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Sample records for precision electron momentum

  1. Precision electron polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chudakov, Eugene A.

    2013-11-01

    A new generation of precise Parity-Violating experiments will require a sub-percent accuracy of electron beam polarimetry. Compton polarimetry can provide such accuracy at high energies, but at a few hundred MeV the small analyzing power limits the sensitivity. M{\\o}ller polarimetry provides a high analyzing power independent on the beam energy, but is limited by the properties of the polarized targets commonly used. Options for precision polarimetry at ~300 MeV will be discussed, in particular a proposal to use ultra-cold atomic hydrogen traps to provide a 100\\%-polarized electron target for M{\\o}ller polarimetry.

  2. Precision electron polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudakov, E.

    2013-11-01

    A new generation of precise Parity-Violating experiments will require a sub-percent accuracy of electron beam polarimetry. Compton polarimetry can provide such accuracy at high energies, but at a few hundred MeV the small analyzing power limits the sensitivity. Mo/ller polarimetry provides a high analyzing power independent on the beam energy, but is limited by the properties of the polarized targets commonly used. Options for precision polarimetry at 300 MeV will be discussed, in particular a proposal to use ultra-cold atomic hydrogen traps to provide a 100%-polarized electron target for Mo/ller polarimetry.

  3. Precision measurements of momentum distribution of Tonks-Girardeau gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Joshua M.; Xia, Lin; Xu, Wei; Malvania, Neel; Zundel, Laura A.; Rigol, Marcos; Weiss, David S.

    2016-05-01

    We report on precision measurements of the momentum distributions of 1D Bose gases over a range of initial temperatures and coupling strengths. We compare our results with unbiased quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We use the comparison with theory to understand the nature of the adiabatic loading from a Bose-Einstein Condensate in 3D to an array of 1D tubes.

  4. Plasma electron hole kinematics. I. Momentum conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, I. H.; Zhou, C.

    2016-08-01

    We analyse the kinematic properties of a plasma electron hole: a non-linear self-sustained localized positive electric potential perturbation, trapping electrons, which behaves as a coherent entity. When a hole accelerates or grows in depth, ion and electron plasma momentum is changed both within the hole and outside, by an energization process we call jetting. We present a comprehensive analytic calculation of the momentum changes of an isolated general one-dimensional hole. The conservation of the total momentum gives the hole's kinematics, determining its velocity evolution. Our results explain many features of the behavior of hole speed observed in numerical simulations, including self-acceleration at formation, and hole pushing and trapping by ion streams.

  5. New Precision Measurements of Deuteron Structure Function A(Q) at Low Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byungwuek

    2009-08-01

    Differences between previous measurements of low momentum transfer electron-deuteron elastic scattering prevent a clean determination of even the sign of the leading low momentum transfer relativistic corrections, or of the convergence of chiral perturbation theory. We have attempted to resolve this issue with a new high-precision measurement in Jefferson Lab Hall A. Elastic electron scattering was measured on targets of tantalum, carbon, hydrogen, and deuterium at beam energy of 685 MeV. The four-momentum transfer covered the range of 0.15 - 0.7 GeV. The experiment included a new beam calorimeter, to better calibrate the low beam currents used in the experiment, and new collimators to better define the spectrometer solid angles. We obtained cross sections of deuteron as ratios to hydrogen cross sections. A fit function of B(Q) world data is newly made and subtracted from cross sections to find values of A(Q).

  6. An orbital angular momentum spectrometer for electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Tyler; Grillo, Vincenzo; McMorran, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    With the advent of techniques for preparation of free-electron and neutron orbital angular momentum (OAM) states, a basic follow-up question emerges: how do we measure the orbital angular momentum state distribution in matter waves? Control of both the energy and helicity of light has produced a range of spectroscopic applications, including molecular fingerprinting and magnetization mapping. Realization of an analogous dual energy-OAM spectroscopy with matter waves demands control of both initial and final energy and orbital angular momentum states: unlike for photons, final state post-selection is necessary for particles that cannot be annihilated. We propose a magnetic field-based mechanism for quantum non-demolition measurement of electron OAM. We show that OAM-dependent lensing is produced by an operator of form U =exp iLzρ2/ℏb2 where ρ =√{x2 +y2 } is the radial position operator, Lz is the orbital angular momentum operator along z, and b is the OAM dispersion length. We can physically realize this operator as a term in the time evolution of an electron in magnetic round lens. We discuss prospects and practical challenges for implementation of a lensing orbital angular momentum measurement. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), under the Early Career Research Program Award # DE-SC0010466.

  7. Angular Momentum Eigenstates for Equivalent Electrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, E. R.; Calvert, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    Simple and efficient methods for adding angular momenta and for finding angular momentum eigenstates for systems of equivalent electrons are developed. Several different common representations are used in specific examples. The material is suitable for a graduate course in quantum mechanics. (SK)

  8. Momentum spectrometer for electron-electron coincidence studies on superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wallauer, Robert; Voss, Stefan; Bauer, Tobias; Schneider, Deborah; Titze, Jasmin; Ulrich, Birte; Kreidi, Katharina; Neumann, Nadine; Havermeier, Tilo; Schoeffler, Markus; Jahnke, Till; Czasch, Achim; Schmidt, Lothar; Schmidt-Boecking, Horst; Doerner, Reinhard; Kanigel, Amit; Campuzano, Juan Carlos; Jeschke, Harald; Valenti, Roser [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt and others

    2012-10-15

    We present a new experimental setup to study electron-electron coincidences from superconducting surfaces. In our approach, electrons emitted from a surface are projected onto a time- and position-sensitive microchannel plate detector with delayline position readout. Electrons that are emitted within 2 {pi} solid angle with respect to the surface are detected in coincidence. The detector used is a hexagonal delayline detector with enhanced multiple hit capabilities. It is read out with a Flash analog-to-digital converter. The three-dimensional momentum vector is obtained for each electron. The intrinsic dead time of the detector has been greatly reduced by implementing a new algorithm for pulse analysis. The sample holder has been matched to fit the spectrometer while being capable of cooling down the sample to 4.5 K during the measurement and heating it up to 420 K for the cleaning procedure.

  9. Probing Electron Dynamics with the Laplacian of the Momentum Density

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, N.; MacDougall, Preston J.; Levit, M. Creon

    2012-09-24

    This chapter in the above-titled monograph presents topological analysis of the Laplacian of the electron momentum density in organic molecules. It relates topological features in this distribution to chemical and physical properties, particularly aromaticity and electron transport.

  10. Precise Measurements of DVCS at JLab and Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisano, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    Deeply-virtual Compton scattering provides the cleanest access to the 3D imaging of the nucleon structure encoded in the generalized parton distributions, that correlate the fraction of the total nucleon momentum carried by a constituent to its position in the transverse plane. Besides the information on the spatial imaging of the nucleon, GPDs provide an access, through the Ji relation, to the contribution of the angular momentum of quarks to proton spin. An accurate estimate of such a contribution will lead to a better understanding of the origin of the proton spin. Jefferson Lab has been an ideal environment for the study of exclusive processes, thanks to the combination of the high-intensity and high-polarization electron beam provided by the CEBAF, with the complementary equipments of the three experimental halls. This has allowed high-precision measurements of the DVCS observables in a wide kinematic region, with focus on those observable s that provide access to the GPDs entering the Ji relation. These studies will be further widened by the projected data from the 12-GeV era, which will improve the existing measurements both in terms of precision and phase-space coverage. The important results on the proton DVCS obtained during the 6-GeV era will be discussed, together with the upcoming experiments approved for the 12-GeV upgrade, that foresees measurements with both proton and quasi-free neutron targets and that, when combined, will lead to the extraction of the Compton Form Factors for separate quark flavors.

  11. Revealing Dissociative Electron Attachment Dynamics in Polyatomic Molecules Using Momentum Imaging Experiments and Electron Scattering Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacem, Ali; Slaughter, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Understanding electron-driven chemical reactions is important for improving a variety of technological applications such as materials processing and the important role they play in the radiation damage in bulk matter. Furthermore, dissociative electron attachment often exhibits site-selective bond cleavage, which holds promise for prediction and precise control of electron-driven chemical reactions. Recent dynamical studies of these reactions have demonstrated that an understanding of anion dissociation dynamics beyond simple one-dimensional models is crucial in interpreting the measured fragment angular distributions. We combine ion fragment momentum imaging experiments with electron attachment entrance amplitude calculations to interrogate the non-Born-Oppenheimer dynamics of dissociative electron attachment in polyatomic molecules. We will report recent experimental developments in molecules of technological interest including methanol, methane and uracil. Work supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences division of BES/DOE.

  12. Vibrational effects on valence electron momentum distributions of ethylene.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Noboru; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2012-09-21

    We report an electron momentum spectroscopy study of vibrational effects on the electron momentum distributions for the outer valence orbitals of ethylene (C(2)H(4)). The symmetric noncoplanar (e,2e) experiment has been conducted at an impact energy of 1.2 keV. Furthermore, a theoretical method of calculating electron momentum distributions for polyatomic molecules has been developed with vibrational effects being involved. It is shown from comparisons between experiment and theory that taking into account effects of the CH(2) asymmetric stretching and CH(2) rocking vibrational modes of C(2)H(4) is essential for a proper understanding of the electron momentum distribution of the 1b(3g) molecular orbital.

  13. The Electron in Three-Dimensional Momentum Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantovani, L.; Bacchetta, A.; Pasquini, B.

    2016-07-01

    We study the electron as a system composed of an electron and a photon and derive the leading-twist transverse-momentum-dependent distribution functions for both the electron and photon in the dressed electron, thereby offering a three-dimensional description of the dressed electron in momentum space. To obtain the distribution functions, we apply both the formalism of light-front wave function overlap representation and the diagrammatic approach; we discuss the comparison of our results between light-cone gauge and Feynman gauge, discussing the role of the Wilson lines to obtain gauge-independent results. We provide examples of plots of the computed distributions.

  14. Momentum exchange in the electron double-slit experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batelaan, Herman; Jones, Eric; Cheng-Wei Huang, Wayne; Bach, Roger

    2016-03-01

    We provide support for the claim that momentum is conserved for individual events in the electron double slit experiment. The natural consequence is that a physical mechanism is responsible for this momentum exchange, but that even if the fundamental mechanism is known for electron crystal diffraction and the Kapitza-Dirac effect, it is unknown for electron diffraction from nano-fabricated double slits. Work towards a proposed explanation in terms of particle trajectories affected by a vacuum field is discussed. The contentious use of trajectories is discussed within the context of oil droplet analogues of double slit diffraction.

  15. Obtaining the Electron Angular Momentum Coupling Spectroscopic Terms, jj

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orofino, Hugo; Faria, Roberto B.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic procedure is developed to obtain the electron angular momentum coupling (jj) spectroscopic terms, which is based on building microstates in which each individual electron is placed in a different m[subscript j] "orbital". This approach is similar to that used to obtain the spectroscopic terms under the Russell-Saunders (LS) coupling…

  16. Momentum-space properties from coordinate-space electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Harbola, Manoj K.; Zope, Rajendra R.; Kshirsagar, Anjali; Pathak, Rajeev K.

    2005-05-22

    Electron density and electron momentum density, while independently tractable experimentally, bear no direct connection without going through the many-electron wave function. However, invoking a variant of the constrained-search formulation of density-functional theory, we develop a general scheme (valid for arbitrary external potentials) yielding decent momentum-space properties, starting exclusively from the coordinate-space electron density. A numerical illustration of the scheme is provided for the closed-shell atomic systems He, Be, and Ne in their ground state and for 1s{sup 1} 2s{sup 1} singlet electronic excited state for helium by calculating the Compton profiles and the expectation values derived from given coordinate-space electron densities.

  17. Parity-violating deep-inelastic electron-deuteron scattering: Higher twist and parton angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seng, Chien-Yeah; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.

    2013-07-01

    We study the effect of parton angular momentum on the twist-four correction to the left-right asymmetry in the electron-deuteron parity-violating deep-inelastic scattering (PVDIS). We show that this higher-twist correction is transparent to the dynamics of parton angular momentum needed to account for the Sivers and Boer-Mulders functions and spin-independent parton distribution functions. A sufficiently precise measurement of the PVDIS asymmetry may, thus, provide additional information about the parton dynamics responsible for nucleon spin.

  18. Electronic structure of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Ruffieux, Pascal; Cai, Jinming; Plumb, Nicholas C; Patthey, Luc; Prezzi, Deborah; Ferretti, Andrea; Molinari, Elisa; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Pignedoli, Carlo A; Fasel, Roman

    2012-08-28

    Some of the most intriguing properties of graphene are predicted for specifically designed nanostructures such as nanoribbons. Functionalities far beyond those known from extended graphene systems include electronic band gap variations related to quantum confinement and edge effects, as well as localized spin-polarized edge states for specific edge geometries. The inability to produce graphene nanostructures with the needed precision, however, has so far hampered the verification of the predicted electronic properties. Here, we report on the electronic band gap and dispersion of the occupied electronic bands of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons fabricated via on-surface synthesis. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy data from armchair graphene nanoribbons of width N = 7 supported on Au(111) reveal a band gap of 2.3 eV, an effective mass of 0.21 m(0) at the top of the valence band, and an energy-dependent charge carrier velocity reaching 8.2 × 10(5) m/s in the linear part of the valence band. These results are in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions that include image charge corrections accounting for screening by the metal substrate and confirm the importance of electron-electron interactions in graphene nanoribbons.

  19. Transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to a bound electron

    PubMed Central

    Schmiegelow, Christian T.; Schulz, Jonas; Kaufmann, Henning; Ruster, Thomas; Poschinger, Ulrich G.; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Photons can carry angular momentum, not only due to their spin, but also due to their spatial structure. This extra twist has been used, for example, to drive circular motion of microscopic particles in optical tweezers as well as to create vortices in quantum gases. Here we excite an atomic transition with a vortex laser beam and demonstrate the transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to the valence electron of a single trapped ion. We observe strongly modified selection rules showing that an atom can absorb two quanta of angular momentum from a single photon: one from the spin and another from the spatial structure of the beam. Furthermore, we show that parasitic ac-Stark shifts from off-resonant transitions are suppressed in the dark centre of vortex beams. These results show how light's spatial structure can determine the characteristics of light–matter interaction and pave the way for its application and observation in other systems. PMID:27694805

  20. Transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to a bound electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiegelow, Christian T.; Schulz, Jonas; Kaufmann, Henning; Ruster, Thomas; Poschinger, Ulrich G.; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand

    2016-10-01

    Photons can carry angular momentum, not only due to their spin, but also due to their spatial structure. This extra twist has been used, for example, to drive circular motion of microscopic particles in optical tweezers as well as to create vortices in quantum gases. Here we excite an atomic transition with a vortex laser beam and demonstrate the transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to the valence electron of a single trapped ion. We observe strongly modified selection rules showing that an atom can absorb two quanta of angular momentum from a single photon: one from the spin and another from the spatial structure of the beam. Furthermore, we show that parasitic ac-Stark shifts from off-resonant transitions are suppressed in the dark centre of vortex beams. These results show how light's spatial structure can determine the characteristics of light-matter interaction and pave the way for its application and observation in other systems.

  1. Nondestructive Measurement of Orbital Angular Momentum for an Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larocque, Hugo; Bouchard, Frédéric; Grillo, Vincenzo; Sit, Alicia; Frabboni, Stefano; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Padgett, Miles J.; Boyd, Robert W.; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2016-10-01

    Free electrons with a helical phase front, referred to as "twisted" electrons, possess an orbital angular momentum (OAM) and, hence, a quantized magnetic dipole moment along their propagation direction. This intrinsic magnetic moment can be used to probe material properties. Twisted electrons thus have numerous potential applications in materials science. Measuring this quantity often relies on a series of projective measurements that subsequently change the OAM carried by the electrons. In this Letter, we propose a nondestructive way of measuring an electron beam's OAM through the interaction of this associated magnetic dipole with a conductive loop. Such an interaction results in the generation of induced currents within the loop, which are found to be directly proportional to the electron's OAM value. Moreover, the electron experiences no OAM variations and only minimal energy losses upon the measurement, and, hence, the nondestructive nature of the proposed technique.

  2. Is the angular momentum of an electron conserved in a uniform magnetic field?

    PubMed

    Greenshields, Colin R; Stamps, Robert L; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Barnett, Stephen M

    2014-12-12

    We show that an electron moving in a uniform magnetic field possesses a time-varying "diamagnetic" angular momentum. Surprisingly this means that the kinetic angular momentum of the electron may vary with time, despite the rotational symmetry of the system. This apparent violation of angular momentum conservation is resolved by including the angular momentum of the surrounding fields.

  3. Mantises exchange angular momentum between three rotating body parts to jump precisely to targets.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Malcolm; Cullen, Darron A; Dorosenko, Marina; Sutton, Gregory P

    2015-03-16

    Flightless animals have evolved diverse mechanisms to control their movements in air, whether falling with gravity or propelling against it. Many insects jump as a primary mode of locomotion and must therefore precisely control the large torques generated during takeoff. For example, to minimize spin (angular momentum of the body) at takeoff, plant-sucking bugs apply large equal and opposite torques from two propulsive legs [1]. Interacting gear wheels have evolved in some to give precise synchronization of these legs [2, 3]. Once airborne, as a result of either jumping or falling, further adjustments may be needed to control trajectory and orient the body for landing. Tails are used by geckos to control pitch [4, 5] and by Anolis lizards to alter direction [6, 7]. When falling, cats rotate their body [8], while aphids [9] and ants [10, 11] manipulate wind resistance against their legs and thorax. Falling is always downward, but targeted jumping must achieve many possible desired trajectories. We show that when making targeted jumps, juvenile wingless mantises first rotated their abdomen about the thorax to adjust the center of mass and thus regulate spin at takeoff. Once airborne, they then smoothly and sequentially transferred angular momentum in four stages between the jointed abdomen, the two raptorial front legs, and the two propulsive hind legs to produce a controlled jump with a precise landing. Experimentally impairing abdominal movements reduced the overall rotation so that the mantis either failed to grasp the target or crashed into it head first. PMID:25754643

  4. Mantises exchange angular momentum between three rotating body parts to jump precisely to targets.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Malcolm; Cullen, Darron A; Dorosenko, Marina; Sutton, Gregory P

    2015-03-16

    Flightless animals have evolved diverse mechanisms to control their movements in air, whether falling with gravity or propelling against it. Many insects jump as a primary mode of locomotion and must therefore precisely control the large torques generated during takeoff. For example, to minimize spin (angular momentum of the body) at takeoff, plant-sucking bugs apply large equal and opposite torques from two propulsive legs [1]. Interacting gear wheels have evolved in some to give precise synchronization of these legs [2, 3]. Once airborne, as a result of either jumping or falling, further adjustments may be needed to control trajectory and orient the body for landing. Tails are used by geckos to control pitch [4, 5] and by Anolis lizards to alter direction [6, 7]. When falling, cats rotate their body [8], while aphids [9] and ants [10, 11] manipulate wind resistance against their legs and thorax. Falling is always downward, but targeted jumping must achieve many possible desired trajectories. We show that when making targeted jumps, juvenile wingless mantises first rotated their abdomen about the thorax to adjust the center of mass and thus regulate spin at takeoff. Once airborne, they then smoothly and sequentially transferred angular momentum in four stages between the jointed abdomen, the two raptorial front legs, and the two propulsive hind legs to produce a controlled jump with a precise landing. Experimentally impairing abdominal movements reduced the overall rotation so that the mantis either failed to grasp the target or crashed into it head first.

  5. Ion Momentum Imaging of Dissociative Electron Attachment to Small Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogle, Michael

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, low energy dissociative electron attachment (DEA) interactions have been of interest to varying biological and technological applications. To study the dynamics resulting from DEA, we used an ion-momentum imaging apparatus based on the Cold Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy (COLTRIMS) technique in which a molecular beam is crossed by a pulsed electron beam. The beam interaction takes place in a 4 π pulsed electrostatic spectrometer that collects the anion fragments resulting from DEA. The molecular beam is formed by a supersonic expansion which results in a well-localized and cold target. Using this apparatus we have investigated the DEA dynamics for several small molecules: CO2 at the 4 eV shape resonance and the 8 eV Feshbach resonance; N2O at the 2.3 eV shape resonance; HCCH at the 3 eV shape resonance; and CF4 near the 7 eV resonance. An overview of these experimental ion-momentum results will be compared to ab initio electronic structure and fixed-nuclei scattering calculations to gauge the resulting dynamics driven by DEA. In many cases, conical intersections play a pivotal role in driving the dynamics. Some of these systems exhibit non-axial recoil conditions indicative of a bending dynamics in the transitory negative ion state while others exhibit a direct axial recoil dissociation without any bending. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Contract NSF-PHYS1404366.

  6. Electron Scattering From High-Momentum Neutrons in Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    A.V. Klimenko; S.E. Kuhn

    2005-10-12

    We report results from an experiment measuring the semi-inclusive reaction D(e,e'p{sub s}) where the proton p{sub s} is moving at a large angle relative to the momentum transfer. If we assume that the proton was a spectator to the reaction taking place on the neutron in deuterium, the initial state of that neutron can be inferred. This method, known as spectator tagging, can be used to study electron scattering from high-momentum (off-shell) neutrons in deuterium. The data were taken with a 5.765 GeV electron beam on a deuterium target in Jefferson Laboratory's Hall B, using the CLAS detector. A reduced cross section was extracted for different values of final-state missing mass W*, backward proton momentum {rvec p}{sub s} and momentum transfer Q{sup 2}. The data are compared to a simple PWIA spectator model. A strong enhancement in the data observed at transverse kinematics is not reproduced by the PWIA model. This enhancement can likely be associated with the contribution of final state interactions (FSI) that were not incorporated into the model. A ''bound neutron structure function'' F{sub 2n}{sup eff} was extracted as a function of W* and the scaling variable x* at extreme backward kinematics, where effects of FSI appear to be smaller. For p{sub s} > 400 MeV/c, where the neutron is far off-shell, the model overestimates the value of F{sub 2n}{sup eff} in the region of x* between 0.25 and 0.6. A modification of the bound neutron structure function is one of possible effects that can cause the observed deviation.

  7. Precision fast kickers for kiloampere electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.; Chen, Y.J.; Weir, J.T.

    1999-10-06

    These kickers will be used to make fast dipoles and quadrupoles which are driven by sharp risetime pulsers to provide precision beam manipulations for high current kA electron beams. This technology will be used on the 2nd axis of the DARHT linac at LANL. It will be used to provide 4 micropulses of pulse width 20 to 120 nsec. selected from a 2 {micro}sec., 2kA, 20MeV macropulse. The fast pulsers will have amplitude modulation capability to compensate for beam-induced steering effects and other slow beam centroid motion to within the bandwidth of the kicker system. Scaling laws derived from theory will be presented along with extensive experimental data obtained on the test bed ETA-II.

  8. Electron momentum spectroscopy of aniline taking account of nuclear dynamics in the initial electronic ground state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farasat, M.; Shojaei, S. H. R.; Morini, F.; Golzan, M. M.; Deleuze, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    The electronic structure, electron binding energy spectrum and (e, 2e) momentum distributions of aniline have been theoretically predicted at an electron impact energy of 1.500 keV on the basis of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamical simulations, in order to account for thermally induced nuclear motions in the initial electronic ground state. Most computed momentum profiles are rather insensitive to thermally induced alterations of the molecular structure, with the exception of the profiles corresponding to two ionization bands at electron binding energies comprised between ˜10.0 and ˜12.0 eV (band C) and between ˜16.5 and ˜20.0 eV (band G). These profiles are found to be strongly influenced by nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state, especially in the low momentum region. The obtained results show that thermal averaging smears out most generally the spectral fingerprints that are induced by nitrogen inversion.

  9. Momentum distribution function of the electron gas at metallic densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Yasutami; Yasuhara, H.

    1991-10-01

    The momentum distribution function n(k) of the electron gas is calculated in the effective-potential-expansion method at metallic densities. The recently established self-consistency relation between n(k) and the correlation energy [Y. Takada and T. Kita, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 60, 25 (1991)] is employed to check the accuracy of our results. This check shows that the effective-potential-expansion method provides probably the exact and at least more accurate results of n(k) than all the other methods that have given n(k) thus far.

  10. Vibrational effects on the electron momentum distributions of valence orbitals of formamide.

    PubMed

    Miao, Y R; Deng, J K; Ning, C G

    2012-03-28

    The ionization energy spectra and electron momentum distributions of formamide were investigated using the high-resolution electron momentum spectrometer in combination with high level calculations. The observed ionization energy spectra and electron momentum distributions were interpreted using symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction theory, outer valence Green function, and DFT-B3LYP methods. The ordering of 10a(') and 2a(") orbitals of formamide was assigned unambiguously by comparing the experimental electron momentum distributions with the corresponding theoretical results, i.e., 10a(') has a lower binding energy. In addition, it was found that the low-frequency wagging vibration of the amino group at room temperature has noticeable effects on the electron momentum distributions. The equilibrium-nuclear-positions-approximation, which was widely used in electron momentum spectroscopy, is not accurate for formamide molecule. The calculations based on the thermal average can evidently improve the agreement with the experimental momentum distributions.

  11. Towards a Precision Measurement of Parity-Violating e-p Elastic Scattering at Low Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jie

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the Q-weak experiment is to make a measurement of the proton's weak charge QWp = 1 - 4 sin2W2(θWprecision test of the Standard Model (SM) prediction on the running of sin2WWp by measuring the parity violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at low momentum transfer Q2 = 0.026 (GeV/c)2 and forward angles (8 degrees). The anticipated size of the asymmetry, based on the SM, is about 230 parts per billion (ppb). With the proposed accuracy, the experiment may probe new physics beyond Standard Model at the TeV scale. This thesis focuses on my contributions to the experiment, including track reconstruction for momentum transfer determination of the scattering process, and the focal plane scanner, a detector I designed and built to measure the flux profile of scattered electrons on the focal plane of the Q-weak spectrometer to assist in the extrapolation of low beam current tracking results to high beam current. Preliminary results from the commissioning and the first run period of the Q-weak experiment are reported and discussed.

  12. Application of Ion and Electron Momentum Imaging to Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocke, C. L.

    2000-06-01

    COLTRIMS (COLd Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy) combines fast imaging detectors with a supersonically cooled gas target to allow the charged particles from any ionizing collision, including both recoil ions and electrons, to be collected with extremely high efficiency and with fully measured vector momenta. Since all particles are measured in event mode, the full multi-dimensional momentum space is mapped. We will review several examples of the use of this technique to study two- , three- and four-body final states created in ionizing interactions of photons and charged particles with He and D2 . The momentum spectra of electrons ejected from these targets by slow projectiles reveal the stucture of the molecular orbitals which are promoted into the continuum. Double photoionization of the same targets reveals patterns which can be interpreted in terms of collective coordinates. Two-electron removal from D2 by Xe ^26+ reveals the influence of the projectile field on the dissociation process. A recent application of the technique to ionization by high intensity laser fields will be discussed. Work performed in collaboration with M.A.Abdallah^1, I.Ali^1, Matthias Achler^2, H.Braeuning^2,3, Angela Braeuning-Deminian^2, Achim Czasch^2,3, R.Doerner^2,3, R.DuBois^6, A. Landers^1,5, V.Mergel^2, R.E.Olson^6, T.Osipov^1, M.Prior^3, H.Schmidt-Boecking^2, M.Singh^1, A.Staudte^2,3, T.Weber^2, W.Wolff^4, and H.E.Wolf^4 ^1J.R.Macdonald Laboratory, Physics Department, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506; ^2 Institut fuer Kernphysik, Univ. Frankfurt, August-Euler-Str.6,D-60486 Frankfurt, Germany ; ^3Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720; ^4Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Caixa Postal 68.528, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; ^5Physics Dept., Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008; ^6Physics Dept., Univ. Missouri Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 Work supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic

  13. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhenbao; Yang, Bing; Lin, Yangming; Su, Dangsheng

    2015-12-07

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials.

  14. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhenbao; Yang, Bing; Lin, Yangming; Su, Dangsheng

    2015-12-01

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials. PMID:26646862

  15. Role of momentum and velocity for radiating electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdessus, Rémi; Noble, Adam; McKenna, Paul; Jaroszynski, Dino A.

    2016-02-01

    Radiation reaction remains one of the most fascinating open questions in electrodynamics. The development of multi-petawatt laser facilities capable of reaching extreme intensities has lent this topic a new urgency, and it is now more important than ever to properly understand it. Two models of radiation reaction, due to Landau and Lifshitz and due to Sokolov, have gained prominence, but there has been little work exploring the relation between the two. We show that in the Sokolov theory, electromagnetic fields induce a Lorentz transformation between momentum and velocity, which eliminates some of the counterintuitive results of Landau-Lifshitz. In particular, the Lorentz boost in a constant electric field causes the particle to lose electrostatic potential energy more rapidly than it otherwise would, explaining the longstanding mystery of how an electron can radiate while experiencing no radiation reaction force. These ideas are illustrated in examples of relevance to astrophysics and laser-particle interactions, where radiation reaction effects are particularly prominent.

  16. Electron momentum spectroscopy of dimethyl ether taking account of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state

    SciTech Connect

    Morini, Filippo; Deleuze, Michael Simon; Watanabe, Noboru; Kojima, Masataka; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-10-07

    The influence of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state on the (e,2e) momentum profiles of dimethyl ether has been analyzed using the harmonic analytical quantum mechanical and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics approaches. In spite of fundamental methodological differences, results obtained with both approaches consistently demonstrate that molecular vibrations in the electronic ground state have a most appreciable influence on the momentum profiles associated to the 2b{sub 1}, 6a{sub 1}, 4b{sub 2}, and 1a{sub 2} orbitals. Taking this influence into account considerably improves the agreement between theoretical and newly obtained experimental momentum profiles, with improved statistical accuracy. Both approaches point out in particular the most appreciable role which is played by a few specific molecular vibrations of A{sub 1}, B{sub 1}, and B{sub 2} symmetries, which correspond to C–H stretching and H–C–H bending modes. In line with the Herzberg-Teller principle, the influence of these molecular vibrations on the computed momentum profiles can be unraveled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing.

  17. Electron momentum spectroscopy of dimethyl ether taking account of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morini, Filippo; Watanabe, Noboru; Kojima, Masataka; Deleuze, Michael Simon; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-10-01

    The influence of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state on the (e,2e) momentum profiles of dimethyl ether has been analyzed using the harmonic analytical quantum mechanical and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics approaches. In spite of fundamental methodological differences, results obtained with both approaches consistently demonstrate that molecular vibrations in the electronic ground state have a most appreciable influence on the momentum profiles associated to the 2b1, 6a1, 4b2, and 1a2 orbitals. Taking this influence into account considerably improves the agreement between theoretical and newly obtained experimental momentum profiles, with improved statistical accuracy. Both approaches point out in particular the most appreciable role which is played by a few specific molecular vibrations of A1, B1, and B2 symmetries, which correspond to C-H stretching and H-C-H bending modes. In line with the Herzberg-Teller principle, the influence of these molecular vibrations on the computed momentum profiles can be unraveled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing.

  18. Electron momentum spectroscopy of dimethyl ether taking account of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state.

    PubMed

    Morini, Filippo; Watanabe, Noboru; Kojima, Masataka; Deleuze, Michael Simon; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-10-01

    The influence of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state on the (e,2e) momentum profiles of dimethyl ether has been analyzed using the harmonic analytical quantum mechanical and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics approaches. In spite of fundamental methodological differences, results obtained with both approaches consistently demonstrate that molecular vibrations in the electronic ground state have a most appreciable influence on the momentum profiles associated to the 2b1, 6a1, 4b2, and 1a2 orbitals. Taking this influence into account considerably improves the agreement between theoretical and newly obtained experimental momentum profiles, with improved statistical accuracy. Both approaches point out in particular the most appreciable role which is played by a few specific molecular vibrations of A1, B1, and B2 symmetries, which correspond to C-H stretching and H-C-H bending modes. In line with the Herzberg-Teller principle, the influence of these molecular vibrations on the computed momentum profiles can be unraveled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing.

  19. Ring-puckering effects on electron momentum distributions of valence orbitals of oxetane.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Shan, Xu; Zhang, Zhe; Tang, Yaguo; Zhao, Minfu; Chen, XiangJun

    2014-12-18

    The binding energy spectra and electron momentum distributions for the outer-valence molecular orbitals of oxetane have been measured utilizing (e, 2e) electron momentum spectrometer with non-coplanar asymmetric geometry at the impact energy of 2500 eV. The experimental momentum distributions were compared with the density functional theory calculations employing B3LYP hybrid functional with aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. It was found that the calculation at planar geometry (C2v) completely fails to interpret the large "turn-up" at low momentum region in electron momentum distribution of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) 3b1, while the calculations considering the thermal abundances of planar (C2v) and bent (Cs) conformers or the thermally populated vibrational states of ring-puckering motion have significantly improved the agreement. The results indicate that the ring-puckering motion of oxetane has a strong effect on the electron density distribution of HOMO.

  20. Generation of angular-momentum-dominated electron beams from a photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.-E; Piot, P.; Kim, K.-J.; Barov, N.; Lidia, S.; Santucci, J.; Tikhoplav, R.; Wennerberg, J.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    Various projects under study require an angular-momentum-dominated electron beam generated by a photoinjector. Some of the proposals directly use the angular-momentum-dominated beams (e.g. electron cooling of heavy ions), while others require the beam to be transformed into a flat beam (e.g. possible electron injectors for light sources and linear colliders). In this paper, we report our experimental study of an angular-momentum-dominated beam produced in a photoinjector, addressing the dependencies of angular momentum on initial conditions. We also briefly discuss the removal of angular momentum. The results of the experiment, carried out at the Fermilab/NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory, are found to be in good agreement with theoretical and numerical models.

  1. Generation of angular-momentum-dominated electron beams from a photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yin-E.; Piot, Philippe; Kim, Kwang-Je; Barov, Nikolas; Lidia, Steven; Santucci, James; Tikhoplav, Rodion; Wennerberg, Jason

    2004-11-30

    Various projects under study require an angular-momentum-dominated electron beam generated by a photoinjector. Some of the proposals directly use the angular-momentum-dominated beams (e.g. electron cooling of heavy ions), while others require the beam to be transformed into a flat beam (e.g. possible electron injectors for light sources and linear colliders). In this paper, we report our experimental study of an angular-momentum-dominated beam produced in a photoinjector, addressing the dependencies of angular momentum on initial conditions. We also briefly discuss the removal of angular momentum. The results of the experiment, carried out at the Fermilab/NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory, are found to be in good agreement with theoretical and numerical models.

  2. Vibrational Effects on Electron Momentum Distributions of Outer-Valence Orbitals of Oxetane.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yaguo; Shan, Xu; Yang, Jing; Niu, Shanshan; Zhang, Zhe; Watanabe, Noboru; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Takahashi, Masahiko; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-09-01

    Vibrational effects on electron momentum distributions (EMDs) of outer-valence orbitals of oxetane are computed with a comprehensive consideration of all vibrational modes. It is found that vibrational motions influence EMDs of all outer-valence orbitals noticeably. The agreement between theoretical and experimental momentum profiles of the first five orbitals is greatly improved when including molecular vibrations in the calculation. In particular, the large turn-up at low momentum in the experimental momentum profile of the 3b1 orbital is well interpreted by vibrational effects, indicating that, besides the low-frequency ring-puckering mode, C-H stretching motion also plays a significant role in affecting EMDs of outer-valence orbitals of oxetane. The case of oxetane exhibits the significance of checking vibrational effects when performing electron momentum spectroscopy measurements. PMID:27494262

  3. Vibrational Effects on Electron Momentum Distributions of Outer-Valence Orbitals of Oxetane.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yaguo; Shan, Xu; Yang, Jing; Niu, Shanshan; Zhang, Zhe; Watanabe, Noboru; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Takahashi, Masahiko; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-09-01

    Vibrational effects on electron momentum distributions (EMDs) of outer-valence orbitals of oxetane are computed with a comprehensive consideration of all vibrational modes. It is found that vibrational motions influence EMDs of all outer-valence orbitals noticeably. The agreement between theoretical and experimental momentum profiles of the first five orbitals is greatly improved when including molecular vibrations in the calculation. In particular, the large turn-up at low momentum in the experimental momentum profile of the 3b1 orbital is well interpreted by vibrational effects, indicating that, besides the low-frequency ring-puckering mode, C-H stretching motion also plays a significant role in affecting EMDs of outer-valence orbitals of oxetane. The case of oxetane exhibits the significance of checking vibrational effects when performing electron momentum spectroscopy measurements.

  4. Precision electroweak studies using parity violation in electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Paschke, Kent D,

    2013-11-01

    The nature of new neutral-current interactions can be revealed at the low-energy precision frontier, where studies of parity-violation in electron scattering will complement the energy-frontier studies at the LHC. Measurements of the parity-violating observable APV - the cross-section asymmetry in the scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from an unpolarized target - are sensitive to possible contact interactions from new physics at multi-TeV mass scales. The 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and a new, high-intensity beam at Mainz offer opportunities for significant improvements in measurements of electron-electron and electron-quark parity-violating interactions.

  5. First-principles Theory of the Momentum-dependent Local Ansatz for Correlated Electron System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sumal; Kakehashi, Yoshiro

    The momentum-dependent local-ansatz (MLA) wavefunction describes well correlated electrons in solids in both the weak and strong interaction regimes. In order to apply the theory to the realistic system, we have extended the MLA to the first-principles version using the tight-binding LDA+U Hamiltonian. We demonstrate for the paramagnetic Fe that the first-principles MLA can describe a reasonable correlation energy gain and suppression of charge fluctuations due to electron correlations. Furthermore, we show that the MLA yields a distinct momentum dependence of the momentum distribution, and thus improves the Gutzwiller wavefunction.

  6. High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy with Simultaneous Energy and Momentum Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Kesmodel, Larry; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, Ward; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-03-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) has been demonstrated as a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic surface excitations of solids. The dispersion relation of the surface excitations, i.e. energy as a function of momentum, can be obtained via the angle resolved measurements by rotating the sample or the analyzer in a conventional HREELS measurement. The sampling density in the momentum space and the detecting efficiency are restricted by the mechanical rotation. Here we introduce a new design of the HREELS system, by combining the traditional Ibach-type electron source with the mainstream hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which could simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons without any mechanical rotation. The new system possesses higher efficiency and sampling density of momentum-resolved measurements by at least one order of magnitude than conventional spectrometers without deteriorating the resolution of energy and momentum. Using Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ as an example, we show that an energy loss spectrum can be scanned throughout the first Brillouin zone and a momentum-dependent spectral intensity distribution could be obtained in one measurement.

  7. Exclusive electron scattering from deuterium at high momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Bulten, H.J.; Anthony, P.L.; Arnold, R.G.; Arrington, J.; Beise, E.J.; Belz, E.; van Bibber, K.; Bosted, P.E.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; Chapman, M.S.; Coulter, K.P.; Dietrich, F.S.; Ent, R.; Epstein, M.; Filippone, B.W.; Gao, H.; Gearhart, R.A.; Geesaman, D.F.; Hansen, J.; Holt, R.J.; Jackson, H.E.; Jones, C.E.; Keppel, C.E.; Kinney, E.; Kuhn, S.E.; Lee, K.; Lorenzon, W.; Lung, A.; Makins, N.C.R.; Margaziotis, D.J.; McKeown, R.D.; Milner, R.G.; Mueller, B.; Napolitano, J.; Nelson, J.; O`Neill, T.G.; Papavassiliou, V.; Petratos, G.G.; Potterveld, D.H.; Rock, S.E.; Spengos, M.; Szalata, Z.M.; Tao, L.H.; White, J.L.; Zeidman, B. ||||||||||

    1995-06-12

    Cross sections are presented for the reaction {sup 2}H({ital e},{ital e}{prime}{ital p}){ital n} for momentum transfers in the range 1.2{le}{ital Q}{sup 2}{le}6.8(GeV/{ital c}){sup 2} and for missing momenta from 0 to 250 MeV/{ital c}. The longitudinal-transverse interference structure function has been separated at {ital Q}{sup 2}=1.2(GeV/{ital c}){sup 2}. The observables are compared to calculations performed in nonrelativistic and relativistic frameworks. The data are best described by a fully relativistic calculation.

  8. Contacting nanowires and nanotubes with atomic precision for electronic transport

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Shengyong; Hellstrom, Sondra L; Bao, Zhenan; Boyanov, Boyan; Li, An-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Making contacts to nanostructures with atomic precision is an important process in the bottom-up fabrication and characterization of electronic nanodevices. Existing contacting techniques use top-down lithography and chemical etching, but lack atomic precision and introduce the possibility of contamination. Here, we report that a field-induced emission process can be used to make local contacts onto individual nanowires and nanotubes with atomic spatial precision. The gold nano-islands are deposited onto nanostructures precisely by using a scanning tunneling microscope tip, which provides a clean and controllable method to ensure both electrically conductive and mechanically reliable contacts. To demonstrate the wide applicability of the technique, nano-contacts are fabricated on silicide atomic wires, carbon nanotubes, and copper nanowires. The electrical transport measurements are performed in situ by utilizing the nanocontacts to bridge the nanostructures to the transport probes.

  9. Vibrational effects on valence electron momentum distributions of CH2F2.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Noboru; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2014-12-28

    We report an electron momentum spectroscopy study of vibrational effects on the electron momentum distributions for the outer valence orbitals of difluoromethane (CH2F2). The symmetric noncoplanar (e,2e) experiment has been performed at an incident electron energy of 1.2 keV. Furthermore, a theoretical calculation of the electron momentum distributions of the CH2F2 molecule has been carried out with vibrational effects being involved. It is shown from comparisons between experiment and theory that it is essential to take into account influences of the CH2 asymmetric stretching and CH2 rocking vibrational modes for a proper understanding of the electron momentum distribution of the 2b1 orbital having the CH-bonding character. The results of CH2F2and additional theoretical calculations for (CH3)2O and H2CO molecules strongly suggest that vibrational effects on electron momentum distributions tend to be appreciable for non-total symmetry molecular orbitals delocalized over some equivalent CH-bond sites.

  10. Vibrational effects on valence electron momentum distributions of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Noboru; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2014-12-28

    We report an electron momentum spectroscopy study of vibrational effects on the electron momentum distributions for the outer valence orbitals of difluoromethane (CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}). The symmetric noncoplanar (e,2e) experiment has been performed at an incident electron energy of 1.2 keV. Furthermore, a theoretical calculation of the electron momentum distributions of the CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} molecule has been carried out with vibrational effects being involved. It is shown from comparisons between experiment and theory that it is essential to take into account influences of the CH{sub 2} asymmetric stretching and CH{sub 2} rocking vibrational modes for a proper understanding of the electron momentum distribution of the 2b{sub 1} orbital having the CH-bonding character. The results of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}and additional theoretical calculations for (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}O and H{sub 2}CO molecules strongly suggest that vibrational effects on electron momentum distributions tend to be appreciable for non-total symmetry molecular orbitals delocalized over some equivalent CH-bond sites.

  11. Effect of electron-beam momentum spread on cyclotron resonance maser operation at two resonant frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, G. J.; McNeil, B. W. J.; Robb, G. R. M.

    2001-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of cyclotron resonance maser (CRM) operation at two resonant frequencies including the effects of momentum spread in the electron beam. A linear analysis of the system equations is presented in the limit of small momentum spreads. Numerical solutions to the system equations are also given and are in agreement with the linear theory. The results predict that for realistic momentum spreads, operation of the CRM at the higher of the two resonant frequencies should be possible, extending its operating frequency range. An experiment currently under development at Strathclyde University is described and modeled numerically.

  12. Dynamics of electron-phonon scattering: crystal- and angular-momentum transfer probed by resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Beye, M; Hennies, F; Deppe, M; Suljoti, E; Nagasono, M; Wurth, W; Föhlisch, A

    2009-12-01

    Experimentally, we observe angular-momentum transfer in electron-phonon scattering, although it is commonly agreed that phonons transfer mostly linear momentum. Therefore, the incorporation of angular momentum to describe phonons is necessary already for simple semiconductors and bears significant implications for the formation of new quasiparticles in correlated functional materials. Separation of linear and angular-momentum transfer in electron-phonon scattering is achieved by highly selective excitations on the femtosecond time scale of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

  13. Calculating electron momentum densities and Compton profiles using the linear tetrahedron method.

    PubMed

    Ernsting, D; Billington, D; Haynes, T D; Millichamp, T E; Taylor, J W; Duffy, J A; Giblin, S R; Dewhurst, J K; Dugdale, S B

    2014-12-10

    A method for computing electron momentum densities and Compton profiles from ab initio calculations is presented. Reciprocal space is divided into optimally-shaped tetrahedra for interpolation, and the linear tetrahedron method is used to obtain the momentum density and its projections such as Compton profiles. Results are presented and evaluated against experimental data for Be, Cu, Ni, Fe3Pt, and YBa2Cu4O8, demonstrating the accuracy of our method in a wide variety of crystal structures.

  14. Electron impact excitation of SO2 - Differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vuskovic, L.; Trajmar, S.

    1982-01-01

    Electron impact excitation of the electronic states of SO2 was investigated. Differential, integral, and inelastic momentum transfer cross sections were obtained by normalizing the relative measurements to the elastic cross sections. The cross sections are given for seven spectral ranges of the energy-loss spectra extending from the lowest electronic state to near the first ionization limit. Most of the regions represent the overlap of several electronic transitions. No measurements for these cross sections have been reported previously.

  15. Design and performance of a spin-polarized electron energy loss spectrometer with high momentum resolution.

    PubMed

    Vasilyev, D; Kirschner, J

    2016-08-01

    We describe a new "complete" spin-polarized electron energy loss spectrometer comprising a spin-polarized primary electron source, an imaging electron analyzer, and a spin analyzer of the "spin-polarizing mirror" type. Unlike previous instruments, we have a high momentum resolution of less than 0.04 Å(-1), at an energy resolution of 90-130 meV. Unlike all previous studies which reported rather broad featureless data in both energy and angle dependence, we find richly structured spectra depending sensitively on small changes of the primary energy, the kinetic energy after scattering, and of the angle of incidence. The key factor is the momentum resolution. PMID:27587131

  16. Design and performance of a spin-polarized electron energy loss spectrometer with high momentum resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyev, D.; Kirschner, J.

    2016-08-01

    We describe a new "complete" spin-polarized electron energy loss spectrometer comprising a spin-polarized primary electron source, an imaging electron analyzer, and a spin analyzer of the "spin-polarizing mirror" type. Unlike previous instruments, we have a high momentum resolution of less than 0.04 Å-1, at an energy resolution of 90-130 meV. Unlike all previous studies which reported rather broad featureless data in both energy and angle dependence, we find richly structured spectra depending sensitively on small changes of the primary energy, the kinetic energy after scattering, and of the angle of incidence. The key factor is the momentum resolution.

  17. Design and performance of a spin-polarized electron energy loss spectrometer with high momentum resolution.

    PubMed

    Vasilyev, D; Kirschner, J

    2016-08-01

    We describe a new "complete" spin-polarized electron energy loss spectrometer comprising a spin-polarized primary electron source, an imaging electron analyzer, and a spin analyzer of the "spin-polarizing mirror" type. Unlike previous instruments, we have a high momentum resolution of less than 0.04 Å(-1), at an energy resolution of 90-130 meV. Unlike all previous studies which reported rather broad featureless data in both energy and angle dependence, we find richly structured spectra depending sensitively on small changes of the primary energy, the kinetic energy after scattering, and of the angle of incidence. The key factor is the momentum resolution.

  18. Zitterbewegung, internal momentum and spin of the circular travelling-wave electromagnetic model electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asif, Malik Mohammad; Khan, Salman

    2016-02-01

    This study demonstrates that an electron, going round, with tangential velocity c , in a circle of radius equal to half the reduced Compton wavelength of the electron, has Dirac-delta-like internal momentum (u,overrightarrow{p}_{θ}). The circular momentum overrightarrow{p}_{θ} and energy u emanate from the circular Dirac-delta-type rotating monochromatic electromagnetic (EM) wave, which travels itself in another circle having radius equal to the reduced Compton wavelength of the electron. The phenomenon of Zitterbewegung and the spin of the electron are natural consequences of the model. The spin is associated with the internal circulating momentum of the electron in terms of a four-component spinor, which leads to the Dirac equation linking the EM electron model with quantum-mechanical theory. Our model accurately explains the experimental results of the electron channelling experiment (P. Catillon et al., Found. Phys. 38, 659 (2008)), in which the momentum resonance is observed at 161.784MeV/ c corresponding to a Zitterbewegung frequency of 80.874MeV/ c electron beam.

  19. Precision electroweak studies using parity violation in electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Paschke, K. D.

    2013-11-07

    The nature of new neutral-current interactions can be revealed at the low-energy precision frontier, where studies of parity-violation in electron scattering will complement the energy-frontier studies at the LHC. Measurements of the parity-violating observable A{sub PV} - the cross-section asymmetry in the scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from an unpolarized target - are sensitive to possible contact interactions from new physics at multi-TeV mass scales. The 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and a new, high-intensity beam at Mainz offer opportunities for significant improvements in measurements of electron-electron and electron-quark parity-violating interactions.

  20. Momentum Imaging of the Dynamics of Dissociative Electron Attachment to Uracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaughter, Dan; Kawarai, Yu; Weber, Thorsten; Azuma, Yoshiro; Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vince; Belkacem, Ali

    2013-05-01

    Observation of the dynamics of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) in biomolecules has recently become possible by momentum imaging of the fragments resulting from the dissociating transient anion resonance. A momentum spectrometer featuring a 4 π solid angle of detection is combined with a pulsed electron beam and effusive molecular beam in a crossed geometry to measure the full 3D momentum distribution of dissociating negative ions. Guided by electronic structure calculations that indicate the most likely orientation of the molecule at the time of attachment, we present key aspects of the dynamics of ring-breaking dissociation of the transient anion formed upon DEA to the nucleobase uracil. Performed under the auspices of the US DOE by LBNL under Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  1. Bloch oscillations for large momentum transfer and high precision in an ytterbium Bose-Einstein condensate interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; McAlpine, Katherine; Gochnauer, Daniel; Saxberg, Brendan; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-05-01

    The narrow momentum and position spread of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) can help improve atom interferometric measurements. In earlier work, we demonstrated a contrast interferometer with ytterbium (Yb) BECs. Here, we report progress towards implementing a second generation Yb BEC interferometer with the goal of measuring h/m, where h is Planck's constant and m is the mass of a Yb atom, in order to determine the fine structure constant α. The use of the non-magnetic Yb atom and the symmetric geometry of the interferometer make the measurement immune to several error sources. We have produced Yb BECs in a new apparatus, and are currently installing and testing the laser pulse atom-optics needed for the interferometry sequence. The precision of our measurement scales with N2, where 2N is the number of photon recoils separating the interfering momentum states in the interferometer. We will discuss our progress towards realizing Bloch oscillations (BO) pulses for large N. Using an extension of our previous analysis2, we will also discuss the role of diffraction phases in our interferometer due to the BO pulses. This work is supported by the NSF.

  2. Probing Electronic Transport of Individual Nanostructures with Atomic Precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shengyong; Li, An-Ping

    Accessing individual nanostructures with atomic precision is an important process in the bottom-up fabrication and characterization of electronic nanodevices. Local electrical contacts, namely nanoelectrodes, are often fabricated by using top-down lithography and chemical etching techniques. These processes however lack atomic precision and introduce the possibility of contamination. Here, we review recent reports on the application of a field-induced emission process in the fabrication of local contacts onto individual nanowires and nanotubes with atomic spatial precision. In this method, gold nanoislands are deposited onto nanostructures precisely by using a scanning tunneling microscope tip, which provides a clean and controllable process to ensure both electrically conductive and mechanically reliable contacts. The applicability of the technique has been demonstrated in a wide variety of nanostructures, including silicide atomic wires, carbon nanotubes, and copper nanowires. These local contacts bridge the nanostructures and the transport probes, allowing for the measurements of both electrical transport and scanning tunneling microscopy on the same nanostructures in situ. The direct correlation between electronic and transport properties and atomic structures can be explored on individual nanostructures at the unprecedented atomic level.

  3. Probing electronic transport of individual nanostructures with atomic precision

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Shengyong; Li, An-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Accessing individual nanostructures with atomic precision is an important process in the bottom-up fabrication and characterization of electronic nanodevices. Local electrical contacts, namely nanoelectrodes, are often fabricated by using top-down lithography and chemical etching techniques. These processes however lack atomic precision and introduce the possibility of contamination. Here, we review recent reports on the application of a field-induced emission process in the fabrication of local contacts onto individual nanowires and nanotubes with atomic spatial precision. In this method, gold nanoislands are deposited onto nanostructures precisely by using a scanning tunneling microscope tip, which provides a clean and controllable process to ensure both electrically conductive and mechanically reliable contacts. The applicability of the technique has been demonstrated in a wide variety of nanostructures, including silicide atomic wires, carbon nanotubes, and copper nanowires. These local contacts bridge the nanostructures and the transport probes, allowing for the measurements of both electrical transport and scanning tunneling microscopy on the same nanostructures in situ. The direct correlation between electronic and transport properties and atomic structures can be explored on individual nanostructures at the unprecedented atomic level.

  4. Precision Absolute Beam Current Measurement of Low Power Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, M. M.; Bevins, M. E.; Degtiarenko, P.; Freyberger, A.; Krafft, G. A.

    2012-11-01

    Precise measurements of low power CW electron beam current for the Jefferson Lab Nuclear Physics program have been performed using a Tungsten calorimeter. This paper describes the rationale for the choice of the calorimeter technique, as well as the design and calibration of the device. The calorimeter is in use presently to provide a 1% absolute current measurement of CW electron beam with 50 to 500 nA of average beam current and 1-3 GeV beam energy. Results from these recent measurements will also be presented.

  5. Selective detection of angular-momentum-polarized Auger electrons by atomic stereography.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Fujita, Masayoshi; Ohta, Takuya; Maejima, Naoyuki; Matsui, Hirosuke; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    When a core level is excited by circularly polarized light, the angular momentum of light is transferred to the emitted photoelectron, which can be confirmed by the parallax shift of the forward focusing peak (FFP) direction in a stereograph of atomic arrangement. No angular momentum has been believed to be transferred to normal Auger electrons resulting from the decay process filling core hole after photoelectron ejection. We succeeded in detecting a non-negligible circular dichroism contrast in a normal Auger electron diffraction from a nonmagnetic Cu(001) surface far off from the absorption threshold. Moreover, we detected angular-momentum-polarized Cu L(3)M(4,5)M(4,5) Auger electrons at the L(3) absorption threshold, where the excited core electron is trapped at the conduction band. From the kinetic energy dependence of the Auger electron FFP parallax shift, we found that the angular momentum is transferred to the Auger electron most effectively in the case of the (1)S(0) two-hole creation.

  6. Selective Detection of Angular-Momentum-Polarized Auger Electrons by Atomic Stereography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Fujita, Masayoshi; Ohta, Takuya; Maejima, Naoyuki; Matsui, Hirosuke; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    When a core level is excited by circularly polarized light, the angular momentum of light is transferred to the emitted photoelectron, which can be confirmed by the parallax shift of the forward focusing peak (FFP) direction in a stereograph of atomic arrangement. No angular momentum has been believed to be transferred to normal Auger electrons resulting from the decay process filling core hole after photoelectron ejection. We succeeded in detecting a non-negligible circular dichroism contrast in a normal Auger electron diffraction from a nonmagnetic Cu(001) surface far off from the absorption threshold. Moreover, we detected angular-momentum-polarized Cu L3M4 ,5M4 ,5 Auger electrons at the L3 absorption threshold, where the excited core electron is trapped at the conduction band. From the kinetic energy dependence of the Auger electron FFP parallax shift, we found that the angular momentum is transferred to the Auger electron most effectively in the case of the 1S0 two-hole creation.

  7. A multiparameter data acquisition system based on universal serial bus interface for electron momentum spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, C.G.; Deng, J.K.; Su, G.L.; Zhou, H.; Ren, X.G.

    2004-09-01

    A versatile multiparameter data acquisition system based on universal serial bus (USB) interface was designed and has been used on the electron momentum spectromenter. Digitized data were first buffered in a FIFO memory in an event-by-event mode with a check bit, and then transferred to computer through the USB interface. USB interface combined with a microcontroller unit provides much flexibility for data acquisition and experimental controls. The operation performance of the system is demonstrated in the measurement of electron momentum spectra of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} molecules.

  8. Tuning the tunneling probability between low-dimensional electron systems by momentum matching

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Daming; Beckel, Andreas; Geller, Martin; Lorke, Axel; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.

    2015-06-15

    We demonstrate the possibility to tune the tunneling probability between an array of self- assembled quantum dots and a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) by changing the energy imbalance between the dot states and the 2DEG. Contrary to the expectation from Fowler-Nordheim tunneling, the tunneling rate decreases with increasing injection energy. This can be explained by an increasing momentum mismatch between the dot states and the Fermi-circle in the 2DEG. Our findings demonstrate momentum matching as a useful mechanism (in addition to energy conservation, density of states, and transmission probability) to electrically control the charge transfer between quantum dots and an electron reservoir.

  9. Performance optimization of total momentum filtering double-resonance energy selective electron heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ze-Min; Chen, Lin-Gen; Ge, Yan-Lin; Sun, Feng-Rui

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical model for energy selective electron (ESE) heat pumps operating with two-dimensional electron reservoirs is established in this study. In this model, a double-resonance energy filter operating with a total momentum filtering mechanism is considered for the transmission of electrons. The optimal thermodynamic performance of the ESE heat pump devices is also investigated. Numerical calculations show that the heating load of the device with two resonances is larger, whereas the coefficient of performance (COP) is lower than the ESE heat pump when considering a single-resonance filter. The performance characteristics of the ESE heat pumps in the total momentum filtering condition are generally superior to those with a conventional filtering mechanism. In particular, the performance characteristics of the ESE heat pumps considering a conventional filtering mechanism are vastly different from those of a device with total momentum filtering, which is induced by extra electron momentum in addition to the horizontal direction. Parameters such as resonance width and energy spacing are found to be associated with the performance of the electron system.

  10. Photoelectron and electron momentum spectroscopy of 1-butene at benchmark theoretical levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaei, S. H. Reza; Morini, Filippo; Hajgató, Bálazs; Deleuze, Michael S.

    2011-12-01

    The results of experimental studies of the valence electronic structure of 1-butene employing photoelectron spectroscopy as well as electron momentum spectroscopy are interpreted on the ground of quantitative calculations of one-electron and shake-up ionization energies and of the related Dyson orbitals, using one-particle Green's function theory in conjunction with the third-order algebraic diagrammatic construction scheme (ADC(3)). Comparison is made with simulations of (e, 2e) electron momentum distributions obtained from standard (B3LYP) Kohn-Sham orbitals. Our analysis is based on highly quantitative determinations of the energy difference between the cis and gauche (C1) conformers, within ~0.02 kcal mol-1 accuracy, and a thermostatistical evaluation thereby of conformer weights beyond the level of the rigid rotor harmonic oscillator approximation. Relative entropies are found to be particularly sensitive to hindered rotations. The shake-up onset is located at 15.9 eV, and the orbital picture of ionization breaks down completely at electron binding energies above 19 eV. If the available experimental momentum profiles demonstrate the dominance of the C1 conformer, they are in this case clearly not sensitive enough to the molecular conformation for evaluating conformer abundances with accuracies better than 10% due to the limited energy and momentum resolutions and likely physical complications.

  11. Spatially Resolved Electronic Structures of Atomically Precise Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Han; Wei, Dacheng; Sun, Jiatao; Wong, Swee Liang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Neto, A. H. Castro; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2012-01-01

    Graphene has attracted much interest in both academia and industry. The challenge of making it semiconducting is crucial for applications in electronic devices. A promising approach is to reduce its physical size down to the nanometer scale. Here, we present the surface-assisted bottom-up fabrication of atomically precise armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) with predefined widths, namely 7-, 14- and 21-AGNRs, on Ag(111) as well as their spatially resolved width-dependent electronic structures. STM/STS measurements reveal their associated electron scattering patterns and the energy gaps over 1 eV. The mechanism to form such AGNRs is addressed based on the observed intermediate products. Our results provide new insights into the local properties of AGNRs, and have implications for the understanding of their electrical properties and potential applications. PMID:23248746

  12. Spatially Resolved Electronic Structures of Atomically Precise Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Han; Wei, Dacheng; Sun, Jiatao; Wong, Swee Liang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Neto, A. H. Castro; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2012-12-01

    Graphene has attracted much interest in both academia and industry. The challenge of making it semiconducting is crucial for applications in electronic devices. A promising approach is to reduce its physical size down to the nanometer scale. Here, we present the surface-assisted bottom-up fabrication of atomically precise armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) with predefined widths, namely 7-, 14- and 21-AGNRs, on Ag(111) as well as their spatially resolved width-dependent electronic structures. STM/STS measurements reveal their associated electron scattering patterns and the energy gaps over 1 eV. The mechanism to form such AGNRs is addressed based on the observed intermediate products. Our results provide new insights into the local properties of AGNRs, and have implications for the understanding of their electrical properties and potential applications.

  13. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E W; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+δ). The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution. PMID:26329206

  14. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E. W.; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ. The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution.

  15. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E W; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+δ). The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution.

  16. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E. W.; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-15

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ}. The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution.

  17. Atomic precision etch using a low-electron temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, L.; Wang, J.-C.; Rauf, S.; Zhang, Y.; Agarwal, A.; Kenney, J.; Ramaswamy, K.; Collins, K.

    2016-03-01

    Sub-nm precision is increasingly being required of many critical plasma etching processes in the semiconductor industry. Accurate control over ion energy and ion/radical composition is needed during plasma processing to meet these stringent requirements. Described in this work is a new plasma etch system which has been designed with the requirements of atomic precision plasma processing in mind. In this system, an electron sheet beam parallel to the substrate surface produces a plasma with an order of magnitude lower electron temperature Te (~ 0.3 eV) and ion energy Ei (< 3 eV without applied bias) compared to conventional radio-frequency (RF) plasma technologies. Electron beam plasmas are characterized by higher ion-to-radical fraction compared to RF plasmas, so a separate radical source is used to provide accurate control over relative ion and radical concentrations. Another important element in this plasma system is low frequency RF bias capability which allows control of ion energy in the 2-50 eV range. Presented in this work are the results of etching of a variety of materials and structures performed in this system. In addition to high selectivity and low controllable etch rate, an important requirement of atomic precision etch processes is no (or minimal) damage to the remaining material surface. It has traditionally not been possible to avoid damage in RF plasma processing systems, even during atomic layer etch. The experiments for Si etch in Cl2 based plasmas in the aforementioned etch system show that damage can be minimized if the ion energy is kept below 10 eV. Layer-by-layer etch of Si is also demonstrated in this etch system using electrical and gas pulsing.

  18. Ultrafast demagnetization after femtosecond laser pulses: Transfer of angular momentum from the electronic system to magnetoelastic spin-phonon modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsatsoulis, T.; Illg, C.; Haag, M.; Mueller, B. Y.; Zhang, L.; Fähnle, M.

    2016-04-01

    During ultrafast demagnetization after the excitation of ferromagnetic films with femtosecond laser pulses, the angular momentum of the electronic system is transferred to the lattice via electron-phonon scatterings. The actual amount of transfer is calculated for Ni and Fe by considering spin-phonon eigenmodes, which have a sharp angular momentum. Because the considered Hamiltonian is not isotropic, the total angular momentum is not conserved.

  19. Momentum imaging studies of electron and ion dynamics in a strong laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharjan, Chakra Man

    An underlying goal of studying atomic or molecular dynamics with short laser pulses is to reach a time scale short enough to study the evolution of the system in the time domain. In this thesis, the strong field ionization of atoms and molecules has been investigated with the highly resolved technique known as cold target recoil momentum spectroscopy (COLTRIMS). The thesis can be divided into two parts: single and double ionization. In the first part, we studied the momentum vectors of low energy electrons generated by short laser pulses of wavelengths varying from 400 to 800 nm with atomic and molecular targets with intensities in the tunneling region. Most of the structures observed in the momentum spectra of atomic and molecular targets can be explained as due to above-threshold ionization, and Freeman resonances. The most significant structure in our observed spectra is the angular structure in the lowest part of the momentum image, and this is attributed to the diffraction pattern evolved by tunneling electrons. Surprisingly, we observed that the structure produced by the electrons from high Rydberg states is independent of the internal structure of the target atom and molecules. The same work is extended to aligned molecules. The basic idea of this part of the work is to see whether the angular distribution of electrons from aligned molecules resembles the orbital structures of the molecules. The rotational revival structure was used to align the molecules. We observed pronounced energy and angular structures of the momentum images which show a dependence on the alignment of the molecule. The last part of this work mainly focuses on double ionization, i.e. the removal of two electrons from the target atoms sequentially by a short laser pulse. Measuring the complete momentum vector of Ar2+ and Ne2+, we demonstrate that these can be used to extract the angular correlation between two electrons sequentially released in the circularly polarized pulse. We

  20. Plasma density gradient injection of low absolute momentum spread electron bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Nakamura, K.; Plateau, G.R.; Toth, Cs.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Cary, J.R.; Leemans, W.P.

    2007-12-22

    Plasma density gradients in a gas jet were used to control the wake phase velocity and trapping threshold in a laser wakefield accelerator, producing stable electron bunches with longitudinal and transverse momentum spreads more than ten times lower than in previous experiments (0.17 and 0.02 MeV/c FWHM, respectively) and with central momenta of 0.76 +- 0.02 MeV/c. Transition radiation measurements combined with simulations indicated that the bunches can be used as a wakefield accelerator injector to produce stable beams with 0.2 MeV/c-class momentum spread at high energies.

  1. Unusual angular momentum transfer in electron-impact excitation of neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, L. R.; Campbell, C.; Khakoo, M. A.; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2012-05-01

    We report results from a joint experimental and theoretical study of the angular momentum transfer in electron-impact excitation of the (2p6)1S0→(2p53s)1P1 resonance transition in Ne. Both the measured and calculated data show the circular light polarization P3 to be positive for an incident energy of 25 eV at scattering angles below 40∘. This observation implies a negative angular momentum transfer L⊥, which is the opposite sign of orientation expected from a well-known propensity rule for S→P excitation at small scattering angles.

  2. Effects of Volkov functions in laser-assisted electron momentum spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulychev, Andrey A.; Kouzakov, Konstantin A.; Popov, Yuri V.

    2013-02-01

    We consider theoretically an electron-impact ionization process at high impact energy and large momentum transfer in the presence of laser radiation. The target is modeled as an electron bound by a harmonic potential. Dressing of the target state by the laser field is treated exactly. Laser-assisted differential cross sections are calculated using either Volkov functions or plane waves for incoming and outgoing electrons. It is shown that even in the case of the low-frequency and weak-intensity laser radiation the effect of the field on these electrons can dramatically influence the shape of the cross sections.

  3. Transverse electron momentum distribution in tunneling and over the barrier ionization by laser pulses with varying ellipticity

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, I. A.; Kheifets, A. S.; Calvert, J. E.; Goodall, S.; Wang, X.; Xu, Han; Palmer, A. J.; Kielpinski, D.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Sang, R. T.

    2016-01-01

    We study transverse electron momentum distribution in strong field atomic ionization driven by laser pulses with varying ellipticity. We show, both experimentally and theoretically, that the transverse electron momentum distribution in the tunneling and over the barrier ionization regimes evolves in a qualitatively different way when the ellipticity parameter describing polarization state of the driving laser pulse increases. PMID:26740072

  4. Transverse electron momentum distribution in tunneling and over the barrier ionization by laser pulses with varying ellipticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. A.; Kheifets, A. S.; Calvert, J. E.; Goodall, S.; Wang, X.; Xu, Han; Palmer, A. J.; Kielpinski, D.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Sang, R. T.

    2016-01-01

    We study transverse electron momentum distribution in strong field atomic ionization driven by laser pulses with varying ellipticity. We show, both experimentally and theoretically, that the transverse electron momentum distribution in the tunneling and over the barrier ionization regimes evolves in a qualitatively different way when the ellipticity parameter describing polarization state of the driving laser pulse increases.

  5. Effect of resonant-to-bulk electron momentum transfer on the efficiency of electron-cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Y.; Smith, G.R.; Cohen, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Efficiency of current drive by electron-cyclotron waves is investigated numerically by a bounce-average Fokker-Planck code to elucidate the effects of momentum transfer from resonant to bulk electrons, finite bulk temperature relative to the energy of resonant electrons, and trapped electrons. Comparisons are made with existing theories to assess their validity and quantitative difference between theory and code results. Difference of nearly a factor of 2 was found in efficiency between some theory and code results. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Photon momentum sharing between an electron and an ion in photoionization: from one-photon (photoelectric effect) to multiphoton absorption.

    PubMed

    Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, André D; Corkum, Paul B

    2014-12-31

    We investigate photon-momentum sharing between an electron and an ion following different photoionization regimes. We find very different partitioning of the photon momentum in one-photon ionization (the photoelectric effect) as compared to multiphoton processes. In the photoelectric effect, the electron acquires a momentum that is much greater than the single photon momentum ℏω/c [up to (8/5) ℏω/c] whereas in the strong-field ionization regime, the photoelectron only acquires the momentum corresponding to the photons absorbed above the field-free ionization threshold plus a momentum corresponding to a fraction (3/10) of the ionization potential Ip. In both cases, due to the smallness of the electron-ion mass ratio, the ion takes nearly the entire momentum of all absorbed N photons (via the electron-ion center of mass). Additionally, the ion takes, as a recoil, the photoelectron momentum resulting from mutual electron-ion interaction in the electromagnetic field. Consequently, the momentum partitioning of the photofragments is very different in both regimes. This suggests that there is a rich, unexplored physics to be studied between these two limits which can be generated with current ultrafast laser technology. PMID:25615323

  7. Photon momentum sharing between an electron and an ion in photoionization: from one-photon (photoelectric effect) to multiphoton absorption.

    PubMed

    Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, André D; Corkum, Paul B

    2014-12-31

    We investigate photon-momentum sharing between an electron and an ion following different photoionization regimes. We find very different partitioning of the photon momentum in one-photon ionization (the photoelectric effect) as compared to multiphoton processes. In the photoelectric effect, the electron acquires a momentum that is much greater than the single photon momentum ℏω/c [up to (8/5) ℏω/c] whereas in the strong-field ionization regime, the photoelectron only acquires the momentum corresponding to the photons absorbed above the field-free ionization threshold plus a momentum corresponding to a fraction (3/10) of the ionization potential Ip. In both cases, due to the smallness of the electron-ion mass ratio, the ion takes nearly the entire momentum of all absorbed N photons (via the electron-ion center of mass). Additionally, the ion takes, as a recoil, the photoelectron momentum resulting from mutual electron-ion interaction in the electromagnetic field. Consequently, the momentum partitioning of the photofragments is very different in both regimes. This suggests that there is a rich, unexplored physics to be studied between these two limits which can be generated with current ultrafast laser technology.

  8. Angular-momentum-dominated electron beams and flat-beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yin-e

    2005-06-01

    In the absence of external forces, if the dynamics within an electron beam is dominated by its angular momentum rather than other effects such as random thermal motion or self Coulomb-repulsive force (i.e., space-charge force), the beam is said to be angular-momentum-dominated. Such a beam can be directly applied to the field of electron-cooling of heavy ions; or it can be manipulated into an electron beam with large transverse emittance ratio, i.e., a flat beam. A flat beam is of interest for high-energy electron-positron colliders or accelerator-based light sources. An angular-momentum-dominated beam is generated at the Fermilab/NICADD photoinjector Laboratory (FNPL) and is accelerated to an energy of 16 MeV. The properties of such a beam is investigated systematically in experiment. The experimental results are in very good agreement with analytical expectations and simulation results. This lays a good foundation for the transformation of an angular-momentum-dominated beam into a flat beam. The round-to-flat beam transformer is composed of three skew quadrupoles. Based on a good knowledge of the angular-momentum-dominated beam, the quadrupoles are set to the proper strengths in order to apply a total torque which removes the angular momentum, resulting in a flat beam. For bunch charge around 0.5 nC, an emittance ratio of 100 ± 5 was measured, with the smaller normalized root-mean-square emittance around 0.4 mm-mrad. Effects limiting the flat-beam emittance ratio are investigated, such as the chromatic effects in the round-to-flat beam transformer, asymmetry in the initial angular-momentum-dominated beam, and space-charge effects. The most important limiting factor turns out to be the uncorrelated emittance growth caused by space charge when the beam energy is low, for example, in the rf gun area. As a result of such emittance growth prior to the round-to-flat beam transformer, the emittance ratio achievable in simulation decreases from orders of thousands to

  9. An electron momentum spectroscopy study of the outer valence orbitals of chlorodifluoromethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, XuHuai; Chen, XiangJun; Xu, Chunkai; Jia, ChangChun; Yin, XiaoFeng; Shan, Xu; Wei, Zheng; Xu, KeZun

    2004-03-01

    Electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) has been used to measure the momentum profiles of outer valence orbitals of chlorodifluoromethane (CHF 2Cl), which are compared with Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations using different-sized basis sets. Overall, DFT calculation employing B3LYP hybrid functional and the largest basis set that we used provides the best agreement with experiment. But the minimum improvement gained by replacing the 6-311++G** basis set with AUG-cc-pVQZ suggests that basis set saturation has been approached, at least for some orbitals of CHF 2Cl, and a computationally affordable method which addresses effects that current theoretical treatment neglects, such as distorted wave and electron relaxation, is sorely needed.

  10. Electron Momentum Distributions for 4a1 Orbitals of CFxCl4-x in Low Momentum Region: a Possible Evidence of Molecular Geometry Distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Xu; Xu, Chun-kai; Yin, Xiao-feng; Zhou, Li-xia; Xu, Ke-zun; Chen, Xiang-jun

    2009-12-01

    Electron momentum distributions for 4a1 orbitals of serial freon molecules CF3Cl, CF2Cl2, and CFCl3 (CFxCl4-x, x = 1-3) have been reanalyzed due to the severe discrepancies between theory and experiment in low momentum region. The tentative calculations using equilibrium geometries of molecular ions have exhibited a great improvement in agreement with the experimental data, which suggests that the molecular geometry distortion may be responsible for the observed high intensities at p < 0.5 a.u. Further analyses show that the severe discrepancies at low momentum region mainly arise from the influence of molecular geometry distortion on C-Cl bonding electron density distributions.

  11. Study on Momentum Density of Electrons and Fermi Surface in Niobium by Positron Annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Takeshi; Kondo, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Murakami, Yasukazu; Cho, Yang-Koo; Tanigawa, Shoichiro; Kawano, Takao; Bahng, Gun-Woong

    1990-12-01

    The three dimensional electron-positron momentum density in niobium has been reconstructed from measurements of two dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiations (2D-ACAR) followed by the image reconstruction technique based on a direct Fourier transformation. We determined the position of the Fermi surface sheets; \\varGamma-centered hole octahedron, multiply connected jungle-gym arms and N-centered hole ellipsoids. The Fermi surface topology is in good agreement with the theory.

  12. Studies of Electron Distributions and Properties in Position and Momentum Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiahu

    Electron charge distributions and electron properties of molecules have been systematically studied. Based upon a density matrix formalism, we have characterized electron charge distributions in molecular systems and worked out an efficient scheme for extracting electronic properties. The electric field gradient (EFG) tensor, which can be obtained through nuclear quadrupole resonance, is one of the properties. Accurate calculation of EFG and the prediction of the temperature dependence of this quantity are examples of our endeavors in this aspect. Nitroxide radicals are especially stable and their application in chemistry and biology has attracted much attention in recent years. We have performed model studies of the spin distribution in some nitroxide radicals and the results are found to be comparable with the polarized neutron scattering experiment. Chemical binding and electron correlation effects in position space have been investigated. Both are required for a better understanding of electronic motion in molecular systems. Our studies of electron-electron pair distributions have been found to be very informative and convenient for the analysis of these effects in molecules. The statistical correlation coefficients and correlation hole functions in molecular systems have been studied. X-ray and high energy electron scattering are important experimental tools as they provide verification and stimulation for further improvement of the theoretical model. Since the present calculations include electron correlation contributions, the predicted scattering intensities are in good agreement with experiment. An analytical procedure for the spherical averaging of scattering intensities has been developed, which not only expedites the computation but also ensures the accuracy of the calculated quantities. Electronic structures in momentum space are new fields in theoretical chemistry. Due to newly implemented (gamma, 2e) and (e, 3e) experiments along with (e, 2e

  13. Time--Dependent Electron--Hydrogen Scattering for increasing Total Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odero, D. O.; Madison, D. H.; Peacher, J. L.; Schultz, D. R.

    2000-06-01

    The electron--hydrogen scattering process has been examined by employing the direct numerical integration of the time--dependent Schrödinger equation using lattice techniques. The wavefunction for the three--body system is formed using a fully correlated two--electron wavefunction approach. The time--dependent probabilities for excitation are computed by projecting the states of the target atom onto the final system wavefunction. The partial excitation cross sections are obtained at the point where the probabilities are no longer changing with time. The results from this approach for a total angular momentum of zero, presented previously (G. D. Buffington, D. H. Madison, J. L. Peacher and D. R. Schultz, J. Phys. B 32), 2991(1999), compared favorably with those obtained from perturbative and close--coupling methods. Here we report the generalization of the previous work to higher angular momentum. We find that the accuracy of the method for higher angular momentum is strongly dependent on the stability of the coupling matrices formed from the mixing of the two electrons.

  14. Gamma-ray momentum reconstruction from Compton electron trajectories by filtered back-projection

    SciTech Connect

    Haefner, A.; Gunter, D.; Plimley, B.; Pavlovsky, R.; Vetter, K.

    2014-11-03

    Gamma-ray imaging utilizing Compton scattering has traditionally relied on measuring coincident gamma-ray interactions to map directional information of the source distribution. This coincidence requirement makes it an inherently inefficient process. We present an approach to gamma-ray reconstruction from Compton scattering that requires only a single electron tracking detector, thus removing the coincidence requirement. From the Compton scattered electron momentum distribution, our algorithm analytically computes the incident photon's correlated direction and energy distributions. Because this method maps the source energy and location, it is useful in applications, where prior information about the source distribution is unknown. We demonstrate this method with electron tracks measured in a scientific Si charge coupled device. While this method was demonstrated with electron tracks in a Si-based detector, it is applicable to any detector that can measure electron direction and energy, or equivalently the electron momentum. For example, it can increase the sensitivity to obtain energy and direction in gas-based systems that suffer from limited efficiency.

  15. Gamma-ray momentum reconstruction from Compton electron trajectories by filtered back-projection

    DOE PAGES

    Haefner, A.; Gunter, D.; Plimley, B.; Pavlovsky, R.; Vetter, K.

    2014-11-03

    Gamma-ray imaging utilizing Compton scattering has traditionally relied on measuring coincident gamma-ray interactions to map directional information of the source distribution. This coincidence requirement makes it an inherently inefficient process. We present an approach to gamma-ray reconstruction from Compton scattering that requires only a single electron tracking detector, thus removing the coincidence requirement. From the Compton scattered electron momentum distribution, our algorithm analytically computes the incident photon's correlated direction and energy distributions. Because this method maps the source energy and location, it is useful in applications, where prior information about the source distribution is unknown. We demonstrate this method withmore » electron tracks measured in a scientific Si charge coupled device. While this method was demonstrated with electron tracks in a Si-based detector, it is applicable to any detector that can measure electron direction and energy, or equivalently the electron momentum. For example, it can increase the sensitivity to obtain energy and direction in gas-based systems that suffer from limited efficiency.« less

  16. Doppler broadening of in-flight positron annihilation radiation due to electron momentum.

    PubMed

    Hunt, A W; Cassidy, D B; Sterne, P A; Cowan, T E; Howell, R H; Lynn, K G; Golevchenko, J A

    2001-06-11

    We report the first observation of electron momentum contributions to the Doppler broadening of radiation produced by in-flight two-photon annihilation in solids. In these experiments an approximately 2.5 MeV positron beam impinged on thin polyethylene, aluminum, and gold targets. Since energetic positrons easily penetrate the nuclear Coulomb potential and do not cause a strong charge polarization, the experimental annihilation line shapes agree well with calculations based on a simple independent-particle model. Moreover, annihilations with the deepest core electrons are greatly enhanced.

  17. Measurement of Tensor Polarization in Elastic Electron-Deuteron Scattering at Large Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    David Abbott; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Heinz Anklin; Francois Arvieux; Jacques Ball; S. Beedoe; Elizabeth Beise; Louis Bimbot; Werner Boeglin; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; Nicholas Chant; Samuel Danagoulian; K. Dow; Jean-Eric Ducret; James Dunne; Lars Ewell; Laurent Eyraud; Christophe Furget; Michel Garcon; Ronald Gilman; Charles Glashausser; Paul Gueye; Kenneth Gustafsson; Kawtar Hafidi; Adrian Honegger; Juerg Jourdan; Serge Kox; Gerfried Kumbartzki; L. Lu; Allison Lung; David Mack; Pete Markowitz; Justin McIntyre; David Meekins; Fernand Merchez; Joseph Mitchell; R. Mohring; Sekazi Mtingwa; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; David Pitz; Liming Qin; Ronald Ransome; Jean-Sebastien Real; Philip Roos; Paul Rutt; Reyad Sawafta; Samuel Stepanyan; Raphael Tieulent; Egle Tomasi-Gustafsson; William Turchinetz; Kelley Vansyoc; Jochen Volmer; Eric Voutier; William Vulcan; Claude Williamson; Stephen Wood; Chen Yan; Jie Zhao; Wenxia Zhao

    2000-05-01

    Tensor polarization observables (t20, t21 and t22) have been measured in elastic electron-deuteron scattering for six values of momentum transfer between 0.66 and 1.7 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The experiment was performed at the Jefferson Laboratory in Hall C using the electron HMS Spectrometer, a specially designed deuteron magnetic channel and the recoil deuteron polarimeter POLDER. The new data determine to much larger Q{sup 2} the deuteron charge form factors G{sub C} and G{sub Q}. They are in good agreement with relativistic calculations and disagree with pQCD predictions.

  18. Evidence of Momentum Conservation at a Nonepitaxial Metal/Semiconductor Interface Using Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, L. D.

    1996-01-01

    Ballistic-Electron-Emission Microscopy (BEEM) spectroscopy has been performed on Au/Si(111) structures as a function of Au thickness and temperature. At 77 K a direct signature of parallel momentum conservation at the Au/Si interface is observed in the BEEM spectra. The variation in spectral shape with both Au thickness and temperature places restrictions on allowable values of inelastic and elastic mean-free paths in the metal, and also requires the presence of multiple electron passes within the Au layer. An independent indication of multiple reflections is directly observed in the attenuation of BEEM current with Au thickness.

  19. Theoretical study of molecular vibrations in electron momentum spectroscopy experiments on furan: an analytical versus a molecular dynamical approach.

    PubMed

    Morini, Filippo; Deleuze, Michael S; Watanabe, Noboru; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-03-01

    The influence of thermally induced nuclear dynamics (molecular vibrations) in the initial electronic ground state on the valence orbital momentum profiles of furan has been theoretically investigated using two different approaches. The first of these approaches employs the principles of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, whereas the so-called harmonic analytical quantum mechanical approach resorts to an analytical decomposition of contributions arising from quantized harmonic vibrational eigenstates. In spite of their intrinsic differences, the two approaches enable consistent insights into the electron momentum distributions inferred from new measurements employing electron momentum spectroscopy and an electron impact energy of 1.2 keV. Both approaches point out in particular an appreciable influence of a few specific molecular vibrations of A1 symmetry on the 9a1 momentum profile, which can be unravelled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing.

  20. Theoretical study of molecular vibrations in electron momentum spectroscopy experiments on furan: An analytical versus a molecular dynamical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Morini, Filippo; Deleuze, Michael S.; Watanabe, Noboru; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-03-07

    The influence of thermally induced nuclear dynamics (molecular vibrations) in the initial electronic ground state on the valence orbital momentum profiles of furan has been theoretically investigated using two different approaches. The first of these approaches employs the principles of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, whereas the so-called harmonic analytical quantum mechanical approach resorts to an analytical decomposition of contributions arising from quantized harmonic vibrational eigenstates. In spite of their intrinsic differences, the two approaches enable consistent insights into the electron momentum distributions inferred from new measurements employing electron momentum spectroscopy and an electron impact energy of 1.2 keV. Both approaches point out in particular an appreciable influence of a few specific molecular vibrations of A{sub 1} symmetry on the 9a{sub 1} momentum profile, which can be unravelled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing.

  1. Precision laser processing for micro electronics and fiber optic manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Andrew; Osborne, Mike; Foster-Turner, Gideon; Dinkel, Duane W.

    2008-02-01

    The application of laser based materials processing for precision micro scale manufacturing in the electronics and fiber optic industry is becoming increasingly widespread and accepted. This presentation will review latest laser technologies available and discuss the issues to be considered in choosing the most appropriate laser and processing parameters. High repetition rate, short duration pulsed lasers have improved rapidly in recent years in terms of both performance and reliability enabling flexible, cost effective processing of many material types including metal, silicon, plastic, ceramic and glass. Demonstrating the relevance of laser micromachining, application examples where laser processing is in use for production will be presented, including miniaturization of surface mount capacitors by applying a laser technique for demetalization of tracks in the capacitor manufacturing process and high quality laser machining of fiber optics including stripping, cleaving and lensing, resulting in optical quality finishes without the need for traditional polishing. Applications include telecoms, biomedical and sensing. OpTek Systems was formed in 2000 and provide fully integrated systems and sub contract services for laser processes. They are headquartered in the UK and are establishing a presence in North America through a laser processing facility in South Carolina and sales office in the North East.

  2. Transverse-electron-momentum distribution in pump-probe sequential double ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheifets, A. S.; Ivanov, I. A.

    2014-09-01

    We study the transverse-electron-momentum distribution (TEMD) of the wave packets launched in a pump-probe sequential double ionization from the valence shell of a noble gas atom. Our calculations, based on an accurate numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE), reproduce a characteristic cusp of the TEMD which is attributed to the Coulomb singularity. The evolution of the TEMD with the time delay between the pump and probe pulses is shown to be similar to the prediction of the standard tunneling formula (TF), as was observed experimentally for argon by Fechner et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 213001 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.213001]. However, TDSE calculations show a clear deviation from the TF and predict a much more complicated structure which cannot be reproduced by the target orbital momentum profile filtered by the tunneling Gaussian. The accuracy of the TF can be improved if the target momentum profile is calculated with the Coulomb waves instead of the plane waves.

  3. Complete momentum and energy resolved TOF electron spectrometerfor time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Zahid; Lebedev, G.; Tremsin, A.; Siegmund, O.; Chen, Y.; Shen, Z.X.; Hussain, Z.

    2007-08-12

    Over the last decade, high-resolution Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) has emerged as a tool of choice for studying the electronic structure of solids, in particular, strongly correlated complex materials such as cuprate superconductors. In this paper we present the design of a novel time-of-flight based electron analyzer with capability of 2D in momentum space (kx and ky) and all energies (calculated from time of flight) in the third dimension. This analyzer will utilize an improved version of a 2D delay linedetector capable of imaging with<35 mm (700x700 pixels) spatial resolution and better than 120 ps FWHM timing resolution. Electron optics concepts and optimization procedure are considered for achieving an energy resolution less than 1 meV and an angular resolution better than 0.11.

  4. The use of electron scattering for studying atomic momentum distributions: the case of graphite and diamond.

    PubMed

    Vos, M; Moreh, R; Tokési, K

    2011-07-14

    The momentum distributions of C atoms in polycrystalline diamond (produced by chemical vapor deposition) and in highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) are studied by scattering of 40 keV electrons at 135°. By measuring the Doppler broadening of the energy of the elastically scattered electrons, we resolve a Compton profile of the motion of the C atoms. The aim of the present work is to resolve long-standing disagreements between the calculated kinetic energies of carbon atoms in HOPG and in diamond films and the measured ones, obtained both by neutron Compton scattering (NCS) and by nuclear resonance photon scattering (NRPS). The anisotropy of the momentum distribution in HOPG was measured by rotating the HOPG sample relative to the electron beam. The obtained kinetic energies for the motion component along, and perpendicular to, the graphite planes were somewhat higher than those obtained from the most recent NCS data of HOPG. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that multiple scattering adds about 2% to the obtained kinetic energies. The presence of different isotopes in carbon affects the measurement at a 1% level. After correcting for these contributions, the kinetic energies are 3%-6% larger than the most recent NCS results for HOPG, but 15%-25% smaller than the NRPS results. For diamond, the corrected direction-averaged kinetic energy is ≈ 6% larger than the calculated value. This compares favorably to the ≈25% discrepancy between theory and both the NCS and NRPS results for diamond.

  5. Momentum imaging spectrometer for molecular fragmentation dynamics induced by pulsed electron beam.

    PubMed

    Wang, EnLiang; Shan, Xu; Shi, YuFeng; Tang, YaGuo; Chen, XiangJun

    2013-12-01

    A momentum imaging spectrometer has been built for studying the electron impact molecular fragmentation dynamics. The setup consists of a pulsed electron gun and a time of flight system as well as a two-dimensional time and position sensitive multi-hit detector. The charged fragments with kinetic energy up to 10 eV can be detected in 4π solid angles and their three-dimensional momentum vectors can be reconstructed. The apparatus is tested by electron impact ionization of Ar and dissociative ionization of CO2. By analyzing the ion-ion coincidence spectra, the complete and incomplete Coulomb fragmentation channels for CO2(2+) and CO2(3+) are identified. The kinetic energy release (KER) and angular correlation for the two-body breakup channel CO2(2+*) → O(+) + CO(+) are reported. The peak value of total KER is found to be 6.8 eV which is consistent with the previous photoion-photoion coincidence studies, and the correlation angle of O(+) and CO(+) is also explicitly determined to be 172.5°. PMID:24387423

  6. Finite orbital angular momentum states and Laguerre-Gaussian potential in two-temperature electron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, K.; Ali, S.

    2014-09-01

    Electron-acoustic waves are studied with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in an unmagnetized collisionless uniform plasma, whose constituents are the Boltzmann hot electrons, inertial cold electrons and stationary ions. For this purpose, we employ the fluid equations to obtain a paraxial equation in terms of cold electron density perturbations, which admits both the Gaussian and Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam solutions. Furthermore, an approximate solution for the electrostatic potential problem is found, which also allows us to express the components of the electric field in terms of LG potential perturbations. Calculating the energy flux of the electron-acoustic waves, an OAM density for these waves is obtained. Numerically, it is found that the parameters, such as, azimuthal angle, radial and angular mode numbers, and the beam waist strongly modify the LG potential profiles associated with electron-acoustic waves. The present results should be helpful to study the trapping and transportation of plasma particles and energy as well as to understand the electron-acoustic mode excitations produced by the Raman backscattering of laser beams in a uniform plasma.

  7. Electron-positron momentum distributions associated with isolated silicon vacancies in 3C-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasuso, A.; Yoshikawa, M.; Itoh, H.; Chiba, T.; Higuchi, T.; Betsuyaku, K.; Redmann, F.; Krause-Rehberg, R.

    2005-07-15

    Two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) and coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB) of annihilation radiation measurements have been performed on electron-irradiated n-type 3C-SiC in which isolated silicon vacancies are responsible for positron trapping. After irradiation, the intensity of the CDB spectrum increased and decreased in low- and high-momentum regions, respectively. These features were explained by a theoretical calculation considering silicon vacancies. The central region of the 2D-ACAR spectra became isotropic after irradiation, while the overall anisotropies extending within the Jones zone were conserved suggesting that isolated silicon vacancies have tetrahedral symmetry, as expected from a previous electron spin resonance study.

  8. Electron Bunch Timing with Femtosecond Precision in a Superconducting Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Loehl, F.; Arsov, V.; Felber, M.; Hacker, K.; Lorbeer, B.; Ludwig, F.; Matthiesen, K.-H.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Winter, A.; Jalmuzna, W.; Schmueser, P.; Schulz, S.; Zemella, J.; Szewinski, J.

    2010-04-09

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  9. Spatially and momentum resolved energy electron loss spectra from an ultra-thin PrNiO{sub 3} layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kinyanjui, M. K. Kaiser, U.; Benner, G.; Pavia, G.; Boucher, F.; Habermeier, H.-U.; Keimer, B.

    2015-05-18

    We present an experimental approach which allows for the acquisition of spectra from ultra-thin films at high spatial, momentum, and energy resolutions. Spatially and momentum (q) resolved electron energy loss spectra have been obtained from a 12 nm ultra-thin PrNiO{sub 3} layer using a nano-beam electron diffraction based approach which enabled the acquisition of momentum resolved spectra from individual, differently oriented nano-domains and at different positions of the PrNiO{sub 3} thin layer. The spatial and wavelength dependence of the spectral excitations are obtained and characterized after the analysis of the experimental spectra using calculated dielectric and energy loss functions. The presented approach makes a contribution towards obtaining momentum-resolved spectra from nanostructures, thin film, heterostructures, surfaces, and interfaces.

  10. New constraints for low-momentum electronic excitations in condensed matter: fundamental consequences from classical and quantum dielectric theory.

    PubMed

    Chantler, C T; Bourke, J D

    2015-11-18

    We present new constraints for the transportation behaviour of low-momentum electronic excitations in condensed matter systems, and demonstrate that these have both a fundamental physical interpretation and a significant impact on the description of low-energy inelastic electron scattering. The dispersion behaviour and characteristic lifetime properties of plasmon and single-electron excitations are investigated using popular classical, semi-classical and quantum dielectric models. We find that, irrespective of constrained agreement to the well known high-momentum and high-energy Bethe ridge limit, standard descriptions of low-momentum electron excitations are inconsistent and unphysical. These observations have direct impact on calculations of transport properties such as inelastic mean free paths, stopping powers and escape depths of charged particles in condensed matter systems. PMID:26490726

  11. New constraints for low-momentum electronic excitations in condensed matter: fundamental consequences from classical and quantum dielectric theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantler, C. T.; Bourke, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    We present new constraints for the transportation behaviour of low-momentum electronic excitations in condensed matter systems, and demonstrate that these have both a fundamental physical interpretation and a significant impact on the description of low-energy inelastic electron scattering. The dispersion behaviour and characteristic lifetime properties of plasmon and single-electron excitations are investigated using popular classical, semi-classical and quantum dielectric models. We find that, irrespective of constrained agreement to the well known high-momentum and high-energy Bethe ridge limit, standard descriptions of low-momentum electron excitations are inconsistent and unphysical. These observations have direct impact on calculations of transport properties such as inelastic mean free paths, stopping powers and escape depths of charged particles in condensed matter systems.

  12. Dyson orbitals of N2O: electron momentum spectroscopy and symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction calculations.

    PubMed

    Miao, Y R; Ning, C G; Liu, K; Deng, J K

    2011-05-28

    Electron momentum spectroscopy and symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction (SAC-CI) theory were combined to study electron correlation effects in nitrous oxide molecule (N(2)O). The SAC-CI General-R method accurately reproduced the experimental ionization spectrum. This bench-marked method was also introduced for calculating the momentum distributions of N(2)O Dyson orbitals. Several calculated momentum distributions with different theoretical methods were compared with the high resolution experimental results. In the outer-valence region, Hartree-Fock (HF), density functional theory (DFT), and SAC-CI theory can well describe the experimental momentum distributions. SAC-CI presented a best performance among them. In the inner-valence region, HF and DFT cannot work well due to the severe breaking of the molecular orbital picture, while SAC-CI still produced an excellent description of experimental momentum profiles because it can accurately take into account electron correlations. Moreover, the thermally averaged calculation showed that the geometrical changes induced by the vibration at room temperature have no noticeable effects on momentum distribution of valence orbitals of N(2)O.

  13. Configuring Electronic States in an Atomically Precise Array of Quantum Boxes.

    PubMed

    Nowakowska, Sylwia; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Piquero-Zulaica, Ignacio; Nowakowski, Jan; Kawai, Shigeki; Wäckerlin, Christian; Matena, Manfred; Nijs, Thomas; Fatayer, Shadi; Popova, Olha; Ahsan, Aisha; Mousavi, S Fatemeh; Ivas, Toni; Meyer, Ernst; Stöhr, Meike; Ortega, J Enrique; Björk, Jonas; Gade, Lutz H; Lobo-Checa, Jorge; Jung, Thomas A

    2016-07-01

    A 2D array of electronically coupled quantum boxes is fabricated by means of on-surface self-assembly assuring ultimate precision of each box. The quantum states embedded in the boxes are configured by adsorbates, whose occupancy is controlled with atomic precision. The electronic interbox coupling can be maintained or significantly reduced by proper arrangement of empty and filled boxes.

  14. Inclusive electron scattering from nuclei at x greater than 1 and high 4-momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrington, John Robert

    CEBAF experiment e89-008 measured inclusive electron scattering from nuclei in a Q2 range between 0.8 and 7.3 (GeV/c)2 for xBjorken/ ~>/ 1. The cross sections for scattering from D, C, Fe, and Au were measured. The C, Fe, and Au data have been analyzed in terms of F(y) to examine y-scaling of the quasielastic scattering, and to study the momentum distribution of the nucleons in the nucleus. The data have also been analyzed in terms of the structure function /nu W2 to examine scaling of the inelastic scattering in x and /xi, and to study the momentum distribution of the quarks. In the regions where quasielastic scattering dominates the cross section (low Q2 or large negative values of y), the data are shown to exhibit y-scaling. However, the y- scaling breaks down once the inelastic contributions become large. The data do not exhibit x-scaling, except at the lowest values of x, while the structure function does appear to scale in the Nachtmann variable, /xi.

  15. Topography of molecular scalar fields. II. An appraisal of the hierarchy principle for electron momentum densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanarayan, P.; Gadre, Shridhar R.

    2005-04-01

    The previously observed hierarchy principle for nondegenerate critical points (CPs) of the electron momentum density (EMD) of molecules [Kulkarni, Gadre, and Pathak, Phys. Rev. A. 45, 4399 (1992)] is verified at a reliable level of theory. Application of Morse inequalities and the Poincaré-Hopf relation to EMD leads to some rigorous results viz (i) for total number of CPs, NCP=3,7,11,15,… there must be either a (3,+3) or a (3,-1) CP at the center of symmetry, (ii) for NCP=1,5,9,13,… there must be either a (3,-3) or a (3,+1) CP at the center of symmetry. A single directional maximum on every ray, starting from p =0 has been observed for all the test molecules and is suggested as a working topographical principle in p space. This working principle is shown to satisfy the sufficiency condition for the hierarchy principle.

  16. Inclusive electron scattering from nuclei in the quasielastic region at large momentum transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Nadia

    2008-12-01

    Experiment E02-019, performed in Hall C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), was a measurement of inclusive electron cross sections for several nuclei (^{2}H,^{3}He, ^{4}He, ^{9}Be,^{12}C, ^{63}Cu, and ^{197}Au) in the quasielastic region at high momentum transfer. In the region of low energy transfer, the cross sections were analyzed in terms of the reduced response, F(y), by examining its y-scaling behavior. The data were also examined in terms of the nuclear structure function ν W_2^A and its behavior in x and the Nachtmann variable ξ. The data show approximate scaling of ν W_2^A in ξ for all targets at all kinematics, unlike scaling in x, which is confined to the DIS regime. However, y-scaling observations are limited to the kinematic region dominated by the quasielastic response ({y<0}), where some scaling violations arising from FSIs are observed.

  17. Linear gyrokinetic calculations of toroidal momentum transport in the presence of trapped electron modes in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kluy, N.; Angioni, C.; Camenen, Y.; Peeters, A. G.

    2009-12-15

    The toroidal momentum transport in the presence of trapped electron mode microinstabilities in tokamak plasmas is studied by means of quasilinear gyrokinetic calculations. In particular, the role of the Coriolis drift in producing an inward convection of toroidal momentum is investigated. The Coriolis drift term has been implemented in the gyrokinetic code GS2 [W. Dorland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5579 (2000)] specifically for the completion of this work. A benchmark between the GS2 implementation of the Coriolis drift and the implementations included in two other gyrokinetic codes is presented. The numerical calculations show that in the presence of trapped electron modes, despite of a weaker symmetry breaking of the eigenfunctions with respect to the case of ion temperature gradient modes, a pinch of toroidal momentum is produced in most conditions. The toroidal momentum viscosity is also computed, and found to be small as compared with the electron heat conductivity, but significantly larger than the ion heat conductivity. In addition, interesting differences are found in the dependence of the toroidal momentum pinch as a function of collisionality between trapped electron modes and ion temperature gradient modes. The results identify also parameter domains in which the pinch is predicted to be small, which are also of interest for comparisons with the experiments.

  18. Molecular orbital imaging of the acetone S2 excited state using time-resolved (e, 2e) electron momentum spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masakazu; Oishi, Keiya; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Zhu, Chaoyuan; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-03-13

    We report a time-resolved (e, 2e) experiment on the deuterated acetone molecule in the S2 Rydberg state with a lifetime of 13.5 ps. The acetone S2 state was prepared by a 195 nm pump laser and probed with electron momentum spectroscopy using a 1.2 keV incident electron beam of 1 ps temporal width. In spite of the low data statistics as well as of the limited time resolution (±35  ps) due to velocity mismatch, the experimental results clearly demonstrate that electron momentum spectroscopy measurements of short-lived transient species are feasible, opening the door to time-resolved orbital imaging in momentum space.

  19. Precision electron flow measurements in a disk transmission line.

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Waylon T.; Pelock, Michael D.; Martin, Jeremy Paul; Jackson, Daniel Peter Jr.; Savage, Mark Edward; Stoltzfus, Brian Scott; Mendel, Clifford Will, Jr.; Pointon, Timothy David

    2008-01-01

    An analytic model for electron flow in a system driving a fixed inductive load is described and evaluated with particle in cell simulations. The simple model allows determining the impedance profile for a magnetically insulated transmission line given the minimum gap desired, and the lumped inductance inside the transition to the minimum gap. The model allows specifying the relative electron flow along the power flow direction, including cases where the fractional electron flow decreases in the power flow direction. The electrons are able to return to the cathode because they gain energy from the temporally rising magnetic field. The simulations were done with small cell size to reduce numerical heating. An experiment to compare electron flow to the simulations was done. The measured electron flow is {approx}33% of the value from the simulations. The discrepancy is assumed to be due to a reversed electric field at the cathode because of the inductive load and falling electron drift velocity in the power flow direction. The simulations constrain the cathode electric field to zero, which gives the highest possible electron flow.

  20. Electron momentum density, band structure, and structural properties of SrS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, G.; Munjal, N.; Vyas, V.; Kumar, R.; Sharma, B. K.; Joshi, K. B.

    2013-10-15

    The electron momentum density, the electronic band structure, and the structural properties of SrS are presented in this paper. The isotropic Compton profile, anisotropies in the directional Compton profiles, the electronic band structure and density of states are calculated using the ab initio periodic linear combination of atomic orbitals method with the CRYSTAL06 code. Structural parameters of SrS-lattice constants and bulk moduli in the B1 and B2 phases-are computed together with the transition pressure. The computed parameters are well in agreement with earlier investigations. To compare the calculated isotropic Compton profile, measurement on polycrystalline SrS is performed using 5Ci-{sup 241}Am Compton spectrometer. Additionally, charge transfer is studied by means of the Compton profiles computed from the ionic model. The nature of bonding in the isovalent SrS and SrO compounds is compared on the basis of equal-valenceelectron-density profiles and the bonding in SrS is found to be more covalent than in SrO.

  1. Orbital angular momentum in electron diffraction and its use to determine chiral crystal symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juchtmans, Roeland; Verbeeck, Jo

    2015-10-01

    In this work we present an alternative way to look at electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope. Instead of writing the scattering amplitude in Fourier space as a set of plane waves, we use the cylindrical Fourier transform to describe the scattering amplitude in a basis of orbital angular momentum (OAM) eigenstates. We show how working in this framework can be very convenient when investigating, e.g., rotation and screw-axis symmetries. For the latter we find selection rules on the OAM coefficients that unambiguously reveal the handedness of the screw axis. Detecting the OAM coefficients of the scattering amplitude thus offers the possibility to detect the handedness of crystals without the need for dynamical simulations, the thickness of the sample, nor the exact crystal structure. We propose an experimental setup to measure the OAM components where an image of the crystal is taken after inserting a spiral phase plate in the diffraction plane and perform multislice simulations on α quartz to demonstrate how the method indeed reveals the chirality. The experimental feasibility of the technique is discussed together with its main advantages with respect to chirality determination of screw axes. The method shows how the use of a spiral phase plate can be extended from a simple phase imaging technique to a tool to measure the local OAM decomposition of an electron wave, widening the field of interest well beyond chiral space group determination.

  2. Frontend electronics for high-precision single photo-electron timing using FPGA-TDCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinali, M.; Dzyhgadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Uhlig, F.; Düren, M.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Rosner, G.; Achenbach, P.; Corell, O.; Ferretti Bondy, M. I.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Rosner, C.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Bühler, P.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-12-01

    The next generation of high-luminosity experiments requires excellent particle identification detectors which calls for Imaging Cherenkov counters with fast electronics to cope with the expected hit rates. A Barrel DIRC will be used in the central region of the Target Spectrometer of the planned PANDA experiment at FAIR. A single photo-electron timing resolution of better than 100 ps is required by the Barrel DIRC to disentangle the complicated patterns created on the image plane. R&D studies have been performed to provide a design based on the TRB3 readout using FPGA-TDCs with a precision better than 20 ps RMS and custom frontend electronics with high-bandwidth pre-amplifiers and fast discriminators. The discriminators also provide time-over-threshold information thus enabling walk corrections to improve the timing resolution. Two types of frontend electronics cards optimised for reading out 64-channel PHOTONIS Planacon MCP-PMTs were tested: one based on the NINO ASIC and the other, called PADIWA, on FPGA discriminators. Promising results were obtained in a full characterisation using a fast laser setup and in a test experiment at MAMI, Mainz, with a small scale DIRC prototype.

  3. A study of the turn-up effect in the electron momentum spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Cappello, C.; Menas, F.; Houamer, S.; Popov, Yu V.; Roy, A. C.

    2015-10-01

    Recently, a number of electron momentum spectroscopy measurements for the ionization of atoms and molecules have shown that the triple differential cross section (TDCS) has an unexpected higher intensity in a low momentum regime (Brunger M J, Braidwood S W, Mc Carthy I E and Weigold E 1994 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 27 L597, Hollebone B P, Neville J J, Zheng Y, Brion C E, Wang Y and Davidson E R 1995 Chem. Phys. 196 13, Brion C E, Zheng Y, Rolke J, Neville J J, McCarthy I E and Wang J 1998 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 31 L223, Ren X G, Ning C G, Deng J K, Zhang S F, Su G L, Huang F and Li G Q 2005 Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 163201, Deng J K, et al 2001 J. Chem. Phys. 114 882, Ning C G, Ren X G, Deng J K, Su G L, Zhang S F and Li G Q 2006 Phys. Rev. A 73 022704). This surprising result is now called the turn-up effect. Our aim is to investigate such an effect by studying the case of the ionization of atomic hydrogen in an excited state using the 3C model (Brauner M, Briggs J S and Klar H 1989 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 22 2265) which is able to describe all the measured results of the single ionization of atomic hydrogen in its ground state for an incident energy beyond 200 eV. A comparison is also made of the findings of the present method with those of the plane wave impulse approximation and distorted wave models.

  4. Effects of bonding on the energy distribution of electrons scattered elastically at high momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Vos, M.; Went, M. R.

    2006-11-15

    High-resolution measurements of 40-keV electrons scattered over 44.3 deg. from evaporated carbon films are presented. The observed width of the energy distribution of electrons scattered from carbon is significantly larger than the experimental energy resolution, and its position is shifted to lower energy. Measurements were done for transmission and reflection geometries for thin films with thicknesses varying from 90 A ring to 1400 A ring . The observed peak shape is largely independent of the thickness and measurement geometry. The peak shape deviates from Gaussian in all cases, in a way consistent with theories that describe these processes beyond the impulse approximation. The energy shift of the carbon peak is measured by evaporating a small amount of Au on these films. Separation of the Au and C peak is somewhat smaller than calculated assuming scattering from free C and Au atoms, but independent of measurement geometry. Finally spectra were measured from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) films. Now different widths are observed in reflection geometry and transmission geometry. This is attributed to the anisotropy of the motion of the C atoms in HOPG. Also the Au-C separation is slightly orientation dependent for HOPG. All observations agree at least semiquantitatively with neutron Compton scattering results, a related scattering experiment that studies neutron-atom collisions at similar momentum transfers.

  5. Precision electronic speed controller for an alternating-current

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, Victor W.

    1988-01-01

    A high precision controller for an alternating-current multi-phase electrical motor that is subject to a large inertial load. The controller was developed for and is particularly suitable for controlling, in a neutron chopper system, a heavy spinning rotor that must be rotated in phase-locked synchronism with a reference pulse train that is representative of an ac power supply signal having a meandering line frequency. The controller includes a shaft revolution sensor which provides a feedback pulse train representative of the actual speed of the motor. An internal digital timing signal generator provides a reference signal which is compared with the feedback signal in a computing unit to provide a motor control signal. In the preferred embodiment, the motor control signal is a weighted linear sum of a speed error voltage, a phase error voltage, and a drift error voltage, each of which is computed anew with each revolution of the motor shaft. The stator windings of the motor are driven by two amplifiers which are provided with input signals having the proper quadrature relationship by an exciter unit consisting of a voltage controlled oscillator, a binary counter, a pair of readonly memories, and a pair of digital-to-analog converters.

  6. Electronic solar compass for high precision orientation on any planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flora, F.; Bollanti, S.; De Meis, D.; Di Lazzaro, P.; Gallerano, G. P.; Mezi, L.; Murra, D.; Torre, A.; Vicca, D.

    2016-07-01

    A compact, fully automatic electronic solar compass has been developed at the ENEA Frascati Laboratories. The compass is inspired to ``camera obscura'' sundials like those inside churches. Sun ephemerides are calculated using an approximate but effective analytical solution of Kepler's laws, where the Earth (or other planets) orbit main parameters are introduced. The instrument is light, cheap and it has an accuracy better than 1 arcmin. Some examples of application of the device as well as the possibility to use it on Mars are presented.

  7. Angle-resolved auger electron spectra for a Ni(110) surface: Calculations with the reduced angular momentum expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, V.; Chassé, A.; Mróz, S.

    1990-05-01

    Results of multiple-scattering cluster calculations are presented for angle-resolved M 2,3VV Auger electron intensities from a clean Ni(110) surface, which are obtained using the reduced angular momentum expansion (RAME). This method goes beyond the popular plane-wave approximation and takes into account both the spherical character and the anisotropy of the electron waves. The positions of the maxima and minima in the calculated polar intensity profiles agree well with the experimentally determined structures.

  8. Precision electronic speed controller for an alternating-current motor

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, V.W.

    A high precision controller for an alternating-current multi-phase electrical motor that is subject to a large inertial load. The controller was developed for controlling, in a neutron chopper system, a heavy spinning rotor that must be rotated in phase-locked synchronism with a reference pulse train that is representative of an ac power supply signal having a meandering line frequency. The controller includes a shaft revolution sensor which provides a feedback pulse train representative of the actual speed of the motor. An internal digital timing signal generator provides a reference signal which is compared with the feedback signal in a computing unit to provide a motor control signal. The motor control signal is a weighted linear sum of a speed error voltage, a phase error voltage, and a drift error voltage, each of which is computed anew with each revolution of the motor shaft. The speed error signal is generated by a novel vernier-logic circuit which is drift-free and highly sensitive to small speed changes. The phase error is also computed by digital logic, with adjustable sensitivity around a 0 mid-scale value. The drift error signal, generated by long-term counting of the phase error, is used to compensate for any slow changes in the average friction drag on the motor. An auxillary drift-byte status sensor prevents any disruptive overflow or underflow of the drift-error counter. An adjustable clocked-delay unit is inserted between the controller and the source of the reference pulse train to permit phase alignment of the rotor to any desired offset angle. The stator windings of the motor are driven by two amplifiers which are provided with input signals having the proper quadrature relationship by an exciter unit consisting of a voltage controlled oscillator, a binary counter, a pair of read-only memories, and a pair of digital-to-analog converters.

  9. Breakdown of the Strong-Field Approximation for Transverse Electron Momentum Distributions in Strong-Field Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Robert; Calvert, J. E.; Goodall, S.; Wang, X.; Xu, H.; Palmer, A. J.; Ivanov, I. A.; Kheifets, A. S.; Kielpinski, D.; Litvinyuk, I. V.

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the transverse electron momentum distributions for the strong field ionization of atoms by laser pulses with varying ellipticity. We investigated two ionization regimes; tunelling and over the barrier ionization regimes. The over the barrier regime was accessed by using neon atoms in excited atomic metastable states and is the first such strong-field experiment to use such an atomic species. We will show that the transverse momentum distributions evolve in qualitatively different when the ellipticity of the driving laser pulses is varied. email: R.Sang@griffith.edu.au

  10. High-resolution electron momentum spectroscopy of valence satellites of carbon disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengwu; Shan, Xu; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Enliang; Li, Zhongjun; Chen, XiangJun

    2010-09-01

    The binding energy spectrum of carbon disulphide (CS2) in the energy range of 9-23 eV has been measured by a high-resolution (e,2e) spectrometer employing asymmetric noncoplanar kinematics at an impact energy of 2500 eV plus the binding energy. Taking the advantage of the high energy resolution of 0.54 eV, four main peaks and five satellites in the outer-valence region are resolved. The assignments and pole strengths for these satellite states are achieved by comparing the experimental electron momentum profiles with the corresponding theoretical ones calculated using Hartree-Fock and density functional theory methods. The results are also compared in detail with the recent SAC-CI general-R calculations. General agreement is satisfactory, while the present experiment suggests cooperative contributions from Π2u, Σg+2 states to satellite 2 and Σg+2, Π2g states to satellite 3. Besides, relatively low pole strength for X Π2g state is obtained which contradicts all the theoretical calculations [2ph-TDA, ADC(3), SAC-CI general-R, ADC(4)] so far.

  11. Momentum distribution of the uniform electron gas: Improved parametrization and exact limits of the cumulant expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori-Giorgi, Paola; Ziesche, Paul

    2002-12-01

    The momentum distribution of the unpolarized uniform electron gas in its Fermi-liquid regime, n(k,rs), with the momenta k measured in units of the Fermi wave number kF and with the density parameter rs, is constructed with the help of the convex Kulik function G(x). It is assumed that n(0,rs),n(1±,rs), the on-top pair density g(0,rs), and the kinetic energy t(rs) are known (respectively, from accurate calculations for rs=1,…,5, from the solution of the Overhauser model, and from quantum Monte Carlo calculations via the virial theorem). Information from the high- and the low-density limit, corresponding to the random-phase approximation and to the Wigner crystal limit, is used. The result is an accurate parametrization of n(k,rs), which fulfills most of the known exact constraints. It is in agreement with the effective-potential calculations of Takada and Yasuhara [Phys. Rev. B 44, 7879 (1991)], is compatible with quantum Monte Carlo data, and is valid in the density range rs≲12. The corresponding cumulant expansions of the pair density and of the static structure factor are discussed, and some exact limits are derived.

  12. Inclusive electron scattering from nuclei in the quasielastic region at large momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Fomin, Nadia

    2008-12-01

    Experiment E02-019, performed in Hall C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), was a measurement of inclusive electron cross sections for several nuclei (2H,3He, 4He, 9Be,12C, 63Cu, and 197Au) in the quasielastic region at high momentum transfer. In the region of low energy transfer, the cross sections were analyzed in terms of the reduced response, F(y), by examining its y-scaling behavior. The data were also examined in terms of the nuclear structure function νWA 2 and its behavior in x and the Nachtmann variable ξ. The data show approximate scaling of νWA 2 in ξ for all targets at all kinematics, unlike scaling in x, which is confined to the DIS regime. However, y-scaling observations are limited to the kinematic region dominated by the quasielastic response (y <0), where some scaling violations arising from FSIs are observed.

  13. Measurement of the hot electron mean free path and the momentum relaxation rate in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Suntrup, Donald J.; Gupta, Geetak; Li, Haoran; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2014-12-29

    We present a method for measuring the mean free path and extracting the momentum relaxation time of hot electrons in GaN using the hot electron transistor (HET). In this device, electrons are injected over a high energy emitter barrier into the base where they experience quasi-ballistic transport well above the conduction band edge. After traversing the base, high energy electrons either surmount the base-collector barrier and become collector current or reflect off the barrier and become base current. We fabricate HETs with various base thicknesses and measure the common emitter transfer ratio (α) for each device. The mean free path is extracted by fitting α to a decaying exponential as a function of base width and the relaxation time is computed using a suitable injection velocity. For devices with an injection energy of ∼1 eV, we measure a hot electron mean free path of 14 nm and calculate a momentum relaxation time of 16 fs. These values are in agreement with theoretical calculations where longitudinal optical phonon scattering is the dominant momentum relaxation mechanism.

  14. Hi-G electronic gated camera for precision trajectory analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Donald R.; Payne, Scott; Keller, Ed; Longo, Salvatore; Caudle, Dennis E.; Walker, Dennis C.; Sartor, Mark A.; Keeler, Joe E.; Kerr, David A.; Fail, R. Wallace; Gannon, Jim; Carrol, Ernie; Jamison, Todd A.

    1997-12-01

    It is extremely difficult and expensive to determine the flight attitude and aimpoint of small maneuvering miniature air vehicles from ground based fixed or tracking photography. Telemetry alone cannot provide sufficient information bandwidth on 'what' the ground tracking is seeing and consequently 'why' it did or did not function properly. Additionally, it is anticipated that 'smart' and 'brilliant' guided vehicles now in development will require a high resolution imaging support system to determine which target and which part of a ground feature is being used for navigation or targeting. Other requirements include support of sub-component separation from developmental supersonic vehicles, where the clean separation from the container is not determinable from ground based film systems and film cameras do not survive vehicle breakup and impact. Hence, the requirement is to develop and demonstrate an imaging support system for development/testing that can provide the flight vehicle developer/analyst with imagery (combined with miniature telemetry sources) sufficient to recreate the trajectory, terminal navigation, and flight termination events. This project is a development and demonstration of a real-time, launch-rated, shuttered, electronic imager, transmitter, and analysis system. This effort demonstrated boresighted imagery from inside small flight vehicles for post flight analysis of trajectory, and capture of ground imagery during random triggered vehicle functions. The initial studies for this capability have been accomplished by the Experimental Dynamics Section of the Air Force Wright Laboratory, Armament Directorate, Eglin AFB, Florida, and the Telemetry Support Branch of the Army Material Research and Development Center at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. It has been determined that at 1/10,000 of a second exposure time, new ultra-miniature CCD sensors have sufficient sensitivity to image key ground target features without blur, thereby providing data for

  15. Precision shape modification of nanodevices with a low-energy electron beam

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alex; Yuzvinsky, Thomas David; Fennimore, Adam

    2010-03-09

    Methods of shape modifying a nanodevice by contacting it with a low-energy focused electron beam are disclosed here. In one embodiment, a nanodevice may be permanently reformed to a different geometry through an application of a deforming force and a low-energy focused electron beam. With the addition of an assist gas, material may be removed from the nanodevice through application of the low-energy focused electron beam. The independent methods of shape modification and material removal may be used either individually or simultaneously. Precision cuts with accuracies as high as 10 nm may be achieved through the use of precision low-energy Scanning Electron Microscope scan beams. These methods may be used in an automated system to produce nanodevices of very precise dimensions. These methods may be used to produce nanodevices of carbon-based, silicon-based, or other compositions by varying the assist gas.

  16. Dynamic Precision for Electron Repulsion Integral Evaluation on Graphical Processing Units (GPUs).

    PubMed

    Luehr, Nathan; Ufimtsev, Ivan S; Martínez, Todd J

    2011-04-12

    It has recently been demonstrated that novel streaming architectures found in consumer video gaming hardware such as graphical processing units (GPUs) are well-suited to a broad range of computations including electronic structure theory (quantum chemistry). Although recent GPUs have developed robust support for double precision arithmetic, they continue to provide 2-8× more hardware units for single precision. In order to maximize performance on GPU architectures, we present a technique of dynamically selecting double or single precision evaluation for electron repulsion integrals (ERIs) in Hartree-Fock and density functional self-consistent field (SCF) calculations. We show that precision error can be effectively controlled by evaluating only the largest integrals in double precision. By dynamically scaling the precision cutoff over the course of the SCF procedure, we arrive at a scheme that minimizes the number of double precision integral evaluations for any desired accuracy. This dynamic precision scheme is shown to be effective for an array of molecules ranging in size from 20 to nearly 2000 atoms. PMID:26606344

  17. Study of the molecular structure, ionization spectrum, and electronic wave function of 1,3-butadiene using electron momentum spectroscopy and benchmark Dyson orbital theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleuze, M. S.; Knippenberg, S.

    2006-09-01

    The scope of the present work is to reconcile electron momentum spectroscopy with elementary thermodynamics, and refute conclusions drawn by Saha et al. in J. Chem. Phys. 123, 124315 (2005) regarding fingerprints of the gauche conformational isomer of 1,3-butadiene in electron momentum distributions that were experimentally inferred from gas phase (e,2e) measurements on this compound [M. J. Brunger et al., J. Chem. Phys. 108, 1859 (1998)]. Our analysis is based on thorough calculations of one-electron and shake-up ionization spectra employing one-particle Green's function theory along with the benchmark third-order algebraic diagrammatic construction [ADC(3)] scheme. Accurate spherically averaged electron momentum distributions are correspondingly computed from the related Dyson orbitals. The ionization spectra and Dyson orbital momentum distributions that were computed for the trans-conformer of 1,3-butadiene alone are amply sufficient to quantitatively unravel the shape of all available experimental (e,2e) electron momentum distributions. A comparison of theoretical ADC(3) spectra for the s-trans and gauche energy minima with inner- and outer-valence high-resolution photoelectron measurements employing a synchrotron radiation beam [D. M. P. Holland et al., J. Phys. B 29, 3091 (1996)] demonstrates that the gauche structure is incompatible with ionization experiments in high-vacuum conditions and at standard temperatures. On the other hand, outer-valence Green's function calculations on the s-trans energy minimum form and approaching basis set completeness provide highly quantitative insights, within ˜0.2eV accuracy, into the available experimental one-electron ionization energies. At last, analysis of the angular dependence of relative (e,2e) ionization intensities nicely confirms the presence of one rather intense π-2 π*+1 satellite at ˜13.1eV in the ionization spectrum of the s-trans conformer.

  18. Double momentum spectrometer for ion-electron vector correlations in dissociative photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Bomme, C.; Guillemin, R.; Marin, T.; Journel, L.; Marchenko, T.; Pilette, B.; Avila, A.; Ringuenet, H.; Kushawaha, R. K.; Simon, M.; Dowek, D.; Trcera, N.

    2013-10-15

    We have developed a new momentum spectrometer dedicated to momentum vector correlations in the context of deep core photoionization of atomic and molecular species in the gas phase. In this article, we describe the design and operation of the experimental setup. The capabilities of the apparatus are illustrated with a set of measurements done on the sulphur core 1s photoionization of gas-phase CS{sub 2}.

  19. Unique electron polarimeter analyzing power comparison and precision spin-based energy measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Grames; Charles Sinclair; Joseph Mitchell; Eugene Chudakov; Howard Fenker; Arne Freyberger; Douglas Higinbotham; B. Poelker; Michael Steigerwald; Michael Tiefenback; Christian Cavata; Stephanie Escoffier; Frederic Marie; Thierry Pussieux; Pascal Vernin; Samuel Danagoulian; Kahanawita Dharmawardane; Renee Fatemi; Kyungseon Joo; Markus Zeier; Viktor Gorbenko; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Brian Raue; Riad Suleiman; Benedikt Zihlmann

    2004-03-01

    Precision measurements of the relative analyzing powers of five electron beam polarimeters, based on Compton, Moller, and Mott scattering, have been performed using the CEBAF accelerator at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Laboratory). A Wien filter in the 100 keV beamline of the injector was used to vary the electron spin orientation exiting the injector. High statistical precision measurements of the scattering asymmetry as a function of the spin orientation were made with each polarimeter. Since each polarimeter receives beam with the same magnitude of polarization, these asymmetry measurements permit a high statistical precision comparison of the relative analyzing powers of the five polarimeters. This is the first time a precise comparison of the analyzing powers of Compton, Moller, and Mott scattering polarimeters has been made. Statistically significant disagreements among the values of the beam polarization calculated from the asymmetry measurements made with each polarimeter reveal either errors in the values of the analyzing power, or failure to correctly include all systematic effects. The measurements reported here represent a first step toward understanding the systematic effects of these electron polarimeters. Such studies are necessary to realize high absolute accuracy (ca. 1%) electron polarization measurements, as required for some parity violation measurements planned at Jefferson Laboratory. Finally, a comparison of the value of the spin orientation exiting the injector that provides maximum longitudinal polarization in each experimental hall leads to an independent and very precise (better than 10-4) absolute measurement of the final electron beam energy.

  20. Improved strain precision with high spatial resolution using nanobeam precession electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Rouviere, Jean-Luc Martin, Yannick; Denneulin, Thibaud; Cooper, David

    2013-12-09

    NanoBeam Electron Diffraction is a simple and efficient technique to measure strain in nanostructures. Here, we show that improved results can be obtained by precessing the electron beam while maintaining a few nanometer probe size, i.e., by doing Nanobeam Precession Electron Diffraction (N-PED). The precession of the beam makes the diffraction spots more uniform and numerous, making N-PED more robust and precise. In N-PED, smaller probe size and better precision are achieved by having diffraction disks instead of diffraction dots. Precision in the strain measurement better than 2 × 10{sup −4} is obtained with a probe size approaching 1 nm in diameter.

  1. A Century-Old Question: Does a Crookes Paddle Wheel Cathode Ray Tube Demonstrate that Electrons Carry Momentum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, T. E.; Calisa, Vaishnavi

    2014-03-01

    In 1879, in the midst of the debate between English and continental scientists about the nature of cathode rays, William Crookes conducted an experiment in which a small mill or "paddle wheel" was pushed along tracks inside a cathode ray tube (CRT) (similar to that shown in Fig. 1) when connected to a high-voltage induction coil. Crookes attributed the motion of the wheel to momentum transfer from the cathode rays (electrons) to the wheel, and interpreted the experiment as providing evidence that cathode rays were particles. In 1903 Thomson discounted Crookes' interpretation by calculating that the rate of momentum transfer (which he estimated at no more than 2×10-3 dyn, equivalent to 2×10-8 N) would be far too small to account for the observed motion of the wheel,2 instead attributing the motion to the radiometric effect. The misconception was not laid to rest, however, and despite an effort in 1961 to draw attention to Thomson's original work and so remove the error from textbooks,3 the notion that a Crookes paddle wheel CRT demonstrates that electrons carry momentum continues to be taught in high school physics courses4 and wheel. We then measured the actual acceleration of the wheel in the CRT by video analysis of its motion and determined the moment of inertia of the wheel along with its mass and dimensions. We could then compare the force, which really acts on the wheel to produce the observed motion to the maximum impulsive force that is supplied by the electrons. Our measurements yield a maximum impulsive force due to the electrons [ F e l = ( 1.1 ± 0.3 ) × 10 - 8 N ], which is within a factor of two of Thomson's estimate, and which is more than two orders of magnitude smaller than the force that is responsible for the observed acceleration of the paddle wheel [ F W = ( 6 ± 2 ) × 10 - 6 N ]. This means that the rotation of the wheel is certainly not due to transferred momentum from the electron beam, and the results of the experiment should not be

  2. Correlated Two-Electron Momentum Spectra for Strong-Field Nonsequential Double Ionization of He at 800 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rudenko, A.; Ergler, Th.; Zrost, K.; Feuerstein, B.; Schroeter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.; Jesus, V. L. B. de

    2007-12-31

    We report on a kinematically complete experiment on nonsequential double ionization of He by 25 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 1.5 PW/cm{sup 2}. The suppression of the recollision-induced excitation at this high intensity allows us to address in a clean way direct (e,2e) ionization by the recolliding electron. In contrast with earlier experimental results, but in agreement with various theoretical predictions, the two-electron momentum distributions along the laser polarization axis exhibit a pronounced V-shaped structure, which can be explained by the role of Coulomb repulsion and typical (e,2e) kinematics.

  3. Acceleration of High Angular Momentum Electron Repulsion Integrals and Integral Derivatives on Graphics Processing Units.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yipu; Merz, Kenneth M

    2015-04-14

    We present an efficient implementation of ab initio self-consistent field (SCF) energy and gradient calculations that run on Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) enabled graphical processing units (GPUs) using recurrence relations. We first discuss the machine-generated code that calculates the electron-repulsion integrals (ERIs) for different ERI types. Next we describe the porting of the SCF gradient calculation to GPUs, which results in an acceleration of the computation of the first-order derivative of the ERIs. However, only s, p, and d ERIs and s and p derivatives could be executed simultaneously on GPUs using the current version of CUDA and generation of NVidia GPUs using a previously described algorithm [Miao and Merz J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2013, 9, 965-976.]. Hence, we developed an algorithm to compute f type ERIs and d type ERI derivatives on GPUs. Our benchmarks shows the performance GPU enable ERI and ERI derivative computation yielded speedups of 10-18 times relative to traditional CPU execution. An accuracy analysis using double-precision calculations demonstrates that the overall accuracy is satisfactory for most applications. PMID:26574356

  4. Large Quantum Probability Backflow and the Azimuthal Angle-Angular Momentum Uncertainty Relation for an Electron in a Constant Magnetic Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strange, P.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a surprising aspect of quantum mechanics that is accessible to an undergraduate student. We discuss probability backflow for an electron in a constant magnetic field. It is shown that even for a wavepacket composed entirely of states with negative angular momentum the effective angular momentum can take on positive…

  5. Picometre-precision analysis of scanning transmission electron microscopy images of platinum nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Yankovich, Andrew B; Berkels, Benjamin; Dahmen, W; Binev, P; Sanchez, S I; Bradley, S A; Li, Ao; Szlufarska, Izabela; Voyles, Paul M

    2014-06-11

    Measuring picometre-scale shifts in the positions of individual atoms in materials provides new insight into the structure of surfaces, defects and interfaces that influence a broad variety of materials' behaviour. Here we demonstrate sub-picometre precision measurements of atom positions in aberration-corrected Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy images based on the non-rigid registration and averaging of an image series. Non-rigid registration achieves five to seven times better precision than previous methods. Non-rigidly registered images of a silica-supported platinum nanocatalyst show pm-scale contraction of atoms at a (111)/(111) corner towards the particle centre and expansion of a flat (111) facet. Sub-picometre precision and standardless atom counting with <1 atom uncertainty in the same scanning transmission electron microscopy image provide new insight into the three-dimensional atomic structure of catalyst nanoparticle surfaces, which contain the active sites controlling catalytic reactions.

  6. Differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections for elastic electron scattering by neon - 5 to 100 eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Register, D. F.; Trajmar, S.

    1984-01-01

    Relative elastic-scattering differential cross sections were measured in the 5-100-eV impact energy and 10-145 deg angular ranges. Normalization of these cross sections was achieved by utilizing accurate total electron-scattering cross sections. A phase-shift analysis of the angular distributions in terms of real phase shifts has been carried out. From the differential cross sections, momentum-transfer cross sections were obtained and the values of the critical energy and angle were established (associated with the lowest value of the differential cross section) as 62.5 + or - 2.5 eV and 101.7 deg + or - 1.5 deg, respectively. The present phase shifts, the critical parameters, and differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections are compared to previous experimental and theoretical results. The error associated with the present data is about 10 percent.

  7. Engineering, Trade, and Technical Cluster. Task Analyses. Drafting and Design Technology, Precision Machining Technology, Electronics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum and Resource Center.

    Developed in Virginia, this publication contains task analysis guides to support selected tech prep programs that prepare students for careers in the engineering, trade, and technical cluster. Three occupations are profiled: drafting and design technology, precision machining technology, and electronics technology. Each guide contains the…

  8. Helium doubly excited states with zero angular momentum and electrons located on the same side of the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    de Prunele, E. )

    1992-09-01

    A particular set of two-electron atomic resonances for the helium atom with zero total orbital angular momentum ({ital S} states) has been recently studied theoretically (K. Richter and D. Wintgen, J. Phys. B 24, L565 (1991)). These resonances essentially have both electrons on the same side of the nucleus and the outer electron frozen.'' The present work suggests that the energies of these resonances correspond, when the degree of excitation of both electrons increases, to the energies of resonances associated with the Hamiltonian {ital H}={ital p}{sup 2}/2+{ital p}{prime}{sup 2}/2{minus}{ital Z}/{ital r}{minus}{ital Z}/{ital r}{prime}+1/{vert bar}{vert bar}{ital r}{vert bar}{minus}{vert bar}{ital r}{prime}{vert bar}{vert bar} in a space where both particles have zero angular momentum ({ital scrl}={ital scrl}{prime}=0). Moreover, the energy of each of these resonances appears to be that of the lowest member of an almost unperturbed Rydberg series of resonances converging to a single ionization threshold of He. The analysis of the problem relies on the method of o(4,2) operator replacements generalized by the method of complex scaling.

  9. The effect of inertia on the Dirac electron, the spin Hall current and the momentum space Berry curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Debashree Basu, B.

    2013-02-15

    We have studied the spin dependent force and the associated momentum space Berry curvature in an accelerating system. The results are derived by taking into consideration the non-relativistic limit of a generally covariant Dirac equation with an electromagnetic field present, where the methodology of the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation is applied to achieve the non-relativistic limit. Spin currents appear due to the combined action of the external electric field, the crystal field and the induced inertial electric field via the total effective spin-orbit interaction. In an accelerating frame, the crucial role of momentum space Berry curvature in the spin dynamics has also been addressed from the perspective of spin Hall conductivity. For time dependent acceleration, the expression for the spin polarization has been derived. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the effect of acceleration on the Dirac electron in the presence of an electromagnetic field, where the acceleration induces an electric field. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spin currents appear due to the total effective electric field via the total spin-orbit interaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We derive the expression for the spin dependent force and the spin Hall current, which is zero for a particular acceleration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The role of the momentum space Berry curvature in an accelerating system is discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An expression for the spin polarization for time dependent acceleration is derived.

  10. Application of Momentum Transfer Theory for Ion and Electron Transport in Pure Gases and in Gas Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, J.V.; Vrhovac, S. B.

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we have presented two applications of Momentum Transfer Theory (MTT), which were both aimed at obtaining reliable data for modeling of non-equilibrium plasma. Transport properties of ion swarms in presence of Resonant Charge Transfer (RCT) collisions are studied using Momentum Transfer Theory (MTT). Using the developed MTT we tested a previously available anisotropic set of cross-sections for Ar++Ar collisions bay making the comparisons with the available data for the transverse diffusion coefficient. We also developed an anisotropic set of Ne++Ne integral cross-sections based on the available data for mobility, longitudinal and transverse diffusion. Anisotropic sets of cross-sections are needed for Monte Carlo simulations of ion transport and plasma models. Application of Blanc's Law for drift velocities of electrons and ions in gas mixtures at arbitrary reduced electric field strengths E/n0 was studied theoretically and by numerical examples. Corrections for Blanc's Law that include effects of inelastic collisions were derived. In addition we have derived the common mean energy procedure that was proposed by Chiflikian in a general case both for ions and electrons. Both corrected common E/n0 and common mean energy procedures provide excellent results even for electrons at moderate E/n0 where application of Blanc's Law was regarded as impossible. In mixtures of two gases that have negative differential conductivity (NDC) even when neither of the two pure gases show NDC the Blanc's Law procedure was able to give excellent predictions.

  11. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, Sanyam; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-10-01

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 107 cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 1011 cm-2. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  12. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, Sanyam Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-10-12

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  13. Precision enhancement in boundary element methods with application to electron optics.

    PubMed

    Loyd, Jody S; Gregory, Don A

    2016-08-01

    A hybrid approach is presented for obtaining electric potentials for use in electron optics modeling. An initial solution from the boundary element method (BEM) is used to derive the bounding potential of a cylindrical subdomain subsequently used in a Fourier series solution. The approach combines the inherent precision of this analytic solution with the flexibility of BEM to describe practical, non-idealized systems of electrodes. The resulting lens field in the Fourier series subdomain is of higher precision, thereby allowing smaller errors in subsequent calculations of electron ray paths. The effects of aberrations are thus easier to observe in tracing non-paraxial rays. Example ray-traces through a simple, known einzel lens are given as validation of this approach.

  14. Precision enhancement in boundary element methods with application to electron optics.

    PubMed

    Loyd, Jody S; Gregory, Don A

    2016-08-01

    A hybrid approach is presented for obtaining electric potentials for use in electron optics modeling. An initial solution from the boundary element method (BEM) is used to derive the bounding potential of a cylindrical subdomain subsequently used in a Fourier series solution. The approach combines the inherent precision of this analytic solution with the flexibility of BEM to describe practical, non-idealized systems of electrodes. The resulting lens field in the Fourier series subdomain is of higher precision, thereby allowing smaller errors in subsequent calculations of electron ray paths. The effects of aberrations are thus easier to observe in tracing non-paraxial rays. Example ray-traces through a simple, known einzel lens are given as validation of this approach. PMID:27068123

  15. Electron and recoil ion momentum imaging with a magneto-optically trapped target

    SciTech Connect

    Hubele, R.; Schuricke, M.; Goullon, J.; Lindenblatt, H.; Ferreira, N.; Laforge, A.; Brühl, E.; Globig, D.; Misra, D.; Sell, M.; Song, Z.; Wang, X.; Zhang, S.; Jesus, V. L. B. de; Kelkar, A.; Schneider, K.; Schulz, M.; Fischer, D.

    2015-03-15

    A reaction microscope (ReMi) has been combined with a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for the kinematically complete investigation of atomic break-up processes. With the novel MOTReMi apparatus, the momentum vectors of the fragments of laser-cooled and state-prepared lithium atoms are measured in coincidence and over the full solid angle. The first successful implementation of a MOTReMi could be realized due to an optimized design of the present setup, a nonstandard operation of the MOT, and by employing a switching cycle with alternating measuring and trapping periods. The very low target temperature in the MOT (∼2 mK) allows for an excellent momentum resolution. Optical preparation of the target atoms in the excited Li 2{sup 2}P{sub 3/2} state was demonstrated providing an atomic polarization of close to 100%. While first experimental results were reported earlier, in this work, we focus on the technical description of the setup and its performance in commissioning experiments involving target ionization in 266 nm laser pulses and in collisions with projectile ions.

  16. Precision electron-gamma spectroscopic data from the beta decay of 153Sm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepa, S.; Rani Rao, Dwaraka; Venkataramaniah, K.

    2016-02-01

    The decay of 153Sm was studied with a HPGe detector and a Si(Li) detector based electron transporter. Forty four gamma transitions belonging to sixteen excited levels in the daughter nucleus 153Eu were analyzed for their energies, emission intensities, conversion electron intensities and conversion coefficients. These values have resulted in the determination of precise beta emission intensities to the levels in 153Eu and in the construction of an internally consistent decay scheme. The present study will add to the decay data available on this radionuclide for reliable dose estimations for medical applications.

  17. Fully self-consistent calculations of momentum distributions of annihilating electron-positron pairs in SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiktor, Julia; Jomard, Gérald; Torrent, Marc; Barthe, Marie-France; Bertolus, Marjorie

    2016-05-01

    We performed calculations of momentum distributions of annihilating electron-positron pairs in various fully relaxed vacancy defects in SiC. We used self-consistent two-component density functional theory schemes to find the electronic and positronic densities and wave functions in the considered systems. Using the one-dimensional momentum distributions (Doppler-broadened annihilation radiation line shapes) we calculated the line-shape parameters S and W . We emphasize the effect of the experimental resolution and the choice of the integration ranges for the S and W parameters on the distributions of the points corresponding to different defects in the S (W ) plot. We performed calculation for two polytypes of SiC, 3 C , and 6 H and showed that for silicon vacancies and clusters containing this defect there were no significant differences between the Doppler spectra. The results of the Doppler spectra calculations were compared with experimental data obtained for n -type 6 H -SiC samples irradiated with 4-MeV Au ions. We observed a good general agreement between the measured and calculated points.

  18. Project 8: Precision Electron Specroscopy to Measure the Mass of the Neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    VanDevender, Brent A.; Asner, David M.; Bahr, Matthew; Bradley, Rich; Doeleman, Sheperd; Jones, Anthony M.; Fernandes, Justin L.; Formaggio, Joseph; Furse, Daniel; Kelly, James F.; Kofron, J.; LaRoque, Benjamin; Leber, Michelle; MCBride, Lisa; Monreal, Ben; Oblath, Noah; Patterson, Ryan B.; Rogers, Alan E.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, Leslie; Rybka, Gray; Thummler, Thomas

    2013-10-21

    The Project 8 Collaboration is exploring a new technique for the spectroscopy of medium-energy electrons (* 1 – 100 keV) with the ultimate goal of measuring the effective mass of the electron antineutrino by the tritium endpoint method. Our method is based on the detection of microwave-frequency cyclotron radiation emitted by magnetically trapped electrons. The immediate goal of Project 8 is to demonstrate the utility of this technique for a tritium endpoint experiment through a high-precision measurement of the conversion electron spectrum of 83mKr. We present concepts for detecting this cyclotron radiation, focusing on a guided wave design currently being implemented in a prototype apparatus at the University of Washington.

  19. Measurements of transverse electron scattering from the deuteron in the threshold region at high momentum transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Frodyma, M.; Arnold, R.G.; Benton, D.; Bosted, P.E.; Clogher, L.; Dechambrier, G.; Katramatou, A.T.; Lambert, J.; Lung, A.; Petratos, G.G.; Rahbar, A.; Rock, S.E.; Szalata, Z.M.; Debebe, B.; Hicks, R.S.; Hotta, A.; Peterson, G.A.; Gearhart, R.A.; Alster, J.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Dietrich, F.; van Bibber, K. University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California 94309 Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 )

    1993-04-01

    Deuteron electrodisintegration cross sections near 180[degree] have been measured near breakup threshold for the four-momentum transfer squared [ital Q][sup 2] range 1.21--2.76 (GeV/[ital c])[sup 2]. Evidence for a change of slope in the cross section near [ital Q][sup 2]=1 (GeV/[ital c])[sup 2] has been obtained. The data are compared to nonrelativistic calculations, which predict a strong influence of meson-exchange currents. The data are also compared to a hybrid quark-hadron model. None of these calculations agrees with the data over the entire measured range of [ital Q][sup 2]. The ratio of inelastic structure functions [ital W][sub 1]([ital Q][sup 2],[ital E][sub [ital n][ital p

  20. Real-space electronic structure calculations with full-potential all-electron precision for transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Tomoya; Heide, Marcus; Atodiresei, Nicolae; Baumeister, Paul; Tsukamoto, Shigeru; Blügel, Stefan

    2010-11-01

    We have developed an efficient computational scheme utilizing the real-space finite-difference formalism and the projector augmented-wave (PAW) method to perform precise first-principles electronic-structure simulations based on the density-functional theory for systems containing transition metals with a modest computational effort. By combining the advantages of the time-saving double-grid technique and the Fourier-filtering procedure for the projectors of pseudopotentials, we can overcome the egg box effect in the computations even for first-row elements and transition metals, which is a problem of the real-space finite-difference formalism. In order to demonstrate the potential power in terms of precision and applicability of the present scheme, we have carried out simulations to examine several bulk properties and structural energy differences between different bulk phases of transition metals and have obtained excellent agreement with the results of other precise first-principles methods such as a plane-wave-based PAW method and an all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FLAPW) method.

  1. High-precision correlative fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy using two independent alignment markers☆

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberger, Pascale; Kaufmann, Rainer; Siebert, C. Alistair; Hagen, Christoph; Wodrich, Harald; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an emerging technique which combines functional information provided by fluorescence microscopy (FM) with the high-resolution structural information of electron microscopy (EM). So far, correlative cryo microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples has not reached better than micrometre range accuracy. Here, a method is presented that enables the correlation between fluorescently tagged proteins and electron cryo tomography (cryoET) data with nanometre range precision. Specifically, thin areas of vitrified whole cells are examined by correlative fluorescence cryo microscopy (cryoFM) and cryoET. Novel aspects of the presented cryoCLEM workflow not only include the implementation of two independent electron dense fluorescent markers to improve the precision of the alignment, but also the ability of obtaining an estimate of the correlation accuracy for each individual object of interest. The correlative workflow from plunge-freezing to cryoET is detailed step-by-step for the example of locating fluorescence-labelled adenovirus particles trafficking inside a cell. PMID:24262358

  2. Angular momentum transfer between a circularly polarized photon and an electron spin in double quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Asayama, T.; Fujita, T.; Kiyama, H.; Oiwa, A.; Tarucha, S.

    2011-12-23

    We propose an experimental scheme of photon-spin quantum interface using a semiconductor double quantum dot. A polarized electron spin is excited by a circularly polarized photon. We detect the spin state applying Pauli spin blockade which is often employed to detect orientation of a single electron spin in double quantum dots.

  3. High-precision x-ray spectroscopy in few-electron ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBigot, E. O.; Boucard, S.; Covita, D. S.; Gotta, D.; Gruber, A.; Hirtl, A.; Fuhrmann, H.; Indelicato, P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Schlesser, S.; Simons, L. M.; Stingelin, L.; Trassinelli, M.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Wasser, A.; Zmeskal, J.

    2009-05-01

    The experimental and spectrum analysis procedures that led to about 15 new, high-precision, relative x-ray line energy measurements are presented. The measured lines may be used as x-ray reference lines in the 2.4-3.1 keV range. Applications also include tests of the atomic theory, and in particular of quantum electrodynamics and of relativistic many-body theory calculations. The lines originate from 2- to 4-electron ions of sulfur (Z=16), chlorine (Z=17) and argon (Z=18). The precision reached for their energy ranges from a few parts per million (ppm) to about 50 ppm. This places the new measurements among the most precise performed in mid-Z highly charged ions (Z is the nuclear charge number). The elements of the experimental setup are described: the ion source (an electron cyclotron resonance ion trap), the spectrometer (a single, spherically bent crystal spectrometer), as well as the spectrum acquisition camera (low-noise, high-efficiency CCD). The spectrum analysis procedure, which is based on a full simulation of the spectrometer response function, is also presented.

  4. Calculation of Dyson orbitals using a symmetry-adapted-cluster configuration-interaction method for electron momentum spectroscopy: N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Y. R.; Ning, C. G.; Deng, J. K.

    2011-06-15

    The symmetry-adapted-cluster (SAC) configuration-interaction (CI) theory was introduced to interpret the non-coplanar symmetric (e,2e) results. Dyson orbitals derived from the bench-marked SAC CI general-R method were utilized for computing the electron momentum distributions. The corresponding excitation energies and spectroscopic factors can be used to reproduce the ionization spectra. The implementation was demonstrated by examples of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The electron momentum distributions calculated using SAC CI method were compared with recent experimental results, as well as the Hartree-Fock and density-functional-theory calculations. The SAC CI method gave the best performance on the description of the experimental momentum distributions. It was found that the electron momentum distributions of Dyson orbitals related to the satellite lines can be notably different from those of their parent orbitals due to the electron correlation in the initial target states. Present work demonstrated that the SAC CI theory is a very useful and accurate tool for interpreting high-resolution electron momentum spectroscopy results.

  5. A numerical method for determining highly precise electron energy distribution functions from Langmuir probe characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Jin-Young; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-12-15

    Electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) were determined from probe characteristics using a numerical ac superimposed method with a distortion correction of high derivative terms by varying amplitude of a sinusoidal perturbation voltage superimposed onto the dc sweep voltage, depending on the related electron energy. Low amplitude perturbation applied around the plasma potential represented the low energy peak of the EEDF exactly, and high amplitude perturbation applied around the floating potential was effective to suppress noise or distortion of the probe characteristic, which is fatal to the tail electron distribution. When a small random noise was imposed over the stabilized prove characteristic, the numerical differentiation method was not suitable to determine the EEDF, while the numerical ac superimposed method was able to obtain a highly precise EEDF.

  6. Organic electronics for precise delivery of neurotransmitters to modulate mammalian sensory function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Daniel T.; Kurup, Sindhulakshmi; Larsson, Karin C.; Hori, Ryusuke; Tybrandt, Klas; Goiny, Michel; Jager, Edwin W. H.; Berggren, Magnus; Canlon, Barbara; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta

    2009-09-01

    Significant advances have been made in the understanding of the pathophysiology, molecular targets and therapies for the treatment of a variety of nervous-system disorders. Particular therapies involve electrical sensing and stimulation of neural activity, and significant effort has therefore been devoted to the refinement of neural electrodes. However, direct electrical interfacing suffers from some inherent problems, such as the inability to discriminate amongst cell types. Thus, there is a need for novel devices to specifically interface nerve cells. Here, we demonstrate an organic electronic device capable of precisely delivering neurotransmitters in vitro and in vivo. In converting electronic addressing into delivery of neurotransmitters, the device mimics the nerve synapse. Using the peripheral auditory system, we show that out of a diverse population of cells, the device can selectively stimulate nerve cells responding to a specific neurotransmitter. This is achieved by precise electronic control of electrophoretic migration through a polymer film. This mechanism provides several sought-after features for regulation of cell signalling: exact dosage determination through electrochemical relationships, minimally disruptive delivery due to lack of fluid flow, and on-off switching. This technology has great potential as a therapeutic platform and could help accelerate the development of therapeutic strategies for nervous-system disorders.

  7. Momentum and energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion in the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors.

    PubMed

    Inosov, D S; Fink, J; Kordyuk, A A; Borisenko, S V; Zabolotnyy, V B; Schuster, R; Knupfer, M; Büchner, B; Follath, R; Dürr, H A; Eberhardt, W; Hinkov, V; Keimer, B; Berger, H

    2007-12-01

    Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy we have studied the momentum and photon energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion, termed waterfalls, between the Fermi level and 1 eV binding energy in several high-T_{c} superconductors. We observe strong changes of the dispersion between different Brillouin zones and a strong dependence on the photon energy around 75 eV, which we associate with the resonant photoemission at the Cu3p-->3d_{x;{2}-y;{2}} edge. We conclude that the high-energy "waterfall" dispersion results from a strong suppression of the photoemission intensity at the center of the Brillouin zone due to matrix element effects and is, therefore, not an intrinsic feature of the spectral function. This indicates that the new high-energy scale in the electronic structure of cuprates derived from the waterfall-like dispersion may be incorrect. PMID:18233401

  8. Momentum and energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion in the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors.

    PubMed

    Inosov, D S; Fink, J; Kordyuk, A A; Borisenko, S V; Zabolotnyy, V B; Schuster, R; Knupfer, M; Büchner, B; Follath, R; Dürr, H A; Eberhardt, W; Hinkov, V; Keimer, B; Berger, H

    2007-12-01

    Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy we have studied the momentum and photon energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion, termed waterfalls, between the Fermi level and 1 eV binding energy in several high-T_{c} superconductors. We observe strong changes of the dispersion between different Brillouin zones and a strong dependence on the photon energy around 75 eV, which we associate with the resonant photoemission at the Cu3p-->3d_{x;{2}-y;{2}} edge. We conclude that the high-energy "waterfall" dispersion results from a strong suppression of the photoemission intensity at the center of the Brillouin zone due to matrix element effects and is, therefore, not an intrinsic feature of the spectral function. This indicates that the new high-energy scale in the electronic structure of cuprates derived from the waterfall-like dispersion may be incorrect.

  9. Syringe Injectable Electronics: Precise Targeted Delivery with Quantitative Input/Output Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Guosong; Fu, Tian-Ming; Zhou, Tao; Schuhmann, Thomas G; Huang, Jinlin; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-10-14

    Syringe-injectable mesh electronics with tissue-like mechanical properties and open macroporous structures is an emerging powerful paradigm for mapping and modulating brain activity. Indeed, the ultraflexible macroporous structure has exhibited unprecedented minimal/noninvasiveness and the promotion of attractive interactions with neurons in chronic studies. These same structural features also pose new challenges and opportunities for precise targeted delivery in specific brain regions and quantitative input/output (I/O) connectivity needed for reliable electrical measurements. Here, we describe new results that address in a flexible manner both of these points. First, we have developed a controlled injection approach that maintains the extended mesh structure during the "blind" injection process, while also achieving targeted delivery with ca. 20 μm spatial precision. Optical and microcomputed tomography results from injections into tissue-like hydrogel, ex vivo brain tissue, and in vivo brains validate our basic approach and demonstrate its generality. Second, we present a general strategy to achieve up to 100% multichannel I/O connectivity using an automated conductive ink printing methodology to connect the mesh electronics and a flexible flat cable, which serves as the standard "plug-in" interface to measurement electronics. Studies of resistance versus printed line width were used to identify optimal conditions, and moreover, frequency-dependent noise measurements show that the flexible printing process yields values comparable to commercial flip-chip bonding technology. Our results address two key challenges faced by syringe-injectable electronics and thereby pave the way for facile in vivo applications of injectable mesh electronics as a general and powerful tool for long-term mapping and modulation of brain activity in fundamental neuroscience through therapeutic biomedical studies.

  10. Electronic and Optical Properties of Atomically Precise Graphene Nanoribbons and Heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignedoli, Carlo Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Among graphene related materials, nanoribbons (GNRs) - narrow stripes of graphene - have emerged as promising building blocks for nanoelectronic devices. The lateral confinement in GNRs opens a bandgap that sensitively depends on the ribbon width, allowing in principle for the design of GNR-based structures with tunable properties. However, structuring with atomic precision is required to avoid detrimental effects induced by edge defects. Recently, we have introduced a versatile route for the bottom-up fabrication of GNRs, allowing for the atomically precise synthesis of ribbons with different shapes as well as heterojunctions be-tween doped and undoped ribbon segments. Here, we report on detailed experimental and computational investigations of the structural, electronic and optical properties of selected GNRs and heterojunctions. For the case of armchair GNRs of width N =7, the electronic band gap and band dispersion have been determined with high precision. Optical characterization has revealed important excitonic effects, which are in good agreement with ab initio calculations including many-body effects. For the case of heterojunctions, consisting of seamlessly assembled segments of pristine (undoped) graphene nanoribbons and deterministically nitrogen-doped graphene nanoribbons, we find a behavior similar to traditional p-n junctions. With a band shift of 0.5 eV and an electric field of 2 × 108 V m-1 at the heterojunction, these materials bear a high potential for applications in photovoltaics and electronics. Finally, we will discuss the potential of the bottom-up approach with regard to the fabrication of GNRs exhibiting zigzag edges, which are predicted to exhibit spin-polarized edge states.

  11. Precise phase determination with the built-in spectral interferometry in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yizhu; Yan, T-M; Jiang, Y H

    2016-09-01

    A new method determining the precise phase of pulse sequences in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) is proposed merely using the already built-in spectral interferometry. The approach is easily implemented without the supplementary instrumental construction, only at the expense of a few additional scanning and data-fitting processes. This method is executed with the sample in place, effectively avoiding the phase ambiguities of the beam propagation in samples, thus calibrating the absolute phase at the exact interaction region. The new proposed method is expected to improve the phasing procedure in 2DES in a more convenient way. PMID:27607991

  12. A rack-mounted precision waveguide-below-cutoff attenuator with an absolute electronic readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    A coaxial precision waveguide-below-cutoff attenuator is described which uses an absolute (unambiguous) electronic digital readout of displacement in inches in addition to the usual gear driven mechanical counter-dial readout in decibels. The attenuator is rack-mountable and has the input and output RF connectors in a fixed position. The attenuation rate for 55, 50, and 30 MHz operation is given along with a discussion of sources of errors. In addition, information is included to aid the user in making adjustments on the attenuator should it be damaged or disassembled for any reason.

  13. Correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy with high spatial precision and improved sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Schorb, Martin; Briggs, John A G

    2014-08-01

    Performing fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy on the same sample allows fluorescent signals to be used to identify and locate features of interest for subsequent imaging by electron microscopy. To carry out such correlative microscopy on vitrified samples appropriate for structural cryo-electron microscopy it is necessary to perform fluorescence microscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperatures. Here we describe an adaptation of a cryo-light microscopy stage to permit use of high-numerical aperture objectives. This allows high-sensitivity and high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of vitrified samples. We describe and apply a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy workflow together with a fiducial bead-based image correlation procedure. This procedure allows us to locate fluorescent bacteriophages in cryo-electron microscopy images with an accuracy on the order of 50 nm, based on their fluorescent signal. It will allow the user to precisely and unambiguously identify and locate objects and events for subsequent high-resolution structural study, based on fluorescent signals.

  14. An electron energy loss spectrometer designed for studies of electronic energy losses and spin waves in the large momentum regime

    SciTech Connect

    Ibach, H.; Rajeswari, J.; Schneider, C. M.

    2011-12-15

    Based on 143 deg. electrostatic deflectors we have realized a new spectrometer for electron energy loss spectroscopy which is particularly suitable for studies on surface spin waves and other low energy electronic energy losses. Contrary to previous designs high resolution is maintained even for diffuse inelastic scattering due to a specific management of the angular aberrations in combination with an angle aperture. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated with high resolution energy loss spectra of surface spin waves on a cobalt film deposited on the Cu(100) surface.

  15. An electron energy loss spectrometer designed for studies of electronic energy losses and spin waves in the large momentum regime.

    PubMed

    Ibach, H; Rajeswari, J; Schneider, C M

    2011-12-01

    Based on 143° electrostatic deflectors we have realized a new spectrometer for electron energy loss spectroscopy which is particularly suitable for studies on surface spin waves and other low energy electronic energy losses. Contrary to previous designs high resolution is maintained even for diffuse inelastic scattering due to a specific management of the angular aberrations in combination with an angle aperture. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated with high resolution energy loss spectra of surface spin waves on a cobalt film deposited on the Cu(100) surface. PMID:22225228

  16. Transverse inelastic electron scattering from the deuteron at high momentum transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Bosted, P.E.; Arnold, R.G.; Benton, D.; Clogher, L.; DeChambrier, G.; Katramatou, A.T.; Lambert, J.; Lung, A.; Petratos, G.G.; Rahbar, A.; and others

    1988-11-20

    Cross sections for 180/sup 0/ inelastic electron scattering from the deuteron were measured from the break-up threshold to beyond the quasielastic peak for incident beam energies between 0.7 and 1.3 GeV, corresponding to 0.75less than or equal toQ/sup 2/less than or equal to2.75 (GeV/c)/sup 2/. The data are in reasonable agreement with nonrelativistic models that include final-state interactions are meson exchange currents.

  17. Momentum density and spatial form of correlated density matrix in model two-electron atoms with harmonic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, Ali; Rubio, Angel; March, Norman H.

    2007-09-15

    The detailed nature of the correlated first-order density matrix for the model atoms in the title for arbitrary interparticle interaction u(r{sub 12}) is studied. One representation with contracted information is first explored by constructing the momentum density {rho}(p) in terms of the wave function of the relative motion, say {psi}{sub R}(r{sub 12}), which naturally depends on the choice of u(r{sub 12}). For u(r{sub 12})=e{sup 2}/r{sub 12}, the so-called Hookean atom, and for the inverse square law u(r{sub 12})={lambda}/r{sub 12}{sup 2}, plots are presented of the above density {rho}(p) in momentum space. The correlated kinetic energy is recovered from averaging p{sup 2}/2m, m denoting the electron mass, with respect to {rho}(p). The second method developed is in coordinate space and expands the density matrix {gamma}(r{sub 1},r{sub 2}) in Legendre polynomials, using relative coordinate r{sub 1}-r{sub 2}, center-of-mass coordinate (r{sub 1}+r{sub 2})/2 and the angle, {theta} say, between these two vectors. For the Moshinsky atom in which u(r{sub 12})=(1/2)kr{sub 12}{sup 2} only the s term (l=0) contributes to the Legendre polynomial expansion. The specific example we present of the inverse square law model is shown to be characterized by the low-order terms (s+d) of the Legendre expansion. The Wigner function is finally calculated analytically for both Moshinsky and inverse square law models.

  18. Momentum density and spatial form of correlated density matrix in model two-electron atoms with harmonic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Ali; March, Norman H.; Rubio, Angel

    2007-09-01

    The detailed nature of the correlated first-order density matrix for the model atoms in the title for arbitrary interparticle interaction u(r12) is studied. One representation with contracted information is first explored by constructing the momentum density ρ(p) in terms of the wave function of the relative motion, say ΨR(r12) , which naturally depends on the choice of u(r12) . For u(r12)=e2/r12 , the so-called Hookean atom, and for the inverse square law u(r12)=λ/r122 , plots are presented of the above density ρ(p) in momentum space. The correlated kinetic energy is recovered from averaging p2/2m , m denoting the electron mass, with respect to ρ(p) . The second method developed is in coordinate space and expands the density matrix γ(r1,r2) in Legendre polynomials, using relative coordinate r1-r2 , center-of-mass coordinate (r1+r2)/2 and the angle, θ say, between these two vectors. For the Moshinsky atom in which u(r12)=(1)/(2)kr122 only the s term (l=0) contributes to the Legendre polynomial expansion. The specific example we present of the inverse square law model is shown to be characterized by the low-order terms (s+d) of the Legendre expansion. The Wigner function is finally calculated analytically for both Moshinsky and inverse square law models.

  19. Measurements of transverse quasielastic electron scattering from the deuteron at high momentum transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, R.G.; Benton, D.; Bosted, P.; Clogher, L.; DeChambrier, G.; Katramatou, A.T.; Lambert, J.; Lung, A.; Petratos, G.G.; Rahbar, A.

    1988-08-15

    Cross sections for 180/sup 0/ inelastic electron scattering from deuterium were measured from breakup threshold to beyond the quasielastic peak for incident-beam energies of 0.843, 1.020, 1.189, and 1.281 GeV, corresponding to 0.75less than or equal toQ/sup 2/less than or equal to2.57 (GeV/c)/sup 2/. The data are in reasonable agreement with nonrelativistic models that include final-state interactions and meson-exchange currents. The scaling function F(y) for these data is generally in agreement with F(y) for forward-angle data at the same Q/sup 2/. Values of G/sub M//sup n/ determined from the data are in good agreement with results from previous experiments.

  20. Elastic electron scattering from water vapor and ice at high momentum transfer.

    PubMed

    Vos, M; Weigold, E; Moreh, R

    2013-01-28

    We compare the area, peak separation, and width of the H and O elastic peak for light and heavy water, as observed in spectra of keV electrons scattered over large angles. Peak separation is well reproduced by the theory, but the O:H area ratio is somewhat larger than expected and is equal to the O:D area ratio. Thus no anomalous scattering from H was observed. Only minor differences are observed for scattering from a gaseous or a solid target. The extracted mean kinetic energy of H and D agreed within 5% with the calculated ones for ice. For the more difficult vapor measurements agreement was on a 12% level. A preliminary attempt to extract the O kinetic energy in ice agreed within 10% with the calculated values.

  1. High precision two-dimensional strain mapping in semiconductor devices using nanobeam electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Frieder H.

    2014-06-30

    A classical method used to characterize the strain in modern semiconductor devices is nanobeam diffraction (NBD) in the transmission electron microscope. One challenge for this method lies in the fact that the smaller the beam becomes, the more difficult it becomes to analyze the resulting diffraction spot pattern. We show that a carefully designed fitting algorithm enables us to reduce the sampling area for the diffraction patterns on the camera chip dramatically (∼1/16) compared to traditional settings without significant loss of precision. The resulting lower magnification of the spot pattern permits the presence of an annular dark field detector, which in turn makes the recording of images for drift correction during NBD acquisition possible. Thus, the reduced sampling size allows acquisition of drift corrected NBD 2D strain maps of up to 3000 pixels while maintaining a precision of better than 0.07%. As an example, we show NBD strain maps of a modern field effect transistor (FET) device. A special filtering feature used in the analysis makes it is possible to measure strain in silicon devices even in the presence of other crystalline materials covering the probed area, which is important for the characterization of the next generation of devices (Fin-FETs).

  2. Echo-enabled harmonics up to the 75th order from precisely tailored electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsing, E.; Dunning, M.; Garcia, B.; Hast, C.; Raubenheimer, T.; Stupakov, G.; Xiang, D.

    2016-08-01

    The production of coherent radiation at ever shorter wavelengths has been a long-standing challenge since the invention of lasers and the subsequent demonstration of frequency doubling. Modern X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) use relativistic electrons to produce intense X-ray pulses on few-femtosecond timescales. However, the shot noise that seeds the amplification produces pulses with a noisy spectrum and limited temporal coherence. To produce stable transform-limited pulses, a seeding scheme called echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) has been proposed, which harnesses the highly nonlinear phase mixing of the celebrated echo phenomenon to generate coherent harmonic density modulations in the electron beam with conventional lasers. Here, we report on a demonstration of EEHG up to the 75th harmonic, where 32 nm light is produced from a 2,400 nm laser. We also demonstrate that individual harmonic amplitudes are controlled by simple adjustment of the phase mixing. Results show the potential of laser-based manipulations to achieve precise control over the coherent spectrum in future X-ray FELs for new science.

  3. Precision measurement of timing RPC gas mixtures with laser-beam induced electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, L.; Siebold, M.; Kaspar, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Kotte, R.; Laso Garcia, A.; Löser, M.; Schramm, U.; Wüstenfeld, J.

    2014-10-01

    The main goals of a new test facility at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf are precision measurements of the electron drift velocity and the Townsend coefficient of gases at atmospheric pressure in the strongest ever used homogenous electrical fields and the search for new RPC gas mixtures to substitute the climate harmful Freon. Picosecond UV laser pulses were focused into a sub-millimeter gas gap to initialize a defined tiny charge. These gaps are formed by electrodes of low-resistive ceramics or high-resistive float glass. The charge multiplication occurs in a strong homogeneous electric field of up to 100 kV/cm. Electron-ion pairs were generated in a cylindrical micro-volume by multi-photon ionization. The laser-pulse repetition rate ranges from 1 Hz to a few kHz. The RPC time resolution has been measured for different gases. First results of the Townsend coefficient at 100 kV/cm show a strong disagreement between the present measurement and Magboltz simulations for the typical timing RPC gas mixture C2F4H2/SF6/i-C4H10, while the measured electron drift velocities are in a good agreement with the model predictions.

  4. Depth- and momentum- resolved electronic structure at buried oxide interfaces from standing-wave angle-resolved photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadley, Charles

    2015-03-01

    It is clear that interfaces in complex oxide heterostructures often represent emergent materials that possess surprising properties not associated with the parent oxides, such as two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs), superconductivity, and magnetism. A detailed knowledge of the composition, atomic structure, and electronic structure through such interfaces is thus critical. Photomission (PES) and angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) represent techniques of choice for such studies, but have certain limitations in being too surface sensitive and in not being able to focus specifically on buried interfaces or heterostructure layers. In this talk, I will discuss combining two newer elements of PES/ARPES to deal with this challenge: - the use of soft x-rays in the ca. few hundred-to-2000 eV regime, or even into the true hard x-ray regime, to probe more deeply into the structure, and - tailoring of the x-ray intensity profile into a strong standing wave (SW) through reflection from a multilayer heterostructure to provide much enhanced depth resolution. The relative advantages of soft/hard x-ray PES and ARPES and their complementarity to conventional VUV ARPES in the ca. 5-150 eV regime will be considered. As illustrative examples, by combining SW-PES and SW-ARPES, it has been possible to measure for the first time the detailed concentration profiles and momentum-resolved electronic structure at the SrTiO3/La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 interface and to directly measure the depth profile of the 2DEG at SrTiO3/GdTiO3 interfaces. Future directions for such measurements will also be discussed. Supported by US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, ARO-MURI Grant W911-NF-09-1-0398, and the PALM-APTCOM Project (France).

  5. Energetic, spatial, and momentum character of the electronic structure at a buried interface: The two-dimensional electron gas between two metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemšák, S.; Conti, G.; Gray, A. X.; Palsson, G. K.; Conlon, C.; Eiteneer, D.; Keqi, A.; Rattanachata, A.; Saw, A. Y.; Bostwick, A.; Moreschini, L.; Rotenberg, E.; Strocov, V. N.; Kobayashi, M.; Schmitt, T.; Stolte, W.; Ueda, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Gloskovskii, A.; Drube, W.; Jackson, C. A.; Moetakef, P.; Janotti, A.; Bjaalie, L.; Himmetoglu, B.; Van de Walle, C. G.; Borek, S.; Minar, J.; Braun, J.; Ebert, H.; Plucinski, L.; Kortright, J. B.; Schneider, C. M.; Balents, L.; de Groot, F. M. F.; Stemmer, S.; Fadley, C. S.

    2016-06-01

    The interfaces between two condensed phases often exhibit emergent physical properties that can lead to new physics and novel device applications and are the subject of intense study in many disciplines. We here apply experimental and theoretical techniques to the characterization of one such interesting interface system: the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) formed in multilayers consisting of SrTi O3 (STO) and GdTi O3 (GTO). This system has been the subject of multiple studies recently and shown to exhibit very high carrier charge densities and ferromagnetic effects, among other intriguing properties. We have studied a 2DEG-forming multilayer of the form [6unit cells (u .c .) STO /3 u .c .of GTO ] 20 using a unique array of photoemission techniques including soft and hard x-ray excitation, soft x-ray angle-resolved photoemission, core-level spectroscopy, resonant excitation, and standing-wave effects, as well as theoretical calculations of the electronic structure at several levels and of the actual photoemission process. Standing-wave measurements below and above a strong resonance have been exploited as a powerful method for studying the 2DEG depth distribution. We have thus characterized the spatial and momentum properties of this 2DEG in detail, determining via depth-distribution measurements that it is spread throughout the 6 u.c. layer of STO and measuring the momentum dispersion of its states. The experimental results are supported in several ways by theory, leading to a much more complete picture of the nature of this 2DEG and suggesting that oxygen vacancies are not the origin of it. Similar multitechnique photoemission studies of such states at buried interfaces, combined with comparable theory, will be a very fruitful future approach for exploring and modifying the fascinating world of buried-interface physics and chemistry.

  6. Deuteron form factor measurements at low momentum transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlimme, B. S.; Achenbach, P.; Beričič, J.; Böhm, R.; Bosnar, D.; Correa, L.; Distler, M. O.; Esser, A.; Fonvieille, H.; Friščić, I.; Griffioen, K. A.; Huan, Y.; Kegel, S.; Kohl, Y.; Merkel, H.; Mihovilovič, M.; Müller, J.; Müller, U.; Pochodzalla, J.; Schoth, M.; Schulz, F.; Sfienti, C.; Širca, S.; Štajner, S.; Thiel, M.; Weber, A.

    2016-03-01

    A precise measurement of the elastic electron-deuteron scattering cross section at four-momentum transfers of 0.24 fm-1 ≤ Q ≤ 2.7 fm-1 has been performed at the Mainz Microtron. In this paper we describe the utilized experimental setup and the necessary analysis procedure to precisely determine the deuteron charge form factor from these data. Finally, the deuteron charge radius rd can be extracted from an extrapolation of that form factor to Q2 = 0.

  7. Implementation of Electronic Consent at a Biobank: An Opportunity for Precision Medicine Research.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Natalie T; Mathieu, Kathleen; Hoffnagle, Alison G; Allen, Nicole L; Castro, Victor M; Morash, Megan; O'Rourke, P Pearl; Hohmann, Elizabeth L; Herring, Neil; Bry, Lynn; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Weiss, Scott T; Smoller, Jordan W

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the potential benefits and challenges of electronic informed consent (eIC) as a strategy for rapidly expanding the reach of large biobanks while reducing costs and potentially enhancing participant engagement. The Partners HealthCare Biobank (Partners Biobank) implemented eIC tools and processes to complement traditional recruitment strategies in June 2014. Since then, the Partners Biobank has rigorously collected and tracked a variety of metrics relating to this novel recruitment method. From June 2014 through January 2016, the Partners Biobank sent email invitations to 184,387 patients at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital. During the same time period, 7078 patients provided their consent via eIC. The rate of consent of emailed patients was 3.5%, and the rate of consent of patients who log into the eIC website at Partners Biobank was 30%. Banking of biospecimens linked to electronic health records has become a critical element of genomic research and a foundation for the NIH's Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI). eIC is a feasible and potentially game-changing strategy for these large research studies that depend on patient recruitment. PMID:27294961

  8. Implementation of Electronic Consent at a Biobank: An Opportunity for Precision Medicine Research

    PubMed Central

    Boutin, Natalie T.; Mathieu, Kathleen; Hoffnagle, Alison G.; Allen, Nicole L.; Castro, Victor M.; Morash, Megan; O’Rourke, P. Pearl; Hohmann, Elizabeth L.; Herring, Neil; Bry, Lynn; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Weiss, Scott T.; Smoller, Jordan W.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the potential benefits and challenges of electronic informed consent (eIC) as a strategy for rapidly expanding the reach of large biobanks while reducing costs and potentially enhancing participant engagement. The Partners HealthCare Biobank (Partners Biobank) implemented eIC tools and processes to complement traditional recruitment strategies in June 2014. Since then, the Partners Biobank has rigorously collected and tracked a variety of metrics relating to this novel recruitment method. From June 2014 through January 2016, the Partners Biobank sent email invitations to 184,387 patients at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. During the same time period, 7078 patients provided their consent via eIC. The rate of consent of emailed patients was 3.5%, and the rate of consent of patients who log into the eIC website at Partners Biobank was 30%. Banking of biospecimens linked to electronic health records has become a critical element of genomic research and a foundation for the NIH’s Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI). eIC is a feasible and potentially game-changing strategy for these large research studies that depend on patient recruitment. PMID:27294961

  9. Precise Directed Assembly of Nanoparticles for Electronic, Optical and Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Cihan

    Assembly of nano building blocks offers a versatile route to the creation of complex 1, 2 and 3-dimensional homogenous or hybrid nanostructures with unique properties to be used in many applications including electronics, optics, energy, and biotechnology. Bottom-up directed assembly of nanoparticles has been recently considered as one of the best approaches to manufacture such functional and novel nanostructures. However, current directed assembly techniques have not been shown to make nanostructures homogeneous or hybrid materials with nanoscale precision at a high yield. This is mainly due to the lack of fundamental understanding of the forces driving the assembly of nanoparticles into organized nanostructures on surfaces and the difficulties in precisely controlling these forces to enable the repeatable and reliable assembly of various types of organic or inorganic nanoparticles. We experimentally and numerically investigated the fundamental mechanism of the electrophoretic directed assembly for different sizes and types of nanoparticles. The results showed that unlike large (such as 500nm) Polysterene Latex (PSL) particles, the electrophoretic assembly of 50nm and smaller PSL particles is significantly influenced by the Brownian diffusion. This results in random and low yield assembly for the smaller nanoparticles. In order to overcome the Brownian diffusion-limited assembly of 50nm or smaller particles, the electrophoretic velocity of the particles must be increased. This can be accomplished by increasing the electrophoretic force, which is a function of particle surface charge and applied voltage. The surface charge of the PSL particles is greatly influenced by the pH of the solution. At high pH values (pH 10.1 or above), the nanoparticles attain higher charge, which increases the electrophoretic force. Consequently, the Brownian diffusion can also be overcome by increasing the pH of the solution. Overcoming the Brownian motion at low pH values (<10

  10. Reply to ``Comment on `Importance of electron time-of-flight measurements in momentum imaging of saddle-point electron emission' ''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irby, Victor D.

    2001-05-01

    As pointed out in the preceding Comment, computer simulations presented by Irby [Phys. Rev. A 60, 1135 (1999)] analyzed the effect of using constant rather than kinematically dependent values of the electron time of flight in assessment of ejected-electron momentum from recorded micro channel plate detector-impact positions. The article raised questions of possible error in the analysis used recently by Abdallah et al. [Phys. Rev. A 56, 2000 (1997)]. In this reply, we present the results of more sophisticated Monte Carlo computer simulations, which show that the error due to the assumptions used in the analysis by Abdallah et al. are indeed quite miniscule. However, and equally as important, our simulations also confirm experimental projectile-charge dependent shifts reported earlier by Irby et al. [Phys. Rev. A 37, 3612 (1988)] and Gay et al. [J. Phys. B 23, L823 (1990)] in which conclusions opposite that of Abdallah et al. were reached. While still confirming the earlier experimental results, the simulations, on the other hand, support the conclusions of Abdallah et al. and not the conclusions of Irby et al. and Gay et al.

  11. Determining neutrino mass hierarchy by precision measurements in electron and muon neutrino disappearance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Minakata, H.; Nunokawa, H.; Parke, S.J.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; /Sao Paulo U.

    2006-07-01

    Recently a new method for determining the neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the effective values of the atmospheric {Delta}m{sup 2} measured in the electron neutrino disappearance channel, {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee), with the one measured in the muon neutrino disappearance channel, {Delta}m{sup 2}({mu}{mu}), was proposed. If {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee) is larger (smaller) than {Delta}m{sup 2} ({mu}{mu}) the hierarchy is of the normal (inverted) type. We re-examine this proposition in the light of two very high precision measurements: {Delta}m{sup 2}({mu}{mu}) that may be accomplished by the phase II of the Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) experiment, for example, and {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee) that can be envisaged using the novel Moessbauer enhanced resonant {bar {nu}}{sub e} absorption technique. Under optimistic assumptions for the systematic uncertainties of both measurements, we estimate the parameter region of ({theta}{sub 13}, {delta}) in which the mass hierarchy can be determined. If {theta}{sub 13} is relatively large, sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} {approx}> 0.05, and both of {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee) and {Delta}m{sup 2}({mu}{mu}) can be measured with the precision of {approx} 0.5 % it is possible to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at > 95% CL for 0.3{pi} {approx}< {delta} {approx}< 1.7 {pi} for the current best fit values of all the other oscillation parameters.

  12. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    DOE PAGES

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; Warner, Nicholas P.

    2016-05-11

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in highdegree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifoldmore » singularities. Upon taking the AdS3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Lastly, our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.« less

  13. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; Warner, Nicholas P.

    2016-05-01

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in high-degree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifold singularities. Upon taking the AdS3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.

  14. Compact Short-Pulsed Electron Linac Based Neutron Sources for Precise Nuclear Material Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Tagi, K.; Matsuyama, D.; Fujiwara, T.; Dobashi, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Harada, H.

    2015-10-01

    An X-band (11.424GHz) electron linac as a neutron source for nuclear data study for the melted fuel debris analysis and nuclear security in Fukushima is under development. Originally we developed the linac for Compton scattering X-ray source. Quantitative material analysis and forensics for nuclear security will start several years later after the safe settlement of the accident is established. For the purpose, we should now accumulate more precise nuclear data of U, Pu, etc., especially in epithermal (0.1-10 eV) neutrons. Therefore, we have decided to modify and install the linac in the core space of the experimental nuclear reactor "Yayoi" which is now under the decommission procedure. Due to the compactness of the X-band linac, an electron gun, accelerating tube and other components can be installed in a small space in the core. First we plan to perform the time-of-flight (TOF) transmission measurement for study of total cross sections of the nuclei for 0.1-10 eV energy neutrons. Therefore, if we adopt a TOF line of less than 10m, the o-pulse length of generated neutrons should be shorter than 100 ns. Electronenergy, o-pulse length, power, and neutron yield are ~30 MeV, 100 ns - 1 micros, ~0.4 kW, and ~1011 n/s (~103 n/cm2/s at samples), respectively. Optimization of the design of a neutron target (Ta, W, 238U), TOF line and neutron detector (Ce:LiCAF) of high sensitivity and fast response is underway. We are upgrading the electron gun and a buncher to realize higher current and beam power with a reasonable beam size in order to avoid damage of the neutron target. Although the neutron flux is limited in case of the X-band electron linac based source, we take advantage of its short pulse aspect and availability for nuclear data measurement with a short TOF system. First, we form a tentative configuration in the current experimental room for Compton scattering in 2014. Then, after the decommissioning has been finished, we move it to the "Yayoi" room and perform

  15. Flight evaluation of highly augmented controls and electronic displays for precision approach and landing of powered-lift aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Hynes, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on simulators and on the Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft to evaluate the effect of highly augmented control modes and electronic displays on the ability of pilots to execute precision approaches and landings on a short runway. It is found that the primary benefits of highly augmented flightpath and airspeed controls and electronic displays are realized when the pilot is required to execute precisely a complex transition and approach under instrument conditions and in the presence of a wide range of wind and turbulence conditions. A flightpath and airspeed command and stabilization system incorporating nonlinear, inverse system concepts produced fully satisfactory flightpath control throughout the aircraft's terminal operating envelope.

  16. Coherent π-electron dynamics of (P)-2,2'-biphenol induced by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses: Angular momentum and ring current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineo, H.; Lin, S. H.; Fujimura, Y.

    2013-02-01

    The results of a theoretical investigation of coherent π-electron dynamics for nonplanar (P)-2,2'-biphenol induced by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses are presented. Expressions for the time-dependent coherent angular momentum and ring current are derived by using the density matrix method. The time dependence of these coherences is determined by the off-diagonal density matrix element, which can be obtained by solving the coupled equations of motion of the electronic-state density matrix. Dephasing effects on coherent angular momentum and ring current are taken into account within the Markov approximation. The magnitudes of the electronic angular momentum and current are expressed as the sum of expectation values of the corresponding operators in the two phenol rings (L and R rings). Here, L (R) denotes the phenol ring in the left (right)-hand side of (P)-2,2'-biphenol. We define the bond current between the nearest neighbor carbon atoms Ci and Cj as an electric current through a half plane perpendicular to the Ci-Cj bond. The bond current can be expressed in terms of the inter-atomic bond current. The inter-atomic bond current (bond current) depends on the position of the half plane on the bond and has the maximum value at the center. The coherent ring current in each ring is defined by averaging over the bond currents. Since (P)-2,2'-biphenol is nonplanar, the resultant angular momentum is not one-dimensional. Simulations of the time-dependent coherent angular momentum and ring current of (P)-2,2'-biphenol excited by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses are carried out using the molecular parameters obtained by the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) method. Oscillatory behaviors in the time-dependent angular momentum (ring current), which can be called angular momentum (ring current) quantum beats, are classified by the symmetry of the coherent state, symmetric or antisymmetric. The bond current of the bridge bond linking the L and R

  17. Coherent π-electron dynamics of (P)-2,2'-biphenol induced by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses: angular momentum and ring current.

    PubMed

    Mineo, H; Lin, S H; Fujimura, Y

    2013-02-21

    The results of a theoretical investigation of coherent π-electron dynamics for nonplanar (P)-2,2'-biphenol induced by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses are presented. Expressions for the time-dependent coherent angular momentum and ring current are derived by using the density matrix method. The time dependence of these coherences is determined by the off-diagonal density matrix element, which can be obtained by solving the coupled equations of motion of the electronic-state density matrix. Dephasing effects on coherent angular momentum and ring current are taken into account within the Markov approximation. The magnitudes of the electronic angular momentum and current are expressed as the sum of expectation values of the corresponding operators in the two phenol rings (L and R rings). Here, L (R) denotes the phenol ring in the left (right)-hand side of (P)-2,2'-biphenol. We define the bond current between the nearest neighbor carbon atoms Ci and Cj as an electric current through a half plane perpendicular to the Ci-Cj bond. The bond current can be expressed in terms of the inter-atomic bond current. The inter-atomic bond current (bond current) depends on the position of the half plane on the bond and has the maximum value at the center. The coherent ring current in each ring is defined by averaging over the bond currents. Since (P)-2,2'-biphenol is nonplanar, the resultant angular momentum is not one-dimensional. Simulations of the time-dependent coherent angular momentum and ring current of (P)-2,2'-biphenol excited by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses are carried out using the molecular parameters obtained by the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) method. Oscillatory behaviors in the time-dependent angular momentum (ring current), which can be called angular momentum (ring current) quantum beats, are classified by the symmetry of the coherent state, symmetric or antisymmetric. The bond current of the bridge bond linking the L and R

  18. Precision analog signal processor for beam position measurements in electron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkson, J.A.; Unser, K.B.

    1995-05-01

    Beam position monitors (BPM) in electron and positron storage rings have evolved from simple systems composed of beam pickups, coaxial cables, multiplexing relays, and a single receiver (usually a analyzer) into very complex and costly systems of multiple receivers and processors. The older may have taken minutes to measure the circulating beam closed orbit. Today instrumentation designers are required to provide high-speed measurements of the beam orbit, often at the ring revolution frequency. In addition the instruments must have very high accuracy and resolution. A BPM has been developed for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley which features high resolution and relatively low cost. The instrument has a single purpose; to measure position of a stable stored beam. Because the pickup signals are multiplexed into a single receiver, and due to its narrow bandwidth, the receiver is not intended for single-turn studies. The receiver delivers normalized measurements of X and Y posit ion entirely by analog means at nominally 1 V/mm. No computers are involved. No software is required. Bergoz, a French company specializing in precision beam instrumentation, integrated the ALS design m their new BPM analog signal processor module. Performance comparisons were made on the ALS. In this paper we report on the architecture and performance of the ALS prototype BPM.

  19. Electron microscopy renders the diagnostic capabilities of cytopathology more precise: an approach to everyday practice.

    PubMed

    Turbat-Herrera, Elba A; Herrera, Guillermo A

    2005-01-01

    Cytology is a powerful diagnostic tool but to make definitive diagnoses, the use of ancillary techniques is imperative. By combining immunohistochemistry (IHC) and electron microscopy (EM), cytologic diagnoses can be as precise as those of surgical pathology. In the authors' daily practice of cytopathology they use all ancillary techniques available to them: histochemistry, IHC, EM, flow cytometry, and molecular pathology. IHC is frequently used as an ancillary technique in their daily practice but EM is many times their technique of choice. By the use of EM the authors can make specific final diagnoses, make the diagnosis more definitive, narrow the differential diagnosis, or determine the origin of a neoplasm with unknown primary site. Specimens obtained by fine-needle aspiration as well as all body fluids are suitable for EM. The limiting factor is to obtain the appropriate material with the diagnostic cells for ultrastructural examination. The common diagnostic dilemmas in the everyday practice of cytology are the following: mesothelioma vs. adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine differentiation or not, the distinction of melanoma from adenocarcinoma and sarcoma, hepatocellular carcinoma vs. adenocarcinoma, and the origin of adenocarcinomas of unknown primary. The authors discuss how they approach these diagnostic problems in their everyday practice and how they incorporate EM in solving them.

  20. Gradient-based high precision alignment of cryo-electron subtomograms

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Min; Alber, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Whole cell cryo-electron tomography emerges as an important component for structural system biology approaches. It allows the localization and structural characterization of macromolecular complexes in near living conditions. However, the method is hampered by low resolution, missing data and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). To overcome some of these difficulties one can align and average a large set of subtomograms. Existing alignment methods are mostly based on an exhaustive scanning and sampling of all but discrete relative rotations and translations of one subtomogram with respect to the other. In this paper, we propose a gradient-guided alignment method based on two subtomogram similarity measures. We also propose a stochastic parallel optimization that increases significantly the efficiency for the simultaneous refinement of a set of alignment candidates. Results on simulated data of model complexes and experimental structures of protein complexes show that even for highly distorted subtomograms and with only a small number of very sparsely distributed initial alignment seeds, our method can accurately recover true transformations with a significantly higher precision than scanning based alignment methods. PMID:25068871

  1. Precise In Situ Modulation of Local Liquid Chemistry via Electron Irradiation in Nanoreactors Based on Graphene Liquid Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Canhui; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Klie, Robert F

    2016-09-01

    A controlled electron-water radiolysis process is used to generate predictable concentrations of radical and ionic species in graphene liquid cells, allowing the concept of a nanoscale chemical reactor. A differential scanning technique is used to generate the desired time- and space-varying electron dose rate. Precise control of the local concentration of H2 , the dominant radiolysis species, is demonstrated experimentally at the nanometer scale.

  2. Analysis of the dependence of surfatron acceleration of electrons by an electromagnetic wave in space plasma on the particle momentum along the wave front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erokhin, A. N.; Zol'nikova, N. N.; Erokhin, N. S.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the numerical solution of the nonlinear nonstationary second-order equation for the wave phase on the particle trajectory, the dynamics of surfatron acceleration of electrons by an electromagnetic wave propagating across the external magnetic field in space plasma is analyzed as a function of the electron momentum along the wave front. Numerical calculations show that, for strongly relativistic initial values of the electron momentum component along the wave front g y (0) (the other parameters of the problem being the same), electrons are trapped into the regime of ultrarelativistic surfatron acceleration within a certain interval of the initial wave phase Ψ(0) on the particle trajectory. It is assumed in the calculations that |Ψ(0)| ≤ π. For strongly relativistic values of g y (0), electrons are immediately trapped by the wave for 19% of the initial values of the phase Ψ(0) (favorable phases). For the rest of the values of Ψ(0), trapping does not occur even at long times. This circumstance substantially simplifies estimations of the wave damping due to particle acceleration in subsequent calculations. The dynamics of the relativistic factor and the components of the electron velocity and momentum under surfatron acceleration is also analyzed. The obtained results are of interest for the development of modern concepts of possible mechanisms of generation of ultrarelativistic particle fluxes in relatively calm space plasma, as well as for correct interpretation of observational data on the fluxes of such particles and explanation of possible reasons for the deviation of ultrarelativistic particle spectra detected in the heliosphere from the standard power-law scalings and the relation of these variations to space weather and large-scale atmospheric processes similar to tropical cyclones.

  3. Outer- and inner-valence satellites of carbon dioxide: electron momentum spectroscopy compared with symmetry-adapted-cluster configuration interaction general-R calculations.

    PubMed

    Tian, QiGuo; Yang, Jing; Shi, YuFeng; Shan, Xu; Chen, XiangJun

    2012-03-01

    The extensive study of outer- and inner-valence satellites of carbon dioxide by electron momentum spectroscopy is reported. The experiments have been performed using a high-sensitivity electron momentum spectrometer employing non-coplanar symmetric geometry at impact energy of about 1200 eV. Binding energy spectrum up to 50 eV, above the first double ionization threshold (~37.3 eV), is presented. Four main peaks and twelve satellites have been identified including four embedded in the double ionization continuum, among which the two beyond 42 eV are observed for the first time. High accuracy symmetry-adapted-cluster configuration interaction general-R calculation with aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets has also been performed and the result is in line with the experimental ionization spectrum except the relative intensities for some of the satellites in inner-valence region. The experimental momentum profiles for both the main ionization transitions and satellites have been obtained and compared with theoretical calculations by HF and B3LYP methods with 6-311++G∗ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets. Through comparison, the detailed assignments of the satellite bands have been achieved and the pole strengths for the relevant shake-up transitions are determined experimentally for the first time.

  4. Evidence of Momentum Conservation at the Au/Si(111) interface using Ballistic-Electron-Emission Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, L. D.

    1996-01-01

    BEEM spectroscopy has been performed at room temperature and at 77K on Au/Si(111) structures. Au thickness was varied in the range 75-300U At 77K a direct signature of parallel momentum conservation is observed in the BEEM spectra of samples with thick Au layers.

  5. Determination of the Antiproton-to-Electron Mass Ratio by Precision Laser Spectroscopy of pHe{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, M.; Dax, A.; Eades, J.; Gomikawa, K.; Hayano, R.S.; Ono, N.; Pirkl, W.; Widmann, E.; Torii, H.A.; Juhasz, B.; Barna, D.; Horvath, D.

    2006-06-23

    A femtosecond optical frequency comb and continuous-wave pulse-amplified laser were used to measure 12 transition frequencies of antiprotonic helium to fractional precisions of (9-16)x10{sup -9}. One of these is between two states having microsecond-scale lifetimes hitherto unaccessible to our precision laser spectroscopy method. Comparisons with three-body QED calculations yielded an antiproton-to-electron mass ratio of M{sub p}/m{sub e}=1836.152 674(5)

  6. Note: electronic circuit for two-way time transfer via a single coaxial cable with picosecond accuracy and precision.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Panek, Petr

    2012-11-01

    We have designed, constructed, and tested the overall performance of the electronic circuit for the two-way time transfer between two timing devices over modest distances with sub-picosecond precision and a systematic error of a few picoseconds. The concept of the electronic circuit enables to carry out time tagging of pulses of interest in parallel to the comparison of the time scales of these timing devices. The key timing parameters of the circuit are: temperature change of the delay is below 100 fs/K, timing stability time deviation better than 8 fs for averaging time from minutes to hours, sub-picosecond time transfer precision, and a few picoseconds time transfer accuracy.

  7. New method to remove the electronic noise for absolutely calibrating low gain photomultiplier tubes with a higher precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P.; Laubach, Mitchell A.

    2014-08-01

    A new method to remove the electronic noise in order to absolutely calibrate low gain photomultiplier tubes with a higher precision is proposed and validated with experiments using a digitizer-based data acquisition system. This method utilizes the fall time difference between the electronic noise (about 0.5 ns) and the real PMT signal (about 2.4 ns for Hamamatsu H10570 PMT assembly). Using this technique along with a convolution algorithm, the electronic noise and the real signals are separated very well, even including the very small signals heavily influenced by the electronic noise. One application that this method allows is for us to explore the energy relationship for gamma sensing in Cherenkov radiators while maintaining the fastest possible timing performance and high dynamic range.

  8. Energy-averaged electron-ion momentum transport cross section in the Born Approximation and Debye-Hückel potential: Comparison with the cut-off theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R.; Bourham, Mohamed A.; Doster, J. Michael

    2000-02-01

    An exact analytical expression for the energy-averaged electron-ion momentum transport cross section in the Born approximation and Debye-Hückel exponentially screened potential has been derived and compared with the formulae given by other authors. A quantitative comparison between cut-off theory and quantum mechanical perturbation theory has been presented. Based on results from the Born approximation and Spitzer's formula, a new approximate formula for the quantum Coulomb logarithm has been derived and shown to be more accurate than previous expressions.

  9. Energy-averaged electron-ion momentum transport cross section in the Born approximation and Debye-Hückel potential: Comparison with the cut-off theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R.; Bourham, Mohamed A.; Doster, J. Michael

    2000-04-01

    An exact analytical expression for the energy-averaged electron-ion momentum transport cross section in the Born approximation and Debye-Hückel exponentially screened potential has been derived and compared with the formulae given by other authors. A quantitative comparison between cut-off theory and quantum mechanical perturbation theory has been presented. Based on results from the Born approximation and Spitzer's formula, a new approximate formula for the quantum Coulomb logarithm has been derived and shown to be more accurate than previous expressions.

  10. Induced Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses, classically and quantum mechanically, the angular momentum induced in the bound motion of an electron by an external magnetic field. Calculates the current density and its magnetic moment, and then uses two methods to solve the first-order perturbation theory equation for the required eigenfunction. (Author/GA)

  11. Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in…

  12. Correlated, precision measurements of θ23 and δ using only the electron neutrino appearance experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Minakata, Hisakazu; Parke, Stephen J.

    2013-06-04

    Precision measurement of the leptonic CP violating phase δ will suffer from the, then surviving, large uncertainty of sin2θ23 of 10–20% in the experimentally interesting region near maximal mixing of θ23. We advocate a new method for determination of both θ23 and δ at the same time using only the νe and ν̄e appearance channels and show that sin2θ23 can be determined automatically with much higher accuracy, approximately a factor of six, than sinδ. In this method, we identify a new degeneracy for the simultaneous determination of θ23 and δ, the θ23 intrinsic degeneracy, which must be resolved in ordermore » to achieve precision measurement of these two parameters. Spectral information around the vacuum oscillation maxima is shown to be the best way to resolve this degeneracy.« less

  13. Precise voltage contrast image assisted positioning for in situ electron beam nanolithography for nanodevice fabrication with suspended nanowire structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Renhai; Chen, Jiajun; Lim, Jin-Hee; Wiley, John B.; Zhou, Weilie

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate precise voltage contrast image positioning for in situ electron beam (e-beam) nanolithography to integrate nanowires into suspended structures for nanoswitch fabrication. The positioning of the deflection electrodes on the nanowires can be well controlled using a precise voltage contrast image positioning technique, where the error can be minimized to about 10 nm. Using such a method, dispersed nanowires can be sandwiched between two layers of resist and suspended by one e-beam nanolithography process without any etching. The in situ e-beam nanolithography eliminates the stage movement error by preventing any movements of the stage during the nanolithography process; hence, a high precision laser stage and alignment marks on the substrate are not needed, which simplifies the traditional e-beam nanolithography process. The nanoswitches fabricated using this method show ON and OFF states with the changes of applied voltages. This simplified process provides an easy, low cost and less time-consuming route to integrating suspended nanowire based structures using a converted field emission scanning electron microscope e-beam system, which can also be customized to fabricate multi-layer structures and a site-specific nanodevice fabrication.

  14. Precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by electron-positron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, R.E.; SLD Collaboration

    1994-03-01

    A precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry (A{sub LR}) for Z boson production by e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions has been attained at the Slac Linear Collider with the SLD detector. We describe this measurement for the 1993 data run, emphasizing the significant improvements in polarized beam operation which took place for this run, where the luminosity-weighted electron beam polarization averaged 62.6 {plus_minus} 1.2 %. Preliminary 1993 results for A{sub LR} are presented. When combined with the (less precise) 1992 result, the preliminary result for the effective weak mixing angle is sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W {sup eff}} = 0.2290 {plus_minus} 0.0010.

  15. Spatial dependent diffusion of cosmic rays and the excess of primary electrons derived from high precision measurements by AMS-02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chao; Guo, Yi-Qing; Hu, Hong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The precise spectra of Cosmic Ray (CR) electrons and positrons have been published by the measurement of AMS-02. It is reasonable to regard the difference between the electron and positron spectra (ΔΦ = Φe- -Φe+) as being dominated by primary electrons. The resulting electron spectrum shows no sign of spectral softening above 20 GeV, which is in contrast with the prediction of the standard model of CR propagation. In this work, we generalize the analytic one-dimensional two-halo model of diffusion to a three-dimensional realistic calculation by implementing spatial variant diffusion coefficients in the DRAGON package. As a result, we can reproduce the spectral hardening of protons observed by several experiments, and predict an excess of high energy primary electrons which agrees with the measurement reasonably well. Unlike the break spectrum obtained for protons, the model calculation predicts a smooth electron excess and thus slightly over-predicts the flux from tens of GeV to 100 GeV. To understand this issue, further experimental and theoretical studies are necessary. Supported by Natural Sciences Foundation of China (11135010)

  16. Precision radiotherapy for cancer of the pancreas: technique and results. [Photons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Dobelbower, R.R. Jr.; Borgelt, B.B.; Strubler, K.A.; Kutcher, G.J.; Suntharalingam, N.

    1980-09-01

    Forty patients with locally extensive, unresectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas received precision high dose (PHD) radiation therapy with a 45 MeV betatron. PHD radiotherapy was generally well tolerated. During treatment, only 7 patients experienced significant nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or anorexia. Late gastrointestinal radiation reactions were observed in 7 patients. Twelve patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. The projected survival of patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer treated with PHD radiotherapy is comparable to that of patients with resectable disease operated on for cure. The projected one year survival rate is 49%.

  17. Precision Determination of Electron Scattering Angle by Differential Nuclear Recoil Energy Method

    SciTech Connect

    Liyanage, Nilanga; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak

    2015-09-01

    The accurate determination of the scattered electron angle is crucial to electron scattering experiments, both with open-geometry large-acceptance spectrometers and ones with dipole-type magnetic spectrometers for electron detection. In particular, for small central-angle experiments using dipole-type magnetic spectrometers, in which surveys are used to measure the spectrometer angle with respect to the primary electron beam, the importance of the scattering angle determination is emphasized. However, given the complexities of large experiments and spectrometers, the accuracy of such surveys is limited and insufficient to meet demands of some experiments. In this article, we present a new technique for determination of the electron scattering angle based on an accurate measurement of the primary beam energy and the principle of differential nuclear recoil. This technique was used to determine the scattering angle for several experiments carried out at the Experimental Hall A, Jefferson Lab. Results have shown that the new technique greatly improved the accuracy of the angle determination compared to surveys.

  18. Precision determination of electron scattering angle by differential nuclear recoil energy method

    SciTech Connect

    Liyanage, N.; Saenboonruang, K.

    2015-12-01

    The accurate determination of the scattered electron angle is crucial to electron scattering experiments, both with open-geometry large-acceptance spectrometers and ones with dipole-type magnetic spectrometers for electron detection. In particular, for small central-angle experiments using dipole-type magnetic spectrometers, in which surveys are used to measure the spectrometer angle with respect to the primary electron beam, the importance of the scattering angle determination is emphasized. However, given the complexities of large experiments and spectrometers, the accuracy of such surveys is limited and insufficient to meet demands of some experiments. In this article, we present a new technique for determination of the electron scattering angle based on an accurate measurement of the primary beam energy and the principle of differential nuclear recoil. This technique was used to determine the scattering angle for several experiments carried out at the Experimental Hall A, Jefferson Lab. Results have shown that the new technique greatly improved the accuracy of the angle determination compared to surveys.

  19. Precision calibration of calorimeter electronics in the D0 liquid argon/uranium particle detector

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, D.L.

    1991-12-01

    The ability to cross calibrate thousands of channels of detector electronics is of prime importance. This paper will describe the system used to deliver and distribute a 300 nanosecond pulse across 50,000 channels of electronics with better than 0.25% difference between channels from a location more than 200 feet away. The system is used for both cross calibration and functionality checking, (i.e., missing channels). Design of a fixed width pulse generator of high stability is presented as a key ingredient in the system`s overall performance. In addition, the design of a controlled impedance distribution system is discussed. 2 refs.

  20. Electron-Hole Transitions in Multiply Charged Ions for Precision Laser Spectroscopy and Searching for Variations in {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Berengut, J. C.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Ong, A.

    2011-05-27

    We consider transitions of electron holes (vacancies in otherwise filled shells of atomic systems) in multiply charged ions that, due to level crossing of the holes, have frequencies within the range of optical atomic clocks. Strong E1 transitions provide options for laser cooling and trapping, while narrow transitions can be used for high-precision spectroscopy and tests of fundamental physics. We show that hole transitions can have extremely high sensitivity to {alpha} variation and propose candidate transitions that have much larger {alpha} sensitivities than any previously seen in atomic systems.

  1. Momentum distributions: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Silver, R. N.; Clark, J. W.

    There have been several excellent reviews of momentum-distribution research in particular subject areas of physics such as electronic systems and nuclear systems. However, it is the commonality of interests, difficulties, and prospects across all of physics, along with certain pivotal advances, which led to the organization of an interdisciplinary Workshop on Momentum Distributions held at Argonne National Laboratory on 24 and 26 October 1988. The purpose of this overview is to explain why scientists with such diverse backgrounds were brought together at this meeting, to introduce and discuss the common elements of momentum-distribution studies, and to establish a common language. We hope to facilitate an appreciation of the more specialized articles which follow in these proceedings. We begin by summarizing the general properties of momentum distributions. Differences and similarities of atomic, electronic, and nuclear many-body systems are examined, in terms of characteristic lengths and energies, relative importance of exchange, and the nature of the two-particle interactions. We continue with a brief commentary on the microscopic methods used to calculate n(p) from first principles.

  2. Precision measurements of g1 of the proton and the deuteron with 6 GeV electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Prok, Yelena; Bosted, Peter; Kvaltine, Nicholas; Adhikari, Krishna; Adikaram-Mudiyanselage, Dasuni; Aghasyan, Mher; Amaryan, Moskov; Anderson, Mark; Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Battaglieri, Marco; Biselli, Angela; Bono, Jason; Briscoe, William; Brock, Joseph; Brooks, William; Bueltmann, Stephen; Burkert, Volker; Carlin, Christopher; Carman, Daniel; Celentano, Andrea; Chandavar, Shloka; Colaneri, Luca; Cole, Philip; Contalbrigo, Marco; Cortes, Olga; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; D'Angelo, Annalisa; Dashyan, Natalya; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Deur, Alexandre; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dupre, Raphael; El Alaoui, Ahmed; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Fedotov, Gleb; Fegan, Stuart; Fersch, Robert; Fleming, Jamie; Forest, Tony; Garcon, Michel; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Ghandilyan, Yeranuhi; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Girod-Gard, Francois-Xavier; Giovanetti, Kevin; Goetz, John; Gohn, Wesley; Gothe, Ralf; Griffioen, Keith; Guegan, Baptiste; Guler, Nevzat; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hanretty, Charles; Harrison, Nathan; Hattawy, Mohammad; Hicks, Kenneth; Ho, Dao; Holtrop, Maurik; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Jawalkar, Sucheta; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Joo, Kyungseon; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keith, Christopher; Keller, Daniel; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Andrey; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Koirala, Suman; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Lenisa, Paolo; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; MacGregor, Ian; Markov, Nikolai; Mayer, Michael; McKinnon, Bryan; Meekins, David; Mineeva, Taisiya; Mirazita, Marco; Mokeev, Viktor; Montgomery, Rachel; MOUTARDE, Herve; Movsisyan, Aram; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Pappalardo, Luciano; Paremuzyan, Rafayel; Park, K; Peng, Peng; Phillips, J J; Pierce, Joshua; Pisano, Silvia; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdniakov, Serguei; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Puckett, Andrew; Raue, Brian; Rimal, Dipak; Ripani, Marco; Rizzo, Alessandro; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Roy, Priyashree; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salgado, Carlos; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seder, Erin; Sharabian, Youri; Simonyan, Ani; Smith, Claude; Smith, Gregory; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stepanyan, Samuel; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Sytnik, Valeriy; Taiuti, Mauro; Tang, Wei; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vernarsky, Brian; Vlasov, Alexander; Voskanyan, Hakob; Voutier, Eric; Walford, Natalie; Watts, Daniel; Weinstein, Lawrence; Zachariou, Nicholas; Zana, Lorenzo; Zhang, Jixie; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Zhiwen; Zonta, Irene

    2014-08-01

    The inclusive polarized structure functions of the proton and deuteron, g1p and g1d, were measured with high statistical precision using polarized 6 GeV electrons incident on a polarized ammonia target in Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory. Electrons scattered at lab angles between 18 and 45 degrees were detected using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). For the usual DIS kinematics, Q^2>1 GeV^2 and the final-state invariant mass W>2 GeV, the ratio of polarized to unpolarized structure functions g1/F1 is found to be nearly independent of Q^2 at fixed x. Significant resonant structure is apparent at values of W up to 2.3 GeV. In the framework of perturbative QCD, the high-W results can be used to better constrain the polarization of quarks and gluons in the nucleon, as well as high-twist contributions.

  3. Direct momentum-resolved observation of one-dimensional confinement of externally doped electrons within a single subnanometer-scale wire.

    PubMed

    Song, Inkyung; Oh, Dong-Hwa; Shin, Ha-Chul; Ahn, Sung-Joon; Moon, Youngkwon; Woo, Sun-Hee; Choi, Hyoung Joon; Park, Chong-Yun; Ahn, Joung Real

    2015-01-14

    Cutting-edge research in the band engineering of nanowires at the ultimate fine scale is related to the minimum scale of nanowire-based devices. The fundamental issue at the subnanometer scale is whether angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) can be used to directly measure the momentum-resolved electronic structure of a single wire because of the difficulty associated with assembling single wire into an ordered array for such measurements. Here, we demonstrated that the one-dimensional (1D) confinement of electrons, which are transferred from external dopants, within a single subnanometer-scale wire (subnanowire) could be directly measured using ARPES. Convincing evidence of 1D electron confinement was obtained using two different gold subnanowires with characteristic single metallic bands that were alternately and spontaneously ordered on a stepped silicon template, Si(553). Noble metal atoms were adsorbed at room temperature onto the gold subnanowires while the overall structure of the wires was maintained. Only one type of gold subnanowire could be controlled using external noble metal dopants without transforming the metallic band of the other type of gold subnanowires. This result was confirmed by scanning tunnelling microscopy experiments and first-principles calculations. The selective control clearly showed that externally doped electrons could be confined within a single gold subnanowire. This experimental evidence was used to further investigate the effects of the disorder induced by external dopants on a single subnanowire using ARPES. PMID:25539134

  4. Bond Formation and Bond Scission Dynamics in Polyatomic Molecules Revealed by Momentum Imaging Experiments and Electron Scattering Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaughter, Daniel; Trevisan, Cynthia; Weyland, Marvin; Dorn, Alexander; Douguet, Nicolas; Orel, Ann; Adaniya, Hidehito; McCurdy, Bill; Belkacem, Ali; Rescigno, Tom

    2016-05-01

    We present combined experimental and theoretical studies of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) dynamics in methane and ammonia. DEA in each of these systems proceeds through electronic Feshbach resonances, where a valence electron is excited and captured with the incident electron in the lowest unoccupied orbital. In methane, one triply-degenerate resonance undergoes Jahn-Teller splitting through molecular distortions, leading to four observed final states, each having a 2-body and a 3-body dissociation with anionic products H- and CH2-and neutrals CH3, CH2, H2 or H. In ammonia, one resonance leads to H- + NH2 and NH2-+ H, the latter resulting from non-adiabatic charge transfer. A higher energy resonance leads directly to H- + NH2* and indirectly to NH2-+ H. We examine the dynamics of the transient anion in each of these processes. work supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences division of BES/DOE.

  5. Interpretation of electron diffraction from carbon nanotube bundles presenting precise helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomer, J.-F.; Henrard, L.; Launois, P.; van Tendeloo, G.; Lucas, A. A.; Lambin, Ph.

    2004-08-01

    The structure of bundles of carbon nanotubes produced by catalytic chemical vapor deposition has been studied by electron diffraction. The experimental results were analyzed with the kinematical theory of diffraction. An interpretation of the diffraction patterns demonstrates unambiguously that some bundles are made of double-walled carbon nanotubes, and not single-walled nanotubes as previously reported in Phys. Rev. B 64, 125425 (2001). In this previous work, we have focused our attention on bundles presenting one or two helicities. The interpretation of our diffraction data based on the assumption of double-walled nanotubes is shown to fit remarkably with experiment. In the present paper, the detailed analysis of an electron diffraction pattern from a small bundle exhibiting two helicities is made and we deduced the most probable wrapping indices of the two tubes constituting the double-walled nanotubes.

  6. Precise measurement method for ionospheric total electron content using signals from GPS satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imae, Michito; Kiuchi, Hitoshi; Kaneko, Akihiro; Hama, Shinichi; Miki, Chihiro

    1990-01-01

    A GPS codeless receiver called GTR-2 was for measuring total electron content (TEC) along the line of sight to the GPS satellite by using the cross correlation amplitude of the received P-code signals carried by L1(1575.42 MHz) and L2(1227.6 MHz). This equipment has the performance of uncertainty in the measurement of TEC of about 2 X 10(exp 16) electrons/sq m when a 10 dBi gain antenna was used. To increase the measurement performance, an upper version of GTR-2 called GTR-3 is planned which uses the phase information of the continuous signals obtained by making a cross correlation or multiplication of the received L1 and L2 P-code signals. By using the difference of these measured phases values, the ionospheric delay with the ambiguities of the periods of L1+L2 and L1-L2 signals can be estimated.

  7. Polarized Bhabha scattering and a precision measurement of the electron neutral current couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Ahn, C.J.; Akagi, T.; Ash, W.W.; Aston, D.; Bacchetta, N.; Baird, K.G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H.R.; Barakat, M.B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Bienz, T.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J.R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.R.; Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W.M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T.H.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Church, E.; Cohn, H.O.; Coller, J.A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R.F.; Coyne, D.G.; D`Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C.J.S.; Dasu, S.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Dell`Orso, R.; Dima, M.; Du, P.Y.C.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Elia, R.; Falciai, D.; Fan, C.; Fero, M.J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G.D.; Hart, E.L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Hildreth, M.D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M.E.; Hughes, E.W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Johnson, J.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H.W.; Kim, Y.; King, M.E.; King, R.; Kofler, R.R.; Krishna, N.M.; Kroeger, R.S.; Labs, J.F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J.A.; Leith, D.W.G.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H.L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Maruyama, T.; Massetti, R.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A.K.; Meadows, B.T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P.M.; Moffeit, K.C.; Mours, B.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L.S.; Panvini, R.S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T.J.; Peruzzi, I.; Pescara, L.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K.T.; Plano, R.J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C.Y.; Punkar, G.D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Reeves, T.W.; Rensing, P.E.; Rochester, L.S.; Rothberg, J.E.; Rowson, P.C.; Russell, J.J.; Saxton, O.H.; Schalk, T.; (SLD Collaborat...

    1995-04-10

    Bhabha scattering with polarized electrons at the {ital Z}{sup 0} resonance has been measured with the SLD experiment at the SLAC Linear Collider. The first measurement of the left-right asymmetry in Bhabha scattering is presented, yielding the effective weak mixing angle of sin{theta}{sup eff}{sub {ital W}}=0.2245{plus_minus}0.0049{plus_minus}0.0010. The effective electron couplings to the {ital Z}{sup 0} are extracted from a combined analysis of polarized Bhabha scattering and the left-right asymmetry previously published: {upsilon}{sub {ital e}}={minus}0.0414{plus_minus}0.0020 and {ital a}{sub {ital e}}={minus}0.4977{plus_minus}0.0045.

  8. THE CHALLENGES IN USING ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORDS FOR PHARMACOGENOMICS AND PRECISION MEDICINE RESEARCH.

    PubMed

    Laper, Sarah M; Restrepo, Nicole A; Crawford, Dana C

    2016-01-01

    Access and utilization of electronic health records with extensive medication lists and genetic profiles is rapidly advancing discoveries in pharmacogenomics. In this study, we analyzed ~116,000 variants on the Illumina Metabochip for response to antihypertensive and lipid lowering medications in African American adults from BioVU, the Vanderbilt University Medical Center's biorepository linked to de-identified electronic health records. Our study population included individuals who were prescribed an antihypertensive or lipid lowering medication, and who had both pre- and post-medication blood pressure or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) measurements, respectively. Among those with pre- and post-medication systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements (n=2,268), the average change in systolic and diastolic blood pressure was -0.6 mg Hg and -0.8 mm Hg, respectively. Among those with pre- and post-medication LDL-C measurements (n=1,244), the average change in LDL-C was -26.3 mg/dL. SNPs were tested for an association with change and percent change in blood pressure or blood levels of LDL-C. After adjustment for multiple testing, we did not observe any significant associations, and we were not able to replicate previously reported associations, such as in APOE and LPA, from the literature. The present study illustrates the benefits and challenges with using electronic health records linked to biorepositories for pharmacogenomic studies.

  9. Angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-12-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in the physics laboratory. Many traditional physics experiments can now be performed very conveniently in a pedagogically enlightening environment while simultaneously reducing the laboratory budget substantially by using student-owned smartphones.

  10. Momentum-Transfer-Resolved Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy of BaBiO3: Anisotropic Dispersion of Threshold Excitation and Optically Forbidden Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Dravid, V. P.; Bulut, N.; Han, P. D.; Klein, M. V.; Schnatterly, S. E.; Zhang, F. C.

    1995-09-01

    Momentum-transfer-resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy of the valence band transitions in BaBiO3 has revealed for the first time that dispersion of the excitation at the optical gap \\(~2 eV\\) and an optically forbidden transition at 4.5 eV are all anisotropic along [100] and [110]. The anisotropic dispersion of the threshold excitation cannot be described by a simple charge density wave picture but can be explained by a small exciton model proposed in this paper. The optically forbidden transition is found to agree well with a proposed molecular orbital model, where the transition is assigned as the excitation from the O 2pσ nonbonding states to the empty Bi 6s state.

  11. MONDE: MOmentum Neutron DEtector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santa Rita, P.; Acosta, L.; Favela, F.; Huerta, A.; Ortiz, M. E.; Policroniades, R.; Chávez, E.

    2016-07-01

    MONDE is a large area neutron momentum detector, consisting of a 70x160x5 cm3 plastic scintillator slab surrounded by 16 photomultiplier tubes, standard NIM signal processing electronics and a CAMAC data acquisition system. In this work we present data from a characterization run using an external trigger. For that purpose, coincident gamma rays from a 60Co radioactive source were used together with a NaI external detector. First results with an "external" trigger are presented.

  12. Matched dipole probe for precise electron density measurements in magnetized and non-magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-09-01

    We present a plasma diagnostics method based on impedance measurements of a short matched dipole placed in the plasma. This allows measuring the local electron density in the range from 1012-1015 m-3 with a magnetic field of at least 0-50 mT. The magnetic field strength is not directly influencing the data analysis and requires only that the dipole probe is oriented perpendicularly to the magnetic field. As a result, the magnetic field can be non-homogeneous or even non-defined within the probe length without any effect on the final tolerance of the measurements. The method can be applied to plasmas of relatively small dimensions (< 10 cm) and doesn't require any special boundary conditions. The high sensitivity of the impedance measurements is achieved by using a miniature matching system installed close to the probe tip, which also allows to suppress sheath resonance effects. We experimentally show here that the tolerance of the electron density measurements reaches values lower than 1%, both with and without the magnetic field. The method is successfully validated by both analytical modeling and experimental comparison with Langmuir probes. The validation experiments are conducted in a low pressure (1 mTorr) Ar discharge sustained in a 10 cm size plasma chamber with and without a transversal magnetic field of about 20 mT. This work was supported by a Marie Curie International Incoming Fellowships within FP7 (NEPTUNE PIIF-GA-2012-326054).

  13. Momentum-transfer, differential and spin-exchange cross sections in the elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by heavy alkali-metal atoms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrim, Cristian; Thumm, Uwe; Fabrikant, Ilya I.

    2000-06-01

    Based on the relativistic Dirac R-matrix method, we analyze various angle-dependent cross sections for electron scattering by Rb, Cs and Fr targets at energies below 3 eV. We show our angle-dependent and total spin-exchange cross sections for scattering of non-polarized (or polarized) electrons by polarized (or non-polarized) Rb, Cs and Fr targets, and we compare them with available experimental data (B. Jaduszliwer, N.D. Bhaskar, and B. Bederson Phys.Rev. A 14), 162 (1976).. The influence of relativistic effects is discussed. From the energy and angular dependence analysis of the differential cross section, we obtain clear evidence of the Cs^-(^3F^o) shape resonance at 1.528 eV, in excellent agreement with accurate experiments (W. Gehenn and E. Reichert, J.Phys. B 10), 3105 (1977).. We compare our electron momentum-transfer cross section with available data obtained in swarm experiments for Rb (Y. Nakamura, Trans. IEE of Japan 102-A), 23 (1982). and Cs (H.T. Saelee and J. Lucas, J.Phys. D 12), 1275 (1979)..

  14. High Angular Momentum Rydberg Wave Packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyker, Brendan

    2011-12-01

    High angular momentum Rydberg wave packets are studied. Application of carefully tailored electric fields to low angular momentum, high- n (n ˜ 300) Rydberg atoms creates coherent superpositions of Stark states with near extreme values of angular momentum, ℓ. Wave packet components orbit the parent nucleus at rates that depend on their energy, leading to periods of localization and delocalization as the components come into and go out of phase with each other. Monitoring survival probability signals in the presence of position dependent probing leads to observation of characteristic oscillations based on the composition of the wave packet. The discrete nature of electron energy levels is observed through the measurement of quantum revivals in the wave packet localization signal. Time-domain spectroscopy of these signals allows determination of both the population and phase of individual superposition components. Precise manipulation of wave packets is achieved through further application of pulsed electric fields. Decoherence effects due to background gas collisions and electrical noise are also detailed. Quantized classical trajectory Monte-Carlo simulations are introduced and agree remarkably well with experimental results.

  15. A new technique for determining charge and momentum of electrons and positrons using calorimetry and silicon tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Q.; Bodek, A. |

    1996-12-01

    We describe the application of a new methods for the determination of charge and track parameters for electrons and positrons in both central (pseudo-rapidity 0 < |{eta}| < 1.2) and forward (pseudo- rapidity 1.2 < |{eta}| < 2.3) regions at CDF. The method uses the shower centroid position in the calorimeter in combination with a track in the inner silicon vertex detector. The use of the central tracking chamber is not required. A comparison of the shower centroid in the calorimeter, with the extrapolated silicon vertex detector track determines the electron sign. This technique has been used to measure the W asymmetry in CDF in regions beyond the pseudo-rapidity coverage of the central tracking chamber. Application to other Physics analyses in current collider experiments at the Tevatron and in future high luminosity experiments at the LHC are discussed. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Reference free, high-precision measurements of transition energies in few electron argon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Csilla I.; Amaro, Pedro; Guerra, Mauro; Schlesser, Sophie; Gumberidze, Alexander; Santos, José Paulo; Indelicato, Paul

    2013-04-01

    The use of a vacuum double crystal spectrometer, coupled to an electron-cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS), allows to measure low-energy x-ray transitions energies in highly-charged ions with accuracies of the order of a few parts per million. We have used this installation to measure the 1s2p 1 P1 → 1s2 1 S0 diagram line and the 1s2s 3 S1 → 1s2 1 S0 forbidden M1 transition energies in helium-like argon, the 1s2s2p 2 Pj → 1s2 2s 2 S1/2 transitions in lithium-like argon and the 1s2s2 2p 1 P1 → 1s2 2s2 1 S0 transition in beryllium-like argon. These transition measurements have accuracies between 2 and 4 ppm depending on the line intensity. Thanks to the excellent agreement between the simulations and the measurements, we were also able to measure the transition width of all the allowed transitions. The results are compared to recent QED and relativistic many-body calculations.

  17. Methodology for increased precision in saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance studies of rotational dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Squier, T C; Thomas, D D

    1986-01-01

    Microsecond rotational motions of nitroxide spin labels are measured primarily with saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance (ST-EPR). In the present study we have used model system experiments to quantitatively evaluate different ST-EPR spectral parameters, both in-phase and out-of-phase, with an emphasis on techniques for suppressing the interference from weakly immobilized probes. Analyses of both systematic and random errors show that maximum sensitivity to small changes in correlation time and minimum ambiguity of interpretation are best achieved by combining measurements of both spectral line-shape, i.e., the ratio of line-heights, and spectral intensity, i.e., the absolute amplitude of either a position within a spectrum or a spectral integral. Errors in the measurement of correlation times for the two types of parameters tend to be complementary. Integrated intensity parameters are particularly useful in measuring microsecond probe motions in the presence of weakly immobilized components. We confirm that integrated intensity parameters are sometimes effective in rejecting signals from weakly immobilized probes, but the effectiveness of this rejection is more limited than previously supposed and depends on the type of parameter being measured. We describe procedures for evaluating and minimizing errors due to weakly immobilized probes, emphasizing the advantages of a new kind of intensity parameter obtained from integrated in-phase spectra. We provide detailed descriptions of experimental procedures, along with calibration plots of the most useful spectral parameters vs. rotational correlation time, which should make it possible for workers in other laboratories, using different instruments and sample geometries, to reproduce spectra quantitatively and to make accurate correlation time measurements. PMID:3013330

  18. High-Precision Calibration of Electron Beam Energy from the Hefei Light Source Using Spin Resonant Depolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Jie-Qin; Xu, Hong-Liang

    2014-12-01

    The electron beam energy at the Hefei Light Source (HLS) in the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is highly precisely calibrated by using the method of spin resonant depolarization for the first time. The spin tune and the beam energy are determined by sweeping the frequency of a radial rf stripline oscillating magnetic field to artificially excite a spin resonance and depolarize the beam. The resonance signal is recognized by observing the sudden change of the Touschek loss counting rate of the beam. The possible systematic errors of the experiment are presented and the accuracy of the calibrated energy is shown to be about 10-4. A series of measurements show that the energy stability of the machine is of the order of 9 × 10-3.

  19. Momentum-Resolved Electronic Structure of the High-T_{c} Superconductor Parent Compound BaBiO_{3}.

    PubMed

    Plumb, N C; Gawryluk, D J; Wang, Y; Ristić, Z; Park, J; Lv, B Q; Wang, Z; Matt, C E; Xu, N; Shang, T; Conder, K; Mesot, J; Johnston, S; Shi, M; Radović, M

    2016-07-15

    We investigate the band structure of BaBiO_{3}, an insulating parent compound of doped high-T_{c} superconductors, using in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on thin films. The data compare favorably overall with density functional theory calculations within the local density approximation, demonstrating that electron correlations are weak. The bands exhibit Brillouin zone folding consistent with known BiO_{6} breathing distortions. Though the distortions are often thought to coincide with Bi^{3+}/Bi^{5+} charge ordering, core level spectra show that bismuth is monovalent. We further demonstrate that the bands closest to the Fermi level are primarily oxygen derived, while the bismuth 6s states mostly contribute to dispersive bands at deeper binding energy. The results support a model of Bi-O charge transfer in which hole pairs are localized on combinations of the O 2p orbitals. PMID:27472130

  20. Momentum-Resolved Electronic Structure of the High-Tc Superconductor Parent Compound BaBiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, N. C.; Gawryluk, D. J.; Wang, Y.; Ristić, Z.; Park, J.; Lv, B. Q.; Wang, Z.; Matt, C. E.; Xu, N.; Shang, T.; Conder, K.; Mesot, J.; Johnston, S.; Shi, M.; Radović, M.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the band structure of BaBiO3 , an insulating parent compound of doped high-Tc superconductors, using in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on thin films. The data compare favorably overall with density functional theory calculations within the local density approximation, demonstrating that electron correlations are weak. The bands exhibit Brillouin zone folding consistent with known BiO6 breathing distortions. Though the distortions are often thought to coincide with Bi3 +/Bi5 + charge ordering, core level spectra show that bismuth is monovalent. We further demonstrate that the bands closest to the Fermi level are primarily oxygen derived, while the bismuth 6 s states mostly contribute to dispersive bands at deeper binding energy. The results support a model of Bi-O charge transfer in which hole pairs are localized on combinations of the O 2 p orbitals.

  1. Momentum-Resolved Electronic Structure of the High-T_{c} Superconductor Parent Compound BaBiO_{3}.

    PubMed

    Plumb, N C; Gawryluk, D J; Wang, Y; Ristić, Z; Park, J; Lv, B Q; Wang, Z; Matt, C E; Xu, N; Shang, T; Conder, K; Mesot, J; Johnston, S; Shi, M; Radović, M

    2016-07-15

    We investigate the band structure of BaBiO_{3}, an insulating parent compound of doped high-T_{c} superconductors, using in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on thin films. The data compare favorably overall with density functional theory calculations within the local density approximation, demonstrating that electron correlations are weak. The bands exhibit Brillouin zone folding consistent with known BiO_{6} breathing distortions. Though the distortions are often thought to coincide with Bi^{3+}/Bi^{5+} charge ordering, core level spectra show that bismuth is monovalent. We further demonstrate that the bands closest to the Fermi level are primarily oxygen derived, while the bismuth 6s states mostly contribute to dispersive bands at deeper binding energy. The results support a model of Bi-O charge transfer in which hole pairs are localized on combinations of the O 2p orbitals.

  2. Measurement of longitudinal-transverse, transverse- transverse, and longitudinal-transverse' response functions in the quasi-elastic deuterium(polarized electron, electron'proton) reaction at 200 (MeV/c) missing momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soong, Shiao-Bin

    We report in this thesis the simultaneous measurement of the longitudinal-transverse response functions, fLT and fLT' , and the transverse-transverse response function fTT of the deuteron. The quasi- elastic H2(e->, e'p)n experiment reported here was conducted at the MIT/Bates Linear Accelerator Center in February, 1997. The experiment was carried out with a 40% polarized, 800 MeV electron beam. The measurement took place in the Bates South Hall using the One Hundred Inch Proton Spectrometer (OHIPS) as the electron spectrometer. It was placed at an angle of 37.27° and the energy transfer, ω, was set for quasi-elastic kinematics with the square of the four-momentum transfer, Q 2, equal to -0.22(GeV/c) 2 . Three out-of- plane proton spectrometers (OOPS) were positioned at fcmpq = (0°, 90°, 180°), respectively, for a given qlabpq of 23.5°. This allowed the simultaneous measurement of fLT,fTT and fLT' at a central missing momentum of ~200 (MeV/ c). The measured asymmetries, cross sections and response functions are compared with different theoretical models. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14- 0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  3. Infrared rovibrational spectroscopy of OH–C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in {sup 4}He nanodroplets: Parity splitting due to partially quenched electronic angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Douberly, Gary E. Liang, Tao; Raston, Paul L.; Marshall, Mark D.

    2015-04-07

    The T-shaped OH–C{sub 2}H{sub 2} complex is formed in helium droplets via the sequential pick-up and solvation of the monomer fragments. Rovibrational spectra of the a-type OH stretch and b-type antisymmetric CH stretch vibrations contain resolved parity splitting that reveals the extent to which electronic angular momentum of the OH moiety is quenched upon complex formation. The energy difference between the spin-orbit coupled {sup 2}B{sub 1} (A″) and {sup 2}B{sub 2} (A′) electronic states is determined spectroscopically to be 216 cm{sup −1} in helium droplets, which is 13 cm{sup −1} larger than in the gas phase [Marshall et al., J. Chem. Phys. 121, 5845 (2004)]. The effect of the helium is rationalized as a difference in the solvation free energies of the two electronic states. This interpretation is motivated by the separation between the Q(3/2) and R(3/2) transitions in the infrared spectrum of the helium-solvated {sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} OH radical. Despite the expectation of a reduced rotational constant, the observed Q(3/2) to R(3/2) splitting is larger than in the gas phase by ≈0.3 cm{sup −1}. This observation can be accounted for quantitatively by assuming the energetic separation between {sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} and {sup 2}Π{sub 1/2} manifolds is increased by ≈40 cm{sup −1} upon helium solvation.

  4. Combining 2 nm Spatial Resolution and 0.02% Precision for Deformation Mapping of Semiconductor Specimens in a Transmission Electron Microscope by Precession Electron Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Cooper, David; Bernier, Nicolas; Rouvière, Jean-Luc

    2015-08-12

    Precession electron diffraction has been used to provide accurate deformation maps of a device structure showing that this technique can provide a spatial resolution of better than 2 nm and a precision of better than 0.02%. The deformation maps have been fitted to simulations that account for thin specimen relaxation. By combining the experimental deformation maps and simulations, we have been able to separate the effects of the stressor and recessed sources and drains and show that the Si3N4 stressor increases the in-plane deformation in the silicon channel from 0.92 to 1.52 ± 0.02%. In addition, the stress in the deposited Si3N4 film has been calculated from the simulations, which is an important parameter for device design.

  5. Momentum-resolved electronic structure at a buried interface from soft X-ray standing-wave angle-resolved photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, A. X.; Minár, J.; Plucinski, L.; Huijben, M.; Bostwick, A.; Rotenberg, E.; Yang, S.-H.; Braun, J.; Winkelmann, A.; Conti, G.; Eiteneer, D.; Rattanachata, A.; Greer, A. A.; Ciston, J.; Ophus, C.; Rijnders, G.; Blank, D. H. A.; Doennig, D.; Pentcheva, R.; Kortright, J. B.; Schneider, C. M.; Ebert, H.; Fadley, C. S.

    2013-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is a powerful technique for the study of electronic structure, but it lacks a direct ability to study buried interfaces between two materials. We address this limitation by combining ARPES with soft X-ray standing-wave (SW) excitation (SWARPES), in which the SW profile is scanned through the depth of the sample. We have studied the buried interface in a prototypical magnetic tunnel junction La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/SrTiO3. Depth-and momentum-resolved maps of Mn 3d eg and t2g states from the central, bulk-like and interface-like regions of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 exhibit distinctly different behavior consistent with a change in the Mn bonding at the interface. We compare the experimental results to state-of-the-art density-functional and one-step photoemission theory, with encouraging agreement that suggests wide future applications of this technique.

  6. Momentum resolution in inverse photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Zumbülte, A.; Schmidt, A. B.; Donath, M.

    2015-01-15

    We present a method to determine the electron beam divergence, and thus the momentum resolution, of an inverse-photoemission setup directly from a series of spectra measured on Cu(111). Simulating these spectra with different beam divergences shows a distinct influence of the divergence on the appearance of the Shockley surface state. Upon crossing the Fermi level, its rise in intensity can be directly linked with the beam divergence. A comparison of measurement and simulation enables us to quantify the momentum resolution independent of surface quality, energy resolution, and experimental geometry. With spin resolution, a single spectrum taken around the Fermi momentum of a spin-split surface state, e.g., on Au(111), is sufficient to derive the momentum resolution of an inverse-photoemission setup.

  7. Momentum resolution in inverse photoemission.

    PubMed

    Zumbülte, A; Schmidt, A B; Donath, M

    2015-01-01

    We present a method to determine the electron beam divergence, and thus the momentum resolution, of an inverse-photoemission setup directly from a series of spectra measured on Cu(111). Simulating these spectra with different beam divergences shows a distinct influence of the divergence on the appearance of the Shockley surface state. Upon crossing the Fermi level, its rise in intensity can be directly linked with the beam divergence. A comparison of measurement and simulation enables us to quantify the momentum resolution independent of surface quality, energy resolution, and experimental geometry. With spin resolution, a single spectrum taken around the Fermi momentum of a spin-split surface state, e.g., on Au(111), is sufficient to derive the momentum resolution of an inverse-photoemission setup.

  8. Electron collisions with phenol: Total, integral, differential, and momentum transfer cross sections and the role of multichannel coupling effects on the elastic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, Romarly F.; de Oliveira, Eliane M.; Bettega, Márcio H. F.; Varella, Márcio T. do N.; Jones, Darryl B.; Brunger, Michael J.; Blanco, Francisco; Colmenares, Rafael; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; García, Gustavo; Lima, Marco A. P.

    2015-03-01

    We report theoretical and experimental total cross sections for electron scattering by phenol (C6H5OH). The experimental data were obtained with an apparatus based in Madrid and the calculated cross sections with two different methodologies, the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR), and the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials (SMCPP). The SMCPP method in the Nopen-channel coupling scheme, at the static-exchange-plus-polarization approximation, is employed to calculate the scattering amplitudes at impact energies ranging from 5.0 eV to 50 eV. We discuss the multichannel coupling effects in the calculated cross sections, in particular how the number of excited states included in the open-channel space impacts upon the convergence of the elastic cross sections at higher collision energies. The IAM-SCAR approach was also used to obtain the elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) and for correcting the experimental total cross sections for the so-called forward angle scattering effect. We found a very good agreement between our SMCPP theoretical differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections and experimental data for benzene (a molecule differing from phenol by replacing a hydrogen atom in benzene with a hydroxyl group). Although some discrepancies were found for lower energies, the agreement between the SMCPP data and the DCSs obtained with the IAM-SCAR method improves, as expected, as the impact energy increases. We also have a good agreement among the present SMCPP calculated total cross section (which includes elastic, 32 inelastic electronic excitation processes and ionization contributions, the latter estimated with the binary-encounter-Bethe model), the IAM-SCAR total cross section, and the experimental data when the latter is corrected for the forward angle scattering effect [Fuss et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 042702 (2013)].

  9. Electron collisions with phenol: Total, integral, differential, and momentum transfer cross sections and the role of multichannel coupling effects on the elastic channel

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Romarly F. da; Oliveira, Eliane M. de; Lima, Marco A. P.; Bettega, Márcio H. F.; Varella, Márcio T. do N.; Jones, Darryl B.; Brunger, Michael J.; Blanco, Francisco; Colmenares, Rafael; and others

    2015-03-14

    We report theoretical and experimental total cross sections for electron scattering by phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). The experimental data were obtained with an apparatus based in Madrid and the calculated cross sections with two different methodologies, the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR), and the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials (SMCPP). The SMCPP method in the N{sub open}-channel coupling scheme, at the static-exchange-plus-polarization approximation, is employed to calculate the scattering amplitudes at impact energies ranging from 5.0 eV to 50 eV. We discuss the multichannel coupling effects in the calculated cross sections, in particular how the number of excited states included in the open-channel space impacts upon the convergence of the elastic cross sections at higher collision energies. The IAM-SCAR approach was also used to obtain the elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) and for correcting the experimental total cross sections for the so-called forward angle scattering effect. We found a very good agreement between our SMCPP theoretical differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections and experimental data for benzene (a molecule differing from phenol by replacing a hydrogen atom in benzene with a hydroxyl group). Although some discrepancies were found for lower energies, the agreement between the SMCPP data and the DCSs obtained with the IAM-SCAR method improves, as expected, as the impact energy increases. We also have a good agreement among the present SMCPP calculated total cross section (which includes elastic, 32 inelastic electronic excitation processes and ionization contributions, the latter estimated with the binary-encounter-Bethe model), the IAM-SCAR total cross section, and the experimental data when the latter is corrected for the forward angle scattering effect [Fuss et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 042702 (2013)].

  10. Precision muon tracking detectors and read-out electronics for operation at very high background rates at future colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortner, O.; Kroha, H.; Nowak, S.; Richter, R.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K.; Schwegler, Ph.

    2016-07-01

    The experience of the ATLAS MDT muon spectrometer shows that drift-tube chambers provide highly reliable precision muon tracking over large areas. The ATLAS muon chambers are exposed to unprecedentedly high background of photons and neutrons induced by the proton collisions. Still higher background rates are expected at future high-energy and high-luminosity colliders beyond HL-LHC. Therefore, drift-tube detectors with 15 mm tube diameter (30 mm in ATLAS), optimised for high rate operation, have been developed for such conditions. Several such full-scale sMDT chambers have been constructed with unprecedentedly high sense wire positioning accuracy of better than 10 μm. The chamber design and assembly methods have been optimised for large-scale production, reducing considerably cost and construction time while maintaining the high mechanical accuracy and reliability. Tests at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN showed that the rate capability of sMDT chambers is improved by more than an order of magnitude compared to the MDT chambers. By using read-out electronics optimised for high counting rates, the rate capability can be further increased.

  11. The Geisinger MyCode Community Health Initiative: an electronic health record-linked biobank for Precision Medicine research

    PubMed Central

    Carey, David J.; Fetterolf, Samantha N.; Davis, F. Daniel; Faucett, William A.; Kirchner, H. Lester; Mirshahi, Uyenlinh; Murray, Michael F.; Smelser, Diane T.; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Ledbetter, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Geisinger Health System (GHS) provides an ideal platform for Precision Medicine. Key elements are the integrated health system, stable patient population, and electronic health record (EHR) infrastructure. In 2007 Geisinger launched MyCode®, a system-wide biobanking program to link samples and EHR data for broad research use. Methods Patient-centered input into MyCode® was obtained using participant focus groups. Participation in MyCode® is based on opt-in informed consent and allows recontact, which facilitates collection of data not in the EHR, and, since 2013, the return of clinically actionable results to participants. MyCode® leverages Geisinger’s technology and clinical infrastructure for participant tracking and sample collection. Results MyCode® has a consent rate of >85% with more than 90,000 participants currently, with ongoing enrollment of ~4,000 per month. MyCode® samples have been used to generate molecular data, including high-density genotype and exome sequence data. Genotype and EHR-derived phenotype data replicate previously reported genetic associations. Conclusion The MyCode® project has created resources that enable a new model for translational research that is faster, more flexible, and more cost effective than traditional clinical research approaches. The new model is scalable, and will increase in value as these resources grow and are adopted across multiple research platforms. PMID:26866580

  12. Angular-momentum evolution in laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Thaury, C; Guillaume, E; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Le Bouteiller, M; Ta Phuoc, K; Davoine, X; Rax, J M; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-09-27

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extent in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for nonplanar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in a laser-plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in a laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular-momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular-momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  13. Orbital angular momentum microlaser.

    PubMed

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-29

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes.

  14. Orbital angular momentum microlaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M.; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes.

  15. Magnetic Field Generation through Angular Momentum Exchange between Circularly Polarized Radiation and Charged Particles

    SciTech Connect

    G. Shvets; N.J. Fisch; J.-M. Rax

    2002-01-18

    The interaction between circularly polarized (CP) radiation and charged particles can lead to generation of magnetic field through an inverse Faraday effect. The spin of the circularly polarized electromagnetic wave can be converted into the angular momentum of the charged particles so long as there is dissipation. We demonstrate this by considering two mechanisms of angular momentum absorption relevant for laser-plasma interactions: electron-ion collisions and ionization. The precise dissipative mechanism, however, plays a role in determining the efficiency of the magnetic field generation.

  16. A simple method for high-precision calibration of long-range errors in an angle encoder using an electronic nulling autocollimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinnane, Mark N.; Hudson, Lawrence T.; Henins, Albert; Mendenhall, Marcus H.

    2015-04-01

    We describe a simple method for high-precision rotary angle encoder calibration for long-range angular errors. By using a redesigned electronic nulling autocollimator, an optical-polygon artifact is calibrated simultaneously with determining the encoder error function over a rotation of 2π rad. The technique is applied to the NIST vacuum double crystal spectrometer, which depends on precise measurement of diffraction angles to determine absolute x-ray wavelengths. By oversampling, the method returned the encoder error function with an expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of 0.004 s of plane angle. Knowledge of the error function permits the instrument to make individual encoder readings with an accuracy of 0.06 s (k = 2), which is limited primarily by the least count and noise of the encoder electronics. While the error function lay within the nominal specifications, it differed from the intrinsic factory curve, indicating the need for in situ calibration in high-precision applications.

  17. Quadrupole, octopole, and hexadecapole electric moments of Sigma, Pi, Delta, and Phi electronic states: cylindrically asymmetric charge density distributions in linear molecules with nonzero electronic angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Bruna, Pablo J; Grein, Friedrich

    2007-08-21

    The number of independent components, n, of traceless electric 2(l)-multipole moments is determined for C(infinity v) molecules in Sigma(+/-), Pi, Delta, and Phi electronic states (Lambda=0,1,2,3). Each 2(l) pole is defined by a rank-l irreducible tensor with (2l+1) components P(m)((l)) proportional to the solid spherical harmonic r(l)Y(m)(l)(theta,phi). Here we focus our attention on 2(l) poles with l=2,3,4 (quadrupole Theta, octopole Omega, and hexadecapole Phi). An important conclusion of this study is that n can be 1 or 2 depending on both the multipole rank l and state quantum number Lambda. For Sigma(+/-)(Lambda=0) states, all 2(l) poles have one independent parameter (n=1). For spatially degenerate states--Pi, Delta, and Phi (Lambda=1,2,3)--the general rule reads n=1 for l<2/Lambda/ (when the 2(l)-pole rank lies below 2/Lambda/ but n=2 for higher 2(l) poles with l>or=2/Lambda/. The second nonzero term is the off-diagonal matrix element [formula: see text]. Thus, a Pi(Lambda=1) state has one dipole (mu(z)) but two independent 2(l) poles for l>or=2--starting with the quadrupole [Theta(zz),(Theta(xx)-Theta(yy))]. A Delta(Lambda=2) state has n=1 for 2((1,2,3)) poles (mu(z),Theta(zz),Omega(zzz)) but n=2 for higher 2((l>or=4)) poles--from the hexadecapole Phi up. For Phi(Lambda=3) states, it holds that n=1 for 2(1) to 2(5) poles but n=2 for all 2((l>or=6)) poles. In short, what is usually stated in the literature--that n=1 for all possible 2(l) poles of linear molecules--only applies to Sigma(+/-) states. For degenerate states with n=2, all Cartesian 2(l)-pole components (l>or=2/Lambda/) can be expressed as linear combinations of two irreducible multipoles, P(m=0)((l)) and P/m/=2 Lambda)((l)) [parallel (z axis) and anisotropy (xy plane)]. Our predictions are exemplified by the Theta, Omega, and Phi moments calculated for Lambda=0-3 states of selected diatomics (in parentheses): X (2)Sigma(+)(CN), X (2)Pi(NO), a (3)Pi(u)(C(2)), X (2)Delta(NiH), X (3)Delta(TiO), X

  18. Introducing Electromagnetic Field Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    I describe an elementary way of introducing electromagnetic field momentum. By considering a system of a long solenoid and line charge, the dependence of the field momentum on the electric and magnetic fields can be deduced. I obtain the electromagnetic angular momentum for a point charge and magnetic monopole pair partially through dimensional…

  19. A proposal for a precision test of the standard model by neutrino-electron scattering (Large /hacek C/erenkov Detector Project)

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.C.; Lu, X-Q.; Gollwitzer, K.; Igo, G.J.; Gulmez, E.; Whitten, C.; VanDalen, G.; Layter, J.; Fung, Sun Yui; Shen, B.C.

    1988-04-01

    A precision measurement of neutrino-electron elastic scattering from a beam stop neutrino source at LAMPF is proposed. The total error in sin/sup 2/theta/sub W/ is estimated to be +-0.89/percent/. The experiment also will be sensitive to neutrino oscillations and supernova-neutrino bursts, and should set improved limits on the neutrino-charge radius and magnetic-dipole moment. The detector consists of a 2.5-million-gallon tank of water with approximately 14,000 photomultiplier tubes lining the surfaces of the tank. Neutrino-electron scattering events will be observed from the /hacek C/erenkov radiation emitted by the electrons in the water. 19 refs.

  20. Measurement of bottom versus charm as a function of transverse momentum with electron-hadron correlations in p + p collisions at square root of s = 200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Chang, B S; Chang, W C; Charvet, J-L; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Das, K; David, G; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Han, R; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Kawall, D; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, S H; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y-S; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Layton, D; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, K B; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Liebing, P; Liska, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Li, X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mikes, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Mohanty, A K; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Niita, T; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Okada, H; Okada, K; Oka, M; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ruzicka, P; Rykov, V L; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakashita, K; Sakata, H; Samsonov, V; Sato, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Slunecka, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomásek, L; Tomita, Y; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vertesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Yasin, Z; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2009-08-21

    The momentum distribution of electrons from semileptonic decays of charm and bottom quarks for midrapidity |y|<0.35 in p+p collisions at square root of s=200 GeV is measured by the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider over the transverse momentum range 2electrons from bottom to that from charm is presented. The ratio is determined using partial D/D-->e(+/-)K(-/+)X (K unidentified) reconstruction. It is found that the yield of electrons from bottom becomes significant above 4 GeV/c in pT. A fixed-order-plus-next-to-leading-log perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculation agrees with the data within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties. The extracted total bottom production cross section at this energy is sigma(bb)=3.2(-1.1)(+1.2)(stat)(-1.3)(+1.4)(syst)mub.

  1. Impulse-Momentum Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengrant, David

    2011-01-01

    Multiple representations are a valuable tool to help students learn and understand physics concepts. Furthermore, representations help students learn how to think and act like real scientists.2 These representations include: pictures, free-body diagrams,3 energy bar charts,4 electrical circuits, and, more recently, computer simulations and animations.5 However, instructors have limited choices when they want to help their students understand impulse and momentum. One of the only available options is the impulse-momentum bar chart.6 The bar charts can effectively show the magnitude of the momentum as well as help students understand conservation of momentum, but they do not easily show the actual direction. This paper highlights a new representation instructors can use to help their students with momentum and impulse—the impulse-momentum diagram (IMD).

  2. Critical gravitational collapse with angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, Carsten; Baumgarte, Thomas W.

    2016-10-01

    We derive a theoretical model of mass and angular momentum scaling in type-II critical collapse with rotation. We focus on the case where the critical solution has precisely one, spherically symmetric, unstable mode. We demonstrate agreement with numerical results for critical collapse of a rotating radiation fluid, which falls into this case.

  3. TDRSS momentum unload planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, George R.; Potter, Mitchell A.; Whitehead, J. Douglass; Smith, James T.

    1991-01-01

    A knowledge-based system is described which monitors TDRSS telemetry for problems in the momentum unload procedure. The system displays TDRSS telemetry and commands in real time via X-windows. The system constructs a momentum unload plan which agrees with the preferences of the attitude control specialists and the momentum growth characteristics of the individual spacecraft. During the execution of the plan, the system monitors the progress of the procedure and watches for unexpected problems.

  4. Nonsurvivable momentum exchange system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roder, Russell (Inventor); Ahronovich, Eliezer (Inventor); Davis, III, Milton C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A demiseable momentum exchange system includes a base and a flywheel rotatably supported on the base. The flywheel includes a web portion defining a plurality of web openings and a rim portion. The momentum exchange system further includes a motor for driving the flywheel and a cover for engaging the base to substantially enclose the flywheel. The system may also include components having a melting temperature below 1500 degrees Celsius. The momentum exchange system is configured to demise on reentry.

  5. Debuncher Momentum Aperture Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, S.

    1991-01-01

    During the November 1990 through January 1991 {bar p} studies period, the momentum aperture of the beam in the debuncher ring was measured. The momentum aperture ({Delta}p/p) was found to be 4.7%. The momentum spread was also measured with beam bunch rotation off. A nearly constant particle population density was observed for particles with {Delta}p/p of less than 4.3%, indicating virtually unobstructed orbits in this region. The population of particles with momenta outside this aperture was found to decrease rapidly. An absolute or 'cut-off' momentum aperture of {Delta}p/p = 5.50% was measured.

  6. Do waves carrying orbital angular momentum possess azimuthal linear momentum?

    PubMed

    Speirits, Fiona C; Barnett, Stephen M

    2013-09-01

    All beams are a superposition of plane waves, which carry linear momentum in the direction of propagation with no net azimuthal component. However, plane waves incident on a hologram can produce a vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum that seems to require an azimuthal linear momentum, which presents a paradox. We resolve this by showing that the azimuthal momentum is not a true linear momentum but the azimuthal momentum density is a true component of the linear momentum density.

  7. Correlated, precision measurements of θ23 and δ using only the electron neutrino appearance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Minakata, Hisakazu; Parke, Stephen J.

    2013-06-04

    Precision measurement of the leptonic CP violating phase δ will suffer from the, then surviving, large uncertainty of sin2θ23 of 10–20% in the experimentally interesting region near maximal mixing of θ23. We advocate a new method for determination of both θ23 and δ at the same time using only the νe and ν̄e appearance channels and show that sin2θ23 can be determined automatically with much higher accuracy, approximately a factor of six, than sinδ. In this method, we identify a new degeneracy for the simultaneous determination of θ23 and δ, the θ23 intrinsic degeneracy, which must be resolved in order to achieve precision measurement of these two parameters. Spectral information around the vacuum oscillation maxima is shown to be the best way to resolve this degeneracy.

  8. Three-dimensional location of a single dopant with atomic precision by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Lupini, Andrew R; Findlay, Scott D; Taniguchi, Takashi; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Materials properties, such as optical and electronic response, can be greatly enhanced by isolated single dopants. Determining the full three-dimensional single-dopant defect structure and spatial distribution is therefore critical to understanding and adequately tuning functional properties. Combining quantitative Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy images with image simulations, we show the direct determination of the atomic-scale depth location of an optically active, single atom Ce dopant embedded within wurtzite-type AlN. The method represents a powerful new tool for reconstructing three-dimensional information from a single, two-dimensional image.

  9. A wavelet-based Projector Augmented-Wave (PAW) method: Reaching frozen-core all-electron precision with a systematic, adaptive and localized wavelet basis set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel, T.; Caliste, D.; Genovese, L.; Torrent, M.

    2016-11-01

    We present a Projector Augmented-Wave (PAW) method based on a wavelet basis set. We implemented our wavelet-PAW method as a PAW library in the ABINIT package [http://www.abinit.org] and into BigDFT [http://www.bigdft.org]. We test our implementation in prototypical systems to illustrate the potential usage of our code. By using the wavelet-PAW method, we can simulate charged and special boundary condition systems with frozen-core all-electron precision. Furthermore, our work paves the way to large-scale and potentially order- N simulations within a PAW method.

  10. Controlling precise magnetic field configuration around electron cyclotron resonance zone for enhancing plasma parameters and beam current

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Keisuke Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Kimura, Daiju; Imai, Youta; Kumakura, Sho; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-15

    Multi-charged ion source which has wide operating conditions is required in various application fields. We have constructed tandem type ECR ion source (ECRIS); one of the features of its main stage is an additional coil for controlling magnetic field distribution around the mirror bottom precisely. Here the effect of magnetic field variation caused by the additional coil is experimentally considered in terms of plasma parameters and beam current as the first investigation of the main stage plasma. Furthermore, behavior of magnetic lines of force flowing from the ECR zone is calculated, and is compared with measurement results aiming for better understanding of interrelationship between plasma production and ion beam generation on the ECRIS.

  11. Introducing conservation of momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunt, Marjorie; Brunt, Geoff

    2013-09-01

    The teaching of the principle of conservation of linear momentum is considered (ages 15 + ). From the principle, the momenta of two masses in an isolated system are considered. Sketch graphs of the momenta make Newton’s laws appear obvious. Examples using different collision conditions are considered. Conservation of momentum is considered for the case of a car hitting a child.

  12. Introducing Conservation of Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunt, Marjorie; Brunt, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    The teaching of the principle of conservation of linear momentum is considered (ages 15 + ). From the principle, the momenta of two masses in an isolated system are considered. Sketch graphs of the momenta make Newton's laws appear obvious. Examples using different collision conditions are considered. Conservation of momentum is considered…

  13. Accelerating momentum for change!

    PubMed

    Wenzel, S; Panetta, J

    1995-05-01

    As we develop strategies to compete globally, we are challenged with integrating our resources to execute these strategies effectively. Many companies are in the midst of dramatic shifts in corporate cultures, giving more responsibility to employees while raising expectations for their performance. The extent of these changes is far reaching and brings significant challenges to both employees and corporations. This article is a continuation of the evolution (over five years) of a corrective action/continuous improvement process implemented at Exide Electronics. It discusses organizational structures, including steering committees, corrective action teams, task teams, and work cells. Specific expectations, goals, and results of the teams are presented, along with ground rules for functioning within the organization. After structuring the organization and coordinating the resources effectively, the next challenge is accelerating momentum for change. The presentation also discusses the evolutionary process required to make a culture focused on change, including ongoing communication and feedback, constant evaluation and direction of the process, and measuring and paying for performance.

  14. Momentum rate probe for use with two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, S. G.; Bennett, J. B.; Sojka, P. E.; Panchagnula, M. V.; Plesniak, M. W.

    1996-05-01

    An instrument for measuring the momentum rate of two-phase flows is described, and design and construction details are provided. The device utilizes a conelike body to turn the flow from the axial to the radial direction. The force resulting from the change in momentum rate of the turning flow is measured using a strain-gage-instrumented cantilevered beam. The instrument is applicable to a wide range of flows including nuclear reactor coolant streams, refrigerants in heating-ventilating air-conditioning equipment, impingement cooling of small scale electronic hardware (computer chips are one example), supercritical fuel injection (in Diesel engines, for instance), and consumer product sprays (such as hair-care product sprays produced using effervescent atomizers). The latter application is discussed here. Features of the instrument include sensitivity to a wide range of forces and the ability to damp oscillations of the deflection cone. Instrument sensitivity allows measurement of momentum rates considerably lower (below 0.01 N) than those that could be obtained using previous devices. This feature is a direct result of our use of precision strain gages, capable of sensing strains below 20 μm/m, and the damping of oscillations which can overwhelm the force measurements. Oscillation damping results from a viscous fluid damper whose resistance is easily varied by changing fluids. Data used to calibrate the instrument are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique. As an example of the instrument's utility, momentum rate data obtained using it will be valuable in efforts to explain entrainment of surrounding air into effervescent atomizer-produced sprays and also to model the effervescent atomization process.

  15. Three-dimensional locations of gold-labeled proteins in a whole mount eukaryotic cell obtained with 3 nm precision using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dukes, Madeline J.; Ramachandra, Ranjan; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Jerome, W. Gray; de Jonge, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) maps of proteins within the context of whole cells are important for investigating cellular function. However, 3D reconstructions of whole cells are challenging to obtain using conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We describe a methodology to determine the 3D locations of proteins labeled with gold nanoparticles on whole eukaryotic cells. The epidermal growth factor receptors on COS7 cells were labeled with gold nanoparticles, and critical-point dried whole-mount cell samples were prepared. 3D focal series were obtained with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), without tilting the specimen. The axial resolution was improved with deconvolution. The vertical locations of the nanoparticles in a whole-mount cell were determined with a precision of 3 nm. From the analysis of the variation of the axial positions of the labels we concluded that the cellular surface was ruffled. To achieve sufficient stability of the sample under the electron beam irradiation during the recording of the focal series, the sample was carbon coated. A quantitative method was developed to analyze the stability of the ultrastructure after electron beam irradiation using TEM. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of using aberration-corrected STEM to study the 3D nanoparticle distribution in whole cells. PMID:21440635

  16. Three-dimensional locations of gold-labeled proteins in a whole mount eukaryotic cell obtained with 3nm precision using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dukes, Madeline J; Ramachandra, Ranjan; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Gray Jerome, W; de Jonge, Niels

    2011-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) maps of proteins within the context of whole cells are important for investigating cellular function. However, 3D reconstructions of whole cells are challenging to obtain using conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We describe a methodology to determine the 3D locations of proteins labeled with gold nanoparticles on whole eukaryotic cells. The epidermal growth factor receptors on COS7 cells were labeled with gold nanoparticles, and critical-point dried whole-mount cell samples were prepared. 3D focal series were obtained with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), without tilting the specimen. The axial resolution was improved with deconvolution. The vertical locations of the nanoparticles in a whole-mount cell were determined with a precision of 3nm. From the analysis of the variation of the axial positions of the labels we concluded that the cellular surface was ruffled. To achieve sufficient stability of the sample under electron beam irradiation during the recording of the focal series, the sample was carbon coated. A quantitative method was developed to analyze the stability of the ultrastructure after electron beam irradiation using TEM. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of using aberration-corrected STEM to study the 3D nanoparticle distribution in whole cells.

  17. Photon Recoil Momentum in Dispersive Media

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Gretchen K.; Leanhardt, Aaron E.; Mun, Jongchul; Boyd, Micah; Streed, Erik W.; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Pritchard, David E.

    2005-05-06

    A systematic shift of the photon recoil momentum due to the index of refraction of a dilute gas of atoms has been observed. The recoil frequency was determined with a two-pulse light grating interferometer using near-resonant laser light. The results show that the recoil momentum of atoms caused by the absorption of a photon is n({Dirac_h}/2{pi})k, where n is the index of refraction of the gas and k is the vacuum wave vector of the photon. This systematic effect must be accounted for in high-precision atom interferometry with light gratings.

  18. Precision performance lamp technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Dean A.; Kiesa, James E.; Dean, Raymond A.

    1997-09-01

    A principal function of a lamp is to produce light output with designated spectra, intensity, and/or geometric radiation patterns. The function of a precision performance lamp is to go beyond these parameters and into the precision repeatability of performance. All lamps are not equal. There are a variety of incandescent lamps, from the vacuum incandescent indictor lamp to the precision lamp of a blood analyzer. In the past the definition of a precision lamp was described in terms of wattage, light center length (LCL), filament position, and/or spot alignment. This paper presents a new view of precision lamps through the discussion of a new segment of lamp design, which we term precision performance lamps. The definition of precision performance lamps will include (must include) the factors of a precision lamp. But what makes a precision lamp a precision performance lamp is the manner in which the design factors of amperage, mscp (mean spherical candlepower), efficacy (lumens/watt), life, not considered individually but rather considered collectively. There is a statistical bias in a precision performance lamp for each of these factors; taken individually and as a whole. When properly considered the results can be dramatic to the system design engineer, system production manage and the system end-user. It can be shown that for the lamp user, the use of precision performance lamps can translate to: (1) ease of system design, (2) simplification of electronics, (3) superior signal to noise ratios, (4) higher manufacturing yields, (5) lower system costs, (6) better product performance. The factors mentioned above are described along with their interdependent relationships. It is statistically shown how the benefits listed above are achievable. Examples are provided to illustrate how proper attention to precision performance lamp characteristics actually aid in system product design and manufacturing to build and market more, market acceptable product products in the

  19. Uniqueness of the momentum map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Chiara; Nest, Ryszard

    2016-08-01

    We give a detailed discussion of existence and uniqueness of the momentum map associated to Poisson Lie actions, which was defined by Lu. We introduce a weaker notion of momentum map, called infinitesimal momentum map, which is defined on one-forms and we analyze its integrability to the Lu's momentum map. Finally, the uniqueness of the Lu's momentum map is studied by describing, explicitly, the tangent space to the space of momentum maps.

  20. Explorations of Representational Momentum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Michael H.; Freyd, Jennifer J.

    1987-01-01

    Figures that undergo an implied rotation are remembered as being slightly beyond their final position, a phenomenon called representational momentum. Eight experiments explored the questions of what gets transformed and what types of transformations induce such representational distortions. (GDC)

  1. Momentum sharing in imbalanced Fermi systems

    DOE PAGES

    Hen, O.; Sargsian, M.; Weinstein, L. B.; Piasetzky, E.

    2014-10-16

    The atomic nucleus is composed of two different kinds of fermions, protons and neutrons. If the protons and neutrons did not interact, the Pauli exclusion principle would force the majority fermions (usually neutrons) to have a higher average momentum. Our high-energy electron scattering measurements using 12C, 27Al, 56Fe and 208Pb targets show that, even in heavy neutron-rich nuclei, short-range interactions between the fermions form correlated high-momentum neutron-proton pairs. Thus, in neutron-rich nuclei, protons have a greater probability than neutrons to have momentum greater than the Fermi momentum. This finding has implications ranging from nuclear few body systems to neutron starsmore » and may also be observable experimentally in two-spin state, ultra-cold atomic gas systems.« less

  2. Momentum sharing in imbalanced Fermi systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hen, O.; Sargsian, M.; Weinstein, L. B.; Piasetzky, E.

    2014-10-16

    The atomic nucleus is composed of two different kinds of fermions, protons and neutrons. If the protons and neutrons did not interact, the Pauli exclusion principle would force the majority fermions (usually neutrons) to have a higher average momentum. Our high-energy electron scattering measurements using 12C, 27Al, 56Fe and 208Pb targets show that, even in heavy neutron-rich nuclei, short-range interactions between the fermions form correlated high-momentum neutron-proton pairs. Thus, in neutron-rich nuclei, protons have a greater probability than neutrons to have momentum greater than the Fermi momentum. This finding has implications ranging from nuclear few body systems to neutron stars and may also be observable experimentally in two-spin state, ultra-cold atomic gas systems.

  3. On Angular Momentum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schwinger, J.

    1952-01-26

    The commutation relations of an arbitrary angular momentum vector can be reduced to those of the harmonic oscillator. This provides a powerful method for constructing and developing the properties of angular momentum eigenvectors. In this paper many known theorems are derived in this way, and some new results obtained. Among the topics treated are the properties of the rotation matrices; the addition of two, three, and four angular momenta; and the theory of tensor operators.

  4. Workshop on momentum distributions: Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, R.O.

    1988-01-01

    This has been an extraordinary Workshop touching many branches of physics. The Workshop has treated momentum distributions in fluid and solid condensed matter, in nuclei, and in electronic systems. Both theoretical and experimental concepts and methods have been considered in all these branches. A variety of specific illustrations and applications in physical systems have been presented. One finds that some common unifying themes emerge. One finds, also, that some examples are available to illustrate where one branch is more mature than others and to contrast where expectations for future progress may be most encouraged. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Atom interferometry with large momentum transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Shau-Yu; Kuan, Pei-Chen; Estey, Brian; Müller, Holger

    2011-05-01

    The sensitivity of light-pulse atom interferometers can be greatly improved by large momentum transfer (LMT) beam splitters and long interrogation times. Large momentum space separation Δp between two interferometric arms result in increased phase shift proportional to Δp or even (Δp)2, and therefore leads to superior tools for precision measurements. ``BBB'' beam splitters, using high order Bragg diffraction combined with Bloch oscillations, have already been demonstrated and are scalable, as their momentum transfer is not limited by the available laser power. By running an additional conjugate interferometer at the same time, noises common to both interferometers can be eliminated. We will present our work aiming at further improvements, which would allow applications requiring extremely large enclosed areas, such as test of the Einstein equivalence principle, measurements of fundamental constants, or searching for new gravitational effects.

  6. Atom interferometry with large momentum transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuan, Peichen; Lan, Shau-Yu; Estey, Brian; Müller, Holger

    2011-05-01

    The sensitivity of light-pulse atom interferometers can be greatly improved by large momentum transfer (LMT) beam splitters and long interrogation times. Large momentum space separation Δp between two interferometric arms result in an increased phase shift proportional to Δp or even (Δp) 2, and therefore leads to superior tools for precision measurements. ``BBB'' beam splitters, using high order Bragg diffraction combined with Bloch oscillations, have already been demonstrated and are scalable, as their momentum transfer is not limited by the available laser power. By running an additional conjugate interferometer at the same time, noise common to both interferometers can be eliminated. We will present our work aiming at further improvements, which would allow applications requiring extremely large enclosed areas, such as test of the Einstein equivalence principle, measurements of fundamental constants, or searching for new gravitational effects.

  7. Atomic momentum patterns with narrower intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Baoguo; Jin, Shengjie; Dong, Xiangyu; Liu, Zhe; Yin, Lan; Zhou, Xiaoji

    2016-10-01

    We studied the atomic momentum distribution of a superposition of Bloch states in the lowest band of an optical lattice after the action of the standing-wave pulse. By designing the imposing pulse on this superposed state, an atomic momentum pattern appears with a narrow interval between the adjacent peaks that can be far less than double recoil momentum. The patterns with narrower interval come from the effect of the designed pulse on the superposition of many Bloch states with quasimomenta throughout the first Brillouin zone. Our experimental result of narrow interval peaks is consistent with the theoretical simulation. The patterns of multiple modes with different quasimomenta may be helpful for precise measurement and atomic manipulation.

  8. Proposition of real-time precise prediction model of infectious disease patients from Prescription Surveillance using the National Database of Electronic Medical Claims.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuuki; Kawanohara, Hirokazu; Kamei, Miwako

    2015-11-01

    The incidence of common pediatric infectious diseases has been monitored officially at sentinel medical institutions in Japan. However, the numbers of affected patients are not provided. Prescription Surveillance (PS), which infers the number of patients with influenza, varicella, and gastrointestinal infections from data related to prescriptions at external pharmacies, provides estimates to the public the following morning. This study assessed the prediction ability of the incidence of common pediatric infectious diseases from PS information using the National Database of Electronic Medical Claims (NDBEMC): the number of patients prescribed neuraminidase inhibitors, anti-herpes virus drugs, antibiotic drugs, antipyretic analgesics, and multi-ingredient cold medications. The diseases include RS virus infection, pharyngoconjunctival fever, hand, foot and mouth disease, erythema infectiosum, exanthem subitum, pertussis, herpangina, influenza, varicella, and gastrointestinal infection. For comparison, we used the estimated number of patients who were prescribed neuraminidase inhibitor in PS, which had been confirmed already for precision, and provided estimates to the general public via the internet. The discrepancy rates of all considered diseases between the reported number in NDBEMC and the predicted numbers of patients from PS were less than the value in NI counts and the coefficients of determination in the estimation were from .8109 to .9825. These predictions were sufficiently precise to provide to the general public. PMID:26320387

  9. Determining neutrino mass hierarchy by precise measurements of two delta m**2 in electron-neutrino and muon-neutrino disappearance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Minakata, H.; Nunokawa, H.; Parke, Stephen J.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; /Sao Paulo U.

    2006-09-01

    In this talk, the authors discuss the possibility of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the two effective atmospheric neutrino mass squared differences measured, respectively, in electron, and in muon neutrino disappearance oscillation experiments. if the former, is larger (smaller) than the latter, the mass hierarchy is of normal (inverted) type. They consider two very high precision (a few per mil) measurements of such mass squared differences by the phase II of the T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) experiment and by the novel Moessbauer enhanced resonant {bar {nu}}{sub e} absorption technique. Under optimistic assumptions for the systematic errors of both measurements, they determine the region of sensitivities where the mass hierarchy can be distinguished. Due to the tight space limitation, they present only the general idea and show a few most important plots.

  10. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOEpatents

    Zonca, Fulvio; Cohen, Samuel A.; Bennett, Timothy; Timberlake, John R.

    1993-01-01

    Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

  11. Momentum-Dependent Charge Transfer Excitations in Sr2CuO 2Cl2 Angle-Resolved Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Zhang, F. C.; Dravid, V. P.; Ng, K. K.; Klein, M. V.; Schnatterly, S. E.; Miller, L. L.

    1996-08-01

    Electron-hole pair excitations in the insulating cuprates Sr2CuO2Cl2 were investigated by angle-resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy. The optically allowed and optically forbidden transitions were observed to be strongly anisotropic in Cu-O2 plane. The former show a large energy dispersion ~1.5 eV along [110], and the latter appear at a higher energy position (~4.5 eV) only along [100], but not along [110]. We interpret these results as transitions involving excitons. A small exciton model is examined to explain both the observed features.

  12. Transverse momentum and centrality dependence of high-ptnon-photonic electron suppression in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$= 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2006-07-11

    The STAR collaboration at RHIC reports measurements of theinclusive yield of non-photonic electrons, which arise dominantly fromsemi-leptonic decays of heavy flavor mesons, over a broad range oftransverse momenta (1.2electron yieldexhibits unexpectedly large suppression in central AuAu collisions athigh pt, suggesting substantial heavy quark energy loss at RHIC. Thecentrality and \\pt dependences of the suppression provide constraints ontheoretical models of suppression.

  13. Transverse momentum and centrality dependence of high-pT nonphotonic electron suppression in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s NN]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Callner, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D; Hollis, R; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kurnadi, P; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lapointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, N S; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Qattan, I A; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, J; Wu, Y; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2007-05-11

    The STAR collaboration at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) reports measurements of the inclusive yield of nonphotonic electrons, which arise dominantly from semileptonic decays of heavy flavor mesons, over a broad range of transverse momenta (1.2electron yield exhibits an unexpectedly large suppression in central Au+Au collisions at high p(T), suggesting substantial heavy-quark energy loss at RHIC. The centrality and p(T) dependences of the suppression provide constraints on theoretical models of suppression. PMID:17677616

  14. Unveiling Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Angular momentum is a notoriously difficult concept to grasp. Visualization often requires three-dimensional pictures of vectors pointing in seemingly arbitrary directions. A simple student-run laboratory experiment coupled with intuitive explanations by an instructor can clear up some of the inherent ambiguity of rotational motion. Specifically, the precessional period of a suspended spinning bicycle wheel can be related to the spinning frequency through a simple algebraic expression. An explanation of this precession apart from the concept of angular momentum will be given.

  15. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOEpatents

    Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1993-08-24

    An apparatus is described for measuring momentum flux from an intense plasma stream, comprising: refractory target means oriented normal to the flow of said plasma stream for bombardment by said plasma stream where said bombardment by said plasma stream applies a pressure to said target means, pendulum means for communicating a translational displacement of said target to a force transducer where said translational displacement of said target is transferred to said force transducer by an elongated member coupled to said target, where said member is suspended by a pendulum configuration means and where said force transducer is responsive to said translational displacement of said member, and force transducer means for outputting a signal representing pressure data corresponding to said displacement.

  16. Angular momentum in molecular quantum mechanical integral evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlap, Brett I.

    2005-01-01

    Solid-harmonic derivatives of quantum-mechanical integrals over Gaussian transforms of scalar, or radial, atomic basis functions create angular momentum about each center. Generalized Gaunt coefficients limit the amount of cross differentiation for multi-center integrals to ensure that cross differentiation does not affect the total angular momentum. The generalized Gaunt coefficients satisfy a number of other selection rules, which are exploited in a new computer code for computing forces in analytic density-functional theory based on robust and variational fitting of the Kohn-Sham potential. Two-center exponents are defined for four or more solid-harmonic differentiations of matrix elements. Those differentiations can either build up angular momentum about the centers or give forces on molecular potential-energy surfaces, thus generalized Gaunt coefficients of order greater than the number of centers are considered. These 4- j generalized Gaunt coefficients and two-center exponents are used to compute the first derivatives of all integrals involving all the Gaussian exponents on a triplet of centers at once. First all angular factors are contracted with the corresponding part of the linear-combination-of-atomic-orbitals density matrix. This intermediate quantity is then reused for the nuclear attraction integral and the integrals corresponding to each basis function in the analytic fit of the Kohn-Sham potential in the muffin-tin-like, but analytic, Slater-Roothaan method that allows molecules to dissociate into atoms having any desired energy, including the experimental electronic energy. The energy is stationary in all respects and all forces precisely agree with a previous code in tests on small molecules. During geometry optimization of an icosahedral C 720 fullerene computing these angular factors and transforming them via the 4- j generalized Gaunt coefficient takes more than sixty percent of the total computer time. These same angular factors could be used

  17. Momentum Distribution of Near-Zero-Energy Photoelectrons in the Strong-Field Tunneling Ionization in the Long Wavelength Limit

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Q. Z.; Ye, D. F.; Fu, L. B.; Han, X. Y.; Liu, J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the ionization dynamics of Argon atoms irradiated by an ultrashort intense laser of a wavelength up to 3100 nm, addressing the momentum distribution of the photoelectrons with near-zero-energy. We find a surprising accumulation in the momentum distribution corresponding to meV energy and a “V”-like structure at the slightly larger transverse momenta. Semiclassical simulations indicate the crucial role of the Coulomb attraction between the escaping electron and the remaining ion at an extremely large distance. Tracing back classical trajectories, we find the tunneling electrons born in a certain window of the field phase and transverse velocity are responsible for the striking accumulation. Our theoretical results are consistent with recent meV-resolved high-precision measurements. PMID:26081971

  18. Development of a magnetically suspended momentum wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, S. B.

    1973-01-01

    An engineering model of a magnetically suspended momentum wheel was designed, fabricated, and tested under laboratory conditions. The basic unit consisted of two magnet bearings, a sculptured aluminum rotor, brushless dc spin motor, and electronics. The magnet bearings, utilizing rare-earth cobltrat-samarium magnets were active radially and passive axially. The results of the program showed that momentum wheels with magnetic bearings are feasible and operable, and that magnetic bearings of this type are capable of being used for applications where high capacity, high stiffness, and low power consumption are required. The tests performed developed criteria for improved performance for future designs.

  19. Time-resolved orbital angular momentum spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Noyan, Mehmet A.; Kikkawa, James M.

    2015-07-20

    We introduce pump-probe magneto-orbital spectroscopy, wherein Laguerre-Gauss optical pump pulses impart orbital angular momentum to the electronic states of a material and subsequent dynamics are studied with 100 fs time resolution. The excitation uses vortex modes that distribute angular momentum over a macroscopic area determined by the spot size, and the optical probe studies the chiral imbalance of vortex modes reflected off the sample. First observations in bulk GaAs yield transients that evolve on time scales distinctly different from population and spin relaxation, as expected, but with surprisingly large lifetimes.

  20. Angular momentum transfer to the inner Jovian satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogro-Campero, A.

    1975-01-01

    Transfer of angular momentum from Jupiter to the four inner satellites in the presence of the Jovian magnetic field is considered. Electron-flux measurements near Io's flux tube and theoretical estimates of the electric currents flowing through the same flux tube are used to estimate the angular-momentum transfer during the evolutionary history of the Jovian system. The results show that the electric currents are sufficient to have produced an angular-momentum transfer from Jupiter equal to the present angular momentum of the inner satellites.

  1. Universality of the momentum band density of periodic networks.

    PubMed

    Band, Ram; Berkolaiko, Gregory

    2013-09-27

    The momentum spectrum of a periodic network (quantum graph) has a band-gap structure. We investigate the relative density of the bands or, equivalently, the probability that a randomly chosen momentum belongs to the spectrum of the periodic network. We show that this probability exhibits universal properties. More precisely, the probability to be in the spectrum does not depend on the edge lengths (as long as they are generic) and is also invariant within some classes of graph topologies.

  2. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, R.P.; Crawford, D.W.

    1982-03-09

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  3. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.; Crawford, Daniel W.

    1984-01-01

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  4. Precise Measurement of the Deuteron Elastic Structure Function A(Q{sup 2 })

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, J.; Ducret, J.; Garcon, M.; Hafidi, K.; Pitz, D.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; Beise, E.J.; Breuer, H.; Chant, N.S.; Ewell, L.; Gustafsson, K.; Lung, A.; Mohring, R.; Pitz, D.; Roos, P.G.; Eyraud, L.; Furget, C.; Kox, S.; Lu, L.; Merchez, F.; Real, J.; Tieulent, R.; Voutier, E.; Abbott, D.; Carlini, R.; Dunne, J.; Ent, R.; Gilman, R.; Gueye, P.; Mack, D.; Meekins, D.; Mitchell, J.; Pitz, D.; Qin, L.; Vansyoc, K.; Volmer, J.; Vulcan, W.; Wood, S.A.; Yan, C.; Gilman, R.; Glashausser, C.; Kumbartzki, G.; McIntyre, J.; Ransome, R.; Rutt, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Dow, K.; Turchinetz, W.; Williamson, C.; Zhao, W.; Anklin, H.; Boeglin, W.; Markowitz, P.; Mrktchyan, H.; Stepanyan, S.; Ahmidouch, A.; Beedoe, S.; Danagoulian, S.; Mtingwa, S.; Sawafta, R.; Arvieux, J.; Ball, J.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; Arvieux, J.; Bimbot, L.

    1999-02-01

    The A(Q{sup 2}) structure function in elastic electron-deuteron scattering was measured at six momentum transfers Q{sup 2} between 0.66 and 1.80 (GeV/c){sup 2} in Hall C at Jefferson Laboratory. The scattered electrons and recoil deuterons were detected in coincidence, at a fixed deuteron angle of 60.5{degree}. These new precise measurements resolve discrepancies between older sets of data. They put significant constraints on existing models of the deuteron electromagnetic structure, and on the strength of isoscalar meson exchange currents. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Quantum Heuristics of Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy-Leblond, Jean-Marc

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the quantization of angular momentum components, Heisenberg-type inequalities for their spectral dispersions, and the quantization of the angular momentum modulus, without using operators or commutation relations. (MLH)

  6. Phonons with orbital angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Ayub, M. K.; Ali, S.; Mendonca, J. T.

    2011-10-15

    Ion accoustic waves or phonon modes are studied with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in an unmagnetized collissionless uniform plasma, whose constituents are the Boltzmann electrons and inertial ions. For this purpose, we have employed the fluid equations to obtain a paraxial equation in terms of ion density perturbations and discussed its Gaussian beam and Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beam solutions. Furthermore, an approximate solution for the electrostatic potential problem is presented, allowing to express the components of the electric field in terms of LG potential perturbations. The energy flux due to phonons is also calculated and the corresponding OAM is derived. Numerically, it is shown that the parameters such as azimuthal angle, radial and angular mode numbers, and beam waist, strongly modify the profiles of the phonon LG potential. The present results should be helpful in understanding the phonon mode excitations produced by Brillouin backscattering of laser beams in a uniform plasma.

  7. Exclusive Reactions at High Momentum Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radyushkin, Anatoly; Stoler, Paul

    2008-03-01

    . P. Szczepaniak and J. T. Londergan -- High energy break-up of few-nucleon systems / M. Sargsian -- Photodisintegration of the deuteron, and [symbol]He / R. Gilman -- A review of the few-body form factors / G. G. Petratos -- Nucleon form factor measurements and interpretation / C. F. Perdrisat -- Implications of G[symbol](Q[symbol])/G[symbol](Q[symbol]) / S. Dubnicka and A. Z. Dubnickova -- High Q[symbol] large acceptance G[symbol]/G[symbol] measurements using polarization transfer / L. Pentchev, C. F. Perdrisat and B. Wojtsekhowski -- A precise measurement of the neutron magnetic form factor G[symbol] in the few-GeV[symbol] region / G. P. Gilfoyle et al. (the CLAS collaboration) -- Magnetic form factor of the neutron up to 8 (GeV/c)[symbol] / B. Quinn -- Timelike form factors / K. K. Seth -- Polarization phenomena in e[symbol]e[symbol] [symbol] pp¯ revisited / A. Z. Dubnickova and S. Dubnicka -- Light-cone sum rules for form factors of the N[symbol] transition at Q[symbol] = 0 / J. Rohrwild -- Exclusive electroproduction of [symbol] mesons / A. N. Villano (for the JLab E01-002 collaboration) -- Exclusive electroproduction of [symbol] mesons in the S[symbol](1535) resonance region at high momentum transfer / M. M. Dalton (for the JLab E01-002 collaboration) -- Two-photon exchange in electron-proton elastic scattering: theory update / A. V. Afanasev -- Two-photon exchange contributions to elastic ep scattering in the non-local field formalism / P. Jain, S. D. Joglekar and S. Mitra -- Beyond the born approximation: a precise comparison of positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering in CLAS / J. Lachniet et al. -- Meson form factors in the space-like region / D. Gaskell -- Pion-nucleon distribution amplitudes / A. Peters -- [symbol] scattering in the 1/N[symbol] expansion / H. J. Kwee -- [symbol] annihilations into quasi-two-body final states at 10.58 GeV / Kai Yi -- Transition distribution amplitudes / J. P. Lansberg, B. Pire and L. Szymanowski -- Novel QCD

  8. Orbital angular momentum and generalized transverse momentum distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yong; Liu, Keh-Fei; Yang, Yi-Bo

    2016-03-01

    We show that, when boosted to the infinite momentum frame, the quark and gluon orbital angular momentum operators defined in the nucleon spin sum rule of Chen et al. are the same as those whose matrix elements correspond to the moments of generalized transverse momentum distributions. This completes the connection between the infinite momentum limit of each term in that sum rule and experimentally measurable observables. We also show that these orbital angular momentum operators can be defined locally and discuss the strategies of calculating them in lattice QCD.

  9. First-Principles Momentum-Dependent Local Ansatz Wavefunction and Momentum Distribution Function Bands of Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakehashi, Yoshiro; Chandra, Sumal

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a first-principles local ansatz wavefunction approach with momentum-dependent variational parameters on the basis of the tight-binding LDA+U Hamiltonian. The theory goes beyond the first-principles Gutzwiller approach and quantitatively describes correlated electron systems. Using the theory, we find that the momentum distribution function (MDF) bands of paramagnetic bcc Fe along high-symmetry lines show a large deviation from the Fermi-Dirac function for the d electrons with eg symmetry and yield the momentum-dependent mass enhancement factors. The calculated average mass enhancement m*/m = 1.65 is consistent with low-temperature specific heat data as well as recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data.

  10. High precision measurement of the proton charge radius: The PRad experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane, Mehdi

    2013-11-01

    The recent high precision measurements of the proton charge radius performed at PSI from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift puzzled the hadronic physics community. A value of 0.8418 {+-} 0.0007 fm was extracted which is 7{sigma} smaller than the previous determinations obtained from electron-proton scattering experiments and based on precision spectroscopy of electronic hydrogen. An additional extraction of the proton charge radius from electron scattering at Mainz is also in good agreement with these "electronic" determinations. An independent measurement of the proton charge radius from unpolarized elastic ep scattering using a magnetic spectrometer free method was proposed and fully approved at Jefferson Laboratory in June 2012. This novel technique uses the high precision calorimeter HyCal and a windowless hydrogen gas target which makes possible the extraction of the charge radius at very forward angles and thus very low momentum transfer Q{sup 2} up to 10{sup -4} (GeV/c){sup 2} with an unprecedented sub-percent precision for this type of experiment. In this paper, after a review of the recent progress on the proton charge radius extraction and the new high precision experiment PRad will be presented.

  11. High precision measurement of the proton charge radius: The PRad experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane, Mehdi; Collaboration: PRad Collaboration

    2013-11-07

    The recent high precision measurements of the proton charge radius performed at PSI from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift puzzled the hadronic physics community. A value of 0.8418 ± 0.0007 fm was extracted which is 7σ smaller than the previous determinations obtained from electron-proton scattering experiments and based on precision spectroscopy of electronic hydrogen. An additional extraction of the proton charge radius from electron scattering at Mainz is also in good agreement with these 'electronic' determinations. An independent measurement of the proton charge radius from unpolarized elastic ep scattering using a magnetic spectrometer free method was proposed and fully approved at Jefferson Laboratory in June 2012. This novel technique uses the high precision calorimeter HyCal and a windowless hydrogen gas target which makes possible the extraction of the charge radius at very forward angles and thus very low momentum transfer Q{sup 2} up to 10{sup −4} (GeV/c){sup 2} with an unprecedented sub-percent precision for this type of experiment. In this paper, after a review of the recent progress on the proton charge radius extraction and the new high precision experiment PRad will be presented.

  12. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2010-03-01

    A new combined understanding of plate tectonics, Earth internal structure, and the role of impulse in deformation of the Earth's crust is presented. Plate accelerations and decelerations have been revealed by iterative filtering of the quaternion history for the Euler poles that define absolute plate motion history for the past 68 million years, and provide an unprecedented precision for plate angular rotation variations with time at 2-million year intervals. Stage poles represent the angular rotation of a plate's motion between adjacent Euler poles, and from which the maximum velocity vector for a plate can be determined. The consistent maximum velocity variations, in turn, yield consistent estimates of plate accelerations and decelerations. The fact that the Pacific plate was shown to accelerate and decelerate, implied that conservation of plate tectonic angular momentum must be globally conserved, and that is confirmed by the results shown here (total angular momentum ~1.4+27 kg m2 s-1). Accordingly, if a plate decelerates, other plates must increase their angular momentums to compensate. In addition, the azimuth of the maximum velocity vectors yields clues as to why the "bend" in the Emperor-Hawaiian seamount trend occurred near 46 Myr. This report summarizes processing results for 12 of the 14 major tectonic plates of the Earth (except for the Juan de Fuca and Philippine plates). Plate accelerations support the contention that plate tectonics is a product of torques that most likely are sustained by the sinking of positive density anomalies revealed by geoid anomalies of the degree 4-10 packet of the Earth's spherical harmonic coefficients. These linear positive geoid anomalies underlie plate subduction zones and are presumed due to phase changes in subducted gabbroic lithosphere at depth in the upper lower mantle (above 1200 km depth). The tectonic plates are pulled along by the sinking of these positive mass anomalies, rather than moving at near constant

  13. Precision Muonium Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann, Klaus P.

    2016-09-01

    The muonium atom is the purely leptonic bound state of a positive muon and an electron. It has a lifetime of 2.2 µs. The absence of any known internal structure provides for precision experiments to test fundamental physics theories and to determine accurate values of fundamental constants. In particular ground state hyperfine structure transitions can be measured by microwave spectroscopy to deliver the muon magnetic moment. The frequency of the 1s-2s transition in the hydrogen-like atom can be determined with laser spectroscopy to obtain the muon mass. With such measurements fundamental physical interactions, in particular quantum electrodynamics, can also be tested at highest precision. The results are important input parameters for experiments on the muon magnetic anomaly. The simplicity of the atom enables further precise experiments, such as a search for muonium-antimuonium conversion for testing charged lepton number conservation and searches for possible antigravity of muons and dark matter.

  14. The momentum imbalance paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichevin, Thierry; Nof, Doron

    1997-03-01

    The classical question of what happens when anomalous water enters an ocean via a meridional northward channel is addressed analytically using a reduced-gravity nonlinear model. The channel corresponds to either a conduit connecting 2 otherwise separated basins (e.g., the Yucatan Channel) or a conduit carrying water from an independent source. The traditional view is that, due to the Coriolis force, such an anomalous northward flowing current turns to the right (looking offshore) and forms a zonal boundary current that flows eastward. In this scenario, a front (corresponding to a surfacing interface) separates the oceanic and the anomalous water. Integration of the steady inviscid momentum equation along the boundary gives the long-shore flow-force and shows that such a scenario leads to a paradox. Specifically, such a flow corresponds to an unbalanced flow-force and, therefore, cannot exist. To balance the integrated momentum and resolve the paradox the inflow constantly sheds anticyclones which propagate to the left due to β. Under such conditions, the momentum of the eddies moving to the left balances the momentum of the current flowing to the right. This new eddy shedding mechanism may explain why the Loop Current produces loops and why other inflows produce anticyclones. A nonlinear analytical solution to the problem is constructed with the aid of a new and powerful theoretical approach which is based on the idea that, after each eddy generation process, the system returns to its original state. This implies that nonlinear periodic flows can be integrated over a control volume in a similar manner to the integration used in steady flows. This novel method enables us to extract the details of the resulting features (i.e., their size, speed, periodicity and depth of the shedded rings) without solving for the details of the incredibly complicated three-dimensional and time-dependent generation process. It turns out that the problem involves a new eddy length

  15. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkardt, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Generalized parton distributions provide information on the distribution of quarks in impact parameter space. For transversely polarized nucleons, these impact parameter distributions are transversely distorted and this deviation from axial symmetry leads on average to a net transverse force from the spectators on the active quark in a DIS experiment. This force when acting along the whole trajectory of the active quark leads to transverse single-spin asymmetries. For a longitudinally polarized nucleon target, the transverse force implies a torque acting on the quark orbital angular momentum (OAM). The resulting change in OAM as the quark leaves the target equals the difference between the Jaffe-Manohar and Ji OAMs.

  16. Exclusive Reactions at High Momentum Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radyushkin, Anatoly; Stoler, Paul

    2008-03-01

    . P. Szczepaniak and J. T. Londergan -- High energy break-up of few-nucleon systems / M. Sargsian -- Photodisintegration of the deuteron, and [symbol]He / R. Gilman -- A review of the few-body form factors / G. G. Petratos -- Nucleon form factor measurements and interpretation / C. F. Perdrisat -- Implications of G[symbol](Q[symbol])/G[symbol](Q[symbol]) / S. Dubnicka and A. Z. Dubnickova -- High Q[symbol] large acceptance G[symbol]/G[symbol] measurements using polarization transfer / L. Pentchev, C. F. Perdrisat and B. Wojtsekhowski -- A precise measurement of the neutron magnetic form factor G[symbol] in the few-GeV[symbol] region / G. P. Gilfoyle et al. (the CLAS collaboration) -- Magnetic form factor of the neutron up to 8 (GeV/c)[symbol] / B. Quinn -- Timelike form factors / K. K. Seth -- Polarization phenomena in e[symbol]e[symbol] [symbol] pp¯ revisited / A. Z. Dubnickova and S. Dubnicka -- Light-cone sum rules for form factors of the N[symbol] transition at Q[symbol] = 0 / J. Rohrwild -- Exclusive electroproduction of [symbol] mesons / A. N. Villano (for the JLab E01-002 collaboration) -- Exclusive electroproduction of [symbol] mesons in the S[symbol](1535) resonance region at high momentum transfer / M. M. Dalton (for the JLab E01-002 collaboration) -- Two-photon exchange in electron-proton elastic scattering: theory update / A. V. Afanasev -- Two-photon exchange contributions to elastic ep scattering in the non-local field formalism / P. Jain, S. D. Joglekar and S. Mitra -- Beyond the born approximation: a precise comparison of positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering in CLAS / J. Lachniet et al. -- Meson form factors in the space-like region / D. Gaskell -- Pion-nucleon distribution amplitudes / A. Peters -- [symbol] scattering in the 1/N[symbol] expansion / H. J. Kwee -- [symbol] annihilations into quasi-two-body final states at 10.58 GeV / Kai Yi -- Transition distribution amplitudes / J. P. Lansberg, B. Pire and L. Szymanowski -- Novel QCD

  17. Momentum Deposition in Curvilinear Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, Mathew Allen; Lowrie, Robert Byron; Rockefeller, Gabriel M.; Thompson, Kelly Glen; Wollaber, Allan Benton

    2015-08-03

    The momentum imparted into a material by thermal radiation deposition is an important physical process in astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) simulations. In recent work we presented a new method of evaluating momentum deposition that relies on the combination of a time-averaged approximation and a numerical integration scheme. This approach robustly and efficiently evaluates the momentum deposition in spherical geometry. Future work will look to extend this approach to 2D cylindrical geometries.

  18. Angular momentum evolution for galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrosa, S. E.; Tissera, P. B.

    2015-08-01

    Using cosmological hydrodinamics simulations we study the angular momentum content of the simulated galaxies in relation with their morphological type. We found that not only the angular momentum of the disk component follow the expected theoretical relation (Mo, Mao White model), but also the spheroidal one, with a gap due to its lost of angular momentum. We also found that the galaxy size can plot in one general relation, despite the morphological type,, in agreement with recent findings.

  19. Partonic Transverse Momentum Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2010-08-04

    In recent years parton distributions have been generalized to account also for transverse degrees of freedom and new sets of more general distributions, Transverse Momentum Dependent (TMD) parton distributions and fragmentation functions were introduced. Different experiments worldwide (HERMES, COMPASS, CLAS, JLab-Hall A) have measurements of TMDs in semi-inclusive DIS processes as one of their main focuses of research. TMD studies are also an important part of the present and future Drell-Yan experiments at RICH and JPARC and GSI, respectively, Studies of TMDs are also one of the main driving forces of the Jefferson Lab (JLab) 12 GeV upgrade project. Progress in phenomenology and theory is flourishing as well. In this talk an overview of the latest developments in studies of TMDs will be given and newly released results, ongoing activities, as well as planned near term and future measurements will be discussed.

  20. Force As A Momentum Current

    SciTech Connect

    Munera, Hector A.

    2010-07-28

    Advantages of a neo-Cartesian approach to classical mechanics are noted. If conservation of linear momentum is the fundamental principle, Newton's three laws become theorems. A minor paradox in static Newtonian mechanics is identified, and solved by reinterpreting force as a current of momentum. Contact force plays the role of a mere midwife in the exchange of momentum; however, force cannot be eliminated from physics because it provides the numerical value for momentum current. In this sense, in a neo-Cartesian formulation of mechanics the concept of force becomes strengthened rather than weakened.

  1. Force As A Momentum Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Múnera, Héctor A.

    2010-07-01

    Advantages of a neo-Cartesian approach to classical mechanics are noted. If conservation of linear momentum is the fundamental principle, Newton's three laws become theorems. A minor paradox in static Newtonian mechanics is identified, and solved by reinterpreting force as a current of momentum. Contact force plays the role of a mere midwife in the exchange of momentum; however, force cannot be eliminated from physics because it provides the numerical value for momentum current. In this sense, in a neo-Cartesian formulation of mechanics the concept of force becomes strengthened rather than weakened.

  2. Electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springford, Michael

    1997-03-01

    1. J. J. Thomson and the discovery of the electron A. B. P. Pippard; 2. The isolated electron W. N. Cottingham; 3. The relativistic electron D. I. Olive; 4. The electron glue B. L. Gyorffy; 5. The electron fluid P. Coleman; 6. The magnetic electron G. G. Lonzarich; 7. The paired electron A. J. Leggett; 8. The heavy electron M. Springford; 9. The coherent electron Y. Imry and M. Peskin; 10. The composite electron R. Nicholas; 11. The electron in the cosmos M. S. Longair.

  3. Electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springford, Michael

    2008-12-01

    1. J. J. Thomson and the discovery of the electron A. B. P. Pippard; 2. The isolated electron W. N. Cottingham; 3. The relativistic electron D. I. Olive; 4. The electron glue B. L. Gyorffy; 5. The electron fluid P. Coleman; 6. The magnetic electron G. G. Lonzarich; 7. The paired electron A. J. Leggett; 8. The heavy electron M. Springford; 9. The coherent electron Y. Imry and M. Peskin; 10. The composite electron R. Nicholas; 11. The electron in the cosmos M. S. Longair.

  4. Unveiling pseudospin and angular momentum in photonic graphene.

    PubMed

    Song, Daohong; Paltoglou, Vassilis; Liu, Sheng; Zhu, Yi; Gallardo, Daniel; Tang, Liqin; Xu, Jingjun; Ablowitz, Mark; Efremidis, Nikolaos K; Chen, Zhigang

    2015-02-17

    Pseudospin, an additional degree of freedom inherent in graphene, plays a key role in understanding many fundamental phenomena such as the anomalous quantum Hall effect, electron chirality and Klein paradox. Unlike the electron spin, the pseudospin was traditionally considered as an unmeasurable quantity, immune to Stern-Gerlach-type experiments. Recently, however, it has been suggested that graphene pseudospin is a real angular momentum that might manifest itself as an observable quantity, but so far direct tests of such a momentum remained unfruitful. Here, by selective excitation of two sublattices of an artificial photonic graphene, we demonstrate pseudospin-mediated vortex generation and topological charge flipping in otherwise uniform optical beams with Bloch momentum traversing through the Dirac points. Corroborated by numerical solutions of the linear massless Dirac-Weyl equation, we show that pseudospin can turn into orbital angular momentum completely, thus upholding the belief that pseudospin is not merely for theoretical elegance but rather physically measurable.

  5. Unveiling pseudospin and angular momentum in photonic graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Daohong; Paltoglou, Vassilis; Liu, Sheng; Zhu, Yi; Gallardo, Daniel; Tang, Liqin; Xu, Jingjun; Ablowitz, Mark; Efremidis, Nikolaos K.; Chen, Zhigang

    2015-02-01

    Pseudospin, an additional degree of freedom inherent in graphene, plays a key role in understanding many fundamental phenomena such as the anomalous quantum Hall effect, electron chirality and Klein paradox. Unlike the electron spin, the pseudospin was traditionally considered as an unmeasurable quantity, immune to Stern-Gerlach-type experiments. Recently, however, it has been suggested that graphene pseudospin is a real angular momentum that might manifest itself as an observable quantity, but so far direct tests of such a momentum remained unfruitful. Here, by selective excitation of two sublattices of an artificial photonic graphene, we demonstrate pseudospin-mediated vortex generation and topological charge flipping in otherwise uniform optical beams with Bloch momentum traversing through the Dirac points. Corroborated by numerical solutions of the linear massless Dirac-Weyl equation, we show that pseudospin can turn into orbital angular momentum completely, thus upholding the belief that pseudospin is not merely for theoretical elegance but rather physically measurable.

  6. Precision Optics Optimization for GMp Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Allada, Kalyan; Averett, Todd; Christy, Eric; Gu, Chao; Huang, Min; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; GMp Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The GMp experiment aims to improve the precision on the elastic e-p cross section measurement to 2%; up to a factor of 5 better than previous measurements, with four-momentum transfer up to 14 GeV2 using the High Resolution Spectrometers (HRS) of Hall A at Jefferson Lab. These measurements will be an important benchmark for many other cross section measurements in hadron physics. To reach this goal, it is necessary to improve the precision of many instrument systems. Knowledge of the magnetic optics of HRS is critically important for precision reconstruction of the momentum and coordinates of the scattered particles at the interaction vertex. In this talk, an improved optimization method for optics will be presented in detail and the results of a study based on recent commissioning data in 2014 will be discussed.

  7. Intrinsic Angular Momentum of Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santarelli, Vincent

    1979-01-01

    Derives a familiar torque-angular momentum theorem for the electromagnetic field, and includes the intrinsic torques exerted by the fields on the polarized medium. This inclusion leads to the expressions for the intrinsic angular momentum carried by the radiation traveling through a charge-free medium. (Author/MA)

  8. Controlling neutron orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Clark, Charles W; Barankov, Roman; Huber, Michael G; Arif, Muhammad; Cory, David G; Pushin, Dmitry A

    2015-09-24

    The quantized orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons offers an additional degree of freedom and topological protection from noise. Photonic OAM states have therefore been exploited in various applications ranging from studies of quantum entanglement and quantum information science to imaging. The OAM states of electron beams have been shown to be similarly useful, for example in rotating nanoparticles and determining the chirality of crystals. However, although neutrons--as massive, penetrating and neutral particles--are important in materials characterization, quantum information and studies of the foundations of quantum mechanics, OAM control of neutrons has yet to be achieved. Here, we demonstrate OAM control of neutrons using macroscopic spiral phase plates that apply a 'twist' to an input neutron beam. The twisted neutron beams are analysed with neutron interferometry. Our techniques, applied to spatially incoherent beams, demonstrate both the addition of quantum angular momenta along the direction of propagation, effected by multiple spiral phase plates, and the conservation of topological charge with respect to uniform phase fluctuations. Neutron-based studies of quantum information science, the foundations of quantum mechanics, and scattering and imaging of magnetic, superconducting and chiral materials have until now been limited to three degrees of freedom: spin, path and energy. The optimization of OAM control, leading to well defined values of OAM, would provide an additional quantized degree of freedom for such studies.

  9. Precise measurements of beam spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive π0 production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghasyan, M.; Avakian, H.; Rossi, P.; De Sanctis, E.; Hasch, D.; Mirazita, M.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; Biselli, A. S.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Chandavar, S.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalkar, S. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Kvaltine, N. D.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McAndrew, J.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Micherdzinska, A. M.; Mokeev, V.; Moreno, B.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Phelps, E.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rosner, G.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z. W.

    2011-10-01

    We present studies of single-spin asymmetries for neutral pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of 5.776 GeV polarized electrons from an unpolarized hydrogen target, using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. A substantial sinϕh amplitude has been measured in the distribution of the cross section asymmetry as a function of the azimuthal angle ϕh of the produced neutral pion. The dependence of this amplitude on Bjorken x and on the pion transverse momentum is extracted with significantly higher precision than previous data and is compared to model calculations.

  10. Precise Measurements of Beam Spin Asymmetries in Semi-Inclusive π0 production

    DOE PAGES

    Aghasyan, M.; Avakian, H.; Rossi, P.; De Sanctis, E.; Hasch, D.; Mirazita, M.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; et al

    2011-10-01

    We present studies of single-spin asymmetries for neutral pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of 5.776 GeV polarized electrons from an unpolarized hydrogen target, using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. A substantial sin Φh amplitude has been measured in the distribution of the cross section asymmetry as a function of the azimuthal angle Φh of the produced neutral pion. The dependence of this amplitude on Bjorken x and on the pion transverse momentum is extracted with significantly higher precision than previous data and is compared to model calculations.

  11. Transverse angular momentum of photons

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, Andrea

    2010-05-15

    We develop the quantum theory of transverse angular momentum of light beams. The theory applies to paraxial and quasiparaxial photon beams in vacuum and reproduces the known results for classical beams when applied to coherent states of the field. Both the Poynting vector, alias the linear momentum, and the angular-momentum quantum operators of a light beam are calculated including contributions from first-order transverse derivatives. This permits a correct description of the energy flow in the beam and the natural emergence of both the spin and the angular momentum of the photons. We show that for collimated beams of light, orbital angular-momentum operators do not satisfy the standard commutation rules. Finally, we discuss the application of our theory to some concrete cases.

  12. Momentum transfer from oblique impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Peter H.; Gault, Donald E.

    1987-01-01

    A completely satisfactory experiment would be in a low gravity environment where the effect of momentum imparted by ejecta impacting the surface can be removed or controlled from momentum transfer during impact. Preliminary estimates can be made using a ballistic pendulum. Such experiments were initiated at the NASA-Ames Vertical Gun Range in order to examine momentum transfer due to impact vaporization for oblique impacts. The preliminary results indicate that momentum from oblique impacts is very inefficient: decreasing with increasing impact velocity and perhaps size; increasing with decreasing density; and increasing with increasing impact angle. At face value, such results minimize the effect of momentum transfer by grazing impact; the more probable impact angles of 30 deg would have a greater effect, contrary to the commonly held impression.

  13. Precision synchrotron radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, M.; Rouse, F.; Butler, J.; Jung, C.K.; Lateur, M.; Nash, J.; Tinsman, J.; Wormser, G.; Gomez, J.J.; Kent, J.

    1989-03-01

    Precision detectors to measure synchrotron radiation beam positions have been designed and installed as part of beam energy spectrometers at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The distance between pairs of synchrotron radiation beams is measured absolutely to better than 28 /mu/m on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This contributes less than 5 MeV to the error in the measurement of SLC beam energies (approximately 50 GeV). A system of high-resolution video cameras viewing precisely-aligned fiducial wire arrays overlaying phosphorescent screens has achieved this accuracy. Also, detectors of synchrotron radiation using the charge developed by the ejection of Compton-recoil electrons from an array of fine wires are being developed. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Double-slit experiment in momentum space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. P.; Seipt, D.; Surzhykov, A.; Fritzsche, S.

    2016-08-01

    Young's classic double-slit experiment demonstrates the reality of interference when waves and particles travel simultaneously along two different spatial paths. Here, we propose a double-slit experiment in momentum space, realized in the free-space elastic scattering of vortex electrons. We show that this process proceeds along two paths in momentum space, which are well localized and well separated from each other. For such vortex beams, the (plane-wave) amplitudes along the two paths acquire adjustable phase shifts and produce interference fringes in the final angular distribution. We argue that this experiment can be realized with the present-day technology. We show that it gives experimental access to the Coulomb phase, a quantity which plays an important role in all charged particle scattering but which usual scattering experiments are insensitive to.

  15. Angular momentum in human walking.

    PubMed

    Herr, Hugh; Popovic, Marko

    2008-02-01

    Angular momentum is a conserved physical quantity for isolated systems where no external moments act about a body's center of mass (CM). However, in the case of legged locomotion, where the body interacts with the environment (ground reaction forces), there is no a priori reason for this relationship to hold. A key hypothesis in this paper is that angular momentum is highly regulated throughout the walking cycle about all three spatial directions [|Lt| approximately 0], and therefore horizontal ground reaction forces and the center of pressure trajectory can be explained predominantly through an analysis that assumes zero net moment about the body's CM. Using a 16-segment human model and gait data for 10 study participants, we found that calculated zero-moment forces closely match experimental values (Rx2=0.91; Ry2=0.90). Additionally, the centroidal moment pivot (point where a line parallel to the ground reaction force, passing through the CM, intersects the ground) never leaves the ground support base, highlighting how closely the body regulates angular momentum. Principal component analysis was used to examine segmental contributions to whole-body angular momentum. We found that whole-body angular momentum is small, despite substantial segmental momenta, indicating large segment-to-segment cancellations ( approximately 95% medio-lateral, approximately 70% anterior-posterior and approximately 80% vertical). Specifically, we show that adjacent leg-segment momenta are balanced in the medio-lateral direction (left foot momentum cancels right foot momentum, etc.). Further, pelvis and abdomen momenta are balanced by leg, chest and head momenta in the anterior-posterior direction, and leg momentum is balanced by upper-body momentum in the vertical direction. Finally, we discuss the determinants of gait in the context of these segment-to-segment cancellations of angular momentum.

  16. Precision Pointing System Development

    SciTech Connect

    BUGOS, ROBERT M.

    2003-03-01

    The development of precision pointing systems has been underway in Sandia's Electronic Systems Center for over thirty years. Important areas of emphasis are synthetic aperture radars and optical reconnaissance systems. Most applications are in the aerospace arena, with host vehicles including rockets, satellites, and manned and unmanned aircraft. Systems have been used on defense-related missions throughout the world. Presently in development are pointing systems with accuracy goals in the nanoradian regime. Future activity will include efforts to dramatically reduce system size and weight through measures such as the incorporation of advanced materials and MEMS inertial sensors.

  17. Parton transverse momentum and orbital angular momentum distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Abha; Courtoy, Aurore; Engelhardt, Michael; Liuti, Simonetta

    2016-08-01

    The quark orbital angular momentum component of proton spin, Lq, can be defined in QCD as the integral of a Wigner phase space distribution weighting the cross product of the quark's transverse position and momentum. It can also be independently defined from the operator product expansion for the off-forward Compton amplitude in terms of a twist-three generalized parton distribution. We provide an explicit link between the two definitions, connecting them through their dependence on partonic intrinsic transverse momentum. Connecting the definitions provides the key for correlating direct experimental determinations of Lq and evaluations through lattice QCD calculations. The direct observation of quark orbital angular momentum does not require transverse spin polarization but can occur using longitudinally polarized targets.

  18. Precision Experiments at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, W.

    2015-07-01

    The Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) established the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics with unprecedented precision, including all its radiative corrections. These led to predictions for the masses of the top quark and Higgs boson, which were beautifully confirmed later on. After these precision measurements the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded in 1999 jointly to 't Hooft and Veltman "for elucidating the quantum structure of electroweak interactions in physics". Another hallmark of the LEP results were the precise measurements of the gauge coupling constants, which excluded unification of the forces within the SM, but allowed unification within the supersymmetric extension of the SM. This increased the interest in Supersymmetry (SUSY) and Grand Unified Theories, especially since the SM has no candidate for the elusive dark matter, while SUSY provides an excellent candidate for dark matter. In addition, SUSY removes the quadratic divergencies of the SM and predicts the Higgs mechanism from radiative electroweak symmetry breaking with a SM-like Higgs boson having a mass below 130 GeV in agreement with the Higgs boson discovery at the LHC. However, the predicted SUSY particles have not been found either because they are too heavy for the present LHC energy and luminosity or Nature has found alternative ways to circumvent the shortcomings of the SM.

  19. Precision Experiments at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, W.

    2015-09-01

    The Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) established the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics with unprecedented precision, including all its radiative corrections. These led to predictions for the masses of the top quark and Higgs boson, which were beautifully confirmed later on. After these precision measurements the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded in 1999 jointly to 't Hooft and Veltman "for elucidating the quantum structure of electroweak interactions in physics". Another hallmark of the LEP results were the precise measurements of the gauge coupling constants, which excluded unification of the forces within the SM, but allowed unification within the supersymmetric extension of the SM. This increased the interest in Supersymmetry (SUSY) and Grand Unified Theories, especially since the SM has no candidate for the elusive dark matter, while Supersymmetry provides an excellent candidate for dark matter. In addition, Supersymmetry removes the quadratic divergencies of the SM and {\\it predicts} the Higgs mechanism from radiative electroweak symmetry breaking with a SM-like Higgs boson having a mass below 130 GeV in agreement with the Higgs boson discovery at the LHC. However, the predicted SUSY particles have not been found either because they are too heavy for the present LHC energy and luminosity or Nature has found alternative ways to circumvent the shortcomings of the SM.

  20. Momentum space imaging of the FFLO state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Alireza; Thalmeier, Peter

    2016-06-01

    In a magnetic field superconductors (SC) with small orbital effect exhibit the Fulde–Ferrell–Larkin–Ovchinnikov (FFLO) phase above the Pauli limiting field. It is characterized by Cooper pairs with finite center of mass momentum and is stabilized by the gain in Zeeman energy of depaired electrons in the imbalanced Fermi gas. The ground state is a coherent superposition of paired and depaired states. This concept, although central to the FFLO state lacks a direct experimental confirmation. We propose that STM quasiparticle interference (QPI) can give a direct momentum space image of the depaired states in the FFLO wave function. For a proof of principle we investigate a 2D single orbital tight binding model with a SC s-wave order parameter. Using the equilibrium values of pair momentum and SC gap we calculate the spectral function of quasiparticles and associated QPI spectrum as function of magnetic field. We show that the characteristic depaired Fermi surface parts appear as a fingerprint in the QPI spectrum of the FFLO phase and we demonstrate its evolution with field strength. Its observation in STM experiments would constitute a direct proof for FFLO ground state wave function.

  1. Momentum space imaging of the FFLO state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Alireza; Thalmeier, Peter

    2016-06-01

    In a magnetic field superconductors (SC) with small orbital effect exhibit the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) phase above the Pauli limiting field. It is characterized by Cooper pairs with finite center of mass momentum and is stabilized by the gain in Zeeman energy of depaired electrons in the imbalanced Fermi gas. The ground state is a coherent superposition of paired and depaired states. This concept, although central to the FFLO state lacks a direct experimental confirmation. We propose that STM quasiparticle interference (QPI) can give a direct momentum space image of the depaired states in the FFLO wave function. For a proof of principle we investigate a 2D single orbital tight binding model with a SC s-wave order parameter. Using the equilibrium values of pair momentum and SC gap we calculate the spectral function of quasiparticles and associated QPI spectrum as function of magnetic field. We show that the characteristic depaired Fermi surface parts appear as a fingerprint in the QPI spectrum of the FFLO phase and we demonstrate its evolution with field strength. Its observation in STM experiments would constitute a direct proof for FFLO ground state wave function.

  2. Angular momentum and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strittmatter, P. A.

    The present investigation is mainly concerned with the importance of high angular resolution observations in studies of star formation and, in particular, with elucidating the role which angular momentum plays in the process. A brief report is included on recent high angular resolution observations made with the Steward Observatory speckle camera system. A consideration of the angular momentum in interstellar clouds indicates that rotation precludes quasi-spherical contraction. A number of solutions to this angular momentum problem are examined, taking into account questions concerning the help provided by high angular resolution observations for an elucidation of the various possible scenarios of star formation. Technical aspects involved in obtaining suitable data are investigated. It is concluded that high angular resolution observations hold considerable promise for solving at least some of the problems associated with the role of angular momentum in star formation.

  3. Transverse Momentum Fluctuations at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavin, Sean; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed

    2004-10-01

    PHENIX and STAR data in Au+Au collisions at RHIC show that transverse momentum fluctuations increase as centrality increases. The approach to local thermal equilibrium can explain the similar centrality dependence of the average transverse momentum and its fluctuations [1]. Alternatively, this dependence can be attributed to jet effects, although the mechanism has not been spelled out in the literature [2]. Certainly both mechanisms play a role at some level. We review the nonequilibrium description of parton thermalization in [1]. We then extend the formulation to account for contributions to fluctuations from the energy loss of the high transverse momentum particles. Calculations are then compared to the measured average transverse momentum and its fluctuations. We then discuss how correlation function measurements may distinguish these effects. [1] Sean Gavin, Phys.Rev.Lett. 92 (2004) 162301. [2] S. S. Adler et al. [PHENIX Collaboration], arXiv:nucl-ex/0310005.

  4. Nuclear physics. Momentum sharing in imbalanced Fermi systems.

    PubMed

    Hen, O; Sargsian, M; Weinstein, L B; Piasetzky, E; Hakobyan, H; Higinbotham, D W; Braverman, M; Brooks, W K; Gilad, S; Adhikari, K P; Arrington, J; Asryan, G; Avakian, H; Ball, J; Baltzell, N A; Battaglieri, M; Beck, A; May-Tal Beck, S; Bedlinskiy, I; Bertozzi, W; Biselli, A; Burkert, V D; Cao, T; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; De Vita, R; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dupre, R; Egiyan, H; El Alaoui, A; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Forest, T; Garillon, B; Garcon, M; Gevorgyan, N; Ghandilyan, Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hanretty, C; Hattawy, M; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkanov, B I; Isupov, E L; Jiang, H; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, F J; Koirala, S; Korover, I; Kuhn, S E; Kubarovsky, V; Lenisa, P; Levine, W I; Livingston, K; Lowry, M; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Mineeva, T; Mokeev, V; Movsisyan, A; Munoz Camacho, C; Mustapha, B; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Pappalardo, L L; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Phelps, W; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Puckett, A J R; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Roy, P; Rossi, P; Sabatié, F; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Sharabian, Y G; Smith, G D; Shneor, R; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Taiuti, M; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Vlassov, A V; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Wei, X; Wood, M H; Wood, S A; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhao, Z W; Zheng, X; Zonta, I

    2014-10-31

    The atomic nucleus is composed of two different kinds of fermions: protons and neutrons. If the protons and neutrons did not interact, the Pauli exclusion principle would force the majority of fermions (usually neutrons) to have a higher average momentum. Our high-energy electron-scattering measurements using (12)C, (27)Al, (56)Fe, and (208)Pb targets show that even in heavy, neutron-rich nuclei, short-range interactions between the fermions form correlated high-momentum neutron-proton pairs. Thus, in neutron-rich nuclei, protons have a greater probability than neutrons to have momentum greater than the Fermi momentum. This finding has implications ranging from nuclear few-body systems to neutron stars and may also be observable experimentally in two-spin-state, ultracold atomic gas systems. PMID:25323697

  5. Nuclear physics. Momentum sharing in imbalanced Fermi systems.

    PubMed

    Hen, O; Sargsian, M; Weinstein, L B; Piasetzky, E; Hakobyan, H; Higinbotham, D W; Braverman, M; Brooks, W K; Gilad, S; Adhikari, K P; Arrington, J; Asryan, G; Avakian, H; Ball, J; Baltzell, N A; Battaglieri, M; Beck, A; May-Tal Beck, S; Bedlinskiy, I; Bertozzi, W; Biselli, A; Burkert, V D; Cao, T; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; De Vita, R; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dupre, R; Egiyan, H; El Alaoui, A; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Forest, T; Garillon, B; Garcon, M; Gevorgyan, N; Ghandilyan, Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hanretty, C; Hattawy, M; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkanov, B I; Isupov, E L; Jiang, H; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, F J; Koirala, S; Korover, I; Kuhn, S E; Kubarovsky, V; Lenisa, P; Levine, W I; Livingston, K; Lowry, M; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Mineeva, T; Mokeev, V; Movsisyan, A; Munoz Camacho, C; Mustapha, B; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Pappalardo, L L; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Phelps, W; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Puckett, A J R; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Roy, P; Rossi, P; Sabatié, F; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Sharabian, Y G; Smith, G D; Shneor, R; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Taiuti, M; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Vlassov, A V; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Wei, X; Wood, M H; Wood, S A; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhao, Z W; Zheng, X; Zonta, I

    2014-10-31

    The atomic nucleus is composed of two different kinds of fermions: protons and neutrons. If the protons and neutrons did not interact, the Pauli exclusion principle would force the majority of fermions (usually neutrons) to have a higher average momentum. Our high-energy electron-scattering measurements using (12)C, (27)Al, (56)Fe, and (208)Pb targets show that even in heavy, neutron-rich nuclei, short-range interactions between the fermions form correlated high-momentum neutron-proton pairs. Thus, in neutron-rich nuclei, protons have a greater probability than neutrons to have momentum greater than the Fermi momentum. This finding has implications ranging from nuclear few-body systems to neutron stars and may also be observable experimentally in two-spin-state, ultracold atomic gas systems.

  6. The varieties of momentum-like experience.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Timothy L

    2015-11-01

    Cognition and behavior exhibit biases consistent with future expectations, and some of these biases result in momentum-like effects and have been linked with the idea of momentum. These momentum-like effects include representational momentum, operational momentum, attentional momentum, behavioral momentum, and psychological momentum. Effects of numerous variables involving characteristics of the target, display, context, or observer on each momentum-like effect are considered, and similarities of different momentum-like effects are considered. It is suggested that representational momentum, operational momentum, and attentional momentum reflect similar or overlapping mechanisms based on a perceptual time-scale and extrapolation primarily across space, and that behavioral momentum and psychological momentum reflect similar or overlapping mechanisms based on a longer time-scale and extrapolation primarily across time. It is further suggested that all 5 forms of momentum-like effect could reflect a more general extrapolation mechanism that anticipates the future action, behavior, or outcome of a given target, person, or process. A list of properties characterizing momentum-like effects is proposed, and constraints and issues relevant to future models of momentum-like effects are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  7. Momentum Confinement at Low Torque

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, W M; Burrell, K H; deGrassie, J S; Budny, R; Groebner, R J; Heidbrink, W W; Kinsey, J E; Kramer, G J; Makowski, M A; Mikkelsen, D; Nazikian, R; Petty, C C; Politzer, P A; Scott, S D; Van Zeeland, M A; Zarnstorff, M C

    2007-06-26

    Momentum confinement was investigated on DIII-D as a function of applied neutral beam torque at constant normalized {beta}{sub N}, by varying the mix of co (parallel to the plasma current) and counter neutral beams. Under balanced neutral beam injection (i.e. zero total torque to the plasma), the plasma maintains a significant rotation in the co-direction. This 'intrinsic' rotation can be modeled as being due to an offset in the applied torque (i.e. an 'anomalous torque'). This anomalous torque appears to have a magnitude comparable to one co-neutral beam source. The presence of such an anomalous torque source must be taken into account to obtain meaningful quantities describing momentum transport, such as the global momentum confinement time and local diffusivities. Studies of the mechanical angular momentum in ELMing H-mode plasmas with elevated q{sub min} show that the momentum confinement time improves as the torque is reduced. In hybrid plasmas, the opposite effect is observed, namely that momentum confinement improves at high torque/rotation. The relative importance of E x B shearing between the two is modeled using GLF23 and may suggest a possible explanation.

  8. Nab: precise experimental study of unpolarized neutron beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocanic, Dinko; Nab Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Nab, a program of experimental study of unpolarized neutron decays at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge, TN, aims to determine a, the electron-neutrino correlation with precision of δa / a =10-3 , and b, the Fierz interference term, with uncertainty δb ~= 3 ×10-3 . Neutron beta decay's simple theoretical description in the Standard Model (SM) is overconstrained by the set of available observables, providing opportunities to search for evidence of SM extensions. Planned Nab results will lead to a new precise determination of the ratio λ =GA /GV , and to significant reductions in the allowed limits for both right- and left-handed scalar and tensor currents. Alternatively, the experiment may detect a discrepancy from SM predictions consistent with certain realizations of supersymmetry. An optimized, asymmetric spectrometer has been designed to achieve the narrow proton momentum response function required to meet the physics goals of the experiment. The apparatus is to be used in a follow-up measurement (ABba) of asymmetry observables A and B in polarized neutron decay. Nab is funded, now in the construction stage, with planned beam readiness in 2016. We discuss the experiment's motivation, expected reach, design and method. Nab, a program of experimental study of unpolarized neutron decays at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge, TN, aims to determine a, the electron-neutrino correlation with precision of δa / a =10-3 , and b, the Fierz interference term, with uncertainty δb ~= 3 ×10-3 . Neutron beta decay's simple theoretical description in the Standard Model (SM) is overconstrained by the set of available observables, providing opportunities to search for evidence of SM extensions. Planned Nab results will lead to a new precise determination of the ratio λ =GA /GV , and to significant reductions in the allowed limits for both right- and left-handed scalar and tensor currents. Alternatively, the experiment may detect a discrepancy from SM

  9. Large momentum beam splitter using Bloch oscillations.

    PubMed

    Cladé, Pierre; Guellati-Khélifa, Saïda; Nez, François; Biraben, François

    2009-06-19

    The sensitivity of an inertial sensor based on an atomic interferometer is proportional to the velocity separation of atoms in the two arms of the interferometer. In this Letter we describe how Bloch oscillations can be used to increase this separation and to create a large momentum transfer (LMT) beam splitter. We experimentally demonstrate a separation of 10 recoil velocities. Light shifts during the acceleration introduce phase fluctuations which can reduce the fringes contrast. We precisely calculate this effect and demonstrate that it can be significantly reduced by using a suitable combination of LMT pulses. We finally show that this method seems to be very promising to realize a LMT beam splitter with several tens of recoils and a very good efficiency.

  10. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-14

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven 'quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers.

  11. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E.; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V.; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-01

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven `quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers.

  12. Scattering and diffraction described using the momentum representation.

    PubMed

    Wennerström, Håkan

    2014-03-01

    We present a unified analysis of the scattering and diffraction of neutrons and photons using momentum representation in a full quantum description. The scattering event is consistently seen as a transfer of momentum between the target and the probing particles. For an elastic scattering process the observed scattering pattern primarily provides information on the momentum distribution for the particles in the target that cause the scattering. Structural information then follows from the Fourier transform relation between momentum and positional state functions. This description is common to the scattering of neutrons, X-ray photons and photons of light. In the quantum description of the interaction between light and the electrons of the target the scattering of X-rays is dominated by the first order contribution from the vector potential squared. The interaction with the electron is local and there is a close analogy, evident from the explicit quantitative expressions, with the neutron scattering case where the nucleus-neutron interaction is fully local from a molecular perspective. For light scattering, on the other hand, the dominant contribution to the scattering comes from a second order term linear in the vector potential. Thus the scattering of light involves correlations between electrons at different positions giving a conceptual explanation of the qualitative difference between the scattering of high and low energy photons. However, at energies close to resonance conditions the scattering of high energy photons is also affected by the second order term which results in a so called anomalous X-ray scattering/diffraction. It is also shown that using the momentum representation the phenomenon of diffraction is a direct consequence of the fact that for a system with periodic symmetry like a crystal the momentum distribution is quantized, which follows from Bloch's theorem. The momentum transfer to a probing particle is then also quantized resulting in a

  13. Positron Annihilation 3-D Momentum Spectrometry by Synchronous 2D-ACAR and DBAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burggraf, Larry W.; Bonavita, Angelo M.; Williams, Christopher S.; Fagan-Kelly, Stefan B.; Jimenez, Stephen M.

    2015-05-01

    A positron annihilation spectroscopy system capable of determining 3D electron-positron (e--e+) momentum densities has been constructed and tested. In this technique two opposed HPGe strip detectors measure angular coincidence of annihilation radiation (ACAR) and Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation (DBAR) in coincidence to produce 3D momentum datasets in which the parallel momentum component obtained from the DBAR measurement can be selected for annihilation events that possess a particular perpendicular momentum component observed in the 2D ACAR spectrum. A true 3D momentum distribution can also be produced. Measurement of 3-D momentum spectra in oxide materials has been demonstrated including O-atom defects in 6H SiC and silver atom substitution in lithium tetraborate crystals. Integration of the 3-D momentum spectrometer with a slow positron beam for future surface resonant annihilation spectrometry measurements will be described. Sponsorship from Air Force Office of Scientific Research

  14. Precise Determination of the Strong Coupling Constant at NNLO in QCD from the Three-Jet Rate in Electron-Positron Annihilation at LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Dissertori, G.; Gehrmann-DeRidder, A.; Gehrmann, T.; Glover, E. W. N.; Heinrich, G.; Stenzel, H.

    2010-02-19

    We present the first determination of the strong coupling constant from the three-jet rate in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at LEP, based on a next-to-next-to-leading-order (NNLO) perturbative QCD prediction. More precisely, we extract {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}) by fitting perturbative QCD predictions at O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 3}) to data from the ALEPH experiment at LEP. Over a large range of the jet-resolution parameter y{sub cut}, this observable is characterized by small nonperturbative corrections and an excellent stability under renormalization scale variation. We find {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z})=0.1175+-0.0020(expt)+-0.0015(theor), which is more accurate than the values of {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}) from e{sup +}e{sup -} event-shape data currently used in the world average.

  15. Precision powder feeder

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, M. Eric; Schmale, David T.; Oliver, Michael S.

    2001-07-10

    A new class of precision powder feeders is disclosed. These feeders provide a precision flow of a wide range of powdered materials, while remaining robust against jamming or damage. These feeders can be precisely controlled by feedback mechanisms.

  16. Spin and precision electroweak physics

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1993-12-31

    A perspective on fundamental parameters and precision tests of the Standard Model is given. Weak neutral current reactions are discussed with emphasis on those processes involving (polarized) electrons. The role of electroweak radiative corrections in determining the top quark mass and probing for ``new physics`` is described.

  17. Optical orbital angular momentum for optical communication and its measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Xi-zheng; Lv, Hong; Wu, Jing-zhi; Hu, Shu-qiao

    2009-07-01

    The beam with orbital angular momentum is a present domestic and foreign research key direction. Its application and development will bring the profound influence in the optical communications field. At the same time, light's orbital angular momentum promises potential applications in both classical and quantum optical communication. The research progress of the beam with orbital angular momentum and encoding information as light's OAM for free-space optical communication were reviewed in this article, the existing design method, mechanism and description methods of encoding information as light's OAM were discussed. In quantum communication, qudits can be encoded in photons using their OAM for creating high-dimensional entanglement based on entangled photon pairs from SPDC. In this paper, light's OAM is used as information carrier for classical and quantum communication, which is promising to ensures the security of atmospheric laser communication, improves the density and precision of information transmission. It is apparent that an efficient way to measure the orbital angular momentum of individual photons and light beams with good efficiency would be of potentially great importance for optical communications and quantum information. In view of the above, the measurements of orbital angular momentum of individual photons and light beams are analyzed and discussed in detail.

  18. Recent Studies of Hypernuclei Formation with Electron Beams at MAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achenbach, Patrick; Ayerbe Gayoso, Carlos; Böhm, Ralph; Borodina, Olga; Bosnar, Damir; Bozkurt, Vakkas; Debenjak, Luka; Distler, Michael O.; Esser, Anselm; Friščić, Ivica; Fujii, Yuu; Gogami, Toshiyuki; Gómez Rodríguez, Mar; Hashimoto, Osamu; Hirose, Satoshi; Kanda, Hiroki; Kaneta, Masashi; Kim, Eunhee; Kusaka, Junichiro; Margaryan, Amur; Merkel, Harald; Müller, Ulrich; Nagao, Sho; Nakamura, Satoshi N.; Pochodzalla, Josef; Rappold, Christophe; Reinhold, Joerg; Saito, Takehiko R.; Sanchez Lorente, Alicia; Sánchez Majos, Salvador; Schlimme, B. Sören; Schoth, Matthias; Schulz, Florian; Sfienti, Concettina; Širca, Simon; Tang, Liguang; Thiel, Michaela; Tsukada, Kyo

    2014-08-01

    At the Mainz Microtron MAMI exploratory experiments on the spectroscopy of mesonic weak decays (MWD) of electroproduced Λ-hypernuclei were performed. A unique setup was realized to use the broad momentum-band kaon spectrometer K aos at zero degree angle with respect to the high-intensity electron beam direction to tag strangeness producing processes. A sample of order 103 MWD from a beryllium target was collected by the coincidence technique with the high-resolution multi-spectrometer facility of the A1 Collaboration. It is conjectured that this sample contains monochromatic two-body decays from stopped hyperfragment decays as well as a wide momentum distribution of quasi-free produced Λ- and Σ-hyperon decays and three-body decays from hyperfragments. Stopped hyperfragments will be identified as monochromatic peaks in the π - momentum spectrum from which their masses can be extracted with a precision of 50 keV/ c 2.

  19. Exploring the benefits of electron tomography to characterize the precise morphology of core-shell Au@Ag nanoparticles and its implications on their plasmonic properties.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Garrido, J C; Moreno, M S; Ducati, C; Pérez, L A; Midgley, P A; Coronado, E A

    2014-11-01

    In the design and engineering of functional core-shell nanostructures, material characterization at small length scales remains one of the major challenges. Here we show how electron tomography in high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) mode can be applied successfully to perform nano-metrological characterization of Au@Ag core-shell nanostructures. This work stresses the benefits of HAADF-STEM tomography and its use as a novel and rigorous tool for understanding the physical-chemical properties of complex 3D core-shell nanostructures. The reconstructed Au@Ag core-shell architecture was used as an input for discrete dipole approximation (DDA)-based electrodynamics simulations of the optical properties of the nanostructures. The implications of localized surface plasmon spectroscopy as well as Raman-enhanced spectroscopy are analysed.

  20. Coulomb effect on photoelectron momentum distributions in orthogonal two-color laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, ShaoGang; Wang, YanLan; Lai, XuanYang; Huang, YiYi; Quan, Wei; Liu, XiaoJun

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically investigate the electron momentum distributions in orthogonally polarized two-color pulses with the Coulomb-Volkov distorted-wave approximation (CVA) theory and focus on the role of the Coulomb potential in the electron momentum distributions by comparing the CVA results with the strong-field approximation (SFA) simulations. Our results show that in comparison with the SFA simulations, the electron momentum distributions in CVA are in better agreement with the experimental observations and the time-dependent Schrödinger equation calculations. By analyzing the phase of the dipole moment, we find that the change of the electron momentum distributions in CVA can be ascribed to the different Coulomb corrections of the phases, which give rise to an enhanced contribution from the forward-rescattering electron and, on the other hand, a decrease of the contribution from the direct electron in the presence of the Coulomb potential.

  1. Isolation of a Diborane(6) Dication: Formation and Cleavage of an Electron-Precise B(sp(3))-B(sp(3)) Bond.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingbing; Lu, Wei; Li, Yongxin; Ganguly, Rakesh; Kinjo, Rei

    2016-07-13

    One-electron oxidation of organoboron L2PhB: 1 (L = oxazol-2-ylidene) afforded a dicationic diborane(6) species [L2PhB-BPhL2]·2X (X = OTf, BF4, AlCl4) 3, representing a new strategy to construct a B(sp(3))-B(sp(3)) covalent bond. Each boron atom in 3 is in the formal oxidation state +II, and tetracoordinate with a Ph group and two oxazol-2-ylidenes. The cyclic voltammetry of 3 shows irreversible reduction and oxidation. Indeed, two-electron reduction of 3 with potassium graphite (KC8) afforded 1, making a fully reversible 1 ↔ 3 redox system, whereas two-electron oxidation with AuCl produced a boronium [L2PhBCl]OTf 4. Moreover, the reactions of 3 with isonitrile derivatives RNC: under heating conditions gave a cyano-substituted boronium [L2PhBCN]BF4 5 and a 2-boranyl-indole derivative 6, depending on the substituent R. The proposed reaction mechanism involves a borinylium radical 1(•+) which is generated via a homolytic cleavage of the B-B bond of 3. PMID:27309118

  2. X-Ray Comb Generation from Nuclear-Resonance-Stabilized X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Oscillator for Fundamental Physics and Precision Metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B. W.; Kim, K. -J.

    2015-03-31

    An x-ray free-electron laser oscillator (XFELO) is a next-generation x-ray source, similar to free-electron laser oscillators at VUV and longer wavelengths but using crystals as high-reflectivity x-ray mirrors. Each output pulse from an XFELO is fully coherent with high spectral purity. The temporal coherence length can further be increased drastically, from picoseconds to microseconds or even longer, by phase-locking successive XFELO output pulses, using the narrow nuclear resonance lines of nuclei such as Fe-57 as a reference. We show that the phase fluctuation due to the seismic activities is controllable and that due to spontaneous emission is small. The fluctuation of electron-bunch spacing contributes mainly to the envelope fluctuation but not to the phase fluctuation. By counting the number of standing-wave maxima formed by the output of the nuclear-resonance-stabilized (NRS) XFELO over an optically known length, the wavelength of the nuclear resonance can be accurately measured, possibly leading to a new length or frequency standard at x-ray wavelengths. A NRS-XFELO will be an ideal source for experimental x-ray quantum optics as well as other fundamental physics. The technique can be refined for other, narrower resonances such as Ta-181 or Sc-45.

  3. On Nonstable and Stable Population Momentum

    PubMed Central

    Olgiati, Analia S.; Levin, Simon A.

    2014-01-01

    This article decomposes total population momentum into two constituent and multiplicative parts: “nonstable” momentum and “stable” momentum. Nonstable momentum depends on deviations between a population’s current age distribution and its implied stable age distribution. Stable momentum is a function of deviations between a population’s implied stable and stationary age distributions. In general, the factorization of total momentum into the product of nonstable and stable momentum is a very good approximation. The factorization is exact, however, when the current age distribution is stable or when observed fertility is already at replacement. We provide numerical illustrations by calculating nonstable, stable, and total momentum for 176 countries, the world, and its major regions. In short, the article brings together disparate strands of the population momentum literature and shows how the various kinds of momentum fit together into a single unifying framework. PMID:21948106

  4. On nonstable and stable population momentum.

    PubMed

    Espenshade, Thomas J; Olgiati, Analia S; Levin, Simon A

    2011-11-01

    This article decomposes total population momentum into two constituent and multiplicative parts: "nonstable" momentum and "stable" momentum. Nonstable momentum depends on deviations between a population's current age distribution and its implied stable age distribution. Stable momentum is a function of deviations between a population's implied stable and stationary age distributions. In general, the factorization of total momentum into the product of nonstable and stable momentum is a very good approximation. The factorization is exact, however, when the current age distribution is stable or when observed fertility is already at replacement. We provide numerical illustrations by calculating nonstable, stable, and total momentum for 176 countries, the world, and its major regions. In short, the article brings together disparate strands of the population momentum literature and shows how the various kinds of momentum fit together into a single unifying framework.

  5. Momentum loss for antimatter meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaelias, P. M.

    1991-02-01

    The momentum loss for a possible antimatter meteor entrance can be described by the combination of two terms. One which can be characterized by the mechanism of annihilation and a second one, the well known mechanism which is common for all koinomatter (ordinary) meteors. That is, the momentum loss caused by the air molecules swept up by the moving object. This paper discusses the contribution of the rocket effect caused by the action of the secondaries which can be produced by the annihilation interactions of the antiatoms with the air molecules.

  6. Automated Angular Momentum Recoupling Algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, H. T.; Silbar, Richard R.

    1992-04-01

    We present a set of heuristic rules for algebraic solution of angular momentum recoupling problems. The general problem reduces to that of finding an optimal path from one binary tree (representing the angular momentum coupling scheme for the reduced matrix element) to another (representing the sub-integrals and spin sums to be done). The method lends itself to implementation on a microcomputer, and we have developed such an implementation using a dialect of LISP. We describe both how our code, called RACAH, works and how it appears to the user. We illustrate the use of RACAH for several transition and scattering amplitude matrix elements occurring in atomic, nuclear, and particle physics.

  7. The maximum momentum transfer in proton-hydrogen collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    The upper limit of momentum transfer by a proton to K-shell electrons is calculated in a restricted three-body classical model. The model shows that the infinite upper limit used in practice, is generally good except for low energy protons passing through an extremely rarefied gas.

  8. Using MBL To Verify Newton's Second Law and the Impulse-Momentum Relationship with an Arbitrary Changing Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumper, Ricardo; Gelbman, Moshe

    2002-01-01

    Uses microcomputer-based laboratories (MBL) to teach Newton's second law and the impulse-momentum relationship with a high degree of precision and accuracy while applying forces that change in an arbitrary way. (YDS)

  9. Command Generation and Control of Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic Reboost Tethered Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    The research completed for this NASA Graduate Student Research Program Fellowship sought to enhance the current state-of-the-art dynamic models and control laws for Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic Reboost satellite systems by utilizing command generation, specifically Input Shaping. The precise control of tethered spacecraft with flexible appendages is extremely difficult. The complexity is magnified many times when the satellite must interact with other satellites as in a momentum exchange via a tether. The Momentum Exchange Electronic Reboost Tether (MXER) concept encapsulates all of these challenging tasks [l]. Input Shaping is a command generation technique that allows flexible spacecraft to move without inducing residual vibration [2], limit transient deflection [3] and utilize fuel-efficient actuation [4]. Input shaping is implemented by convolving a sequence of impulses, known as the input shaper, with a desired system command to produce a shaped input that is then used to drive the system. This process is demonstrated in Figure 1. The shaped command is then use to drive the system without residual vibration while meeting many other performance specifications. The completed work developed tether control algorithms for retrieval. A simple model of the tether response has been developed and command shaping was implemented to minimize unwanted dynamics. A model of a flexible electrodynamic tether has been developed to investigate the tether s response during reboost. Command shaping techniques have been developed to eliminate the tether oscillations and reduce the tether s deflection to pre-specified levels during reboost. Additionally, a model for the spin-up of a tethered system was developed. This model was used in determining the parameters for optimization the resulting angular velocity.

  10. Representational Momentum in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piotrowski, Andrea S.; Jakobson, Lorna S.

    2011-01-01

    Humans have a tendency to perceive motion even in static images that simply "imply" movement. This tendency is so strong that our memory for actions depicted in static images is distorted in the direction of implied motion--a phenomenon known as representational momentum (RM). In the present study, we created an RM display depicting a pattern of…

  11. Teaching about Impulse and Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Bill

    2004-01-01

    This American Association of Physics Teachers/Physics Teaching Resource Agents (APPT/PTRA) spiral-bound manual features labs and demos physics teachers can use to give students hands-on opportunities to learn about impulse and momentum. "Make-and-take activities" include AAPT Apparatus Contest winners "An Air Impulse Rocket," "A Fan Driven…

  12. Intercomponent momentum transport and electrical conductivity of collisionless plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    Based on the Lenard-Balescu equation, the interaction integral for the intercomponent momentum transfer in a two-component, collisionless plasma is evaluated in closed form. The distribution functions of the electrons and ions are represented in the form of nonisothermal, displaced Maxwellians corresponding to the 5-moment approximation. As an application, the transport of electrical current in an electric field is discussed for infrasonic up to sonic electron-ion drift velocities.

  13. Undulator radiation carrying spin and orbital angular momentum.

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, S.; McNulty, I.; Dejus, R.; X-Ray Science Division

    2007-11-11

    We show that the radiation from a helical undulator not only carries spin angular momentum (circular polarization) but also orbital angular momentum. This exotic property of the undulator radiation may be useful in coherent X-ray imaging and scattering experiments and to probe electronic transitions in matter by orbital dichroism spectroscopy. Also, we present that a new magnet configuration, similar to the structure of Figure-8 undulator or the PERA undulator, may generate right- and left-hand circularly polarized off-axis radiation simultaneously.

  14. Plasmons carrying orbital angular momentum in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shabbir A.; Ali, S.; Mendonca, J. T.; Mendonca

    2013-10-01

    The existence of plasmons with orbital angular momentum due to the Laguerre-Gaussian-type density and potential perturbations is studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma. Starting from appropriate hydrodynamic equations for the electrostatic electron dynamics, a dispersion equation is derived in paraxial approximation. The Laguerre-Gaussian beam solutions are obtained and the properties of electric field components, energy flux, and corresponding angular momentum density of plasmons are investigated. The electric field lines are found to form helical structures with a dominant axial component. The results are analyzed numerically and the influence of radial and angular mode numbers on potential and electric field components is illustrated.

  15. Environment Assisted Precision Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellaro, P.; Goldstein, G.; Maze, J. R.; Jiang, L.; Hodges, J. S.; Sorensen, A. S.; Lukin, M. D.

    2010-03-01

    We describe a method to enhance the sensitivity of magnetometry and achieve nearly Heisenberg-limited precision measurement using a novel class of entangled states. An individual qubit is used to sense the dynamics of surrounding ancillary qubits, which are in turn affected by the external field to be measured. The resulting sensitivity enhancement is determined by the number of ancillas strongly coupled to the sensor qubit, it does not depend on the exact values of the couplings (allowing to use disordered systems), and is resilient to decoherence. As a specific example we consider electronic spins in the solid-state, where the ancillary system is associated with the surrounding spin bath. The conventional approach has been to consider these spins only as a source of decoherence and to adopt decoupling scheme to mitigate their effects. Here we describe novel control techniques that transform the environment spins into a resource used to amplify the sensor spin response to weak external perturbations, while maintaining the beneficial effects of dynamical decoupling sequences. We discuss specific applications to improve magnetic sensing with diamond nano-crystals, using one Nitrogen-Vacancy center spin coupled to Nitrogen electronic spins.

  16. Energy, momentum and angular momentum conservations in de Sitter gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jia-An

    2016-08-01

    In de Sitter (dS) gravity, where gravity is a gauge field introduced to realize the local dS invariance of the matter field, two kinds of conservation laws are derived. The first kind is a differential equation for a dS-covariant current, which unites the canonical energy-momentum (EM) and angular momentum (AM) tensors. The second kind presents a dS-invariant current which is conserved in the sense that its torsion-free divergence vanishes. The dS-invariant current unites the total (matter plus gravity) EM and AM currents. It is well known that the AM current contains an inherent part, called the spin current. Here it is shown that the EM tensor also contains an inherent part, which might be observed by its contribution to the deviation of the dust particle’s world line from a geodesic. All the results are compared to the ordinary Lorentz gravity.

  17. Orbital Propagation of Momentum Exchange Tether Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westerhoff, John

    2002-01-01

    An advanced concept in in-space transportation currently being studied is the Momentum-Exchange/Electrodynamic Reboost Tether System (MXER). The system acts as a large momentum wheel, imparting a Av to a payload in low earth orbit (LEO) at the expense of its own orbital energy. After throwing a payload, the system reboosts itself using an electrodynamic tether to push against Earth's magnetic field and brings itself back up to an operational orbit to prepare for the next payload. The ability to reboost itself allows for continued reuse of the system without the expenditure of propellants. Considering the cost of lifting propellant from the ,ground to LEO to do the same Av boost at $10000 per pound, the system cuts the launch cost of the payload dramatically, and subsequently, the MXER system pays for itself after a small number of missions.1 One of the technical hurdles to be overcome with the MXER concept is the rendezvous maneuver. The rendezvous window for the capture of the payload is on the order of a few seconds, as opposed to traditional docking maneuvers, which can take as long ets necessary to complete a precise docking. The payload, therefore, must be able to match its orbit to meet up with the capture device on the end of the tether at a specific time and location in the future. In order to be able to determine that location, the MXER system must be numerically propagated forward in time to predict where the capture device will be at that instant. It should be kept in mind that the propagation computation must be done faster than real-time. This study focuses on the efforts to find and/or build the tools necessary to numerically propagate the motion of the MXER system as accurately as possible.

  18. Globalism of commutation relation and mechanism of momentum transfer in the Aharonov-Bohm effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Fang

    1997-09-01

    After examining the domain of an operator that has classical analog, which is shown to be the whole spatial space, the concept of globalism of a commutation relation is introduced through analyzing the quantization of the kinetic angular momentum in the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Its applications are also given to explain in an elegant and precise way, the mechanism of momentum transfer in the Aharonov-Bohm scattering and to study the probability distribution of the momentum for a particle in a one-dimensional infinitely deep square potential well.

  19. Pion transverse momentum dependent parton distributions in the Nambu and Jona-Lasinio model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguera, Santiago; Scopetta, Sergio

    2015-11-01

    An explicit evaluation of the two pion transverse momentum dependent parton distributions at leading twist is presented, in the framework of the Nambu-Jona Lasinio model with Pauli-Villars regularization. The transverse momentum dependence of the obtained distributions is generated solely by the dynamics of the model. Using these results, the so called generalized Boer-Mulders shift is studied and compared with recent lattice data. The obtained agreement is very encouraging, in particular because no additional parameter has been introduced. A more conclusive comparison would require a precise knowledge of the QCD evolution of the transverse momentum dependent parton distributions under scrutiny.

  20. Fractional angular momentum in cold-atom systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuhe; Sreejith, G J; Gemelke, N D; Jain, J K

    2014-10-17

    The quantum statistics of bosons or fermions are manifest through the even or odd relative angular momentum of a pair. We show theoretically that, under certain conditions, a pair of certain test particles immersed in a fractional quantum Hall state possesses, effectively, a fractional relative angular momentum, which can be interpreted in terms of fractional braid statistics. We propose that the fractionalization of the angular momentum can be detected directly through the measurement of the pair correlation function in rotating ultracold atomic systems in the fractional quantum Hall regime. Such a measurement will also provide direct evidence for the effective magnetic field resulting from Berry phases arising from attached vortices, and of excitations with a fractional particle number, analogous to the fractional charge of the electron fractional quantum Hall effect.

  1. Population momentum across the demographic transition.

    PubMed

    Blue, Laura; Espenshade, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Population momentum is the main driver of global population growth today, and this makes an appreciation of momentum critical to understanding contemporary worldwide growth dynamics. This article traces population momentum along with two recently defined measures of momentum decomposed—stable and nonstable momentum—across the demographic transition. We use historical data and population projections from 16 countries to illustrate some previously ignored empirical regularities of the demographic transition in both the developed and the developing world. We also demonstrate the dynamic nature of stable and nonstable momentum, as changes in stable momentum lead to predictable changes in current and future nonstable momentum. These results suggest that momentum, which by definition is measured at a point in time, can also be considered as a process that unfolds over time.

  2. Energy and Momentum Transport in String Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juenker, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Formulas are derived for the energy, momentum, and angular momentum transmitted by waves of arbitrary shape in an inextensible string by pure transverse waves in a string using Tait's procedure. (Author/CP)

  3. A Precise Measurement of the Deuteron Elastic Structure Function A(A2)

    SciTech Connect

    Andrian Honegger

    1999-12-01

    During summer 1997 experiment 394-018 measured the deuteron tensor polarization in D(e,e'd) scattering in Hall C at Jefferson Laboratory. In a momentum transfer range between 0.66 and 1:8 (GeV=c){sup 2}, with slight changes in the experimental setup, the collaboration performed six precision measurements of the deuteron structure function A(Q{sup 2}) in elastic D(e,e'd) scattering . Scattered electrons and recoil deuterons were detected in coincidence in the High Momentum Spectrometer and the recoil polarimeter POLDER, respectively. At every kinematics H(e,e') data were taken to study systematic effects of the measurement. These new precise measurements resolve discrepancies between older data sets and put significant constraints on existing models of the deuteron electromagnetic structure. This work was supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation, the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and the Commissariat 'a l'Energie Atomique, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation and the K.C. Wong Foundation.

  4. A momentum space view of the surface chemical bond.

    PubMed

    Berkebile, Stephen; Ules, Thomas; Puschnig, Peter; Romaner, Lorenz; Koller, Georg; Fleming, Alexander J; Emtsev, Konstantin; Seyller, Thomas; Ambrosch-Draxl, Claudia; Netzer, Falko P; Ramsey, Michael G

    2011-03-01

    Well-ordered and oriented monolayers of conjugated organic molecules can offer new perspectives on surface bonding. We will demonstrate the importance of the momentum distribution, or symmetry, of the adsorbate molecules' π orbitals in relation to the states available for hybridization at the metal surface. Here, the electronic band structure of the first monolayer of sexiphenyl on Cu(110) has been examined in detail with angle-resolved ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy over a large momentum range and will be compared to measurements of a multilayer thin film and to density functional calculations. In the monolayer, the one-dimensional intramolecular band structure can still be recognized, allowing an accurate determination of orbital modification upon bonding and the relative energetic positions of the electronic levels. It is seen that the character of the molecular π orbitals is largely maintained despite strong mixing between Cu and molecular states and that the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) is filled by hybridization with Cu s,p states rather than through a charge transfer process. It is also shown that the momentum distribution of the substrate states involved and the periodicity of the molecular overlayer play a large role in the final E(k) distribution of the hybrid states. The distinct momentum distribution of the LUMO, interacting with the Cu substrate s,p valence bands around the gap in the surface projection of the bulk band structure, make this system a particularly illustrative example of momentum resolved hybridization. This system demonstrates that, for hybridization to occur, not only do states require overlap in energy and space, but also in momentum.

  5. Studies of Transverse Momentum Distributions of Partons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avagyan, Harut

    2014-03-01

    The detailed understanding of the orbital structure of partonic distributions, encoded in Transverse Momentum Dependent (TMD) parton distributions, has been widely recognized as key objective of the JLab 12 GeV upgrade, the polarised pp program at RHIC, and a driving force behind the construction of the Electron Ion Collider. Several proposals have been already approved by the JLab PAC to study TMDs using different spin-azimuthal asymmetries at JLab12 and were awarded the highest physics rating. Although the interest in TMDs has grown enormously we are still in need of fresh theoretical and phenomenological ideas. One of the main challenges still remaining is the extraction of actual 3D parton distribution functions from hard scattering processes in nucleons and nuclei. In this talk, we present an overview of the latest developments and future studies of the TMDs.

  6. Extinction, Relapse, and Behavioral Momentum

    PubMed Central

    Podlesnik, Christopher A.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2010-01-01

    Previous experiments on behavioral momentum have shown that relative resistance to extinction of operant behavior in the presence of a discriminative stimulus depends upon the baseline rate or magnitude of reinforcement associated with that stimulus (i.e., the Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation). Recently, we have shown that relapse of operant behavior in reinstatement, resurgence, and context renewal preparations also is a function of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations. In this paper we present new data examining the role of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations on resistance to extinction and relapse using a variety of baseline training conditions and relapse operations. Furthermore, we evaluate the adequacy of a behavioral-momentum based model in accounting for the results. The model suggests that relapse occurs as a result of a decrease in the disruptive impact of extinction precipitated by a change in circumstances associated with extinction, and that the degree of relapse is a function of the pre-extinction baseline Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation. Across experiments, relative resistance to extinction and relapse were greater in the presence of stimuli associated with more favorable conditions of reinforcement and were positively related to one another. In addition, the model did a good job in accounting for these effects. Thus, behavioral momentum theory may provide a useful quantitative approach for characterizing how differential reinforcement conditions contribute to relapse of operant behavior. PMID:20152889

  7. Extinction, relapse, and behavioral momentum.

    PubMed

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2010-05-01

    Previous experiments on behavioral momentum have shown that relative resistance to extinction of operant behavior in the presence of a discriminative stimulus depends upon the baseline rate or magnitude of reinforcement associated with that stimulus (i.e., the Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation). Recently, we have shown that relapse of operant behavior in reinstatement, resurgence, and context renewal preparations also is a function of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations. In this paper we present new data examining the role of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations on resistance to extinction and relapse using a variety of baseline training conditions and relapse operations. Furthermore, we evaluate the adequacy of a behavioral momentum based model in accounting for the results. The model suggests that relapse occurs as a result of a decrease in the disruptive impact of extinction precipitated by a change in circumstances associated with extinction, and that the degree of relapse is a function of the pre-extinction baseline Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation. Across experiments, relative resistance to extinction and relapse were greater in the presence of stimuli associated with more favorable conditions of reinforcement and were positively related to one another. In addition, the model did a good job in accounting for these effects. Thus, behavioral momentum theory may provide a useful quantitative approach for characterizing how differential reinforcement conditions contribute to relapse of operant behavior. PMID:20152889

  8. Extinction, relapse, and behavioral momentum.

    PubMed

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2010-05-01

    Previous experiments on behavioral momentum have shown that relative resistance to extinction of operant behavior in the presence of a discriminative stimulus depends upon the baseline rate or magnitude of reinforcement associated with that stimulus (i.e., the Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation). Recently, we have shown that relapse of operant behavior in reinstatement, resurgence, and context renewal preparations also is a function of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations. In this paper we present new data examining the role of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations on resistance to extinction and relapse using a variety of baseline training conditions and relapse operations. Furthermore, we evaluate the adequacy of a behavioral momentum based model in accounting for the results. The model suggests that relapse occurs as a result of a decrease in the disruptive impact of extinction precipitated by a change in circumstances associated with extinction, and that the degree of relapse is a function of the pre-extinction baseline Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation. Across experiments, relative resistance to extinction and relapse were greater in the presence of stimuli associated with more favorable conditions of reinforcement and were positively related to one another. In addition, the model did a good job in accounting for these effects. Thus, behavioral momentum theory may provide a useful quantitative approach for characterizing how differential reinforcement conditions contribute to relapse of operant behavior.

  9. Hidden momentum in a hydrogen atom and the Lorentz-force law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filho, J. S. Oliveira; Saldanha, Pablo L.

    2015-11-01

    By using perturbation theory, we show that a hydrogen atom with magnetic moment due to the orbital angular momentum of the electron has so-called hidden momentum in the presence of an external electric field. This means that the atomic electronic cloud has a nonzero linear momentum in its center-of-mass rest frame due to a relativistic effect. This is completely analogous to the hidden momentum that a classical current loop has in the presence of an external electric field. We discuss how this effect is essential for the validity of the Lorentz-force law in quantum systems. We also connect our results to the long-standing Abraham-Minkowski debate about the momentum of light in material media.

  10. Proposed electron halo detector system as one of the beam overlap diagnostic tools for the new RHIC electron lens

    SciTech Connect

    Thieberger, P.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Chasman, C.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D.; Gu, X.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Lambiase, R.; Montag, C.; Luo, Y.; Minty, M.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.; Tan, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, W.

    2011-03-28

    An electron lens for head-on beam-beam compensation planned for RHIC requires precise overlap of the electron and proton beams which both can have down to 0.3 mm rms transverse radial widths along the 2m long interaction region. Here we describe a new diagnostic tool that is being considered to aid in the tuning and verification of this overlap. Some of ultra relativistic protons (100 or 250 GeV) colliding with low energy electrons (2 to 10 keV) will transfer sufficient transverse momentum to cause the electrons to spiral around the magnetic guiding field in a way that will make them detectable outside of the main solenoid. Time-of-flight of the halo electron signals will provide position-sensitive information along the overlap region. Scattering cross sections are calculated and counting rate estimates are presented as function of electron energy and detector position.

  11. Spin resolved bandstructure imaging with a high resolution momentum microscope.

    PubMed

    Tusche, Christian; Krasyuk, Alexander; Kirschner, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    We present a spin resolving "momentum microscope" for the high resolution imaging of the momentum distribution of photoelectrons. Measurements of the band structure of a Au(111) single crystal surface demonstrate an energy resolution of ΔE=12 meV and a momentum resolution of Δk∥=0.0049 Å(-1), measured at the line-width of the spin-orbit split Shockley surface state. The relative accuracy of the k∥ measurement in the order of 10(-4) Å(-1) reveals a deviation from the ideal two-dimensional free electron gas model of the Shockley surface state, manifested in a threefold radial symmetry. Spin resolution in the full momentum image is obtained by an imaging spin-filter based on low-energy electron diffraction at a Au passivated Ir(100) single crystal. Using working points at 10.5 eV and 11.5 eV scattering energy with a completely reversed asymmetry of ±60% we demonstrate the efficient mapping of the spin texture of the Au(111) surface state.

  12. Probing Resonances of the Dirac Equation with Complex Momentum Representation.

    PubMed

    Li, Niu; Shi, Min; Guo, Jian-You; Niu, Zhong-Ming; Liang, Haozhao

    2016-08-01

    Resonance plays critical roles in the formation of many physical phenomena, and several methods have been developed for the exploration of resonance. In this work, we propose a new scheme for resonance by solving the Dirac equation in the complex momentum representation, in which the resonant states are exposed clearly in the complex momentum plane and the resonance parameters can be determined precisely without imposing unphysical parameters. Combined with the relativistic mean-field theory, this method is applied to probe the resonances in ^{120}Sn with the energies, widths, and wave functions being obtained. Compared to other methods, this method is not only very effective for narrow resonances, but also can be reliably applied to broad resonances. PMID:27541464

  13. Bias Momentum Sizing for Hovering Dual-Spin Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, K. B.; Shin, J-Y.; Moerder, D. D.

    2005-01-01

    An atmospheric flight vehicle in hover is typically controlled by varying its thrust vector. Achieving both levitation and control with the propulsion system places considerable demands on it for agility and precision, particularly if the vehicle is statically unstable, or nearly so. These demands can be relaxed by introducing an appropriately sized angular momentum bias about the vehicle's yaw axis, thus providing an additional margin of attitude stability about the roll and pitch axes. This paper describes an approach for specifying the appropriate size of such angular momentum bias, based on the vehicle s physical parameters and its disturbance environment. It also describes several simplifications that provide a more physical and intuitive understanding of the dynamics. This will enhance the possibility of practically applying this technology to a flying vehicle.

  14. Probing Resonances of the Dirac Equation with Complex Momentum Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Niu; Shi, Min; Guo, Jian-You; Niu, Zhong-Ming; Liang, Haozhao

    2016-08-01

    Resonance plays critical roles in the formation of many physical phenomena, and several methods have been developed for the exploration of resonance. In this work, we propose a new scheme for resonance by solving the Dirac equation in the complex momentum representation, in which the resonant states are exposed clearly in the complex momentum plane and the resonance parameters can be determined precisely without imposing unphysical parameters. Combined with the relativistic mean-field theory, this method is applied to probe the resonances in 120120 with the energies, widths, and wave functions being obtained. Compared to other methods, this method is not only very effective for narrow resonances, but also can be reliably applied to broad resonances.

  15. Prompt and Precise Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    For Sanders Design International, Inc., of Wilton, New Hampshire, every passing second between the concept and realization of a product is essential to succeed in the rapid prototyping industry where amongst heavy competition, faster time-to-market means more business. To separate itself from its rivals, Sanders Design aligned with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to develop what it considers to be the most accurate rapid prototyping machine for fabrication of extremely precise tooling prototypes. The company's Rapid ToolMaker System has revolutionized production of high quality, small-to-medium sized prototype patterns and tooling molds with an exactness that surpasses that of computer numerically-controlled (CNC) machining devices. Created with funding and support from Marshall under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, the Rapid ToolMaker is a dual-use technology with applications in both commercial and military aerospace fields. The advanced technology provides cost savings in the design and manufacturing of automotive, electronic, and medical parts, as well as in other areas of consumer interest, such as jewelry and toys. For aerospace applications, the Rapid ToolMaker enables fabrication of high-quality turbine and compressor blades for jet engines on unmanned air vehicles, aircraft, and missiles.

  16. Experimental deuteron momentum distributions with reduced final state interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Hari P.

    This dissertation presents a study of the D( e, e'p)n reaction carried out at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) for a set of fixed values of four-momentum transfer Q 2 = 2.1 and 0.8 (GeV/c)2 and for missing momenta pm ranging from pm = 0.03 to pm = 0.65 GeV/c. The analysis resulted in the determination of absolute D(e,e' p)n cross sections as a function of the recoiling neutron momentum and it's scattering angle with respect to the momentum transfer [vector] q. The angular distribution was compared to various modern theoretical predictions that also included final state interactions. The data confirmed the theoretical prediction of a strong anisotropy of final state interaction contributions at Q2 of 2.1 (GeV/c)2 while at the lower Q2 value, the anisotropy was much less pronounced. At Q2 of 0.8 (GeV/c)2, theories show a large disagreement with the experimental results. The experimental momentum distribution of the bound proton inside the deuteron has been determined for the first time at a set of fixed neutron recoil angles. The momentum distribution is directly related to the ground state wave function of the deuteron in momentum space. The high momentum part of this wave function plays a crucial role in understanding the short-range part of the nucleon-nucleon force. At Q2 = 2.1 (GeV/c)2, the momentum distribution determined at small neutron recoil angles is much less affected by FSI compared to a recoil angle of 75°. In contrast, at Q2 = 0.8 (GeV/c)2 there seems to be no region with reduced FSI for larger missing momenta. Besides the statistical errors, systematic errors of about 5--6 % were included in the final results in order to account for normalization uncertainties and uncertainties in the determi- nation of kinematic veriables. The measurements were carried out using an electron beam energy of 2.8 and 4.7 GeV with beam currents between 10 to 100 μ A. The scattered electrons and the ejected protons originated from a 15cm

  17. Momentum in general relativity: local versus quasilocal conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epp, Richard J.; McGrath, Paul L.; Mann, Robert B.

    2013-10-01

    We construct a general relativistic conservation law for linear and angular momentum for matter and gravitational fields in a finite volume of space that does not rely on any spacetime symmetries. This work builds on our previous construction of a general relativistic energy conservation law with the same features (McGrath et al 2012 Class. Quantum Grav. 29 215012). Our approach uses the Brown and York (1993 Phys. Rev. D 47 1407-19) quasilocal stress-energy-momentum tensor for matter and gravitational fields, plus the concept of a rigid quasilocal frame (RQF) introduced in (Epp et al 2009 Class. Quantum Grav. 26 035015; 2012 Classical and Quantum Gravity: Theory, Analysis, and Applications (Nova Science)). The RQF approach allows us to construct, in a generic spacetime, frames of reference whose boundaries are rigid (their shape and size do not change with time), and that have precisely the same six arbitrary time-dependent degrees of freedom as the accelerating and tumbling rigid frames we are familiar with in Newtonian mechanics. These RQFs, in turn, give rise to a completely general conservation law for the six components of momentum (three linear and three angular) of a finite system of matter and gravitational fields. We compare in detail this quasilocal RQF approach to constructing conservation laws with the usual local one based on spacetime symmetries, and discuss the shortcomings of the latter. These RQF conservation laws lead to a deeper understanding of physics in the form of simple, exact, operational definitions of gravitational energy and momentum fluxes, which in turn reveal, for the first time, the exact, detailed mechanisms of gravitational energy and momentum transfer taking place in a wide variety of physical phenomena, including a simple falling apple. As a concrete example, we derive a general relativistic version of Archimedes’ law that we apply to understand electrostatic weight and buoyant force in the context of a Reissner

  18. Cotton buds, momentum, and impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Ed; Nuñez, Jover; Guirit, Alfredo; van Huis, Cor

    2000-01-01

    Here is a simple experiment demonstrating impulse and momentum that was picked up from a Japanese presenter at a physics teacher conference held in Cebu City. We have not been able to trace the experiment farther and have never seen it in print. After student-author Nuñez demonstrated it during an exam on conducting demonstrations, we converted the qualitative idea into a quanitative experiment and even discovered some possibilities for student research. The lab is also suitable as homework, since it uses universally available "equipment" — cotton buds (swabs), drinking straws, and a ruler.

  19. Momentum deficit in quantum glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, A. F.

    2009-07-15

    Using the concept of tunneling two-level systems, we explain the reduction of rotational inertia of disordered solid {sup 4}He observed in the torsional oscillator experiments. The key point is a peculiar quantum phenomenon of momentum deficit for two-level systems in moving solids. We show that an unusual state that is essentially different from both normal and superfluid solid states can be realized in quantum glasses. This state is characterized by reduced rotational inertia in oscillator experiments, by the absence of a superflow, and by the normal behavior in steady rotation.

  20. Confining potential in momentum space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Kahana, David E.; Maung, Khin Maung

    1992-01-01

    A method is presented for the solution in momentum space of the bound state problem with a linear potential in r space. The potential is unbounded at large r leading to a singularity at small q. The singularity is integrable, when regulated by exponentially screening the r-space potential, and is removed by a subtraction technique. The limit of zero screening is taken analytically, and the numerical solution of the subtracted integral equation gives eigenvalues and wave functions in good agreement with position space calculations.

  1. Precision volume measuring system

    SciTech Connect

    Klevgard, P.A.

    1984-11-01

    An engineering study was undertaken to calibrate and certify a precision volume measurement system that uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) to ratio a known to an unknown volume. The constant-temperature, computer-controlled system was tested for thermodynamic instabilities, for precision (0.01%), and for bias (0.01%). Ratio scaling was used to optimize the quartz crystal pressure transducer calibration.

  2. Precision positioning device

    DOEpatents

    McInroy, John E.

    2005-01-18

    A precision positioning device is provided. The precision positioning device comprises a precision measuring/vibration isolation mechanism. A first plate is provided with the precision measuring mean secured to the first plate. A second plate is secured to the first plate. A third plate is secured to the second plate with the first plate being positioned between the second plate and the third plate. A fourth plate is secured to the third plate with the second plate being positioned between the third plate and the fourth plate. An adjusting mechanism for adjusting the position of the first plate, the second plate, the third plate, and the fourth plate relative to each other.

  3. Momentum slits, collimators and masks in the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Walz, D.R.; McFarlane, A.; Lewandowski, E.; Zabdyr, J.

    1989-04-01

    The high specific power densities in the SLC give rise to a multitude of challenging problems in collimation and momentum analysis, beam containment, machine protection and background control. The results of an extensive program to develop most of the devices deemed necessary for operation of the arcs matching sections and the final focus region are presented. Emphasis is placed on materials selection and on unique features of remotely adjustable slits and halo clipper collimators which have to operate with great precision in a high-radiation, ultra-high vacuum environment. Also covered are solutions for a few fixed aperture machine protection collimators. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Precision Teaching: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Richard P.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Precision teaching is introduced as a method of helping students develop fluency or automaticity in the performance of academic skills. Precision teaching involves being aware of the relationship between teaching and learning, measuring student performance regularly and frequently, and analyzing the measurements to develop instructional and…

  5. Precision Optics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Robert L.; And Others

    This guide outlines the competency-based, two-year precision optics curriculum that the American Precision Optics Manufacturers Association has proposed to fill the void that it suggests will soon exist as many of the master opticians currently employed retire. The model, which closely resembles the old European apprenticeship model, calls for 300…

  6. Suppression of angular momentum transfer in cold collisions of transition metal atoms in ground States with nonzero orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Hancox, Cindy I; Doret, S Charles; Hummon, Matthew T; Krems, Roman V; Doyle, John M

    2005-01-14

    The Zeeman relaxation rate in cold collisions of Ti(3d(2)4s(2) 3F2) with He is measured. We find that collisional transfer of angular momentum is dramatically suppressed due to the presence of the filled 4s(2) shell. The degree of electronic interaction anisotropy, which is responsible for Zeeman relaxation, is estimated to be about 200 times smaller in the Ti-He complex than in He complexes with typical non-S-state atoms.

  7. Electromagnetic energy momentum in dispersive media

    SciTech Connect

    Philbin, T. G.

    2011-01-15

    The standard derivations of electromagnetic energy and momentum in media take Maxwell's equations as the starting point. It is well known that for dispersive media this approach does not directly yield exact expressions for the energy and momentum densities. Although Maxwell's equations fully describe electromagnetic fields, the general approach to conserved quantities in field theory is not based on the field equations, but rather on the action. Here an action principle for macroscopic electromagnetism in dispersive, lossless media is used to derive the exact conserved energy-momentum tensor. The time-averaged energy density reduces to Brillouin's simple formula when the fields are monochromatic. The time-averaged momentum density for monochromatic fields corresponds to the familiar Minkowski expression DxB, but for general fields in dispersive media the momentum density does not have the Minkowski value. The results are unaffected by the debate over momentum balance in light-matter interactions.

  8. Precise Measurements of Beam Spin Asymmetries in Semi-Inclusive π0 production

    SciTech Connect

    Aghasyan, M.; Avakian, H.; Rossi, P.; De Sanctis, E.; Hasch, D.; Mirazita, M.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; Biselli, A. S.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Chandavar, S.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; DʼAngelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalkar, S. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Kvaltine, N. D.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McAndrew, J.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Micherdzinska, A. M.; Mokeev, V.; Moreno, B.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Phelps, E.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rosner, G.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z. W.

    2011-10-01

    We present studies of single-spin asymmetries for neutral pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of 5.776 GeV polarized electrons from an unpolarized hydrogen target, using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. A substantial sin Φh amplitude has been measured in the distribution of the cross section asymmetry as a function of the azimuthal angle Φh of the produced neutral pion. The dependence of this amplitude on Bjorken x and on the pion transverse momentum is extracted with significantly higher precision than previous data and is compared to model calculations.

  9. High-Precision Determination of the Electric and Magnetic Form Factors of the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Bernauer, J. C.; Achenbach, P.; Ayerbe Gayoso, C.; Boehm, R.; Distler, M. O.; Doria, L.; Esser, A.; Friedrich, J.; Gomez Rodriguez de la Paz, M.; Merkel, H.; Middleton, D. G.; Mueller, U.; Nungesser, L.; Pochodzalla, J.; Sanchez Majos, S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Walcher, Th.; Weinriefer, M.; Bosnar, D.; Makek, M.

    2010-12-10

    New precise results of a measurement of the elastic electron-proton scattering cross section performed at the Mainz Microtron MAMI are presented. About 1400 cross sections were measured with negative four-momentum transfers squared up to Q{sup 2}=1 (GeV/c){sup 2} with statistical errors below 0.2%. The electric and magnetic form factors of the proton were extracted by fits of a large variety of form factor models directly to the cross sections. The form factors show some features at the scale of the pion cloud. The charge and magnetic radii are determined to be {sup 1/2}=0.879(5){sub stat}(4){sub syst}(2){sub model}(4){sub group} fm and {sup 1/2}=0.777(13){sub stat}(9){sub syst}(5){sub model}(2){sub group} fm.

  10. Mood as Representation of Momentum

    PubMed Central

    Eldar, Eran; Rutledge, Robb B.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Niv, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Experiences affect mood, which in turn affects subsequent experiences. Recent studies suggest two specific principles. First, mood depends on how recent reward outcomes differ from expectations. Second, mood biases the way we perceive outcomes (e.g., rewards), and this bias affects learning about those outcomes. We propose that this two-way interaction serves to mitigate inefficiencies in the application of reinforcement learning to real-world problems. Specifically, we propose that mood represents the overall momentum of recent outcomes, and its biasing influence on the perception of outcomes ‘corrects’ learning to account for environmental dependencies. We describe potential dysfunctions of this adaptive mechanism that might contribute to the symptoms of mood disorders. PMID:26545853

  11. Behavioral momentum in college basketball.

    PubMed

    Mace, F C; Lalli, J S

    1992-01-01

    Three classes of events were scored from videotapes of 14 college basketball games during the 1989 National Collegiate Athletic Association tournament: reinforcers (such as points and favorable turnovers), adversities (such as missed shots, unfavorable turnovers, and fouls), and responses to adversities (favorable or unfavorable outcomes of the first possession of the ball following an adversity). Within-game and within-team analyses of these data supported three findings. First, a team's favorable response to an adversity generally increased as the rate of reinforcement increased 3 min preceding the adversity. Second, basketball coaches called time-out from play when being outscored by their opponents an average of 2.63 to 1.0. Third, calling time-outs from play appeared to be an effective intervention for reducing an opponent's rate of reinforcement. Rates of reinforcement during the 3 min immediately after a time-out were nearly equal for both teams. Results are discussed within a behavioral momentum framework.

  12. The Angular Momentum of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cang, Rongquin; Guo, Jianpo; Hu, Juanxiu; He, Chaoquiong

    2016-05-01

    The angular momentum of the Solar System is a very important physical quantity to the formation and evolution of the Solar System. Previously, the spin angular momentum of the Sun and the orbital angular momentum of the Eight Giant Planets were only taken into consideration, when researchers calculated the angular momentum of the Solar System. Nowadays, it seems narrow and conservative. Using Eggleton's code, we calculate the rotational inertia of the Sun. Furthermore, we obtain that the spin angular momentum of the Sun is 1.8838 x 10^41 kg m^2 s^-1. Besides the spin angular momentum of the Sun and the orbital angular momentum of the Eight Giant Planets, we also account for the orbital angular momentum of the Asteroid Belt, the Kuiper Belt, the Oort Cloud, the Ninth Giant Planet and the Solar Companion. We obtain that the angular momentum of the whole Solar System is 3.3212 x 10^45 kg m^2 s^-1.

  13. Hollow ballistic pendulum for plasma momentum measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, S.F.; Pashinin, P.P.; Perov, V.Y.; Serov, R.V.; Yanovsky, V.P.

    1988-05-01

    A novel pendulum design: hollow ballistic pendulum: is suggested for plasma momentum measurements. It has an advantage over the pendula used earlier in laser plasma experiments of being insensitive to a momentum of matter evaporated and scattered by the pendulum wall exposed to the plasma, which usually exceeds plasma momentum to be measured. Simple expressions describing pendulum performance are derived, and requirements of shape and size are established. Using this kind of pendulum in experiments on laser acceleration of thin foils made it possible to measure the momentum of accelerated foil with an accuracy of about 10%.

  14. Physical mechanisms of heat, momentum and turbulence fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theon, John S.

    1987-01-01

    In a qualitative way, the physical mechanisms which generate fluxes of heat, momentum, and turbulence in the atmosphere are discussed. This material is presented to acquaint people with the Earth science aspects of turbulence as important processes in the atmosphere. To attempt to describe turbulent fluxes of heat, momentum, and moisture in precise mathematical detail becomes an intractable problem. It is burdened by an eighth order set of equations involving more variables than equations. It is a closure problem which requires complicated assumptions that are not necessarily always satisfied, variable boundary conditions, and sparse observational data. Therefore, we must approach the problem in a simplified manner to obtain any kind of solution involving the variables of shear, stress, and heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes. There are other problems, of course, in which the inclusion of the planetary boundary layer is extremely important. Air pollution studies, air-sea exchanges, mesoscale models, and so on, must account for the planetary layer in very specific terms. Some of the physical mechanisms that are involved in generating fluxes are described.

  15. Precision volume measurement system.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Erin E.; Shugard, Andrew D.

    2004-11-01

    A new precision volume measurement system based on a Kansas City Plant (KCP) design was built to support the volume measurement needs of the Gas Transfer Systems (GTS) department at Sandia National Labs (SNL) in California. An engineering study was undertaken to verify or refute KCP's claims of 0.5% accuracy. The study assesses the accuracy and precision of the system. The system uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) in a temperature and computer controlled environment to ratio a known volume to an unknown volume.

  16. Ionization Time and Exit Momentum in Strong-Field Tunnel Ionization.

    PubMed

    Teeny, Nicolas; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Bauke, Heiko; Keitel, Christoph H

    2016-02-12

    Tunnel ionization belongs to the fundamental processes of atomic physics. The so-called two-step model, which describes the ionization as instantaneous tunneling at the electric field maximum and classical motion afterwards with zero exit momentum, is commonly employed to describe tunnel ionization in adiabatic regimes. In this contribution, we show by solving numerically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in one dimension and employing a virtual detector at the tunnel exit that there is a nonvanishing positive time delay between the electric field maximum and the instant of ionization. Moreover, we find a nonzero exit momentum in the direction of the electric field. To extract proper tunneling times from asymptotic momentum distributions of ionized electrons, it is essential to incorporate the electron's initial momentum in the direction of the external electric field.

  17. Momentum harvesting techniques for solar system travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willoughby, Alan J.

    1991-01-01

    Astronomers are lately estimating there are 400,000 earth visiting asteroids larger than 100 meters in diameter. These asteroids are uniquely accessible sources of building materials, propellants, oxygen, water, and minerals. They also constitute a huge momentum reserve, potentially usable for travel throughout the solar system. To use this momentum, these stealthy objects must be tracked and the ability to extract the desired momentum obtained. Momentum harvesting by momentum transfer from asteroid to spacecraft, and by using the momentum of the extraterrestrial material to help deliver itself to its destination is discussed. The purpose is neither to quantify nor justify the momentum exchange processes, but to stimulate collective imaginations with some intriguing possibilities which emerge when momentum as well as material is considered. A net and tether concept is the suggested means of asteroid capture, the basic momentum exchange process. The energy damping characteristics of the tether determines the velocity mismatch that can be tolerated, and hence the amount of momentum that can be harvested per capture. As the tether plays out of its reel, drag on the tether steadily accelerates the spacecraft and dilutes, in time, the would-be collision. A variety of concepts for riding and using asteroids after capture are introduced. The hitchhiker uses momentum transfer only. The beachcomber, the caveman, the swinger, the prospector, and the rock wrecker also take advantage of raw asteroid materials. The chemist and the hijacker go further, they process the asteroid into propellants. Or, an asteroid railway system could be constructed with each hijacked asteroid becoming a scheduled train. Travelers could board this space railway system assured that water, oxygen propellants, and shielding await them. Austere space travel could give way to comforts, with a speed and economy impossible without nature's gift of earth visiting asteroids.

  18. Momentum-space Electronic Structures and Charge Orders of the High-temperature Superconductors Ca2−xNaxCuO2Cl2 and Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, J.Q.; Xu, Z.; Brunner, M.; Kim, K.-H.; Lee, H.-G.; Lee, S.-I.; Wen, J.S.; Gu, G.D.; Gweon, G.-H.

    2011-08-24

    We study the electronic structure of Ca{sub 2-x}Na{sub x}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} samples in a wide range of doping, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, with emphasis on the Fermi surface (FS) in the near antinodal region. The 'nesting wave vector,' i.e., the wave vector that connects two nearly flat pieces of the FS in the antinodal region, reveals a universal monotonic decrease in magnitude as a function of doping. Comparing our results to the charge order recently observed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), we conclude that the FS nesting and the charge order pattern seen in STS do not have a direct relationship. Therefore, the charge order likely arises due to strong-correlation physics rather than FS nesting physics.

  19. Momentum-space electronic structures and charge orders of the high-temperature superconductors Ca2-xNaxCuO₂Cl₂ and Bi₂Sr₂CaCu₂O8+δ

    DOE PAGES

    Meng, Jian-Qiao; Brunner, M.; Kim, K.-H.; Lee, H.-G.; Lee, S.-I.; Wen, J. S.; Xu, Z. J.; Gu, G. D.; Gweon, G.-H.

    2011-08-24

    We study the electronic structure of Ca2-xNaxCuO₂Cl₂ and Bi₂Sr₂CaCu₂O8+δ samples in a wide range of doping, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, with emphasis on the Fermi surface (FS) in the near antinodal region. The “nesting wave vector,” i.e., the wave vector that connects two nearly flat pieces of the FS in the antinodal region, reveals a universal monotonic decrease in magnitude as a function of doping. Comparing our results to the charge order recently observed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), we conclude that the FS nesting and the charge order pattern seen in STS do not have a direct relationship. Therefore,more » the charge order likely arises due to strong-correlation physics rather than FS nesting physics« less

  20. Momentum-space electronic structures and charge orders of the high-temperature superconductors Ca2-xNaxCuO₂Cl₂ and Bi₂Sr₂CaCu₂O8+δ

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Jian-Qiao; Brunner, M.; Kim, K.-H.; Lee, H.-G.; Lee, S.-I.; Wen, J. S.; Xu, Z. J.; Gu, G. D.; Gweon, G.-H.

    2011-08-24

    We study the electronic structure of Ca2-xNaxCuO₂Cl₂ and Bi₂Sr₂CaCu₂O8+δ samples in a wide range of doping, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, with emphasis on the Fermi surface (FS) in the near antinodal region. The “nesting wave vector,” i.e., the wave vector that connects two nearly flat pieces of the FS in the antinodal region, reveals a universal monotonic decrease in magnitude as a function of doping. Comparing our results to the charge order recently observed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), we conclude that the FS nesting and the charge order pattern seen in STS do not have a direct relationship. Therefore, the charge order likely arises due to strong-correlation physics rather than FS nesting physics

  1. Status of the variable momentum compaction storage ring experiment in SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, P.; Amiry, A.; Pellegrini, C.

    1993-09-01

    Variable momentum compaction lattices have been proposed for electron-positron colliders and synchrotron radiation sources to control synchrotron tune and bunch length. To address questions of single particle stability limits, a study has been initiated to change the SPEAR lattice into a variable momentum compaction configuration for experimental investigation of the beam dynamics. In this paper, we describe a model-based method used to transform SPEAR from the injection lattice to the low momentum compaction configuration. Experimental observations of the process are reviewed.

  2. Effect of energy and momentum conservation on fluid resonances for resonant magnetic perturbations in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Peter; Heyn, Martin F.; Kernbichler, Winfried; Ivanov, Ivan B.; Kasilov, Sergei V.

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, the impact of momentum and energy conservation of the collision operator in the kinetic description for Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) in a tokamak is studied. The particle conserving differential collision operator of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type is supplemented with integral parts such that energy and momentum are conserved. The application to RMP penetration in a tokamak shows that energy conservation in the electron collision operator is important for the quantitative description of plasma shielding effects at the resonant surface. On the other hand, momentum conservation in the ion collision operator does not significantly change the results.

  3. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  4. Precision Measurement in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quake, Stephen

    Is biology a quantitative science like physics? I will discuss the role of precision measurement in both physics and biology, and argue that in fact both fields can be tied together by the use and consequences of precision measurement. The elementary quanta of biology are twofold: the macromolecule and the cell. Cells are the fundamental unit of life, and macromolecules are the fundamental elements of the cell. I will describe how precision measurements have been used to explore the basic properties of these quanta, and more generally how the quest for higher precision almost inevitably leads to the development of new technologies, which in turn catalyze further scientific discovery. In the 21st century, there are no remaining experimental barriers to biology becoming a truly quantitative and mathematical science.

  5. Precision displacement reference system

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Dubois, Robert R.; Strother, Jerry D.

    2000-02-22

    A precision displacement reference system is described, which enables real time accountability over the applied displacement feedback system to precision machine tools, positioning mechanisms, motion devices, and related operations. As independent measurements of tool location is taken by a displacement feedback system, a rotating reference disk compares feedback counts with performed motion. These measurements are compared to characterize and analyze real time mechanical and control performance during operation.

  6. Mechanism of Angular Momentum Exchange between Molecules and Laguerre-Gaussian Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrescu, Adrian; Cojoc, Dan; Fabrizio, Enzo Di

    2006-06-23

    We derive the interaction Hamiltonian between a diatomic molecule and a Laguerre-Gaussian beam under the assumption of a small spread of the center of mass wave function of the molecule in comparison with the beam waist. Considering the dynamical variables of the center of mass, vibrational, rotational, and electronic motion, we show that, within the electronic dipole approximation, the orbital angular momentum of the field couples with the rotational and electronic motion. The changes in the transition probabilities and selection rules induced by the field orbital angular momentum and the applicability of the derived interaction mechanisms for polyatomic molecules are discussed.

  7. Energy and momentum in multiple metric theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talshir, Idan

    2013-07-01

    We derive the expressions for canonical energy, momentum, and angular momentum for multiple metric theories. We prove that although the metric fields are generally interacting, the total energy is the sum of conserved energies corresponding to each metric. A positive energy theorem is given as a result. In addition, we present an Hamiltonian formalism for a subgroup of multimetric theories.

  8. Variation of transverse momentum in hadronic collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint Amand, J.; Uritam, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents a detailed parameterization of the transverse momentum in hadronic collisions on multiplicity and on beam momentum. Hadronic collisions are considered at energies below the ultra-high energy domain, on the basis of an uncertainty relation and a naive eikonal model with an impact-parameter-dependent multiplicity.

  9. Momentum control in photoassociation of ultracold atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kallush, S.; Kosloff, R.

    2007-11-15

    Ultracold photoassociation is a process in which two cold atoms combine to form a molecule. This process is crucially dependent on the atom pair density at close distance termed the photoassociation window. We explore the possibilities for increasing the pair density at the photoassociation window by using a prepulse to accelerate the pairs of atoms at large interatomic separation toward each other. We show that the signal of a subsequent photoassociation pulse could be enhanced by a factor of one to two orders of magnitude with respect to the conventional continuous wave experiment. For neutral encounters on the ground potential surface which scales as R{sup -6} the acceleration becomes negligible. The electronic excited state potentials scale for homonuclear S{yields}P transitions more favorably as R{sup -3}. A possible pump-dump mechanism for acceleration, excites a pair of atoms at large distance employing the natural acceleration on the excited state. Then a dump pulse moves the population back to the ground surface. By controlling the phase and the amplitude of the light field this scenario can be optimized. In addition the momentum partitioned between the ground and excited surfaces can also be controlled. The possibility for pure quantum light-induced acceleration due to a gradient of the transition dipole is analyzed. Significant acceleration can be obtained only for pulses with intensities above 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} and pulse duration of 10 ps.

  10. Forms of momentum across space: representational, operational, and attentional.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Timothy L

    2014-12-01

    Cognition can exhibit biases consistent with future expectations, and some of these biases result in momentum-like effects and have been linked with the idea of an internalization of the effects of momentum. These momentum-like effects include representational momentum, operational momentum, and attentional momentum. Similarities and differences between these different momentum-like effects are considered. Hubbard's (2005) review of representational momentum is updated to include studies published since that review appeared, and the first full reviews of operational momentum and attentional momentum are provided. It is suggested that (1) many variables that influence one of these momentum-like effects have a similar influence on another momentum-like effect, (2) representational momentum, operational momentum, and attentional momentum reflect similar or overlapping mechanisms, and operational momentum and attentional momentum are special cases of representational momentum, and (3) representational momentum, operational momentum, and attentional momentum reflect properties of a more general spatial representation in which change or transformation of a stimulus is mapped onto motion in a spatial coordinate system.

  11. Momentum kill procedure can quickly control blowouts

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.D. ); Moore, P. )

    1993-08-30

    The momentum kill method can help in quickly regaining control of a blowing well, providing the blowing well rate and fluid properties can be estimated reasonably. The momentum of the kill fluid counteracts and overcomes the flowing momentum of formation fluids. In other words, sufficient mud density pumped at a sufficient rate is directed into the flow stream to force the escaping fluid column back into the well bore. Sufficient kill fluid hydrostatic pressure must be stacked'' in the hole so that the well remains dead after the operation. The momentum kill is not a panacea for all blowouts. An assessment must be made of the potential problems unique to this method, and certain requirements must be met if the technique is to be successful. The paper discusses some of the considerations for evaluating the use of the momentum kill method.

  12. The angular momentum of the Oort cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the work of Marochnik et al. (1988), which estimated that the angular momentum of the Oort cloud is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the planetary system's total angular momentum. It is noted that most of the angular momentum in the currently observed Oort cloud is the result of the effects of external perturbers over the solar system's history, and it is demonstrated that the total current angular momentum is probably in the 6.0 x 10 to the 50th to 1.1 x 10 to the 51st g sq cm/sec range; original angular momentum was probably a factor of 5 below such values.

  13. The angular momentum of the Oort cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, P.R. )

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the work of Marochnik et al. (1988), which estimated that the angular momentum of the Oort cloud is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the planetary system's total angular momentum. It is noted that most of the angular momentum in the currently observed Oort cloud is the result of the effects of external perturbers over the solar system's history, and it is demonstrated that the total current angular momentum is probably in the 6.0 x 10 to the 50th to 1.1 x 10 to the 51st g sq cm/sec range; original angular momentum was probably a factor of 5 below such values. 21 refs.

  14. Quantum gravity momentum representation and maximum energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, J. W.

    2016-11-01

    We use the idea of the symmetry between the spacetime coordinates xμ and the energy-momentum pμ in quantum theory to construct a momentum space quantum gravity geometry with a metric sμν and a curvature tensor Pλ μνρ. For a closed maximally symmetric momentum space with a constant 3-curvature, the volume of the p-space admits a cutoff with an invariant maximum momentum a. A Wheeler-DeWitt-type wave equation is obtained in the momentum space representation. The vacuum energy density and the self-energy of a charged particle are shown to be finite, and modifications of the electromagnetic radiation density and the entropy density of a system of particles occur for high frequencies.

  15. Population momentum across vertebrate life histories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koons, D.N.; Grand, J.B.; Arnold, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Population abundance is critically important in conservation, management, and demographic theory. Thus, to better understand how perturbations to the life history affect long-term population size, we examined population momentum for four vertebrate classes with different life history strategies. In a series of demographic experiments we show that population momentum generally has a larger effect on long-term population size for organisms with long generation times than for organisms with short generation times. However, patterns between population momentum and generation time varied across taxonomic groups and according to the life history parameter that was changed. Our findings indicate that momentum may be an especially important aspect of population dynamics for long-lived vertebrates, and deserves greater attention in life history studies. Further, we discuss the importance of population momentum in natural resource management, pest control, and conservation arenas. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Extraordinary momentum and spin in evanescent waves.

    PubMed

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Bekshaev, Aleksandr Y; Nori, Franco

    2014-03-06

    Momentum and spin represent fundamental dynamic properties of quantum particles and fields. In particular, propagating optical waves (photons) carry momentum and longitudinal spin determined by the wave vector and circular polarization, respectively. Here we show that exactly the opposite can be the case for evanescent optical waves. A single evanescent wave possesses a spin component, which is independent of the polarization and is orthogonal to the wave vector. Furthermore, such a wave carries a momentum component, which is determined by the circular polarization and is also orthogonal to the wave vector. We show that these extraordinary properties reveal a fundamental Belinfante's spin momentum, known in field theory and unobservable in propagating fields. We demonstrate that the transverse momentum and spin push and twist a probe Mie particle in an evanescent field. This allows the observation of 'impossible' properties of light and of a fundamental field-theory quantity, which was previously considered as 'virtual'.

  17. Optical gyrotropy from axion electrodynamics in momentum space.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shudan; Orenstein, Joseph; Moore, Joel E

    2015-09-11

    Several emergent phenomena and phases in solids arise from configurations of the electronic Berry phase in momentum space that are similar to gauge field configurations in real space such as magnetic monopoles. We show that the momentum-space analogue of the "axion electrodynamics" term E·B plays a fundamental role in a unified theory of Berry-phase contributions to optical gyrotropy in time-reversal invariant materials and the chiral magnetic effect. The Berry-phase mechanism predicts that the rotatory power along the optic axes of a crystal must sum to zero, a constraint beyond that stipulated by point-group symmetry, but observed to high accuracy in classic experimental observations on alpha quartz. Furthermore, the Berry mechanism provides a microscopic basis for the surface conductance at the interface between gyrotropic and nongyrotropic media.

  18. Benchmarking of collision operators with momentum source corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Maassberg, H.; Beidler, C. D.

    2010-05-15

    Several linearized collision operator models with parallel momentum conservation enforced by source functions are benchmarked against the correct collision operator based on Rosenbluth potentials. The model operators without energy diffusion allow for an analytic solution of a generalized Spitzer problem. For the other operators under investigation, an integrodifferential equation is solved. The benchmarking is performed both for the parallel conductivity with the ions assumed at rest and for the bootstrap current, where ion and electron flows are collisionally coupled. The accuracy of the results obtained with the operators varies from rather poor in the case of the simplest monoenergetic model to quite satisfactory for the models employing an energy-weighted parallel momentum source function.

  19. Optical gyrotropy from axion electrodynamics in momentum space.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shudan; Orenstein, Joseph; Moore, Joel E

    2015-09-11

    Several emergent phenomena and phases in solids arise from configurations of the electronic Berry phase in momentum space that are similar to gauge field configurations in real space such as magnetic monopoles. We show that the momentum-space analogue of the "axion electrodynamics" term E·B plays a fundamental role in a unified theory of Berry-phase contributions to optical gyrotropy in time-reversal invariant materials and the chiral magnetic effect. The Berry-phase mechanism predicts that the rotatory power along the optic axes of a crystal must sum to zero, a constraint beyond that stipulated by point-group symmetry, but observed to high accuracy in classic experimental observations on alpha quartz. Furthermore, the Berry mechanism provides a microscopic basis for the surface conductance at the interface between gyrotropic and nongyrotropic media. PMID:26406854

  20. Temperature dependence of angular momentum transport across interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai; Lin, Weiwei; Chien, C. L.; Zhang, Shufeng

    2016-08-01

    Angular momentum transport in magnetic multilayered structures plays a central role in spintronic physics and devices. The angular momentum currents or spin currents are carried by either quasiparticles such as electrons and magnons, or by macroscopic order parameters such as local magnetization of ferromagnets. Based on the generic interface exchange interaction, we develop a microscopic theory that describes interfacial spin conductance for various interfaces among nonmagnetic metals, ferromagnetic insulators, and antiferromagnetic insulators. Spin conductance and its temperature dependence are obtained for different spin batteries including spin pumping, temperature gradient, and spin Hall effect. As an application of our theory, we calculate the spin current in a trilayer made of a ferromagnetic insulator, an antiferromagnetic insulator, and a nonmagnetic heavy metal. The calculated results on the temperature dependence of spin conductance quantitatively agree with the existing experiments.

  1. Energy-momentum squared gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshan, Mahmood; Shojai, Fatimah

    2016-08-01

    A new covariant generalization of Einstein's general relativity is developed which allows the existence of a term proportional to Tα βTα β in the action functional of the theory (Tα β is the energy-momentum tensor). Consequently, the relevant field equations are different from general relativity only in the presence of matter sources. In the case of a charged black hole, we find exact solutions for the field equations. Applying this theory to a homogeneous and isotropic spacetime, we find that there is a maximum energy density ρmax , and correspondingly a minimum length amin , at the early Universe. This means that there is a bounce at early times, and this theory avoids the existence of an early-time singularity. Moreover, we show that this theory possesses a true sequence of cosmological eras. We also argue that, although in the context of the standard cosmological model the cosmological constant Λ does not play any important role in the early times and becomes important only after the matter-dominated era, in this theory the "repulsive" nature of the cosmological constant plays a crucial role at early times in resolving the singularity.

  2. Precision Environmental Radiation Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Popov, Pavel Degtiarenko

    2010-07-01

    A new precision low-level environmental radiation monitoring system has been developed and tested at Jefferson Lab. This system provides environmental radiation measurements with accuracy and stability of the order of 1 nGy/h in an hour, roughly corresponding to approximately 1% of the natural cosmic background at the sea level. Advanced electronic front-end has been designed and produced for use with the industry-standard High Pressure Ionization Chamber detector hardware. A new highly sensitive readout electronic circuit was designed to measure charge from the virtually suspended ionization chamber ion collecting electrode. New signal processing technique and dedicated data acquisition were tested together with the new readout. The designed system enabled data collection in a remote Linux-operated computer workstation, which was connected to the detectors using a standard telephone cable line. The data acquisition system algorithm is built around the continuously running 24-bit resolution 192 kHz data sampling analog to digital convertor. The major features of the design include: extremely low leakage current in the input circuit, true charge integrating mode operation, and relatively fast response to the intermediate radiation change. These features allow operating of the device as an environmental radiation monitor, at the perimeters of the radiation-generating installations in densely populated areas, like in other monitoring and security applications requiring high precision and long-term stability. Initial system evaluation results are presented.

  3. Physical approach to price momentum and its application to momentum strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaehyung

    2014-12-01

    We introduce various quantitative and mathematical definitions for price momentum of financial instruments. The price momentum is quantified with velocity and mass concepts originated from the momentum in physics. By using the physical momentum of price as a selection criterion, the weekly contrarian strategies are implemented in South Korea KOSPI 200 and US S&P 500 universes. The alternative strategies constructed by the physical momentum achieve the better expected returns and reward-risk measures than those of the traditional contrarian strategy in weekly scale. The portfolio performance is not understood by the Fama-French three-factor model.

  4. Estimating sparse precision matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin; Zhou, Harrison H.; O'Connell, Ross

    2016-08-01

    We apply a method recently introduced to the statistical literature to directly estimate the precision matrix from an ensemble of samples drawn from a corresponding Gaussian distribution. Motivated by the observation that cosmological precision matrices are often approximately sparse, the method allows one to exploit this sparsity of the precision matrix to more quickly converge to an asymptotic 1/sqrt{N_sim} rate while simultaneously providing an error model for all of the terms. Such an estimate can be used as the starting point for further regularization efforts which can improve upon the 1/sqrt{N_sim} limit above, and incorporating such additional steps is straightforward within this framework. We demonstrate the technique with toy models and with an example motivated by large-scale structure two-point analysis, showing significant improvements in the rate of convergence. For the large-scale structure example, we find errors on the precision matrix which are factors of 5 smaller than for the sample precision matrix for thousands of simulations or, alternatively, convergence to the same error level with more than an order of magnitude fewer simulations.

  5. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-14

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven 'quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers. PMID:25971512

  6. Data Plots of Run I - III Results from SLAC E-158: A precision Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    DOE Data Explorer

    Three physics runs were made in 2002 and 2003 by E-158. As a result, the E-158 Collaboration announced that it had made "the first observation of Parity Violation in electron-electron (Moller) scattering). This precise Parity Violation measurement gives the best determination of the electron's weak charge at low energy (low momentum transfer between interacting particles). E158's measurement tests the predicted running (or evolution) of this weak charge with energy, and searches for new phenomena at TeV energy scales (one thousand times the proton-mass energy scale).[Copied from the experiment's public home page at http://www-project slac.stanford.edu/3158/Default.htm] See also the E158 page for collaborators at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e158/. Both websites provide data and detailed information.

  7. Momentum Transport in Rarefied Gases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, Keith Alan

    The study of non-uniform rarefied gas flow under different geometries and boundary conditions is fundamental to problems in a variety of systems. This dissertation investigates problems of viscous flow or momentum transport in the thin regions (Knudsen layers) close to the boundaries where rarefied gas flows must be described by the Boltzmann equation (Kinetic Theory). The problems of planar slip flow and planar Poiseuille flow for rigid spheres are examined by solving the linearized Boltzmann equation using the discrete ordinates (S_{rm N} ) method. The slip flow or half-space problem of rarefied gas flow is considered and use of the S_ {rm N} (discrete ordinates) algorithm outlined. Accurate numerical results for the velocity slip coefficient and velocity defect are obtained for a rigid sphere gas and are compared with previously reported results and experimental data. In plane Poiseuille flow, the continuum limit is characterized by the Burnett distribution. Explicit results for this distribution are obtained by solving numerically the relevant integral equations for a rigid sphere gas in the context of the linearized Boltzmann equation. This distribution together with the Chapman-Enskog distribution is used to obtain asymptotic results (near-continuum) for mass and heat fluxes corresponding to planar thermal transpiration and mechanocaloric effects. The problem of plane Poiseuille flow of a rarefied gas is solved by the S_{rm N } method. Explicit results for the flow rates and velocity profiles for a rigid sphere intermolecular interaction are obtained, and compared with the BGK and one-term synthetic model results. The flow rates are verified by use of variational expressions incorporating the newly developed Burnett distribution values. The rigid sphere values for the flow rates are in better agreement with the available experimental data than those based on the BGK kinetic model and the one term synthetic model. The development of the appropriate equations

  8. Photon momentum and optical forces in cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partanen, Mikko; Häyrynen, Teppo; Oksanen, Jani; Tulkki, Jukka

    2016-03-01

    During the past century the electromagnetic field momentum in material media has been under debate in the Abraham-Minkowski controversy as convincing arguments have been advanced in favor of both the Abraham and Minkowski forms of photon momentum. Here we study the photon momentum and optical forces in cavity structures in the cases of dynamical and steady state fields. In the description of the single-photon transmission process we use a field-kinetic one-photon theory. Our model suggests that in the medium photons couple with the induced atomic dipoles forming polariton quasiparticles with the Minkowski form momentum. The Abraham momentum can be associated to the electromagnetic field part of the coupled polariton state. The polariton with the Minkowski momentum is shown to obey the uniform center of mass of energy motion that has previously been interpreted to support only the Abraham momentum. When describing the steady state non-equilibrium field distributions we use the recently developed quantized fluctuational electrodynamics (QFED) formalism. While allowing detailed studies of light propagation and quantum field fluctuations in interfering structures, our methods also provide practical tools for modeling optical energy transfer and the formation of thermal balance in nanodevices as well as studying electromagnetic forces in optomechanical devices.

  9. Precision gap particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Miles, Robin; Jones, II., Leslie M.; Stockton, Cheryl

    2004-06-08

    A system for separating particles entrained in a fluid includes a base with a first channel and a second channel. A precision gap connects the first channel and the second channel. The precision gap is of a size that allows small particles to pass from the first channel into the second channel and prevents large particles from the first channel into the second channel. A cover is positioned over the base unit, the first channel, the precision gap, and the second channel. An port directs the fluid containing the entrained particles into the first channel. An output port directs the large particles out of the first channel. A port connected to the second channel directs the small particles out of the second channel.

  10. How Physics Got Precise

    SciTech Connect

    Kleppner, Daniel

    2005-01-19

    Although the ancients knew the length of the year to about ten parts per million, it was not until the end of the 19th century that precision measurements came to play a defining role in physics. Eventually such measurements made it possible to replace human-made artifacts for the standards of length and time with natural standards. For a new generation of atomic clocks, time keeping could be so precise that the effects of the local gravitational potentials on the clock rates would be important. This would force us to re-introduce an artifact into the definition of the second - the location of the primary clock. I will describe some of the events in the history of precision measurements that have led us to this pleasing conundrum, and some of the unexpected uses of atomic clocks today.

  11. Precision Heating Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A heat sealing process was developed by SEBRA based on technology that originated in work with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The project involved connecting and transferring blood and fluids between sterile plastic containers while maintaining a closed system. SEBRA markets the PIRF Process to manufacturers of medical catheters. It is a precisely controlled method of heating thermoplastic materials in a mold to form or weld catheters and other products. The process offers advantages in fast, precise welding or shape forming of catheters as well as applications in a variety of other industries.

  12. Precision manometer gauge

    DOEpatents

    McPherson, Malcolm J.; Bellman, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    A precision manometer gauge which locates a zero height and a measured height of liquid using an open tube in communication with a reservoir adapted to receive the pressure to be measured. The open tube has a reference section carried on a positioning plate which is moved vertically with machine tool precision. Double scales are provided to read the height of the positioning plate accurately, the reference section being inclined for accurate meniscus adjustment, and means being provided to accurately locate a zero or reference position.

  13. Precision manometer gauge

    DOEpatents

    McPherson, M.J.; Bellman, R.A.

    1982-09-27

    A precision manometer gauge which locates a zero height and a measured height of liquid using an open tube in communication with a reservoir adapted to receive the pressure to be measured. The open tube has a reference section carried on a positioning plate which is moved vertically with machine tool precision. Double scales are provided to read the height of the positioning plate accurately, the reference section being inclined for accurate meniscus adjustment, and means being provided to accurately locate a zero or reference position.

  14. Precision Nova operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, R.B.; Miller, J.L.; Saunders, R.L.; Thompson, C.E.; Weiland, T.L.; Laumann, C.W.

    1995-09-01

    To improve the symmetry of x-ray drive on indirectly driven ICF capsules, we have increased the accuracy of operating procedures and diagnostics on the Nova laser. Precision Nova operations includes routine precision power balance to within 10% rms in the ``foot`` and 5% nns in the peak of shaped pulses, beam synchronization to within 10 ps rms, and pointing of the beams onto targets to within 35 {mu}m rms. We have also added a ``fail-safe chirp`` system to avoid Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) in optical components during high energy shots.

  15. Angular momentum in the Local Group

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, A.; Laflamme, R.

    1994-04-01

    We briefly review models for the Local Group and the acquisition of its angular momentum. We describe early attempts to understand the origin of the spin of the galaxies discussing the hypothesis that the Local Group has little angular momentum. Finally we show that using Peebles` least action principle there should be a rather large amount of orbital angular momentum compared to the magnitude of the spin of its galaxies. Therefore the Local Group cannot be thought as tidally isolated. Using Peebles` trajectories we give a possible set of trajectories for Local Group galaxies which would predict their spin.

  16. Proposal for a CLEO precision vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Fermilab experiment E691 and CERN experiment NA32 have demonstrated the enormous power of precision vertexing for studying heavy quark physics. Nearly all collider experiments now have or are installing precision vertex detectors. This is a proposal for a precision vertex detector for CLEO, which will be the pre-eminent heavy quark experiment for at least the next 5 years. The purpose of a precision vertex detector for CLEO is to enhance the capabilities for isolating B, charm, and tau decays and to make it possible to measure the decay time. The precision vertex detector will also significantly improve strange particle identification and help with the tracking. The installation and use of this detector at CLEO is an important step in developing a vertex detector for an asymmetric B factory and therefore in observing CP violation in B decays. The CLEO environment imposes a number of unique conditions and challenges. The machine will be operating near the {gamma} (4S) in energy. This means that B's are produced with a very small velocity and travel a distance about {1/2} that of the expected vertex position resolution. As a consequence B decay time information will not be useful for most physics. On the other hand, the charm products of B decays have a higher velocity. For the long lived D{sup +} in particular, vertex information can be used to isolate the charm particle on an event-by-event basis. This helps significantly in reconstructing B's. The vertex resolution for D's from B's is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering of the necessarily rather low momentum tracks. As a consequence it is essential to minimize the material, as measured in radiation lengths, in the beam pip and the vertex detector itself. It is also essential to build the beam pipe and detector with the smallest possible radius.

  17. Indirect precise angular control using four-wave mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Shi, Bao-Sen Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Yun-Kun

    2014-04-28

    Here, we show indirect precise angular control using a four-wave mixing (FWM) process. This was performed with a superposition of light with orbital angular momentum in an M-Type configuration of a hot {sup 85}Rb atomic ensemble. A gear-shaped interference pattern is observed at FWM light with a donut-shaped input signal. The gear could be rotated and is controlled through the change of the polarization of the pump laser. Our experimental results that are based on nonlinear coherent interactions have applications in image processing and precise angular control.

  18. Precision bolometer bridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. R.

    1968-01-01

    Prototype precision bolometer calibration bridge is manually balanced device for indicating dc bias and balance with either dc or ac power. An external galvanometer is used with the bridge for null indication, and the circuitry monitors voltage and current simultaneously without adapters in testing 100 and 200 ohm thin film bolometers.

  19. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    1985-01-29

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge. 2 figs.

  20. Precision physics at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1997-05-01

    In this talk the author gives a brief survey of some physics topics that will be addressed by the Large Hadron Collider currently under construction at CERN. Instead of discussing the reach of this machine for new physics, the author gives examples of the types of precision measurements that might be made if new physics is discovered.

  1. Precision in Stereochemical Terminology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Leroy G., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    An analysis of relatively new terminology that has given multiple definitions often resulting in students learning principles that are actually false is presented with an example of the new term stereogenic atom introduced by Mislow and Siegel. The Mislow terminology would be useful in some cases if it were used precisely and correctly, but it is…

  2. High Precision Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Adam

    2012-10-01

    This |*|program |*|uses |*|the |*|enhanced |*|astrometric |*|precision |*|enabled |*|by |*|spatial |*|scanning |*|to |*|calibrate |*|remaining |*|obstacles |*|toreaching |*|<<40 |*|microarc|*|second |*|astrometry |*|{<1 |*|millipixel} |*|with |*|WFC3/UVIS |*|by |*|1} |*|improving |*|geometric |*|distor-on |*|2} |*|calibratingthe |*|e|*|ect |*|of |*|breathing |*|on |*|astrometry|*|3} |*|calibrating |*|the |*|e|*|ect |*|of |*|CTE |*|on |*|astrometry, |*|4} |*|characterizing |*|the |*|boundaries |*|andorientations |*|of |*|the |*|WFC3 |*|lithograph |*|cells.

  3. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, Michael E.; Sullivan, William H.

    1985-01-01

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  4. Fundamental constants: The teamwork of precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Edmund G.

    2014-02-01

    A new value for the atomic mass of the electron is a link in a chain of measurements that will enable a test of the standard model of particle physics with better than part-per-trillion precision. See Letter p.467

  5. Sensing technologies for precision specialty crop production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the advances in electronic and information technologies, various sensing systems have been developed for specialty crop production around the world. Accurate information concerning the spatial variability within fields is very important for precision farming of specialty crops. However, this va...

  6. Quantum Hall effect in momentum space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically discuss a momentum-space analog of the quantum Hall effect, which could be observed in topologically nontrivial lattice models subject to an external harmonic trapping potential. In our proposal, the Niu-Thouless-Wu formulation of the quantum Hall effect on a torus is realized in the toroidally shaped Brillouin zone. In this analogy, the position of the trap center in real space controls the magnetic fluxes that are inserted through the holes of the torus in momentum space. We illustrate the momentum-space quantum Hall effect with the noninteracting trapped Harper-Hofstadter model, for which we numerically demonstrate how this effect manifests itself in experimental observables. Extension to the interacting trapped Harper-Hofstadter model is also briefly considered. We finally discuss possible experimental platforms where our proposal for the momentum-space quantum Hall effect could be realized.

  7. Momentum-space Harper-Hofstadter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2015-08-01

    We show how the weakly trapped Harper-Hofstadter model can be mapped onto a Harper-Hofstadter model in momentum space. In this momentum-space model, the band dispersion plays the role of the periodic potential, the Berry curvature plays the role of an effective magnetic field, the real-space harmonic trap provides the momentum-space kinetic energy responsible for the hopping, and the trap position sets the boundary conditions around the magnetic Brillouin zone. Spatially local interactions translate into nonlocal interactions in momentum space: within a mean-field approximation, we show that increasing interparticle interactions leads to a structural change of the ground state, from a single rotationally symmetric ground state to degenerate ground states that spontaneously break rotational symmetry.

  8. Momentum errors in an RF separated beam

    SciTech Connect

    T. Kobilarcik

    2002-09-19

    The purity of an RF separated beam is affected by the difference in mass of the particle types and the momentum bite of the beam. The resulting time-of-flight difference between different types allows separation to occur; the finite momentum bite results in chromatic aberration. Both these features also give rise to a particle type dependent velocity bite, which must also be taken into account. This memo demonstrates a generalizable method for calculating the effect.

  9. Transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2011-10-01

    Transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) provide three-dimensional images of the partonic structure of the nucleon in momentum space. We made impressive progress in understanding TMDs, both from the theoretical and experimental point of view. This brief overview on TMDs is divided in two parts: in the first, an essential list of achievements is presented. In the second, a selection of open questions is discussed.

  10. Total longitudinal momentum in a dispersive optical waveguide.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianhui; Chen, Chunyan; Zhai, Yanfang; Chen, Zhe; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Lijun; Huang, Furong; Xiao, Yi

    2011-12-01

    Using the Lorentz force law, we derived simpler expressions for the total longitudinal (conserved) momentum and the mechanical momentums associated with an optical pulse propagating along a dispersive optical waveguide. These expressions can be applied to an arbitrary non-absorptive optical waveguide having continuous translational symmetry. Our simulation using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method verified that the total momentum formula is valid in a two-dimensional infinite waveguide. We studied the conservation of the total momentum and the transfer of the momentum to the waveguide for the case when an optical pulse travels from a finite waveguide to vacuum. We found that neither the Abraham nor the Minkowski momentum expression for an electromagnetic wave in a waveguide represents the complete total (conserved) momentum. Only the total momentum as we derived for a mode propagating in a dispersive optical waveguides is the 'true' conserved momentum. This total momentum can be expressed as PTot = -U Die/(vg) + neff (U/c). It has three contributions: (1) the Abraham momentum; (2) the momentum from the Abraham force, which equals to the difference between the Abraham momentum and the Minkowski momentum; and (3) the momentum from the dipole force which can be expressed as -UDie/vg. The last two contributions constitute the mechanical momentum. Compared with FDTD-Lorentz-force method, the presently derived total momentum formula provides a better method in terms of analyzing the permanent transfer of optical momentum to a waveguide.

  11. Momentum dependence in the dynamically assisted Sauter-Schwinger effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fey, Christian; Schützhold, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Recently it was found that the superposition of a strong and slow electric field with a weaker and faster pulse can significantly enhance the probability for nonperturbative electron-positron pair creation out of the vacuum—the dynamically assisted Sauter-Schwinger effect. Via the WKB method, we estimate the momentum dependence of the pair creation probability and compare it to existing numerical results. Besides the theoretical interest, a better understanding of this pair creation mechanism should be helpful for the planned experiments aiming at its detection.

  12. Universal spin-momentum locked optical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalhor, Farid; Thundat, Thomas; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-02-01

    Evanescent electromagnetic waves possess spin-momentum locking, where the direction of propagation (momentum) is locked to the inherent polarization of the wave (transverse spin). We study the optical forces arising from this universal phenomenon and show that the fundamental origin of recently reported non-trivial optical chiral forces is spin-momentum locking. For evanescent waves, we show that the direction of energy flow, the direction of decay, and the direction of spin follow a right hand rule for three different cases of total internal reflection, surface plasmon polaritons, and HE11 mode of an optical fiber. Furthermore, we explain how the recently reported phenomena of lateral optical force on chiral and achiral particles are caused by the transverse spin of the evanescent field and the spin-momentum locking phenomenon. Finally, we propose an experiment to identify the unique lateral forces arising from the transverse spin in the optical fiber and point to fundamental differences of the spin density from the well-known orbital angular momentum of light. Our work presents a unified view on spin-momentum locking and how it affects optical forces on chiral and achiral particles.

  13. Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. III. Angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    Helicons are electromagnetic waves with helical phase fronts propagating in the whistler mode in magnetized plasmas and solids. They have similar properties to electromagnetic waves with angular momentum in free space. Helicons are circularly polarized waves carrying spin angular momentum and orbital angular momentum due to their propagation around the ambient magnetic field B0. These properties have not been considered in the community of researchers working on helicon plasma sources, but are the topic of the present work. The present work focuses on the field topology of helicons in unbounded plasmas, not on helicon source physics. Helicons are excited in a large uniform laboratory plasma with a magnetic loop antenna whose dipole axis is aligned along or across B0. The wave fields are measured in orthogonal planes and extended to three dimensions (3D) by interpolation. Since density and B0 are uniform, small amplitude waves from loops at different locations can be superimposed to generate complex antenna patterns. With a circular array of phase shifted loops, whistler modes with angular and axial wave propagation, i.e., helicons, are generated. Without boundaries radial propagation also arises. The azimuthal mode number m can be positive or negative while the field polarization remains right-hand circular. The conservation of energy and momentum implies that these field quantities are transferred to matter which causes damping or reflection. Wave-particle interactions with fast electrons are possible by Doppler shifted resonances. The transverse Doppler shift is demonstrated. Wave-wave interactions are also shown by showing collisions between different helicons. Whistler turbulence does not always have to be created by nonlinear wave-interactions but can also be a linear superposition of waves from random sources. In helicon collisions, the linear and/or orbital angular momenta can be canceled, which results in a great variety of field topologies. The work will

  14. Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. III. Angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-09-15

    Helicons are electromagnetic waves with helical phase fronts propagating in the whistler mode in magnetized plasmas and solids. They have similar properties to electromagnetic waves with angular momentum in free space. Helicons are circularly polarized waves carrying spin angular momentum and orbital angular momentum due to their propagation around the ambient magnetic field B{sub 0}. These properties have not been considered in the community of researchers working on helicon plasma sources, but are the topic of the present work. The present work focuses on the field topology of helicons in unbounded plasmas, not on helicon source physics. Helicons are excited in a large uniform laboratory plasma with a magnetic loop antenna whose dipole axis is aligned along or across B{sub 0}. The wave fields are measured in orthogonal planes and extended to three dimensions (3D) by interpolation. Since density and B{sub 0} are uniform, small amplitude waves from loops at different locations can be superimposed to generate complex antenna patterns. With a circular array of phase shifted loops, whistler modes with angular and axial wave propagation, i.e., helicons, are generated. Without boundaries radial propagation also arises. The azimuthal mode number m can be positive or negative while the field polarization remains right-hand circular. The conservation of energy and momentum implies that these field quantities are transferred to matter which causes damping or reflection. Wave-particle interactions with fast electrons are possible by Doppler shifted resonances. The transverse Doppler shift is demonstrated. Wave-wave interactions are also shown by showing collisions between different helicons. Whistler turbulence does not always have to be created by nonlinear wave-interactions but can also be a linear superposition of waves from random sources. In helicon collisions, the linear and/or orbital angular momenta can be canceled, which results in a great variety of field

  15. Precision experiments in electroweak interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, M.L.

    1990-03-01

    The electroweak theory of Glashow, Weinberg, and Salam (GWS) has become one of the twin pillars upon which our understanding of all particle physics phenomena rests. It is a brilliant achievement that qualitatively and quantitatively describes all of the vast quantity of experimental data that have been accumulated over some forty years. Note that the word quantitatively must be qualified. The low energy limiting cases of the GWS theory, Quantum Electrodynamics and the V-A Theory of Weak Interactions, have withstood rigorous testing. The high energy synthesis of these ideas, the GWS theory, has not yet been subjected to comparably precise scrutiny. The recent operation of a new generation of proton-antiproton (p{bar p}) and electron-positron (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}) colliders has made it possible to produce and study large samples of the electroweak gauge bosons W{sup {plus minus}} and Z{sup 0}. We expect that these facilities will enable very precise tests of the GWS theory to be performed in the near future. In keeping with the theme of this Institute, Physics at the 100 GeV Mass Scale, these lectures will explore the current status and the near-future prospects of these experiments.

  16. Antihydrogen production and precision experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto, M.M.; Goldman, T.; Holzscheiter, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    The study of CPT invariance with the highest achievable precision in all particle sectors is of fundamental importance for physics. Equally important is the question of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. In recent years, impressive progress has been achieved in capturing antiprotons in specially designed Penning traps, in cooling them to energies of a few milli-electron volts, and in storing them for hours in a small volume of space. Positrons have been accumulated in large numbers in similar traps, and low energy positron or positronium beams have been generated. Finally, steady progress has been made in trapping and cooling neutral atoms. Thus the ingredients to form antihydrogen at rest are at hand. Once antihydrogen atoms have been captured at low energy, spectroscopic methods can be applied to interrogate their atomic structure with extremely high precision and compare it to its normal matter counterpart, the hydrogen atom. Especially the 1S-2S transition, with a lifetime of the excited state of 122 msec and thereby a natural linewidth of 5 parts in 10{sup 16}, offers in principle the possibility to directly compare matter and antimatter properties at a level of 1 part in 10{sup 16}.

  17. Controlling the Spins Angular Momentum in Ferromagnets with Sequences of Picosecond Acoustic Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Wan; Vomir, Mircea; Bigot, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the angular momentum of spins with very short external perturbations is a key issue in modern magnetism. For example it allows manipulating the magnetization for recording purposes or for inducing high frequency spin torque oscillations. Towards that purpose it is essential to modify and control the angular momentum of the magnetization which precesses around the resultant effective magnetic field. That can be achieved with very short external magnetic field pulses or using intrinsically coupled magnetic structures, resulting in a transfer of spin torque. Here we show that using picosecond acoustic pulses is a versatile and efficient way of controlling the spin angular momentum in ferromagnets. Two or three acoustic pulses, generated by femtosecond laser pulses, allow suppressing or enhancing the magnetic precession at any arbitrary time by precisely controlling the delays and amplitudes of the optical pulses. A formal analogy with a two dimensional pendulum allows us explaining the complex trajectory of the magnetic vector perturbed by the acoustic pulses. PMID:25687970

  18. Controlling the spins angular momentum in ferromagnets with sequences of picosecond acoustic pulses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Wan; Vomir, Mircea; Bigot, Jean-Yves

    2015-02-17

    Controlling the angular momentum of spins with very short external perturbations is a key issue in modern magnetism. For example it allows manipulating the magnetization for recording purposes or for inducing high frequency spin torque oscillations. Towards that purpose it is essential to modify and control the angular momentum of the magnetization which precesses around the resultant effective magnetic field. That can be achieved with very short external magnetic field pulses or using intrinsically coupled magnetic structures, resulting in a transfer of spin torque. Here we show that using picosecond acoustic pulses is a versatile and efficient way of controlling the spin angular momentum in ferromagnets. Two or three acoustic pulses, generated by femtosecond laser pulses, allow suppressing or enhancing the magnetic precession at any arbitrary time by precisely controlling the delays and amplitudes of the optical pulses. A formal analogy with a two dimensional pendulum allows us explaining the complex trajectory of the magnetic vector perturbed by the acoustic pulses.

  19. Gravitational Energy-Momentum and Conservation of Energy-Momentum in General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhao-Yan

    2016-06-01

    Based on a general variational principle, Einstein-Hilbert action and sound facts from geometry, it is shown that the long existing pseudotensor, non-localizability problem of gravitational energy-momentum is a result of mistaking different geometrical, physical objects as one and the same. It is also pointed out that in a curved spacetime, the sum vector of matter energy-momentum over a finite hyper-surface can not be defined. In curvilinear coordinate systems conservation of matter energy-momentum is not the continuity equations for its components. Conservation of matter energy-momentum is the vanishing of the covariant divergence of its density-flux tensor field. Introducing gravitational energy-momentum to save the law of conservation of energy-momentum is unnecessary and improper. After reasonably defining “change of a particle's energy-momentum”, we show that gravitational field does not exchange energy-momentum with particles. And it does not exchange energy-momentum with matter fields either. Therefore, the gravitational field does not carry energy-momentum, it is not a force field and gravity is not a natural force.

  20. Geometric momentum: The proper momentum for a free particle on a two-dimensional sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Q. H.; Tang, L. H.; Xun, D. M.

    2011-10-15

    In Dirac's canonical quantization theory on systems with second-class constraints, the commutators between the position, momentum, and Hamiltonian form a set of algebraic relations that are fundamental in construction of both the quantum momentum and the Hamiltonian. For a free particle on a two-dimensional sphere or a spherical top, results show that the well-known canonical momentum p{sub {theta}} breaks one of the relations, while three components of the momentum expressed in the three-dimensional Cartesian system of axes as p{sub i} (i=1,2,3) are satisfactory all around. This momentum is not only geometrically invariant but also self-adjoint, and we call it geometric momentum. The nontrivial commutators between p{sub i} generate three components of the orbital angular momentum; thus the geometric momentum is fundamental to the angular one. We note that there are five different forms of the geometric momentum proposed in the current literature, but only one of them turns out to be meaningful.

  1. A passion for precision

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    For more than three decades, the quest for ever higher precision in laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom has inspired many advances in laser, optical, and spectroscopic techniques, culminating in femtosecond laser optical frequency combs  as perhaps the most precise measuring tools known to man. Applications range from optical atomic clocks and tests of QED and relativity to searches for time variations of fundamental constants. Recent experiments are extending frequency comb techniques into the extreme ultraviolet. Laser frequency combs can also control the electric field of ultrashort light pulses, creating powerful new tools for the emerging field of attosecond science.Organiser(s): L. Alvarez-Gaume / PH-THNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  2. A passion for precision

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-19

    For more than three decades, the quest for ever higher precision in laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom has inspired many advances in laser, optical, and spectroscopic techniques, culminating in femtosecond laser optical frequency combs  as perhaps the most precise measuring tools known to man. Applications range from optical atomic clocks and tests of QED and relativity to searches for time variations of fundamental constants. Recent experiments are extending frequency comb techniques into the extreme ultraviolet. Laser frequency combs can also control the electric field of ultrashort light pulses, creating powerful new tools for the emerging field of attosecond science.Organiser(s): L. Alvarez-Gaume / PH-THNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  3. Towards precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Euan A

    2016-08-16

    There is great potential for genome sequencing to enhance patient care through improved diagnostic sensitivity and more precise therapeutic targeting. To maximize this potential, genomics strategies that have been developed for genetic discovery - including DNA-sequencing technologies and analysis algorithms - need to be adapted to fit clinical needs. This will require the optimization of alignment algorithms, attention to quality-coverage metrics, tailored solutions for paralogous or low-complexity areas of the genome, and the adoption of consensus standards for variant calling and interpretation. Global sharing of this more accurate genotypic and phenotypic data will accelerate the determination of causality for novel genes or variants. Thus, a deeper understanding of disease will be realized that will allow its targeting with much greater therapeutic precision. PMID:27528417

  4. Ultra precision machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debra, Daniel B.; Hesselink, Lambertus; Binford, Thomas

    1990-05-01

    There are a number of fields that require or can use to advantage very high precision in machining. For example, further development of high energy lasers and x ray astronomy depend critically on the manufacture of light weight reflecting metal optical components. To fabricate these optical components with machine tools they will be made of metal with mirror quality surface finish. By mirror quality surface finish, it is meant that the dimensions tolerances on the order of 0.02 microns and surface roughness of 0.07. These accuracy targets fall in the category of ultra precision machining. They cannot be achieved by a simple extension of conventional machining processes and techniques. They require single crystal diamond tools, special attention to vibration isolation, special isolation of machine metrology, and on line correction of imperfection in the motion of the machine carriages on their way.

  5. Two-dimensional attosecond electron wave-packet interferometry.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xinhua

    2015-05-01

    We propose a two-dimensional interferometry based on the electron wave-packet interference by using a cycle-shaped orthogonally polarized two-color laser field. With such a method, the subcycle and intercycle interferences can be disentangled into different directions in the measured photoelectron momentum spectra. The Coulomb influence can be minimized and the overlapping of interference fringes with the complicated low-energy structures can be avoided as well. The contributions of the excitation effect and the long-range Coulomb potential can be traced in the Fourier domain of the photoelectron distribution. Because of these advantages, precise information on valence electron dynamics of atoms or molecules with attosecond temporal resolution and additional spatial information with angstrom resolution can be obtained with the two-dimensional electron wave-packet interferometry.

  6. Two-Dimensional Attosecond Electron Wave-Packet Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xinhua

    2015-05-01

    We propose a two-dimensional interferometry based on the electron wave-packet interference by using a cycle-shaped orthogonally polarized two-color laser field. With such a method, the subcycle and intercycle interferences can be disentangled into different directions in the measured photoelectron momentum spectra. The Coulomb influence can be minimized and the overlapping of interference fringes with the complicated low-energy structures can be avoided as well. The contributions of the excitation effect and the long-range Coulomb potential can be traced in the Fourier domain of the photoelectron distribution. Because of these advantages, precise information on valence electron dynamics of atoms or molecules with attosecond temporal resolution and additional spatial information with angstrom resolution can be obtained with the two-dimensional electron wave-packet interferometry.

  7. Ultra-Precision Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Under a Joint Sponsored Research Agreement with Goddard Space Flight Center, SEMATECH, Inc., the Silicon Valley Group, Inc. and Tinsley Laboratories, known as SVG-Tinsley, developed an Ultra-Precision Optics Manufacturing System for space and microlithographic applications. Continuing improvements in optics manufacture will be able to meet unique NASA requirements and the production needs of the lithography industry for many years to come.

  8. Precise clock synchronization protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luit, E. J.; Martin, J. M. M.

    1993-12-01

    A distributed clock synchronization protocol is presented which achieves a very high precision without the need for very frequent resynchronizations. The protocol tolerates failures of the clocks: clocks may be too slow or too fast, exhibit omission failures and report inconsistent values. Synchronization takes place in synchronization rounds as in many other synchronization protocols. At the end of each round, clock times are exchanged between the clocks. Each clock applies a convergence function (CF) to the values obtained. This function estimates the difference between its clock and an average clock and corrects its clock accordingly. Clocks are corrected for drift relative to this average clock during the next synchronization round. The protocol is based on the assumption that clock reading errors are small with respect to the required precision of synchronization. It is shown that the CF resynchronizes the clocks with high precision even when relatively large clock drifts are possible. It is also shown that the drift-corrected clocks remain synchronized until the end of the next synchronization round. The stability of the protocol is proven.

  9. Bias Momentum Sizing for Hovering Dual-Spin Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kyong B.; Shin, Jong-Yeob; Moerder, Daniel D.

    2006-01-01

    An atmospheric flight vehicle in hover is typically controlled by varying its thrust vector. Achieving both levitation and attitude control with the propulsion system places considerable demands on it for agility and precision, particularly if the vehicle is statically unstable, or nearly so. These demands can be relaxed by introducing an appropriately sized angular momentum bias aligned with the vehicle's yaw axis, thus providing an additional margin of attitude stability about the roll and pitch axes. This paper describes a methodical approach for trading off angular momentum bias level needed with desired levels of vehicle response due to the design disturbance environment given a vehicle's physical parameters. It also describes several simplifications that provide a more physical and intuitive understanding of dual-spin dynamics for hovering atmospheric vehicles. This approach also mitigates the need for control torques and inadvertent actuator saturation difficulties in trying to stabilize a vehicle via control torques produced by unsteady aerodynamics, thrust vectoring, and unsteady throttling. Simulation results, based on a subscale laboratory test flying platform, demonstrate significant improvements in the attitude control robustness of the vehicle with respect to both wind disturbances and off-center of gravity payload changes during flight.

  10. Estimation of shear viscosity based on transverse momentum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    STAR Collaboration; Sharma, Monika; STAR Collaboration

    2009-11-01

    Event anisotropy measurements at RHIC suggest the strongly interacting matter created in heavy ion collisions flows with very little shear viscosity. Precise determination of “shear viscosity-to-entropy” ratio is currently a subject of extensive study [S. Gavin and M. Abdel-Aziz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 (2006) 162302]. We present preliminary results of measurements of the evolution of transverse momentum correlation function with collision centrality of Au+Au interactions at s=200 GeV. We compare two differential correlation functions, namely inclusive [J. Adams et al. (STAR Collaboration), Phys. Rev. C 72 (2005) 044902] and a differential version of the correlation measure C˜ introduced by Gavin et al. [S. Gavin and M. Abdel-Aziz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 (2006) 162302; M. Sharma and C. A. Pruneau, Phys. Rev. C 79 (2009) 024905.]. These observables can be used for the experimental study of the shear viscosity per unit entropy.

  11. Integrated accretion disk angular momentum removal and astrophysical jet acceleration mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellan, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A model has been developed for how accretion disks discard angular momentum while powering astrophysical jets. The model depends on the extremely weak ionization of disks. This causes disk ions to be collisionally locked to adjacent disk neutrals so a clump of disk ions and neutrals has an effective cyclotron frequency αωci where α is the fractional ionization. When αωci is approximately twice the Kepler orbital frequency, conservation of canonical momentum shows that the clump spirals radially inwards producing a radially inward disk electric current as electrons cannot move radially in the disk. Upon reaching the jet radius, this current then flows axially away from the disk plane along the jet, producing a toroidal magnetic field that drives the jet. Electrons remain frozen to poloidal flux surfaces everywhere and electron motion on flux surfaces in the ideal MHD region outside the disk completes the current path. Angular momentum absorbed from accreting material in the disk by magnetic counter-torque -JrBz is transported by the electric circuit and ejected at near infinite radius in the disk plane. This is like an electric generator absorbing angular momentum and wired to a distant electric motor that emits angular momentum. Supported by USDOE/NSF Partnership in Plasma Science.

  12. Characterization of hyperfine interaction between an NV electron spin and a first-shell 13C nuclear spin in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. Rama Koteswara; Suter, Dieter

    2016-08-01

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond has attractive properties for a number of quantum technologies that rely on the spin angular momentum of the electron and the nuclei adjacent to the center. The nucleus with the strongest interaction is the 13C nuclear spin of the first shell. Using this degree of freedom effectively hinges on precise data on the hyperfine interaction between the electronic and the nuclear spin. Here, we present detailed experimental data on this interaction, together with an analysis that yields all parameters of the hyperfine tensor, as well as its orientation with respect to the atomic structure of the center.

  13. Correction of the deterministic part of space-charge interaction in momentum microscopy of charged particles.

    PubMed

    Schönhense, G; Medjanik, K; Tusche, C; de Loos, M; van der Geer, B; Scholz, M; Hieke, F; Gerken, N; Kirschner, J; Wurth, W

    2015-12-01

    Ultrahigh spectral brightness femtosecond XUV and X-ray sources like free electron lasers (FEL) and table-top high harmonics sources (HHG) offer fascinating experimental possibilities for analysis of transient states and ultrafast electron dynamics. For electron spectroscopy experiments using illumination from such sources, the ultrashort high-charge electron bunches experience strong space-charge interactions. The Coulomb interactions between emitted electrons results in large energy shifts and severe broadening of photoemission signals. We propose a method for a substantial reduction of the effect by exploiting the deterministic nature of space-charge interaction. The interaction of a given electron with the average charge density of all surrounding electrons leads to a rotation of the electron distribution in 6D phase space. Momentum microscopy gives direct access to the three momentum coordinates, opening a path for a correction of an essential part of space-charge interaction. In a first experiment with a time-of-flight momentum microscope using synchrotron radiation at BESSY, the rotation in phase space became directly visible. In a separate experiment conducted at FLASH (DESY), the energy shift and broadening of the photoemission signals were quantified. Finally, simulations of a realistic photoemission experiment including space-charge interaction reveals that a gain of an order of magnitude in resolution is possible using the correction technique presented here. PMID:26051657

  14. Correction of the deterministic part of space-charge interaction in momentum microscopy of charged particles.

    PubMed

    Schönhense, G; Medjanik, K; Tusche, C; de Loos, M; van der Geer, B; Scholz, M; Hieke, F; Gerken, N; Kirschner, J; Wurth, W

    2015-12-01

    Ultrahigh spectral brightness femtosecond XUV and X-ray sources like free electron lasers (FEL) and table-top high harmonics sources (HHG) offer fascinating experimental possibilities for analysis of transient states and ultrafast electron dynamics. For electron spectroscopy experiments using illumination from such sources, the ultrashort high-charge electron bunches experience strong space-charge interactions. The Coulomb interactions between emitted electrons results in large energy shifts and severe broadening of photoemission signals. We propose a method for a substantial reduction of the effect by exploiting the deterministic nature of space-charge interaction. The interaction of a given electron with the average charge density of all surrounding electrons leads to a rotation of the electron distribution in 6D phase space. Momentum microscopy gives direct access to the three momentum coordinates, opening a path for a correction of an essential part of space-charge interaction. In a first experiment with a time-of-flight momentum microscope using synchrotron radiation at BESSY, the rotation in phase space became directly visible. In a separate experiment conducted at FLASH (DESY), the energy shift and broadening of the photoemission signals were quantified. Finally, simulations of a realistic photoemission experiment including space-charge interaction reveals that a gain of an order of magnitude in resolution is possible using the correction technique presented here.

  15. A precision measurement of the neutron2. Probing the color force

    SciTech Connect

    Posik, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    The g2 nucleon spin-dependent structure function measured in electron deep inelastic scattering contains information beyond the simple parton model description of the nucleon. It provides insight into quark-gluon correlations and a path to access the confining local color force a struck quark experiences just as it is hit by the virtual photon due to the remnant di-quark. The quantity d2, a measure of this local color force, has its information encoded in an x2 weighted integral of a linear combination of spin structure functions g1 and g2 and thus is dominated by the valence-quark region at large momentum fraction x. To date, theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of the neutron d2 differ by about two standard deviations. Therefore, JLab experiment E06-014, performed in Hall A, made a precision measurement of this quantity at two mean four momentum transfers values of 3.21 and 4.32 GeV2. Double spin asymmetries and absolute cross-sections were measured in both DIS and resonance regions by scattering longitudinally polarized electrons at beam energies of 4.74 and 5.89 GeV from a longitudinally and transversely polarized 3He target. Results for the absolute cross-sections and spin structure functions on 3He will be presented in the dissertation, as well as results for the neutron d2 and extracted color forces.

  16. Momentum considerations on the New MEXICO experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, E. A.; Boorsma, K.; Schepers, J. G.; Snel, H.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper regards axial and angular momentum considerations combining detailed loads from pressure sensors and the flow field mapped with particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques. For this end, the study implements important results leaning on experimental data from wind tunnel measurements of the New MEXICO project. The measurements, taken on a fully instrumented rotor, were carried out in the German Dutch Wind tunnel Organisation (DNW) testing the MEXICO rotor in the open section. The work revisits the so-called momentum theory, showing that the integral thrust and torque measured on the rotor correspond with an extent of 0.7 and 2.4% respectively to the momentum balance of the global flow field using the general momentum equations. Likewise, the sectional forces combined with the local induced velocities are found to plausibly obey the annular streamtube theory, albeit some limitations in the axial momentum become more apparent at high inductions after a=0.3. Finally, azimuth induced velocities are measured and compared to predictions from models of Glauert and Burton et al., showing close-matching forecasts for blade spans above 25%.

  17. The NNLO QCD corrections to Z boson production at large transverse momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridder, A. Gehrmann-De; Gehrmann, T.; Glover, E. W. N.; Huss, A.; Morgan, T. A.

    2016-07-01

    The transverse momentum distribution of massive neutral vector bosons can be measured to high accuracy at hadron colliders. The transverse momentum is caused by a partonic recoil, and is determined by QCD dynamics. We compute the single and double-differential transverse momentum distributions for fully inclusive Z/γ ∗ production including leptonic decay to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in perturbative QCD. We also compute the same distributions normalised to the cross sections for inclusive Z/γ ∗ production, i.e. integrated over the transverse momentum of the lepton pair. We compare our predictions for the fiducial cross sections to the 8 TeV data set from the ATLAS and CMS collaborations, which both observed a tension between data and NLO theory predictions, using the experimental cuts and binning. We find that the inclusion of the NNLO QCD effects does not fully resolve the tension with the data for the unnormalised p T Z distribution. However, we observe that normalising the NNLO Z-boson transverse momentum distribution by the NNLO Drell-Yan cross section substantially improves the agreement between experimental data and theory, and opens the way for precision QCD studies of this observable.

  18. Radiation pressure and the linear momentum of the electromagnetic field in magnetic media.

    PubMed

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2007-10-17

    We examine the force of the electromagnetic radiation on linear, isotropic, homogeneous media specified in terms of their permittivity epsilon and permeability mu . A formula is proposed for the electromagnetic Lorentz force on the magnetization M, which is treated here as an Amperian current loop. Using the proposed formula, we demonstrate conservation of momentum in several cases that are amenable to rigorous analysis based on the classical Maxwell equations, the Lorentz law of force, and the constitutive relations. Our analysis yields precise expressions for the density of the electromagnetic and mechanical momenta inside the media that are specified by their (epsilon,mu ) parameters. An interesting consequence of this analysis is the identification of an "intrinsic" mechanical momentum density, (1/2)E xM/c(2), analogous to the electromagnetic (or Abraham) momentum density, (1/2)E xH/c(2). (Here E and H are the magnitudes of the electric and magnetic fields, respectively, and c is the speed of light in vacuum.) This intrinsic mechanical momentum, associated with the magnetization M in the presence of an electric field E, is apparently the same "hidden" momentum that was predicted by W. Shockley and R. P. James nearly four decades ago.

  19. Efficiency of linear and angular momentum transfer in oblique impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirono, S.; Tada, M.; Nakamura, A. M.; Kadono, T.; Rivkin, A.; Fujiwara, A.

    1993-09-01

    Linear and angular momentum transfer efficiencies for oblique impacts into spherical mortar targets at velocity up to about 4 km/s were determined. Angular momentum transfer efficiency decreases gradually while linear momentum transfer increases with increasing impact velocity. This is understood by determining the impact velocity dependence of both the total momentum carried by ejecta and its direction.

  20. Precision electroweak measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.

    1996-11-01

    Recent electroweak precision measurements fro {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup -} and {ital p{anti p}} colliders are presented. Some emphasis is placed on the recent developments in the heavy flavor sector. The measurements are compared to predictions from the Standard Model of electroweak interactions. All results are found to be consistent with the Standard Model. The indirect constraint on the top quark mass from all measurements is in excellent agreement with the direct {ital m{sub t}} measurements. Using the world`s electroweak data in conjunction with the current measurement of the top quark mass, the constraints on the Higgs` mass are discussed.