were precipitated out using sodium metabisulphite and sodium formate, respectively. Sodium chloride was used for the precipitation of Ag from leach solution. Overall recovery for base metals and precious metals are 95% and 92%, respectively. Based on the results of the present study, a process flow diagram was proposed for commercial application.

  11. Exploring the Utilization of Low-Pressure, Piston-Cylinder Experiments to Determine the Bulk Compositions of Finite, Precious Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vander Kaaden, K. E.; McCubbin, F. M.; Harrington, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Determining the bulk composition of precious materials with a finite mass (e.g., meteorite samples) is extremely important in the fields of Earth and Planetary Science. From meteorite studies we are able to place constraints on large scale planetary processes like global differentiation and subsequent volcanism, as well as smaller scale processes like crystallization in a magma chamber or sedimentary compaction at the surface. However, with meteorite samples in particular, far too often we are limited by how precious the sample is as well as its limited mass. In this study, we have utilized aliquots of samples previously studied for toxicological hazards, including both the fresh samples (lunar mare basalt NWA 4734, lunar regolith breccia NWA 7611, martian basalt Tissint, martian regolith breccia NWA 7034, a vestian basalt Berthoud, a vestian regolith breccia NWA 2060, and a terrestrial mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)), and those that underwent iron leaching (Tissint, NWA 7034, NWA 4734, MORB). With these small masses of material, we performed low pressure (approx. 0.75 GPa), high temperature (greater than 1600 degrees Celsius) melting experiments. Each sample was analyzed using a JEOL 8530F electron microprobe to determine the bulk composition of the materials that were previously examined. When available, the results of our microprobe data were compared with bulk rock compositions in the literature. The results of this study show that with this technique, only approx. 50 mg of sample is required to accurately determine the bulk composition of the materials of interest.

  12. Effect of long-term irrigation with sewage effluent on the metal content of soils, Berlin, Germany.

    PubMed

    Lottermoser, Bernd G

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed to determine whether >110 years of sewage application has led to recognizable changes in the metal chemistry of soils from former sewage farms, Berlin, Germany. Background concentrations of soils and element enrichment factors were used for the evaluation of possible perturbations of natural element abundances in sewage farm soils. Calculations verify that precious metals (Ag, Au) as well as P, C(org), and heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sn, and Zn) are invariably enriched in sewage farm topsoils (0-0.1 m depth) compared to local and regional background soils. Long-term irrigation of soils with municipal wastewater has caused significant heavy metal contamination as well as a pronounced enrichment in precious metals. Leaching of metals including Ag into underlying aquifers may impact on the quality of drinking water supplies.

  13. Burn Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... a resource to the community. Learn more The Burn Institute reaches thousands of children and adults each year through fire and burn prevention education, burn survivor support programs and the ...

  14. Recycling metal scrap. June 1970-January 1990 (A Bibliography from the COMPENDEX database). Report for June 1970-January 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the processes, techniques, and benefits of recycling metal scrap. The recycling processes for aluminum, chromium, nickel, cobalt, lead, copper, and precious metals scrap are discussed. Recycling in the jewelry, electronics, milling, beverage, automotive, and aircraft industries is considered. Analyses of the current global scrap metal recycling trends are included. (This updated bibliography contains 362 citations, 21 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  15. Iron-copper metallization for flexible solar/cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavendel, H. W.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of a copper-base metallization for shallow-junction cells applied in flexible solar arrays in space is discussed. This type of metallization will reduce usage of precious metals (such as silver), increase case of bonding (by welding or by soldering) and eliminate heavy high Z interconnects (such as molybdenum). The main points of concern are stability against thermally induced diffusion of copper into silicon which causes degradation of shallow cell junctions, and low series resistance of the contact with semiconductor which promotes cell efficiency.

  16. Bioelectrochemical metal recovery from wastewater: a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heming; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2014-12-01

    Metal contaminated wastewater posts great health and environmental concerns, but it also provides opportunities for precious metal recovery, which may potentially make treatment processes more cost-effective and sustainable. Conventional metal recovery technologies include physical, chemical and biological methods, but they are generally energy and chemical intensive. The recent development of bioelectrochemical technology provides a new approach for efficient metal recovery, because it offers a flexible platform for both oxidation and reduction reaction oriented processes. While dozens of recent studies demonstrated the feasibility of the bioelectrochemical metal recovery concept, the mechanisms have been different and confusing. This study provides a review that summarizes and discusses the different fundamental mechanisms of metal conversion, with the aim of facilitating the scientific understanding and technology development. While the general approach of bioelectrochemical metal recovery is using metals as the electron acceptor in the cathode chamber and organic waste as the electron donor in the anode chamber, there are so far four mechanisms that have been reported: (1) direct metal recovery using abiotic cathodes; (2) metal recovery using abiotic cathodes supplemented by external power sources; (3) metal conversion using bio-cathodes; and (4) metal conversion using bio-cathodes supplemented by external power sources.

  17. Institution Morphisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goguen, Joseph; Rosu, Grigore; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Institutions formalize the intuitive notion of logical system, including both syntax and semantics. A surprising number of different notions of morphisim have been suggested for forming categories with institutions as objects, and a surprising variety of names have been proposed for them. One goal of this paper is to suggest a terminology that is both uniform and informative to replace the current rather chaotic nomenclature. Another goal is to investigate the properties and interrelations of these notions. Following brief expositions of indexed categories, twisted relations, and Kan extensions, we demonstrate and then exploit the duality between institution morphisms in the original sense of Goguen and Burstall, and the 'plain maps' of Meseguer, obtaining simple uniform proofs of completeness and cocompleteness for both resulting categories; because of this duality, we prefer the name 'comorphism' over 'plain map.' We next consider 'theoroidal' morphisms and comorphisims, which generalize signatures to theories, finding that the 'maps' of Meseguer are theoroidal comorphisms, while theoroidal morphisms are a new concept. We then introduce 'forward' and 'semi-natural' morphisms, and appendices discuss institutions for hidden algebra, universal algebra, partial equational logic, and a variant of order sorted algebra supporting partiality.

  18. Institutional Censorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, John Gordon; Bowers, H. Paxton

    1970-01-01

    The difficulty an individual who has been denied access to library material faces in obtaining a remedy in the courts dictates that the library profession go on record against all forms of institutional censorship or unreasonable restrictions on use of library materials. (Author/JS)

  19. Institutional Paralysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarmolinsky, Adam

    1975-01-01

    Institutional paralysis of higher education is the result of the disjunction between faculty and administration; the disjunction between substantive planning and bugetary decision-making; the disjunction between departmental structures and functional areas of university concern; and the disjunction between the theory of direct democracy and its…

  20. Institutional Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Hayden R., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    This publication's theme, "Institutional Change," is broadly examined in fourteen articles that range from research and opinion to allegory and satire. A student teacher, a dean, and a state education director are among the authors. Articles concern: 1) key elements of change; 2) relationships between local, county, state, and federal educational…

  1. Institutional betrayal.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carly Parnitzke; Freyd, Jennifer J

    2014-09-01

    A college freshman reports a sexual assault and is met with harassment and insensitive investigative practices leading to her suicide. Former grade school students, now grown, come forward to report childhood abuse perpetrated by clergy, coaches, and teachers--first in trickles and then in waves, exposing multiple perpetrators with decades of unfettered access to victims. Members of the armed services elect to stay quiet about sexual harassment and assault during their military service or risk their careers by speaking up. A Jewish academic struggles to find a name for the systematic destruction of his people in Nazi Germany during the Holocaust. These seemingly disparate experiences have in common trusted and powerful institutions (schools, churches, military, government) acting in ways that visit harm upon those dependent on them for safety and well-being. This is institutional betrayal. The purpose of this article is to describe psychological research that examines the role of institutions in traumatic experiences and psychological distress following these experiences. We demonstrate the ways in which institutional betrayal has been left unseen by both the individuals being betrayed as well as the field of psychology and introduce means by which to identify and address this betrayal.

  2. Metal Preferences and Metallation*

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Andrew W.; Osman, Deenah; Robinson, Nigel J.

    2014-01-01

    The metal binding preferences of most metalloproteins do not match their metal requirements. Thus, metallation of an estimated 30% of metalloenzymes is aided by metal delivery systems, with ∼25% acquiring preassembled metal cofactors. The remaining ∼70% are presumed to compete for metals from buffered metal pools. Metallation is further aided by maintaining the relative concentrations of these pools as an inverse function of the stabilities of the respective metal complexes. For example, magnesium enzymes always prefer to bind zinc, and these metals dominate the metalloenzymes without metal delivery systems. Therefore, the buffered concentration of zinc is held at least a million-fold below magnesium inside most cells. PMID:25160626

  3. Metal-ion recycle technology for metal electroplating waste waters

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, N.N.; Smith, B.F.

    1993-06-01

    As a result of a collaboration with Boeing Aerospace, the authors have begun a program to identify suitable treatments or to develop new treatments for electroplating baths. The target baths are mixed-metal or alloy baths that are being integrated into the Boeing electroplating complex. These baths, which are designed to replace highly toxic chromium and cadmium baths, contain mixtures of two metals, either nickel-tungsten, nickel-zinc, or zinc-tin. This report reviews the literature and details currently available on emerging technologies that could affect recovery of metals from electroplating baths under development by Boeing Aerospace. This literature survey summarizes technologies relevant to the recovery of metals from electroplating processes. The authors expanded the scope to investigate single metal ion recovery technologies that could be applied to metal ion recovery from alloy baths. This review clearly showed that the electroplating industry has traditionally relied on precipitation and more recently on electrowinning as its waste treatment methods. Despite the almost ubiquitous use of precipitation to remove contaminant metal ions from waste electroplating baths and rinse waters, this technology is clearly no longer feasible for the electroplating industry for several reasons. First, disposal of unstabilized sludge is no longer allowed by law. Second, these methods are no longer adequate as metal-removal techniques because they cannot meet stringent new metal discharge limits. Third, precious resources are being wasted or discarded because these methods do not readily permit recovery of the target metal ions. As a result, emerging technologies for metal recovery are beginning to see application to electroplating waste recycle. This report summarizes current research in these areas. Included are descriptions of various membrane technologies, such as reverse osmosis and ultrafiltration, ion exchange and chelating polymer technology, and electrodialysis.

  4. Galvanic Replacement of the Liquid Metal Galinstan.

    PubMed

    Hoshyargar, Faegheh; Crawford, Jessica; O'Mullane, Anthony P

    2017-02-01

    The galvanic replacement reaction is a highly versatile approach for the creation of a variety of nanostructured materials. However, the majority of reports are limited to the replacement of metallic nanoparticles or metal surfaces. Here we extend this elegant approach and describe the galvanic replacement of the liquid metal alloy galinstan with Ag and Au. This is achieved at a macrosized droplet to create a liquid metal marble that comprises a liquid metal core and a solid metal shell, whereby the morphology of the outer shell is determined by the concentration of metallic ions used in the solution during the galvanic replacement process. In principle, this allows one to recover precious metal ions from solution in their metallic form, which are immobilized on the liquid metal and therefore easy to recover. The reaction is also undertaken at liquid metal microdroplets created via sonication to produce Ag- and Au-based galinstan nanorice particles. These materials are characterized with SEM, XRD, TEM, SAED, EDX, XPS, UV-visible spectroscopy, and open-circuit potential versus time experiments to understand the galvanic replacement process. Finally, the nanosized materials are investigated for their catalytic activity toward the reduction of methylene blue in the presence of sodium borohydride. This approach illustrates a new avenue of research for the galvanic replacement process and, in principle, could be applied to many more systems.

  5. Hydrometallurgical Recovery of Metals from Large Printed Circuit Board Pieces

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, U.; Hocheng, H.

    2015-01-01

    The recovery of precious metals from waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) is an effective recycling process. This paper presents a promising hydrometallurgical process to recover precious metals from waste PCBs. To simplify the metal leaching process, large pieces of PCBs were used instead of a pulverized sample. The chemical coating present on the PCBs was removed by sodium hydroxide (NaOH) treatment prior to the hydrometallurgical treatment. Among the leaching reagents examined, hydrochloric acid (HCl) showed great potential for the recovery of metals. The HCl-mediated leaching of waste PCBs was investigated over a range of conditions. Increasing the acid concentration decreased the time required for complete metal recovery. The shaking speed showed a pronounced positive effect on metal recovery, but the temperature showed an insignificant effect. The results showed that 1 M HCl recovered all of the metals from 4 cm × 4 cm PCBs at room temperature and 150 rpm shaking speed in 22 h. PMID:26415827

  6. Hydrometallurgical Recovery of Metals from Large Printed Circuit Board Pieces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhav, U.; Hocheng, H.

    2015-09-01

    The recovery of precious metals from waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) is an effective recycling process. This paper presents a promising hydrometallurgical process to recover precious metals from waste PCBs. To simplify the metal leaching process, large pieces of PCBs were used instead of a pulverized sample. The chemical coating present on the PCBs was removed by sodium hydroxide (NaOH) treatment prior to the hydrometallurgical treatment. Among the leaching reagents examined, hydrochloric acid (HCl) showed great potential for the recovery of metals. The HCl-mediated leaching of waste PCBs was investigated over a range of conditions. Increasing the acid concentration decreased the time required for complete metal recovery. The shaking speed showed a pronounced positive effect on metal recovery, but the temperature showed an insignificant effect. The results showed that 1 M HCl recovered all of the metals from 4 cm × 4 cm PCBs at room temperature and 150 rpm shaking speed in 22 h.

  7. Catalyst Architecture for Stable Single Atom Dispersion Enables Site-Specific Spectroscopic and Reactivity Measurements of CO Adsorbed to Pt Atoms, Oxidized Pt Clusters, and Metallic Pt Clusters on TiO2.

    PubMed

    DeRita, Leo; Dai, Sheng; Lopez-Zepeda, Kimberly; Pham, Nicholas; Graham, George W; Pan, Xiaoqing; Christopher, Phillip

    2017-10-11

    Oxide-supported precious metal nanoparticles are widely used industrial catalysts. Due to expense and rarity, developing synthetic protocols that reduce precious metal nanoparticle size and stabilize dispersed species is essential. Supported atomically dispersed, single precious metal atoms represent the most efficient metal utilization geometry, although debate regarding the catalytic activity of supported single precious atom species has arisen from difficulty in synthesizing homogeneous and stable single atom dispersions, and a lack of site-specific characterization approaches. We propose a catalyst architecture and characterization approach to overcome these limitations, by depositing ∼1 precious metal atom per support particle and characterizing structures by correlating scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging and CO probe molecule infrared spectroscopy. This is demonstrated for Pt supported on anatase TiO2. In these structures, isolated Pt atoms, Ptiso, remain stable through various conditions, and spectroscopic evidence suggests Ptiso species exist in homogeneous local environments. Comparing Ptiso to ∼1 nm preoxidized (Ptox) and prereduced (Ptmetal) Pt clusters on TiO2, we identify unique spectroscopic signatures of CO bound to each site and find CO adsorption energy is ordered: Ptiso ≪ Ptmetal < Ptox. Ptiso species exhibited a 2-fold greater turnover frequency for CO oxidation than 1 nm Ptmetal clusters but share an identical reaction mechanism. We propose the active catalytic sites are cationic interfacial Pt atoms bonded to TiO2 and that Ptiso exhibits optimal reactivity because every atom is exposed for catalysis and forms an interfacial site with TiO2. This approach should be generally useful for studying the behavior of supported precious metal atoms.

  8. 31 CFR 597.307 - Financial institution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... orders, or similar instruments, credit card system operators, insurance companies, dealers in precious... money, telegraph companies, businesses engaged in vehicle sales, including automobile, airplane or...

  9. 31 CFR 597.307 - Financial institution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... orders, or similar instruments, credit card system operators, insurance companies, dealers in precious... money, telegraph companies, businesses engaged in vehicle sales, including automobile, airplane or...

  10. Efficient hydrogen evolution in transition metal dichalcogenides via a simple one-step hydrazine reaction.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Dustin R; Martinez, Ulises; Sherehiy, Andriy; Kappera, Rajesh; Martinez-Garcia, Alejandro; Schulze, Roland K; Jasinski, Jacek; Zhang, Jing; Gupta, Ram K; Lou, Jun; Chhowalla, Manish; Sumanasekera, Gamini; Mohite, Aditya D; Sunkara, Mahendra K; Gupta, Gautam

    2016-06-10

    Hydrogen evolution reaction is catalysed efficiently with precious metals, such as platinum; however, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently emerged as a promising class of materials for electrocatalysis, but these materials still have low activity and durability when compared with precious metals. Here we report a simple one-step scalable approach, where MoOx/MoS2 core-shell nanowires and molybdenum disulfide sheets are exposed to dilute aqueous hydrazine at room temperature, which results in marked improvement in electrocatalytic performance. The nanowires exhibit ∼100 mV improvement in overpotential following exposure to dilute hydrazine, while also showing a 10-fold increase in current density and a significant change in Tafel slope. In situ electrical, gate-dependent measurements and spectroscopic investigations reveal that hydrazine acts as an electron dopant in molybdenum disulfide, increasing its conductivity, while also reducing the MoOx core in the core-shell nanowires, which leads to improved electrocatalytic performance.

  11. Efficient hydrogen evolution in transition metal dichalcogenides via a simple one-step hydrazine reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummins, Dustin R.; Martinez, Ulises; Sherehiy, Andriy; Kappera, Rajesh; Martinez-Garcia, Alejandro; Schulze, Roland K.; Jasinski, Jacek; Zhang, Jing; Gupta, Ram K.; Lou, Jun; Chhowalla, Manish; Sumanasekera, Gamini; Mohite, Aditya D.; Sunkara, Mahendra K.; Gupta, Gautam

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen evolution reaction is catalysed efficiently with precious metals, such as platinum; however, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently emerged as a promising class of materials for electrocatalysis, but these materials still have low activity and durability when compared with precious metals. Here we report a simple one-step scalable approach, where MoOx/MoS2 core-shell nanowires and molybdenum disulfide sheets are exposed to dilute aqueous hydrazine at room temperature, which results in marked improvement in electrocatalytic performance. The nanowires exhibit ~100 mV improvement in overpotential following exposure to dilute hydrazine, while also showing a 10-fold increase in current density and a significant change in Tafel slope. In situ electrical, gate-dependent measurements and spectroscopic investigations reveal that hydrazine acts as an electron dopant in molybdenum disulfide, increasing its conductivity, while also reducing the MoOx core in the core-shell nanowires, which leads to improved electrocatalytic performance.

  12. Efficient hydrogen evolution in transition metal dichalcogenides via a simple one-step hydrazine reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Dustin R.; Martinez, Ulises; Sherehiy, Andriy; Kappera, Rajesh; Martinez-Garcia, Alejandro; Schulze, Roland K.; Jasinski, Jacek; Zhang, Jing; Gupta, Ram K.; Lou, Jun; Chhowalla, Manish; Sumanasekera, Gamini; Mohite, Aditya D.; Sunkara, Mahendra K.; Gupta, Gautam

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen evolution reaction is catalysed efficiently with precious metals, such as platinum; however, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently emerged as a promising class of materials for electrocatalysis, but these materials still have low activity and durability when compared with precious metals. Here we report a simple one-step scalable approach, where MoOx/MoS2 core-shell nanowires and molybdenum disulfide sheets are exposed to dilute aqueous hydrazine at room temperature, which results in marked improvement in electrocatalytic performance. The nanowires exhibit ∼100 mV improvement in overpotential following exposure to dilute hydrazine, while also showing a 10-fold increase in current density and a significant change in Tafel slope. In situ electrical, gate-dependent measurements and spectroscopic investigations reveal that hydrazine acts as an electron dopant in molybdenum disulfide, increasing its conductivity, while also reducing the MoOx core in the core-shell nanowires, which leads to improved electrocatalytic performance. PMID:27282871

  13. Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-11-01

    Joining the team A new member of staff has recently joined the Institute of Physics Education Department (Schools and Colleges) team. (Dr) Steven Chapman will have managerial responsibility for physics education issues in the 11 - 16 age range, particularly on the policy side. He will work closely with Mary Wood, who spends much of her time out and about doing the practical things to support physics education pre-16. Catherine Wilson will be spending more of her time working to support the Post-16 Physics Initiative but retains overall responsibility for the department. Steven graduated in Physics and Astronomy and then went on to do his doctorate at Sussex University. He stayed in the research field for a while, including a period at NPL. Then, having decided to train as a teacher, he taught for the last five years, most recently at a brand new school in Sutton where he was Head of Physics. Physics update Dates for `Physics Update' courses in 2000, intended for practising science teachers, are as follows: 1 - 3 April: Malvern College 9 - 10 June: Stirling University 8 - 10 July: York University 8 - 10 December: Oxford University The deadline for applications for the course to be held on 11 - 13 December 1999 at the School of Physics, Exeter University, is 12 November, so any late enquiries should be sent to Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 020 7470 4821) right away. Name that teacher! Late nominations are still welcome for the Teachers of Physics/Teachers of Primary Science awards for the year 2000. Closing date for nominations is `the last week in November'. Further details can be obtained from Catherine Wilson or Barbara Hill in the Institute's Education Department. Forward and back! The Education Group's one-day meeting on 13 November is accepting bookings until almost the last minute, so don't delay your application! The day is entitled `Post-16 physics: Looking forward, learning from the past' and it aims to

  14. Metal-free heterogeneous catalysis for sustainable chemistry.

    PubMed

    Su, Dang Sheng; Zhang, Jian; Frank, Benjamin; Thomas, Arne; Wang, Xinchen; Paraknowitsch, Jens; Schlögl, Robert

    2010-02-22

    The current established catalytic processes used in chemical industries use metals, in many cases precious metals, or metal oxides as catalysts. These are often energy-consuming and not highly selective, wasting resources and producing greenhouse gases. Metal-free heterogeneous catalysis using carbon or carbon nitride is an interesting alternative to some current industrialized chemical processes. Carbon and carbon nitride combine environmental acceptability with inexhaustible resources and allow a favorable management of energy with good thermal conductivity. Owing to lower reaction temperatures and increased selectivity, these catalysts could be candidates for green chemistry with low emission and an efficient use of the chemical feedstock. This Review highlights some recent promising activities and developments in heterogeneous catalysis using only carbon and carbon nitride as catalysts. The state-of-the-art and future challenges of metal-free heterogeneous catalysis are also discussed.

  15. A Precious Moment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelner, Lenore Blank

    2005-01-01

    After twenty-three years of being a Teaching Artist, there is one residency that has continually haunted the author. It was an experience that reinforced the value of her work, validated the power of the arts in the classroom, and provoked deep personal reflection. The residency took place in 1999 at Park Street Elementary in a large Southern…

  16. A Precious Moment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelner, Lenore Blank

    2005-01-01

    After twenty-three years of being a Teaching Artist, there is one residency that has continually haunted the author. It was an experience that reinforced the value of her work, validated the power of the arts in the classroom, and provoked deep personal reflection. The residency took place in 1999 at Park Street Elementary in a large Southern…

  17. Profits from precious pets.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, E

    2000-06-09

    In 1998, an anonymous millionaire, hoping to clone his pet dog Missy, awarded a Texas A&M University animal scientist $2.3 million to develop the necessary techniques. Now several companies are cashing in on the boom in frozen-tissue storage of pets for future cloning.

  18. Molecular metal-Nx centres in porous carbon for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Brüller, Sebastian; Dong, Renhao; Zhang, Jian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2015-08-01

    Replacement of precious platinum with efficient and low-cost catalysts for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution at low overpotentials holds tremendous promise for clean energy devices. Here we report a novel type of robust cobalt-nitrogen/carbon catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) that is prepared by the pyrolysis of cobalt-N4 macrocycles or cobalt/o-phenylenediamine composites and using silica colloids as a hard template. We identify the well-dispersed molecular CoNx sites on the carbon support as the active sites responsible for the HER. The CoNx/C catalyst exhibits extremely high turnover frequencies per cobalt site in acids, for example, 0.39 and 6.5 s-1 at an overpotential of 100 and 200 mV, respectively, which are higher than those reported for other scalable non-precious metal HER catalysts. Our results suggest the great promise of developing new families of non-precious metal HER catalysts based on the controlled conversion of homogeneous metal complexes into solid-state carbon catalysts via economically scalable protocols.

  19. Challenges to achievement of metal sustainability in our high-tech society

    SciTech Connect

    Izatt, Reed M.; Izatt, Steven R.; Bruening, Ronald L.; Izatt, Neil; Moyer, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Achievement of sustainability in metal life cycles from mining of virgin ore to consumer and industrial devices to end-of-life products requires greatly increased recycling and improved processing of metals. Electronic and other high-tech products containing precious, toxic, and specialty metals usually have short lifetimes and low recycling rates. Products containing these metals generally are incinerated, discarded as waste in landfills, or dismantled in informal recycling using crude and environmentally irresponsible procedures. Low metal recycling rates coupled with increasing demand for products containing them necessitate increased mining with attendant environmental, health, energy, water, and carbon-footprint consequences. In this tutorial review, challenges to achieving metal sustainability in present high-tech society are presented; health, environmental, and economic incentives for various stakeholders to improve metal sustainability are discussed; a case for technical improvements in separations technology, especially employing molecular recognition, is given; and global consequences of continuing on the present path are examined.

  20. Hydrogen evolution by a metal-free electrocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yao; Jiao, Yan; Zhu, Yihan; Li, Lu Hua; Han, Yu; Chen, Ying; Du, Aijun; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2014-04-28

    Electrocatalytic reduction of water to molecular hydrogen via the hydrogen evolution reaction may provide a sustainable energy supply for the future, but its commercial application is hampered by the use of precious platinum catalysts. All alternatives to platinum thus far are based on nonprecious metals, and, to our knowledge, there is no report about a catalyst for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution beyond metals. Here we couple graphitic-carbon nitride with nitrogen-doped graphene to produce a metal-free hybrid catalyst, which shows an unexpected hydrogen evolution reaction activity with comparable overpotential and Tafel slope to some of well-developed metallic catalysts. Experimental observations in combination with density functional theory calculations reveal that its unusual electrocatalytic properties originate from an intrinsic chemical and electronic coupling that synergistically promotes the proton adsorption and reduction kinetics.

  1. Institute Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann; Steadman, Jackie; Little, Sally; Underwood, Debra; Blackman, Mack; Simonds, Judy

    1997-01-01

    This report documents a study conducted by the MSFC working group on Institutes in 1995 on the structure, organization and business arrangements of Institutes at a time when the agency was considering establishing science institutes. Thirteen institutes, ten science centers associated with the state of Georgia, Stanford Research Institute (SRI), and IIT Research Institute (IITRI), and general data on failed institutes were utilized to form this report. The report covers the working group's findings on institute mission, structure, director, board of directors/advisors, the working environment, research arrangements, intellectual property rights, business management, institute funding, and metrics.

  2. Hawaii Natural Energy Institute: Annual report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This progress report from the University of Hawaii at Manoa's School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology describes state of the art research in tapping the energy in and around the Hawaiian Islands. Researchers are seeking new ways of generating electricity and producing methanol from sugarcane waste and other biomass. They are finding ways to encourage the expanded use of methanol as a transportation fuel. They are creating innovative and cost-efficient methods of producing and storing hydrogen gas, considered the fuel of the future''. Researchers are also developing the techniques and technologies that will enable us to tap the unlimited mineral resources of the surrounding ocean. they are testing methods of using the oceans to reduce the carbon dioxide being discharged to the atmosphere. And they are mapping the strategies by which the seas can become a major source of food, precious metals, and space for living and for industry. The achievements described in this annual report can be attributed to the experience, creativity, painstaking study, perseverance, and sacrifices of our the dedicated corps of researchers.

  3. Ion exchange extraction of heavy metals from wastewater sludges.

    PubMed

    Al-Enezi, G; Hamoda, M F; Fawzi, N

    2004-01-01

    Heavy metals are common contaminants of some industrial wastewater. They find their way to municipal wastewaters due to industrial discharges into the sewerage system or through household chemicals. The most common heavy metals found in wastewaters are lead, copper, nickel, cadmium, zinc, mercury, arsenic, and chromium. Such metals are toxic and pose serious threats to the environment and public health. In recent years, the ion exchange process has been increasingly used for the removal of heavy metals or the recovery of precious metals. It is a versatile separation process with the potential for broad applications in the water and wastewater treatment field. This article summarizes the results obtained from a laboratory study on the removal of heavy metals from municipal wastewater sludges obtained from Ardhiya plant in Kuwait. Data on heavy metal content of the wastewater and sludge samples collected from the plant are presented. The results obtained from laboratory experiments using a commercially available ion exchange resin to remove heavy metals from sludge were discussed. A technique was developed to solubilize such heavy metals from the sludge for subsequent treatment by the ion exchange process. The results showed high efficiency of extraction, almost 99.9%, of heavy metals in the concentration range bound in wastewater effluents and sludges. Selective removal of heavy metals from a contaminated wastewater/sludge combines the benefits of being economically prudent and providing the possibility of reuse/recycle of the treated wastewater effluents and sludges.

  4. Innovative approach for the valorization of useful metals from waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soare, V.; Burada, M.; Dumitrescu, D. V.; Constantin, I.; Soare, V.; Popescu, A.-M. J.; Carcea, I.

    2016-08-01

    Waste electric and electronic equipment are an important secondary source of rare and precious metals and their processing through ecological technologies constitutes a major concern in the European Union and significantly contributes to the reduction of environmental pollution and to the preservation of valuable resources of nonferrous metals. The paper presents an innovative approach for the complex valorization of useful metals contained in WEEE. The method consists in the melting of WEEE in a furnace in a microwave field at temperatures of 1000 ÷1200°C, for the complete separation of the metallic fraction from the organic components. The gases resulting from the melting process were also treated/neutralized in a microwave environment and the obtained metallic bulk (multi-component alloy) was processed through combined hydrometallurgical and electrochemical methods. The major elements in the metallic bulk (Cu, Sn, Zn, Pb) were separated/recovered by anodic dissolution, respectively by leaching in nitric acid followed by cementation using various agents, or by electrodeposition. Depending on the electrochemical parameters, cathodic deposits consisting of Cu, with a purity higher than 99.9%, or of Cu-Sn and Cu-Sn-Zn alloys were obtained. Silver was valorized by leaching/precipitation with NaCl and the gold concentrated in the anodic slime will be recovered by thiourea extraction. The experiments performed demonstrate the possibility of ecological and efficient processing of WEEE in a microwave field and the recovery of nonferrous and precious metals through combined hydrometallurgical and electrochemical methods.

  5. Effects of metal combinations on cytotoxicity evaluation using a dynamic extraction method.

    PubMed

    Takeda, S; Akiyama, M; Sakane, K; Sakai, T; Nakamura, M

    2000-12-01

    The effects of metal combinations on cytotoxicity were examined following dynamic extraction by freely gyrating two spherical metals in a glass vessel. The cell viabilities of an Au alloy, a Ag-Pd-Au alloy and Ti were little affected by combinations among three metals. Cell viability ranged between 60 and 80% when precious alloys were in combination with Co-Cr or Ni-Cr alloys. Ti showed a clear difference in cell viability either in combination with Co-Cr or Ni-Cr alloys. The cell viability of the Ti/Co-Cr alloy combination was the same as that of precious alloys/Co-Cr or Ni-Cr alloy combinations. However, in an analogy with Co-Cr alloy/Ni-Cr alloy combination, the Ti/Ni-Cr alloy combination depressed the cell viability below 20%. This suggested that when new metals are to be used in combination with dissimilar metals, the cytotoxicity of the metals could be evaluated in extraction conditions using the mutual dynamic contact of dissimilar metals.

  6. Metallic bionanocatalysts: potential applications as green catalysts and energy materials.

    PubMed

    Macaskie, Lynne E; Mikheenko, Iryna P; Omajai, Jacob B; Stephen, Alan J; Wood, Joseph

    2017-08-22

    Microbially generated or supported nanocatalysts have potential applications in green chemistry and environmental application. However, precious (and base) metals biorefined from wastes may be useful for making cheap, low-grade catalysts for clean energy production. The concept of bionanomaterials for energy applications is reviewed with respect to potential fuel cell applications, bio-catalytic upgrading of oils and manufacturing 'drop-in fuel' precursors. Cheap, effective biomaterials would facilitate progress towards dual development goals of sustainable consumption and production patterns and help to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Global mining risk footprint of critical metals necessary for low-carbon technologies: the case of neodymium, cobalt, and platinum in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nansai, Keisuke; Nakajima, Kenichi; Kagawa, Shigemi; Kondo, Yasushi; Shigetomi, Yosuke; Suh, Sangwon

    2015-02-17

    Meeting the 2-degree global warming target requires wide adoption of low-carbon energy technologies. Many such technologies rely on the use of precious metals, however, increasing the dependence of national economies on these resources. Among such metals, those with supply security concerns are referred to as critical metals. Using the Policy Potential Index developed by the Fraser Institute, this study developed a new footprint indicator, the mining risk footprint (MRF), to quantify the mining risk directly and indirectly affecting a national economy through its consumption of critical metals. We formulated the MRF as a product of the material footprint (MF) of the consuming country and the mining risks of the countries where the materials are mined. A case study was conducted for the 2005 Japanese economy to determine the MF and MRF for three critical metals essential for emerging energy technologies: neodymium, cobalt and platinum. The results indicate that in 2005 the MFs generated by Japanese domestic final demand, that is, the consumption-based metal output of Japan, were 1.0 × 10(3) t for neodymium, 9.4 × 10(3) t for cobalt, and 2.1 × 10 t for platinum. Export demand contributes most to the MF, accounting for 3.0 × 10(3) t, 1.3 × 10(5) t, and 3.1 × 10 t, respectively. The MRFs of Japanese total final demand (domestic plus export) were calculated to be 1.7 × 10 points for neodymium, 4.5 × 10(-2) points for cobalt, and 5.6 points for platinum, implying that the Japanese economy is incurring a high mining risk through its use of neodymium. This country's MRFs are all dominated by export demand. The paper concludes by discussing the policy implications and future research directions for measuring the MFs and MRFs of critical metals. For countries poorly endowed with mineral resources, adopting low-carbon energy technologies may imply a shifting of risk from carbon resources to other natural resources, in particular critical metals, and a trade

  8. Remote sensing and GIS prospectivity mapping for magmatic-hydrothermal base- and precious-metal deposits in the Honghai district, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gongwen; Du, Wenhui; Carranza, Emmanuel John M.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we constructed an exploration target model for volcanogenic massive sulfide and hydrothermal deposits in Honghai district (China) using moderate resolution ETM+, ASTER, and hyperspectral Hyperion images and high resolution ZY-3 images, and weights-of-evidence (WofE) analysis and concentration-area (C-A) fractal modeling. The methodology and mapping steps were: (1) ETM + images were used to extract hydroxyl and iron-oxide alterations for identification of linear and ring fault structures and prospective zones in regional scale; (2) ASTER images were used to extract SiO2 index, kaolinite, chlorite, propylite, potassium, carbonate, and limonite alterations for identification of mineralization zones in district scale; (3) hyperspectral Hyperion images were analyzed to identify mineral components for identification of Cusbnd Au deposit zones in district scale; (4) high resolution ZY-3 images were used to extract geological objects (e.g., volcanic rocks, integration, and linear and ring fault structures) and cross-validate multiple type alterations and their associations with lithological strata based on interpretation of ETM+ and ASTER images; (5) alteration/structural factors and geological objects were integrated for mineral prospectivity mapping by WofE analysis, and mineral prospectivity was classified by (C-A) fractal modeling. Ring faults, iron-oxide alteration, chlorite alteration and silicification are important exploration factors, whereas carbonate alteration, potassic alteration, and linear faults are secondary exploration factors. Ten exploration targets were recognized in the Honghai district.

  9. Base- and precious-metal deposits in the Basin and Range of Southern California and Southern Nevada—Metallogenic implications of lead isotope studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, Stanley E.; Cox, Dennis P.; Wooden, Joseph L.; Tingley, Joseph V.; Vaughn, Robert B.

    2005-12-01

    Southern California and southern Nevada contain abundant lead-zinc deposits with strikingly different characteristics. On the west, the Darwin Terrane contains abundant Jurassic and Cretaceous intrusions surrounded by lead-zinc skarn and replacement deposits rich in pyrite and manganese minerals. The Tecopa Terrane is east of the Darwin Terrane and contains some lead deposits that are hosted by the Proterozoic Noonday Dolomite. These lead deposits have no consistent relation to igneous rocks; they contain mainly galena, and are devoid of pyrite and manganese minerals. Other skarn and vein deposits in the Ivanpah and Tecopa districts are more closely associated with igneous rocks. Mississippi Valley type lead-zinc deposits are present still farther to the east in the Goodsprings Terrane in Nevada. These deposits are hosted by breccias formed below the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian unconformity and are unrelated to igneous rocks. Deposits in the Darwin Terrane have lead isotopic signatures that lie along a mantle-sediment mixing line indicating that they formed in a continental arc setting analogous to that for the plutons in the Sierra Nevada batholith [Chen, J.H. and Tilton, G.R., 1991. Application of lead and strontium isotopic relationships to the petrogenesis of granitoid rocks, central Sierra Nevada batholith, California. Geological Society of America Bulletin 103, 439-447]. Encroachment of this continental arc on the North American continent in the eastern part of the Darwin Terrane resulted in a lead isotopic signature that is like that of the strongly contaminated plutons [Chen, J.H. and Tilton, G.R., 1991. Application of lead and strontium isotopic relationships to the petrogenesis of granitoid rocks, central Sierra Nevada batholith, California. Geological Society of America Bulletin 103, 439-447]. Many deposits from the Inyo Mountains on east side of the Owens Valley have lead isotopic signatures that reflect this encroachment. To the east in the Tecopa Terrane, encroachment of the continental arc on the Mojave crust resulted in partial melting of 1.7 Ga amphibolite and granulite facies rocks to produce the plutons and mineral deposits associated with plutons in this terrane. Lead from deposits in this terrane hosted in the Proterozoic Noonday Dolomite and associated rocks have a lead isotope signature that reflects hydrothermal circulation of fluids in the Mojave supracrustal rocks. The boundary between the Darwin Terrane and the Tecopa Terrane lies just west of the Ash Valley-Panamint Range Fault and is bounded by the Towne Fault on the north and the Garlock Fault on the south. Lead isotopic data from the Goodsprings district in southwestern Nevada, east of the Tecopa Terrane, form a 1.45 Ga linear array that is indicative of Mississippi Valley type mineralization. Although we have no independent evidence of the timing of the tectonic events that formed these deposits, it is likely that all formed as a result of the Mesozoic collision of the Panthalassen crust with the North American continent.

  10. Base- and precious-metal deposits in the Basin and Range of Southern California and Southern Nevada - Metallogenic implications of lead isotope studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, S.E.; Cox, D.P.; Wooden, J.L.; Tingley, J.V.; Vaughn, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    Southern California and southern Nevada contain abundant lead-zinc deposits with strikingly different characteristics. On the west, the Darwin Terrane contains abundant Jurassic and Cretaceous intrusions surrounded by lead-zinc skarn and replacement deposits rich in pyrite and manganese minerals. The Tecopa Terrane is east of the Darwin Terrane and contains some lead deposits that are hosted by the Proterozoic Noonday Dolomite. These lead deposits have no consistent relation to igneous rocks; they contain mainly galena, and are devoid of pyrite and manganese minerals. Other skarn and vein deposits in the Ivanpah and Tecopa districts are more closely associated with igneous rocks. Mississippi Valley type lead-zinc deposits are present still farther to the east in the Goodsprings Terrane in Nevada. These deposits are hosted by breccias formed below the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian unconformity and are unrelated to igneous rocks. Deposits in the Darwin Terrane have lead isotopic signatures that lie along a mantle-sediment mixing line indicating that they formed in a continental arc setting analogous to that for the plutons in the Sierra Nevada batholith [Chen, J.H. and Tilton, G.R., 1991. Application of lead and strontium isotopic relationships to the petrogenesis of granitoid rocks, central Sierra Nevada batholith, California. Geological Society of America Bulletin 103, 439-447]. Encroachment of this continental arc on the North American continent in the eastern part of the Darwin Terrane resulted in a lead isotopic signature that is like that of the strongly contaminated plutons [Chen, J.H. and Tilton, G.R., 1991. Application of lead and strontium isotopic relationships to the petrogenesis of granitoid rocks, central Sierra Nevada batholith, California. Geological Society of America Bulletin 103, 439-447]. Many deposits from the Inyo Mountains on east side of the Owens Valley have lead isotopic signatures that reflect this encroachment. To the east in the Tecopa Terrane, encroachment of the continental arc on the Mojave crust resulted in partial melting of 1.7 Ga amphibolite and granulite facies rocks to produce the plutons and mineral deposits associated with plutons in this terrane. Lead from deposits in this terrane hosted in the Proterozoic Noonday Dolomite and associated rocks have a lead isotope signature that reflects hydrothermal circulation of fluids in the Mojave supracrustal rocks. The boundary between the Darwin Terrane and the Tecopa Terrane lies just west of the Ash Valley-Panamint Range Fault and is bounded by the Towne Fault on the north and the Garlock Fault on the south. Lead isotopic data from the Goodsprings district in southwestern Nevada, east of the Tecopa Terrane, form a 1.45 Ga linear array that is indicative of Mississippi Valley type mineralization. Although we have no independent evidence of the timing of the tectonic events that formed these deposits, it is likely that all formed as a result of the Mesozoic collision of the Panthalassen crust with the North American continent. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Process development for recovery of copper and precious metals from waste printed circuit boards with emphasize on palladium and gold leaching and precipitation.

    PubMed

    Behnamfard, Ali; Salarirad, Mohammad Mehdi; Veglio, Francesco

    2013-11-01

    A novel hydrometallurgical process was proposed for selective recovery of Cu, Ag, Au and Pd from waste printed circuit boards (PCBs). More than 99% of copper content was dissolved by using two consecutive sulfuric acid leaching steps in the presence of H2O2 as oxidizing agents. The solid residue of 2nd leaching step was treated by acidic thiourea in the presence of ferric iron as oxidizing agent and 85.76% Au and 71.36% Ag dissolution was achieved. The precipitation of Au and Ag from acidic thiourea leachate was investigated by using different amounts of sodium borohydride (SBH) as a reducing agent. The leaching of Pd and remained gold from the solid reside of 3rd leaching step was performed in NaClO-HCl-H2O2 leaching system and the effect of different parameters was investigated. The leaching of Pd and specially Au increased by increasing the NaClO concentration up to 10V% and any further increasing the NaClO concentration has a negligible effect. The leaching of Pd and Au increased by increasing the HCl concentration from 2.5 to 5M. The leaching of Pd and Au were endothermic and raising the temperature had a positive effect on leaching efficiency. The kinetics of Pd leaching was quite fast and after 30min complete leaching of Pd was achieved, while the leaching of Au need a longer contact time. The best conditions for leaching of Pd and Au in NaClO-HCl-H2O2 leaching system were determined to be 5M HCl, 1V% H2O2, 10V% NaClO at 336K for 3h with a solid/liquid ratio of 1/10. 100% of Pd and Au of what was in the chloride leachate were precipitated by using 2g/L SBH. Finally, a process flow sheet for the recovery of Cu, Ag, Au and Pd from PCB was proposed.

  12. A Cleaner Process for Selective Recovery of Valuable Metals from Electronic Waste of Complex Mixtures of End-of-Life Electronic Products.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhi; Xiao, Y; Sietsma, J; Agterhuis, H; Yang, Y

    2015-07-07

    In recent years, recovery of metals from electronic waste within the European Union has become increasingly important due to potential supply risk of strategic raw material and environmental concerns. Electronic waste, especially a mixture of end-of-life electronic products from a variety of sources, is of inherently high complexity in composition, phase, and physiochemical properties. In this research, a closed-loop hydrometallurgical process was developed to recover valuable metals, i.e., copper and precious metals, from an industrially processed information and communication technology waste. A two-stage leaching design of this process was adopted in order to selectively extract copper and enrich precious metals. It was found that the recovery efficiency and extraction selectivity of copper both reached more than 95% by using ammonia-based leaching solutions. A new electrodeposition process has been proven feasible with 90% current efficiency during copper recovery, and the copper purity can reach 99.8 wt %. The residue from the first-stage leaching was screened into coarse and fine fractions. The coarse fraction was returned to be releached for further copper recovery. The fine fraction was treated in the second-stage leaching using sulfuric acid to further concentrate precious metals, which could achieve a 100% increase in their concentrations in the residue with negligible loss into the leaching solution. By a combination of different leaching steps and proper physical separation of light materials, this process can achieve closed-loop recycling of the waste with significant efficiency.

  13. Recovery of high-value metals from geothermal sites by biosorption and bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yung-Chung; Cheng, Chieh-Lun; Han, Yin-Lung; Chen, Bor-Yann; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2014-05-01

    Generation of geothermal energy is associated with a significant amount of geothermal fluids, which may be abundant in high-value metals, such as lithium, cesium, rubidium, and other precious and rare earth metals. The recovery of high-value metals from geothermal fluids would thus have both economic and environmental benefits. The conventional technologies applied to achieve this are mostly physicochemical, which may be energy intensive, pose the risk of secondary pollution whilst being inefficient in recovering metals from dilute solutions. Biological methods, based on biosorption or bioaccumulation, have recently emerged as alternative approaches, as they are more environmentally friendly, cost effective, and suitable for treating wastewater with dilute metal contents. This article provides a comprehensive review of the related biological technologies used to recover the high-value metals present in geothermal fluids as well as critical discussion on the key issues that are often used to evaluate the effectiveness of those methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A preliminary categorization of end-of-life electrical and electronic equipment as secondary metal resources.

    PubMed

    Oguchi, Masahiro; Murakami, Shinsuke; Sakanakura, Hirofumi; Kida, Akiko; Kameya, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    End-of-life electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) has recently received attention as a secondary source of metals. This study examined characteristics of end-of-life EEE as secondary metal resources to consider efficient collection and metal recovery systems according to the specific metals and types of EEE. We constructed an analogy between natural resource development and metal recovery from end-of-life EEE and found that metal content and total annual amount of metal contained in each type of end-of-life EEE should be considered in secondary resource development, as well as the collectability of the end-of-life products. We then categorized 21 EEE types into five groups and discussed their potential as secondary metal resources. Refrigerators, washing machines, air conditioners, and CRT TVs were evaluated as the most important sources of common metals, and personal computers, mobile phones, and video games were evaluated as the most important sources of precious metals. Several types of small digital equipment were also identified as important sources of precious metals; however, mid-size information and communication technology (ICT) equipment (e.g., printers and fax machines) and audio/video equipment were shown to be more important as a source of a variety of less common metals. The physical collectability of each type of EEE was roughly characterized by unit size and number of end-of-life products generated annually. Current collection systems in Japan were examined and potentially appropriate collection methods were suggested for equipment types that currently have no specific collection systems in Japan, particularly for video games, notebook computers, and mid-size ICT and audio/video equipment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Protecting health from metal exposures in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Armour, Margaret-Ann

    2016-03-01

    Drinking water is essential to us as human beings. According to the World Health Organization "The quality of drinking-water is a powerful environmental determinant of health" (http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/dwq/en/), but clean drinking water is a precious commodity not always readily available. Surface and ground water are the major sources of drinking water. Both can be contaminated, surface water with bacteria while ground water frequently contains salts of metals that occur naturally or are introduced by human activity. This paper will briefly review the metallic salts found in drinking water in areas around the world, as well as list some of the methods used to reduce or remove them. It will then discuss our research on reducing the risk of pollution of drinking water by removal of metal ions from wastewater.

  16. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-08-22

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  17. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    DOEpatents

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-02-07

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  18. Study of a brittle and precious medieval rose-window by means of the integration of GPR, stress wave tests and infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuzzo, L.; Masini, N.; Rizzo, E.

    2009-04-01

    The correct management and restoration of architectural monuments of high cultural interest requires a comprehensive understanding of their status of preservation, the detection of the building features, the localization of damages and possibly the identification of their causes, nature and extent. To this aim, in recent times there is a growing interest on non-destructive and non-invasive geophysical methods as an invaluable tool for correlating spatially the information gained through destructive tests, which are restricted to a few locations of the investigated structure, and to optimize the choice of their position in order to minimize their impact on the monument structural stability. Moreover, the integration of the classical geophysical techniques with emerging surface and subsurface sensing techniques (acoustics, thermography) provides a suitable methodology for a multi-scale assessment of the monument state of preservation and its material and building components, which is vital for addressing maintenance and restoration issues. The present case study focuses on the application of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), infrared thermography (IRT), sonic and ultrasonic tests to analyze a 13th century precious rose window in Southern Italy, affected by widespread decay and instability problems. The Cathedral of Troia (Apulia, Italy) is the masterpiece of the Apulian Romanesque architecture. Its façade is adorned with an astonishing 6 m diameter rose window consisting of 11 twin columns, in various stone and reused marbles, connected to a central oculus and to a ring of trapezoidal elements decorated with arched ribworks. Between the twin columns there are 11 triangular carved panels with different and strongly symbolic geometrical patterns. According to visual inspection, mineralogical and petrographic studies, different materials have been used for the different architectural elements: fine grained limestone for the central oculus, medium-fine grained calcarenite

  19. Transition-Metal Doped Ceria Microspheres with Nanoporous Structures for CO Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Ze; Chen, Zhuwen; Hong, Mei; Zhu, Rongshu; Liang, Yongye; Zhao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide (CO) is of great importance in many different fields of industry. Until now it still remains challenging to use non-noble metal based catalysts to oxidize CO at low temperature. Herein, we report a new class of nanoporous, uniform, and transition metal-doped cerium (IV) oxide (ceria, CeO2) microsphere for CO oxidation catalysis. The porous and uniform microsphere is generated by sacrificed polymer template. Transition-metals, like Cu, Co, Ni, Mn and Fe, were doped into CeO2 microspheres. The combination of hierarchical structure and metal doping afford superior catalytic activities of the doped ceria microspheres, which could pave a new way to advanced non-precious metal based catalysts for CO oxidation. PMID:27030159

  20. Transition-Metal Doped Ceria Microspheres with Nanoporous Structures for CO Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Yao, Ze; Chen, Zhuwen; Hong, Mei; Zhu, Rongshu; Liang, Yongye; Zhao, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide (CO) is of great importance in many different fields of industry. Until now it still remains challenging to use non-noble metal based catalysts to oxidize CO at low temperature. Herein, we report a new class of nanoporous, uniform, and transition metal-doped cerium (IV) oxide (ceria, CeO2) microsphere for CO oxidation catalysis. The porous and uniform microsphere is generated by sacrificed polymer template. Transition-metals, like Cu, Co, Ni, Mn and Fe, were doped into CeO2 microspheres. The combination of hierarchical structure and metal doping afford superior catalytic activities of the doped ceria microspheres, which could pave a new way to advanced non-precious metal based catalysts for CO oxidation.

  1. Swimmer-Training Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    This satirical essay proposes an institution of higher learning that would prepare students to become swimmers" and swimming instructors. Curriculum, teaching methods, student selection and evaluation are modelled on certain contemporary teacher-training institutes. (PD)

  2. Noble metal-free hydrogen evolution catalysts for water splitting.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Yu

    2015-08-07

    Sustainable hydrogen production is an essential prerequisite of a future hydrogen economy. Water electrolysis driven by renewable resource-derived electricity and direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion based on photochemical and photoelectrochemical water splitting are promising pathways for sustainable hydrogen production. All these techniques require, among many things, highly active noble metal-free hydrogen evolution catalysts to make the water splitting process more energy-efficient and economical. In this review, we highlight the recent research efforts toward the synthesis of noble metal-free electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and their catalytic properties for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We review several important kinds of heterogeneous non-precious metal electrocatalysts, including metal sulfides, metal selenides, metal carbides, metal nitrides, metal phosphides, and heteroatom-doped nanocarbons. In the discussion, emphasis is given to the synthetic methods of these HER electrocatalysts, the strategies of performance improvement, and the structure/composition-catalytic activity relationship. We also summarize some important examples showing that non-Pt HER electrocatalysts could serve as efficient cocatalysts for promoting direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion in both photochemical and photoelectrochemical water splitting systems, when combined with suitable semiconductor photocatalysts.

  3. Canadian institute honours Hawking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrani, Matin

    2009-11-01

    The Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada, has announced that a major new extension to its campus will be known as the Stephen Hawking Centre. The extension, which is currently being built, is due to open in 2011 and will double the size of the institute. It will also provide a home for the institute's Masters students, the first of whom joined the Perimeter Institute this autumn as part of its Perimeter Scholars international programme.

  4. Implementing Institutional Research Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Although many agree that institutional research in higher education has come of age and is accepted as a part of institutional management, great variations exist in the extent to which institutional research findings are synthesized and utilized in management decision-making. A number of reasons can be identified as accounting for this phenomenon,…

  5. Astronomical Institute of Athens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Astronomical Institute of Athens is the oldest research institute of modern Greece (it faces the Parthenon). The Astronomical Institute (AI) of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA) started its observational projects in 1847. The modern computer and research center are housed at the Penteli Astronomical Station with major projects and international collaborations focused on extragalactic ...

  6. Netherlands Maritime Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoefsmit, R. G. A.

    1976-01-01

    Account of the aims and activities of the Netherlands Maritime Institute provided by the Secretary to the Institute's Board of Directors, The Institute's intent is "to promote maritime activities, including the shipbuilding-shipping relationship, in the broadest sense of the word." (Editor/RK)

  7. Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics (HIA) is the Institute within the NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL of Canada responsible for providing astronomical facilities, and developing related instrumentation and software for Canadian researchers. The Institute was established in 1975, and now operates 1.8 m and 1.2 m optical telescopes at the DOMINION ASTROPHYSICAL OBSERVATORY close to Victoria, BC, as we...

  8. Fabrication of crystals from single metal atoms

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Nicolas P. E.; Pitto-Barry, Anaïs; Sanchez, Ana M.; Dove, Andrew P.; Procter, Richard J.; Soldevila-Barreda, Joan J.; Kirby, Nigel; Hands-Portman, Ian; Smith, Corinne J.; O’Reilly, Rachel K.; Beanland, Richard; Sadler, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Metal nanocrystals offer new concepts for the design of nanodevices with a range of potential applications. Currently the formation of metal nanocrystals cannot be controlled at the level of individual atoms. Here we describe a new general method for the fabrication of multi-heteroatom-doped graphitic matrices decorated with very small, ångström-sized, three-dimensional (3D)-metal crystals of defined size. We irradiate boron-rich precious-metal-encapsulated self-spreading polymer micelles with electrons and produce, in real time, a doped graphitic support on which individual osmium atoms hop and migrate to form 3D-nanocrystals, as small as 15 Å in diameter, within 1 h. Crystal growth can be observed, quantified and controlled in real time. We also synthesize the first examples of mixed ruthenium–osmium 3D-nanocrystals. This technology not only allows the production of ångström-sized homo- and hetero-crystals, but also provides new experimental insight into the dynamics of nanocrystals and pathways for their assembly from single atoms. PMID:24861089

  9. Fabrication of crystals from single metal atoms.

    PubMed

    Barry, Nicolas P E; Pitto-Barry, Anaïs; Sanchez, Ana M; Dove, Andrew P; Procter, Richard J; Soldevila-Barreda, Joan J; Kirby, Nigel; Hands-Portman, Ian; Smith, Corinne J; O'Reilly, Rachel K; Beanland, Richard; Sadler, Peter J

    2014-05-27

    Metal nanocrystals offer new concepts for the design of nanodevices with a range of potential applications. Currently the formation of metal nanocrystals cannot be controlled at the level of individual atoms. Here we describe a new general method for the fabrication of multi-heteroatom-doped graphitic matrices decorated with very small, ångström-sized, three-dimensional (3D)-metal crystals of defined size. We irradiate boron-rich precious-metal-encapsulated self-spreading polymer micelles with electrons and produce, in real time, a doped graphitic support on which individual osmium atoms hop and migrate to form 3D-nanocrystals, as small as 15 Å in diameter, within 1 h. Crystal growth can be observed, quantified and controlled in real time. We also synthesize the first examples of mixed ruthenium-osmium 3D-nanocrystals. This technology not only allows the production of ångström-sized homo- and hetero-crystals, but also provides new experimental insight into the dynamics of nanocrystals and pathways for their assembly from single atoms.

  10. Mapping Hispanic-Serving Institutions: A Typology of Institutional Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Núñez, Anne-Marie; Crisp, Gloria; Elizondo, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs), institutions that enroll at least 25% Hispanic students, are institutionally diverse, including a much wider array of institutional types than other Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs). Furthermore, they have distinctive institutional characteristics from those typically emphasized in institutional typologies…

  11. Metals Sector

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find environmental regulatory information about the metals sector (NAICS 331 & 332), including NESHAPs for metal coatings, effluent guidelines for metal products, combustion compliance assistance, and information about foundry sand recycling.

  12. Metal aminoboranes

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Davis, Benjamin J.; Thorn, David L.; Gordon, John C.; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy Allen; Tumas, William; Diyabalanage, Himashinie Vichalya Kaviraj; Shrestha, Roshan P.

    2010-05-11

    Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit.

  13. Binding and catalytic reduction of NO by transition metal aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Hou, Shaolie.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of this research is to provide the scientific understanding of processes that actively and selectively reduce NO in dilute exhaust streams, as well as in concentrated streams, to N{sub 2}. Experimental studies of NO chemistry in transition metal-containing aluminosilicate catalysts are being carried out with the aim of determining the chemical rules for NO reduction on non-precious metals. The catalyst supports chosen for this investigation are A and Y zeolites, mordenite, and monoliths based on cordierite. The supported transition metal cations that were examined are principally the first row redox metals, e.g. Cr(2), Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Cu(I). The reactions of interest are the reductions of NO by H{sub 2}, CO, and CH{sub 4}, as well as the disproportionation of NO. Rare earth cations that possess redox properties were placed in the more shielded sites, e.g. Site I in Y zeolite, prior to or simultaneously with the exchange procedure with the transition metal cations. Theoretical calculations of the electronic structure of the transition metal cations in zeolitic sites were carried out by ab initio methods. The aim of this part of the research is to find the best match between the metal-based antibonding orbitals and the antibonding orbitals of the NO molecule such that the N-O bond is weakened and is readily broken. 9 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Coinage Metal Complexes of Bis-Alkynyl-Functionalized N-Heterocyclic Carbenes: Reactivity, Photophysical Properties, and Quantum Chemical Investigations.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Claude; Bestgen, Sebastian; Gamer, Michael T; Kühn, Michael; Lebedkin, Sergei; Weigend, Florian; Kappes, Manfred M; Roesky, Peter W

    2017-01-31

    Bis-phenylpropynyl-functionalized imidazolium salts and their corresponding gold and copper N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes were prepared in order to investigate their potential application for the synthesis of heterometallic coinage metal compounds. By transmetalation reactions with different precious metal sources, including copper and silver phenylacetylides [MCCPh]n (M=Cu, Ag), polynuclear compounds were obtained, which were further investigated for their photoluminescence properties. Additionally, one gold NHC complex was post-functionalized by autocatalytic hydration of the alkynyl side chains. Time-dependent DFT investigations of singlet electronic excitations in representative complexes revealed excited states of diverse character, as determined by the specific complex structure and metallophilic interactions.

  15. Bio‐palladium: from metal recovery to catalytic applications

    PubMed Central

    De Corte, Simon; Hennebel, Tom; De Gusseme, Bart; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2012-01-01

    Summary While precious metals are available to a very limited extent, there is an increasing demand to use them as catalyst. This is also true for palladium (Pd) catalysts and their sustainable recycling and production are required. Since Pd catalysts exist nowadays mostly under the form of nanoparticles, these particles need to be produced in an environment‐friendly way. Biological synthesis of Pd nanoparticles (‘bio‐Pd’) is an innovative method for both metal recovery and nanocatalyst synthesis. This review will discuss the different bio‐Pd precipitating microorganisms, the applications of the catalyst (both for environmental purposes and in organic chemistry) and the state of the art of the reactors based on the bio‐Pd concept. In addition, some main challenges are discussed, which need to be overcome in order to create a sustainable nanocatalyst. Finally, some outlooks for bio‐Pd in environmental technology are presented. PMID:21554561

  16. Chemical analyses of geothermal waters and Strategic Petroleum Reserve brines for metals of economic importance

    SciTech Connect

    Harrar, J.E.; Raber, E.

    1984-01-01

    Waters from seven hydrothermal-geothermal, one geopressured-geothermal, and six Strategic Petroleum Reserve wells have been surveyed for 12 metals of economic importance using trace chemical analysis techniques. The elements sought were Cr, Co, Mn, Ta, Sn, V, Nb, Li, Sr, Pt, Au and Ag. Platinum was found at a concentration of approx. 50 ppb in a brine from the Salton Sea geothermal area. Brine from this region, as has been known from previous studies, is also rich in Li, Sr and Mn. Higher concentrations (approx. 900 ppm) of Sr are found in the high-salinity geopressured brines. None of the fluids contained interesting concentrations of the other metals. Good recovery of precious metals at sub-ppm concentrations from synthetic high salinity brines was achieved using Amborane reductive resin, but similar recovery in the laboratory using real brines could not be demonstrated. Several analytical techniques were compared in sensitivity for the determination of the precious metals; neutron activation analysis with carrier separation is the best for gold and platinum in geothermal brines. 26 references, 7 tables.

  17. Integration of ground-penetrating radar, ultrasonic tests and infrared thermography for the analysis of a precious medieval rose window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuzzo, L.; Calia, A.; Liberatore, D.; Masini, N.; Rizzo, E.

    2010-04-01

    The integration of high-resolution, non-invasive geophysical techniques (such as ground-penetrating radar or GPR) with emerging sensing techniques (acoustics, thermography) can complement limited destructive tests to provide a suitable methodology for a multi-scale assessment of the state of preservation, material and construction components of monuments. This paper presents the results of the application of GPR, infrared thermography (IRT) and ultrasonic tests to the 13th century rose window of Troia Cathedral (Apulia, Italy), affected by widespread decay and instability problems caused by the 1731 earthquake and reactivated by recent seismic activity. This integrated approach provided a wide amount of complementary information at different scales, ranging from the sub-centimetre size of the metallic joints between the various architectural elements, narrow fractures and thin mortar fillings, up to the sub-metre scale of the internal masonry structure of the circular ashlar curb linking the rose window to the façade, which was essential to understand the original building technique and to design an effective restoration strategy.

  18. Texas Heart Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Texas Heart Institute, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, MD Anderson Cancer Center, and The University of Houston. Held most ... for Physicians Fellowships & Residencies School ...

  19. Metal Halide Optical Glasses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    HEAVY METAL FLUORIDE GLASSES C. T. Moynihan, R. Mossadegh and S. N. Crichton Materials Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy...and Tesar, A. A., J. Am. Ceram. Soc., 67, p. C-164 (1984). 11. Crichton , S. N., Mossadegh, R., Schroeder, J., and Moynihan, C. T., unpublished data. 12...FLUORIDE GLASSES C. T. Moynihan, S. M. Opalka, R. Mossadegh, S. N. Crichton and A. J. Bruce Center for Glass Science and Technology Materials Engineering

  20. A new class of electrocatalysts for hydrogen production from water electrolysis: metal monolayers supported on low-cost transition metal carbides.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Daniel V; Hunt, Sean T; Kimmel, Yannick C; Chen, Jingguang G

    2012-02-15

    This work explores the opportunity to substantially reduce the cost of hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts by supporting monolayer (ML) amounts of precious metals on transition metal carbide substrates. The metal component includes platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd), and gold (Au); the low-cost carbide substrate includes tungsten carbides (WC and W(2)C) and molybdenum carbide (Mo(2)C). As a platform for these studies, single-phase carbide thin films with well-characterized surfaces have been synthesized, allowing for a direct comparison of the intrinsic HER activity of bare and Pt-modified carbide surfaces. It is found that WC and W(2)C are both excellent cathode support materials for ML Pt, exhibiting HER activities that are comparable to bulk Pt while displaying stable HER activity during chronopotentiometric HER measurements. The findings of excellent stability and HER activity of the ML Pt-WC and Pt-W(2)C surfaces may be explained by the similar bulk electronic properties of tungsten carbides to Pt, as is supported by density functional theory calculations. These results are further extended to other metal overlayers (Pd and Au) and supports (Mo(2)C), which demonstrate that the metal ML-supported transition metal carbide surfaces exhibit HER activity that is consistent with the well-known volcano relationship between activity and hydrogen binding energy. This work highlights the potential of using carbide materials to reduce the costs of hydrogen production from water electrolysis by serving as stable, low-cost supports for ML amounts of precious metals.

  1. Dyeing fabrics with metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivas, Georgia

    2002-06-01

    Traditionally, in textile dyeing, metals have been used as mordants or to improve the color produced by a natural or synthetic dye. In biomedical research and clinical diagnostics gold colloids are used as sensitive signals to detect the presence of pathogens. It has been observed that when metals are finely divided, a distinct color may result that is different from the color of the metal in bulk. For example, when gold is finely divided it may appear black, ruby or purple. This can be seen in biomedical research when gold colloids are reduced to micro-particles. Bright color signals are produced by few nanometer-sized particles. Dr. William Todd, a researcher in the Department of Veterinary Science at the Louisiana State University, developed a method of dyeing fabrics with metals. By using a reagent to bond the metal particles deep into the textile fibers and actually making the metal a part of the chemistry of the fiber. The chemicals of the fabric influence the resulting color. The combination of the element itself, the size of the particle, the chemical nature of the particle and the interaction of the metal with the chemistry of the fabric determine the actual hue. By using different elements, reagents, textiles and solvents a broad range of reproducible colors and tones can be created. Metals can also be combined into alloys, which will produce a variety of colors. The students of the ISCC chapter at the Fashion Institute of Technology dyed fabric using Dr. Todd's method and created a presentation of the results. They also did a demonstration of dyeing fabrics with metals.

  2. Fate of metals contained in waste electrical and electronic equipment in a municipal waste treatment process.

    PubMed

    Oguchi, Masahiro; Sakanakura, Hirofumi; Terazono, Atsushi; Takigami, Hidetaka

    2012-01-01

    In Japan, waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) that is not covered by the recycling laws are treated as municipal solid waste. A part of common metals are recovered during the treatment; however, other metals are rarely recovered and their destinations are not clear. This study investigated the distribution ratios and substance flows of 55 metals contained in WEEE during municipal waste treatment using shredding and separation techniques at a Japanese municipal waste treatment plant. The results revealed that more than half of Cu and most of Al contained in WEEE end up in landfills or dissipate under the current municipal waste treatment system. Among the other metals contained in WEEE, at least 70% of the mass was distributed to the small-grain fraction through the shredding and separation and is to be landfilled. Most kinds of metals were concentrated several fold in the small-grain fraction through the process and therefore the small-grain fraction may be a next target for recovery of metals in terms of both metal content and amount. Separate collection and pre-sorting of small digital products can work as effective way for reducing precious metals and less common metals to be landfilled to some extent; however, much of the total masses of those metals would still end up in landfills and it is also important to consider how to recover and utilize metals contained in other WEEE such as audio/video equipment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Engagement and Institutional Advancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weerts, David; Hudson, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Research suggests that institutional commitment to community engagement can be understood by examining levels of student, faculty, and community involvement in engagement; organizational structure, rewards, and campus publications supporting engagement; and compatibility of an institution's mission with this work (Holland, 1997). Underlying all of…

  4. Educational Institutions: Terminology. Turkey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Cultural Cooperation, Strasbourg (France).

    Prepared from interviews with personnel of the Turkish Ministry of National Education, and other educational administrators in that country, this publication provides a guide to the terminology used to name the types of public educational institutions found in Turkey. Private educational institutions, military schools, higher schools attached to…

  5. Institutional Long Range Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell Community Coll. and Technical Inst., Lenoir, NC.

    Long-range institutional planning has been in effect at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute since 1973. The first step in the process was the identification of planning areas: administration, organization, educational programs, learning resources, student services, faculty, facilities, maintenance/operation, and finances. The major…

  6. Educational Institutions: Terminology. Turkey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Cultural Cooperation, Strasbourg (France).

    Prepared from interviews with personnel of the Turkish Ministry of National Education, and other educational administrators in that country, this publication provides a guide to the terminology used to name the types of public educational institutions found in Turkey. Private educational institutions, military schools, higher schools attached to…

  7. What Is Institutional Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Paul R.

    Institutional research (IR), defined as inquiry "directed toward data useful or necessary [for] intelligent decisions and/or for the successful maintenance, operation and/or improvement of a given collegiate institution," can be directly applied to soaring enrollment, greater administrative complexity, rising costs. The junior college…

  8. "Canterbury Tales" Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruud, Jay

    Northern State University (South Dakota) held a 4-week institute on Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales" for high school English teachers from South Dakota and four neighboring states (North Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa, and Nebraska) in summer 1989. The institute provided an opportunity for high school teachers inadequately trained in this area to…

  9. Institutionalism "Old" and "New."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selznick, Philip

    1996-01-01

    Explores the new institutionalism's ethos and direction. Drawing a sharp line between old and new inhibits the contribution of institutional theory to major issues of bureaucracy and social policy. Problems of accountability and responsiveness, public and private bureaucracy, regulation and self-regulation, and management and governance will…

  10. Institutional Inbreeding Reexamined.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyer, Jean C.; Conrad, Clifton F.

    1984-01-01

    Data from the 1977 Survey of the American Professoriate were used to examine the relationship among institutional origin, productivity, and institutional rewards. When an adjustment was made for time allocation, inbred faculty were found to be more productive but are paid significantly less than noninbred faculty. (Author/BW)

  11. Guiding Institutional Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Frank G.

    1997-01-01

    Looks at several ways that change comes about over which the institution has little or no control: by mandate, through legislation, or through the accreditation process. Offers the CAP method (Communication, Alternatives selection, and Participation) to guide the institution through the change process. (JOW)

  12. Astrophysical Institute, Potsdam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Built upon a tradition of almost 300 years, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam (AIP) is in an historical sense the successor of one of the oldest astronomical observatories in Germany. It is the first institute in the world which incorporated the term `astrophysical' in its name, and is connected with distinguished scientists such as Karl Schwarzschild and Albert Einstein. The AIP constitutes on...

  13. Problems with Institutional Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, James H.

    1979-01-01

    A survey done properly by accepted and scientifically justifiable techniques can provide information on behalf of the goals of institutional advancement in academe. Deficiencies in institutional research are seen as the result of the lack of guidance on survey design, questionnaire construction, or problem definition in education research texts.…

  14. Engagement and Institutional Advancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weerts, David; Hudson, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Research suggests that institutional commitment to community engagement can be understood by examining levels of student, faculty, and community involvement in engagement; organizational structure, rewards, and campus publications supporting engagement; and compatibility of an institution's mission with this work (Holland, 1997). Underlying all of…

  15. Mechanical failure of metal-polyethylene sandwich liner in metal-on-metal total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Yasushi; Fetto, Joseph F

    2015-01-01

    Metal-on-metal had been proposed as an optimal articulation in THRs, however, many monoblock prostheses have been recalled in the USA because of significant high rates of early failure. Metal-on-metal prostheses had been implanted in our institution, and this is a case history of a single patient, in whom metal-on-metal THRs with different femoral sizes of heads were implanted. A 57-year-old female patient underwent bilateral total hip replacements with metal-on-metal prostheses using metal-polyethylene "sandwich" liners 9 years ago on the right side and 7 years ago on the left side respectively. The only difference in both sides was the femoral head diameter of 28 mm in right and 34 mm in left. Seven years after the left surgery, the acetabular liner was dissociated, however, metallosis was not detected. Although the larger femoral head was thought to increase hip joint stability, it dictated a reduction in polyethylene thickness in this prosthesis design, and it was 4 mm in the left hip. Recently, metal-on-metal articulations are thought not to be optimal for hip joint bearing surface, however, this clinical failure was due to the polyethylene thickness and quality.

  16. Precious memories: a randomized controlled trial on the effects of an autobiographical memory intervention delivered by trained volunteers in residential care homes.

    PubMed

    Westerhof, Gerben J; Korte, Jojanneke; Eshuis, Sander; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T

    2017-09-20

    This study assesses the effects of an autobiographical memory intervention on the prevention and reduction of depressive symptoms in older persons in residential care. Trained volunteers delivered the intervention. A randomized controlled trial was carried out with depressive symptoms as the primary outcome. The experimental condition received the intervention Precious Memories one-on-one, whereas the control condition had individual unstructured contacts with a volunteer. Participants were 86 older persons living in residential care. There were three measurements: pre-intervention, post-intervention (2 months after the first measurement), and follow-up (8 months after the first measurement). Besides depressive symptoms, the retrieval of specific positive memories was measured as a process variable. Anxiety, loneliness, well-being, and mastery were assessed as secondary outcomes. Depressive symptoms improved equally in the intervention and the control condition at post-measurement. Participants with clinically relevant depressive symptoms also maintained the effects at follow-up in both conditions. The retrieval of specific positive memories improved more in the autobiographical memory intervention, although this was not maintained at follow-up. Anxiety and loneliness improved equally well in both conditions, but no effects were found for well-being or mastery. It is concluded that volunteers can deliver the intervention and contribute to the mental health of this highly vulnerable group of older adults.

  17. Development and application of biotechnologies in the metal mining industry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D Barrie

    2013-11-01

    Metal mining faces a number of significant economic and environmental challenges in the twenty-first century for which established and emerging biotechnologies may, at least in part, provide the answers. Bioprocessing of mineral ores and concentrates is already used in variously engineered formats to extract base (e.g., copper, cobalt, and nickel) and precious (gold and silver) metals in mines throughout the world, though it remains a niche technology. However, current projections of an increasing future need to use low-grade primary metal ores, to reprocess mine wastes, and to develop in situ leaching technologies to extract metals from deep-buried ore bodies, all of which are economically more amenable to bioprocessing than conventional approaches (e.g., pyrometallurgy), would suggest that biomining will become more extensively utilized in the future. Recent research has also shown that bioleaching could be used to process a far wider range of metal ores (e.g., oxidized ores) than has previously been the case. Biotechnologies are also being developed to control mine-related pollution, including securing mine wastes (rocks and tailings) by using "ecological engineering" approaches, and also to remediate and recover metals from waste waters, such as acid mine drainage. This article reviews the current status of biotechnologies within the mining sector and considers how these may be developed and applied in future years.

  18. Metal inks

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alex; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Kaydanova, Tatiana

    2014-02-04

    Self-reducing metal inks and systems and methods for producing and using the same are disclosed. In an exemplary embodiment, a method may comprise selecting metal-organic (MO) precursor, selecting a reducing agent, and dissolving the MO precursor and the reducing agent in an organic solvent to produce a metal ink that remains in a liquid phase at room temperature. Metal inks, including self-reducing and fire-through metal inks, are also disclosed, as are various applications of the metal inks.

  19. A preliminary categorization of end-of-life electrical and electronic equipment as secondary metal resources

    SciTech Connect

    Oguchi, Masahiro; Murakami, Shinsuke; Sakanakura, Hirofumi; Kida, Akiko; Kameya, Takashi

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > End-of-life electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) as secondary metal resources. > The content and the total amount of metals in specific equipment are both important. > We categorized 21 EEE types from contents and total amounts of various metals. > Important equipment types as secondary resources were listed for each metal kind. > Collectability and possible collection systems of various EEE types were discussed. - Abstract: End-of-life electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) has recently received attention as a secondary source of metals. This study examined characteristics of end-of-life EEE as secondary metal resources to consider efficient collection and metal recovery systems according to the specific metals and types of EEE. We constructed an analogy between natural resource development and metal recovery from end-of-life EEE and found that metal content and total annual amount of metal contained in each type of end-of-life EEE should be considered in secondary resource development, as well as the collectability of the end-of-life products. We then categorized 21 EEE types into five groups and discussed their potential as secondary metal resources. Refrigerators, washing machines, air conditioners, and CRT TVs were evaluated as the most important sources of common metals, and personal computers, mobile phones, and video games were evaluated as the most important sources of precious metals. Several types of small digital equipment were also identified as important sources of precious metals; however, mid-size information and communication technology (ICT) equipment (e.g., printers and fax machines) and audio/video equipment were shown to be more important as a source of a variety of less common metals. The physical collectability of each type of EEE was roughly characterized by unit size and number of end-of-life products generated annually. Current collection systems in Japan were examined and potentially appropriate collection methods

  20. NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) testimony to Department of Labor on the Mine Safety and Health Administration proposed rule: ionizing radiation standards for metal and nonmetal mines, August 13, 1987 by R. Niemeier

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-13

    Recommendations were offered for protecting workers against the health effects of ionizing radiation in metal and nonmetal mines. Available data demonstrating such health effects was reviewed and evidence supporting the technical feasibility of reducing the current Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) standard was presented. Five recent studies indicated a significant increase in lung cancer rates associated with radon progeny exposure in underground mines. Additional studies indicated an exposure/response relationship in uranium miners. The influence of smoking on the association between radon progeny exposure and lung cancer was cited. Evidence has indicated that exposure to radon progeny carries a potential risk of developing occupationally induced lung cancer. Risk-assessment data supported the conclusion that miners with the same characteristics as the United States Public Health Service uranium miners cohort and who accrue a cumulative occupational exposure of 120 working level months, would have a lung cancer excess lifetime risk of about 35 to 40 lung cancer deaths per 1000 exposed miners. Modern mining methods using dilution ventilation as well as bulkheading and backfilling techniques make it possible to achieve substantial reductions in the cumulative exposure to radon progeny. Information was provided on sampling strategy, control technology, ventilation systems, respirators, and medical surveillance programs.

  1. Metallization failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, R.

    1971-01-01

    Metallization-related failure mechanisms were shown to be a major cause of integrated circuit failures under accelerated stress conditions, as well as in actual use under field operation. The integrated circuit industry is aware of the problem and is attempting to solve it in one of two ways: (1) better understanding of the aluminum system, which is the most widely used metallization material for silicon integrated circuits both as a single level and multilevel metallization, or (2) evaluating alternative metal systems. Aluminum metallization offers many advantages, but also has limitations particularly at elevated temperatures and high current densities. As an alternative, multilayer systems of the general form, silicon device-metal-inorganic insulator-metal, are being considered to produce large scale integrated arrays. The merits and restrictions of metallization systems in current usage and systems under development are defined.

  2. Energy and institution size

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Why do institutions grow? Despite nearly a century of scientific effort, there remains little consensus on this topic. This paper offers a new approach that focuses on energy consumption. A systematic relation exists between institution size and energy consumption per capita: as energy consumption increases, institutions become larger. I hypothesize that this relation results from the interplay between technological scale and human biological limitations. I also show how a simple stochastic model can be used to link energy consumption with firm dynamics. PMID:28178339

  3. METAL PHTHALOCYANINES

    DOEpatents

    Frigerio, N.A.

    1962-03-27

    A process is given for preparing heavy metal phthalocyanines, sulfonated or not. The process comprises mixing an inorganic metal salt with dimethyl formamide or methyl sulfoxide; separating the metal complex formed from the solution; mixing the complex with an equimolar amount of sodium, potassium, lithium, magnesium, or beryllium sulfonated or unsulfonated phthalocyanine whereby heavy-metal phthalocyanine crystals are formed; and separating the crystals from the solution. Uranyl, thorium, lead, hafnium, and lanthanide rare earth phthalocyanines can be produced by the process. (AEC)

  4. Efficient hydrogen evolution in transition metal dichalcogenides via a simple one-step hydrazine reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cummins, Dustin R.; Martinez, Ulises; Sherehiy, Andriy; Kappera, Rajesh; Martinez-Garcia, Alejandro; Schulze, Roland K.; Jasinski, Jacek; Zhang, Jing; Gupta, Ram K.; Lou, Jun; Chhowalla, Manish; Sumanasekera, Gamini; Mohite, Aditya D.; Sunkara, Mahendra K.; Gupta, Gautam

    2016-06-10

    In this study, hydrogen evolution reaction is catalyzed efficiently with precious metals, such as platinum; however, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently emerged as a promising class of materials for electrocatalysis, but these materials still have low activity and durability when compared with precious metals. Here we report a simple one-step scalable approach, where MoOx/MoS2 core-shell nanowires and molybdenum disulfide sheets are exposed to dilute aqueous hydrazine at room temperature, which results in marked improvement in electrocatalytic performance. The nanowires exhibit ~100 mV improvement in over potential following exposure to dilute hydrazine, while also showing a 10-fold increase in current density and a significant change in Tafel slope. In situ electrical, gate-dependent measurements and spectroscopic investigations reveal that hydrazine acts as an electron dopant in molybdenum disulfide, increasing its conductivity, while also reducing the MoOx core in the core-shell nanowires, which leads to improved electrocatalytic performance.

  5. Efficient hydrogen evolution in transition metal dichalcogenides via a simple one-step hydrazine reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Cummins, Dustin R.; Martinez, Ulises; Sherehiy, Andriy; ...

    2016-06-10

    In this study, hydrogen evolution reaction is catalyzed efficiently with precious metals, such as platinum; however, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently emerged as a promising class of materials for electrocatalysis, but these materials still have low activity and durability when compared with precious metals. Here we report a simple one-step scalable approach, where MoOx/MoS2 core-shell nanowires and molybdenum disulfide sheets are exposed to dilute aqueous hydrazine at room temperature, which results in marked improvement in electrocatalytic performance. The nanowires exhibit ~100 mV improvement in over potential following exposure to dilute hydrazine, while also showing a 10-fold increase in current densitymore » and a significant change in Tafel slope. In situ electrical, gate-dependent measurements and spectroscopic investigations reveal that hydrazine acts as an electron dopant in molybdenum disulfide, increasing its conductivity, while also reducing the MoOx core in the core-shell nanowires, which leads to improved electrocatalytic performance.« less

  6. Silicone metalization

    SciTech Connect

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  7. Silicone metalization

    SciTech Connect

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2006-12-05

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  8. Silicone metalization

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  9. Japanese research and development on metallic biomedical, dental, and healthcare materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niinomi, Mitsuo; Hanawa, Takao; Narushima, Takayuki

    2005-04-01

    There is considerable demand for metallic materials for use in medical and dental devices. Metals and alloys are widely used as biomedical materials and are indispensable in the medical field. In dentistry, metal is used for restorations, orthodontic wires, and dental implants. This article describes R&D on metallic biomaterials primarily conducted by the members of the Japan Institute of Metals.

  10. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema

    Alex King

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  11. Minority Innovation Challenges Institute

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Do you want to learn more about how to compete in NASA’s technical challenges for both prestige and significant cash prizes? NASA’s Minority Innovation Challenges Institute trains and mentors mino...

  12. Institutionally based videoconferencing.

    PubMed

    Caudill, Robert Lee; Sager, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of psychiatric care via video-teleconferencing (VTC) technology is thought to have reached a tipping point. As a medical speciality with relatively few material or technical requirements for service delivery, psychiatry has been one of the earliest to embrace the possibility of providing evaluations and treatment at a distance. Such technical infrastructure as is necessary can often be found in the institutions already in existence. It was natural therefore that institutionally based telepsychiatry would lay the foundation for the development of the field. In this article we review the history and development of institutional VTC in a wide variety of clinically supervised settings such as hospitals, outpatient clinics, and forensic settings. We cite evidence supporting institutionally sponsored use and expand on key takeaways for the development and expansion of videoconferencing in these settings. We also speculate on the future direction and development of psychiatric care provided by these arrangements.

  13. Critical Materials Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alex King

    2013-01-09

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  14. Institutional Transformation Model

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-19

    Reducing the energy consumption of large institutions with dozens to hundreds of existing buildings while maintaining and improving existing infrastructure is a critical economic and environmental challenge. SNL's Institutional Transformation (IX) work integrates facilities and infrastructure sustainability technology capabilities and collaborative decision support modeling approaches to help facilities managers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) simulate different future energy reduction strategies and meet long term energy conservation goals.

  15. Great Lakes Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J. Iwan

    2012-11-18

    The vision of the Great Lakes Energy Institute is to enable the transition to advanced, sustainable energy generation, storage, distribution and utilization through coordinated research, development, and education. The Institute will place emphasis on translating leading edge research into next generation energy technology. The Institute’s research thrusts focus on coordinated research in decentralized power generation devices (e.g. fuel cells, wind turbines, solar photovoltaic devices), management of electrical power transmission and distribution, energy storage, and energy efficiency.

  16. National Cancer Institute Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Rosemary S.L. . E-mail: rw26f@nih.gov; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2006-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Perspectives this year presented information on the systemic targeted radionuclide therapy (STaRT) research projects: (1) being investigated at the NCI's Intramural Center for Cancer Research; (2) funded by NCI's Radiation Research Program and other extramural programs; and (3) the appropriate National Institutes of Health/NCI funding mechanisms applicable to researchers for obtaining funds for STaRT projects.

  17. Trend Analysis of Controlled Thin Metallization Flashover

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    TREND ANALYSIS OF CONTROLLED THIN METALLIZATION FLASHOVER S.O. Olabisi, K. M. Burke, W. J. Sarjeant Energy Systems Institute, University at...Abstract Tests validating the consistency and repeatability of controlled electrical surface flashover on metallized thin film insulators...were performed. The study of electrical surface flashover has been mainly confined to its prevention under various contaminated conditions such as

  18. Breaking down institutional barriers: Undergraduate institutions

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper assesses the knowledge base on the undergraduate years, and the critical transition to graduate school or the workplace. The paper addresses the overarching issues associated with the institutional climate of undergraduate colleges and the transition on to the next step. What are the particular dynamics of retaining students in SM&E? How do these differ for various ethnic groups and by discipline? What has been the impact on minority students of curriculum reform and attempts to improve the quality of undergraduate instruction in the sciences and mathematics (especially among the gatekeeper courses)? Do present curriculum reforms and teaching practices reflect what is known about different learning styles of students from different ethnic backgrounds? What do we know about the attitudes and practices of college faculty in mentoring minority students in science and math courses? Has mentoring been a factor for change in campus climate? What do we know about higher education interventions, and why have these programs been more successful in engineering than in science? Can interventions change negative campus climates, or become a precipitating factor institutional change?

  19. Collectors on illicit collecting: Higher loyalties and other techniques of neutralization in the unlawful collecting of rare and precious orchids and antiquities

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Simon; Yates, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Trafficking natural objects and trafficking cultural objects have been treated separately both in regulatory policy and in criminological discussion. The former is generally taken to be ‘wildlife crime’ while the latter has come to be considered under the auspices of a debate on ‘illicit art and antiquities’. In this article we study the narrative discourse of high-end collectors of orchids and antiquities. The illicit parts of these global trades are subject to this analytical divide between wildlife trafficking and art trafficking, and this has resulted in quite different regulatory structures for each of these markets. However, the trafficking routines, the types and levels of harm involved, and the supply–demand dynamics in the trafficking of orchids and antiquities are actually quite similar, and in this study we find those structural similarities reflected in substantial common ground in the way collectors talk about their role in each market. Collectors of rare and precious orchids and antiquities valorize their participation in markets that are known to be in quite considerable degree illicit, appealing to ‘higher loyalties’ such as preservation, appreciation of aesthetic beauty and cultural edification. These higher loyalties, along with other techniques of neutralization, deplete the force of law as a guide to appropriate action. We propose that the appeal to higher loyalties is difficult to categorize as a technique of neutralization in this study as it appears to be a motivational explanation for the collectors involved. The other classic techniques of neutralization are deflective, guilt and critique reducing narrative mechanisms, while higher loyalties drives illicit behaviour in collecting markets for orchids and antiquities in ways that go significantly beyond the normal definition of neutralization. PMID:28066153

  20. Collectors on illicit collecting: Higher loyalties and other techniques of neutralization in the unlawful collecting of rare and precious orchids and antiquities.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Simon; Yates, Donna

    2016-08-01

    Trafficking natural objects and trafficking cultural objects have been treated separately both in regulatory policy and in criminological discussion. The former is generally taken to be 'wildlife crime' while the latter has come to be considered under the auspices of a debate on 'illicit art and antiquities'. In this article we study the narrative discourse of high-end collectors of orchids and antiquities. The illicit parts of these global trades are subject to this analytical divide between wildlife trafficking and art trafficking, and this has resulted in quite different regulatory structures for each of these markets. However, the trafficking routines, the types and levels of harm involved, and the supply-demand dynamics in the trafficking of orchids and antiquities are actually quite similar, and in this study we find those structural similarities reflected in substantial common ground in the way collectors talk about their role in each market. Collectors of rare and precious orchids and antiquities valorize their participation in markets that are known to be in quite considerable degree illicit, appealing to 'higher loyalties' such as preservation, appreciation of aesthetic beauty and cultural edification. These higher loyalties, along with other techniques of neutralization, deplete the force of law as a guide to appropriate action. We propose that the appeal to higher loyalties is difficult to categorize as a technique of neutralization in this study as it appears to be a motivational explanation for the collectors involved. The other classic techniques of neutralization are deflective, guilt and critique reducing narrative mechanisms, while higher loyalties drives illicit behaviour in collecting markets for orchids and antiquities in ways that go significantly beyond the normal definition of neutralization.

  1. Mechanochemical Reactions of Elastomers with Metals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    34i neeeeewy a"md&tf by week nmbo) Elastomers, Fracture, Free-radical reactions, Mechanochemistry , Metals , Macromolecular rupture, Organic radicals...from metallic grey to red-brown, indicating the formation of an increased amount of iron oxide . When this oxidized powder was mixed into SBR and the...Project NR 092-555In ID Technical Report No. 33 MECHANOCHEMICAL REACTIONS OF ELASTOMERS WITH METALS by A. N. Gent and W. R. Rodgers Institute of

  2. Plasma-induced nanoporous metal oxides with nitrogen doping for high-performance electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min

    2017-06-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is a critical reaction in energy storage and conversion systems such as metal-air batteries and water splitting. The current commercial OER catalysts are the noble metal based materials, which have a high cost and a limited supply. Xu et al have prepared the nanoporous N-Co3O4 materials as cost-effective and high efficient electrocatalysts for OER by N2 plasma (Xu et al 2017 Nanotechnology 28 165402). This work has successfully demonstrated the simple N2 plasma treatment to be a powerful technique to introduce the nitrogen doping and nanoporous structure in the bulk materials, enhancing the performance of electrochemical catalysis. Based on this study, more future work on developing highly porous non-precious metal-based materials with good conductivity would be promising for energy storage and conversion.

  3. Vapor Phase Hydrogenolysis of Furanics Utilizing Reduced Cobalt Mixed Metal Oxide Catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Sulmonetti, Taylor P.; Hu, Bo; Ifkovits, Zachary; ...

    2017-03-21

    Vapor phase hydrogenolysis of both furfuryl alcohol and furfural were investigated over reduced Co based mixed metal oxides derived from the calcination of a layered double hydroxide precursor. Although a reduced cobalt aluminate sample displays promising selectivity towards 2-methylfuran (2-MF) production, the addition of an Fe dopant into the oxide matrix significantly enhances the activity and selectivity per gram of catalyst. Approximately 82% 2-MF yield is achieved at high conversion when furfuryl alcohol is fed into the reactor at 180 °C over the reduced 3Co-0.25Fe-0.75Al catalyst. Based on structural characterization studies including TPR, XPS, and in-situ XAS it is suggestedmore » that Fe facilitates the reduction of Co, allowing for formation of more metallic species. Altogether, this study demonstrates that non-precious metal catalysts offer promise for the selective conversion of a key biomass oxygenate to a proposed fuel additive.« less

  4. Challenges to achievement of metal sustainability in our high-tech society.

    PubMed

    Izatt, Reed M; Izatt, Steven R; Bruening, Ronald L; Izatt, Neil E; Moyer, Bruce A

    2014-04-21

    Achievement of sustainability in metal life cycles from mining of virgin ore to consumer and industrial devices to end-of-life products requires greatly increased recycling rates and improved processing of metals using conventional and green chemistry technologies. Electronic and other high-tech products containing precious, toxic, and specialty metals usually have short lifetimes and low recycling rates. Products containing these metals generally are incinerated, discarded as waste in landfills, or dismantled in informal recycling using crude and environmentally irresponsible procedures. Low recycling rates of metals coupled with increasing demand for high-tech products containing them necessitate increased mining with attendant environmental, health, energy, water, and carbon-footprint consequences. In this tutorial review, challenges to achieving metal sustainability, including projected use of urban mining, in present high-tech society are presented; health, environmental, and economic incentives for various government, industry, and public stakeholders to improve metal sustainability are discussed; a case for technical improvements, including use of molecular recognition, in selective metal separation technology, especially for metal recovery from dilute feed stocks is given; and global consequences of continuing on the present path are examined.

  5. Metals bioleaching from electronic waste by Chromobacterium violaceum and Pseudomonads sp.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Jatindra Kumar; Kumar, Sudhir

    2012-11-01

    These days, electronic waste needs to be taken into consideration due to its materials content, but due to the heterogeneity of the metals present, reprocessing of electronic waste is quite limited. The bioleaching of metals from electronic waste was investigated by using cyanogenic bacterial strains (Chromobacterium violaceum, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens). A two-step bioleaching process was followed under cyanide-forming conditions for maximum metals mobilization. Both single and mixed cultures of cyanogenic bacteria were able to mobilize metals from electronic waste with different efficiencies. In all the flasks in which high metal mobilizations were observed, the consequent biomass productions were also high. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was applied in the bioleaching process for the first time and this achieved its bioleaching ability of mobilization of metals from electronic waste. Chromobacterium violaceum as a single culture and a mixture of C. violaceum and P. aeruginosa exhibited maximum metal mobilization. Chromobacterium violaceum was capable of leaching more than 79, 69, 46, 9 and 7% of Cu, Au, Zn, Fe and Ag, respectively at an electronic waste concentration of 1% w/v. Moreover, the mixture of C. violaceum and P. aeruginosa exhibited metals leaching of more than 83, 73, 49, 13 and 8% of total Cu, Au, Zn, Fe, and Ag, respectively. Precious metals were mobilized through bioleaching which might be considered as an industrial application for recycling of electronic waste in the near future.

  6. Effect of metal conditioner on bonding of porcelain to cobalt-chromium alloy

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Yutaro; Takenouchi, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Takuo; Suzuki, Shiro; Minami, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of two different metal conditioners for non-precious metal alloys for the bonding of porcelain to a cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy. MATERIALS AND METHODS Disk-shaped specimens (2.5×10.0 mm) were cast with Co-Cr alloy and used as adherend materials. The bonding surfaces were polished with a 600-grid silicon carbide paper and airborne-particle abraded using 110 µm alumina particles. Bonding specimens were fabricated by applying and firing either of the metal conditioners on the airborne-particle abraded surface, followed by firing porcelain into 5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height. Specimens without metal conditioner were also fabricated. Shear bond strength for each group (n=8) were measured and compared (α=.05). Sectional view of bonding interface was observed by SEM. EDS analysis was performed to determine the chemical elements of metal conditioners and to determine the failure modes after shear test. RESULTS There were significant differences among three groups, and two metal conditioner-applied groups showed significantly higher values compared to the non-metal conditioner group. The SEM observation of the sectional view at bonding interface revealed loose contact at porcelain-alloy surface for non-metal conditioner group, however, close contact at both alloy-metal conditioner and metal conditioner-porcelain interfaces for both metal conditioner-applied groups. All the specimens showed mixed failures. EDS analysis showed that one metal conditioner was Si-based material, and another was Ti-based material. Si-based metal conditioner showed higher bond strengths compared to the Ti-based metal conditioner, but exhibited more porous failure surface failure. CONCLUSION Based on the results of this study, it can be stated that the application of metal conditioner is recommended for the bonding of porcelain to cobalt-chromium alloys. PMID:26949481

  7. Transition-metal-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions: a remarkable advance from palladium to nickel catalysts.

    PubMed

    Han, Fu-She

    2013-06-21

    In the transition-metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions, the use of the first row transition metals as catalysts is much more appealing than the precious metals owing to the apparent advantages such as cheapness and earth abundance. Within the last two decades, particularly the last five years, explosive interests have been focused on the nickel-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura reactions. This has greatly advanced the chemistry of transition-metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. Most notably, a broad range of aryl electrophiles such as phenols, aryl ethers, esters, carbonates, carbamates, sulfamates, phosphates, phosphoramides, phosphonium salts, and fluorides, as well as various alkyl electrophiles, which are conventionally challenging, by applying palladium catalysts can now be coupled efficiently with boron reagents in the presence of nickel catalysts. In this review, we would like to summarize the progress in this reaction.

  8. Institutional Policy and Its Abuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogue, E. G.; Riggs, R. O.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews the role of institutional policy, cites frequent abuses of institutional policy, and delineates several principles of policy management (development, communication, execution and evaluation). (Author/PG)

  9. 40 CFR 413.24 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ELECTROPLATING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Electroplating of Precious Metals... electroplating process wastewater the following limitations shall apply: Subpart B—Precious Metals Facilities... electroplating process wastewater the following limitations shall apply: Subpart B—Precious Metals Facilities...

  10. Water: Too Precious to Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Geographic World, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Provides background information on many topics related to water. These include the water cycle, groundwater, fresh water, chemical wastes, water purification, river pollution, acid rain, and water conservation. Information is presented at an elementary level. (JM)

  11. Water: Too Precious to Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Geographic World, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Provides background information on many topics related to water. These include the water cycle, groundwater, fresh water, chemical wastes, water purification, river pollution, acid rain, and water conservation. Information is presented at an elementary level. (JM)

  12. Why our topsoil is precious

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, N.A.

    1981-04-01

    The US, which has already lost a large portion of its original topsoil, is learning from China, India, and other ancient countries the time-tested ways to conserve soil by terracing, contour planting, and other techniques. In exchange for this knowledge, the US can offer tree-planning and other services. The economic impact of topsoil loss shows up in water-treatment costs and in the loss of fish, wildlife, and recreational land. The US is fortunate to still have land avaliable for alternative uses than growing food and fiber, but policies and conservation attitudes must be coordinated to retain this option for future generations. Mr. Berg answers questions about land use and farming practices which have created the present problem and outlines the implications of various regulatory actions and land technologies that affect soil conservation. (DCK)

  13. Generation of copper rich metallic phases from waste printed circuit boards

    SciTech Connect

    Cayumil, R.; Khanna, R.; Ikram-Ul-Haq, M.; Rajarao, R.; Hill, A.; Sahajwalla, V.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Recycling and material recovery from waste printed circuit boards is very complex. • Thermoset polymers, ceramics and metals are present simultaneously in waste PCBs. • Heat treatment of PCBs was carried out at 1150 °C under inert conditions. • Various metallic phases could be segregated out as copper based metallic droplets. • Carbon and ceramics residues can be further recycled in a range of applications. - Abstract: The rapid consumption and obsolescence of electronics have resulted in e-waste being one of the fastest growing waste streams worldwide. Printed circuit boards (PCBs) are among the most complex e-waste, containing significant quantities of hazardous and toxic materials leading to high levels of pollution if landfilled or processed inappropriately. However, PCBs are also an important resource of metals including copper, tin, lead and precious metals; their recycling is appealing especially as the concentration of these metals in PCBs is considerably higher than in their ores. This article is focused on a novel approach to recover copper rich phases from waste PCBs. Crushed PCBs were heat treated at 1150 °C under argon gas flowing at 1 L/min into a horizontal tube furnace. Samples were placed into an alumina crucible and positioned in the cold zone of the furnace for 5 min to avoid thermal shock, and then pushed into the hot zone, with specimens exposed to high temperatures for 10 and 20 min. After treatment, residues were pulled back to the cold zone and kept there for 5 min to avoid thermal cracking and re-oxidation. This process resulted in the generation of a metallic phase in the form of droplets and a carbonaceous residue. The metallic phase was formed of copper-rich red droplets and tin-rich white droplets along with the presence of several precious metals. The carbonaceous residue was found to consist of slag and ∼30% carbon. The process conditions led to the segregation of hazardous lead and tin clusters in the

  14. Supported Molten Metal Membranes for Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Ravindra; Ma, Yi Hua; Yen, Pei-Shan; Deveau, Nicholas; Fishtik, Ilie; Mardilovich, Ivan

    2013-09-30

    We describe here our results on the feasibility of a novel dense metal membrane for hydrogen separation: Supported Molten Metal Membrane, or SMMM.1 The goal in this work was to develop these new membranes based on supporting thin films of low-melting, non- precious group metals, e.g., tin (Sn), indium (In), gallium (Ga), or their alloys, to provide a flux and selectivity of hydrogen that rivals the conventional but substantially more expensive palladium (Pd) or Pd alloy membranes, which are susceptible to poisoning by the many species in the coal-derived syngas, and further possess inadequate stability and limited operating temperature range. The novelty of the technology presented numerous challenges during the course of this project, however, mainly in the selection of appropriate supports, and in the fabrication of a stable membrane. While the wetting instability of the SMMM remains an issue, we did develop an adequate understanding of the interaction between molten metal films with porous supports that we were able to find appropriate supports. Thus, our preliminary results indicate that the Ga/SiC SMMM at 550 ºC has a permeance that is an order of magnitude higher than that of Pd, and exceeds the 2015 DOE target. To make practical SMM membranes, however, further improving the stability of the molten metal membrane is the next goal. For this, it is important to better understand the change in molten metal surface tension and contact angle as a function of temperature and gas-phase composition. A thermodynamic theory was, thus, developed, that is not only able to explain this change in the liquid-gas surface tension, but also the change in the solid-liquid surface tension as well as the contact angle. This fundamental understanding has allowed us to determine design characteristics to maintain stability in the face of changing gas composition. These designs are being developed. For further progress, it is also important to understand the nature of solution and

  15. Possible evidence for metal accretion onto the surfaces of metal-poor main-sequence stars

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Kohei; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Beers, Timothy C.; Carollo, Daniela; Lee, Young Sun

    2014-04-01

    The entire evolution of the Milky Way, including its mass-assembly and star-formation history, is imprinted onto the chemo-dynamical distribution function of its member stars, f(x, v, [X/H]), in the multi-dimensional phase space spanned by position, velocity, and elemental abundance ratios. In particular, the chemo-dynamical distribution functions for low-mass stars (e.g., G- or K-type dwarfs) are precious tracers of the earliest stages of the Milky Way's formation, since their main-sequence lifetimes approach or exceed the age of the universe. A basic tenet of essentially all previous analyses is that the stellar metallicity, usually parameterized as [Fe/H], is conserved over time for main-sequence stars (at least those that have not been polluted due to mass transfer from binary companions). If this holds true, any correlations between metallicity and kinematics for long-lived main-sequence stars of different masses, effective temperatures, or spectral types must strictly be the same, since they reflect the same mass-assembly and star-formation histories. By analyzing a sample of nearby metal-poor halo and thick-disk stars on the main sequence, taken from Data Release 8 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we find that the median metallicity of G-type dwarfs is systematically higher (by about 0.2 dex) than that of K-type dwarfs having the same median rotational velocity about the Galactic center. If it can be confirmed, this finding may invalidate the long-accepted assumption that the atmospheric metallicities of long-lived stars are conserved over time.

  16. The Institutes of Nations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Franklyn M.

    1972-01-01

    During the past ten years, the Institutes have presented a series of living and learning summer sessions in an outdoor setting among the redwoods near San Francisco. Young people from 16 to 20 have participated in the cross cultural studies, some involving foreign scholars studying in the United States. (Author)

  17. Planning for Institutional Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Frank W., Comp.; Garthwaite, Elloyse M., Comp.

    Drawing from the experiences of Delgado Community College (DCC) in Louisiana, this manual offers guidance on choosing and implementing an institutional planning system. Section 1 offers introductory comments on planning, educators' reluctance to embrace the management systems of the private sector, and the growing recognition of the importance of…

  18. Institutional Research, July 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Oklahoma City Junior Coll., OK.

    Ten of the eleven research monographs which embody the major institutional research thrust of South Oklahoma City Junior College (SOCJC) during 1975 are presented in this compilation. The first study considers the American College Testing Program scores of students entering SOCJC in Fall 1975 in relation to college choice, student characteristics,…

  19. Institute Born of Gratitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLellan, Vin

    1980-01-01

    The Wang Institute of Graduate Studies plans to offer a master's degree in software engineering. The development of an academic program to produce superior, technically qualified managers for the computer industry's software production is discussed. (Journal availability: Datamation, 666 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10103.) (MLW)

  20. Honors and Institutional Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ransdell, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    Honors colleges and programs often evolve in response to a mandate from boards of regents or trustees. Such mandates can lead to new or accelerated change within the institution, change that in many cases is linked to and represented by honors. Such has been the case at Western Kentucky University (WKU), where the honors program has played a key…