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Sample records for precision electron momentum

  1. Imaging molecular geometry with electron momentum spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Enliang; Shan, Xu; Tian, Qiguo; Yang, Jing; Gong, Maomao; Tang, Yaguo; Niu, Shanshan; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-12-22

    Electron momentum spectroscopy is a unique tool for imaging orbital-specific electron density of molecule in momentum space. However, the molecular geometry information is usually veiled due to the single-centered character of momentum space wavefunction of molecular orbital (MO). Here we demonstrate the retrieval of interatomic distances from the multicenter interference effect revealed in the ratios of electron momentum profiles between two MOs with symmetric and anti-symmetric characters. A very sensitive dependence of the oscillation period on interatomic distance is observed, which is used to determine F-F distance in CF4 and O-O distance in CO2 with sub-Ångström precision. Thus, using one spectrometer, and in one measurement, the electron density distributions of MOs and the molecular geometry information can be obtained simultaneously. Our approach provides a new robust tool for imaging molecules with high precision and has potential to apply to ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics if combined with ultrashort electron pulses in the future.

  2. Imaging molecular geometry with electron momentum spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Enliang; Shan, Xu; Tian, Qiguo; Yang, Jing; Gong, Maomao; Tang, Yaguo; Niu, Shanshan; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-01-01

    Electron momentum spectroscopy is a unique tool for imaging orbital-specific electron density of molecule in momentum space. However, the molecular geometry information is usually veiled due to the single-centered character of momentum space wavefunction of molecular orbital (MO). Here we demonstrate the retrieval of interatomic distances from the multicenter interference effect revealed in the ratios of electron momentum profiles between two MOs with symmetric and anti-symmetric characters. A very sensitive dependence of the oscillation period on interatomic distance is observed, which is used to determine F-F distance in CF4 and O-O distance in CO2 with sub-Ångström precision. Thus, using one spectrometer, and in one measurement, the electron density distributions of MOs and the molecular geometry information can be obtained simultaneously. Our approach provides a new robust tool for imaging molecules with high precision and has potential to apply to ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics if combined with ultrashort electron pulses in the future. PMID:28004794

  3. Imaging molecular geometry with electron momentum spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enliang; Shan, Xu; Tian, Qiguo; Yang, Jing; Gong, Maomao; Tang, Yaguo; Niu, Shanshan; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-12-01

    Electron momentum spectroscopy is a unique tool for imaging orbital-specific electron density of molecule in momentum space. However, the molecular geometry information is usually veiled due to the single-centered character of momentum space wavefunction of molecular orbital (MO). Here we demonstrate the retrieval of interatomic distances from the multicenter interference effect revealed in the ratios of electron momentum profiles between two MOs with symmetric and anti-symmetric characters. A very sensitive dependence of the oscillation period on interatomic distance is observed, which is used to determine F-F distance in CF4 and O-O distance in CO2 with sub-Ångström precision. Thus, using one spectrometer, and in one measurement, the electron density distributions of MOs and the molecular geometry information can be obtained simultaneously. Our approach provides a new robust tool for imaging molecules with high precision and has potential to apply to ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics if combined with ultrashort electron pulses in the future.

  4. Precision electron polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chudakov, Eugene A.

    2013-11-01

    A new generation of precise Parity-Violating experiments will require a sub-percent accuracy of electron beam polarimetry. Compton polarimetry can provide such accuracy at high energies, but at a few hundred MeV the small analyzing power limits the sensitivity. M{\\o}ller polarimetry provides a high analyzing power independent on the beam energy, but is limited by the properties of the polarized targets commonly used. Options for precision polarimetry at ~300 MeV will be discussed, in particular a proposal to use ultra-cold atomic hydrogen traps to provide a 100\\%-polarized electron target for M{\\o}ller polarimetry.

  5. Precision electron polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudakov, E.

    2013-11-01

    A new generation of precise Parity-Violating experiments will require a sub-percent accuracy of electron beam polarimetry. Compton polarimetry can provide such accuracy at high energies, but at a few hundred MeV the small analyzing power limits the sensitivity. Mo/ller polarimetry provides a high analyzing power independent on the beam energy, but is limited by the properties of the polarized targets commonly used. Options for precision polarimetry at 300 MeV will be discussed, in particular a proposal to use ultra-cold atomic hydrogen traps to provide a 100%-polarized electron target for Mo/ller polarimetry.

  6. Precision electron polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chudakov, E.

    2013-11-07

    A new generation of precise Parity-Violating experiments will require a sub-percent accuracy of electron beam polarimetry. Compton polarimetry can provide such accuracy at high energies, but at a few hundred MeV the small analyzing power limits the sensitivity. Mo/ller polarimetry provides a high analyzing power independent on the beam energy, but is limited by the properties of the polarized targets commonly used. Options for precision polarimetry at 300 MeV will be discussed, in particular a proposal to use ultra-cold atomic hydrogen traps to provide a 100%-polarized electron target for Mo/ller polarimetry.

  7. Angular Momentum Decomposition for an Electron

    SciTech Connect

    Burkardt, Matthias; BC, Hikmat

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the orbital angular momentum of the `quark' in the scalar diquark model as well as that of the electron in QED (to order $\\alpha$). We compare the orbital angular momentum obtained from the Jaffe-Manohar decomposition to that obtained from the Ji relation and estimate the importance of the vector potential in the definition of orbital angular momentum.

  8. Relativistic Electron Wave Packets Carrying Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo; Bialynicka-Birula, Zofia

    2017-03-01

    There are important differences between the nonrelativistic and relativistic description of electron beams. In the relativistic case the orbital angular momentum quantum number cannot be used to specify the wave functions and the structure of vortex lines in these two descriptions is completely different. We introduce analytic solutions of the Dirac equation in the form of exponential wave packets and we argue that they properly describe relativistic electron beams carrying angular momentum.

  9. An orbital angular momentum spectrometer for electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Tyler; Grillo, Vincenzo; McMorran, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    With the advent of techniques for preparation of free-electron and neutron orbital angular momentum (OAM) states, a basic follow-up question emerges: how do we measure the orbital angular momentum state distribution in matter waves? Control of both the energy and helicity of light has produced a range of spectroscopic applications, including molecular fingerprinting and magnetization mapping. Realization of an analogous dual energy-OAM spectroscopy with matter waves demands control of both initial and final energy and orbital angular momentum states: unlike for photons, final state post-selection is necessary for particles that cannot be annihilated. We propose a magnetic field-based mechanism for quantum non-demolition measurement of electron OAM. We show that OAM-dependent lensing is produced by an operator of form U =exp iLzρ2/ℏb2 where ρ =√{x2 +y2 } is the radial position operator, Lz is the orbital angular momentum operator along z, and b is the OAM dispersion length. We can physically realize this operator as a term in the time evolution of an electron in magnetic round lens. We discuss prospects and practical challenges for implementation of a lensing orbital angular momentum measurement. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), under the Early Career Research Program Award # DE-SC0010466.

  10. Precision measurement of longitudinal and transverse response functions of quasi-elastic electron scattering in the momentum transfer range 0.55GeV/c lte math| lte 0.9GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Huan Yao, Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration, E05-110 Collaboration

    2012-04-01

    In order to test the Coulomb sum rule in nuclei, a precision measurement of inclusive electron scattering cross sections in the quasi-elastic region was performed at Jefferson Lab. Incident electrons of energies ranging from 0.4 GeV/c to 4 GeV/c scattered off {sup 4}He, {sup 12}C, {sup 56}Fe and {sup 208}Pb nuclei at four scattering angles (15deg., 60deg., 90deg., 120deg.) and scattered energies ranging from 0.1 GeV/c to 4 GeV/c. The Rosenbluth method with proper Coulomb corrections is used to extract the transverse and longitudinal response functions at three-momentum transfers 0.55 GeV/c {le} |q{yields}| {le} 1.0 GeV/c. The Coulomb Sum is determined in the same |q{yields}| range as mentioned above and will be compared to predictions. Analysis progress and preliminary results will be presented.

  11. Angular Momentum Eigenstates for Equivalent Electrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, E. R.; Calvert, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    Simple and efficient methods for adding angular momenta and for finding angular momentum eigenstates for systems of equivalent electrons are developed. Several different common representations are used in specific examples. The material is suitable for a graduate course in quantum mechanics. (SK)

  12. New Precision Measurements of Deuteron Structure Function A(Q) at Low Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byungwuek

    2009-08-01

    Differences between previous measurements of low momentum transfer electron-deuteron elastic scattering prevent a clean determination of even the sign of the leading low momentum transfer relativistic corrections, or of the convergence of chiral perturbation theory. We have attempted to resolve this issue with a new high-precision measurement in Jefferson Lab Hall A. Elastic electron scattering was measured on targets of tantalum, carbon, hydrogen, and deuterium at beam energy of 685 MeV. The four-momentum transfer covered the range of 0.15 - 0.7 GeV. The experiment included a new beam calorimeter, to better calibrate the low beam currents used in the experiment, and new collimators to better define the spectrometer solid angles. We obtained cross sections of deuteron as ratios to hydrogen cross sections. A fit function of B(Q) world data is newly made and subtracted from cross sections to find values of A(Q).

  13. Momentum correlation of electron-hydrogen ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui-meng, Zhang; Zhang-jin, Chen

    1999-07-01

    Following the work of Berakdar, the momentum correlation in the three-body Coulomb continuum problem is considered by the introduction of effective Sommerfeld parameters for both symmetric and asymmetric geometry. The triple differential cross sections for electron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen at incident energies of 54.4 and 150eV in asymmetric geometry are calculated. Results are compared with the related measurements and the only existing theoretical results of the convergent close-coupling method. They are in good agreement with experiment, though some small quantitative discrepancies remain.

  14. Momentum spectrometer for electron-electron coincidence studies on superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wallauer, Robert; Voss, Stefan; Bauer, Tobias; Schneider, Deborah; Titze, Jasmin; Ulrich, Birte; Kreidi, Katharina; Neumann, Nadine; Havermeier, Tilo; Schoeffler, Markus; Jahnke, Till; Czasch, Achim; Schmidt, Lothar; Schmidt-Boecking, Horst; Doerner, Reinhard; Kanigel, Amit; Campuzano, Juan Carlos; Jeschke, Harald; Valenti, Roser [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt and others

    2012-10-15

    We present a new experimental setup to study electron-electron coincidences from superconducting surfaces. In our approach, electrons emitted from a surface are projected onto a time- and position-sensitive microchannel plate detector with delayline position readout. Electrons that are emitted within 2 {pi} solid angle with respect to the surface are detected in coincidence. The detector used is a hexagonal delayline detector with enhanced multiple hit capabilities. It is read out with a Flash analog-to-digital converter. The three-dimensional momentum vector is obtained for each electron. The intrinsic dead time of the detector has been greatly reduced by implementing a new algorithm for pulse analysis. The sample holder has been matched to fit the spectrometer while being capable of cooling down the sample to 4.5 K during the measurement and heating it up to 420 K for the cleaning procedure.

  15. Momentum spectrometer for electron-electron coincidence studies on superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallauer, Robert; Voss, Stefan; Foucar, Lutz; Bauer, Tobias; Schneider, Deborah; Titze, Jasmin; Ulrich, Birte; Kreidi, Katharina; Neumann, Nadine; Havermeier, Tilo; Schöffler, Markus; Jahnke, Till; Czasch, Achim; Schmidt, Lothar; Kanigel, Amit; Campuzano, Juan Carlos; Jeschke, Harald; Valenti, Roser; Müller, Andreas; Berner, Götz; Sing, Michael; Claessen, Ralph; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Dörner, Reinhard

    2012-10-01

    We present a new experimental setup to study electron-electron coincidences from superconducting surfaces. In our approach, electrons emitted from a surface are projected onto a time- and position-sensitive microchannel plate detector with delayline position readout. Electrons that are emitted within 2 π solid angle with respect to the surface are detected in coincidence. The detector used is a hexagonal delayline detector with enhanced multiple hit capabilities. It is read out with a Flash analog-to-digital converter. The three-dimensional momentum vector is obtained for each electron. The intrinsic dead time of the detector has been greatly reduced by implementing a new algorithm for pulse analysis. The sample holder has been matched to fit the spectrometer while being capable of cooling down the sample to 4.5 K during the measurement and heating it up to 420 K for the cleaning procedure.

  16. Momentum spectrometer for electron-electron coincidence studies on superconductors.

    PubMed

    Wallauer, Robert; Voss, Stefan; Foucar, Lutz; Bauer, Tobias; Schneider, Deborah; Titze, Jasmin; Ulrich, Birte; Kreidi, Katharina; Neumann, Nadine; Havermeier, Tilo; Schöffler, Markus; Jahnke, Till; Czasch, Achim; Schmidt, Lothar; Kanigel, Amit; Campuzano, Juan Carlos; Jeschke, Harald; Valenti, Roser; Müller, Andreas; Berner, Götz; Sing, Michael; Claessen, Ralph; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Dörner, Reinhard

    2012-10-01

    We present a new experimental setup to study electron-electron coincidences from superconducting surfaces. In our approach, electrons emitted from a surface are projected onto a time- and position-sensitive microchannel plate detector with delayline position readout. Electrons that are emitted within 2 π solid angle with respect to the surface are detected in coincidence. The detector used is a hexagonal delayline detector with enhanced multiple hit capabilities. It is read out with a Flash analog-to-digital converter. The three-dimensional momentum vector is obtained for each electron. The intrinsic dead time of the detector has been greatly reduced by implementing a new algorithm for pulse analysis. The sample holder has been matched to fit the spectrometer while being capable of cooling down the sample to 4.5 K during the measurement and heating it up to 420 K for the cleaning procedure.

  17. Probing Electron Dynamics with the Laplacian of the Momentum Density

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, N.; MacDougall, Preston J.; Levit, M. Creon

    2012-09-24

    This chapter in the above-titled monograph presents topological analysis of the Laplacian of the electron momentum density in organic molecules. It relates topological features in this distribution to chemical and physical properties, particularly aromaticity and electron transport.

  18. Precise momentum determination of the external COSY proton beam near 1930 MeV//c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betigeri, M. G.; Bojowald, J.; Budzanowski, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Drochner, M.; Ernst, J.; Förtsch, S.; Freindl, L.; Frekers, D.; Garske, W.; Grewer, K.; Hamacher, A.; Hawash, M.; Igel, S.; Ilieva, I.; Jahn, R.; Jarczyk, L.; Kemmerling, G.; Kilian, K.; Kliczewski, S.; Klimala, W.; Kolev, D.; Kutsarova, T.; Lieb, B. J.; Lippert, G.; Machner, H.; Magiera, A.; Maier, R.; Nann, H.; Plendl, H. S.; Protic, D.; Razen, B.; von Rossen, P.; Roy, B.; Siudak, R.; Smyrski, J.; Strzałkowski, A.; Tsenov, R.; Zolnierczuk, P. A.; Zwoll, K.; GEM Collaboration

    1999-05-01

    We present a method to determine precisely the absolute momentum of the external proton beam from the Jülich Cooler Synchrotron COSY near 1930 MeV /c. In the pp → d π+ reaction at 1930.477 MeV /c incident beam momentum, the forward going pions ( θ c.m.=0° ) and the backward going deuterons ( θ c.m.=180° ) have the same laboratory momentum. Such coincident pion-deuteron events are detected in the focal plane of the magnetic spectrometer BIG KARL located at θ lab=0° . Using the nearly linear dependence of the difference between the measured pion and deuteron momenta as a function of the proton beam momentum, the absolute momentum of the external proton beam from COSY near 1930 MeV /c was determined with a precision of 5.2×10 -5.

  19. Electron vortex beams with high quanta of orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    McMorran, Benjamin J; Agrawal, Amit; Anderson, Ian M; Herzing, Andrew A; Lezec, Henri J; McClelland, Jabez J; Unguris, John

    2011-01-14

    Electron beams with helical wavefronts carrying orbital angular momentum are expected to provide new capabilities for electron microscopy and other applications. We used nanofabricated diffraction holograms in an electron microscope to produce multiple electron vortex beams with well-defined topological charge. Beams carrying quantized amounts of orbital angular momentum (up to 100ħ) per electron were observed. We describe how the electrons can exhibit such orbital motion in free space in the absence of any confining potential or external field, and discuss how these beams can be applied to improved electron microscopy of magnetic and biological specimens.

  20. High precision momentum calibration of the magnetic spectrometers at MAMI for hypernuclear binding energy determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margaryan, A.; Annand, J. R. M.; Achenbach, P.; Ajvazyan, R.; Elbakyan, H.; Montgomery, R.; Nakamura, S. N.; Pochodzalla, J.; Schulz, F.; Toyama, Y.; Zhamkochyan, S.

    2017-02-01

    We propose a new method for absolute momentum calibration of magnetic spectrometers used in nuclear physics, using the time-of-flight (TOF) differences of pairs of particles with different masses. In cases where the flight path is not known, a calibration can be determined by using the TOF differences of two pair combinations of three particles. A Cherenkov detector, read out by a radio frequency photomultiplier tube, is considered as the high-resolution and highly stable TOF detector. By means of Monte Carlo simulations it is demonstrated that the magnetic spectrometers at the MAMI electron-scattering facility can be calibrated absolutely with an accuracy δp / p ≤10-4 , which will be crucial for high precision determination of hypernuclear masses.

  1. Revealing Dissociative Electron Attachment Dynamics in Polyatomic Molecules Using Momentum Imaging Experiments and Electron Scattering Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacem, Ali; Slaughter, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Understanding electron-driven chemical reactions is important for improving a variety of technological applications such as materials processing and the important role they play in the radiation damage in bulk matter. Furthermore, dissociative electron attachment often exhibits site-selective bond cleavage, which holds promise for prediction and precise control of electron-driven chemical reactions. Recent dynamical studies of these reactions have demonstrated that an understanding of anion dissociation dynamics beyond simple one-dimensional models is crucial in interpreting the measured fragment angular distributions. We combine ion fragment momentum imaging experiments with electron attachment entrance amplitude calculations to interrogate the non-Born-Oppenheimer dynamics of dissociative electron attachment in polyatomic molecules. We will report recent experimental developments in molecules of technological interest including methanol, methane and uracil. Work supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences division of BES/DOE.

  2. Obtaining the Electron Angular Momentum Coupling Spectroscopic Terms, jj

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orofino, Hugo; Faria, Roberto B.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic procedure is developed to obtain the electron angular momentum coupling (jj) spectroscopic terms, which is based on building microstates in which each individual electron is placed in a different m[subscript j] "orbital". This approach is similar to that used to obtain the spectroscopic terms under the Russell-Saunders (LS) coupling…

  3. Young's Interference Experiment with Electron Beams Carrying Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yuya; Saitoh, Koh; Tanaka, Nobuo; Tanimura, Shogo; Uchida, Masaya

    2013-03-01

    A Young's-type double-slit experiment using electron beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) is demonstrated in a transmission electron microscope. Each of the slits is replaced by a grating mask with a fork dislocation, which generates electron beams with OAM as diffracted beams. Interference fringes produced by two diffracted electron beams with OAM appear at the observation screen. The interference fringe patterns exhibit dislocation features depending on the topological charges of the two electron beams. The experimental results clearly show the wave nature of the electron beams with OAM and gives potential applications in electron physics and quantum mechanics.

  4. Electron momentum distribution and electronic response of ceramic borides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heda, N. L.; Meena, B. S.; Mund, H. S.; Sahariya, Jagrati; Kumar, Kishor; Ahuja, B. L.

    2017-03-01

    Isotropic Compton profiles of transition metal based ceramics TaB and VB have been measured using 137Cs (661.65 keV) γ-ray Compton spectrometer. The experimental momentum densities are compared with those deduced using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) with Hartree-Fock (HF), density functional theory (DFT) with Wu-Cohen generalized gradient approximation (WCGGA) and also the hybridization of HF and DFT (namely B3PW and PBE0) schemes. It is found that LCAO-DFT-WCGGA scheme based profiles give an overall better agreement with the experimental data, for both the borides. In addition, we have computed the Mulliken's population (MP) charge transfer data, energy bands, density of states and Fermi surface topology of both the borides using full potential-linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) and LCAO methods with DFT-WCGGA scheme. Cross-overs of Fermi level by the energy bands corresponding to B-2p and valence d-states of transition metals lead to metallic character in both the compounds. Equal-valence-electron-density profiles and MP analysis suggest more ionic character of VB than that of TaB.

  5. Momentum-space properties from coordinate-space electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Harbola, Manoj K.; Zope, Rajendra R.; Kshirsagar, Anjali; Pathak, Rajeev K.

    2005-05-22

    Electron density and electron momentum density, while independently tractable experimentally, bear no direct connection without going through the many-electron wave function. However, invoking a variant of the constrained-search formulation of density-functional theory, we develop a general scheme (valid for arbitrary external potentials) yielding decent momentum-space properties, starting exclusively from the coordinate-space electron density. A numerical illustration of the scheme is provided for the closed-shell atomic systems He, Be, and Ne in their ground state and for 1s{sup 1} 2s{sup 1} singlet electronic excited state for helium by calculating the Compton profiles and the expectation values derived from given coordinate-space electron densities.

  6. Electron momentum densities near Dirac cones: Anisotropic Umklapp scattering and momentum broadening.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, N; Nomura, T

    2017-04-03

    The relationship between electron momentum densities (EMDs) and a band gap is clarified in momentum space. The interference between wavefunctions via reciprocal lattice vectors, making a band gap in momentum space, causes the scattering of electrons from the first Brillouin zone to the other zones, so-called Umklapp scattering. This leads to the broadening of EMDs. A sharp drop of the EMD in the limit of a zero gap becomes broadened as the gap opens. The broadening is given by a simple quantity, E g /v F , where E g is the gap magnitude and v F the Fermi velocity. As the ideal case to see such an effect, we investigate the EMDs in graphene and graphite. They are basically semimetals, and their EMDs have a hexagonal shape enclosed in the first Brillouin zone. Since the gap is zero at Dirac points, a sharp drop exists at the corners (K/K' points) while the broadening becomes significant away from K/K's, showing the smoothest fall at the centers of the edges (M's). In fact, this unique topology mimics a general variation of the EMDs across the metal-insulator transition in condensed matters. Such an anisotropic broadening effect is indeed observed by momentum-density-based experiments e.g. x-ray Compton scattering.

  7. Origins and demonstrations of electrons with orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    McMorran, Benjamin J; Agrawal, Amit; Ercius, Peter A; Grillo, Vincenzo; Herzing, Andrew A; Harvey, Tyler R; Linck, Martin; Pierce, Jordan S

    2017-02-28

    The surprising message of Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)) was that photons could possess orbital angular momentum in free space, which subsequently launched advancements in optical manipulation, microscopy, quantum optics, communications, many more fields. It has recently been shown that this result also applies to quantum mechanical wave functions describing massive particles (matter waves). This article discusses how electron wave functions can be imprinted with quantized phase vortices in analogous ways to twisted light, demonstrating that charged particles with non-zero rest mass can possess orbital angular momentum in free space. With Allen et al. as a bridge, connections are made between this recent work in electron vortex wave functions and much earlier works, extending a 175 year old tradition in matter wave vortices.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  8. Origins and demonstrations of electrons with orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMorran, Benjamin J.; Agrawal, Amit; Ercius, Peter A.; Grillo, Vincenzo; Herzing, Andrew A.; Harvey, Tyler R.; Linck, Martin; Pierce, Jordan S.

    2017-02-01

    The surprising message of Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)) was that photons could possess orbital angular momentum in free space, which subsequently launched advancements in optical manipulation, microscopy, quantum optics, communications, many more fields. It has recently been shown that this result also applies to quantum mechanical wave functions describing massive particles (matter waves). This article discusses how electron wave functions can be imprinted with quantized phase vortices in analogous ways to twisted light, demonstrating that charged particles with non-zero rest mass can possess orbital angular momentum in free space. With Allen et al. as a bridge, connections are made between this recent work in electron vortex wave functions and much earlier works, extending a 175 year old tradition in matter wave vortices. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  9. Efficient sorting of free electron orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMorran, Benjamin J.; Harvey, Tyler R.; Lavery, Martin P. J.

    2017-02-01

    We propose a method for sorting electrons by orbital angular momentum (OAM). Several methods now exist to prepare electron wavefunctions in OAM states, but no technique has been developed for efficient, parallel measurement of pure and mixed electron OAM states. The proposed technique draws inspiration from the recent demonstration of the sorting of OAM through modal transformation. We show that the same transformation can be performed on electrons with electrostatic optical elements. Specifically, we show that a charged needle and an array of electrodes perform the transformation and phase correction necessary to sort OAM states. This device may enable the analysis of the spatial mode distribution of inelastically scattered electrons.

  10. Transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to a bound electron

    PubMed Central

    Schmiegelow, Christian T.; Schulz, Jonas; Kaufmann, Henning; Ruster, Thomas; Poschinger, Ulrich G.; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Photons can carry angular momentum, not only due to their spin, but also due to their spatial structure. This extra twist has been used, for example, to drive circular motion of microscopic particles in optical tweezers as well as to create vortices in quantum gases. Here we excite an atomic transition with a vortex laser beam and demonstrate the transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to the valence electron of a single trapped ion. We observe strongly modified selection rules showing that an atom can absorb two quanta of angular momentum from a single photon: one from the spin and another from the spatial structure of the beam. Furthermore, we show that parasitic ac-Stark shifts from off-resonant transitions are suppressed in the dark centre of vortex beams. These results show how light's spatial structure can determine the characteristics of light–matter interaction and pave the way for its application and observation in other systems. PMID:27694805

  11. Transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to a bound electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiegelow, Christian T.; Schulz, Jonas; Kaufmann, Henning; Ruster, Thomas; Poschinger, Ulrich G.; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand

    2016-10-01

    Photons can carry angular momentum, not only due to their spin, but also due to their spatial structure. This extra twist has been used, for example, to drive circular motion of microscopic particles in optical tweezers as well as to create vortices in quantum gases. Here we excite an atomic transition with a vortex laser beam and demonstrate the transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to the valence electron of a single trapped ion. We observe strongly modified selection rules showing that an atom can absorb two quanta of angular momentum from a single photon: one from the spin and another from the spatial structure of the beam. Furthermore, we show that parasitic ac-Stark shifts from off-resonant transitions are suppressed in the dark centre of vortex beams. These results show how light's spatial structure can determine the characteristics of light-matter interaction and pave the way for its application and observation in other systems.

  12. High precision phase-shifting electron holography

    PubMed

    Yamamoto; Kawajiri; Tanji; Hibino; Hirayama

    2000-01-01

    Today's information-oriented society requires high density and high quality magnetic recording media. The quantitative observation of fine magnetic structures by electron holography is greatly anticipated in the development of such new recording materials. However, the magnetic fields around particles <50 nm have not been observed, because the fields are too weak to observe in the usual way. Here we present a highly precise phase measurement technique: improved phase-shifting electron holography. Using this method, the electric field around a charged polystyrene latex particle (100 nm in diameter) and the magnetic field around iron particles (30 nm in diameter) are observed precisely. A precision of the reconstructed phase image of 2pi/300 rad is achieved in the image of the latex particle.

  13. Momentum Transport in Electron-Dominated Spherical Torus Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S. M.; Solomon, W.; Bell, R. E.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Levinton, F.; Menard, J.; Rewoldt, G.; Sabbagh, S.; Wang, W.; Yuh, H.

    2009-02-24

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) operates between 0.35 and 0.55 T, which, when coupled to up to 7 MW of neutral beam injection, leads to central rotation velocities in excess of 300 km/s and ExB shearing rates up to 1 MHz. This level of ExB shear can be up to a factor of five greater than typical linear growth rates of long-wavelength ion (e.g., ITG) modes, at least partially suppressing these instabilities. Evidence for this turbulence suppression is that the inferred diffusive ion thermal flux in NSTX H-modes is often at the neoclassical level, and thus these plasmas operate in an electron-dominated transport regime. Analysis of experiments using n=3 magnetic fields to change plasma rotation indicate that local rotation shear influences local transport coefficients, most notably the ion thermal diffusivity, in a manner consistent with suppression of the low-k turbulence by this rotation shear. The value of the effective momentum diffusivity, as inferred from steady-state momentum balance, is found to be larger than the neoclassical value. Results of perturbative experiments indicate inward pinch velocities up to 40 m/s and perturbative momentum diffusivities of up to 4 m2/s, which are larger by a factor of several than those values inferred from steady-state analysis. The inferred pinch velocity values are consistent with values based on theories in which low-k turbulence drives the inward momentum pinch. Thus, in Spherical Tori (STs), while the neoclassical ion energy transport effects can be relatively high and dominate the ion energy transport, the neoclassical momentum transport effects are near zero, meaning that transport of momentum is dominated by any low-k turbulence that exists.

  14. Ion Momentum Imaging of Dissociative Electron Attachment to Small Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogle, Michael

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, low energy dissociative electron attachment (DEA) interactions have been of interest to varying biological and technological applications. To study the dynamics resulting from DEA, we used an ion-momentum imaging apparatus based on the Cold Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy (COLTRIMS) technique in which a molecular beam is crossed by a pulsed electron beam. The beam interaction takes place in a 4 π pulsed electrostatic spectrometer that collects the anion fragments resulting from DEA. The molecular beam is formed by a supersonic expansion which results in a well-localized and cold target. Using this apparatus we have investigated the DEA dynamics for several small molecules: CO2 at the 4 eV shape resonance and the 8 eV Feshbach resonance; N2O at the 2.3 eV shape resonance; HCCH at the 3 eV shape resonance; and CF4 near the 7 eV resonance. An overview of these experimental ion-momentum results will be compared to ab initio electronic structure and fixed-nuclei scattering calculations to gauge the resulting dynamics driven by DEA. In many cases, conical intersections play a pivotal role in driving the dynamics. Some of these systems exhibit non-axial recoil conditions indicative of a bending dynamics in the transitory negative ion state while others exhibit a direct axial recoil dissociation without any bending. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Contract NSF-PHYS1404366.

  15. Electron momentum spectroscopy study of amantadine: binding energy spectra and valence orbital electron density distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinyuk, I. V.; Zheng, Y.; Brion, C. E.

    2000-11-01

    The electron binding energy spectrum and valence orbital electron momentum density distributions of amantadine (1-aminoadamantane), an important anti-viral and anti-Parkinsonian drug, have been measured by electron momentum spectroscopy. Theoretical momentum distributions, calculated at the 6-311++G** and AUG-CC-PVTZ levels within the target Hartree-Fock and also the target Kohn-Sham density functional theory approximations, show good agreement with the experimental results. The results for amantadine are also compared with those for the parent molecule, adamantane, reported earlier (Chem. Phys. 253 (2000) 41). Based on the comparison tentative assignments of the valence region ionization bands of amantadine have been made.

  16. Momentum space analysis of the electronic structure of biphenyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morini, F.; Shojaei, S. H. Reza; Deleuze, M. S.

    2014-11-01

    The results of a yet to come experimental study of the electronic structure of biphenyl employing electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) have been theoretically predicted, taking into account complications such as structural mobility in the electronic ground state, electronic correlation and relaxation, and a dispersion of the inner-valence ionization intensity to electronically excited (shake-up) configurations in the cation. The main purpose of this work is to explore the current limits of EMS in unraveling details of the molecular structure, namely the torsional characteristics of large and floppy aromatic molecules. At the benchmark ADC(3)/cc-pVDZ level of theory, the influence of the twist angle between the two phenyl rings is found to be extremely limited, except for individual orbital momentum profiles corresponding to ionization lines at electron binding energies ranging from 15 to 18 eV. When taking band overlap effects into account, this influence is deceptively far too limited to allow for any experimental determination of the torsional characteristics of biphenyl by means of EMS.

  17. Mantises exchange angular momentum between three rotating body parts to jump precisely to targets.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Malcolm; Cullen, Darron A; Dorosenko, Marina; Sutton, Gregory P

    2015-03-16

    Flightless animals have evolved diverse mechanisms to control their movements in air, whether falling with gravity or propelling against it. Many insects jump as a primary mode of locomotion and must therefore precisely control the large torques generated during takeoff. For example, to minimize spin (angular momentum of the body) at takeoff, plant-sucking bugs apply large equal and opposite torques from two propulsive legs [1]. Interacting gear wheels have evolved in some to give precise synchronization of these legs [2, 3]. Once airborne, as a result of either jumping or falling, further adjustments may be needed to control trajectory and orient the body for landing. Tails are used by geckos to control pitch [4, 5] and by Anolis lizards to alter direction [6, 7]. When falling, cats rotate their body [8], while aphids [9] and ants [10, 11] manipulate wind resistance against their legs and thorax. Falling is always downward, but targeted jumping must achieve many possible desired trajectories. We show that when making targeted jumps, juvenile wingless mantises first rotated their abdomen about the thorax to adjust the center of mass and thus regulate spin at takeoff. Once airborne, they then smoothly and sequentially transferred angular momentum in four stages between the jointed abdomen, the two raptorial front legs, and the two propulsive hind legs to produce a controlled jump with a precise landing. Experimentally impairing abdominal movements reduced the overall rotation so that the mantis either failed to grasp the target or crashed into it head first.

  18. Electron Scattering From High-Momentum Neutrons in Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    A.V. Klimenko; S.E. Kuhn

    2005-10-12

    We report results from an experiment measuring the semi-inclusive reaction D(e,e'p{sub s}) where the proton p{sub s} is moving at a large angle relative to the momentum transfer. If we assume that the proton was a spectator to the reaction taking place on the neutron in deuterium, the initial state of that neutron can be inferred. This method, known as spectator tagging, can be used to study electron scattering from high-momentum (off-shell) neutrons in deuterium. The data were taken with a 5.765 GeV electron beam on a deuterium target in Jefferson Laboratory's Hall B, using the CLAS detector. A reduced cross section was extracted for different values of final-state missing mass W*, backward proton momentum {rvec p}{sub s} and momentum transfer Q{sup 2}. The data are compared to a simple PWIA spectator model. A strong enhancement in the data observed at transverse kinematics is not reproduced by the PWIA model. This enhancement can likely be associated with the contribution of final state interactions (FSI) that were not incorporated into the model. A ''bound neutron structure function'' F{sub 2n}{sup eff} was extracted as a function of W* and the scaling variable x* at extreme backward kinematics, where effects of FSI appear to be smaller. For p{sub s} > 400 MeV/c, where the neutron is far off-shell, the model overestimates the value of F{sub 2n}{sup eff} in the region of x* between 0.25 and 0.6. A modification of the bound neutron structure function is one of possible effects that can cause the observed deviation.

  19. Electron Scattering From a High-Momentum Neutron in Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Klimenko, Alexei

    2004-05-01

    The deuterium nucleus is a system of two nucleons (proton and neutron) bound together. The configuration of the system is described by a quantum-mechanical wave function and the state of the nucleons at a given time is not know a priori. However, by detecting a backward going proton of moderate momentum in coincidence with a reaction taking place on the neutron in deuterium, the initial state of that neutron can be inferred if we assume that the proton was a spectator to the reaction. This method, known as spectator tagging, was used to study the electron scattering from high-momentum neutrons in deuterium. The data were taken with a 5.765 GeV polarized electron beam on a deuterium target in Jefferson Laboratory's Hall B, using the CLAS detector. The accumulated data cover a wide kinematic range, reaching values of the invariant mass of the unobserved final state W* up to 3 GeV. A data sample of approximately 5 - 105 events, with protons detected at large scattering angles (as high as 136 degrees) in coincidence with the forward electrons, was selected. The product of the neutron structure function with the initial nucleon momentum distribution F2n. S was extracted for different values of W*, backward proton momenta ps and momentum transfer Q2. The data were compared to a calculation based on the spectator approximation and using the free nucleon form factors and structure functions. A strong enhancement in the data, not reproduced by the model, was observed at cos(thetapq) > -0.3 (where theta{sub pq} is the proton scattering angle relative to the direction of the momentum transfer) and can be associated with the contribution of final state interactions (FSI) that were not incorporated into the model. The bound nucleon structure function F2n was studied in the region cos(thetapq) < -0.3 as a function of W* and scaling variable x*. At high spectator proton momenta the struck neutron is far

  20. Vibrational effects on the electron momentum distributions of valence orbitals of formamide.

    PubMed

    Miao, Y R; Deng, J K; Ning, C G

    2012-03-28

    The ionization energy spectra and electron momentum distributions of formamide were investigated using the high-resolution electron momentum spectrometer in combination with high level calculations. The observed ionization energy spectra and electron momentum distributions were interpreted using symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction theory, outer valence Green function, and DFT-B3LYP methods. The ordering of 10a(') and 2a(") orbitals of formamide was assigned unambiguously by comparing the experimental electron momentum distributions with the corresponding theoretical results, i.e., 10a(') has a lower binding energy. In addition, it was found that the low-frequency wagging vibration of the amino group at room temperature has noticeable effects on the electron momentum distributions. The equilibrium-nuclear-positions-approximation, which was widely used in electron momentum spectroscopy, is not accurate for formamide molecule. The calculations based on the thermal average can evidently improve the agreement with the experimental momentum distributions.

  1. Precision fast kickers for kiloampere electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.; Chen, Y.J.; Weir, J.T.

    1999-10-06

    These kickers will be used to make fast dipoles and quadrupoles which are driven by sharp risetime pulsers to provide precision beam manipulations for high current kA electron beams. This technology will be used on the 2nd axis of the DARHT linac at LANL. It will be used to provide 4 micropulses of pulse width 20 to 120 nsec. selected from a 2 {micro}sec., 2kA, 20MeV macropulse. The fast pulsers will have amplitude modulation capability to compensate for beam-induced steering effects and other slow beam centroid motion to within the bandwidth of the kicker system. Scaling laws derived from theory will be presented along with extensive experimental data obtained on the test bed ETA-II.

  2. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhenbao; Yang, Bing; Lin, Yangming; Su, Dangsheng

    2015-12-07

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials.

  3. Role of momentum and velocity for radiating electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdessus, Rémi; Noble, Adam; McKenna, Paul; Jaroszynski, Dino A.

    2016-02-01

    Radiation reaction remains one of the most fascinating open questions in electrodynamics. The development of multi-petawatt laser facilities capable of reaching extreme intensities has lent this topic a new urgency, and it is now more important than ever to properly understand it. Two models of radiation reaction, due to Landau and Lifshitz and due to Sokolov, have gained prominence, but there has been little work exploring the relation between the two. We show that in the Sokolov theory, electromagnetic fields induce a Lorentz transformation between momentum and velocity, which eliminates some of the counterintuitive results of Landau-Lifshitz. In particular, the Lorentz boost in a constant electric field causes the particle to lose electrostatic potential energy more rapidly than it otherwise would, explaining the longstanding mystery of how an electron can radiate while experiencing no radiation reaction force. These ideas are illustrated in examples of relevance to astrophysics and laser-particle interactions, where radiation reaction effects are particularly prominent.

  4. Towards a Precision Measurement of Parity-Violating e-p Elastic Scattering at Low Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jie

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the Q-weak experiment is to make a measurement of the proton's weak charge QWp = 1 - 4 sin2W2(θWprecision test of the Standard Model (SM) prediction on the running of sin2WWp by measuring the parity violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at low momentum transfer Q2 = 0.026 (GeV/c)2 and forward angles (8 degrees). The anticipated size of the asymmetry, based on the SM, is about 230 parts per billion (ppb). With the proposed accuracy, the experiment may probe new physics beyond Standard Model at the TeV scale. This thesis focuses on my contributions to the experiment, including track reconstruction for momentum transfer determination of the scattering process, and the focal plane scanner, a detector I designed and built to measure the flux profile of scattered electrons on the focal plane of the Q-weak spectrometer to assist in the extrapolation of low beam current tracking results to high beam current. Preliminary results from the commissioning and the first run period of the Q-weak experiment are reported and discussed.

  5. Polarization radiation of vortex electrons with large orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Igor P.; Karlovets, Dmitry V.

    2013-10-01

    Vortex electrons—freely propagating electrons whose wave functions have helical wave fronts—could become a novel tool in the physics of electromagnetic radiation. They carry a nonzero intrinsic orbital angular momentum (OAM) ℓ with respect to the propagation axis and, for ℓ≫1, a large OAM-induced magnetic moment μ≈ℓμB (μB is the Bohr magneton), which influences the radiation of electromagnetic waves. Here, we consider in detail the OAM-induced effects caused by such electrons in two forms of polarization radiation, namely, in Cherenkov radiation and transition radiation. Thanks to the large ℓ, we can neglect quantum or spin-induced effects, which are of the order of ℏω/Ee≪1, but retain the magnetic moment contribution ℓℏω/Ee≲1, which makes the quasiclassical approach to polarization radiation applicable. We discuss the magnetic moment contribution to polarization radiation, which has never been experimentally observed, and study how its visibility depends on the kinematical parameters and the medium permittivity. In particular, it is shown that this contribution can, in principle, be detected in azimuthally nonsymmetrical problems, for example when vortex electrons obliquely cross a metallic screen (transition radiation) or move near it (diffraction radiation). We predict a left-right angular asymmetry of the transition radiation (in the plane where the charge radiation distributions would stay symmetric), which appears due to an effective interference between the charge radiation field and the magnetic moment contribution. Numerical values of this asymmetry for vortex electrons with Ee=300 keV and ℓ=100-1000 are 0.1%-1%, and we argue that this effect could be detected with existing technology. The finite conductivity of the target and frequency dispersion play crucial roles in these predictions.

  6. Momentum-Dependent Lifetime Broadening of Electron Energy Loss Spectra: A Self-Consistent Coupled-Plasmon Model.

    PubMed

    Bourke, J D; Chantler, C T

    2015-02-05

    The complex dielectric function and associated energy loss spectrum of a condensed matter system is a fundamental material parameter that determines both the optical and electronic scattering behavior of the medium. The common representation of the electron energy loss function (ELF) is interpreted as the susceptibility of a system to a single- or bulk-electron (plasmon) excitation at a given energy and momentum and is commonly derived as a summation of noninteracting free-electron resonances with forms constrained by adherence to some externally determined optical standard. This work introduces a new causally constrained momentum-dependent broadening theory, permitting a more physical representation of optical and electronic resonances that agrees more closely with both optical attenuation and electron scattering data. We demonstrate how the momentum dependence of excitation resonances may be constrained uniquely by utilizing a coupled-plasmon model, in which high-energy excitations are able to relax into lower-energy excitations within the medium. This enables a robust and fully self-consistent theory with no free or fitted parameters that reveals additional physical insight not present in previous work. The new developments are applied to the scattering behavior of solid molybdenum and aluminum. We find that plasmon and single-electron lifetimes are significantly affected by the presence of alternate excitation channels and show for molybdenum that agreement with high-precision electron inelastic mean free path data is dramatically improved for energies above 20 eV.

  7. Electron momentum spectroscopy of dimethyl ether taking account of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state.

    PubMed

    Morini, Filippo; Watanabe, Noboru; Kojima, Masataka; Deleuze, Michael Simon; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-10-07

    The influence of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state on the (e,2e) momentum profiles of dimethyl ether has been analyzed using the harmonic analytical quantum mechanical and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics approaches. In spite of fundamental methodological differences, results obtained with both approaches consistently demonstrate that molecular vibrations in the electronic ground state have a most appreciable influence on the momentum profiles associated to the 2b1, 6a1, 4b2, and 1a2 orbitals. Taking this influence into account considerably improves the agreement between theoretical and newly obtained experimental momentum profiles, with improved statistical accuracy. Both approaches point out in particular the most appreciable role which is played by a few specific molecular vibrations of A1, B1, and B2 symmetries, which correspond to C-H stretching and H-C-H bending modes. In line with the Herzberg-Teller principle, the influence of these molecular vibrations on the computed momentum profiles can be unraveled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing.

  8. Electron momentum spectroscopy of dimethyl ether taking account of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state

    SciTech Connect

    Morini, Filippo; Deleuze, Michael Simon; Watanabe, Noboru; Kojima, Masataka; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-10-07

    The influence of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state on the (e,2e) momentum profiles of dimethyl ether has been analyzed using the harmonic analytical quantum mechanical and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics approaches. In spite of fundamental methodological differences, results obtained with both approaches consistently demonstrate that molecular vibrations in the electronic ground state have a most appreciable influence on the momentum profiles associated to the 2b{sub 1}, 6a{sub 1}, 4b{sub 2}, and 1a{sub 2} orbitals. Taking this influence into account considerably improves the agreement between theoretical and newly obtained experimental momentum profiles, with improved statistical accuracy. Both approaches point out in particular the most appreciable role which is played by a few specific molecular vibrations of A{sub 1}, B{sub 1}, and B{sub 2} symmetries, which correspond to C–H stretching and H–C–H bending modes. In line with the Herzberg-Teller principle, the influence of these molecular vibrations on the computed momentum profiles can be unraveled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing.

  9. Development of an (e,2e) electron momentum spectroscopy apparatus using an ultrashort pulsed electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, M.; Kasai, Y.; Oishi, K.; Nakazawa, H.; Takahashi, M.

    2013-06-15

    An (e,2e) apparatus for electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) has been developed, which employs an ultrashort-pulsed incident electron beam with a repetition rate of 5 kHz and a pulse duration in the order of a picosecond. Its instrumental design and technical details are reported, involving demonstration of a new method for finding time-zero. Furthermore, EMS data for the neutral Ne atom in the ground state measured by using the pulsed electron beam are presented to illustrate the potential abilities of the apparatus for ultrafast molecular dynamics, such as by combining EMS with the pump-and-probe technique.

  10. Angular Momentum of Twisted Radiation from an Electron in Spiral Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoh, M.; Fujimoto, M.; Kawaguchi, H.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ohmi, K.; Kaneyasu, T.; Taira, Y.; Hosaka, M.; Mochihashi, A.; Takashima, Y.

    2017-03-01

    We theoretically demonstrate for the first time that a single free electron in circular or spiral motion emits twisted photons carrying well-defined orbital angular momentum along the axis of the electron circulation, in adding to spin angular momentum. We show that, when the electron velocity is relativistic, the radiation field contains harmonic components and the photons of l th harmonic carry l ℏ total angular momentum for each. This work indicates that twisted photons are naturally emitted by free electrons and are more ubiquitous in laboratories and in nature than ever thought.

  11. Ring-puckering effects on electron momentum distributions of valence orbitals of oxetane.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Shan, Xu; Zhang, Zhe; Tang, Yaguo; Zhao, Minfu; Chen, XiangJun

    2014-12-18

    The binding energy spectra and electron momentum distributions for the outer-valence molecular orbitals of oxetane have been measured utilizing (e, 2e) electron momentum spectrometer with non-coplanar asymmetric geometry at the impact energy of 2500 eV. The experimental momentum distributions were compared with the density functional theory calculations employing B3LYP hybrid functional with aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. It was found that the calculation at planar geometry (C2v) completely fails to interpret the large "turn-up" at low momentum region in electron momentum distribution of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) 3b1, while the calculations considering the thermal abundances of planar (C2v) and bent (Cs) conformers or the thermally populated vibrational states of ring-puckering motion have significantly improved the agreement. The results indicate that the ring-puckering motion of oxetane has a strong effect on the electron density distribution of HOMO.

  12. Influence of molecular vibrations on the valence electron momentum distributions of adamantane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morini, Filippo; Watanabe, Noboru; Kojima, Masataka; Deleuze, Michael Simon; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2017-03-01

    We report an electron momentum spectroscopy study of vibrational effects on the electron momentum distributions of the outer valence orbitals of adamantane (C10H16). The symmetric noncoplanar (e, 2e) experiment has been carried out at an incident electron energy of 1.2 keV. Furthermore, theoretical calculations of the electron momentum distributions with vibrational effects being involved have been performed using the harmonic analytical quantum mechanical and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics approaches. In spite of the complex nature of the vibrational structure of this large molecule, both approaches provide overall quantitative insights into the results of the experiment. Comparisons between experiment and theory have shown that ground state nuclear dynamics appreciably affects the momentum profiles of the 7t2, {2t1 + 3e}, and {5t2 + 5a1} orbitals. It has been demonstrated that changes in the momentum profiles are mainly due to the vibrational motions associated with the CH bonds.

  13. Vibrational Effects on Electron Momentum Distributions of Outer-Valence Orbitals of Oxetane.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yaguo; Shan, Xu; Yang, Jing; Niu, Shanshan; Zhang, Zhe; Watanabe, Noboru; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Takahashi, Masahiko; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-09-01

    Vibrational effects on electron momentum distributions (EMDs) of outer-valence orbitals of oxetane are computed with a comprehensive consideration of all vibrational modes. It is found that vibrational motions influence EMDs of all outer-valence orbitals noticeably. The agreement between theoretical and experimental momentum profiles of the first five orbitals is greatly improved when including molecular vibrations in the calculation. In particular, the large turn-up at low momentum in the experimental momentum profile of the 3b1 orbital is well interpreted by vibrational effects, indicating that, besides the low-frequency ring-puckering mode, C-H stretching motion also plays a significant role in affecting EMDs of outer-valence orbitals of oxetane. The case of oxetane exhibits the significance of checking vibrational effects when performing electron momentum spectroscopy measurements.

  14. Momentum spectra for single and double electron ionization of He in relativistic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, C. J.; Olson, R. E.; Schmitt, W.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    1997-11-01

    The complete momentum spectra for single and double ionization of He by 1-GeV/u (β=0.88) U92+ have been investigated using a classical trajectory Monte Carlo method corrected for the relativistic projectile. The 1/r12 electron-electron interaction has been included in the post-collision region for double ionization to incorporate the effects of both the nuclear-electron and electron-electron ionizing interactions, and to access the effects of electron correlation in the electron spectra. Experimental measurements were able to determine the longitudinal momentum spectra for single ionization; these observations are in accordance with the theoretical predictions for the three-body momentum balance between projectile, recoil ion, and ionized electron. In particular, the Lorentz contraction of the Coulomb interaction of the projectile manifests itself in the decrease of the post-collision interaction of the projectile with the electron and recoil ion, causing them to recoil back-to-back as in the case for a short electromagnetic pulse. This feature is clearly displayed in both the theoretical and experimental longitudinal momentum spectra, and by comparing to calculations that are performed at the same collision speed but do not include the relativistic potentials. Moreover, collision plane spectra of the three particles demonstrate that the momenta of the recoil ion and ionized electron are preferentially equal, and opposite, to each other. The electron spectra for double ionization show that the inclusion of the electron-electron interaction in the post-collision regime partitions the combined ionization momentum of the electrons so that the electrons are preferentially emitted in opposite azimuthal angles to one another. This is in contrast to calculations made assuming independent electrons.

  15. Electron momentum spectroscopy of H+ 2 in the presence of laser radiation*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulychev, Andrew A.; Kouzakov, Konstantin A.

    2017-02-01

    Theoretical analysis of laser-assisted electron impact ionization of a hydrogen molecular ion H+ 2 at high impact energy and large momentum transfer is carried out. The laser-field effects on the incoming and outgoing electrons are taken into account using the Volkov functions. The field-dressing of the target electron is treated with a quasistatic state approach. Calculations for laser radiation with frequency ω = 1.55 eV and intensity I = 5 × 1011 W/cm2 exhibit strong laser influence on the molecular bond oscillation in laser-assisted electron momentum distributions.

  16. Recoil Momentum Spectroscopy Study of Electron Capture from He by 10 MeV Hydrogenlike Fluorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, L.; Winecki, S.; Stöckli, M.; Cocke, C. L.; Richard, P.; Ullrich, J.; Moshammer, R.

    1996-05-01

    We have used recoil momentum spectroscopy (COLTRIMS (J. Ullrich, et al., Comm. At. Mol. Phys. \\underline30), 285 (1994).) to determine final state momentum distributions in the single electron capture from He by 10 MeV F^8+ ions. A momentum resolution below 0.15 a.u. was obtained. The longitidunal momentum resolution is sufficient to allow the separation of final state populations of the L, M and higher states, and to identify excitation of the residual He^+ ion. This probability of this excitation is large in the capture process. Transverse momentum distributions were used to extract transverse cross sections (angular distributions) for different final states. Comparison of the data to theoretical expectations will be presented.

  17. Precision electroweak studies using parity violation in electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Paschke, Kent D,

    2013-11-01

    The nature of new neutral-current interactions can be revealed at the low-energy precision frontier, where studies of parity-violation in electron scattering will complement the energy-frontier studies at the LHC. Measurements of the parity-violating observable APV - the cross-section asymmetry in the scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from an unpolarized target - are sensitive to possible contact interactions from new physics at multi-TeV mass scales. The 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and a new, high-intensity beam at Mainz offer opportunities for significant improvements in measurements of electron-electron and electron-quark parity-violating interactions.

  18. Vibrational effects on valence electron momentum distributions of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Noboru; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2014-12-28

    We report an electron momentum spectroscopy study of vibrational effects on the electron momentum distributions for the outer valence orbitals of difluoromethane (CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}). The symmetric noncoplanar (e,2e) experiment has been performed at an incident electron energy of 1.2 keV. Furthermore, a theoretical calculation of the electron momentum distributions of the CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} molecule has been carried out with vibrational effects being involved. It is shown from comparisons between experiment and theory that it is essential to take into account influences of the CH{sub 2} asymmetric stretching and CH{sub 2} rocking vibrational modes for a proper understanding of the electron momentum distribution of the 2b{sub 1} orbital having the CH-bonding character. The results of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}and additional theoretical calculations for (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}O and H{sub 2}CO molecules strongly suggest that vibrational effects on electron momentum distributions tend to be appreciable for non-total symmetry molecular orbitals delocalized over some equivalent CH-bond sites.

  19. Vibrational effects on valence electron momentum distributions of CH2F2.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Noboru; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2014-12-28

    We report an electron momentum spectroscopy study of vibrational effects on the electron momentum distributions for the outer valence orbitals of difluoromethane (CH2F2). The symmetric noncoplanar (e,2e) experiment has been performed at an incident electron energy of 1.2 keV. Furthermore, a theoretical calculation of the electron momentum distributions of the CH2F2 molecule has been carried out with vibrational effects being involved. It is shown from comparisons between experiment and theory that it is essential to take into account influences of the CH2 asymmetric stretching and CH2 rocking vibrational modes for a proper understanding of the electron momentum distribution of the 2b1 orbital having the CH-bonding character. The results of CH2F2and additional theoretical calculations for (CH3)2O and H2CO molecules strongly suggest that vibrational effects on electron momentum distributions tend to be appreciable for non-total symmetry molecular orbitals delocalized over some equivalent CH-bond sites.

  20. Calculating electron momentum densities and Compton profiles using the linear tetrahedron method.

    PubMed

    Ernsting, D; Billington, D; Haynes, T D; Millichamp, T E; Taylor, J W; Duffy, J A; Giblin, S R; Dewhurst, J K; Dugdale, S B

    2014-12-10

    A method for computing electron momentum densities and Compton profiles from ab initio calculations is presented. Reciprocal space is divided into optimally-shaped tetrahedra for interpolation, and the linear tetrahedron method is used to obtain the momentum density and its projections such as Compton profiles. Results are presented and evaluated against experimental data for Be, Cu, Ni, Fe3Pt, and YBa2Cu4O8, demonstrating the accuracy of our method in a wide variety of crystal structures.

  1. Effect of orbital angular momentum on electron acoustic waves in double-Kappa plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Aman-ur; Shan, S. Ali; Hamza, M. Yousaf; Lee, J. K.

    2017-02-01

    Kinetic theory of electron acoustic waves (EAWs) in the presence of wave angular momentum has been derived to study the effect of wave angular momentum on the propagation of EAWs in a non-Maxwellian plasma. Both types of electrons (hot and cool) are modeled as Kappa-distributed velocity distribution functions. The theory is also applied to Saturn's magnetosphere where these kinds of distribution functions are commonly found. It is seen that the presence of wave angular momentum in the model has a significant effect on the existence of the regions where EAWs are weakly damped. The effect of wave angular momentum on EAWs is studied by defining a parameter η = k/(lqθ), which is the ratio of the planar wave number to the azimuthal wave number. The wave is purely planar if η→∞. The weakly damped region of EAWs depends strongly on this parameter in addition to other parameters such as hot electron spectral index κh, cool electron spectral index κc, the fraction of hot electrons, and hot to cool electrons temperature ratio. The results also show the effect of η on the propagation of EAWs in various regions of Saturn's magnetosphere.

  2. Selective detection of angular-momentum-polarized Auger electrons by atomic stereography.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Fujita, Masayoshi; Ohta, Takuya; Maejima, Naoyuki; Matsui, Hirosuke; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2015-01-09

    When a core level is excited by circularly polarized light, the angular momentum of light is transferred to the emitted photoelectron, which can be confirmed by the parallax shift of the forward focusing peak (FFP) direction in a stereograph of atomic arrangement. No angular momentum has been believed to be transferred to normal Auger electrons resulting from the decay process filling core hole after photoelectron ejection. We succeeded in detecting a non-negligible circular dichroism contrast in a normal Auger electron diffraction from a nonmagnetic Cu(001) surface far off from the absorption threshold. Moreover, we detected angular-momentum-polarized Cu L(3)M(4,5)M(4,5) Auger electrons at the L(3) absorption threshold, where the excited core electron is trapped at the conduction band. From the kinetic energy dependence of the Auger electron FFP parallax shift, we found that the angular momentum is transferred to the Auger electron most effectively in the case of the (1)S(0) two-hole creation.

  3. Directly Characterizing the Relative Strength and Momentum Dependence of Electron-Phonon Coupling Using Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Devereaux, T. P.; Shvaika, A. M.; Wu, K.; Wohlfeld, K.; Jia, C. J.; Wang, Y.; Moritz, B.; Chaix, L.; Lee, W. -S.; Shen, Z. -X.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Braicovich, L.

    2016-10-25

    The coupling between lattice and charge degrees of freedom in condensed matter materials is ubiquitous and can often result in interesting properties and ordered phases, including conventional superconductivity, charge-density wave order, and metal-insulator transitions. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and both neutron and nonresonant x-ray scattering serve as effective probes for determining the behavior of appropriate, individual degrees of freedom—the electronic structure and lattice excitation, or phonon dispersion, respectively. However, each provides less direct information about the mutual coupling between the degrees of freedom, usually through self-energy effects, which tend to renormalize and broaden spectral features precisely where the coupling is strong, impacting one’s ability to quantitatively characterize the coupling. Here, we demonstrate that resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, or RIXS, can be an effective tool to directly determine the relative strength and momentum dependence of the electron-phonon coupling in condensed matter systems. Using a diagrammatic approach for an eight-band model of copper oxides, we study the contributions from the lowest-order diagrams to the full RIXS intensity for a realistic scattering geometry, accounting for matrix element effects in the scattering cross section, as well as the momentum dependence of the electron-phonon coupling vertex. A detailed examination of these maps offers a unique perspective into the characteristics of electron-phonon coupling, which complements both neutron and nonresonant x-ray scattering, as well as Raman and infrared conductivity.

  4. Directly Characterizing the Relative Strength and Momentum Dependence of Electron-Phonon Coupling Using Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devereaux, T. P.; Shvaika, A. M.; Wu, K.; Wohlfeld, K.; Jia, C. J.; Wang, Y.; Moritz, B.; Chaix, L.; Lee, W.-S.; Shen, Z.-X.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Braicovich, L.

    2016-10-01

    The coupling between lattice and charge degrees of freedom in condensed matter materials is ubiquitous and can often result in interesting properties and ordered phases, including conventional superconductivity, charge-density wave order, and metal-insulator transitions. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and both neutron and nonresonant x-ray scattering serve as effective probes for determining the behavior of appropriate, individual degrees of freedom—the electronic structure and lattice excitation, or phonon dispersion, respectively. However, each provides less direct information about the mutual coupling between the degrees of freedom, usually through self-energy effects, which tend to renormalize and broaden spectral features precisely where the coupling is strong, impacting one's ability to quantitatively characterize the coupling. Here, we demonstrate that resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, or RIXS, can be an effective tool to directly determine the relative strength and momentum dependence of the electron-phonon coupling in condensed matter systems. Using a diagrammatic approach for an eight-band model of copper oxides, we study the contributions from the lowest-order diagrams to the full RIXS intensity for a realistic scattering geometry, accounting for matrix element effects in the scattering cross section, as well as the momentum dependence of the electron-phonon coupling vertex. A detailed examination of these maps offers a unique perspective into the characteristics of electron-phonon coupling, which complements both neutron and nonresonant x-ray scattering, as well as Raman and infrared conductivity.

  5. A multiparameter data acquisition system based on universal serial bus interface for electron momentum spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, C.G.; Deng, J.K.; Su, G.L.; Zhou, H.; Ren, X.G.

    2004-09-01

    A versatile multiparameter data acquisition system based on universal serial bus (USB) interface was designed and has been used on the electron momentum spectromenter. Digitized data were first buffered in a FIFO memory in an event-by-event mode with a check bit, and then transferred to computer through the USB interface. USB interface combined with a microcontroller unit provides much flexibility for data acquisition and experimental controls. The operation performance of the system is demonstrated in the measurement of electron momentum spectra of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} molecules.

  6. A multiparameter data acquisition system based on universal serial bus interface for electron momentum spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, C. G.; Deng, J. K.; Su, G. L.; Zhou, H.; Ren, X. G.

    2004-09-01

    A versatile multiparameter data acquisition system based on universal serial bus (USB) interface was designed and has been used on the electron momentum spectromenter. Digitized data were first buffered in a FIFO memory in an event-by-event mode with a check bit, and then transferred to computer through the USB interface. USB interface combined with a microcontroller unit provides much flexibility for data acquisition and experimental controls. The operation performance of the system is demonstrated in the measurement of electron momentum spectra of CH2F2 molecules.

  7. Tuning the tunneling probability between low-dimensional electron systems by momentum matching

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Daming; Beckel, Andreas; Geller, Martin; Lorke, Axel; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.

    2015-06-15

    We demonstrate the possibility to tune the tunneling probability between an array of self- assembled quantum dots and a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) by changing the energy imbalance between the dot states and the 2DEG. Contrary to the expectation from Fowler-Nordheim tunneling, the tunneling rate decreases with increasing injection energy. This can be explained by an increasing momentum mismatch between the dot states and the Fermi-circle in the 2DEG. Our findings demonstrate momentum matching as a useful mechanism (in addition to energy conservation, density of states, and transmission probability) to electrically control the charge transfer between quantum dots and an electron reservoir.

  8. Unoccupied electronic structure and momentum-dependent scattering dynamics in Pb/Si(557) nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, A. Samad; Trontl, V. Mikšić; Ligges, M.; Sakong, S.; Kratzer, P.; Lükermann, D.; Zhou, P.; Avigo, I.; Pfnür, H.; Tegenkamp, C.; Bovensiepen, U.

    2015-10-01

    The unoccupied electronic structure of quasi-one-dimensional reconstructions of Pb atoms on a Si(557) surface is investigated by means of femtosecond time- and angle-resolved two-photon photoemission. Two distinct unoccupied electronic states are observed at E -EF=3.55 and 3.30 eV, respectively. Density functional theory calculations reveal that these states are spatially located predominantly on the lead wires and that they are energetically degenerated with an energy window of reduced electronic density of states in Si. We further find momentum-averaged lifetimes of 24 and 35 fs of these two states, respectively. The photoemission yield and the population dynamics depend on the electron momentum component perpendicular to the steps of the Si substrate, and the momentum-dependent dynamics cannot be described by means of rate equations. We conclude that momentum- and direction-dependent dephasing of the electronic excitations, likely caused by elastic scattering at the step edges on the vicinal surface, modifies the excited-state population dynamics in this system.

  9. Ion-momentum imaging of dissociative attachment of electrons to molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaughter, D. S.; Belkacem, A.; McCurdy, C. W.; Rescigno, T. N.; Haxton, D. J.

    2016-11-01

    We present an overview of experiments and theory relevant to dissociative electron attachment studied by momentum imaging. We describe several key examples of characteristic transient anion dynamics in the form of small polyatomic electron-molecule systems. In each of these examples the so-called axial recoil approximation is found to break down due to correlation of the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom of the transient anion. Guided by anion fragment momentum measurements and predictions of the electron scattering attachment probability in the molecular frame, we demonstrate that accurate predictions of the dissociation dynamics can be achieved without a detailed investigation of the surface topology of the relevant electronic states or the fragment trajectories on those surfaces.

  10. Bloch oscillations for large momentum transfer and high precision in an ytterbium Bose-Einstein condensate interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; McAlpine, Katherine; Gochnauer, Daniel; Saxberg, Brendan; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-05-01

    The narrow momentum and position spread of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) can help improve atom interferometric measurements. In earlier work, we demonstrated a contrast interferometer with ytterbium (Yb) BECs. Here, we report progress towards implementing a second generation Yb BEC interferometer with the goal of measuring h/m, where h is Planck's constant and m is the mass of a Yb atom, in order to determine the fine structure constant α. The use of the non-magnetic Yb atom and the symmetric geometry of the interferometer make the measurement immune to several error sources. We have produced Yb BECs in a new apparatus, and are currently installing and testing the laser pulse atom-optics needed for the interferometry sequence. The precision of our measurement scales with N2, where 2N is the number of photon recoils separating the interfering momentum states in the interferometer. We will discuss our progress towards realizing Bloch oscillations (BO) pulses for large N. Using an extension of our previous analysis2, we will also discuss the role of diffraction phases in our interferometer due to the BO pulses. This work is supported by the NSF.

  11. Precision electroweak studies using parity violation in electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Paschke, K. D.

    2013-11-07

    The nature of new neutral-current interactions can be revealed at the low-energy precision frontier, where studies of parity-violation in electron scattering will complement the energy-frontier studies at the LHC. Measurements of the parity-violating observable A{sub PV} - the cross-section asymmetry in the scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from an unpolarized target - are sensitive to possible contact interactions from new physics at multi-TeV mass scales. The 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and a new, high-intensity beam at Mainz offer opportunities for significant improvements in measurements of electron-electron and electron-quark parity-violating interactions.

  12. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E W; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-01

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+δ). The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution.

  13. Electron Momentum Spectroscopy Investigation of Molecular Conformations of Ethanol Considering Vibrational Effects.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yaguo; Shan, Xu; Niu, Shanshan; Liu, Zhaohui; Wang, Enliang; Watanabe, Noboru; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Takahashi, Masahiko; Chen, Xiangjun

    2017-01-12

    The interpretation of experimental electron momentum distributions (EMDs) of ethanol, one of the simplest molecules having conformers, has confused researchers for years. High-level calculations of Dyson orbital EMDs by thermally averaging the gauche and trans conformers as well as molecular dynamical simulations failed to quantitatively reproduce the experiments for some of the outer valence orbitals. In this work, the valence shell electron binding energy spectrum and EMDs of ethanol are revisited by the high-sensitivity electron momentum spectrometer employing symmetric noncoplanar geometry at an incident energy of 1200 eV plus binding energy, together with a detailed analysis of the influence of vibrational motions on the EMDs for the two conformers employing a harmonic analytical quantum mechanical (HAQM) approach by taking into account all of the vibrational modes. The significant discrepancies between theories and experiments in previous works have now been interpreted quantitatively, indicating that the vibrational effect plays a significant role in reproducing the experimental results, not only through the low-frequency OH and CH3 torsion modes but also through other high-frequency ones. Rational explanation of experimental momentum profiles provides solid evidence that the trans conformer is slightly more stable than the gauche conformer, in accordance with thermodynamic predictions and other experiments. The case of ethanol demonstrates the significance of considering vibrational effects when performing a conformational study on flexible molecules using electron momentum spectroscopy.

  14. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy with two-dimensional energy and momentum mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xuetao; Cao, Yanwei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Jia, Xun; Guo, Qinlin; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Linfan; Zhang, Jiandi; Plummer, E. W.; Guo, Jiandong

    2015-08-15

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful technique to probe vibrational and electronic excitations at surfaces. The dispersion relation of surface excitations, i.e., energy as a function of momentum, has in the past, been obtained by measuring the energy loss at a fixed angle (momentum) and then rotating sample, monochromator, or analyzer. Here, we introduce a new strategy for HREELS, utilizing a specially designed lens system with a double-cylindrical Ibach-type monochromator combined with a commercial VG Scienta hemispherical electron energy analyzer, which can simultaneously measure the energy and momentum of the scattered electrons. The new system possesses high angular resolution (<0.1°), detecting efficiency and sampling density. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated using Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ}. The time required to obtain a complete dispersion spectrum is at least one order of magnitude shorter than conventional spectrometers, with improved momentum resolution and no loss in energy resolution.

  15. Precision spectroscopic measurements in few-electron ions

    SciTech Connect

    Dunford, R.W.; Berry, H.G.; Church, D.A.; Dinneen, T.P.; Hass, M.; Liu, C.J.; Berrah-Mansour, N.; Pardo, R.C.; Raphaelian, M.L.A.; Young, L.; Zabransky, B.J. ); Curtis, L.J. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1990-01-01

    We describe recent precision experiments in few-electron ions including measurements of the lifetimes of two-photon-emitting levels in Ni{sup 26+} and Ni{sup 27+}, a measurement of the lifetime of the 2{sup 3}S{sub 1} level in Br{sup 33+} and measurements of the 2{sup 3}S{sub 1} {yields} 2{sup 3}{sub 0,1,2} transition energies in B{sup 3+}. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Precision Absolute Beam Current Measurement of Low Power Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, M. M.; Bevins, M. E.; Degtiarenko, P.; Freyberger, A.; Krafft, G. A.

    2012-11-01

    Precise measurements of low power CW electron beam current for the Jefferson Lab Nuclear Physics program have been performed using a Tungsten calorimeter. This paper describes the rationale for the choice of the calorimeter technique, as well as the design and calibration of the device. The calorimeter is in use presently to provide a 1% absolute current measurement of CW electron beam with 50 to 500 nA of average beam current and 1-3 GeV beam energy. Results from these recent measurements will also be presented.

  17. Momentum imaging studies of electron and ion dynamics in a strong laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharjan, Chakra Man

    An underlying goal of studying atomic or molecular dynamics with short laser pulses is to reach a time scale short enough to study the evolution of the system in the time domain. In this thesis, the strong field ionization of atoms and molecules has been investigated with the highly resolved technique known as cold target recoil momentum spectroscopy (COLTRIMS). The thesis can be divided into two parts: single and double ionization. In the first part, we studied the momentum vectors of low energy electrons generated by short laser pulses of wavelengths varying from 400 to 800 nm with atomic and molecular targets with intensities in the tunneling region. Most of the structures observed in the momentum spectra of atomic and molecular targets can be explained as due to above-threshold ionization, and Freeman resonances. The most significant structure in our observed spectra is the angular structure in the lowest part of the momentum image, and this is attributed to the diffraction pattern evolved by tunneling electrons. Surprisingly, we observed that the structure produced by the electrons from high Rydberg states is independent of the internal structure of the target atom and molecules. The same work is extended to aligned molecules. The basic idea of this part of the work is to see whether the angular distribution of electrons from aligned molecules resembles the orbital structures of the molecules. The rotational revival structure was used to align the molecules. We observed pronounced energy and angular structures of the momentum images which show a dependence on the alignment of the molecule. The last part of this work mainly focuses on double ionization, i.e. the removal of two electrons from the target atoms sequentially by a short laser pulse. Measuring the complete momentum vector of Ar2+ and Ne2+, we demonstrate that these can be used to extract the angular correlation between two electrons sequentially released in the circularly polarized pulse. We

  18. Observation of the Interference Effect in Vibrationally Resolved Electron Momentum Spectroscopy of H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Shan, Xu; Wang, Tian; Wang, Enliang; Chen, Xiangjun

    2014-01-01

    We report the first measurement on vibrationally resolved electron momentum spectroscopy of H2 by using a high-resolution (e, 2e) spectrometer. The vibrational-specific experimental momentum profiles have been obtained and shown to be in agreement with calculations of (e, 2e) ionization cross sections taking into account the vibrational wave functions. Distinct deviations from Franck-Condon predictions have been observed in vibrational ratios of cross sections, which can readily be ascribed to the Young-type two-center interference. Unlike previous (e, 2e) work, the present observation of an interference effect does not rely on the comparison with the one-center atomic cross section.

  19. Two-photon exchange correction in elastic unpolarized electron-proton scattering at small momentum transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomalak, O.; Vanderhaeghen, M.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the two-photon exchange (TPE) correction to the unpolarized elastic electron-proton scattering at small momentum transfer Q2 . We account for the inelastic intermediate states approximating the double virtual Compton scattering by the unpolarized forward virtual Compton scattering. The unpolarized proton structure functions are used as input for the numerical evaluation of the inelastic contribution. Our calculation reproduces the leading terms in the Q2 expansion of the TPE correction and goes beyond this approximation by keeping the full Q2 dependence of the proton structure functions. In the range of small momentum transfer, our result is in good agreement with the empirical TPE fit to existing data.

  20. Rotation drive and momentum transport with electron cyclotron heating in tokamak plasmas.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, M; Sakamoto, Y; Takenaga, H; Ide, S; Oyama, N; Kobayashi, T; Kamada, Y

    2009-08-07

    The role of electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) on the toroidal rotation velocity profile has been investigated in the JT-60U tokamak device by separating the effects of the change in momentum transport, the intrinsic rotation by pressure gradient, and the intrinsic rotation by ECRH. It is found that ECRH increases the toroidal momentum diffusivity and the convection velocity. It is also found that ECRH drives the codirection (co) intrinsic rotation inside the EC deposition radius and the counterdirection (ctr) intrinsic rotation outside the EC deposition radius. This ctr rotation starts from the EC deposition radius and propagates to the edge region.

  1. Assessment of delocalized and localized molecular orbitals through electron momentum spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Cheung, Ling-Fung; Ning, Chuan-Gang

    2014-06-01

    Recently, there was a hot controversy about the concept of localized orbitals, which was triggered by Grushow's work titled “Is it time to retire the hybrid atomic orbital?” [J. Chem. Educ. 88, 860 (2011)]. To clarify the issue, we assess the delocalized and localized molecular orbitals from an experimental view using electron momentum spectroscopy. The delocalized and localized molecular orbitals based on various theoretical models for CH4, NH3, and H2O are compared with the experimental momentum distributions. Our results show that the delocalized molecular orbitals rather than the localized ones can give a direct interpretation of the experimental (e, 2e) results.

  2. A novel system for measurement of the transverse electron momentum distribution from photocathodes.

    PubMed

    Feng, J; Nasiatka, J; Wan, W; Vecchione, T; Padmore, H A

    2015-01-01

    The transverse momentum of electrons produced by a photocathode contributes significantly to the performance of several different types of accelerator-based light sources, such as Free Electron Lasers, as well as systems designed for ultrafast electron diffraction and dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Minimization of the transverse emittance from photocathodes is the subject of intensive research, and therefore measurement of this parameter is of great importance. Here, we describe a simple system that offers real time measurements of transverse emittance and can be easily integrated into the photocathode fabrication process.

  3. Development of time-resolved electron momentum spectroscopy: a tool for visualizing the motion of electrons during a chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, M.; Kasai, Y.; Oishi, K.; Nakazawa, H.; Takahashi, M.

    2014-04-01

    An electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) apparatus has been developed, which employs an ultrashort-pulsed incident electron beam with a repetition rate of 5 kHz and a pulse duration in the order of picoseconds. Its instrumental design and technical details are reported, involving demonstration of a new method for finding time-zero. Furthermore, a preliminary time-resolved EMS study on the photodissociation dynamics of acetone at 195 nm is presented.

  4. Photon-electron-ion momentum transfer in high intensityIR laser pulse ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrauk, Andre D.; Chelkowski, Szczefan; Corkum, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Photon momentum sharing between electrons and parent ions in high intensityIR multiphoton ionization requires going beyond the traditional perturbative dipole approximation. Using numerical solutions of the 2-D TDSE(Time dependent Schroedinger equation) for one electron atom models, we show that the radiation pressure on photoelectrons is sensitive to the ionization mechanism, either direct or by recollision. A complex electron-ion response is obtained due to the interplay between the Lorentz force and Coulomb attraction of the ion.The influence of the photon momentum sharing is shown to be discernible in IR high intensity atomic and/or molecular holographic patterns thus suggesting a new research subject in IR strong field physics.

  5. Photoelectron and electron momentum spectroscopy of tetrahydrofuran from a molecular dynamical perspective.

    PubMed

    Shojaei, S H Reza; Morini, Filippo; Deleuze, Michael S

    2013-03-07

    The results of experimental studies of the valence electronic structure of tetrahydrofuran employing He I photoelectron spectroscopy as well as Electron Momentum Spectroscopy (EMS) have been reinterpreted on the basis of Molecular Dynamical simulations employing the classical MM3 force field and large-scale quantum mechanical simulations employing Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics in conjunction with the dispersion corrected ωB97XD exchange-correlation functional. Analysis of the produced atomic trajectories demonstrates the importance of thermal deviations from the lowest energy path for pseudorotation, in the form of considerable variations of the ring-puckering amplitude. These deviations are found to have a significant influence on several outer-valence electron momentum distributions, as well as on the He I photoelectron spectrum.

  6. Photon momentum sharing between an electron and an ion in photoionization: from one-photon (photoelectric effect) to multiphoton absorption.

    PubMed

    Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, André D; Corkum, Paul B

    2014-12-31

    We investigate photon-momentum sharing between an electron and an ion following different photoionization regimes. We find very different partitioning of the photon momentum in one-photon ionization (the photoelectric effect) as compared to multiphoton processes. In the photoelectric effect, the electron acquires a momentum that is much greater than the single photon momentum ℏω/c [up to (8/5) ℏω/c] whereas in the strong-field ionization regime, the photoelectron only acquires the momentum corresponding to the photons absorbed above the field-free ionization threshold plus a momentum corresponding to a fraction (3/10) of the ionization potential Ip. In both cases, due to the smallness of the electron-ion mass ratio, the ion takes nearly the entire momentum of all absorbed N photons (via the electron-ion center of mass). Additionally, the ion takes, as a recoil, the photoelectron momentum resulting from mutual electron-ion interaction in the electromagnetic field. Consequently, the momentum partitioning of the photofragments is very different in both regimes. This suggests that there is a rich, unexplored physics to be studied between these two limits which can be generated with current ultrafast laser technology.

  7. Angular-momentum-dominated electron beams and flat-beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yin-e

    2005-06-01

    In the absence of external forces, if the dynamics within an electron beam is dominated by its angular momentum rather than other effects such as random thermal motion or self Coulomb-repulsive force (i.e., space-charge force), the beam is said to be angular-momentum-dominated. Such a beam can be directly applied to the field of electron-cooling of heavy ions; or it can be manipulated into an electron beam with large transverse emittance ratio, i.e., a flat beam. A flat beam is of interest for high-energy electron-positron colliders or accelerator-based light sources. An angular-momentum-dominated beam is generated at the Fermilab/NICADD photoinjector Laboratory (FNPL) and is accelerated to an energy of 16 MeV. The properties of such a beam is investigated systematically in experiment. The experimental results are in very good agreement with analytical expectations and simulation results. This lays a good foundation for the transformation of an angular-momentum-dominated beam into a flat beam. The round-to-flat beam transformer is composed of three skew quadrupoles. Based on a good knowledge of the angular-momentum-dominated beam, the quadrupoles are set to the proper strengths in order to apply a total torque which removes the angular momentum, resulting in a flat beam. For bunch charge around 0.5 nC, an emittance ratio of 100 ± 5 was measured, with the smaller normalized root-mean-square emittance around 0.4 mm-mrad. Effects limiting the flat-beam emittance ratio are investigated, such as the chromatic effects in the round-to-flat beam transformer, asymmetry in the initial angular-momentum-dominated beam, and space-charge effects. The most important limiting factor turns out to be the uncorrelated emittance growth caused by space charge when the beam energy is low, for example, in the rf gun area. As a result of such emittance growth prior to the round-to-flat beam transformer, the emittance ratio achievable in simulation decreases from orders of thousands to

  8. Spatially Resolved Electronic Structures of Atomically Precise Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Han; Wei, Dacheng; Sun, Jiatao; Wong, Swee Liang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Neto, A. H. Castro; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2012-01-01

    Graphene has attracted much interest in both academia and industry. The challenge of making it semiconducting is crucial for applications in electronic devices. A promising approach is to reduce its physical size down to the nanometer scale. Here, we present the surface-assisted bottom-up fabrication of atomically precise armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) with predefined widths, namely 7-, 14- and 21-AGNRs, on Ag(111) as well as their spatially resolved width-dependent electronic structures. STM/STS measurements reveal their associated electron scattering patterns and the energy gaps over 1 eV. The mechanism to form such AGNRs is addressed based on the observed intermediate products. Our results provide new insights into the local properties of AGNRs, and have implications for the understanding of their electrical properties and potential applications. PMID:23248746

  9. Precision of multi-frequency electronic apex locators.

    PubMed

    George, Roy

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, Embase and Scopus databases.Study selectionStudies that reported the precision of electronic apex locators (EALs) in locating the apical constriction (AC) in primary root canal treatment of human teeth compared with a histologic evaluation of the AC were considered.Data extraction and synthesisData were extracted and quality assessed independently by two reviewers.ResultsTen studies were included, reporting on 1105 EAL measurements. Seven studies were considered to be at high risk of bias and three at low risk. Four different EALs were evaluated; Root ZX (J Morita, Tokyo, Japan), Justy II (Hager & Werken GmbH & Co, Duisburg, Germany), Endy 5000 (Loser Co, Leverkusen, Germany) and Endox (Lysis Co, Milan, Italy). Three EALs, Root ZX, Justy II and Endy 5000 were more accurate than the Endox in determining the distance between the file tip and the apical constriction. Pulp status was only available for 194 (17.55%) of the measurements. The status of the pulp (vital or necrotic) had no significant effect on precision.ConclusionsThe precision of electronic working length measurement depends on the device used and the type of irrigation and is not influenced by the status of the pulp tissue.

  10. Three-Dimensional Momentum Imaging of Electron Wave Packet Interference in Few-Cycle Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, R.; Simeonidis, K.; Moshammer, R.; Ergler, Th.; Duerr, M.; Kurka, M.; Kuehnel, K.-U.; Tschuch, S.; Schroeter, C.-D.; Bauer, D.; Ullrich, J.; Rudenko, A.; Herrwerth, O.; Uphues, Th.; Schultze, M.; Goulielmakis, E.; Uiberacker, M.; Lezius, M.; Kling, M. F.

    2009-07-31

    Using a reaction microscope, three-dimensional (3D) electron (and ion) momentum (P) spectra have been recorded for carrier-envelope-phase (CEP) stabilized few-cycle (approx5 fs), intense (approx4x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses (740 nm) impinging on He. Preferential emission of low-energy electrons (E{sub e}<15 eV) to either hemisphere is observed as a function of the CEP. Clear interference patterns emerge in P space at CEPs with maximum asymmetry, interpreted as attosecond interferences of rescattered and directly emitted electron wave packets by means of a simple model.

  11. Study of the photoelectron and electron momentum spectra of cyclopentene using benchmark Dyson orbital theories.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan R; Ning, Chuan G; Deng, Jing K; Deleuze, Michael S

    2008-05-07

    A complete study of the valence electronic structure and related electronic excitation properties of cyclopentene in its C(s) ground state geometry is presented. Ionization spectra obtained from this compound by means of photoelectron spectroscopy (He I and He II) and electron momentum spectroscopy have been analyzed in details up to electron binding energies of 30 eV using one-particle Green's function (1p-GF) theory along with the outer-valence (OVGF) and the third-order algebraic diagrammatic construction [ADC(3)] schemes. The employed geometries derive from DFT/B3LYP calculations in conjunction with the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set, and closely approach the structures inferred from experiments employing microwave spectroscopy or electron diffraction in the gas phase. The 1p-GF/ADC(3) calculations indicate that the orbital picture of ionization breaks down at electron binding energies larger than approximately 17 eV in the inner-valence region, and that the outer-valence 7a' orbital is also subject to a significant dispersion of the ionization intensity over shake-up states. This study confirms further the rule that OVGF pole strengths smaller than 0.85 foretell a breakdown of the orbital picture of ionization at the ADC(3) level. Spherically averaged (e, 2e) electron momentum distributions at an electron impact energy of 1200 eV that were experimentally inferred from an angular analysis of EMS intensities have been interpreted by comparison with accurate simulations employing ADC(3) Dyson orbitals. Very significant discrepancies were observed with momentum distributions obtained from several outer-valence ionization bands using standard Kohn-Sham orbitals.

  12. Asymptotic expansions of the electron momentum densities of the atoms from hydrogen through lawrencium

    SciTech Connect

    Thakkar, A.J.; Wonfor, A.L.; Pedersen, W.A.

    1987-07-15

    The first three coefficients in each of the small p Maclaurin and large p asymptotic expansions of the spherically averaged electron momentum densities of the ground states of the 103 neutral atoms from hydrogen through lawrencium, 73 atomic cations and 41 atomic anions are calculated from nonrelativistic self-consistent-field wave functions. These coefficients should be useful in the analysis of experimental Compton profiles. An analysis of the periodic behavior of these coefficients is given.

  13. Momentum of superconducting electrons and the explanation of the Meissner effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, J. E.

    2017-01-01

    Momentum and energy conservation are fundamental tenets of physics, which valid physical theories have to satisfy. In the reversible transformation between superconducting and normal phases in the presence of a magnetic field, the mechanical momentum of the supercurrent has to be transferred to the body as a whole and vice versa, the kinetic energy of the supercurrent stays in the electronic degrees of freedom, and no energy is dissipated nor entropy is generated in the process. We argue on general grounds that to explain these processes it is necessary that the electromagnetic field mediates the transfer of momentum between electrons and the body as a whole, and this requires that when the phase boundary between normal and superconducting phases is displaced, a flow and counterflow of charge occurs in a direction perpendicular to the phase boundary. This flow and counterflow does not occur according to the conventional BCS-London theory of superconductivity, therefore we argue that within BCS-London theory the Meissner transition is a "forbidden transition." Furthermore, to explain the phase transformation in a way that is consistent with the experimental observations, requires that (i) the wave function and charge distribution of superconducting electrons near the phase boundary extend into the normal phase, and (ii) that the charge carriers in the normal state have holelike character. The conventional theory of superconductivity does not have these physical elements, the theory of hole superconductivity does.

  14. Classical trajectory diagnosis of a fingerlike pattern in the correlated electron momentum distribution in strong field double ionization of helium.

    PubMed

    Ye, D F; Liu, X; Liu, J

    2008-12-05

    With a semiclassical quasistatic model, we identify the distinct roles of nuclear Coulomb attraction, final-state electron repulsion, and the electron-field interaction in forming the fingerlike (or V-shaped) pattern in the correlated electron momentum distribution for helium double ionization in intense laser field [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 263002;Phys.Rev.Lett.99, 263003 (2007)]. The underlying microscopic trajectory configurations responsible for asymmetric electron energy sharing after electron-electron collision have been uncovered, and the corresponding subcycle dynamics is analyzed. The correlation pattern is found to be sensitive to the transverse momentum of correlated electrons.

  15. Gamma-ray momentum reconstruction from Compton electron trajectories by filtered back-projection

    DOE PAGES

    Haefner, A.; Gunter, D.; Plimley, B.; ...

    2014-11-03

    Gamma-ray imaging utilizing Compton scattering has traditionally relied on measuring coincident gamma-ray interactions to map directional information of the source distribution. This coincidence requirement makes it an inherently inefficient process. We present an approach to gamma-ray reconstruction from Compton scattering that requires only a single electron tracking detector, thus removing the coincidence requirement. From the Compton scattered electron momentum distribution, our algorithm analytically computes the incident photon's correlated direction and energy distributions. Because this method maps the source energy and location, it is useful in applications, where prior information about the source distribution is unknown. We demonstrate this method withmore » electron tracks measured in a scientific Si charge coupled device. While this method was demonstrated with electron tracks in a Si-based detector, it is applicable to any detector that can measure electron direction and energy, or equivalently the electron momentum. For example, it can increase the sensitivity to obtain energy and direction in gas-based systems that suffer from limited efficiency.« less

  16. Radial Electron Momentum Densities of Colloidal CdSe Nanocrystals Determined by Positron Beam Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Denison, A B; Meulenberg, R; Eijt, S W H; Van Veen, A; Mijnarends, P E; Barbiellini, B; Bansil, A; Fischer, C; Weber, M H; Lynn, K G

    2003-07-31

    We present depth-resolved positron 2D angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2DACAR) experiments on CdSe quantum dots in the diameter range from 2.5 to 6 nm, deposited as micrometer thin layers. The average radial distribution of the valence electron momentum density (EMD) of CdSe quantum dots has been extracted, which reveals a systematic dependence upon particle size. The quantum confinement related changes and their size scaling observable at the Jones zone momentum of {approx}0.8 a.u. seem to agree with the previous coincidence Doppler study. In addition, the average radial EMD shows an increase in the low-momentum range (<0.6 a.u.) and a reduction in the high-momentum range (>1.6 a.u.) with respect to that measured on a bulk CdSe single crystal. Possible origins of these are described. First-principles calculations based on the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (KKR) method were performed to gain a better insight.

  17. Electron Momentum Spectroscopy and Its Applications to Molecules of Biological Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng

    2007-11-01

    Energy and wave function are the heart and soul of Schrödinger quantum mechanics. Electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) so far provides the most stringent test for quantum mechanical models (theory, basis sets and the combination of both) through observables such as binding energy spectra and Dyson orbital momentum distributions. The capability of EMS to measure Dyson orbitals of a molecule as momentum distributions provides a unique opportunity to assess the models of quantum mechanics based on orbitals, rather than on energy dominated (mostly isotropic) properties. Recently, the author introduced a technique called dual space analysis (DSA), which is based on EMS and quantum mechanics to analyze orbital based information in the more familiar position space as well as the less familiar momentum space. In this article, the development of EMS and DSA is reviewed through the applications to molecules of biological interest such as amino acids, nucleic acid bases and recently nucleosides. The emphasis is the applications of DSA to study isomerization processes and chemical bonding mechanisms of these molecules.

  18. Low-energy Auger electron diffraction: influence of multiple scattering and angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassé, A.; Niebergall, L.; Kucherenko, Yu.

    2002-04-01

    The angular dependence of Auger electrons excited from single-crystal surfaces is treated theoretically within a multiple-scattering cluster model taking into account the full Auger transition matrix elements. In particular the model has been used to discuss the influence of multiple scattering and angular momentum of the Auger electron wave on Auger electron diffraction (AED) patterns in the region of low kinetic energies. Theoretical results of AED patterns are shown and discussed in detail for Cu(0 0 1) and Ni(0 0 1) surfaces, respectively. Even though Cu and Ni are very similar in their electronic and scattering properties recently strong differences have been found in AED patterns measured in the low-energy region. It is shown that the differences may be caused to superposition of different electron diffraction effects in an energy-integrated experiment. A good agreement between available experimental and theoretical results has been achieved.

  19. Few-cycle attosecond pulse chirp effects on asymmetries in ionized electron momentum distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Liangyou; Tan Fang; Gong Qihuang; Pronin, Evgeny A.; Starace, Anthony F.

    2009-07-15

    The momentum distributions of electrons ionized from H atoms by chirped few-cycle attosecond pulses are investigated by numerically solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. The central carrier frequency of the pulse is chosen to be 25 eV, which is well above the ionization threshold. The asymmetry (or difference) in the yield of electrons ionized along and opposite to the direction of linear laser polarization is found to be very sensitive to the pulse chirp (for pulses with fixed carrier-envelope phase), both for a fixed electron energy and for the energy-integrated yield. In particular, the larger the pulse chirp, the larger the number of times the asymmetry changes sign as a function of ionized electron energy. For a fixed chirp, the ionized electron asymmetry is found to be sensitive also to the carrier-envelope phase of the few-cycle pulse.

  20. Evidence of Momentum Conservation at a Nonepitaxial Metal/Semiconductor Interface Using Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, L. D.

    1996-01-01

    Ballistic-Electron-Emission Microscopy (BEEM) spectroscopy has been performed on Au/Si(111) structures as a function of Au thickness and temperature. At 77 K a direct signature of parallel momentum conservation at the Au/Si interface is observed in the BEEM spectra. The variation in spectral shape with both Au thickness and temperature places restrictions on allowable values of inelastic and elastic mean-free paths in the metal, and also requires the presence of multiple electron passes within the Au layer. An independent indication of multiple reflections is directly observed in the attenuation of BEEM current with Au thickness.

  1. Measurement of Tensor Polarization in Elastic Electron-Deuteron Scattering at Large Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    David Abbott; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Heinz Anklin; Francois Arvieux; Jacques Ball; S. Beedoe; Elizabeth Beise; Louis Bimbot; Werner Boeglin; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; Nicholas Chant; Samuel Danagoulian; K. Dow; Jean-Eric Ducret; James Dunne; Lars Ewell; Laurent Eyraud; Christophe Furget; Michel Garcon; Ronald Gilman; Charles Glashausser; Paul Gueye; Kenneth Gustafsson; Kawtar Hafidi; Adrian Honegger; Juerg Jourdan; Serge Kox; Gerfried Kumbartzki; L. Lu; Allison Lung; David Mack; Pete Markowitz; Justin McIntyre; David Meekins; Fernand Merchez; Joseph Mitchell; R. Mohring; Sekazi Mtingwa; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; David Pitz; Liming Qin; Ronald Ransome; Jean-Sebastien Real; Philip Roos; Paul Rutt; Reyad Sawafta; Samuel Stepanyan; Raphael Tieulent; Egle Tomasi-Gustafsson; William Turchinetz; Kelley Vansyoc; Jochen Volmer; Eric Voutier; William Vulcan; Claude Williamson; Stephen Wood; Chen Yan; Jie Zhao; Wenxia Zhao

    2000-05-01

    Tensor polarization observables (t20, t21 and t22) have been measured in elastic electron-deuteron scattering for six values of momentum transfer between 0.66 and 1.7 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The experiment was performed at the Jefferson Laboratory in Hall C using the electron HMS Spectrometer, a specially designed deuteron magnetic channel and the recoil deuteron polarimeter POLDER. The new data determine to much larger Q{sup 2} the deuteron charge form factors G{sub C} and G{sub Q}. They are in good agreement with relativistic calculations and disagree with pQCD predictions.

  2. Electron momentum spectroscopy of norbornadiene at the benchmark ADC(3) level.

    PubMed

    Morini, Filippo; Hajgató, Balázs; Deleuze, Michael S

    2010-09-02

    An extensive study, throughout the valence region, of the electronic structure, ionization spectrum, and electron momentum distributions of norbornadiene is presented, on the ground of accurate calculations of valence one-electron and shake-up ionization energies and of the related Dyson orbitals, using one-particle Green's function (1p-GF) theory in conjunction with the so-called third-order algebraic diagrammatic construction scheme [ADC(3)]. Comparison is made with results obtained from standard (B3LYP) Kohn-Sham orbitals and measurements employing electron momentum spectroscopy, taking into account the contamination of inner- and outer-valence spectral bands by numerous shake-up states. Four relatively intense shake-up lines at 12.1, 16.4, 17.6, and 17.8 eV are found to yield recognizable spectral fingerprints in the EMS experiments. Valence bands at electron binding energies larger than 20 eV are subject to a complete breakdown of the orbital picture of ionization.

  3. Spin-Momentum Correlations in Quasi-Elastic Electron Scattering from Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    I. Passchier; L.D. van Buuren; D. Szczerba; R. Alarcon; Th.S. Bauer; D. Boersma; J.F.J. van den Brand; H.J. Bulten; R. Ent; M. Ferro-Luzzi; M. Harvey; P. Heimberg; D.W. Higinbotham; S. Klous; H. Kolster; J. Lang; B.L. Militsyn; D. Nikolenko; G.J.L. Nooren; B.E. Norum; H.R. Poolman; I. Rachek; M.C. Simani; E. Six; H. de Vries; K. Wang; Z.-L. Zhou

    2002-02-25

    We report on a measurement of spin-momentum correlations in quasi-elastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons with an energy of 720 MeV from vector-polarized deuterium. The spin correlation parameter A{sub ed}{sup V} was measured for the 2{rvec H}({rvec e},e{prime}p)n reaction for missing momenta up to 350 MeV/c at a four-momentum transfer squared of 0.21 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The data give detailed information about the spin structure of the deuteron, and are in good agreement with the predictions of microscopic calculations based on realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials and including various spin-dependent reaction mechanism effects. The experiment demonstrates in a most direct manner the effects of the D-state in the deuteron ground-state wave function and shows the importance of isobar configurations for this reaction.

  4. Theoretical study of molecular vibrations in electron momentum spectroscopy experiments on furan: An analytical versus a molecular dynamical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Morini, Filippo; Deleuze, Michael S.; Watanabe, Noboru; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-03-07

    The influence of thermally induced nuclear dynamics (molecular vibrations) in the initial electronic ground state on the valence orbital momentum profiles of furan has been theoretically investigated using two different approaches. The first of these approaches employs the principles of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, whereas the so-called harmonic analytical quantum mechanical approach resorts to an analytical decomposition of contributions arising from quantized harmonic vibrational eigenstates. In spite of their intrinsic differences, the two approaches enable consistent insights into the electron momentum distributions inferred from new measurements employing electron momentum spectroscopy and an electron impact energy of 1.2 keV. Both approaches point out in particular an appreciable influence of a few specific molecular vibrations of A{sub 1} symmetry on the 9a{sub 1} momentum profile, which can be unravelled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing.

  5. Theoretical study of molecular vibrations in electron momentum spectroscopy experiments on furan: an analytical versus a molecular dynamical approach.

    PubMed

    Morini, Filippo; Deleuze, Michael S; Watanabe, Noboru; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-03-07

    The influence of thermally induced nuclear dynamics (molecular vibrations) in the initial electronic ground state on the valence orbital momentum profiles of furan has been theoretically investigated using two different approaches. The first of these approaches employs the principles of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, whereas the so-called harmonic analytical quantum mechanical approach resorts to an analytical decomposition of contributions arising from quantized harmonic vibrational eigenstates. In spite of their intrinsic differences, the two approaches enable consistent insights into the electron momentum distributions inferred from new measurements employing electron momentum spectroscopy and an electron impact energy of 1.2 keV. Both approaches point out in particular an appreciable influence of a few specific molecular vibrations of A1 symmetry on the 9a1 momentum profile, which can be unravelled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing.

  6. Precise study of the Z/γ* boson transverse momentum distribution in pp collisions using a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Ćwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2011-03-25

    Using 7.3 fb⁻¹ of pp collisions collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, we measure the distribution of the variable φ(η)*, which probes the same physical effects as the Z/γ* boson transverse momentum, but is less susceptible to the effects of experimental resolution and efficiency. A QCD prediction is found to describe the general features of the φ(η)* distribution, but is unable to describe its detailed shape or dependence on boson rapidity. A prediction that includes a broadening of transverse momentum for small values of the parton momentum fraction is strongly disfavored.

  7. Theoretical calculation of electron-positron momentum density in YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massidda, S.

    1990-07-01

    We present calculations of the electron-positron momentum density for the high- Tc superconductor YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ for δ=0 and for the insulating parent compound YBa 2Cu 3O 6, based on first-principle electronic structure calculations performed within the local density approximation (LDA) using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method. Our results indicate a small overlap of the positron wave function with the CuO 2 plane electrons and, as a consequence, relatively small signals due to the related Fermi surfaces. By contrast, the present calculations show, after the folding of Umklapp terms according to Lock, Crisp and West, clear Fermi surface breaks arising from the Cu-O chain bands. No general agreement with existing experiments allows a clear definition of Fermi surface structures in the latter. A comparison of the calculated momentum with the experimental two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) recently measured in Geneva shows an overall agreement for the insulating compound, despite the spurious LDA metallic state, and possibly suggests the importance of O vacancies in experiments performed on non-stoichiometric YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ samples.

  8. The use of electron scattering for studying atomic momentum distributions: the case of graphite and diamond.

    PubMed

    Vos, M; Moreh, R; Tokési, K

    2011-07-14

    The momentum distributions of C atoms in polycrystalline diamond (produced by chemical vapor deposition) and in highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) are studied by scattering of 40 keV electrons at 135°. By measuring the Doppler broadening of the energy of the elastically scattered electrons, we resolve a Compton profile of the motion of the C atoms. The aim of the present work is to resolve long-standing disagreements between the calculated kinetic energies of carbon atoms in HOPG and in diamond films and the measured ones, obtained both by neutron Compton scattering (NCS) and by nuclear resonance photon scattering (NRPS). The anisotropy of the momentum distribution in HOPG was measured by rotating the HOPG sample relative to the electron beam. The obtained kinetic energies for the motion component along, and perpendicular to, the graphite planes were somewhat higher than those obtained from the most recent NCS data of HOPG. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that multiple scattering adds about 2% to the obtained kinetic energies. The presence of different isotopes in carbon affects the measurement at a 1% level. After correcting for these contributions, the kinetic energies are 3%-6% larger than the most recent NCS results for HOPG, but 15%-25% smaller than the NRPS results. For diamond, the corrected direction-averaged kinetic energy is ≈ 6% larger than the calculated value. This compares favorably to the ≈25% discrepancy between theory and both the NCS and NRPS results for diamond.

  9. Contraction of completeness-optimized basis sets: application to ground-state electron momentum densities.

    PubMed

    Lehtola, Susi; Manninen, Pekka; Hakala, Mikko; Hämäläinen, Keijo

    2013-01-28

    Completeness-optimization is a novel method for the formation of one-electron basis sets. Contrary to conventional methods of basis set generation that optimize the basis set with respect to ground-state energy, completeness-optimization is a completely general, black-box method that can be used to form cost-effective basis sets for any wanted property at any level of theory. In our recent work [J. Lehtola, P. Manninen, M. Hakala, and K. Hämäläinen, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 104105 (2012)] we applied the completeness-optimization approach to forming primitive basis sets tuned for calculations of the electron momentum density at the Hartree-Fock (HF) level of theory. The current work extends the discussion to contracted basis sets and to the post-HF level of theory. Contractions are found to yield significant reductions in the amount of functions without compromising the accuracy. We suggest polarization-consistent and correlation-consistent basis sets for the first three rows of the periodic table, which are completeness-optimized for electron momentum density calculations.

  10. The two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-nucleon scattering at large momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei V. Afanasev; Stanley J. Brodsky; Carl E. Carlson; Yu-Chun Chen; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2005-01-01

    We estimate the two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering at large momentum transfer by using a quark-parton representation of virtual Compton scattering. We thus can relate the two-photon exchange amplitude to the generalized parton distributions which also enter in other wide angle scattering processes. We find that the interference of one- and two-photon exchange contribution is able to substantially resolve the difference between electric form factor measurements from Rosenbluth and polarization transfer experiments.

  11. Multiphoton stimulated bremsstrahlung for broad (in the momentum representation) electron wave packets in an ultrashort laser pulse field

    SciTech Connect

    Burenkov, I. A.; Tikhonova, O. V.

    2010-06-15

    We consider features of absorption and emission of external laser field quanta by a broad (in the momentum representation) electron wave packet during its scattering from a potential center. Various scattering modes for the electron wave packet in a high-intensity laser field are analyzed using perturbation theory of potential energy. It is found that the absorption of laser field energy by an electron is substantially more effective as compared to the case of a plane wave. The important role of a number of interference effects associated with the large width of the initial electron momentum distribution is demonstrated.

  12. Spin-dependent electron momentum density in the Ni2MnSn Heusler alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Aniruddha; Hiraoka, N.; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.; Onodera, M.; Sakai, N.

    2001-05-01

    The spin-dependent electron momentum distribution in Ni2MnSn Heusler alloy single crystals was studied using 270 keV circularly polarized synchrotron radiation, through magnetic Compton profile measurements, on the high energy inelastic scattering beamline at SPring-8. The experiments were carried out for the three principal crystallographic directions [100], [110], and [111] at 10 K. The results show that the conduction electrons have a negative spin polarization of 0.34μB the 3d spin moment on the nickel site was found to be negligible. A band structure calculation was performed including a hyperfine field study using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method, with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for the electronic exchange and correlation. The spin moment on the Mn site at 10 K was observed as 4.39μB. The spin-dependent Compton profiles for the [100], [110], and [111] directions reported here show anisotropy in the momentum density, which is in good agreement with the FLAPW-GGA results, based on a ferromagnetic ground state. The hyperfine fields calculated were compared with previously calculated hyperfine field of Cu2MnAl and Co2FeGa Heusler alloys. From the comparison it is seen that the value of Hval (valence contribution to the hyperfine field) is roughly proportional to the spin polarization (ms) of the s electrons at the X (Ni,Cu,Co) and Y (Mn of Ni2MnSn and Cu2MnAl, Fe of Co2FeGa) atom positions.

  13. Momentum and Doping Dependence of Spin Excitations in Electron-Doped Cuprate Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Pengfei; Zhao, Huaisong; Kuang, Lülin; Lan, Yu; Feng, Shiping

    2017-01-01

    Superconductivity in copper oxides emerges on doping holes or electrons into their Mott-insulating parent compounds. The spin excitations are thought to be the mediating glue for the pairing in superconductivity. Here the momentum and doping dependence of the dynamical spin response in the electron-doped cuprate superconductors is studied based on the kinetic-energy-driven superconducting mechanism. It is shown that the dispersion of the low-energy spin excitations changes strongly upon electron doping; however, the hour-glass-shaped dispersion of the low-energy spin excitations appeared in the hole-doped case is absent on the electron-doped side due to the electron-hole asymmetry. In particular, the commensurate resonance appears in the superconducting state with the resonance energy that correlates with the dome-shaped doping dependence of the superconducting gap. Moreover, the spectral weight and dispersion of the high-energy spin excitations in the superconducting state are comparable with those in the corresponding normal state, indicating that the high-energy spin excitations do not play an important part in the pair formation.

  14. Spatially and momentum resolved energy electron loss spectra from an ultra-thin PrNiO{sub 3} layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kinyanjui, M. K. Kaiser, U.; Benner, G.; Pavia, G.; Boucher, F.; Habermeier, H.-U.; Keimer, B.

    2015-05-18

    We present an experimental approach which allows for the acquisition of spectra from ultra-thin films at high spatial, momentum, and energy resolutions. Spatially and momentum (q) resolved electron energy loss spectra have been obtained from a 12 nm ultra-thin PrNiO{sub 3} layer using a nano-beam electron diffraction based approach which enabled the acquisition of momentum resolved spectra from individual, differently oriented nano-domains and at different positions of the PrNiO{sub 3} thin layer. The spatial and wavelength dependence of the spectral excitations are obtained and characterized after the analysis of the experimental spectra using calculated dielectric and energy loss functions. The presented approach makes a contribution towards obtaining momentum-resolved spectra from nanostructures, thin film, heterostructures, surfaces, and interfaces.

  15. New constraints for low-momentum electronic excitations in condensed matter: fundamental consequences from classical and quantum dielectric theory.

    PubMed

    Chantler, C T; Bourke, J D

    2015-11-18

    We present new constraints for the transportation behaviour of low-momentum electronic excitations in condensed matter systems, and demonstrate that these have both a fundamental physical interpretation and a significant impact on the description of low-energy inelastic electron scattering. The dispersion behaviour and characteristic lifetime properties of plasmon and single-electron excitations are investigated using popular classical, semi-classical and quantum dielectric models. We find that, irrespective of constrained agreement to the well known high-momentum and high-energy Bethe ridge limit, standard descriptions of low-momentum electron excitations are inconsistent and unphysical. These observations have direct impact on calculations of transport properties such as inelastic mean free paths, stopping powers and escape depths of charged particles in condensed matter systems.

  16. Dyson orbitals of N2O: electron momentum spectroscopy and symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction calculations.

    PubMed

    Miao, Y R; Ning, C G; Liu, K; Deng, J K

    2011-05-28

    Electron momentum spectroscopy and symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction (SAC-CI) theory were combined to study electron correlation effects in nitrous oxide molecule (N(2)O). The SAC-CI General-R method accurately reproduced the experimental ionization spectrum. This bench-marked method was also introduced for calculating the momentum distributions of N(2)O Dyson orbitals. Several calculated momentum distributions with different theoretical methods were compared with the high resolution experimental results. In the outer-valence region, Hartree-Fock (HF), density functional theory (DFT), and SAC-CI theory can well describe the experimental momentum distributions. SAC-CI presented a best performance among them. In the inner-valence region, HF and DFT cannot work well due to the severe breaking of the molecular orbital picture, while SAC-CI still produced an excellent description of experimental momentum profiles because it can accurately take into account electron correlations. Moreover, the thermally averaged calculation showed that the geometrical changes induced by the vibration at room temperature have no noticeable effects on momentum distribution of valence orbitals of N(2)O.

  17. Simultaneous transitions in cuprate momentum-space topology and electronic symmetry breaking.

    PubMed

    Fujita, K; Kim, Chung Koo; Lee, Inhee; Lee, Jinho; Hamidian, M H; Firmo, I A; Mukhopadhyay, S; Eisaki, H; Uchida, S; Lawler, M J; Kim, E-A; Davis, J C

    2014-05-09

    The existence of electronic symmetry breaking in the underdoped cuprates and its disappearance with increased hole density p are now widely reported. However, the relation between this transition and the momentum-space (k-space) electronic structure underpinning the superconductivity has not yet been established. Here, we visualize the Q = 0 (intra-unit-cell) and Q ≠ 0 (density-wave) broken-symmetry states, simultaneously with the coherent k-space topology, for Bi₂Sr₂CaCu₂O(8+δ) samples spanning the phase diagram 0.06 ≤ p ≤ 0.23. We show that the electronic symmetry-breaking tendencies weaken with increasing p and disappear close to a critical doping p(c) = 0.19. Concomitantly, the coherent k-space topology undergoes an abrupt transition, from arcs to closed contours, at the same p(c). These data reveal that the k-space topology transformation in cuprates is linked intimately with the disappearance of the electronic symmetry breaking at a concealed critical point.

  18. Ion-momentum imaging of resonant dissociative-electron-attachment dynamics in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaughter, D. S.; Haxton, D. J.; Adaniya, H.; Weber, T.; Rescigno, T. N.; McCurdy, C. W.; Belkacem, A.

    2013-05-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the dissociative-electron-attachment (DEA) dynamics in methanol are presented for the Feshbach resonance at 6.5-eV incident electron energy. Highly differential laboratory-frame momentum distributions have been measured for each fragmentation channel using a DEA reaction microscope. These measurements are combined with calculations of the molecular-frame electron attachment probability in order to investigate the dynamics of the dissociating methanol transient negative anion. In contrast to previous comparisons between water and methanol [Curtis and Walker, J. Chem. Soc., Faraday Trans.JCFTEV0956-500010.1039/ft9928802805 88, 2805 (1992); Prabhudesai, Nandi, Kelkar, and Krishnakumar, J. Chem. Phys.JCPSA60021-960610.1063/1.2899330 128, 154309 (2008)], we find subtle differences in the dissociation dynamics of the two fragment channels that are direct evidence of planar symmetry-breaking of warm methanol in its electronic ground state. We also find that the DEA fragmentation does not strictly follow the axial recoil approximation and we describe the dynamics that enable an accurate prediction of the fragment angular distributions.

  19. Electron interaction with the spin angular momentum of the electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O’Connell, R. F.

    2017-02-01

    We give a simple derivation and expansion of a recently proposed new relativistic interaction between the electron and the spin angular momentum of the electromagnetic field in quantum electrodynamics (QED). Our derivation is based on the work of Møller, who pointed out that, in special relativity, a particle with spin must always have a finite extension. After generalizing Møller’s classical result to include both rotation and quantum effects, we show that it leads to a new contribution to the energy, which is the special relativistic interaction term. In addition, we show that all relativistic terms involving spin terms arising from the Dirac equation may be obtained by this method.

  20. Inclusive electron scattering from nuclei in the quasielastic region at large momentum transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Nadia

    2008-12-01

    Experiment E02-019, performed in Hall C at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), was a measurement of inclusive electron cross sections for several nuclei (^{2}H,^{3}He, ^{4}He, ^{9}Be,^{12}C, ^{63}Cu, and ^{197}Au) in the quasielastic region at high momentum transfer. In the region of low energy transfer, the cross sections were analyzed in terms of the reduced response, F(y), by examining its y-scaling behavior. The data were also examined in terms of the nuclear structure function ν W_2^A and its behavior in x and the Nachtmann variable ξ. The data show approximate scaling of ν W_2^A in ξ for all targets at all kinematics, unlike scaling in x, which is confined to the DIS regime. However, y-scaling observations are limited to the kinematic region dominated by the quasielastic response ({y<0}), where some scaling violations arising from FSIs are observed.

  1. Photo-electron momentum distribution and electron localization studies from laser-induced atomic and molecular dissociations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Dipanwita

    The broad objective of ultrafast strong-field studies is to be able to measure and control atomic and molecular dynamics on a femtosecond timescale. This thesis work has two major themes: (1) Study of high-energy photoelectron distributions from atomic targets. (2) Electron localization control in atomic and molecular reactions using shaped laser pulses. The first section focuses on the study of photoelectron diffraction patterns of simple atomic targets to understand the target structure. We measure the full vector momentum spectra of high energy photoelectrons from atomic targets (Xe, Ar and Kr) generated by intense laser pulses. The target dependence of the angular distribution of the highest energy photoelectrons as predicted by Quantitative Rescattering Theory (QRS) is explored. More recent developments show target structure information can be retrieved from photoelectrons over a range of energies, from 4Up up to 10Up, independent of the peak intensity at which the photoelectron spectra have been measured. Controlling the fragmentation pathways by manipulating the pulse shape is another major theme of ultrafast science today. In the second section we study the asymmetry of electron (and ion) emission from atoms (and molecules) by interaction with asymmetric pulses formed by the superposition of two colors (800 & 400 nm). Xe electron momentum spectra obtained as a function of the two-color phase exhibit a pronounced asymmetry. Using QRS theory we can analyze this asymmetric yield of the high energy photoelectrons to determine accurately the laser peak intensity and the absolute phase of the two-color electric field. This can be used as a standard pulse calibration method for all two-color studies. Experiments showing strong left-right asymmetry in D+ ion yield from D2 molecules using two-color pulses is also investigated. The asymmetry effect is found to be very ion-energy dependent.

  2. Interference effects on (e, 2e) electron momentum profiles: a comparative study for CCl4 and CF4*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Noboru; Katafuchi, Keisuke; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2016-12-01

    Interference effects on electron momentum density distributions have been studied using electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) for the three outermost orbitals of CCl4, which are constructed from the Cl 3p nonbonding atomic orbitals. The EMS experiment was conducted in the symmetric noncoplanar geometry at an incident electron energy of 2.0 keV. Interference pattern has then been obtained by dividing the experimental data by distorted-wave-Born-approximation cross section for an isolated Cl 3p atomic orbital. A comparison with the result of our earlier study on CF4 [N. Watanabe, X.-J. Chen, M. Takahashi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 173201 (2012)] has demonstrated that the period of the interference pattern reflects the internuclear distance between the constituent halogen atoms. Furthermore, the present result strongly suggests that distorted-wave effects lead to partial destruction of the interference for CCl4 at large momentum.

  3. Orbital angular momentum in electron diffraction and its use to determine chiral crystal symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juchtmans, Roeland; Verbeeck, Jo

    2015-10-01

    In this work we present an alternative way to look at electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope. Instead of writing the scattering amplitude in Fourier space as a set of plane waves, we use the cylindrical Fourier transform to describe the scattering amplitude in a basis of orbital angular momentum (OAM) eigenstates. We show how working in this framework can be very convenient when investigating, e.g., rotation and screw-axis symmetries. For the latter we find selection rules on the OAM coefficients that unambiguously reveal the handedness of the screw axis. Detecting the OAM coefficients of the scattering amplitude thus offers the possibility to detect the handedness of crystals without the need for dynamical simulations, the thickness of the sample, nor the exact crystal structure. We propose an experimental setup to measure the OAM components where an image of the crystal is taken after inserting a spiral phase plate in the diffraction plane and perform multislice simulations on α quartz to demonstrate how the method indeed reveals the chirality. The experimental feasibility of the technique is discussed together with its main advantages with respect to chirality determination of screw axes. The method shows how the use of a spiral phase plate can be extended from a simple phase imaging technique to a tool to measure the local OAM decomposition of an electron wave, widening the field of interest well beyond chiral space group determination.

  4. Electron momentum density, band structure, and structural properties of SrS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, G.; Munjal, N.; Vyas, V.; Kumar, R.; Sharma, B. K.; Joshi, K. B.

    2013-10-15

    The electron momentum density, the electronic band structure, and the structural properties of SrS are presented in this paper. The isotropic Compton profile, anisotropies in the directional Compton profiles, the electronic band structure and density of states are calculated using the ab initio periodic linear combination of atomic orbitals method with the CRYSTAL06 code. Structural parameters of SrS-lattice constants and bulk moduli in the B1 and B2 phases-are computed together with the transition pressure. The computed parameters are well in agreement with earlier investigations. To compare the calculated isotropic Compton profile, measurement on polycrystalline SrS is performed using 5Ci-{sup 241}Am Compton spectrometer. Additionally, charge transfer is studied by means of the Compton profiles computed from the ionic model. The nature of bonding in the isovalent SrS and SrO compounds is compared on the basis of equal-valenceelectron-density profiles and the bonding in SrS is found to be more covalent than in SrO.

  5. Momentum-resolved hot electron dynamics at the 2 H -MoS2 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, P.; Stange, A.; Hanff, K.; Yang, L. X.; Rohde, G.; Rossnagel, K.; Bauer, M.

    2016-11-01

    Time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (trARPES) is employed to study hot electron dynamics in the conduction band of photoexcited 2 H -MoS2. Momentum-dependent rise times of up to 150 fs after near-ultraviolet photoexcitation and decay times of the order of several-hundred fs allow us to locate areas of light absorption in the conduction-band energy landscape as well as to track the relaxation of hot electrons into the lowest-energy states. The conduction-band minima are finally depopulated within ≈1 ps, although a residual population remains up to the maximum investigated pump-probe delay of 15 ps. The presence of the fast depopulation channel differs from the results of experiments of bulk MoS2 performed with all-optical methods. It conforms, however, with recent findings for monolayer MoS2. We attribute this similarity to defect and surface states being of considerable relevance for the near-surface electron dynamics of bulk MoS2, as probed in a trARPES experiment.

  6. Electron Bunch Timing with Femtosecond Precision in a Superconducting Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Loehl, F.; Arsov, V.; Felber, M.; Hacker, K.; Lorbeer, B.; Ludwig, F.; Matthiesen, K.-H.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Winter, A.; Jalmuzna, W.; Schmueser, P.; Schulz, S.; Zemella, J.; Szewinski, J.

    2010-04-09

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  7. Electron bunch timing with femtosecond precision in a superconducting free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Löhl, F; Arsov, V; Felber, M; Hacker, K; Jalmuzna, W; Lorbeer, B; Ludwig, F; Matthiesen, K-H; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, B; Schmüser, P; Schulz, S; Szewinski, J; Winter, A; Zemella, J

    2010-04-09

    High-gain free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of generating femtosecond x-ray pulses with peak brilliances many orders of magnitude higher than at other existing x-ray sources. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by these femtosecond light pulses in time-resolved experiments, an unprecedented synchronization accuracy is required. In this Letter, we distributed the pulse train of a mode-locked fiber laser with femtosecond stability to different locations in the linear accelerator of the soft x-ray FEL FLASH. A novel electro-optic detection scheme was applied to measure the electron bunch arrival time with an as yet unrivaled precision of 6 fs (rms). With two beam-based feedback systems we succeeded in stabilizing both the arrival time and the electron bunch compression process within two magnetic chicanes, yielding a significant reduction of the FEL pulse energy jitter.

  8. Configuring Electronic States in an Atomically Precise Array of Quantum Boxes.

    PubMed

    Nowakowska, Sylwia; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Piquero-Zulaica, Ignacio; Nowakowski, Jan; Kawai, Shigeki; Wäckerlin, Christian; Matena, Manfred; Nijs, Thomas; Fatayer, Shadi; Popova, Olha; Ahsan, Aisha; Mousavi, S Fatemeh; Ivas, Toni; Meyer, Ernst; Stöhr, Meike; Ortega, J Enrique; Björk, Jonas; Gade, Lutz H; Lobo-Checa, Jorge; Jung, Thomas A

    2016-07-01

    A 2D array of electronically coupled quantum boxes is fabricated by means of on-surface self-assembly assuring ultimate precision of each box. The quantum states embedded in the boxes are configured by adsorbates, whose occupancy is controlled with atomic precision. The electronic interbox coupling can be maintained or significantly reduced by proper arrangement of empty and filled boxes.

  9. A study of the turn-up effect in the electron momentum spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Cappello, C.; Menas, F.; Houamer, S.; Popov, Yu V.; Roy, A. C.

    2015-10-01

    Recently, a number of electron momentum spectroscopy measurements for the ionization of atoms and molecules have shown that the triple differential cross section (TDCS) has an unexpected higher intensity in a low momentum regime (Brunger M J, Braidwood S W, Mc Carthy I E and Weigold E 1994 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 27 L597, Hollebone B P, Neville J J, Zheng Y, Brion C E, Wang Y and Davidson E R 1995 Chem. Phys. 196 13, Brion C E, Zheng Y, Rolke J, Neville J J, McCarthy I E and Wang J 1998 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 31 L223, Ren X G, Ning C G, Deng J K, Zhang S F, Su G L, Huang F and Li G Q 2005 Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 163201, Deng J K, et al 2001 J. Chem. Phys. 114 882, Ning C G, Ren X G, Deng J K, Su G L, Zhang S F and Li G Q 2006 Phys. Rev. A 73 022704). This surprising result is now called the turn-up effect. Our aim is to investigate such an effect by studying the case of the ionization of atomic hydrogen in an excited state using the 3C model (Brauner M, Briggs J S and Klar H 1989 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 22 2265) which is able to describe all the measured results of the single ionization of atomic hydrogen in its ground state for an incident energy beyond 200 eV. A comparison is also made of the findings of the present method with those of the plane wave impulse approximation and distorted wave models.

  10. Improvement of the precision of lattice parameter determination by nano-beam electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Koh; Nakahara, Hirotaka; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2013-01-01

    A highly precise determination of lattice parameters using higher-order Laue zone (HOLZ) reflections observed in nano-beam electron diffraction is presented. The introduction of more than 40 HOLZ reflections, whose positions are corrected by considering the aberration of the electron optics and are determined with an accuracy of 0.04 nm⁻¹, allows us to achieve a remarkable high precision of a 0.02% error, which is four times higher than the precision without HOLZ reflections.

  11. Precision electron flow measurements in a disk transmission line.

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Waylon T.; Pelock, Michael D.; Martin, Jeremy Paul; Jackson, Daniel Peter Jr.; Savage, Mark Edward; Stoltzfus, Brian Scott; Mendel, Clifford Will, Jr.; Pointon, Timothy David

    2008-01-01

    An analytic model for electron flow in a system driving a fixed inductive load is described and evaluated with particle in cell simulations. The simple model allows determining the impedance profile for a magnetically insulated transmission line given the minimum gap desired, and the lumped inductance inside the transition to the minimum gap. The model allows specifying the relative electron flow along the power flow direction, including cases where the fractional electron flow decreases in the power flow direction. The electrons are able to return to the cathode because they gain energy from the temporally rising magnetic field. The simulations were done with small cell size to reduce numerical heating. An experiment to compare electron flow to the simulations was done. The measured electron flow is {approx}33% of the value from the simulations. The discrepancy is assumed to be due to a reversed electric field at the cathode because of the inductive load and falling electron drift velocity in the power flow direction. The simulations constrain the cathode electric field to zero, which gives the highest possible electron flow.

  12. Mixed-precision evaluation of two-electron integrals by Rys quadrature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadchev, Andrey; Gordon, Mark S.

    2012-08-01

    A mixed precision implementation of two-electron integrals is demonstrated to have two benefits: (a) computations can be performed reliably in 32-bit precision on architectures for which 32-bit precision is significantly faster than 64-bit precision (e.g. graphical processing units), and (b) numerical results that match those using higher than 64-bit precision can be recovered without a significant penalty associated with performing the entire computation in higher precision. A justification is presented for using mixed precision in the Rys two-electron integral quadrature algorithm, together with timings and numerical results using a variety of floating-point types. The code discussed here presents a systematic way to control the accuracy of the Rys algorithm, regardless of the types and numbers of integrals.

  13. High-resolution electron momentum spectroscopy of valence satellites of carbon disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengwu; Shan, Xu; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Enliang; Li, Zhongjun; Chen, XiangJun

    2010-09-01

    The binding energy spectrum of carbon disulphide (CS2) in the energy range of 9-23 eV has been measured by a high-resolution (e,2e) spectrometer employing asymmetric noncoplanar kinematics at an impact energy of 2500 eV plus the binding energy. Taking the advantage of the high energy resolution of 0.54 eV, four main peaks and five satellites in the outer-valence region are resolved. The assignments and pole strengths for these satellite states are achieved by comparing the experimental electron momentum profiles with the corresponding theoretical ones calculated using Hartree-Fock and density functional theory methods. The results are also compared in detail with the recent SAC-CI general-R calculations. General agreement is satisfactory, while the present experiment suggests cooperative contributions from Π2u, Σg+2 states to satellite 2 and Σg+2, Π2g states to satellite 3. Besides, relatively low pole strength for X Π2g state is obtained which contradicts all the theoretical calculations [2ph-TDA, ADC(3), SAC-CI general-R, ADC(4)] so far.

  14. Precision Electron Beam Polarimetry in Hall C at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, David

    2013-10-01

    The electron beam polarization in experimental Hall C at Jefferson Lab is measured using two devices. The Hall-C/Basel Møller polarimeter measures the beam polarization via electron-electron scattering and utilizes a novel target system in which a pure iron foil is driven to magnetic saturation (out of plane) using a superconducting solenoid. A Compton polarimeter measures the polarization via electron-photon scattering, where the photons are provided by a high-power, CW laser coupled to a low gain Fabry-Perot cavity. In this case, both the Compton-scattered electrons and backscattered photons provide measurements of the beam polarization. Results from both polarimeters, acquired during the Q-Weak experiment in Hall C, will be presented. In particular, the results of a test in which the Møller and Compton polarimeters made interleaving measurements at identical beam currents will be shown. In addition, plans for operation of both devices after completion of the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade will also be discussed.

  15. Precise polarization measurements via detection of compton scattered electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tvaskis, Vladas; Dutta, Dipangkar; Gaskell, David J.; Narayan, Amrendra

    2014-01-01

    The Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab aims to make a 4% measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic scattering at very low Q{sup 2} of a longitudinally polarized electron beam off a proton target. One of the dominant experimental systematic uncertainties in Qweak will result from determining the beam polarization. A new Compton polarimeter was installed in the fall of 2010 to provide a non-invasive and continuous monitoring of the electron beam polarization in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. The Compton-scattered electrons are detected in four planes of diamond micro-strip detectors. We have achieved the design goals of <1% statistical uncertainty per hour and expect to achieve <1% systematic uncertainty.

  16. Asymmetries in the momentum distributions of electrons stripped by a XUV chirped pulse in the presence of a laser field.

    PubMed

    Bonanno, G; Bivona, S; Burlon, R; Leone, C

    2012-09-24

    The ionization of hydrogen by a chirped XUV pulse in the presence of a few cycle infrared laser pulse has been investigated. The electron momentum distribution has been obtained by treating the interaction of the atom with the XUV radiation at the first order of the time-dependent perturbation theory and describing the emitted electron through the Coulomb-Volkov wavefunction. The results of the calculations agree with the ones found by solving numerically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. It has been found that depending on the delay between the pulses the combined effect of the XUV chirp and of the steering action on the infrared field brings about asymmetries in the electron momentum distribution. These asymmetries may give information on both the chirp and the XUV pulse duration.

  17. π-plasmon dispersion in free-standing graphene by momentum-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, S. C.; Shie, C.-S.; Chen, C. H.; Breitwieser, R.; Pai, W. W.; Guo, G. Y.; Chu, M.-W.

    2015-01-01

    The π-plasmon dispersion in graphene was scrutinized by momentum-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy with an improved momentum q resolution and was found to display the square root of the q dispersion characteristic of the collective excitation of two-dimensional electron systems, in contrast to previous experimental and theoretical studies which reported a linear q dispersion. Our theoretical elaborations on the q -dependent spectra affirm this square root of q relation and further unveil an in-plane electronic anisotropy. The physical property of the π plasmon is thoroughly compared to that of the two-dimensional plasmon due to carriers of the Dirac fermions. A clear distinction between the π plasmon and the two-dimensional Dirac plasmon is demonstrated, clarifying the common notion about correlating the linearly dispersed Dirac cones with the linear dispersion of the π plasmon previously reported.

  18. Measurement of the hot electron mean free path and the momentum relaxation rate in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Suntrup, Donald J.; Gupta, Geetak; Li, Haoran; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2014-12-29

    We present a method for measuring the mean free path and extracting the momentum relaxation time of hot electrons in GaN using the hot electron transistor (HET). In this device, electrons are injected over a high energy emitter barrier into the base where they experience quasi-ballistic transport well above the conduction band edge. After traversing the base, high energy electrons either surmount the base-collector barrier and become collector current or reflect off the barrier and become base current. We fabricate HETs with various base thicknesses and measure the common emitter transfer ratio (α) for each device. The mean free path is extracted by fitting α to a decaying exponential as a function of base width and the relaxation time is computed using a suitable injection velocity. For devices with an injection energy of ∼1 eV, we measure a hot electron mean free path of 14 nm and calculate a momentum relaxation time of 16 fs. These values are in agreement with theoretical calculations where longitudinal optical phonon scattering is the dominant momentum relaxation mechanism.

  19. Charge Breeding Techniques in an Electron Beam Ion Trap for High Precision Mass Spectrometry at TITAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, T. D.; Simon, M. C.; Bale, J. C.; Chowdhury, U.; Eibach, M.; Gallant, A. T.; Lennarz, A.; Simon, V. V.; Chaudhuri, A.; Grossheim, A.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Schultz, B. E.; Dilling, J.

    2012-10-01

    Penning trap mass spectrometry is the most accurate and precise method available for performing atomic mass measurements. TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science is currently the only facility to couple its Penning trap to a rare isotope facility and an electron beam ion trap (EBIT). The EBIT is a valuable tool for beam preparation: since the precision scales linearly with the charge state, it takes advantage of the precision gained by using highly charged ions. However, this precision gain is contingent on fast and efficient charge breeding. An optimization algorithm has been developed to identify the optimal conditions for running the EBIT. Taking only the mass number and half-life of the isotope of interest as inputs, the electron beam current density, charge breeding time, charge state, and electron beam energy are all specified to maximize this precision. An overview of the TITAN charge breeding program, and the results of charge breeding simulations will be presented.

  20. Study of the molecular structure, ionization spectrum, and electronic wave function of 1,3-butadiene using electron momentum spectroscopy and benchmark Dyson orbital theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleuze, M. S.; Knippenberg, S.

    2006-09-01

    The scope of the present work is to reconcile electron momentum spectroscopy with elementary thermodynamics, and refute conclusions drawn by Saha et al. in J. Chem. Phys. 123, 124315 (2005) regarding fingerprints of the gauche conformational isomer of 1,3-butadiene in electron momentum distributions that were experimentally inferred from gas phase (e,2e) measurements on this compound [M. J. Brunger et al., J. Chem. Phys. 108, 1859 (1998)]. Our analysis is based on thorough calculations of one-electron and shake-up ionization spectra employing one-particle Green's function theory along with the benchmark third-order algebraic diagrammatic construction [ADC(3)] scheme. Accurate spherically averaged electron momentum distributions are correspondingly computed from the related Dyson orbitals. The ionization spectra and Dyson orbital momentum distributions that were computed for the trans-conformer of 1,3-butadiene alone are amply sufficient to quantitatively unravel the shape of all available experimental (e,2e) electron momentum distributions. A comparison of theoretical ADC(3) spectra for the s-trans and gauche energy minima with inner- and outer-valence high-resolution photoelectron measurements employing a synchrotron radiation beam [D. M. P. Holland et al., J. Phys. B 29, 3091 (1996)] demonstrates that the gauche structure is incompatible with ionization experiments in high-vacuum conditions and at standard temperatures. On the other hand, outer-valence Green's function calculations on the s-trans energy minimum form and approaching basis set completeness provide highly quantitative insights, within ˜0.2eV accuracy, into the available experimental one-electron ionization energies. At last, analysis of the angular dependence of relative (e,2e) ionization intensities nicely confirms the presence of one rather intense π-2 π*+1 satellite at ˜13.1eV in the ionization spectrum of the s-trans conformer.

  1. Double momentum spectrometer for ion-electron vector correlations in dissociative photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomme, C.; Guillemin, R.; Marin, T.; Journel, L.; Marchenko, T.; Dowek, D.; Trcera, N.; Pilette, B.; Avila, A.; Ringuenet, H.; Kushawaha, R. K.; Simon, M.

    2013-10-01

    We have developed a new momentum spectrometer dedicated to momentum vector correlations in the context of deep core photoionization of atomic and molecular species in the gas phase. In this article, we describe the design and operation of the experimental setup. The capabilities of the apparatus are illustrated with a set of measurements done on the sulphur core 1s photoionization of gas-phase CS2.

  2. Double momentum spectrometer for ion-electron vector correlations in dissociative photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Bomme, C.; Guillemin, R.; Marin, T.; Journel, L.; Marchenko, T.; Pilette, B.; Avila, A.; Ringuenet, H.; Kushawaha, R. K.; Simon, M.; Dowek, D.; Trcera, N.

    2013-10-15

    We have developed a new momentum spectrometer dedicated to momentum vector correlations in the context of deep core photoionization of atomic and molecular species in the gas phase. In this article, we describe the design and operation of the experimental setup. The capabilities of the apparatus are illustrated with a set of measurements done on the sulphur core 1s photoionization of gas-phase CS{sub 2}.

  3. Precision electronic speed controller for an alternating-current

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, Victor W.

    1988-01-01

    A high precision controller for an alternating-current multi-phase electrical motor that is subject to a large inertial load. The controller was developed for and is particularly suitable for controlling, in a neutron chopper system, a heavy spinning rotor that must be rotated in phase-locked synchronism with a reference pulse train that is representative of an ac power supply signal having a meandering line frequency. The controller includes a shaft revolution sensor which provides a feedback pulse train representative of the actual speed of the motor. An internal digital timing signal generator provides a reference signal which is compared with the feedback signal in a computing unit to provide a motor control signal. In the preferred embodiment, the motor control signal is a weighted linear sum of a speed error voltage, a phase error voltage, and a drift error voltage, each of which is computed anew with each revolution of the motor shaft. The stator windings of the motor are driven by two amplifiers which are provided with input signals having the proper quadrature relationship by an exciter unit consisting of a voltage controlled oscillator, a binary counter, a pair of readonly memories, and a pair of digital-to-analog converters.

  4. Electronic solar compass for high precision orientation on any planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flora, F.; Bollanti, S.; De Meis, D.; Di Lazzaro, P.; Gallerano, G. P.; Mezi, L.; Murra, D.; Torre, A.; Vicca, D.

    2016-07-01

    A compact, fully automatic electronic solar compass has been developed at the ENEA Frascati Laboratories. The compass is inspired to ``camera obscura'' sundials like those inside churches. Sun ephemerides are calculated using an approximate but effective analytical solution of Kepler's laws, where the Earth (or other planets) orbit main parameters are introduced. The instrument is light, cheap and it has an accuracy better than 1 arcmin. Some examples of application of the device as well as the possibility to use it on Mars are presented.

  5. Precision electronic speed controller for an alternating-current motor

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, V.W.

    A high precision controller for an alternating-current multi-phase electrical motor that is subject to a large inertial load. The controller was developed for controlling, in a neutron chopper system, a heavy spinning rotor that must be rotated in phase-locked synchronism with a reference pulse train that is representative of an ac power supply signal having a meandering line frequency. The controller includes a shaft revolution sensor which provides a feedback pulse train representative of the actual speed of the motor. An internal digital timing signal generator provides a reference signal which is compared with the feedback signal in a computing unit to provide a motor control signal. The motor control signal is a weighted linear sum of a speed error voltage, a phase error voltage, and a drift error voltage, each of which is computed anew with each revolution of the motor shaft. The speed error signal is generated by a novel vernier-logic circuit which is drift-free and highly sensitive to small speed changes. The phase error is also computed by digital logic, with adjustable sensitivity around a 0 mid-scale value. The drift error signal, generated by long-term counting of the phase error, is used to compensate for any slow changes in the average friction drag on the motor. An auxillary drift-byte status sensor prevents any disruptive overflow or underflow of the drift-error counter. An adjustable clocked-delay unit is inserted between the controller and the source of the reference pulse train to permit phase alignment of the rotor to any desired offset angle. The stator windings of the motor are driven by two amplifiers which are provided with input signals having the proper quadrature relationship by an exciter unit consisting of a voltage controlled oscillator, a binary counter, a pair of read-only memories, and a pair of digital-to-analog converters.

  6. Effects on axial momentum spread on the electron-ion two-stream instability in high-intensity ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    R. Davidso; H. Qin

    2000-06-15

    Use is made of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations to describe the electron-ion two-stream instability driven by the directed axial motion of a high-intensity ion beam propagating through a stationary population of (unwanted) background electrons. The ion beam is treated as continuous in the z-direction, and the electrons are electrostatically confined in the transverse direction by the space-charge potential produced by the excession charge. The analysis is carried out for arbitrary beam intensity, consistent with transverse confinement of the beam particles, and arbitrary fractional charge neutralization by the background electrons. For the case of overlapping step-function ion and electron density profiles, corresponding to monoenergetic electrons and ions in the transverse direction, detailed stability properties are calculated, including the important effects of an axial momentum spread, over a wide range of system parameters for dipole perturbations with azimuthal mode number l=1. The two-stream instability growth rate is found to increase with increasing beam intensity, increasing fractional charge neutralization, and decreasing proximity of the conducting wall. It is shown that Landau damping associated with a modest axial momentum spread of the beam ions and background electrons has a strong stabilizing influence on the instability.

  7. First-principles calculations of momentum distributions of annihilating electron-positron pairs in defects in UO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiktor, Julia; Jomard, Gérald; Torrent, Marc; Bertolus, Marjorie

    2017-01-01

    We performed first-principles calculations of the momentum distributions of annihilating electron-positron pairs in vacancies in uranium dioxide. Full atomic relaxation effects (due to both electronic and positronic forces) were taken into account and self-consistent two-component density functional theory schemes were used. We present one-dimensional momentum distributions (Doppler-broadened annihilation radiation line shapes) along with line-shape parameters S and W. We studied the effect of the charge state of the defect on the Doppler spectra. The effect of krypton incorporation in the vacancy was also considered and it was shown that it should be possible to observe the fission gas incorporation in defects in UO2 using positron annihilation spectroscopy. We suggest that the Doppler broadening measurements can be especially useful for studying impurities and dopants in UO2 and of mixed actinide oxides.

  8. Precise MS light-quark masses from lattice QCD in the regularization invariant symmetric momentum-subtraction scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbahn, Martin; Jaeger, Sebastian

    2010-12-01

    We compute the conversion factors needed to obtain the MS and renormalization-group-invariant (RGI) up, down, and strange quark masses at next-to-next-to-leading order from the corresponding parameters renormalized in the recently proposed RI/SMOM and RI/SMOM{sub {gamma}{sub {mu}} }renormalization schemes. This is important for obtaining the MS masses with the best possible precision from numerical lattice QCD simulations, because the customary RI{sup (')}/MOM scheme is afflicted with large irreducible uncertainties both on the lattice and in perturbation theory. We find that the smallness of the known one-loop matching coefficients is accompanied by even smaller two-loop contributions. From a study of residual scale dependences, we estimate the resulting perturbative uncertainty on the light-quark masses to be about 2% in the RI/SMOM scheme and about 3% in the RI/SMOM{sub {gamma}{sub {mu}} }scheme. Our conversion factors are given in fully analytic form, for general covariant gauge and renormalization point. We provide expressions for the associated anomalous dimensions.

  9. Partonic calculation of the two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering at large momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Y. C. Chen; A. Afanasev; S. J. Brodsky; C. E. Carlson; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2004-03-01

    We estimate the two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering at large momentum transfer through the scattering off a parton in the proton. We relate the process on the nucleon to the generalized parton distributions which also enter in other wide angle scattering processes. We find that when taking the polarization transfer determinations of the form factors as input, adding in the 2 photon correction, does reproduce the Rosenbluth data.

  10. A Century-Old Question: Does a Crookes Paddle Wheel Cathode Ray Tube Demonstrate that Electrons Carry Momentum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, T. E.; Calisa, Vaishnavi

    2014-03-01

    In 1879, in the midst of the debate between English and continental scientists about the nature of cathode rays, William Crookes conducted an experiment in which a small mill or "paddle wheel" was pushed along tracks inside a cathode ray tube (CRT) (similar to that shown in Fig. 1) when connected to a high-voltage induction coil. Crookes attributed the motion of the wheel to momentum transfer from the cathode rays (electrons) to the wheel, and interpreted the experiment as providing evidence that cathode rays were particles. In 1903 Thomson discounted Crookes' interpretation by calculating that the rate of momentum transfer (which he estimated at no more than 2×10-3 dyn, equivalent to 2×10-8 N) would be far too small to account for the observed motion of the wheel,2 instead attributing the motion to the radiometric effect. The misconception was not laid to rest, however, and despite an effort in 1961 to draw attention to Thomson's original work and so remove the error from textbooks,3 the notion that a Crookes paddle wheel CRT demonstrates that electrons carry momentum continues to be taught in high school physics courses4 and wheel. We then measured the actual acceleration of the wheel in the CRT by video analysis of its motion and determined the moment of inertia of the wheel along with its mass and dimensions. We could then compare the force, which really acts on the wheel to produce the observed motion to the maximum impulsive force that is supplied by the electrons. Our measurements yield a maximum impulsive force due to the electrons [ F e l = ( 1.1 ± 0.3 ) × 10 - 8 N ], which is within a factor of two of Thomson's estimate, and which is more than two orders of magnitude smaller than the force that is responsible for the observed acceleration of the paddle wheel [ F W = ( 6 ± 2 ) × 10 - 6 N ]. This means that the rotation of the wheel is certainly not due to transferred momentum from the electron beam, and the results of the experiment should not be

  11. Nucleon momentum distributions and elastic electron scattering from 19F, 25Mg, 27Al, and 29Si nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rahmani, A.

    2016-04-01

    The nucleon momentum distributions and elastic electron scattering form factors of the ground state for some odd 2 s-1 d shell nuclei, such as 19F, 25Mg, 27Al, and 29Si, have been investigated using the coherent density fluctuation model and expressed in terms of the fluctuation function (weight function) | f( x)|2. The fluctuation function has been related to the nucleon density distribution of the nuclei and determined from the theory. The property of the long-tail manner at high-momentum region of the nucleon momentum distribution has been obtained by theoretical fluctuation function. The calculated form factors F( q) of all nuclei under study are in very good agreement with those of experimental data throughout all values of momentum transfer q. It is concluded that the contributions of the quadrupole form factor F C2( q) in 25Mg and 27Al nuclei, which are characterized by the undeformed 2 s-1 d shell model, are necessary for getting a remarkable agreement between the theoretical and experimental form factors.

  12. Ab initio calculations of the electron momentum distribution function for ordered and disordered warm dense matter (WDM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klevak, E.; Mattern, B. A.; Kas, J. J.; Rehr, J. J.; Seidler, G. T.

    2014-03-01

    We report new calculations of the electron momentum distribution n(p) for ordered and disordered materials of interest for warm dense matter research. The central role of the electron-ion interaction and the need to orthogonalize the valence-electron and core-electron wave functions has often been ignored in the interpretation of x-ray Thomson scattering studies of WDM.[2] This has led to substantial uncertainty in the inferred temperatures and ionization states in laser-shock generated dense plasmas. Real space Green's function calculations as a function of density and disorder are used to evaluate the possibility of a broadly applicable universal rescaling of the free-electron n(p) by an effective volume and effective temperature to approximate the effects of valence-core orthogonalization. Supported in part by DOE BES Grant DEFG03-97ER45623 (EK, JJR, JJK) and DOE-BES DE-SC0002194(BAM and GTS).

  13. Correlated Two-Electron Momentum Spectra for Strong-Field Nonsequential Double Ionization of He at 800 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rudenko, A.; Ergler, Th.; Zrost, K.; Feuerstein, B.; Schroeter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.; Jesus, V. L. B. de

    2007-12-31

    We report on a kinematically complete experiment on nonsequential double ionization of He by 25 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 1.5 PW/cm{sup 2}. The suppression of the recollision-induced excitation at this high intensity allows us to address in a clean way direct (e,2e) ionization by the recolliding electron. In contrast with earlier experimental results, but in agreement with various theoretical predictions, the two-electron momentum distributions along the laser polarization axis exhibit a pronounced V-shaped structure, which can be explained by the role of Coulomb repulsion and typical (e,2e) kinematics.

  14. Progress in (e, 2e) electron momentum spectroscopy: from the static to the time-resolved regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-09-01

    Electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) is a kinematically-complete electron-impact ionization experiment performed under the high-energy Bethe ridge conditions, where the collision kinematics can be described by electron Compton scattering that most nearly corresponds to the collision of two free electrons with the residual ion acting as a spectator. The remarkable feature of this technique is its ability to measure momentum distributions of each electron bound in matter or to look at molecular orbitals in momentum space. We have been exploring atomic and molecular science using EMS, such as 3D orbital imaging for a stable gaseous molecule [Takahashi et al., PRL 2005], observation of the giant resonance phenomenon in the 2nd order projectile-target interactions [Takahashi et al., PRL 2007], and determination of spatial orientation of the constituent atomic orbitals in molecular orbitals [Watanabe et al., PRL 2012]. Recently, we have started to direct our efforts also towards expanding frontiers of EMS, through development of time-resolved EMS (TR-EMS) that employs ultrashort laser (120 fs) and electron (1 ps) pulses in a pump-probe scheme [Yamazaki et al., RSI 2013]. In spite of the low data statistics as well as of the limited time-resolution due to velocity mismatch, our experimental results on the deuterated acetone molecule in its second excited singlet state with a lifetime of 13.5 ps [Yamazaki et al., PRL 2015] have represented the first time that EMS measurements of short lived transient species are feasible, opening the door to time-resolved orbital imaging in momentum space. With further technical development, TR-EMS could eventually enable one to take a series of snapshots of molecular orbitals changing rapidly during chemical reaction, thereby making it possible to exploit a new area for studies of ultrafast molecular dynamics as well as the nature of molecular excited states; it is electrons that bind atoms into molecules, and chemical reactions are all

  15. Hi-G electronic gated camera for precision trajectory analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Donald R.; Payne, Scott; Keller, Ed; Longo, Salvatore; Caudle, Dennis E.; Walker, Dennis C.; Sartor, Mark A.; Keeler, Joe E.; Kerr, David A.; Fail, R. Wallace; Gannon, Jim; Carrol, Ernie; Jamison, Todd A.

    1997-12-01

    It is extremely difficult and expensive to determine the flight attitude and aimpoint of small maneuvering miniature air vehicles from ground based fixed or tracking photography. Telemetry alone cannot provide sufficient information bandwidth on 'what' the ground tracking is seeing and consequently 'why' it did or did not function properly. Additionally, it is anticipated that 'smart' and 'brilliant' guided vehicles now in development will require a high resolution imaging support system to determine which target and which part of a ground feature is being used for navigation or targeting. Other requirements include support of sub-component separation from developmental supersonic vehicles, where the clean separation from the container is not determinable from ground based film systems and film cameras do not survive vehicle breakup and impact. Hence, the requirement is to develop and demonstrate an imaging support system for development/testing that can provide the flight vehicle developer/analyst with imagery (combined with miniature telemetry sources) sufficient to recreate the trajectory, terminal navigation, and flight termination events. This project is a development and demonstration of a real-time, launch-rated, shuttered, electronic imager, transmitter, and analysis system. This effort demonstrated boresighted imagery from inside small flight vehicles for post flight analysis of trajectory, and capture of ground imagery during random triggered vehicle functions. The initial studies for this capability have been accomplished by the Experimental Dynamics Section of the Air Force Wright Laboratory, Armament Directorate, Eglin AFB, Florida, and the Telemetry Support Branch of the Army Material Research and Development Center at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. It has been determined that at 1/10,000 of a second exposure time, new ultra-miniature CCD sensors have sufficient sensitivity to image key ground target features without blur, thereby providing data for

  16. Precision shape modification of nanodevices with a low-energy electron beam

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alex; Yuzvinsky, Thomas David; Fennimore, Adam

    2010-03-09

    Methods of shape modifying a nanodevice by contacting it with a low-energy focused electron beam are disclosed here. In one embodiment, a nanodevice may be permanently reformed to a different geometry through an application of a deforming force and a low-energy focused electron beam. With the addition of an assist gas, material may be removed from the nanodevice through application of the low-energy focused electron beam. The independent methods of shape modification and material removal may be used either individually or simultaneously. Precision cuts with accuracies as high as 10 nm may be achieved through the use of precision low-energy Scanning Electron Microscope scan beams. These methods may be used in an automated system to produce nanodevices of very precise dimensions. These methods may be used to produce nanodevices of carbon-based, silicon-based, or other compositions by varying the assist gas.

  17. Large Quantum Probability Backflow and the Azimuthal Angle-Angular Momentum Uncertainty Relation for an Electron in a Constant Magnetic Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strange, P.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a surprising aspect of quantum mechanics that is accessible to an undergraduate student. We discuss probability backflow for an electron in a constant magnetic field. It is shown that even for a wavepacket composed entirely of states with negative angular momentum the effective angular momentum can take on positive…

  18. Development of time-resolved (e, 2e) electron momentum spectroscopy: a tool for visualizing the motion of electrons during a chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, M.; Kasai, Y.; Oishi, K.; Nakazawa, H.; Takahashi, M.

    2014-04-01

    We report the instrumental design and technical details of an (e, 2e) electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) apparatus, which employs an ultrashort-pulsed incident electron beam with a repetition rate of 5 kHz and a pulse duration in the order of one picosecond. EMS data for the neutral Ar atom in the ground state measured by using the pulsed electron beam are presented to illustrate the potential abilities of the apparatus for ultrafast molecular dynamics. The results are discussed mainly in terms of signal intensity.

  19. Differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections for elastic electron scattering by neon - 5 to 100 eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Register, D. F.; Trajmar, S.

    1984-01-01

    Relative elastic-scattering differential cross sections were measured in the 5-100-eV impact energy and 10-145 deg angular ranges. Normalization of these cross sections was achieved by utilizing accurate total electron-scattering cross sections. A phase-shift analysis of the angular distributions in terms of real phase shifts has been carried out. From the differential cross sections, momentum-transfer cross sections were obtained and the values of the critical energy and angle were established (associated with the lowest value of the differential cross section) as 62.5 + or - 2.5 eV and 101.7 deg + or - 1.5 deg, respectively. The present phase shifts, the critical parameters, and differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections are compared to previous experimental and theoretical results. The error associated with the present data is about 10 percent.

  20. Band- and momentum-dependent electron dynamics in superconducting Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 as seen via electronic Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Muschler, B.

    2010-02-24

    We present details of carrier properties in high quality Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} single crystals obtained from electronic Raman scattering. The experiments indicate a strong band and momentum anisotropy of the electron dynamics above and below the superconducting transition highlighting the importance of complex band-dependent interactions. The presence of low energy spectral weight deep in the superconducting state suggests a gap with accidental nodes which may be lifted by doping and/or impurity scattering. When combined with other measurements, our observation of band and momentum dependent carrier dynamics indicate that the iron arsenides may have several competing superconducting ground states.

  1. Improved strain precision with high spatial resolution using nanobeam precession electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Rouviere, Jean-Luc Martin, Yannick; Denneulin, Thibaud; Cooper, David

    2013-12-09

    NanoBeam Electron Diffraction is a simple and efficient technique to measure strain in nanostructures. Here, we show that improved results can be obtained by precessing the electron beam while maintaining a few nanometer probe size, i.e., by doing Nanobeam Precession Electron Diffraction (N-PED). The precession of the beam makes the diffraction spots more uniform and numerous, making N-PED more robust and precise. In N-PED, smaller probe size and better precision are achieved by having diffraction disks instead of diffraction dots. Precision in the strain measurement better than 2 × 10{sup −4} is obtained with a probe size approaching 1 nm in diameter.

  2. Nonsequential Double Ionization of Atoms in Strong Laser Field: Identifying the Mechanisms behind the Correlated-Electron Momentum Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Difa; Fu, Libin; Liu, Jie

    Within the strong-field physics community, there has been increasing interest on nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) induced by electron-electron (e-e) correlation. A large variety of novel phenomena has been revealed in experiments during the past decades. However, the theoretical understanding and interpretation of this process is still far from being complete. The most accurate simulation, i.e. the exact solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) for two electrons in a laser field is computationally expensive. In order to overcome the difficulty, we proposed a feasible semiclassical model, in which we treat the tunneling ionization of the outmost electron quantum mechanically according to the ADK theory, sample the inner electron from microcanonical distribution and then evolve the two electrons with Newton's equations. With this model, we have successfully explained various NSDI phenomena, including the excessive DI yield, the energy spectra and angular distribution of photoelectrons. Very recently, it is adopted to reveal the physical mechanisms behind the fingerlike structure in the correlated electron momentum spectra, the unexpected correlation-anticorrelation transition close to the recollision threshold, and the anomalous NSDI of alkaline-earth-metal atoms in circularly polarized field. The obvious advantage of our model is that it gives time-resolved insights into the complex dynamics of NSDI, from the turn-on of the laser field to the final escape of the electrons, thus allowing us to disentangle and thoroughly analyze the underlying physical mechanisms.

  3. π-Plasmon Dispersion in Free-Standing Monolayer Graphene Investigated by Momentum-Resolved Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, S. C.; Breitwieser, R.; Chen, C. H.; Pai, W. W.; Guo, G. Y.; Chu, M. W.

    2014-08-01

    The {\\pi}-plasmon dispersion in graphene was scrutinized by momentum(q)-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy with an improved q resolution and found to display the square root of q dispersion characteristic of the collective excitation of two-dimensional electron systems, in contrast with previous experimental and theoretical studies which reported a linear q dispersion. Our theoretical elaborations on the q-dependent spectra affirm this square root of q relation and further unveil an in-plane electronic anisotropy. The physical property of the {\\pi} plasmon is thoroughly compared to that of the two-dimensional plasmon due to carriers of the Dirac fermions. A clear distinction between the {\\pi} plasmon and the two-dimensional Dirac plasmon was demonstrated, clarifying the common notion on correlating the linearly-dispersed Dirac cones to the linear dispersion of the {\\pi} plasmon previously reported.

  4. Measurement of atomic electric fields and charge densities from average momentum transfers using scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Müller-Caspary, Knut; Krause, Florian F; Grieb, Tim; Löffler, Stefan; Schowalter, Marco; Béché, Armand; Galioit, Vincent; Marquardt, Dennis; Zweck, Josef; Schattschneider, Peter; Verbeeck, Johan; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2016-05-12

    This study sheds light on the prerequisites, possibilities, limitations and interpretation of high-resolution differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). We draw particular attention to the well-established DPC technique based on segmented annular detectors and its relation to recent developments based on pixelated detectors. These employ the expectation value of the momentum transfer as a reliable measure of the angular deflection of the STEM beam induced by an electric field in the specimen. The influence of scattering and propagation of electrons within the specimen is initially discussed separately and then treated in terms of a two-state channeling theory. A detailed simulation study of GaN is presented as a function of specimen thickness and bonding. It is found that bonding effects are rather detectable implicitly, e.g., by characteristics of the momentum flux in areas between the atoms than by directly mapping electric fields and charge densities. For strontium titanate, experimental charge densities are compared with simulations and discussed with respect to experimental artifacts such as scan noise. Finally, we consider practical issues such as figures of merit for spatial and momentum resolution, minimum electron dose, and the mapping of larger-scale, built-in electric fields by virtue of data averaged over a crystal unit cell. We find that the latter is possible for crystals with an inversion center. Concerning the optimal detector design, this study indicates that a sampling of 5mrad per pixel is sufficient in typical applications, corresponding to approximately 10×10 available pixels.

  5. Laser-sub-cycle two-dimensional electron-momentum mapping using orthogonal two-color fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Xie, Xinhua; Roither, Stefan; Kartashov, Daniil; Wang, YanLan; Wang, ChuanLiang; Schöffler, Markus; Shafir, Dror; Corkum, Paul B.; Baltuška, Andrius; Ivanov, Igor; Kheifets, Anatoli; Liu, XiaoJun; Staudte, André; Kitzler, Markus

    2014-12-01

    We study laser-sub-cycle control over electron trajectories concomitantly in space and time using orthogonally polarized two-color laser fields. We compare experimental photoelectron spectra of neon recorded by coincidence momentum imaging with photoelectron spectra obtained by semiclassical and numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We find that a resolution of a quarter optical cycle in the photoelectron trajectories can be achieved. It is shown that depending on their sub-cycle birth time the trajectories of photoelectrons are affected differently by the ion's Coulomb field.

  6. Signatures of Molecular Orbital Structure in Lateral Electron Momentum Distributions from Strong-Field Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Ingo; Henkel, Jost; Lein, Manfred

    2015-03-01

    Strong-field ionization of aligned diatomic and polyatomic molecules such as O2, N2, C2H4, and others in circularly polarized laser fields is investigated theoretically. By calculating the emission-angle-resolved lateral width of the momentum distribution perpendicular to the polarization plane, we show that nodal planes in molecular orbitals are directly imprinted on the angular dependence of the width. We demonstrate that orbital symmetries can be distinguished with the information obtained by observing the lateral width in addition to the angular distributions.

  7. Picometre-precision analysis of scanning transmission electron microscopy images of platinum nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Yankovich, Andrew B; Berkels, Benjamin; Dahmen, W; Binev, P; Sanchez, S I; Bradley, S A; Li, Ao; Szlufarska, Izabela; Voyles, Paul M

    2014-06-11

    Measuring picometre-scale shifts in the positions of individual atoms in materials provides new insight into the structure of surfaces, defects and interfaces that influence a broad variety of materials' behaviour. Here we demonstrate sub-picometre precision measurements of atom positions in aberration-corrected Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy images based on the non-rigid registration and averaging of an image series. Non-rigid registration achieves five to seven times better precision than previous methods. Non-rigidly registered images of a silica-supported platinum nanocatalyst show pm-scale contraction of atoms at a (111)/(111) corner towards the particle centre and expansion of a flat (111) facet. Sub-picometre precision and standardless atom counting with <1 atom uncertainty in the same scanning transmission electron microscopy image provide new insight into the three-dimensional atomic structure of catalyst nanoparticle surfaces, which contain the active sites controlling catalytic reactions.

  8. Precision Electron-Beam Polarimetry at 1 GeV Using Diamond Microstrip Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, A.; Jones, D.; Cornejo, J. C.; Dalton, M. M.; Deconinck, W.; Dutta, D.; Gaskell, D.; Martin, J. W.; Paschke, K. D.; Tvaskis, V.; Asaturyan, A.; Benesch, J.; Cates, G.; Cavness, B. S.; Dillon-Townes, L. A.; Hays, G.; Ihloff, E.; Jones, R.; King, P. M.; Kowalski, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lee, L.; McCreary, A.; McDonald, M.; Micherdzinska, A.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Nelyubin, V.; Page, S.; Ramsay, W. D.; Solvignon, P.; Storey, D.; Tobias, A.; Urban, E.; Vidal, C.; Waidyawansa, B.; Wang, P.; Zhamkotchyan, S.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the highest precision yet achieved in the measurement of the polarization of a low-energy, O (1 GeV ) , continuous-wave (CW) electron beam, accomplished using a new polarimeter based on electron-photon scattering, in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. A number of technical innovations were necessary, including a novel method for precise control of the laser polarization in a cavity and a novel diamond microstrip detector that was able to capture most of the spectrum of scattered electrons. The data analysis technique exploited track finding, the high granularity of the detector, and its large acceptance. The polarization of the 180 -μ A , 1.16-GeV electron beam was measured with a statistical precision of <1 % per hour and a systematic uncertainty of 0.59%. This exceeds the level of precision required by the Qweak experiment, a measurement of the weak vector charge of the proton. Proposed future low-energy experiments require polarization uncertainty <0.4 %, and this result represents an important demonstration of that possibility. This measurement is the first use of diamond detectors for particle tracking in an experiment. It demonstrates the stable operation of a diamond-based tracking detector in a high radiation environment, for two years.

  9. Electron and recoil ion momentum imaging with a magneto-optically trapped target

    SciTech Connect

    Hubele, R.; Schuricke, M.; Goullon, J.; Lindenblatt, H.; Ferreira, N.; Laforge, A.; Brühl, E.; Globig, D.; Misra, D.; Sell, M.; Song, Z.; Wang, X.; Zhang, S.; Jesus, V. L. B. de; Kelkar, A.; Schneider, K.; Schulz, M.; Fischer, D.

    2015-03-15

    A reaction microscope (ReMi) has been combined with a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for the kinematically complete investigation of atomic break-up processes. With the novel MOTReMi apparatus, the momentum vectors of the fragments of laser-cooled and state-prepared lithium atoms are measured in coincidence and over the full solid angle. The first successful implementation of a MOTReMi could be realized due to an optimized design of the present setup, a nonstandard operation of the MOT, and by employing a switching cycle with alternating measuring and trapping periods. The very low target temperature in the MOT (∼2 mK) allows for an excellent momentum resolution. Optical preparation of the target atoms in the excited Li 2{sup 2}P{sub 3/2} state was demonstrated providing an atomic polarization of close to 100%. While first experimental results were reported earlier, in this work, we focus on the technical description of the setup and its performance in commissioning experiments involving target ionization in 266 nm laser pulses and in collisions with projectile ions.

  10. Development of a Hydrogen Møller Polarimeter for Precision Parity-Violating Electron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Valerie M.

    2013-10-01

    Parity-violating electron scattering experiments allow for testing the Standard Model at low energy accelerators. Future parity-violating electron scattering experiments, like the P2 experiment at the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany, and the MOLLER and SoLID experiments at Jefferson Lab will measure observables predicted by the Standard Model to high precision. In order to make these measurements, we will need to determine the polarization of the electron beam to sub-percent precision. The present way of measuring the polarization, with Møller scattering in iron foils or using Compton laser backscattering, will not easily be able to reach this precision. The novel Hydrogen Møller Polarimeter presents a non-invasive way to measure the electron polarization by scattering the electron beam off of atomic hydrogen gas polarized in a 7 Tesla solenoidal magnetic trap. This apparatus is expected to be operational by 2016 in Mainz. Currently, simulations of the polarimeter are used to develop the detection system at College of William & Mary, while the hydrogen trap and superconducting solenoid magnet are being developed at the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz. I will discuss the progress of the design and development of this novel polarimeter system. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1206053.

  11. Multistage ab initio quantum wavepacket dynamics for electronic structure and dynamics in open systems: momentum representation, coupled electron-nuclear dynamics, and external fields.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Alexander B; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2011-02-21

    We recently proposed a multistage ab initio wavepacket dynamics (MS-AIWD) treatment for the study of delocalized electronic systems as well as electron transport through donor-bridge-acceptor systems such as those found in molecular-wire/electrode networks. In this method, the full donor-bridge-acceptor open system is treated through a rigorous partitioning scheme that utilizes judiciously placed offsetting absorbing and emitting boundary conditions. In this manner, the electronic coupling between the bridge molecule and surrounding electrodes is accounted. Here, we extend MS-AIWD to include the dynamics of open-electronic systems in conjunction with (a) simultaneous treatment of nuclear dynamics and (b) external electromagnetic fields. This generalization is benchmarked through an analysis of wavepackets propagated on a potential modeled on an Al(27) - C(7) - Al(27) nanowire. The wavepacket results are inspected in the momentum representation and the dependence of momentum of the wavepacket as well as its transmission probabilities on the magnitude of external bias are analyzed.

  12. Optical gating and streaking of free electrons with sub-optical cycle precision

    PubMed Central

    Kozák, M.; McNeur, J.; Leedle, K. J.; Deng, H.; Schönenberger, N.; Ruehl, A.; Hartl, I.; Harris, J. S.; Byer, R. L.; Hommelhoff, P.

    2017-01-01

    The temporal resolution of ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy experiments is currently limited by the available experimental techniques for the generation and characterization of electron bunches with single femtosecond or attosecond durations. Here, we present proof of principle experiments of an optical gating concept for free electrons via direct time-domain visualization of the sub-optical cycle energy and transverse momentum structure imprinted on the electron beam. We demonstrate a temporal resolution of 1.2±0.3 fs. The scheme is based on the synchronous interaction between electrons and the near-field mode of a dielectric nano-grating excited by a femtosecond laser pulse with an optical period duration of 6.5 fs. The sub-optical cycle resolution demonstrated here is promising for use in laser-driven streak cameras for attosecond temporal characterization of bunched particle beams as well as time-resolved experiments with free-electron beams. PMID:28120930

  13. On the exchange of orbital angular momentum between twisted photons and atomic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Basil S.; Kaplan, L.; McGuire, J. H.

    2013-03-01

    We obtain an expression for the matrix element for scattering of a twisted (Laguerre-Gaussian profile) photon from a hydrogen atom. We consider photons incoming with an orbital angular momentum (OAM) of ℓħ, carried by a factor of eiℓϕ not present in a plane-wave or pure Gaussian profile beam. The nature of the transfer of +2ℓ units of OAM from the photon to the azimuthal atomic quantum number of the atom is investigated. We obtain simple formulas for these OAM flip transitions for elastic forward scattering of twisted photons when the photon wavelength λ is large compared with the atomic target size a, and small compared with the Rayleigh range zR, which characterizes the collimation length of the twisted photon beam.

  14. Effects of the Magnetic Flux and of the Electron Momentum on the Transmission Amplitude in the Aharonov-Bohm Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaresh Kumar, M. V.; Sahoo, Debendranath

    A characterization of the two-terminal open-ring Aharonov-Bohm interferometer is made by analyzing the phase space plots in the complex transmission amplitude plane. Two types of plots are considered: type 1 plot uses the magnetic flux as the variable parameter and type 2 plot which uses the electron momentum as the variable parameter. In type 1 plot, the trajectory closes upon itself only when the ratio R of the arm lengths (of the interferometer) is a rational fraction, and the shape and the type of the generated flower-like pattern is sensitive to the electron momentum. For momenta corresponding to discrete eigenstates of the perfect ring (i.e., the ring without the leads), the trajectory passes through the origin a certain fixed number of times before closing upon itself, whereas for arbitrary momenta it never passes through the origin. Although the transmission coefficient is periodic in the flux with the elementary flux quantum as the basic period, the phenomenon of electron transmission is shown not to be so when analyzed via the present technique. The periodicity is seen to spread over several flux units whenever R is a rational fraction whereas there is absolutely no periodicity present when R is an irrational number. In type 2 plot, closed trajectories passing through the origin a number of times are seen for R being a rational fraction. The case R = 1 (i.e., a symmetric ring) with zero flux is rather pathological — it presents a closed loop surrounding the origin. For irrational R values, the trajectories never close.

  15. Precise study of the $Z/\\gamma^*$ boson transverse momentum distribution in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions using a novel technique

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-10-01

    Using 7.3 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, we measure the distribution of the variable {phi}*{sub {eta}}, which probes the same physical effects as the Z/{gamma}* boson transverse momentum, but is less susceptible to the effects of experimental resolution and efficiency. A QCD prediction is found to describe the general features of the {phi}*{sub {eta}} distribution, but is unable to describe its detailed shape or dependence on boson rapidity. A prediction that includes a broadening of transverse momentum for small values of the parton momentum fraction is strongly disfavored.

  16. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, Sanyam Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-10-12

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  17. Green's function and Dyson orbital studies of the electronic structure of cage compounds and flexible molecules: A confrontation of many-body quantum mechanics with electron momentum, photo-electron and penning ionization electron spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knippenberg, Stefan

    Electron Momentum Spectroscopy (EMS) has emerged in recent years as a powerful experimental technique for studying the valence electronic structure of molecules and solids. With such experiments, orbital Momentum Distributions (MDs) are reconstructed from an angular analysis of electron impact ionization energies in the limit of the binary encounter, the Born (sudden) and the plane wave impulse approximations. In this thesis, the possibilities and limitations of ubiquitous orbital depictions (Hartree-Fock, Kohn-Sham and Dyson orbitals) are emphasized through theoretical studies of EMS experiments on two extreme cases: rigid cage compounds and conformationally versatile molecules. These EMS studies employ benchmark Green's Function (GF) calculations of valence one-electron and shake-up ionization spectra, as well as spherically averaged MDs derived from the related Dyson orbitals. Shortcomings of empirical analyses of EMS experiments based on Kohn-Sham orbitals and the related eigen-energies are comparatively discussed. Our work demonstrates that, owing to recent advances in energy and momentum resolution, EMS is now at a stage to very finely image the influence of the molecular conformation on orbital topologies, or changes in the effective topology of orbitals at varying distances from the molecular center. GF and Dyson orbital calculations are advocated in particular in order to safely identify complications such as distorted wave effects, vibronic coupling, nuclear dynamics, or a breakdown of the standard orbital picture of ionization. As an example, ionization experiments at large enough electron binding energies seem to result into an ultrafast intramolecular Coulomb decay and fragmentation of norbornane. On the experimental side, our work also advocates accurate enough determination of the absolute temperature in ionization experiments of all kind.

  18. Project 8: Precision Electron Specroscopy to Measure the Mass of the Neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    VanDevender, Brent A.; Asner, David M.; Bahr, Matthew; Bradley, Rich; Doeleman, Sheperd; Jones, Anthony M.; Fernandes, Justin L.; Formaggio, Joseph; Furse, Daniel; Kelly, James F.; Kofron, J.; LaRoque, Benjamin; Leber, Michelle; MCBride, Lisa; Monreal, Ben; Oblath, Noah; Patterson, Ryan B.; Rogers, Alan E.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, Leslie; Rybka, Gray; Thummler, Thomas

    2013-10-21

    The Project 8 Collaboration is exploring a new technique for the spectroscopy of medium-energy electrons (* 1 – 100 keV) with the ultimate goal of measuring the effective mass of the electron antineutrino by the tritium endpoint method. Our method is based on the detection of microwave-frequency cyclotron radiation emitted by magnetically trapped electrons. The immediate goal of Project 8 is to demonstrate the utility of this technique for a tritium endpoint experiment through a high-precision measurement of the conversion electron spectrum of 83mKr. We present concepts for detecting this cyclotron radiation, focusing on a guided wave design currently being implemented in a prototype apparatus at the University of Washington.

  19. Theoretical study of precision and accuracy of strain analysis by nano-beam electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Christoph; Müller-Caspary, Knut; Grieb, Tim; Schowalter, Marco; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Krause, Florian F; Zillmann, Dennis; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Measurement of lattice strain is important to characterize semiconductor nanostructures. As strain has large influence on the electronic band structure, methods for the measurement of strain with high precision, accuracy and spatial resolution in a large field of view are mandatory. In this paper we present a theoretical study of precision and accuracy of measurement of strain by convergent nano-beam electron diffraction. It is found that the accuracy of the evaluation suffers from halos in the diffraction pattern caused by a variation of strain within the area covered by the focussed electron beam. This effect, which is expected to be strong at sharp interfaces between materials with different lattice plane distances, will be discussed for convergent-beam electron diffraction patterns using a conventional probe and for patterns formed by a precessing electron beam. Furthermore, we discuss approaches to optimize the accuracy of strain measured at interfaces. The study is based on the evaluation of diffraction patterns simulated for different realistic structures that have been investigated experimentally in former publications. These simulations account for thermal diffuse scattering using the frozen-lattice approach and the modulation-transfer function of the image-recording system. The influence of Poisson noise is also investigated.

  20. Momentum and Energy Dependence of the Anomalous High-Energy Dispersion in the Electronic Structure of High Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inosov, D. S.; Fink, J.; Kordyuk, A. A.; Borisenko, S. V.; Zabolotnyy, V. B.; Schuster, R.; Knupfer, M.; Büchner, B.; Follath, R.; Dürr, H. A.; Eberhardt, W.; Hinkov, V.; Keimer, B.; Berger, H.

    2007-12-01

    Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy we have studied the momentum and photon energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion, termed waterfalls, between the Fermi level and 1 eV binding energy in several high-Tc superconductors. We observe strong changes of the dispersion between different Brillouin zones and a strong dependence on the photon energy around 75 eV, which we associate with the resonant photoemission at the Cu3p→3dx2-y2 edge. We conclude that the high-energy “waterfall” dispersion results from a strong suppression of the photoemission intensity at the center of the Brillouin zone due to matrix element effects and is, therefore, not an intrinsic feature of the spectral function. This indicates that the new high-energy scale in the electronic structure of cuprates derived from the waterfall-like dispersion may be incorrect.

  1. Momentum and energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion in the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors.

    PubMed

    Inosov, D S; Fink, J; Kordyuk, A A; Borisenko, S V; Zabolotnyy, V B; Schuster, R; Knupfer, M; Büchner, B; Follath, R; Dürr, H A; Eberhardt, W; Hinkov, V; Keimer, B; Berger, H

    2007-12-07

    Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy we have studied the momentum and photon energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion, termed waterfalls, between the Fermi level and 1 eV binding energy in several high-T_{c} superconductors. We observe strong changes of the dispersion between different Brillouin zones and a strong dependence on the photon energy around 75 eV, which we associate with the resonant photoemission at the Cu3p-->3d_{x;{2}-y;{2}} edge. We conclude that the high-energy "waterfall" dispersion results from a strong suppression of the photoemission intensity at the center of the Brillouin zone due to matrix element effects and is, therefore, not an intrinsic feature of the spectral function. This indicates that the new high-energy scale in the electronic structure of cuprates derived from the waterfall-like dispersion may be incorrect.

  2. Precision and Resolution on Tore-Supra Ece Electron Temperature Profile Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ségui, J. L.; Molina, D.; Goniche, M.

    2003-02-01

    A 16-channel heterodyne radiometer, 2 GHz spaced, is used on Tore-Supra to measure the electron cyclotron emission in the frequency range 78-110 GHz for the O mode and 94 -126 GHz for the Xmode. In the equatorial plane, a dual polarisation gaussian optics lens antenna, with a perpendicular line of sight (with respect to the magnetic field), gives ECE measurements with very low refraction and Doppler effects. A separate O/X mode RF front-end allows the use of an IF electronic mode selector. This improves time stability calibration and gives the potentiality of simultaneous O/X mode measurements in the 94 -110 Ghz RF band for polarisation studies. RF and IF filters reject the gyrotron frequency (118 Ghz) in order to perform temperature measurements during ECRH plasmas. A precise absolute spectral calibration is performed outside the vacuum vessel by using a 600°C black body, a digital signal averaging on the waveform generated by a mechanical chopper placed directly in front of it, and a simulation window without Fabry-Pérot effects. The calibration precision leads to ECE temperature profiles which are very consistent with Thomson scattering measurements and guarantees a good stability of the ECE profiles for small changes on the magnetic field (absolute precision +/-6%, relative precision between channels +/-3%). Post-pulse data processing takes routinely into account the total magnetic field (Bvacuum with ripple, Bpara, Bdia, Bpol, all with analytical formulations), the radial relativistic shift (analytical formulation is used), the refraction (cut-offs detection with safety margin to avoid strong refraction), the nonthermal ECE spectra during LHCD (using an electron density threshold criterion). These previous analytical formulations are compatible with real time processing. Relativistic radial broadening simulations show that it is useful to fulfil 32 channels (1GHz

  3. High-precision correlative fluorescence and electron cryo microscopy using two independent alignment markers☆

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberger, Pascale; Kaufmann, Rainer; Siebert, C. Alistair; Hagen, Christoph; Wodrich, Harald; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an emerging technique which combines functional information provided by fluorescence microscopy (FM) with the high-resolution structural information of electron microscopy (EM). So far, correlative cryo microscopy of frozen-hydrated samples has not reached better than micrometre range accuracy. Here, a method is presented that enables the correlation between fluorescently tagged proteins and electron cryo tomography (cryoET) data with nanometre range precision. Specifically, thin areas of vitrified whole cells are examined by correlative fluorescence cryo microscopy (cryoFM) and cryoET. Novel aspects of the presented cryoCLEM workflow not only include the implementation of two independent electron dense fluorescent markers to improve the precision of the alignment, but also the ability of obtaining an estimate of the correlation accuracy for each individual object of interest. The correlative workflow from plunge-freezing to cryoET is detailed step-by-step for the example of locating fluorescence-labelled adenovirus particles trafficking inside a cell. PMID:24262358

  4. B (E2) strength ratio of one-phonon 2+ states of 94Zr from electron scattering at low momentum transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheikh Obeid, A.; Aslanidou, S.; Birkhan, J.; Krugmann, A.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Pietralla, N.; Poltoratska, I.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.

    2014-03-01

    Background: The B (E2) transition strength to the 22+ state in 94Zr was initially reported to be larger by a factor of 1.63 than the one to the 21+ state from lifetime measurements with the Doppler-shift attenuation method using the (n,n'γ) reaction [Elhami et al., Phys. Rev. C 75, 011301(R) (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevC.75.011301]. This surprising behavior was recently revised in a new measurement by the same group using the same experimental technique leading to a ratio below unity as expected in vibrational nuclei. Purpose: The goal is an independent determination of the ratio of B (E2) strengths for the transitions to the 21,2+ states of 94Zr with inelastic electron scattering. Method: The relative population of the 21,2+ states in the (e,e') reaction was measured at the S-DALINAC in a momentum transfer range q =0.17-0.51 fm-1 and analyzed in plane-wave Born approximation with the method described by Scheikh Obeid et al. [Phys. Rev. C 87, 014337 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevC.87.014337]. Results: The extracted B (E2) strength ratio of 0.789(43) between the excitation of the 21+ and 22+ states of 94Zr is consistent with but more precise than the latest (n,n'γ) experiment. Using the B (E2) transition strength to the first excited state from the literature a value of 3.9(9) Weisskopf units is deduced for the B (E2;22+→01+) transition. Conclusions: The electron scattering result independently confirms the latest interpretation of the different (n,n'γ) results for the transition to the 22+ state in 94Zr.

  5. High precision high voltage divider and its application to electron beam ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W. D.; Xiao, J.; Shen, Y.; Fu, Y. Q.; Meng, F. C.; Chen, C. Y.; Zou, Y.; Hutton, R.

    2008-12-15

    A high precision high voltage divider has been developed for the electron beam ion trap in Shanghai. The uncertainty caused by the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) and the voltage coefficient of resistance has been studied in detail and was minimized to the level of ppm (10{sup -6}) range. Once the TCR was matched between the resistors, the precision of the dividing ratio finally reached the ppm range also. We measured the delay of the divider caused by the capacitor introduced to minimize voltage ripple to be 2.35 ms. Finally we applied the divider to an experiment to measure resonant energies for some dielectronic recombination processes for highly charged xenon ions. The final energies include corrections for both space charge and fringe field effects are mostly under 0.03%.

  6. Momentum-resolved electronic structure of the superconductor parent compound BaBiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, N. C.; Ristic, Z.; Park, J.; Wang, Z.; Matt, C. E.; Xu, N.; Lv, B. Q.; Gawryluk, D.; Pomjakushina, E.; Conder, K.; Wang, Y.; Johnston, S.; Mesot, J.; Shi, M.; Radovic, M.

    We use in situ angle-resolved photoemission to study thin films of BaBiO3, a parent compound of bismuthate superconductors with Tc up to 30 K. By simple electron counting, BaBiO3 should be metallic. However, in analogy with many unconventional and high-Tc superconductor families, it is instead insulating, and superconductivity emerges with doping. Our experiments reveal a folded band structure consistent with known BiO6 breathing distortions. However, charge ordering often thought to accompany the distortions is virtually nonexistent. The data combined with DFT calculations indicate that states near EF are primarily oxygen-derived. Hence BaBiO3 appears to be characterized by negative charge transfer energy. This can account for the seeming discrepancy between the atomic structure and ''missing'' charge order. It should also be relevant for understanding the doping evolution and superconductivity in bismuthates.

  7. A rack-mounted precision waveguide-below-cutoff attenuator with an absolute electronic readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    A coaxial precision waveguide-below-cutoff attenuator is described which uses an absolute (unambiguous) electronic digital readout of displacement in inches in addition to the usual gear driven mechanical counter-dial readout in decibels. The attenuator is rack-mountable and has the input and output RF connectors in a fixed position. The attenuation rate for 55, 50, and 30 MHz operation is given along with a discussion of sources of errors. In addition, information is included to aid the user in making adjustments on the attenuator should it be damaged or disassembled for any reason.

  8. Energetic, spatial, and momentum character of the electronic structure at a buried interface: The two-dimensional electron gas between two metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemšák, S.; Conti, G.; Gray, A. X.; Palsson, G. K.; Conlon, C.; Eiteneer, D.; Keqi, A.; Rattanachata, A.; Saw, A. Y.; Bostwick, A.; Moreschini, L.; Rotenberg, E.; Strocov, V. N.; Kobayashi, M.; Schmitt, T.; Stolte, W.; Ueda, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Gloskovskii, A.; Drube, W.; Jackson, C. A.; Moetakef, P.; Janotti, A.; Bjaalie, L.; Himmetoglu, B.; Van de Walle, C. G.; Borek, S.; Minar, J.; Braun, J.; Ebert, H.; Plucinski, L.; Kortright, J. B.; Schneider, C. M.; Balents, L.; de Groot, F. M. F.; Stemmer, S.; Fadley, C. S.

    2016-06-01

    The interfaces between two condensed phases often exhibit emergent physical properties that can lead to new physics and novel device applications and are the subject of intense study in many disciplines. We here apply experimental and theoretical techniques to the characterization of one such interesting interface system: the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) formed in multilayers consisting of SrTi O3 (STO) and GdTi O3 (GTO). This system has been the subject of multiple studies recently and shown to exhibit very high carrier charge densities and ferromagnetic effects, among other intriguing properties. We have studied a 2DEG-forming multilayer of the form [6unit cells (u .c .) STO /3 u .c .of GTO ] 20 using a unique array of photoemission techniques including soft and hard x-ray excitation, soft x-ray angle-resolved photoemission, core-level spectroscopy, resonant excitation, and standing-wave effects, as well as theoretical calculations of the electronic structure at several levels and of the actual photoemission process. Standing-wave measurements below and above a strong resonance have been exploited as a powerful method for studying the 2DEG depth distribution. We have thus characterized the spatial and momentum properties of this 2DEG in detail, determining via depth-distribution measurements that it is spread throughout the 6 u.c. layer of STO and measuring the momentum dispersion of its states. The experimental results are supported in several ways by theory, leading to a much more complete picture of the nature of this 2DEG and suggesting that oxygen vacancies are not the origin of it. Similar multitechnique photoemission studies of such states at buried interfaces, combined with comparable theory, will be a very fruitful future approach for exploring and modifying the fascinating world of buried-interface physics and chemistry.

  9. Generation and Amplification of Coherent Radiation with Optical Orbital Angular Momentum in a Free-Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsing, Erik Willard

    The object of this work is to examine how coherent light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM) can be generated and amplified in a single pass, high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) at the fundamental operating frequency. This concept unites two rapidly expanding, but at present largely non-overlapping fields of study: high-order OAM light modes, which interact in new ways with matter, and FELs, in which a relativistically energetic electron beam emits coherent, ultra high-brightness, highly frequency-tunable light. The ability to generate OAM light in an FEL enables new regimes of laser interaction physics to be explored at wavelengths down to hard x-rays. The theoretical portion of this dissertation attempts to provide a new predictive mathematical framework. It builds on existing work, and describes the three-dimensional electromagnetic field of the high-gain FEL as a sum of OAM modes such that the amplification properties of individual modes can be characterized. The effects of uncorrelated energy spread, longitudinal space charge, energy detuning, and transverse emittance in the electron beam are included, as is the diffraction of the laser light. Theoretical predictions are corroborated by detailed numerical Genesis 1.3 simulations. When the theory is extended to frequency harmonics, a novel interaction is uncovered that generates a helical electron beam density distribution. These predictions are also supported by numerical Tredi simulations. This type of highly correlated structure is shown to naturally emit OAM light, and forms the basis of a new high-gain, high-mode generation (HGHMG) scheme proposed in its entirety here. The experimental section examines the helical microbunching concept in a proof-of-principle experiment dubbed HELIX, performed at the UCLA Neptune laboratory. We present detailed measurement of the coherent transition radiation emitted by the 12.5 MeV electron beam that is microbunched in a second harmonic interaction with an input

  10. Root ZX Electronic Foramen Locator: An Ex Vivo Study of Its Three Models' Precision and Reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Reinaldo, Rafael Santos; Frota, Luciana Maria Arcanjo; do Vale, Mônica Sampaio

    2017-01-01

    Although Root ZX is considered the gold standard electronic foramen locator (EFL), two variations of this device were launched, however without different operating mechanisms. This investigation aims to evaluate the precision of Root ZX (RZX), Root ZX II (RII), and Root ZX Mini (RM) EFLs. After access cavity preparation, 32 mandibular single rooted human premolars had their real length measured with the aid of a #15 K-type manual file under magnification (25x). Electronic measurements were performed by the devices in an alternate order until the apical foramen was reached (0.0). Each measurement was performed with adjusted file to the real length of the teeth and verified with a digital caliper. The accuracy of the EFLs was 68.8% (RZX), 65.8% (RII), and 68.8% (RM), considering ±0.5 mm as a margin of tolerance. The mean errors of the devices were 0.37 ± 0.25 mm (RZX), 0.41 ± 0.34 mm (RII), and 0.32 ± 0.28 mm (RM). ANOVA and Tukey test were applied to analyze the obtained data, which showed that there were no statistically significant differences among the locators (P > .05). It can be concluded that the three tested devices demonstrated precise measurements of the real length of the canal without performance differences among them. PMID:28367215

  11. Precision controlled atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy using spiral scan pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Xiahan; Lupini, Andrew R.; Ding, Jilai; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Unocic, Raymond R.

    2017-01-01

    Atomic-resolution imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can enable direct correlation between atomic structure and materials functionality. The fast and precise control of the STEM probe is, however, challenging because the true beam location deviates from the assigned location depending on the properties of the deflectors. To reduce these deviations, i.e. image distortions, we use spiral scanning paths, allowing precise control of a sub-Å sized electron probe within an aberration-corrected STEM. Although spiral scanning avoids the sudden changes in the beam location (fly-back distortion) present in conventional raster scans, it is not distortion-free. “Archimedean” spirals, with a constant angular frequency within each scan, are used to determine the characteristic response at different frequencies. We then show that such characteristic functions can be used to correct image distortions present in more complicated constant linear velocity spirals, where the frequency varies within each scan. Through the combined application of constant linear velocity scanning and beam path corrections, spiral scan images are shown to exhibit less scan distortion than conventional raster scan images. The methodology presented here will be useful for in situ STEM imaging at higher temporal resolution and for imaging beam sensitive materials. PMID:28272404

  12. Root ZX Electronic Foramen Locator: An Ex Vivo Study of Its Three Models' Precision and Reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Bernardo Almeida; Reinaldo, Rafael Santos; Frota, Luciana Maria Arcanjo; do Vale, Mônica Sampaio; de Vasconcelos, Bruno Carvalho

    2017-01-01

    Although Root ZX is considered the gold standard electronic foramen locator (EFL), two variations of this device were launched, however without different operating mechanisms. This investigation aims to evaluate the precision of Root ZX (RZX), Root ZX II (RII), and Root ZX Mini (RM) EFLs. After access cavity preparation, 32 mandibular single rooted human premolars had their real length measured with the aid of a #15 K-type manual file under magnification (25x). Electronic measurements were performed by the devices in an alternate order until the apical foramen was reached (0.0). Each measurement was performed with adjusted file to the real length of the teeth and verified with a digital caliper. The accuracy of the EFLs was 68.8% (RZX), 65.8% (RII), and 68.8% (RM), considering ±0.5 mm as a margin of tolerance. The mean errors of the devices were 0.37 ± 0.25 mm (RZX), 0.41 ± 0.34 mm (RII), and 0.32 ± 0.28 mm (RM). ANOVA and Tukey test were applied to analyze the obtained data, which showed that there were no statistically significant differences among the locators (P > .05). It can be concluded that the three tested devices demonstrated precise measurements of the real length of the canal without performance differences among them.

  13. Precision controlled atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy using spiral scan pathways.

    PubMed

    Sang, Xiahan; Lupini, Andrew R; Ding, Jilai; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen; Unocic, Raymond R

    2017-03-08

    Atomic-resolution imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can enable direct correlation between atomic structure and materials functionality. The fast and precise control of the STEM probe is, however, challenging because the true beam location deviates from the assigned location depending on the properties of the deflectors. To reduce these deviations, i.e. image distortions, we use spiral scanning paths, allowing precise control of a sub-Å sized electron probe within an aberration-corrected STEM. Although spiral scanning avoids the sudden changes in the beam location (fly-back distortion) present in conventional raster scans, it is not distortion-free. "Archimedean" spirals, with a constant angular frequency within each scan, are used to determine the characteristic response at different frequencies. We then show that such characteristic functions can be used to correct image distortions present in more complicated constant linear velocity spirals, where the frequency varies within each scan. Through the combined application of constant linear velocity scanning and beam path corrections, spiral scan images are shown to exhibit less scan distortion than conventional raster scan images. The methodology presented here will be useful for in situ STEM imaging at higher temporal resolution and for imaging beam sensitive materials.

  14. Precision controlled atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy using spiral scan pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Xiahan; Lupini, Andrew R.; Ding, Jilai; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Unocic, Raymond R.

    2017-03-01

    Atomic-resolution imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can enable direct correlation between atomic structure and materials functionality. The fast and precise control of the STEM probe is, however, challenging because the true beam location deviates from the assigned location depending on the properties of the deflectors. To reduce these deviations, i.e. image distortions, we use spiral scanning paths, allowing precise control of a sub-Å sized electron probe within an aberration-corrected STEM. Although spiral scanning avoids the sudden changes in the beam location (fly-back distortion) present in conventional raster scans, it is not distortion-free. “Archimedean” spirals, with a constant angular frequency within each scan, are used to determine the characteristic response at different frequencies. We then show that such characteristic functions can be used to correct image distortions present in more complicated constant linear velocity spirals, where the frequency varies within each scan. Through the combined application of constant linear velocity scanning and beam path corrections, spiral scan images are shown to exhibit less scan distortion than conventional raster scan images. The methodology presented here will be useful for in situ STEM imaging at higher temporal resolution and for imaging beam sensitive materials.

  15. Echo-enabled harmonics up to the 75th order from precisely tailored electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsing, E.; Dunning, M.; Garcia, B.; Hast, C.; Raubenheimer, T.; Stupakov, G.; Xiang, D.

    2016-08-01

    The production of coherent radiation at ever shorter wavelengths has been a long-standing challenge since the invention of lasers and the subsequent demonstration of frequency doubling. Modern X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) use relativistic electrons to produce intense X-ray pulses on few-femtosecond timescales. However, the shot noise that seeds the amplification produces pulses with a noisy spectrum and limited temporal coherence. To produce stable transform-limited pulses, a seeding scheme called echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) has been proposed, which harnesses the highly nonlinear phase mixing of the celebrated echo phenomenon to generate coherent harmonic density modulations in the electron beam with conventional lasers. Here, we report on a demonstration of EEHG up to the 75th harmonic, where 32 nm light is produced from a 2,400 nm laser. We also demonstrate that individual harmonic amplitudes are controlled by simple adjustment of the phase mixing. Results show the potential of laser-based manipulations to achieve precise control over the coherent spectrum in future X-ray FELs for new science.

  16. Echo-enabled harmonics up to the 75th order from precisely tailored electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hemsing, E.; Dunning, M.; Garcia, B.; Hast, C.; Raubenheimer, T.; Stupakov, G.; Xiang, D.

    2016-06-06

    The production of coherent radiation at ever shorter wavelengths has been a long-standing challenge since the invention of lasers1, 2 and the subsequent demonstration of frequency doubling3. Modern X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) use relativistic electrons to produce intense X-ray pulses on few-femtosecond timescales4, 5, 6. However, the shot noise that seeds the amplification produces pulses with a noisy spectrum and limited temporal coherence. To produce stable transform-limited pulses, a seeding scheme called echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) has been proposed7, 8, which harnesses the highly nonlinear phase mixing of the celebrated echo phenomenon9 to generate coherent harmonic density modulations in the electron beam with conventional lasers. Here, we report on a demonstration of EEHG up to the 75th harmonic, where 32 nm light is produced from a 2,400 nm laser. We also demonstrate that individual harmonic amplitudes are controlled by simple adjustment of the phase mixing. Results show the potential of laser-based manipulations to achieve precise control over the coherent spectrum in future X-ray FELs for new science10, 11.

  17. Sample preparation for precise and quantitative electron holographic analysis of semiconductor devices.

    PubMed

    Han, Myung-Geun; Li, Jing; Xie, Qianghua; Fejes, Peter; Conner, James; Taylor, Bill; McCartney, Martha R

    2006-08-01

    Wedge polishing was used to prepare one-dimensional Si n-p junction and Si p-channel metal-oxide-silicon field effect transistor (pMOSFET) samples for precise and quantitative electrostatic potential analysis using off-axis electron holography. To avoid artifacts associated with ion milling, cloth polishing with 0.02-microm colloidal silica suspension was used for final thinning. Uniform thickness and no significant charging were observed by electron holography analysis for samples prepared entirely by this method. The effect of sample thickness was investigated and the minimum thickness for reliable results was found to be approximately 160 nm. Below this thickness, measured phase changes were smaller than expected. For the pMOSFET sample, quantitative analysis of two-dimensional electrostatic potential distribution showed that the metallurgical gate length (separation between two extension junctions) was approximately 54 nm, whereas the actual gate length was measured to be approximately 70 nm by conventional transmission electron microscopy. Thus, source and drain junction encroachment under the gate was 16 nm.

  18. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    SciTech Connect

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; Warner, Nicholas P.

    2016-05-11

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in highdegree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifold singularities. Upon taking the AdS3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Lastly, our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.

  19. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    DOE PAGES

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; ...

    2016-05-11

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in highdegree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifoldmore » singularities. Upon taking the AdS3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Lastly, our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.« less

  20. Towards the assembly of structurally precise graphene nanoribbons for electronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jia; Uribe-Romo, Fernando J.; Arslan, Hasan; Crick, Colin; Saathoff, Jonathan D.; Clancy, Paulette; Dichtel, William R.; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2014-03-01

    Graphene's lack of band gap has been a bottleneck that limits its use in transistors. One promising approach to open up a gap in its band structure is to narrow the width of graphene, i.e., make ``nanoribbons.'' Bottom-up synthesis is a most promising method to produce structurally precise nanoribbons. But the assembly and patterning of these nanoribbons remains a challenge. In this study, we demonstrate a method for the assembly of structurally precise graphene nanoribbons. We observe preferential adsorption of nanoribbons on gold surfaces as opposed to silicon dioxide surfaces with aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition. Importantly, we can tune the coverage of graphene nanoribbons through appropriate surface treatments. Graphene nanoribbon adsorption on a gold surface that had been modified with pentafluorobenzenethiol, for example, is higher than that on ozone-cleaned gold, as evidenced by higher D and G band intensities in its Raman spectra. The ability to tune the surface coverage through surface treatment provides a unique opportunity to assemble and pattern graphene nanoribbons for electronic applications.

  1. Coherent π-electron dynamics of (P)-2,2'-biphenol induced by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses: angular momentum and ring current.

    PubMed

    Mineo, H; Lin, S H; Fujimura, Y

    2013-02-21

    The results of a theoretical investigation of coherent π-electron dynamics for nonplanar (P)-2,2'-biphenol induced by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses are presented. Expressions for the time-dependent coherent angular momentum and ring current are derived by using the density matrix method. The time dependence of these coherences is determined by the off-diagonal density matrix element, which can be obtained by solving the coupled equations of motion of the electronic-state density matrix. Dephasing effects on coherent angular momentum and ring current are taken into account within the Markov approximation. The magnitudes of the electronic angular momentum and current are expressed as the sum of expectation values of the corresponding operators in the two phenol rings (L and R rings). Here, L (R) denotes the phenol ring in the left (right)-hand side of (P)-2,2'-biphenol. We define the bond current between the nearest neighbor carbon atoms Ci and Cj as an electric current through a half plane perpendicular to the Ci-Cj bond. The bond current can be expressed in terms of the inter-atomic bond current. The inter-atomic bond current (bond current) depends on the position of the half plane on the bond and has the maximum value at the center. The coherent ring current in each ring is defined by averaging over the bond currents. Since (P)-2,2'-biphenol is nonplanar, the resultant angular momentum is not one-dimensional. Simulations of the time-dependent coherent angular momentum and ring current of (P)-2,2'-biphenol excited by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses are carried out using the molecular parameters obtained by the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) method. Oscillatory behaviors in the time-dependent angular momentum (ring current), which can be called angular momentum (ring current) quantum beats, are classified by the symmetry of the coherent state, symmetric or antisymmetric. The bond current of the bridge bond linking the L and R

  2. Coherent π-electron dynamics of (P)-2,2'-biphenol induced by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses: Angular momentum and ring current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineo, H.; Lin, S. H.; Fujimura, Y.

    2013-02-01

    The results of a theoretical investigation of coherent π-electron dynamics for nonplanar (P)-2,2'-biphenol induced by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses are presented. Expressions for the time-dependent coherent angular momentum and ring current are derived by using the density matrix method. The time dependence of these coherences is determined by the off-diagonal density matrix element, which can be obtained by solving the coupled equations of motion of the electronic-state density matrix. Dephasing effects on coherent angular momentum and ring current are taken into account within the Markov approximation. The magnitudes of the electronic angular momentum and current are expressed as the sum of expectation values of the corresponding operators in the two phenol rings (L and R rings). Here, L (R) denotes the phenol ring in the left (right)-hand side of (P)-2,2'-biphenol. We define the bond current between the nearest neighbor carbon atoms Ci and Cj as an electric current through a half plane perpendicular to the Ci-Cj bond. The bond current can be expressed in terms of the inter-atomic bond current. The inter-atomic bond current (bond current) depends on the position of the half plane on the bond and has the maximum value at the center. The coherent ring current in each ring is defined by averaging over the bond currents. Since (P)-2,2'-biphenol is nonplanar, the resultant angular momentum is not one-dimensional. Simulations of the time-dependent coherent angular momentum and ring current of (P)-2,2'-biphenol excited by ultrashort linearly polarized UV pulses are carried out using the molecular parameters obtained by the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) method. Oscillatory behaviors in the time-dependent angular momentum (ring current), which can be called angular momentum (ring current) quantum beats, are classified by the symmetry of the coherent state, symmetric or antisymmetric. The bond current of the bridge bond linking the L and R

  3. Fermi surface determination from momentum density projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Michael; Weber, Josef Andreas; Ceeh, Hubert

    2016-06-01

    The problem of determining a metal’s Fermi surface from measured projections of the electron or electron/positron momentum densities, such as those obtained by Compton scattering or angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation, respectively, is examined in a Bayesian formulation. A consistent approach with an explicit treatment of the Fermi surface already at the reconstruction stage is presented, and its advantages compared to previous practice are discussed. A validation of the proposed method on simulated data shows its systematic accuracy to be very satisfactory and its statistical precision on modest experimental data to be surprisingly good.

  4. An attempt at a product vibrational analysis of a photo-induced chemical reaction by means of time-resolved (e, 2e) electron momentum spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Zhu, C. Y.; Takahashi, M.

    2015-09-01

    We report on a new attempt at an analysis of the vibrational state distributions in the products of a photo-induced chemical reaction. The experiment was performed by using time- resolved electron momentum spectroscopy (TR-EMS) for the products produced by the three- body photodissociation dynamics of the deuterated acetone molecule at 195 nm. It has been found from a comparison between the experiment and associated theoretical calculations that future TR-EMS measurements with improved statistics could be useful for the vibrational analysis of reaction products, in cases when effects of molecular vibration on their electron momentum densities are large enough so as to be noticeable in the binding energy spectra.

  5. Implementation of Electronic Consent at a Biobank: An Opportunity for Precision Medicine Research

    PubMed Central

    Boutin, Natalie T.; Mathieu, Kathleen; Hoffnagle, Alison G.; Allen, Nicole L.; Castro, Victor M.; Morash, Megan; O’Rourke, P. Pearl; Hohmann, Elizabeth L.; Herring, Neil; Bry, Lynn; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Weiss, Scott T.; Smoller, Jordan W.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the potential benefits and challenges of electronic informed consent (eIC) as a strategy for rapidly expanding the reach of large biobanks while reducing costs and potentially enhancing participant engagement. The Partners HealthCare Biobank (Partners Biobank) implemented eIC tools and processes to complement traditional recruitment strategies in June 2014. Since then, the Partners Biobank has rigorously collected and tracked a variety of metrics relating to this novel recruitment method. From June 2014 through January 2016, the Partners Biobank sent email invitations to 184,387 patients at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. During the same time period, 7078 patients provided their consent via eIC. The rate of consent of emailed patients was 3.5%, and the rate of consent of patients who log into the eIC website at Partners Biobank was 30%. Banking of biospecimens linked to electronic health records has become a critical element of genomic research and a foundation for the NIH’s Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI). eIC is a feasible and potentially game-changing strategy for these large research studies that depend on patient recruitment. PMID:27294961

  6. Optical angular momentum and atoms.

    PubMed

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-28

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  7. Optical angular momentum and atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-01

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  8. Precise Directed Assembly of Nanoparticles for Electronic, Optical and Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Cihan

    Assembly of nano building blocks offers a versatile route to the creation of complex 1, 2 and 3-dimensional homogenous or hybrid nanostructures with unique properties to be used in many applications including electronics, optics, energy, and biotechnology. Bottom-up directed assembly of nanoparticles has been recently considered as one of the best approaches to manufacture such functional and novel nanostructures. However, current directed assembly techniques have not been shown to make nanostructures homogeneous or hybrid materials with nanoscale precision at a high yield. This is mainly due to the lack of fundamental understanding of the forces driving the assembly of nanoparticles into organized nanostructures on surfaces and the difficulties in precisely controlling these forces to enable the repeatable and reliable assembly of various types of organic or inorganic nanoparticles. We experimentally and numerically investigated the fundamental mechanism of the electrophoretic directed assembly for different sizes and types of nanoparticles. The results showed that unlike large (such as 500nm) Polysterene Latex (PSL) particles, the electrophoretic assembly of 50nm and smaller PSL particles is significantly influenced by the Brownian diffusion. This results in random and low yield assembly for the smaller nanoparticles. In order to overcome the Brownian diffusion-limited assembly of 50nm or smaller particles, the electrophoretic velocity of the particles must be increased. This can be accomplished by increasing the electrophoretic force, which is a function of particle surface charge and applied voltage. The surface charge of the PSL particles is greatly influenced by the pH of the solution. At high pH values (pH 10.1 or above), the nanoparticles attain higher charge, which increases the electrophoretic force. Consequently, the Brownian diffusion can also be overcome by increasing the pH of the solution. Overcoming the Brownian motion at low pH values (<10

  9. Analysis of the dependence of surfatron acceleration of electrons by an electromagnetic wave in space plasma on the particle momentum along the wave front

    SciTech Connect

    Erokhin, A. N.; Zol’nikova, N. N.; Erokhin, N. S.

    2016-01-15

    Based on the numerical solution of the nonlinear nonstationary second-order equation for the wave phase on the particle trajectory, the dynamics of surfatron acceleration of electrons by an electromagnetic wave propagating across the external magnetic field in space plasma is analyzed as a function of the electron momentum along the wave front. Numerical calculations show that, for strongly relativistic initial values of the electron momentum component along the wave front g{sub y}(0) (the other parameters of the problem being the same), electrons are trapped into the regime of ultrarelativistic surfatron acceleration within a certain interval of the initial wave phase Ψ(0) on the particle trajectory. It is assumed in the calculations that vertical bar Ψ(0) vertical bar ≤ π. For strongly relativistic values of g{sub y}(0), electrons are immediately trapped by the wave for 19% of the initial values of the phase Ψ(0) (favorable phases). For the rest of the values of Ψ(0), trapping does not occur even at long times. This circumstance substantially simplifies estimations of the wave damping due to particle acceleration in subsequent calculations. The dynamics of the relativistic factor and the components of the electron velocity and momentum under surfatron acceleration is also analyzed. The obtained results are of interest for the development of modern concepts of possible mechanisms of generation of ultrarelativistic particle fluxes in relatively calm space plasma, as well as for correct interpretation of observational data on the fluxes of such particles and explanation of possible reasons for the deviation of ultrarelativistic particle spectra detected in the heliosphere from the standard power-law scalings and the relation of these variations to space weather and large-scale atmospheric processes similar to tropical cyclones.

  10. Compact Short-Pulsed Electron Linac Based Neutron Sources for Precise Nuclear Material Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Tagi, K.; Matsuyama, D.; Fujiwara, T.; Dobashi, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Harada, H.

    2015-10-01

    An X-band (11.424GHz) electron linac as a neutron source for nuclear data study for the melted fuel debris analysis and nuclear security in Fukushima is under development. Originally we developed the linac for Compton scattering X-ray source. Quantitative material analysis and forensics for nuclear security will start several years later after the safe settlement of the accident is established. For the purpose, we should now accumulate more precise nuclear data of U, Pu, etc., especially in epithermal (0.1-10 eV) neutrons. Therefore, we have decided to modify and install the linac in the core space of the experimental nuclear reactor "Yayoi" which is now under the decommission procedure. Due to the compactness of the X-band linac, an electron gun, accelerating tube and other components can be installed in a small space in the core. First we plan to perform the time-of-flight (TOF) transmission measurement for study of total cross sections of the nuclei for 0.1-10 eV energy neutrons. Therefore, if we adopt a TOF line of less than 10m, the o-pulse length of generated neutrons should be shorter than 100 ns. Electronenergy, o-pulse length, power, and neutron yield are ~30 MeV, 100 ns - 1 micros, ~0.4 kW, and ~1011 n/s (~103 n/cm2/s at samples), respectively. Optimization of the design of a neutron target (Ta, W, 238U), TOF line and neutron detector (Ce:LiCAF) of high sensitivity and fast response is underway. We are upgrading the electron gun and a buncher to realize higher current and beam power with a reasonable beam size in order to avoid damage of the neutron target. Although the neutron flux is limited in case of the X-band electron linac based source, we take advantage of its short pulse aspect and availability for nuclear data measurement with a short TOF system. First, we form a tentative configuration in the current experimental room for Compton scattering in 2014. Then, after the decommissioning has been finished, we move it to the "Yayoi" room and perform

  11. Precision analog signal processor for beam position measurements in electron storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkson, J.A.; Unser, K.B.

    1995-05-01

    Beam position monitors (BPM) in electron and positron storage rings have evolved from simple systems composed of beam pickups, coaxial cables, multiplexing relays, and a single receiver (usually a analyzer) into very complex and costly systems of multiple receivers and processors. The older may have taken minutes to measure the circulating beam closed orbit. Today instrumentation designers are required to provide high-speed measurements of the beam orbit, often at the ring revolution frequency. In addition the instruments must have very high accuracy and resolution. A BPM has been developed for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley which features high resolution and relatively low cost. The instrument has a single purpose; to measure position of a stable stored beam. Because the pickup signals are multiplexed into a single receiver, and due to its narrow bandwidth, the receiver is not intended for single-turn studies. The receiver delivers normalized measurements of X and Y posit ion entirely by analog means at nominally 1 V/mm. No computers are involved. No software is required. Bergoz, a French company specializing in precision beam instrumentation, integrated the ALS design m their new BPM analog signal processor module. Performance comparisons were made on the ALS. In this paper we report on the architecture and performance of the ALS prototype BPM.

  12. High precision measurements of the mass, intrinsic width, momentum spectrum and the branching fractions of Λc(2880)+ decay modes in the BABAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zain, Samya Bano

    2006-04-01

    This dissertation reports an acurate measurement of the mass, intrinsic width and momentum spectra of the charmed baryon Λc(2880) + along with the first measurements on the relative branching fractions of the Λc(2880)+ decaying resonantly and non-resonantly to the Λc(2286) +pi+pi- mode. This analysis was performed using a data sample of approximately 230 fb-1 (integrated luminosity) collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We measure the mass of the Λ c(2880)+ to be 2.8809 +/- 0.0004 (stat.) GeV/c2 and the intrinsic width to be 5.8 +/- 1.7 (stat. MeV. We also measure the relative branching fraction for each of the non-resonant and resonant decays of the Λc(2880) + → Λc(2286)+pipi final states, relative to all modes of Λc(2880) + → Λc(2286)+pipi. The relative branching fraction for the non-resonant decay mode Λ c(2880)+ → Λc(2286) +pi+pi- relative to (Λ c(2880)+ → Λc(2286) +pi+pi-)allmodes is evaluated to be 0.385 +/- 0.087 (stat.) +0.044-0.074 (syst.), wheras the relative branching fraction for the non-resonant decay modes sumc(2455)0pi +, sumc(2520)0pi +, sumc(2455)++pi - and sumc(2520)++pi - are measured to be 0.119 +/- 0.024 (stat.) +0.026-0.014 (syst.), 0.141 +/- 0.038 (stat.) +0.020-0.013 (syst.), 0.206 +/- 0.033 (stat.) +0.026-0.013 (syst.) and 0.149 +/- 0.039 (stat.) +0.023-0.015 (syst.) respectively. Comparison to previous experiments are also given.

  13. Momentum spectra of electrons rescattered from rare-gas targets following their extraction by one- and two-color femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, D.; Chen Zhangjin; De, S.; Cao, W.; Le, A. T.; Lin, C. D.; Cocke, C. L.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Kling, M. F.

    2011-01-15

    We have used velocity-map imaging to measure the three-dimensional momenta of electrons rescattered from Xe and Ar following the liberation of the electrons from these atoms by 45 fs, 800 nm intense laser pulses. Strong structure in the rescattering region is observed in both angle and energy, and is interpreted in terms of quantitative rescattering (QRS) theory. Momentum images have also been taken with two-color (800 nm + 400 nm) pulses on Xe targets. A strong dependence of the spectra on the relative phase of the two colors is observed in the rescattering region. Interpretation of the phase dependence using both QRS theory and a full solution to the time-dependent Schroedinger equation shows that the rescattered electrons provide a much more robust method for determining the relative phase of the two colors than do the direct electrons.

  14. Reaction/Momentum Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    CTA Space Systems, Inc. has been licensed to sell commercially a reaction/momentum wheel originally developed for NASA's scientific satellites. NASA originally identified a need for the wheel in its Small Explorer program. The Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite required extremely low jitter and a reaction/momentum wheel with a torque greater than any comparably sized commercially available wheel to keep the instrument pointed at celestial objects to a high degree of precision. After development, a market assessment by Research Triangle Institute was completed, showing commercial potential for the flywheel technology. A license was granted to CTA in the fall of 1996. The company currently uses the technology in its complete spacecraft fabrication services and has built over 10 reaction/momentum wheels for commercial, scientific, and military customers.

  15. Analysis of de-noising methods to improve the precision of the ILSF BPM electronic readout system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafiee, M.; Feghhi, S. A. H.; Rahighi, J.

    2016-12-01

    In order to have optimum operation and precise control system at particle accelerators, it is required to measure the beam position with the precision of sub-μm. We developed a BPM electronic readout system at Iranian Light Source Facility and it has been experimentally tested at ALBA accelerator facility. The results show the precision of 0.54 μm in beam position measurements. To improve the precision of this beam position monitoring system to sub-μm level, we have studied different de-noising methods such as principal component analysis, wavelet transforms, filtering by FIR, and direct averaging method. An evaluation of the noise reduction was given to testify the ability of these methods. The results show that the noise reduction based on Daubechies wavelet transform is better than other algorithms, and the method is suitable for signal noise reduction in beam position monitoring system.

  16. A study of effective atomic number and electron density of gel dosimeters and human tissues for scattering of gamma rays: momentum transfer, energy and scattering angle dependence.

    PubMed

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this work was to study water- and tissue-equivalent properties of some gel dosimeters, human tissues and water, for scattering of photons using the effective atomic number (Z eff). The Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio (R/C) was used to obtain Z eff and electron density (N e ) of gel dosimeters, human tissues and water considering a 10(-2)-10(9) momentum transfer, q (Å(-1)). In the present work, a logarithmic interpolation procedure was used to estimate R/C as well as Z eff of the chosen materials in a wide scattering angle (1°-180°) and energy range (0.001-100 MeV). The Z eff of the chosen materials was found to increase as momentum transfer increases, for q > ~1 Å(-1). At fixed scattering angle and energy, Z eff of the material first increases and then becomes constant for high momentum transfers (q ≥ 3 Å(-1)), which indicates that Z eff is almost independent of energy and scattering angle for the chosen materials. Based on the Z eff data and the continuous momentum transfer range (10(-2)-10(9) Å(-1)), MAGIC, PAGAT and soft tissue were found to be water-equivalent materials, since their differences (%) relative to water are significantly low (≤3.2 % for MAGIC up to 10(3) Å(-1), ≤2.9 % for PAGAT up to 10(9) Å(-1), and ≤3.8 % for soft tissue up to 10(9) Å(-1)), while the Fricke gel was not found to be water equivalent. PAGAT was found to be a soft tissue-equivalent material in the entire momentum transfer range (<4.3 %), while MAGAT has shown to be tissue equivalent for brain (≤8.1 % up to 10 Å(-1)) and lung (<8.2 % up to 10 Å(-1)) tissues. The Fricke gel dosimeter has shown to be adipose tissue equivalent for most of the momentum range considered (<10 %).

  17. Induced Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses, classically and quantum mechanically, the angular momentum induced in the bound motion of an electron by an external magnetic field. Calculates the current density and its magnetic moment, and then uses two methods to solve the first-order perturbation theory equation for the required eigenfunction. (Author/GA)

  18. Energy-averaged electron-ion momentum transport cross section in the Born approximation and Debye-Hückel potential: Comparison with the cut-off theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R.; Bourham, Mohamed A.; Doster, J. Michael

    2000-04-01

    An exact analytical expression for the energy-averaged electron-ion momentum transport cross section in the Born approximation and Debye-Hückel exponentially screened potential has been derived and compared with the formulae given by other authors. A quantitative comparison between cut-off theory and quantum mechanical perturbation theory has been presented. Based on results from the Born approximation and Spitzer's formula, a new approximate formula for the quantum Coulomb logarithm has been derived and shown to be more accurate than previous expressions.

  19. Energy-averaged electron-ion momentum transport cross section in the Born Approximation and Debye-Hückel potential: Comparison with the cut-off theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R.; Bourham, Mohamed A.; Doster, J. Michael

    2000-02-01

    An exact analytical expression for the energy-averaged electron-ion momentum transport cross section in the Born approximation and Debye-Hückel exponentially screened potential has been derived and compared with the formulae given by other authors. A quantitative comparison between cut-off theory and quantum mechanical perturbation theory has been presented. Based on results from the Born approximation and Spitzer's formula, a new approximate formula for the quantum Coulomb logarithm has been derived and shown to be more accurate than previous expressions.

  20. Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in…

  1. Energy- and momentum-resolved exchange and spin-orbit interaction in cobalt film by spin-polarized two-electron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Samarin, S; Artamonov, O M; Sergeant, A D; Stamps, R; Williams, J F

    2006-09-01

    Spontaneous ordering of electronic spins in ferromagnetic materials is one of the best known and most studied examples of quantum correlations. Exchange correlations are responsible for long range spin order and the spin-orbit interaction (SOI) can create preferred crystalline directions for the spins, i.e., magnetic anisotropy. Presented experimental data illustrate how novel spin-polarized two-electron spectroscopy in-reflection mode allows observation of the localization of spin-dependent interactions in energy-momentum space. Comparison of spin-orbit asymmetries in spectra of Co film and clean W(110) may indicate the presence of interface specific proximity effects providing important clues to the formation of preferred orientations for the magnetic moment of the Co film. These results may help to understand the microscopic origin of interface magnetic anisotropy.

  2. Electron momentum distribution and singlet-singlet annihilation in the organic anthracene molecular crystals using positron 2D-ACAR and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, Sellaiyan; Sivaji, Krishnan; Arulchakkaravarthi, Arjunan; Sankar, Sambasivam

    2014-08-14

    We present the mapping of electron momentum distribution (EMD) in a single crystal of anthracene by two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR). The projected EMD is explained on the basis of the crystallographic features of the material. The EMD spectra provide information about the positron states and their behavior and also about the hindrance of the positronium (Ps) formation in this material. The EMD has exhibited evidence for the absence of free volume defects. The characteristic EMD features regarding the delocalized electronic states are explained. Further, scintillation characteristics such as fluorescence and time-correlated single photon counting have also been studied. The emission peaks are attributed to vibrational bands of fluorescence emission from the singlet excitons and lifetime components are observed to be due to singlet fission and the singlet-singlet excitons annihilation.

  3. Positron 2D-ACAR experiments and electron-positron momentum density in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Welp, U.; Fang, Y.; Bailey, K.G.; Bansil, A.

    1991-12-01

    We discuss positron annihilation (2D-ACAR) measurements in the C- projection on an untwinned metallic single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} as a function of temperature, for five temperatures ranging from 30K to 300K. The measured 2D-ACAR intensities are interpreted in terms of the electron-positron momentum density obtained within the KKR-band theory framework. The temperature dependence of the 2D-ACAR spectra is used to extract a ``background corrected`` experimental spectrum which is in remarkable accord with the corresponding band theory predictions, and displays in particular clear signatures of the electron ridge Fermi surface.

  4. Positron 2D-ACAR experiments and electron-positron momentum density in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-x

    SciTech Connect

    Smedskjaer, L.C.; Welp, U.; Fang, Y.; Bailey, K.G. ); Bansil, A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-12-01

    We discuss positron annihilation (2D-ACAR) measurements in the C- projection on an untwinned metallic single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} as a function of temperature, for five temperatures ranging from 30K to 300K. The measured 2D-ACAR intensities are interpreted in terms of the electron-positron momentum density obtained within the KKR-band theory framework. The temperature dependence of the 2D-ACAR spectra is used to extract a background corrected'' experimental spectrum which is in remarkable accord with the corresponding band theory predictions, and displays in particular clear signatures of the electron ridge Fermi surface.

  5. Note: electronic circuit for two-way time transfer via a single coaxial cable with picosecond accuracy and precision.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Panek, Petr

    2012-11-01

    We have designed, constructed, and tested the overall performance of the electronic circuit for the two-way time transfer between two timing devices over modest distances with sub-picosecond precision and a systematic error of a few picoseconds. The concept of the electronic circuit enables to carry out time tagging of pulses of interest in parallel to the comparison of the time scales of these timing devices. The key timing parameters of the circuit are: temperature change of the delay is below 100 fs/K, timing stability time deviation better than 8 fs for averaging time from minutes to hours, sub-picosecond time transfer precision, and a few picoseconds time transfer accuracy.

  6. Precision Magnetometry and Systematic Effects in the Nab Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Jason; Nab Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Nab experiment will determine the electron-neutrino correlation parameter a with a precision of δa / a =10-3 and the Fierz interference term b to δb = 3 ×10-3 in unpolarized neutron β decay. A long asymmetric spectrometer is optimized to achieve fast proton momentum longitudinalization and the required narrow proton momentum response function. A reliable relation of the measured proton TOF to a requires detailed knowledge of the effective proton pathlength, which imposes requirements on the precision of the magnetic fields in the Nab spectrometer. The Nab magnetometry goals, associated systematics, and some initial results will be discussed.

  7. c-Axis projected electron-positron momentum density in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect

    Bansil, A.; Mijnarends, P.E.; Smedskjaer, L.C.

    1990-11-01

    The authors present the theoretical c-axis projected electron-positron momentum density N{sub 2{gamma}}(P{sub x},p{sub y}) in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} based on the local density approximation (LDA) framework along various lines in momentum space. The calculations use the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (KKR) band structure formalism. The anisotropic distribution defined by taking cuts through the calculated spectra along different lines in the (p{sub x},p{sub y}) plane possesses complex structures which arise from both Fermi surface effects and the anisotropy of the smoothly varying underlying background from filled bands; the maximum size of the anisotropy is about 10% of N{sub 2{gamma}}(0,0). The theoretically predicted N{sub 2{gamma}}(p{sub x},{sub y}) distribution is compared with the measured 2D-ACAR spectrum. The considerations suggest that in interpreting the 2D-ACAR data on YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} in terms of a band theory LDA picture, a substantial, largely isotropic, background should be subtracted from both the 2D-ACAR`s and the associated LCW-folded spectra.

  8. Bond Formation and Bond Scission Dynamics in Polyatomic Molecules Revealed by Momentum Imaging Experiments and Electron Scattering Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaughter, Daniel; Trevisan, Cynthia; Weyland, Marvin; Dorn, Alexander; Douguet, Nicolas; Orel, Ann; Adaniya, Hidehito; McCurdy, Bill; Belkacem, Ali; Rescigno, Tom

    2016-05-01

    We present combined experimental and theoretical studies of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) dynamics in methane and ammonia. DEA in each of these systems proceeds through electronic Feshbach resonances, where a valence electron is excited and captured with the incident electron in the lowest unoccupied orbital. In methane, one triply-degenerate resonance undergoes Jahn-Teller splitting through molecular distortions, leading to four observed final states, each having a 2-body and a 3-body dissociation with anionic products H- and CH2-and neutrals CH3, CH2, H2 or H. In ammonia, one resonance leads to H- + NH2 and NH2-+ H, the latter resulting from non-adiabatic charge transfer. A higher energy resonance leads directly to H- + NH2* and indirectly to NH2-+ H. We examine the dynamics of the transient anion in each of these processes. work supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences division of BES/DOE.

  9. Direct momentum-resolved observation of one-dimensional confinement of externally doped electrons within a single subnanometer-scale wire.

    PubMed

    Song, Inkyung; Oh, Dong-Hwa; Shin, Ha-Chul; Ahn, Sung-Joon; Moon, Youngkwon; Woo, Sun-Hee; Choi, Hyoung Joon; Park, Chong-Yun; Ahn, Joung Real

    2015-01-14

    Cutting-edge research in the band engineering of nanowires at the ultimate fine scale is related to the minimum scale of nanowire-based devices. The fundamental issue at the subnanometer scale is whether angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) can be used to directly measure the momentum-resolved electronic structure of a single wire because of the difficulty associated with assembling single wire into an ordered array for such measurements. Here, we demonstrated that the one-dimensional (1D) confinement of electrons, which are transferred from external dopants, within a single subnanometer-scale wire (subnanowire) could be directly measured using ARPES. Convincing evidence of 1D electron confinement was obtained using two different gold subnanowires with characteristic single metallic bands that were alternately and spontaneously ordered on a stepped silicon template, Si(553). Noble metal atoms were adsorbed at room temperature onto the gold subnanowires while the overall structure of the wires was maintained. Only one type of gold subnanowire could be controlled using external noble metal dopants without transforming the metallic band of the other type of gold subnanowires. This result was confirmed by scanning tunnelling microscopy experiments and first-principles calculations. The selective control clearly showed that externally doped electrons could be confined within a single gold subnanowire. This experimental evidence was used to further investigate the effects of the disorder induced by external dopants on a single subnanowire using ARPES.

  10. Polarization of the angular momentum of electrons in calculations of the electronic structure of the NiO/sub 6//sup 10 -/ cluster by the X. cap alpha. -scattered-wave method

    SciTech Connect

    Gagarin, S.G.; Teterin, Yu.A.; Plekhanov, Yu.V.

    1986-05-01

    The x-ray photoelectron spectra of the core 2p/sub 1/2/, 2p/sub 3/2/, 3s/sub 1/2/, 3p/sub 1/2/, and 3/p/sub 3/2/ electrons of nickel in the oxide NiO and in an aluminum - nickel catalyst have been discussed on the basis of the results of a self-consistent calculation of the electronic states of the NiO/sub 6//sup 10 -/ cluster in the spin-polarized variation of the X..cap alpha..-scattered-wave method with complete consideration of the relativistic properties of the core electrons in the angular-momentum-polarized variant. Partial consideration of the relativistic properties of the valence-band electrons (consideration of the Darwin terms and the dependence of the mass on the velocity during the averaging of the wave functions and the density with respect to the angular momentum) does not alter the basic conclusions of the work.

  11. Spatial dependent diffusion of cosmic rays and the excess of primary electrons derived from high precision measurements by AMS-02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chao; Guo, Yi-Qing; Hu, Hong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The precise spectra of Cosmic Ray (CR) electrons and positrons have been published by the measurement of AMS-02. It is reasonable to regard the difference between the electron and positron spectra (ΔΦ = Φe- -Φe+) as being dominated by primary electrons. The resulting electron spectrum shows no sign of spectral softening above 20 GeV, which is in contrast with the prediction of the standard model of CR propagation. In this work, we generalize the analytic one-dimensional two-halo model of diffusion to a three-dimensional realistic calculation by implementing spatial variant diffusion coefficients in the DRAGON package. As a result, we can reproduce the spectral hardening of protons observed by several experiments, and predict an excess of high energy primary electrons which agrees with the measurement reasonably well. Unlike the break spectrum obtained for protons, the model calculation predicts a smooth electron excess and thus slightly over-predicts the flux from tens of GeV to 100 GeV. To understand this issue, further experimental and theoretical studies are necessary. Supported by Natural Sciences Foundation of China (11135010)

  12. Cyclotron resonant scattering feature simulations. I. Thermally averaged cyclotron scattering cross sections, mean free photon-path tables, and electron momentum sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarm, F.-W.; Schönherr, G.; Falkner, S.; Pottschmidt, K.; Wolff, M. T.; Becker, P. A.; Sokolova-Lapa, E.; Klochkov, D.; Ferrigno, C.; Fürst, F.; Hemphill, P. B.; Marcu-Cheatham, D. M.; Dauser, T.; Wilms, J.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Electron cyclotron resonant scattering features (CRSFs) are observed as absorption-like lines in the spectra of X-ray pulsars. A significant fraction of the computing time for Monte Carlo simulations of these quantum mechanical features is spent on the calculation of the mean free path for each individual photon before scattering, since it involves a complex numerical integration over the scattering cross section and the (thermal) velocity distribution of the scattering electrons. Aims: We aim to numerically calculate interpolation tables which can be used in CRSF simulations to sample the mean free path of the scattering photon and the momentum of the scattering electron. The tables also contain all the information required for sampling the scattering electron's final spin. Methods: The tables were calculated using an adaptive Simpson integration scheme. The energy and angle grids were refined until a prescribed accuracy is reached. The tables are used by our simulation code to produce artificial CRSF spectra. The electron momenta sampled during these simulations were analyzed and justified using theoretically determined boundaries. Results: We present a complete set of tables suited for mean free path calculations of Monte Carlo simulations of the cyclotron scattering process for conditions expected in typical X-ray pulsar accretion columns (0.01 ≤ B/Bcrit ≤ 0.12, where Bcrit = 4.413 × 1013 G, and 3 keV ≤ kBT ≤ 15 keV). The sampling of the tables is chosen such that the results have an estimated relative error of at most 1/15 for all points in the grid. The tables are available online (see link in footnote, page 1). The electronic tables described here are available at http://www.sternwarte.uni-erlangen.de/research/cyclo

  13. Precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by electron-positron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, R.E.; SLD Collaboration

    1994-03-01

    A precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry (A{sub LR}) for Z boson production by e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions has been attained at the Slac Linear Collider with the SLD detector. We describe this measurement for the 1993 data run, emphasizing the significant improvements in polarized beam operation which took place for this run, where the luminosity-weighted electron beam polarization averaged 62.6 {plus_minus} 1.2 %. Preliminary 1993 results for A{sub LR} are presented. When combined with the (less precise) 1992 result, the preliminary result for the effective weak mixing angle is sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W {sup eff}} = 0.2290 {plus_minus} 0.0010.

  14. Precision radiotherapy for cancer of the pancreas: technique and results. [Photons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Dobelbower, R.R. Jr.; Borgelt, B.B.; Strubler, K.A.; Kutcher, G.J.; Suntharalingam, N.

    1980-09-01

    Forty patients with locally extensive, unresectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas received precision high dose (PHD) radiation therapy with a 45 MeV betatron. PHD radiotherapy was generally well tolerated. During treatment, only 7 patients experienced significant nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or anorexia. Late gastrointestinal radiation reactions were observed in 7 patients. Twelve patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. The projected survival of patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer treated with PHD radiotherapy is comparable to that of patients with resectable disease operated on for cure. The projected one year survival rate is 49%.

  15. Precision Control of the Electron Longitudinal Bunch Shape Using an Emittance-Exchange Beam Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, G.; Cho, M. H.; Namkung, W.; Power, J. G.; Doran, D. S.; Wisniewski, E. E.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.; Liu, W.; Whiteford, C.; Gao, Q.; Kim, K.-J.; Zholents, A.; Sun, Y.-E.; Jing, C.; Piot, P.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the experimental generation of relativistic electron bunches with a tunable longitudinal bunch shape. A longitudinal bunch-shaping (LBS) beam line, consisting of a transverse mask followed by a transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange (EEX) beam line, is used to tailor the longitudinal bunch shape (or current profile) of the electron bunch. The mask shapes the bunch's horizontal profile, and the EEX beam line converts it to a corresponding longitudinal profile. The Argonne wakefield accelerator rf photoinjector delivers electron bunches into a LBS beam line to generate a variety of longitudinal bunch shapes. The quality of the longitudinal bunch shape is limited by various perturbations in the exchange process. We develop a simple method, based on the incident slope of the bunch, to significantly suppress the perturbations.

  16. Quantum fluctuations and coherence in high-precision single-electron capture.

    PubMed

    Kashcheyevs, Vyacheslavs; Timoshenko, Janis

    2012-11-21

    The phase of a single quantum state is undefined unless the history of its creation provides a reference point. Thus, quantum interference may seem hardly relevant for the design of deterministic single-electron sources which strive to isolate individual charge carriers quickly and completely. We provide a counterexample by analyzing the nonadiabatic separation of a localized quantum state from a Fermi sea due to a closing tunnel barrier. We identify the relevant energy scales and suggest ways to separate the contributions of quantum nonadiabatic excitation and back tunneling to the rare noncapture events. In the optimal regime of balanced decay and nonadiabaticity, our simple electron trap turns into a single-lead Landau-Zener back tunneling interferometer, revealing the dynamical phase accumulated between the particle capture and leakage. The predicted "quantum beats in back tunneling" may turn the error of a single-electron source into a valuable signal revealing essentially nonadiabatic energy scales of a dynamic quantum dot.

  17. Electron-Hole Transitions in Multiply Charged Ions for Precision Laser Spectroscopy and Searching for Variations in {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Berengut, J. C.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Ong, A.

    2011-05-27

    We consider transitions of electron holes (vacancies in otherwise filled shells of atomic systems) in multiply charged ions that, due to level crossing of the holes, have frequencies within the range of optical atomic clocks. Strong E1 transitions provide options for laser cooling and trapping, while narrow transitions can be used for high-precision spectroscopy and tests of fundamental physics. We show that hole transitions can have extremely high sensitivity to {alpha} variation and propose candidate transitions that have much larger {alpha} sensitivities than any previously seen in atomic systems.

  18. Precision measurements of g1 of the proton and of the deuteron with 6 GeV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prok, Y.; Bosted, P.; Kvaltine, N.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carlin, C.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crabb, D.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Garçon, M.; Garillon, B.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Girod, F. X.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guler, N.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalkar, S.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Kalantarians, N.; Keith, C.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Peng, P.; Phillips, J. J.; Pierce, J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Smith, C.; Smith, G.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2014-08-01

    The inclusive polarized structure functions of the proton and deuteron, g1p and g1d, were measured with high statistical precision using polarized 6 GeV electrons incident on a polarized ammonia target in Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory. Electrons scattered at laboratory angles between 18 and 45 degrees were detected using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). For the usual deep inelastic region kinematics, Q2>1 GeV2 and the final-state invariant mass W >2 GeV, the ratio of polarized to unpolarized structure functions g1/F1 is found to be nearly independent of Q2 at fixed x. Significant resonant structure is apparent at values of W up to 2.3 GeV. In the framework of perturbative quantum chromodynamics, the high-W results can be used to better constrain the polarization of quarks and gluons in the nucleon, as well as high-twist contributions.

  19. Precision measurements of g1 of the proton and the deuteron with 6 GeV electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Prok, Yelena; Bosted, Peter; Kvaltine, Nicholas; Adhikari, Krishna; Adikaram-Mudiyanselage, Dasuni; Aghasyan, Mher; Amaryan, Moskov; Anderson, Mark; Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Battaglieri, Marco; Biselli, Angela; Bono, Jason; Briscoe, William; Brock, Joseph; Brooks, William; Bueltmann, Stephen; Burkert, Volker; Carlin, Christopher; Carman, Daniel; Celentano, Andrea; Chandavar, Shloka; Colaneri, Luca; Cole, Philip; Contalbrigo, Marco; Cortes, Olga; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; D'Angelo, Annalisa; Dashyan, Natalya; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Deur, Alexandre; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dupre, Raphael; El Alaoui, Ahmed; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Fedotov, Gleb; Fegan, Stuart; Fersch, Robert; Fleming, Jamie; Forest, Tony; Garcon, Michel; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Ghandilyan, Yeranuhi; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Girod-Gard, Francois-Xavier; Giovanetti, Kevin; Goetz, John; Gohn, Wesley; Gothe, Ralf; Griffioen, Keith; Guegan, Baptiste; Guler, Nevzat; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hanretty, Charles; Harrison, Nathan; Hattawy, Mohammad; Hicks, Kenneth; Ho, Dao; Holtrop, Maurik; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Jawalkar, Sucheta; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Joo, Kyungseon; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keith, Christopher; Keller, Daniel; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Andrey; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Koirala, Suman; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Lenisa, Paolo; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; MacGregor, Ian; Markov, Nikolai; Mayer, Michael; McKinnon, Bryan; Meekins, David; Mineeva, Taisiya; Mirazita, Marco; Mokeev, Viktor; Montgomery, Rachel; MOUTARDE, Herve; Movsisyan, Aram; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Pappalardo, Luciano; Paremuzyan, Rafayel; Park, K; Peng, Peng; Phillips, J J; Pierce, Joshua; Pisano, Silvia; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdniakov, Serguei; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Protopopescu, Dan; Puckett, Andrew; Raue, Brian; Rimal, Dipak; Ripani, Marco; Rizzo, Alessandro; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Roy, Priyashree; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salgado, Carlos; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seder, Erin; Sharabian, Youri; Simonyan, Ani; Smith, Claude; Smith, Gregory; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stepanyan, Samuel; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Sytnik, Valeriy; Taiuti, Mauro; Tang, Wei; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vernarsky, Brian; Vlasov, Alexander; Voskanyan, Hakob; Voutier, Eric; Walford, Natalie; Watts, Daniel; Weinstein, Lawrence; Zachariou, Nicholas; Zana, Lorenzo; Zhang, Jixie; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Zhiwen; Zonta, Irene

    2014-08-01

    The inclusive polarized structure functions of the proton and deuteron, g1p and g1d, were measured with high statistical precision using polarized 6 GeV electrons incident on a polarized ammonia target in Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory. Electrons scattered at lab angles between 18 and 45 degrees were detected using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). For the usual DIS kinematics, Q^2>1 GeV^2 and the final-state invariant mass W>2 GeV, the ratio of polarized to unpolarized structure functions g1/F1 is found to be nearly independent of Q^2 at fixed x. Significant resonant structure is apparent at values of W up to 2.3 GeV. In the framework of perturbative QCD, the high-W results can be used to better constrain the polarization of quarks and gluons in the nucleon, as well as high-twist contributions.

  20. MSWAVEF: Momentum-Space Wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, Paul S.

    2017-01-01

    MSWAVEF calculates hydrogenic and non-hydrogenic momentum-space electronic wavefunctions. Such wavefunctions are often required to calculate various collision processes, such as excitation and line broadening cross sections. The hydrogenic functions are calculated using the standard analytical expressions. The non-hydrogenic functions are calculated within quantum defect theory according to the method of Hoang Binh and van Regemorter (1997). Required Hankel transforms have been determined analytically for angular momentum quantum numbers ranging from zero to 13 using Mathematica. Calculations for higher angular momentum quantum numbers are possible, but slow (since calculated numerically). The code is written in IDL.

  1. Precise measurement method for ionospheric total electron content using signals from GPS satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imae, Michito; Kiuchi, Hitoshi; Kaneko, Akihiro; Hama, Shinichi; Miki, Chihiro

    1990-01-01

    A GPS codeless receiver called GTR-2 was for measuring total electron content (TEC) along the line of sight to the GPS satellite by using the cross correlation amplitude of the received P-code signals carried by L1(1575.42 MHz) and L2(1227.6 MHz). This equipment has the performance of uncertainty in the measurement of TEC of about 2 X 10(exp 16) electrons/sq m when a 10 dBi gain antenna was used. To increase the measurement performance, an upper version of GTR-2 called GTR-3 is planned which uses the phase information of the continuous signals obtained by making a cross correlation or multiplication of the received L1 and L2 P-code signals. By using the difference of these measured phases values, the ionospheric delay with the ambiguities of the periods of L1+L2 and L1-L2 signals can be estimated.

  2. Towards a precise modelling of transport processes in planetary ionospheres: photoelectrons, magnetospheric electrons and protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Cyril

    Numerical simulations of planetary ionospheres (Earth, Mars, Venus and Titan) using Boltzmann's kinetic formalism have proved their efficiency in interpreting multi-instrumental data sets. We present now the last evolution of the Trans-* codes family, called Trans4, which takes simultaneously into account photoionisation and electron/proton precipitation effects. The kinetic transport is coupled to a fluid model, which yields electron and ion densities, temperatures, velocities and heating fluxes, directly comparable to incoherent scatter radar measurements. We describe the physics of the model in detail, from chemical inputs to collisions and magnetic mirroring. As an example, a multi-instrumental (ground-based and satellite) data set at high latitudes on Earth is studied, which shows the applicability and the interest of such a code while dealing with complex solar-planetary events. Perspectives on the other planets (Mars, Venus, Titan) are discussed, as well as future extensions (cosmic rays, radiative transfer, polarisation).

  3. One-chip electronic detection of DNA hybridization using precision impedance-based CMOS array sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Oen; Sohn, Mi-Jin; Lee, Byunghun; Choi, Suk-Hwan; Kim, Sang Kyu; Yoon, Jun-Bo; Cho, Gyu-Hyeong

    2010-12-15

    This paper describes a label-free and fully electronic detection method of DNA hybridization, which is achieved through the use of a 16×8 microarray sensor in conjunction with a new type of impedance spectroscopy constructed with standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. The impedance-based method is based on changes in the reactive capacitance and the charge-transfer resistance after hybridization with complementary DNA targets. In previously published label-free techniques, the measured capacitance presented unstable capacitive properties due to the parallel resistance that is not infinite and can cause a leakage by discharging the charge on the capacitor. This paper presents an impedance extraction method that uses excitation by triangular wave voltage, which enables a reliable measurement of both C and R producing a highly sensitive sensor with a stable operation independent of external variables. The system was fabricated in an industrial 0.35-μm 4-metal 2-poly CMOS process, integrating working electrodes and readout electronics into one chip. The integrated readout, which uses a parasitic insensitive integrator, achieves an enlarged detection range and improved noise performance. The maximum average relative variations of C and R are 31.5% and 68.6%, respectively, after hybridization with a 1 μM target DNA. The proposed sensor allows quantitative evaluation of the molecule densities on the chip with distinguishable variation in the impedance. This fully electronic microsystem has great potential for use with bioanalytical tools and point-of-care diagnosis.

  4. Accessing electronic and vibronic quanta and their coherent interactions in atomically precise nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeltzer, Gabriel

    In condensed matter systems the spatial limit is given by the fundamental atomic and molecular interactions. Controlling matter at these length scales hold promise in both fundamental scientific research as well as applications in nanotechnology and related fields such as electronics, biochemistry and medicine. Atomic and molecular manipulation on surfaces has opened a new realm of possibilities where materials can be engineered at the spatial limit and artificial structures can be constructed with a bottom-up approach, one building block at a time. This thesis describes nanostructures assembled from CO molecules on Cu(111) using a custom-built low-temperature ultra-high vacuum (UHV) scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The design and performance of the atom-manipulation apparatus that has enabled these experiments is presented. The control of electronic and vibronic states is demonstrated in several coherent quantum geometries and interactions between these two degrees of freedom are investigated. This work has revealed a virtual vibron process where non-local vibrons are synthesized and focused using a two-dimensional electron gas as a propagation medium and molecular oscillators as a source. Analysis of higher order harmonic modes of quartz tuning fork sensors is presented in the context of high frequency optical homodyne interferometric detection of subnanometer oscillatory motion. Further developments which could expand upon the work presented herein, in which STM may be combined with quantum force sensing through the use of quartz tuning forks, are suggested.

  5. Precise convective cooling simulation of electronic equipment under various g-conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Johannes; Stuempel, Dieter; Rath, Michael

    1991-12-01

    Using the thermohydraulic code 'THEBES' a three dimensional flow analysis of a Spacelab rack under forced convection and a combined convective, conductive and radiative analysis of a closed electronic box under various g conditions are presented. The capabilities and features of THEBES are described. The motivation to extend the thermal analysis cycle for better treatment of fluid flow and solid to air heat transfer is discussed. It is proposed to include THEBES in a thermal analysis toolsat and present a concept for integration of THEBES with ESABASE.

  6. Precision electronics for a system of custom MCPs in the TORCH Time of Flight detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, R.; Brook, N.; Castillo García, L.; Conneely, T.; Cussans, D.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros García, A.; Van Dijk, M.

    2017-03-01

    The TORCH detector will provide charged particle pi/K/p identification up to 10 GeV/c, combining Time-of-Flight and Cherenkov techniques to achieve a timing resolution of 70 ps for single photons. Based on a scalable design, a Time-of-Flight electronics readout system has been developed to instrument a novel customized 512-channel Micro Channel Plate (MCP) device. A Gigabit Ethernet-based readout scheme that operates the TORCH demonstration unit consisting of ten such MCPs will be reported. The trigger and clock distribution will also be discussed.

  7. Momentum-Resolved Electronic Structure of the High-Tc Superconductor Parent Compound BaBiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, N. C.; Gawryluk, D. J.; Wang, Y.; Ristić, Z.; Park, J.; Lv, B. Q.; Wang, Z.; Matt, C. E.; Xu, N.; Shang, T.; Conder, K.; Mesot, J.; Johnston, S.; Shi, M.; Radović, M.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the band structure of BaBiO3 , an insulating parent compound of doped high-Tc superconductors, using in situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on thin films. The data compare favorably overall with density functional theory calculations within the local density approximation, demonstrating that electron correlations are weak. The bands exhibit Brillouin zone folding consistent with known BiO6 breathing distortions. Though the distortions are often thought to coincide with Bi3 +/Bi5 + charge ordering, core level spectra show that bismuth is monovalent. We further demonstrate that the bands closest to the Fermi level are primarily oxygen derived, while the bismuth 6 s states mostly contribute to dispersive bands at deeper binding energy. The results support a model of Bi-O charge transfer in which hole pairs are localized on combinations of the O 2 p orbitals.

  8. Matched dipole probe for precise electron density measurements in magnetized and non-magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-09-01

    We present a plasma diagnostics method based on impedance measurements of a short matched dipole placed in the plasma. This allows measuring the local electron density in the range from 1012-1015 m-3 with a magnetic field of at least 0-50 mT. The magnetic field strength is not directly influencing the data analysis and requires only that the dipole probe is oriented perpendicularly to the magnetic field. As a result, the magnetic field can be non-homogeneous or even non-defined within the probe length without any effect on the final tolerance of the measurements. The method can be applied to plasmas of relatively small dimensions (< 10 cm) and doesn't require any special boundary conditions. The high sensitivity of the impedance measurements is achieved by using a miniature matching system installed close to the probe tip, which also allows to suppress sheath resonance effects. We experimentally show here that the tolerance of the electron density measurements reaches values lower than 1%, both with and without the magnetic field. The method is successfully validated by both analytical modeling and experimental comparison with Langmuir probes. The validation experiments are conducted in a low pressure (1 mTorr) Ar discharge sustained in a 10 cm size plasma chamber with and without a transversal magnetic field of about 20 mT. This work was supported by a Marie Curie International Incoming Fellowships within FP7 (NEPTUNE PIIF-GA-2012-326054).

  9. Research on precision-calibration techniques for selected area electron diffraction patterns of pyrocarbon.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lehua; Li, Miaoling; Li, Hejun; Xu, Guozhong; Wang, Chuang

    2009-04-01

    The key techniques for determining orientation angle (OA) and interlayer space (d002) of pyrocarbon were investigated by analyzing selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns. A series of algorithms, which mainly include the five-point center-determined technique, the integral factor for the ellipse detection, the background subtraction operation and the Gaussian multipeak fitting algorithm, were designed for intensity sampling, data correction, and data fitting. The contribution ratio of the reflection intensity to the average d002 was considered. The algorithms were programmed and applied to evaluate SAED patterns of pyrocarbon in C/C composites by chemical vapor infiltration. Results showed that the proposed techniques can be effectively used to measure various SAED patterns, with a beam stop image or not, of pyrocarbon. The azimuthal intensities along the (002) arcs essentially obey the Gaussian distribution, although this is not obvious for the lower textural pyrocarbon. It is necessary for accurate OA to use the Gaussian multipeak fitting algorithm.

  10. Infrared rovibrational spectroscopy of OH–C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in {sup 4}He nanodroplets: Parity splitting due to partially quenched electronic angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Douberly, Gary E. Liang, Tao; Raston, Paul L.; Marshall, Mark D.

    2015-04-07

    The T-shaped OH–C{sub 2}H{sub 2} complex is formed in helium droplets via the sequential pick-up and solvation of the monomer fragments. Rovibrational spectra of the a-type OH stretch and b-type antisymmetric CH stretch vibrations contain resolved parity splitting that reveals the extent to which electronic angular momentum of the OH moiety is quenched upon complex formation. The energy difference between the spin-orbit coupled {sup 2}B{sub 1} (A″) and {sup 2}B{sub 2} (A′) electronic states is determined spectroscopically to be 216 cm{sup −1} in helium droplets, which is 13 cm{sup −1} larger than in the gas phase [Marshall et al., J. Chem. Phys. 121, 5845 (2004)]. The effect of the helium is rationalized as a difference in the solvation free energies of the two electronic states. This interpretation is motivated by the separation between the Q(3/2) and R(3/2) transitions in the infrared spectrum of the helium-solvated {sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} OH radical. Despite the expectation of a reduced rotational constant, the observed Q(3/2) to R(3/2) splitting is larger than in the gas phase by ≈0.3 cm{sup −1}. This observation can be accounted for quantitatively by assuming the energetic separation between {sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} and {sup 2}Π{sub 1/2} manifolds is increased by ≈40 cm{sup −1} upon helium solvation.

  11. High-precision electronic structure studies of thermoelectrics: Bi_2Te_3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Miyoung; Freeman, A. J.; Geller, C. B.

    2004-03-01

    The heavy-atom, narrow-bandgap semiconductor Bi_2Te3 is of centralcommercial importance for thermoelectric cooling. Detailed ab initio screened exchange(R. Asahi, W. Mannstadt, A.J. Freeman, Phys. Rev. B, 59), 7486 (1999) (sX-LDA) electronic structure calculations have been performed for Bi_2Te3 within the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW)footnote Wimmer, Krakauer, Weinert, Freeman, Phys. Rev. B 24, 864(1981) method, accounting for spin-orbit coupling self-consistently. An indirect bandgap of 0.155 eV is found for a conduction band (CB) minimum on the mirror plane containing the trigonal and bisectric axes, thus confirming the experimental(H. Köhler, Phys. Status. Solidi, 73), 95 (1976); 74, 591 (1976) and earlier theoretical(S. Youn, A.J. Freeman, Phys. Rev. B, 63), 085112 (2001) observations of sixfold-degenerate CB and VB extrema in doped Bi_2Te_3. The predicted sX-LDA bandgap value is <5% of the zero temperature-extrapolated experimental value(B.M. Golts'man, et.al., Thermoelectric Semiconductor Materials Based on Bi_2Te_3, English trans., US Nat. Tech. Info Center (1973).) (0.162 eV). These values compare with a predicted LDA bandgap^3 (on the mirror plane) of 0.045 eV. The carrier density dependence of the effective mass tensor and the Seebeck coefficient are explored using our accurate quasiparticle band structure.

  12. StatSTEM: An efficient approach for accurate and precise model-based quantification of atomic resolution electron microscopy images.

    PubMed

    De Backer, A; van den Bos, K H W; Van den Broek, W; Sijbers, J; Van Aert, S

    2016-12-01

    An efficient model-based estimation algorithm is introduced to quantify the atomic column positions and intensities from atomic resolution (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) images. This algorithm uses the least squares estimator on image segments containing individual columns fully accounting for overlap between neighbouring columns, enabling the analysis of a large field of view. For this algorithm, the accuracy and precision with which measurements for the atomic column positions and scattering cross-sections from annular dark field (ADF) STEM images can be estimated, has been investigated. The highest attainable precision is reached even for low dose images. Furthermore, the advantages of the model-based approach taking into account overlap between neighbouring columns are highlighted. This is done for the estimation of the distance between two neighbouring columns as a function of their distance and for the estimation of the scattering cross-section which is compared to the integrated intensity from a Voronoi cell. To provide end-users this well-established quantification method, a user friendly program, StatSTEM, is developed which is freely available under a GNU public license.

  13. A non-destructive n-doping method for graphene with precise control of electronic properties via atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyu Seok; Kalode, Pranav Y; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Kim, Hongbum; Lee, Lynn; Sung, Myung Mo

    2016-03-07

    Graphene applications require high precision control of the Fermi level and carrier concentration via a nondestructive doping method. Here, we develop an effective n-doping technique using atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnO thin films on graphene through a reactive molecular layer. This ALD doping method is nondestructive, simple, and precise. The ZnO thin films on graphene are uniform, conformal, of good quality with a low density of pinholes, and finely tunable in thickness with 1 Å resolution. We demonstrate graphene transistor control in terms of the Dirac point, carrier density, and doping state as a function of the ZnO thickness. Moreover, ZnO functions as an effective thin-film barrier against air-borne water and oxygen on the graphene, resulting in extraordinary stability in air for graphene devices. ZnO ALD was also applied to other two-dimensional materials including MoS2 and WSe2, which substantially enhanced electron mobility.

  14. High-Precision Calibration of Electron Beam Energy from the Hefei Light Source Using Spin Resonant Depolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Jie-Qin; Xu, Hong-Liang

    2014-12-01

    The electron beam energy at the Hefei Light Source (HLS) in the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is highly precisely calibrated by using the method of spin resonant depolarization for the first time. The spin tune and the beam energy are determined by sweeping the frequency of a radial rf stripline oscillating magnetic field to artificially excite a spin resonance and depolarize the beam. The resonance signal is recognized by observing the sudden change of the Touschek loss counting rate of the beam. The possible systematic errors of the experiment are presented and the accuracy of the calibrated energy is shown to be about 10-4. A series of measurements show that the energy stability of the machine is of the order of 9 × 10-3.

  15. Momentum resolution in inverse photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Zumbülte, A.; Schmidt, A. B.; Donath, M.

    2015-01-15

    We present a method to determine the electron beam divergence, and thus the momentum resolution, of an inverse-photoemission setup directly from a series of spectra measured on Cu(111). Simulating these spectra with different beam divergences shows a distinct influence of the divergence on the appearance of the Shockley surface state. Upon crossing the Fermi level, its rise in intensity can be directly linked with the beam divergence. A comparison of measurement and simulation enables us to quantify the momentum resolution independent of surface quality, energy resolution, and experimental geometry. With spin resolution, a single spectrum taken around the Fermi momentum of a spin-split surface state, e.g., on Au(111), is sufficient to derive the momentum resolution of an inverse-photoemission setup.

  16. Momentum-resolved electronic structure at a buried interface from soft X-ray standing-wave angle-resolved photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, A. X.; Minár, J.; Plucinski, L.; Huijben, M.; Bostwick, A.; Rotenberg, E.; Yang, S.-H.; Braun, J.; Winkelmann, A.; Conti, G.; Eiteneer, D.; Rattanachata, A.; Greer, A. A.; Ciston, J.; Ophus, C.; Rijnders, G.; Blank, D. H. A.; Doennig, D.; Pentcheva, R.; Kortright, J. B.; Schneider, C. M.; Ebert, H.; Fadley, C. S.

    2013-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is a powerful technique for the study of electronic structure, but it lacks a direct ability to study buried interfaces between two materials. We address this limitation by combining ARPES with soft X-ray standing-wave (SW) excitation (SWARPES), in which the SW profile is scanned through the depth of the sample. We have studied the buried interface in a prototypical magnetic tunnel junction La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/SrTiO3. Depth-and momentum-resolved maps of Mn 3d eg and t2g states from the central, bulk-like and interface-like regions of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 exhibit distinctly different behavior consistent with a change in the Mn bonding at the interface. We compare the experimental results to state-of-the-art density-functional and one-step photoemission theory, with encouraging agreement that suggests wide future applications of this technique.

  17. Single and double electron capture from He by Ar{sup 16+} studied using cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdallah, M.A.; Wolff, W.; Wolf, H.E.; Kamber, E.Y.; Stoeckli, M.; Cocke, C.L.

    1998-10-01

    Single and double electron capture from He targets by Ar{sup 16+} ions have been studied at projectile velocities from 0.3 to 1.5 a.u. Cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy was used to record the energy gain and scattering angle simultaneously. For single capture, the reaction window is found to spread in width approximately as the square root of the projectile velocity and to shift slightly toward smaller energy-gain values as the velocity increases. The angular distributions center at the half Coulomb angle over most of the velocity range covered, but differ in shape from multichannel Landau-Zener model results. For double capture, transfer ionization dominates and feeds primarily n-symmetric states, where {ital n} is the principal quantum number. True double capture feeds mainly n-asymmetric states. The angular distributions for double capture lie outside the half Coulomb angle, indicating the importance of two-step processes in populating doubly excited states. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Electron collisions with phenol: Total, integral, differential, and momentum transfer cross sections and the role of multichannel coupling effects on the elastic channel.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Romarly F; de Oliveira, Eliane M; Bettega, Márcio H F; Varella, Márcio T do N; Jones, Darryl B; Brunger, Michael J; Blanco, Francisco; Colmenares, Rafael; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; García, Gustavo; Lima, Marco A P

    2015-03-14

    We report theoretical and experimental total cross sections for electron scattering by phenol (C6H5OH). The experimental data were obtained with an apparatus based in Madrid and the calculated cross sections with two different methodologies, the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR), and the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials (SMCPP). The SMCPP method in the Nopen-channel coupling scheme, at the static-exchange-plus-polarization approximation, is employed to calculate the scattering amplitudes at impact energies ranging from 5.0 eV to 50 eV. We discuss the multichannel coupling effects in the calculated cross sections, in particular how the number of excited states included in the open-channel space impacts upon the convergence of the elastic cross sections at higher collision energies. The IAM-SCAR approach was also used to obtain the elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) and for correcting the experimental total cross sections for the so-called forward angle scattering effect. We found a very good agreement between our SMCPP theoretical differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections and experimental data for benzene (a molecule differing from phenol by replacing a hydrogen atom in benzene with a hydroxyl group). Although some discrepancies were found for lower energies, the agreement between the SMCPP data and the DCSs obtained with the IAM-SCAR method improves, as expected, as the impact energy increases. We also have a good agreement among the present SMCPP calculated total cross section (which includes elastic, 32 inelastic electronic excitation processes and ionization contributions, the latter estimated with the binary-encounter-Bethe model), the IAM-SCAR total cross section, and the experimental data when the latter is corrected for the forward angle scattering effect [Fuss et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 042702 (2013)].

  19. Angular-momentum evolution in laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Thaury, C; Guillaume, E; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Le Bouteiller, M; Ta Phuoc, K; Davoine, X; Rax, J M; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-09-27

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extent in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for nonplanar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in a laser-plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in a laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular-momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular-momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  20. Orbital angular momentum microlaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M.; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes.

  1. Combining 2 nm Spatial Resolution and 0.02% Precision for Deformation Mapping of Semiconductor Specimens in a Transmission Electron Microscope by Precession Electron Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Cooper, David; Bernier, Nicolas; Rouvière, Jean-Luc

    2015-08-12

    Precession electron diffraction has been used to provide accurate deformation maps of a device structure showing that this technique can provide a spatial resolution of better than 2 nm and a precision of better than 0.02%. The deformation maps have been fitted to simulations that account for thin specimen relaxation. By combining the experimental deformation maps and simulations, we have been able to separate the effects of the stressor and recessed sources and drains and show that the Si3N4 stressor increases the in-plane deformation in the silicon channel from 0.92 to 1.52 ± 0.02%. In addition, the stress in the deposited Si3N4 film has been calculated from the simulations, which is an important parameter for device design.

  2. Transverse momentum at work in high-energy scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signori, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    I will review some aspects of the definition and the phenomenology of Transverse-Momentum-Dependent distributions (TMDs) which are potentially interesting for the physics program at several current and future experimental facilities. First of all, I will review the definition of quark, gluon and Wilson loop TMDs based on gauge invariant hadronic matrix elements. Looking at the phenomenology of quarks, I will address the flavor dependence of the intrinsic transverse momentum in unpolarized TMDs, focusing on its extraction from Semi-Inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering. I will also present an estimate of its impact on the transverse momentum spectrum of W and Z bosons produced in unpolarized hadronic collisions and on the determination of the W boson mass. Moreover, the combined effect of the flavor dependence and the evolution of TMDs with the energy scale will be discussed for electron-positron annihilation. Concerning gluons, I will present from an effective theory point of view the TMD factorization theorem for the transverse momentum spectrum of pseudoscalar quarkonium produced in hadronic collisions. Relying on this, I will discuss the possibility of extracting precise information on (un)polarized gluon TMDs at a future Fixed Target Experiment at the LHC (AFTER@LHC).

  3. Precision muon tracking detectors and read-out electronics for operation at very high background rates at future colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortner, O.; Kroha, H.; Nowak, S.; Richter, R.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K.; Schwegler, Ph.

    2016-07-01

    The experience of the ATLAS MDT muon spectrometer shows that drift-tube chambers provide highly reliable precision muon tracking over large areas. The ATLAS muon chambers are exposed to unprecedentedly high background of photons and neutrons induced by the proton collisions. Still higher background rates are expected at future high-energy and high-luminosity colliders beyond HL-LHC. Therefore, drift-tube detectors with 15 mm tube diameter (30 mm in ATLAS), optimised for high rate operation, have been developed for such conditions. Several such full-scale sMDT chambers have been constructed with unprecedentedly high sense wire positioning accuracy of better than 10 μm. The chamber design and assembly methods have been optimised for large-scale production, reducing considerably cost and construction time while maintaining the high mechanical accuracy and reliability. Tests at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN showed that the rate capability of sMDT chambers is improved by more than an order of magnitude compared to the MDT chambers. By using read-out electronics optimised for high counting rates, the rate capability can be further increased.

  4. Introducing Electromagnetic Field Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    I describe an elementary way of introducing electromagnetic field momentum. By considering a system of a long solenoid and line charge, the dependence of the field momentum on the electric and magnetic fields can be deduced. I obtain the electromagnetic angular momentum for a point charge and magnetic monopole pair partially through dimensional…

  5. Electron reconstruction and electroweak processes as tools to achieve precision measurements at a hadron collider: From CDF to CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Giolo-Nicollerat, Anne-Sylvie

    2004-01-01

    Precision measurements are an important aspect of hadron colliders physics program. This thesis describes a method, together with a first application, of how to achieve and use precision measurements at the LHC. The idea is to use refernce processes to control the detector systematics and to constrain the theoretical predictions.

  6. Why do a precision measurement of delta m(atm)**2 in the electron-neutrino and anti-electron-neutrino disappearance channel?

    SciTech Connect

    Nunokawa, H; Parke, Stephen J; Zukanovich Funchal, R

    2005-07-01

    We discuss why high precision measurements of {delta}m{sub atm}{sup 2} in the {nu}{sub e}/{bar {nu}}{sub e} disappearance channels would be desirable in conjunction with the {delta}m{sub atms}{sup 2} high precision measurements that will be performed in the {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} disappearance channels by long baseline experiments such as T2K and NOvA. We show that if these measurements can achieve the challenging precision of about 0.5%, it will be possible to determine the mass hierarchy of the neutrino sector without the need of matter effects.

  7. Nonsurvivable momentum exchange system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roder, Russell (Inventor); Ahronovich, Eliezer (Inventor); Davis, III, Milton C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A demiseable momentum exchange system includes a base and a flywheel rotatably supported on the base. The flywheel includes a web portion defining a plurality of web openings and a rim portion. The momentum exchange system further includes a motor for driving the flywheel and a cover for engaging the base to substantially enclose the flywheel. The system may also include components having a melting temperature below 1500 degrees Celsius. The momentum exchange system is configured to demise on reentry.

  8. TDRSS momentum unload planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, George R.; Potter, Mitchell A.; Whitehead, J. Douglass; Smith, James T.

    1991-01-01

    A knowledge-based system is described which monitors TDRSS telemetry for problems in the momentum unload procedure. The system displays TDRSS telemetry and commands in real time via X-windows. The system constructs a momentum unload plan which agrees with the preferences of the attitude control specialists and the momentum growth characteristics of the individual spacecraft. During the execution of the plan, the system monitors the progress of the procedure and watches for unexpected problems.

  9. Do waves carrying orbital angular momentum possess azimuthal linear momentum?

    PubMed

    Speirits, Fiona C; Barnett, Stephen M

    2013-09-06

    All beams are a superposition of plane waves, which carry linear momentum in the direction of propagation with no net azimuthal component. However, plane waves incident on a hologram can produce a vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum that seems to require an azimuthal linear momentum, which presents a paradox. We resolve this by showing that the azimuthal momentum is not a true linear momentum but the azimuthal momentum density is a true component of the linear momentum density.

  10. New sum rules relating the 1-body momentum distribution of the homogeneous electron gas to the Kimball-Overhauser 2-body wave functions (geminals) of its pair density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziesche, P.; Pernal, K.; Tasnádi, F.

    2003-09-01

    Recently, new sum rules for the scattering phase shifts of the pair-density geminals (being 2-body-wave functions which parametrize the pair density together with an appropriately chosen occupancy) have been derived from the normalization of the pair density [P. Ziesche, Phys. Rev. B 67, 233102 (2003)]. Here, we present a generalization of these sum rules, which allows one in principle to calculate the momentum distribution from these geminals and their phase shifts. These contraction sum rules contain the afore mentioned (Friedel-like) normalization sum rules as special cases.

  11. Introducing Conservation of Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunt, Marjorie; Brunt, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    The teaching of the principle of conservation of linear momentum is considered (ages 15 + ). From the principle, the momenta of two masses in an isolated system are considered. Sketch graphs of the momenta make Newton's laws appear obvious. Examples using different collision conditions are considered. Conservation of momentum is considered…

  12. Precisely-controlled fabrication of single ZnO nanoemitter arrays and their possible application in low energy parallel electron beam exposure.

    PubMed

    He, H; She, J C; Huang, Y F; Deng, S Z; Xu, N S

    2012-03-21

    Precisely-controlled fabrication of single ZnO nanoemitter arrays and their possible application in low energy parallel electron beam exposure are reported. A well defined polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) nanohole template was employed for local solution-phase growth of single ZnO nanoemitter arrays. Chlorine plasma etching for surface smoothing and pulsed-laser illumination in nitrogen for nitrogen doping were performed, which can significantly enhance the electron emission and improve the emitter-to-emitter uniformity in performance. Mechanisms responsible for the field emission enhancing effect are proposed. Low voltage (368 V) e-beam exposure was performed by using a ZnO nanoemitter array and a periodical hole pattern (0.72-1.26 μm in diameter) was produced on a thin (25 nm) PMMA. The work demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing single ZnO nano-field emitter arrays for low voltage parallel electron beam lithography.

  13. A proposal for a precision test of the standard model by neutrino-electron scattering (Large /hacek C/erenkov Detector Project)

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.C.; Lu, X-Q.; Gollwitzer, K.; Igo, G.J.; Gulmez, E.; Whitten, C.; VanDalen, G.; Layter, J.; Fung, Sun Yui; Shen, B.C.

    1988-04-01

    A precision measurement of neutrino-electron elastic scattering from a beam stop neutrino source at LAMPF is proposed. The total error in sin/sup 2/theta/sub W/ is estimated to be +-0.89/percent/. The experiment also will be sensitive to neutrino oscillations and supernova-neutrino bursts, and should set improved limits on the neutrino-charge radius and magnetic-dipole moment. The detector consists of a 2.5-million-gallon tank of water with approximately 14,000 photomultiplier tubes lining the surfaces of the tank. Neutrino-electron scattering events will be observed from the /hacek C/erenkov radiation emitted by the electrons in the water. 19 refs.

  14. Correlated, precision measurements of θ23 and δ using only the electron neutrino appearance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Minakata, Hisakazu; Parke, Stephen J.

    2013-06-04

    Precision measurement of the leptonic CP violating phase δ will suffer from the, then surviving, large uncertainty of sin2θ23 of 10–20% in the experimentally interesting region near maximal mixing of θ23. We advocate a new method for determination of both θ23 and δ at the same time using only the νe and ν̄e appearance channels and show that sin2θ23 can be determined automatically with much higher accuracy, approximately a factor of six, than sinδ. In this method, we identify a new degeneracy for the simultaneous determination of θ23 and δ, the θ23 intrinsic degeneracy, which must be resolved in order to achieve precision measurement of these two parameters. Spectral information around the vacuum oscillation maxima is shown to be the best way to resolve this degeneracy.

  15. Low-cost, high-precision propagation delay measurement of 12-fibre MPO cables for the CMS DT electronics upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Tobar, Á.; Fernández-Bedoya, C.; Redondo, I.

    2013-02-01

    CMS DT electronics upgrade involves laying down 3500 optical links from the CMS experimental cavern to the service cavern, whose lengths must be matched to minimize skew, so that the present upstream electronics can be reused at an initial stage. In order to assess the cables' compliance, a high resolution and cost-effective system has been developed to measure the length uniformity of these fibres. Transit-time oscillation method has been implemented with matched MTP 12-channel fibre optic transmitter and receiver and a Spartan-6 FPGA. After proper corrections and averaging, millimetre-range accuracy has been achieved.

  16. Three-dimensional location of a single dopant with atomic precision by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Lupini, Andrew R; Findlay, Scott D; Taniguchi, Takashi; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Materials properties, such as optical and electronic response, can be greatly enhanced by isolated single dopants. Determining the full three-dimensional single-dopant defect structure and spatial distribution is therefore critical to understanding and adequately tuning functional properties. Combining quantitative Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy images with image simulations, we show the direct determination of the atomic-scale depth location of an optically active, single atom Ce dopant embedded within wurtzite-type AlN. The method represents a powerful new tool for reconstructing three-dimensional information from a single, two-dimensional image.

  17. A wavelet-based Projector Augmented-Wave (PAW) method: Reaching frozen-core all-electron precision with a systematic, adaptive and localized wavelet basis set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel, T.; Caliste, D.; Genovese, L.; Torrent, M.

    2016-11-01

    We present a Projector Augmented-Wave (PAW) method based on a wavelet basis set. We implemented our wavelet-PAW method as a PAW library in the ABINIT package [http://www.abinit.org] and into BigDFT [http://www.bigdft.org]. We test our implementation in prototypical systems to illustrate the potential usage of our code. By using the wavelet-PAW method, we can simulate charged and special boundary condition systems with frozen-core all-electron precision. Furthermore, our work paves the way to large-scale and potentially order- N simulations within a PAW method.

  18. On Angular Momentum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schwinger, J.

    1952-01-26

    The commutation relations of an arbitrary angular momentum vector can be reduced to those of the harmonic oscillator. This provides a powerful method for constructing and developing the properties of angular momentum eigenvectors. In this paper many known theorems are derived in this way, and some new results obtained. Among the topics treated are the properties of the rotation matrices; the addition of two, three, and four angular momenta; and the theory of tensor operators.

  19. Momentum sharing in imbalanced Fermi systems

    DOE PAGES

    Hen, O.; Sargsian, M.; Weinstein, L. B.; ...

    2014-10-16

    The atomic nucleus is composed of two different kinds of fermions, protons and neutrons. If the protons and neutrons did not interact, the Pauli exclusion principle would force the majority fermions (usually neutrons) to have a higher average momentum. Our high-energy electron scattering measurements using 12C, 27Al, 56Fe and 208Pb targets show that, even in heavy neutron-rich nuclei, short-range interactions between the fermions form correlated high-momentum neutron-proton pairs. Thus, in neutron-rich nuclei, protons have a greater probability than neutrons to have momentum greater than the Fermi momentum. This finding has implications ranging from nuclear few body systems to neutron starsmore » and may also be observable experimentally in two-spin state, ultra-cold atomic gas systems.« less

  20. Momentum sharing in imbalanced Fermi systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hen, O.; Sargsian, M.; Weinstein, L. B.; Piasetzky, E.

    2014-10-16

    The atomic nucleus is composed of two different kinds of fermions, protons and neutrons. If the protons and neutrons did not interact, the Pauli exclusion principle would force the majority fermions (usually neutrons) to have a higher average momentum. Our high-energy electron scattering measurements using 12C, 27Al, 56Fe and 208Pb targets show that, even in heavy neutron-rich nuclei, short-range interactions between the fermions form correlated high-momentum neutron-proton pairs. Thus, in neutron-rich nuclei, protons have a greater probability than neutrons to have momentum greater than the Fermi momentum. This finding has implications ranging from nuclear few body systems to neutron stars and may also be observable experimentally in two-spin state, ultra-cold atomic gas systems.

  1. Controlling precise magnetic field configuration around electron cyclotron resonance zone for enhancing plasma parameters and beam current.

    PubMed

    Yano, Keisuke; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Kimura, Daiju; Imai, Youta; Kumakura, Sho; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-01

    Multi-charged ion source which has wide operating conditions is required in various application fields. We have constructed tandem type ECR ion source (ECRIS); one of the features of its main stage is an additional coil for controlling magnetic field distribution around the mirror bottom precisely. Here the effect of magnetic field variation caused by the additional coil is experimentally considered in terms of plasma parameters and beam current as the first investigation of the main stage plasma. Furthermore, behavior of magnetic lines of force flowing from the ECR zone is calculated, and is compared with measurement results aiming for better understanding of interrelationship between plasma production and ion beam generation on the ECRIS.

  2. Precision measurements of spectral phases in femtosecond spectroscopy and application to doubly degenerate electronic dynamics in silicon naphthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro, Allison Albrecht

    Femtosecond lasers have been used to reveal the timescales for important physical processes including the primary steps of vision and photosynthesis. It is demonstrated here that spectral interferometry has the accuracy necessary to distinguish phase shifts from time delays for femtosecond pulses. This distinction opens up access to new levels of information and has consequences for experimental practice, coherent control, phase-locked pulse pair experiments, and the theory of femtosecond nonlinear spectroscopy. In particular, the distinction makes optical two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform spectroscopy possible. A complete measurement of the femtosecond linear free induction decay in a dye solution is also demonstrated using spectral interferometry. For weak pulses, it is shown that Beer's law predicts the amplitude change and appropriate dispersion relations can be used to calculate the spectral phase change. The results indicate that the rotating wave approximation used in nonlinear spectroscopy can fail at the 6% level for molecular spectra with widths 15% of the center frequency. The doubly degenerate electronic dynamics of silicon 2,3- naphthalocyanine bis(trihexylsilyloxide) (C84H102N8O 2Si3) were investigated using transient grating signals, pump-probe polarization anisotropy measurements, and 2D electronic spectra. The signals displayed weak vibrational quantum beats and a resolvable sub 100 fs initial anisotropy decay. The pump-probe anisotropy disagreed with current theory and led to a reformulation of the theory which explicitly includes ground state depopulation, excited state emission, and excited state absorption. Jahn-Teller electronic reorientation is proposed as a likely mechanism for the anisotropy decay. A model for the electronic reorientation and vibrational motion in silicon naphthalocyanine was constructed. Calculations of the nonlinear signals using the model reproduced the quantum beats and the anisotropy decay outside the pulse

  3. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOEpatents

    Zonca, Fulvio; Cohen, Samuel A.; Bennett, Timothy; Timberlake, John R.

    1993-01-01

    Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

  4. Determination of the charge radii of several light nuclei from precision, high-energy electron elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kabir, Al Amin

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of high-energy electron scattering has been used to determine the charge radii of nuclei for several decades. Recent analysis of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen found an r.m.s. radius significantly different than the electron scattering result. To understand this puzzle we have analyzed the "LEDEX" data for the (e, e'p) reaction. This experiment includes measurements on several light nuclei, hydrogen, deuterium, lithium, boron, and carbon. To test our ability to measure absolute cross sections, as well as our ability to extract the charge radius, we tested our technique against the extremely well-measured carbon case and found excellent agreement using the Fourier-Bessel parametrization. We then extended the procedure to boron and lithium, which show nice agreement with the latest theoretical calculations. For hydrogen, we see clearly the limits of this technique and therefore, the charge radius is determined from the traditional extrapolation to q2 = 0. We will show that there is a model dependence in extracting the charge radius of hydrogen and its unambiguous determination is very difficult with available electron-scattering measurements.

  5. Three-dimensional locations of gold-labeled proteins in a whole mount eukaryotic cell obtained with 3nm precision using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dukes, Madeline J; Ramachandra, Ranjan; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Gray Jerome, W; de Jonge, Niels

    2011-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) maps of proteins within the context of whole cells are important for investigating cellular function. However, 3D reconstructions of whole cells are challenging to obtain using conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We describe a methodology to determine the 3D locations of proteins labeled with gold nanoparticles on whole eukaryotic cells. The epidermal growth factor receptors on COS7 cells were labeled with gold nanoparticles, and critical-point dried whole-mount cell samples were prepared. 3D focal series were obtained with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), without tilting the specimen. The axial resolution was improved with deconvolution. The vertical locations of the nanoparticles in a whole-mount cell were determined with a precision of 3nm. From the analysis of the variation of the axial positions of the labels we concluded that the cellular surface was ruffled. To achieve sufficient stability of the sample under electron beam irradiation during the recording of the focal series, the sample was carbon coated. A quantitative method was developed to analyze the stability of the ultrastructure after electron beam irradiation using TEM. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of using aberration-corrected STEM to study the 3D nanoparticle distribution in whole cells.

  6. Transverse momentum and centrality dependence of high-ptnon-photonic electron suppression in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$= 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2006-07-11

    The STAR collaboration at RHIC reports measurements of theinclusive yield of non-photonic electrons, which arise dominantly fromsemi-leptonic decays of heavy flavor mesons, over a broad range oftransverse momenta (1.2electron yieldexhibits unexpectedly large suppression in central AuAu collisions athigh pt, suggesting substantial heavy quark energy loss at RHIC. Thecentrality and \\pt dependences of the suppression provide constraints ontheoretical models of suppression.

  7. The Angular Momentum Dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teklu, Adelheid; Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Dolag, Klaus; Burkert, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    In the context of the formation of spiral galaxies the evolution and distribution of the angular momentum of dark matter halos have been discussed for more than 20 years, especially the idea that the specific angular momentum of the halo can be estimated from the specific angular momentum of its disk (e.g. Fall & Efstathiou (1980), Fall (1983) and Mo et al. (1998)). We use a new set of hydrodynamic cosmological simulations called Magneticum Pathfinder which allow us to split the galaxies into spheroidal and disk galaxies via the circularity parameter ɛ, as commonly used (e.g. Scannapieco et al. (2008)). Here, we focus on the dimensionless spin parameter λ = J |E|1/2 / (G M5/2) (Peebles 1969, 1971), which is a measure of the rotation of the total halo and can be fitted by a lognormal distribution, e.g. Mo et al. (1998). The spin parameter allows one to compare the relative angular momentum of halos across different masses and different times. Fig. 1 reveals a dichotomy in the distribution of λ at all redshifts when the galaxies are split into spheroids (dashed) and disk galaxies (dash-dotted). The disk galaxies preferentially live in halos with slightly larger spin parameter compared to spheroidal galaxies. Thus, we see that the λ of the whole halo reflects the morphology of its central galaxy. For more details and a larger study of the angular momentum properties of disk and spheroidal galaxies, see Teklu et al. (in prep.).

  8. Design and dosimetry characteristics of a commercial applicator system for intra-operative electron beam therapy utilizing ELEKTA Precise accelerator.

    PubMed

    Nevelsky, Alexander; Bernstein, Zvi; Bar-Deroma, Raquel; Kuten, Abraham; Orion, Itzhak

    2010-07-19

    The design concept and dosimetric characteristics of a new applicator system for intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) are presented in this work. A new hard-docking commercial system includes polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) applicators with different diameters and applicator end angles and a set of secondary lead collimators. A telescopic device allows changing of source-to-surface distance (SSD). All measurements were performed for 6, 9, 12 and 18 MeV electron energies. Output factors and percentage depth doses (PDD) were measured in a water phantom using a plane-parallel ion chamber. Isodose contours and radiation leakage were measured using a solid water phantom and radiographic films. The dependence of PDD on SSD was checked for the applicators with the smallest and the biggest diameters. SSD dependence of the output factors was measured. Hardcopies of PDD and isodose contours were prepared to help the team during the procedure on deciding applicator size and energy to be chosen. Applicator output factors are a function of energy, applicator size and applicator type. Dependence of SSD correction factors on applicator size and applicator type was found to be weak. The same SSD correction will be applied for all applicators in use for each energy. The radiation leakage through the applicators is clinically acceptable. The applicator system enables effective collimation of electron beams for IORT. The data presented are sufficient for applicator, energy and monitor unit selection for IORT treatment of a patient.

  9. Losing forward momentum holographically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Koushik; Herzog, Christopher P.

    2014-06-01

    We present a numerical scheme for solving Einstein’s Equations in the presence of a negative cosmological constant and an event horizon with planar topology. Our scheme allows for the introduction of a particular metric source at the conformal boundary. Such a spacetime has a dual holographic description in terms of a strongly interacting quantum field theory at nonzero temperature. By introducing a sinusoidal static metric source that breaks translation invariance, we study momentum relaxation in the field theory. In the long wavelength limit, our results are consistent with the fluid-gravity correspondence and relativistic hydrodynamics. In the small amplitude limit, our results are consistent with the memory function prediction for the momentum relaxation rate. Our numerical scheme allows us to study momentum relaxation outside these two limits as well.

  10. Searching for momentum enhancement in hypervelocity impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Stradling, G.L.; Idzorek, G.C.; Keaton, P.W.; Studebaker, J.K. ); Blossom, A.A.H. ); Collopy, M.T.; Curling, H.L. Jr. ); Bergeson, S.D. )

    1990-01-01

    In conjunction with the Los Alamos National Laboratory hypervelocity microparticle impact (HMI) team effort to produce higher impact velocities and to understand the physics of crater formation and momentum transfer, the authors have implemented a low noise microphone as a momentum detector on both the 6 MV Van de Graaff and 85 KV test stand' particle accelerators. Calculations are presented showing that the impulse response of a circular membrane. When used as a momentum impulse detector, the microphone theoretically may detect impulses as small as 8.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}15} N s. Sensitivity of the microphone in this application is limited by the noise threshold of the electronic amplifiers and the ambient microphinic vibration of the system. Calculations lead the authors to anticipate detection of particles over the full range of the Van de Graaff acceleration capability and up to 7 km/s on the test stand. They present momentum enhancement data in the velocity range between 10 km/s and 20 km/s. Preliminary work is presented on momentum impulse calibration of the microphone using laser-pulse photon momentum as an impulse source.

  11. Optical orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Stephen M; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J

    2017-02-28

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  12. Optical orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J.

    2017-02-01

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  13. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOEpatents

    Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1993-08-24

    An apparatus is described for measuring momentum flux from an intense plasma stream, comprising: refractory target means oriented normal to the flow of said plasma stream for bombardment by said plasma stream where said bombardment by said plasma stream applies a pressure to said target means, pendulum means for communicating a translational displacement of said target to a force transducer where said translational displacement of said target is transferred to said force transducer by an elongated member coupled to said target, where said member is suspended by a pendulum configuration means and where said force transducer is responsive to said translational displacement of said member, and force transducer means for outputting a signal representing pressure data corresponding to said displacement.

  14. Transverse momentum and centrality dependence of high-pT nonphotonic electron suppression in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s NN]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Callner, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D; Hollis, R; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kurnadi, P; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lapointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, N S; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Qattan, I A; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, J; Wu, Y; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2007-05-11

    The STAR collaboration at the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) reports measurements of the inclusive yield of nonphotonic electrons, which arise dominantly from semileptonic decays of heavy flavor mesons, over a broad range of transverse momenta (1.2electron yield exhibits an unexpectedly large suppression in central Au+Au collisions at high p(T), suggesting substantial heavy-quark energy loss at RHIC. The centrality and p(T) dependences of the suppression provide constraints on theoretical models of suppression.

  15. Performing elemental microanalysis with high accuracy and high precision by scanning electron microscopy/silicon drift detector energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/SDD-EDS).

    PubMed

    Newbury, Dale E; Ritchie, Nicholas W M

    Electron-excited X-ray microanalysis performed in the scanning electron microscope with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) is a core technique for characterization of the microstructure of materials. The recent advances in EDS performance with the silicon drift detector (SDD) enable accuracy and precision equivalent to that of the high spectral resolution wavelength-dispersive spectrometer employed on the electron probe microanalyzer platform. SDD-EDS throughput, resolution, and stability provide practical operating conditions for measurement of high-count spectra that form the basis for peak fitting procedures that recover the characteristic peak intensities even for elemental combination where severe peak overlaps occur, such PbS, MoS2, BaTiO3, SrWO4, and WSi2. Accurate analyses are also demonstrated for interferences involving large concentration ratios: a major constituent on a minor constituent (Ba at 0.4299 mass fraction on Ti at 0.0180) and a major constituent on a trace constituent (Ba at 0.2194 on Ce at 0.00407; Si at 0.1145 on Ta at 0.0041). Accurate analyses of low atomic number elements, C, N, O, and F, are demonstrated. Measurement of trace constituents with limits of detection below 0.001 mass fraction (1000 ppm) is possible within a practical measurement time of 500 s.

  16. Non-free-electron momentum- and thickness-dependent evolution of quantum well states in the Cu/Co/Cu (001) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenberg, Eli; Wu, Y. Z.; An, J. M.; van Hove, M. A.; Canning, A.; Wang, L. W.; Qiu, Z. Q.

    2006-02-01

    We present systematic k‖ -dependent measurements of the Fermi surface and underlying band structure of quantum well states in Cu/Co/Cu(001) . Compared to bands from normal emission, we find a complicated evolution of “split” quantum well states as a function of the thicknesses of both the copper overlayer and the cobalt barrier layer. Self-consistent calculations show that the penetration of the quantum well states into the cobalt barrier layer is significant and leads to the observed very non-free-electron behavior of these states.

  17. Precision performance lamp technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Dean A.; Kiesa, James E.; Dean, Raymond A.

    1997-09-01

    A principal function of a lamp is to produce light output with designated spectra, intensity, and/or geometric radiation patterns. The function of a precision performance lamp is to go beyond these parameters and into the precision repeatability of performance. All lamps are not equal. There are a variety of incandescent lamps, from the vacuum incandescent indictor lamp to the precision lamp of a blood analyzer. In the past the definition of a precision lamp was described in terms of wattage, light center length (LCL), filament position, and/or spot alignment. This paper presents a new view of precision lamps through the discussion of a new segment of lamp design, which we term precision performance lamps. The definition of precision performance lamps will include (must include) the factors of a precision lamp. But what makes a precision lamp a precision performance lamp is the manner in which the design factors of amperage, mscp (mean spherical candlepower), efficacy (lumens/watt), life, not considered individually but rather considered collectively. There is a statistical bias in a precision performance lamp for each of these factors; taken individually and as a whole. When properly considered the results can be dramatic to the system design engineer, system production manage and the system end-user. It can be shown that for the lamp user, the use of precision performance lamps can translate to: (1) ease of system design, (2) simplification of electronics, (3) superior signal to noise ratios, (4) higher manufacturing yields, (5) lower system costs, (6) better product performance. The factors mentioned above are described along with their interdependent relationships. It is statistically shown how the benefits listed above are achievable. Examples are provided to illustrate how proper attention to precision performance lamp characteristics actually aid in system product design and manufacturing to build and market more, market acceptable product products in the

  18. Precision Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radius, Marcie; And Others

    The manual provides information for precision measurement (counting of movements per minute of a chosen activity) of achievement in special education students. Initial sections give guidelines for the teacher, parent, and student to follow for various methods of charting behavior. It is explained that precision measurement is a way to measure the…

  19. Determining neutrino mass hierarchy by precise measurements of two delta m**2 in electron-neutrino and muon-neutrino disappearance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Minakata, H.; Nunokawa, H.; Parke, Stephen J.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; /Sao Paulo U.

    2006-09-01

    In this talk, the authors discuss the possibility of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the two effective atmospheric neutrino mass squared differences measured, respectively, in electron, and in muon neutrino disappearance oscillation experiments. if the former, is larger (smaller) than the latter, the mass hierarchy is of normal (inverted) type. They consider two very high precision (a few per mil) measurements of such mass squared differences by the phase II of the T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) experiment and by the novel Moessbauer enhanced resonant {bar {nu}}{sub e} absorption technique. Under optimistic assumptions for the systematic errors of both measurements, they determine the region of sensitivities where the mass hierarchy can be distinguished. Due to the tight space limitation, they present only the general idea and show a few most important plots.

  20. Time-resolved orbital angular momentum spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Noyan, Mehmet A.; Kikkawa, James M.

    2015-07-20

    We introduce pump-probe magneto-orbital spectroscopy, wherein Laguerre-Gauss optical pump pulses impart orbital angular momentum to the electronic states of a material and subsequent dynamics are studied with 100 fs time resolution. The excitation uses vortex modes that distribute angular momentum over a macroscopic area determined by the spot size, and the optical probe studies the chiral imbalance of vortex modes reflected off the sample. First observations in bulk GaAs yield transients that evolve on time scales distinctly different from population and spin relaxation, as expected, but with surprisingly large lifetimes.

  1. Development of a magnetically suspended momentum wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, S. B.

    1973-01-01

    An engineering model of a magnetically suspended momentum wheel was designed, fabricated, and tested under laboratory conditions. The basic unit consisted of two magnet bearings, a sculptured aluminum rotor, brushless dc spin motor, and electronics. The magnet bearings, utilizing rare-earth cobltrat-samarium magnets were active radially and passive axially. The results of the program showed that momentum wheels with magnetic bearings are feasible and operable, and that magnetic bearings of this type are capable of being used for applications where high capacity, high stiffness, and low power consumption are required. The tests performed developed criteria for improved performance for future designs.

  2. Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cholerton, Brenna; Larson, Eric B.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Mata, Ignacio F.; Keene, C. Dirk; Flanagan, Margaret; Crane, Paul K.; Grabowski, Thomas J.; Montine, Kathleen S.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    Three key elements to precision medicine are stratification by risk, detection of pathophysiological processes as early as possible (even before clinical presentation), and alignment of mechanism of action of intervention(s) with an individual's molecular driver(s) of disease. Used for decades in the management of some rare diseases and now gaining broad currency in cancer care, a precision medicine approach is beginning to be adapted to cognitive impairment and dementia. This review focuses on the application of precision medicine to address the clinical and biological complexity of two common neurodegenerative causes of dementia: Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. PMID:26724389

  3. Nanomechanical effects of light unveil photons momentum in medium.

    PubMed

    Verma, Gopal; Chaudhary, Komal; Singh, Kamal P

    2017-02-15

    Precision measurement on momentum transfer between light and fluid interface has many implications including resolving the intriguing nature of photons momentum in a medium. For example, the existence of Abraham pressure of light under specific experimental configuration and the predictions of Chau-Amperian formalism of optical momentum for TE and TM polarizations remain untested. Here, we quantitatively and cleanly measure nanomehanical dynamics of water surface excited by radiation pressure of a laser beam. We systematically scanned wide range of experimental parameters including long exposure times, angle of incidence, spot size and laser polarization, and used two independent pump-probe techniques to validate a nano- bump on the water surface under all the tested conditions, in quantitative agreement with the Minkowski's momentum of light. With careful experiments, we demonstrate advantages and limitations of nanometer resolved optical probing techniques and narrow down actual manifestation of optical momentum in a medium.

  4. Nanomechanical effects of light unveil photons momentum in medium

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Gopal; Chaudhary, Komal; Singh, Kamal P.

    2017-01-01

    Precision measurement on momentum transfer between light and fluid interface has many implications including resolving the intriguing nature of photons momentum in a medium. For example, the existence of Abraham pressure of light under specific experimental configuration and the predictions of Chau-Amperian formalism of optical momentum for TE and TM polarizations remain untested. Here, we quantitatively and cleanly measure nanomehanical dynamics of water surface excited by radiation pressure of a laser beam. We systematically scanned wide range of experimental parameters including long exposure times, angle of incidence, spot size and laser polarization, and used two independent pump-probe techniques to validate a nano- bump on the water surface under all the tested conditions, in quantitative agreement with the Minkowski’s momentum of light. With careful experiments, we demonstrate advantages and limitations of nanometer resolved optical probing techniques and narrow down actual manifestation of optical momentum in a medium. PMID:28198468

  5. Nanomechanical effects of light unveil photons momentum in medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Gopal; Chaudhary, Komal; Singh, Kamal P.

    2017-02-01

    Precision measurement on momentum transfer between light and fluid interface has many implications including resolving the intriguing nature of photons momentum in a medium. For example, the existence of Abraham pressure of light under specific experimental configuration and the predictions of Chau-Amperian formalism of optical momentum for TE and TM polarizations remain untested. Here, we quantitatively and cleanly measure nanomehanical dynamics of water surface excited by radiation pressure of a laser beam. We systematically scanned wide range of experimental parameters including long exposure times, angle of incidence, spot size and laser polarization, and used two independent pump-probe techniques to validate a nano- bump on the water surface under all the tested conditions, in quantitative agreement with the Minkowski’s momentum of light. With careful experiments, we demonstrate advantages and limitations of nanometer resolved optical probing techniques and narrow down actual manifestation of optical momentum in a medium.

  6. Momentum-resolved view of mixed 2D and nonbulklike 3D electronic structure of the surface state on SrTiO3 (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, N. C.; Salluzzo, M.; Razzoli, E.; Mansson, M.; Krempasky, J.; Matt, C. E.; Schmitt, T.; Shi, M.; Mesot, J.; Patthey, L.; Radovic, M.

    2014-03-01

    The recent discovery of a metallic surface state on SrTiO3 may open a route to simplified low-dimensional oxide-based conductors, as well as give new insights into interfacial phenomena in heterostructures such as LaAlO3/SrTiO3. Our recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) study demonstrates that not only quasi-2D but also non-bulklike 3D Fermi surface components make up the surface state. Like their more 2D counterparts, the size and character of the 3D components are fixed with respect to a broad range of sample preparations. As seen in previous studies, the surface state can be ``prepared'' by photon irradiation under UHV conditions. An extremely high fraction of the surface valence states are affected by this process, especially in relation to the stability of oxygen core level intensity during the same exposure, which points to a key role of electronic/structural changes that spread over the surface as the metal emerges.

  7. Design and application of a novel high precision and low cost electronic tachogenerator for sensor-based brushless direct current motor drivers.

    PubMed

    Ozgenel, Mehmet Cihat; Bal, Gungor; Uygun, Durmus

    2017-03-01

    This study presents a precise speed control method for Brushless Direct Current (BLDC) Motors using an electronic tachogenerator (ETg) instead of an electro-mechanical tachogenerator. Most commonly used three-phase BLDC motors have three position sensors for rotor position data to provide commutation among stator windings. Aforementioned position sensors are usually Hall-effect sensors delivering binary-high and binary-low data as long as the motor rotates. These binary sets from three Hall-effect sensors can be used as an analogue rotor speed signal for closed loop applications. Each position sensor signal is apart from 120 electrical degrees. By using an electronic circuitry, a combination of position sensor signals is converted to the analogue signal providing an input to a PI speed controller. To implement this, a frequency to voltage converter has been used in this study. Then, the analogue speed signal has been evaluated as rotor speed data in comparison with the reference speed. So, an ETg system has been successfully achieved in place of an electro-mechanical tachogenerator for BLDC motor speed control. The proposed ETg has been tested under various speed conditions on an experimental setup. Employed tests and obtained results show that the proposed low-cost speed feedback sub-system can be effectively used in BLDC motor drive systems. Through the proved method and designed sub-system, a new motor controller chip with a speed feedback capability has been aimed.

  8. Design and application of a novel high precision and low cost electronic tachogenerator for sensor-based brushless direct current motor drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgenel, Mehmet Cihat; Bal, Gungor; Uygun, Durmus

    2017-03-01

    This study presents a precise speed control method for Brushless Direct Current (BLDC) Motors using an electronic tachogenerator (ETg) instead of an electro-mechanical tachogenerator. Most commonly used three-phase BLDC motors have three position sensors for rotor position data to provide commutation among stator windings. Aforementioned position sensors are usually Hall-effect sensors delivering binary-high and binary-low data as long as the motor rotates. These binary sets from three Hall-effect sensors can be used as an analogue rotor speed signal for closed loop applications. Each position sensor signal is apart from 120 electrical degrees. By using an electronic circuitry, a combination of position sensor signals is converted to the analogue signal providing an input to a PI speed controller. To implement this, a frequency to voltage converter has been used in this study. Then, the analogue speed signal has been evaluated as rotor speed data in comparison with the reference speed. So, an ETg system has been successfully achieved in place of an electro-mechanical tachogenerator for BLDC motor speed control. The proposed ETg has been tested under various speed conditions on an experimental setup. Employed tests and obtained results show that the proposed low-cost speed feedback sub-system can be effectively used in BLDC motor drive systems. Through the proved method and designed sub-system, a new motor controller chip with a speed feedback capability has been aimed.

  9. Electromagnetic momentum conservation in media

    SciTech Connect

    Brevik, Iver; Ellingsen, Simen A.

    2011-03-15

    That static electric and magnetic fields can store momentum may be perplexing, but is necessary to ensure total conservation of momentum. Simple situations in which such field momentum is transferred to nearby bodies and point charges have often been considered for pedagogical purposes, normally assuming vacuum surroundings. If dielectric media are involved, however, the analysis becomes more delicate, not least since one encounters the electromagnetic energy-momentum problem in matter, the 'Abraham-Minkowski enigma', of what the momentum is of a photon in matter. We analyze the momentum balance in three nontrivial examples obeying azimuthal symmetry, showing how the momentum conservation is satisfied as the magnetic field decays and momentum is transferred to bodies present. In the last of the examples, that of point charge outside a dielectric sphere in an infinite magnetic field, we find that not all of the field momentum is transferred to the nearby bodies; a part of the momentum appears to vanish as momentum flux towards infinity. We discuss this and other surprising observations which can be attributed to the assumption of magnetic fields of infinite extent. We emphasize how formal arguments of conserved quantities cannot determine which energy-momentum tensor is more 'correct', and each of our conservation checks may be performed equally well in the Minkowski or Abraham framework.

  10. Exclusive Reactions at High Momentum Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radyushkin, Anatoly; Stoler, Paul

    2008-03-01

    . P. Szczepaniak and J. T. Londergan -- High energy break-up of few-nucleon systems / M. Sargsian -- Photodisintegration of the deuteron, and [symbol]He / R. Gilman -- A review of the few-body form factors / G. G. Petratos -- Nucleon form factor measurements and interpretation / C. F. Perdrisat -- Implications of G[symbol](Q[symbol])/G[symbol](Q[symbol]) / S. Dubnicka and A. Z. Dubnickova -- High Q[symbol] large acceptance G[symbol]/G[symbol] measurements using polarization transfer / L. Pentchev, C. F. Perdrisat and B. Wojtsekhowski -- A precise measurement of the neutron magnetic form factor G[symbol] in the few-GeV[symbol] region / G. P. Gilfoyle et al. (the CLAS collaboration) -- Magnetic form factor of the neutron up to 8 (GeV/c)[symbol] / B. Quinn -- Timelike form factors / K. K. Seth -- Polarization phenomena in e[symbol]e[symbol] [symbol] pp¯ revisited / A. Z. Dubnickova and S. Dubnicka -- Light-cone sum rules for form factors of the N[symbol] transition at Q[symbol] = 0 / J. Rohrwild -- Exclusive electroproduction of [symbol] mesons / A. N. Villano (for the JLab E01-002 collaboration) -- Exclusive electroproduction of [symbol] mesons in the S[symbol](1535) resonance region at high momentum transfer / M. M. Dalton (for the JLab E01-002 collaboration) -- Two-photon exchange in electron-proton elastic scattering: theory update / A. V. Afanasev -- Two-photon exchange contributions to elastic ep scattering in the non-local field formalism / P. Jain, S. D. Joglekar and S. Mitra -- Beyond the born approximation: a precise comparison of positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering in CLAS / J. Lachniet et al. -- Meson form factors in the space-like region / D. Gaskell -- Pion-nucleon distribution amplitudes / A. Peters -- [symbol] scattering in the 1/N[symbol] expansion / H. J. Kwee -- [symbol] annihilations into quasi-two-body final states at 10.58 GeV / Kai Yi -- Transition distribution amplitudes / J. P. Lansberg, B. Pire and L. Szymanowski -- Novel QCD

  11. First-Principles Momentum-Dependent Local Ansatz Wavefunction and Momentum Distribution Function Bands of Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakehashi, Yoshiro; Chandra, Sumal

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a first-principles local ansatz wavefunction approach with momentum-dependent variational parameters on the basis of the tight-binding LDA+U Hamiltonian. The theory goes beyond the first-principles Gutzwiller approach and quantitatively describes correlated electron systems. Using the theory, we find that the momentum distribution function (MDF) bands of paramagnetic bcc Fe along high-symmetry lines show a large deviation from the Fermi-Dirac function for the d electrons with eg symmetry and yield the momentum-dependent mass enhancement factors. The calculated average mass enhancement m*/m = 1.65 is consistent with low-temperature specific heat data as well as recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data.

  12. Compact expressions for spherically averaged position and momentum densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crittenden, Deborah L.; Bernard, Yves A.

    2009-08-01

    Compact expressions for spherically averaged position and momentum density integrals are given in terms of spherical Bessel functions (jn) and modified spherical Bessel functions (in), respectively. All integrals required for ab initio calculations involving s, p, d, and f-type Gaussian functions are tabulated, highlighting a neat isomorphism between position and momentum space formulae. Spherically averaged position and momentum densities are calculated for a set of molecules comprising the ten-electron isoelectronic series (Ne-CH4) and the eighteen-electron series (Ar-SiH4, F2-C2H6).

  13. Precision metrology.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X; Whitehouse, D J

    2012-08-28

    This article is a summary of the Satellite Meeting, which followed on from the Discussion Meeting at the Royal Society on 'Ultra-precision engineering: from physics to manufacture', held at the Kavli Royal Society International Centre, Chicheley Hall, Buckinghamshire, UK. The meeting was restricted to 18 invited experts in various aspects of precision metrology from academics from the UK and Sweden, Government Institutes from the UK and Germany and global aerospace industries. It examined and identified metrology problem areas that are, or may be, limiting future developments in precision engineering and, in particular, metrology. The Satellite Meeting was intended to produce a vision that will inspire academia and industry to address the solutions of those open-ended problems identified. The discussion covered three areas, namely the function of engineering parts, their measurement and their manufacture, as well as their interactions.

  14. Two-proton radioactivity and three-body decay. V. Improved momentum distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorenko, L. V.; Egorova, I. A.; Zhukov, M. V.; Charity, R. J.; Miernik, K.

    2010-07-01

    Nowadays quantum-mechanical theory allows one to reliably calculate the processes of 2p radioactivity (true three-body decays) and the corresponding energy and angular correlations up to distances of the order of 103 fm. However, the precision of modern experiments has now become sufficient to indicate some deficiency of the predicted theoretical distributions. In this paper we discuss extrapolation along the classical trajectories as a method to improve the convergence of the theoretical energy and angular correlations at very large distances (of the order of atomic distances), where only long-range Coulomb forces are still operating. The precision of this approach is demonstrated using the “exactly” solvable semianalytical models with simplified three-body Hamiltonians. It is also demonstrated that for heavy 2p emitters, the 2p decay momentum distributions can be sensitive to the effect of screening by atomic electrons. We compare theoretical results with available experimental data.

  15. Optical orbital angular momentum

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J.

    2017-01-01

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069775

  16. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.; Crawford, Daniel W.

    1984-01-01

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  17. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, R.P.; Crawford, D.W.

    1982-03-09

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  18. The importance of high-precision hadronic calorimetry to physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptman, John

    2016-11-01

    The reconstruction and high-precision measurement of the four-vectors of W and Z decays to quarks, which constitute nearly 70% of their decay branching fractions, are critical to a high efficiency and high quality experiment. Furthermore, it is crucial that the energy resolution, and consequently the resolution on the invariant mass of the two fragmenting quarks, is comparable to the energy-momentum resolution on the other particles of the standard model, in particular, electrons, photons, and muons, at energies around 100 GeV. I show that this “unification of resolutions” on all particles of the standard model is now in sight, and will lead to excellent physics at an electron-positron collider.

  19. Momentum Deposition in Curvilinear Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, Mathew Allen; Lowrie, Robert Byron; Rockefeller, Gabriel M.; Thompson, Kelly Glen; Wollaber, Allan Benton

    2015-08-03

    The momentum imparted into a material by thermal radiation deposition is an important physical process in astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) simulations. In recent work we presented a new method of evaluating momentum deposition that relies on the combination of a time-averaged approximation and a numerical integration scheme. This approach robustly and efficiently evaluates the momentum deposition in spherical geometry. Future work will look to extend this approach to 2D cylindrical geometries.

  20. Why momentum width matters for atom interferometry with Bragg pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szigeti, S. S.; Debs, J. E.; Hope, J. J.; Robins, N. P.; Close, J. D.

    2012-02-01

    We theoretically consider the effect of the atomic source's momentum width on the efficiency of Bragg mirrors and beamsplitters and, more generally, on the phase sensitivity of Bragg pulse atom interferometers. By numerical optimization, we show that an atomic cloud's momentum width places a fundamental upper bound on the maximum transfer efficiency of a Bragg mirror pulse, and furthermore limits the phase sensitivity of a Bragg pulse atom interferometer. We quantify these momentum width effects, and precisely compute how mirror efficiencies and interferometer phase sensitivities vary as functions of Bragg order and source type. Our results and methodology allow for an efficient optimization of Bragg pulses and the comparison of different atomic sources, and will help in the design of large momentum transfer Bragg mirrors and beamsplitters for use in atom-based inertial sensors.

  1. Precision medicine in cardiology.

    PubMed

    Antman, Elliott M; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    The cardiovascular research and clinical communities are ideally positioned to address the epidemic of noncommunicable causes of death, as well as advance our understanding of human health and disease, through the development and implementation of precision medicine. New tools will be needed for describing the cardiovascular health status of individuals and populations, including 'omic' data, exposome and social determinants of health, the microbiome, behaviours and motivations, patient-generated data, and the array of data in electronic medical records. Cardiovascular specialists can build on their experience and use precision medicine to facilitate discovery science and improve the efficiency of clinical research, with the goal of providing more precise information to improve the health of individuals and populations. Overcoming the barriers to implementing precision medicine will require addressing a range of technical and sociopolitical issues. Health care under precision medicine will become a more integrated, dynamic system, in which patients are no longer a passive entity on whom measurements are made, but instead are central stakeholders who contribute data and participate actively in shared decision-making. Many traditionally defined diseases have common mechanisms; therefore, elimination of a siloed approach to medicine will ultimately pave the path to the creation of a universal precision medicine environment.

  2. Angular Momentum in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Popolo, A.

    We study the ``angular momentum catastrophe" in the framework of interaction among baryons and dark matter through dynamical friction. By means of Del Popolo (2009) model we simulate 14 galaxies similar to those investigated by van den Bosch, Burkert and Swaters (2001), and calculate the distribution of their spin parameters and the angular momenta. Our model gives the angular momentum distribution which is in agreement with the van den Bosch et al. observations. Our result shows that the ``angular momentum catastrophe" can be naturally solved in a model that takes into account the baryonic physics and the exchange of energy and angular momentum between the baryonic clumps and dark matter through dynamical friction.

  3. Force As A Momentum Current

    SciTech Connect

    Munera, Hector A.

    2010-07-28

    Advantages of a neo-Cartesian approach to classical mechanics are noted. If conservation of linear momentum is the fundamental principle, Newton's three laws become theorems. A minor paradox in static Newtonian mechanics is identified, and solved by reinterpreting force as a current of momentum. Contact force plays the role of a mere midwife in the exchange of momentum; however, force cannot be eliminated from physics because it provides the numerical value for momentum current. In this sense, in a neo-Cartesian formulation of mechanics the concept of force becomes strengthened rather than weakened.

  4. High precision measurement of the proton charge radius: The PRad experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane, Mehdi

    2013-11-01

    The recent high precision measurements of the proton charge radius performed at PSI from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift puzzled the hadronic physics community. A value of 0.8418 {+-} 0.0007 fm was extracted which is 7{sigma} smaller than the previous determinations obtained from electron-proton scattering experiments and based on precision spectroscopy of electronic hydrogen. An additional extraction of the proton charge radius from electron scattering at Mainz is also in good agreement with these "electronic" determinations. An independent measurement of the proton charge radius from unpolarized elastic ep scattering using a magnetic spectrometer free method was proposed and fully approved at Jefferson Laboratory in June 2012. This novel technique uses the high precision calorimeter HyCal and a windowless hydrogen gas target which makes possible the extraction of the charge radius at very forward angles and thus very low momentum transfer Q{sup 2} up to 10{sup -4} (GeV/c){sup 2} with an unprecedented sub-percent precision for this type of experiment. In this paper, after a review of the recent progress on the proton charge radius extraction and the new high precision experiment PRad will be presented.

  5. High precision measurement of the proton charge radius: The PRad experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane, Mehdi; Collaboration: PRad Collaboration

    2013-11-07

    The recent high precision measurements of the proton charge radius performed at PSI from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift puzzled the hadronic physics community. A value of 0.8418 ± 0.0007 fm was extracted which is 7σ smaller than the previous determinations obtained from electron-proton scattering experiments and based on precision spectroscopy of electronic hydrogen. An additional extraction of the proton charge radius from electron scattering at Mainz is also in good agreement with these 'electronic' determinations. An independent measurement of the proton charge radius from unpolarized elastic ep scattering using a magnetic spectrometer free method was proposed and fully approved at Jefferson Laboratory in June 2012. This novel technique uses the high precision calorimeter HyCal and a windowless hydrogen gas target which makes possible the extraction of the charge radius at very forward angles and thus very low momentum transfer Q{sup 2} up to 10{sup −4} (GeV/c){sup 2} with an unprecedented sub-percent precision for this type of experiment. In this paper, after a review of the recent progress on the proton charge radius extraction and the new high precision experiment PRad will be presented.

  6. Unveiling pseudospin and angular momentum in photonic graphene.

    PubMed

    Song, Daohong; Paltoglou, Vassilis; Liu, Sheng; Zhu, Yi; Gallardo, Daniel; Tang, Liqin; Xu, Jingjun; Ablowitz, Mark; Efremidis, Nikolaos K; Chen, Zhigang

    2015-02-17

    Pseudospin, an additional degree of freedom inherent in graphene, plays a key role in understanding many fundamental phenomena such as the anomalous quantum Hall effect, electron chirality and Klein paradox. Unlike the electron spin, the pseudospin was traditionally considered as an unmeasurable quantity, immune to Stern-Gerlach-type experiments. Recently, however, it has been suggested that graphene pseudospin is a real angular momentum that might manifest itself as an observable quantity, but so far direct tests of such a momentum remained unfruitful. Here, by selective excitation of two sublattices of an artificial photonic graphene, we demonstrate pseudospin-mediated vortex generation and topological charge flipping in otherwise uniform optical beams with Bloch momentum traversing through the Dirac points. Corroborated by numerical solutions of the linear massless Dirac-Weyl equation, we show that pseudospin can turn into orbital angular momentum completely, thus upholding the belief that pseudospin is not merely for theoretical elegance but rather physically measurable.

  7. Precision Muonium Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann, Klaus P.

    2016-09-01

    The muonium atom is the purely leptonic bound state of a positive muon and an electron. It has a lifetime of 2.2 µs. The absence of any known internal structure provides for precision experiments to test fundamental physics theories and to determine accurate values of fundamental constants. In particular ground state hyperfine structure transitions can be measured by microwave spectroscopy to deliver the muon magnetic moment. The frequency of the 1s-2s transition in the hydrogen-like atom can be determined with laser spectroscopy to obtain the muon mass. With such measurements fundamental physical interactions, in particular quantum electrodynamics, can also be tested at highest precision. The results are important input parameters for experiments on the muon magnetic anomaly. The simplicity of the atom enables further precise experiments, such as a search for muonium-antimuonium conversion for testing charged lepton number conservation and searches for possible antigravity of muons and dark matter.

  8. Intrinsic Angular Momentum of Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santarelli, Vincent

    1979-01-01

    Derives a familiar torque-angular momentum theorem for the electromagnetic field, and includes the intrinsic torques exerted by the fields on the polarized medium. This inclusion leads to the expressions for the intrinsic angular momentum carried by the radiation traveling through a charge-free medium. (Author/MA)

  9. Controlling neutron orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Clark, Charles W; Barankov, Roman; Huber, Michael G; Arif, Muhammad; Cory, David G; Pushin, Dmitry A

    2015-09-24

    The quantized orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons offers an additional degree of freedom and topological protection from noise. Photonic OAM states have therefore been exploited in various applications ranging from studies of quantum entanglement and quantum information science to imaging. The OAM states of electron beams have been shown to be similarly useful, for example in rotating nanoparticles and determining the chirality of crystals. However, although neutrons--as massive, penetrating and neutral particles--are important in materials characterization, quantum information and studies of the foundations of quantum mechanics, OAM control of neutrons has yet to be achieved. Here, we demonstrate OAM control of neutrons using macroscopic spiral phase plates that apply a 'twist' to an input neutron beam. The twisted neutron beams are analysed with neutron interferometry. Our techniques, applied to spatially incoherent beams, demonstrate both the addition of quantum angular momenta along the direction of propagation, effected by multiple spiral phase plates, and the conservation of topological charge with respect to uniform phase fluctuations. Neutron-based studies of quantum information science, the foundations of quantum mechanics, and scattering and imaging of magnetic, superconducting and chiral materials have until now been limited to three degrees of freedom: spin, path and energy. The optimization of OAM control, leading to well defined values of OAM, would provide an additional quantized degree of freedom for such studies.

  10. Emittance compensation studies of photoinjector beams with angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Lidia, Steven

    2003-05-19

    Beam dynamics studies on the FNPL photo injector that seek to optimize the transport of intense electron beams with large values of canonical angular momentum have been performed. These studies investigate the effect of solenoid emittance compensation on beams that evolve under the combined influence of intense space charge forces and large angular momentum. We present details of experimental measurements and supporting simulations of beam envelope evolution.

  11. Orbital angular momentum entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Mary Jacquiline Romero

    Entanglement in higher dimensions is an attractive concept that is a challenge to realise experimentally. To this end, the entanglement of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons holds promise. The OAM state-space is discrete and theoretically unbounded. In the work that follows, we investigate various aspects of OAM entanglement. We show how the correlations in OAM and its conjugate variable, angular position, are determined by phase- matching and the shape of the pump beam in spontaneous parametric down- conversion. We implement tests of quantum mechanics which have been previously done for other variables. We show the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox for OAM and angle, supporting the incompatibility of quantum mechanics with locality and realism. We demonstrate violations of Bell-type inequalities, thereby discounting local hidden variables for describing the correlations we observe. We show the Hardy paradox using OAM, again highlighting the nonlocal nature of quantum mechanics. We demonstrate violations of Leggett-type inequalities, thereby discounting nonlocal hidden variables for describing correlations. Lastly, we have looked into the entanglement of topological vortex structures formed from a special superposition of OAM modes and show violations of Bell-type inequalities confined to a finite, isolated volume.

  12. Double-slit experiment in momentum space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. P.; Seipt, D.; Surzhykov, A.; Fritzsche, S.

    2016-08-01

    Young's classic double-slit experiment demonstrates the reality of interference when waves and particles travel simultaneously along two different spatial paths. Here, we propose a double-slit experiment in momentum space, realized in the free-space elastic scattering of vortex electrons. We show that this process proceeds along two paths in momentum space, which are well localized and well separated from each other. For such vortex beams, the (plane-wave) amplitudes along the two paths acquire adjustable phase shifts and produce interference fringes in the final angular distribution. We argue that this experiment can be realized with the present-day technology. We show that it gives experimental access to the Coulomb phase, a quantity which plays an important role in all charged particle scattering but which usual scattering experiments are insensitive to.

  13. Precise Measurements of Beam Spin Asymmetries in Semi-Inclusive π0 production

    DOE PAGES

    Aghasyan, M.; Avakian, H.; Rossi, P.; ...

    2011-10-01

    We present studies of single-spin asymmetries for neutral pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of 5.776 GeV polarized electrons from an unpolarized hydrogen target, using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. A substantial sin Φh amplitude has been measured in the distribution of the cross section asymmetry as a function of the azimuthal angle Φh of the produced neutral pion. The dependence of this amplitude on Bjorken x and on the pion transverse momentum is extracted with significantly higher precision than previous data and is compared to model calculations.

  14. MBL Experiment in Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluck, Paul

    2002-04-01

    Among the series of beautiful take-home experiments designed by A.P. French and J.G. King for MIT students, the one on angular momentum studies the loss and conservation of angular momentum using a small dc motor as generator. Here we describe a version of the experiment that increases its accuracy, enables students to perform detailed rotational dynamics calculations, and sharpens the ability to isolate the region where the collision occurs.

  15. The varieties of momentum-like experience.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Timothy L

    2015-11-01

    Cognition and behavior exhibit biases consistent with future expectations, and some of these biases result in momentum-like effects and have been linked with the idea of momentum. These momentum-like effects include representational momentum, operational momentum, attentional momentum, behavioral momentum, and psychological momentum. Effects of numerous variables involving characteristics of the target, display, context, or observer on each momentum-like effect are considered, and similarities of different momentum-like effects are considered. It is suggested that representational momentum, operational momentum, and attentional momentum reflect similar or overlapping mechanisms based on a perceptual time-scale and extrapolation primarily across space, and that behavioral momentum and psychological momentum reflect similar or overlapping mechanisms based on a longer time-scale and extrapolation primarily across time. It is further suggested that all 5 forms of momentum-like effect could reflect a more general extrapolation mechanism that anticipates the future action, behavior, or outcome of a given target, person, or process. A list of properties characterizing momentum-like effects is proposed, and constraints and issues relevant to future models of momentum-like effects are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. Nuclear physics. Momentum sharing in imbalanced Fermi systems.

    PubMed

    Hen, O; Sargsian, M; Weinstein, L B; Piasetzky, E; Hakobyan, H; Higinbotham, D W; Braverman, M; Brooks, W K; Gilad, S; Adhikari, K P; Arrington, J; Asryan, G; Avakian, H; Ball, J; Baltzell, N A; Battaglieri, M; Beck, A; May-Tal Beck, S; Bedlinskiy, I; Bertozzi, W; Biselli, A; Burkert, V D; Cao, T; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; De Vita, R; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dupre, R; Egiyan, H; El Alaoui, A; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Forest, T; Garillon, B; Garcon, M; Gevorgyan, N; Ghandilyan, Y; Gilfoyle, G P; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hanretty, C; Hattawy, M; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkanov, B I; Isupov, E L; Jiang, H; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, F J; Koirala, S; Korover, I; Kuhn, S E; Kubarovsky, V; Lenisa, P; Levine, W I; Livingston, K; Lowry, M; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Mineeva, T; Mokeev, V; Movsisyan, A; Munoz Camacho, C; Mustapha, B; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Pappalardo, L L; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Phelps, W; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Puckett, A J R; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Roy, P; Rossi, P; Sabatié, F; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Sharabian, Y G; Smith, G D; Shneor, R; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Taiuti, M; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Vlassov, A V; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Wei, X; Wood, M H; Wood, S A; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhao, Z W; Zheng, X; Zonta, I

    2014-10-31

    The atomic nucleus is composed of two different kinds of fermions: protons and neutrons. If the protons and neutrons did not interact, the Pauli exclusion principle would force the majority of fermions (usually neutrons) to have a higher average momentum. Our high-energy electron-scattering measurements using (12)C, (27)Al, (56)Fe, and (208)Pb targets show that even in heavy, neutron-rich nuclei, short-range interactions between the fermions form correlated high-momentum neutron-proton pairs. Thus, in neutron-rich nuclei, protons have a greater probability than neutrons to have momentum greater than the Fermi momentum. This finding has implications ranging from nuclear few-body systems to neutron stars and may also be observable experimentally in two-spin-state, ultracold atomic gas systems.

  17. Measuring and optimizing the momentum aperture in a particle accelerator.

    PubMed

    Steier, C; Robin, D; Nadolski, L; Decking, W; Wu, Y; Laskar, J

    2002-05-01

    Particle motion in storage rings is confined by various aperture limits, the size of which restricts the performance of the ring in terms of injection efficiency, lifetime, etc. Intrabeam scattering makes particles sweep a large portion of the phase space, where their motion may eventually be resonantly or chaotically excited to large amplitudes leading to collision with the vacuum chamber. We report here the studies performed at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) on the on- and off-momentum particle motion that provides a good understanding of these limitations. Using off-momentum simulations and experiments together with frequency map analysis, we could precisely correlate beam loss areas with resonance locations. The very good agreement between simulations and experiments allowed us to provide guidance for avoiding these dangerous areas. This analysis results in predictive improvements of the momentum aperture, which actually led to a lifetime increase of 25% at the ALS for very high bunch charge.

  18. Determination of and compensation for wafer bow and warp in a scanning electron microscope requiring precise feature locating and variable tilt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Duane C.

    1990-06-01

    Precise and accurate feature positioning in SEMs is becoming more critical. Moving the stage to a predetermined location must be done with accuracy and precision that put the feature ofinterest in the field ofview at a magnification high enough to detect orrecognize the same feature. Ifthis is notdone, some sort ofsearch, either automatic ormanual must be performed. This may not only be bothersome, but detrimental to inspection or measurement throughput performance. Ultra precise stages - for example, those using laser interferometers or linear encoders - are capable of positioning precisions, if not accuracies, to 0. 1 micron. In both optical and SEM systems where inspection is normal to the plane ofthe waler(cailed zero tilt), precise locating of features is possible without serious attention being paid to the bow or warp of a wafer. From the SEMI Standards Manuals, it is seen that a 200 mm wafer may have up to 65 microns of bow. In optical lithography tools and optical inspection or measurement systems, a vacuum chuck may alter or reduce the bow. However, in the vacuum chamber of the SEM this technique does not work. The bow or warp remains. The problem occurs in going to a particular numerical address whenthe waferis tilted, ifthat numerical address was determined at some different tilt -themost probable, of course, being zero iilt. Tilting of the wafer will cause the initially observed feature to move through an arc of "unknown" extent (unknown because it is a function of the bow and the bow is not known at that point). A 60 degree tilt of awafer with 40 microns of bow can cause about 35 microns oflaten.l displacement of a feature from where it would be expected for a wafer with no bow. The effect of this displacement on detectability is discussed. Actual displacement measurements on a 125 mm wafer ait plotted. These plots are compared with those derived from measurements made by optical and SEM systems specially set up to measure bow magnitudes. Bow

  19. Scattering and diffraction described using the momentum representation.

    PubMed

    Wennerström, Håkan

    2014-03-01

    We present a unified analysis of the scattering and diffraction of neutrons and photons using momentum representation in a full quantum description. The scattering event is consistently seen as a transfer of momentum between the target and the probing particles. For an elastic scattering process the observed scattering pattern primarily provides information on the momentum distribution for the particles in the target that cause the scattering. Structural information then follows from the Fourier transform relation between momentum and positional state functions. This description is common to the scattering of neutrons, X-ray photons and photons of light. In the quantum description of the interaction between light and the electrons of the target the scattering of X-rays is dominated by the first order contribution from the vector potential squared. The interaction with the electron is local and there is a close analogy, evident from the explicit quantitative expressions, with the neutron scattering case where the nucleus-neutron interaction is fully local from a molecular perspective. For light scattering, on the other hand, the dominant contribution to the scattering comes from a second order term linear in the vector potential. Thus the scattering of light involves correlations between electrons at different positions giving a conceptual explanation of the qualitative difference between the scattering of high and low energy photons. However, at energies close to resonance conditions the scattering of high energy photons is also affected by the second order term which results in a so called anomalous X-ray scattering/diffraction. It is also shown that using the momentum representation the phenomenon of diffraction is a direct consequence of the fact that for a system with periodic symmetry like a crystal the momentum distribution is quantized, which follows from Bloch's theorem. The momentum transfer to a probing particle is then also quantized resulting in a

  20. Quasi-elastic electron scattering from polarized 3He

    SciTech Connect

    H. J. Bulten; Ricardo Alarcon; Th. Bauer; D. Boersma; T. Botto; J. F. J. van den Brand; L. van Buuren; Rolf Ent; M. Ferro-Luzzi; D. Geurts; M. Harvey; Peter Heimberg; D. Highinbotham; Kees de Jager; Blaine Norum; I. Passchier; H. R. Poolman; M. van den Putte; E. Six; J. Steijger; D. Szczerba; H. de Vries

    1997-08-01

    Quasi-elastic electron scattering may provide precise information on the S and the D-wave parts of the {sup 3}He ground-state wave function, the neutron form factors, and the role of spin-dependent reaction mechanism effects. An experiment is being performed at the AmPS storage ring at NIKHEF (Amsterdam, the Netherlands), where polarized electrons (up to 900 MeV) are used in combination with large acceptance electron and hadron detectors. Preliminary results from data at four-momentum transfer squared Q{sup 2} = 0.15 GeV{sup 2} are presented.

  1. First-Principles Momentum Dependent Local Ansatz Approach to the Momentum Distribution Function in Iron-Group Transition Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakehashi, Yoshiro; Chandra, Sumal

    2017-03-01

    The momentum distribution function (MDF) bands of iron-group transition metals from Sc to Cu have been investigated on the basis of the first-principles momentum dependent local ansatz wavefunction method. It is found that the MDF for d electrons show a strong momentum dependence and a large deviation from the Fermi-Dirac distribution function along high-symmetry lines of the first Brillouin zone, while the sp electrons behave as independent electrons. In particular, the deviation in bcc Fe (fcc Ni) is shown to be enhanced by the narrow eg (t2g) bands with flat dispersion in the vicinity of the Fermi level. Mass enhancement factors (MEF) calculated from the jump on the Fermi surface are also shown to be momentum dependent. Large mass enhancements of Mn and Fe are found to be caused by spin fluctuations due to d electrons, while that for Ni is mainly caused by charge fluctuations. Calculated MEF are consistent with electronic specific heat data as well as recent angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy data.

  2. Variations in atmospheric angular momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, R. D.; Salstein, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Twice-daily values of the atmosphere's angular momentum about the polar axis during the five years from 1976 through 1980 are presented in graphs and a table. The compilation is based on a global data set, incorporating 90 percent of the mass of the atmosphere. The relationship between changes in the angular momentum of the atmosphere and changes in the length of day is described, as are the main sources of error in the data. The variability in angular momentum is revealed in a preliminary fashion by means of a spectral decomposition. The data presented should stimulate comparisons with other measures of the length of day and so provide a basis for greater understanding of Earth-atmosphere interactions.

  3. Angular momentum desaturation for Skylab using gravity gradient torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, H. F.

    1971-01-01

    An angular momentum desaturation method for momentum exchange devices of orbiting spacecraft is described. The specific application of the method is to the Skylab which contains three double-gimbaled control moment gyros for precise attitude control and maneuvering. It is assumed that the attitude reference is inertially fixed and that two of the vehicle principal moments of inertia are much larger than the third. Gravity gradient torques and resultant angular momentum accumulation are developed for small deviations from the reference. The assumed moment-of-inertia distribution allows desaturation about all axes with only two attitude angles each for the two axes with large moments of inertia. The necessary desaturation maneuvers can be decoupled for a special set of orbital coordinates. All maneuvers are made during the night portion of the orbit, and the percentage utilized for desaturation is selectable. Expressions for the attitude angle commands are developed assuming infinite vehicle rates. The effect of finite rates introduces an efficiency into the desaturation. Expressions for this efficiency are developed and means for compensation are treated. Arbitrary misalignments between geometric vehicle axes and principal moment-of-inertia axes are permissible. An angle bias about the sun line minimizes the angular momentum accumulation about the sun line projection into the orbital plane. Adaptive desaturation maneuver limiting consistent with the available maneuver momentum is included.

  4. On nonstable and stable population momentum.

    PubMed

    Espenshade, Thomas J; Olgiati, Analia S; Levin, Simon A

    2011-11-01

    This article decomposes total population momentum into two constituent and multiplicative parts: "nonstable" momentum and "stable" momentum. Nonstable momentum depends on deviations between a population's current age distribution and its implied stable age distribution. Stable momentum is a function of deviations between a population's implied stable and stationary age distributions. In general, the factorization of total momentum into the product of nonstable and stable momentum is a very good approximation. The factorization is exact, however, when the current age distribution is stable or when observed fertility is already at replacement. We provide numerical illustrations by calculating nonstable, stable, and total momentum for 176 countries, the world, and its major regions. In short, the article brings together disparate strands of the population momentum literature and shows how the various kinds of momentum fit together into a single unifying framework.

  5. On Nonstable and Stable Population Momentum

    PubMed Central

    Olgiati, Analia S.; Levin, Simon A.

    2014-01-01

    This article decomposes total population momentum into two constituent and multiplicative parts: “nonstable” momentum and “stable” momentum. Nonstable momentum depends on deviations between a population’s current age distribution and its implied stable age distribution. Stable momentum is a function of deviations between a population’s implied stable and stationary age distributions. In general, the factorization of total momentum into the product of nonstable and stable momentum is a very good approximation. The factorization is exact, however, when the current age distribution is stable or when observed fertility is already at replacement. We provide numerical illustrations by calculating nonstable, stable, and total momentum for 176 countries, the world, and its major regions. In short, the article brings together disparate strands of the population momentum literature and shows how the various kinds of momentum fit together into a single unifying framework. PMID:21948106

  6. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-14

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven 'quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers.

  7. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E.; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V.; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-01

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven `quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers.

  8. The maximum momentum transfer in proton-hydrogen collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    The upper limit of momentum transfer by a proton to K-shell electrons is calculated in a restricted three-body classical model. The model shows that the infinite upper limit used in practice, is generally good except for low energy protons passing through an extremely rarefied gas.

  9. Four-dimensional positron age-momentum correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Ulrich; Löwe, Benjamin; Dickmann, Marcel; Mitteneder, Johannes; Sperr, Peter; Egger, Werner; Reiner, Markus; Dollinger, Günther

    2016-11-01

    We have performed first four-dimensional age-momentum correlation (4D-AMOC) measurements at a pulsed high intensity positron micro beam and determined the absolute value of the three-dimensional momentum of the electrons annihilating with the positrons in coincidence with the positron age in the sample material. We operated two position sensitive detectors in coincidence to measure the annihilation radiation: a pixelated HPGe-detector and a microchannel plate image intensifier with a CeBr3 scintillator pixel array. The transversal momentum resolution of the 4D-AMOC setup was measured to be about 17 × 10-3 {m}0c (FWHM) and was circa 3.5 times larger than the longitudinal momentum resolution. The total time resolution was 540 ps (FWHM). We measured two samples: a gold foil and a carbon tape at a positron implantation energy of 2 keV. For each sample discrete electron momentum states and their respective positron lifetimes were extracted.

  10. Representational Momentum in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piotrowski, Andrea S.; Jakobson, Lorna S.

    2011-01-01

    Humans have a tendency to perceive motion even in static images that simply "imply" movement. This tendency is so strong that our memory for actions depicted in static images is distorted in the direction of implied motion--a phenomenon known as representational momentum (RM). In the present study, we created an RM display depicting a pattern of…

  11. Teaching about Impulse and Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Bill

    2004-01-01

    This American Association of Physics Teachers/Physics Teaching Resource Agents (APPT/PTRA) spiral-bound manual features labs and demos physics teachers can use to give students hands-on opportunities to learn about impulse and momentum. "Make-and-take activities" include AAPT Apparatus Contest winners "An Air Impulse Rocket," "A Fan Driven…

  12. Synthesis and structure of Ca(18)Li(5)In(25.07): a novel intergrowth of Li-centered in(12) icosahedral clusters and electron-precise Zintl layers.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jiang-Gao; Goodey, Joanna; Guloy, Arnold M

    2004-01-12

    A new ternary polar intermetallic, Ca(18)Li(5)In(25.07), was obtained from high-temperature reactions of the elements in welded Nb tubes. Its crystal structure, established by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, was found to crystallize in the orthorhombic space group Cmmm (No. 65). Unit cell parameters are a = 9.9151(6) A, b = 26.432(2) A, and c = 10.2116(6) A; Z = 2. The structure of Ca(18)Li(5)In(25.07) features two distinct types of indium anionic layers. An "electron-deficient" layer is made up of Li-centered In(12) icosahedra that are interconnected by bridging planar In(4) units and In atoms. A second In(3)(5-) layer is an electron-precise Zintl layer formed by fused four-, five-, and six-membered rings of three- and four-bonded indium atoms. The two distinct layers are alternately stacked and linked into a complex three-dimensional network. Vacancies are observed to occur only at the In(12) icosahedral and the bridging indium units within the "electron-deficient" layers. Magnetic property measurements indicate that Ca(18)Li(5)In(25.07) exhibits temperature-independent paramagnetism consistent with metallic behavior. Band structure calculations were performed to elucidate the role of defects and vacancies in the electronic structure of the electron-deficient "metallic" Zintl phase.

  13. Electroencephalographic field influence on calcium momentum waves.

    PubMed

    Ingber, Lester; Pappalepore, Marco; Stesiak, Ronald R

    2014-02-21

    Macroscopic electroencephalographic (EEG) fields can be an explicit top-down neocortical mechanism that directly drives bottom-up processes that describe memory, attention, and other neuronal processes. The top-down mechanism considered is macrocolumnar EEG firings in neocortex, as described by a statistical mechanics of neocortical interactions (SMNI), developed as a magnetic vector potential A. The bottom-up process considered is Ca(2+) waves prominent in synaptic and extracellular processes that are considered to greatly influence neuronal firings. Here, the complimentary effects are considered, i.e., the influence of A on Ca(2+) momentum, p. The canonical momentum of a charged particle in an electromagnetic field, Π=p+qA (SI units), is calculated, where the charge of Ca(2+) is q=-2e, e is the magnitude of the charge of an electron. Calculations demonstrate that macroscopic EEG A can be quite influential on the momentum p of Ca(2+) ions, in both classical and quantum mechanics. Molecular scales of Ca(2+) wave dynamics are coupled with A fields developed at macroscopic regional scales measured by coherent neuronal firing activity measured by scalp EEG. The project has three main aspects: fitting A models to EEG data as reported here, building tripartite models to develop A models, and studying long coherence times of Ca(2+) waves in the presence of A due to coherent neuronal firings measured by scalp EEG. The SMNI model supports a mechanism wherein the p+qA interaction at tripartite synapses, via a dynamic centering mechanism (DCM) to control background synaptic activity, acts to maintain short-term memory (STM) during states of selective attention.

  14. Intercomponent momentum transport and electrical conductivity of collisionless plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    Based on the Lenard-Balescu equation, the interaction integral for the intercomponent momentum transfer in a two-component, collisionless plasma is evaluated in closed form. The distribution functions of the electrons and ions are represented in the form of nonisothermal, displaced Maxwellians corresponding to the 5-moment approximation. As an application, the transport of electrical current in an electric field is discussed for infrasonic up to sonic electron-ion drift velocities.

  15. Spin momentum density of Nd using Compton spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sahariya, Jagrati; Dashora, Alpa; Mund, H. S.; Ahuja, B. L.; Tiwari, Shailja; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.

    2013-02-05

    Spin momentum density of Nd has been measured at 6K temperature using magnetic Compton scattering. The individual contribution of different electronic states, in the formation of total spin moment, is deduced from the analysis of magnetic Compton profile. The electron-specific spin moments deduced from the experimental Compton data are compared with the theoretical results obtained from full potential linearized augmented plane wave method and are found to be in good agreement.

  16. Angular Momentum Theory Applied to Interactions in Solids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    calculation of the matrix elements of the various Interactions Is presented, along with other tables andaids in the computation of thie energy levels...87 8.3 Annotated Bibliography and References ........................ 88 9. MATRIX ELEMENTS OF H3 IN TOTAL A GULAR MOMENTUM STATE FOR THE ELECTRONIC...in Ckq ........... 86 10.1 Matrix Elements of Crystal Field for a Single d Electron in S4 Symmetry

  17. Precise Determination of the Strong Coupling Constant at NNLO in QCD from the Three-Jet Rate in Electron-Positron Annihilation at LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Dissertori, G.; Gehrmann-DeRidder, A.; Gehrmann, T.; Glover, E. W. N.; Heinrich, G.; Stenzel, H.

    2010-02-19

    We present the first determination of the strong coupling constant from the three-jet rate in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at LEP, based on a next-to-next-to-leading-order (NNLO) perturbative QCD prediction. More precisely, we extract {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}) by fitting perturbative QCD predictions at O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 3}) to data from the ALEPH experiment at LEP. Over a large range of the jet-resolution parameter y{sub cut}, this observable is characterized by small nonperturbative corrections and an excellent stability under renormalization scale variation. We find {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z})=0.1175+-0.0020(expt)+-0.0015(theor), which is more accurate than the values of {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}) from e{sup +}e{sup -} event-shape data currently used in the world average.

  18. Command Generation and Control of Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic Reboost Tethered Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    The research completed for this NASA Graduate Student Research Program Fellowship sought to enhance the current state-of-the-art dynamic models and control laws for Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic Reboost satellite systems by utilizing command generation, specifically Input Shaping. The precise control of tethered spacecraft with flexible appendages is extremely difficult. The complexity is magnified many times when the satellite must interact with other satellites as in a momentum exchange via a tether. The Momentum Exchange Electronic Reboost Tether (MXER) concept encapsulates all of these challenging tasks [l]. Input Shaping is a command generation technique that allows flexible spacecraft to move without inducing residual vibration [2], limit transient deflection [3] and utilize fuel-efficient actuation [4]. Input shaping is implemented by convolving a sequence of impulses, known as the input shaper, with a desired system command to produce a shaped input that is then used to drive the system. This process is demonstrated in Figure 1. The shaped command is then use to drive the system without residual vibration while meeting many other performance specifications. The completed work developed tether control algorithms for retrieval. A simple model of the tether response has been developed and command shaping was implemented to minimize unwanted dynamics. A model of a flexible electrodynamic tether has been developed to investigate the tether s response during reboost. Command shaping techniques have been developed to eliminate the tether oscillations and reduce the tether s deflection to pre-specified levels during reboost. Additionally, a model for the spin-up of a tethered system was developed. This model was used in determining the parameters for optimization the resulting angular velocity.

  19. Angular Momentum in Disk Wind Revealed in the Young Star MWC 349A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qizhou; Claus, Brian; Watson, Linda; Moran, James

    2017-03-01

    Disk winds are thought to play a critical role in star birth. As winds extract excess angular momentum from accretion disks, matter in the disk can be transported inward to the star to fuel mass growth. However, observational evidence of wind carrying angular momentum has been very limited. We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of the young star MWC 349A in the H26α and H30α recombination lines. The high signal-to-noise ratios made possible by the maser emission process allow us to constrain the relative astrometry of the maser spots to milli-arcsecond precision. Previous observations of the H30α line with the SMA and the Plateau de Bure interferometer (PdBI) showed that masers are distributed in the disk and wind. Our new high-resolution observations of the H26α line reveal differences in spatial distribution from that of the H30α line. H26α line masers in the disk are excited in a thin annulus with a radius of about 25 au, while the H30α line masers are formed in a slightly larger annulus with a radius of 30 au. This is consistent with expectations for maser excitation in the presence of an electron density variation of approximately R ‑4. In addition, the H30α and H26α line masers arise from different parts in the wind. This difference is also expected from maser theory. The wind component of both masers exhibits line-of-sight velocities that closely follow a Keplerian law. This result provides strong evidence that the disk wind extracts significant angular momentum, thereby facilitating mass accretion in the young star.

  20. Using MBL To Verify Newton's Second Law and the Impulse-Momentum Relationship with an Arbitrary Changing Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumper, Ricardo; Gelbman, Moshe

    2002-01-01

    Uses microcomputer-based laboratories (MBL) to teach Newton's second law and the impulse-momentum relationship with a high degree of precision and accuracy while applying forces that change in an arbitrary way. (YDS)

  1. Plasmons carrying orbital angular momentum in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shabbir A.; Ali, S.; Mendonca, J. T.; Mendonca

    2013-10-01

    The existence of plasmons with orbital angular momentum due to the Laguerre-Gaussian-type density and potential perturbations is studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma. Starting from appropriate hydrodynamic equations for the electrostatic electron dynamics, a dispersion equation is derived in paraxial approximation. The Laguerre-Gaussian beam solutions are obtained and the properties of electric field components, energy flux, and corresponding angular momentum density of plasmons are investigated. The electric field lines are found to form helical structures with a dominant axial component. The results are analyzed numerically and the influence of radial and angular mode numbers on potential and electric field components is illustrated.

  2. Energy, momentum and angular momentum conservations in de Sitter gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jia-An

    2016-08-01

    In de Sitter (dS) gravity, where gravity is a gauge field introduced to realize the local dS invariance of the matter field, two kinds of conservation laws are derived. The first kind is a differential equation for a dS-covariant current, which unites the canonical energy-momentum (EM) and angular momentum (AM) tensors. The second kind presents a dS-invariant current which is conserved in the sense that its torsion-free divergence vanishes. The dS-invariant current unites the total (matter plus gravity) EM and AM currents. It is well known that the AM current contains an inherent part, called the spin current. Here it is shown that the EM tensor also contains an inherent part, which might be observed by its contribution to the deviation of the dust particle’s world line from a geodesic. All the results are compared to the ordinary Lorentz gravity.

  3. Exploring the benefits of electron tomography to characterize the precise morphology of core-shell Au@Ag nanoparticles and its implications on their plasmonic properties.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Garrido, J C; Moreno, M S; Ducati, C; Pérez, L A; Midgley, P A; Coronado, E A

    2014-11-07

    In the design and engineering of functional core-shell nanostructures, material characterization at small length scales remains one of the major challenges. Here we show how electron tomography in high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) mode can be applied successfully to perform nano-metrological characterization of Au@Ag core-shell nanostructures. This work stresses the benefits of HAADF-STEM tomography and its use as a novel and rigorous tool for understanding the physical-chemical properties of complex 3D core-shell nanostructures. The reconstructed Au@Ag core-shell architecture was used as an input for discrete dipole approximation (DDA)-based electrodynamics simulations of the optical properties of the nanostructures. The implications of localized surface plasmon spectroscopy as well as Raman-enhanced spectroscopy are analysed.

  4. Polarization momentum transfer collision: Faxen-Holtzmark theory and quantum dynamic shielding.

    PubMed

    Ki, Dae-Han; Jung, Young-Dae

    2013-04-21

    The influence of the quantum dynamic shielding on the polarization momentum transport collision is investigated by using the Faxen-Holtzmark theory in strongly coupled Coulomb systems. The electron-atom polarization momentum transport cross section is derived as a function of the collision energy, de Broglie wavelength, Debye length, thermal energy, and atomic quantum states. It is found that the dynamic shielding enhances the scattering phase shift as well as the polarization momentum transport cross section. The variation of quantum effect on the momentum transport collision due to the change of thermal energy and de Broglie wavelength is also discussed.

  5. Optical angular momentum: Multipole transitions and photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, David L.

    2010-03-15

    The premise that multipolar decay should produce photons uniquely imprinted with a measurably corresponding angular momentum is shown in general to be untrue. To assume a one-to-one correlation between the transition multipoles involved in source decay and detector excitation is to impose a generally unsupportable one-to-one correlation between the multipolar form of emission transition and a multipolar character for the detected field. It is specifically proven impossible to determine without ambiguity, by use of any conventional detector, and for any photon emitted through the nondipolar decay of an atomic excited state, a unique multipolar character for the transition associated with its generation. Consistent with the angular quantum uncertainty principle, removal of a detector from the immediate vicinity of the source produces a decreasing angular uncertainty in photon propagation direction, reflected in an increasing range of integer values for the measured angular momentum. In such a context it follows that when the decay of an electronic excited state occurs by an electric quadrupolar transition, for example, any assumption that the radiation so produced is conveyed in the form of 'quadrupole photons' is experimentally unverifiable. The results of the general proof based on irreducible tensor analysis invite experimental verification, and they signify certain limitations on quantum optical data transmission.

  6. X-ray comb generation from nuclear-resonance-stabilized x-ray free-electron laser oscillator for fundamental physics and precision metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, B. W.; Kim, K.-J.

    2015-03-01

    An x-ray free-electron laser oscillator (XFELO) is a next-generation x-ray source, similar to free-electron laser oscillators at VUV and longer wavelengths but using crystals as high-reflectivity x-ray mirrors. Each output pulse from an XFELO is fully coherent with high spectral purity. The temporal coherence length can further be increased drastically, from picoseconds to microseconds or even longer, by phase-locking successive XFELO output pulses, using the narrow nuclear resonance lines of nuclei such as 57Fe as a reference. We show that the phase fluctuation due to the seismic activities is controllable and that due to spontaneous emission is small. The fluctuation of electron-bunch spacing contributes mainly to the envelope fluctuation but not to the phase fluctuation. By counting the number of standing-wave maxima formed by the output of the nuclear-resonance-stabilized (NRS) XFELO over an optically known length, the wavelength of the nuclear resonance can be accurately measured, possibly leading to a new length or frequency standard at x-ray wavelengths. A NRS-XFELO will be an ideal source for experimental x-ray quantum optics as well as other fundamental physics. The technique can be refined for other, narrower resonances such as 181Ta or 45Sc.

  7. X-Ray Comb Generation from Nuclear-Resonance-Stabilized X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Oscillator for Fundamental Physics and Precision Metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B. W.; Kim, K. -J.

    2015-03-31

    An x-ray free-electron laser oscillator (XFELO) is a next-generation x-ray source, similar to free-electron laser oscillators at VUV and longer wavelengths but using crystals as high-reflectivity x-ray mirrors. Each output pulse from an XFELO is fully coherent with high spectral purity. The temporal coherence length can further be increased drastically, from picoseconds to microseconds or even longer, by phase-locking successive XFELO output pulses, using the narrow nuclear resonance lines of nuclei such as Fe-57 as a reference. We show that the phase fluctuation due to the seismic activities is controllable and that due to spontaneous emission is small. The fluctuation of electron-bunch spacing contributes mainly to the envelope fluctuation but not to the phase fluctuation. By counting the number of standing-wave maxima formed by the output of the nuclear-resonance-stabilized (NRS) XFELO over an optically known length, the wavelength of the nuclear resonance can be accurately measured, possibly leading to a new length or frequency standard at x-ray wavelengths. A NRS-XFELO will be an ideal source for experimental x-ray quantum optics as well as other fundamental physics. The technique can be refined for other, narrower resonances such as Ta-181 or Sc-45.

  8. Precision powder feeder

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, M. Eric; Schmale, David T.; Oliver, Michael S.

    2001-07-10

    A new class of precision powder feeders is disclosed. These feeders provide a precision flow of a wide range of powdered materials, while remaining robust against jamming or damage. These feeders can be precisely controlled by feedback mechanisms.

  9. SCRIT electron scattering facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukada, Kyo

    2014-09-01

    Electron scattering is the most powerful and reliable tool to investigate the nuclear structure because this reaction has the great advantage that the electron is structureless particle and its interaction is well described by the quantum electrodynamics. As is well known, the charge density distributions of many stable nuclei were determined by elastic electron scattering. Recently, many efforts for studies of unstable nuclei have been made, and the precise information of the structure of unstabe nuclei have been strongly desired. However, due to the difficulty of preparing a short-lived unstable nuclear target, there is no electron scattering on unstable nuclei with a few important exceptions, such as on 3H, 14C and so on. Under these circumstances, we have established a completely new target-forming technique, namely SCRIT (Self-Confining Radioactive isotope Ion Target) which makes electron scattering on unstable nuclei possible. A Dedicated electron scattering facility at RIKEN consists of an electron accelerator with the SCRIT system, an ERIS (Electron-beam-driven RI separator for SCRIT), and a WiSES (Window-frame Spectrometer for Electron Scattering). Feasibility test of the SCRIT and ERIS system have been successfully carried out using the stable nuclei, and more than 1026 [cm-2s-1] luminosity was already achieved. Furthermore, 132Sn, which is one of the important target at the beginning of this project, was also successfully separated in the ERIS. The WiSES with momentum resolution of Δp/p ~ 10-3 consisting of the wide acceptance dipole magnet, two set of drift chambers together with trigger scintillation hodoscope is under construction. Electron scattering on unstable nuclei will start within a year. In this talk, the introduction of our project and the progress of the preparation status will be presented.

  10. Orbital Propagation of Momentum Exchange Tether Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westerhoff, John

    2002-01-01

    An advanced concept in in-space transportation currently being studied is the Momentum-Exchange/Electrodynamic Reboost Tether System (MXER). The system acts as a large momentum wheel, imparting a Av to a payload in low earth orbit (LEO) at the expense of its own orbital energy. After throwing a payload, the system reboosts itself using an electrodynamic tether to push against Earth's magnetic field and brings itself back up to an operational orbit to prepare for the next payload. The ability to reboost itself allows for continued reuse of the system without the expenditure of propellants. Considering the cost of lifting propellant from the ,ground to LEO to do the same Av boost at $10000 per pound, the system cuts the launch cost of the payload dramatically, and subsequently, the MXER system pays for itself after a small number of missions.1 One of the technical hurdles to be overcome with the MXER concept is the rendezvous maneuver. The rendezvous window for the capture of the payload is on the order of a few seconds, as opposed to traditional docking maneuvers, which can take as long ets necessary to complete a precise docking. The payload, therefore, must be able to match its orbit to meet up with the capture device on the end of the tether at a specific time and location in the future. In order to be able to determine that location, the MXER system must be numerically propagated forward in time to predict where the capture device will be at that instant. It should be kept in mind that the propagation computation must be done faster than real-time. This study focuses on the efforts to find and/or build the tools necessary to numerically propagate the motion of the MXER system as accurately as possible.

  11. Fractional angular momentum in cold-atom systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuhe; Sreejith, G J; Gemelke, N D; Jain, J K

    2014-10-17

    The quantum statistics of bosons or fermions are manifest through the even or odd relative angular momentum of a pair. We show theoretically that, under certain conditions, a pair of certain test particles immersed in a fractional quantum Hall state possesses, effectively, a fractional relative angular momentum, which can be interpreted in terms of fractional braid statistics. We propose that the fractionalization of the angular momentum can be detected directly through the measurement of the pair correlation function in rotating ultracold atomic systems in the fractional quantum Hall regime. Such a measurement will also provide direct evidence for the effective magnetic field resulting from Berry phases arising from attached vortices, and of excitations with a fractional particle number, analogous to the fractional charge of the electron fractional quantum Hall effect.

  12. Fractional Angular Momentum in Cold-Atom Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuhe; Sreejith, G. J.; Gemelke, N. D.; Jain, J. K.

    2014-10-01

    The quantum statistics of bosons or fermions are manifest through the even or odd relative angular momentum of a pair. We show theoretically that, under certain conditions, a pair of certain test particles immersed in a fractional quantum Hall state possesses, effectively, a fractional relative angular momentum, which can be interpreted in terms of fractional braid statistics. We propose that the fractionalization of the angular momentum can be detected directly through the measurement of the pair correlation function in rotating ultracold atomic systems in the fractional quantum Hall regime. Such a measurement will also provide direct evidence for the effective magnetic field resulting from Berry phases arising from attached vortices, and of excitations with a fractional particle number, analogous to the fractional charge of the electron fractional quantum Hall effect.

  13. Population momentum across the demographic transition.

    PubMed

    Blue, Laura; Espenshade, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Population momentum is the main driver of global population growth today, and this makes an appreciation of momentum critical to understanding contemporary worldwide growth dynamics. This article traces population momentum along with two recently defined measures of momentum decomposed—stable and nonstable momentum—across the demographic transition. We use historical data and population projections from 16 countries to illustrate some previously ignored empirical regularities of the demographic transition in both the developed and the developing world. We also demonstrate the dynamic nature of stable and nonstable momentum, as changes in stable momentum lead to predictable changes in current and future nonstable momentum. These results suggest that momentum, which by definition is measured at a point in time, can also be considered as a process that unfolds over time.

  14. Energy and Momentum Transport in String Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juenker, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Formulas are derived for the energy, momentum, and angular momentum transmitted by waves of arbitrary shape in an inextensible string by pure transverse waves in a string using Tait's procedure. (Author/CP)

  15. Measurements of Parity Violation in Electron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschke, Kent

    2016-09-01

    The measurement of the violation of parity symmetry in electron scattering has proven to be a powerful technique for exploring nuclear matter and for the search for new fundamental forces. A successful history with the experimental technique has set the stage for a series of high precision measurements to be made over the next decade. Scattering from heavy, spinless targets will measure the neutron skin of heavy nuclei, providing a valuable calibration for the equation-of-state in neutron-rich nuclear systems. Searches for new neutral-current interactions will be performed in ultra-high precision measurements of scattering from protons and electrons at very low momentum transfer Q2 . In the DIS regime, scattering from deuterium will extend this search for new physics while also providing a unique window on nucleon partonic structure. The physics implications of recent results and development of the next generation of experiments will be reviewed.

  16. Extinction, relapse, and behavioral momentum.

    PubMed

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2010-05-01

    Previous experiments on behavioral momentum have shown that relative resistance to extinction of operant behavior in the presence of a discriminative stimulus depends upon the baseline rate or magnitude of reinforcement associated with that stimulus (i.e., the Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation). Recently, we have shown that relapse of operant behavior in reinstatement, resurgence, and context renewal preparations also is a function of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations. In this paper we present new data examining the role of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations on resistance to extinction and relapse using a variety of baseline training conditions and relapse operations. Furthermore, we evaluate the adequacy of a behavioral momentum based model in accounting for the results. The model suggests that relapse occurs as a result of a decrease in the disruptive impact of extinction precipitated by a change in circumstances associated with extinction, and that the degree of relapse is a function of the pre-extinction baseline Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation. Across experiments, relative resistance to extinction and relapse were greater in the presence of stimuli associated with more favorable conditions of reinforcement and were positively related to one another. In addition, the model did a good job in accounting for these effects. Thus, behavioral momentum theory may provide a useful quantitative approach for characterizing how differential reinforcement conditions contribute to relapse of operant behavior.

  17. Achromatic orbital angular momentum generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Mand, Harjaspreet; Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Karimi, Ebrahim; Boyd, Robert W.

    2014-12-01

    We describe a novel approach for generating light beams that carry orbital angular momentum (OAM) by means of total internal reflection in an isotropic medium. A continuous space-varying cylindrically symmetric reflector, in the form of two glued hollow axicons, is used to introduce a nonuniform rotation of polarization into a linearly polarized input beam. This device acts as a full spin-to-orbital angular momentum convertor. It functions by switching the helicity of the incoming beam's polarization, and by conservation of total angular momentum thereby generates a well-defined value of OAM. Our device is broadband, since the phase shift due to total internal reflection is nearly independent of wavelength. We verify the broad-band behaviour by measuring the conversion efficiency of the device for three different wavelengths corresponding to the RGB colours, red, green and blue. An average conversion efficiency of 95% for these three different wavelengths is observed. This device may find applications in imaging from micro- to astronomical systems where a white vortex beam is needed.

  18. Reexamination of the He- 1s2p2 4Pe shape resonance: Details of its properties and a precise electron affinity for He 2 3S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, C. W.; Seifert, J. A.; Peterson, J. R.

    1994-09-01

    The huge He- 4Pe shape resonance was reexamined in photodetachment using a titanium:sapphire laser tuned over the energy range 9740-10 300 cm-1. This range covered well below the He (2 3P) threshold and included the entire resonance region. The uncertainties in the earlier data [Peterson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 692 (1985)] were greatly reduced. The new (old) experimental value for the electron affinity of He (2 3S) is 77.67+/-0.12 meV (77.6+/-1.0 meV), in fair agreement with the most accurate theoretical value, 77.51+/-0.04 meV, of Bunge and Bunge [Phys. Rev. A 30, 2179 (1984)]. This resonance lies 10.80+/-0.07 meV above the He 2 3P threshold, and has a decay width of Γ=7.16+/-0.07 meV. The ratio of the cross section at resonance to the continuum at the threshold is σR/σ0=89+/-5. This study provides by far the most detailed experimental view of an electronic shape resonance.

  19. Stylized features of single-nucleon momentum distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryckebusch, Jan; Vanhalst, Maarten; Cosyn, Wim

    2015-05-01

    Nuclear short-range correlations (SRC) typically manifest themselves in the tail parts of the single-nucleon momentum distributions. We propose an approximate practical method for computing those SRC contributions to the high-momentum parts. The framework adopted in this work is applicable throughout the nuclear mass table and corrects mean-field models for central, spin-isospin and tensor correlations by shifting the complexity induced by the SRC from the wave functions to the operators. It is argued that the expansion of these modified operators can be truncated to a low order. The proposed model can generate the SRC-related high-momentum tail of the single-nucleon momentum distribution. These are dominated by correlation operators acting on mean-field pairs with vanishing relative radial and angular-momentum quantum numbers. The proposed method explains the dominant role of proton-neutron pairs in generating the SRC and accounts for the magnitude and mass dependence of SRC as probed in inclusive electron scattering. It also provides predictions for the ratio of the amount of correlated proton-proton to proton-neutron pairs which are in line with the observations. In asymmetric nuclei, the correlations make the average kinetic energy for the minority nucleons larger than for the majority nucleons.

  20. Precision QCD measurements at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirumov, Hayk

    2014-11-01

    A review of recent experimental results on perturbative QCD from the HERA experiments H1 and ZEUS is presented. All inclusive deep inelastic cross sections measured by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations in neutral and charged current unpolarised ep scattering are combined. They span six orders of magnitude in negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q2, and in Bjorken x. This data set is used as the sole input to NLO and NNLO QCD analyses to determine new sets of parton distributions, HERAPDF2.0, with small experimental uncertainties and an estimate of model and parametrisation uncertainties. Also shown are new results on inclusive jet, dijet and trijet differential cross sections measured in neutral current deep inelastic scattering. The precision jet data is used to extract the strong coupling αs at NLO with small experimental errors.

  1. Hidden momentum in a hydrogen atom and the Lorentz-force law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filho, J. S. Oliveira; Saldanha, Pablo L.

    2015-11-01

    By using perturbation theory, we show that a hydrogen atom with magnetic moment due to the orbital angular momentum of the electron has so-called hidden momentum in the presence of an external electric field. This means that the atomic electronic cloud has a nonzero linear momentum in its center-of-mass rest frame due to a relativistic effect. This is completely analogous to the hidden momentum that a classical current loop has in the presence of an external electric field. We discuss how this effect is essential for the validity of the Lorentz-force law in quantum systems. We also connect our results to the long-standing Abraham-Minkowski debate about the momentum of light in material media.

  2. Spin resolved bandstructure imaging with a high resolution momentum microscope.

    PubMed

    Tusche, Christian; Krasyuk, Alexander; Kirschner, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    We present a spin resolving "momentum microscope" for the high resolution imaging of the momentum distribution of photoelectrons. Measurements of the band structure of a Au(111) single crystal surface demonstrate an energy resolution of ΔE=12 meV and a momentum resolution of Δk∥=0.0049 Å(-1), measured at the line-width of the spin-orbit split Shockley surface state. The relative accuracy of the k∥ measurement in the order of 10(-4) Å(-1) reveals a deviation from the ideal two-dimensional free electron gas model of the Shockley surface state, manifested in a threefold radial symmetry. Spin resolution in the full momentum image is obtained by an imaging spin-filter based on low-energy electron diffraction at a Au passivated Ir(100) single crystal. Using working points at 10.5 eV and 11.5 eV scattering energy with a completely reversed asymmetry of ±60% we demonstrate the efficient mapping of the spin texture of the Au(111) surface state.

  3. Positron age-momentum correlation studies of free volumes in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, K.; Murakami, H.; Ito, K.; Hirata, K.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Positron age-momentum correlation (AMOC) spectroscopy, which can sensitively probe momentum distributions of positrons and positronium (Ps), was conducted for studying the pick-off process of the triplet bound state ortho-Ps ( o-Ps) with electrons at the walls of the free volumes in polymers. Influences of different chemical elements forming free volume were investigated. It was found that the momentum distribution of o-Ps pick-off annihilation sensitively depends on the electronic state in the free volumes. The feasibility of the chemical analysis relevant to the free volume in polymers is discussed.

  4. Approaching the theoretical limit of diamagnetic-induced momentum in a rapidly diverging magnetic nozzle.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W

    2013-05-10

    Cross-field diffusion and plasma expansion in a rapidly diverging magnetic nozzle are controlled while maintaining constant plasma production in a contiguously attached radio frequency plasma source. It is demonstrated that the measured electron-diamagnetic-induced axial momentum increases with increasing magnetic field strength to approach the theoretical limit derived using an ideal nozzle approximation. The measured axial momentum exerted onto the axial and radial plasma source boundaries validate the prediction from a maximum electron pressure model on the back wall and from a zero net axial momentum model on the radial wall.

  5. Bias Momentum Sizing for Hovering Dual-Spin Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, K. B.; Shin, J-Y.; Moerder, D. D.

    2005-01-01

    An atmospheric flight vehicle in hover is typically controlled by varying its thrust vector. Achieving both levitation and control with the propulsion system places considerable demands on it for agility and precision, particularly if the vehicle is statically unstable, or nearly so. These demands can be relaxed by introducing an appropriately sized angular momentum bias about the vehicle's yaw axis, thus providing an additional margin of attitude stability about the roll and pitch axes. This paper describes an approach for specifying the appropriate size of such angular momentum bias, based on the vehicle s physical parameters and its disturbance environment. It also describes several simplifications that provide a more physical and intuitive understanding of the dynamics. This will enhance the possibility of practically applying this technology to a flying vehicle.

  6. Quantum coherence in momentum space of light-matter condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón, C.; Tosi, G.; Martín, M. D.; Hatzopoulos, Z.; Konstantinidis, G.; Eldridge, P. S.; Savvidis, P. G.; Tejedor, C.; Viña, L.

    2014-08-01

    We show that the use of momentum-space optical interferometry, which avoids any spatial overlap between two parts of a macroscopic quantum state, presents a unique way to study coherence phenomena in polariton condensates. In this way, we address the longstanding question in quantum mechanics: "Do two components of a condensate, which have never seen each other, possess a definitive phase?" [P. W. Anderson, Basic Notions of Condensed Matter Physics (Benjamin Cummings, Menlo Park, CA, 1984)]. A positive answer to this question is experimentally obtained here for light-matter condensates, created under precise symmetry conditions, in semiconductor microcavities, taking advantage of the direct relation between the angle of emission and the in-plane momentum of polaritons.

  7. Confining potential in momentum space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Kahana, David E.; Maung, Khin Maung

    1992-01-01

    A method is presented for the solution in momentum space of the bound state problem with a linear potential in r space. The potential is unbounded at large r leading to a singularity at small q. The singularity is integrable, when regulated by exponentially screening the r-space potential, and is removed by a subtraction technique. The limit of zero screening is taken analytically, and the numerical solution of the subtracted integral equation gives eigenvalues and wave functions in good agreement with position space calculations.

  8. Momentum in general relativity: local versus quasilocal conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epp, Richard J.; McGrath, Paul L.; Mann, Robert B.

    2013-10-01

    We construct a general relativistic conservation law for linear and angular momentum for matter and gravitational fields in a finite volume of space that does not rely on any spacetime symmetries. This work builds on our previous construction of a general relativistic energy conservation law with the same features (McGrath et al 2012 Class. Quantum Grav. 29 215012). Our approach uses the Brown and York (1993 Phys. Rev. D 47 1407-19) quasilocal stress-energy-momentum tensor for matter and gravitational fields, plus the concept of a rigid quasilocal frame (RQF) introduced in (Epp et al 2009 Class. Quantum Grav. 26 035015; 2012 Classical and Quantum Gravity: Theory, Analysis, and Applications (Nova Science)). The RQF approach allows us to construct, in a generic spacetime, frames of reference whose boundaries are rigid (their shape and size do not change with time), and that have precisely the same six arbitrary time-dependent degrees of freedom as the accelerating and tumbling rigid frames we are familiar with in Newtonian mechanics. These RQFs, in turn, give rise to a completely general conservation law for the six components of momentum (three linear and three angular) of a finite system of matter and gravitational fields. We compare in detail this quasilocal RQF approach to constructing conservation laws with the usual local one based on spacetime symmetries, and discuss the shortcomings of the latter. These RQF conservation laws lead to a deeper understanding of physics in the form of simple, exact, operational definitions of gravitational energy and momentum fluxes, which in turn reveal, for the first time, the exact, detailed mechanisms of gravitational energy and momentum transfer taking place in a wide variety of physical phenomena, including a simple falling apple. As a concrete example, we derive a general relativistic version of Archimedes’ law that we apply to understand electrostatic weight and buoyant force in the context of a Reissner

  9. A Precise Measurement of the Deuteron Elastic Structure Function A(Q2)

    SciTech Connect

    Honegger, Andrian

    1999-12-07

    During summer 1997 experiment 394-018 measured the deuteron tensor polarization in D(e,e'$vec\\{d}$) scattering in Hall C at Jefferson Laboratory. In a momentum transfer range between 0.66 and 1.8 (GeV=c)2, with slight changes in the experimental setup, the collaboration performed six precision measurements of the deuteron structure function A(Q2) in elastic D(e,e'd) scattering . Scattered electrons and recoil deuterons were detected in coincidence in the High Momentum Spectrometer and the recoil polarimeter POLDER, respectively. At every kinematics H(e,e') data were taken to study systematic effects of the measurement. These new precise measurements resolve discrepancies between older data sets and put significant constraints on existing models of the deuteron electromagnetic structure. This work was supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation, the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and the Commissariat 'a l'Energie Atomique, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation and the K.C. Wong Foundation.

  10. Intrinsic spin and orbital angular momentum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Yang, Z

    2005-02-18

    A generalized definition of intrinsic and extrinsic transport coefficients is introduced. We show that transport coefficients from the intrinsic origin are solely determined by local electronic structure, and thus the intrinsic spin Hall effect is not a transport phenomenon. The intrinsic spin Hall current is always accompanied by an equal but opposite intrinsic orbital angular momentum Hall current. We prove that the intrinsic spin Hall effect does not induce a spin accumulation at the edge of the sample or near the interface.

  11. Precise Countersinking Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Eric S.; Smith, William N.

    1992-01-01

    Tool countersinks holes precisely with only portable drill; does not require costly machine tool. Replaceable pilot stub aligns axis of tool with centerline of hole. Ensures precise cut even with imprecise drill. Designed for relatively low cutting speeds.

  12. Precision atomic gravimeter based on Bragg diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altin, P. A.; Johnsson, M. T.; Negnevitsky, V.; Dennis, G. R.; Anderson, R. P.; Debs, J. E.; Szigeti, S. S.; Hardman, K. S.; Bennetts, S.; McDonald, G. D.; Turner, L. D.; Close, J. D.; Robins, N. P.

    2013-02-01

    We present a precision gravimeter based on coherent Bragg diffraction of freely falling cold atoms. Traditionally, atomic gravimeters have used stimulated Raman transitions to separate clouds in momentum space by driving transitions between two internal atomic states. Bragg interferometers utilize only a single internal state, and can therefore be less susceptible to environmental perturbations. Here we show that atoms extracted from a magneto-optical trap using an accelerating optical lattice are a suitable source for a Bragg atom interferometer, allowing efficient beamsplitting and subsequent separation of momentum states for detection. Despite the inherently multi-state nature of atom diffraction, we are able to build a Mach-Zehnder interferometer using Bragg scattering which achieves a sensitivity to the gravitational acceleration of Δg/g = 2.7 × 10-9 with an integration time of 1000 s. The device can also be converted to a gravity gradiometer by a simple modification of the light pulse sequence.

  13. Coulomb wave functions in momentum space

    DOE PAGES

    Eremenko, V.; Upadhyay, N. J.; Thompson, I. J.; ...

    2015-10-15

    We present an algorithm to calculate non-relativistic partial-wave Coulomb functions in momentum space. The arguments are the Sommerfeld parameter η, the angular momentum l, the asymptotic momentum q and the 'running' momentum p, where both momenta are real. Since the partial-wave Coulomb functions exhibit singular behavior when p → q, different representations of the Legendre functions of the 2nd kind need to be implemented in computing the functions for the values of p close to the singularity and far away from it. The code for the momentum-space Coulomb wave functions is applicable for values of vertical bar eta vertical barmore » in the range of 10-1 to 10, and thus is particularly suited for momentum space calculations of nuclear reactions.« less

  14. Coulomb wave functions in momentum space

    SciTech Connect

    Eremenko, V.; Upadhyay, N. J.; Thompson, I. J.; Elster, Ch.; Nunes, F. M.; Arbanas, G.; Escher, J. E.; Hlophe, L.

    2015-10-15

    We present an algorithm to calculate non-relativistic partial-wave Coulomb functions in momentum space. The arguments are the Sommerfeld parameter η, the angular momentum l, the asymptotic momentum q and the 'running' momentum p, where both momenta are real. Since the partial-wave Coulomb functions exhibit singular behavior when p → q, different representations of the Legendre functions of the 2nd kind need to be implemented in computing the functions for the values of p close to the singularity and far away from it. The code for the momentum-space Coulomb wave functions is applicable for values of vertical bar eta vertical bar in the range of 10-1 to 10, and thus is particularly suited for momentum space calculations of nuclear reactions.

  15. Electromagnetic energy momentum in dispersive media

    SciTech Connect

    Philbin, T. G.

    2011-01-15

    The standard derivations of electromagnetic energy and momentum in media take Maxwell's equations as the starting point. It is well known that for dispersive media this approach does not directly yield exact expressions for the energy and momentum densities. Although Maxwell's equations fully describe electromagnetic fields, the general approach to conserved quantities in field theory is not based on the field equations, but rather on the action. Here an action principle for macroscopic electromagnetism in dispersive, lossless media is used to derive the exact conserved energy-momentum tensor. The time-averaged energy density reduces to Brillouin's simple formula when the fields are monochromatic. The time-averaged momentum density for monochromatic fields corresponds to the familiar Minkowski expression DxB, but for general fields in dispersive media the momentum density does not have the Minkowski value. The results are unaffected by the debate over momentum balance in light-matter interactions.

  16. Momentum and Hamiltonian in Complex Action Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Keiichi; Nielsen, Holger Bech

    In the complex action theory (CAT) we explicitly examine how the momentum and Hamiltonian are defined from the Feynman path integral (FPI) point of view based on the complex coordinate formalism of our foregoing paper. After reviewing the formalism briefly, we describe in FPI with a Lagrangian the time development of a ξ-parametrized wave function, which is a solution to an eigenvalue problem of a momentum operator. Solving this eigenvalue problem, we derive the momentum and Hamiltonian. Oppositely, starting from the Hamiltonian we derive the Lagrangian in FPI, and we are led to the momentum relation again via the saddle point for p. This study confirms that the momentum and Hamiltonian in the CAT have the same forms as those in the real action theory. We also show the third derivation of the momentum relation via the saddle point for q.

  17. Precision agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision agriculture is a new farming practice that has been developing since late 1980s. It has been variously referred to as precision farming, prescription farming, site-specific crop management, to name but a few. There are numerous definitions for precision agriculture, but the central concept...

  18. Mood as Representation of Momentum

    PubMed Central

    Eldar, Eran; Rutledge, Robb B.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Niv, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Experiences affect mood, which in turn affects subsequent experiences. Recent studies suggest two specific principles. First, mood depends on how recent reward outcomes differ from expectations. Second, mood biases the way we perceive outcomes (e.g., rewards), and this bias affects learning about those outcomes. We propose that this two-way interaction serves to mitigate inefficiencies in the application of reinforcement learning to real-world problems. Specifically, we propose that mood represents the overall momentum of recent outcomes, and its biasing influence on the perception of outcomes ‘corrects’ learning to account for environmental dependencies. We describe potential dysfunctions of this adaptive mechanism that might contribute to the symptoms of mood disorders. PMID:26545853

  19. Novel Detection of Optical Orbital Angular Momentum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-16

    AFRL-RD-PS- AFRL-RD-PS TR-2014-0045 TR-2014-0045 Novel Detection of Optical Orbital Angular Momentum David Voelz Klipsch...Orbital Angular Momentum FA9451-13-1-0261 GR0004113 David Voelz Klipsch School of ECE New Mexico State University MSC 3-O, PO Box 30001 Las Cruces, NM...1026 . Government Purpose Rights. A light beam carry Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) has typical wave front and singularity at the optical axis. The

  20. Chirality and the angular momentum of light.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Robert P; Götte, Jörg B; Barnett, Stephen M; Yao, Alison M

    2017-02-28

    Chirality is exhibited by objects that cannot be rotated into their mirror images. It is far from obvious that this has anything to do with the angular momentum of light, which owes its existence to rotational symmetries. There is nevertheless a subtle connection between chirality and the angular momentum of light. We demonstrate this connection and, in particular, its significance in the context of chiral light-matter interactions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  1. Orbital angular momentum in phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Rigas, I.; Sanchez-Soto, L.L.; Klimov, A.B.; Rehacek, J.; Hradil, Z.

    2011-02-15

    Research Highlights: > We propose a comprehensive Weyl-Wigner formalism for the canonical pair angle-angular momentum. > We present a simple and useful toolkit for the practitioner. > We derive simple evolution equations in terms of a star product in the semiclassical limit. - Abstract: A comprehensive theory of the Weyl-Wigner formalism for the canonical pair angle-angular momentum is presented. Special attention is paid to the problems linked to rotational periodicity and angular-momentum discreteness.

  2. Chirality and the angular momentum of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Robert P.; Götte, Jörg B.; Barnett, Stephen M.; Yao, Alison M.

    2017-02-01

    Chirality is exhibited by objects that cannot be rotated into their mirror images. It is far from obvious that this has anything to do with the angular momentum of light, which owes its existence to rotational symmetries. There is nevertheless a subtle connection between chirality and the angular momentum of light. We demonstrate this connection and, in particular, its significance in the context of chiral light-matter interactions. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  3. Momentum harvesting techniques for solar system travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willoughby, Alan J.

    1990-01-01

    Astronomers are lately estimating there are 400,000 Earth visiting asteroids larger than 100 meters in diameter. These asteroids are accessible sources of building materials, propellants, oxygen, water, and minerals which also constitute a huge momentum reserve, potentially usable for travel throughout the solar system. To use this momentum, these stealthy objects must be tracked and the extraction of the momentum wanted must be learned. Momentum harvesting by momentum transfer from asteroid to spacecraft, and by using the momentum of the extraterrestrial material to help deliver itself to the destination are discussed. A net and tether concept is the suggested means of asteroid capture, the basic momentum exchange process. The energy damping characteristics of the tether will determine the velocity mismatch that can be tolerated, and hence the amount of momentum that can be harvested per capture. As it plays out of its reel, drag on the tether steadily accelerates the spacecraft. A variety of concepts for riding and using the asteroid after capture are discussed. The hitchhiker uses momentum transfer only. The beachcomber, the caveman, the swinger, the prospector, and the rock wrecker also take advantage of raw asteroidal materials. The chemist and the hijacker go further, they process the asteroid into propellant. Or, an 'asteroid railway system' could evolve with each hijacked asteroid becoming a scheduled train. Travelers could board the space railway system assured that water, oxygen, and propellants await them.

  4. Hollow ballistic pendulum for plasma momentum measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, S.F.; Pashinin, P.P.; Perov, V.Y.; Serov, R.V.; Yanovsky, V.P.

    1988-05-01

    A novel pendulum design: hollow ballistic pendulum: is suggested for plasma momentum measurements. It has an advantage over the pendula used earlier in laser plasma experiments of being insensitive to a momentum of matter evaporated and scattered by the pendulum wall exposed to the plasma, which usually exceeds plasma momentum to be measured. Simple expressions describing pendulum performance are derived, and requirements of shape and size are established. Using this kind of pendulum in experiments on laser acceleration of thin foils made it possible to measure the momentum of accelerated foil with an accuracy of about 10%.

  5. The Angular Momentum of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cang, Rongquin; Guo, Jianpo; Hu, Juanxiu; He, Chaoquiong

    2016-05-01

    The angular momentum of the Solar System is a very important physical quantity to the formation and evolution of the Solar System. Previously, the spin angular momentum of the Sun and the orbital angular momentum of the Eight Giant Planets were only taken into consideration, when researchers calculated the angular momentum of the Solar System. Nowadays, it seems narrow and conservative. Using Eggleton's code, we calculate the rotational inertia of the Sun. Furthermore, we obtain that the spin angular momentum of the Sun is 1.8838 x 10^41 kg m^2 s^-1. Besides the spin angular momentum of the Sun and the orbital angular momentum of the Eight Giant Planets, we also account for the orbital angular momentum of the Asteroid Belt, the Kuiper Belt, the Oort Cloud, the Ninth Giant Planet and the Solar Companion. We obtain that the angular momentum of the whole Solar System is 3.3212 x 10^45 kg m^2 s^-1.

  6. Photons, phonons, and plasmons with orbital angular momentum in plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Qiang; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian

    2017-02-06

    Exact eigen modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in the complex media of unmagnetized homogeneous plasmas are studied. Three exact eigen modes with OAM are derived, i.e., photons, phonons, and plasmons. The OAM of different plasma components are closely related to the charge polarities. For photons, the OAM of electrons and ions are of the same magnitude but opposite direction, and the total OAM is carried by the field. For the phonons and plasmons, their OAM are carried by the electrons and ions. Lastly, the OAM modes in plasmas and their characteristics can be explored for potential applications in plasmamore » physics and accelerator physics.« less

  7. Photons, phonons, and plasmons with orbital angular momentum in plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Exact eigen modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in the complex media of unmagnetized homogeneous plasmas are studied. Three exact eigen modes with OAM are derived, i.e., photons, phonons, and plasmons. The OAM of different plasma components are closely related to the charge polarities. For photons, the OAM of electrons and ions are of the same magnitude but opposite direction, and the total OAM is carried by the field. For the phonons and plasmons, their OAM are carried by the electrons and ions. The OAM modes in plasmas and their characteristics can be explored for potential applications in plasma physics and accelerator physics. PMID:28164998

  8. Photons, phonons, and plasmons with orbital angular momentum in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiang; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian

    2017-02-01

    Exact eigen modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in the complex media of unmagnetized homogeneous plasmas are studied. Three exact eigen modes with OAM are derived, i.e., photons, phonons, and plasmons. The OAM of different plasma components are closely related to the charge polarities. For photons, the OAM of electrons and ions are of the same magnitude but opposite direction, and the total OAM is carried by the field. For the phonons and plasmons, their OAM are carried by the electrons and ions. The OAM modes in plasmas and their characteristics can be explored for potential applications in plasma physics and accelerator physics.

  9. Prompt and Precise Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    For Sanders Design International, Inc., of Wilton, New Hampshire, every passing second between the concept and realization of a product is essential to succeed in the rapid prototyping industry where amongst heavy competition, faster time-to-market means more business. To separate itself from its rivals, Sanders Design aligned with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to develop what it considers to be the most accurate rapid prototyping machine for fabrication of extremely precise tooling prototypes. The company's Rapid ToolMaker System has revolutionized production of high quality, small-to-medium sized prototype patterns and tooling molds with an exactness that surpasses that of computer numerically-controlled (CNC) machining devices. Created with funding and support from Marshall under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, the Rapid ToolMaker is a dual-use technology with applications in both commercial and military aerospace fields. The advanced technology provides cost savings in the design and manufacturing of automotive, electronic, and medical parts, as well as in other areas of consumer interest, such as jewelry and toys. For aerospace applications, the Rapid ToolMaker enables fabrication of high-quality turbine and compressor blades for jet engines on unmanned air vehicles, aircraft, and missiles.

  10. Precision Measurement of Nuclear Electron Capture Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltick, David; Liu, Shih-Chieh; Wang, Haoyu; Heim, Jordan; Nistor, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    The method of accurately measuring the radioactive decay constant of a isotope by measuring the decay rate as a function of time requires that both the detector and environment be stable over time periods comparable to the life-time of the isotope. In addition statistical accuracy requires initial counting rates be high but limited by the dead time capability of the data collection system and the detectors double-event resolving time. A High Purity Germanium (HPGe) spectrometer, sensitive to radiation from 3-KeV to over 3-MeV, has been built to measure radioactive decay constants to a level of 10-5 10-6 at a location only 6 meters from the core of the High Flux Isotope Reactor located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Such accuracy requires understanding of, background, signal-processing algorithms, and both the double and triple event pile-up in the observed spectrum. The approach taken is to fit the collected energy spectrum with invariant shapes, independent of event rate. By fixing the source-detector geometry and environmental conditions, the invariant shapes are (1) ideal energy spectrum without pile-up and background, (2) the ideal double event pile-up spectrum, (3) the ideal triple event pile-up spectrum, and (4) the stable background spectrum. A method is presented that finds these ideal shapes using the collected data in situ. Taking this approach the HPGe detector photopeak shape in the absence of background and pile-up is presented showing associated structure over a range of 7 orders of magnitude.

  11. Momentum harvesting techniques for solar system travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willoughby, Alan J.

    1991-01-01

    Astronomers are lately estimating there are 400,000 earth visiting asteroids larger than 100 meters in diameter. These asteroids are uniquely accessible sources of building materials, propellants, oxygen, water, and minerals. They also constitute a huge momentum reserve, potentially usable for travel throughout the solar system. To use this momentum, these stealthy objects must be tracked and the ability to extract the desired momentum obtained. Momentum harvesting by momentum transfer from asteroid to spacecraft, and by using the momentum of the extraterrestrial material to help deliver itself to its destination is discussed. The purpose is neither to quantify nor justify the momentum exchange processes, but to stimulate collective imaginations with some intriguing possibilities which emerge when momentum as well as material is considered. A net and tether concept is the suggested means of asteroid capture, the basic momentum exchange process. The energy damping characteristics of the tether determines the velocity mismatch that can be tolerated, and hence the amount of momentum that can be harvested per capture. As the tether plays out of its reel, drag on the tether steadily accelerates the spacecraft and dilutes, in time, the would-be collision. A variety of concepts for riding and using asteroids after capture are introduced. The hitchhiker uses momentum transfer only. The beachcomber, the caveman, the swinger, the prospector, and the rock wrecker also take advantage of raw asteroid materials. The chemist and the hijacker go further, they process the asteroid into propellants. Or, an asteroid railway system could be constructed with each hijacked asteroid becoming a scheduled train. Travelers could board this space railway system assured that water, oxygen propellants, and shielding await them. Austere space travel could give way to comforts, with a speed and economy impossible without nature's gift of earth visiting asteroids.

  12. Ionization Time and Exit Momentum in Strong-Field Tunnel Ionization.

    PubMed

    Teeny, Nicolas; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Bauke, Heiko; Keitel, Christoph H

    2016-02-12

    Tunnel ionization belongs to the fundamental processes of atomic physics. The so-called two-step model, which describes the ionization as instantaneous tunneling at the electric field maximum and classical motion afterwards with zero exit momentum, is commonly employed to describe tunnel ionization in adiabatic regimes. In this contribution, we show by solving numerically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in one dimension and employing a virtual detector at the tunnel exit that there is a nonvanishing positive time delay between the electric field maximum and the instant of ionization. Moreover, we find a nonzero exit momentum in the direction of the electric field. To extract proper tunneling times from asymptotic momentum distributions of ionized electrons, it is essential to incorporate the electron's initial momentum in the direction of the external electric field.

  13. Momentum-space electronic structures and charge orders of the high-temperature superconductors Ca2-xNaxCuO₂Cl₂ and Bi₂Sr₂CaCu₂O8+δ

    DOE PAGES

    Meng, Jian-Qiao; Brunner, M.; Kim, K.-H.; ...

    2011-08-24

    We study the electronic structure of Ca2-xNaxCuO₂Cl₂ and Bi₂Sr₂CaCu₂O8+δ samples in a wide range of doping, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, with emphasis on the Fermi surface (FS) in the near antinodal region. The “nesting wave vector,” i.e., the wave vector that connects two nearly flat pieces of the FS in the antinodal region, reveals a universal monotonic decrease in magnitude as a function of doping. Comparing our results to the charge order recently observed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), we conclude that the FS nesting and the charge order pattern seen in STS do not have a direct relationship. Therefore,more » the charge order likely arises due to strong-correlation physics rather than FS nesting physics« less

  14. Momentum-space Electronic Structures and Charge Orders of the High-temperature Superconductors Ca2−xNaxCuO2Cl2 and Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, J.Q.; Xu, Z.; Brunner, M.; Kim, K.-H.; Lee, H.-G.; Lee, S.-I.; Wen, J.S.; Gu, G.D.; Gweon, G.-H.

    2011-08-24

    We study the electronic structure of Ca{sub 2-x}Na{sub x}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} samples in a wide range of doping, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, with emphasis on the Fermi surface (FS) in the near antinodal region. The 'nesting wave vector,' i.e., the wave vector that connects two nearly flat pieces of the FS in the antinodal region, reveals a universal monotonic decrease in magnitude as a function of doping. Comparing our results to the charge order recently observed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), we conclude that the FS nesting and the charge order pattern seen in STS do not have a direct relationship. Therefore, the charge order likely arises due to strong-correlation physics rather than FS nesting physics.

  15. Status of the variable momentum compaction storage ring experiment in SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, P.; Amiry, A.; Pellegrini, C.

    1993-09-01

    Variable momentum compaction lattices have been proposed for electron-positron colliders and synchrotron radiation sources to control synchrotron tune and bunch length. To address questions of single particle stability limits, a study has been initiated to change the SPEAR lattice into a variable momentum compaction configuration for experimental investigation of the beam dynamics. In this paper, we describe a model-based method used to transform SPEAR from the injection lattice to the low momentum compaction configuration. Experimental observations of the process are reviewed.

  16. Effect of energy and momentum conservation on fluid resonances for resonant magnetic perturbations in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Peter; Heyn, Martin F.; Kernbichler, Winfried; Ivanov, Ivan B.; Kasilov, Sergei V.

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, the impact of momentum and energy conservation of the collision operator in the kinetic description for Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) in a tokamak is studied. The particle conserving differential collision operator of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type is supplemented with integral parts such that energy and momentum are conserved. The application to RMP penetration in a tokamak shows that energy conservation in the electron collision operator is important for the quantitative description of plasma shielding effects at the resonant surface. On the other hand, momentum conservation in the ion collision operator does not significantly change the results.

  17. Orbital angular momentum: a personal memoir.

    PubMed

    Allen, L

    2017-02-28

    A definitive statement of the model used to describe orbital angular momentum is essentially now available. Its early history, and the interaction of those who played key roles in its development over 20 years ago in its development, is outlined in this Memoir.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  18. Orbital angular momentum: a personal memoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, L.

    2017-02-01

    A definitive statement of the model used to describe orbital angular momentum is essentially now available. Its early history, and the interaction of those who played key roles in its development over 20 years ago in its development, is outlined in this Memoir. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  19. Variation of transverse momentum in hadronic collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint Amand, J.; Uritam, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents a detailed parameterization of the transverse momentum in hadronic collisions on multiplicity and on beam momentum. Hadronic collisions are considered at energies below the ultra-high energy domain, on the basis of an uncertainty relation and a naive eikonal model with an impact-parameter-dependent multiplicity.

  20. Momentum control in photoassociation of ultracold atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kallush, S.; Kosloff, R.

    2007-11-15

    Ultracold photoassociation is a process in which two cold atoms combine to form a molecule. This process is crucially dependent on the atom pair density at close distance termed the photoassociation window. We explore the possibilities for increasing the pair density at the photoassociation window by using a prepulse to accelerate the pairs of atoms at large interatomic separation toward each other. We show that the signal of a subsequent photoassociation pulse could be enhanced by a factor of one to two orders of magnitude with respect to the conventional continuous wave experiment. For neutral encounters on the ground potential surface which scales as R{sup -6} the acceleration becomes negligible. The electronic excited state potentials scale for homonuclear S{yields}P transitions more favorably as R{sup -3}. A possible pump-dump mechanism for acceleration, excites a pair of atoms at large distance employing the natural acceleration on the excited state. Then a dump pulse moves the population back to the ground surface. By controlling the phase and the amplitude of the light field this scenario can be optimized. In addition the momentum partitioned between the ground and excited surfaces can also be controlled. The possibility for pure quantum light-induced acceleration due to a gradient of the transition dipole is analyzed. Significant acceleration can be obtained only for pulses with intensities above 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} and pulse duration of 10 ps.

  1. A zero cost experiment on the ‘impulse-momentum theorem’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganci, Salvatore; Lagomarsino Oneto, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Impulse-momentum theorem is a basic matter of the mechanics. A zero cost experiment can be used in the classroom, without any apparatus, in order to verify the fundamental relationship between an impulsive force and the linear momentum variation. Using various data, the use of an electronic sheet such Excel gives an ‘impulse’ to put in practice the ‘errors-analysis’ theory.

  2. Population momentum across vertebrate life histories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koons, D.N.; Grand, J.B.; Arnold, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Population abundance is critically important in conservation, management, and demographic theory. Thus, to better understand how perturbations to the life history affect long-term population size, we examined population momentum for four vertebrate classes with different life history strategies. In a series of demographic experiments we show that population momentum generally has a larger effect on long-term population size for organisms with long generation times than for organisms with short generation times. However, patterns between population momentum and generation time varied across taxonomic groups and according to the life history parameter that was changed. Our findings indicate that momentum may be an especially important aspect of population dynamics for long-lived vertebrates, and deserves greater attention in life history studies. Further, we discuss the importance of population momentum in natural resource management, pest control, and conservation arenas. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Extraordinary momentum and spin in evanescent waves.

    PubMed

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Bekshaev, Aleksandr Y; Nori, Franco

    2014-03-06

    Momentum and spin represent fundamental dynamic properties of quantum particles and fields. In particular, propagating optical waves (photons) carry momentum and longitudinal spin determined by the wave vector and circular polarization, respectively. Here we show that exactly the opposite can be the case for evanescent optical waves. A single evanescent wave possesses a spin component, which is independent of the polarization and is orthogonal to the wave vector. Furthermore, such a wave carries a momentum component, which is determined by the circular polarization and is also orthogonal to the wave vector. We show that these extraordinary properties reveal a fundamental Belinfante's spin momentum, known in field theory and unobservable in propagating fields. We demonstrate that the transverse momentum and spin push and twist a probe Mie particle in an evanescent field. This allows the observation of 'impossible' properties of light and of a fundamental field-theory quantity, which was previously considered as 'virtual'.

  4. Quantum gravity momentum representation and maximum energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, J. W.

    2016-11-01

    We use the idea of the symmetry between the spacetime coordinates xμ and the energy-momentum pμ in quantum theory to construct a momentum space quantum gravity geometry with a metric sμν and a curvature tensor Pλ μνρ. For a closed maximally symmetric momentum space with a constant 3-curvature, the volume of the p-space admits a cutoff with an invariant maximum momentum a. A Wheeler-DeWitt-type wave equation is obtained in the momentum space representation. The vacuum energy density and the self-energy of a charged particle are shown to be finite, and modifications of the electromagnetic radiation density and the entropy density of a system of particles occur for high frequencies.

  5. Momentum kill procedure can quickly control blowouts

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.D. ); Moore, P. )

    1993-08-30

    The momentum kill method can help in quickly regaining control of a blowing well, providing the blowing well rate and fluid properties can be estimated reasonably. The momentum of the kill fluid counteracts and overcomes the flowing momentum of formation fluids. In other words, sufficient mud density pumped at a sufficient rate is directed into the flow stream to force the escaping fluid column back into the well bore. Sufficient kill fluid hydrostatic pressure must be stacked'' in the hole so that the well remains dead after the operation. The momentum kill is not a panacea for all blowouts. An assessment must be made of the potential problems unique to this method, and certain requirements must be met if the technique is to be successful. The paper discusses some of the considerations for evaluating the use of the momentum kill method.

  6. The angular momentum of the Oort cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, P.R. )

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the work of Marochnik et al. (1988), which estimated that the angular momentum of the Oort cloud is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the planetary system's total angular momentum. It is noted that most of the angular momentum in the currently observed Oort cloud is the result of the effects of external perturbers over the solar system's history, and it is demonstrated that the total current angular momentum is probably in the 6.0 x 10 to the 50th to 1.1 x 10 to the 51st g sq cm/sec range; original angular momentum was probably a factor of 5 below such values. 21 refs.

  7. The angular momentum of the Oort cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the work of Marochnik et al. (1988), which estimated that the angular momentum of the Oort cloud is 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the planetary system's total angular momentum. It is noted that most of the angular momentum in the currently observed Oort cloud is the result of the effects of external perturbers over the solar system's history, and it is demonstrated that the total current angular momentum is probably in the 6.0 x 10 to the 50th to 1.1 x 10 to the 51st g sq cm/sec range; original angular momentum was probably a factor of 5 below such values.

  8. Forms of momentum across space: representational, operational, and attentional.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Timothy L

    2014-12-01

    Cognition can exhibit biases consistent with future expectations, and some of these biases result in momentum-like effects and have been linked with the idea of an internalization of the effects of momentum. These momentum-like effects include representational momentum, operational momentum, and attentional momentum. Similarities and differences between these different momentum-like effects are considered. Hubbard's (2005) review of representational momentum is updated to include studies published since that review appeared, and the first full reviews of operational momentum and attentional momentum are provided. It is suggested that (1) many variables that influence one of these momentum-like effects have a similar influence on another momentum-like effect, (2) representational momentum, operational momentum, and attentional momentum reflect similar or overlapping mechanisms, and operational momentum and attentional momentum are special cases of representational momentum, and (3) representational momentum, operational momentum, and attentional momentum reflect properties of a more general spatial representation in which change or transformation of a stimulus is mapped onto motion in a spatial coordinate system.

  9. Energy-momentum squared gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshan, Mahmood; Shojai, Fatimah

    2016-08-01

    A new covariant generalization of Einstein's general relativity is developed which allows the existence of a term proportional to Tα βTα β in the action functional of the theory (Tα β is the energy-momentum tensor). Consequently, the relevant field equations are different from general relativity only in the presence of matter sources. In the case of a charged black hole, we find exact solutions for the field equations. Applying this theory to a homogeneous and isotropic spacetime, we find that there is a maximum energy density ρmax , and correspondingly a minimum length amin , at the early Universe. This means that there is a bounce at early times, and this theory avoids the existence of an early-time singularity. Moreover, we show that this theory possesses a true sequence of cosmological eras. We also argue that, although in the context of the standard cosmological model the cosmological constant Λ does not play any important role in the early times and becomes important only after the matter-dominated era, in this theory the "repulsive" nature of the cosmological constant plays a crucial role at early times in resolving the singularity.

  10. Angular Momentum of Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Kirsty M.; Obreschkow, Danail; Oh, Se-Heon

    2017-01-01

    We present measurements of baryonic mass {M}{{b}} and specific angular momentum (sAM) {j}{{b}} in 14 rotating dwarf Irregular (dIrr) galaxies from the LITTLE THINGS sample. These measurements, based on 21 cm kinematic data from the Very Large Array and stellar mass maps from the Spitzer Space Telescope, extend previous AM measurements by more than two orders of magnitude in {M}{{b}}. The dwarf galaxies show systematically higher {j}{{b}} values than expected from the {j}{{b}}\\propto {M}{{b}}2/3 scaling of spiral galaxies, representative of a scale-free galaxy formation scenario. This offset can be explained by decreasing baryon mass fractions {f}{{M}}={M}{{b}}/{M}{dyn} (where {M}{dyn} is the dynamical mass) with decreasing {M}{{b}} (for {M}{{b}}< {10}11 {M}ȯ ). We find that the sAM of neutral atomic hydrogen (H i) alone is about 2.5 times higher than that of the stars. The M–j relation of H i is significantly steeper than that of the stars, as a direct consequence of the systematic variation of the H i fraction with {M}{{b}}.

  11. Benchmarking of collision operators with momentum source corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Maassberg, H.; Beidler, C. D.

    2010-05-15

    Several linearized collision operator models with parallel momentum conservation enforced by source functions are benchmarked against the correct collision operator based on Rosenbluth potentials. The model operators without energy diffusion allow for an analytic solution of a generalized Spitzer problem. For the other operators under investigation, an integrodifferential equation is solved. The benchmarking is performed both for the parallel conductivity with the ions assumed at rest and for the bootstrap current, where ion and electron flows are collisionally coupled. The accuracy of the results obtained with the operators varies from rather poor in the case of the simplest monoenergetic model to quite satisfactory for the models employing an energy-weighted parallel momentum source function.

  12. Temperature dependence of angular momentum transport across interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai; Lin, Weiwei; Chien, C. L.; Zhang, Shufeng

    2016-08-01

    Angular momentum transport in magnetic multilayered structures plays a central role in spintronic physics and devices. The angular momentum currents or spin currents are carried by either quasiparticles such as electrons and magnons, or by macroscopic order parameters such as local magnetization of ferromagnets. Based on the generic interface exchange interaction, we develop a microscopic theory that describes interfacial spin conductance for various interfaces among nonmagnetic metals, ferromagnetic insulators, and antiferromagnetic insulators. Spin conductance and its temperature dependence are obtained for different spin batteries including spin pumping, temperature gradient, and spin Hall effect. As an application of our theory, we calculate the spin current in a trilayer made of a ferromagnetic insulator, an antiferromagnetic insulator, and a nonmagnetic heavy metal. The calculated results on the temperature dependence of spin conductance quantitatively agree with the existing experiments.

  13. Optical gyrotropy from axion electrodynamics in momentum space.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shudan; Orenstein, Joseph; Moore, Joel E

    2015-09-11

    Several emergent phenomena and phases in solids arise from configurations of the electronic Berry phase in momentum space that are similar to gauge field configurations in real space such as magnetic monopoles. We show that the momentum-space analogue of the "axion electrodynamics" term E·B plays a fundamental role in a unified theory of Berry-phase contributions to optical gyrotropy in time-reversal invariant materials and the chiral magnetic effect. The Berry-phase mechanism predicts that the rotatory power along the optic axes of a crystal must sum to zero, a constraint beyond that stipulated by point-group symmetry, but observed to high accuracy in classic experimental observations on alpha quartz. Furthermore, the Berry mechanism provides a microscopic basis for the surface conductance at the interface between gyrotropic and nongyrotropic media.

  14. [Precision and personalized medicine].

    PubMed

    Sipka, Sándor

    2016-10-01

    The author describes the concept of "personalized medicine" and the newly introduced "precision medicine". "Precision medicine" applies the terms of "phenotype", "endotype" and "biomarker" in order to characterize more precisely the various diseases. Using "biomarkers" the homogeneous type of a disease (a "phenotype") can be divided into subgroups called "endotypes" requiring different forms of treatment and financing. The good results of "precision medicine" have become especially apparent in relation with allergic and autoimmune diseases. The application of this new way of thinking is going to be necessary in Hungary, too, in the near future for participants, controllers and financing boards of healthcare. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(44), 1739-1741.

  15. Precision positioning device

    DOEpatents

    McInroy, John E.

    2005-01-18

    A precision positioning device is provided. The precision positioning device comprises a precision measuring/vibration isolation mechanism. A first plate is provided with the precision measuring mean secured to the first plate. A second plate is secured to the first plate. A third plate is secured to the second plate with the first plate being positioned between the second plate and the third plate. A fourth plate is secured to the third plate with the second plate being positioned between the third plate and the fourth plate. An adjusting mechanism for adjusting the position of the first plate, the second plate, the third plate, and the fourth plate relative to each other.

  16. Physical approach to price momentum and its application to momentum strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaehyung

    2014-12-01

    We introduce various quantitative and mathematical definitions for price momentum of financial instruments. The price momentum is quantified with velocity and mass concepts originated from the momentum in physics. By using the physical momentum of price as a selection criterion, the weekly contrarian strategies are implemented in South Korea KOSPI 200 and US S&P 500 universes. The alternative strategies constructed by the physical momentum achieve the better expected returns and reward-risk measures than those of the traditional contrarian strategy in weekly scale. The portfolio performance is not understood by the Fama-French three-factor model.

  17. Precise Measurements of Beam Spin Asymmetries in Semi-Inclusive π0 production

    SciTech Connect

    Aghasyan, M.; Avakian, H.; Rossi, P.; De Sanctis, E.; Hasch, D.; Mirazita, M.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; Biselli, A. S.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Chandavar, S.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; DʼAngelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalkar, S. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Kvaltine, N. D.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McAndrew, J.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Micherdzinska, A. M.; Mokeev, V.; Moreno, B.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Phelps, E.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rosner, G.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z. W.

    2011-10-01

    We present studies of single-spin asymmetries for neutral pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of 5.776 GeV polarized electrons from an unpolarized hydrogen target, using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. A substantial sin Φh amplitude has been measured in the distribution of the cross section asymmetry as a function of the azimuthal angle Φh of the produced neutral pion. The dependence of this amplitude on Bjorken x and on the pion transverse momentum is extracted with significantly higher precision than previous data and is compared to model calculations.

  18. Momentum space Cooper pairing in a spin-momentum locked Dirac gap on the surface of a topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Su-Yang

    2014-03-01

    Superconductivity in Dirac systems is one of the central theoretical themes in modern physics. In particular, a helical superconductor is a theoretically predicted exotic topological phase of matter, which can be experimentally realized if superconductivity can be induced in an odd number of spin-helical Dirac electronic states. By spectroscopically momentum-resolving the superconducting proximity effect at the boundary of a topological insulator ultra-thin film, we experimentally present direct experimental evidence for a helical topological superconductor via the observation of superconductivity in an odd number of spin-momentum locked topological surface states. Observation of helical superconductivity opens the door to a number of novel topological phenomena such as supersymmetry and Abelian Majorana modes in a condensed matter context. This work is primarily supported by U.S. DOE and Princeton University

  19. Precision antenna reflector structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The assembly of the Large Precise Reflector Infrared Telescope is detailed. Also given are the specifications for the Aft Cargo Carrier and the Large Precision Reflector structure. Packaging concepts and options, stowage depth and support truss geometry are also considered. An example of a construction scenario is given.

  20. Precision Optics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Robert L.; And Others

    This guide outlines the competency-based, two-year precision optics curriculum that the American Precision Optics Manufacturers Association has proposed to fill the void that it suggests will soon exist as many of the master opticians currently employed retire. The model, which closely resembles the old European apprenticeship model, calls for 300…

  1. Cloaking of the momentum in acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Sklan, Sophia

    2010-01-01

    Through an appropriate change in variables, we find that the three-dimensional acoustic wave equation is subject to the transformation media interpretation. In particular, we determine that this interpretation can be extended beyond the pressure difference to also account for the momentum transported by the wave. The suitability of momentum transport is especially interesting as it is an example where the field of interest is not governed by a wave equation. We examine how both fields behave in the case of cloaking. Explicit consideration of the boundary conditions shows that perfect cloaking is preserved, even when the incoming momentum is nonzero at the surface of the cloak.

  2. Constraining nucleon high momentum in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Gao-Chan

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies at Jefferson Lab show that there are a certain proportion of nucleons in nuclei have momenta greater than the so-called nuclear Fermi momentum pF. Based on the transport model of nucleus-nucleus collisions at intermediate energies, nucleon high momentum caused by the neutron-proton short-range correlations in nuclei is constrained by comparing with π and photon experimental data and considering some uncertainties. The high momentum cutoff value pmax ≤ 2pF is obtained.

  3. Angular and Linear Momentum of Excited Ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peng; Kamra, Akashdeep; Cao, Yunshan; Bauer, Gerrit

    2014-03-01

    The angular momentum vector of a Heisenberg ferromagnet with isotropic exchange interaction is conserved, while under uniaxial crystalline anisotropy the projection of the total spin along the easy axis is a constant of motion. Using Noether's theorem, we prove that these conservation laws persist in the presence of dipole-dipole interactions. However, spin and orbital angular momentum are not conserved separately anymore. We also define the linear momentum of ferromagnetic textures. We illustrate the general principles with special reference to spin transfer torques and identify the emergence of a non-adiabatic effective field acting on domain walls in ferromagnetic insulators

  4. Autonomous momentum management for space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, E.

    1984-01-01

    Momentum management for the CDG planar space platform is discussed. It is assumed that the external torques on the space station are gravity gradient and aerodynamic, both have bias and cyclic terms. The integrals of the cyclic torques are the cyclic momenti which will be stored in the momentum storage actuator. Techniques to counteract the bias torques and center the cyclic momentum and gravity gradient desaturation by adjusting vehicle attitude, aerodynamic desaturation using solar panels and radiators and the deployment of flat plates at the end of long booms generating aerodynamic torques are investigated.

  5. Angular momentum in the Local Group

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, A.; Laflamme, R.

    1994-04-01

    We briefly review models for the Local Group and the acquisition of its angular momentum. We describe early attempts to understand the origin of the spin of the galaxies discussing the hypothesis that the Local Group has little angular momentum. Finally we show that using Peebles` least action principle there should be a rather large amount of orbital angular momentum compared to the magnitude of the spin of its galaxies. Therefore the Local Group cannot be thought as tidally isolated. Using Peebles` trajectories we give a possible set of trajectories for Local Group galaxies which would predict their spin.

  6. 15 CFR 711.5 - Numerical precision of submitted data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Numerical precision of submitted data... ELECTRONIC FILING OF DECLARATIONS AND REPORTS § 711.5 Numerical precision of submitted data. Numerical... (i.e., parts 712 through 715 of the CWCR) with a precision equal to that which can be...

  7. Precision volume measurement system.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Erin E.; Shugard, Andrew D.

    2004-11-01

    A new precision volume measurement system based on a Kansas City Plant (KCP) design was built to support the volume measurement needs of the Gas Transfer Systems (GTS) department at Sandia National Labs (SNL) in California. An engineering study was undertaken to verify or refute KCP's claims of 0.5% accuracy. The study assesses the accuracy and precision of the system. The system uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) in a temperature and computer controlled environment to ratio a known volume to an unknown volume.

  8. Psychological momentum: intuitive physics and naive beliefs.

    PubMed

    Markman, Keith D; Guenther, Corey L

    2007-06-01

    The present research examines psychological momentum (PM), a perceived force that lay intuition suggests influences performance. PM theory is proposed to account for how momentum perceptions arise, and four studies demonstrate the influence of lay intuitions about PM on expectations regarding performance outcomes. Study 1 establishes that individuals share intuitions about the types of events that precipitate PM, and Study 2 finds that defeating a rival increases momentum perceptions. Study 3 provides evidence for the lay belief that as more PM accumulates during a prior task, there should be more residual momentum left to carry over to a subsequent task, and Study 4 finds that an individual whose PM is interrupted is expected to have greater difficulty completing a task than is an individual whose steady progress is interrupted. Discussion focuses on linkages between PM and related constructs.

  9. Momentum-space Harper-Hofstadter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2015-08-01

    We show how the weakly trapped Harper-Hofstadter model can be mapped onto a Harper-Hofstadter model in momentum space. In this momentum-space model, the band dispersion plays the role of the periodic potential, the Berry curvature plays the role of an effective magnetic field, the real-space harmonic trap provides the momentum-space kinetic energy responsible for the hopping, and the trap position sets the boundary conditions around the magnetic Brillouin zone. Spatially local interactions translate into nonlocal interactions in momentum space: within a mean-field approximation, we show that increasing interparticle interactions leads to a structural change of the ground state, from a single rotationally symmetric ground state to degenerate ground states that spontaneously break rotational symmetry.

  10. Quantum Hall effect in momentum space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically discuss a momentum-space analog of the quantum Hall effect, which could be observed in topologically nontrivial lattice models subject to an external harmonic trapping potential. In our proposal, the Niu-Thouless-Wu formulation of the quantum Hall effect on a torus is realized in the toroidally shaped Brillouin zone. In this analogy, the position of the trap center in real space controls the magnetic fluxes that are inserted through the holes of the torus in momentum space. We illustrate the momentum-space quantum Hall effect with the noninteracting trapped Harper-Hofstadter model, for which we numerically demonstrate how this effect manifests itself in experimental observables. Extension to the interacting trapped Harper-Hofstadter model is also briefly considered. We finally discuss possible experimental platforms where our proposal for the momentum-space quantum Hall effect could be realized.

  11. Linear Momentum Conservation in a Nonconservative Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Edward J.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses an experiment on the conservation of momentum and Q-values for elastic and inelastic collisions with frictional energy dissipation taken into account. Indicates that the apparatus is readily fabricated from easily available materials. (CC)

  12. Gravity wave momentum fluxes from MF and meteor radar measurements in the polar MLT region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placke, Manja; Hoffmann, Peter; Latteck, Ralph; Rapp, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Annual cycles of horizontal winds and gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) are presented for the medium frequency Doppler radar at Saura (SMF radar, located at 69°N, 16°E) for the first time. Four year mean wind and momentum flux fields for 2008 through 2011 clearly show the coupling and interactions between GWs and the mean flow especially in the summer months. GW breaking at mesopause heights results in momentum flux divergence and affects the wind field by forcing a reversal of the wind profile in summer. Height-time cross sections for the individual years (2008 to 2011) illustrate the year-to-year variation of horizontal winds and the vertical fluxes of zonal and meridional momentum. They show similar annual patterns from year to year which are more consistent in the summer months than during winter and have maximum absolute values in 2009. Furthermore, the precise SMF radar measurements give an excellent possibility to evaluate momentum flux estimates from the colocated meteor radar at Andenes. Both radars have different capabilities, and different techniques are applied to derive momentum fluxes. They show comparable results for the 4 year mean annual cycles of horizontal winds and momentum fluxes especially in summer. This holds for both structure and magnitudes in the overlapping heights, where the SMF radar data provide a wider vertical coverage. The best agreement is found for the zonal components of both radars, whereas there are some larger discrepancies in the meridional components, especially in the vertical flux of meridional momentum.

  13. Nonlinearity effects on the directed momentum current.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-Lei; Fu, Li-Bin; Liu, Jie

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the quantum transport dynamics governed by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a periodically-δ-kicking potential and discover the emergence of a directed current in momentum space. With the increase of nonlinearity, we find strikingly that the momentum current decreases, reverses, and finally vanishes, indicating that the quantum transport can be effectively manipulated through adjusting the nonlinearity. The underlying dynamic mechanism is uncovered and some important implications are addressed.

  14. Transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs)

    SciTech Connect

    Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2011-10-24

    Transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) provide three-dimensional images of the partonic structure of the nucleon in momentum space. We made impressive progress in understanding TMDs, both from the theoretical and experimental point of view. This brief overview on TMDs is divided in two parts: in the first, an essential list of achievements is presented. In the second, a selection of open questions is discussed.

  15. Momentum errors in an RF separated beam

    SciTech Connect

    T. Kobilarcik

    2002-09-19

    The purity of an RF separated beam is affected by the difference in mass of the particle types and the momentum bite of the beam. The resulting time-of-flight difference between different types allows separation to occur; the finite momentum bite results in chromatic aberration. Both these features also give rise to a particle type dependent velocity bite, which must also be taken into account. This memo demonstrates a generalizable method for calculating the effect.

  16. Total longitudinal momentum in a dispersive optical waveguide.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianhui; Chen, Chunyan; Zhai, Yanfang; Chen, Zhe; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Lijun; Huang, Furong; Xiao, Yi

    2011-12-05

    Using the Lorentz force law, we derived simpler expressions for the total longitudinal (conserved) momentum and the mechanical momentums associated with an optical pulse propagating along a dispersive optical waveguide. These expressions can be applied to an arbitrary non-absorptive optical waveguide having continuous translational symmetry. Our simulation using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method verified that the total momentum formula is valid in a two-dimensional infinite waveguide. We studied the conservation of the total momentum and the transfer of the momentum to the waveguide for the case when an optical pulse travels from a finite waveguide to vacuum. We found that neither the Abraham nor the Minkowski momentum expression for an electromagnetic wave in a waveguide represents the complete total (conserved) momentum. Only the total momentum as we derived for a mode propagating in a dispersive optical waveguides is the 'true' conserved momentum. This total momentum can be expressed as PTot = -U Die/(vg) + neff (U/c). It has three contributions: (1) the Abraham momentum; (2) the momentum from the Abraham force, which equals to the difference between the Abraham momentum and the Minkowski momentum; and (3) the momentum from the dipole force which can be expressed as -UDie/vg. The last two contributions constitute the mechanical momentum. Compared with FDTD-Lorentz-force method, the presently derived total momentum formula provides a better method in terms of analyzing the permanent transfer of optical momentum to a waveguide.

  17. Role of the electromagnetic momentum in the spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spavieri, Gianfranco

    2016-12-01

    The role played by the linear and angular momentum of the electromagnetic fields in the understanding of several aspects of quantum mechanics is discussed. A non-relativistic semi-classical model of the spin-orbit interaction, where the electromagnetic interaction energy U is calculated in the frame of the nucleus, is presented. Taking into account the electron hidden momentum P h = c -1 μ × E, the spin-orbit energy splitting turns out to be Δℰ so = (1 / 2) U, the factor 1 / 2 emerging directly by requiring that the energy variation be a minimum. After quantization, the radius of the orbit is found to be spin-dependent, anticipating a feature of the Dirac equation. Finally, a test of the hidden momentum P h , which may corroborate the approaches based on the hidden momentum and related interpretations of electrodynamics, is proposed and shown to be viable with present technology.

  18. Universal spin-momentum locked optical forces

    SciTech Connect

    Kalhor, Farid; Thundat, Thomas; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-02-08

    Evanescent electromagnetic waves possess spin-momentum locking, where the direction of propagation (momentum) is locked to the inherent polarization of the wave (transverse spin). We study the optical forces arising from this universal phenomenon and show that the fundamental origin of recently reported non-trivial optical chiral forces is spin-momentum locking. For evanescent waves, we show that the direction of energy flow, the direction of decay, and the direction of spin follow a right hand rule for three different cases of total internal reflection, surface plasmon polaritons, and HE{sub 11} mode of an optical fiber. Furthermore, we explain how the recently reported phenomena of lateral optical force on chiral and achiral particles are caused by the transverse spin of the evanescent field and the spin-momentum locking phenomenon. Finally, we propose an experiment to identify the unique lateral forces arising from the transverse spin in the optical fiber and point to fundamental differences of the spin density from the well-known orbital angular momentum of light. Our work presents a unified view on spin-momentum locking and how it affects optical forces on chiral and achiral particles.

  19. Enhanced momentum feedback from clustered supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, Eric S.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Dekel, Avishai; Madau, Piero

    2017-02-01

    Young stars typically form in star clusters, so the supernovae (SNe) they produce are clustered in space and time. This clustering of SNe may alter the momentum per SN deposited in the interstellar medium (ISM) by affecting the local ISM density, which in turn affects the cooling rate. We study the effect of multiple SNe using idealized 1D hydrodynamic simulations which explore a large parameter space of the number of SNe, and the background gas density and metallicity. The results are provided as a table and an analytic fitting formula. We find that for clusters with up to ∼100 SNe, the asymptotic momentum scales superlinearly with the number of SNe, resulting in a momentum per SN which can be an order of magnitude larger than for a single SN, with a maximum efficiency for clusters with 10-100 SNe. We argue that additional physical processes not included in our simulations - self-gravity, breakout from a galactic disc, and galactic shear - can slightly reduce the momentum enhancement from clustering, but the average momentum per SN still remains a factor of 4 larger than the isolated SN value when averaged over a realistic cluster mass function for a star-forming galaxy. We conclude with a discussion of the possible role of mixing between hot and cold gas, induced by multidimensional instabilities or pre-existing density variations, as a limiting factor in the build-up of momentum by clustered SNe, and suggest future numerical experiments to explore these effects.

  20. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  1. Optimetrics for Precise Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Guangning; Heckler, Gregory; Gramling, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    Optimetrics for Precise Navigation will be implemented on existing optical communication links. The ranging and Doppler measurements are conducted over communication data frame and clock. The measurement accuracy is two orders of magnitude better than TDRSS. It also has other advantages of: The high optical carrier frequency enables: (1) Immunity from ionosphere and interplanetary Plasma noise floor, which is a performance limitation for RF tracking; and (2) High antenna gain reduces terminal size and volume, enables high precision tracking in Cubesat, and in deep space smallsat. High Optical Pointing Precision provides: (a) spacecraft orientation, (b) Minimal additional hardware to implement Precise Optimetrics over optical comm link; and (c) Continuous optical carrier phase measurement will enable the system presented here to accept future optical frequency standard with much higher clock accuracy.

  2. Precision Measurement in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quake, Stephen

    Is biology a quantitative science like physics? I will discuss the role of precision measurement in both physics and biology, and argue that in fact both fields can be tied together by the use and consequences of precision measurement. The elementary quanta of biology are twofold: the macromolecule and the cell. Cells are the fundamental unit of life, and macromolecules are the fundamental elements of the cell. I will describe how precision measurements have been used to explore the basic properties of these quanta, and more generally how the quest for higher precision almost inevitably leads to the development of new technologies, which in turn catalyze further scientific discovery. In the 21st century, there are no remaining experimental barriers to biology becoming a truly quantitative and mathematical science.

  3. Momentum correlation in the three-body Coulomb continuum problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Suimeng

    2000-09-01

    Following the work of Berakdar (1996 Phys. Rev. A 53 2316), momentum correlation in the three-body Coulomb continuum problem is considered by the introduction of effective Sommerfeld parameters for both the symmetric and the asymmetric geometry. The triple differential cross sections for electron impact ionization of atomic helium at incident energies of 50 eV in the asymmetric geometry are calculated. Results of this approach are compared with the absolute measurements, the results of the BBK model without modification, the convergent close-coupling calculations and the results of our earlier model.

  4. Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. III. Angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-09-15

    Helicons are electromagnetic waves with helical phase fronts propagating in the whistler mode in magnetized plasmas and solids. They have similar properties to electromagnetic waves with angular momentum in free space. Helicons are circularly polarized waves carrying spin angular momentum and orbital angular momentum due to their propagation around the ambient magnetic field B{sub 0}. These properties have not been considered in the community of researchers working on helicon plasma sources, but are the topic of the present work. The present work focuses on the field topology of helicons in unbounded plasmas, not on helicon source physics. Helicons are excited in a large uniform laboratory plasma with a magnetic loop antenna whose dipole axis is aligned along or across B{sub 0}. The wave fields are measured in orthogonal planes and extended to three dimensions (3D) by interpolation. Since density and B{sub 0} are uniform, small amplitude waves from loops at different locations can be superimposed to generate complex antenna patterns. With a circular array of phase shifted loops, whistler modes with angular and axial wave propagation, i.e., helicons, are generated. Without boundaries radial propagation also arises. The azimuthal mode number m can be positive or negative while the field polarization remains right-hand circular. The conservation of energy and momentum implies that these field quantities are transferred to matter which causes damping or reflection. Wave-particle interactions with fast electrons are possible by Doppler shifted resonances. The transverse Doppler shift is demonstrated. Wave-wave interactions are also shown by showing collisions between different helicons. Whistler turbulence does not always have to be created by nonlinear wave-interactions but can also be a linear superposition of waves from random sources. In helicon collisions, the linear and/or orbital angular momenta can be canceled, which results in a great variety of field

  5. Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. III. Angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    Helicons are electromagnetic waves with helical phase fronts propagating in the whistler mode in magnetized plasmas and solids. They have similar properties to electromagnetic waves with angular momentum in free space. Helicons are circularly polarized waves carrying spin angular momentum and orbital angular momentum due to their propagation around the ambient magnetic field B0. These properties have not been considered in the community of researchers working on helicon plasma sources, but are the topic of the present work. The present work focuses on the field topology of helicons in unbounded plasmas, not on helicon source physics. Helicons are excited in a large uniform laboratory plasma with a magnetic loop antenna whose dipole axis is aligned along or across B0. The wave fields are measured in orthogonal planes and extended to three dimensions (3D) by interpolation. Since density and B0 are uniform, small amplitude waves from loops at different locations can be superimposed to generate complex antenna patterns. With a circular array of phase shifted loops, whistler modes with angular and axial wave propagation, i.e., helicons, are generated. Without boundaries radial propagation also arises. The azimuthal mode number m can be positive or negative while the field polarization remains right-hand circular. The conservation of energy and momentum implies that these field quantities are transferred to matter which causes damping or reflection. Wave-particle interactions with fast electrons are possible by Doppler shifted resonances. The transverse Doppler shift is demonstrated. Wave-wave interactions are also shown by showing collisions between different helicons. Whistler turbulence does not always have to be created by nonlinear wave-interactions but can also be a linear superposition of waves from random sources. In helicon collisions, the linear and/or orbital angular momenta can be canceled, which results in a great variety of field topologies. The work will

  6. Precision displacement reference system

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Dubois, Robert R.; Strother, Jerry D.

    2000-02-22

    A precision displacement reference system is described, which enables real time accountability over the applied displacement feedback system to precision machine tools, positioning mechanisms, motion devices, and related operations. As independent measurements of tool location is taken by a displacement feedback system, a rotating reference disk compares feedback counts with performed motion. These measurements are compared to characterize and analyze real time mechanical and control performance during operation.

  7. Data Plots of Run I - III Results from SLAC E-158: A precision Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    DOE Data Explorer

    Three physics runs were made in 2002 and 2003 by E-158. As a result, the E-158 Collaboration announced that it had made "the first observation of Parity Violation in electron-electron (Moller) scattering). This precise Parity Violation measurement gives the best determination of the electron's weak charge at low energy (low momentum transfer between interacting particles). E158's measurement tests the predicted running (or evolution) of this weak charge with energy, and searches for new phenomena at TeV energy scales (one thousand times the proton-mass energy scale).[Copied from the experiment's public home page at http://www-project slac.stanford.edu/3158/Default.htm] See also the E158 page for collaborators at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e158/. Both websites provide data and detailed information.

  8. Creating electron vortex beams with light.

    PubMed

    Handali, Jonathan; Shakya, Pratistha; Barwick, Brett

    2015-02-23

    We propose an all-optical method of creating electron vortices utilizing the Kapitza-Dirac effect. This technique uses the transfer of orbital angular momentum from photons to free electrons creating electron vortex beams in the process. The laser intensities needed for this experiment can be obtained with available pulsed lasers and the resulting electron beams carrying orbital angular momentum will be particularly useful in the study of magnetic materials and chiral plasmonic structures in ultrafast electron microscopy.

  9. Precision Environmental Radiation Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Popov, Pavel Degtiarenko

    2010-07-01

    A new precision low-level environmental radiation monitoring system has been developed and tested at Jefferson Lab. This system provides environmental radiation measurements with accuracy and stability of the order of 1 nGy/h in an hour, roughly corresponding to approximately 1% of the natural cosmic background at the sea level. Advanced electronic front-end has been designed and produced for use with the industry-standard High Pressure Ionization Chamber detector hardware. A new highly sensitive readout electronic circuit was designed to measure charge from the virtually suspended ionization chamber ion collecting electrode. New signal processing technique and dedicated data acquisition were tested together with the new readout. The designed system enabled data collection in a remote Linux-operated computer workstation, which was connected to the detectors using a standard telephone cable line. The data acquisition system algorithm is built around the continuously running 24-bit resolution 192 kHz data sampling analog to digital convertor. The major features of the design include: extremely low leakage current in the input circuit, true charge integrating mode operation, and relatively fast response to the intermediate radiation change. These features allow operating of the device as an environmental radiation monitor, at the perimeters of the radiation-generating installations in densely populated areas, like in other monitoring and security applications requiring high precision and long-term stability. Initial system evaluation results are presented.

  10. Bondi-Sachs energy-momentum for the constant mean extrinsic curvature initial value problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardeen, James M.; Buchman, Luisa T.

    2012-03-01

    The constraints on the asymptotic behavior of the conformal factor and conformal extrinsic curvature imposed by the initial value equations of general relativity on constant mean extrinsic curvature (CMC) hypersurfaces are analyzed in detail. We derive explicit formulas for the Bondi-Sachs energy and momentum in terms of coefficients of asymptotic expansions on CMC hypersurfaces near future null infinity. Precise numerical results for the Bondi-Sachs energy, momentum, and angular momentum are used to interpret physically Bowen-York initial data on conformally flat CMC hypersurfaces similar to that calculated earlier by Buchman et al. [L. T. Buchman, H. P. Pfeiffer, and J. M. Bardeen, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 80, 084024-1 (2009).10.1103/PhysRevD.80.084024].

  11. Integrated accretion disk angular momentum removal and astrophysical jet acceleration mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellan, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A model has been developed for how accretion disks discard angular momentum while powering astrophysical jets. The model depends on the extremely weak ionization of disks. This causes disk ions to be collisionally locked to adjacent disk neutrals so a clump of disk ions and neutrals has an effective cyclotron frequency αωci where α is the fractional ionization. When αωci is approximately twice the Kepler orbital frequency, conservation of canonical momentum shows that the clump spirals radially inwards producing a radially inward disk electric current as electrons cannot move radially in the disk. Upon reaching the jet radius, this current then flows axially away from the disk plane along the jet, producing a toroidal magnetic field that drives the jet. Electrons remain frozen to poloidal flux surfaces everywhere and electron motion on flux surfaces in the ideal MHD region outside the disk completes the current path. Angular momentum absorbed from accreting material in the disk by magnetic counter-torque -JrBz is transported by the electric circuit and ejected at near infinite radius in the disk plane. This is like an electric generator absorbing angular momentum and wired to a distant electric motor that emits angular momentum. Supported by USDOE/NSF Partnership in Plasma Science.

  12. Bias Momentum Sizing for Hovering Dual-Spin Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kyong B.; Shin, Jong-Yeob; Moerder, Daniel D.

    2006-01-01

    An atmospheric flight vehicle in hover is typically controlled by varying its thrust vector. Achieving both levitation and attitude control with the propulsion system places considerable demands on it for agility and precision, particularly if the vehicle is statically unstable, or nearly so. These demands can be relaxed by introducing an appropriately sized angular momentum bias aligned with the vehicle's yaw axis, thus providing an additional margin of attitude stability about the roll and pitch axes. This paper describes a methodical approach for trading off angular momentum bias level needed with desired levels of vehicle response due to the design disturbance environment given a vehicle's physical parameters. It also describes several simplifications that provide a more physical and intuitive understanding of dual-spin dynamics for hovering atmospheric vehicles. This approach also mitigates the need for control torques and inadvertent actuator saturation difficulties in trying to stabilize a vehicle via control torques produced by unsteady aerodynamics, thrust vectoring, and unsteady throttling. Simulation results, based on a subscale laboratory test flying platform, demonstrate significant improvements in the attitude control robustness of the vehicle with respect to both wind disturbances and off-center of gravity payload changes during flight.

  13. Momentum relaxation due to polar optical phonons in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.-Z.; Dyson, A.; Ridley, B. K.

    2011-10-01

    Using the dielectric continuum (DC) model, momentum relaxation rates are calculated for electrons confined in quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D) channels of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures. Particular attention is paid to the effects of half-space and interface modes on the momentum relaxation. The total momentum relaxation rates are compared with those evaluated by the three-dimensional phonon (3DP) model, and also with the Callen results for bulk GaN. In heterostructures with a wide channel (effective channel width >100 Å), the DC and 3DP models yield very close momentum relaxation rates. Only for narrow-channel heterostructures do interface phonons become important in momentum relaxation processes, and an abrupt threshold occurs for emission of interface as well as half-space phonons. For a 30-Å GaN channel, for instance, the 3DP model is found to underestimate rates just below the bulk phonon energy by 70% and overestimate rates just above the bulk phonon energy by 40% compared to the DC model. Owing to the rapid decrease in the electron-phonon interaction with the phonon wave vector, negative momentum relaxation rates are predicted for interface phonon absorption in usual GaN channels. The total rates remain positive due to the dominant half-space phonon scattering. The quasi-2D rates can have substantially higher peak values than the three-dimensional rates near the phonon emission threshold. Analytical expressions for momentum relaxation rates are obtained in the extreme quantum limits (i.e., the threshold emission and the near subband-bottom absorption). All the results are well explained in terms of electron and phonon densities of states.

  14. Precise Measurement of Deuteron Tensor Analyzing Powers with BLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Kohl, M.; Akdogan, T.; Alarcon, R.; Bertozzi, W.; Booth, E.; Botto, T.; Calarco, J. R.; Clasie, B.; Crawford, C.; Degrush, A.; Dow, K.; Farkhondeh, M.; Fatemi, R.; Filoti, O.; Franklin, W.; Gao, H.; Geis, E.; Gilad, S.; Hasell, D.; Karpius, P.; Kolster, H.; Lee, T.; Maschinot, A.; Matthews, J.; McIlhany, K.; Meitanis, N.; Milner, R.; Rapaport, J.; Redwine, R.; Seely, J.; Shinozaki, A.; Sindile, A.; Širca, S.; Six, E.; Smith, T.; Tonguc, B.; Tschalär, C.; Tsentalovich, E.; Turchinetz, W.; Xiao, Y.; Xu, W.; Zhou, Z.-L.; Ziskin, V.; Zwart, T.

    2011-12-01

    We report a precision measurement of the deuteron tensor analyzing powers T20 and T21 at the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center. Data were collected simultaneously over a momentum transfer range Q=2.15-4.50fm-1 with the Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid using a highly polarized deuterium internal gas target. The data are in excellent agreement with calculations in a framework of effective field theory. The deuteron charge monopole and quadrupole form factors GC and GQ were separated with improved precision, and the location of the first node of GC was confirmed at Q=4.19±0.05fm-1. The new data provide a strong constraint on theoretical models in a momentum transfer range covering the minimum of T20 and the first node of GC.

  15. Estimating sparse precision matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin; Zhou, Harrison H.; O'Connell, Ross

    2016-08-01

    We apply a method recently introduced to the statistical literature to directly estimate the precision matrix from an ensemble of samples drawn from a corresponding Gaussian distribution. Motivated by the observation that cosmological precision matrices are often approximately sparse, the method allows one to exploit this sparsity of the precision matrix to more quickly converge to an asymptotic 1/sqrt{N_sim} rate while simultaneously providing an error model for all of the terms. Such an estimate can be used as the starting point for further regularization efforts which can improve upon the 1/sqrt{N_sim} limit above, and incorporating such additional steps is straightforward within this framework. We demonstrate the technique with toy models and with an example motivated by large-scale structure two-point analysis, showing significant improvements in the rate of convergence. For the large-scale structure example, we find errors on the precision matrix which are factors of 5 smaller than for the sample precision matrix for thousands of simulations or, alternatively, convergence to the same error level with more than an order of magnitude fewer simulations.

  16. Momentum considerations on the New MEXICO experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, E. A.; Boorsma, K.; Schepers, J. G.; Snel, H.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper regards axial and angular momentum considerations combining detailed loads from pressure sensors and the flow field mapped with particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques. For this end, the study implements important results leaning on experimental data from wind tunnel measurements of the New MEXICO project. The measurements, taken on a fully instrumented rotor, were carried out in the German Dutch Wind tunnel Organisation (DNW) testing the MEXICO rotor in the open section. The work revisits the so-called momentum theory, showing that the integral thrust and torque measured on the rotor correspond with an extent of 0.7 and 2.4% respectively to the momentum balance of the global flow field using the general momentum equations. Likewise, the sectional forces combined with the local induced velocities are found to plausibly obey the annular streamtube theory, albeit some limitations in the axial momentum become more apparent at high inductions after a=0.3. Finally, azimuth induced velocities are measured and compared to predictions from models of Glauert and Burton et al., showing close-matching forecasts for blade spans above 25%.

  17. How Physics Got Precise

    SciTech Connect

    Kleppner, Daniel

    2005-01-19

    Although the ancients knew the length of the year to about ten parts per million, it was not until the end of the 19th century that precision measurements came to play a defining role in physics. Eventually such measurements made it possible to replace human-made artifacts for the standards of length and time with natural standards. For a new generation of atomic clocks, time keeping could be so precise that the effects of the local gravitational potentials on the clock rates would be important. This would force us to re-introduce an artifact into the definition of the second - the location of the primary clock. I will describe some of the events in the history of precision measurements that have led us to this pleasing conundrum, and some of the unexpected uses of atomic clocks today.

  18. Precision gap particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Miles, Robin; Jones, II., Leslie M.; Stockton, Cheryl

    2004-06-08

    A system for separating particles entrained in a fluid includes a base with a first channel and a second channel. A precision gap connects the first channel and the second channel. The precision gap is of a size that allows small particles to pass from the first channel into the second channel and prevents large particles from the first channel into the second channel. A cover is positioned over the base unit, the first channel, the precision gap, and the second channel. An port directs the fluid containing the entrained particles into the first channel. An output port directs the large particles out of the first channel. A port connected to the second channel directs the small particles out of the second channel.

  19. Ramsey-Bordé interferometer for electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzlin, Karl-Peter

    2013-10-01

    A scheme to realize an electron interferometer using low-intensity, bichromatic laser pulses as beam splitter is proposed. The splitting process is based on a modification of the Kapitza-Dirac effect, which produces a momentum kick for electrons with a specific initial momentum. A full interferometric setup in Ramsey-Bordé configuration is theoretically analyzed.

  20. Correction of the deterministic part of space-charge interaction in momentum microscopy of charged particles.

    PubMed

    Schönhense, G; Medjanik, K; Tusche, C; de Loos, M; van der Geer, B; Scholz, M; Hieke, F; Gerken, N; Kirschner, J; Wurth, W

    2015-12-01

    Ultrahigh spectral brightness femtosecond XUV and X-ray sources like free electron lasers (FEL) and table-top high harmonics sources (HHG) offer fascinating experimental possibilities for analysis of transient states and ultrafast electron dynamics. For electron spectroscopy experiments using illumination from such sources, the ultrashort high-charge electron bunches experience strong space-charge interactions. The Coulomb interactions between emitted electrons results in large energy shifts and severe broadening of photoemission signals. We propose a method for a substantial reduction of the effect by exploiting the deterministic nature of space-charge interaction. The interaction of a given electron with the average charge density of all surrounding electrons leads to a rotation of the electron distribution in 6D phase space. Momentum microscopy gives direct access to the three momentum coordinates, opening a path for a correction of an essential part of space-charge interaction. In a first experiment with a time-of-flight momentum microscope using synchrotron radiation at BESSY, the rotation in phase space became directly visible. In a separate experiment conducted at FLASH (DESY), the energy shift and broadening of the photoemission signals were quantified. Finally, simulations of a realistic photoemission experiment including space-charge interaction reveals that a gain of an order of magnitude in resolution is possible using the correction technique presented here.

  1. Indirect precise angular control using four-wave mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Shi, Bao-Sen Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Yun-Kun

    2014-04-28

    Here, we show indirect precise angular control using a four-wave mixing (FWM) process. This was performed with a superposition of light with orbital angular momentum in an M-Type configuration of a hot {sup 85}Rb atomic ensemble. A gear-shaped interference pattern is observed at FWM light with a donut-shaped input signal. The gear could be rotated and is controlled through the change of the polarization of the pump laser. Our experimental results that are based on nonlinear coherent interactions have applications in image processing and precise angular control.

  2. Precision manometer gauge

    DOEpatents

    McPherson, M.J.; Bellman, R.A.

    1982-09-27

    A precision manometer gauge which locates a zero height and a measured height of liquid using an open tube in communication with a reservoir adapted to receive the pressure to be measured. The open tube has a reference section carried on a positioning plate which is moved vertically with machine tool precision. Double scales are provided to read the height of the positioning plate accurately, the reference section being inclined for accurate meniscus adjustment, and means being provided to accurately locate a zero or reference position.

  3. Precision manometer gauge

    DOEpatents

    McPherson, Malcolm J.; Bellman, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    A precision manometer gauge which locates a zero height and a measured height of liquid using an open tube in communication with a reservoir adapted to receive the pressure to be measured. The open tube has a reference section carried on a positioning plate which is moved vertically with machine tool precision. Double scales are provided to read the height of the positioning plate accurately, the reference section being inclined for accurate meniscus adjustment, and means being provided to accurately locate a zero or reference position.

  4. Precision Heating Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A heat sealing process was developed by SEBRA based on technology that originated in work with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The project involved connecting and transferring blood and fluids between sterile plastic containers while maintaining a closed system. SEBRA markets the PIRF Process to manufacturers of medical catheters. It is a precisely controlled method of heating thermoplastic materials in a mold to form or weld catheters and other products. The process offers advantages in fast, precise welding or shape forming of catheters as well as applications in a variety of other industries.

  5. Observation of anomalous momentum transport in tokamak plasmas with no momentum input.

    PubMed

    Lee, W D; Rice, J E; Marmar, E S; Greenwald, M J; Hutchinson, I H; Snipes, J A

    2003-11-14

    Anomalous momentum transport has been observed in Alcator C-Mod tokamak plasmas through analysis of the time evolution of core impurity toroidal rotation velocity profiles. Following the L-mode to EDA (enhanced D(alpha)) H-mode transition, the ensuing cocurrent toroidal rotation velocity, which is generated in the absence of any external momentum source, is observed to propagate in from the edge plasma to the core. The steady state toroidal rotation velocity profiles are relatively flat and the momentum transport can be simulated with a simple diffusion model. Velocity profiles during edge localized mode free (ELM-free) H-modes are centrally peaked, which suggests the addition of inward momentum convection. In all operating regimes the observed momentum diffusivities are much larger than the neoclassical values.

  6. Ball bearing versus magnetic bearing reaction and momentum wheels as momentum actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, W.

    1980-01-01

    Different bearing technologies of momentum actuators for the attitude control of satellites are compared and a guideline for the selection of the suitable momentum actuators or momentum actuator configurations to meet given mission goals with high reliability and low cost is developed. The comparison between ball bearing and magnetic bearing momentum actuators shows that given mission requirements can be economically met by employing the ball bearing technology without decreasing reliability and lifetime. However, for some special mission requirements, such as 'zero friction at zero speed,' fine pointing (met by vernier gimballing), and/or active damping, magnetic bearings may be advantageous. This makes it evident that magnetic bearing technology will not replace ball bearing technology for momentum actuators, but will supplement it for some special mission requirements.

  7. Electromagnetic angular momentum transport in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Morfill, G. E.; Ip, W.; Gruen, E.; Havnes, O.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown here that submicrometer dust particles sporadically elevated above Saturn's ring are subject to electromagnetic forces which will reduce their angular momentum inside synchronous orbit and increase it outside. When the dust is reabsorbed by the ring the angular momentum of the ring is decreased (increased) inside (outside) of synchronous orbit. For the case of the spokes in Saturn's B-ring it is estimated that the timescale for transporting ring material due to this angular momentum coupling effect is comparable to the viscous transport time or even smaller. It is suggested that the minimum in the optical depth of the B-ring at synchronous orbit is due to this effect.

  8. Energy angular momentum closed-loop guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patera, Russell P.

    2015-03-01

    A novel guidance algorithm for launch vehicle ascent to the desired mission orbit is proposed. The algorithm uses total specific energy and orbital angular momentum as new state vector parameters. These parameters are ideally suited for the ascent guidance task, since the guidance algorithm steers the launch vehicle along a pre-flight optimal trajectory in energy angular momentum space. The guidance algorithm targets apogee, perigee, inclination and right ascension of ascending node. Computational complexities are avoided by eliminating time in the guidance computation and replacing it with angular momentum magnitude. As a result, vehicle acceleration, mass, thrust, length of motor burns, and staging times are also eliminated from the pitch plane guidance calculations. The algorithm does not involve launch vehicle or target state propagation, which results in minimal computational effort. Proof of concept of the new algorithm is presented using several numerical examples that illustrate performance results.

  9. Optical angular momentum in a rotating frame.

    PubMed

    Speirits, Fiona C; Lavery, Martin P J; Padgett, Miles J; Barnett, Stephen M

    2014-05-15

    It is well established that light carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) can be used to induce a mechanical torque causing an object to spin. We consider the complementary scenario: will an observer spinning relative to the beam axis measure a change in OAM as a result of their rotational velocity? Remarkably, although a linear Doppler shift changes the linear momentum of a photon, the angular Doppler shift induces no change in the angular momentum. Further, we examine the rotational Doppler shift in frequency imparted to the incident light due to the relative motion of the beam with respect to the observer and consider what must happen to the measured wavelength if the speed of light c is to remain constant. We show specifically that the OAM of the incident beam is not affected by the rotating observer and that the measured wavelength is shifted by a factor equal and opposite to that of the frequency shift induced by the rotational Doppler effect.

  10. Lagrange-mesh calculations in momentum space.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Gwendolyn; Semay, Claude; Buisseret, Fabien

    2012-08-01

    The Lagrange-mesh method is a powerful method to solve eigenequations written in configuration space. It is very easy to implement and very accurate. Using a Gauss quadrature rule, the method requires only the evaluation of the potential at some mesh points. The eigenfunctions are expanded in terms of regularized Lagrange functions which vanish at all mesh points except one. It is shown that this method can be adapted to solve eigenequations written in momentum space, keeping the convenience and the accuracy of the original technique. In particular, the kinetic operator is a diagonal matrix. Observables and wave functions in both configuration space and momentum space can also be easily computed with good accuracy using only eigenfunctions computed in the momentum space. The method is tested with Gaussian and Yukawa potentials, requiring, respectively, a small and a large mesh to reach convergence. Corresponding wave functions in both spaces are compared with each other using the Fourier transform.

  11. Adaptive momentum management for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, E.

    1987-01-01

    Momentum management is discussed for a Large Space Structure (LSS) with the structure selected configuration being the Initial Orbital Configuration (IOC) of the dual keel space station. The external forces considered were gravity gradient and aerodynamic torques. The goal of the momentum management scheme developed is to remove the bias components of the external torques and center the cyclic components of the stored angular momentum. The scheme investigated is adaptive to uncertainties of the inertia tensor and requires only approximate knowledge of principle moments of inertia. Computational requirements are minimal and should present no implementation problem in a flight type computer and the method proposed is shown to be effective in the presence of attitude control bandwidths as low as .01 radian/sec.

  12. Angular momentum conservation in dipolar energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Knight, Troy E; McCusker, James K

    2011-12-23

    Conservation of angular momentum is a familiar tenet in science but has seldom been invoked to understand (or predict) chemical processes. We have developed a general formalism based on Wigner's original ideas concerning angular momentum conservation to interpret the photo-induced reactivity of two molecular donor-acceptor assemblies with physical properties synthetically tailored to facilitate intramolecular energy transfer. Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic data establishing excited-state energy transfer from a rhenium(I)-based charge-transfer state to a chromium(III) acceptor can be fully accounted for by Förster theory, whereas the corresponding cobalt(III) adduct does not undergo an analogous reaction despite having a larger cross-section for dipolar coupling. Because this pronounced difference in reactivity is easily explained within the context of the angular momentum conservation model, this relatively simple construct may provide a means for systematizing a broad range of chemical reactions.

  13. Correlated electron dynamics in nonsequential double ionization by orthogonal two-color laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yueming; Huang, Cheng; Tong, Aihong; Liao, Qing; Lu, Peixiang

    2011-01-31

    We have investigated the correlated electron dynamics in nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) of helium by the orthogonally polarized two-color pulses that consisted of an 800-nm and a 400-nm laser fields using the classical ensemble model. Depending on the relative phase of the two-color field, the electron momentum distributions along the polarization direction of the 800-nm field exhibit a surprisingly strong anticorrelated or correlated behavior. Back analysis reveals that recollisions eventually leading to NSDI are concentrated in a time window as short as several hundreds attoseconds with this scheme. By changing the relative phase of the two-color field, the revisit time of recolliding electron wave packet has been controlled with attosecond precision, which is responsible for the various correlated behaviors of the two electrons. Our results reveal that the orthogonally polarized two-color field can serve as a powerful tool to control the correlated electron dynamics in NSDI.

  14. The 3D structure of the nucleon in momentum space: status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of partons inside the nucleon can be described in terms of partonic Transverse Momentum Distributions (TMDs), which extend the concept of standard parton distribution functions (PDFs). We aim at obtaining a precise determination of these quantities based on global fits. A concise overview of this active field of research will be presented, illustrating a selection of recent achievements, current open issues, and future perspectives. Supported by European Research Council (ERC) grant agreement No. 647981, 3DSPIN.

  15. Sensing technologies for precision specialty crop production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the advances in electronic and information technologies, various sensing systems have been developed for specialty crop production around the world. Accurate information concerning the spatial variability within fields is very important for precision farming of specialty crops. However, this va...

  16. Fundamental constants: The teamwork of precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Edmund G.

    2014-02-01

    A new value for the atomic mass of the electron is a link in a chain of measurements that will enable a test of the standard model of particle physics with better than part-per-trillion precision. See Letter p.467

  17. Teaching with Precision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raybould, Ted; Solity, Jonathan

    1982-01-01

    Use of precision teaching principles with learning problem students involves five steps: specifying performance, recording daily behavior, charting daily behavior, recording the teaching approach, and analyzing data. The approach has been successfully implemented through consultation of school psychologists in Walsall, England. (CL)

  18. Precision bolometer bridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. R.

    1968-01-01

    Prototype precision bolometer calibration bridge is manually balanced device for indicating dc bias and balance with either dc or ac power. An external galvanometer is used with the bridge for null indication, and the circuitry monitors voltage and current simultaneously without adapters in testing 100 and 200 ohm thin film bolometers.

  19. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    1985-01-29

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge. 2 figs.

  20. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, Michael E.; Sullivan, William H.

    1985-01-01

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.