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Sample records for precision radiotherapy techniques

  1. Imaging Instrumentation and Techniques for Precision Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parodi, Katia; Parodi, Katia; Thieke, Christian; Thieke, Christian

    Over the last decade, several technological advances have considerably improved the achievable precision of dose delivery in radiation therapy. Clinical exploitation of the superior tumor-dose conformality offered by modern radiotherapy techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy and ion beam therapy requires morphological and functional assessment of the tumor during the entire therapy chain from treatment planning to beam application and treatment response evaluation. This chapter will address the main rationale and role of imaging in state-of-the-art external beam radiotherapy. Moreover, it will present the status of novel imaging instrumentation and techniques being nowadays introduced in clinical use or still under development for image guidance and, ultimately, dose guidance of precision radiotherapy.

  2. Precision radiotherapy for cancer of the pancreas: technique and results. [Photons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Dobelbower, R.R. Jr.; Borgelt, B.B.; Strubler, K.A.; Kutcher, G.J.; Suntharalingam, N.

    1980-09-01

    Forty patients with locally extensive, unresectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas received precision high dose (PHD) radiation therapy with a 45 MeV betatron. PHD radiotherapy was generally well tolerated. During treatment, only 7 patients experienced significant nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or anorexia. Late gastrointestinal radiation reactions were observed in 7 patients. Twelve patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. The projected survival of patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer treated with PHD radiotherapy is comparable to that of patients with resectable disease operated on for cure. The projected one year survival rate is 49%.

  3. Precision radiotherapy for brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ying; Guo, Zhanwen; Zhang, Haibo; Wang, Ning; Xu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Precision radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of brain tumors. This study aimed to identify global research trends in precision radiotherapy for brain tumors using a bibliometric analysis of the Web of Science. DATA RETRIEVAL: We performed a bibliometric analysis of data retrievals for precision radiotherapy for brain tumors containing the key words cerebral tumor, brain tumor, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy, imaging-guided radiotherapy, dose-guided radiotherapy, stereotactic brachytherapy, and stereotactic radiotherapy using the Web of Science. SELECTION CRITERIA: Inclusion criteria: (a) peer-reviewed articles on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors which were published and indexed in the Web of Science; (b) type of articles: original research articles and reviews; (c) year of publication: 2002-2011. Exclusion criteria: (a) articles that required manual searching or telephone access; (b) Corrected papers or book chapters. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) Annual publication output; (2) distribution according to country; (3) distribution according to institution; (4) top cited publications; (5) distribution according to journals; and (6) comparison of study results on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. RESULTS: The stereotactic radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and imaging-guided radiotherapy are three major methods of precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. There were 260 research articles addressing precision radiotherapy for brain tumors found within the Web of Science. The USA published the most papers on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors, followed by Germany and France. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, German Cancer Research Center and Heidelberg University were the most prolific research institutes for publications on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. Among the top 13 research institutes publishing in this field, seven

  4. Assessment of improved organ at risk sparing for advanced cervix carcinoma utilizing precision radiotherapy techniques.

    PubMed

    Georg, Dietmar; Georg, Petra; Hillbrand, Martin; Pötter, Richard; Mock, Ulrike

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the potential benefit of proton therapy and photon based intensity-modulated radiotherapy in comparison to 3-D conformal photon radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in locally advanced cervix cancer. In five patients with advanced cervix cancer 3D-CRT (four-field box) was compared with intensity modulated photon (IMXT) and proton therapy (IMPT) as well as proton beam therapy (PT) based on passive scattering. Planning target volumes (PTVs) included primary tumor and pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed for the PTV and various organs at risk (OARs) (rectal wall, bladder, small bowel, colon, femoral heads, and kidneys). In addition dose conformity, dose inhomogeneity and overall volumes of 50% isodoses were assessed. All plans were comparable concerning PTV parameters. Large differences between photon and proton techniques were seen in volumes of the 50% isodoses and conformity indices. DVH for colon and small bowel were significantly improved with PT and IMPT compared to IMXT, with D(mean) reductions of 50-80%. Doses to kidneys and femoral heads could also be substantially reduced with PT and IMPT. Sparing of rectum and bladder was superior with protons as well but less pronounced. Proton beam RT has significant potential to improve treatment related side effects in the bowel compared to photon beam RT in patients with advanced cervix carcinoma.

  5. A precision 3D conformal treatment technique in rats: application to whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal avoidance.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Suk W; Cramer, Christina K; Miles, Devin A; Reinsvold, Michael H; Joo, Kyeung M; Kirsch, David G; Oldham, Mark

    2017-08-24

    To develop and validate 3D conformal hippocampal sparing whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT) for Wistar rats utilizing precision 3D printed immobilization and micro-blocks. This technique paves the way for future pre-clinical studies investigating brain treatments that reduce neurotoxicity. A novel pre-clinical treatment planning and delivery process was developed to enable precision 3D conformal treatment and hippocampal avoidance capability for the Xrad 225cx small animal irradiator. A range of conformal avoidance plans were evaluated consisting of equi-angularly spaced co-planar axial beams, with plans containing 2, 4, 7, and 8 fields. The hippocampal sparing and coverage of these plans were investigated through Monte Carlo dose calculation (SmART-Plan Xrad 225cx planning system). Treatment delivery was implemented through a novel process where hippocampal block shapes were computer-generated from an MRI rat atlas which was registered to on-board cone-beam-CT of the rat in treatment position. The blocks were 3D-printed with a tungsten-doped filament at lateral resolution of 80μm. Precision immobilization was achieved utilizing a 3D-printed support system which enabled angled positioning of the rat head in supine position and bite-block to improve coverage of the central diencephalon. Treatment delivery was verified on rodent-morphic Presage(®) 3D dosimeters optically scanned at 0.2mm isotropic resolution. Biological verification of hippocampal avoidance was performed with immunohistologic staining. All simulated plans spared the hippocampus while delivering high dose to the brain (22.5-26.2Gy mean dose to brain at mean hippocampal dose of 7Gy). No significant improvement in hippocampal sparing was observed by adding beams beyond 4 fields. Dosimetric sparing of hippocampal region of the 4-field plan was verified with the Presage(®) dosimeter (mean dose = 9.6Gy, D100% = 7.1Gy). Simulation and dosimeter match at distance-to-agreement of 2mm and dose

  6. Precision Radiotherapy for Small Animal Research

    PubMed Central

    Matinfar, Mohammad; Iordachita, Iulian; Ford, Eric; Wong, John; Kazanzides, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Preclinical research using well characterized small animal models has provided tremendous benefits to medical research, enabling low cost, large scale trials with high statistical significance of observed effects. The goal of the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is to make those models available for the development and evaluation of novel radiation therapies. SARRP demonstrates the capabilities of delivering high resolution, sub-millimeter, optimally planned conformal radiation with on-board cone-beam CT (CBCT) guidance. The system requires accurate calibration of the x-ray beam for both imaging and radiation treatment. In this paper, we present a novel technique using an x-ray camera for calibration of the treatment beam. This technique does not require precise positioning or calibration of the x-ray camera. PMID:18982656

  7. Segmentation precision of abdominal anatomy for MRI-based radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Noel, Camille E; Zhu, Fan; Lee, Andrew Y; Yanle, Hu; Parikh, Parag J

    2014-01-01

    The limited soft tissue visualization provided by computed tomography, the standard imaging modality for radiotherapy treatment planning and daily localization, has motivated studies on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for better characterization of treatment sites, such as the prostate and head and neck. However, no studies have been conducted on MRI-based segmentation for the abdomen, a site that could greatly benefit from enhanced soft tissue targeting. We investigated the interobserver and intraobserver precision in segmentation of abdominal organs on MR images for treatment planning and localization. Manual segmentation of 8 abdominal organs was performed by 3 independent observers on MR images acquired from 14 healthy subjects. Observers repeated segmentation 4 separate times for each image set. Interobserver and intraobserver contouring precision was assessed by computing 3-dimensional overlap (Dice coefficient [DC]) and distance to agreement (Hausdorff distance [HD]) of segmented organs. The mean and standard deviation of intraobserver and interobserver DC and HD values were DC(intraobserver) = 0.89 ± 0.12, HD(intraobserver) = 3.6mm ± 1.5, DC(interobserver) = 0.89 ± 0.15, and HD(interobserver) = 3.2mm ± 1.4. Overall, metrics indicated good interobserver/intraobserver precision (mean DC > 0.7, mean HD < 4mm). Results suggest that MRI offers good segmentation precision for abdominal sites. These findings support the utility of MRI for abdominal planning and localization, as emerging MRI technologies, techniques, and onboard imaging devices are beginning to enable MRI-based radiotherapy.

  8. Segmentation precision of abdominal anatomy for MRI-based radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Camille E.; Zhu, Fan; Lee, Andrew Y.; Yanle, Hu; Parikh, Parag J.

    2014-10-01

    The limited soft tissue visualization provided by computed tomography, the standard imaging modality for radiotherapy treatment planning and daily localization, has motivated studies on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for better characterization of treatment sites, such as the prostate and head and neck. However, no studies have been conducted on MRI-based segmentation for the abdomen, a site that could greatly benefit from enhanced soft tissue targeting. We investigated the interobserver and intraobserver precision in segmentation of abdominal organs on MR images for treatment planning and localization. Manual segmentation of 8 abdominal organs was performed by 3 independent observers on MR images acquired from 14 healthy subjects. Observers repeated segmentation 4 separate times for each image set. Interobserver and intraobserver contouring precision was assessed by computing 3-dimensional overlap (Dice coefficient [DC]) and distance to agreement (Hausdorff distance [HD]) of segmented organs. The mean and standard deviation of intraobserver and interobserver DC and HD values were DC{sub intraobserver} = 0.89 ± 0.12, HD{sub intraobserver} = 3.6 mm ± 1.5, DC{sub interobserver} = 0.89 ± 0.15, and HD{sub interobserver} = 3.2 mm ± 1.4. Overall, metrics indicated good interobserver/intraobserver precision (mean DC > 0.7, mean HD < 4 mm). Results suggest that MRI offers good segmentation precision for abdominal sites. These findings support the utility of MRI for abdominal planning and localization, as emerging MRI technologies, techniques, and onboard imaging devices are beginning to enable MRI-based radiotherapy.

  9. Precision, high dose radiotherapy: helium ion treatment of uveal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, W.M.; Char, D.H.; Quivey, J.M.; Castro, J.R.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Cartigny, A.; Blakely, E.A.; Lyman, J.T.; Zink, S.R.

    1985-02-01

    The authors report on 75 patients with uveal melanoma who were treated by placing the Bragg peak of a helium ion beam over the tumor volume. The technique localizes the high dose region very tightly around the tumor volume. This allows critical structures, such as the optic disc and the macula, to be excluded from the high dose region as long as they are 3 to 4 mm away from the edge of the tumor. Careful attention to tumor localization, treatment planning, patient immobilization and treatment verification is required. With a mean follow-up of 22 months (3 to 60 months) the authors have had only five patients with a local recurrence, all of whom were salvaged with another treatment. Pretreatment visual acuity has generally been preserved as long as the tumor edge is at least 4 mm away from the macula and optic disc. The only serious complication to date has been an 18% incidence of neovascular glaucoma in the patients treated at our highest dose level. Clinical results and details of the technique are presented to illustrate potential clinical precision in administering high dose radiotherapy with charged particles such as helium ions or protons.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging for precise radiotherapy of small laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Thorsten; Kaul, Michael Gerhard; Ernst, Thomas Michael; Salamon, Johannes; Jäckel, Maria; Schumacher, Udo; Krüll, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Radiotherapy of small laboratory animals (SLA) is often not as precisely applied as in humans. Here we describe the use of a dedicated SLA magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner for precise tumor volumetry, radiotherapy treatment planning, and diagnostic imaging in order to make the experiments more accurate. Different human cancer cells were injected at the lower trunk of pfp/rag2 and SCID mice to allow for local tumor growth. Data from cross sectional MRI scans were transferred to a clinical treatment planning system (TPS) for humans. Manual palpation of the tumor size was compared with calculated tumor size of the TPS and with tumor weight at necropsy. As a feasibility study MRI based treatment plans were calculated for a clinical 6MV linear accelerator using a micro multileaf collimator (μMLC). In addition, diagnostic MRI scans were used to investigate animals which did clinical poorly during the study. MRI is superior in precise tumor volume definition whereas manual palpation underestimates their size. Cross sectional MRI allow for treatment planning so that conformal irradiation of mice with a clinical linear accelerator using a μMLC is in principle feasible. Several internal pathologies were detected during the experiment using the dedicated scanner. MRI is a key technology for precise radiotherapy of SLA. The scanning protocols provided are suited for tumor volumetry, treatment planning, and diagnostic imaging. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  11. Characterizing geometric accuracy and precision in image guided gated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Stephen Edward

    Gated radiotherapy combined with intensity modulated or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for tumors in the thorax and abdomen can deliver dose distributions which conform closely to tumor shapes allowing increased tumor dose while sparing healthy tissues. These conformal fields require more accurate and precise placement than traditional fields or tumors may receive suboptimal dose thereby reducing tumor control probability. Image guidance based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) provides a means to improve accuracy and precision in radiotherapy. The ability of 4DCT to accurately reproduce patient geometry and the ability of image guided gating equipment to position tumors and place fields around them must be characterized in order to determine treatment parameters such as tumor margins. Fiducial based methods of characterizing accuracy and precision of equipment for 4DCT planning and image guided gated radiotherapy (IGGRT) are presented with results for specific equipment. Fiducial markers of known geometric orientation are used to characterize 4DCT image reconstruction accuracy. Accuracy is determined under different acquisition protocols, reconstruction phases, and phantom trajectories. Targeting accuracy of fiducial based image guided gating is assessed by measuring in-phantom field positions for different motions, gating levels and target rotations. Synchronization parameters for gating equipment are also determined. Finally, end-to-end testing is performed to assess overall accuracy and precision of the equipment under controlled conditions. 4DCT limits fiducial geometric distance errors to 2 mm for repeatable target trajectories and to 5 mm for a pseudo-random trajectory. Largest offsets were in the longitudinal direction. If correctly calibrated and synchronized, the IGGRT system tested here can target reproducibly moving tumors with accuracy better than 1.2 mm. Gating level can affect accuracy if target motion is asymmetric about the

  12. [New techniques and potential benefits for radiotherapy of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, L; Doré, M; Giraud, P

    2014-10-01

    Radiotherapy is used for inoperable lung cancers, sometimes in association with chemotherapy. Outcomes of conventional radiotherapy are disappointing. New techniques improve adaptation to tumour volume, decrease normal tissue irradiation and lead to increasing tumour dose with the opportunity for improved survival. With intensity-modulated radiation therapy, isodoses can conform to complex volumes. It is widely used and seems to be indicated in locally advanced stages. Its dosimetric improvements have been demonstrated but outcomes are still heterogeneous. Stereotactic radiotherapy allows treatment of small volumes with many narrow beams. Dedicated devices or appropriate equipment on classical devices are needed. In early stages, its efficacy is comparable to surgery with an acceptable toxicity. Endobronchial brachytherapy could be used for early stages with specific criteria. Hadrontherapy is still experimental regarding lung cancer. Hadrons have physical properties leading to very accurate dose distribution. In the rare published studies, toxicities are roughly lower than others techniques but for early stages its effectiveness is not better than stereotactic radiotherapy. These techniques are optimized by metabolic imaging which precisely defines the target volume and assesses the therapeutic response; image-guided radiation therapy which allows a more accurate patient set up and by respiratory tracking or gating which takes account of tumour respiratory motions.

  13. Radiotherapy technique for thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Thambi, V.; Pedapatti, P.J.; Murthy, A.; Kartha, P.K.

    1980-02-01

    A treatment technique for treating patients with cancer of the thyroid is presented. This is a modification of the bar-arc technique that uses a centrally blocked moving field. We have introduced wedges and partial midline block to achieve uniform dose within the treatment volume. This enables the desired dose to be delivered to the primary, the lymph nodes and the cervical soft tissues at risk, yet keeping the dose to the spinal cord to a minimum in the cervical region and to acceptable levels in the superior mediastinum.

  14. Partial breast radiotherapy with simple teletherapy techniques.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Gábor; Újhidy, Dóra; Együd, Zsófia; Kiscsatári, Laura; Marosi, Gusztáv; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Varga, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    A prospective pilot study of partial breast irradiation (PBI) with conventional vs hypofractionated schedules was set out. The study aimed to determine efficacy, acute and late side effects, and the preference of photon vs electron irradiation based on individual features. Patients were enrolled according to internationally accepted guidelines on PBI. Conformal radiotherapy plans were generated with both photon and electron beams, and the preferred technique based on dose homogeneity and the radiation exposure of healthy tissues was applied. For electron dose verification, a special phantom was constructed. Patients were randomized for fractionation schedules of 25 × 2 vs 13 × 3Gy. Skin and breast changes were registered at the time of and ≥1 year after the completion of radiotherapy. Dose homogeneity was better with photons. If the tumor bed was located in the inner quadrants, electron beam gave superior results regarding conformity and sparing of organ at risk (OAR). If the tumor was situated in the lateral quadrants, conformity was better with photons. A depth of the tumor bed ≥3.0cm predicted the superiority of photon irradiation (odds ratio [OR] = 23.6, 95% CI: 5.2 to 107.5, p < 0.001) with >90% sensitivity and specificity. After a median follow-up of 39 months, among 72 irradiated cases, 1 local relapse out of the tumor bed was detected. Acute radiodermatitis of grade I to II, hyperpigmentation, and telangiectasia developed ≥1 year after radiotherapy, exclusively after electron beam radiotherapy. The choice of electrons or photons for PBI should be based on tumor bed location; the used methods are efficient and feasible.

  15. Partial breast radiotherapy with simple teletherapy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fekete, Gábor; Újhidy, Dóra; Együd, Zsófia; Kiscsatári, Laura; Marosi, Gusztáv; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Varga, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    A prospective pilot study of partial breast irradiation (PBI) with conventional vs hypofractionated schedules was set out. The study aimed to determine efficacy, acute and late side effects, and the preference of photon vs electron irradiation based on individual features. Patients were enrolled according to internationally accepted guidelines on PBI. Conformal radiotherapy plans were generated with both photon and electron beams, and the preferred technique based on dose homogeneity and the radiation exposure of healthy tissues was applied. For electron dose verification, a special phantom was constructed. Patients were randomized for fractionation schedules of 25 × 2 vs 13 × 3 Gy. Skin and breast changes were registered at the time of and ≥1 year after the completion of radiotherapy. Dose homogeneity was better with photons. If the tumor bed was located in the inner quadrants, electron beam gave superior results regarding conformity and sparing of organ at risk (OAR). If the tumor was situated in the lateral quadrants, conformity was better with photons. A depth of the tumor bed ≥3.0 cm predicted the superiority of photon irradiation (odds ratio [OR] = 23.6, 95% CI: 5.2 to 107.5, p < 0.001) with >90% sensitivity and specificity. After a median follow-up of 39 months, among 72 irradiated cases, 1 local relapse out of the tumor bed was detected. Acute radiodermatitis of grade I to II, hyperpigmentation, and telangiectasia developed ≥1 year after radiotherapy, exclusively after electron beam radiotherapy. The choice of electrons or photons for PBI should be based on tumor bed location; the used methods are efficient and feasible.

  16. Precision porcelain jacket crown technique.

    PubMed

    Riley, E J; Sozio, R B; Casthely, F; Wilcko, M T; Sotera, A J

    1975-09-01

    A simple technique for construction of an aluminous porcelain crown has been described. An aluminous core is fabricated without platinum foil on a ceramic refractory die and, when retrieved, serves as a coping on the master cast. The technique and accuracy of fit are illustrated with the fabrication of an aluminous porcelain crown on the Bureau of Standards' full-crown die.

  17. Principles and techniques for designing precision machines

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, Layton Carter

    1999-02-01

    This thesis is written to advance the reader's knowledge of precision-engineering principles and their application to designing machines that achieve both sufficient precision and minimum cost. It provides the concepts and tools necessary for the engineer to create new precision machine designs. Four case studies demonstrate the principles and showcase approaches and solutions to specific problems that generally have wider applications. These come from projects at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in which the author participated: the Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine, Accuracy Enhancement of High- Productivity Machine Tools, the National Ignition Facility, and Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography. Although broad in scope, the topics go into sufficient depth to be useful to practicing precision engineers and often fulfill more academic ambitions. The thesis begins with a chapter that presents significant principles and fundamental knowledge from the Precision Engineering literature. Following this is a chapter that presents engineering design techniques that are general and not specific to precision machines. All subsequent chapters cover specific aspects of precision machine design. The first of these is Structural Design, guidelines and analysis techniques for achieving independently stiff machine structures. The next chapter addresses dynamic stiffness by presenting several techniques for Deterministic Damping, damping designs that can be analyzed and optimized with predictive results. Several chapters present a main thrust of the thesis, Exact-Constraint Design. A main contribution is a generalized modeling approach developed through the course of creating several unique designs. The final chapter is the primary case study of the thesis, the Conceptual Design of a Horizontal Machining Center.

  18. Abridged Technique for Precise Implant Angulation

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Praveen; Chander, Gopi Naveen; Reddy, Ramesh; Muthukumar, B.

    2015-01-01

    Enormous scientific knowledge with evidence and clinical dexterity impart definitive ground for success in implant dentistry. Nevertheless, the unfeasibility to access the inner bone tissue makes the situation altogether more demanding. Presently the advent of numerous imaging techniques and associated surgical guide templates are documented for evaluation of implant angulation. However, they are not cost effective and consume more time to plan and design the structure. This article describes a simple concise technique for precise implant angulation. PMID:26816997

  19. Japanese structure survey of high-precision radiotherapy in 2012 based on institutional questionnaire about the patterns of care.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Natsuo; Kodaira, Takeshi; Teshima, Teruki; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Kumazaki, Yu; Yamauchi, Chikako; Toita, Takafumi; Uno, Takashi; Sumi, Minako; Onishi, Hiroshi; Kenjo, Masahiro; Nakamura, Katsumasa

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify operational situations, treatment planning and processes, quality assurance and quality control with relevance to stereotactic radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and image-guided radiotherapy in Japan. We adopted 109 items as the quality indicators of high-precision radiotherapy to prepare a questionnaire. In April 2012, we started to publicly open the questionnaire on the website, requesting every institution with radiotherapy machines for response. The response ratio was 62.1% (490 out of 789 institutions responded). Two or more radiotherapy technologists per linear accelerator managed linear accelerator operation in ∼90% of the responded institutions while medical physicists/radiotherapy quality managers were engaged in the operation in only 64.9% of the institutions. Radiotherapy certified nurses also worked in only 18.4% of the institutions. The ratios of the institutions equipped for stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumor, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and image-guided radiotherapy were 43.3, 32.6 and 46.8%, respectively. In intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning, radiation oncologists were usually responsible for delineation while medical physicists/radiotherapy quality managers or radiotherapy technologists set up beam in 33.3% of the institutions. The median time required for quality assurance of intensity-modulated radiotherapy at any site of brain, head and neck and prostate was 4 h. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy quality assurance activity had to be started after clinical hours in >60% of the institutions. This study clarified one major issue in the current high-precision radiotherapy in Japan. A manpower shortage should be corrected for high-precision radiotherapy, especially in the area relevant to quality assurance/quality control. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Digital Imaging Techniques for Radiotherapy Treatment Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leszczynski, Konrad Wojciech

    The curative effect of ionizing radiation depends strongly upon the precision with which dose is delivered to the prescribed target volume. The requirement for high geometric accuracy in patient positioning is even more stringent where complex treatment techniques are used, such as conformal, dynamic arc or truly 3-D (non-coplanar) beams. It is expected that digital on-line portal imaging devices will play a key role in the monitoring of radiation therapy treatments. Different approaches to on-line portal image acquisition have been compared, and the basic imaging properties of a video portal imager have been evaluated and discussed in this thesis. Analysis of the system performance indicates the most efficient ways to effect improvements in spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Digital image processing techniques for noise suppression and contrast enhancement have been developed and implemented in order to facilitate visual analysis of on-line portal images. Results obtained with phantom and clinical images indicate that improvement in image quality can be achieved using adaptive filtering and local histogram modification. A novel study of observer performance with on-line portal images showed that enhancement of contrast by selective local histogram modification significantly improves perceptibility of anatomical landmarks and assures higher accuracy in quantitative computer-assisted treatment verification. Fully automated treatment verification is the ultimate goal of on-line digital portal imaging. It should include analysis of size and shape of the radiation field as well as evaluation of placement of the field with respect to the internal anatomy of the patient. A computerized technique, has been developed, for extraction of the treatment field edges and for parametrization of the field, and examples of its application to automated analysis of size and shape of the radiation field are presented.

  1. Development of three-dimensional radiotherapy techniques in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Charlotte E.

    Radiotherapy following conservation surgery decreases local relapse and death from breast cancer. Currently, the challenge is to minimise the morbidity caused by this treatment without losing efficacy. Despite many advances in radiation techniques in other sites of the body, the majority of breast cancer patients are still planned and treated using 2-dimensional simple radiotherapy techniques. In addition, breast irradiation currently consumes 30% of the UK's radiotherapy workload. Therefore, any change to more complex treatment should be of proven benefit. The primary objective of this research is to develop and evaluate novel radiotherapy techniques to decrease irradiation of normal structures and improve localisation of the tumour bed. I have developed a forward-planned intensity modulated (IMRT) breast radiotherapy technique, which has shown improved dosimetry results compared to standard breast radiotherapy. Subsequently, I have developed and implemented a phase III randomised controlled breast IMRT trial. This National Cancer Research Network adopted trial will answer an important question regarding the clinical benefit of breast IMRT. It will provide DNA samples linked with high quality clinical outcome data, for a national translational radiogenomics study investigating variation in normal tissue toxicity. Thus, patients with significant late normal tissue side effects despite good dose homogeneity will provide the best model for finding differences due to underlying genetics. I evaluated a novel technique using high definition free-hand 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound in a phantom study, and the results suggested that this is an accurate and reproducible method for tumour bed localisation. I then compared recognised methods of tumour bed localisation with the 3D ultrasound method in a clinical study. The 3D ultrasound technique appeared to accurately represent the shape and spatial position of the tumour cavity. This tumour bed localisation research

  2. A precise technique for manufacturing correction coil

    SciTech Connect

    Schieber, L.

    1992-01-01

    An automated method of manufacturing correction coils has been developed which provides a precise embodiment of the coil design. Numerically controlled machines have been developed to accurately position coil windings on the beam tube. Two types of machines have been built. One machine bonds the wire to a substrate which is wrapped around the beam tube after it is completed while the second machine bonds the wire directly to the beam tube. Both machines use the Multiwire[reg sign] technique of bonding the wire to the substrate utilizing an ultrasonic stylus. These machines are being used to manufacture coils for both the SSC and RHIC.

  3. A precise technique for manufacturing correction coil

    SciTech Connect

    Schieber, L.

    1992-11-01

    An automated method of manufacturing correction coils has been developed which provides a precise embodiment of the coil design. Numerically controlled machines have been developed to accurately position coil windings on the beam tube. Two types of machines have been built. One machine bonds the wire to a substrate which is wrapped around the beam tube after it is completed while the second machine bonds the wire directly to the beam tube. Both machines use the Multiwire{reg_sign} technique of bonding the wire to the substrate utilizing an ultrasonic stylus. These machines are being used to manufacture coils for both the SSC and RHIC.

  4. Predicting radiotherapy outcomes using statistical learning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Naqa, Issam; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Hope, Andrew J.; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2009-09-01

    Radiotherapy outcomes are determined by complex interactions between treatment, anatomical and patient-related variables. A common obstacle to building maximally predictive outcome models for clinical practice is the failure to capture potential complexity of heterogeneous variable interactions and applicability beyond institutional data. We describe a statistical learning methodology that can automatically screen for nonlinear relations among prognostic variables and generalize to unseen data before. In this work, several types of linear and nonlinear kernels to generate interaction terms and approximate the treatment-response function are evaluated. Examples of institutional datasets of esophagitis, pneumonitis and xerostomia endpoints were used. Furthermore, an independent RTOG dataset was used for 'generalizabilty' validation. We formulated the discrimination between risk groups as a supervised learning problem. The distribution of patient groups was initially analyzed using principle components analysis (PCA) to uncover potential nonlinear behavior. The performance of the different methods was evaluated using bivariate correlations and actuarial analysis. Over-fitting was controlled via cross-validation resampling. Our results suggest that a modified support vector machine (SVM) kernel method provided superior performance on leave-one-out testing compared to logistic regression and neural networks in cases where the data exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA. For instance, in prediction of esophagitis and pneumonitis endpoints, which exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA, the method provided 21% and 60% improvements, respectively. Furthermore, evaluation on the independent pneumonitis RTOG dataset demonstrated good generalizabilty beyond institutional data in contrast with other models. This indicates that the prediction of treatment response can be improved by utilizing nonlinear kernel methods for discovering important nonlinear interactions among model

  5. Predicting radiotherapy outcomes using statistical learning techniques*

    PubMed Central

    El Naqa, Issam; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Lindsay, Patricia E; Hope, Andrew J; Deasy, Joseph O

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy outcomes are determined by complex interactions between treatment, anatomical and patient-related variables. A common obstacle to building maximally predictive outcome models for clinical practice is the failure to capture potential complexity of heterogeneous variable interactions and applicability beyond institutional data. We describe a statistical learning methodology that can automatically screen for nonlinear relations among prognostic variables and generalize to unseen data before. In this work, several types of linear and nonlinear kernels to generate interaction terms and approximate the treatment-response function are evaluated. Examples of institutional datasets of esophagitis, pneumonitis and xerostomia endpoints were used. Furthermore, an independent RTOG dataset was used for ‘generalizabilty’ validation. We formulated the discrimination between risk groups as a supervised learning problem. The distribution of patient groups was initially analyzed using principle components analysis (PCA) to uncover potential nonlinear behavior. The performance of the different methods was evaluated using bivariate correlations and actuarial analysis. Over-fitting was controlled via cross-validation resampling. Our results suggest that a modified support vector machine (SVM) kernel method provided superior performance on leave-one-out testing compared to logistic regression and neural networks in cases where the data exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA. For instance, in prediction of esophagitis and pneumonitis endpoints, which exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA, the method provided 21% and 60% improvements, respectively. Furthermore, evaluation on the independent pneumonitis RTOG dataset demonstrated good generalizabilty beyond institutional data in contrast with other models. This indicates that the prediction of treatment response can be improved by utilizing nonlinear kernel methods for discovering important nonlinear interactions among model

  6. Predicting radiotherapy outcomes using statistical learning techniques.

    PubMed

    El Naqa, Issam; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Lindsay, Patricia E; Hope, Andrew J; Deasy, Joseph O

    2009-09-21

    Radiotherapy outcomes are determined by complex interactions between treatment, anatomical and patient-related variables. A common obstacle to building maximally predictive outcome models for clinical practice is the failure to capture potential complexity of heterogeneous variable interactions and applicability beyond institutional data. We describe a statistical learning methodology that can automatically screen for nonlinear relations among prognostic variables and generalize to unseen data before. In this work, several types of linear and nonlinear kernels to generate interaction terms and approximate the treatment-response function are evaluated. Examples of institutional datasets of esophagitis, pneumonitis and xerostomia endpoints were used. Furthermore, an independent RTOG dataset was used for 'generalizabilty' validation. We formulated the discrimination between risk groups as a supervised learning problem. The distribution of patient groups was initially analyzed using principle components analysis (PCA) to uncover potential nonlinear behavior. The performance of the different methods was evaluated using bivariate correlations and actuarial analysis. Over-fitting was controlled via cross-validation resampling. Our results suggest that a modified support vector machine (SVM) kernel method provided superior performance on leave-one-out testing compared to logistic regression and neural networks in cases where the data exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA. For instance, in prediction of esophagitis and pneumonitis endpoints, which exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA, the method provided 21% and 60% improvements, respectively. Furthermore, evaluation on the independent pneumonitis RTOG dataset demonstrated good generalizabilty beyond institutional data in contrast with other models. This indicates that the prediction of treatment response can be improved by utilizing nonlinear kernel methods for discovering important nonlinear interactions among model

  7. Stereotactic linear accelerator radiotherapy for pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Ajithkumar, Thankama; Brada, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Last decade has seen important advances in radiotherapy technology which combine precise tumor localization with accurate targeted delivery of radiation. This technique of high precision conformal radiotherapy, described as stereotactic radiotherapy or radiosurgery, uses modern linear accelerators available in most radiation oncology departments. The article describes the new technique as applied to the treatment of pituitary adenoma and reviews published clinical results.

  8. A Investigation of Radiotherapy Electron Beams Using Monte Carlo Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, George X.

    1995-01-01

    Radiotherapy electron beams are more complicated than photon beams due to variations in the beam production, the scattering of low-energy electrons, and the presence contaminant photons. The detailed knowledge of a radiotherapy beam is essential to an accurate calculation of dose distribution for a treatment planning system. This investigation aims to enhance our understanding of radiotherapy beams by focusing on electron beams used in radiotherapy. It starts with a description of the Monte Carlo simulation code, BEAM, and a detailed simulation of an accelerator head to obtain realistic radiotherapy beams. The simulation covers electron beams from various accelerators, including the NRC research accelerator, the NPL (UK), accelerator, A Varian Clinac 2100C, a Philips SL75-20, a Siemens KD2, an AECL Therac 20, and a Scanditronix MM50. The beam energies range from 4 to 50 MeV. The EGS4 user code, BEAM, is extensively benchmarked against experiment by comparing calculated dose distributions with measured dose distributions in water. The simulated beams are analyzed to obtain the characteristics of various electron beams from a variety of accelerators. The simulated beams are also used as inputs to calculate the following parameters: the mean electron energy, the most probable energy, the energy-range relationships, the depth-scaling factor to convert depths in plastic to water-equivalent depths, the water-to-air stopping-power ratios, and the electron fluence correction factors used to convert dose measured in plastics to dose in water. These parameters are essential for electron beam dosimetry. The results from this study can be applied in cancer clinics to improve the accuracy of the absolute dosimetry. The simulation also provides information about the backscatter into the beam monitor chamber, and predicts the influence on the beam output factors. This investigation presents comprehensive data on the clinical electron beams, and answers many questions which could

  9. Integral dose: Comparison between four techniques for prostate radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ślosarek, Krzysztof; Osewski, Wojciech; Grządziel, Aleksandra; Radwan, Michał; Dolla, Łukasz; Szlag, Marta; Stąpór-Fudzińska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Comparisons of integral dose delivered to the treatment planning volume and to the whole patient body during stereotactic, helical and intensity modulated radiotherapy of prostate. Multifield techniques produce large volumes of low dose inside the patient body. Delivered dose could be the result of the cytotoxic injuries of the cells even away from the treatment field. We calculated the total dose absorbed in the patient body for four radiotherapy techniques to investigate whether some methods have a potential to reduce the exposure to the patient. We analyzed CyberKnife plans for 10 patients with localized prostate cancer. Five alternative plans for each patient were calculated with the VMAT, IMRT and TomoTherapy techniques. Alternative dose distributions were calculated to achieve the same coverage for PTV. Integral Dose formula was used to calculate the total dose delivered to the PTV and whole patient body. Analysis showed that the same amount of dose was deposited to the treated volume despite different methods of treatment delivery. The mean values of total dose delivered to the whole patient body differed significantly for each treatment technique. The highest integral dose in the patient's body was at the TomoTherapy and CyberKnife treatment session. VMAT was characterized by the lowest integral dose deposited in the patient body. The highest total dose absorbed in normal tissue was observed with the use of a robotic radiosurgery system and TomoTherapy. These results demonstrate that the exposure of healthy tissue is a dosimetric factor which differentiates the dose delivery methods.

  10. An arranged marriage for precision medicine: hypoxia and genomic assays in localized prostate cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, A; Dal Pra, A

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in males in the Western world with one in six males diagnosed in their lifetime. Current clinical prognostication groupings use pathologic Gleason score, pre-treatment prostatic-specific antigen and Union for International Cancer Control-TNM staging to place patients with localized CaP into low-, intermediate- and high-risk categories. These categories represent an increasing risk of biochemical failure and CaP-specific mortality rates, they also reflect the need for increasing treatment intensity and justification for increased side effects. In this article, we point out that 30–50% of patients will still fail image-guided radiotherapy or surgery despite the judicious use of clinical risk categories owing to interpatient heterogeneity in treatment response. To improve treatment individualization, better predictors of prognosis and radiotherapy treatment response are needed to triage patients to bespoke and intensified CaP treatment protocols. These should include the use of pre-treatment genomic tests based on DNA or RNA indices and/or assays that reflect cancer metabolism, such as hypoxia assays, to define patient-specific CaP progression and aggression. More importantly, it is argued that these novel prognostic assays could be even more useful if combined together to drive forward precision cancer medicine for localized CaP. PMID:24588670

  11. Role of Radiotherapy and Newer Techniques in the Treatment of GI Cancers.

    PubMed

    Hajj, Carla; Goodman, Karyn A

    2015-06-01

    The role of radiotherapy in multidisciplinary treatment of GI malignancies is well established. Recent advances in imaging as well as radiotherapy planning and delivery techniques have made it possible to target tumors more accurately while sparing normal tissues. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is an advanced method of delivering radiation using cutting-edge technology to manipulate beams of radiation. The role of intensity-modulated radiotherapy is growing for many GI malignancies, such as cancers of the stomach, pancreas, esophagus, liver, and anus. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is an emerging treatment option for some GI tumors such as locally advanced pancreatic cancer and primary or metastatic tumors of the liver. Stereotactic body radiotherapy requires a high degree of confidence in tumor location and subcentimeter accuracy of the delivered dose. New image-guided techniques have been developed to overcome setup uncertainties at the time of treatment, including real-time imaging on the linear accelerator. Modern imaging techniques have also allowed for more accurate pretreatment staging and delineation of the primary tumor and involved sites. In particular, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography scans can be particularly useful in radiotherapy planning and assessing treatment response. Molecular biomarkers are being investigated as predictors of response to radiotherapy with the intent of ultimately moving toward using genomic and proteomic determinants of therapeutic strategies. The role of all of these new approaches in the radiotherapeutic management of GI cancers and the evolving role of radiotherapy in these tumor sites will be highlighted in this review.

  12. Multimodal image registration for the identification of dominant intraprostatic lesion in high-precision radiotherapy treatments.

    PubMed

    Ciardo, Delia; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Petralia, Giuseppe; Timon, Giorgia; Zerini, Dario; Cambria, Raffaella; Rondi, Elena; Cattani, Federica; Bazani, Alessia; Ricotti, Rosalinda; Garioni, Maria; Maestri, Davide; Marvaso, Giulia; Romanelli, Paola; Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido; Orecchia, Roberto

    2017-08-22

    The integration of computed tomography (CT) and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) is a challenging task in high-precision radiotherapy for prostate cancer. A simple methodology for multimodal deformable image registration (DIR) of prostate cancer patients is presented. CT and mpMRI of ten patients were considered. Organs at risk and prostate were contoured on both scans. The dominant intraprostatic lesion was additionally delineated on magnetic resonance imaging. After a preliminary rigid image registration, the voxel intensity of all the segmented structures in both scans except the prostate was increased by a specific amount (a constant additional value, A), in order to enhance the contrast of the main organs influencing its position and shape. Seventy couples of scans were obtained by varying A from 0 to 800 and they were subsequently non-rigidly registered. Quantities derived from image analysis and contour statistics were considered for the tuning of the best performing A. A = 200 resulted the minimum enhancement value required to obtain statistically significant superior registration results. Mean centre of mass distance between corresponding structures decreases from 7.4 mm in rigid registration to 5.3 mm in DIR without enhancement (DIR-0) and to 2.7 mm in DIR with A = 200 (DIR-200). Mean contour distance was 2.5, 1.9 and 0.67 mm in rigid registration, DIR-0 and DIR-200, respectively. In DIR-200 mean contours overlap increases of +13% and +24% with respect to DIR-0 and rigid registration, respectively. Contour propagation according to the vector field resulting from DIR-200 allows the delineation of dominant intraprostatic lesion on CT scan and its use for high-precision radiotherapy treatment planning. Advances in knowledge: We investigated the application of a B-spline, mutual information-based multimodal DIR coupled with a simple, patient-unspecific but efficient contrast enhancement procedure in the pelvic body area, thus

  13. Efficiency and prognosis of whole brain irradiation combined with precise radiotherapy on triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinhong; Luo, Bo; Wei, Shaozhong; Luo, Yan; Feng, Yaojun; Xu, Juan; Wei, Wei

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the treatment efficiency of whole brain irradiation combined with precise radiotherapy on triple-negative (TN) phenotype breast cancer patients with brain metastases and their survival times. A total of 112 metastatic breast cancer patients treated with whole brain irradiation and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) were analyzed. Thirty-seven patients were of TN phenotype. Objective response rates were compared. Survival times were estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier method. Log-rank test was used to compare the survival time difference between the TN and non-TN groups. Potential prognostic factors were determined by using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. The efficiency of radiotherapy treatment on TN and non-TN phenotypes was 96.2% and 97%, respectively. TN phenotype was associated with worse survival times than non-TN phenotype after radiotherapy (6.9 months vs. 17 months) (P < 0.01). On multivariate analysis, good prognosis was associated with non-TN status, lower graded prognosis assessment class, and nonexistence of active extracranial metastases. After whole brain irradiation followed by IMRT or 3DCRT treatment, TN phenotype breast cancer patients with intracranial metastasis had high objective response rates but shorter survival time. With respect to survival in breast cancer patients with intracranial metastasis, the TN phenotype represents a significant adverse prognostic factor.

  14. Radiotherapy of abdomen with precise renal assessment with SPECT/CT imaging (RAPRASI): design and methodology of a prospective trial to improve the understanding of kidney radiation dose response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The kidneys are a principal dose-limiting organ in radiotherapy for upper abdominal cancers. The current understanding of kidney radiation dose response is rudimentary. More precise dose-volume response models that allow direct correlation of delivered radiation dose with spatio-temporal changes in kidney function may improve radiotherapy treatment planning for upper-abdominal tumours. Our current understanding of kidney dose response and tolerance is limited and this is hindering efforts to introduce advanced radiotherapy techniques for upper-abdominal cancers, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The aim of this study is to utilise radiotherapy and combined anatomical/functional imaging data to allow direct correlation of radiation dose with spatio-temporal changes in kidney function. The data can then be used to develop a more precise dose-volume response model which has the potential to optimise and individualise upper abdominal radiotherapy plans. Methods/design The Radiotherapy of Abdomen with Precise Renal Assessment with SPECT/CT Imaging (RAPRASI) is an observational clinical research study with participating sites at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital (SCGH) in Perth, Australia and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (PMCC) in Melbourne, Australia. Eligible patients are those with upper gastrointestinal cancer, without metastatic disease, undergoing conformal radiotherapy that will involve incidental radiation to one or both kidneys. For each patient, total kidney function is being assessed before commencement of radiotherapy treatment and then at 4, 12, 26, 52 and 78 weeks after the first radiotherapy fraction, using two procedures: a Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) measurement using the 51Cr-ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) clearance; and a regional kidney perfusion measurement assessing renal uptake of 99mTc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), imaged with a Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography / Computed Tomography (SPECT

  15. [What is the level of evidence of new techniques in prostate cancer radiotherapy?].

    PubMed

    Khadige, M; Peiffert, D; Supiot, S

    2014-10-01

    Prostate cancer radiotherapy has evolved from the old 2D technique to conformal, and then to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiotherapy. At the same time, image-guidance (IGRT) is routinely used. New techniques such as protontherapy or carbontherapy are being developed with the objective of increased efficacy, decreased treatment duration, toxicity or cost. This review summarizes the evidence-based medicine of new technologies in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  16. Radiotherapy treatment planning based on Monte Carlo techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juste, Belén; Miró, Rafael; Campayo, Juan M.; Díez, Sergio; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2010-07-01

    At the present, treatment planning systems (TPS) used in radiotherapy treatments use determinist correlations based on measurements in water to evaluate doses in the volume of interest and dose distributions around it. Nevertheless, it is well known that doses assigned with this type of planner can be problematic, especially in the presence of heterogeneities. The present work has developed a computational model using the Monte Carlo (MC) code MCNP5 (Monte Carlo N-Particle) for the simulation of a 6 MeV photon beam emitted by Elekta Precise medical linear accelerator treatment head. The model includes the major components of the accelerator head and the cube-shaped heterogeneous water tank " RFA-300". A low-density heterogeneity has been placed inside this water tank. It consists of a extruded polystyrene piece (97% air and 3% polystyrene) whose dimensions are 30 cm×10 cm×8 cm and with a density of 0.0311 g/cm 3. Calculations were performed for a photon beam setting 10 cm×10 cm and 20 cm×20 cm irradiation field sizes at 100 cm distance from source. The MC simulation is able to predict the absorbed dose distribution within the water tank using the *F8 or FMESH4 tally. These results have been compared with experimental values measured at the Hospital Clínic Universitari de Valencia. Dosimetric parameters calculated by simulation at the water tank and the experimental measures agreed, with an average deviation inside the heterogeneity region of 3%. Simulation results have been also compared with dose curves predicted by a commercial TPS in the same irradiation conditions, focusing attention on the accuracy that both systems reach in the dose calculation at the interphase zone and inside the heterogeneity. In contrast, TPS results overestimate the dose inside the heterogeneity and after it, with a maximum deviation of 7% for the 6 MeV photon beam and a field size of 20 cm×20 cm. We can conclude that the algorithms of computation of the TPS are not able to predict

  17. Adjuvant radiotherapy for endometrial cancer--a comparative review of radiotherapy technique with acute toxicity.

    PubMed

    Koh, Y V; Tang, J I; Choo, B A; Koh, M S; Lee, K M

    2014-01-01

    The addition of pelvic radiotherapy to brachytherapy (EBRT-BT) in early-stage endometrial cancer is controversial and may cause unnecessary toxicity. The incidence of acute toxicity of EBRT-BT will have an impact on clinical decision and patient compliance but is currently poorly understood. This study compares the acute toxicities of EBRT-BT versus BT alone. Seventy-nine patients with FIGO Stage IA-II endometrial cancer who underwent adjuvant radiotherapy, (EBRT-BT or BT alone) from 2001 to 2011 were included in the study. Medical records of these patients were reviewed retrospectively and toxicity graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.0. Patients were followed up for at least three months post-treatment to assess resolution of toxicity. The mean age of the study group was 60.6 years. Median follow-up was four years. Forty patients received EBRT-BT. There was a 37% increase in Grade 1-3 diarrhea with the addition of pelvic radiotherapy (OR 18.67, p < 0.0005) and a 34% increase in lethargy (p < 0.0005). There was also an increased occurrence of genitourinary and skin toxicities. Two patients in the EBRT-BT group required hospitalisation for severe diarrhea and three patients were unable to complete the treatment. All acute toxicities had resolved by three months post treatment. EBRT-BT causes significantly more acute toxicities compared to BT alone. Patients should be informed of this during counselling.

  18. Alignment techniques required by precise measurement of effective focal length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, T. D.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics of false color imagery produced by instrumentation on earth resource mapping satellites are examined. The spatial fidelity of the imagery is dependent upon the geometric accuracy (GA) and the band-to-band registration (BBR) with which the telescope instrument is assembled. BBR and GA require knowledge of telescope effective focal length (EFL) to one part in 10,000 in order that the next generation of earth mappers be able to carry out their missions. The basis for this level of precision is briefly considered, and a description is given of the means by which such precise EFL measurements have been carried out. Attention is given to accuracy requirements, the technique used to measure effective focal length, possible sources of error in the EFL measurement, approaches for eliminating errors, and the results of the efforts to control measurement errors in EFL determinations.

  19. A technique for the assessment of fighter aircraft precision controllability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisk, T. R.

    1978-01-01

    Today's emerging fighter aircraft are maneuvering as well at normal accelerations of 7 to 8 g's as their predecessors did at 4 to 5 g's. This improved maneuvering capability has significantly expanded their operating envelope and made the task of evaluating handling qualities more difficult. This paper describes a technique for assessing the precision controllability of highly maneuverable aircraft, a technique that was developed to evaluate the effects of buffet intensity on gunsight tracking capability and found to be a useful tool for the general assessment of fighter aircraft handling qualities. It has also demonstrated its usefulness for evaluating configuration and advanced flight control system refinements. This technique is believed to have application to future aircraft dynamics and pilot-vehicle interface studies.

  20. The Effect of Adjuvant Postmastectomy Radiotherapy Bolus Technique on Local Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Tieu, Minh Thi; Graham, Peter; Browne, Lois; Chin, Yaw Sinn

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiotherapy bolus is heterogenous, with little evidence to guide clinical practise. This study explores the effect of chest wall bolus technique on chest wall recurrence. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective cohort study of 254 patients treated with adjuvant postmastectomy radiotherapy between 1993 and 2003. Patient and treatment characteristics including bolus details were extracted. Outcomes considered were treatment toxicities, treatment delivery, and local recurrence. Results: In all, 143 patients received radiotherapy with whole chest wall bolus, 88 patients with parascar bolus, and 23 with no bolus. Twenty patients did not complete radiotherapy because of acute skin toxicity: 17 in the whole chest wall bolus group, 2 in the parascar bolus group, and 1 in the group not treated with bolus. On multivariate analysis, whole chest wall bolus and chemotherapy were found to be significant predictors for early cessation of radiotherapy resulting from acute skin toxicity. There were 19 chest wall failures: 13 in the whole chest wall bolus group, 4 in the parascar bolus group, and 2 in the no-bolus group. On multivariate analysis, lymphovascular invasion and failure to complete radiotherapy because of acute skin toxicity were associated with chest wall recurrence. Conclusions: From our results, parascar bolus and no bolus performed no worse than did whole chest wall bolus with regard to chest wall recurrence. However, bolus may have an impact on early cessation of radiotherapy caused by skin toxicity, which then may influence chest wall recurrence.

  1. [Approaches to individual radiotherapy in breast cancer: individual risk estimation and individualized techniques].

    PubMed

    Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Varga, Zoltán; Csenki, Melinda; Szabó, Júlia; Szil, Elemér; Fekete, Gábor; Hideghéty, Katalin; Boda, Krisztina; Thurzó, László

    2007-05-06

    Radiotherapy comprises an integral part of the curative therapy of breast cancer by improving the locoregional control and survival when given on an individualized basis. Conformal radiotherapy and three-dimensional radiation treatment planning enhance the safety of radiotherapy by adjusting the irradiated volume to the shape of the target volume, and providing control of the radiation dose to the organs at risk (OARs). The methods introduced at the authors' institute in 2002 are demonstrated. The breast/chest wall and lymph node areas were irradiated provided that there was a minimum risk of local or locoregional relapse of 10%. CT-based 3D radiotherapy treatment planning and individual patient-positioning were applied, with thermoplastic mask-fixation in the second part of the study. The dose constraints of the OARs were given in accordance with the literature recommendations. In the first group of patients, individually shaped blocks, in the second group, multileaf collimator, and in the third group, with the aim of a more homogenous dose-distribution in the target volume, intensity-modulated beams were applied. During the study, 737 breast cancer patients received conformal radiotherapy based on individual risk estimation. In 372 cases only local, while in 365 cases locoregional radiotherapy was delivered. The dose-homogeneity in the target volume was significantly improved in the second period of the study, when segments were superposed on the radiotherapy fields. The proportions of the target volumes irradiated with +/-10% of the planned dose in the breast/chest wall, axillary and supraclavicular lymph nodes and internal mammary lymph nodes varied between 90.5-94.2%, 84.1-93.8% and 86.7-91.6%, respectively, depending on the radiation technique used. The parameters indicating the dose to the ipsilateral lung or to the heart were significantly higher when locoregional radiotherapy was applied compared to that in case of local radiotherapy. Radiation dose to the

  2. Current role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozyigit, Gokhan; Gultekin, Melis

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of malignancy in females. Advances in systemic therapies and radiotherapy (RT) provided long survival rates in breast cancer patients. RT has a major role in the management of breast cancer. During the past 15 years several developments took place in the field of imaging and irradiation techniques, intensity modulated RT, hypofractionation and partial-breast irradiation. Currently, improvements in the RT technology allow us a subsequent decrease in the treatment-related complications such as fibrosis and long-term cardiac toxicity while improving the loco-regional control rates and cosmetic results. Thus, it is crucial that modern radiotherapy techniques should be carried out with maximum care and efficiency. Several randomized trials provided evidence for the feasibility of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer. However, the role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer will continue to be defined by the mature results of randomized trials. Current review will provide an up-to-date evidence based data on the role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer. PMID:25114857

  3. Precise Aircraft Guidance Techniques for NASA's Operation IceBridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonntag, J. G.; Russell, R.

    2013-12-01

    We present a suite of novel aircraft guidance techniques we designed, developed and now operationally utilize to precisely guide large NASA aircraft and their sensor suites over polar science targets. Our techniques are based on real-time, non-differential Global Positioning System (GPS) data. They interact with the flight crew and the aircraft using a combination of yoke-mounted computer displays and an electronic interface to the aircraft's autopilot via the aircraft's Instrument Landing System (ILS). This ILS interface allows the crew to 'couple' the autopilot to our systems, which then guide the aircraft over science targets with considerably better accuracy than it can using its internal guidance. We regularly demonstrate errors in cross-track aircraft positioning of better than 4 m standard deviation and better than 2 m in mean offset over lengthy great-circle routes across the ice sheets. Our system also has a mode allowing for manual aircraft guidance down a predetermined path of arbitrary curvature, such as a sinuous glacier centerline. This mode is in general not as accurate as the coupled technique but is more versatile. We employ both techniques interchangeably and seamlessly during a typical Operation IceBridge science flight. Flight crews find the system sufficiently intuitive so that little or no familiarization is required prior to their accurately flying science lines. We regularly employ the system on NASA's P-3B and DC-8 aircraft, and since the interface to the aircraft's autopilot operates through the ILS, it should work well on any ILS-equipped aircraft. Finally, we recently extended the system to provide precise, three-dimensional landing approach guidance to the aircraft, thus transforming any approach into a precise ILS approach, even to a primitive runway. This was intended to provide a backup to the aircraft's internal landing systems in the event of a zero-visibility landing to a non-ILS equipped runway, such as the McMurdo sea ice runway

  4. Radiation-Induced Cancers From Modern Radiotherapy Techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare secondary cancer risk resulting from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy in patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy in the scattering mode were planned for 5 prostate caner patients and 5 head-and-neck cancer patients. The secondary doses during irradiation were measured using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and proton therapy, respectively. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk was estimated by applying organ equivalent dose to dose distributions. Results: The average secondary doses of proton therapy for prostate cancer patients, measured 20-60cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.4 mSv/Gy to 0.1 mSv/Gy. The average secondary doses of IMRT for prostate patients, however, ranged between 3 mSv/Gy and 1 mSv/Gy, approximately one order of magnitude higher than for proton therapy. Although the average secondary doses of IMRT were higher than those of proton therapy for head-and-neck cancers, these differences were not significant. Organ equivalent dose calculations showed that, for prostate cancer patients, the risk of secondary cancers in out-of-field organs, such as the stomach, lungs, and thyroid, was at least 5 times higher for IMRT than for proton therapy, whereas the difference was lower for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusions: Comparisons of organ-specific organ equivalent dose showed that the estimated secondary cancer risk using scattering mode in proton therapy is either significantly lower than the cases in IMRT treatment or, at least, does not exceed the risk induced by conventional IMRT treatment.

  5. High Performance and Increased Precision Techniques for Feynman Loop Integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, K.; de Doncker, E.; Ishikawa, T.; Kapenga, J.; Olagbemi, O.; Yuasa, F.

    2016-10-01

    For the investigation of physics within and beyond the Standard Model, a precise evaluation of higher order corrections in perturbative quantum field theory is required. We have worked on the development of a computational method for Feynman loop integrals with a fully numerical approach. It is based on numerical integration and extrapolation techniques. In this paper, we describe the status and new developments in our techniques for the numerical computation of Feynman loop integrals. Separation of ultra-violet divergences is important for the renormalization procedure. In our analyses, the separation can be done numerically. For 2-loop integrals we have performed the calculations for up to 4-point functions, and for 2-point functions we can handle up to 4- loop integrals. We report the status and accuracy of the computations with detailed numerical comparisons to results in the literature, in order to demonstrate that our method will evolve into an important component of automated systems for the study of higher-order radiative corrections.

  6. Broadband Lidar Technique for Precision CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.

    2008-01-01

    Presented are preliminary experimental results, sensitivity measurements and discuss our new CO2 lidar system under development. The system is employing an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), superluminescent light emitting diode (SLED) as a source and our previously developed Fabry-Perot interferometer subsystem as a detector part. Global measurement of carbon dioxide column with the aim of discovering and quantifying unknown sources and sinks has been a high priority for the last decade. The goal of Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission is to significantly enhance the understanding of the role of CO2 in the global carbon cycle. The National Academy of Sciences recommended in its decadal survey that NASA put in orbit a CO2 lidar to satisfy this long standing need. Existing passive sensors suffer from two shortcomings. Their measurement precision can be compromised by the path length uncertainties arising from scattering within the atmosphere. Also passive sensors using sunlight cannot observe the column at night. Both of these difficulties can be ameliorated by lidar techniques. Lidar systems present their own set of problems however. Temperature changes in the atmosphere alter the cross section for individual CO2 absorption features while the different atmospheric pressures encountered passing through the atmosphere broaden the absorption lines. Currently proposed lidars require multiple lasers operating at multiple wavelengths simultaneously in order to untangle these effects. The current goal is to develop an ultra precise, inexpensive new lidar system for precise column measurements of CO2 changes in the lower atmosphere that uses a Fabry-Perot interferometer based system as the detector portion of the instrument and replaces the narrow band laser commonly used in lidars with the newly available high power SLED as the source. This approach reduces the number of individual lasers used in the system from three or more

  7. Comparison of Different Techniques in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Planning

    PubMed Central

    Kara, F. Gülşen; Haydaroğlu, Ayfer; Eren, Hakan; Kitapçıoğlu, Gül

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to minimize the radiation dose to organs other than the target tissue during adjuvant therapy applied for breast cancer, by using different planning methods. Materials and Methods 30 women with T1-2 N1-3 M0 breast cancer were included in the study. Planning was performed using four different methods to the supraclavicular area, internal, and external tangential fields. All planning was done in a virtual environment by and the requested data was obtained. All patients were treated by the 1st method. Method 1: Different isocenter, complete supraclavicular area, breast half beam. Method 2: Different isocenter, half supraclavicular area, breast half beam. Method 3: Single isocenter, half supraclavicular area, breast half beam. Method 4: Different isocenter, supraclavicular area full beam, breast full beam. Results Evaluation of PTV values showed a statistically significant reduction in D-max, 110% and 115% values by method III. Lower doses in other parameters were not statistically significant. Conclusion Based on these results, the application of single isocenter, 3D radiotherapy in breast cancer provides significant advantages especially in PTV and pulmonary dosages.

  8. Body radiation exposure in breast cancer radiotherapy: Impact of breast IMRT and virtual wedge compensation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Tony; Pignol, Jean-Philippe . E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca; Rakovitch, Eileen; Vu, Toni; Hicks, Deanna; O'Brien, Peter; Pritchard, Kathleen

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: Recent reports demonstrate a dramatically increased rate of secondary leukemia for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant high-dose anthracycline and radiotherapy, and that radiation is an independent factor for the development of leukemia. This study aimed to evaluate the radiation body exposure during breast radiotherapy and to characterize the factors associated with an increased exposure. Patients and Methods: In a prospective cohort of 120 women, radiation measurements were taken from four sites on the body at the time of adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Multiple regression analysis was performed to analyze patient and treatment factors associated with the amount of scattered radiation. Results: For standard 50 Gy breast radiotherapy, the minimal dose received by abdominal organs is on average 0.45 Gy, ranging from 0.06 to 1.55 Gy. The use of physical wedges as a compensation technique was the most significant factor associated with increased scattered dose (p < 0.001), resulting in approximately three times more exposure compared with breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dynamic wedge. Conclusions: The amount of radiation that is scattered to a patient's body is consistent with exposure reported to be associated with excess of leukemia. In accordance with the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle, we recommend using breast IMRT or virtual wedging for the radiotherapy of breast cancer receiving high-dose anthracycline chemotherapy.

  9. Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors: A Comparison With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, Andrea; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Mans, Anton; Belderbos, Jose S.; Damen, Eugene M.F.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the potential of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques with a limited number of segments for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early-stage lung cancer. Methods and Materials: For a random selection of 27 patients eligible for SBRT, coplanar and noncoplanar IMRT and coplanar VMAT (using SmartArc) treatment plans were generated in Pinnacle{sup 3} and compared. In addition, film measurements were performed using an anthropomorphic phantom to evaluate the skin dose for the different treatment techniques. Results: Using VMAT, the delivery times could be reduced to an average of 6.6 min compared with 23.7 min with noncoplanar IMRT. The mean dose to the healthy lung was 4.1 Gy for VMAT and noncoplanar IMRT and 4.2 Gy for coplanar IMRT. The volume of healthy lung receiving >5 Gy and >20 Gy was 18.0% and 5.4% for VMAT, 18.5% and 5.0% for noncoplanar IMRT, and 19.4% and 5.7% for coplanar IMRT, respectively. The dose conformity at 100% and 50% of the prescribed dose of 54 Gy was 1.13 and 5.17 for VMAT, 1.11 and 4.80 for noncoplanar IMRT and 1.12 and 5.31 for coplanar IMRT, respectively. The measured skin doses were comparable for VMAT and noncoplanar IMRT and slightly greater for coplanar IMRT. Conclusions: Coplanar VMAT for SBRT for early-stage lung cancer achieved plan quality and skin dose levels comparable to those using noncoplanar IMRT and slightly better than those with coplanar IMRT. In addition, the delivery time could be reduced by {<=}70% with VMAT.

  10. Cranio Spinal Irradiation of Medulloblastoma Using High Precision Techniques - A Dosimetric Comparison.

    PubMed

    Pichandi, A; Ganesh, K M; Jerrin, A; Balaji, K; Sridhar, P S; Surega, A

    2014-03-17

    Radiotherapy planning, delivery and junction dose verification remain exigent for Cranio Spinal Irradiation (CSI) in medulloblastoma patients. This study aims to evaluate high precision techniques such as Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), Rapid Arc Therapy (RA) with and without flattening filter (FF) on the basis of dosimetric analysis. Five patients treated with jagged junction Intensity Modulated RadioTherapy (IMRT) using dynamic Multi Leaf Collimators (MLC) were randomly selected for this retrospective study. IMRT, Rapid Arc (RA) plans were simulated in the same CT data set with and without flattening filter. Total dose prescribed was 28.80 Gy in 16 fractions. An evaluation criterion of 98% of PTV receiving 100% of the prescription dose was followed in all plans. Twenty treatment plans with 260 Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) was created. Dosimetric parameters such as Dmax, Dmin, Dmean, V95%, V107%, CI for PTV and Dmax, Dmean, V80%, V50%, V30%, V10% for Organs At Risk (OAR) were extracted from DVHs. Treatment delivery efficiency was also evaluated for total Beam On Time (BOT). FFF Rapid Arc therapy (6F_RA) resulted in conformal doses throughout the cranio spinal axis. FF and FFF dynamic IMRT had minimal V107%, 1.23% and 2.88% compared to 49.15 and 66.36 of rapid arc therapy (with and without FF). 6F_IMRT resulted in lesser mean doses to eyes, liver, lungs and kidneys. Heart mean dose was less (3.08 Gy) with 6X_IMRT. Thyroid and esophagus doses could be reduced to about 41.2% and 10% respectively with 6F_RA. The BOT for the treatment techniques were 3.43 min (6X_IMRT), 1.59 min (6F_IMRT), 5min (6X_RA), 4.5 min (6F_RA). Removal of flattening filter in IMRT could improve dose coverage along the caniospinal axis and normal tissue sparing. A reduction of 46.3% BOT could increase treatment efficiency of 6F_IMRT compared to 6X_IMRT. CSI could be simpler since junction doses can be evaded in IMRT and RA techniques.

  11. Cranio Spinal Irradiation of Medulloblastoma Using High Precision Techniques - A Dosimetric Comparison.

    PubMed

    Pichandi, A; Ganesh, K M; Jerrin, A; Balaji, K; Sridhar, P S; Surega, A

    2015-08-01

    Radiotherapy planning, delivery and junction dose verification remain exigent for Cranio Spinal Irradiation (CSI) in medulloblastoma patients. This study aims to evaluate high precision techniques such as Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), Rapid Arc Therapy (RA) with and without flattening filter (FF) on the basis of dosimetric analysis. Five patients treated with jagged junction Intensity Modulated RadioTherapy (IMRT) using dynamic Multi Leaf Collimators (MLC) were randomly selected for this retrospective study. IMRT, Rapid Arc (RA) plans were simulated in the same CT data set with and without flattening filter. Total dose prescribed was 28.80 Gy in 16 fractions. An evaluation criterion of 98% of PTV receiving 100% of the prescription dose was followed in all plans. Twenty treatment plans with 260 Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) was created. Dosimetric parameters such as Dmax, Dmin, Dmean, V95%, V107%, CI for PTV and Dmax, Dmean, V80%, V50%, V30%, V10% for Organs At Risk (OAR) were extracted from DVHs. Treatment delivery efficiency was also evaluated for total Beam On Time (BOT). FFF Rapid Arc therapy : 6F_RA) resulted in conformal doses throughout the cranio spinal axis. FF and FFF dynamic IMRT had minimal V107%, 1.23% and 2.88% compared to 49.15 and 66.36 of rapid arc therapy (with and without FF). 6F_IMRT resulted in lesser mean doses to eyes, liver, lungs and kidneys. Heart mean dose was less (3.08 Gy) with 6X_IMRT. Thyroid and esophagus doses could be reduced to about 41.2% and 10% respectively with 6F_RA. The BOT for the treatment techniques were 3.43 min (6X_IMRT), 1.59 min (6F_IMRT), 5min (6X_RA), 4.5 min (6F_RA). Removal of flattening filter in IMRT could improve dose coverage along the caniospinal axis and normal tissue sparing. A reduction of 46.3% BOT could increase treatment efficiency of 6F_IMRT compared to 6X_IMRT. CSI could be simpler since junction doses can be evaded in IMRT and RA techniques.

  12. Modified radiotherapy technique in the treatment of medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Dewit, L.; Van Dam, J.; Rijnders, A.; Van De Velde, G.; Ang, K.K.; Van Der Schueren, E.

    1984-02-01

    Craniospinal irradiation is a standard treatment technique in patients who receive surgery for medulloblastoma. In most centers megavoltage photon irradiation is used, resulting in significant irradiation exposure to critical organs. In order to overcome this difficulty, the authors recently modified the technique applied in their center, by using high energy electrons (20 MeV) for irradiation of the spinal cord. The reliability of this technique was checked by performing dosimetry in a specially constructed wax phantom. Attention was focused upon dose variations at the junction of fields. Furthermore, the influence of vertebrae on the absorbed dose distribution of high energy electrons is presented. This technique seems to be safe and reliable in selected patients (children and teenagers).

  13. High precision metrology based microwave effective linewidth measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Nan; Green, Jerome J.; Beitscher, Bailey A.; Patton, Carl E.

    2007-11-15

    A precision microwave effective linewidth measurement technique for magnetic samples has been developed. The measurement utilizes a high-Q cylindrical cavity that contains the sample of interest, a highly stable and programable static magnetic field source, a computer controlled network analyzer for cavity center frequency {omega}{sub c} and quality factor Q{sub c} determinations, and the standard metrological substitution ABA method for accurate relative {omega}{sub c} and Q{sub c} measurements. Sequential long term ABA measurements show that the time and temperature drifts and random errors are the dominant sources of error, with uncertainties in {omega}{sub c}/2{pi} and Q{sub c} in the range of 50 kHz and 25, respectively. The ABA method is applied to eliminate these drifts and minimize the random errors. For measurements over 25 ABA cycles, accuracy is improved to 0.14 kHz for {omega}{sub c}/2{pi} and 3 for Q{sub c}. The temperature variation over a single ABA cycle is generally on the order of 10{sup -3}-10{sup -5} deg. C and there is no need for any further temperature stabilization or correction measures. The overall uncertainty in the 10 GHz effective linewidth determinations for a 3 mm diam, 0.5 mm thick polycrystalline yttrium iron garnet (YIG) disk is 0.15 Oe or less, well below the intrinsic single crystal YIG linewidth. This represents a factor of 10 improvement in measurement accuracy over previous work.

  14. [Conformational radiotherapy for bladder cancer: limits to precision and potential advantages of the utilization of proton beams].

    PubMed

    Miralbell, R

    1999-01-01

    Studies have been conducted and are ongoing to determine the utility of radiotherapy (with or without chemotherapy) as an alternative to surgery and for organ preservation in infiltrating cancer of the bladder. There are data that suggest that a higher dose of radiation can increase the probability of achieving local tumor control. However, a higher dose can only by utilized with greater precision in order to reduce radiation to the surrounding normal tissues. The variability and unpredictability of the bladder makes precision in irradiation difficult. Immobilization of the bladder with a balloon has been attempted but reproducibility was scanty. A 2 cm safety margin around the tumor appears to be the most appropriate method to ensure delivery of radiation to the target. High energy proton beams possess characteristic (fine trajectory and dose can be significantly reduced once the energy beam has reached a specific depth) that enhance precision in the treatment of an important number of tumors such as bladder cancer. In this study it is shown that proton radiation therapy permits a better dose distribution than with photons (25 MV x-rays) in a specific case of bladder cancer. In comparison to photon radiation therapy, this theroretical optimization permits administering a 10% higher dose with proton beams while reducing the dose to the neighbouring organs. This advantage can even be more important if we consider the 2 cm safety margin around the tumor. However, clinical studies are warranted to evaluate the potential benefits of a greater precision with high dose external radiation using proton beams or enhanced photon radiation therapy.

  15. Late-responding normal tissue cells benefit from high-precision radiotherapy with prolonged fraction delivery times via enhanced autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Qiwei; Zheng, Rong; Xie, Guozhu; Liao, Guixiang; Du, Shasha; Ren, Chen; Li, Rong; Lin, Xiaoshan; Hu, Daokun; Yuan, Yawei

    2015-01-01

    High-precision radiotherapy (HPR) has established its important role in the treatment of tumors due to its precise dose distribution. Given its more complicated delivery process, HPR commonly requires more fraction delivery time (FDT). However, it is unknown whether it has an identical response of prolonged FDT on different normal tissues. Our results showed that fractionated irradiation with prolonged FDTs (15, 36, and 50 minutes) enhanced cell surviving fractions for normal tissue cells compared with irradiation with an FDT of 2 minutes. However, the late-responding normal cell line HEI-OC1 was more responsive to prolonged FDTs and demonstrated higher surviving fractions and significantly decreased apoptosis and DNA damage compared to the acute-responding normal cell line HaCaT. Increased autophagy mediated via the ATM-AMPK pathway was observed in HEI-OC1 cells compared with HaCaT cells when irradiated with prolonged FDTs. Furthermore, treatment with the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA or ATM inhibitor KU55933 resulted in enhanced ROS accumulation and attenuation of the effect of prolonged FDT-mediated protection on irradiated HEI-OC1 cells. Our results indicated that late-responding normal tissue cells benefitted more from prolonged FDTs compared with acute-responding tissue cells, which was mainly attributed to enhanced cytoprotective autophagy mediated via the ATM/AMPK signaling pathway. PMID:25766900

  16. Comparison of adaptive radiotherapy techniques for external radiation therapy of canine bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Nieset, Jessica R; Harmon, Joseph F; Johnson, Thomas E; Larue, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Daily bladder variations make it difficult to utilize standard radiotherapy as a primary treatment option for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Our purpose was to develop a model comparing dose distributions of image-guided and adaptive radiotherapy (ART) techniques for canine bladder cancer. Images were obtained retrospectively from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans used for daily positioning of four dogs undergoing fractionated image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Four different treatment plans were modeled for each dog, and dosimetric data were compared. Two plans were developed using planning target volumes based on planning computed tomography (CT) bladder volume. These plans then used bony anatomy or soft tissue anatomy for daily positioning and dosimetric modeling. The third plan type was a hybrid IGRT and ART technique utilizing a library of premade anisotropic planning target volumes using bladder wall motion data and selection of a "plan-of-the-day" determined from positioning CBCT bladder volumes. The fourth plan was an ART technique that constructed a new planning target volume each day based on daily bladder volume as determined by pretreatment CBCT. Dose volume histograms were generated for each plan type and dose distribution for the bladder and rectum were compared between plan types. Irradiated rectal volume decreased and irradiated bladder volume increased as plan conformality increased. ART provided the greatest rectal sparing, with lowest irradiated rectal volume (P < 0.001), and largest bladder volume receiving 95% of the prescription dose (P < 0.001). In our model, adaptive radiotherapy techniques for canine bladder cancer showed significant reduction in rectal volume irradiated when compared to nonadaptive techniques, while maintaining appropriate bladder coverage.

  17. Application of Metal Implant 16-Bit Imaging: New Technique in Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xin-Ye, Ni; Liugang, Gao; Mingming, Fang; Tao, Lin

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the computed tomography number and the variation of dose distribution based on 12-bit, 16-bit, and revised 16-bit images while the metal bars were inserted. The phantoms containing stainless steel, titanium alloy, and aluminum bar were scanned with computed tomography. These images were reconstructed with 12-bit and 16-bit imaging technologies. The "cupping artifacts" computed tomography value of the metal object revised by Matlab software was called the revised 16-bit image. The computed tomography values of these metal materials were analyzed. Two radiotherapy treatment plans were designed using the treatment plan system: (1) gantry was of 0° irradiation field and (2) gantry was of 90° and 270° for 2 opposed irradiation fields. The dose profile and dose-volume histogram of a structure of interest were analyzed in various images. The analysis was based on the radiotherapy plan differences between 3 different imaging techniques (12-bit imaging, 16-bit imaging, and revised 16-bit imaging technologies). For low-density metal object (computed tomography value <3071 Hounsfield unit, HU), the radiotherapy plan results were consistent based on 3 different imaging techniques. For high-density metal object (computed tomography value >3071 HU), the difference in radiotherapy plan results was obvious. The dose of 12-bit was 15.9% higher than revised 16-bit on average for the downstream of titanium rod. For stainless steel, this number reached up to 42.7%. A 16-bit imaging technology of metal implants can distinguish the computed tomography value of different metal materials. Furthermore, the revised 16-bit imaging technology can improve the dose computational accuracy of radiotherapy plan with high-density metal implants.

  18. A Dosimetric Analysis of IMRT and Multistatic Fields Techniques for Left Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Seong Kwon; Kim, Yeon Sil; Kim, Soo Young; Lee, Mi Jo; Keum, Hyun Sup; Kim, Seung Jin; Youn, Seon Min

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the dosimetric difference between intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using 3 or 5 beams and multistatic field technique (MSF) in radiotherapy of the left breast. We made comparative analysis of two kinds of radiotherapy that can achieve improved dose homogeneity. First is a MSF that uses both major and small irradiation fields at the same time. The other is IMRT using 3 or 5 beams with an inverse planning system using multiple static multileaf collimators. We made treatment plans for 16 early left breast cancer patients who were randomly selected and had undergone breast conserving surgery and radiotherapy, and analyzed them in the dosimetric aspect. For the mean values of V{sub 95} and dose homogeneity index, no statistically significant difference was observed among the three therapies. Extreme hot spots receiving >110% of prescribed dose were not found in any of the three methods. Using Tukey's test, IMRT showed a significantly larger increase in exposure dose to the ipsilateral lung and the heart than MSF in the low-dose area, but in the high-dose area, MSF showed a slight increase. To improve dose homogeneity, the application of MSF, which can be easily planned and applied more widely, is considered optimal as an alternative to IMRT for radiotherapy of early left breast cancer.

  19. Acute toxicity during external-beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: Comparison of different techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, S.; Awan, A.; Karrison, T.; Culbert, H.; Chan, S.; Kolker, J.; Low, N.; Halpern, H.; Rubin, S.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Weicheselbaum, R.R. )

    1993-01-15

    The chronic and acute toxicities associated with conventional radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer are well documented. However, the degree and incidence of toxicities with conformal techniques are not known. Studying side effects associated with modern radiotherapeutic techniques is more important now since there has been a general trend to use computerized tomography-based techniques in recent years; beam's eye view-based conformal techniques are also becoming more commonplace. It is possible that the local disease control can be improved with the delivery of higher doses than currently used. Conformation of the treatment volume to the target volume may facilitate such dose-escalation. However, prior to such dose-escalation, it is important to know the toxicities associated with such techniques with conventional doses. We have compared week-by-week acute toxicities associated with conventional (Group A, 16 patients), computerized tomography-based, manual (Group B, 57 patients) and beam's eye view-based (Group C, 43 patients) techniques during 7 weeks of radiotherapy. Group B and C patients were treated contemporaneously (1988-1990). The incidence of acute toxicities was significantly less with the beams eye view-based technique than with the other two methods. A trend suggesting increased severity of toxicity with increase in the volume of treatment was seen.

  20. A Temperature-Based Gain Calibration Technique for Precision Radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashare, Chaitali Ravindra

    Detecting extremely weak signals in radio astronomy demands high sensitivity and stability of the receivers. The gain of a typical radio astronomy receiver is extremely large, and therefore, even very small gain instabilities can dominate the received noise power and degrade the instrument sensitivity. Hence, receiver stabilization is of prime importance. Gain variations occur mainly due to ambient temperature fluctuations. We take a new approach to receiver stabilization, which makes use of active temperature monitoring and corrects for the gain fluctuations in post processing. This approach is purely passive and does not include noise injection or switching for calibration. This system is to be used for the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER), which is being developed to detect the extremely faint neutral hydrogen (HI) signature of the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). The epoch of reionization refers to the period in the history of the Universe when the first stars and galaxies started to form. When there are N antenna elements in the case of a large scale array, all elements may not be subjected to the same environmental conditions at a given time. Hence, we expect to mitigate the gain variations by monitoring the physical temperature of each element of the array. This stabilization approach will also benefit experiments like EDGES (Experiment to Detect the Global EoR Signature) and DARE (Dark Ages Radio Explorer), which involve a direct measurement of the global 21 cm signal using a single antenna element and hence, require an extremely stable system. This dissertation focuses on the development and evaluation of a calibration technique that compensates for the gain variations caused due to temperature fluctuations of the RF components. It carefully examines the temperature dependence of the components in the receiver chain. The results from the first-order field instrument, called a Gainometer (GoM), highlight the issue with the cable

  1. Key techniques of ultra-precision aerostatic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongsheng; Li, Jiafu; Cui, Ting; Hu, Jiacheng; Cheng, Yang; Wang, Meibao

    2013-10-01

    In the process of ultra-precision machining and measuring, nanoscale rotary and linear motion can be realized by aerostatic system. Aerostatic restrictors are one of core components in aerostatic system. An aerostatic restrictor with multi-micro channels was designed and developed, combined with the orifice and torus throttling methods. Besides, the mentioned restrictor has two individual parts assembled together by interference fit, which can alleviating the contradiction between its stiffness and stability. Its maximum bearing capacity was 708.4N when the supply gas pressure was 0.5MPa. Numerical simulation and experimental investigation indicates the pressure in gas film of this restrictor gradually reduces to atmospheric pressure from the center to the surrounding. The temperature decreases from the outlet to the edge and the maximum temperature difference is more than 5°, which verifies Joule-Thomson effect in the throttling process. In order to reduce the influence of gas source fluctuation on the parameters such as gas film thickness, pressure and temperature, high accuracy stable pressure source was developed applying two-stage series closed-loops feedback control, which can make the outlet pressure error below 1%. Because of the influence of ambient noise on ultra-precision aerostatic system, high precision vibration-isolation platform was developed applying air spring vibration-isolation technology, whose natural frequency can be as low as 1.22Hz.

  2. Precise relative earthquake depth determination using array processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez, M. A.; Prieto, G. A.

    2017-06-01

    Precise determination of hypocentral depth remains one of the most relevant problems in earthquake seismology. It is well known that using depth phases allows for significant improvement in event depth determination; however, routinely and systematically picking such phases, for teleseismic or regional arrivals, is problematic due to poor signal-to-noise ratios around the pP and sP phases. To overcome this limitation, we have taken advantage of the additional information carried by seismic arrays. We use velocity spectral analysis to precisely measure pP-P times. The individual estimates obtained at different subarrays, for all pairs of earthquakes, are combined using a double-difference algorithm, in order to precisely map seismicity in regions where it is tightly clustered. We illustrate this method by relocating intermediate-depth earthquakes in the Nazca subducting plate, beneath northern Chile, where we confirm the existence of a narrowly spaced double seismic zone, previously imaged using a local dedicated deployment. As a second example we relocate the aftershock sequence of the 2014 Mw 7.9 intermediate depth, Rat Islands earthquake, and provide evidence of a subvertical fault plane for the main shock. Finally, we show that the resulting relative depth errors are typically smaller than 2 km.

  3. Key techniques of the high precision gravity field system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weimin; Chen, Shi; Lu, Hongyan; Shi, Lei

    2017-04-01

    Ground-based gravity time series provide a direct method to monitor all sources of mass changes from local to global scale. But the effectively infinite spatial sensitivity of gravity measurements make it difficult to isolate the signal of interest. The high precision gravity field system is an alternative approach of modeling mass changes under-ground. The field system, consists of absolute gravity, gravity and gravity gradient, GNSS, leveling and climate hydrology measurements, can improve the signal-to-noise ratio for many applications by removing contributions of unwanted signal from elevation changes, air pressure changes, local hydrology, and others. The networks of field system combination, such as field-profile in more than 100 kilometers, can be used in critical zone with high seismic risk for monitoring earth dynamics, volcanic and seismic phenomena. The system is constituted by 9 typical observation stations in 3*3 array (or 4 in 2*2 array) in 60 square meters field, each station is designed for integrated measurements, including absolute gravity, gravity gradient, elevation changes, air pressure and hydrology. Time-lapse gravity changes resulting from absolute gravimeter (FG5 or A10) with standard deviation less than 2 μGal, without the contributions of Earth tides, loading and polar motion. Additional measurements such as air pressure change, local hydrology and soil moisture are indispensable. The elevation changes resulting from GNSS (on the base station) and leveling (between stations) with precision less than 10 mm. The gravity gradient is the significant measurement for delimiting the location of the related mass changes underground the station, which is measured by Scintrex CG-5 gravimeters in different height (80cm in the test field), with precision less than 10 E. It is necessary to improve the precision of gravity gradient measurements by certain method in field experiment for the high precision measurement system. Acknowledgment: This

  4. Involved-Node Radiotherapy and Modern Radiation Treatment Techniques in Patients With Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paumier, Amaury; Ghalibafian, Mithra; Beaudre, Anne; Ferreira, Ivaldo; Pichenot, Charlotte; Messai, Taha; Lessard, Nathalie Athalie; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Girinsky, Theodore

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical outcome of the involved-node radiotherapy (INRT) concept using modern radiation treatments (intensity-modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]or deep-inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy [DIBH) in patients with localized supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin lymphoma. Methods and Materials: All but 2 patients had early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma, and they were treated with chemotherapy prior to irradiation. Radiation treatments were delivered using the INRT concept according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer guidelines. IMRT was performed with the patient free-breathing. For the adapted breath-hold technique, a spirometer dedicated to DIBH radiotherapy was used. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy was performed with those patients. Results: Fifty patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (48 patients with primary Hodgkin lymphoma, 1 patient with recurrent disease, and 1 patient with refractory disease) entered the study from January 2003 to August 2008. Thirty-two patients were treated with IMRT, and 18 patients were treated with the DIBH technique. The median age was 28 years (range, 17-62 years). Thirty-four (68%) patients had stage I - (I-IIA) IIA disease, and 16 (32%) patients had stage I - (I-IIB) IIB disease. All but 3 patients received three to six cycles of adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD). The median radiation doses to patients treated with IMRT and DIBH were, respectively, 40 Gy (range, 21.6-40 Gy) and 30.6 Gy (range, 19.8-40 Gy). Protection of various organs at risk was satisfactory. Median follow-up was 53.4 months (range, 19.1-93 months). The 5-year progression-free and overall survival rates for the whole population were 92% (95% confidence interval [CI], 80%-97%) and 94% (95% CI, 75%-98%), respectively. Recurrences occurred in 4 patients: 2 patients had in-field relapses, and 2 patients had visceral recurrences. Grade 3 acute lung toxicity (transient pneumonitis) occurred in 1 case. Conclusions

  5. Evaluation of the field-in-field technique with lung blocks for breast tangential radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hidekazu; Hayashi, Shinya; Kajiura, Yuichi; Kitahara, Masashi; Matsuyama, Katsuya; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several studies have reported the advantages of the field-in-field (FIF) technique in breast radiotherapy, including dose reduction in the lungs by using lung field blocks. We evaluated the FIF technique with lung blocks for breast tangential radiotherapy. Sixteen patients underwent free breathing (FB) computed tomography (CT), followed by two CT procedures performed during breath hold after light inhalation (IN) and light exhalation (EX). Three radiotherapy plans were created using the FIF technique based on the FB-CT images: one without lung blocks (LB0) and two with lung blocks whose monitor units (MUs) were 5 (LB5) and 10 (LB10), respectively. These plans were copied to the IN-CT and EX-CT images. V20Gy, V30Gy, and V40Gy of the ipsilateral lung and V100%, V95%, and the mean dose (Dmean) to the planning target volume (PTV) were analyzed. The extent of changes in these parameters on the IN-plan and EX-plan compared with the FB-plan was evaluated. V20Gy, V30Gy, and V40Gy were significantly smaller for FB-LB5 and FB-LB10 than for FB-LB0; similar results were obtained for the IN-plan and EX-plan. V100%, V95%, and Dmean were also significant smaller for FB-LB5 and FB-LB10 than for FB-LB0. The extent of changes in V20Gy, V30Gy, and V40Gy on the IN-plan and EX-plan compared with the FB-plan was not statistically significant. Lung blocks were useful for dose reduction in the lung and a simultaneous PTV decrease. This technique should not be applied in the general population. PMID:26412879

  6. A Precise Calibration Technique for Measuring High Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Schultz, Donald F.

    2000-01-01

    A technique was developed for direct measurement of gas temperatures in the range of 2050 K 2700 K with improved accuracy and reproducibility. The technique utilized the low-emittance of certain fibrous materials, and the uncertainty of the technique was United by the uncertainty in the melting points of the materials, i.e., +/-15 K. The materials were pure, thin, metal-oxide fibers whose diameters varied from 60 microns to 400 microns in the experiments. The sharp increase in the emittance of the fibers upon melting was utilized as indication of reaching a known gas temperature. The accuracy of the technique was confirmed by both calculated low emittance values of transparent fibers, of order 0.01, up to a few degrees below their melting point and by the fiber-diameter independence of the results. This melting-point temperature was approached by increments not larger than 4 K, which was accomplished by controlled increases of reactant flow rates in hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen-oxygen flames. As examples of the applications of the technique, the gas-temperature measurements were used: (a) for assessing the uncertainty in inferring gas temperatures from thermocouple measurements, and (b) for calibrating an IR camera to measure gas temperatures. The technique offers an excellent calibration reference for other gas-temperature measurement methods to improve their accuracy and reliably extending their temperature range of applicability.

  7. A Precise Calibration Technique for Measuring High Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Schultz, Donald F.

    1999-01-01

    A technique was developed for direct measurement of gas temperatures in the range of 2050 K - 2700 K with improved accuracy and reproducibility. The technique utilized the low-emittance of certain fibrous Materials, and the uncertainty of the technique was limited by the uncertainty in the melting points of the materials, i.e., +/- 15 K. The materials were pure, thin, metal-oxide fibers whose diameters varied from 60 mm to 400 mm in the experiments. The sharp increase in the emittance of the fibers upon melting was utilized as indication of reaching a known gas temperature. The accuracy of the technique was confirmed by both calculated low emittance values of transparent fibers, of order 0.01, up to a few degrees below their melting point and by the fiber-diameter independence of the results. This melting-point temperature was approached by increments not larger than 4 K, which was accomplished by controlled increases of reactant flow rates in hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen- oxygen flames. As examples of the applications of the technique, the gas-temperature measurements were used (a) for assessing the uncertainty in infering gas temperatures from thermocouple measurements, and (b) for calibrating an IR camera to measure gas temperatures. The technique offers an excellent calibration reference for other gas-temperature measurement methods to improve their accuracy and reliably extending their temperature range of applicability.

  8. Analog-to-digital conversion techniques for precision photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opal, Chet B.

    1988-01-01

    Three types of analog-to-digital converters are described: parallel, successive-approximation, and integrating. The functioning of comparators and sample-and-hold amplifiers is explained. Differential and integral linearity are defined, and good and bad examples are illustrated. The applicability and relative advantages of the three types of converters for precision astronomical photometric measurements are discussed. For most measurements, integral linearity is more important than differential linearity. Successive-approximation converters should be used with multielement solid state detectors because of their high speed, but dual slope integrating converters may be superior for use with single element solid state detectors where speed of digitization is not a factor. In all cases, the input signal should be tailored so that they occupy the upper part of the converter's dynamic range; this can be achieved by providing adjustable gain, or better by varying the integration time of the observation if possible.

  9. An optimal GPS data processing technique for precise positioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Sien-Chong; Melbourne, William G.

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical formula to optimally combine dual-frequency GPS pseudorange and carrier phase (integrated Doppler) data streams into a single data stream is derived in closed form. The data combination reduces the data volume and computing time in the filtering process for parameter estimation by a factor of 4 while preserving the full data strength for precise positioning. The resulting single data stream is that of carrier phase measurements with both data noise and bias uncertainty strictly defined. With this mathematical formula the single stream of optimally combined GPS measurements can be efficiently formed by simple numerical calculations. Carrier phase ambiguity resolution, when feasible, is strengthened due to the preserved full data strength with the optimally combined data and the resulting longer wavelength for the ambiguity to be resolved.

  10. Measurement of radiation dose with BeO dosimeters using optically stimulated luminescence technique in radiotherapy applications.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Serdar; Güneş Tanır, A; Meriç, Niyazi; Aydınkarahaliloğlu, Ercan

    2015-09-01

    The radiation dose delivered to the target by using different radiotherapy applications has been measured with the help of beryllium oxide (BeO) dosimeters to be placed inside the rando phantom. Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy (3DCRT), Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy (IMAT) have been used as radiotherapy application. Individual treatment plans have been made for the three radiotherapy applications of rando phantom. The section 4 on the phantom was selected as target and 200 cGy doses were delivered. After the dosimeters placed on section 4 (target) and the sections 2 and 6 (non-target) were irradiated, the result was read through the OSL technique on the Risø TL/OSL system. This procedure was repeated three times for each radiotherapy application. The doses delivered to the target and the non-target sections as a result of the 3DCRT, IMRT and IMAT plans were analyzed. The doses received by the target were measured as 204.71 cGy, 204.76 cGy and 205.65 cGy, respectively. The dose values obtained from treatment planning system (TPS) were compared to the dose values obtained using the OSL technique. It has been concluded that, the radiation dose can be measured with the OSL technique by using BeO dosimeters in medical practices.

  11. Optimization of Stereotactic Radiotherapy Treatment Delivery Technique for Base-Of-Skull Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Brenda G. Candish, Charles; Vollans, Emily; Gete, Ermias; Lee, Richard; Martin, Monty; Ma, Roy; McKenzie, Michael

    2008-10-01

    This study compares static conformal field (CF), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and dynamic arcs (DA) for the stereotactic radiotherapy of base-of-skull meningiomas. Twenty-one cases of base-of-skull meningioma (median planning target volume [PTV] = 21.3 cm{sup 3}) previously treated with stereotactic radiotherapy were replanned with each technique. The plans were compared for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI), and doses to normal structures at 6 dose values from 50.4 Gy to 5.6 Gy. The mean CI was 1.75 (CF), 1.75 (DA), and 1.66 (IMRT) (p < 0.05 when comparing IMRT to either CF or DA plans). The CI (IMRT) was inversely proportional to the size of the PTV (Spearman's rho = -0.53, p = 0.01) and at PTV sizes above 25 cm{sup 3}, the CI (IMRT) was always superior to CI (DA) and CI (CF). At PTV sizes below 25 cm{sup 3}, there was no significant difference in CI between each technique. There was no significant difference in HI between plans. The total volume of normal tissue receiving 50.4, 44.8, and 5.6 Gy was significantly lower when comparing IMRT to CF and DA plans (p < 0.05). There was significantly improved dose sparing for the brain stem and ipsilateral temporal lobe with IMRT but no significant difference for the optic chiasm or pituitary gland. These results demonstrate that stereotactic IMRT should be considered to treat base-of-skull meningiomas with a PTV larger than 25 cm{sup 3}, due to improved conformity and normal tissue sparing, in particular for the brain stem and ipsilateral temporal lobe.

  12. Markerless gating for lung cancer radiotherapy based on machine learning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tong; Li, Ruijiang; Tang, Xiaoli; Dy, Jennifer G.; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-03-01

    In lung cancer radiotherapy, radiation to a mobile target can be delivered by respiratory gating, for which we need to know whether the target is inside or outside a predefined gating window at any time point during the treatment. This can be achieved by tracking one or more fiducial markers implanted inside or near the target, either fluoroscopically or electromagnetically. However, the clinical implementation of marker tracking is limited for lung cancer radiotherapy mainly due to the risk of pneumothorax. Therefore, gating without implanted fiducial markers is a promising clinical direction. We have developed several template-matching methods for fluoroscopic marker-less gating. Recently, we have modeled the gating problem as a binary pattern classification problem, in which principal component analysis (PCA) and support vector machine (SVM) are combined to perform the classification task. Following the same framework, we investigated different combinations of dimensionality reduction techniques (PCA and four nonlinear manifold learning methods) and two machine learning classification methods (artificial neural networks—ANN and SVM). Performance was evaluated on ten fluoroscopic image sequences of nine lung cancer patients. We found that among all combinations of dimensionality reduction techniques and classification methods, PCA combined with either ANN or SVM achieved a better performance than the other nonlinear manifold learning methods. ANN when combined with PCA achieves a better performance than SVM in terms of classification accuracy and recall rate, although the target coverage is similar for the two classification methods. Furthermore, the running time for both ANN and SVM with PCA is within tolerance for real-time applications. Overall, ANN combined with PCA is a better candidate than other combinations we investigated in this work for real-time gated radiotherapy.

  13. Optimization of stereotactic radiotherapy treatment delivery technique for base-of-skull meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Clark, Brenda G; Candish, Charles; Vollans, Emily; Gete, Ermias; Lee, Richard; Martin, Monty; Ma, Roy; McKenzie, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This study compares static conformal field (CF), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and dynamic arcs (DA) for the stereotactic radiotherapy of base-of-skull meningiomas. Twenty-one cases of base-of-skull meningioma (median planning target volume [PTV] = 21.3 cm3) previously treated with stereotactic radiotherapy were replanned with each technique. The plans were compared for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI), and doses to normal structures at 6 dose values from 50.4 Gy to 5.6 Gy. The mean CI was 1.75 (CF), 1.75 (DA), and 1.66 (IMRT) (p < 0.05 when comparing IMRT to either CF or DA plans). The CI (IMRT) was inversely proportional to the size of the PTV (Spearman's rho = -0.53, p = 0.01) and at PTV sizes above 25 cm3, the CI (IMRT) was always superior to CI (DA) and CI (CF). At PTV sizes below 25 cm3, there was no significant difference in CI between each technique. There was no significant difference in HI between plans. The total volume of normal tissue receiving 50.4, 44.8, and 5.6 Gy was significantly lower when comparing IMRT to CF and DA plans (p < 0.05). There was significantly improved dose sparing for the brain stem and ipsilateral temporal lobe with IMRT but no significant difference for the optic chiasm or pituitary gland. These results demonstrate that stereotactic IMRT should be considered to treat base-of-skull meningiomas with a PTV larger than 25 cm3, due to improved conformity and normal tissue sparing, in particular for the brain stem and ipsilateral temporal lobe.

  14. A reduced-dynamic technique for precise orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. C.; Yunck, T. P.; Thornton, C. L.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of the Global Positioning System (GPS) will enable a reduced-dynamic technique for achieving subdecimeter orbit determination of earth-orbiting satellites. With this technique, information on the transition between satellite states at different observing times is furnished by both a formal dynamic model and observed satellite positional change (which is inferred kinematically from continuous GPS carrier-phase data). The relative weighting of dynamic and kinematic information can be freely varied. Covariance studies show that in situations where observing geometry is poor and the dynamic model is good, the model dominates determination of the state transition; where the dynamic model is poor and the geometry strong, carrier phase governs the determination of the transition. When neither kinematic nor dynamic information is clearly superior, the reduced-dynamic combination of the two can substantially improve the orbit-determination solution. Guidelines are given here for selecting a near-optimal weighting for the reduced-dynamic solution, and sensitivity of solution accuracy to this weighting is examined.

  15. High precision speed measurement by using interferometric techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Ávila, M. A.; Ochoa Valiente, R.; García Trujillo, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present the experimental realization of speed measurement by the use of a two wave interferometer and digital signal processing techniques. We built an automated Michelson interferometer and using an He-Ne laser and with the use of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and computer algorithms we derived a method for finding the speed of displacement. We report uncertainties in the order of 2-3 μm/s. with the use of this procedure. This brings the potential of another physical variable measurement like distance or pressure by this indirect measurement method. This approach is compared with an ultrasonic Logger Pro ® speed measurement system, and the results are compared between systems.

  16. On-Line Use of Three-Dimensional Marker Trajectory Estimation From Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Projections for Precise Setup in Radiotherapy for Targets With Respiratory Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Worm, Esben S.; Hoyer, Morten; Fledelius, Walther; Nielsen, Jens E.; Larsen, Lars P.; Poulsen, Per R.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate accurate and objective on-line patient setup based on a novel semiautomatic technique in which three-dimensional marker trajectories were estimated from two-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) projections. Methods and Materials: Seven treatment courses of stereotactic body radiotherapy for liver tumors were delivered in 21 fractions in total to 6 patients by a linear accelerator. Each patient had two to three gold markers implanted close to the tumors. Before treatment, a CBCT scan with approximately 675 two-dimensional projections was acquired during a full gantry rotation. The marker positions were segmented in each projection. From this, the three-dimensional marker trajectories were estimated using a probability based method. The required couch shifts for patient setup were calculated from the mean marker positions along the trajectories. A motion phantom moving with known tumor trajectories was used to examine the accuracy of the method. Trajectory-based setup was retrospectively used off-line for the first five treatment courses (15 fractions) and on-line for the last two treatment courses (6 fractions). Automatic marker segmentation was compared with manual segmentation. The trajectory-based setup was compared with setup based on conventional CBCT guidance on the markers (first 15 fractions). Results: Phantom measurements showed that trajectory-based estimation of the mean marker position was accurate within 0.3 mm. The on-line trajectory-based patient setup was performed within approximately 5 minutes. The automatic marker segmentation agreed with manual segmentation within 0.36 {+-} 0.50 pixels (mean {+-} SD; pixel size, 0.26 mm in isocenter). The accuracy of conventional volumetric CBCT guidance was compromised by motion smearing ({<=}21 mm) that induced an absolute three-dimensional setup error of 1.6 {+-} 0.9 mm (maximum, 3.2) relative to trajectory-based setup. Conclusions: The first on-line clinical use of

  17. Pencilbeam irradiation technique for whole brain radiotherapy: technical and biological challenges in a small animal model.

    PubMed

    Schültke, Elisabeth; Trippel, Michael; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Renier, Michel; Bartzsch, Stefan; Requardt, Herwig; Döbrössy, Máté D; Nikkhah, Guido

    2013-01-01

    We have conducted the first in-vivo experiments in pencilbeam irradiation, a new synchrotron radiation technique based on the principle of microbeam irradiation, a concept of spatially fractionated high-dose irradiation. In an animal model of adult C57 BL/6J mice we have determined technical and physiological limitations with the present technical setup of the technique. Fifty-eight animals were distributed in eleven experimental groups, ten groups receiving whole brain radiotherapy with arrays of 50 µm wide beams. We have tested peak doses ranging between 172 Gy and 2,298 Gy at 3 mm depth. Animals in five groups received whole brain radiotherapy with a center-to-center (ctc) distance of 200 µm and a peak-to-valley ratio (PVDR) of ∼ 100, in the other five groups the ctc was 400 µm (PVDR ∼ 400). Motor and memory abilities were assessed during a six months observation period following irradiation. The lower dose limit, determined by the technical equipment, was at 172 Gy. The LD50 was about 1,164 Gy for a ctc of 200 µm and higher than 2,298 Gy for a ctc of 400 µm. Age-dependent loss in motor and memory performance was seen in all groups. Better overall performance (close to that of healthy controls) was seen in the groups irradiated with a ctc of 400 µm.

  18. Comparative planning evaluation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques for complex lung cancer cases.

    PubMed

    Yartsev, Slav; Chen, Jeff; Yu, Edward; Kron, Tomas; Rodrigues, George; Coad, Terry; Trenka, Kristina; Wong, Eugene; Bauman, Glenn; Dyk, Jake Van

    2006-02-01

    Lung cancer treatment can be one of the most challenging fields in radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to compare different modalities of radiation delivery based on a balanced scoring scheme for target coverage and normal tissue avoidance. Treatment plans were developed for 15 patients with stage III inoperable non-small cell lung cancer using 3D conformal technique and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Elective nodal irradiation was included for all cases to create the most challenging scenarios with large target volumes. A 2 cm margin was used around the gross tumour volume (GTV) to generate PTV2 and 1cm margin around elective nodes for PTV1 resulting in PTV1 volumes larger than 1000 cm(3) in 13 of the 15 patients. 3D conformal and IMRT plans were generated on a commercial treatment planning system (TheraPlan Plus, Nucletron) with various combinations of beam energies and gantry angles. A 'dose quality factor' (DQF) was introduced to correlate the plan quality with patient specific parameters. A good correlation was found between the quality of the plans and the overlap between PTV1 and lungs. The patient feature factor (PFF), which is a product of several pertinent characteristics, was introduced to facilitate the choice of a particular technique for a particular patient. This approach may allow the evaluation of different treatment options prior to actual planning, subject to validation in larger prospective data sets.

  19. Techniques for precise energy calibration of particle pixel detectors.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, M; Campbell-Ricketts, T; Bahadori, A; Empl, A

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate techniques to improve the accuracy of the energy calibration of Timepix pixel detectors, used for the measurement of energetic particles. The typical signal from such particles spreads among many pixels due to charge sharing effects. As a consequence, the deposited energy in each pixel cannot be reconstructed unless the detector is calibrated, limiting the usability of such signals for calibration. To avoid this shortcoming, we calibrate using low energy X-rays. However, charge sharing effects still occur, resulting in part of the energy being deposited in adjacent pixels and possibly lost. This systematic error in the calibration process results in an error of about 5% in the energy measurements of calibrated devices. We use FLUKA simulations to assess the magnitude of charge sharing effects, allowing a corrected energy calibration to be performed on several Timepix pixel detectors and resulting in substantial improvement in energy deposition measurements. Next, we address shortcomings in calibration associated with the huge range (from kiloelectron-volts to megaelectron-volts) of energy deposited per pixel which result in a nonlinear energy response over the full range. We introduce a new method to characterize the non-linear response of the Timepix detectors at high input energies. We demonstrate improvement using a broad range of particle types and energies, showing that the new method reduces the energy measurement errors, in some cases by more than 90%.

  20. Techniques for precise energy calibration of particle pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroupa, M.; Campbell-Ricketts, T.; Bahadori, A.; Empl, A.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate techniques to improve the accuracy of the energy calibration of Timepix pixel detectors, used for the measurement of energetic particles. The typical signal from such particles spreads among many pixels due to charge sharing effects. As a consequence, the deposited energy in each pixel cannot be reconstructed unless the detector is calibrated, limiting the usability of such signals for calibration. To avoid this shortcoming, we calibrate using low energy X-rays. However, charge sharing effects still occur, resulting in part of the energy being deposited in adjacent pixels and possibly lost. This systematic error in the calibration process results in an error of about 5% in the energy measurements of calibrated devices. We use FLUKA simulations to assess the magnitude of charge sharing effects, allowing a corrected energy calibration to be performed on several Timepix pixel detectors and resulting in substantial improvement in energy deposition measurements. Next, we address shortcomings in calibration associated with the huge range (from kiloelectron-volts to megaelectron-volts) of energy deposited per pixel which result in a nonlinear energy response over the full range. We introduce a new method to characterize the non-linear response of the Timepix detectors at high input energies. We demonstrate improvement using a broad range of particle types and energies, showing that the new method reduces the energy measurement errors, in some cases by more than 90%.

  1. Radiotherapy T1 glottic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zablow, A.I.; Erba, P.S.; Sanfillippo, L.J.

    1989-11-01

    From 1970 to 1985, curative radiotherapy was administered to 63 patients with stage I carcinoma of the true vocal cords. Precision radiotherapeutic technique yields cure rates comparable to surgical results. Good voice quality was preserved in a high percentage of patients.

  2. Prediction of Potato Crop Yield Using Precision Agriculture Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Al-Gaadi, Khalid A.; Hassaballa, Abdalhaleem A.; Tola, ElKamil; Kayad, Ahmed G.; Madugundu, Rangaswamy; Alblewi, Bander; Assiri, Fahad

    2016-01-01

    Crop growth and yield monitoring over agricultural fields is an essential procedure for food security and agricultural economic return prediction. The advances in remote sensing have enhanced the process of monitoring the development of agricultural crops and estimating their yields. Therefore, remote sensing and GIS techniques were employed, in this study, to predict potato tuber crop yield on three 30 ha center pivot irrigated fields in an agricultural scheme located in the Eastern Region of Saudi Arabia. Landsat-8 and Sentinel-2 satellite images were acquired during the potato growth stages and two vegetation indices (the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI)) were generated from the images. Vegetation index maps were developed and classified into zones based on vegetation health statements, where the stratified random sampling points were accordingly initiated. Potato yield samples were collected 2–3 days prior to the harvest time and were correlated to the adjacent NDVI and SAVI, where yield prediction algorithms were developed and used to generate prediction yield maps. Results of the study revealed that the difference between predicted yield values and actual ones (prediction error) ranged between 7.9 and 13.5% for Landsat-8 images and between 3.8 and 10.2% for Sentinel-2 images. The relationship between actual and predicted yield values produced R2 values ranging between 0.39 and 0.65 for Landsat-8 images and between 0.47 and 0.65 for Sentinel-2 images. Results of this study revealed a considerable variation in field productivity across the three fields, where high-yield areas produced an average yield of above 40 t ha-1; while, the low-yield areas produced, on the average, less than 21 t ha-1. Identifying such great variation in field productivity will assist farmers and decision makers in managing their practices. PMID:27611577

  3. Prediction of Potato Crop Yield Using Precision Agriculture Techniques.

    PubMed

    Al-Gaadi, Khalid A; Hassaballa, Abdalhaleem A; Tola, ElKamil; Kayad, Ahmed G; Madugundu, Rangaswamy; Alblewi, Bander; Assiri, Fahad

    2016-01-01

    Crop growth and yield monitoring over agricultural fields is an essential procedure for food security and agricultural economic return prediction. The advances in remote sensing have enhanced the process of monitoring the development of agricultural crops and estimating their yields. Therefore, remote sensing and GIS techniques were employed, in this study, to predict potato tuber crop yield on three 30 ha center pivot irrigated fields in an agricultural scheme located in the Eastern Region of Saudi Arabia. Landsat-8 and Sentinel-2 satellite images were acquired during the potato growth stages and two vegetation indices (the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI)) were generated from the images. Vegetation index maps were developed and classified into zones based on vegetation health statements, where the stratified random sampling points were accordingly initiated. Potato yield samples were collected 2-3 days prior to the harvest time and were correlated to the adjacent NDVI and SAVI, where yield prediction algorithms were developed and used to generate prediction yield maps. Results of the study revealed that the difference between predicted yield values and actual ones (prediction error) ranged between 7.9 and 13.5% for Landsat-8 images and between 3.8 and 10.2% for Sentinel-2 images. The relationship between actual and predicted yield values produced R2 values ranging between 0.39 and 0.65 for Landsat-8 images and between 0.47 and 0.65 for Sentinel-2 images. Results of this study revealed a considerable variation in field productivity across the three fields, where high-yield areas produced an average yield of above 40 t ha-1; while, the low-yield areas produced, on the average, less than 21 t ha-1. Identifying such great variation in field productivity will assist farmers and decision makers in managing their practices.

  4. Conventional and conformal technique of external beam radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer: Dose distribution, tumor response, and side effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutrikah, N.; Winarno, H.; Amalia, T.; Djakaria, M.

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare conventional and conformal techniques of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in terms of the dose distribution, tumor response, and side effects in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer patients. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on cervical cancer patients who underwent EBRT before brachytherapy in the Radiotherapy Department of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. The prescribed dose distribution, tumor response, and acute side effects of EBRT using conventional and conformal techniques were investigated. In total, 51 patients who underwent EBRT using conventional techniques (25 cases using Cobalt-60 and 26 cases using a linear accelerator (LINAC)) and 29 patients who underwent EBRT using conformal techniques were included in the study. The distribution of the prescribed dose in the target had an impact on the patient’s final response to EBRT. The complete response rate of patients to conformal techniques was significantly greater (58%) than that of patients to conventional techniques (42%). No severe acute local side effects were seen in any of the patients (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grades 3-4). The distribution of the dose and volume to the gastrointestinal tract affected the proportion of mild acute side effects (RTOG grades 1-2). The urinary bladder was significantly greater using conventional techniques (Cobalt-60/LINAC) than using conformal techniques at 72% and 78% compared to 28% and 22%, respectively. The use of conformal techniques in pelvic radiation therapy is suggested in radiotherapy centers with CT simulators and 3D Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems (RTPSs) to decrease some uncertainties in radiotherapy planning. The use of AP/PA pelvic radiation techniques with Cobalt-60 should be limited in body thicknesses equal to or less than 18 cm. When using conformal techniques, delineation should be applied in the small bowel, as it is considered a critical organ according to RTOG

  5. Dosimetric Comparison of Three Different Involved Nodal Irradiation Techniques for Stage II Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients: Conventional Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, and Three-Dimensional Proton Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Rodriguez, Christina; Morris, Christopher G.; Louis, Debbie; Yeung, Daniel; Li Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the dose distribution to targeted and nontargeted tissues in Hodgkin's lymphoma patients using conventional radiotherapy (CRT), intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), and three-dimensional proton RT (3D-PRT). Methods and Materials: CRT, IMRT, and 3D-PRT treatment plans delivering 30 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE)/Gy to an involved nodal field were created for 9 Stage II Hodgkin's lymphoma patients (n = 27 plans). The dosimetric endpoints were compared. Results: The planning target volume was adequately treated using all three techniques. The IMRT plan produced the most conformal high-dose distribution; however, the 3D-PRT plan delivered the lowest mean dose to nontarget tissues, including the breast, lung, and total body. The relative reduction in the absolute lung volume receiving doses of 4-16 CGE/Gy for 3D-PRT compared with CRT ranged from 26% to 37% (p < .05), and the relative reduction in the absolute lung volume receiving doses of 4-10 CGE/Gy for 3D-PRT compared with IMRT was 48-65% (p < .05). The relative reduction in absolute total body volume receiving 4-30 CGE/Gy for 3D-PRT compared with CRT was 47% (p < .05). The relative reduction in absolute total body volume receiving a dose of 4 CGE/Gy for 3D-PRT compared with IMRT was 63% (p = .03). The mean dose to the breast was significantly less for 3D-PRT than for either IMRT or CRT (p = .03) The mean dose and absolute volume receiving 4-30 CGE/Gy for the heart, thyroid, and salivary glands were similar for the three modalities. Conclusion: In this favorable subset of Hodgkin's lymphoma patients without disease in or below the hila, 3D-PRT significantly reduced the dose to the breast, lung, and total body. These observed dosimetric advantages might improve the clinical outcomes of Hodgkin's lymphoma patients by reducing the risk of late radiation effects related to low-to-moderate doses in nontargeted tissues.

  6. A Dosimetric Evaluation of Conventional Helmet Field Irradiation Versus Two-Field Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, James B.; Shiao, Stephen L.; Knisely, Jonathan . E-mail: jonathan.knisely@yale.edu

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric differences between conventional two-beam helmet field irradiation (external beam radiotherapy, EBRT) of the brain and a two-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique. Methods and Materials: Ten patients who received helmet field irradiation at our institution were selected for study. External beam radiotherapy portals were planned per usual practice. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy fields were created using the identical field angles as the EBRT portals. Each brain was fully contoured along with the spinal cord to the bottom of the C2 vertebral body. This volume was then expanded symmetrically by 0.5 cm to construct the planning target volume. An IMRT plan was constructed using uniform optimization constraints. For both techniques, the nominal prescribed dose was 3,000 cGy in 10 fractions of 300 cGy using 6-MV photons. Comparative dose-volume histograms were generated for each patient and analyzed. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy improved dose uniformity over EBRT for whole brain radiotherapy. The mean percentage of brain receiving >105% of dose was reduced from 29.3% with EBRT to 0.03% with IMRT. The mean maximum dose was reduced from 3,378 cGy (113%) for EBRT to 3,162 cGy (105%) with IMRT. The mean percent volume receiving at least 98% of the prescribed dose was 99.5% for the conventional technique and 100% for IMRT. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy reduces dose inhomogeneity, particularly for the midline frontal lobe structures where hot spots occur with conventional two-field EBRT. More study needs to be done addressing the clinical implications of optimizing dose uniformity and its effect on long-term cognitive function in selected long-lived patients.

  7. New techniques for assessing response after hypofractionated radiotherapy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Huang, Kitty; Ward, Aaron D.; Senan, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Hypofractionated radiotherapy (HFRT) is an effective and increasingly-used treatment for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is a form of HFRT and delivers biologically effective doses (BEDs) in excess of 100 Gy10 in 3-8 fractions. Excellent long-term outcomes have been reported; however, response assessment following SABR is complicated as radiation induced lung injury can appear similar to a recurring tumor on CT. Current approaches to scoring treatment responses include Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and positron emission tomography (PET), both of which appear to have a limited role in detecting recurrences following SABR. Novel approaches to assess response are required, but new techniques should be easily standardized across centers, cost effective, with sensitivity and specificity that improves on current CT and PET approaches. This review examines potential novel approaches, focusing on the emerging field of quantitative image feature analysis, to distinguish recurrence from fibrosis after SABR. PMID:24688782

  8. Radiobiological comparison of two radiotherapy treatment techniques for high-risk prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Trinitat García; González, Aurora Vicedo; Peidro, Jorge Pastor; Ferrando, Juan V. Roselló; González, Luis Brualla; Cabañero, Domingo Granero; Torrecilla, José López

    2013-01-01

    Background To make a radiobiological comparison, for high risk prostate cancer (T3a, PSA > 20 ng/ml or Gleason > 7) of two radiotherapy treatment techniques. One technique consists of a treatment in three phases of the pelvic nodes, vesicles and prostate using a conventional fractionation scheme of 2 Gy/fraction (SIMRT). The other technique consists of a treatment in two phases that gives simultaneously different dose levels in each phase, 2 Gy/fraction, 2.25 Gy/fraction and 2.5 Gy/fraction to the pelvic nodes, vesicles and prostate, respectively (SIBIMRT). Materials and methods The equivalent dose at fractionation of 2 Gy (EQD2), calculated using the linear quadratic model with α/βprostate = 1.5 Gy, was the same for both treatment strategies. For comparison the parameters employed were D95, mean dose and Tumour Control Probabilities for prostate PTV and D15, D25, D35, D50, mean dose and Normal Tissue Complication Probabilities for the rectum and bladder, with physical doses converted to EQD2. Parameters were obtained for α/βprostate = 1.5, 3 and 10 Gy and for α/βoar = 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8. Results For prostate PTV, both treatment strategies are equivalent for α/βprostate = 1.5 Gy but for higher α/βprostate, EQD2 and TCP, decrease for the SIBIMRT technique. For the rectum and bladder when α/βoar ≤ 2 Gy, EQD2 and NTCP are lower for the SIMRT technique or equal in both techniques. For α/βoar ≥ 2–3 Gy, EQD2 and NTCP increase for the SIMRT treatment. Conclusions A comparison between two radiotherapy techniques is presented. The SIBIMRT technique reduces EQD2 and NTCP for α/βoar from 2 to 8 Gy. PMID:24416563

  9. Development and Evaluation of Multiple Isocentric Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Technique for Craniospinal Axis Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young K.; Brooks, Corrinne J.; Bedford, James L.; Warrington, Alan P.; Saran, Frank H.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To develop and compare a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique with conventional radiotherapy for craniospinal irradiation with respect to improved dose conformity and homogeneity in the planning target volume (PTV) and to reduced dose to organs at risk (OAR). Methods and Materials: Conventional craniospinal axis radiotherapy plans of 5 patients were acquired. The median (range) length of the PTV was 58.9 (48.1-83.7) cm. The 6-MV VMAT plans were inversely planned with one isocenter near the base of the brain and the minimum number of isocenters required for the specified lengths of spine. The plans were optimized with high weighting for PTV coverage and low weighting for OAR sparing. Conformity and heterogeneity indices, dose-volume histograms, mean doses, and non-PTV integral doses from the two plans (prescription dose 23.4 Gy in 13 fractions) were compared. Results: The median (range) conformity index of VMAT was 1.22 (1.09-1.45), compared with 1.69 (1.44-2.67) for conventional plans (p = 0.04). The median (range) heterogeneity index was also lower for VMAT compared with conventional plans: 1.04 (1.03-1.07) vs. 1.12 (1.09-1.19), respectively (p = 0.04). A significant reduction of mean and maximum doses was observed in the heart, thyroid, esophagus, optic nerves, and eyes with VMAT when compared with conventional plans. A decrease in body V{sub 10Gy} was observed, but for 4 of 5 patients non-PTV integral dose was increased with VMAT when compared with the conventional plans. Conclusions: A VMAT technique to treat the craniospinal axis significantly reduces OAR dose, potentially leading to lower late organ toxicity. However, this is achieved at the expense of increased low-dose volumes, which is inherent to the technique, carrying a potentially increased risk of secondary malignancies.

  10. A novel conformal arc technique for postoperative whole pelvic radiotherapy for endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruijie; Jiang, Weijuan; Wang, Junjie

    2009-12-01

    Conventional whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) exposes most of the contents of the true pelvis to the prescribed dose. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) provides more conformal dose distribution and better sparing of critical structures for WPRT. However, IMRT is more complicated in planning and delivery, requiring more expensive equipment and time-consuming quality assurance. We explore and evaluate a novel conformal arc radiotherapeutic technique for postoperative WPRT for endometrial cancer in this study. This technique involves 2-axis conformal arc therapy (2A-CAT) with 180-degree rotation around 2 isocenters each in 2 separate dose-shaping structures. Dosimetric comparison with 3D-CRT and IMRT for 10 endometrial cancer patients undergoing postoperative WPRT was performed to evaluate this new 2A-CAT technique. The mean conformity indices were 0.83, 0.61, and 0.88 for 2A-CAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT, respectively. The mean homogeneity indices were 1.15, 1.08, and 1.10. The mean doses to bowel, rectum, bladder, and pelvic bone marrow were, respectively, 1.19, 3.39, 4.65, and 1.64 Gy lower with 2A-CAT than with 3D-CRT (P < 0.05), whereas a little higher than with IMRT. The mean dose to normal tissue was 1.87 Gy higher with 2A-CAT than with IMRT (P = 0.00). In postoperative WPRT for endometrial cancer, 2A-CAT significantly improves the dose conformity and sparing of bowel, rectum, and bladder compared with 3D-CRT. Despite dose uniformity and conformity being still inferior to those of IMRT, its simplicity and extensive availability combined with further improvement warrant it as a potential shortcut alternative to IMRT.

  11. Development and evaluation of multiple isocentric volumetric modulated arc therapy technique for craniospinal axis radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young K; Brooks, Corrinne J; Bedford, James L; Warrington, Alan P; Saran, Frank H

    2012-02-01

    To develop and compare a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique with conventional radiotherapy for craniospinal irradiation with respect to improved dose conformity and homogeneity in the planning target volume (PTV) and to reduced dose to organs at risk (OAR). Conventional craniospinal axis radiotherapy plans of 5 patients were acquired. The median (range) length of the PTV was 58.9 (48.1-83.7) cm. The 6-MV VMAT plans were inversely planned with one isocenter near the base of the brain and the minimum number of isocenters required for the specified lengths of spine. The plans were optimized with high weighting for PTV coverage and low weighting for OAR sparing. Conformity and heterogeneity indices, dose-volume histograms, mean doses, and non-PTV integral doses from the two plans (prescription dose 23.4 Gy in 13 fractions) were compared. The median (range) conformity index of VMAT was 1.22 (1.09-1.45), compared with 1.69 (1.44-2.67) for conventional plans (p = 0.04). The median (range) heterogeneity index was also lower for VMAT compared with conventional plans: 1.04 (1.03-1.07) vs. 1.12 (1.09-1.19), respectively (p = 0.04). A significant reduction of mean and maximum doses was observed in the heart, thyroid, esophagus, optic nerves, and eyes with VMAT when compared with conventional plans. A decrease in body V(10Gy) was observed, but for 4 of 5 patients non-PTV integral dose was increased with VMAT when compared with the conventional plans. A VMAT technique to treat the craniospinal axis significantly reduces OAR dose, potentially leading to lower late organ toxicity. However, this is achieved at the expense of increased low-dose volumes, which is inherent to the technique, carrying a potentially increased risk of secondary malignancies. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative study of convolution, superposition, and fast superposition algorithms in conventional radiotherapy, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, and intensity modulated radiotherapy techniques for various sites, done on CMS XIO planning system

    PubMed Central

    Muralidhar, K. R.; Murthy, Narayana P.; Raju, Alluri Krishnam; Sresty, NVNM

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the dosimetry results that are obtained by using Convolution, Superposition and Fast Superposition algorithms in Conventional Radiotherapy, Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) for different sites, and to study the suitability of algorithms with respect to site and technique. For each of the Conventional, 3D-CRT, and IMRT techniques, four different sites, namely, Lung, Esophagus, Prostate, and Hypopharynx were analyzed. Treatment plans were created using 6MV Photon beam quality using the CMS XiO (Computerized Medical System, St.Louis, MO) treatment planning system. The maximum percentage of variation recorded between algorithms was 3.7% in case of Ca.Lung, for the IMRT Technique. Statistical analysis was performed by comparing the mean relative difference, Conformity Index, and Homogeneity Index for target structures. The fast superposition algorithm showed excellent results for lung and esophagus cases for all techniques. For the prostate, the superposition algorithm showed better results in all techniques. In the conventional case of the hypopharynx, the convolution algorithm was good. In case of Ca. Lung, Ca Prostate, Ca Esophagus, and Ca Hypopharynx, OARs got more doses with the superposition algorithm; this progressively decreased for fast superposition and convolution algorithms, respectively. According to this study the dosimetric results using different algorithms led to significant variation and therefore care had to be taken while evaluating treatment plans. The choice of a dose calculation algorithm may in certain cases even influence clinical results. PMID:20126561

  13. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy for synchronous bilateral breast irradiation using a mono iso-center technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Karthick Raj; Basu, Saumen; Bhuiyan, Md Anisuzzaman; Ahmed, Sharif; Sumon, Mostafa Aziz; Haque, Kh Anamul; Sengupta, Ashim Kumar; Un Nabi, Md Rashid; Das, K. J. Maria

    2017-06-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the synchronous bilateral breast irradiation radiotherapy technique using a single isocenter. Materials and Methods: Six patients of synchronous bilateral breast were treated with single isocenter technique from February 2011 to June 2016. All the patients underwent a CT-simulation using appropriate positioning device. Target volumes and critical structures like heart, lung, esophagus, thyroid, etc., were delineated slice by slice in the CT data. An isocenter was placed above the sternum on the skin and both medial tangential and lateral tangential of the breast / chest wall were created using asymmetrical jaws to avoid the beam divergence through the lung and heart. The field weighting were adjusted manually to obtain a homogenous dose distribution. The planning objectives were to deliver uniform doses around the target and keep the doses to the organ at risk within the permissible limit. The beam energy of 6 MV or combination of 6 MV and 15 MV photons were used in the tangential fields according to the tangential separation. Boluses were used for all the mastectomy patients to increase the doses on the chest wall. In addition to that enhanced dynamic wedge and field in field technique were also used to obtain a homogenous distribution around the target volume and reduce the hot spots. The isocenter was just kept on the skin, such that the beam junctions will be overlapped only on the air just above the sternum. Acute toxicity during the treatment and late toxicity were recorded during the patient's follow-up. Results: During the radiotherapy treatment follow-up there were no acute skin reactions in the field junctions, but one patient had grade 1 esophagitis and two patients had grade 2 skin reactions in the chest wall. With a median follow-up of 38.5 months (range: 8 - 49 months), no patients had a local recurrence, but one patients with triple negative disease had a distant metastases in brain and died

  14. Development of multileaf collimator- and compensator-based techniques for modulated electron radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tynan, Patricia Marie

    Modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) is a new electron therapy technique that uses intensity- and/or energy-modulated electron beams to provide a highly conformal dose of radiation to the treatment volume with low levels of dose deposition outside the treatment volume. Several methods are under investigation for treatment of patients, including the use of photon multileaf collimator-modulated (pMLC-modulated) beams, add-on electron multileaf collimators, and carved bolus materials placed directly on the patient's skin. This project developed a new method of delivering MERT beams using patient-specific milled compensators mounted in the standard electron applicator of a linear accelerator, accomplished through four specific aims. Aim 1: Conduct a feasibility study regarding the application of pMLC- and compensator-based MERT techniques within the clinic. Aim 2: Develop a software system to design compensators for modulated electron radiotherapy. Using MATLAB, an automated process for extracting treatment volume location data from a patient's CT data set was created. This software provides data about the depth to which the compensator must be machined to provide a conformal dose to the tumor. Aim 3: Use the Monte Carlo codes BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc to commission electron beams of a Varian 23EX linear accelerator for subsequent use in MERT treatment planning. A 10 cm x 10 cm field was modeled for three different energies (9, 12, and 16 MeV) for a Varian 23EX linear accelerator. Excellent match of the models to physical data was achieved, with less than 2% difference in dose and less than 2 mm difference in the lateral dimensions for the beam profiles. Aim 4: Create and validate a compensator-based MERT treatment plan. Using the coordinate data provided by the program created in Aim 3, a treatment plan was developed using the Monte Carlo code MCSIM for a simulated treatment volume. The resulting plan was manually optimized, resulting in a final dosimetric distribution

  15. Postprostatectomy ultrasound-guided transrectal implantation of gold markers for external beam radiotherapy. Technique and complications rate.

    PubMed

    Langenhuijsen, J F; Donker, R; McColl, G M; Kiemeney, L A L M; Witjes, J A; van Lin, E N J T

    2013-06-01

    Postprostatectomy radiotherapy (RT) improves survival in adjuvant and salvage settings. The implantation technique and complications rate of gold markers in the prostate bed for high-precision RT were analyzed. Patients undergoing postprostatectomy RT for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse or high-risk disease were enrolled in the study. Under transrectal ultrasound guidance, three fine gold markers were implanted in the prostate bed and the technical difficulties of insertion were documented. Patients received our self-designed questionnaires concerning complications and pain. The influence of anticoagulants and coumarins on bleeding was analyzed, as was the effect of potential risk factors on pain. In 77 consecutive patients, failure of marker implantation or marker migration was seen in six cases. Rectal bleeding was reported by 10 patients and 1 had voiding complaints. No macroscopic hematuria persisting for more than 3 days was observed. Other complications included rectal discomfort (n = 2), nausea (n = 1), abdominal discomfort (n = 1), and pain requiring analgesics (n = 4). No major complications were reported. On a 0-10 visual analogue scale (VAS), the mean pain score was 3.7. No clinically significant risk factors for complications were identified. Transrectal implantation of gold markers in the prostate bed is feasible and safe. Alternatives like cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) should be considered, but the advantages of gold marker implantation for high-precision postprostatectomy RT would seem to outweigh the minor risks involved.

  16. Craniospinal Irradiation Techniques: A Dosimetric Comparison of Proton Beams With Standard and Advanced Photon Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Jinsung; Kim, Jong Won; Kim, Dae Woong; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Kim, Joo Young; Park, Hyeon-Jin; Park, Byung Kiu; Shin, Sang Hoon

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric benefits of advanced radiotherapy techniques for craniospinal irradiation in cancer in children. Methods and Materials: Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), tomotherapy (TOMO), and proton beam treatment (PBT) in the scattering mode was planned for each of 10 patients at our institution. Dosimetric benefits and organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risks were based on comparisons of dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and on the application of organ equivalent doses (OEDs), respectively. Results: When we analyzed the organ-at-risk volumes that received 30%, 60%, and 90% of the prescribed dose (PD), we found that PBT was superior to TOMO and 3D-CRT. On average, the doses delivered by PBT to the esophagus, stomach, liver, lung, pancreas, and kidney were 19.4 Gy, 0.6 Gy, 0.3 Gy, 2.5 Gy, 0.2 Gy, and 2.2 Gy for the PD of 36 Gy, respectively, which were significantly lower than the doses delivered by TOMO (22.9 Gy, 4.5 Gy, 6.1 Gy, 4.0 Gy, 13.3 Gy, and 4.9 Gy, respectively) and 3D-CRT (34.6 Gy, 3.6 Gy, 8.0 Gy, 4.6 Gy, 22.9 Gy, and 4.3 Gy, respectively). Although the average doses delivered by PBT to the chest and abdomen were significantly lower than those of 3D-CRT or TOMO, these differences were reduced in the head-and-neck region. OED calculations showed that the risk of secondary cancers in organs such as the stomach, lungs, thyroid, and pancreas was much higher when 3D-CRT or TOMO was used than when PBT was used. Conclusions: Compared with photon techniques, PBT showed improvements in most dosimetric parameters for CSI patients, with lower OEDs to organs at risk.

  17. Evaluation of a single-isocenter technique for axillary radiotherapy in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Suzanne; De Jaeger, Katrien; Mijnheer, Ben; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a technique for axillary radiotherapy that minimizes the risk of radiation-induced damage to the surrounding normal tissue (i.e., arm, shoulder, lung, esophagus, and spinal cord) while keeping the risk of a nodal recurrence to a minimum. A planning study was performed in 20 breast cancer patients. The target volume of the axillary treatment encompassed the periclavicular and axillary lymph node areas. The 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) information in this study was used to outline the lymph node areas and the organs at risk (i.e., the esophagus, spinal cord, brachial plexus, and lung). A conventional AP-PA technique (with a transmission plate placed in the AP beam) was evaluated. In addition, a new single-isocenter technique consisting of AP/PA fields using a gantry rotation of +/-20 degrees and a medial AP segment was developed. Both techniques were compared by evaluation of the calculated dose distributions and the dose-volume histograms of the target volume and surrounding organs at risk. The field borders and humeral shielding were redefined based on the 3D anatomical references. Adapting the humeral shielding reduced the irradiated volume by 19% and might contribute to a reduction of the incidence of arm edema and impairment of shoulder function. The maximum radiation dose in the esophagus and spinal cord was reduced by more than 50% using the single-isocenter technique. The difference between both techniques with respect to the mean doses in the target volume and lung, and the maximum dose in brachial plexus, was not statistically significant. Moreover, the single-isocenter technique allowed a fast and easy treatment preparation and reduced the execution time considerably (with approximately 10 minutes per fraction).

  18. Evaluation of a Single-Isocenter Technique for Axillary Radiotherapy in Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Beek, Suzanne van Jaeger, Katrien de; Mijnheer, Ben |; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a technique for axillary radiotherapy that minimizes the risk of radiation-induced damage to the surrounding normal tissue (i.e., arm, shoulder, lung, esophagus, and spinal cord) while keeping the risk of a nodal recurrence to a minimum. A planning study was performed in 20 breast cancer patients. The target volume of the axillary treatment encompassed the periclavicular and axillary lymph node areas. The 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) information in this study was used to outline the lymph node areas and the organs at risk (i.e., the esophagus, spinal cord, brachial plexus, and lung). A conventional AP-PA technique (with a transmission plate placed in the AP beam) was evaluated. In addition, a new single-isocenter technique consisting of AP/PA fields using a gantry rotation of {+-}20 deg. and a medial AP segment was developed. Both techniques were compared by evaluation of the calculated dose distributions and the dose-volume histograms of the target volume and surrounding organs at risk. The field borders and humeral shielding were redefined based on the 3D anatomical references. Adapting the humeral shielding reduced the irradiated volume by 19% and might contribute to a reduction of the incidence of arm edema and impairment of shoulder function. The maximum radiation dose in the esophagus and spinal cord was reduced by more than 50% using the single-isocenter technique. The difference between both techniques with respect to the mean doses in the target volume and lung, and the maximum dose in brachial plexus, was not statistically significant. Moreover, the single-isocenter technique allowed a fast and easy treatment preparation and reduced the execution time considerably (with approximately 10 minutes per fraction)

  19. Radiobiological evaluation of the radiation dose as used in high-precision radiotherapy: effect of prolonged delivery time and applicability of the linear-quadratic model.

    PubMed

    Shibamoto, Yuta; Otsuka, Shinya; Iwata, Hiromitsu; Sugie, Chikao; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Tomita, Natsuo

    2012-01-01

    Since the dose delivery pattern in high-precision radiotherapy is different from that in conventional radiation, radiobiological assessment of the physical dose used in stereotactic irradiation and intensity-modulated radiotherapy has become necessary. In these treatments, the daily dose is usually given intermittently over a time longer than that used in conventional radiotherapy. During prolonged radiation delivery, sublethal damage repair takes place, leading to the decreased effect of radiation. This phenomenon is almost universarily observed in vitro. In in vivo tumors, however, this decrease in effect can be counterbalanced by rapid reoxygenation, which has been demonstrated in a laboratory study. Studies on reoxygenation in human tumors are warranted to better evaluate the influence of prolonged radiation delivery. Another issue related to radiosurgery and hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy is the mathematical model for dose evaluation and conversion. Many clinicians use the linear-quadratic (LQ) model and biologically effective dose (BED) to estimate the effects of various radiation schedules, but it has been suggested that the LQ model is not applicable to high doses per fraction. Recent experimental studies verified the inadequacy of the LQ model in converting hypofractionated doses into single doses. The LQ model overestimates the effect of high fractional doses of radiation. BED is particularly incorrect when it is used for tumor responses in vivo, since it does not take reoxygenation into account. For normal tissue responses, improved models have been proposed, but, for in vivo tumor responses, the currently available models are not satisfactory, and better ones should be proposed in future studies.

  20. Comparison of conformal radiation therapy techniques within the dynamic radiotherapy project `Dynarad'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Lind, Bengt K.; Van Dijk, Jan; Koedooder, Kees; DeNeve, Wilfried; DeWagter, Carlos; Planskoy, Beate; Rosenwald, Jean-Claude; Proimos, Basil; Kappas, Constantin; Danciu, Claudia; Benassi, Marcello; Chierego, Giorgio; Brahme, Anders

    2000-09-01

    The objective of the dynamic radiotherapy project `Dynarad' within the European Community has been to compare and grade treatment techniques that are currently applied or being developed at the participating institutions. Cervical cancer was selected as the tumour site on the grounds that the involved organs at risk, mainly the rectum and the bladder, are very close to the tumour and partly located inside the internal target volume. In this work, a solid phantom simulating the pelvic anatomy was used by institutions in Belgium, France, Greece, Holland, Italy, Sweden and the United Kingdom. The results were evaluated using both biological and physical criteria. The main purpose of this parallel evaluation is to test the value of biological and physical evaluations in comparing treatment techniques. It is demonstrated that the biological objective functions allow a much higher conformality and a more clinically relevant scoring of the outcome. Often external beam treatment techniques have to be combined with intracavitary therapy to give clinically acceptable results. However, recent developments can reduce or even eliminate this need by delivering more conformal dose distributions using intensity modulated external dose delivery. In these cases the reliability of the patient set-up procedure becomes critical for the effectiveness of the treatment.

  1. Dosimetry verification on VMAT and IMRT radiotherapy techniques: In the case of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulana, A.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy treatment depends on the accuracy of the dose delivery to patients, the purpose of the study is to verify the dose in IMRT and VMAT technique in prostate cancer cases correspond to TPS dose using phantom base on ICRU No.50. The dose verification of the target and OAR was performed by placing the TLD Rod LiF100 and EBT2 Gafchromic film at slab hole of pelvic part of the Alderson RANDO phantom for prostate cancer simulation. The Exposed TLDs was evaluated using the TLD Reader Harshaw while EBT2 film was scanned using Epson scanner. The point dose measurements were compared between planned dose and measured dose at target volume and OAR. The result is the dose difference at target volume, bladder and rectum for IMRT and VMAT are less than 5%. On the other hand, the dose difference at the Femoral head is more than 5% for both techniques because the location of OAR already in low gradient dose. Furthermore, the difference dose of the target volume for IMRT technique tends to be smaller than VMAT either for TLD and EBT2 film detectors. From the measurement showed that the delivered dose on the phantom simulation match with ICRU No.50 criteria.

  2. Comparison of conformal radiation therapy techniques within the dynamic radiotherapy project 'Dynarad'.

    PubMed

    Mavroidis, P; Lind, B K; Van Dijk, J; Koedooder, K; De Neve, W; De Wagter, C; Planskoy, B; Rosenwald, J C; Proimos, B; Kappas, C; Claudia, D; Benassi, M; Chierego, G; Brahme, A

    2000-09-01

    The objective of the dynamic radiotherapy project 'Dynarad' within the European Community has been to compare and grade treatment techniques that are currently applied or being developed at the participating institutions. Cervical cancer was selected as the tumour site on the grounds that the involved organs at risk, mainly the rectum and the bladder, are very close to the tumour and partly located inside the internal target volume. In this work, a solid phantom simulating the pelvic anatomy was used by institutions in Belgium, France, Greece, Holland, Italy, Sweden and the United Kingdom. The results were evaluated using both biological and physical criteria. The main purpose of this parallel evaluation is to test the value of biological and physical evaluations in comparing treatment techniques. It is demonstrated that the biological objective functions allow a much higher conformality and a more clinically relevant scoring of the outcome. Often external beam treatment techniques have to be combined with intracavitary therapy to give clinically acceptable results. However, recent developments can reduce or even eliminate this need by delivering more conformal dose distributions using intensity modulated external dose delivery. In these cases the reliability of the patient set-up procedure becomes critical for the effectiveness of the treatment.

  3. Simple Carotid-Sparing Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Technique and Preliminary Experience for T1-2 Glottic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, David I.; Fuller, Clifton D.; Barker, Jerry L.; Mason, Bryan M.S.; Garcia, John A. C.; Lewin, Jan S.; Holsinger, F. Christopher; Stasney, C. Richard; Frank, Steven J.; Schwartz, David L.; Morrison, William H.; Garden, Adam S.; Ang, K. Kian

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetry and feasibility of carotid-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for early glottic cancer and to report preliminary clinical experience. Methods and Materials: Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine radiotherapy (DICOM-RT) datasets from 6 T1-2 conventionally treated glottic cancer patients were used to create both conventional IMRT plans. We developed a simplified IMRT planning algorithm with three fields and limited segments. Conventional and IMRT plans were compared using generalized equivalent uniform dose and dose-volume parameters for in-field carotid arteries, target volumes, and organs at risk. We have treated 11 patients with this simplified IMRT technique. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy consistently reduced radiation dose to the carotid arteries (p < 0.05) while maintaining the clinical target volume coverage. With conventional planning, median carotid V35, V50, and V63 were 100%, 100%, and 69.0%, respectively. With IMRT planning these decreased to 2%, 0%, and 0%, respectively (p < 0.01). Radiation planning and treatment times were similar for conventional radiotherapy and IMRT. Treatment results have been excellent thus far. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy significantly reduced unnecessary radiation dose to the carotid arteries compared with conventional lateral fields while maintaining clinical target volume coverage. Further experience and longer follow-up will be required to demonstrate outcomes for cancer control and carotid artery effects.

  4. [Techniques of radiotherapy in so-called operable carcinoma of the breast].

    PubMed

    Pierquin, B

    1973-06-01

    The techniques of radiotherapy alone in carcinoma of the breast are determined by the possibilities of durable cure of the tumoral process using locoregional treatment. It seems undisputable that the risk of metastases at a distance from the tumor is related to the topographical as well as volum extension of lymph node involvement. Such risk is low with N-; it rapidly increases with lower axillary N+; it predominates with medial mammary N+; it becomes almost constant with upper axillary (subclavian) and supraclavicular N+. This explains why dose distribution should aim at curing, even at the price of some cosmetic or functional risk, tumoral lesions of the mammary gland, of the lower axillary area and, to a certain extent, of the medial mammary area. On the contrary, it is illusory to deliver an overdosage at ultrahigh dose-rates to the sub- and supraclavicular areas, where the chances for durable cure are almost nul if lymph nodes are invaded. This explains why curative radiotherapy alone appears only indicated in little developed cancers in their mammary (T1 or T2) as well as lymph node (N0 or N1 a) aspects. This also explains why such a responsability implies for the radiotherapist absolutely perfect technical conditions of spotting, centring and dose-measurements; careful protection of all healthy structures surrounding the target-volumes should, in particular, be obtained (for instance, accurate delimitation of beams, use of lead shields or even compensatory wedges should provide appropriate protection to the lung parenchyma, pectoral muscle, head of the humerus, laryngotracheal system). Finally, it is in the axillary area that the major technical hazards are encountered with: an insufficient dose is liable to cause lymph node recurrence, an excessive dose is liable to provoke irreversible muscular, articular, vascular or nervous sequelae. Provided a high level of technicity, it should be admitted to-day that a durable locoregional cure can be obtained in the

  5. An imaging evaluation of the simultaneously integrated boost breast radiotherapy technique

    SciTech Connect

    Turley, Jessica; Claridge Mackonis, Elizabeth

    2015-09-15

    To evaluate in-field megavoltage (MV) imaging of simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) breast fields to determine its feasibility in treatment verification for the SIB breast radiotherapy technique, and to assess whether the current-imaging protocol and treatment margins are sufficient. For nine patients undergoing SIB breast radiotherapy, in-field MV images of the SIB fields were acquired on days that regular treatment verification imaging was performed. The in-field images were matched offline according to the scar wire on digitally reconstructed radiographs. The offline image correction results were then applied to a margin recipe formula to calculate safe margins that account for random and systematic uncertainties in the position of the boost volume when an offline correction protocol has been applied. After offline assessment of the acquired images, 96% were within the tolerance set in the current department-imaging protocol. Retrospectively performing the maximum position deviations on the Eclipse™ treatment planning system demonstrated that the clinical target volume (CTV) boost received a minimum dose difference of 0.4% and a maximum dose difference of 1.4% less than planned. Furthermore, applying our results to the Van Herk margin formula to ensure that 90% of patients receive 95% of the prescribed dose, the calculated CTV margins were comparable to the current departmental procedure used. Based on the in-field boost images acquired and the feasible application of these results to the margin formula the current CTV-planning target volume margins used are appropriate for the accurate treatment of the SIB boost volume without additional imaging.

  6. An imaging evaluation of the simultaneously integrated boost breast radiotherapy technique

    PubMed Central

    Turley, Jessica; Claridge Mackonis, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate in-field megavoltage (MV) imaging of simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) breast fields to determine its feasibility in treatment verification for the SIB breast radiotherapy technique, and to assess whether the current-imaging protocol and treatment margins are sufficient. Methods For nine patients undergoing SIB breast radiotherapy, in-field MV images of the SIB fields were acquired on days that regular treatment verification imaging was performed. The in-field images were matched offline according to the scar wire on digitally reconstructed radiographs. The offline image correction results were then applied to a margin recipe formula to calculate safe margins that account for random and systematic uncertainties in the position of the boost volume when an offline correction protocol has been applied. Results After offline assessment of the acquired images, 96% were within the tolerance set in the current department-imaging protocol. Retrospectively performing the maximum position deviations on the Eclipse™ treatment planning system demonstrated that the clinical target volume (CTV) boost received a minimum dose difference of 0.4% and a maximum dose difference of 1.4% less than planned. Furthermore, applying our results to the Van Herk margin formula to ensure that 90% of patients receive 95% of the prescribed dose, the calculated CTV margins were comparable to the current departmental procedure used. Conclusion Based on the in-field boost images acquired and the feasible application of these results to the margin formula the current CTV-planning target volume margins used are appropriate for the accurate treatment of the SIB boost volume without additional imaging. PMID:26451242

  7. Research on key techniques of nanometer scale macro-micro dual-drive precision positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaohui; Du, Ruxu

    2007-12-01

    With the development of science and technology, high precision of positioning platform is needed in many areas, for example, cell fusing in biology and precision surgery in medical area. In such areas, both high efficiency and high precision are needed in some cases, for example, semiconductor processing equipment, super precision lathe etc. In a word, precision positioning platform becomes an important tool in exploring microscope world. Precision positioning platform is a key element in microscope operation. Macro/micro dual-drive precision positioning is a key technique in high-efficiency high-precision area. By such techniques, large distance and high precision can get. In order to realize nanometer scale macro/micro dual-drive precision positioning there are some key problems. First, system structure of macro/micro combination precision positioning platform is worthy to work on. Another key work is realization method of micrometer scale macroscope motion and nanometer scale microscope motion. The third is mechanics, drive, detection and control techniques in nanometer scale positioning of piezoelectric ceramics drive, in which realization of nanometer scale microscope positioning and micro drive is important by solving hysteresis, creep deformation and non-linearity in piezoelectric ceramics driving. To solve hysteresis problem, instead of traditional Preisach algorithm, a new type hysteresis model with simple computation and identification is needed. The inverse model is also easily to get. So we can present new control method to solve hysteresis and creep deformation problem based on this inverse model. Another way, hysteresis and creep deformation problem exist in traditional voltage-feedback power source for piezoelectric ceramics. To solve this problem, a new type current feedback power source for piezoelectric ceramics is presented. In the end, a macro-micro dual-drive super precision positioning mechanism is presented. Combining macro with micro

  8. A cosmetic evaluation of breast cancer treatment: A randomized study of radiotherapy boost technique

    SciTech Connect

    Vass, Sylvie . E-mail: sylvie.vass@ssss.gouv.qc.ca; Bairati, Isabelle

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To compare cosmetic results of two different radiotherapy (RT) boost techniques used in the treatment of breast cancer after whole breast radiotherapy and to identify factors affecting cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 1998, 142 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer were treated with breast conservative surgery and adjuvant RT. Patients were then randomly assigned to receive a boost dose of 15 Gy delivered to the tumor bed either by iridium 192, or a combination of photons and electrons. Cosmetic evaluations were done on a 6-month basis, with a final evaluation at 36 months after RT. The evaluations were done using a panel of global and specific subjective scores, a digitized scoring system using the breast retraction assessment (BRA) measurement, and a patient's self-assessment evaluation. As cosmetic results were graded according to severity, the comparison of boost techniques was done using the ordinal logistic regression model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) are presented. Results: At 36 months of follow-up, there was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the global subjective cosmetic outcome (OR = 1.40; 95%CI = 0.69-2.85, p = 0.35). Good to excellent scores were observed in 65% of implant patients and 62% of photon/electron patients. At 24 months and beyond, telangiectasia was more severe in the implant group with an OR of 9.64 (95%CI = 4.05-22.92, p < 0.0001) at 36 months. The only variable associated with a worse global cosmetic outcome was the presence of concomitant chemotherapy (OR = 3.87; 95%CI = 1.74-8.62). The BRA value once adjusted for age, concomitant chemotherapy, and boost volume showed a positive association with the boost technique. The BRA value was significantly greater in the implant group (p 0.03). There was no difference in the patient's final self-assessment score between the two groups. Three variables were statistically associated with

  9. Influence of optimizing protocol choice on the integral dose value in prostate radiotherapy planning by dynamic techniques - Pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zaleska, Anna; Bogaczyk, Krzysztof; Piotrowski, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the values of integral dose, calculated for treatment plans of dynamic radiotherapy techniques prepared with two different optimization protocols. Delivering radiation by IMRT, VMAT and also HT techniques has an influence on the low dose deposition of large areas of the patient body. Delivery of low dose can induce injury of healthy cells. In this situation, a good solution would be to reduce the area, which receives a low dose, but with appropriate dose level for the target volume. To calculate integral dose values of plans structures, we used 90 external beam radiotherapy plans prepared for three techniques (intensity modulated radiotherapy, volumetric modulated arc therapy and helical tomotherapy). One technique includes three different geometry combinations. 45 plans were prepared with classic optimization protocol and 45 with rings optimization protocol which should reduce the low doses in the normal tissue. Differences in values of the integral dose depend on the geometry and technique of irradiation, as well as optimization protocol used in preparing treatment plans. The application of the rings optimization caused the value of normal tissue integral dose (NTID) to decrease. It is possible to limit the area of low dose irradiation and reduce NTID in dynamic techniques with the same clinical constraints for OAR and PTV volumes by using an optimization protocol other than the classic one.

  10. Dosimetric feasibility of an "off-breast isocenter" technique for whole-breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Ortega, Juan-Francisco; Moragues, Sandra; Pozo, Miquel; Casals, Joan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the viability of placing the treatment isocenter at the patient midline for breast cancer radiotherapy in order to avoid the risk of collisions during image-guided setup and treatment delivery. The use of kilovoltage orthogonal setup images has spread in last years in breast radiotherapy. There is a potential risk of an imaging system-patient collision when the isocenter is laterally placed. Twenty IMRT plans designed by placing the isocenter within the breast volume ("plan_ref"), were retrospectively replanned by shifting the isocenter at the patient's midline ("plan_off-breast"). An integrated simultaneous boost (SIB) technique was used. Multiple metrics for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and organs at risk (OARs) were compared for both approaches using a paired t test. Comparing plan_ref vs. plan_off-breast, no significant differences in PTV coverage (V95%) were found (96.5% vs. 96.2%; p = 0.361 to PTVbreast; 97.0% vs. 97.0%; p = 0.977 to PTVtumor_bed). With regard to OARs, no substantial differences were observed in any analyzed metric: V5Gy (30.3% vs. 31.4%; p = 0.486), V20Gy (10.3% vs. 10.3%; p = 0.903) and mean dose (7.1 Gy vs. 7.1 Gy; p = 0.924) to the ipsilateral lung; V5Gy (11.2% vs. 10.0%; p = 0.459), V30Gy (0.7% vs. 0.6%; p = 0.251) and mean dose (2.3 Gy vs. 2.2 Gy; p = 0.400) to the heart; and average dose to the contralateral breast (0.4 Gy vs. 0.5 Gy; p = 0.107). The off-breast isocenter solution resulted in dosimetrically comparable plans as the reference technique, avoiding the collision risk during the treatment session.

  11. Hippocampal-Sparing Whole-Brain Radiotherapy: A 'How-To' Technique Using Helical Tomotherapy and Linear Accelerator-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gondi, Vinai; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Mehta, Minesh P.; Tewatia, Dinesh; Rowley, Howard; Kuo, John S.; Khuntia, Deepak; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Sparing the hippocampus during cranial irradiation poses important technical challenges with respect to contouring and treatment planning. Herein we report our preliminary experience with whole-brain radiotherapy using hippocampal sparing for patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Five anonymous patients previously treated with whole-brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing were reviewed. The hippocampus was contoured, and hippocampal avoidance regions were created using a 5-mm volumetric expansion around the hippocampus. Helical tomotherapy and linear accelerator (LINAC)-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plans were generated for a prescription dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Results: On average, the hippocampal avoidance volume was 3.3 cm{sup 3}, occupying 2.1% of the whole-brain planned target volume. Helical tomotherapy spared the hippocampus, with a median dose of 5.5 Gy and maximum dose of 12.8 Gy. LINAC-based IMRT spared the hippocampus, with a median dose of 7.8 Gy and maximum dose of 15.3 Gy. On a per-fraction basis, mean dose to the hippocampus (normalized to 2-Gy fractions) was reduced by 87% to 0.49 Gy{sub 2} using helical tomotherapy and by 81% to 0.73 Gy{sub 2} using LINAC-based IMRT. Target coverage and homogeneity was acceptable with both IMRT modalities, with differences largely attributed to more rapid dose fall-off with helical tomotherapy. Conclusion: Modern IMRT techniques allow for sparing of the hippocampus with acceptable target coverage and homogeneity. Based on compelling preclinical evidence, a Phase II cooperative group trial has been developed to test the postulated neurocognitive benefit.

  12. Technical advances in external radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul; Kang, Min Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy techniques have substantially improved in the last two decades. After the introduction of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, radiotherapy has been increasingly used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Currently, more advanced techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), and charged particle therapy, are used for the treatment of HCC. IMRT can escalate the tumor dose while sparing the normal tissue even though the tumor is large or located near critical organs. SABR can deliver a very high radiation dose to small HCCs in a few fractions, leading to high local control rates of 84%-100%. Various advanced imaging modalities are used for radiotherapy planning and delivery to improve the precision of radiotherapy. These advanced techniques enable the delivery of high dose radiotherapy for early to advanced HCCs without increasing the radiation-induced toxicities. However, as there have been no effective tools for the prediction of the response to radiotherapy or recurrences within or outside the radiation field, future studies should focus on selecting the patients who will benefit from radiotherapy. PMID:27621577

  13. Dosimetric comparison between jaw tracking and static jaw techniques in intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhongsu; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Yibao; Zhang, Yunjun; Cheng, Jinsheng; Su, Xu

    2015-01-27

    To compare the dosimetric differences between jaw tracking technique (JTT) and static jaw technique (SJT) in dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (d-IMRT) and assess the potential advantages of jaw tracking technique. Two techniques, jaw tracking and static jaw, were used respectively to develop the d-IMRT plans for 28 cancer patients with various lesion sites: head and neck, lungs, esophageal, abdominal, prostate, rectal and cervical. The dose volume histograms (DVH) and selected dosimetric indexes for the whole body and for organs at risk (OARs) were compared. A two dimensional ionization chamber Array Seven29 (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) and OCTAVIUS Octagonal phantom (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) were used to verify all the plans. For all patients, the treatment plans using both techniques met the clinical requirements. The V5, V10, V20, V30, V40 (volumes receiving 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 Gy at least, respectively), mean dose (Dmean) for the whole body and V5, V10, V20, Dmean for lungs in the JTT d-IMRT plans were significantly less than the corresponding values of the SJT d-IMRT plans (p < 0.001). The JTT d-IMRT plans deposited lower maximum dose (Dmax) to the lens, eyes, brainstem, spinal cord, and right optic nerve, the doses reductions for these OARs ranged from 2.2% to 28.6%. The JTT d-IMRT plans deposited significantly lower Dmean to various OARs (all p values < 0.05), the mean doses reductions for these OARs ranged from 1.1% to 31.0%, and the value reductions depend on the volume and the location of the OARs. The γ evaluation method showed an excellent agreement between calculation and measurement for all techniques with criteria of 3%/3 mm. Both jaw tracking and static jaw d-IMRT plans can achieve comparable target dose coverage. JTT displays superior OARs sparing than SJT plans. These results are of clinical importance, especially for the patients with large and complex targets but close to some highly radio-sensitive organs to spare, and for patients

  14. Effect of bite tray impression technique on relocation accuracy in frameless stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, Clare E.; Ebert, Martin A.; Barclay, D.; Whittall, David S.; Joseph, David J.; Harper, Chris S.; Spry, Nigel A

    2003-03-31

    A previously developed method for achieving patient relocation in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (attachment of an infrared fiducial system to a bite tray) relies on the integrity of a bite tray system that incorporates moulding to the patient's upper dentition. Reproducible and accurate patient positioning requires stability of the bite tray and mould during the full treatment process, both during the time the bite tray is inserted in the patient's mouth, and between separate bite tray insertions. The optimum construction method for a stable reproducible tray has not been sufficiently investigated. We undertook a study to identify factors which might influence the integrity of the hard palate bite tray system. Reprosil Fast Set Putty was used to construct 3 impression conditions; teeth only; teeth and alveolar sulcus; and teeth, alveolar sulcus, and the hard palate. Reproducibility was assessed by volunteers inserting the impressions multiple times and recording the locations of 8 standard reference points. Our results showed the optimal impression technique (i.e., the one that led to the smallest ranges in positional and rotational errors) was that which incorporated the teeth, alveolar sulcus, and hard palate.

  15. Indirect orthodontic bonding - a modified technique for improved efficiency and precision

    PubMed Central

    Nojima, Lincoln Issamu; Araújo, Adriele Silveira; Alves, Matheus

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The indirect bonding technique optimizes fixed appliance installation at the orthodontic office, ensuring precise bracket positioning, among other advantages. In this laboratory clinical phase, material and methods employed in creating the transfer tray are decisive to accuracy. OBJECTIVE: This article describes a simple, efficient and reproducible indirect bonding technique that allows the procedure to be carried out successfully. Variables influencing the orthodontic bonding are analyzed and discussed in order to aid professionals wishing to adopt the indirect bonding technique routinely in their clinical practice. PMID:26154464

  16. A radiotherapy technique to limit dose to neural progenitor cell niches without compromising tumor coverage

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, Kristin J.; Achanta, Pragathi; Grossman, Stuart A.; Armour, Michael; Reyes, Juvenal; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Tryggestad, Erik; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) for brain tumors is associated with neurocognitive toxicity which may be a result of damage to neural progenitor cells (NPCs). We present a novel technique to limit the radiation dose to NPC without compromising tumor coverage. A study was performed in mice to examine the rationale and another was conducted in humans to determine its feasibility. C57BL/6 mice received localized radiation using a dedicated animal irradiation system with on-board CT imaging with either: (1) Radiation which spared NPC containing regions; (2) Radiation which did not spare these niches; or (3) Sham irradiation. Mice were sacrificed 24 h later and the brains were processed for immunohistochemical Ki-67 staining. For the human component of the study, 33 patients with primary brain tumors were evaluated. Two intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were retrospectively compared: a standard clinical plan and a plan which spares NPC regions while maintaining the same dose coverage of the tumor. The change in radiation dose to the contralateral NPC-containing regions was recorded. In the mouse model, non-NPC-sparing radiation treatment resulted in a significant decrease in the number of Ki67+ cells in dentate gyrus (DG) (P = 0.008) and subventricular zone (SVZ) (P = 0.005) compared to NPC-sparing radiation treatment. In NPC-sparing clinical plans, NPC regions received significantly lower radiation dose with no clinically relevant changes in tumor coverage. This novel radiation technique should significantly reduce radiation doses to NPC containing regions of the brain which may reduce neurocognitive deficits following RT for brain tumors. PMID:21327710

  17. Influence of Radiotherapy Technique and Dose on Patterns of Failure for Mesothelioma Patients After Extrapleural Pneumonectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Aaron M. . E-mail: aallen@lroc.harvard.edu; Den, Robert; Wong, Julia S.; Zurakowski, David; Soto, Ricardo; Jaenne, Pasi A.; Zellos, Lambros; Bueno, Raphael; Sugarbaker, David J.; Baldini, Elizabeth H.

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: Extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) is an effective treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma. We compared the outcomes after moderate-dose hemithoracic radiotherapy (MDRT) and high-dose hemithoracic RT (HDRT) after EPP for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Methods and Materials: Between July 1994 and April 2004, 39 patients underwent EPP and adjuvant RT at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital. Between 1994 and 2002, MDRT, including 30 Gy to the hemithorax, 40 Gy to the mediastinum, and boosts to positive margins or nodes to 54 Gy, was given, generally with concurrent chemotherapy. In 2003, HDRT to 54 Gy with a matched photon/electron technique was given, with sequential chemotherapy. Results: A total of 39 patients underwent RT after EPP. The median age was 59 years (range, 44-77). The histologic type was epithelial in 25 patients (64%) and mixed or sarcomatoid in 14 patients (36%). Of the 39 patients, 24 underwent MDRT and 15 (39%) HDRT. The median follow-up was 23 months (range, 6-71). The median overall survival was 19 months (95% confidence interval, 14-24). The median time to distant failure (DF) and local failure (LF) was 20 months (95% confidence interval, 14-26) and 26 months (95% confidence interval, 16-36), respectively. On univariate and multivariate analyses, only a mixed histologic type was predictive of inferior DF (p <0.006) and overall survival (p <0.004). The RT technique was not predictive of LF, DF, or overall survival. The LF rate was 50% (12 of 24) after MDRT and 27% (4 of 15) after HDRT (p = NS). Four patients who had undergone HDRT were alive and without evidence of disease at the last follow-up. Conclusions: High-dose hemithoracic RT appears to limit in-field LF compared with MDRT. However, DF remains a significant challenge, with one-half of our patients experiencing DF.

  18. Scene correction (precision techniques) of ERTS sensor data using digital image processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, R.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques have been developed, implemented, and evaluated to process ERTS Return Beam Vidicon (RBV) and Multispectral Scanner (MSS) sensor data using digital image processing techniques. The RBV radiometry has been corrected to remove shading effects, and the MSS geometry and radiometry have been corrected to remove internal and external radiometric and geometric errors. The results achieved show that geometric mapping accuracy of about one picture element RMS and two picture elements (maximum) can be achieved by the use of nine ground control points. Radiometric correction of MSS and RBV sensor data has been performed to eliminate striping and shading effects to about one count accuracy. Image processing times on general purpose computers of the IBM 370/145 to 168 class are in the range of 29 to 3.2 minutes per MSS scene (4 bands). Photographic images of the fully corrected and annotated scenes have been generated from the processed data and have demonstrated excellent quality and information extraction potential.

  19. Precise Point Positioning technique for short and long baselines time transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejba, Pawel; Nawrocki, Jerzy; Lemanski, Dariusz; Foks-Ryznar, Anna; Nogas, Pawel; Dunst, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    In this work the clock parameters determination of several timing receivers TTS-4 (AOS), ASHTECH Z-XII3T (OP, ORB, PTB, USNO) and SEPTENTRIO POLARX4TR (ORB, since February 11, 2012) by use of the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) technique were presented. The clock parameters were determined for several time links based on the data delivered by time and frequency laboratories mentioned above. The computations cover the period from January 1 to December 31, 2012 and were performed in two modes with 7-day and one-month solution for all links. All RINEX data files which include phase and code GPS data were recorded in 30-second intervals. All calculations were performed by means of Natural Resource Canada's GPS Precise Point Positioning (GPS-PPP) software based on high-quality precise satellite coordinates and satellite clock delivered by IGS as the final products. The used independent PPP technique is a very powerful and simple method which allows for better control of antenna positions in AOS and a verification of other time transfer techniques like GPS CV, GLONASS CV and TWSTFT. The PPP technique is also a very good alternative for calibration of a glass fiber link PL-AOS realized at present by AOS. Currently PPP technique is one of the main time transfer methods used at AOS what considerably improve and strengthen the quality of the Polish time scales UTC(AOS), UTC(PL), and TA(PL). KEY-WORDS: Precise Point Positioning, time transfer, IGS products, GNSS, time scales.

  20. EDITORIAL: International Workshop on Monte Carlo Techniques in Radiotherapy Delivery and Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaegen, Frank; Seuntjens, Jan

    2008-03-01

    Monte Carlo particle transport techniques offer exciting tools for radiotherapy research, where they play an increasingly important role. Topics of research related to clinical applications range from treatment planning, motion and registration studies, brachytherapy, verification imaging and dosimetry. The International Workshop on Monte Carlo Techniques in Radiotherapy Delivery and Verification took place in a hotel in Montreal in French Canada, from 29 May-1 June 2007, and was the third workshop to be held on a related topic, which now seems to have become a tri-annual event. About one hundred workers from many different countries participated in the four-day meeting. Seventeen experts in the field were invited to review topics and present their latest work. About half of the audience was made up by young graduate students. In a very full program, 57 papers were presented and 10 posters were on display during most of the meeting. On the evening of the third day a boat trip around the island of Montreal allowed participants to enjoy the city views, and to sample the local cuisine. The topics covered at the workshop included the latest developments in the most popular Monte Carlo transport algorithms, fast Monte Carlo, statistical issues, source modeling, MC treatment planning, modeling of imaging devices for treatment verification, registration and deformation of images and a sizeable number of contributions on brachytherapy. In this volume you will find 27 short papers resulting from the workshop on a variety of topics, some of them on very new stuff such as graphics processing units for fast computing, PET modeling, dual-energy CT, calculations in dynamic phantoms, tomotherapy devices, . . . . We acknowledge the financial support of the National Cancer Institute of Canada, the Institute of Cancer Research of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Association Québécoise des Physicien(ne)s Médicaux Clinique, the Institute of Physics, and Medical

  1. Investigation of pulsed low dose rate radiotherapy using dynamic arc delivery techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Lin, M. H.; Dai, X. F.; Koren, Sion; Klayton, T.; Wang, L.; Li, J. S.; Chen, L.; Price, R. A.

    2012-07-01

    There has been no consensus standard of care to treat recurrent cancer patients who have previously been irradiated. Pulsed low dose rate (PLDR) external beam radiotherapy has the potential to reduce normal tissue toxicities while still providing significant tumor control for recurrent cancers. This work investigates the dosimetry feasibility of PLDR treatment using dynamic arc delivery techniques. Five treatment sites were investigated in this study including breast, pancreas, prostate, head and neck, and lung. Dynamic arc plans were generated using the Varian Eclipse system and the RapidArc delivery technique with 6 and 10 MV photon beams. Each RapidArc plan consisted of two full arcs and the plan was delivered five times to achieve a daily dose of 200 cGy. The dosimetry requirement was to deliver approximately 20 cGy/arc with a 3 min interval to achieve an effective dose rate of 6.7 cGy min-1. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to calculate the actual dose delivered to the planning target volume (PTV) per arc taking into account beam attenuation/scattering and intensity modulation. The maximum, minimum and mean doses to the PTV were analyzed together with the dose volume histograms and isodose distributions. The dose delivery for the five plans was validated using solid water phantoms inserted with an ionization chamber and film, and a cylindrical detector array. Two intensity-modulated arcs were used to efficiently deliver the PLDR plans that provided conformal dose distributions for treating complex recurrent cancers. For the five treatment sites, the mean PTV dose ranged from 18.9 to 22.6 cGy/arc. For breast, the minimum and maximum PTV dose was 8.3 and 35.2 cGy/arc, respectively. The PTV dose varied between 12.9 and 27.5 cGy/arc for pancreas, 12.6 and 28.3 cGy/arc for prostate, 12.1 and 30.4 cGy/arc for H&N, and 16.2 and 27.6 cGy/arc for lung. Advanced radiation therapy can provide superior target coverage and normal tissue sparing for PLDR

  2. Lung volume assessment for a cross-comparison of two breathing-adapted techniques in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Luc . E-mail: luc.simon@curie.net; Giraud, Philippe; Servois, Vincent; Rosenwald, Jean-Claude

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the validity of gated radiotherapy of lung by using a cross-check methodology based on four-dimensional (4D)-computed tomography (CT) exams. Variations of volume of a breathing phantom was used as an indicator. Methods and Materials: A balloon was periodically inflated and deflated by a medical ventilator. The volume variation ({delta}V) of the balloon was measured simultaneously by a spirometer, taken as reference, and by contouring 4D-CT series (10 phases) acquired by the real-time position management system (RPM). Similar cross-comparison was performed for 2 lung patients, 1 with free breathing (FB), the other with deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique. Results: During FB, {delta}V measured by the spirometer and from 4D-CT were in good agreement: the mean differences for all phases were 8.1 mL for the balloon and 10.5 mL for a patient-test. End-inspiration lung volume has been shown to be slightly underestimated by the 4D-CT. The discrepancy for {delta}V between DIBH and end-expiration, measured from CT and from spirometer, respectively, was less than 3%. Conclusions: Provided that each slice series is correctly associated with the proper breathing phase, 4D-CT allows an accurate assessment of lung volume during the whole breathing cycle ({delta}V error <3% compared with the spirometer signal). Taking the lung volume variation into account is a central issue in the evaluation and control of the toxicity for lung radiation treatments.

  3. Measurement of precision oscillator phase noise using the two-oscillator coherent down-conversion technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnanelli, Christopher J.; Cashin, William F.

    1992-01-01

    The characterization of precision frequency standard phase noise and spurious outputs is addressed, using the two-oscillator coherent downconversion technique. Focus is on techniques for making accurate measurements of phase noise and spurious outputs within 100 KHz of a carrier. Significant sources of measurement error related to hardware design problems and inadequate measurement procedures are discussed: measurement errors resulting from system noise sources, phase-locked loop effects, and system bandwidth limitations. In addition, methods and design considerations for minimizing the effects of such errors are presented. Analytic discussions and results are supplemented with actual test data and measurements made using measurement hardware developed at the Ball Corporation, Efratom Division.

  4. Precise Heat Control: What Every Scientist Needs to Know About Pyrolytic Techniques to Solve Real Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devivar, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    The performance of a material is greatly influenced by its thermal and chemical properties. Analytical pyrolysis, when coupled to a GC-MS system, is a powerful technique that can unlock the thermal and chemical properties of almost any substance and provide vital information. At NASA, we depend on precise thermal analysis instrumentation for understanding aerospace travel. Our analytical techniques allow us to test materials in the laboratory prior to an actual field test; whether the field test is miles up in the sky or miles underground, the properties of any involved material must be fully studied and understood in the laboratory.

  5. Next generation multi-scale biophysical characterization of high precision cancer particle radiotherapy using clinical proton, helium-, carbon- and oxygen ion beams

    PubMed Central

    Niklas, Martin; Zimmermann, Ferdinand; Chaudhri, Naved; Krunic, Damir; Tessonnier, Thomas; Ferrari, Alfredo; Parodi, Katia; Jäkel, Oliver; Debus, Jürgen; Haberer, Thomas; Abdollahi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    The growing number of particle therapy facilities worldwide landmarks a novel era of precision oncology. Implementation of robust biophysical readouts is urgently needed to assess the efficacy of different radiation qualities. This is the first report on biophysical evaluation of Monte Carlo simulated predictive models of prescribed dose for four particle qualities i.e., proton, helium-, carbon- or oxygen ions using raster-scanning technology and clinical therapy settings at HIT. A high level of agreement was found between the in silico simulations, the physical dosimetry and the clonogenic tumor cell survival. The cell fluorescence ion track hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD) technology was employed to detect particle traverse per cell nucleus. Across a panel of radiobiological surrogates studied such as late ROS accumulation and apoptosis (caspase 3/7 activation), the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) chiefly correlated with the radiation species-specific spatio-temporal pattern of DNA double strand break (DSB) formation and repair kinetic. The size and the number of residual nuclear γ-H2AX foci increased as a function of linear energy transfer (LET) and RBE, reminiscent of enhanced DNA-damage complexity and accumulation of non-repairable DSB. These data confirm the high relevance of complex DSB formation as a central determinant of cell fate and reliable biological surrogates for cell survival/RBE. The multi-scale simulation, physical and radiobiological characterization of novel clinical quality beams presented here constitutes a first step towards development of high precision biologically individualized radiotherapy. PMID:27494855

  6. MicroRNA changes in advanced radiotherapy techniques and its effect to secondary cancers.

    PubMed

    Sert, Fatma

    2012-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a kind of RNA, produced copies of endogenous hairpin-shaped, are 21-25 nucleotide length, small, and single chain. Recent studies have revealed that hundreds of miRNAs are found in the human genome and are responsible for diverse cellular processes including the control of developmental timing, cell proliferation, apoptosis and tumorigenesis. miRNAs can activate the initiation of apoptosis, cessation of the cell cycle and aging in case of DNA damage by stimulating the tumor suppressor target gene p53 directly and indirectly. DNA damage is composed by multiple stress factors including ionizing radiation, reactive oxygen species, UV exposure and drugs like doxorubicin and camptothecin. Radiation is used widely in health, academic area, and industry for producing electricity. As a result of using radiation widely in different fields, environmental radiation exposure is increasing as well. Whereas high dose radiation exposure causes DNA damage and gives rise to ionization to molecules of living cells by accelerating malignant tumor formation. Fields receiving high dose radiation are evaluated in terms of adverse effects, therapeutic efficacy and secondary malignancies in radiotherapy applications. Dose distributions are re-created when it is required. On the other hand, fields received low dose and the doses that the patient is exposure in simulation and/or portal imaging are often overlooked. The changes in miRNA levels arising in low dose radiation field and its effect to neoplastic process in cell will be pathfinder in terms of secondary cancers or second primary cancers. It is shown that there are differences between the level changes of miRNA in low dose fields which are overlooked in daily practical applications because of not resulting with acute or chronic side effect and the level changes of miRNA in high dose fields. With the help of verifying so-called differences in low dose fields which are seen in advanced radiation techniques

  7. High precision calcium isotope analysis using 42Ca-48Ca double-spike TIMS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, L.; Zhou, L.; Gao, S.; Tong, S. Y.; Zhou, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    Double spike techniques are widely used for determining calcium isotopic compositions of natural samples. The most important factor controlling precision of the double spike technique is the choice of appropriate spike isotope pair, the composition of double spikes and the ratio of spike to sample(CSp/CN). We propose an optimal 42Ca-48Ca double spike protocol which yields the best internal precision for calcium isotopic composition determinations among all kinds of spike pairs and various spike compositions and ratios of spike to sample, as predicted by linear error propagation method. It is suggested to use spike composition of 42Ca/(42Ca+48Ca) = 0.44 mol/mol and CSp/(CN+ CSp)= 0.12mol/mol because it takes both advantages of the largest mass dispersion between 42Ca and 48Ca (14%) and lowest spike cost. Spiked samples were purified by pass through homemade micro-column filled with Ca special resin. K, Ti and other interference elements were completely separated, while 100% calcium was recovered with negligible blank. Data collection includes integration time, idle time, focus and peakcenter frequency, which were all carefully designed for the highest internal precision and lowest analysis time. All beams were automatically measured in a sequence by Triton TIMS so as to eliminate difference of analytical conditions between samples and standards, and also to increase the analytical throughputs. The typical internal precision of 100 duty cycles for one beam is 0.012‒0.015 ‰ (2δSEM), which agrees well with the predicted internal precision of 0.0124 ‰ (2δSEM). Our methods improve internal precisions by a factor of 2‒10 compared to previous methods of determination of calcium isotopic compositions by double spike TIMS. We analyzed NIST SRM 915a, NIST SRM 915b and Pacific Seawater as well as interspersed geological samples during two months. The obtained average δ44/40Ca (all relative to NIST SRM 915a) is 0.02 ± 0.02 ‰ (n=28), 0.72±0.04 ‰ (n=10) and 1

  8. Hippocampal-Sparing Whole Brain Radiotherapy: A “How-To” Technique, Utilizing Helical Tomotherapy and LINAC-based Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gondi, Vinai; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Mehta, Minesh P.; Tewatia, Dinesh; Rowley, Howard; Kuo, John S.; Khuntia, Deepak; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Sparing the hippocampus during cranial irradiation poses important technical challenges with respect to contouring and treatment planning. Herein, we report our preliminary experience with whole-brain radiotherapy using hippocampal sparing for patients with brain metastases. Materials/Methods 5 anonymous patients previously treated with whole-brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing were reviewed. The hippocampus was contoured, and hippocampal avoidance regions were created using a 5mm volumetric expansion around the hippocampus. Helical tomotherapy and LINAC-based IMRT treatment plans were generated for a prescription dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Results On average, the hippocampal avoidance volume was 3.3 cm3, occupying 2.1% of the whole brain planned target volume. Helical tomotherapy spared the hippocampus, with a median dose of 5.5 Gy and maximum dose of 12.8 Gy. LINAC-based IMRT spared the hippocampus, with a median dose of 7.8 Gy and maximum dose of 15.3 Gy. On a per-fraction basis, mean dose to the hippocampus (normalized to 2-Gy fractions) was reduced by 87% to 0.49 Gy2 using helical tomotherapy and by 81% to 0.73 Gy2 using LINAC-based IMRT. Target coverage and homogeneity was acceptable with both IMRT modalities, with differences largely attributed to more rapid dose fall-off with helical tomotherapy. Conclusion Modern IMRT techniques allow for sparing of the hippocampus with acceptable target coverage and homogeneity. Based on compelling preclinical evidence, a phase II cooperative group trial has been developed to test the postulated neurocognitive benefit. PMID:20598457

  9. Precise near-earth navigation with GPS: A survey of techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, T. P.; Wu, S. C.; Wu, J.

    1987-01-01

    The tracking accuracy of the low earth orbiters (below about 3000 km altitude) can be brought below 10 cm with a variety of differential techniques that exploit the Global Positioning System (GPS). All of these techniques require a precisely known global network of GPS ground receivers and a receiver aboard the user satellite, and all simultaneously estimate the user and GPS satellite orbits. Three basic approaches are the geometric, dynamic, and nondynamic strategies. The last combines dynamic GPS solutions with a geometric user solution. Two powerful extensions of the nondynamic strategy show considerable promise. The first uses an optimized synthesis of dynamics and geometry in the user solution, while the second uses a novel gravity-adjustment method to exploit data from repeat ground tracks. These techniques will offer sub-decimeter accuracy for dynamically unpredictable satellites down to the lowesst possible altitudes.

  10. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy.

  11. [Attaching importance to molecular imaging techniques and promoting precision diagnosis in burns].

    PubMed

    Yu, Y M; Peng, X

    2017-08-20

    The explosive growth and advancement of computer science in recent decades have prompted the rapid development and wide applications of imaging techniques in life science, which have brought about revolutionary changes in modern medicine. Nowadays, it is possible to visualize multiple physiological and disease processes, precisely and non-invasively, in a living human body. Modern medicine has even started"reading the mind", to diagnose psychology, behavior and degenerative disorders of human brain. The border between the organic and inorganic diseases in old dogma is disappearing because imaging techniques have"visualized"the neurological and tissue changes of inorganic disorders. Severe burn injury is associated with very complicated pathological processes, which are always at the borderline between life and death. Complete recovery of patients with severe burn injury, if possible, may take years of time. Hence, a real-time monitoring of the disease process is of pivotal importance in early recognition and prevention of life-threatening complications and in assessing the therapeutic efficacy for a less-eventful recovery. Here we review and introduce some potential applications of modern imaging techniques in burn care and research, which may benefit burn patients. Some techniques are still in their early or pre-clinical stage and some are mature techniques in other fields of medicine, which are potentially applicable in burn diagnosis and treatment through our research. We intend to bring your interest to this field which may eventually lead to new revenues improving our clinical work on burn victims.

  12. High precision EPR dosimetry as a reference tool for validation of other techniques.

    PubMed

    Chumak, V V; Sholom, S V; Bakhanova, E V; Pasalskaya, L F; Musijachenko, A V

    2005-02-01

    We present here a particular application area for EPR dosimetry with teeth--use as a source of reference dose values for validation/verification of other retrospective dosimetry techniques and existing dose records. The conditions of application of EPR dosimetry in this role as well as practical design of such studies are shown. Particular attention is given to the requirements to the techniques in terms of precision and throughput, as well as to the issue of availability of samples for analysis and practical solution of this problem. Practical application of this approach is illustrated by several examples of completed validation sub-studies, which were performed in the framework of large-scale post-Chernobyl epidemiological studies.

  13. [Opto-electronic techniques and 3D body surface reconstruction for the control of patient positioning in the radiotherapy of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Baroni, G; Troia, A; Troia, A; Orecchia, R; Pedotti, A

    2001-09-01

    In radiotherapy clinical practice, the currently existing gap between the high degree of accuracy in treatment planning and, the possibility of conforming the high-energy radiation beams on the one hand, and the uncertain set-up of each irradiation session on the other is a decisive factor for optimizing radiation treatment. Indeed there is wide experimental evidence that the current methods used for patient alignment and immobilization do not guarantee the necessary precision in delivering therapy with respect to the specifications of the treatment plan. The main reason for this is the lack of control systems that may be applied systematically to provide quantitative real-time feedback on the quality of patient repositioning and immobility during radiation emission. Opto-electronic techniques and body surface registration methods were sygergisically used for the automatic three-dimensional verification and correction of patient position at the therapy unit. The method is based on radiotherapy applications of real-time opto-electronic human motion analysis using passive markers to control patient repositioning and to acquire and describe body surfaces in three dimensions. The quantitative detection of the localization error relies on the real-time detection of the position of an hybrid set of control points, namely physical passive markers and laser light markers, and their immediate comparison with a reference data set. The data set consists of the reference positions of the passive markers and a three-dimensional model of the body surface. The method was experimentally tested at the Radiotherapy Division of the European Institute of Oncology to control the repositioning of a phantom and of a volunteer, with reference to the clinical realignment procedure applied for breast cancer radiotherapy. The results confirm that the technique represents a valuable method to detect and automatically correct localization errors in the irradiation set-up. The use of the

  14. 3D precision measurements of meter sized surfaces using low cost illumination and camera techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekberg, Peter; Daemi, Bita; Mattsson, Lars

    2017-04-01

    Using dedicated stereo camera systems and structured light is a well-known method for measuring the 3D shape of large surfaces. However the problem is not trivial when high accuracy, in the range of few tens of microns, is needed. Many error sources need to be handled carefully in order to obtain high quality results. In this study, we present a measurement method based on low-cost camera and illumination solutions combined with high-precision image analysis and a new approach in camera calibration and 3D reconstruction. The setup consists of two ordinary digital cameras and a Gobo projector as a structured light source. A matrix of dots is projected onto the target area. The two cameras capture the images of the projected pattern on the object. The images are processed by advanced subpixel resolution algorithms prior to the application of the 3D reconstruction technique. The strength of the method lays in a different approach for calibration, 3D reconstruction, and high-precision image analysis algorithms. Using a 10 mm pitch pattern of the light dots, the method is capable of reconstructing the 3D shape of surfaces. The precision (1σ repeatability) in the measurements is  <10 µm over a volume of 60  ×  50  ×  10 cm3 at a hardware cost of ~2% of available advanced measurement techniques. The expanded uncertainty (95% confidence level) is estimated to be 83 µm, with the largest uncertainty contribution coming from the absolute length of the metal ruler used as reference.

  15. [Comparison of conventional technique, Ligasure Precise and Harmonic Focus in total thyroidectomy].

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, R M; Bove, A; Bongarzoni, G; Palone, G; Corradetti, L; Corbellini, L

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the results obtained using an electrothermal bipolar vessel sealing system (Ligasure Precise), a harmonic curved shears (Harmonic Focus) and traditional technique in total thyroidectomy. We have enrolled 93 patients and assigned randomly to three groups of 31 pt: groups L (Ligasure Precise), F (Harmonic Focus) and C (traditional thecnique). Recorded data were demographics, preoperative serum calcium levels, operation time, length of hospital stay, weight of exported gland and pathology, postoperative calcemia at one and two days and recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. The three groups did not present statistically significant differences in term of age, gender and pathology classification. No postoperative haemorrhages were observed. The overall incidence of hypocalcemia was 38.9% (36 pt) and the mean days of hospitalization were 2.3 days without statistically significant differences between the three groups. Only one patient (group F) presented temporary recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Mean operation time (minutes) was significantly reduced by approximately 15% in group F (62.7+/-14.1) compared with group C (72.7+/-13.6; Kruskal-Wallis test: p<0.05). Both devices resulted safe and efficient. The only advantage observed was a significant reduction operation time when using Harmonic Foscus curved shears compared to the other techniques.

  16. [Radiotherapy of oropharynx carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Servagi Vernat, S; Tochet, F; Vieillevigne, L; Pointreau, Y; Maingon, P; Giraud, P

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, technique of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy for oropharynx carcinoma are presented. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed.

  17. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy as Monotherapy or Post-External Beam Radiotherapy Boost for Prostate Cancer: Technique, Early Toxicity, and PSA Response

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbari, Siavash; Weinberg, Vivian K.; Kaprealian, Tania; Hsu, I-Chow; Ma Lijun; Chuang, Cynthia; Descovich, Martina; Shiao, Stephen; Shinohara, Katsuto; Roach, Mack; Gottschalk, Alexander R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy has been established as an excellent monotherapy or after external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) boost treatment for prostate cancer (PCa). Recently, dosimetric studies have demonstrated the potential for achieving similar dosimetry with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) compared with HDR brachytherapy. Here, we report our technique, PSA nadir, and acute and late toxicity with SBRT as monotherapy and post-EBRT boost for PCa using HDR brachytherapy fractionation. Patients and Methods: To date, 38 patients have been treated with SBRT at University of California-San Francisco with a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Twenty of 38 patients were treated with SBRT monotherapy (9.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 4 fractions), and 18 were treated with SBRT boost (9.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2 fractions) post-EBRT and androgen deprivation therapy. PSA nadir to date for 44 HDR brachytherapy boost patients with disease characteristics similar to the SBRT boost cohort was also analyzed as a descriptive comparison. Results: SBRT was well tolerated. With a median follow-up of 18.3 months (range, 12.6-43.5), 42% and 11% of patients had acute Grade 2 gastrourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity, respectively, with no Grade 3 or higher acute toxicity to date. Two patients experienced late Grade 3 GU toxicity. All patients are without evidence of biochemical or clinical progression to date, and favorably low PSA nadirs have been observed with a current median PSA nadir of 0.35 ng/mL (range, <0.01-2.1) for all patients (0.47 ng/mL, range, 0.2-2.1 for the monotherapy cohort; 0.10 ng/mL, range, 0.01-0.5 for the boost cohort). With a median follow-up of 48.6 months (range, 16.4-87.8), the comparable HDR brachytherapy boost cohort has achieved a median PSA nadir of 0.09 ng/mL (range, 0.0-3.3). Conclusions: Early results with SBRT monotherapy and post-EBRT boost for PCa demonstrate acceptable PSA response and minimal toxicity. PSA nadir with SBRT boost

  18. Centimeter-level group-delay altimetric precision using the new PARIS interferometric technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardellach, E.; Nogues-Correig, O.; Ribo, S.; Rius, A.; Camps, A.; van der Marel, H.; Martin-Neira, M.

    2010-12-01

    Since its suggestion in 1993, the altimetric and scatterometric capabilities of the PAssive Reflectometry and Interferometry System (PARIS) have been tested extensively from ground- air- and even space-based experiments. The concept is based in the use of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals reflected off the Earth (Ocean, Ice, Land), in a bi-static radar configuration. ESA has proposed to use the PARIS Interferometric Technique in the future PARIS In-Orbit Demonstrator Instrument (PARIS-IOD). This is a novel instrumental approach respect to previous PARIS instruments which obtained the observables through cross-correlating direct and reflected signals against a GPS signal model (or replica). The limit of such an altimetric approach was given by the availability of the open-access GNSS codes. The new interferometric technique aligns the direct and reflected signals and directly computes the cross-correlation between them. Therefore, also encrypted signals can be used, increasing the available signal bandwidth and power, and thus the expected precision of the altimetric measurement. This project contributes to the PARIS-IOD concept trying to demonstrate the suitability of the interferometric technique for altimetric purposes, as well as to study and demonstrate the proposed calibration techniques for the PARIS-IOD instrument. We aim to confirm whether the interferometric technique is capable of measuring GPS signal delay differences with an associated 1 sigma error of 3 cm with 1 second of observation time. The first step to accomplish the objective of the activity was to build the appropriate receiver, able to perform the direct correlation of the signals. This was achieved by modifying the existing dedicated full-custom GNSS-Reflection Receiver GPS Open Loop Differential Real-Time Receiver (GOLD-RTR). The proof-of-concept instrument has been tested in two campaigns, during June and July 2010. The first campaign used synthetic signals generated by

  19. Precision, high dose radiotherapy. II. Helium ion treatment of tumors adjacent to critical central nervous system structures

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, W.M.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Austin-Seymour, M.; Castro, J.R.; Collier, J.M.; Gauger, G.; Gutin, P.; Phillips, T.L.; Pitluck, S.; Walton, R.E.

    1985-07-01

    In this paper, the authors present a technique for treating relatively small, low grade tumors located very close to critical, radiation sensitive central nervous system structures such as the spinal cord and the brain stem. A beam of helium ions is used to irradiate the tumor. The nearby normal tissues are protected by exploiting the superb dose localization properties of this beam, particularly its well defined and controllable range in tissue, the increased dose deposited near the end of this range (i.e., the Bragg peak), the sharp decrease in dose beyond the Bragg peak, and the sharp penumbra of the beam. To illustrate the technique, the authors present a group of 19 patients treated for chordomas, meningiomas and low grade chondrosarcomas in the base of the skull or spinal column. They have been able to deliver high, uniform doses to the target volumes, while keeping the doses to the nearby critical tissues below the threshold for radiation damage. Follow-up on this group of patients is short, averaging 22 months (2 to 75 months). Currently, 15 patients have local control of their tumor. Two major complications, a spinal cord transsection and optic tract damage, are discussed in detail. Their treatment policies have been modified to minimize the risk of these complications in the future, and they are continuing to use this method to treat such patients.

  20. Optimization Techniques for Improving the Precision of Isotopic Analysis by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. Q.; Xu, J. F.; Wu-Yang, S. Q.

    2016-12-01

    Operation of instruments and preparation of samples are also significant factors that can affect the precision of TIMS analyses, in addition to instrument hardware. We have reviewed the isotopic data of several standard materials at our TIMS lab for 5 years. It is suggested that several optimization techniques should be used in order to obtain high-precision isotopic ratio data: (1) It is important to choose a suitable filament material for isotopic measurements. We have established that W filament is likely the most efficient for ionizing Sr when selecting from W, Re, and Ta; meanwhile, Re filament can produce a higher intensity for Nd isotopes than W and Ta filament can. It is concluded that the best TIMS signals are obtained for Sr using W signal-filaments and for Nd using Re double-filaments. (2) The preparation of the activator plays a key role in the analysis of some isotopic ratios. This study indicates that choosing a suitable activator can greatly elevate the precision of 206Pb/204Pb ratios during Pb isotopic measurements. We have suggested a new scheme to make an activator by using a mixture of 10% Si-gel + 7.5% H3PO3 + 82.5% H2O (weight %). (3) It is necessary to re-set the cup configuration to avoid cup degradation when operating for a long period of time (a year or more). We propose a new cup configuration to avoid this disadvantage during Sr isotopic analyses. (4) The contamination of 187Re and 185Re after using Re-filament could be eliminated by cleaning the ion source and baking the source housing.

  1. Precise plant breeding using new genome editing techniques: opportunities, safety and regulation in the EU.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Frank; Schiemann, Joachim

    2014-06-01

    Several new plant breeding techniques (NPBTs) have been developed during the last decade, and make it possible to precisely perform genome modifications in plants. The major problem, other than technical aspects, is the vagueness of regulation concerning these new techniques. Since the definition of eight NPBTs by a European expert group in 2007, there has been an ongoing debate on whether the resulting plants and their products are covered by GMO legislation. Obviously, cover by GMO legislation would severely hamper the use of NPBT, because genetically modified plants must pass a costly and time-consuming GMO approval procedure in the EU. In this review, we compare some of the NPBTs defined by the EU expert group with classical breeding techniques and conventional transgenic plants. The list of NPBTs may be shortened (or extended) during the international discussion process initiated by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. From the scientific point of view, it may be argued that plants developed by NPBTs are often indistinguishable from classically bred plants and are not expected to possess higher risks for health and the environment. In light of the debate on the future regulation of NPBTs and the accumulated evidence on the biosafety of genetically modified plants that have been commercialized and risk-assessed worldwide, it may be suggested that plants modified by crop genetic improvement technologies, including genetic modification, NPBTs or other future techniques, should be evaluated according to the new trait and the resulting end product rather than the technique used to create the new plant variety.

  2. Development of ultra-precision micro-cavity measurement technique in HIT-UOI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jiwen; Li, Lei; Tan, Jiubin

    2010-08-01

    Micro cavities with high aspect ratio are widely used in different fields including aerospace and defense industries with the development of manufacturing technology. So how to measure the dimension of these cavities has become one of the major research subjects in the field of measurement and instrument. This paper describes some activities of the precision micro cavity measurement technique in Center of Ultra-precision Optoelectronic Instrument (UOI), Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT). The key issue of micro cavity measurement in UOI is called touch-trigger measurement method. The first scheme is double optical fiber coupling, in which light coming from the incident optical fiber is transmitted in the reversal direction via the optical fiber coupling into the effluent optical fiber, the lateral displacement of the touch-trigger sensor is transformed into the deflexion of light coming out from the effluent optical fiber, and the deflexion is transformed into an image signal by the object lens and CCD capturing system. And the second scheme is micro focal-length collimation, in which a fiber stem with a ball mounted on its end is used as a probe and a small segment of it is used as a cylindrical lens to collimate a point light source and image it to a camera, the deflection of the fiber stem can be inferred from the change in image acquired by the camera with ultrahigh displacement sensitivity. Experiments for these activities will be given with a focus on the measurement results and repeatability uncertainty.

  3. Development of Techniques for a Precision Neutron EDM Measurement at RCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumiya, Ryohei; Masuda, Yasuhiro; Kawasaki, Shinsuke; Jeong, Sun-Chan; Watanabe, Yutaka; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Pierre, Edgard; Shin, Yunchang; Matsuta, Kensaku; Mihara, Mototsugu

    2014-09-01

    A non-zero neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) breaks the time-reversal symmetry. A precision measurement of the nEDM is expected to be a good probe to search for theories beyond the standard model. We have been developing techniques for a nEDM measurement, using a high intensity ultra-cold neutron (UCN) source developed by the collaboration between KEK and RCNP. We have succeeded to polarize UCNs by a super conducting polarizer, and stored them in a cell. This cell will be installed in static magnetic and electric fields for a nEDM observation by the Ramsey separated-oscillatory-field magnetic resonance method. The homogeneity of the magnetic field is being improved aiming to increase the transverse relaxation time T2. A multilayered magnetic shielding and a compensation coil system was developed to cancel the geomagnetic field. Some materials around the cell which were not completely non-magnetic were replaced. We are developing a 129Xe co-magnetometer for the high precision field monitoring, and a high voltage system including electrodes with minimum UCN losses. In this talk, the present status of these apparatuses will be discussed.

  4. High precision ultrasonic guided wave technique for inspection of power transmission line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jun; Qiu, Jinhao; Ji, Hongli; Wang, Enrong; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Uchimoto, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    Due to the merits of high inspection speed and long detecting distance, Ultrasonic Guided Wave(UGW) method has been commonly applied to the on-line maintenance of power transmission line. However, the guided wave propagation in this structure is very complicated, leading to the unfavorable defect localization accuracy. Aiming at this situation, a high precision UGW technique for inspection of local surface defect in power transmission line is proposed. The technique is realized by adopting a novel segmental piezoelectric ring transducer and transducer mounting scheme, combining with the comprehensive characterization of wave propagation and circumferential defect positioning with multiple piezoelectric elements. Firstly, the propagation path of guided waves in the multi-wires of transmission line under the proposed technique condition is investigated experimentally. Next, the wave velocities are calculated by dispersion curves and experiment test respectively, and from comparing of the two results, the guided wave mode propagated in transmission line is confirmed to be F(1,1) mode. Finally, the axial and circumferential positioning of local defective wires in transmission line are both achieved, by using multiple piezoelectric elements to surround the stands and send elastic waves into every single wire. The proposed research can play a role of guiding the development of highly effective UGW method and detecting system for multi-wire transmission line.

  5. CRESTAL SINUS LIFT USING A FLUIDO-DYNAMIC COMPUTER GUIDED PRECISE AND ATRAUMATIC TECHNIQUE.

    PubMed

    Lopez, M A; Andreasi Bassi, M; Confalone, L; Lico, S; Carinci, F

    2015-01-01

    One of the most frequent reasons for failure during the maxillary sinus floor lift operation is connected to the possibility of a rupture of the Schneiderian membrane which, if lacerated, cannot perform the function of graft containment. In order to reduce the incidence of complications it is necessary to cut the hard tissue with extreme accuracy and as little trauma as possible, while saving the soft tissue. The precision of pre-operation measures obtained through endoral x-rays, dental-scans and cone-beam CT allows us to approach and cut with delicacy the sinus cortical floor. The recent development of computer guided surgery gives the possibility of planning the operation, which reduces the risk of failure. The cortical of the maxillary sinus is reduced through the use of calibrated burs and a profiler to obtain a hole that enables both access to the maxillary sinus and, subsequently, the lifting of the Schneiderian membrane. Each stage of the operation is monitored and all the devices used pass through a custom-made template, which acts as a surgical guide. The sinus was filled using fluid biomaterial distributed through a dispenser, which had been created specifically for this technique. Due to the reduction in trauma and the fact that the process is much less invasive, this technique could be a valid alternative to the techniques known and carried out to date. Work time is reduced to less than 3 minutes in the cortical thinning operation and percussive trauma is avoided.

  6. Region-growing technique adapted to precise microcalcification characterization in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darboux, Michel; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Nicolas, Eric

    1996-11-01

    The early detection of breast cancer is essential for increasing the survival rate of the disease. Today, mammography is the only breast screening technique capable of detecting breast cancer at a very early stage. The presence of a breast tumor is indicated by some features on the mammogram. One sign of malignancy is the presence of clusters of fine, granular microcalcifications. We present here a three-step method for detecting and characterizing these microcalcifications. We begin with the detection of potential candidates. The aim of this first step is to detect all the pixels that could be a microcalcification. Then we focus on our specific region growing technique which provides an accurate extraction of the shape of the region corresponding to each detected growing technique which provides an accurate extraction of the shape of the region corresponding to each detected seed. This second step is essential because microcalcifications shape is a very important feature for the diagnosis. It is then possible to determine precise parameters to characterize these microcalcifications. This three-step method has been evaluated on a set of images form the mammographic image analysis society database.

  7. Development of a novel treatment planning test for credentialing rotational intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Ciurlionis, L; Clark, C; Venables, K

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The increasing use of tomotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy in UK centres will result in more centres choosing to use this technology in a clinical trial setting. The Radiotherapy Trials Quality Assurance (RTTQA) group has developed a new procedure to integrate into the UK intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) credentialing programme to cover rotational IMRT delivery techniques. Methods: A planning test [three-dimensional treatment planning system (3DTPS)] was designed specifically for rotational IMRT techniques. The feasibility of using this test in the credentialing programme for rotational IMRT was validated by 10 experienced UK centres. The study included five centres using Varian RapidArc™ (RA) (Varian Medical Systems, Milpitas, CA), two using Elekta VMAT™ (VMAT) (Elekta Inc., Norcross, GA) and three using helical tomotherapy (HT) plans. Centres were asked to carry out their own in-house quality assurance (QA) for the plans submitted for this study. A survey was sent out to centres aiming to gather information on their experience in undertaking the exercise and their QA results. Results: All centres fulfilled the primary goal by achieving the dose constraints of the primary planning target volume and organ at risk. Seven centres (three RA, one VMAT and three HT plans) were able to fulfil the secondary goal. Among those seven centres, three centres (two RA and one VMAT plans) achieved the tertiary goal. The results of the survey indicated that the 3DTPS test is a clinically relevant and practical planning test to be used. Conclusion: A planning test for rotational therapy techniques was developed for the RTTQA IMRT credentialing programme. Advances in knowledge: This study validated the feasibility of a 3DTPS test to be used as part of a credentialing programme for rotational IMRT techniques in the UK. PMID:23385993

  8. A Novel Method of Island Blocking in Whole Abdominal Radiotherapy Using a Modified Electronic Tissue Compensation Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Sharad

    2010-10-01

    Traditionally, large fields requiring island blocking used external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with Cerrobend blocks to limit dose to the critical structures. It is laborious to construct blocks and use them on a daily basis. We present a novel technique for island blocking using a modified electronic tissue compensation (MECOMP) technique. Five patients treated at our institution were selected for this study. The study compared two planning techniques: a novel MECOMP and a conventional EBRT technique. Conventional fields were defined using anterior-posterior and posterior-anterior (PA) fields. The kidneys were contoured and an aperture cut-out block was fitted to the OAR with a 1-cm margin (OAR{sub CTV}) and placed in the PA field. A dynamic multileaf collimation (DMLC) plan with ECOMP was developed using identical beam and blocking strategy; this tissue compensation-based fluence map was modified to deliver a 'zero' dose to the CTV{sub OAR} from the PA field. There were no significant differences in the mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the right or left kidney between the two methods. The mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the peritoneal cavity were also not significantly different. The number of monitor units (MUs) required was increased using the MECOMP (273 vs. 1152, p < 0.01). The MECOMP is effectively able to deliver DMLC-based radiotherapy, even with island blocks present. This novel use of MECOMP for whole abdominal radiotherapy should substantially reduce the labor, daily treatment time, and treatment-related errors through the elimination of cerrobend blocks.

  9. Computational time reduction for sequential batch solutions in GNSS precise point positioning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín Furones, Angel; Anquela Julián, Ana Belén; Dimas-Pages, Alejandro; Cos-Gayón, Fernando

    2017-08-01

    Precise point positioning (PPP) is a well established Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) technique that only requires information from the receiver (or rover) to obtain high-precision position coordinates. This is a very interesting and promising technique because eliminates the need for a reference station near the rover receiver or a network of reference stations, thus reducing the cost of a GNSS survey. From a computational perspective, there are two ways to solve the system of observation equations produced by static PPP either in a single step (so-called batch adjustment) or with a sequential adjustment/filter. The results of each should be the same if they are both well implemented. However, if a sequential solution (that is, not only the final coordinates, but also those observed in previous GNSS epochs), is needed, as for convergence studies, finding a batch solution becomes a very time consuming task owing to the need for matrix inversion that accumulates with each consecutive epoch. This is not a problem for the filter solution, which uses information computed in the previous epoch for the solution of the current epoch. Thus filter implementations need extra considerations of user dynamics and parameter state variations between observation epochs with appropriate stochastic update parameter variances from epoch to epoch. These filtering considerations are not needed in batch adjustment, which makes it attractive. The main objective of this research is to significantly reduce the computation time required to obtain sequential results using batch adjustment. The new method we implemented in the adjustment process led to a mean reduction in computational time by 45%.

  10. Dosimetric Comparison between Single and Dual Arc-Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy and Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Using a Simultaneous Integrated Boost Technique

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Sivakumar; Chandrasekaran, Anuradha; Sarma, Yugandhar; Balakrishnan, Saranganathan; Nandigam, Janardhan

    2017-01-01

    Backround: Plan quality and performance of dual arc (DA) volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), single arc (SA) VMAT and nine field (9F) intensity modulated radiotherapy were compared using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique. Methods: Twelve patients treated in Elekta Synergy Platform (mlci2) by 9F-IMRT were replanned with SA/DA-VMAT using a CMS Monaco Treatment Planning System (TPS) with Monte Carlo simulation. Target delineation was conducted as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Protocols (RTOG0225 and 0615). A 70Gy dose prescribed to PTV70 and 61Gy to PTV61 in 33 fractions was applied for the SIB technique. The conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) for targets and the mean dose and maximum dose for OAR’s, treatment delivery time (min), monitor units (MUs) per fraction, normal tissue integral dose and patient specific quality assurance were analysed. Results: Acceptable target coverage was achieved for PTV70 and PTV61 with all the planning techniques. No significant differences were observed except for D98 (PTV61), CI(PTV70) and HI(PTV61). Maximum dose (Dmax) to the spinal cord was lower in DA-VMAT than 9F-IMRT (p=0.002) and SA-VMAT (p=0.001). D50 (%) of parotid glands was better controlled by 9F-IMRT (p=0.001) and DA-VMAT (p=0.001) than SA-VMAT. A lower mean dose to the larynx was achieved with 9F-IMRT (P=0.001) and DA-VMAT (p=0.001) than with SA-VMAT. DA-VMAT achieved higher CI of PTV70 (P= 0.005) than SA-VMAT. For PTV61, DA-VMAT (P=0.001) and 9F-IMRT (P=0.001) achieved better HI than SA-VMAT. The average treatment delivery times were 7.67mins, 3.35 mins, 4.65 mins for 9F-IMRT, SA-VMAT and DA-VMAT, respectively. No significant difference were observed in MU/fr (p=0.9) and NTID (P=0.90) and the patient quality assurance pass rates were >95% (gamma analysis I3mm, 3%). Conclusion: DA-VMAT showed better conformity over target dose and spared the OARs better or equal to IMRT. SA-VMAT could not spare the OARs well. DA-VMAT offered shorter

  11. A novel imaging technique for fusion of high-quality immobilised MR images of the head and neck with CT scans for radiotherapy target delineation.

    PubMed

    Webster, G J; Kilgallon, J E; Ho, K F; Rowbottom, C G; Slevin, N J; Mackay, R I

    2009-06-01

    Uncertainty and inconsistency are observed in target volume delineation in the head and neck for radiotherapy treatment planning based only on CT imaging. Alternative modalities such as MRI have previously been incorporated into the delineation process to provide additional anatomical information. This work aims to improve on previous studies by combining good image quality with precise patient immobilisation in order to maintain patient position between scans. MR images were acquired using quadrature coils placed over the head and neck while the patient was immobilised in the treatment position using a five-point thermoplastic shell. The MR image and CT images were automatically fused in the Pinnacle treatment planning system using Syntegra software. Image quality, distortion and accuracy of the image registration using patient anatomy were evaluated. Image quality was found to be superior to that acquired using the body coil, while distortion was < 1.0 mm to a radius of 8.7 cm from the scan centre. Image registration accuracy was found to be 2.2 mm (+/- 0.9 mm) and < 3.0 degrees (n = 6). A novel MRI technique that combines good image quality with patient immobilization has been developed and is now in clinical use. The scan duration of approximately 15 min has been well tolerated by all patients.

  12. Combined total body X-ray irradiation and total skin electron beam radiotherapy with an improved technique for mycosis fungoides

    SciTech Connect

    Halberg, F.E.; Fu, K.K.; Weaver, K.A.; Zackheim, H.S.; Epstein, E.H. Jr.; Wintroub, B.U.

    1989-08-01

    Twelve consecutive patients with advanced stage mycosis fungoides (MF) were treated with combined total body X ray irradiation (TBI) and total skin electron beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Six had generalized plaque disease and dermatopathic nodes, three had tumor stage disease and node biopsy positive for mycosis fungoides, and three had erythroderma/Sezary syndrome. The treatment regimen consisted of split course total body X ray irradiation, given in twice weekly 15 cGy fractions to 75 cGy, then total skin electron beam radiation therapy given in once weekly 400 cGy fractions to a total dose of 2400 cGy. Underdosed areas and areas of greatest initial involvement were boosted 400 cGy twice weekly for an additional 1200 cGy. This was followed by a second course of total body X ray irradiation, to a total dose of 150 cGy. The total skin electron beam radiotherapy technique is a modification of an established six position EBRT technique for mycosis fungoides. Measurements to characterize the beam with and without a lexan scattering plate, demonstrated that the combination of no-plate beams produced better dose uniformity with a much higher dose rate. This improved technique is particularly advantageous for elderly and/or frail patients. Nine (75%) of the 12 patients achieved complete response (CR). The other three had significant improvement with greater than 80% clearing of their disease and resolution of symptoms. All six patients with generalized plaque disease achieved complete response and remained free of disease from 2 to 16 months. Two of three node positive patients also achieved complete response; one, with massive biopsy-documented mycosis fungoides nodal disease and deep open tumors, remained relapse-free over 2 years. Only one of the three patients with erythroderma/Sezary syndrome achieved a complete response, which was short lived.

  13. [Application of molecular diagnostic techniques in precision medicine of personalized treatment for colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Fu, Ji; Lin, Guole

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine is to customize the treatment options for individual patient based on the personal genome information. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancer worldwide. Molecular heterogeneity of CRC, which includes the MSI phenotype, hypermutation phenotype, and their relationship with clinical preferences, is believed to be one of the main factors responsible for the considerable variability in treatment response. The development of powerful next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies allows us to further understand the biological behavior of colorectal cancer, and to analyze the prognosis and chemotherapeutic drug reactions by molecular diagnostic techniques, which can guide the clinical treatment. This paper will introduce the new findings in this field. Meanwhile we integrate the new progress of key pathways including EGFR, RAS, PI3K/AKT and VEGF, and the experience in selective patients through associated molecular diagnostic screening who gain better efficacy after target therapy. The technique for detecting circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is introduced here as well, which can identify patients with high risk for recurrence, and demonstrate the risk of chemotherapy resistance. Mechanism of tumor drug resistance may be revealed by dynamic observation of gene alteration during treatment.

  14. Technique for needle-free drop deposition: Pathway for precise characterization of superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waghmare, Prashant R.; Das, Siddhartha; Mitra, Sushanta K.

    2013-11-01

    The most important step for characterizing the wettability of a surface is to deposit a water drop on the surface and measure the contact angle made by the drop on the surface. This innocuously simple process relies on bringing a needle holding the water drop in close proximity to the surface, with a ``desire'' that the drop would spontaneously detach from the needle and get deposited on the surface. Problem occurs when the surface is superhydrophobic, expressing an ``unwillingness'' to ``see'' the water drop in preference to a much more ``water-loving'' needle surface. There exists no solution to this problem, and surfaces are invariably characterized where the drop-needle assembly contacts the superhydrophobic surface. Such a configuration will always lead to an incorrect estimation of the contact angle, as there is no certainty of the existence of the drop-surface contact. Here we shall discuss our recently invented technique, where we solve this long-standing problem-we indeed ensure a needle-free drop in contact with the superhydrophobic surface, thereby ascertaining precise determination of the contact angle. The successful application of the technique will address a major headache of the big research community interested in science and technology of superhydrophobic surfaces.

  15. Can carotid-sparing radiotherapy approaches replace with conventional techniques for the patients with T1 glottic larynx cancer?

    PubMed

    Sert, Fatma; Karakoyun-Çelik, Omür; Esassolak, Mustafa Adnan

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to compare the carotid artery doses applied with various radiotherapy techniques for the treatment of T1N0 glottic larynx cancer. Five patients were simulated with using computed tomography (CT). Clinical (CTV) and planning target volumes (PTV) were created for T1N0 glottic larynx cancer. Planning risk volumes (PRV) were constructed for carotid arteries and spinal cord. Three irradiation planning, opposed lateral box field (OLBF), three dimension conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were done for each patient. Over 95% of planned target volumes were loaded with predetermined dose (a total of 62.25 Gy of 2.25 Gy daily dose). The comparison of the treatment planning of five T1 glottic larynx cancer, three involving the right vocal cord and two involving the left vocal cord, the technique of IMRT planning was provided the best carotid-sparing doses. Mean carotid V35, V50, and V63 values including OLBF, 3DCRT, and IMRT were 70%, 47%, 35%; 55%, 15%, 5% and 28%, 6%, 0%, respectively. The statistical comparison of V35, V50 and V63 revealed significant values for OLBF and IMRT. Dose of spinal cord did not exceed 45 Gy for any of radiation treatment planning. Between the three techniques, there was no significant difference in terms of conformity index and dose distribution was homogenous with all techniques. It is obvious that IMRT planning technique can decrease the carotid artery radiation doses in early stage glottic larynx cancer.

  16. SU-E-T-814: Whole Breast Irradiation with Two Different Intensity Modulation Radiotherapy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, T; Yin, Y; Lin, X; Zhang, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Breast cancer now mainly received forward intensity modulation radiotherapy (f-IMRT) and inverse IMRT (i-IMRT). The purpose of this study was to observe the differences of two treatment methods. Methods: 10 patients after left breast-conserving surgery were selected to receive radiotherapy. For each patient, two treatment plans (f-IMRT and i-IMRT) were designed. For f-IMRT plans, two tangent beams were designed to the target, and in each tangent orientation two or three segment beams were designed to reduced high dose region in the target and the dose of lung received. For i-IMRT plans, two tangent beams were designed to the target and the treatment planning system optimize the dose according to the optimization parameters. For each plan 50Gy was prescribed. Results: In f-IMRT and i-IMRT plans, the average target conformal index (CI) were (0.67±0.06) and (0.66±0.06), (P>0.05); average homogeneity index (HI) were (28.2±6.0)% and (26.1±6.8)%, (P>0.05); volume of left lung received 20Gy (V20) were (18.7±3.3)% and (17.0±2.8)%, (P<0.05), V30 were (15.5±3.0)% and (14.0±2.6)%, (P<0.05); V30 of heart were (4.1±3.1)% and (3.5±2.5)%, (P>0.05); Monitor Unit (MU) were (262±5)MU and (308±14)MU. Conclusion: Compared with i-IMRT plan, for breast cancer, the differences of CI and HI were not significant. Because of fewer MU, f-IMRT plan could reduce the machine abrasion and treatment time, but dose of normal tissue received were higher significantly than i-IMRT plan.

  17. Radiation pneumonitis in breast cancer patients who received radiotherapy using the partially wide tangent technique after breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yoonsun; Yoon, Hong In; Kim, Yong Bae; Ahn, Seung Kwon; Keum, Ki Chang; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2012-09-01

    We assessed the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in terms of dosimetric parameters in breast cancer patients, who received radiotherapy using the partially wide tangent technique (PWT), following breast conservation surgery (BCS). We analyzed the data from 100 breast cancer patients who underwent radiotherapy using PWT. The entire breast, supraclavicular lymph node, and internal mammary lymph node (IMN) were irradiated with 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. RP was scored on a scale of 0 to 5, based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. The dosimetric parameters, used in analysis for the ipsilateral lung, were the mean lung dose (MLD), V(5) (percentage of lung volume that received a dose of 5 Gy or more)-V(50), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Of the 100 patients, three suffered from symptomatic RP (symptom grade ≥2), but were relieved by supportive care. The risk of RP was not correlated with the treatment regimen. RP associated mostly with asymptomatic minimal pulmonary radiologic change or mild dry cough developed more frequently in the group with MLD ≥20.5 Gy or NTCP ≥23% than in the group with MLD <20.5 Gy and NTCP <23% (48.6% vs. 25.4%, p=0.018). Dosimetric parameters of MLD and NTCP were correlated with the incidence of RP, but the clinical impact was minimal. We suggest that PWT is a safe technique for the treatment of IMN for BCS patients with low risk of symptomatic RP.

  18. Radiosensitization effect of folate-conjugated gold nanoparticles on HeLa cancer cells under orthovoltage superficial radiotherapy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshgard, Karim; Hashemi, Bijan; Arbabi, Azim; Javad Rasaee, Mohammad; Soleimani, Masoud

    2014-05-01

    Due to the high atomic number of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), they are known as new radiosensitizer agents for enhancing the efficiency of superficial radiotherapy techniques by increasing the dose absorbed in tumor cells wherein they can be accumulated selectively. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of various common low energy levels of orthovoltage x-rays and megavoltage γ-rays (Co-60) on enhancing the therapeutic efficiency of HeLa cancer cells in the presence of conjugated folate and non-conjugated (pegylated) GNPs. To achieve this, GNPs with an average diameter of 52 nm were synthesized and conjugated to folic acid molecules. Pegylated GNPs with an average diameter of 47 nm were also synthesized and used as non-conjugated folate GNPs. Cytotoxicity assay of the synthesized folate-conjugated and pegylated GNPs was performed using different levels of nanoparticle concentration incubated with HeLa cells for 24 h. The radiosensitizing effect of both the conjugated and pegylated GNPs on the cells at a concentration of 50 µM was compared using MTT as well as clonogenic assays after exposing them to 2 Gy ionizing radiation produced by an orthovoltage x-ray machine at four different kVps and γ-rays of a Co-60 unit. Significant differences were noted among various irradiated groups with and without the folate conjugation, with an average dose enhancement factor (DEF) of 1.64 ± 0.05 and 1.35 ± 0.05 for the folate-conjugated and pegylated GNPs, respectively. The maximum DEF was obtained with the 180 kVp x-ray beam for both of the GNPs. Folate-conjugated GNPs can significantly enhance the cell killing potential of orthovoltage x-ray energies (especially at 180 kVp) in folate receptor-expressing cancer cells, such as HeLa, in superficial radiotherapy techniques.

  19. Application of Geo-Spatial Techniques for Precise Demarcation of Village/Panchayat Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, S. S.; Banu, V.; Tiwari, A.; Bahuguna, S.; Uniyal, S.; Chavan, S. B.; Murthy, M. V. R.; Arya, V. S.; Nagaraja, R.; Sharma, J. R.

    2014-11-01

    In order to achieve the overall progress of the country with active and effective participation of all sections of society, the 12th Five Year Plan (FYP) would bring Panchayats centre-stage and achieve the inclusive growth agenda through inclusive governance. The concept of 'democratic decentralization' in the form of a three-tier administration was introduced in the name of "Panchayat Raj". Horizontally, it is a network of village Panchayats. Vertically, it is an organic growth of Panchayats rising up to national level. The Ministry of Panchayati Raj has three broad agenda: Empowerment, Enablement and Accountability. Space based Information Support for Decentralized Planning (SIS-DP) is one of the initiatives taken by Govt. of India with ISRO/DOS for generation and dissemination of spatial information for planning at the grass root level. The boundary layer for villages across different states/district/block is available with line departments. Most of these data exist at a much generalized scale. These boundaries do not overlay exactly with that of ground realities and may not be suitable for accurate analysis in terms of area, shape, position, etc. To deal with this problem, a strategy is adopted, which makes use of High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI) from Indian Remote sensing satellites and cadastral maps at 1:4000 scale integrated with GIS techniques to enhance the accuracy of geo-spatial depiction of Village/Panchayat boundaries. Cadastral maps are used to depict the boundaries of land parcels and other features at the village level. These maps are registered to ortho products of HRSI using Ground Control Points. The cadastral maps are precisely overlaid on ortho-rectified HRSI and each parcel vertex is tagged with the real-world geographical coordinates. Village boundaries are extracted from the geo-referenced village cadastral maps. These boundaries are fine-tuned by considering under lap and overlap of neighboring villages and a mosaic is generated at

  20. A novel two-step laser ranging technique for a precision test of the theory of gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Chui, Talso

    2003-01-01

    All powered spacecraft experience residual systematic acceleration due to anisotropy of the thermal radiation pressure and fuel leakage. The residual acceleration limits the accuracy of any test of gravity that relies on the precise determination of the spacecraft trajectory. We describe a novel two-step laser ranging technique, which largely eliminates the effects of non-gravity acceleration sources and enables celestial mechanics checks with unprecedented precision.

  1. A novel two-step laser ranging technique for a precision test of the theory of gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Chui, Talso

    2003-01-01

    All powered spacecraft experience residual systematic acceleration due to anisotropy of the thermal radiation pressure and fuel leakage. The residual acceleration limits the accuracy of any test of gravity that relies on the precise determination of the spacecraft trajectory. We describe a novel two-step laser ranging technique, which largely eliminates the effects of non-gravity acceleration sources and enables celestial mechanics checks with unprecedented precision.

  2. Dosimetric study of volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc and intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer and comparison with 3-dimensional conformal technique for definitive radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Falk, Alexander T.; Auberdiac, Pierre; Cartier, Lysian; Vallard, Alexis; Ollier, Edouard; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Khodri, Moustapha; Chargari, Cyrus; Magné, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: For patients with cervical cancer, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) improves target coverage and allows dose escalation while reducing the radiation dose to organs at risk (OARs). In this study, we compared dosimetric parameters among 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), “step-and-shoot” IMRT, and volumetric intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) in a series of patients with cervical cancer receiving definitive radiotherapy. Computed tomography (CT) scans of 10 patients with histologically proven cervical cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT) from December 2008 to March 2010 at our department were selected for this study. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) were delineated following the guidelines of the Gyn IMRT consortium that included cervix, uterus, parametrial tissues, and the pelvic nodes including presacral. The median age was 57 years (range: 30 to 85 years). All 10 patients had squamous cell carcinoma with Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB-IIIB. All patients were treated by VMAT. OAR doses were significantly reduced for plans with intensity-modulated technique compared with 3D-CRT except for the dose to the vagina. Between the 2 intensity-modulated techniques, significant difference was observed for the mean dose to the small intestine, to the benefit of VMAT (p < 0.001). There was no improvement in terms of OARs sparing for VMAT although there was a tendency for a slightly decreased average dose to the rectum: − 0.65 Gy but not significant (p = 0.07). The intensity modulation techniques have many advantages in terms of quality indexes, and particularly OAR sparing, compared with 3D-CRT. Following the ongoing technologic developments in modern radiotherapy, it is essential to evaluate the intensity-modulated techniques on prospective studies of a larger scale.

  3. Experimental Technique for Producing and Recording Precise Particle Impacts on Transparent Window Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Perry; Guven, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    A new facility for making small particle impacts is being developed at NASA. Current sand/particle impact facilities are an erosion test and do not precisely measure and document the size and velocity of each of the impacting particles. In addition, evidence of individual impacts is often obscured by subsequent impacts. This facility will allow the number, size, and velocity of each particle to be measured and adjusted. It will also be possible to determine which particle produced damage at a given location on the target. The particle size and velocity will be measured by high speed imaging techniques. Information as to the extent of damage and debris from impacts will also be recorded. It will be possible to track these secondary particles, measuring size and velocity. It is anticipated that this additional degree of detail will provide input for erosion models and also help determine the impact physics of the erosion process. Particle impacts will be recorded at 90 degrees to the particle flight path and also from the top looking through the target window material.

  4. The First Simultaneous Intraoperative Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy Procedure: Dog Experiment and Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ashayeri, Ebrahim; Halyard, Michele; Goldson, Alfred L.; Cruz, Leon; Nibhanupudy, J. Rao; DeWitty, Robert; Galal, Fathy; Marquis, Bernard; Slaughter, Lynnard; Landes, Fred

    1987-01-01

    The Department of Radiation Therapy of Howard University Hospital was the first to revive (1976) the use of intraoperative radiotherapy, or direct view irradiation, using electron beam (IORTe−) in the United States. Since that time, this pioneering effort has gained both national and international acceptance. Now, many leading centers employ this investigational treatment modality. Recently, a new mode of cancer therapy has been gaining acceptance, namely hyperthermia (the treatment of cancer by heat). Hyperthermia has been shown, both experimentally and clinically, to improve the rate of local control (thermal enchancement ratio [TER]) when combined with radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer. Maximal TER has been observed with simultaneous or immediate application of radiation and hyperthermia for both tumor and normal tissues. Therefore, to achieve maximum therapeutic gain, selective, intraoperative, simultaneous heating and irradiation of the tumor with mechanical retraction of the normal and sensitive structures from the treatment field seems a promising alternative. There have been no published reports, to the authors' knowledge, on the combination of simultaneous IORTe− with intraoperative hyperthermia (IOHT). To employ this combination in human subjects, several questions must be answered first using animal models, including the technical and practical feasibility, the toxicity and morbidity, as well as the pathologic changes that may arise. The technical aspects of the first animal case, using a mongrel dog, applying simultaneous IORTe− and IOHT are presented. PMID:3112416

  5. Internal radiotherapy techniques using radiolanthanide praseodymium-142: a review of production routes, brachytherapy, unsealed source therapy.

    PubMed

    Bakht, Mohamadreza K; Sadeghi, Mahdi

    2011-10-01

    Radionuclides of rare earth elements are gaining importance as emerging therapeutic agents in nuclear medicine. β(-)-particle emitter 142Pr [T (1/2) = 19.12 h, E(-)β = 2.162 MeV (96.3%), Eγ = 1575 keV (3.7%)] is one of the praseodymium-141 (100% abundant) radioisotopes. Production routes and therapy aspects of 142Pr will be reviewed in this paper. However, 142Pr produces via 141Pr(n, γ) 142Pr reaction by irradiation in a low-fluence reactor; 142Pr cyclotron produced, could be achievable. 142Pr due to its high β(-)-emission and low specific gamma γ-emission could not only be a therapeutic radionuclide, but also a suitable radionuclide in order for biodistribution studies. Internal radiotherapy using 142Pr can be classified into two sub-categories: (1) unsealed source therapy (UST), (2) brachytherapy. UST via 142Pr-HA and 142Pr-DTPA in order for radiosynovectomy have been proposed. In addition, 142Pr Glass seeds and 142Pr microspheres have been utilized for interstitial brachytherapy of prostate cancer and intraarterial brachytherapy of arteriovenous malformation, respectively.

  6. Postoperative radiotherapy for lung cancer: improvement in locoregional control using three-dimensional compared with two-dimensional technique.

    PubMed

    Masson-Côté, Laurence; Couture, Christian; Fortin, André; Dagnault, Anne

    2011-07-01

    To determine whether lung cancer patients treated with three-dimensional (3D) postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) have more favorable outcomes than those treated with two-dimensional (2D) PORT. We retrospectively analyzed the charts of 153 lung cancer patients who underwent PORT with curative intent at our center between 1995 and 2007. The patients were grouped according to the RT technique; 66 patients were in the 2D group and 87 in the 3D group. The outcomes included locoregional control, survival, and secondary effects. All patients were treated using a linear accelerator at a total dose of approximately 50 Gy and 2 Gy/fraction. A few patients (21%) also received chemotherapy. Most tumors were in the advanced stage, either Stage II (30%) or Stage III (65%). The main clinical indications for PORT were positive resection margins (23%) and Stage pN2 (52%) and pN1 (22%). The patient characteristics were comparable in both groups. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the 3D technique significantly improved the locoregional control rate at 5 years compared with the 2D technique (81% vs. 56%, p = .007 [Cox]). The 2D technique was associated with a more than twofold increased risk of locoregional recurrence (hazard ratio, 2.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-5.5; p = .006). The overall survival rate did not differ at 5 years (38% vs. 20%, p = .3 [Cox]). The toxicities were also similar and acceptable in both groups. The 3D technique for conformal PORT for lung cancer improved the locoregional control rates of patients compared with the 2D technique. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer: Improvement in Locoregional Control Using Three-Dimensional Compared With Two-Dimensional Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Masson-Cote, Laurence; Couture, Christian; Fortin, Andre; Dagnault, Anne

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether lung cancer patients treated with three-dimensional (3D) postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) have more favorable outcomes than those treated with two-dimensional (2D) PORT. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the charts of 153 lung cancer patients who underwent PORT with curative intent at our center between 1995 and 2007. The patients were grouped according to the RT technique; 66 patients were in the 2D group and 87 in the 3D group. The outcomes included locoregional control, survival, and secondary effects. All patients were treated using a linear accelerator at a total dose of approximately 50 Gy and 2 Gy/fraction. A few patients (21%) also received chemotherapy. Most tumors were in the advanced stage, either Stage II (30%) or Stage III (65%). The main clinical indications for PORT were positive resection margins (23%) and Stage pN2 (52%) and pN1 (22%). The patient characteristics were comparable in both groups. Results: Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the 3D technique significantly improved the locoregional control rate at 5 years compared with the 2D technique (81% vs. 56%, p = .007 [Cox]). The 2D technique was associated with a more than twofold increased risk of locoregional recurrence (hazard ratio, 2.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-5.5; p = .006). The overall survival rate did not differ at 5 years (38% vs. 20%, p = .3 [Cox]). The toxicities were also similar and acceptable in both groups. Conclusion: The 3D technique for conformal PORT for lung cancer improved the locoregional control rates of patients compared with the 2D technique.

  8. Dosimetric Comparison of Bone Marrow-Sparing Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Conventional Techniques for Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mell, Loren K.; Tiryaki, Hanifi; Ahn, Kang-Hyun; Mundt, Arno J.; Roeske, John C.; Aydogan, Bulent

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To compare bone marrow-sparing intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy (BMS-IMRT) with conventional (four-field box and anteroposterior-posteroanterior [AP-PA]) techniques in the treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The data from 7 cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT without BMS were analyzed and compared with data using four-field box and AP-PA techniques. All plans were normalized to cover the planning target volume with the 99% isodose line. The clinical target volume consisted of the pelvic and presacral lymph nodes, uterus and cervix, upper vagina, and parametrial tissue. Normal tissues included bowel, bladder, and pelvic bone marrow (PBM), which comprised the lumbosacral spine and ilium and the ischium, pubis, and proximal femora (lower pelvis bone marrow). Dose-volume histograms for the planning target volume and normal tissues were compared for BMS-IMRT vs. four-field box and AP-PA plans. Results: BMS-IMRT was superior to the four-field box technique in reducing the dose to the PBM, small bowel, rectum, and bladder. Compared with AP-PA plans, BMS-IMRT reduced the PBM volume receiving a dose >16.4 Gy. BMS-IMRT reduced the volume of ilium, lower pelvis bone marrow, and bowel receiving a dose >27.7, >18.7, and >21.1 Gy, respectively, but increased dose below these thresholds compared with the AP-PA plans. BMS-IMRT reduced the volume of lumbosacral spine bone marrow, rectum, small bowel, and bladder at all dose levels in all 7 patients. Conclusion: BMS-IMRT reduced irradiation of PBM compared with the four-field box technique. Compared with the AP-PA technique, BMS-IMRT reduced lumbosacral spine bone marrow irradiation and reduced the volume of PBM irradiated to high doses. Therefore BMS-IMRT might reduce acute hematologic toxicity compared with conventional techniques.

  9. Dosimetric comparison of bone marrow-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus conventional techniques for treatment of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Mell, Loren K; Tiryaki, Hanifi; Ahn, Kang-Hyun; Mundt, Arno J; Roeske, John C; Aydogan, Bulent

    2008-08-01

    To compare bone marrow-sparing intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy (BMS-IMRT) with conventional (four-field box and anteroposterior-posteroanterior [AP-PA]) techniques in the treatment of cervical cancer. The data from 7 cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT without BMS were analyzed and compared with data using four-field box and AP-PA techniques. All plans were normalized to cover the planning target volume with the 99% isodose line. The clinical target volume consisted of the pelvic and presacral lymph nodes, uterus and cervix, upper vagina, and parametrial tissue. Normal tissues included bowel, bladder, and pelvic bone marrow (PBM), which comprised the lumbosacral spine and ilium and the ischium, pubis, and proximal femora (lower pelvis bone marrow). Dose-volume histograms for the planning target volume and normal tissues were compared for BMS-IMRT vs. four-field box and AP-PA plans. BMS-IMRT was superior to the four-field box technique in reducing the dose to the PBM, small bowel, rectum, and bladder. Compared with AP-PA plans, BMS-IMRT reduced the PBM volume receiving a dose >16.4 Gy. BMS-IMRT reduced the volume of ilium, lower pelvis bone marrow, and bowel receiving a dose >27.7, >18.7, and >21.1 Gy, respectively, but increased dose below these thresholds compared with the AP-PA plans. BMS-IMRT reduced the volume of lumbosacral spine bone marrow, rectum, small bowel, and bladder at all dose levels in all 7 patients. BMS-IMRT reduced irradiation of PBM compared with the four-field box technique. Compared with the AP-PA technique, BMS-IMRT reduced lumbosacral spine bone marrow irradiation and reduced the volume of PBM irradiated to high doses. Therefore BMS-IMRT might reduce acute hematologic toxicity compared with conventional techniques.

  10. Dosimetric comparison of preoperative single-fraction partial breast radiotherapy techniques: 3D CRT, noncoplanar IMRT, coplanar IMRT, and VMAT.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sua; Blitzblau, Rachel; Yin, Fang-Fang; Horton, Janet K

    2015-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to compare dosimetric parameters of treatment plans among four techniques for preoperative single-fraction partial breast radiotherapy in order to select an optimal treatment technique. The techniques evaluated were noncoplanar 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT), noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRTNC), coplanar IMRT (IMRTCO), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The planning CT scans of 16 patients in the prone position were used in this study, with the single-fraction prescription doses of 15 Gy for the first eight patients and 18 Gy for the remaining eight patients. Six (6) MV photon beams were designed to avoid the heart and contralateral breast. Optimization for IMRT and VMAT was performed to reduce the dose to the skin and normal breast. All plans were normalized such that 100% of the prescribed dose covered greater than 95% of the clinical target volume (CTV) consisting of gross tumor volume (GTV) plus 1.5 cm margin. Mean homogeneity index (HI) was the lowest (1.05 ± 0.02) for 3D CRT and the highest (1.11 ± 0.04) for VMAT. Mean conformity index (CI) was the lowest (1.42 ± 0.32) for IMRTNC and the highest (1.60 ± 0.32) for VMAT. Mean of the maximum point dose to skin was the lowest (73.7 ± 11.5%) for IMRTNC and the highest (86.5 ± 6.68%) for 3D CRT. IMRTCO showed very similar HI, CI, and maximum skin dose to IMRTNC (differences <1%). The estimated mean treatment delivery time, excluding the time spent for patient positioning and imaging, was 7.0 ± 1.0, 8.3 ± 1.1, 9.7 ± 1.0, and 11.0 ± 1.5min for VMAT, IMRTCO, IMRTNC and 3D CRT, respectively. In comparison of all four techniques for preoperative single-fraction partial breast radiotherapy, we can conclude that noncoplanar or coplanar IMRT were optimal in this study as IMRT plans provided homogeneous and conformal target coverage, skin sparing, and relatively short treatment delivery time.

  11. The Accuracy and Precision of Flow Measurements Using Phase Contrast Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chao

    Quantitative volume flow rate measurements using the magnetic resonance imaging technique are studied in this dissertation because the volume flow rates have a special interest in the blood supply of the human body. The method of quantitative volume flow rate measurements is based on the phase contrast technique, which assumes a linear relationship between the phase and flow velocity of spins. By measuring the phase shift of nuclear spins and integrating velocity across the lumen of the vessel, we can determine the volume flow rate. The accuracy and precision of volume flow rate measurements obtained using the phase contrast technique are studied by computer simulations and experiments. The various factors studied include (1) the partial volume effect due to voxel dimensions and slice thickness relative to the vessel dimensions; (2) vessel angulation relative to the imaging plane; (3) intravoxel phase dispersion; (4) flow velocity relative to the magnitude of the flow encoding gradient. The partial volume effect is demonstrated to be the major obstacle to obtaining accurate flow measurements for both laminar and plug flow. Laminar flow can be measured more accurately than plug flow in the same condition. Both the experiment and simulation results for laminar flow show that, to obtain the accuracy of volume flow rate measurements to within 10%, at least 16 voxels are needed to cover the vessel lumen. The accuracy of flow measurements depends strongly on the relative intensity of signal from stationary tissues. A correction method is proposed to compensate for the partial volume effect. The correction method is based on a small phase shift approximation. After the correction, the errors due to the partial volume effect are compensated, allowing more accurate results to be obtained. An automatic program based on the correction method is developed and implemented on a Sun workstation. The correction method is applied to the simulation and experiment results. The

  12. Technique of Injection of Hyaluronic Acid as a Prostatic Spacer and Fiducials Before Hypofractionated External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Boissier, Romain; Udrescu, Corina; Rebillard, Xavier; Terrier, Jean-Etienne; Faix, Antoine; Chapet, Olivier; Azria, David; Devonec, Marian; Paparel, Philippe; Ruffion, Alain

    2017-01-01

    To describe a technique combining the implantation of fiducials and a prostatic spacer (hyaluronic acid [HA]) to decrease the rectal toxicity after an image-guided external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with hypofractionation for prostate cancer and to assess the tolerance and the learning curve of the procedure. Thirty patients with prostate cancer at low or intermediate risk were included in a phase II trial: image-guided EBRT of 62 Gy in 20 fractions of 3.1 Gy with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. A transrectal implantation of 3 fiducials and transperineal injection of 10 cc of HA (NASHA gel spacer, Q-Med AB, Uppsala, Sweden) between the rectum and the prostate was performed by 1 operator. The thickness of HA was measured at 10 points on magnetic resonance imaging to establish a quality score of the injection (maximum score = 10) and determine the learning curve of the procedure. The quality score increased from patients 1-10, 11-20, to 21-30 with respective median scores: 7 [2-10], 5 [4-7], and 8 [3-10]. The average thicknesses of HA between the base, middle part, and apex of the prostate and the rectum were the following: 15.1 mm [6.4-29], 9.8 mm [5-21.2], and 9.9 mm [3.2-21.5]. The injection of the HA induced a median pain score of 4 [1-8] and no residual pain at mid-long term. Creating an interface between the rectum and the prostate and the implantation of fiducials were feasible under local anesthesia with a short learning curve and could become a standard procedure before a hypofractionated EBRT for prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [From random mutagenesis to precise genome editing: the development and evolution of genome editing techniques in Drosophila].

    PubMed

    Su, Fang; Huang, Zongliang; Guo, Yawen; Jiao, Renjie; Zi, Li; Chen, Jianming; Liu, Jiyong

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster, an important model organism for studying life science, has contributed more to the research of genetics, developmental biology and biomedicine with the development of genome editing techniques. Drosophila genome-editing techniques have evolved from random mutagenesis to precise genome editing and from simple mutant construction to diverse genome editing methods since the 20th century. Chemical mutagenesis, using Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), is an important technique to study gene function in forward genetics, however, the precise knockout of Drosophila genes could not be achieved. The gene targeting technology, based on homologous recombination, has accomplished the precise editing of Drosophila genome for the first time, but with low efficiency. The CRISPR/Cas9 (Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein)-mediated precise genome editing is simple, fast and highly efficient compared with the gene targeting technology in Drosophila. In this review, we focus on Drosophila gene knockout, and summarize the evolution of genome editing techniques in Drosophila, emphasizing the development and applications of gene targeting, zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and CRISPR/Cas9 techniques.

  14. Charge Breeding Techniques in an Electron Beam Ion Trap for High Precision Mass Spectrometry at TITAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, T. D.; Simon, M. C.; Bale, J. C.; Chowdhury, U.; Eibach, M.; Gallant, A. T.; Lennarz, A.; Simon, V. V.; Chaudhuri, A.; Grossheim, A.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Schultz, B. E.; Dilling, J.

    2012-10-01

    Penning trap mass spectrometry is the most accurate and precise method available for performing atomic mass measurements. TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science is currently the only facility to couple its Penning trap to a rare isotope facility and an electron beam ion trap (EBIT). The EBIT is a valuable tool for beam preparation: since the precision scales linearly with the charge state, it takes advantage of the precision gained by using highly charged ions. However, this precision gain is contingent on fast and efficient charge breeding. An optimization algorithm has been developed to identify the optimal conditions for running the EBIT. Taking only the mass number and half-life of the isotope of interest as inputs, the electron beam current density, charge breeding time, charge state, and electron beam energy are all specified to maximize this precision. An overview of the TITAN charge breeding program, and the results of charge breeding simulations will be presented.

  15. A comparative study of standard intensity-modulated radiotherapy and RapidArc planning techniques for ipsilateral and bilateral head and neck irradiation.

    PubMed

    Pursley, Jennifer; Damato, Antonio L; Czerminska, Maria A; Margalit, Danielle N; Sher, David J; Tishler, Roy B

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate class solutions using RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning for ipsilateral and bilateral head and neck (H&N) irradiation, and to compare dosimetric results with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans. A total of 14 patients who received ipsilateral and 10 patients who received bilateral head and neck irradiation were retrospectively replanned with several volumetric-modulated arc therapy techniques. For ipsilateral neck irradiation, the volumetric-modulated arc therapy techniques included two 360° arcs, two 360° arcs with avoidance sectors around the contralateral parotid, two 260° or 270° arcs, and two 210° arcs. For bilateral neck irradiation, the volumetric-modulated arc therapy techniques included two 360° arcs, two 360° arcs with avoidance sectors around the shoulders, and 3 arcs. All patients had a sliding-window-delivery intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan that was used as the benchmark for dosimetric comparison. For ipsilateral neck irradiation, a volumetric-modulated arc therapy technique using two 360° arcs with avoidance sectors around the contralateral parotid was dosimetrically comparable to intensity-modulated radiotherapy, with improved conformity (conformity index = 1.22 vs 1.36, p < 0.04) and lower contralateral parotid mean dose (5.6 vs 6.8Gy, p < 0.03). For bilateral neck irradiation, 3-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy techniques were dosimetrically comparable to intensity-modulated radiotherapy while also avoiding irradiation through the shoulders. All volumetric-modulated arc therapy techniques required fewer monitor units than sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy to deliver treatment, with an average reduction of 35% for ipsilateral plans and 67% for bilateral plans. Thus, for ipsilateral head and neck irradiation a volumetric-modulated arc therapy technique using two 360° arcs with avoidance sectors around the contralateral parotid is

  16. Dosimetric difference amongst 3 techniques: TomoTherapy, sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and RapidArc radiotherapy in the treatment of late-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC).

    PubMed

    Lee, Francis Kar-ho; Yip, Celia Wai-yi; Cheung, Frankie Chun-hung; Leung, Alex Kwok-cheung; Chau, Ricky Ming-chun; Ngan, Roger Kai-cheong

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the dosimetric difference amongst TomoTherapy, sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and RapidArc radiotherapy in the treatment of late-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten patients with late-stage (Stage III or IV) NPC treated with TomoTherapy or IMRT were selected for the study. Treatment plans with these 3 techniques were devised according to departmental protocol. Dosimetric parameters for organ at risk and treatment targets were compared between TomoTherapy and IMRT, TomoTherapy and RapidArc, and IMRT and RapidArc. Comparison amongst the techniques was done by statistical tests on the dosimetric parameters, total monitor unit (MU), and expected delivery time. All 3 techniques achieved similar target dose coverage. TomoTherapy achieved significantly lower doses in lens and mandible amongst the techniques. It also achieved significantly better dose conformity to the treatment targets. RapidArc achieved significantly lower dose to the eye and normal tissue, lower total MU, and less delivery time. The dosimetric advantages of the 3 techniques were identified in the treatment of late-stage NPC. This may serve as a guideline for selection of the proper technique for different clinical cases. © 2013 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists Published by American Association of Medical Dosimetrists All rights reserved.

  17. Dosimetric difference amongst 3 techniques: TomoTherapy, sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and RapidArc radiotherapy in the treatment of late-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Francis Kar-ho Yip, Celia Wai-yi; Cheung, Frankie Chun-hung; Leung, Alex Kwok-cheung; Chau, Ricky Ming-chun; Ngan, Roger Kai-cheong

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the dosimetric difference amongst TomoTherapy, sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and RapidArc radiotherapy in the treatment of late-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten patients with late-stage (Stage III or IV) NPC treated with TomoTherapy or IMRT were selected for the study. Treatment plans with these 3 techniques were devised according to departmental protocol. Dosimetric parameters for organ at risk and treatment targets were compared between TomoTherapy and IMRT, TomoTherapy and RapidArc, and IMRT and RapidArc. Comparison amongst the techniques was done by statistical tests on the dosimetric parameters, total monitor unit (MU), and expected delivery time. All 3 techniques achieved similar target dose coverage. TomoTherapy achieved significantly lower doses in lens and mandible amongst the techniques. It also achieved significantly better dose conformity to the treatment targets. RapidArc achieved significantly lower dose to the eye and normal tissue, lower total MU, and less delivery time. The dosimetric advantages of the 3 techniques were identified in the treatment of late-stage NPC. This may serve as a guideline for selection of the proper technique for different clinical cases.

  18. Current concepts on imaging in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lecchi, Michela; Fossati, Piero; Elisei, Federica; Orecchia, Roberto; Lucignani, Giovanni

    2008-04-01

    New high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or hadrontherapy, allow better dose distribution within the target and spare a larger portion of normal tissue than conventional RT. These techniques require accurate tumour volume delineation and intrinsic characterization, as well as verification of target localisation and monitoring of organ motion and response assessment during treatment. These tasks are strongly dependent on imaging technologies. Among these, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasonography (US) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been applied in high-precision RT. For tumour volume delineation and characterization, PET has brought an additional dimension to the management of cancer patients by allowing the incorporation of crucial functional and molecular images in RT treatment planning, i.e. direct evaluation of tumour metabolism, cell proliferation, apoptosis, hypoxia and angiogenesis. The combination of PET and CT in a single imaging system (PET/CT) to obtain a fused anatomical and functional dataset is now emerging as a promising tool in radiotherapy departments for delineation of tumour volumes and optimization of treatment plans. Another exciting new area is image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), which focuses on the potential benefit of advanced imaging and image registration to improve precision, daily target localization and monitoring during treatment, thus reducing morbidity and potentially allowing the safe delivery of higher doses. The variety of IGRT systems is rapidly expanding, including cone beam CT and US. This article examines the increasing role of imaging techniques in the entire process of high-precision radiotherapy.

  19. Comparison of Chest Wall and Lymphatic Radiotherapy Techniques in Patients with Left Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gültekin, Melis; Karabuğa, Mehmet; Yıldız, Ferah; Özyiğit, Gökhan; Cengiz, Mustafa; Zorlu, Faruk; Akyol, Fadıl; Gürkaynak, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to find the most appropriate technique for postmastectomy chest wall (CW) and lymphatic irradiation. Materials and Methods Partially wide tangent, 30/70 photon/electron mix, 20/80 photon/electron mix and CW and internal mammary en face electron field, were studied on computerized tomography (CT) scans of 10 left breast carcinoma patients and dosimetric calculations have been studied. Dose volume histograms (DVH) obtained from treatment planning system (TPS) were used for minimal, maximal and mean doses received by the clinical target volumes and critical structures. Results Partially wide tangent field resulted in the most homogeneous dose distribution for the CW and a significantly lower lung and heart doses compared with all other techniques. However, right breast dose was significantly higher for partially wide tangent technique than that each of the other techniques. Approximately 0.6–7.9% differences were found between thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) and treatment planning system (TPS). The daily surface doses calculating using Gafchromic® external beam therapy (EBT) dosimetry films were 161.8±2.7 cGy for the naked, 241.0±1.5 cGy when 0.5 cm bolus was used and 255.3±2.7 cGy when 1 cm bolus was used. Conclusion As a result of this study, partially wide tangent field was found to be the most appropriate technique in terms of the dose distribution, treatment planning and set-up procedure. The main disadvantage of this technique was the higher dose to the contralateral breast comparing the other techniques.

  20. [Acute skin toxicity in breast intensity modulated radiotherapy using field in field technique].

    PubMed

    Blanchecotte, J; Ruffier-Loubière, A; Reynaud-Bougnoux, A; Barillot, I

    2015-04-01

    The optimization with presegmentation irradiation technique (Dosisoft™), used in treatment of breast carcinomas, facilitates the treatment delivery and improves radioprotection. The objective of our study was to evaluate the potential impact of this innovative technique on the acute skin toxicity especially on the rate of moist desquamation during irradiation of the whole breast after conservative surgery. The scores of acute skin toxicity observed at 50 Gy in 103 patients treated with the presegmentation technique were compared to those of 101 patients with similar breast size treated with a classic 3D technique. All patients received 50 Gy/2 Gy per fraction, 5 days a week using 4 MV photon beam. The boost on the tumoural bed was realized according to conventional technique. Using the NCI-CTCAE V4, the skin toxicity was recorded every week during the medical visit. Moreover, the following factors that could induce skin toxicity have been studied: breast size, body mass index, age, prior chemotherapy, concurrent administration of trastuzumab, hypertension, diabetes, smoking habits and statin uptake. The incidence of moist desquamation observed in all sites, has been decreased to only 9.8% in the presegmentation group versus 16.8% in the test group, the difference being not statistically significant OR=0.53 [0.23; 1.22] (P=0.13). In univariate analysis the presegmentation technique enabled a significant decrease of 4.4 Gy in mean, of the value of maximum dose (P=0.001). The other risk factors of skin toxicity are the increase of breast size (P<0.001), a high body mass index (P<0.001), hypertension (P=0.03) and concurrent administration of trastuzumab (P=0.07). In multivariate analysis, the two remaining significant factors are breast size (OR=1.004 [1.002; 1.006]) and trastuzumab administration (OR=4.95 [1.17; 20.79]). The comparison of the skin toxicity induced by the presegmentation or the reference technique shows a trend regarding the improvement of the skin

  1. Adjuvant external beam radiotherapy after therapeutic groin lymphadenectomy for patients with melanoma: a dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques.

    PubMed

    Adams, Gerard; Foote, Matthew; Brown, Simon; Burmeister, Bryan

    2017-02-01

    Radiotherapy after lymph node dissection is recommended in high-risk melanoma cases. The aim of this study is to assess whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) offers advantages over three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in the groin nodal basin. Fifteen consecutively treated patients (5 3DCRT and 10 IMRT) were selected. Optimized theoretical plans using the other modality were created - enabling direct comparisons of 3DCRT and IMRT. Target volume and organs at risk constraints were assessed as achieved or as having minor (≤5%) or major (>5%) deviations. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare the dose received from each patient plan (3DCRT vs. IMRT), whereas the Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare clinical plans with theoretical plans. Fisher's exact test was used to compare categorical data. Target coverage was achievable in most patients (major deviations - 1 IMRT and 3 3DCRT). Conformity index improved with IMRT - median 0.65, range 0.48-0.81, versus median 0.44, range 0.29-0.60 for 3DCRT; P value less than 0.001. All 3DCRT plans had major deviations for femoral head/neck constraints. Twelve and 13 IMRT plans achieved the high (V42<5%) and low (V36<35%) constraints; P value less than 0.001. IMRT delivered statistically significant lower doses to small bowel volumes up to 40 ml. There were no differences in beam numbers used nor dosimetric endpoints measured when clinical plans were compared with theoretical plans. IMRT appears to allow superior conformity of dose to the target volume while relatively sparing the adjacent the bowel and femoral head/neck. This may reduce toxicity while maintaining control rates.

  2. Holmium-loaded PLLA nanoparticles for intratumoral radiotherapy via the TMT technique: preparation, characterization, and stability evaluation after neutron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hamoudeh, Misara; Fessi, Hatem; Salim, Hani; Barbos, Dumitru

    2008-08-01

    This article describes the preparation of biocompatible radioactive holmium-loaded particles with appropriate nanoscale size for radionuclide intratumoral administration by the targeted multitherapy (TMT) technique. For this objective, holmium acetylacetonate has been encapsulated in poly-L-lactide (PLLA)-based nanoparticles (NP) by oil-in-water emulsion-solvent evaporation method. NP sizes ranged between 100 and 1,100 m being suitable for the TMT administration method. Elemental holmium loading was found to be around 18% wt/wt and the holmium acetylacetonate trihydrate (HoAcAc) encapsulation efficacy was about 90%. Different experiments demonstrated an amorphous state of HoAcAc after incorporation in NPs. The NPs were irradiated in a nuclear reactor with a neutron flux of 1.1 x 10(13) n/cm(2)/s for 1 h, which yielded a specific activity of about 27.4 GBq/g of NPs being sufficient for our desired application. Microscopic analysis of irradiated NPs showed some alteration after neutron irradiation as some NPs looked partially coagglomerated and a few pores appeared at their surface because of the locally released heat in the irradiation vials. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results indicated a clear decrease in PLLA melting point and melting enthalpy reflecting a decrease in polymer crystallinity. This was accompanied by a clear decrease in polymer molecular weights, which can be ascribed to a radiation-induced chain scission mechanism. However, interestingly, other experiments confirmed the chemical identity retention of both HoAcAc and PLLA in irradiated NPs despite this detected decrease in the polymer crystallinity and molecular weight. Although neutron irradiation has induced some NPs damage, these NPs kept out their overall chemical composition, and their size distribution remained suitable for the TMT administration technique. Coupled with the TMT technique, these NPs may represent a novel potential radiopharmaceutical agent for

  3. Comparison of dose distribution in IMRT and RapidArc technique in prostate radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Leszczyński, Wojciech; Ślosarek, Krzysztof; Szlag, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim was to provide a dosimetric comparison between IMRT and RapidArc treatment plans with RPI index with simultaneous comparison of the treatment delivery time. Background IMRT and RapidArc provide highly conformal dose distribution with good sparing of normal tissues. However, a complex spatial dosimetry of IMRT and RapidArc plans hampers the evaluation and comparison between plans calculated for the two modalities. RPI was used in this paper for treatment plan comparisons. The duration of the therapeutic session in RapidArc is reported to be shorter in comparison to therapeutic time of the other dynamic techniques. For this reasons, total treatment delivery time in both techniques was compared and discussed. Materials and methods 15 patients with prostate carcinoma were randomly selected for the analysis. Two competitive treatment plans using respectively the IMRT and RapidArc techniques were computed for each patient in Eclipse planning system v. 8.6.15. RPIwin® application was used for RPI calculations for each treatment plan. Additionally, total treatment time was compared between IMRT and RapidArc plans. Total treatment time was a sum of monitor units (MU) for each treated field. Results The mean values of the RPI indices were insignificantly higher for IMRT plans in comparison to rotational therapy. Comparison of the mean numbers of monitor units confirmed that the use of rotational technique instead of conventional static field IMRT can significantly reduce the treatment time. Conclusion Analysis presented in this paper, demonstrated that RapidArc can compete with the IMRT technique in the field of treatment plan dosimetry reducing the time required for dose delivery. PMID:24377036

  4. Dosimetric comparison of 3-dimensional conformal and field-in-field radiotherapy techniques for the adjuvant treatment of early stage endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Yavas, Guler; Yavas, Cagdas; Acar, Hilal; Buyukyoruk, Ahmet; Cobanoglu, Gokcen; Kerimoglu, Ozlem Secilmis; Yavas, Ozlem; Celik, Cetin

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare field-in-field radiotherapy (FIF) with conformal radiotherapy (CRT) in terms of dosimetric benefits for early stage endometrial cancer patients. Ten consecutive early stage endometrial cancer patients who underwent adjuvant external beam radiotherapy were included in the study. For each patient, two different treatment plans were created. FIF and CRT plans were compared for doses in the planning target volume (PTV), the organ at risk (OAR) volumes including rectum, bladder, bowel, bilateral femurs and bone marrow, the dose homogeneity index, and the monitor unit counts required for the treatment. The FIF technique significantly reduced the maximum dose of the PTV, rectum, bladder, bowel, left femur, right femur and bone marrow (p values were: <0.001, 0.031, 0.003, <0.001, 0.001, 0.001 and <0.001 respectively). When the OAR volumes irradiated with >30 and >45 Gy were compared, the results were in favor of the FIF technique. The volumes of rectum, bladder, bowel, left femur, right femur and bone marrow receiving more than the prescription dose of 45 Gy were significantly reduced with FIF technique (p values were 0.016, 0.039, 0.01, 0.04, 0.037 and 0.01 respectively). The dose homogeneity index (DHI) was significantly improved with FIF technique (p < 0.001). FIF allowed more homogeneous dose distribution in the PTV and reduced the doses received by OAR. Considering the lower maximum doses in the OAR and PTV, FIF technique seems to be more advantageous than CRT during adjuvant radiotherapy for early stage endometrial cancer patients. Copyright © 2012 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, not 3D conformal, is the preferred technique for treating locally advanced lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Joe Y.

    2015-01-01

    When used to treat lung cancer, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can deliver higher dose to the targets and spare more critical organs in lung cancer than can 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). However, tumor-motion management and optimized radiotherapy planning based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) scanning are crucial to maximize the benefit of IMRT and to eliminate or minimize potential uncertainties. This article summarizes these strategies and reviews published findings supporting the safety and efficacy of IMRT for lung cancer. PMID:25771415

  6. Precise measurement of a magnetic field generated by the electromagnetic flux compression technique.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, D; Sawabe, H; Matsuda, Y H; Takeyama, S

    2013-04-01

    The precision of the values of a magnetic field generated by electromagnetic flux compression was investigated in ultra-high magnetic fields of up to 700 T. In an attempt to calibrate the magnetic field measured by pickup coils, precise Faraday rotation (FR) measurements were conducted on optical (quartz and crown) glasses. A discernible "turn-around" phenomenon was observed in the FR signal as well as the pickup coils before the end of a liner implosion. We found that the magnetic field measured by pickup coils should be corrected by taking into account the high-frequency response of the signal transmission line. Near the peak magnetic field, however, the pickup coils failed to provide reliable values, leaving the FR measurement as the only method to precisely measure extremely high magnetic fields.

  7. An attenuation integral digital imaging technique for the treatment portal verification of conventional and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Guan Huaiqun

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To propose an attenuation integral digital imaging (AIDI) technique for the treatment portal verification of conventional and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: In AIDI technique, an open in air fluence image I{sub o} and a patient fluence image I were acquired under the same exposure. Then after doing the dark field correction for both the I{sub o} and I, the AIDI image was simply calculated as log(I{sub o}/I), which is the attenuation integral along the ray path from the x-ray source to a detector pixel element. Theoretical analysis for the low contrast detection and the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of AIDI was presented and compared to those for the fluence imaging. With AIDI, the variation of x-ray fluence and the variation of individual detector pixel's response can be automatically compensated without using the flood field correction. Results: The AIDI image for a contrast detail phantom demonstrated that it can efficiently suppress the background structures such as the couch and generate better visibility for low contrast objects with megavoltage x rays. The AIDI image acquired for a Catphan 500 phantom using a 60 deg. electronic dynamic wedge field also revealed more contrast disks than the fluence imaging did. Finally, AIDI for an IMRT field of a head/neck patient successfully displayed the anatomical structures underneath the treatment portal but not shown in fluence imaging. Conclusions: For IMRT and high degree wedge beams, direct imaging using them is difficult because their photon fluence is highly nonuniform. But AIDI can be used for the treatment portal verification of these beams.

  8. The Precise Repositioning Instrument for Genioplasty and a Three-Dimensional Printing Technique for Treatment of Complex Facial Asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Tian, Dan; Sun, Xiumei; Xiao, Yanju; Chen, Li; Wu, Guomin

    2017-08-01

    Facial asymmetry is very common in maxillofacial deformities. It is difficult to achieve accurate reconstruction. With the help of 3D printing models and surgical templates, the osteotomy line and the amount of bone grinding can be accurate. Also, by means of the precise repositioning instrument, the repositioning of genioplasty can be accurate and quick. In this study, we present a three-dimensional printing technique and the precise repositioning instrument to guide the osteotomy and repositioning, and illustrate their feasibility and validity. Eight patients with complex facial asymmetries were studied. A precise 3D printing model was obtained. We made the preoperative design and surgical templates according to it. The surgical templates and precise repositioning instrument were used to obtain an accurate osteotomy and repositioning during the operation. Postoperative measurements were made based on computed tomographic data, including chin point deviation as well as the symmetry of the mandible evaluated by 3D curve functions. All patients obtained satisfactory esthetic results, and no recurrences occurred during follow-up. The results showed that we achieved clinically acceptable precision for the mandible and chin. The mean and SD of ICC between R-Post and L-Post were 0.973 ± 0.007. The mean and SD of chin point deviation 6 months after the operation were 0.63 ± 0.19 mm. The results of this study suggest that the three-dimensional printing technique and the precise repositioning instrument could aid in making better operation designs and more accurate manipulation in orthognathic surgery for complex facial asymmetry. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  9. [Radiotherapy for primary lung carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Giraud, P; Lacornerie, T; Mornex, F

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, technique of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy, for primary lung carcinoma are presented. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed.

  10. Evaluation of the precision of three implant transfer impression techniques using two elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Tamer Mohamed Nasr; Elgendy, Mohamed Nabeel Mohamed; Kashef, Nahed Ahmed; Halim, Maha Mostafa

    2010-01-01

    A master cast representing a completely edentulous mandible was fabricated in polyurethane resin and had four implants secured to the anterior interforaminal area. Impressions were made using six technique-material combinations. Ten definitive casts were fabricated for each technique. Linear distances between implants were measured using a traveling microscope. There was no statistically significant difference between the direct unsplinted and splinted techniques (P > .05), while the indirect technique was statistically significantly different from the other two techniques (P < .05). There was no statistically significant difference between the two impression materials.

  11. Half-body radiotherapy. Evaluation of the technique in normal dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Laing, E.J.; Fitzpatrick, P.J.; Norris, A.M.; Mosseri, A.; Rider, W.D.; Binnington, A.G.; Baur, A.; Valli, V.E.

    1989-04-01

    Eight healthy mongrel dogs were treated with half-body irradiation (HBI) in a pilot study to evaluate the technique and radiotolerance of different organs. Cranial and caudal half-body fields were established using the 13th thoracic vertebra as the dividing point. Under general anesthesia, either 7 or 8 Gray (Gy) were delivered to one half of the body using opposing radiation portals. The other half of the body was similarly treated 28 days later. The dogs were monitored for 12 months. Significant radiation effects included transient bone marrow suppression and radiation sickness. There were no serious or life-threatening problems, but the 8 Gy group consistently showed more severe clinical signs and histologic changes than the 7 Gy group. Total body irradiation in two fractions of 7 or 8 Gy given 1 month apart appears to be a safe treatment that can be developed for therapy in veterinary oncology.

  12. Clinical Application of a Modular Genomics Technique in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Progress towards Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Bethany J.; Allaire, Norm; Ranger, Ann; Hardiman, Gary; Petri, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring disease activity in a complex, heterogeneous disease such as lupus is difficult. Both over- and undertreatment lead to damage. Current standard of care serologies are unreliable. Better measures of disease activity are necessary as we move into the era of precision medicine. We show here the use of a data-driven, modular approach to genomic biomarker development within lupus—specifically lupus nephritis. PMID:27656648

  13. Application of dynamic Monte Carlo technique in proton beam radiotherapy using Geant4 simulation toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Fada

    Monte Carlo method has been successfully applied in simulating the particles transport problems. Most of the Monte Carlo simulation tools are static and they can only be used to perform the static simulations for the problems with fixed physics and geometry settings. Proton therapy is a dynamic treatment technique in the clinical application. In this research, we developed a method to perform the dynamic Monte Carlo simulation of proton therapy using Geant4 simulation toolkit. A passive-scattering treatment nozzle equipped with a rotating range modulation wheel was modeled in this research. One important application of the Monte Carlo simulation is to predict the spatial dose distribution in the target geometry. For simplification, a mathematical model of a human body is usually used as the target, but only the average dose over the whole organ or tissue can be obtained rather than the accurate spatial dose distribution. In this research, we developed a method using MATLAB to convert the medical images of a patient from CT scanning into the patient voxel geometry. Hence, if the patient voxel geometry is used as the target in the Monte Carlo simulation, the accurate spatial dose distribution in the target can be obtained. A data analysis tool---root was used to score the simulation results during a Geant4 simulation and to analyze the data and plot results after simulation. Finally, we successfully obtained the accurate spatial dose distribution in part of a human body after treating a patient with prostate cancer using proton therapy.

  14. Fast and precise computation of electrostatic fields with a charge simulation method using modern programming techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.; Zech, G.; Otto, W.

    1996-05-01

    A precise computation of the electrostatic field is of considerable importance for the optimization of devices with electrooptical imaging. Another field of interest is the development of particle detectors like wire chambers or microstrip chambers. Inside a gas volume of such a detector a high electrostatic field is produced at small electrodes. Particles passing the detector ionize a certain number of gas molecules. The electrons produced by this process are moving along the field lines. When they reach a high field region they are accelerated and in turn ionize the gas. This leads to a charge avalanche that induces a signal on the electrodes that can be measured. To simulate these detectors the field has to be computed to high precision, especially in regions where the field is large, since the gas gain depends exponentially on the field strength. For signal simulation also the drift velocity of the positive ions which is proportional to the field, the induced charges on the electrodes, and the capacitances are of interest. Here a method to reduce the computational effort for numerical calculation of electrostatic fields by a Charge Simulation Method is introduced. By simplifying complex charge configurations for the evaluation of the field at large distances, the computation time can be reduced considerably preserving high precision. Since the method is ideally suited to object-oriented programming it has been implemented in C++.

  15. PT-06RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF HIGH-PRECISION CONFORMAL RADIATION THERAPY COMPARED TO CONVENTIONAL RADIOTHERAPY IN PRESERVATION OF LONG-TERM NEURO-COGNITIVE OUTCOMES IN YOUNG PATIENTS WITH PROGRESSIVE OR RESIDUAL BENIGN/LOW-GRADE BRAIN TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, Rakesh; Gupta, Tejpal; Goswami, Savita; Krishna, Uday; Dutta, Debnarayan; Deodhar, Joyita; Kannan, Sadhna; Sarin, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To report neuro-psychological outcomes in young patients with progressive benign and low-grade brain tumors treated with high-precision stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) versus conventional radiotherapy (Conv RT) (NCT00517959). METHODS: Between 2001-10, 200 patients (median age 13 years, commonest histology craniopraryngioma) were randomized to SCRT (n = 105; 6MV, non-coplanar fields using micromultileaf collimators) or Conv RT (n = 95; 6MV, 2-4 open fields) to 54 Gy/30 fractions. Neuropsychological battery included full-scale IQ (FSIQ), verbal quotient (VQ), performance quotient (PQ), memory quotient (MQ in patients > 16 years) by Wechsler scores, LOTCA battery and state-trait Anxiety Inventory and Hamilton Anxiety-Depression Scales. Serial evaluations were performed at baseline (pre-RT), 6-months and 2, 3, 4, and 5-years post-RT and analyzed using generalized linear-mixed model (GLMM). RESULTS: Pre- RT baseline revealed considerable proportion of patients with low intelligence in both arms indicating effects of tumor and prior treatments. GLMM for repeated measures demonstrated significantly better preservation of FSIQ over time in SCRT versus Conv RT arm at 3 years (p = 0.0003) and 5 years (p = 0.012). There was significantly better preservation of VQ (age < 16 years) (p = 0.047) and MQ (age > 16 years) (p = 0.049) in SCRT than Conv RT arm. Anxiety scores between two arms was not significant at 5 years but mean depression scores at 5 years in age group <16 years was found significantly higher in Conv RT arm (p = 0.01). Patients in Conv RT also had significantly more neurocognitive decline in LOTCA battery at 5 years (p = 0.019), particularly in visuomotor organization and attention-concentration domains. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate high-precision conformal radiotherapy superior to conventional radiotherapy in preservation of neuropsychological functions in young patients with benign/low grade brain tumors. This is among few trials generating

  16. A simple DVH generation technique for various radiotherapy treatment planning systems for an independent information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byung Jun; Nam, Heerim; Jeong, Il Sun; Lee, Hyebin

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, the use of a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) for radiation therapy has become the norm in hospital environments and has been suggested for collecting and managing data using Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) objects from different treatment planning systems (TPSs). However, some TPSs do not provide the ability to export the dose-volume histogram (DVH) in text or other format. In addition, plan review systems for various TPSs often allow DVH recalculations with different algorithms. These algorithms result in inevitable discrepancies between the values obtained with the recalculation and those obtained with TPS itself. The purpose of this study was to develop a simple method for generating reproducible DVH values by using the TPSs. Treatment planning information, including structures and delivered dose, was exported in the DICOM format from the Eclipse v8.9 or the Pinnacle v9.6 planning systems. The supersampling and trilinear interpolation methods were employed to calculate the DVH data from 35 treatment plans. The discrepancies between the DVHs extracted from each TPS and those extracted by using the proposed calculation method were evaluated with respect to the supersampling ratio. The volume, minimum dose, maximum dose, and mean dose were compared. The variations in DVHs from multiple TPSs were compared by using the MIM software v6.1, which is a commercially available treatment planning comparison tool. The overall comparisons of the volume, minimum dose, maximum dose, and mean dose showed that the proposed method generated relatively smaller discrepancies compared with TPS than the MIM software did compare with the TPS. As the structure volume decreased, the overall percent difference increased. The largest difference was observed in small organs such as the eye ball, eye lens, and optic nerve which had volume below 10 cc. A simple and useful technique was developed to generate a DVH with an acceptable

  17. Dosimetric comparison of two arc-based stereotactic body radiotherapy techniques for early-stage lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Ye, Jingjing; Kim, John J; Deng, Jun; Kaur, Monica S; Chen, Zhe Jay

    2015-01-01

    To compare the dosimetric and delivery characteristics of two arc-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) techniques for early-stage lung cancer treatment. SBRT treatment plans for lung tumors of different sizes and locations were designed using a single-isocenter multisegment dynamic conformal arc technique (SiMs-arc) and a volumetric modulated arc therapy technique (RapidArc) for 5 representative patients treated previously with lung SBRT. The SiMs-arc plans were generated with the isocenter located in the geometric center of patient׳s axial plane (which allows for collision-free gantry rotation around the patient) and 6 contiguous 60° arc segments spanning from 1° to 359°. 2 RapidArc plans, one using the same arc geometry as the SiMs-arc and the other using typical partial arcs (210°) with the isocenter inside planning target volume (PTV), were generated for each corresponding SiMs-arc plan. All plans were generated using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system (V10.0) and were normalized with PTV V100 to 95%. PTV coverage, dose to organs at risk, and total monitor units (MUs) were then compared and analyzed. For PTV coverage, the RapidArc plans generally produced higher PTV D99 (by 1.0% to 3.3%) and higher minimum dose (by 2.7% to 12.7%), better PTV conformality index (by 1% to 8%), and less volume of 50% dose outside 2cm from PTV (by 0 to 20.8cm(3)) than the corresponding SiMs-arc plans. For normal tissues, no significant dose differences were observed for the lungs, trachea, chest wall, and heart; RapidArc using partial arcs produced lowest maximum dose to spinal cord. For dose delivery, the RapidArc plans typically required 50% to 90% more MUs than SiMs-arc plans to deliver the same prescribed dose. The additional intensity modulation afforded by variable gantry speed and dose rate and by overlapping arcs enabled RapidArc plans to produce dosimetrically improved plans for lung SBRT, but required more MUs (by a factor > 1.5) to deliver. The

  18. Dosimetric comparison of two arc-based stereotactic body radiotherapy techniques for early-stage lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Huan Ye, Jingjing; Kim, John J.; Deng, Jun; Kaur, Monica S.; Chen, Zhe

    2015-04-01

    To compare the dosimetric and delivery characteristics of two arc-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) techniques for early-stage lung cancer treatment. SBRT treatment plans for lung tumors of different sizes and locations were designed using a single-isocenter multisegment dynamic conformal arc technique (SiMs-arc) and a volumetric modulated arc therapy technique (RapidArc) for 5 representative patients treated previously with lung SBRT. The SiMs-arc plans were generated with the isocenter located in the geometric center of patient's axial plane (which allows for collision-free gantry rotation around the patient) and 6 contiguous 60° arc segments spanning from 1° to 359°. 2 RapidArc plans, one using the same arc geometry as the SiMs-arc and the other using typical partial arcs (210°) with the isocenter inside planning target volume (PTV), were generated for each corresponding SiMs-arc plan. All plans were generated using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system (V10.0) and were normalized with PTV V{sub 100} to 95%. PTV coverage, dose to organs at risk, and total monitor units (MUs) were then compared and analyzed. For PTV coverage, the RapidArc plans generally produced higher PTV D{sub 99} (by 1.0% to 3.3%) and higher minimum dose (by 2.7% to 12.7%), better PTV conformality index (by 1% to 8%), and less volume of 50% dose outside 2 cm from PTV (by 0 to 20.8 cm{sup 3}) than the corresponding SiMs-arc plans. For normal tissues, no significant dose differences were observed for the lungs, trachea, chest wall, and heart; RapidArc using partial arcs produced lowest maximum dose to spinal cord. For dose delivery, the RapidArc plans typically required 50% to 90% more MUs than SiMs-arc plans to deliver the same prescribed dose. The additional intensity modulation afforded by variable gantry speed and dose rate and by overlapping arcs enabled RapidArc plans to produce dosimetrically improved plans for lung SBRT, but required more MUs (by a factor > 1.5) to

  19. The Technique, Resources and Costs of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer: A Comparison of Dose Regimens and Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Sharieff, Waseem; Greenspoon, Jeffrey N; Dayes, Ian; Chow, Tom; Wright, James; Lukka, Himu

    2016-02-01

    Robotic system has been used for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of prostate cancer. Arc-based and fixed-gantry systems are used for hypofractionated regimens (10-20 fractions) and the standard regimen (39 fractions); they may also be used to deliver SBRT. Studies are currently underway to compare efficacy and safety of these systems and regimens. Thus, we describe the technique and required resources for the provision of robotic SBRT in relation to the standard regimen and other systems to guide investment decisions. Using administrative data of resource volumes and unit prices, we computed the cost per patient, cost per cure and cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) of four regimens (5, 12, 20 and 39 fractions) and three delivery systems (robotic, arc-based and fixed-gantry) from a payer's perspective. We performed sensitivity analyses to examine the effects of daily hours of operation and in-room treatment delivery times on cost per patient. In addition, we estimated the budget impact when a robotic system is preferred over an arc-based or fixed-gantry system. Costs of SBRT were $6333/patient (robotic), $4368/patient (arc-based) and $4443/patient (fixed-gantry). When daily hours of operation were varied, the cost of robotic SBRT varied from $9324/patient (2 hours daily) to $5250/patient (10 hours daily). This was comparable to the costs of 39 fraction standard regimen which were $5935/patient (arc-based) and $7992/ patient (fixed-gantry). In settings of moderate to high patient volume, robotic SBRT is cost effective compared to the standard regimen. If SBRT can be delivered with equivalent efficacy and safety, the arc-based system would be the most cost effective system.

  20. Datum maintenance of the main Egyptian geodetic control networks by utilizing Precise Point Positioning "PPP" technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabah, Mostafa; Elmewafey, Mahmoud; Farahan, Magda H.

    2016-06-01

    A geodetic control network is the wire-frame or the skeleton on which continuous and consistent mapping, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and surveys are based. Traditionally, geodetic control points are established as permanent physical monuments placed in the ground and precisely marked, located, and documented. With the development of satellite surveying methods and their availability and high degree of accuracy, a geodetic control network could be established by using GNSS and referred to an international terrestrial reference frame used as a three-dimensional geocentric reference system for a country. Based on this concept, in 1992, the Egypt Survey Authority (ESA) established two networks, namely High Accuracy Reference Network (HARN) and the National Agricultural Cadastral Network (NACN). To transfer the International Terrestrial Reference Frame to the HARN, the HARN was connected with four IGS stations. The processing results were 1:10,000,000 (Order A) for HARN and 1:1,000,000 (Order B) for NACN relative network accuracy standard between stations defined in ITRF1994 Epoch1996. Since 1996, ESA did not perform any updating or maintaining works for these networks. To see how non-performing maintenance degrading the values of the HARN and NACN, the available HARN and NACN stations in the Nile Delta were observed. The Processing of the tested part was done by CSRS-PPP Service based on utilizing Precise Point Positioning "PPP" and Trimble Business Center "TBC". The study shows the feasibility of Precise Point Positioning in updating the absolute positioning of the HARN network and its role in updating the reference frame (ITRF). The study also confirmed the necessity of the absent role of datum maintenance of Egypt networks.

  1. Precision bone and muscle loss measurements by advanced, multiple projection DEXA (AMPDXA) techniques for spaceflight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, H. K. Jr; Beck, T. J.; Feldmesser, H. S.; Magee, T. C.; Spisz, T. S.; Pisacane, V. L.

    2001-01-01

    An advanced, multiple projection, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (AMPDXA) scanner system is under development. The AMPDXA is designed to make precision bone and muscle loss measurements necessary to determine the deleterious effects of microgravity on astronauts as well as develop countermeasures to stem their bone and muscle loss. To date, a full size test system has been developed to verify principles and the results of computer simulations. Results indicate that accurate predictions of bone mechanical properties can be determined from as few as three projections, while more projections are needed for a complete, three-dimensional reconstruction. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Precision bone and muscle loss measurements by advanced, multiple projection DEXA (AMPDXA) techniques for spaceflight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, H. K. Jr; Beck, T. J.; Feldmesser, H. S.; Magee, T. C.; Spisz, T. S.; Pisacane, V. L.

    2001-01-01

    An advanced, multiple projection, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (AMPDXA) scanner system is under development. The AMPDXA is designed to make precision bone and muscle loss measurements necessary to determine the deleterious effects of microgravity on astronauts as well as develop countermeasures to stem their bone and muscle loss. To date, a full size test system has been developed to verify principles and the results of computer simulations. Results indicate that accurate predictions of bone mechanical properties can be determined from as few as three projections, while more projections are needed for a complete, three-dimensional reconstruction. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Precision bone and muscle loss measurements by advanced, multiple projection DEXA (AMPDXA) techniques for spaceflight applications.

    PubMed

    Charles, H K; Beck, T J; Feldmesser, H S; Magee, T C; Spisz, T S; Pisacane, V L

    2001-01-01

    An advanced, multiple projection, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (AMPDXA) scanner system is under development. The AMPDXA is designed to make precision bone and muscle loss measurements necessary to determine the deleterious effects of microgravity on astronauts as well as develop countermeasures to stem their bone and muscle loss. To date, a full size test system has been developed to verify principles and the results of computer simulations. Results indicate that accurate predictions of bone mechanical properties can be determined from as few as three projections, while more projections are needed for a complete, three-dimensional reconstruction. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A technique using {sup 99m}Tc-mebrofenin SPECT for radiotherapy treatment planning for liver cancers or metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Sui; Jacob, Rojymon; Bender, Luvenia W.; Duan, Jun; Spencer, Sharon A.

    2014-04-01

    Radiotherapy or stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) requires a sufficient functional liver volume to tolerate the treatment. The current study extended the work of de Graaf et al. (2010) [3] on the use of {sup 99m}Tc-mebrofenin imaging for presurgery planning to radiotherapy planning for liver cancer or metastases. Patient was immobilized and imaged in an identical position on a single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT-CT) system and a radiotherapy simulation CT system. {sup 99m}Tc-mebrofenin SPECT was registered to the planning CT through image registration of noncontrast CT from SPECT-CT system to the radiotherapy planning CT. The voxels with higher uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-mebrofenin were transferred to the planning CT as an avoidance structure in optimizing a 2-arc RapidArc plan for SBRT delivery. Excellent dose coverage to the target and sparing of the healthy remnant liver volume was achieved. This report illustrated a procedure for the use of {sup 99m}Tc-mebrofenin SPECT for optimizing radiotherapy for liver cancers and metastases.

  5. A technique using 99mTc-mebrofenin SPECT for radiotherapy treatment planning for liver cancers or metastases.

    PubMed

    Shen, Sui; Jacob, Rojymon; Bender, Luvenia W; Duan, Jun; Spencer, Sharon A

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy or stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT) requires a sufficient functional liver volume to tolerate the treatment. The current study extended the work of de Graaf et al. (2010) [3] on the use of (99m)Tc-mebrofenin imaging for presurgery planning to radiotherapy planning for liver cancer or metastases. Patient was immobilized and imaged in an identical position on a single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT-CT) system and a radiotherapy simulation CT system. (99m)Tc-mebrofenin SPECT was registered to the planning CT through image registration of noncontrast CT from SPECT-CT system to the radiotherapy planning CT. The voxels with higher uptake of (99m)Tc-mebrofenin were transferred to the planning CT as an avoidance structure in optimizing a 2-arc RapidArc plan for SBRT delivery. Excellent dose coverage to the target and sparing of the healthy remnant liver volume was achieved. This report illustrated a procedure for the use of (99m)Tc-mebrofenin SPECT for optimizing radiotherapy for liver cancers and metastases. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of three instrumentation techniques at the precision of apical stop and apical sealing of obturation

    PubMed Central

    GENÇ, Özgür; ALAÇAM, Tayfun; KAYAOGLU, Guven

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of two NiTi rotary apical preparation techniques used with an electronic apex locator-integrated endodontic motor and a manual technique to create an apical stop at a predetermined level (0.5 mm short of the apical foramen) in teeth with disrupted apical constriction, and to evaluate microleakage following obturation in such prepared teeth. Material and Methods: 85 intact human mandibular permanent incisors with single root canal were accessed and the apical constriction was disrupted using a #25 K-file. The teeth were embedded in alginate and instrumented to #40 using rotary Lightspeed or S-Apex techniques or stainless-steel K-files. Distance between the apical foramen and the created apical stop was measured to an accuracy of 0.01 mm. In another set of instrumented teeth, root canals were obturated using gutta-percha and sealer, and leakage was tested at 1 week and 3 months using a fluid filtration device. Results All techniques performed slightly short of the predetermined level. Closest preparation to the predetermined level was with the manual technique and the farthest was with S-Apex. A significant difference was found between the performances of these two techniques (p<0.05). Lightspeed ranked in between. Leakage was similar for all techniques at either period. However, all groups leaked significantly more at 3 months compared to 1 week (p<0.05). Conclusions Despite statistically significant differences found among the techniques, deviations from the predetermined level were small and clinically acceptable for all techniques. Leakage following obturation was comparable in all groups. PMID:21655774

  7. [The need for a paradigm shift in radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Mayer, Árpád; Katona, Csilla; Farkas, Róbert; Póti, Zsuzsa

    2015-11-01

    The status and indications of radiotherapy have significantly changed in the past decade because novel techniques, radiobiological research and major advances in informatics have made better local control possible. Using supplemented marking of the target volume with computer tomography based other image-making methods adapted made it possible to define the tumor and intact surrounding tissues more precisely. With novel radiotherapy techniques the dosage of the homogenity and the covering in the target volume can be raised optimally, especially with intensity modulated arc radiotherapy (volumetric modulated arc therapy) without causing radiation injury or damage to intact surrounding tissues. Furthermore, with novel techniques and target volume marking, new indications have appeared in clinical practice and besides stereotactic radiotherapy for intracranial metastases, the extracranial so-called oligometastic conditions can be maintained close to a curative state (or in remission) for many years. Among these, perhaps the most striking is the stereotactic radiotherapy treatment of liver, lung and spinal cord metastases in one or more fractions, for which the indispensable condition is the image or respiratory guided technique.

  8. Obtaining accurate and precise environmental reconstructions from the modern analog technique and North American surface pollen dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. W.; Shuman, B.

    2008-04-01

    Using a recently compiled surface-sample pollen dataset for North America, we test methods to improve the skillfulness (i.e. accuracy and precision) of the modern analog technique (MAT) for continental- to sub-continental-scale paleoenvironmental reconstructions. Interregional floristic differences challenge such reconstructions, because with widening spatial extent each pollen type represents an increasing number of species, each with its unique niche, thus blurring pollen-climate relationships. We conduct a series of cross-validation experiments in which we first explore (1) whether increasing the spatial extent of the pool of potential analogs improves or worsens MAT skill, (2) whether MAT skill is improved by increasing the number of pollen taxa and splitting pollen taxa into regional groups, and (3) the differences in MAT skill among environmental variables. Regional splits are guided by the range boundaries of parent species. Results are analyzed for multiple environmental variables. We then systematically explore options for (a) the value of the no-analog/analog threshold (T), (b) the maximum number of modern analogs (N) allowed for a target fossil sample, and (c) whether the environmental average constructed from the modern analogs should be weighted by their compositional dissimilarity (D) to the target sample. We demonstrate that substantial interregional differences in pollen-climate relationships, particularly between eastern and western North America, degrade MAT precision and accuracy, but these adverse effects can be overcome by expanding the list of taxa used and/or splitting pollen types into regional groups. MAT precision was best when pollen types were regionally split and better when more taxa were used, although increasing the taxon list from 64 to 135 types did not substantially increase performance. Temperature-related variables were reconstructed more precisely than hydrological variables, and there was little difference in MAT skill between

  9. Tedlar bag sampling technique for vertical profiling of carbon dioxide through the atmospheric boundary layer with high precision and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Kristen; Jensen, Michael L; Balsley, Ben B; Davis, Kenneth; Birks, John W

    2004-07-01

    Carbon dioxide is the most important greenhouse gas other than water vapor, and its modulation by the biosphere is of fundamental importance to our understanding of global climate change. We have developed a new technique for vertical profiling of CO2 and meteorological parameters through the atmospheric boundary layer and well into the free troposphere. Vertical profiling of CO2 mixing ratios allows estimates of landscape-scale fluxes characteristic of approximately100 km2 of an ecosystem. The method makes use of a powered parachute as a platform and a new Tedlar bag air sampling technique. Air samples are returned to the ground where measurements of CO2 mixing ratios are made with high precision (< or =0.1%) and accuracy (< or =0.1%) using a conventional nondispersive infrared analyzer. Laboratory studies are described that characterize the accuracy and precision of the bag sampling technique and that measure the diffusion coefficient of CO2 through the Tedlar bag wall. The technique has been applied in field studies in the proximity of two AmeriFlux sites, and results are compared with tower measurements of CO2.

  10. Precision Lower Stratospheric Temperature Monitoring with the MSU: Technique, Validation, and Results, 1979-1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Roy W.; Christy, John R.

    1996-01-01

    Microwave Sounding Unit channel 4 data from the TIROS-N (Television and Infrared Operational Satellite)-N series of NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) satellites are intercalibrated to provide a continuous global record of deep-layer averaged lower stratospheric temperatures during 1979-1991. A 13-year record of temperature anomalies is time averaged into pentads and months on a 2.5 deg. grid. The monthly gridpoint anomalies are validated with ten years of radiosonde data during 1979-88. The calibration stability of each satellite's measurements is evaluated during satellite overlap periods, the longest of which reveal no measurable instrumental drift at the level of 0.01 C yr (exp -1). Intercomparisons between NOAA-6 and NOAA- 7 anomalies indicate monthly gridpoint precision of 0.05 C in the tropics to around 0.10 C in the extratropics, and signal-to-noise ratios precision and stability statistics are much better than have been previously reported by other investigators for MSU channel 4. Pentad precision is about 0.10 C in the tropics to around 0.25 C at high latitudes and signal-to- noise ratios generally over 250 in the tropics and high latitudes, but 100-200 in the middle latitudes. Radiosonde comparisons to the monthly gridpoint anomalies have correlations ranging from 0.90 in the tropics (where the interannual variability is smallest) to as high as 0.99 at high-latitude stations. The corresponding standard error of estimate is generally around 0.3 C. A significant difference in decadal trends is found between the satellite and radiosonde systems, with a step change of 0.21 C (sondes cooler) compared to the satellite measurements. Investigations of the possible sources of the discrepancy lead us to suspect that the gradual transition from on-site calibration of sondes with thermometers to factory calibration of sondes around 1982 might have caused a change in the calibration, although this conclusion must be viewed as tentative. The

  11. Intraoperative irradiation: precision medicine for quality cancer control promotion.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Felipe A

    2017-02-02

    Intraoperative irradiation was implemented 4 decades ago, pioneering the efforts to improve precision in local cancer therapy by combining real-time surgical exploration/resection with high single dose radiotherapy (Gunderson et al., Intraoperative irradiation: techniques and results, 2011). Clinical and technical developments have led to very precise radiation dose deposit. The ability to deliver a very precise dose of radiation is an essential element of contemporary multidisciplinary individualized oncology.This issue of Radiation Oncology contains a collection of expert review articles and updates with relevant data regarding intraoperative radiotherapy. Technology, physics, biology of single dose and clinical results in a variety of cancer sites and histologies are described and analyzed. The state of the art for advanced cancer care through medical innovation opens a significant opportunity for individualize cancer management across a broad spectrum of clinical practice. The advantage for tailoring diagnostic and treatment decisions in an individualized fashion will translate into precise medical treatment.

  12. Adaptive bonding technique for precise assembly of three-dimensional microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang-Hu; Jeong, Jun-Ho; Choi, Dae-Geun; Kim, Ki-Don; Altun, Ali Ozhan; Lee, Eung-Sug; Yang, Dong-Yol; Lee, Kwang-Sup

    2007-06-01

    Precise fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) self-standing microstructures on thin glass plates via two-photon induced polymerization (TPP) has been an important issue for innovative 3D nanodevices and microdevices. However, there are still issues remaining to be solved, such as building 3D microstructures on opaque materials via TPP and being able to implant them as functional parts onto practical systems. To settle these issues simply and effectively, the authors propose a contact print lithography (CPL) method using an ultraviolet-curable polymer layer. They report some of the possibilities and potential of CPL by presenting their results for transplanting 3D microstructures onto large-area substrates and also their examination of some of the effects of the process parameters on CPL.

  13. Precise measurement of single carbon nanocoils using focused ion beam technique

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Yasushi; Suda, Yoshiyuki Kunimoto, Ryuji; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Iida, Tamio; Ue, Hitoshi; Shima, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-11

    We have developed a precise resistivity measurement system for quasi-one-dimensional nanomaterials using a focused ion beam. The system enables the resistivity of carbon nanocoils (CNCs) to be measured and its dependence on coil geometry to be elucidated. At room temperature, the resistivity of CNCs tended to increase with coil diameter, while that of artificially graphitized CNCs remained constant. These contrasting behaviors indicate coil-diameter-induced enhancement in structural disorder internal to CNCs. Low-temperature resistivity measurements performed on the CNCs revealed that electron transport through the helical axis is governed by the variable range hopping mechanism. The characteristic temperature in variable range hopping theory was found to systematically increase with coil diameter, which supports our theory that the population of sp{sup 2}-domains in CNCs decreases considerably with coil diameter.

  14. Radiation techniques for acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) remains an effective treatment in patients with acromegaly refractory to medical and/or surgical interventions, with durable tumor control and biochemical remission; however, there are still concerns about delayed biochemical effect and potential late toxicity of radiation treatment, especially high rates of hypopituitarism. Stereotactic radiotherapy has been developed as a more accurate technique of irradiation with more precise tumour localization and consequently a reduction in the volume of normal tissue, particularly the brain, irradiated to high radiation doses. Radiation can be delivered in a single fraction by stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or as fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in which smaller doses are delivered over 5-6 weeks in 25-30 treatments. A review of the recent literature suggests that pituitary irradiation is an effective treatment for acromegaly. Stereotactic techniques for GH-secreting pituitary tumors are discussed with the aim to define the efficacy and potential adverse effects of each of these techniques. PMID:22136376

  15. Research on precision-calibration techniques for selected area electron diffraction patterns of pyrocarbon.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lehua; Li, Miaoling; Li, Hejun; Xu, Guozhong; Wang, Chuang

    2009-04-01

    The key techniques for determining orientation angle (OA) and interlayer space (d002) of pyrocarbon were investigated by analyzing selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns. A series of algorithms, which mainly include the five-point center-determined technique, the integral factor for the ellipse detection, the background subtraction operation and the Gaussian multipeak fitting algorithm, were designed for intensity sampling, data correction, and data fitting. The contribution ratio of the reflection intensity to the average d002 was considered. The algorithms were programmed and applied to evaluate SAED patterns of pyrocarbon in C/C composites by chemical vapor infiltration. Results showed that the proposed techniques can be effectively used to measure various SAED patterns, with a beam stop image or not, of pyrocarbon. The azimuthal intensities along the (002) arcs essentially obey the Gaussian distribution, although this is not obvious for the lower textural pyrocarbon. It is necessary for accurate OA to use the Gaussian multipeak fitting algorithm.

  16. SU-D-213-03: Towards An Optimized 3D Scintillation Dosimetry Tool for Quality Assurance of Dynamic Radiotherapy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Rilling, M; Goulet, M; Thibault, S; Archambault, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to simulate a multi-focus plenoptic camera used as the measuring device in a real-time three-dimensional scintillation dosimeter. Simulating and optimizing this realistic optical system will bridge the technological gap between concept validation and a clinically viable tool that can provide highly efficient, accurate and precise measurements for dynamic radiotherapy techniques. Methods: The experimental prototype, previously developed for proof of concept purposes, uses an off-the-shelf multi-focus plenoptic camera. With an array of interleaved microlenses of different focal lengths, this camera records spatial and angular information of light emitted by a plastic scintillator volume. The three distinct microlens focal lengths were determined experimentally for use as baseline parameters by measuring image-to-object magnification for different distances in object space. A simulated plenoptic system was implemented using the non-sequential ray tracing software Zemax: this tool allows complete simulation of multiple optical paths by modeling interactions at interfaces such as scatter, diffraction, reflection and refraction. The active sensor was modeled based on the camera manufacturer specifications by a 2048×2048, 5 µm-pixel pitch sensor. Planar light sources, simulating the plastic scintillator volume, were employed for ray tracing simulations. Results: The microlens focal lengths were determined to be 384, 327 and 290 µm. A realistic multi-focus plenoptic system, with independently defined and optimizable specifications, was fully simulated. A f/2.9 and 54 mm-focal length Double Gauss objective was modeled as the system’s main lens. A three-focal length hexagonal microlens array of 250-µm thickness was designed, acting as an image-relay system between the main lens and sensor. Conclusion: Simulation of a fully modeled multi-focus plenoptic camera enables the decoupled optimization of the main lens and microlens

  17. Label-Free Tracking of Single Organelle Transportation in Cells with Nanometer Precision Using a Plasmonic Imaging Technique.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunze; Yu, Hui; Shan, Xiaonan; Wang, Wei; Liu, Xianwei; Wang, Shaopeng; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-06-24

    Imaging and tracking of nano- and micrometer-sized organelles in cells with nanometer precision is crucial for understanding cellular behaviors at the molecular scale. Because of the fast intracellular dynamic processes, the imaging and tracking method must also be fast. In addition, to ensure that the observed dynamics is relevant to the native functions, it is critical to keep the cells under their native states. Here, a plasmonics-based imaging technique is demonstrated for studying the dynamics of organelles in 3D with high localization precision (5 nm) and temporal (10 ms) resolution. The technique is label-free and can track subcellular structures in the native state of the cells. Using the technique, nanometer steps of organelle (e.g., mitochondria) transportation are observed along neurite microtubules in primary neurons, and the 3D structure of neurite microtubule bundles is reconstructed at the nanometer scale from the tracks of the moving organelles. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Systematic biobanking, novel imaging techniques, and advanced molecular analysis for precise tumor diagnosis and therapy: The Polish MOBIT project.

    PubMed

    Niklinski, Jacek; Kretowski, Adam; Moniuszko, Marcin; Reszec, Joanna; Michalska-Falkowska, Anna; Niemira, Magdalena; Ciborowski, Michal; Charkiewicz, Radoslaw; Jurgilewicz, Dorota; Kozlowski, Miroslaw; Ramlau, Rodryg; Piwkowski, Cezary; Kwasniewski, Miroslaw; Kaczmarek, Monika; Ciereszko, Andrzej; Wasniewski, Tomasz; Mroz, Robert; Naumnik, Wojciech; Sierko, Ewa; Paczkowska, Magdalena; Kisluk, Joanna; Sulewska, Anetta; Cybulski, Adam; Mariak, Zenon; Kedra, Boguslaw; Szamatowicz, Jacek; Kurzawa, Paweł; Minarowski, Lukasz; Charkiewicz, Angelika Edyta; Mroczko, Barbara; Malyszko, Jolanta; Manegold, Christian; Pilz, Lothar; Allgayer, Heike; Abba, Mohammed L; Juhl, Hartmut; Koch, Frauke

    2017-06-21

    Personalized and precision medicine is gaining recognition due to the limitations by standard diagnosis and treatment; many areas of medicine, from cancer to psychiatry, are moving towards tailored and individualized treatment for patients based on their clinical characteristics and genetic signatures as well as novel imaging techniques. Advances in whole genome sequencing have led to identification of genes involved in a variety of diseases. Moreover, biomarkers indicating severity of disease or susceptibility to treatment are increasingly being characterized. The continued identification of new genes and biomarkers specific to disease subtypes and individual patients is essential and inevitable for translation into personalized medicine, in estimating both, disease risk and response to therapy. Taking into consideration the mostly unsolved necessity of tailored therapy in oncology the innovative project MOBIT (molecular biomarkers for individualized therapy) was designed. The aims of the project are: (i) establishing integrative management of precise tumor diagnosis and therapy including systematic biobanking, novel imaging techniques, and advanced molecular analysis by collecting comprehensive tumor tissues, liquid biopsies (whole blood, serum, plasma), and urine specimens (supernatant; sediment) as well as (ii) developing personalized lung cancer diagnostics based on tumor heterogeneity and integrated genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, and radiomics PET/MRI analysis. It will consist of 5 work packages. In this paper the rationale of the Polish MOBIT project as well as its design is presented. (iii) The project is to draw interest in and to invite national and international, private and public, preclinical and clinical initiatives to establish individualized and precise procedures for integrating novel targeted therapies and advanced imaging techniques. Copyright © 2017 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Gelatin-based laser direct-write technique for the precise spatial patterning of cells.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Nathan R; Chrisey, Douglas B; Corr, David T

    2011-03-01

    Laser direct-writing provides a method to pattern living cells in vitro, to study various cell-cell interactions, and to build cellular constructs. However, the materials typically used may limit its long-term application. By utilizing gelatin coatings on the print ribbon and growth surface, we developed a new approach for laser cell printing that overcomes the limitations of Matrigel™. Gelatin is free of growth factors and extraneous matrix components that may interfere with cellular processes under investigation. Gelatin-based laser direct-write was able to successfully pattern human dermal fibroblasts with high post-transfer viability (91% ± 3%) and no observed double-strand DNA damage. As seen with atomic force microscopy, gelatin offers a unique benefit in that it is present temporarily to allow cell transfer, but melts and is removed with incubation to reveal the desired application-specific growth surface. This provides unobstructed cellular growth after printing. Monitoring cell location after transfer, we show that melting and removal of gelatin does not affect cellular placement; cells maintained registry within 5.6 ± 2.5 μm to the initial pattern. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of gelatin in laser direct-writing to create spatially precise cell patterns with the potential for applications in tissue engineering, stem cell, and cancer research.

  20. Gelatin-Based Laser Direct-Write Technique for the Precise Spatial Patterning of Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schiele, Nathan R.; Chrisey, Douglas B.

    2011-01-01

    Laser direct-writing provides a method to pattern living cells in vitro, to study various cell–cell interactions, and to build cellular constructs. However, the materials typically used may limit its long-term application. By utilizing gelatin coatings on the print ribbon and growth surface, we developed a new approach for laser cell printing that overcomes the limitations of Matrigel™. Gelatin is free of growth factors and extraneous matrix components that may interfere with cellular processes under investigation. Gelatin-based laser direct-write was able to successfully pattern human dermal fibroblasts with high post-transfer viability (91% ± 3%) and no observed double-strand DNA damage. As seen with atomic force microscopy, gelatin offers a unique benefit in that it is present temporarily to allow cell transfer, but melts and is removed with incubation to reveal the desired application-specific growth surface. This provides unobstructed cellular growth after printing. Monitoring cell location after transfer, we show that melting and removal of gelatin does not affect cellular placement; cells maintained registry within 5.6 ± 2.5 μm to the initial pattern. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of gelatin in laser direct-writing to create spatially precise cell patterns with the potential for applications in tissue engineering, stem cell, and cancer research. PMID:20849381

  1. Delineating the Rattlesnake Springs, New Mexico Watershed Using Precision Gravity Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doser, D. I.; Boykov, N. D.; Baker, M. R.; Kaip, G. M.; Langford, R. P.

    2009-12-01

    Rattlesnake Springs serves as the sole domestic water source for Carlsbad Caverns National Park. The recent development of oil and gas leases and agricultural lands surrounding the springs has led to concern about contamination of the fracture controlled aquifer system. We have conducted a series of precision gravity surveys (station spacing 200 to 300 m in a 4 x 4 km area), combined with other geophysical studies and geologic mapping, to delineate possible fracture systems in the gypsum and carbonate bedrock that feed the spring system. Our combined results suggest several pathways for water to enter the springs. A series of WNW-ESE striking features are apparent in our gravity data that appear to align with relict spring valleys we have mapped to the west of the springs. A self potential survey indicates that water is entering the springs at a shallow level from the northwest direction. However, gravity data also indicate a north-south trending fracture system could be providing a pathway for water to enter from the south. This is consistent with drawdown tests conducted in the 1950’s and 1960’s on irrigation wells located to the south of the springs. The north-south fracture system appears related to a basin bounding fault system observed in the regional gravity data.

  2. Supplementary comparison EURAMET.L-S23 (#1269) high precision roundness measurement by error separation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Emilio; Muñoz, Rafael; Arce, Aelio A.; Bergmans, Rob; Kotte, Gerard; Holmberg, Maria; Svendsmark, Maria; Toftegaard, Jens Bo; Astrua, Milena; Pisani, Marco; Saraiva, Fernanda; Eusebio, Liliana; Nouira, Hichem; Salgado, José A.

    2017-01-01

    At its meeting in October 2012, the EURAMET Technical Committee for Length, EURAMET TC-L, decided that a key comparison on high precision roundness measurement by multi-step method shall be carried out with CEM acting as the pilot laboratory. The roundness standards to be calibrated were chosen to be a glass hemisphere with a diameter of about 50 mm and a sphere with a diameter of about 30 mm. A goal of the key comparisons for topics in dimensional metrology is to demonstrate the equivalence of routine calibration services offered by NMIs to clients, as listed in appendix C of the Mutual Recognition Agreement (MRA). To this end, participants in this comparison agreed to use the same apparatus and methods as routinely applied to client artefacts. The comparison was registered in March 2013 as Project EURAMET 1269 and at KCDB as supplementary comparison EURAMET.L-S23.2013. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCL, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  3. Validation of a Non-Invasive Technique to Precisely Measure In Vivo Three-Dimensional Cervical Spine Movement

    PubMed Central

    Anderst, William J; Baillargeon, Emma; Donaldson, William F; Lee, Joon Y; Kang, James D

    2011-01-01

    Study Design In vivo validation during functional loading. Objective To determine the accuracy and repeatability of a model-based tracking technique that combines subject-specific CT models and high-speed biplane X-ray images to measure three-dimensional (3D) in vivo cervical spine motion. Summary of Background Data Accurate 3D spine motion is difficult to obtain in vivo during physiological loading due to the inability to directly attach measurement equipment to individual vertebrae. Previous measurement systems were limited by two-dimensional (2D) results and/or their need for manual identification of anatomical landmarks, precipitating unreliable and inaccurate results. All previous techniques lack the ability to capture true 3D motion during dynamic functional loading. Methods Three subjects had 1.0 mm diameter tantalum beads implanted into their fused and adjacent vertebrae during ACDF surgery. High resolution CT scans were obtained following surgery and used to create subject-specific 3D models of each cervical vertebra. Biplane X-rays were collected at 30 frames per second while the subjects performed flexion/extension and axial rotation movements six months after surgery. Individual bone motion, intervertebral kinematics, and arthrokinematics derived from dynamic RSA served as a gold standard to evaluate the accuracy of the model-based tracking technique. Results Individual bones were tracked with an average precision of 0.19 mm and 0.33 mm in non-fused and fused bones, respectively. Precision in measuring 3D joint kinematics in fused and adjacent segments averaged 0.4 mm for translations and 1.1° for rotations, while anterior and posterior disc height above and below the fusion were measured with a precision ranging between 0.2 mm and 0.4 mm. The variability in 3D joint kinematics associated with tracking the same trial repeatedly was 0.02 mm in translation and 0.06° in rotation. Conclusions 3D cervical spine motion can be precisely measured in vivo with

  4. Dosimetric comparison of axilla and groin radiotherapy techniques for high-risk and locally advanced skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mattes, Malcolm D.; Zhou, Ying; Berry, Sean L.; Barker, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy targeting axilla and groin lymph nodes improves regional disease control in locally advanced and high-risk skin cancers. However, trials generally used conventional two-dimensional radiotherapy (2D-RT), contributing towards relatively high rates of side effects from treatment. The goal of this study is to determine if three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) may improve radiation delivery to the target while avoiding organs at risk in the clinical context of skin cancer regional nodal irradiation. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients with locally advanced/high-risk skin cancers underwent computed tomography simulation. The relevant axilla or groin planning target volumes and organs at risk were delineated using standard definitions. Paired t-tests were used to compare the mean values of several dose-volumetric parameters for each of the 4 techniques. Results: In the axilla, the largest improvement for 3D-CRT compared to 2D-RT was for homogeneity index (13.9 vs. 54.3), at the expense of higher lung V20 (28.0% vs. 12.6%). In the groin, the largest improvements for 3D-CRT compared to 2D-RT were for anorectum Dmax (13.6 vs. 38.9 Gy), bowel D200cc (7.3 vs. 23.1 Gy), femur D50 (34.6 vs. 57.2 Gy), and genitalia Dmax (37.6 vs. 51.1 Gy). IMRT had further improvements compared to 3D-CRT for humerus Dmean (16.9 vs. 22.4 Gy), brachial plexus D5 (57.4 vs. 61.3 Gy), bladder D5 (26.8 vs. 36.5 Gy), and femur D50 (18.7 vs. 34.6 Gy). Fewer differences were observed between IMRT and VMAT. Conclusion: Compared to 2D-RT and 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT had dosimetric advantages in the treatment of nodal regions of skin cancer patients. PMID:27306779

  5. Density characterization of radiochromic film through source axis distance (SAD) technique in linac with slab phantom for radiotherapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariani, Yousida; Haris, Bambang

    2017-05-01

    Characterization of radiochromic film density is accomplished through Source Axis Distance (SAD) technique in a slab phantom Linac with various depths and breadths of field. Type of the film used is gafchromic RTQA2. The dose of radiation exposure of the film may cause changes in the film density. This research aims to determine the relation between the density and the dose depth through the characteristic of curves to identify the depth of the dose and particular breadth of the field as a reference for the dose of radiotherapy patients. The result shows that the higher the dose is absorbed, the darker the film will be, yet the lower the density is obtained. The dose depth is determined by measuring the amount of dose received at various depths and breadths of field using film that is placed on the slab phantom with 6 MV linac radiation and dose of 300 cGy. The variation of the depth at 1.5 cm; 4 cm; 6 cm; 8 cm; 10 cm, the field size at 4 × 4 cm2, and the dose depth at 359.7 cGy; 315.3 cGy; 281.4 cGy; 241.2 cGy; 220.5 cGy were settled. The field size 6 × 6 cm2 takes the dose depth 354.6 cGy; 314.1 cGy; 282.6 cGy; 244.5 cGy; 224.7 cGy. The field size 8 × 8 cm2 takes the dose depth 351.6 cGy; 313 cGy; 283.8 cGy; 247.2 cGy; 228 cGy. The field size 10 × 10 cm2 takes the dose depth 348.9 cGy; 342.6 cGy; 248.4 cGy; 249.6 cGy; 231 cGy.

  6. Precise control of caval and hepatic vessels: Surgical technique to treat level III caval thrombus concomitant to renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming; Xu, Bin; Liu, Ning; Jiang, Hua; Wang, Yiduo; Yang, Yu; Zhang, Xiaowen; Sun, Chao; Liu, Jing; Zhu, Weidong; Chen, Shuqiu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We investigated the surgical techniques, safety, and prevention of complications of nephrectomy and removal of tumour thrombus for treating level III inferior vena cava (IVC) concomitant to renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We did this by precise controlling IVC and hepatic vessels without a vascular bypass. Methods: In this series, we included 5 patients with level III IVC tumour thrombus below the hepatic vein concomitant to RCC. After precisely controlling the IVC and hepatic vessels, we then removed the thrombus en bloc with the renal vein. Blood loss volume, IVC clamping time, hypotension time, resuscitation, cardiocerebrovascular complications, and postoperative organ dysfunction were observed. Results: Surgery was successfully performed without perioperative death. Blood loss volume was 900 to 1500 mL, operation time was 165 to 250 minutes, vascular clamping time was 8 to 12 minutes, and intraoperative hypotension time was 9 to 12 minutes. Serious perioperative complications were not observed. Local recurrence was not observed during the 9 to 24 months of follow-up. One patient exhibited disease-free survival, 3 developed lung or liver metastasis, and 1 died 11 months after surgery. Conclusion: Precise control of IVC and hepatic pedicle vessels, without vascular bypass, is a safe and effective surgical treatment for level III tumor thrombus below the hepatic vein concomitant to RCC. The procedure was conducted without increased risks of intraoperative hypotensive shock, difficult resuscitation, pulmonary embolism, and multiple organ dysfunctions. PMID:26600890

  7. Comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy and forward-planning dynamic arc therapy techniques for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Metwaly, Mohamed; Awaad, Awaad Mousa; El-Sayed, El-Sayed Mahmoud; Sallam, Abdel Sattar Mohamed

    2008-10-24

    We compare an inverse-planning intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique with three previously published forward-planning dynamic arc therapy techniques and a newly implemented technique for treatment of prostate only. The three previously published dynamic arc techniques are dynamic arc therapy (DAT), two-axis dynamic arc therapy (2A-DAT), and modified dynamic arc therapy (M-DAT). The newly implemented technique is the bilateral wedged dynamic arc (BW-DAT). In all dynamic arcs, the multileaf collimator is moving during rotation to fit the prostate, except that, in 2A-DAT, it is fitting two separate symmetrical rhombi including the prostate. The rectum is shielded during rotation only in the cases of M-DAT and BW-DAT. The results obtained indicate that the BW-DAT, M-DAT, and DAT techniques provide the intended dose coverage of the prescribed dose to the planning target volume (PTV)--that is, 95% of the PTV is covered by 100% of the dose. The maximum dose to a 3-cm margin of healthy tissue that surrounds the PTV is lower by 2.5% in the case of IMRT than in both BW-DAT and M-DAT, but it is lower by 5.0% than that in both DAT and 2A-DAT. The maximum dose to the rest of the healthy tissue in the case of BW-DAT is 33.2 Gy +/- 2.2 Gy. This dose covers percentage healthy body volumes of 8% +/- 3.2% with IMRT, 4% +/- 1.5% with DAT, and 6% +/- 1.2% with both 2A-DAT and M-DAT. Also, this dose is much lower than the accepted maximum dose (52 Gy) to the femoral heads and necks according to Report 62 from the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements. Accordingly, it would be possible to neglect delineation of the femoral heads and necks as organs at risk in cases of BW-DAT. Doses to 15%, 25%, 35%, and 50% (D15%, D25%, D35%, and D50%) of the rectum volume in the case of BW-DAT were 43.5 Gy +/- 8.6 Gy, 24.2 Gy +/- 8.7 Gy, 13.2 Gy +/- 4.2 Gy, and 5.7 Gy +/- 2.1 Gy respectively. The D15% of rectum in the case of IMRT was lower than that in BW-DAT, M

  8. Precise Sr isotopic compositions determination by the double-spike technique (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Liu, Y.; Lin, L.

    2010-12-01

    Strontium has four stable isotopes, with the exception of 87Sr, whose natural abundance may be varied due to the decay of 87Rb, the abundance of the other three isotopes remained unchanged in all natural samples. Consequently, the radiogenic Sr isotopic compositions have been widely used in geological, marine, environmental, and atmospheric sciences as a chronometer as well as tracers. With the advances of MC-ICPMS, while mass spectrometer induced mass fractionation is usually well within the analytical uncertainties for any given element, many scientists are exploring the possibilities of using stable isotopic fractionation for a series of metals, e.g., Fe, Zn, Mo, and Cd, that are either essential to marine organisms, or as proxies for environmental and physical parameters, e.g., pH, temperature, pressure, and redox states, in the past. Evidently, the variations of stable isotopic composition of Sr from both deep sea and shallow sea corals have been used as temperature proxy for monitoring the variations of water temperature in the past. In order to explore the usage of radiogenic and stable Sr isotopic compositions in a series of different water samples as potential proxies for temperature and source components, a mixed 84-86Sr double spike has been set up, such that both radiogenic and stable Sr isotopic compositions can be obtained simultaneously. Living corals Porites collected from offshore southern Taiwan and seawater have been tested initially, and the initial results suggest that the variations of stable Sr isotopes do not show any correlation with the oxygen records, while radiogenic Sr data indicate a mixing of various water masses near the offshore southern Taiwan. More precise and high spatial resolution coral record is needed in order to verify the preliminary findings. In addition, pore water extracted from a series of mud volcanoes in the southern and eastern Taiwan have also been analyzed for Sr isotopes in order to verify the sources and the

  9. Evaluations of an adaptive planning technique incorporating dose feedback in image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Han; Wu Qiuwen

    2011-12-15

    treatment course, then 11 patients fail. If the same criteria is assessed at the end of each week (every five fractions), then 14 patients fail, with three patients failing the 1st or 2nd week but passing at the end. The average dose deficit from these 14 patients was 4.4%. They improved to 2% after the weekly compensation. Out of these 14 patients who needed dose compensation, ten passed the dose criterion after weekly dose compensation, three patients failed marginally, and one patient still failed the criterion significantly (10% deficit), representing 3.6% of the patient population. A more aggressive compensation frequency (every three fractions) could successfully reduce the dose deficit to the acceptable level for this patient. The average number of required dose compensation re-planning per patient was 0.82 (0.79) per patient for schedule A (B) delivery strategy. The doses to OARs were not significantly different from the online IG only plans without dose compensation. Conclusions: We have demonstrated the effectiveness of offline dose compensation technique in image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer. It can effectively account for residual uncertainties which cannot be corrected through online IG. Dose compensation allows further margin reduction and critical organs sparing.

  10. Robotic-assisted femoral osteochondroplasty is more precise than a freehand technique in a Sawbone model

    PubMed Central

    Ranawat, Anil S.

    2015-01-01

    Robotic-assistance has the potential to improve the accuracy of bony resections, when performing femoral osteochondroplasty in the treatment of cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of robotic-assisted femoral osteochondroplasty and compare this to a conventional open, freehand technique. We hypothesized that robotic-assistance would increase the accuracy of femoral head-neck offset correction in cam FAI. Sixteen identical sawbones models with a cam-type impingement deformity were resected by a single surgeon, simulating an open femoral osteochondroplasty. Eight procedures were performed using an open freehand technique and eight were performed using robotic-assistance, through the creation of a three-dimensional haptic volume. A desired arc of resection of 117.7° was determined pre-operatively using an anatomic plan. Post-resection, all 16 sawbones were laser scanned to measure the arc of resection, volume of bone removed and depth of resection. For each sawbone, these measurements were compared with the pre-operatively planned desired resection, to determine the resection error. Freehand resection resulted in a mean arc of resection error of 42.0 ± 8.5° compared with robotic-assisted resection which had a mean arc of resection error of 1.2 ± 0.7° (P < 0.0001). Over-resection occurred with every freehand resection with a mean volume error of 758.3 ± 477.1 mm3 compared with a mean robotic-assisted resection volume error of 31.3 ± 220.7 mm3 (P < 0.01). This study has shown that robotic-assisted femoral osteochondroplasty in the treatment of cam-type FAI is more accurate than a conventional, freehand technique, which are currently in widespread use. PMID:27011830

  11. Precision of lumbar intervertebral measurements: does a computer-assisted technique improve reliability?

    PubMed

    Pearson, Adam M; Spratt, Kevin F; Genuario, James; McGough, William; Kosman, Katherine; Lurie, Jon; Sengupta, Dilip K

    2011-04-01

    Comparison of intra- and interobserver reliability of digitized manual and computer-assisted intervertebral motion measurements and classification of "instability." To determine if computer-assisted measurement of lumbar intervertebral motion on flexion-extension radiographs improves reliability compared with digitized manual measurements. Many studies have questioned the reliability of manual intervertebral measurements, although few have compared the reliability of computer-assisted and manual measurements on lumbar flexion-extension radiographs. Intervertebral rotation, anterior-posterior (AP) translation, and change in anterior and posterior disc height were measured with a digitized manual technique by three physicians and by three other observers using computer-assisted quantitative motion analysis (QMA) software. Each observer measured 30 sets of digital flexion-extension radiographs (L1-S1) twice. Shrout-Fleiss intraclass correlation coefficients for intra- and interobserver reliabilities were computed. The stability of each level was also classified (instability defined as >4 mm AP translation or 10° rotation), and the intra- and interobserver reliabilities of the two methods were compared using adjusted percent agreement (APA). Intraobserver reliability intraclass correlation coefficients were substantially higher for the QMA technique THAN the digitized manual technique across all measurements: rotation 0.997 versus 0.870, AP translation 0.959 versus 0.557, change in anterior disc height 0.962 versus 0.770, and change in posterior disc height 0.951 versus 0.283. The same pattern was observed for interobserver reliability (rotation 0.962 vs. 0.693, AP translation 0.862 vs. 0.151, change in anterior disc height 0.862 vs. 0.373, and change in posterior disc height 0.730 vs. 0.300). The QMA technique was also more reliable for the classification of "instability." Intraobserver APAs ranged from 87 to 97% for QMA versus 60% to 73% for digitized manual

  12. Novel techniques for high precision refractive index measurements, and application to assessing neutron damage and dose in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, K.; Vaughan, E. I.; Arissian, L.; Hendrie, J. P.; Cole, J.; Diels, J.-C.; Hecht, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    In this work we present novel techniques for high precision index of refraction measurements for transparent crystals, and demonstrate a change from neutron irradiation. Radiation damage affects the structure of material, which can be read out nondestructively in transparent crystals. There is some difference in gamma-ray and neutron interactions which may be useful in characterization. Ionization from gamma rays produces color centers in the material, producing distinct spectral absorption, and some small shift in the index of refraction. Neutrons produce atomic recoils and, while the recoils do some ionization, they have a much greater efficiency for lattice displacement than do gamma rays, and these displacements can have a greater effect on the index of refraction. Using CaF2 crystals exposed to neutron radiation, together with a new high precision technique of detecting changes of index of refraction, we establish proof that this type of measurement can be used to monitor neutron exposure. This can provide a basic study of material changes with radiation and, with calibration of material in known neutron fields, this may even find application to neutron dosimetry.

  13. High-precision technique for in-situ testing of the PZT scanner based on fringe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Daodang; Yang, Yongying; Liu, Dong; Zhuo, Yongmo

    2010-08-01

    A technique based on fringe analysis is presented for the in-situ testing of the PZT scanner, including the end rotation analysis and displacement measurement. With the interferograms acquired in the Twyman-Green interferometer, the testing can be carried out in real time. The end rotation of the PZT scanner and its spatial displacement deviation are analyzed by processing the fringe rotation and interval changes; displacement of the PZT scanner is determined by fringe shift according to the algorithm of template-matching, from which the relation between the driving voltage and displacement is measured to calibrate the nonlinearity of the PZT scanner. It is shown by computer simulation and experiments that the proposed technique for in-situ testing of the PZT scanner takes a short time, and achieves precise displacement measurement as well as the end rotation angle and displacement deviation measurement. The proposed method has high efficiency and precision, and is of great practicality for in-situ calibration of the PZT scanner.

  14. DETERMINATION OF INTERSTITIAL CHLORIDE IN SHALES AND CONSOLIDATED ROCKS BY A PRECISION LEACHING TECHNIQUE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, Frank T.; Peck, E.E.; Lane, Candice M.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have devised a technique for determining chloride in interstitial water of consolidated rocks. Samples of rocks ranging from 5 to 10 g are crushed and sieved under controlled conditions and then ground with distilled water to submicron size in a closed mechanical mill. The chloride concentrations and total pore-water concentrations, obtained earlier from the same samples by low-temperature vacuum desiccation, are used to arrive at the 'original' pore-water chloride concentrations by a simple iteration procedure. Interstitial chlorinity results obtained from Cretaceous and Jurassic strata in the Gulf of Mexico coastal areas ranged from 20 to 100 g/kg Cl with reproducibility approaching plus or minus 1%.

  15. Peripheral dose measurements in cervical cancer radiotherapy: a comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy and step-and-shoot IMRT techniques

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the peripheral doses resulting from volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in cervical cancer radiotherapy. Methods Nine patients with cervical cancer had treatment planned with both VMAT and IMRT. A specially designed phantom was used for this study, with ion chambers placed at interest points approximating the position of the breast, thyroid, and lens. The peripheral doses at the phantom interest points were measured and compared between the VMAT and IMRT techniques. Results VMAT provides a potential dosimetric advantage compared with IMRT. The mean (± standard deviation) peripheral dose to the breast point for 1 fraction (2 Gy) during VMAT measured 5.13 ± 0.96 mGy, compared with 9.04 ± 1.50 mGy for IMRT. At the thyroid and lens interest points, the mean (± standard deviation) peripheral dose during VMAT was 2.19 ± 0.33 and 2.16 ± 0.28 mGy, compared with 7.07 ± 0.76 and 6.97 ± 0.91 mGy for IMRT, respectively. VMAT reduced the monitor units used by 28% and shortened the treatment delivery time by 54% compared with IMRT. Conclusion While the dosimetric results are similar for both techniques, VMAT results in a lower peripheral dose to the patient and reduces the monitor-unit usage and treatment delivery time compared with IMRT. PMID:24555547

  16. Radioimmunoguided-intraoperative radiation therapy in colorectal carcinoma: a new technique to precisely define the clinical target volume.

    PubMed

    Nag, S; Martinez-Monge, R; Nieroda, C; Martin, E

    1999-04-01

    The clinical target volume (CTV) to be irradiated by intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) after resection is generally based on the surgeon's estimation of close margins. We have developed a new technique, radioimmunoguided-intraoperative radiation therapy (RIG-IORT), that uses an intraoperative hand-held gamma-detecting probe to define areas of residual microscopic disease containing radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies to tumor associated antigen, to more precisely delineate the CTV for IORT. Patients were injected i.v. with 2 mCi 125I- radiolabeled CC49 antibody approximately 3 weeks before surgery. They then underwent radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) with maximal resection of tumor. A hand-held gamma-detecting probe (Neoprobe 1000) was used intraoperatively to detect and resect areas of high radioactivity, representing tumor. Areas with persistently high probe counts after resection were the areas of occult residual disease, and represented the CTV to be irradiated. The IORT was given with either 6-9 MeV electron beam from a dedicated linear accelerator, or with high-dose-rate brachytherapy from a remote afterloader. If all RIGS-positive tissue had been resected, or if widely disseminated disease remained, the patient was not considered for IORT. This technique was used in 31 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma recurrent into the pelvis (n = 23) or paraortic nodes (n = 8). The CTV for IORT was delineated by increased RIGS count in 13 of 19 patients (68%) with microscopic residual, and in 11 of 12 patients (92%) with gross residual. In the other 7 patients, the tumor area did not accumulate the radiolabeled antibody; therefore, these tumor beds were irradiated based on the surgeon's estimation of close margins. Hence, overall, the RIG-IORT technique was used to define the tumor bed for IORT in 24 of 31 patients (77%). This technical report focuses on the development of the RIG-IORT technique and does not address the outcome results of the treated patients

  17. Techniques for precise mapping of 226Ra and 228Ra in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Willard S.; Key, Robert M.; Sarmiento, Jorge L.

    1985-01-01

    Improvements in the analyses of 226Ra and 228Ra in seawater made possible by better extraction and processing techniques reduce significantly the errors associated with these measurements. These improvements and the extensive sampling for Ra isotopes conducted on the TTO North Atlantic Study should enable us to use the distribution of 228Ra to study mixing processes on a 3-15 year time scale in both the upper and deep North Atlantic. The 228Ra profiles already analyzed show a closer resemblance to GEOSECS tritium data than to TTO tritium data in the upper ocean. This is because the transient tracer tritium was responding on a 10-year time scale during GEOSECS and a 20-year time scale during TTO. The steady state tracer 228Ra should always respond on a time scale of 8 years. Thus the 228Ra data obtained on TTO should provide a means to extend the features of the GEOSECS tritium field to the regions of the TTO study. The 226Ra data are of high enough quality to identify features associated with different water masses. Changes in the positions of the deep-water masses since the GEOSECS cruise are revealed by the 226Radata.

  18. WE-G-18A-07: Clinical Evaluation of Normalized Metal Artifact Reduction in KVCT Using MVCT Prior Images (MVCT-NMAR) Technique in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, M; MacKenzie, M; Fallone, B; Rathee, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the metal artifacts in diagnostic kVCT images of patients that are corrected using a normalized metal artifact reduction method with MVCT prior images, MVCT-NMAR. Methods: An MVCTNMAR algorithm was developed and applied to five patients: three with bilateral hip prostheses, one with unilateral hip prosthesis and one with dental fillings. The corrected images were evaluated for visualization of tissue structures and their interfaces, and for radiotherapy dose calculations. They were also compared against the corresponding images corrected by a commercial metal artifact reduction technique, O-MAR, on a Phillips™ CT scanner. Results: The use of MVCT images for correcting kVCT images in the MVCT-NMAR technique greatly reduces metal artifacts, avoids secondary artifacts, and makes patient images more useful for correct dose calculation in radiotherapy. These improvements are significant over the commercial correction method, provided the MVCT and kVCT images are correctly registered. The remaining and the secondary artifacts (soft tissue blurring, eroded bones, false bones or air pockets, CT number cupping within the metal) present in O-MAR corrected images are removed in the MVCT-NMAR corrected images. Large dose reduction is possible outside the planning target volume (e.g., 59.2 Gy in comparison to 52.5 Gy in pubic bone) when these MVCT-NMAR corrected images are used in TomoTherapy™ treatment plans, as the corrected images no longer require directional blocks for prostate plans in order to avoid the image artifact regions. Conclusion: The use of MVCT-NMAR corrected images in radiotherapy treatment planning could improve the treatment plan quality for cancer patients with metallic implants. Moti Raj Paudel is supported by the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship, the Endowed Graduate Scholarship in Oncology and the Dissertation Fellowship at the University of Alberta. The authors acknowledge the CIHR operating grant number MOP 53254.

  19. SU-C-17A-07: The Development of An MR Accelerator-Enabled Planning-To-Delivery Technique for Stereotactic Palliative Radiotherapy Treatment of Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogcarspel, S J; Kontaxis, C; Velden, J M van der; Bol, G H; Vulpen, M van; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an MR accelerator-enabled online planning-todelivery technique for stereotactic palliative radiotherapy treatment of spinal metastases. The technical challenges include; automated stereotactic treatment planning, online MR-based dose calculation and MR guidance during treatment. Methods: Using the CT data of 20 patients previously treated at our institution, a class solution for automated treatment planning for spinal bone metastases was created. For accurate dose simulation right before treatment, we fused geometrically correct online MR data with pretreatment CT data of the target volume (TV). For target tracking during treatment, a dynamic T2-weighted TSE MR sequence was developed. An in house developed GPU based IMRT optimization and dose calculation algorithm was used for fast treatment planning and simulation. An automatically generated treatment plan developed with this treatment planning system was irradiated on a clinical 6 MV linear accelerator and evaluated using a Delta4 dosimeter. Results: The automated treatment planning method yielded clinically viable plans for all patients. The MR-CT fusion based dose calculation accuracy was within 2% as compared to calculations performed with original CT data. The dynamic T2-weighted TSE MR Sequence was able to provide an update of the anatomical location of the TV every 10 seconds. Dose calculation and optimization of the automatically generated treatment plans using only one GPU took on average 8 minutes. The Delta4 measurement of the irradiated plan agreed with the dose calculation with a 3%/3mm gamma pass rate of 86.4%. Conclusions: The development of an MR accelerator-enabled planning-todelivery technique for stereotactic palliative radiotherapy treatment of spinal metastases was presented. Future work will involve developing an intrafraction motion adaptation strategy, MR-only dose calculation, radiotherapy quality-assurance in a magnetic field, and streamlining the entire treatment

  20. Filling the gap in central shielding: three-dimensional analysis of the EQD2 dose in radiotherapy for cervical cancer with the central shielding technique.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Tomoaki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Noda, Shin-ei; Kato, Shingo; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to provide accurate dose distribution profiles of radiotherapy for cervical cancer when treated with the central shielding technique by analysing the composite 3D EQD2 dose distribution of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plus intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). On a phantom, four patterns of the combinations of whole pelvis irradiation (WP) (4 fields), pelvis irradiation with central shielding technique (CS) [anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior (AP-PA fields), shielding width of 3 or 4 cm] and ICBT using Point-A prescription were created: 30 Gy/15 fractions + 20 Gy/10 fractions + 24 Gy/4 fractions [Plan (30 + 20 + 24)], 40 Gy/20 fractions + 10 Gy/5 fractions + 18 Gy/3 fractions [Plan (40 + 10 + 18)], 40 Gy/20 fractions + 10 Gy/5 fractions + 24 Gy/4 fractions [Plan (40 + 10 + 24)] and 45 Gy/25 fractions + 0 Gy + 28 Gy/4 fractions [Plan (45 + 0 + 28)]. The composite EQD2 dose distributions of the complete treatment were analysed. The Point-A dose of Plan (30 + 20 + 24), Plan (40 + 10 + 18), Plan (40 + 10 + 24) and Plan (45 + 0 + 28) were 78.0 Gy (CS 3 cm)/71.8 Gy (CS 4 cm), 72.1 Gy (CS 3 cm)/69.0 Gy (CS 4 cm), 80.1 Gy (CS 3 cm)/77.0 Gy (CS 4 cm) and 84.1 Gy, whereas it has been previously reported to be 62 Gy, 64 Gy, 72 Gy and 84 Gy, respectively. For all the treatment plans with CS, equivalent or wider coverage of 60 Gy (EQD2) was achieved in the right-left direction, while coverage in the anterior-posterior direction decreased in plans with CS. There were no irregularly 'cold' regions around the central target. The use of CS in radiotherapy for cervical cancer resulted in tumor coverage in the lateral direction with doses higher than the previously reported Point-A doses.

  1. Filling the gap in central shielding: three-dimensional analysis of the EQD2 dose in radiotherapy for cervical cancer with the central shielding technique

    PubMed Central

    Tamaki, Tomoaki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Noda, Shin-ei; Kato, Shingo; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to provide accurate dose distribution profiles of radiotherapy for cervical cancer when treated with the central shielding technique by analysing the composite 3D EQD2 dose distribution of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plus intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). On a phantom, four patterns of the combinations of whole pelvis irradiation (WP) (4 fields), pelvis irradiation with central shielding technique (CS) [anterior–posterior/posterior–anterior (AP-PA fields), shielding width of 3 or 4 cm] and ICBT using Point-A prescription were created: 30 Gy/15 fractions + 20 Gy/10 fractions + 24 Gy/4 fractions [Plan (30 + 20 + 24)], 40 Gy/20 fractions + 10 Gy/5 fractions + 18 Gy/3 fractions [Plan (40 + 10 + 18)], 40 Gy/20 fractions + 10 Gy/5 fractions + 24 Gy/4 fractions [Plan (40 + 10 + 24)] and 45 Gy/25 fractions + 0 Gy + 28 Gy/4 fractions [Plan (45 + 0 + 28)]. The composite EQD2 dose distributions of the complete treatment were analysed. The Point-A dose of Plan (30 + 20 + 24), Plan (40 + 10 + 18), Plan (40 + 10 + 24) and Plan (45 + 0 + 28) were 78.0 Gy (CS 3 cm)/71.8 Gy (CS 4 cm), 72.1 Gy (CS 3 cm)/69.0 Gy (CS 4 cm), 80.1 Gy (CS 3 cm)/77.0 Gy (CS 4 cm) and 84.1 Gy, whereas it has been previously reported to be 62 Gy, 64 Gy, 72 Gy and 84 Gy, respectively. For all the treatment plans with CS, equivalent or wider coverage of 60 Gy (EQD2) was achieved in the right–left direction, while coverage in the anterior–posterior direction decreased in plans with CS. There were no irregularly ‘cold’ regions around the central target. The use of CS in radiotherapy for cervical cancer resulted in tumor coverage in the lateral direction with doses higher than the previously reported Point-A doses. PMID:26062811

  2. Clinical Applications of 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralbell, Raymond

    Although a significant improvement in cancer cure (i.e. 20% increment) has been obtained in the last 2-3 decades, 30-40% of patients still fail locally after curative radiotherapy. In order to improve local tumor control rates with radiotherapy high doses to the tumor volume are frequently necessary. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) is used to denote a spectrum of radiation planning and delivery techniques that rely on three-dimensional imaging to define the target (tumor) and to distinguish it from normal tissues. Modern, high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques are needed in order to implement the goal of optimal tumor destruction delivering minimal dose to the non-target normal tissues. A better target definition is nowadays possible with contemporary imaging (computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography) and image registration technology. A highly precise dose distributions can be obtained with optimal 3-D CRT treatment delivery techniques such as stereotactic RT, intensity modulated RT (IMRT), or protontherapy (the latter allowing for in-depth conformation). Patient daily set-up repositioning and internal organ immobilization systems are necessary before considering to undertake any of the above mentioned high-precision treatment approaches. Prostate cancer, brain tumors, and base of skull malignancies are among the sites most benefitting of dose escalation approaches. Nevertheless, a significant dose reduction to the normal tissues in the vicinity of the irradiated tumor also achievable with optimal 3-D CRT may also be a major issue in the treatment of pediatric tumors in order to preserve growth, normal development, and to reduce the risk of developing radiation induced diseases such as cancer or endocrinologic disorders.

  3. SU-E-J-47: Development of a High-Precision, Image-Guided Radiotherapy, Multi- Purpose Radiation Isocenter Quality-Assurance Calibration and Checking System

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C; Yan, G; Helmig, R; Lebron, S; Kahler, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a system that can define the radiation isocenter and correlate this information with couch coordinates, laser alignment, optical distance indicator (ODI) settings, optical tracking system (OTS) calibrations, and mechanical isocenter walkout. Methods: Our team developed a multi-adapter, multi-purpose quality assurance (QA) and calibration device that uses an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and in-house image-processing software to define the radiation isocenter, thereby allowing linear accelerator (Linac) components to be verified and calibrated. Motivated by the concept that each Linac component related to patient setup for image-guided radiotherapy based on cone-beam CT should be calibrated with respect to the radiation isocenter, we designed multiple concentric adapters of various materials and shapes to meet the needs of MV and KV radiation isocenter definition, laser alignment, and OTS calibration. The phantom's ability to accurately define the radiation isocenter was validated on 4 Elekta Linacs using a commercial ball bearing (BB) phantom as a reference. Radiation isocenter walkout and the accuracy of couch coordinates, ODI, and OTS were then quantified with the device. Results: The device was able to define the radiation isocenter within 0.3 mm. Radiation isocenter walkout was within ±1 mm at 4 cardinal angles. By switching adapters, we identified that the accuracy of the couch position digital readout, ODI, OTS, and mechanical isocenter walkout was within sub-mm. Conclusion: This multi-adapter, multi-purpose isocenter phantom can be used to accurately define the radiation isocenter and represents a potential paradigm shift in Linac QA. Moreover, multiple concentric adapters allowed for sub-mm accuracy for the other relevant components. This intuitive and user-friendly design is currently patent pending.

  4. A technique for extending the precision and the range of temperature programmed desorption toward extremely low coverages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haegel, Stefan; Zecho, Thomas; Wehner, Stefan

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, an improvement of the temperature programmed desorption (TPD) technique is introduced, which facilitates fully automated sampling of TPD spectra with excellent reproducibility, especially useful for extremely low coverages. By averaging many sampled TPD spectra, the range of the TPD technique can be extended toward lower coverages, as well as the quality of the spectra can be improved. This allows for easy extraction of information about the adsorbate-surface bond. A state of the art TPD apparatus with a two chamber setup and a high quality quadrupole mass spectrometer was extended by automated components. These are an automated gas dosing system, ensuring precise dosing of gas, combined with a motor driven sample manipulation unit and a liquid nitrogen cryostat with automatic refilling. In addition all components were controlled by a computer. A large number of TPD cycles could be sampled without the need of interaction of an operator. Here, it is shown for up to more than 400 TPD cycles. This opens a wide range of new interesting applications for the TPD technique, especially in the limit of zero coverage. Here, basic experiments on well known adsorbate systems are shown to view the ability and limit of this approach.

  5. [Radiotherapy of benign intracranial tumors].

    PubMed

    Delannes, M; Latorzeff, I; Chand, M E; Huchet, A; Dupin, C; Colin, P

    2016-09-01

    Most of the benign intracranial tumors are meningiomas, vestibular schwannomas, pituitary adenomas, craniopharyngiomas, and glomus tumors. Some of them grow very slowly, and can be observed without specific treatment, especially if they are asymptomatic. Symptomatic or growing tumors are treated by surgery, which is the reference treatment. When surgery is not possible, due to the location of the lesion, or general conditions, radiotherapy can be applied, as it is if there is a postoperative growing residual tumor, or a local relapse. Indications have to be discussed in polydisciplinary meetings, with precise evaluation of the benefit and risks of the treatments. The techniques to be used are the most modern ones, as multimodal imaging and image-guided radiation therapy. Stereotactic treatments, using fractionated or single doses depending on the size or the location of the tumors, are commonly realized, to avoid as much a possible the occurrence of late side effects.

  6. A Novel Two-Step Laser Ranging Technique for a Precision Test of the Theory of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Chui, Talso

    2004-09-01

    All powered spacecraft experience residual systematic acceleration due to anisotropy of the thermal radiation pressure and fuel leakage. The residual acceleration limits the accuracy of any test of gravity that relies on the precise determination of the spacecraft trajectory. We describe a novel two-step laser ranging technique, which largely eliminates the effects of non-gravity acceleration sources and enables celestial mechanics checks with unprecedented precision. A passive proof mass is released from the mother spacecraft on a solar system exploration mission. Retro-reflectors attached to the proof mass allow its relative position to the spacecraft to be determined using optical ranging techniques. Meanwhile, the position of the spacecraft relative to the Earth is determined by ranging with a laser transponder. The vector sum of the two is the position, relative to the Earth, of the proof mass, the measurement of which is not affected by the residual accelerations of the mother spacecraft. We also describe the mission concept of the Dark Matter Explorers (DMX), which will demonstrate this technology and will use it to test the hypothesis that dark matter congregates around the sun. This hypothesis implies a small apparent deviation from the inverse square law of gravity, which can be detected by a sensitive experiment. We expect to achieve an acceleration resolution of ˜ 10-14m/s2. DMX will also be sensitive to acceleration towards the galactic center, which has a value of ˜ 10-10m/s2. Since dark matter dominates the galactic acceleration, DMX can also test whether dark matter obeys the equivalence principle to a level of 100 ppm by ranging to several proof masses of different composition from the mother spacecraft.

  7. Evaluation of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography-Based Intensity-Modulated and Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy Techniques for Pancreatic Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Geld, Ylanga G. van der; Triest, Baukelien van; Verbakel, Wilko; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van; Senan, Suresh; Slotman, Ben J.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To compare conformal radiotherapy (CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and respiration-gated radiotherapy (RGRT) planning techniques for pancreatic cancer. All target volumes were determined using four-dimensional computed tomography scans (4D CT). Methods and Materials: The pancreatic tumor and enlarged regional lymph nodes were contoured on all 10 phases of a planning 4D CT scan for 10 patients, and the planning target volumes (PTV{sub allphases}) were generated. Three consecutive respiratory phases for RGRT delivery in both inspiration and expiration were identified, and the corresponding PTVs (PTV{sub inspiration} and PTV{sub expiration}) and organ at risk volumes created. Treatment plans using CRT and IMRT, with and without RGRT, were created for each PTV. Results: Compared with the CRT plans, IMRT significantly reduced the mean volume of right kidney exposed to 20 Gy from 27.7% {+-} 17.7% to 16.0% {+-} 18.2% (standard deviation) (p < 0.01), but this was not achieved for the left kidney (11.1% {+-} 14.2% to 5.7% {+-} 6.5%; p = 0.1). The IMRT plans also reduced the mean gastric, hepatic, and small bowel doses (p < 0.01). No additional reductions in the dose to the kidneys or other organs at risk were seen when RGRT plans were combined with either CRT or IMRT, and the findings for RGRT in end-expiration and end-inspiration were similar. Conclusion: 4D CT-based IMRT plans for pancreatic tumors significantly reduced the radiation doses to the right kidney, liver, stomach, and small bowel compared with CRT plans. The additional dosimetric benefits from RGRT appear limited in this setting.

  8. Particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Sinoto, Makoto; Matsunobu, Akira; Toyama, Shingo; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Kudo, Sho

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in external beam radiotherapy have allowed us to deliver higher doses to the tumors while decreasing doses to the surrounding tissues. Dose escalation using high-precision radiotherapy has improved the treatment outcomes of prostate cancer. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy has been widely used throughout the world as the most advanced form of photon radiotherapy. In contrast, particle radiotherapy has also been under development, and has been used as an effective and non-invasive radiation modality for prostate and other cancers. Among the particles used in such treatments, protons and carbon ions have the physical advantage that the dose can be focused on the tumor with only minimal exposure of the surrounding normal tissues. Furthermore, carbon ions also have radiobiological advantages that include higher killing effects on intrinsic radio-resistant tumors, hypoxic tumor cells and tumor cells in the G0 or S phase. However, the degree of clinical benefit derived from these theoretical advantages in the treatment of prostate cancer has not been adequately determined. The present article reviews the available literature on the use of particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer as well as the literature on the physical and radiobiological properties of this treatment, and discusses the role and the relative merits of particle radiotherapy compared with current photon-based radiotherapy, with a focus on proton beam therapy and carbon ion radiotherapy.

  9. Simultaneously precise frequency transfer and time synchronization using feed-forward compensation technique via 120 km fiber link.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Lu, Jinlong; Cui, Yifan; Zhang, Jian; Lu, Xing; Tian, Xusheng; Ci, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Wu, Hong; Tang, Tingsong; Shi, Kebin; Zhang, Zhigang

    2015-12-22

    Precision time synchronization between two remote sites is desired in many applications such as global positioning satellite systems, long-baseline interferometry, coherent radar detection and fundamental physics constant measurements. The recently developed frequency dissemination technologies based on optical fiber link have improved the transfer instability to the level of 10(-19)/day at remote location. Therefore it is possible to keep clock oscillation at remote locations continuously corrected, or to reproduce a "virtual" clock on the remote location. However the initial alignment and the correction of 1 pps timing signal from time to time are still required, besides the highly stabilized clock frequency transfer between distant locations. Here we demonstrate a time synchronization based on an ultra-stable frequency transfer system via 120-km commercial fiber link by transferring an optical frequency comb. Both the phase noise compensation in frequency dissemination and temporal basis alignment in time synchronization were implemented by a feed-forward digital compensation (FFDC) technique. The fractional frequency instability was measured to be 6.18 × 10(-20) at 2000 s. The timing deviation of time synchronization was measured to be 0.6 ps in 1500 s. This technique also can be applied in multi-node fiber network topology.

  10. Simultaneously precise frequency transfer and time synchronization using feed-forward compensation technique via 120 km fiber link

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing; Lu, Jinlong; Cui, Yifan; Zhang, Jian; Lu, Xing; Tian, Xusheng; Ci, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Wu, Hong; Tang, Tingsong; Shi, Kebin; Zhang, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Precision time synchronization between two remote sites is desired in many applications such as global positioning satellite systems, long-baseline interferometry, coherent radar detection and fundamental physics constant measurements. The recently developed frequency dissemination technologies based on optical fiber link have improved the transfer instability to the level of 10−19/day at remote location. Therefore it is possible to keep clock oscillation at remote locations continuously corrected, or to reproduce a “virtual” clock on the remote location. However the initial alignment and the correction of 1 pps timing signal from time to time are still required, besides the highly stabilized clock frequency transfer between distant locations. Here we demonstrate a time synchronization based on an ultra-stable frequency transfer system via 120-km commercial fiber link by transferring an optical frequency comb. Both the phase noise compensation in frequency dissemination and temporal basis alignment in time synchronization were implemented by a feed-forward digital compensation (FFDC) technique. The fractional frequency instability was measured to be 6.18 × 10−20 at 2000 s. The timing deviation of time synchronization was measured to be 0.6 ps in 1500 s. This technique also can be applied in multi-node fiber network topology. PMID:26691731

  11. Simultaneously precise frequency transfer and time synchronization using feed-forward compensation technique via 120 km fiber link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xing; Lu, Jinlong; Cui, Yifan; Zhang, Jian; Lu, Xing; Tian, Xusheng; Ci, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Wu, Hong; Tang, Tingsong; Shi, Kebin; Zhang, Zhigang

    2015-12-01

    Precision time synchronization between two remote sites is desired in many applications such as global positioning satellite systems, long-baseline interferometry, coherent radar detection and fundamental physics constant measurements. The recently developed frequency dissemination technologies based on optical fiber link have improved the transfer instability to the level of 10-19/day at remote location. Therefore it is possible to keep clock oscillation at remote locations continuously corrected, or to reproduce a “virtual” clock on the remote location. However the initial alignment and the correction of 1 pps timing signal from time to time are still required, besides the highly stabilized clock frequency transfer between distant locations. Here we demonstrate a time synchronization based on an ultra-stable frequency transfer system via 120-km commercial fiber link by transferring an optical frequency comb. Both the phase noise compensation in frequency dissemination and temporal basis alignment in time synchronization were implemented by a feed-forward digital compensation (FFDC) technique. The fractional frequency instability was measured to be 6.18 × 10-20 at 2000 s. The timing deviation of time synchronization was measured to be 0.6 ps in 1500 s. This technique also can be applied in multi-node fiber network topology.

  12. SU-E-P-56: Dosimetric Comparison of Three Post Modified Radical Mastectomy Radiotherapy Techniques for Locally Advanced Left-Sided Breast Cancer and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C; Zhang, W; Lu, J; Wu, L; Wu, F; Huang, B; Li, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetry of post modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRMRT) for left-sided breast cancer using 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: We created ten sets of PMRMRT plans for ten consecutive patients and utilized two tangential and one or two supraclavicular beams in 3DCRT, a total of 5 beams in IMRT and two optimized partial arcs in VMAT. The difference in results between any two of the three new plans, between new and previous 3DCRT plans were compared and analyzed by ANOVA (α =0.05) and paired-sample t-test respectively. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Both IMRT and VMAT plans had similar PTV coverage, hotspot area and conformity (all p>0.05), and significantly higher PTV coverage compared with new 3DCRT (both p<0.001). IMRT plans had significantly less heart and left lung radiation exposure compared with VMAT (all p<0.05). The 3DCRT plans with larger estimated CTV displacement had better target coverage but worse OARs sparing compared to those with smaller one. Conclusion: IMRT has dosimetrical advantages over the other two techniques in PMRMRT for left-sided breast cancer. Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve dosage distribution. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  13. [Which rules apply to hypofractionated radiotherapy?].

    PubMed

    Supiot, S; Clément-Colmou, K; Paris, F; Corre, I; Chiavassa, S; Delpon, G

    2015-10-01

    Hypofractionated radiotherapy is now more widely prescribed due to improved targeting techniques (intensity modulated radiotherapy, image-guided radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy). Low dose hypofractionated radiotherapy is routinely administered mostly for palliative purposes. High or very high dose hypofractionated irradiation must be delivered according to very strict procedures since every minor deviation can lead to major changes in dose delivery to the tumor volume and organs at risk. Thus, each stage of the processing must be carefully monitored starting from the limitations and the choice of the hypofractionation technique, tumour contouring and dose constraints prescription, planning and finally dose calculation and patient positioning verification.

  14. Ultra-high-precision surface processing techniques for nanofocusing ellipsoidal mirrors in hard x-ray region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Koyama, Takahisa; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Ohashi, Haruhiko

    2014-09-01

    X-ray microscopic analysis as a fundamental tool in various scientific fields is supported by advancements in highprecision x-ray optics. Off-axis ellipsoidal focusing mirror optics, which can produce two-dimensional focus with a mirror and has characteristics of high reflectivity and achromaticity, is quite attractive for use in microscopic analysis. However, technical problems in fabrication prevent a realization of off-axis ellipsoidal mirrors with nanometer accuracy for nano-focusing of hard x-rays. The purpose of this study was to resolve a problem of surface processing technique for fabrication of nanofocusing ellipsoidal mirrors in the hard x-ray region. We developed two types of ultra-high-precision surface processing machines by advancing the Elastic Emission Machining method. One is a machine for improvement of surface roughness with a rotary type working head, and the other is a machine for a computer-controlled figure correction with a small-aperture nozzle type working head. Using the rotary type machine, we confirmed that surface roughness of 4.32 nm root-mean-square (RMS) on an off-axis ellipsoidal mirror surface was improved to 0.14 nm (RMS) within a spatial wavelength range of shorter than several hundred microns. Using the nozzle type machine, we demonstrated a figure correction in a spatial wavelength of longer than 100 μm with nanometer height accuracy. Ultrahigh- precision surface processing technologies with the capability of fabricating nano-focusing off-axis ellipsoidal mirrors were established.

  15. Who Should Bear the Cost of Convenience? A Cost-effectiveness Analysis Comparing External Beam and Brachytherapy Radiotherapy Techniques for Early Stage Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    McGuffin, M; Merino, T; Keller, B; Pignol, J-P

    2017-03-01

    Standard treatment for early breast cancer includes whole breast irradiation (WBI) after breast-conserving surgery. Recently, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has been proposed for well-selected patients. A cost and cost-effectiveness analysis was carried out comparing WBI with two APBI techniques. An activity-based costing method was used to determine the treatment cost from a societal perspective of WBI, high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) and permanent breast seed implants (PBSI). A Markov model comparing the three techniques was developed with downstream costs, utilities and probabilities adapted from the literature. Sensitivity analyses were carried out for a wide range of variables, including treatment costs, patient costs, utilities and probability of developing recurrences. Overall, HDR was the most expensive ($14 400), followed by PBSI ($8700), with WBI proving the least expensive ($6200). The least costly method to the health care system was WBI, whereas PBSI and HDR were less costly for the patient. Under cost-effectiveness analyses, downstream costs added about $10 000 to the total societal cost of the treatment. As the outcomes are very similar between techniques, WBI dominated under cost-effectiveness analyses. WBI was found to be the most cost-effective radiotherapy technique for early breast cancer. However, both APBI techniques were less costly to the patient. Although innovation may increase costs for the health care system it can provide cost savings for the patient in addition to convenience. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Image Guidance in Radiation Therapy: Techniques and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kataria, Tejinder

    2014-01-01

    In modern day radiotherapy, the emphasis on reduction on volume exposed to high radiotherapy doses, improving treatment precision as well as reducing radiation-related normal tissue toxicity has increased, and thus there is greater importance given to accurate position verification and correction before delivering radiotherapy. At present, several techniques that accomplish these goals impeccably have been developed, though all of them have their limitations. There is no single method available that eliminates treatment-related uncertainties without considerably adding to the cost. However, delivering “high precision radiotherapy” without periodic image guidance would do more harm than treating large volumes to compensate for setup errors. In the present review, we discuss the concept of image guidance in radiotherapy, the current techniques available, and their expected benefits and pitfalls. PMID:25587445

  17. Intraoperative radiotherapy in colorectal cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis of techniques, long-term outcomes, and complications.

    PubMed

    Mirnezami, Reza; Chang, George J; Das, Prajnan; Chandrakumaran, Kandiah; Tekkis, Paris; Darzi, Ara; Mirnezami, Alexander H

    2013-03-01

    The precise contribution of IORT to the management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer (CRC) remains uncertain. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the value of IORT in this setting. Studies published between 1965 and 2011 that reported outcomes after IORT for advanced or recurrent CRC were identified by an electronic literature search. Studies were assessed for methodological quality and design, and evaluated for technique of IORT delivery, oncological outcomes, and complications following IORT. Outcomes were analysed with fixed-effect and random-effect model meta-analyses and heterogeneity and publication bias examined. 29 studies comprising 14 prospective and 15 retrospective studies met the inclusion criteria and were assessed, yielding a total of 3003 patients. The indication for IORT was locally advanced disease in 1792 patients and locally recurrent disease in 1211 patients. Despite heterogeneity in methodology and reporting practice, IORT is principally applied for the treatment of close or positive margins. When comparative studies were evaluated, a significant effect favouring improved local control (OR 0.22; 95% CI = 0.05-0.86; p = 0.03), disease free survival (HR 0.51; 95% CI = 0.31-0.85; p = 0.009), and overall survival (HR 0.33; 95% CI = 0.2-0.54; p = 0.001) was noted with no increase in total (OR 1.13; 95% CI = 0.77-1.65; p = 0.57), urologic (OR 1.35; 95% CI = 0.84-2.82; p = 0.47), or anastomotic complications (OR 0.94; 95% CI = 0.42-2.1; p = 0.98). Increased wound complications were noted after IORT (OR 1.86; 95% CI = 1.03-3.38; p = 0.049). Despite methodological weaknesses in the studies evaluated, our results suggest that IORT may improve oncological outcomes in advanced and recurrent CRC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dosimetric study of the protection level of the bone marrow in patients with cervical or endometrial cancer for three radiotherapy techniques - 3D CRT, IMRT and VMAT. Study protocol.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jodda, Agata; Urbański, Bartosz; Piotrowski, Tomasz; Malicki, Julian

    2016-03-01

    Background: The paper shows the methodology of an in-phantom study of the protection level of the bone marrow in patients with cervical or endometrial cancer for three radiotherapy techniques: three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and volumetric modulated arc therapy, preceded by the procedures of image guidance. Methods/Design: The dosimetric evaluation of the doses will be performed in an in-house multi-element anthropomorphic phantom of the female pelvic area created by three-dimensional printing technology. The volume and position of the structures will be regulated according to the guidelines from the Bayesian network. The input data for the learning procedure of the model will be obtained from the retrospective analysis of imaging data obtained for 96 patients with endometrial cancer or cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy in our centre in 2008-2013. Three anatomical representations of the phantom simulating three independent clinical cases will be chosen. Five alternative treatment plans (1 × three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 2 × intensity modulated radiotherapy and 2 × volumetric modulated arc therapy) will be created for each representation. To simulate image-guided radiotherapy, ten specific recombinations will be designated, for each anatomical representation separately, reflecting possible changes in the volume and position of the phantom components. Discussion: The comparative analysis of planned measurements will identify discrepancies between calculated doses and doses that were measured in the phantom. Finally, differences between the doses cumulated in the hip plates performed by different techniques simulating the gynaecological patients' irradiation of dose delivery will be established. The results of this study will form the basis of the prospective clinical trial that will be designed for the assessment of hematologic toxicity and its correlation with the doses cumulated in the hip plates

  19. From technological advances to biological understanding: The main steps toward high-precision RT in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Ricotti, Rosalinda; Dicuonzo, Samantha; Cattani, Federica; Morra, Anna; Dell'Acqua, Veronica; Orecchia, Roberto; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja

    2016-10-01

    Radiotherapy improves local control in breast cancer (BC) patients which increases overall survival in the long term. Improvements in treatment planning and delivery and a greater understanding of BC behaviour have laid the groundwork for high-precision radiotherapy, which is bound to further improve the therapeutic index. Precise identification of target volumes, better coverage and dose homogeneity have had a positive impact on toxicity and local control. The conformity of treatment dose due to three-dimensional radiotherapy and new techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy makes it possible to spare surrounding normal tissue. The widespread use of dose-volume constraints and histograms have increased awareness of toxicity. Real time image guidance has improved geometric precision and accuracy, together with the implementation of quality assurance programs. Advances in the precision of radiotherapy is also based on the choice of the appropriate fractionation and approach. Adaptive radiotherapy is not only a technical concept, but is also a biological concept based on the knowledge that different types of BC have distinctive patterns of locoregional spread. A greater understanding of cancer biology helps in choosing the treatment best suited to a particular situation. Biomarkers predictive of response play a crucial role. The combination of radiotherapy with molecular targeted therapies may enhance radiosensitivity, thus increasing the cytotoxic effects and improving treatment response. The appropriateness of an alternative fractionation, partial breast irradiation, dose escalating/de-escalating approaches, the extent of nodal irradiation have been examined for all the BC subtypes. The broadened concept of adaptive radiotherapy is vital to high-precision treatments.

  20. Dosimetric Comparison and Evaluation of Three Radiotherapy Techniques for Use after Modified Radical Mastectomy for Locally Advanced Left-sided Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Changchun; Zhang, Wuzhe; Lu, Jiayang; Wu, Lili; Wu, Fangcai; Huang, Baotian; Lin, Yan; Li, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the post-modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRMRT) for left-sided breast cancer utilizing 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with field-in-field technique (3DCRT-FinF), 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (5F-IMRT) and 2- partial arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (2P-VMAT). We created the 3 different PMRMRT plans for each of the ten consecutive patients. We performed Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Dunn’s-type multiple comparisons to establish a hierarchy in terms of plan quality and dosimetric benefits. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Both 5F-IMRT and 2P-VMAT plans exhibited similar PTV coverage (V95%), hotspot areas (V110%) and conformity (all p > 0.05), and significantly higher PTV coverage compared with 3DCRT-FinF (both p < 0.001). In addition, 5F-IMRT plans provided significantly less heart and left lung radiation exposure than 2P-VMAT (all p < 0.05). The 3DCRT-FinF plans with accurately estimated CTV displacement exhibited enhanced target coverage but worse organs at risk (OARs) sparing compared with those plans with underestimated displacements. Our results indicate that 5F-IMRT has dosimetrical advantages compared with the other two techniques in PMRMRT for left-sided breast cancer given its optimal balance between PTV coverage and OAR sparing (especially heart sparing). Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve dosage distribution. PMID:26194593

  1. Precise oxygen and hydrogen isotope determination in nanoliter quantities of speleothem inclusion water by cavity ring-down spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Ryu; Nakamoto, Masashi; Asami, Ryuji; Mishima, Satoru; Gibo, Masakazu; Masaka, Kosuke; Jin-Ping, Chen; Wu, Chung-Che; Chang, Yu-Wei; Shen, Chuan-Chou

    2016-01-01

    Speleothem inclusion-water isotope compositions are a promising new climatic proxy, but their applicability is limited by their low content in water and by analytical challenges. We have developed a precise and accurate isotopic technique that is based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). This method features a newly developed crushing apparatus, a refined sample extraction line, careful evaluation of the water/carbonate adsorption effect. After crushing chipped speleothem in a newly-developed crushing device, released inclusion water is purified and mixed with a limited amount of nitrogen gas in the extraction line for CRDS measurement. We have measured 50-260 nL of inclusion water from 77 to 286 mg of stalagmite deposits sampled from Gyokusen Cave, Okinawa Island, Japan. The small sample size requirement demonstrates that our analytical technique can offer high-resolution inclusion water-based paleoclimate reconstructions. The 1σ reproducibility for different stalagmites ranges from ±0.05 to 0.61‰ for δ18O and ±0.0 to 2.9‰ for δD. The δD vs. δ18O plot for inclusion water from modern stalagmites is consistent with the local meteoric water line. The 1000 ln α values based on calcite and fluid inclusion measurements from decades-old stalagmites are in agreement with the data from present-day farmed calcite experiment. Combination of coeval carbonate and fluid inclusion data suggests that past temperatures at 9-10 thousand years ago (ka) and 26 ka were 3.4 ± 0.7 °C and 8.2 ± 2.4 °C colder than at present, respectively.

  2. Stability of Precise Point Positioning with Different Techniques for Applying the IGb08 and IGS14 Reference Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, P. A.; Heflin, M. B.; Amiri, N.; Sakumura, C.; Sibois, A. E.; David, M. W.

    2016-12-01

    In order to evaluate the accuracy of the station locations within both the IGb08 and IGS14 reference frames, we apply two different methods for constraining their positions within the reference frames. We produce time series data from 50 different stations between March 2011 and March 2012 including sites near large seismic events. For the first technique, we point position the stations against JPL's fiducial-free orbit and clock products and use a 7-parameter Helmert transformation on the network positions and covariance from the free solution to transform the position into each reference frame. For the second test, we perform precise orbit determination (POD) on the GPS constellation using a network of ground stations and apply a no-net-rotation (NNR) constraint from each frame on the network during POD. We then compare the stability of time series of stations point positioned against the NNR products generated in each frame and transformed into the reference frame with a 4-parameter Helmert transform. We also compare the stability between the positions obtained from the NNR products and a 4-parameter transformation against positions obtained from fiducial-free products and a 7-parameter transformation in each frame.

  3. [Radiotherapy for retroperitoneal sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Sargos, P; Stoeckle, E; Henriques de Figueiredo, B; Antoine, M; Delannes, M; Mervoyer, A; Kantor, G

    2016-10-01

    The management of retroperitoneal sarcoma can be very challenging, and the quality of initial treatment strategy appears to be a crucial prognostic factor. En bloc surgery is currently the standard of care for these rare tumours and perioperative treatments such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy have not been validated yet. However, local-regional relapse constitutes the most common disease course. While adjuvant radiotherapy is less and less common due to gastrointestinal toxicities, preoperative radiation therapy offers numerous advantages and is being evaluated as part of a national multicentre phase II study (TOMOREP trial) and is the subject of a European randomized phase III study (STRASS trial). The objective of this article is to present data on preoperative irradiation in terms of dose, volumes and optimal radiotherapy techniques for the treatment of this rare disease.

  4. Reliable and integrated technique for determining resonant frequency in radio frequency resonators. Application to a high-precision resonant cavity-based displacement sensor.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Rigoberto; Asua, Estibaliz; Portilla, Joaquin; Etxebarria, Victor

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a reliable and integrated technique for determining the resonant frequency of radio frequency resonators, which can be of interest for different purposes. The approach uses a heterodyne scheme as phase detector coupled to a voltage-controlled oscillator. The system seeks the oscillator frequency that produces a phase null in the resonator, which corresponds to the resonant frequency. A complete explanation of the technique to determine the resonant frequency is presented and experimentally tested. The method has been applied to a high-precision displacement sensor based on resonant cavity, obtaining a theoretical nanometric precision.

  5. Imaging tumour motion for radiotherapy planning using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Plathow, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Novel technology has made dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lung motion and lung tumour mobility during continuous respiration feasible. This might be beneficial for planning of radiotherapy of lung tumours, especially when using high precision techniques. This paper describes the recent developments to analyze and visualize pulmonary nodules during continuous respiration using MRI. Besides recent dynamic two-dimensional approaches to quantify motion of pulmonary nodules during respiration novel three-dimensional techniques are presented. Beyond good correlation to pulmonary function tests MRI also provides regional information about differences between tumour-bearing and non-tumour bearing lung and the restrictive effects of radiotherapy as well as the compensation by the contralateral lung. PMID:17114068

  6. Clinical observation and quality of life in terms of nasal sinusitis after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: long-term results from different nasal irrigation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Luo, H-H; Fu, Z-C; Liao, S-G; Li, D-S

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between nasal irrigation techniques (NIT) and the survival rate and the quality of life (QOL) in patients with nasal sinusitis (NS). Methods: We studied data from 1134 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) who received radical radiotherapy, which were randomly divided into three groups (A, B and C). Group A used nasal irrigator; Group B used homemade nasal irrigation (NI) connector combined with enemator; and Group C used nasal sprayer. The clinical effects, 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were observed. Furthermore, the QOL in patients with NS was evaluated using the Sino-Nasal Outcome Test 20. Results: The median follow-up time was 69 months. The 5-year OS and PFS were 80.5% and 73.2%, respectively, for all patients. There was no significant difference in OS, PFS, xerostomia and neck skin toxicity grade 3 and greater among groups. There was no difference among groups. The incidence of NS was the highest in group C. Conclusion: The symptoms of NS seriously affected the QOL period of 1 year. Group C showed no improvement during the follow-up period, which for A and B, by contrast, had after 1 year. Although the exact mechanism remains to be explored in NIT, our findings suggest that patients with NPC should nasal irrigate for 2 years after radiotherapy. Advances in knowledge: Our study shows that a nasal irrigator is necessary for patients with NPC for a high QOL in terms of NS. PMID:24814695

  7. Online planning and delivery technique for radiotherapy of spinal metastases using cone-beam CT: Image quality and system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Letourneau, Daniel . E-mail: daniel.letourneau@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Wong, Rebecca; Moseley, Douglas; Sharpe, Michael B.; Ansell, Stephen B.Sc.; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Jaffray, David A.

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of an online strategy for palliative radiotherapy (RT) of spinal bone metastasis, which integrates imaging, planning, and treatment delivery in a single step at the treatment unit. The technical challenges of this approach include cone-beam CT (CBCT) image quality for target definition, online planning, and efficient process integration. Methods and Materials: An integrated imaging, planning, and delivery system was constructed and tested with phantoms. The magnitude of CBCT image artifacts following the use of an antiscatter grid and a nonlinear scatter correction was quantified using phantom data and images of patients receiving conventional palliative RT of the spine. The efficacy of online planning was then assessed using corrected CBCT images. Testing of the complete process was performed on phantoms with assessment of timing and dosimetric accuracy. Results: The use of image corrections reduced the cupping artifact from 30% to 4.5% on CBCT images of a body phantom and improved the accuracy of CBCT numbers (water: {+-} 20 Hounsfield unit [HU], and lung and bone: to within {+-} 130 HU). Bony anatomy was clearly visible and was deemed sufficient for target definition. The mean total time (n = 5) for application of the online approach was 23.1 min. Image-guided dose placement was assessed using radiochromic film measurements with good agreement (within 5% of dose difference and 2 mm of distance to agreement). Conclusions: The technical feasibility of CBCT-guided online planning and delivery for palliative single treatment has been demonstrated. The process was performed in one session equivalent to an initial treatment slot (<30 min) with dosimetric accuracy satisfying accepted RT standards.

  8. A technique to re-establish dose distributions for previously treated brain cancer patients in external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Ning J.; Knisely, Jonathan; Studholme, Colin; Chen Zhe; Bond, James E.; Nath, Ravinder

    2004-03-31

    Tumor recurrences or new tumors may develop after irradiation of local lesion(s) in the brain, and additional radiotherapy treatments are often needed for previously treated patients. It is critical to re-establish the dose distributions delivered during the previous treatment in the current patient geometry, so that the previous dose distributions can be accurately taken into consideration in the design of the current treatment plan. The difficulty in re-establishing the previous treatment dose distributions in the current patient geometry arises from the fact that the patient position at the time of reirradiation is different from that at the previous treatment session. Simple re-entry of the previous isocenter coordinates, gantry, and couch and collimator angles into the new treatment plan would result in incorrect beam orientations relative to the new patient anatomy, and therefore incorrect display of the previous dose distributions on the current patient anatomy. To address this issue, a method has been developed so that the previous dose distributions can be accurately re-established in the framework of the current brain treatment. The method involves 3 matrix transformations: (1) transformation of beams from machine coordinate system to patient coordinate system in the previous treatment; (2) transformation of beams from patient coordinate system in the previous treatment to patient coordinate system in the current treatment; and (3) transformation of beams from patient coordinate system in the current treatment to machine coordinate system. The transformation matrices used in the second transformation are determined by registration using a mutual information-based algorithm with which the old and new computed tomography (CT) scan sets are registered automatically without human interpretation. A series of transformation matrices are derived to calculate the isocenter coordinates, the gantry, couch, and collimator angles of the beams for the previous

  9. Optimal planning strategy among various arc arrangements for prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy technique

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sang Won; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, In Ah; Eom, Keun Yong; Song, Changhoon; Lee, Jeong Woo; Kim, Jin Young

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine the optimal strategy among various arc arrangements in prostate plans of stereotactic body radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy (SBRT-VMAT). Patients and methods To investigate how arc arrangements affect dosimetric and biological metrics, SBRT-VMAT plans for eighteen patients were generated with arrangements of single-full arc (1FA), single-partial arc (1PA), double-full arc (2FA), and double-partial arc (2PA). All plans were calculated by the Acuros XB calculation algorithm. Dosimetric and radiobiological metrics for target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were evaluated from dosevolume histograms. Results All plans were highly conformal (CI<1.05, CN=0.91) and homogeneous (HI=0.09-0.12) for target volumes. For OARs, there was no difference in the bladder dose, while there was a significant difference in the rectum and both femoral head doses. Plans using 1PA and 2PA showed a strong reduction to the mean rectum dose compared to plans using 1FA and 2FA. Contrastively, the D2% and mean dose in both femoral heads were always lower in plans using 1FA and 2FA. The average tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability were comparable in plans using all arc arrangements. Conclusions The use of 1PA had a more effective delivery time and produced equivalent target coverage with better rectal sparing, although all plans using four arc arrangements showed generally similar for dosimetric and biological metrics. However, the D2% and mean dose in femoral heads increased slightly and remained within the tolerance. Therefore, this study suggests that the use of 1PA is an attractive choice for delivering prostate SBRT-VMAT. PMID:28265240

  10. In situ precision electrospinning as an effective delivery technique for cyanoacrylate medical glue with high efficiency and low toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, R. H.; Qin, C. C.; Qiu, X.; Yan, X.; Yu, M.; Cui, L.; Zhou, Y.; Zhang, H. D.; Jiang, X. Y.; Long, Y. Z.

    2015-11-01

    The side effects or toxicity of cyanoacrylate used in vivo have been argued since its first application in wound closure. We propose an airflow-assisted in situ precision electrospinning apparatus as an applicator and make a detailed comparison with traditional spraying via in vitro and in vivo experiments. This novel method can not only improve operational performance and safety by precisely depositing cyanoacrylate fibers onto a wound, but significantly reduce the dosage of cyanoacrylate by almost 80%. A white blood cell count, liver function test and histological analysis prove that the in situ precision electrospinning applicator produces a better postoperative outcome, e.g., minor hepatocyte injury, moderate inflammation and the significant ability for liver regeneration. This in situ precision electrospinning method may thus dramatically broaden both civilian and military applications of cyanoacrylates.

  11. In situ precision electrospinning as an effective delivery technique for cyanoacrylate medical glue with high efficiency and low toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dong, R H; Qin, C C; Qiu, X; Yan, X; Yu, M; Cui, L; Zhou, Y; Zhang, H D; Jiang, X Y; Long, Y Z

    2015-12-14

    The side effects or toxicity of cyanoacrylate used in vivo have been argued since its first application in wound closure. We propose an airflow-assisted in situ precision electrospinning apparatus as an applicator and make a detailed comparison with traditional spraying via in vitro and in vivo experiments. This novel method can not only improve operational performance and safety by precisely depositing cyanoacrylate fibers onto a wound, but significantly reduce the dosage of cyanoacrylate by almost 80%. A white blood cell count, liver function test and histological analysis prove that the in situ precision electrospinning applicator produces a better postoperative outcome, e.g., minor hepatocyte injury, moderate inflammation and the significant ability for liver regeneration. This in situ precision electrospinning method may thus dramatically broaden both civilian and military applications of cyanoacrylates.

  12. Liver-Directed Radiotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Florence K.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) continues to increase world-wide. Many patients present with advanced disease with extensive local tumor or vascular invasion and are not candidates for traditionally curative therapies such as orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) or resection. Radiotherapy (RT) was historically limited by its inability to deliver a tumoricidal dose; however, modern RT techniques have prompted renewed interest in the use of liver-directed RT to treat patients with primary hepatic malignancies. Summary The aim of this review was to discuss the use of external beam RT in the treatment of HCC, with particular focus on the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We review the intricacies of SBRT treatment planning and delivery. Liver-directed RT involves accurate target identification, precise and reproducible patient immobilization, and assessment of target and organ motion. We also summarize the published data on liver-directed RT, and demonstrate that it is associated with excellent local control and survival rates, particularly in patients who are not candidates for OLT or resection. Key Messages Modern liver-directed RT is safe and effective for the treatment of HCC, particularly in patients who are not candidates for OLT or resection. Liver-directed RT, including SBRT, depends on accurate target identification, precise and reproducible patient immobilization, and assessment of target and organ motion. Further prospective studies are needed to fully delineate the role of liver-directed RT in the treatment of HCC. PMID:27493895

  13. [Respiratory synchronization and breast radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Mège, A; Ziouèche-Mottet, A; Bodez, V; Garcia, R; Arnaud, A; de Rauglaudre, G; Pourel, N; Chauvet, B

    2016-10-01

    Adjuvant radiation therapy following breast cancer surgery continues to improve locoregional control and overall survival. But the success of highly targeted-conformal radiotherapy such as intensity-modulated techniques, can be compromised by respiratory motion. The intrafraction motion can potentially result in significant under- or overdose, and also expose organs at risk. This article summarizes the respiratory motion and its effects on imaging, dose calculation and dose delivery by radiotherapy for breast cancer. We will review the methods of respiratory synchronization available for breast radiotherapy to minimize the respiratory impact and to spare organs such as heart and lung.

  14. Postoperative chemoradiotherapy vs. preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced (operable) gastric cancer: clarifying the role and technique of radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Raymond; Darling, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Background Worldwide, almost one million new cases of stomach cancer were diagnosed in 2012, making it the fifth most common cancer, and the third leading cause of cancer deaths. The current tumor node metastasis (TNM) staging system represents a consensus between the East and the West, and will serve as a strong foundation upon which to build future evidence. In this review article, we first discuss the definition and optimal surgery for locally advanced gastric cancer, followed by the general principles when considering a pre vs. postoperative radiotherapy (RT) strategy. We then provide a synthesis of the existing randomized trial evidence in an attempt clarify the role of pre and postoperative RT in the management of locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods A Medline search 1966-Jun 2014 was undertaken. Randomized trials including patients with locally advanced gastric cancer (using established definitions), comparing RT [with or without chemotherapy (CT)], with surgery alone or other treatment modalities were included. Systematic reviews and evidence based practice guidelines that include this body of primary studies were preferentially discussed. Medline, Cochrane Library, Clinicaltrial.gov, Guidelines Clearinghouse were searched. Results Sixteen randomized trials, three systematic reviews and one practice guideline were included as the evidence base. In this group of studies, two reports compared postoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with surgery alone. Driven predominantly by INT0116, they established the role of postoperative CRT to provide a survival benefit in a patient group that underwent surgery with predominantly D0-1 dissections. Preoperative RT (four studies) showed promise for survival benefit but the risks of bias in these trials were high. Postoperative CRT compared with CT alone (eight trials) showed no survival benefit with the addition of radiation although some evidence of activity can be observed with improved local regional control

  15. SU-E-T-332: Dosimetric Impact of Photon Energy and Treatment Technique When Knowledge Based Auto-Planning Is Implemented in Radiotherapy of Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z; Kennedy, A; Larsen, E; Grow, A; Hayes, C; Balamucki, C; Salmon, H; Thompson, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric impact of the combination of photon energy and treatment technique on radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer when knowledge based planning was used. Methods: A total of 16 patients with localized prostate cancer were retrospectively retrieved from database and used for this study. For each patient, four types of treatment plans with different combinations of photon energy (6X and 10X) and treatment techniques (7-field IMRT and 2-arc VMAT) were created using a prostate DVH estimation model in RapidPlan™ and Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical System). For any beam arrangement, DVH objectives and weighting priorities were generated based on the geometric relationship between the OAR and PTV. Photon optimization algorithm was used for plan optimization and AAA algorithm was used for final dose calculation. Plans were evaluated in terms of the pre-defined dosimetric endpoints for PTV, rectum, bladder, penile bulb, and femur heads. A Student’s paired t-test was used for statistical analysis and p > 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: For PTV, V95 was statistically similar among all four types of plans, though the mean dose of 10X plans was higher than that of 6X plans. VMAT plans showed higher heterogeneity index than IMRT plans. No statistically significant difference in dosimetry metrics was observed for rectum, bladder, and penile bulb among plan types. For left and right femur, VMAT plans had a higher mean dose than IMRT plans regardless of photon energy, whereas the maximum dose was similar. Conclusion: Overall, the dosimetric endpoints were similar regardless of photon energy and treatment techniques when knowledge based auto planning was used. Given the similarity in dosimetry metrics of rectum, bladder, and penile bulb, the genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities should be comparable among the selections of photon energy and treatment techniques.

  16. Dosimetric Benefits of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Combined With the Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique in Patients With Mediastinal Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paumier, Amaury; Ghalibafian, Mithra; Gilmore, Jennifer; Beaudre, Anne; Blanchard, Pierre; El Nemr, Mohammed; Azoury, Farez; Al Hamokles, Hweej; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Girinsky, Theodore

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the additional benefits of using the deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in terms of the protection of organs at risk for patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma with mediastinal involvement were entered into the study. Two simulation computed tomography scans were performed for each patient: one using the free-breathing (FB) technique and the other using the DIBH technique with a dedicated spirometer. The clinical target volume, planning target volume (PTV), and organs at risk were determined on both computed tomography scans according to the guidelines of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. In both cases, 30 Gy in 15 fractions was prescribed. The dosimetric parameters retrieved for the statistical analysis were PTV coverage, mean heart dose, mean coronary artery dose, mean lung dose, and lung V20. Results: There were no significant differences in PTV coverage between the two techniques (FB vs. DIBH). The mean doses delivered to the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs were significantly reduced by 15% to 20% using DIBH compared with FB, and the lung V20 was reduced by almost one third. The dose reduction to organs at risk was greater for masses in the upper part of the mediastinum. IMRT with DIBH was partially implemented in 1 patient. This combination will be extended to other patients in the near future. Conclusions: Radiation exposure of the coronary arteries, heart, and lungs in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin's lymphoma was greatly reduced using DIBH with IMRT. The greatest benefit was obtained for tumors in the upper part of the mediastinum. The possibility of a wider use in clinical practice is currently under investigation in our department.

  17. Radiation-induced second malignancies after involved-node radiotherapy with deep-inspiration breath-hold technique for early stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: a dosimetric study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To estimate the risk of radiation induced second cancers after radiotherapy using deep-inspiration breath-hold (DI) technique with three-dimensional conformal (3DCRT) and volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) for patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL). Methods Early-stage HL with mediastinal and supraclavicular involvement was studied using an Alderson phantom. A whole body CT was performed and all tissues were delineated. The clinical target volumes and planning target volumes (PTV) were determined according to the German Hodgkin study group guidelines. Free-breathing (FB) technique and DI technique were simulated by different safety margins for the PTV definition. In both cases, 30 Gy in 15 fractions was prescribed. Second cancer risk was estimated for various tissues with a second cancer model including fractionation. Results When compared with FB-3DCRT, estimated relative life time attributable risk (LAR) of cancer induction after DI-3DCRT was 0.86, 0.76, 0.94 and 0.92 for breast, lung, esophagus and stomach, respectively. With DI-VMAT, the corresponding values were 2.05, 1.29, 1.01, 0.93, respectively. For breast cancer, the LAR observed with DI-VMAT was not substantially distinguishable from the LAR computed for mantle RT with an administered dose of 40 Gy. Conclusions This study suggests that DI may reduce the LAR of secondary cancers of all OARs and may be a valuable technique when using 3DCRT. Conversely, VMAT may increase substantially the LAR and should be cautiously implemented in clinical practice. PMID:24548307

  18. Bowel sparing in pediatric cranio-spinal radiotherapy: a comparison of combined electron and photon and helical TomoTherapy techniques to a standard photon method

    SciTech Connect

    Harron, Elizabeth; Lewis, Joanne

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the dose to organs at risk (OARs) from different craniospinal radiotherapy treatment approaches available at the Northern Centre for Cancer Care (NCCC), with a particular emphasis on sparing the bowel. Method: Treatment plans were produced for a pediatric medulloblastoma patient with inflammatory bowel disease using 3D conformal 6-MV photons (3DCP), combined 3D 6-MV photons and 18-MeV electrons (3DPE), and helical photon TomoTherapy (HT). The 3DPE plan was a modification of the standard 3DCP technique, using electrons to treat the spine inferior to the level of the diaphragm. The plans were compared in terms of the dose-volume data to OARs and the nontumor integral dose. Results: The 3DPE plan was found to give the lowest dose to the bowel and the lowest nontumor integral dose of the 3 techniques. However, the coverage of the spine planning target volume (PTV) was least homogeneous using this technique, with only 74.6% of the PTV covered by 95% of the prescribed dose. HT was able to achieve the best coverage of the PTVs (99.0% of the whole-brain PTV and 93.1% of the spine PTV received 95% of the prescribed dose), but delivered a significantly higher integral dose. HT was able to spare the heart, thyroid, and eyes better than the linac-based techniques, but other OARs received a higher dose. Conclusions: Use of electrons was the best method for reducing the dose to the bowel and the integral dose, at the expense of compromised spine PTV coverage. For some patients, HT may be a viable method of improving dose homogeneity and reducing selected OAR doses.

  19. A Dosimetric Comparison of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Techniques: Multicatheter Interstitial Brachytherapy, Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, and Supine Versus Prone Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rakesh R. . E-mail: patel@humonc.wisc.edu; Becker, Stewart J.; Das, Rupak K.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetrically four different techniques of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in the same patient. Methods and Materials: Thirteen post-lumpectomy interstitial brachytherapy (IB) patients underwent imaging with preimplant computed tomography (CT) in the prone and supine position. These CT scans were then used to generate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and prone and supine helical tomotherapy (PT and ST, respectively) APBI plans and compared with the treated IB plans. Dose-volume histogram analysis and the mean dose (NTD{sub mean}) values were compared. Results: Planning target volume coverage was excellent for all methods. Statistical significance was considered to be a p value <0.05. The mean V100 was significantly lower for IB (12% vs. 15% for PT, 18% for ST, and 26% for 3D-CRT). A greater significant differential was seen when comparing V50 with mean values of 24%, 43%, 47%, and 52% for IB, PT, ST, and 3D-CRT, respectively. The IB and PT were similar and delivered an average lung NTD{sub mean} dose of 1.3 Gy{sub 3} and 1.2 Gy{sub 3}, respectively. Both of these methods were statistically significantly lower than the supine external beam techniques. Overall, all four methods yielded similar low doses to the heart. Conclusions: The use of IB and PT resulted in greater normal tissue sparing (especially ipsilateral breast and lung) than the use of supine external beam techniques of 3D-CRT or ST. However, the choice of APBI technique must be tailored to the patient's anatomy, lumpectomy cavity location, and overall treatment goals.

  20. [Radiotherapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy].

    PubMed

    Kuhnt, T; Müller, A C; Janich, M; Gerlach, R; Hädecke, J; Duncker, G I W; Dunst, J

    2004-11-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is the most frequent extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease, an autoimmune disorder of the thyroid, whereas the precise pathogenesis still remains unclear. In Hashimoto's thyroiditis the occurrence of proptosis is an extremely rare event. The therapy for middle and severe courses of GO shows in partly disappointing results, although several therapy modalities are possible (glucocorticoid therapy, radiotherapy, antithyroid drug treatment, surgery). All these therapies lead in only 40 - 70 % to an improvement of the pathogenic symptoms. An intensive interdisciplinary cooperation is necessary to satisfy the requirements for the treatment of Graves' ophthalmopathy. As a consequence of the very different results of the few of clinical studies that were accomplished with reference to this topic, treatment by radiotherapy in the management of the disease is presently controversially discussed. In the German-speaking countries the radiotherapy is, however, firmly established as a therapy option in the treatment of the moderate disease classes (class 2-5 according to NO SPECS), especially if diplopia is present. This article describes the sequences, dosages and fractionation schemes as well as the risks and side effects of the radiotherapy. Altogether, radiotherapy is assessed as an effective and sure method. The administration of glucocorticoids can take place before the beginning of or during the radiotherapy. For the success of treatment the correct selection of patients who may possibly profit from a radiotherapy is absolutely essential. By realising that GO proceeds normally over a period of 2-5 years, which is followed by a period of fibrotic alteration, the application of the radiotherapy in the early, active phase is indispensable. A precise explanation for the effects of radiotherapy in treatment of the GO does not exist at present. The determination of the most effective irradiation doses was made from retrospectively evaluated

  1. IsoBED: a tool for automatic calculation of biologically equivalent fractionation schedules in radiotherapy using IMRT with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An advantage of the Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) technique is the feasibility to deliver different therapeutic dose levels to PTVs in a single treatment session using the Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) technique. The paper aims to describe an automated tool to calculate the dose to be delivered with the SIB-IMRT technique in different anatomical regions that have the same Biological Equivalent Dose (BED), i.e. IsoBED, compared to the standard fractionation. Methods Based on the Linear Quadratic Model (LQM), we developed software that allows treatment schedules, biologically equivalent to standard fractionations, to be calculated. The main radiobiological parameters from literature are included in a database inside the software, which can be updated according to the clinical experience of each Institute. In particular, the BED to each target volume will be computed based on the alpha/beta ratio, total dose and the dose per fraction (generally 2 Gy for a standard fractionation). Then, after selecting the reference target, i.e. the PTV that controls the fractionation, a new total dose and dose per fraction providing the same isoBED will be calculated for each target volume. Results The IsoBED Software developed allows: 1) the calculation of new IsoBED treatment schedules derived from standard prescriptions and based on LQM, 2) the conversion of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for each Target and OAR to a nominal standard dose at 2Gy per fraction in order to be shown together with the DV-constraints from literature, based on the LQM and radiobiological parameters, and 3) the calculation of Tumor Control Probability (TCP) and Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) curve versus the prescribed dose to the reference target. PMID:21554675

  2. Innovations in Radiotherapy Technology.

    PubMed

    Feain, I J; Court, L; Palta, J R; Beddar, S; Keall, P

    2017-02-01

    Many low- and middle-income countries, together with remote and low socioeconomic populations within high-income countries, lack the resources and services to deal with cancer. The challenges in upgrading or introducing the necessary services are enormous, from screening and diagnosis to radiotherapy planning/treatment and quality assurance. There are severe shortages not only in equipment, but also in the capacity to train, recruit and retain staff as well as in their ongoing professional development via effective international peer-review and collaboration. Here we describe some examples of emerging technology innovations based on real-time software and cloud-based capabilities that have the potential to redress some of these areas. These include: (i) automatic treatment planning to reduce physics staffing shortages, (ii) real-time image-guided adaptive radiotherapy technologies, (iii) fixed-beam radiotherapy treatment units that use patient (rather than gantry) rotation to reduce infrastructure costs and staff-to-patient ratios, (iv) cloud-based infrastructure programmes to facilitate international collaboration and quality assurance and (v) high dose rate mobile cobalt brachytherapy techniques for intraoperative radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. All rights reserved.

  3. Protons and more: state of the art in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hoskin, Peter J; Bhattacharya, Indrani S

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of modern radiotherapy is to deliver a precise high dose of radiation which will result in reproductive death of the cells. Radiation should transverse within the tumour volume whilst minimising damage to surrounding normal tissue. Overall 40% of cancers which are cured will have received radiotherapy. Current state of the art treatment will incorporate cross-sectional imaging and multiple high energy X-ray beams in processes called intensity modulated radiotherapy and image guided radiotherapy. Brachytherapy enables very high radiation doses to be delivered by the direct passage of a radiation source through or within the tumour volume and similar results can be achieved using rotational stereotactic X-ray beam techniques. Protons have the characteristics of particle beams which deposit their energy in a finite fixed peak at depth in tissue with no dose beyond this point - the Bragg peak. This has advantages in certain sites such as the spine adjacent to the spinal cord and particularly in children when the overall volume of tissue receiving radiation can be minimised. © 2014 Royal College of Physicians.

  4. Pituitary radiotherapy for Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Losa, Marco; Picozzi, Piero; Redaelli, Maria Grazia; Laurenzi, Andrea; Mortini, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of choice for Cushing's disease is pituitary surgery. Second-line treatments include repeat pituitary surgery, radiation therapy, medical therapy, and bilateral adrenalectomy. The most used modalities to irradiate patients with Cushing's disease include fractionated radiotherapy and single-dose Gamma Knife. We aim to review the efficacy and safety of radiotherapy in patients with persistent or recurring Cushing's disease. Remission of Cushing's disease after radiotherapy ranges from 42 to 83%. There seems to be no clear difference according to the technique of radiation used. Most patients experience remission of disease within 3 years from treatment, with only few cases reaching normal cortisol secretion after a longer follow-up. Control of tumor growth varies from 93 to 100%. Severe side effects of radiotherapy, such as optic neuropathy and radionecrosis, are uncommon. New-onset hypopituitarism is the most frequent side effect of radiation, occurring in 30-50% of patients treated by fractionated radiotherapy while it has been reported in 11-22% of patients after Gamma Knife. Radiotherapy is an effective second-line treatment in patients with Cushing's disease not cured by surgery. Consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of radiotherapy in comparison with other therapeutic options should always be carried out in the single patient before deciding the second-line therapeutic strategy for persisting or recurring Cushing's disease. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. [Radiotherapy of bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Riou, O; Chauvet, B; Lagrange, J-L; Martin, P; Llacer Moscardo, C; Charissoux, M; Lauche, O; Aillères, N; Fenoglietto, P; Azria, D

    2016-09-01

    Surgery (radical cystectomy) is the standard treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Radiochemotherapy has risen as an alternative treatment option to surgery as part as organ-sparing combined modality treatment or for patients unfit for surgery. Radiochemotherapy achieves 5-year bladder intact survival of 40 to 65% and 5-year overall survival of 40 to 50% with excellent quality of life. This article introduces the French recommendations for radiotherapy of bladder cancer: indications, exams, technique, dosimetry, delivery and image guidance.

  6. [Conformal radiotherapy of prostatic cancer: a general review].

    PubMed

    Chauvet, B; Oozeer, R; Bey, P; Pontvert, D; Bolla, M

    1999-01-01

    Recent progress in radiotherapeutic management of localized prostate cancer is reviewed. Clinical aspects--including dose-effect beyond 70 Gy, relative role of conformal radiation therapy techniques and of early hormonal treatment--are discussed as well as technical components--including patient immobilization, organ motion, prostate contouring, beam arrangement, 3-D treatment planning and portal imaging. The local control and biological relapse-free survival rates appear to be improved by high dose conformal radiotherapy from 20 to 30% for patients with intermediate and high risk of relapse. A benefit of overall survival is expected but not yet demonstrated. Late reactions, especially the rectal toxicity, remain moderate despite the dose escalation. However, conformal radiotherapy demands a high precision at all steps of the procedure.

  7. Particle Accelerators for Radiotherapy:. Present Status and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciszewski, Wieslaw; Scharf, Waldemar

    2004-07-01

    The paper describes the development of the application of particle accelerators in the treatment of cancer diseases over the past fifty years. Special emphasis is put on the routine application of conventional electron accelerators delivering electron and photon beams. This is the largest group of devices for radiotherapy (over 7500 machines operating worldwide). The number of patients reaches 5 million per year. The medical electron linacs have recently undergone considerable modifications of construction, in particular the systems of radiation field shaping. Contemporary accelerators for radiotherapy are equipped with multi-leaf collimators (MLC) which, in conjunction with IMRT (Intensity Modulation Radiation Therapy) technique and special system of therapy planning, assure considerably higher precision, effectiveness and quality of treatment.

  8. Craniospinal irradiation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Scarlatescu, Ioana Avram, Calin N.; Virag, Vasile

    2015-12-07

    In this paper we present one treatment plan for irradiation cases which involve a complex technique with multiple beams, using the 3D conformational technique. As the main purpose of radiotherapy is to administrate a precise dose into the tumor volume and protect as much as possible all the healthy tissues around it, for a case diagnosed with a primitive neuro ectoderm tumor, we have developed a new treatment plan, by controlling one of the two adjacent fields used at spinal field, in a way that avoids the fields superposition. Therefore, the risk of overdose is reduced by eliminating the field divergence.

  9. The impact of body mass index on radiotherapy technique in patients with early-stage endometrial cancer: a single-center dosimetric study.

    PubMed

    Yavas, Guler; Yavas, Cagdas; Kerimoglu, Ozlem Secilmis; Celik, Cetin

    2014-11-01

    We aimed to evaluate the impact of body mass index on radiotherapy (RT) technique in patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Twenty-seven consecutive patients were included in the study and divided into 3 groups with respect to their body mass index (normal weight, 18.5-24.9 kg/m; overweight, 25-29.9 kg/m; obese, 30-39.9 kg/m). Treatment plans using field-in-field (FIF) and 3-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) were compared for the doses in the planning target volume (PTV), organs-at-risk (OAR) volumes, dose homogeneity index, and monitor unit counts required for the treatment. The FIF technique was superior to 3D-CRT with respect to the maximum and mean doses received by OAR and dose homogeneity index values. The subgroup analyses revealed that the maximum dose received by the right femur and the mean doses received by the rectum and bladder were significantly reduced only in obese patients (Ps = 0.021, 0.008, and 0.008, respectively). The FIF technique significantly reduced the PTV volumes irradiated with greater than 105% of the prescribed dose (P < 0.001). The volumes of bowel and bone marrow receiving more than the prescribed dose of 30 Gy were significantly reduced only in obese patients (Ps = 0.025 and 0.043, respectively). The volumes of bladder, bowel, and bone marrow receiving more than the prescribed dose of 45 Gy were significantly reduced in only obese patients (Ps = 0.011, 0.011, and 0.008, respectively). Considering the lower maximum doses in OAR and PTV, we demonstrate the FIF technique to be more advantageous than 3D-CRT during adjuvant RT for early-stage endometrial cancer patients. This advantage is more prominent in obese patients. Therefore, FIF technique represents an effective pelvic RT treatment option for obese patients in clinics that do not have access to or prefer an alternative to intensity-modulated RT.

  10. Impact of radiotherapy technique on the outcome of early breast cancer treated with conservative surgery: A multicenter observational study on 1,176 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Palazzi, Mauro . E-mail: mauro.palazzi@istitutotumori.mi.it; Tomatis, Stefano; Valli, Maria Carla; Guzzetti, Renata; Tonoli, Sandro; Bertoni, Filippo; Magrini, Stefano Maria; Meregalli, Sofia; Asnaghi, Diego; Arienti, Virginia; Pradella, Renato; Cafaro, Ines

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of radiotherapy technique on cosmetic outcome and on 5-year local control rate of early breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and adjuvant radiation. Methods and MaterialsPurpose: A total of 1,176 patients irradiated to the breast in 1997 were entered by eight centers into a prospective, observational study. Surgical procedure was quadrantectomy in 97% of patients, with axillary dissection performed in 96%; pT-stage was T1 in 81% and T2 in 19% of cases; pN-stage was N0 in 71%, N + (1-3) in 21%, and N + (>3) in 8% of cases. An immobilization device was used in 17% of patients; external contour-based and computed tomography-based treatment planning were performed in 20% and 72% of cases, respectively; 37% of patients were treated with a telecobalt unit and 63% with a linear accelerator; portal verification was used in 55% of patients; a boost dose to the tumor bed was delivered in 60% of cases. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.2 years, local, regional, and distant control rates at 5 years are 98%, 99%, and 92%, respectively. Use of less sophisticated treatment technique was associated with a less favorable cosmetic outcome. Local control was comparable between centers despite substantial technical differences. In a multivariate analysis including clinical and technical factors, only older age and prescription of medical adjuvant treatment significantly predicted for better local control, whereas use of portal verification was of borderline significance. Conclusions: Radiation technical factors impacted negatively on cosmetic outcome, but had relatively small effects on local control compared with other clinical factors.

  11. A simulation study investigating a radiation detector utilizing the prompt gamma range verification technique for proton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Andrew David

    Proton therapy has shown to be a viable therapy for radiation oncology applications. The advantages of using protons as compared to photons in the treatments of diseases with radiation are numerous including the ability to deliver overall lower amounts of lethal radiation doses to the patient. This advantage is due to the fundamental interaction mechanism of the incident therapeutic protons with the patient, which produces a characteristic dose-distribution unique only to protons. Unlike photons, the entire proton beam is absorbed within the patent and the dose-distribution's maximum occurs near the end of the proton's path. Protons deliver less dose on the skin and intervening tissues, tighter dose conformality to the disease site, as well as no dose past the target volume, sparring healthy tissue distally in the patient. Current research in proton therapy is geared towards minimizing proton range uncertainty and monitoring in-vivo the location of the proton's path. Monitoring the beam's path serves also to verify which healthy structures/tissues were irradiated and whether the target volume has met the prescription dose. Among the many techniques used for in-vivo proton monitoring, the technique based on the emitted secondary particles, specifically the Prompt Gamma (PG) method, can be used for clinical implementation. This work focuses on developing a radiation detector system for using the PG method by investigating the characterizing the secondary particle field emitted from plastic and water phantoms as well as a radiation detector based on glass materials that exploits the Cherenkov phenomenon.

  12. SU-C-BRD-05: Implementation of Incident Learning in the Safety and Quality Management of Radiotherapy: The Primary Experience in a New Established Program with Advanced Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, R; Wang, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the implementation and effectiveness of incident learning for the safety and quality of radiotherapy in a new established radiotherapy program with advanced technology. Methods: Reference to the consensus recommendations by American Association of Physicist in Medicine, an incident learning system was specifically designed for reporting, investigating, and learning of individual radiotherapy incidents in a new established radiotherapy program, with 4D CBCT, Ultrasound guided radiotherapy, VMAT, gated treatment delivered on two new installed linacs. The incidents occurring in external beam radiotherapy from February, 2012 to January, 2014 were reported. Results: A total of 33 reports were analyzed, including 28 near misses and 5 incidents. Among them, 5 originated in imaging for planning, 25 in planning, 1 in plan transfer, 1 in commissioning and 1 in treatment delivery. Among them, three near misses originated in the safety barrier of the radiotherapy process. In terms of error type, 1 incident was classified as wrong patient, 7 near misses/incidents as wrong site, 6 as wrong laterality, 5 as wrong dose, 7 as wrong prescription, and 7 as suboptimal plan quality. 5 incidents were all classified as grade 1/2 of dosimetric severity, 1 as grade 0, and the other 4 as grade 1 of medical severity. For the causes/contributory factors, negligence, policy not followed, inadequate training, failure to develop an effective plan, and communication contributed to 19, 15, 12, 5 and 3 near misses/incidents, respectively. The average incident rate per 100 patients treated was 0.4; this rate fell to 0.28% in the second year from 0.56% in the first year. The rate of near miss fell to 1.24% from 2.22%. Conclusion: Effective incident learning can reduce the occurrence of near miss/incidents, enhance the culture of safety. Incident learning is an effective proactive method for improving the quality and safety of radiotherapy.

  13. Precise material identification method based on a photon counting technique with correction of the beam hardening effect in X-ray spectra.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Natsumi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Asahara, Takashi; Mihara, Yoshiki; Kanazawa, Yuki; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Yamasaki, Masashi; Okada, Masahiro

    2017-03-09

    The aim of our study is to develop a novel material identification method based on a photon counting technique, in which the incident and penetrating X-ray spectra are analyzed. Dividing a 40 kV X-ray spectra into two energy regions, the corresponding linear attenuation coefficients are derived. We can identify the materials precisely using the relationship between atomic number and linear attenuation coefficient through the correction of the beam hardening effect of the X-ray spectra.

  14. Vision-Aided Autonomous Precision Weapon Terminal Guidance Using a Tightly-Coupled INS and Predictive Rendering Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Government and is not subject to copy- right protection in the United States. AFIT/GE/ENG/11-42 Vision-Aided Autonomous Precision Weapon Terminal Guidance...the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Electrical Engineering Jonathan W. Beich, BSEE, MS Space Studies, MS Flight Test Engineering...bias noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 wbbbias Additive gyro bias noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 zk Measurement vector

  15. Lateral high abdominal ovariopexy: an original surgical technique for protection of the ovaries during curative radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Gaetini, A.; De Simone, M.; Urgesi, A.; Levis, A.; Resegotti, A.; Ragona, R.; Anglesio, S.

    1988-09-01

    An original surgical method for gonadal protection in young women given pelvic radiation for Hodgkin's disease is presented. Lateral high ovarian transposition (LHAO) consists of the transposition of the ovaries into the paracolic gutter during staging laparotomy, after disconnecting the gonads from the fallopian tubes by dividing the tubo-ovarian vessels. The technique's effectiveness was assessed by a study using clinical investigation, radioimmunoassay (RIA) determination of sex hormones, and dosimetry; of 18 patients treated, 10 participated in the study. All but one have normal menses and hormone values, and one pregnancy occurred. We also calculated the doses absorbed by the ovaries and proved that, during inverted Y irradiation following LHAO, the ovaries are exposed to nearly one-half the dose they receive after traditional medial transposition. During subtotal nodal irradiation after LHAO, the irradiation dose is higher than after medialisation, but absolute values are minimal and castration is not induced.

  16. Transitioning from conventional radiotherapy to intensity-modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: changing focus from rectal bleeding to detailed quality of life analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Nakamura, Satoaki; Nishimura, Takuya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of modern radiation techniques, we have been able to deliver a higher prescribed radiotherapy dose for localized prostate cancer without severe adverse reactions. We reviewed and analyzed the change of toxicity profiles of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) from the literature. Late rectal bleeding is the main adverse effect, and an incidence of >20% of Grade ≥2 adverse events was reported for 2D conventional radiotherapy of up to 70 Gy. 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) was found to reduce the incidence to ∼10%. Furthermore, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) reduced it further to a few percentage points. However, simultaneously, urological toxicities were enhanced by dose escalation using highly precise external radiotherapy. We should pay more attention to detailed quality of life (QOL) analysis, not only with respect to rectal bleeding but also other specific symptoms (such as urinary incontinence and impotence), for two reasons: (i) because of the increasing number of patients aged >80 years, and (ii) because of improved survival with elevated doses of radiotherapy and/or hormonal therapy; age is an important prognostic factor not only for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) control but also for adverse reactions. Those factors shift the main focus of treatment purpose from survival and avoidance of PSA failure to maintaining good QOL, particularly in older patients. In conclusion, the focus of toxicity analysis after radiotherapy for prostate cancer patients is changing from rectal bleeding to total elaborate quality of life assessment. PMID:25204643

  17. Radiological and Clinical Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy: A Matched Analysis of Three-Dimensional Conformal and Volumetric-modulated Arc Therapy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, David A.; Senan, Suresh; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.; Vincent, Andrew; Lagerwaard, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Lung fibrosis is common after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors, but the influence of treatment technique on rates of clinical and radiological pneumonitis is not well described. After implementing volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) for SBRT, we scored the early pulmonary changes seen with arc and conventional three-dimensional SBRT (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-five SBRT patients treated with RA were matched 1:2 with 50 SBRT patients treated with 3D-CRT. Dose fractionations were based on a risk-adapted strategy. Clinical pneumonitis was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Acute radiological changes 3 months posttreatment were scored by three blinded observers. Relationships among treatment type, baseline factors, and outcomes were assessed using Spearman's correlation, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel tests, and logistic regression. Results: The RA and 3D-CRT groups were well matched. Forty-three patients (57%) had radiological pneumonitis 3 months after treatment. Twenty-eight patients (37%) had computed tomography (CT) findings of patchy or diffuse consolidation, and 15 patients (20%) had ground-glass opacities only. Clinical pneumonitis was uncommon, and no differences were seen between 3D-CRT vs. RA patients in rates of grade 2/3 clinical pneumonitis (6% vs. 4%, respectively; p = 0.99), moderate/severe radiological changes (24% vs. 36%, respectively, p = 0.28), or patterns of CT changes (p = 0.47). Radiological severity scores were associated with larger planning target volumes (p = 0.09) and extended fractionation (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Radiological changes after lung SBRT are common with both approaches, but no differences in early clinical or radiological findings were observed after RA. Longer follow-up will be required to exclude late changes.

  18. An Investigation on the Reliability of Deformation Analysis at Simulated Network Depending on the Precise Point Position Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durdag, U. M.; Erdogan, B.; Hekimoglu, S.

    2014-12-01

    Deformation analysis plays an important role for human life safety; hence investigating the reliability of the obtained results from deformation analysis is crucial. The deformation monitoring network is established and the observations are analyzed periodically. The main problem in the deformation analysis is that if there is more than one displaced point in the monitoring network, the analysis methods smear the disturbing effects of the displaced points over all other points which are not displaced. Therefore, only one displaced point can be detected successfully. The Precise Point Positioning (PPP) gives opportunity to prevent smearing effect of the displaced points. In this study, we have simulated a monitoring network that consisting four object points and generated six different scenarios. The displacements were added to the points by using a device that the GPS antenna was easily moved horizontally and the seven hours static GPS measurements were carried out. The measurements were analyzed by using online Automatic Precise Positioning Service (APPS) to obtain the coordinates and covariance matrices. The results of the APPS were used in the deformation analysis. The detected points and true displaced points were compared with each other to obtain reliability of the method. According to the results, the analysis still detect stable points as displaced points. For the next step, we are going to search the reason of the wrong results and deal with acquiring more reliable results.

  19. High precision micro-impulse measurements for micro-thrusters based on torsional pendulum and sympathetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daixian; Wu, Jianjun; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Hua; He, Zhen

    2013-12-01

    A sympathetic resonance theory is analyzed and applied in a newly developed torsional pendulum to measure the micro-impulse produced by a μN s-class ablative pulsed plasma thruster. According to theoretical analysis on the dynamical behaviors of a torsional pendulum, the resonance amplification effect of micro-signals is presented. In addition, a new micro-impulse measurement method based on sympathetic resonance theory is proposed as an improvement of the original single pulse measurement method. In contrast with the single pulse measurement method, the advantages of sympathetic resonance method are significant. First, because of the magnification of vibration signals due to resonance processes, measurement precision for the sympathetic resonance method becomes higher especially in reducing reading error. With an increase in peak number, the relative errors induced by readout of voltage signals decrease to approximately ±1.9% for the sympathetic resonance mode, whereas the relative error in single pulse mode is estimated as ±13.4%. Besides, by using the resonance amplification effect the sympathetic resonance method makes it possible to measure an extremely low-impulse beyond the resolution of a thrust stand without redesigning or purchasing a new one. Moreover, because of the simple operational principle and structure the sympathetic resonance method is much more convenient and inexpensive to be implemented than other high-precision methods. Finally, the sympathetic resonance measurement method can also be applied in other thrust stands to improve further the ability to measure the low-impulse bits.

  20. High precision micro-impulse measurements for micro-thrusters based on torsional pendulum and sympathetic resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daixian; Wu, Jianjun; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Hua; He, Zhen

    2013-12-01

    A sympathetic resonance theory is analyzed and applied in a newly developed torsional pendulum to measure the micro-impulse produced by a μN s-class ablative pulsed plasma thruster. According to theoretical analysis on the dynamical behaviors of a torsional pendulum, the resonance amplification effect of micro-signals is presented. In addition, a new micro-impulse measurement method based on sympathetic resonance theory is proposed as an improvement of the original single pulse measurement method. In contrast with the single pulse measurement method, the advantages of sympathetic resonance method are significant. First, because of the magnification of vibration signals due to resonance processes, measurement precision for the sympathetic resonance method becomes higher especially in reducing reading error. With an increase in peak number, the relative errors induced by readout of voltage signals decrease to approximately ±1.9% for the sympathetic resonance mode, whereas the relative error in single pulse mode is estimated as ±13.4%. Besides, by using the resonance amplification effect the sympathetic resonance method makes it possible to measure an extremely low-impulse beyond the resolution of a thrust stand without redesigning or purchasing a new one. Moreover, because of the simple operational principle and structure the sympathetic resonance method is much more convenient and inexpensive to be implemented than other high-precision methods. Finally, the sympathetic resonance measurement method can also be applied in other thrust stands to improve further the ability to measure the low-impulse bits.

  1. Accuracy and precision of polyurethane dental arch models fabricated using a three-dimensional subtractive rapid prototyping method with an intraoral scanning technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Kim, Ki-Baek; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Young

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy and precision of polyurethane (PUT) dental arch models fabricated using a three-dimensional (3D) subtractive rapid prototyping (RP) method with an intraoral scanning technique by comparing linear measurements obtained from PUT models and conventional plaster models. Ten plaster models were duplicated using a selected standard master model and conventional impression, and 10 PUT models were duplicated using the 3D subtractive RP technique with an oral scanner. Six linear measurements were evaluated in terms of x, y, and z-axes using a non-contact white light scanner. Accuracy was assessed using mean differences between two measurements, and precision was examined using four quantitative methods and the Bland-Altman graphical method. Repeatability was evaluated in terms of intra-examiner variability, and reproducibility was assessed in terms of inter-examiner and inter-method variability. The mean difference between plaster models and PUT models ranged from 0.07 mm to 0.33 mm. Relative measurement errors ranged from 2.2% to 7.6% and intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.93 to 0.96, when comparing plaster models and PUT models. The Bland-Altman plot showed good agreement. The accuracy and precision of PUT dental models for evaluating the performance of oral scanner and subtractive RP technology was acceptable. Because of the recent improvements in block material and computerized numeric control milling machines, the subtractive RP method may be a good choice for dental arch models.

  2. A high-brightness light guide plate with high precise double-sided microstructures fabricated using the fixed boundary hot embossing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng-Huan; Yang, Sen-Yeu

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, microstructures have been widely applied in many key optical elements and bio-elements. The effective and efficient fabrication of optical elements and bio-elements with superior performance has become an essential challenge. This requires very accurate shape replication of microstructures. The plate-to-plate hot embossing process is the most likely method of mass production for the replication of double-sided micro/nano structures with high precision and quality. However, the traditional uniform heating hot embossing process as the free boundary of open die forging leads to variation. In this research, three techniques are implemented; the conventional uniform heating technique, the non-uniform pressure compensating technique and the fixed boundary hot embossing technique. The temperature distribution of the hot-plates of the fixed boundary hot embossing technique are designed to keep the temperature in the center part higher than the outer part on the surface of the substrates. This phenomenon changes free boundary in conventional uniform heating into fixed boundary. The results demonstrate the potential of the fixed boundary hot embossing technique for the fabrication of large-area high brightness LGPs with double-sided microstructures. The results are also helpful for enhancing the performance of optical elements and bio-elements fabricated using the fixed boundary hot embossing technique.

  3. High-precision opto-mechanical lens system for space applications assembled by innovative local soldering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribes, P.; Koechlin, C.; Burkhardt, T.; Hornaff, M.; Burkhardt, D.; Kamm, A.; Gramens, S.; Beckert, E.; Fiault, G.; Eberhardt, R.; Tünnermann, A.

    2016-02-01

    Solder joining using metallic solder alloys is an alternative to adhesive bonding. Laser-based soldering processes are especially well suited for the joining of optical components made of fragile and brittle materials such as glasses, ceramics and optical crystals. This is due to a localized and minimized input of thermal energy. Solderjet bumping technology has been used to assemble a lens mount breadboard taking as input specifications the requirements found for the optical beam expander for the European Space Agency (ESA) EarthCare Mission. The silica lens and a titanium barrel have been designed and assembled with this technology in order to withstand the stringent mission demands; handling high mechanical and thermal loads without losing its optical performances. Finally a high-precision opto-mechanical lens mount has been assembled with a minimal localized stress (<1 MPa) showing outstanding performances in terms of wave-front error measurements and beam depolarization ratio before and after environmental tests.

  4. Fractionated radiotherapy and radiosurgery of intracranial meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Biau, J; Khalil, T; Verrelle, P; Lemaire, J-J

    2015-06-19

    This review focuses on the role of radiosurgery and fractionated radiotherapy in the management of intracranial meningiomas, which are the most common benign intracranial tumors. Whenever feasible, surgery remains a cornerstone of treatment in effective health care treatment where modern radiotherapy plays an important role. Irradiation can be proposed as first-line treatment, as adjuvant treatment, or as a second-line treatment after recurrence. Stereotactic radiosurgery consists of delivering, a high-dose of radiation with high precision, to the tumor in a single-fraction with a minimal exposure of surrounding healthy tissue. Stereotactic radiosurgery, especially with the gamma knife technique, has reached a high level of success for the treatment of intracranial meningiomas with excellent local control and low morbidity. However, stereotactic radiosurgery is limited by tumor size,<3-4cm, and location, i.e. reasonable distance from the organs at risk. Fractionated radiation therapy is an interesting alternative (5 to 6weeks treatment time) for large inoperable tumors. The results of fractionated radiation therapy seem encouraging as regards both local control and morbidity although long-term prospective studies are still needed.

  5. Inertial Measurement Unit-Assisted Implantation of Thoracic, Lumbar, and Sacral Pedicle Screws Improves Precision of a Freehand Technique.

    PubMed

    Jost, Gregory F; Walti, Jonas; Mariani, Luigi; Schaeren, Stefan; Cattin, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    A method applying inertial measurement units (IMUs) was developed to implant pedicle screws in the thoracic and lumbosacral spine. This was compared with a freehand technique. The study was done on 9 human cadavers. For each cadaver, a preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan was performed to measure the axial and sagittal tilt angles of the screw trajectories from T1 to S1. After the entry points were defined on the exposed spine, the IMU-equipped pedicle finder and screwdriver were used to reproduce these tilt angles and implant half of the screws. The other half was implanted with a freehand technique. Fluoroscopy was not used. The screw trajectories were analyzed on postoperative CTs. A hundred and sixty-two screws were placed with use of the IMUs and 162 screws were implanted by freehand. The IMU-guided technique matched the planned trajectories significantly better than the freehand technique (axial tilt P < 0.001, sagittal tilt P < 0.001). With IMU assistance, the mean offsets between the planned and postoperatively measured tilt angles of the screws were 3.3 degrees ± 3.5 degrees for the axial plane (median 2 degrees, range 0-23 degrees) and 3.4 degrees ± 3 degrees for the sagittal plane (median 3 degrees, range 0-13 degrees). For the freehand technique, the mean offsets between the planned and postoperatively measured tilt angles of the screws were 5.6 degrees ± 4.5 degrees for the axial plane (median 5 degrees, range 0-31 degrees) and 6.7 degrees ± 5.4 degrees for the sagittal plane (median 6 degrees, range 0-33 degrees). IMU-assisted implantation of pedicle screws may enhance the performance of a freehand technique in the thoracic and lumbosacral spine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The planet search program at the ESO Coudé Echelle spectrometer. I. Data modeling technique and radial velocity precision tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endl, M.; Kürster, M.; Els, S.

    2000-10-01

    We present the modeling technique we apply to analyse data of the ESO Coudé Echelle Spectrometer (CES) planet search program, in order to obtain high precision stellar radial velocity (RV) measurements. The detection of the Doppler reflex motion of a star due to an orbiting planet has so far been the most successful method to discover planetary companions to solar-type stars. The first extrasolar planet discovered by the CES program is the companion to the young (ZAMS) G0V star iota Hor (Kürster et al. \\cite{martin00}). To achieve a high long-term RV measurement stability the CES spectra are self-calibrated by a superimposed iodine vapor (I_2) reference spectrum. In the modeling process a multi-parameter chi 2-optimization is employed to generate an accurate description of the observation. We largely follow the general modeling approach for I_2-calibrated data outlined by Butler et al. (\\cite{butler}) and Valenti et al. (\\cite{valenti}). The sharp I_2 reference lines allow the reconstruction of the spectrograph instrumental profile (IP) and the precise determination of the Doppler shift of the stellar absorption lines. We show examples of the application of the modeling technique to CES data obtained over a time span of five and a half years at ESO La Silla. The small spectral bandwidth of only 4.85 nm for CES spectra makes this data challenging for high precision radial velocities. We demonstrate for the known RV-constant star tau Cet, for two stars with known extrasolar planets, 51 Peg and 70 Vir, and for alpha Men and GJ 570A, two stars from our survey that the achievable RV precision for CES data is 8-15 ms-1. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La~Silla}

  7. Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: is it 'what you do' or 'the way that you do it'? A UK Perspective on Technique and Quality Assurance.

    PubMed

    Mason, M D; Moore, R; Jones, G; Lewis, G; Donovan, J L; Neal, D E; Hamdy, F C; Lane, J A; Staffurth, J N

    2016-09-01

    The treatment of prostate cancer has evolved markedly over the last 40 years, including radiotherapy, notably with escalated dose and targeting. However, the optimal treatment for localised disease has not been established in comparative randomised trials. The aim of this article is to describe the history of prostate radiotherapy trials, including their quality assurance processes, and to compare these with the ProtecT trial. The UK ProtecT randomised trial compares external beam conformal radiotherapy, surgery and active monitoring for clinically localised prostate cancer and will report on the primary outcome (disease-specific mortality) in 2016 following recruitment between 1999 and 2009. The embedded quality assurance programme consists of on-site machine dosimetry at the nine trial centres, a retrospective review of outlining and adherence to dose constraints based on the trial protocol in 54 participants (randomly selected, around 10% of the total randomised to radiotherapy, n = 545). These quality assurance processes and results were compared with prostate radiotherapy trials of a comparable era. There has been an increasingly sophisticated quality assurance programme in UK prostate radiotherapy trials over the last 15 years, reflecting dose escalation and treatment complexity. In ProtecT, machine dosimetry results were comparable between trial centres and with the UK RT01 trial. The outlining review showed that most deviations were clinically acceptable, although three (1.4%) may have been of clinical significance and were related to outlining of the prostate. Seminal vesicle outlining varied, possibly due to several prostate trials running concurrently with different protocols. Adherence to dose constraints in ProtecT was considered acceptable, with 80% of randomised participants having two or less deviations and planning target volume coverage was excellent. The ProtecT trial quality assurance results were satisfactory and comparable with trials of its

  8. Tumor Location, Interval Between Surgery and Radiotherapy, and Boost Technique Influence Local Control After Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation: Retrospective Analysis of Monoinstitutional Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Knauerhase, Hellen; Strietzel, Manfred; Gerber, Bernd; Reimer, Toralf; Fietkau, Rainer

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To obtain long-term data on local tumor control after treatment of invasive breast cancer by breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT), in consideration of the interstitial high-dose-rate boost technique. Patients and Methods: A total of 263 women with 268 mammary carcinomas (International Union Against Cancer Stage I-IIB) who had undergone breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant RT between 1990 and 1994 were included. The potential risk factors for local recurrence-free survival were investigated. Results: During a median follow-up period of 94 months, 27 locoregional recurrences, 25 of which were in breast, were diagnosed. The cumulative rate of in-breast recurrence was 4.1% {+-} 1.4% at 5 years of follow-up and 9.9% {+-} 2.4% at 10 years. The multivariate analysis identified medial tumor location and delayed RT (defined as an interval of >2 months between surgery and the start of RT) as significant risk factors for in-breast recurrence in the overall study population. Medial tumor location vs. lateral/central location (hazard ratio, 2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-5.84) resulted in a cumulative in-breast recurrence rate of 22.5% {+-} 8.3% vs. 6.9% {+-} 2.3% at 10 years. Delayed RT (hazard ratio, 2.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-7.13) resulted in a cumulative in-breast recurrence rate of 18.5% {+-} 6.2% vs. 6.8% {+-} 2.4% at 10 years. The multivariate analysis also showed that the risk of in-breast recurrence was lower after high-dose-rate boost therapy than after external beam boost therapy in patients with laterally/centrally located tumors (hazard ratio, 3.25; 95% confidence interval, 0.91-11.65). Conclusion: Tumor location, interval between surgery and RT, and boost technique might influence local control of breast cancer treated by breast-conserving surgery and RT.

  9. Treatment Plan Technique and Quality for Single-Isocenter Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Multiple Lung Lesions with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy or Intensity-Modulated Radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Quan, Kimmen; Xu, Karen M; Lalonde, Ron; Horne, Zachary D; Bernard, Mark E; McCoy, Chuck; Clump, David A; Burton, Steven A; Heron, Dwight E

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a practical approach to the planning technique and evaluation of plan quality for the multi-lesion, single-isocenter stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of the lung. Eleven patients with two or more lung lesions underwent single-isocenter volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) radiosurgery or IMRS. All plans were normalized to the target maximum dose. For each plan, all targets were treated to the same dose. Plan conformity and dose gradient were maximized with dose-control tuning structures surrounding targets. For comparison, multi-isocenter plans were retrospectively created for four patients. Conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient index (GI), and gradient distance (GD) were calculated for each plan. V5, V10, and V20 of the lung and organs at risk (OARs) were collected. Treatment time and total monitor units (MUs) were also recorded. One patient had four lesions and the remainder had two lesions. Six patients received VMAT and five patients received intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS). For those treated with VMAT, two patients received 3-arc VMAT and four received 2-arc VMAT. For those treated with IMRS, two patients were treated with 10 and 11 beams, respectively, and the rest received 12 beams. Prescription doses ranged from 30 to 54 Gy in three to five fractions. The median prescribed isodose line was 84% (range: 80-86%). The median maximum dose was 57.1 Gy (range: 35.7-65.1 Gy). The mean combined PTV was 49.57 cm(3) (range: 14.90-87.38 cm(3)). For single-isocenter plans, the median CI was 1.15 (range: 0.97-1.53). The median HI was 1.19 (range: 1.16-1.28). The median GI was 4.60 (range: 4.16-7.37). The median maximum radiation dose (Dmax) to total lung was 55.6 Gy (range: 35.7-62.0 Gy). The median mean radiation dose to the lung (Dmean) was 4.2 Gy (range: 1.1-9.3 Gy). The median lung V5 was 18.7% (range: 3.8-41.3%). There was no significant difference in CI, HI, GI, GD, V5, V10

  10. Volumetric modulated arc planning for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy using conventional and unflattened photon beams: a dosimetric comparison with 3D technique

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Frequently, three-dimensional (3D) conformal beams are used in lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Recently, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) was introduced as a new treatment modality. VMAT techniques shorten delivery time, reducing the possibility of intrafraction target motion. However dose distributions can be quite different from standard 3D therapy. This study quantifies those differences, with focus on VMAT plans using unflattened photon beams. Methods A total of 15 lung cancer patients previously treated with 3D or VMAT SBRT were randomly selected. For each patient, non-coplanar 3D, coplanar and non-coplanar VMAT and flattening filter free VMAT (FFF-VMAT) plans were generated to meet the same objectives with 50 Gy covering 95% of the PTV. Two dynamic arcs were used in each VMAT plan. The couch was set at ± 5° to the 0° straight position for the two non-coplanar arcs. Pinnacle version 9.0 (Philips Radiation Oncology, Fitchburg WI) treatment planning system with VMAT capabilities was used. We analyzed the conformity index (CI), which is the ratio of the total volume receiving at least the prescription dose to the target volume receiving at least the prescription dose; the conformity number (CN) which is the ratio of the target coverage to CI; and the gradient index (GI) which is the ratio of the volume of 50% of the prescription isodose to the volume of the prescription isodose; as well as the V20, V5, and mean lung dose (MLD). Paired non-parametric analysis of variance tests with post-tests were performed to examine the statistical significance of the differences of the dosimetric indices. Results Dosimetric indices CI, CN and MLD all show statistically significant improvement for all studied VMAT techniques compared with 3D plans (p < 0.05). V5 and V20 show statistically significant improvement for the FFF-VMAT plans compared with 3D (p < 0.001). GI is improved for the FFF-VMAT and the non-coplanar VMAT plans (p < 0.01 and p

  11. Highly Conformal Craniospinal Radiotherapy Techniques Can Underdose the Cranial Clinical Target Volume if Leptomeningeal Extension through Skull Base Exit Foramina is not Contoured.

    PubMed

    Noble, D J; Ajithkumar, T; Lambert, J; Gleeson, I; Williams, M V; Jefferies, S J

    2017-07-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) remains a crucial treatment for patients with medulloblastoma. There is uncertainty about how to manage meningeal surfaces and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that follows cranial nerves exiting skull base foramina. The purpose of this study was to assess plan quality and dose coverage of posterior cranial fossa foramina with both photon and proton therapy. We analysed the radiotherapy plans of seven patients treated with CSI for medulloblastoma and primitive neuro-ectodermal tumours and three with ependymoma (total n = 10). Four had been treated with a field-based technique and six with TomoTherapy™. The internal acoustic meatus (IAM), jugular foramen (JF) and hypoglossal canal (HC) were contoured and added to the original treatment clinical target volume (Plan_CTV) to create a Test_CTV. This was grown to a test planning target volume (Test_PTV) for comparison with a Plan_PTV. Using Plan_CTV and Plan_PTV, proton plans were generated for all 10 cases. The following dosimetry data were recorded: conformity (dice similarity coefficient) and homogeneity index (D2 - D98/D50) as well as median and maximum dose (D2%) to Plan_PTV, V95% and minimum dose (D99.9%) to Plan_CTV and Test_CTV and Plan_PTV and Test_PTV, V95% and minimum dose (D98%) to foramina PTVs. Proton and TomoTherapy™ plans were more conformal (0.87, 0.86) and homogeneous (0.07, 0.04) than field-photon plans (0.79, 0.17). However, field-photon plans covered the IAM, JF and HC PTVs better than proton plans (P = 0.002, 0.004, 0.003, respectively). TomoTherapy™ plans covered the IAM and JF better than proton plans (P = 0.000, 0.002, respectively) but the result for the HC was not significant. Adding foramen CTVs/PTVs made no difference for field plans. The mean Dmin dropped 3.4% from Plan_PTV to Test_PTV for TomoTherapy™ (not significant) and 14.8% for protons (P = 0.001). Highly conformal CSI techniques may underdose meninges and CSF in the dural reflections of

  12. Five-year follow-up using a prostate stent as fiducial in image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Carl, Jesper; Sander, Lotte

    2015-06-01

    To report results from the five-year follow-up on a previously reported study using image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of localized or locally advanced prostate cancer (PC) and a removable prostate stent as fiducial. Patients with local or locally advanced PC were treated using five-field 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DRT). The clinical target volumes (CTV) were treated to 78 Gy in 39 fractions using daily on-line image guidance (IG). Late genito-urinary (GU) and gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicities were scored using the radiotherapy oncology group (RTOG) score and the common toxicity score of adverse events (CTC) score. Urinary symptoms were also scored using the international prostate symptom score (IPSS). Median observation time was 5.4 year. Sixty-two of the 90 patients from the original study cohort were eligible for toxicity assessment. Overall survival, cancer-specific survival and biochemical freedom from failure were 85%, 96% and 80%, respectively at five years after radiotherapy. Late toxicity GU and GI RTOG scores≥2 were 5% and 0%. Comparing pre- and post-radiotherapy IPSS scores indicate that development in urinary symptoms after radiotherapy may be complex. Prostate image-guided radiotherapy using a prostate stent demonstrated survival data comparable with recently published data. GU and GI toxicities at five-year follow-up were low and comparable to the lowest toxicity rates reported. These findings support that the precision of the prostate stent technique is at least as good as other techniques. IPSS revealed a complex development in urinary symptoms after radiotherapy.

  13. Radiotherapy DICOM packet sniffing.

    PubMed

    Ackerly, T; Gesoand, M; Smith, R

    2008-09-01

    The Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard is meant to allow communication of medical images between equipment provided by different vendors, but when two applications do not interact correctly in a multi-vendor environment it is often first necessary to demonstrate non-compliance of either the sender or the receiver before a resolution to the problem can be progressed. Sometimes the only way to do this is to monitor the network communication between the two applications to find out which one is not complying with the DICOM standard. Packet sniffing is a technique of network traffic analysis by passive observation of all information transiting a point on the network, regardless of the specified sender or receiver. DICOM packet sniffing traps and interprets the network communication between two DICOM applications to determine which is non compliant. This is illustrated with reference to three examples, a radiotherapy planning system unable to receive CT data from a particular CT scanner, a radiotherapy simulator unable to print correctly on a DICOM printer, and a PACS unable to respond when queried about what images it has in its archive by a radiotherapy treatment planning system. Additionally in this work it has been proven that it is feasible to extract DICOM images from the intercepted network data. This process can be applied to determine the cause of a DICOM image being rendered differently by the sender and the receiver.

  14. A study on ultra-precision machining technique for Al6061-T6 to fabricate space infrared optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Geun-man; Lee, Gil-jae; Hyun, Sang-won; Sung, Ha-yeong; Chung, Euisik; Kim, Geon-hee

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, analysis of variance on designed experiments with full factorial design was applied to determine the optimized machining parameters for ultra-precision fabrication of the secondary aspheric mirror, which is one of the key elements of the space cryogenic infrared optics. A single point diamond turning machine (SPDTM, Nanotech 4μpL Moore) was adopted to fabricate the material, AL6061-T6, and the three machining parameters of cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut were selected. With several randomly assigned experimental conditions, surface roughness of each condition was measured by a non-contact optical profiler (NT2000; Vecco). As a result of analysis using Minitab, the optimum cutting condition was determined as following; cutting speed: 122 m/min, feed rate: 3 mm/min and depth of cut: 1 μm. Finally, a 120 mm diameter aspheric secondary mirror was attached to a particularly designed jig by using mixture of paraffin and wax and successfully fabricated under the optimum machining parameters. The profile of machined surface was measured by a high-accuracy 3-D profilometer(UA3P; Panasonic) and we obtained the geometrical errors of 30.6 nm(RMS) and 262.4 nm(PV), which satisfy the requirements of the space cryogenic infrared optics.

  15. Techniques for wide range, high resolution and precision, thermal desorption measurements. I. Principles of apparatus and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, H.; Menzel, D.

    1993-04-01

    We describe techniques and an apparatus with which thermal desorption measurements, both temperature-programmed and isothermal, can be considerably improved compared to the best measurements done to date. These constitute further development of a previously used scheme (detection of desorbing species in a separate small volume which is pumped by a geometrically defined conductance to the main chamber) by procedures for very accurate resetability of the sample before the cap aperture, and by an accurate correction procedure for readsorption. Direct application of these techniques leads to a range of 4 powers of 10 in rate which can be extended by another power of 10 by a simple background correction. The dynamic range of coverages that can be studied is even larger. The very good reproducibility makes calibration of rates and coverages in absolute terms possible. The high accuracy allows studies of majority species by direct logarithmic plots, of minority species encompassing only promilles of a monolayer, and of sticking coefficients at coverages down to 10 -3 and up to more than 10 monolayers, with high accuracy. While these techniques have been developed for the study of weakly adsorbed species desorbing at very low temperatures (6-100 K), they can be easily adapted to more strongly bound species, as long as the desorption products do not react with the system walls.

  16. Does a too risk-averse approach to the implementation of new radiotherapy technologies delay their clinical use?

    PubMed Central

    Nyström, H; Fiorino, C; Thwaites, D

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a generally safe treatment modality in practice; nevertheless, recent well-reported accidents also confirm its potential risks. However, this may obstruct or delay the introduction of new technologies and treatment strategies/techniques into clinical practice. Risks must be addressed and judged in a realistic context: risks must be assessed realistically. Introducing new technology may introduce new possibilities of errors. However, delaying the introduction of such new technology therefore means that patients are denied the potentially better treatment opportunities. Despite the difficulty in quantitatively assessing the risks on both sides of the possible choice of actions, including the “lost opportunity”, the best estimates should be included in the overall risk–benefit and cost–benefit analysis. Radiotherapy requires a sufficiently high level of support for the safety, precision and accuracy required: radiotherapy development and implementation is exciting. However, it has been anxious with a constant awareness of the consequences of mistakes or misunderstandings. Recent history can be used to show that for introduction of advanced radiotherapy, the risk-averse medical physicist can act as an electrical fuse in a complex circuit. The lack of sufficient medical physics resource or expertise can short out this fuse and leave systems unsafe. Future technological developments will continue to present further safety and risk challenges. The important evolution of radiotherapy brings different management opinions and strategies. Advanced radiotherapy technologies can and should be safely implemented in as timely a manner as possible for the patient groups where clinical benefit is indicated. PMID:25993488

  17. Development and fabrication of a hyperspectral, mirror based IR-telescope with ultra-precise manufacturing and mounting techniques for a snap-together system assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risse, S.; Scheiding, S.; Gebhardt, A.; Damm, C.; Holota, W.; Eberhardt, R.; Tünnermann, A.

    2011-11-01

    We report on an ultra-precise manufacturing method of a hyperspectral, mirror based IR-Telescope for applications in the Mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR). The proposed method simplifies the otherwise time consuming system alignment by the use of a snap-together assembly technique, that can be used for rotationally symmetric designs such as Korsch or Three Mirror Anastigmatic (TMA) telescope designs. The proposed technology is based on diamond machining of at least two mirror surfaces on one common substrate in one and the same machine setup. A novel hybrid manufacturing approach, which is a combination of diamond turning and diamond milling is used to manufacture fiducials and mounting planes that reduce the adjustment expenditure significantly. Reference elements and interfaces on the substrates are the basis for a precise metrology of the shape and the position of the optical surfaces as well as for the final assembly of the optical bench. The system integration into a hexapod framework is also based on precisely diamond machined stop surfaces to define the air distance and tilt between the mirrors. The presented method is a novel manufacturing and mounting technology for IR-telescope assemblies with diffraction limited optical performance in the MWIR.

  18. The accuracy, precision and sustainability of different techniques for tablet subdivision: breaking by hand and the use of tablet splitters or a kitchen knife.

    PubMed

    van Riet-Nales, Diana A; Doeve, Myrthe E; Nicia, Agnes E; Teerenstra, Steven; Notenboom, Kim; Hekster, Yechiel A; van den Bemt, Bart J F

    2014-05-15

    Tablets are frequently subdivided to lower the dose, to facilitate swallowing by e.g. children or older people or to save costs. Splitting devices are commonly used when hand breaking is difficult or painful. Three techniques for tablet subdivision were investigated: hand breaking, tablet splitter, kitchen knife. A best case drug (paracetamol), tablet (round, flat, uncoated, 500 mg) and operator (24-year student) were applied. Hundred tablets were subdivided by hand and by three devices of each of the following types: Fit & Healthy, Health Care Logistics, Lifetime, PillAid, PillTool, Pilomat tablet splitter; Blokker kitchen knife. The intra and inter device accuracy, precision and sustainability were investigated. The compliance to (adapted) regulatory requirements was investigated also. The accuracy and precision of hand broken tablets was 104/97% resp. 2.8/3.2% (one part per tablet considered; parts right/left side operator). The right/left accuracies of the splitting devices varied between 60 and 133%; the precisions 4.0 and 29.6%. The devices did not deteriorate over 100-fold use. Only hand broken tablets complied with all regulatory requirements. Health care professionals should realize that tablet splitting may result in inaccurate dosing. Authorities should undertake appropriate measures to assure good function of tablet splitters and, where feasible, to reduce the need for their use. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Precision measurements of the total and partial widths of the psi(2S) charmonium meson with a new complementary-scan technique in anti-p p annihilations

    SciTech Connect

    Andreotti, M.; Bagnasco, S.; Baldini, W.; Bettoni, D.; Borreani, G.; Buzzo, A.; Calabrese, R.; Cester, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Dalpiaz, P.; Garzoglio, G.

    2007-03-01

    We present new precision measurements of the {Psi}(2S) total and partial widths from excitation curves obtained in antiproton-proton annihilations by Fermilab experiment E835 at the Antiproton Accumulator in the year 2000. A new technique of complementary scans was developed to study narrow resonances with stochastically cooled antiproton beams. It relies on precise revolution-frequency and orbit-length measurements, while making the analysis of the excitation curve almost independent of machine lattice parameters. For the {Psi}(2S) meson, by studying the processes {bar p}p {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} and {bar p}p {yields} J/{Psi} + X {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} + X, we measure the width {Gamma} = 290 {+-} 25(sta) {+-} 4(sys) keV and the combination of partial widths {Gamma}{sub e{sup +}e{sup -}}{Gamma}{sub {bar p}p}/{Gamma} = 579 {+-} 38(sta) {+-} 36(sys) meV, which represent the most precise measurements to date.

  20. Optimizing the accuracy and precision of the single-pulse Laue technique for synchrotron photo-crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Kamiński, Radosław; Graber, Timothy; Benedict, Jason B.; Henning, Robert; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Scheins, Stephan; Messerschmidt, Marc; Coppens, Philip

    2010-01-01

    The accuracy that can be achieved in single-pulse pump-probe Laue experiments is discussed. It is shown that with careful tuning of the experimental conditions a reproducibility of the intensity ratios of equivalent intensities obtained in different measurements of 3–4% can be achieved. The single-pulse experiments maximize the time resolution that can be achieved and, unlike stroboscopic techniques in which the pump-probe cycle is rapidly repeated, minimize the temperature increase due to the laser exposure of the sample. PMID:20567080

  1. SU-E-T-272: Radiation Damage Comparison Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and Field-In-Field Technique in Breast Cancer Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, H; Zhang, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare normal tissue complications between IMRT and FIF treatment in breast cancer. Methods: 16 patients treated with IMRT plan and 20 patients treated with FIF plan were evaluated in this study. Both kinds of plans were generated using Eclipse treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The plans were reviewed and approved by radiation oncologist. The average survival fraction (SF) for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for corresponding normal tissues of each structure were calculated. Results: The EUDs of the lungs, heart, healthy breast and spinal cord with both IMRT and FIF treatments were calculated. Considering the average value of all IMRT plans, the lung of treated side absorbed 16.0% of dosage prescribed to the tumor if the radiosensitivity of the lung is similar to the radiosensitive cell line. For moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, the average EUDs can be 18.9% and 22.4% of prescription. In contrast, patients treated with FIF plans were delivered 6.0%, 7.5% and 10.3% of prescribed dose for radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, respectively. Comparing heart EUDs between IMRT and FIF plans, average absorbed doses in IMRT treatment were 7.7%, 8.7% and 9.7% of prescription for three types of heart normal tissue cell lines while FIF treatments delivered only 1.3%, 1.5% and 1.6% of prescription dose. For the other organs, the results were similar. Conclusion: The results indicated that breast cancer treatment using IMRT technique had more normal tissue damage than FIF treatment. FIF demonstrated

  2. A novel numerical technique for the high-precision simulation of flow processes related to artificial recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, David; Orsini, Paolo; Power, Henry; Morvan, Herve; Bensabat, Jacob

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a novel numerical technique for large-scale groundwater flow simulations, in the frame of artificial recharge planning. The implementation is demonstrated using two test-sites from the EU funded GABARDINE project (FP6): The Sindos test site, near Thessaloniki, Greece, examines the infiltration of water towards the water table, through several unsaturated soil layers. The test site at Campina de Faro, Portugal, investigates phreatic surface movement around a large-diameter well. For both test cases a numerical simulation is constructed, and the local subsurface flow regime is investigated. Numerical methods for solving PDEs using interpolation with radial basis functions (RBFs) will typically provide high accuracy solutions, achieve excellent convergence rates, and offer great flexibility with regards to the enforcement of arbitrary boundary conditions. However, RBF methods have traditionally been limited to the solution of small academic problems, due to issues of computational cost and numerical conditioning. Recent developments in locally supported RBF methods have led to techniques which can be scaled to the largest problem sizes, while maintaining many of the flexibilities of traditional RBF methods. As a contribution to the GABARDINE project, two such numerical techniques have been developed; the meshless LHI method and the control-volume based CV-RBF method. These numerical techniques are capable of modelling flow and transport in heterogeneous porous media, and are of order-N computational complexity, allowing problems to be solved on large and irregular datasets. For both numerical techniques, the RBF Hermitian collocation method is utilised to perform interpolation at the local level, allowing the simultaneous imposition of pressure and mass-flux matching conditions at soil-layer interfaces. The non-overlapping stencil configuration then allows the accurate capture of non-smooth solution profiles across layer interfaces, to a high

  3. [Radiotherapy during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Mazeron, R; Barillot, I; Mornex, F; Giraud, P

    2016-09-01

    The diagnostic of cancer during pregnancy is a rare and delicate situation. As the developments of the embryo and the human fetus are extremely sensitive to ionizing radiations, the treatment of these tumors should be discussed. The studies - preclinical and clinical - based mostly on exposure accidents show that subdiaphragmatic treatments are possible during pregnancy. When radiotherapy is used, phantom estimations of the dose to the fetus, confirmed by in vivo measurements are required. Irradiation and imaging techniques should be arranged to decrease as much as possible the dose delivered to the fetus and hold below the threshold of 0.1Gy.

  4. [Radiotherapy of carcinoma of the salivary glands].

    PubMed

    Servagi-Vernat, S; Tochet, F

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, and technique of radiotherapy for salivary glands carcinoma are presented, and the contribution of neutrons and carbon ions. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed.

  5. Accuracy and precision of polyurethane dental arch models fabricated using a three-dimensional subtractive rapid prototyping method with an intraoral scanning technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Kim, Ki-Baek; Kim, Woong-Chul; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy and precision of polyurethane (PUT) dental arch models fabricated using a three-dimensional (3D) subtractive rapid prototyping (RP) method with an intraoral scanning technique by comparing linear measurements obtained from PUT models and conventional plaster models. Methods Ten plaster models were duplicated using a selected standard master model and conventional impression, and 10 PUT models were duplicated using the 3D subtractive RP technique with an oral scanner. Six linear measurements were evaluated in terms of x, y, and z-axes using a non-contact white light scanner. Accuracy was assessed using mean differences between two measurements, and precision was examined using four quantitative methods and the Bland-Altman graphical method. Repeatability was evaluated in terms of intra-examiner variability, and reproducibility was assessed in terms of inter-examiner and inter-method variability. Results The mean difference between plaster models and PUT models ranged from 0.07 mm to 0.33 mm. Relative measurement errors ranged from 2.2% to 7.6% and intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.93 to 0.96, when comparing plaster models and PUT models. The Bland-Altman plot showed good agreement. Conclusions The accuracy and precision of PUT dental models for evaluating the performance of oral scanner and subtractive RP technology was acceptable. Because of the recent improvements in block material and computerized numeric control milling machines, the subtractive RP method may be a good choice for dental arch models. PMID:24696823

  6. Precision of MRI/ultrasound-fusion biopsy in prostate cancer diagnosis: an ex vivo comparison of alternative biopsy techniques on prostate phantoms.

    PubMed

    Westhoff, N; Siegel, F P; Hausmann, D; Polednik, M; von Hardenberg, J; Michel, M S; Ritter, M

    2017-07-01

    Comparing the accuracy of MRI/ultrasound-guided target-biopsy by transrectal biopsy (TRB) with elastic versus rigid image fusion versus transperineal biopsy (TPB) with rigid image fusion in a standardized setting. Target-biopsy of six differently sized and located lesions was performed on customized CIRS 070L prostate phantoms. Lesions were only MRI-visible. After prior MRI for lesion location, one targeted biopsy per lesion was obtained by TRB with elastic image fusion with Artemis™ (Eigen, USA), TRB with rigid image fusion with real-time virtual sonography (Hitachi, Japan) and TPB with rigid image fusion with a brachytherapy approach (Elekta, Sweden), each on a phantom of 50, 100 and 150 ml prostate volume. The needle trajectories were marked by contrast agent and detected in a postinterventional MRI. Overall target detection rate was 79.6% with a slight superiority for the TPB (83.3 vs. 77.8 vs. 77.8%). TRB with elastic image fusion showed the highest overall precision [median distance to lesion center 2.37 mm (0.14-4.18 mm)], independent of prostate volume. Anterior lesions were significantly more precisely hit than transitional and basal lesions (p = 0.034; p = 0.015) with comparable accuracy for TRB with elastic image fusion and TPB. In general, TRB with rigid image fusion was inferior [median 3.15 mm (0.37-10.62 mm)], particularly in small lesions. All biopsy techniques allow detection of clinically significant tumors with a median error of 2-3 mm. Elastic image fusion appears to be the most precise technique, independent of prostate volume, target size or location.

  7. Accuracy and Precision of an IGRT Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, Gareth J. Rowbottom, Carl G.; Mackay, Ranald I.

    2009-07-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) can potentially improve the accuracy of delivery of radiotherapy treatments by providing high-quality images of patient anatomy in the treatment position that can be incorporated into the treatment setup. The achievable accuracy and precision of delivery of highly complex head-and-neck intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans with an IGRT technique using an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator and the Pinnacle Treatment Planning System (TPS) was investigated. Four head-and-neck IMRT plans were delivered to a semi-anthropomorphic head-and-neck phantom and the dose distribution was measured simultaneously by up to 20 microMOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transmitter) detectors. A volumetric kilovoltage (kV) x-ray image was then acquired in the treatment position, fused with the phantom scan within the TPS using Syntegra software, and used to recalculate the dose with the precise delivery isocenter at the actual position of each detector within the phantom. Three repeat measurements were made over a period of 2 months to reduce the effect of random errors in measurement or delivery. To ensure that the noise remained below 1.5% (1 SD), minimum doses of 85 cGy were delivered to each detector. The average measured dose was systematically 1.4% lower than predicted and was consistent between repeats. Over the 4 delivered plans, 10/76 measurements showed a systematic error > 3% (3/76 > 5%), for which several potential sources of error were investigated. The error was ultimately attributable to measurements made in beam penumbrae, where submillimeter positional errors result in large discrepancies in dose. The implementation of an image-guided technique improves the accuracy of dose verification, particularly within high-dose gradients. The achievable accuracy of complex IMRT dose delivery incorporating image-guidance is within {+-} 3% in dose over the range of sample points. For some points in high-dose gradients

  8. [Past, present and near future of techniques in radiation oncology].

    PubMed

    Gérard, J-P; Thariat, J; Giraud, P; Cosset, J-M

    2010-07-01

    Since the discovery of X-rays, the goal of radiotherapy has been to deliver an optimal dose in the target volume and the lowest possible dose in the normal tissues. The history of radiotherapy can be divided in three periods. The Kilovoltage era (1900-1939) where only superficial and radiosensitive tumours could be controlled, the Megavoltage era (1950-1995) where Telecobalt and linear accelerators could deliver high doses in all parts of the body. Radiotherapy has since been playing an important curative and conservative role for most cancers. The Computer-Assisted Radiotherapy era (1995-2010) now provides the capacity to optimise the dose distribution in three dimensions. Dose is better conformed to the target volume and organ at risk are better preserved. intensity modulated radio-therapy (IMRT) allows to "shape" concave isodoses and to spare the parotids when irradiating oropharyngeal tumours. Moving targets (lung, liver etc.) are efficiently irradiated using "on-line tracking" and "image-guided radiotherapy". Stereotactic irradiation, first initiated for brain lesions, is now performed for extra-cranial tumours and due to its millimetric precision opens the way back to hypo-fractionated treatments. The next period, already ongoing, is Hadrontherapy with protons and soon helium or carbon ions techniques. In a multidisciplinary strategy, progress in radiotherapy is based on a global approach of the patient and tailored/personalized well targeted treatment of the tumour.

  9. [Radiotherapy of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Barillot, I; Azria, D; Belkacémi, Y; Bollet, M; Chauvet, B; Cowen, D; Cutuli, B; Fourquet, A; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Leblanc, M; Mahé, M A

    2016-09-01

    In breast cancer, radiotherapy is an essential component of the treatment. After conservative surgery for an infiltrating carcinoma, radiotherapy must be systematically performed, regardless of the characteristics of the disease, because it decreases the rate of local recurrence and by this way, specific mortality. Partial breast irradiation could not be proposed routinely but only in very selected and informed patients. For ductal carcinoma in situ, adjuvant radiotherapy must be also systematically performed after lumpectomy. After mastectomy, chest wall irradiation is required for pT3-T4 tumours and if there is an axillary nodal involvement, whatever the number of involved lymph nodes. After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, in case of pN0 disease, chest wall irradiation is recommended if there is a clinically or radiologically T3-T4 or node positive disease before chemotherapy. Axillary irradiation is recommended only if there is no axillary surgical dissection and a positive sentinel lymph node. Supra and infra-clavicular irradiation is advised in case of positive axillary nodes. Internal mammary irradiation must be discussed case by case, according to the benefit/risk ratio (cardiac toxicity). Dose to the chest wall or the breast must be between 45-50Gy with a conventional fractionation. A boost dose over the tumour bed is required if the patient is younger than 60 years old. Hypofractionation (42.5 Gy in 16 fractions, or 41.6 Gy en 13 or 40 Gy en 15) is possible after tumorectomy and if a nodal irradiation is not mandatory. Delineation of the breast, the chest wall and the nodal areas are based on clinical and radiological evaluations. 3D-conformal irradiation is the recommended technique, intensity-modulated radiotherapy must be proposed only in case of specific clinical situations. Respiratory gating could be useful to decrease the cardiac dose. Concomitant administration of chemotherapy in unadvised, but hormonal treatment could be start with

  10. Heart-sparing radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer: What are the techniques used in the clinical routine?: A pattern of practice survey in the German-speaking countries.

    PubMed

    Duma, Marciana-Nona; Münch, Stefan; Oechsner, Markus; Combs, Stephanie E

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the practice of care in German-speaking countries with regard to heart-sparing radiotherapy techniques. Between August 2015 and September 2015, an e-mail/fax-based survey was sent to radiation oncology departments in Germany, Austria, and the German-speaking Switzerland. The questionnaire was divided into 3 chapters: a general chapter on the department, a chapter specific for heart-sparing techniques in patients with breast cancer, and a third chapter on personal beliefs on the topic of heart sparing in patients with breast cancer. A total of 82 radiation oncology departments answered the questionnaire: 16 university clinics and 66 other departments. In general, heart-sparing techniques are being offered by 90.2% of departments for radiation oncology in the German-speaking countries. However, in the clinical routine, 87.7% of institutions use heart-sparing techniques in less than 50% of patients with breast cancer. Heart-sparing techniques are especially provided for patients with left-sided breast cancer (80%), patients after mastectomy (52.5%), and when the mammaria interna lymph drainage vessels are irradiated (41.3%). In 46.3% of departments, there are written internal guidelines for heart sparing in patients with breast cancer. Breathing-adapted radiotherapy is used as the most frequent heart-sparing technique in 64.7% of the institutions, followed by intensity-modulated radiation therapy, which is most frequently used by 22.1%. The only significant difference between university hospitals and other departments was seen for the offering of partial breast irradiation. The most commonly used heart-sparing technique is breathing-adapted radiotherapy, but there is no coherent approach for heart sparing in patients with breast cancer in the German-speaking countries. Overall, all options for cardiac protection/cardiac avoidance have their advantages and disadvantages, with deep inspiration breath-hold radiotherapyhaving the

  11. Treatment Plan Technique and Quality for Single-Isocenter Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Multiple Lung Lesions with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy or Intensity-Modulated Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Kimmen; Xu, Karen M.; Lalonde, Ron; Horne, Zachary D.; Bernard, Mark E.; McCoy, Chuck; Clump, David A.; Burton, Steven A.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a practical approach to the planning technique and evaluation of plan quality for the multi-lesion, single-isocenter stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of the lung. Eleven patients with two or more lung lesions underwent single-isocenter volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) radiosurgery or IMRS. All plans were normalized to the target maximum dose. For each plan, all targets were treated to the same dose. Plan conformity and dose gradient were maximized with dose-control tuning structures surrounding targets. For comparison, multi-isocenter plans were retrospectively created for four patients. Conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient index (GI), and gradient distance (GD) were calculated for each plan. V5, V10, and V20 of the lung and organs at risk (OARs) were collected. Treatment time and total monitor units (MUs) were also recorded. One patient had four lesions and the remainder had two lesions. Six patients received VMAT and five patients received intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS). For those treated with VMAT, two patients received 3-arc VMAT and four received 2-arc VMAT. For those treated with IMRS, two patients were treated with 10 and 11 beams, respectively, and the rest received 12 beams. Prescription doses ranged from 30 to 54 Gy in three to five fractions. The median prescribed isodose line was 84% (range: 80–86%). The median maximum dose was 57.1 Gy (range: 35.7–65.1 Gy). The mean combined PTV was 49.57 cm3 (range: 14.90–87.38 cm3). For single-isocenter plans, the median CI was 1.15 (range: 0.97–1.53). The median HI was 1.19 (range: 1.16–1.28). The median GI was 4.60 (range: 4.16–7.37). The median maximum radiation dose (Dmax) to total lung was 55.6 Gy (range: 35.7–62.0 Gy). The median mean radiation dose to the lung (Dmean) was 4.2 Gy (range: 1.1–9.3 Gy). The median lung V5 was 18.7% (range: 3.8–41.3%). There was no significant difference in CI, HI, GI

  12. Improving the precision of our ecosystem calipers: a modified morphometric technique for estimating marine mammal mass and body composition.

    PubMed

    Shero, Michelle R; Pearson, Linnea E; Costa, Daniel P; Burns, Jennifer M

    2014-01-01

    Mass and body composition are indices of overall animal health and energetic balance and are often used as indicators of resource availability in the environment. This study used morphometric models and isotopic dilution techniques, two commonly used methods in the marine mammal field, to assess body composition of Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii, N = 111). Findings indicated that traditional morphometric models that use a series of circular, truncated cones to calculate marine mammal blubber volume and mass overestimated the animal's measured body mass by 26.9±1.5% SE. However, we developed a new morphometric model that uses elliptical truncated cones, and estimates mass with only -2.8±1.7% error (N = 10). Because this elliptical truncated cone model can estimate body mass without the need for additional correction factors, it has the potential to be a broadly applicable method in marine mammal species. While using elliptical truncated cones yielded significantly smaller blubber mass estimates than circular cones (10.2±0.8% difference; or 3.5±0.3% total body mass), both truncated cone models significantly underestimated total body lipid content as compared to isotopic dilution results, suggesting that animals have substantial internal lipid stores (N = 76). Multiple linear regressions were used to determine the minimum number of morphometric measurements needed to reliably estimate animal mass and body composition so that future animal handling times could be reduced. Reduced models estimated body mass and lipid mass with reasonable accuracy using fewer than five morphometric measurements (root-mean-square-error: 4.91% for body mass, 10.90% for lipid mass, and 10.43% for % lipid). This indicates that when test datasets are available to create calibration coefficients, regression models also offer a way to improve body mass and condition estimates in situations where animal handling times must be short and efficient.

  13. Advanced Fabrication Techniques for Precisely Controlled Micro and Nano Scale Environments for Complex Tissue Regeneration and Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Benjamin

    As modern medicine advances, it is still very challenging to cure joint defects due to their poor inherent regenerative capacity, complex stratified architecture, and disparate biomechanical properties. The current clinical standard for catastrophic or late stage joint degradation is a total joint implant, where the damaged joint is completely excised and replaced with a metallic or artificial joint. However, these procedures still only lasts for 10-15 years, and there are hosts of recovery complications which can occur. Thus, these studies have sought to employ advanced biomaterials and scaffold fabricated techniques to effectively regrow joint tissue, instead of merely replacing it with artificial materials. We can hypothesize here that the inclusion of biomimetic and bioactive nanomaterials with highly functional electrospun and 3D printed scaffold can improve physical characteristics (mechanical strength, surface interactions and nanotexture) enhance cellular growth and direct stem cell differentiation for bone, cartilage and vascular growth as well as cancer metastasis modeling. Nanomaterial inclusion and controlled 3D printed features effectively increased nano surface roughness, Young's Modulus and provided effective flow paths for simulated arterial blood. All of the approaches explored proved highly effective for increasing cell growth, as a result of increasing micro-complexity and nanomaterial incorporation. Additionally, chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation, cell migration, cell to cell interaction and vascular formation were enhanced. Finally, growth-factor(gf)-loaded polymer nanospheres greatly improved vascular cell behavior, and provided a highly bioactive scaffold for mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) co-culture and bone formation. In conclusion, electrospinning and 3D printing when combined effectively with biomimetic and bioactive nanomaterials (i.e. carbon nanomaterials, collagen, nHA, polymer

  14. Clinical results of a pilot study on stereovision-guided stereotactic radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shidong; Kleinberg, Lawrence R; Rigamonti, Daniele; Wharam, Moody D; Rashid, Abdul; Jackson, Juan; Djajaputra, David; He, Shenjen; Creasey, Tunisia; DeWeese, Theodore L

    2010-12-01

    Real-time stereovision-guidance has been introduced for efficient and convenient fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This first pilot study is to clinically evaluate its accuracy and precision as well as impact on treatment doses. Sixty-one FSR patients wearing stereotactic masks (SMs) and nine IMRT patients wearing flexible masks (FMs), were accrued. Daily target reposition was initially based-on biplane-radiographs and then adjusted in six degrees of freedom under real-time stereovision guidance. Mean and standard deviation of the head displacements measured the accuracy and precision. Head positions during beam-on times were measured with real-time stereovisions and used for determination of delivered doses. Accuracy ± ± precision in direction with the largest errors shows improvement from 0.4 ± 2.3 mm to 0.0 ± 1.0 mm in the inferior-to-superior direction for patients wearing SM or from 0.8 ± 4.3 mm to 0.4 ± 1.7 mm in the posterior-to-anterior direction for patients wearing FM. The image-guidance increases target volume coverage by >30% for small lesions. Over half of head position errors could be removed from the stereovision-guidance. Importantly, the technique allows us to check head position during beam-on time and makes it possible for having frameless head refixation without tight masks.

  15. Clinical Results of a Pilot Study on Stereovision-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy and Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shidong; Kleinberg, Lawrence R.; Rigamonti, Daniele; Wharam, Moody D.; Rashid, Abdul; Jackson, Juan; Djajaputra, David; He, Shenjen; Creasey, Tunisia; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2011-01-01

    Real-time stereovision-guidance has been introduced for efficient and convenient fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This first pilot study is to clinically evaluate its accuracy and precision as well as impact on treatment doses. Sixty-one FSR patients wearing stereotactic masks (SMs) and nine IMRT patients wearing flexible masks (FMs), were accrued. Daily target reposition was initially based-on biplane-radiographs and then adjusted in six degrees of freedom under real-time stereovision guidance. Mean and standard deviation of the head displacements measured the accuracy and precision. Head positions during beam-on times were measured with real-time stereovisions and used for determination of delivered doses. Accuracy ± precision in direction with the largest errors shows improvement from 0.4 ± 2.3 mm to 0.0 ± 1.0 mm in the inferior-to-superior direction for patients wearing SM or from 0.8 ± 4.3 mm to 0.4 ± 1.7 mm in the posterior-to-anterior direction for patients wearing FM. The image-guidance increases target volume coverage by >30% for small lesions. Over half of head position errors could be removed from the stereovision-guidance. Importantly, the technique allows us to check head position during beam-on time and makes it possible for having frameless head refixation without tight masks. PMID:21070083

  16. Benefit of precise control of surface reaction by new patterning technique for small-contact etching with TiN hard mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabata, Masahiro; Tsuji, Akihiro; Katsunuma, Takayuki; Honda, Masanobu

    2017-06-01

    We introduce state-of-the art small-contact etching by a new patterning technique using atomic layer etching (ALE) for sub-5 nm technology generation. In small-contact etching, SiO2 is etched by using a TiN hard mask with the progress of the miniaturization process. However, when applying the conventional method to small-contact etching with a TiN mask, etch stop is caused by excess deposition on the SiO2 film. From the results of surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (TEM-EDX), it is considered that the deposition is formed by the reaction of fluorocarbon (FC) plasma and TiN. To solve this problem, we have developed a quasi-ALE technique to improve the ALE process to make it more suitable for SiO2 etching. By adopting this technique to small-contact etching with a TiN hard mask, etch stop was significantly reduced. Quasi-ALE precisely controls the surface reaction by controlling the radical flux and ion flux independently. Therefore, the reaction of FC plasma and TiN leading to etch stop can be minimized. Quasi-ALE can resolve the etch-stop issue due to the TiN mask used in the conventional method.

  17. Biomarkers for DNA DSB inhibitors and radiotherapy clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Stanley K; Olive, Peggy L; Bristow, Robert G

    2008-09-01

    Major technical advances in radiotherapy, including IMRT and image-guided radiotherapy, have allowed for improved physical precision and increased dose delivery to the tumor, with better sparing of surrounding normal tissue. The development of inhibitors of the sensing and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is exciting and could be combined with precise radiotherapy targeting to improve local control following radiotherapy. However, caution must be exercised in order that DSB inhibitors are combined with radiotherapy in such a manner as to preserve the therapeutic ratio by exploiting repair deficiencies in malignant cells over that of normal cells. In this review, we discuss the rationale and current approaches to targeting DSB sensing and repair pathways in combined modality with radiotherapy. We also describe potential biomarkers that could be useful in detecting functional inhibition of DSB repair in a patient's tissues during clinical radiotherapy trials. Finally, we examine a number of issues relating to the use of DSB-inhibiting molecular agents and radiotherapy in the context of the tumor microenvironment, effects on normal tissues and the optimal timing and duration of the agent in relation to fractionated radiotherapy.

  18. Precise identification of <1 0 0> directions on Si{0 0 1} wafer using a novel self-aligning pre-etched technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. S.; Veerla, S.; Sharma, V.; Pandey, A. K.; Pal, P.

    2016-02-01

    Micromirrors with a tilt angle of 45° are widely used in optical switching and interconnect applications which require 90° out of plane reflection. Silicon wet bulk micromachining based on surfactant added TMAH is usually employed to fabricate 45° slanted walls at the < 1 0 0> direction on Si≤ft\\{0 0 1\\right\\} wafers. These slanted walls are used as 45° micromirrors. However, the appearance of a precise 45° ≤ft\\{0 1 1\\right\\} wall is subject to the accurate identification of the < 1 0 0> direction. In this paper, we present a simple technique based on pre-etched patterns for the identification of < 1 0 0> directions on the Si≤ft\\{0 0 1\\right\\} surface. The proposed pre-etched pattern self-aligns itself at the < 1 0 0> direction while becoming misaligned at other directions. The < 1 0 0> direction is determined by a simple visual inspection of pre-etched patterns and does not need any kind of measurement. To test the accuracy of the proposed method, we fabricated a 32 mm long rectangular opening with its sides aligned along the < 1 0 0> direction, which is determined using the proposed technique. Due to the finite etch rate of the ≤ft\\{1 1 0\\right\\} plane, undercutting occurred, which was measured at 12 different locations along the longer edge of the rectangular strip. The mean of these undercutting lengths, measured perpendicular to the mask edge, is found to be 13.41 μm with a sub-micron standard deviation of 0.38 μm. This level of uniform undercutting indicates that our method of identifying the < 1 0 0> direction is precise and accurate. The developed method will be extremely useful in fabricating arrays of 45° micromirrors.

  19. Bystander effects and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy.

  20. Bystander effects and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy. PMID:25535579

  1. Improving postoperative radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Lipman, D; Pieters, B R; De Reijke, Theo M

    2017-10-01

    Prostate cancer has one of the highest incidences in the world, with good curative treatment options like radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy. Unfortunately, about 30% of the patients initially treated with curative intent will develop a recurrence and need adjuvant treatment. Five randomized trials covered the role of postoperative radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy, but there is still a lot of debate about which patients should receive postoperative radiotherapy. Areas covered: This review will give an overview on the available literature concerning post-operative radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy with an emphasis on the five randomized trials. Also, new imaging techniques like prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography (PSMA-PET) and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and the development of biomarkers like genomic classifiers will be discussed in the search for an improved selection of patients who will benefit from postoperative radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy. With new treatment techniques like Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy, toxicity profiles will be kept low. Expert commentary: Patients with biochemical recurrence following radical prostatectomy with an early rise in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) will benefit most from postoperative radiotherapy. In this way, patients with only high risk pathological features can avoid unnecessary treatment and toxicity, and early intervention in progressing patients would not compromise the outcome.

  2. Use of image registration and fusion algorithms and techniques in radiotherapy: Report of the AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group No. 132.

    PubMed

    Brock, Kristy K; Mutic, Sasa; McNutt, Todd R; Li, Hua; Kessler, Marc L

    2017-07-01

    Image registration and fusion algorithms exist in almost every software system that creates or uses images in radiotherapy. Most treatment planning systems support some form of image registration and fusion to allow the use of multimodality and time-series image data and even anatomical atlases to assist in target volume and normal tissue delineation. Treatment delivery systems perform registration and fusion between the planning images and the in-room images acquired during the treatment to assist patient positioning. Advanced applications are beginning to support daily dose assessment and enable adaptive radiotherapy using image registration and fusion to propagate contours and accumulate dose between image data taken over the course of therapy to provide up-to-date estimates of anatomical changes and delivered dose. This information aids in the detection of anatomical and functional changes that might elicit changes in the treatment plan or prescription. As the output of the image registration process is always used as the input of another process for planning or delivery, it is important to understand and communicate the uncertainty associated with the software in general and the result of a specific registration. Unfortunately, there is no standard mathematical formalism to perform this for real-world situations where noise, distortion, and complex anatomical variations can occur. Validation of the software systems performance is also complicated by the lack of documentation available from commercial systems leading to use of these systems in undesirable 'black-box' fashion. In view of this situation and the central role that image registration and fusion play in treatment planning and delivery, the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine commissioned Task Group 132 to review current approaches and solutions for image registration (both rigid and deformable) in radiotherapy and to provide recommendations for quality

  3. Prone Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiotherapy Without a Boost to the Tumor Bed: Comparable Toxicity of IMRT Versus a 3D Conformal Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, Matthew E.; Raza, Shahzad; Becker, Stewart J.; Jozsef, Gabor; Lymberis, Stella C.; Hochman, Tsivia; Goldberg, Judith D.; DeWyngaert, Keith J.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: We report a comparison of the dosimetry and toxicity of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) vs. intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) among patients treated in the prone position with the same fractionation and target of the hypofractionation arm of the Canadian/Whelan trial. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved protocol identified a consecutive series of early-stage breast cancer patients treated according to the Canadian hypofractionation regimen but in the prone position. Patients underwent IMRT treatment planning and treatment if the insurance carrier approved reimbursement for IMRT; in case of refusal, a 3D-CRT plan was used. A comparison of the dosimetric and toxicity outcomes during the acute, subacute, and long-term follow-up of the two treatment groups is reported. Results: We included 97 consecutive patients with 100 treatment plans in this study (3 patients with bilateral breast cancer); 40 patients were treated with 3D-CRT and 57 with IMRT. IMRT significantly reduced the maximum dose (Dmax median, 109.96% for 3D-CRT vs. 107.28% for IMRT; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) and improved median dose homogeneity (median, 1.15 for 3D-CRT vs. 1.05 for IMRT; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) when compared with 3D-CRT. Acute toxicity consisted primarily of Grade 1 to 2 dermatitis and occurred in 92% of patients. Grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 13% of patients in the 3D-CRT group and 2% in the IMRT group. IMRT moderately decreased rates of acute pruritus (p = 0.03, chi-square test) and Grade 2 to 3 subacute hyperpigmentation (p = 0.01, Fisher exact test). With a minimum of 6 months' follow-up, the treatment was similarly well tolerated in either group, including among women with large breast volumes. Conclusion: Hypofractionated breast radiotherapy is well tolerated when treating patients in the prone position, even among those with large breast volumes. Breast IMRT significantly improves dosimetry but yields only a modest but

  4. [Radiotherapy of bone metastases].

    PubMed

    Thureau, S; Vieillard, M-H; Supiot, S; Lagrange, J-L

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy plays a major role in palliative treatment of bone metastases. Recent developments of stereotactic radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy give the possibility to treat oligometastatic diseases. The objective of this paper is to report indications and treatment modalities of radiotherapy in these situations.

  5. Exploiting molecular genomics in precision radiation oncology: a marriage of biological and physical precision.

    PubMed

    Tan, Janice S H; Lin, Xiaotian; Chua, Kevin L M; Lam, Paula Y; Soo, Khee-Chee; Chua, Melvin L K

    2017-09-01

    Achieving local tumour control is paramount for cure in head and neck and prostate cancers. With the transition to precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques, survival rates have improved in the majority of these cancers, but a substantial proportion of 30-40% still relapse following primary treatment. Recent large-scale molecular profiling studies have revealed unique biological events that could explain for tumour aggression and resistance to therapies, redefining the molecular taxonomy of head and neck and prostate cancers. Here, we reviewed the key findings from these studies, highlighting those relevant for clinical stratification. We also proposed novel combinatorial clinicomolecular models to identify subsets of patients with aggressive localised tumours and limited metastases, and to inform on the optimal management of these patients using molecular targeted agents, immunotherapy, and RT.

  6. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Norman R.; Pigott, Katharine H.; Brew-Graves, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

  7. The impact of feeding growing-finishing pigs with daily tailored diets using precision feeding techniques on animal performance, nutrient utilization, and body and carcass composition.

    PubMed

    Andretta, I; Pomar, C; Rivest, J; Pomar, J; Lovatto, P A; Radünz Neto, J

    2014-09-01

    The impact of moving from conventional to precision feeding systems in growing-finishing pig operations on animal performance, nutrient utilization, and body and carcass composition was studied. Fifteen animals per treatment for a total of 60 pigs of 41.2 (SE = 0.5) kg of BW were used in a performance trial (84 d) with 4 treatments: a 3-phase (3P) feeding program obtained by blending fixed proportions of feeds A (high nutrient density) and B (low nutrient density); a 3-phase commercial (COM) feeding program; and 2 daily-phase feeding programs in which the blended proportions of feeds A and B were adjusted daily to meet the estimated nutritional requirements of the group (multiphase-group feeding, MPG) or of each pig individually (multiphase-individual feeding, MPI). Daily feed intake was recorded each day and pigs were weighed weekly during the trial. Body composition was assessed at the beginning of the trial and every 28 d by dual-energy X-ray densitometry. Nitrogen and phosphorus excretion was estimated as the difference between retention and intake. Organ, carcass, and primal cut measurements were taken after slaughter. The COM feeding program reduced (P < 0.05) ADFI and improved G:F rate in relation to other treatments. The MPG and MPI programs showed values for ADFI, ADG, G:F, final BW, and nitrogen and phosphorus retention that were similar to those obtained for the 3P feeding program. However, compared with the 3P treatment, the MPI feeding program reduced the standardized ileal digestible lysine intake by 27%, the estimated nitrogen excretion by 22%, and the estimated phosphorus excretion by 27% (P < 0.05). Organs, carcass, and primal cut weights did not differ among treatments. Feeding growing-finishing pigs with daily tailored diets using precision feeding techniques is an effective approach to reduce nutrient excretion without compromising pig performance or carcass composition.

  8. Precision Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radius, Marcie; And Others

    The manual provides information for precision measurement (counting of movements per minute of a chosen activity) of achievement in special education students. Initial sections give guidelines for the teacher, parent, and student to follow for various methods of charting behavior. It is explained that precision measurement is a way to measure the…

  9. The Feasibility Study of a Hybrid Coplanar Arc Technique Versus Hybrid Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy in Treatment of Early-stage Left-sided Breast Cancer with Simultaneous-integrated Boost

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuan-Gui; Li, An-Chuan; Li, Wen-Yao; Huang, Miao-Yun; Li, Xiao-Bo; Chen, Ming-Qiu; Zhang, Mutian; Xu, Ben-Hua

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility and advantages of a hybrid, volumetric arc therapy technique that used two 90° coplanar arcs and two three-dimensional conformal tangential beams in the simultaneous-integrated boost radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. A total of nine patients with stage I, left-sided breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving surgery were selected for this retrospective study. For each patient, a hybrid arc plan was generated and then compared with two hybrid intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. All plans were optimized using the same objectives and dose constraints. The prescription dose was 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume with simultaneous boost to 60 Gy to the expanded gross target volume in 28 fractions. The differences among these hybrid plans were analyzed by the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test or the Wilcoxon rank sum test. The hybrid arc plans achieved the clinical requirements of target dose coverage and normal tissue (NT) dose constraints. It was found that the hybrid arc plans showed advantages in the conformity index of the expanded gross target volume, the V5 of the heart, the D2 of the left ventricle, and the D2 and V50.4 of NTs. The average beam-on time and monitor units of the hybrid arc plans were significantly lower (P < 0.001). PMID:28405101

  10. Quality assurance and commissioning of an infrared marker-based patient positioning system for frameless extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Tejpal; Phurailatpam, Reena; Ajay, Mishra; Rajeshri, Pai; Pranshu, Mohindra; Supriya, Chopra

    2007-12-01

    Rapid advancements in imaging technology have led to remarkable improvements in identification and localization of tumors, ushering the era of high-precision techniques in contemporary radiotherapy practice. However, uncertainties in patient set-up and organ motion during a course of fractionated radiotherapy can compromise precision of radiation therapy. Excellent accuracy has been achieved with invasive and non-invasive fixation systems for stereotactic radiotherapy. This report describes the commissioning procedure and Quality Assurance studies done to evaluate the accuracy of isocenter localization by an infrared marker-based positioning system (ExacTrac). The ExacTrac has two infrared cameras that emit and detect infrared rays from reflective markers and construct three-dimensional coordinates of each marker. It detects the difference of the actual isocenter position from the planned isocenter coordinates in three translational (lateral, longitudinal, vertical, or x,y,z axes) and three rotational axes (six degree of freedom). This study performed on a flat and static phantom shows excellent accuracy achieved by the ExacTrac system. The positioning accuracy of ExacTrac (± 1 mm translational displacement and ± 1° rotational errors) can be a valuable tool in implementing frameless extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. Nevertheless, it needs to be further evaluated on patients with inherent motion and greater positional uncertainty before being adopted in clinical practice.

  11. The role of PET in target localization for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Rembielak, Agata; Price, Pat

    2008-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is currently accepted as an important tool in oncology, mostly for diagnosis, staging and restaging purposes. It provides a new type of information in radiotherapy, functional rather than anatomical. PET imaging can also be used for target volume definition in radiotherapy treatment planning. The need for very precise target volume delineation has arisen with the increasing use of sophisticated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy techniques and intensity modulated radiation therapy. It is expected that better delineation of the target volume may lead to a significant reduction in the irradiated volume, thus lowering the risk of treatment complications (smaller safety margins). Better tumour visualisation also allows a higher dose of radiation to be applied to the tumour, which may lead to better tumour control. The aim of this article is to review the possible use of PET imaging in the radiotherapy of various cancers. We focus mainly on non-small cell lung cancer, lymphoma and oesophageal cancer, but also include current opinion on the use of PET-based planning in other tumours including brain, uterine cervix, rectum and prostate.

  12. Evolution of radiation techniques in the treatment of mediastinal lymphoma: from 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) to intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) using helical tomotherapy (HT): a single-centre experience and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Besson, Nadia; Pernin, Victor; Zefkili, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate radiation techniques and their toxicity in the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) with mediastinal disease over a 10-year period. Methods: Between 2003 and 2015, 173 patients with Stage I–III nodal lymphoma were treated in our institution: some of these patients were irradiated for HL or NHL with mediastinal disease. Some of the patients were treated by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), others by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Results: We studied 26 males and 43 females with a median age of 26 years. The median follow-up was 43 months. 49 patients were treated by 3DCRT and 20 patients by IMRT. The median dose received by patients treated for NHL was 40 Gy (range: 36–44 Gy), and the median dose received by patients with HL was 30 Gy (range: 30–36 Gy). Between 2003 and 2006, 16 patients were treated by 3DCRT vs 0 patients by IMRT. Between 2007 and 2009, 16 patients received 3DCRT and one patient received IMRT. Between 2010 and 2015, 19 patients received IMRT, and no patients received 3DCRT. 11 of the 20 (55%) patients treated by IMRT and 35 of the 49 (71.4%) patients treated by 3DCRT experienced acute toxicity. Among the patients treated by 3DCRT, one patient experienced Grade 1 radiation pneumonitis and two patients experienced Grade 1 acute mucositis. No late toxicity was observed in patients treated by IMRT. Conclusion: Improvement of radiation techniques for HL and NHL appears to have improved acute and late clinical safety. Longer follow-up is necessary to evaluate very late toxicity. Advances in knowledge: Improvement of radiation techniques for HL and NHL appears to improve the tolerance. PMID:26744079

  13. [Prostate localization systems for prostate radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Lagrange, J-L; Messai, T; M'Barek, B; Lefkopoulos, D

    2006-11-01

    The development of sophisticated conformal radiation therapy techniques for prostate cancer, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy, implies precise and accurate targeting. Inter- and intrafraction prostate motion can be significant and should be characterized, unless the target volume may occasionally be missed. Indeed, bony landmark-based portal imaging does not provide the positional information for soft-tissue targets (prostate and seminal vesicles) or critical organs (rectum and bladder). In this article, we describe various prostate localization systems used before or during the fraction: rectal balloon, intraprostatic fiducials, ultrasound-based localization, integrated CT/linear accelerator system, megavoltage or kilovoltage cone-beam CT, Calypso 4D localization system tomotherapy, Cyberknife and Exactrac X-Ray 6D. The clinical benefit in using such prostate localization tools is not proven by randomized studies and the feasibility has just been established for some of these techniques. Nevertheless, these systems should improve local control by a more accurate delivery of an increased prescribed dose in a reduced planning target volume.

  14. Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cholerton, Brenna; Larson, Eric B.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Mata, Ignacio F.; Keene, C. Dirk; Flanagan, Margaret; Crane, Paul K.; Grabowski, Thomas J.; Montine, Kathleen S.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    Three key elements to precision medicine are stratification by risk, detection of pathophysiological processes as early as possible (even before clinical presentation), and alignment of mechanism of action of intervention(s) with an individual's molecular driver(s) of disease. Used for decades in the management of some rare diseases and now gaining broad currency in cancer care, a precision medicine approach is beginning to be adapted to cognitive impairment and dementia. This review focuses on the application of precision medicine to address the clinical and biological complexity of two common neurodegenerative causes of dementia: Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. PMID:26724389

  15. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S.; Johnson, Perry B.; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ∼0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost. PMID:26958942

  16. Sacral plexus injury after radiotherapy for carcinoma of cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Stryker, J.A.; Sommerville, K.; Perez, R.; Velkley, D.E. )

    1990-10-01

    A 42-year-old woman developed lower extremity weakness and sensory loss 1 year after external and intracavitary radiotherapy for Stage IB carcinoma of cervix. She has been followed for 5 years posttreatment, and the neurologic abnormalities have persisted, but no evidence of recurrent carcinoma has been found. We believe this to be a rare case of sacral plexus radiculopathy developing as a late complication after radiotherapy. Suggestions are made for improving the radiotherapy technique to prevent this complication in future cases.

  17. High-precision determination of 18O/16O ratios of silver phosphate by EA-pyrolysis-IRMS continuous flow technique.

    PubMed

    Lécuyer, Christophe; Fourel, François; Martineau, François; Amiot, Romain; Bernard, Aurélien; Daux, Valérie; Escarguel, Gilles; Morrison, John

    2007-01-01

    A high-precision, and rapid on-line method for oxygen isotope analysis of silver phosphate is presented. The technique uses high-temperature elemental analyzer (EA)-pyrolysis interfaced in continuous flow (CF) mode to an isotopic ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). Calibration curves were generated by synthesizing silver phosphate with a 13 per thousand spread in delta(18)O values. Calibration materials were obtained by reacting dissolved potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH(2)PO(4)) with water samples of various oxygen isotope compositions at 373 K. Validity of the method was tested by comparing the on-line results with those obtained by classical off-line sample preparation and dual inlet isotope measurement. In addition, silver phosphate precipitates were prepared from a collection of biogenic apatites with known delta(18)O values ranging from 12.8 to 29.9 per thousand (V-SMOW). Reproducibility of +/- 0.2 per thousand was obtained by the EA-Py-CF-IRMS method for sample sizes in the range 400-500 microg. Both natural and synthetic samples are remarkably well correlated with conventional (18)O/(16)O determinations. Silver phosphate is a very stable material and easy to degas and, thus, could be considered as a good candidate to become a reference material for the determination of (18)O/(16)O ratios of phosphate by high-temperature pyrolysis. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Effect of Radiotherapy Techniques (IMRT vs. 3D-CRT) on Outcome in Patients With Intermediate-Risk Rhabdomyosarcoma Enrolled in COG D9803-A Report From the Children's Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Chi; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Meza, Jane L.; Anderson, James R.; Lyden, Elizabeth R.; Brown, Christopher K.; Morano, Karen; Laurie, Fran; Arndt, Carola A.; Enke, Charles A.; Breneman, John C.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric parameters of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in patients with intermediate-risk rhabdomyosarcoma and to analyze their effect on locoregional control and failure-free survival (FFS). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 375 patients enrolled in the Children's Oncology Group protocol D9803 study, receiving IMRT or 3D-CRT. Dosimetric data were collected from 179 patients with an available composite plan. The chi-square test or Fisher's exact test was used to compare the patient characteristics and radiotherapy parameters between the two groups. The interval-to-event outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using log-rank tests. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to examine the effect of the treatment technique on FFS after adjusting for primary site and risk group. Results: The median follow-up time was 5.7 and 4.2 years for patients receiving 3D-CRT and IMRT, respectively. No differences in the 5-year failure of locoregional control (18% vs. 15%) or FFS (72% vs. 76%) rates were noted between the two groups. Multivariate analysis revealed no association between the two techniques and FFS. Patients with primary tumors in parameningeal sites were more likely to receive IMRT than 3D-CRT. IMRT became more common during the later years of the study. Patients receiving IMRT were more likely to receive >50 Gy, photon energy of {<=}6 MV, and >5 radiation fields than those who received 3D-CRT. The coverage of the IMRT planning target volume by the prescription dose was improved compared with the coverage using 3D-CRT with similar target dose heterogeneity. Conclusions: IMRT improved the target dose coverage compared with 3D-CRT, although an improvement in locoregional control or FFS could not be demonstrated in this population. Future studies comparing the integral dose to nontarget tissue and late radiation toxicity

  19. A double-spike method for K-Ar measurement: A technique for high precision in situ dating on Mars and other planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, K. A.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Asimow, P. D.; Jacobson, N. S.; Cartwright, J. A.

    2013-06-01

    A new method for K-Ar dating using a double isotope dilution technique is proposed and demonstrated. The method is designed to eliminate known difficulties facing in situ dating on planetary surfaces, especially instrument complexity and power availability. It may also have applicability in some terrestrial dating applications. Key to the method is the use of a solid tracer spike enriched in both 39Ar and 41K. When mixed with lithium borate flux in a Knudsen effusion cell, this tracer spike and a sample to be dated can be successfully fused and degassed of Ar at <1000 °C. The evolved 40Ar∗/39Ar ratio can be measured to high precision using noble gas mass spectrometry. After argon measurement the sample melt is heated to a slightly higher temperature (˜1030 °C) to volatilize potassium, and the evolved 39K/41K ratio measured by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry. Combined with the known composition of the tracer spike, these two ratios define the K-Ar age using a single sample aliquot and without the need for extreme temperature or a mass determination. In principle the method can be implemented using a single mass spectrometer. Experiments indicate that quantitative extraction of argon from a basalt sample occurs at a sufficiently low temperature that potassium loss in this step is unimportant. Similarly, potassium isotope ratios measured in the Knudsen apparatus indicate good sample-spike equilibration and acceptably small isotopic fractionation. When applied to a flood basalt from the Viluy Traps, Siberia, a K-Ar age of 351 ± 19 Ma was obtained, a result within 1% of the independently known age. For practical reasons this measurement was made on two separate mass spectrometers, but a scheme for combining the measurements in a single analytical instrument is described. Because both parent and daughter are determined by isotope dilution, the precision on K-Ar ages obtained by the double isotope dilution method should routinely approach that of a pair of

  20. [Radiotherapy of hypopharynx cancers].

    PubMed

    Pointreau, Y; Lafond, C; Trémolières, P; Legouté, F; Servagi-Vernat, S; Giraud, P; Maingon, P; Calais, G; Lapeyre, M

    2016-09-01

    The intensity-modulated radiotherapy is the gold standard in the treatment of hypopharynx cancers. Early T1 and T2 tumours could be treated by exclusive radiotherapy or surgery. For tumours requiring total pharyngolaryngectomy (T2 or T3), induction chemotherapy followed by exclusive radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy are possible. For T4 tumours, surgery must be proposed. The treatment of lymph nodes is based on the initial treatment of the primary tumour. In non-surgical procedure, in case of sequential radiotherapy, curative dose is 70Gy and prophylactic dose is 50Gy. An integrated simultaneous boost radiotherapy is allowed (70Gy in 2Gy per fraction and 56Gy in 1.8Gy per fraction or 70Gy in 2.12Gy per fraction). Postoperatively, radiotherapy is used for locally advanced cancers with dose levels based on pathologic criteria (66Gy for R1 resection, 50 to 54Gy for complete resection). Volume delineation is based on guidelines.

  1. Heavy-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2000-11-01

    Heavy-ion radiotherapy using high-energy carbon beams has been performed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan. The physical frame works for heavy-ion radiotherapy are established using physical understandings of radiation physics. In order to increase the accuracy of heavy-ion radiotherapy, many physical problems should be solved. Unsolved problems, such as the depth dose distributions, range of heavy-ion in patients and heavy-ion dosimetry in the radiation therapy, are discussed. .

  2. Controlling motion prediction errors in radiotherapy with relevance vector machines.

    PubMed

    Dürichen, Robert; Wissel, Tobias; Schweikard, Achim

    2015-04-01

    Robotic radiotherapy can precisely ablate moving tumors when time latencies have been compensated. Recently, relevance vector machines (RVM), a probabilistic regression technique, outperformed six other prediction algorithms for respiratory compensation. The method has the distinct advantage that each predicted point is assumed to be drawn from a normal distribution. Second-order statistics, the predicted variance, were used to control RVM prediction error during a treatment and to construct hybrid prediction algorithms. First, the duty cycle and the precision were correlated to the variance by interrupting the treatment if the variance exceeds a threshold. Second, two hybrid algorithms based on the variance were developed, one consisting of multiple RVMs (HYB(RVM)) and the other of a combination between a wavelet-based least mean square algorithm (wLMS) and a RVM (HYB(wLMS-RVM)). The variance for different motion traces was analyzed to reveal a characteristic variance pattern which gives insight in what kind of prediction errors can be controlled by the variance. Limiting the variance by a threshold resulted in an increased precision with a decreased duty cycle. All hybrid algorithms showed an increased prediction accuracy compared to using only their individual algorithms. The best hybrid algorithm, HYB(RVM), can decrease the mean RMSE over all 304 motion traces from 0.18 mm for a linear RVM to 0.17 mm. The predicted variance was shown to be an efficient metric to control prediction errors, resulting in a more robust radiotherapy treatment. The hybrid algorithm HYB(RVM) could be translated to clinical practice. It does not require further parameters, can be completely parallelised and easily further extended.

  3. Precision metrology.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X; Whitehouse, D J

    2012-08-28

    This article is a summary of the Satellite Meeting, which followed on from the Discussion Meeting at the Royal Society on 'Ultra-precision engineering: from physics to manufacture', held at the Kavli Royal Society International Centre, Chicheley Hall, Buckinghamshire, UK. The meeting was restricted to 18 invited experts in various aspects of precision metrology from academics from the UK and Sweden, Government Institutes from the UK and Germany and global aerospace industries. It examined and identified metrology problem areas that are, or may be, limiting future developments in precision engineering and, in particular, metrology. The Satellite Meeting was intended to produce a vision that will inspire academia and industry to address the solutions of those open-ended problems identified. The discussion covered three areas, namely the function of engineering parts, their measurement and their manufacture, as well as their interactions.

  4. Stereotactic body radiotherapy: a critical review for nonradiation oncologists.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, John P; Kelsey, Christopher R; Palta, Manisha; Cabrera, Alvin R; Salama, Joseph K; Patel, Pretesh; Perez, Bradford A; Lee, Jason; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-04-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) involves the treatment of extracranial primary tumors or metastases with a few, high doses of ionizing radiation. In SBRT, tumor kill is maximized and dose to surrounding tissue is minimized, by precise and accurate delivery of multiple radiation beams to the target. This is particularly challenging, because extracranial lesions often move with respiration and are irregular in shape, requiring careful treatment planning and continual management of this motion and patient position during irradiation. This review presents the rationale, process workflow, and technology for the safe and effective administration of SBRT, as well as the indications, outcome, and limitations for this technique in the treatment of lung cancer, liver cancer, and metastatic disease.

  5. SU-E-T-306: Study of the Reduction Technique for the Secondary Cancer Risk Due to Cone Beam CT in Image Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, J; Kim, D; Kim, D; Chung, W; Baek, T; Lee, H; Yoon, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the effectiveness of a thin lead sheet based simple shielding method for imaging doses from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Methods: The entire body, except for the region scanned by CBCT, was shielded by wrapping in a 2 mm lead sheet. Reduction of secondary doses from CBCT was measured using a radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeter (RPLGD) placed inside an anthropomorphic phantom and changes in secondary cancer risk due to the shielding effect were estimated using BEIR VII model. Results: Doses to out-of-field organs for head-and-neck, chest, and pelvis scans were decreased 15∼100 %, 23∼90 %, and 23∼98 %, respectively, and the average reductions in lifetime secondary cancer risk due to the 2 mm lead shielding were 1.61, 10.4, and 12.8 persons per 100,000, respectively. Conclusion: This study suggests that a simple thin lead sheet based shielding method results in a non-negligible reduction of secondary doses to out-of-field regions for CBCT.

  6. A new high-precision technique for measurement of N2O concentration in polar ice cores with small amount of samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Yeongjun; Yang, Ji-Woong; Ahn, Jinho

    2016-04-01

    Nitrous oxide, one of the major greenhouse gases, has about 300 times higher GWP for 100 years, although its mixing ratio is a thousand time less than that of CO2. Since N2O has important roles in biogeochemical nitrogen cycles, atmospheric ozone destruction, and long term scale climate feedback, it is crucial to comprehend the underlying mechanisms that lead changes in global inventories of greenhouse gases in the past. Because previous data from ice core studies have large uncertainty of 5 ppbv with relatively low temporal resolutions, they are not sufficient for interpreting centennial to multi-centennial variations. Here we present a new high-precision technique for measuring N2O concentration of ancient air occluded in ice cores. We use a wet extraction method (melting-refreezing method) to extract gas from the ice core, and GC-ECD to determine N2O concentration. The optimized setting for GC-ECD permits high sensitivity for N2O, and minimizes volume of ice core sample that is requisite to get reliable results. Here we present preliminary results that we obtained from 15 ~ 20 g of ice core samples. The values for solubility correction is measured by an additional melting-refreezing process. The amount of correction is about 3 ppbv for 329.88 ppbv N2O standard gas air (calibrated from NOAA) with an uncertainty of < 1 ppbv. We also compare the results with those from a dry extraction method for validation, and present preliminary results from Styx ice core, Antarctica. The updated results will be presented at the meeting.

  7. Development of a novel method based on a photon counting technique with the aim of precise material identification in clinical x-ray diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimoto, Natsumi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Asahara, Takashi; Kanazawa, Yuki; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Yamasaki, Masashi; Okada, Masahiro

    2017-03-01

    A photon counting system has the ability of energy discrimination, therefore obtaining new information using X-rays for material identification is an expected goal to achieve precise diagnosis. The aim of our study is to propose a novel method for material identification based on a photon counting technique. First, X-ray spectra at 40-60 kV were constructed using a published database. Second, X-ray spectra penetrating different materials having atomic numbers from 5-13 were calculated. These spectra were divided into two energy regions, then linear attenuation factors concerning these regions were obtained. In addition, in order to accomplish highly accurate material identification, correction of beam hardening effects based on soft-tissue was applied to each linear attenuation factor. Then, using the linear attenuation factors, a normalized linear attenuation coefficient was derived. Finally, an effective atomic number was determined using the theoretical relationship between the normalized linear attenuation coefficient and atomic number. In order to demonstrate our method, four different phantoms (acrylic, soft-tissue equivalent, bone equivalent, and aluminum) were measured using a single-probe-type CdTe detector under the assumption that the response of the single-probe-type CdTe detector is equal to the response of one pixel of a multi-pixel-type photon counting detector. Each of these phantoms can be completely separated using our method. Furthermore, we evaluated an adoptive limit of beam hardening correction. We found that the adoptive limit depends on the mass thickness and atomic number. Our vision is to realize highly accurate identification for material with narrow range in atomic number.

  8. Mathematics for modern precision engineering.

    PubMed

    Scott, Paul J; Forbes, Alistair B

    2012-08-28

    The aim of precision engineering is the accurate control of geometry. For this reason, mathematics has a long association with precision engineering: from the calculation and correction of angular scales used in surveying and astronomical instrumentation to statistical averaging techniques used to increase precision. This study illustrates the enabling role the mathematical sciences are playing in precision engineering: modelling physical processes, instruments and complex geometries, statistical characterization of metrology systems and error compensation.

  9. The Leicester radiotherapy bite block: an aid to head and neck radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hollows, P; Hayter, J P; Vasanthan, S

    2001-02-01

    We describe the construction of a custom-made bite block to be used during external beam radiotherapy to the oral cavity. The bite block is made with standard maxillofacial prosthetic techniques and materials. The design allows accurate and reproducible positioning of the perioral tissues to aid planning of radiotherapy and treatment. The compressibility of this device improves comfort for the patient, while it is in use.

  10. Techniques and equipment required for precise stream gaging in tide-affected fresh-water reaches of the Sacramento River, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Winchell

    1971-01-01

    Current-meter measurements of high accuracy will be required for calibration of an acoustic flow-metering system proposed for installation in the Sacramento River at Chipps Island in California. This report presents an analysis of the problem of making continuous accurate current-meter measurements in this channel where the flow regime is changing constantly in response to tidal action. Gaging-system requirements are delineated, and a brief description is given of the several applicable techniques that have been developed by others. None of these techniques provides the accuracies required for the flowmeter calibration. A new system is described--one which has been assembled and tested in prototype and which will provide the matrix of data needed for accurate continuous current-meter measurements. Analysis of a large quantity of data on the velocity distribution in the channel of the Sacramento River at Chipps Island shows that adequate definition of the velocity can be made during the dominant flow periods--that is, at times other than slack-water periods--by use of current meters suspended at elevations 0.2 and 0.8 of the depth below the water surface. However, additional velocity surveys will be necessary to determine whether or not small systematic corrections need be applied during periods of rapidly changing flow. In the proposed system all gaged parameters, including velocities, depths, position in the stream, and related times, are monitored continuously as a boat moves across the river on the selected cross section. Data are recorded photographically and transferred later onto punchcards for computer processing. Computer programs have been written to permit computation of instantaneous discharges at any selected time interval throughout the period of the current meter measurement program. It is anticipated that current-meter traverses will be made at intervals of about one-half hour over periods of several days. Capability of performance for protracted

  11. Postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer : Morbidity of local-only or local-plus-pelvic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Waldstein, Cora; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard; Widder, Joachim; Goldner, Gregor

    2017-09-19

    The aim of this work was to characterise actuarial incidence and prevalence of early and late side effects of local versus pelvic three-dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Based on a risk-adapted protocol, 575 patients received either local (n = 447) or local-plus-pelvic (n = 128) radiotherapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) side effects (≥grade 2 RTOG/EORTC criteria) were prospectively assessed. Maximum morbidity, actuarial incidence rate, and prevalence rates were compared between the two groups. For local radiotherapy, median follow-up was 68 months, and the mean dose was 66.7 Gy. In pelvic radiotherapy, the median follow-up was 49 months, and the mean local and pelvic doses were 66.9 and 48.3 Gy respectively. Early GI side effects ≥ G2 were detected in 26% and 42% of patients respectively (p < 0.001). Late GI adverse events were detected in 14% in both groups (p = 0.77). The 5‑year actuarial incidence rates were 14% and 14%, while the prevalence rates were 2% and 0% respectively. Early GU ≥ G2 side effects were detected in 15% and 16% (p = 0.96), while late GU morbidity was detected in 18% and 24% (p = 0.001). The 5‑year actuarial incidence rates were 16% and 35% (p = 0.001), while the respective prevalence rates were 6% and 8%. Despite the low prevalence of side effects, postoperative pelvic radiotherapy results in significant increases in the actuarial incidence of early GI and late GU morbidity using a conventional 4‑field box radiotherapy technique. Advanced treatment techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) should therefore be considered in pelvic radiotherapy to potentially reduce these side effects.

  12. Dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR): a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Anna; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qiuwen

    2014-01-20

    Compared to other radiation therapy modalities, clinical electron beam therapy has remained practically unchanged for the past few decades even though electron beams with multiple energies are widely available on most linacs. In this paper, we present the concept of dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR), a new conformal electron therapy technique with synchronized couch motion. DEAR utilizes combination of gantry rotation, couch motion, and dose rate modulation to achieve desirable dose distributions in patient. The electron applicator is kept to minimize scatter and maintain narrow penumbra. The couch motion is synchronized with the gantry rotation to avoid collision between patient and the electron cone. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of DEAR delivery and demonstrate the potential of DEAR to improve dose distributions on simple cylindrical phantoms. DEAR was delivered on Varian's TrueBeam linac in Research Mode. In conjunction with the recorded trajectory log files, mechanical motion accuracies and dose rate modulation precision were analyzed. Experimental and calculated dose distributions were investigated for different energies (6 and 9 MeV) and cut-out sizes (1×10 cm(2) and 3×10 cm(2) for a 15×15 cm(2) applicator). Our findings show that DEAR delivery is feasible and has the potential to deliver radiation dose with high accuracy (root mean square error, or RMSE of <0.1 MU, <0.1° gantry, and <0.1 cm couch positions) and good dose rate precision (1.6 MU min(-1)). Dose homogeneity within ±2% in large and curved targets can be achieved while maintaining penumbra comparable to a standard electron beam on a flat surface. Further, DEAR does not require fabrication of patient-specific shields. These benefits make DEAR a promising technique for conformal radiotherapy of superficial tumors.

  13. Dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR): a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Anna; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qiuwen

    2014-01-01

    Compared to other radiation therapy modalities, clinical electron beam therapy has remained practically unchanged for the past few decades even though electron beams with multiple energies are widely available on most linacs. In this paper, we present the concept of dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR), a new conformal electron therapy technique with synchronized couch motion. DEAR utilizes combination of gantry rotation, couch motion, and dose rate modulation to achieve desirable dose distributions in patient. The electron applicator is kept to minimize scatter and maintain narrow penumbra. The couch motion is synchronized with the gantry rotation to avoid collision between patient and the electron cone. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of DEAR delivery and demonstrate the potential of DEAR to improve dose distributions on simple cylindrical phantoms. DEAR was delivered on Varian's TrueBeam linac in Research Mode. In conjunction with the recorded trajectory log files, mechanical motion accuracies and dose rate modulation precision were analyzed. Experimental and calculated dose distributions were investigated for different energies (6 and 9 MeV) and cut-out sizes (1×10 cm2 and 3×10 cm2 for a 15×15 cm2 applicator). Our findings show that DEAR delivery is feasible and has the potential to deliver radiation dose with high accuracy (root mean square error, or RMSE of <0.1 MU, <0.1° gantry, and <0.1 cm couch positions) and good dose rate precision (1.6 MU min-1). Dose homogeneity within ±2% in large and curved targets can be achieved while maintaining penumbra comparable to a standard electron beam on a flat surface. Further, DEAR does not require fabrication of patient-specific shields. These benefits make DEAR a promising technique for conformal radiotherapy of superficial tumors.

  14. Comparison of optical localization techniques for optical coherence tomography of the hand for multi-fraction orthovoltage radiotherapy or photodynamic therapy: white light vs. optical surface imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubovic, Raphael; Bains, Amitpal; Ramjist, Joel; Babic, Steve; Chin, Lee; Barnes, Elizabeth; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2017-02-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is considered the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States and Canada. Treatment options include radiotherapy, surgical excision, radiotherapy, topical therapies, electrocautery, and cryotherapy. For patients undergoing fractionated orthovoltage radiation therapy or photodynamic therapy (PDT), the lesions are typically delineated by clinical markup prior to treatment without providing any information about the underlying tissue thus increasing the risk of geographic miss. The development of biomarkers for response in NMSC is imperative considering the current treatment paradigm is based on clinical examination and biopsy confirmation. Therefore, a non-invasive image-based evaluation of skin structure would allow for faster and potentially more comprehensive microscopic evaluation of the treated region at the point of care. To address this, our group is investigating the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for pre- and post- treatment evaluation of NMSC lesions during radiation therapy and PDT. Localization of the OCT probe for follow-up is complex, especially in the context of treatment response where the lesion is not present, precluding accurate delineation of the planning treatment area. Further, comparison to standard white light pre-treatment images is limited by the scale of the OCT probe (6 mm X 6 mm) relative to target region. In this study we compare the set-up accuracy of a typical OCT probe to detect a theoretical lesion on a patient's hand. White light images, optical surface imaging (OSI) and OCT will be obtained at baseline and used for probe set up on subsequent scans. Set-up error will be quantified using advanced image processing techniques.

  15. Present Status of Radiotherapy in Clinical Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duehmke, Eckhart

    Aims of radiation oncology are cure from malignant diseases and - at the same time preservation of anatomy (e.g. female breast, uterus, prostate) and organ functions (e.g. brain, eye, voice, sphincter ani). At present, methods and results of clinical radiotherapy (RT) are based on experiences with natural history and radiobiology of malignant tumors in properly defined situations as well as on technical developments since World War II in geometrical and biological treatment planning in teletherapy and brachytherapy. Radiobiological research revealed tolerance limits of healthy tissues to be respected, effective total treatment doses of high cure probability depending on histology and tumor volume, and - more recently - altered fractionation schemes to be adapted to specific growth fractions and intrinsic radiosensitivities of clonogenic tumor cells. In addition, Biological Response Modifiers (BRM), such as cis-platinum, oxygen and hyperthermia may steepen cell survival curves of hypoxic tumor cells, others - such as tetrachiordekaoxid (TCDO) - may enhance repair of normal tissues. Computer assisted techniques in geometrical RT-planning based on individual healthy and pathologic anatomy (CT, MRT) provide high precision RT for well defined brain lesions by using dedicated linear accelerators (Stereotaxy). CT-based individual tissue compensators help with homogenization of distorted dose distributions in magna field irradiation for malignant lymphomas and with total body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, e.g. for leukemia. RT with fast neutrons, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), RT with protons and heavy ions need to be tested in randomized trials before implementation into clinical routine.

  16. System Toward Automation in Radiotherapy Treatment: START

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Andrew Y. S.; Tsoi, Kenneth Y. P.

    1994-10-01

    START is a new automation system invented for nasopharyngeal carcinoma treatment. A laser scanner system capable of non-contact digitization of 3D surface is used to digitize the contours of the patient's face, shoulder and special landmark reference features of the patient. These features are stored in the computer in 3D digitized format. The digitized facial features with traced landmark reference features are used for fabrication of a true sized wood-particle laminates mould by a computer numerical controlled milling system. A Cobex mask is formed on this mould by using vacuum forming technique. With an image analysis and computer aided design system, the X-ray film with treatment window marked is traced automatically and converted to match the prescanned 3D information. A computer controlled 6-axis robot can precisely mark out the required areas on the Cobex cast for treatment. Finally, the patient receives radiotherapy treatment with the Cobex case as a positioning registration device. The new system will replace the manual procedure with better patient comfort, higher efficiency and enhanced accuracy.

  17. Assuring Precise LFC-Suction-Strip Porosities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallimore, Frank H.

    1988-01-01

    Masking technique in bonding perforated titanium sheets to substructures. Technique to obtain precise control of widths of perforated titanium suction strips. Precision required for successful laminar-flow control, (LFC) in flight environments.

  18. Standard and Nonstandard Craniospinal Radiotherapy Using Helical TomoTherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, William; Brodeur, Marylene; Roberge, David; Freeman, Carolyn

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To show the advantages of planning and delivering craniospinal radiotherapy with helical TomoTherapy (TomoTherapy Inc., Madison, WI) by presenting 4 cases treated at our institution. Methods and Materials: We first present a standard case of craniospinal irradiation in a patient with recurrent myxopapillary ependymoma (MPE) and follow this with 2 cases requiring differential dosing to multiple target volumes. One of these, a patient with recurrent medulloblastoma, required a lower dose to be delivered to the posterior fossa because the patient had been previously irradiated to the full dose, and the other required concurrent boosts to leptomeningeal metastases as part of his treatment for newly diagnosed MPE. The final case presented is a patient with pronounced scoliosis who required spinal irradiation for recurrent MPE. Results: The four cases presented were planned and treated successfully with Helical Tomotherapy. Conclusions: Helical TomoTherapy delivers continuous arc-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy that gives high conformality and excellent dose homogeneity for the target volumes. Increased healthy tissue sparing is achieved at higher doses albeit at the expense of larger volumes of tissue receiving lower doses. Helical TomoTherapy allows for differential dosing of multiple targets, resulting in very elegant dose distributions. Daily megavoltage computed tomography imaging allows for precision of patient positioning, permitting a reduction in planning margins and increased healthy tissue sparing in comparison with standard techniques.

  19. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Hypoxia during Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Harald; Bleicher, Marcus; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia plays a pivotal role in cancer therapy for most therapeutic approaches from radiotherapy to immunotherapy. The detailed and accurate knowledge of the oxygen distribution in a tumour is necessary in order to determine the right treatment strategy. Still, due to the limited spatial and temporal resolution of imaging methods as well as lacking fundamental understanding of internal oxygenation dynamics in tumours, the precise oxygen distribution map is rarely available for treatment planing. We employ an agent-based in silico tumour spheroid model in order to study the complex, localized and fast oxygen dynamics in tumour micro-regions which are induced by radiotherapy. A lattice-free, 3D, agent-based approach for cell representation is coupled with a high-resolution diffusion solver that includes a tissue density-dependent diffusion coefficient. This allows us to assess the space- and time-resolved reoxygenation response of a small subvolume of tumour tissue in response to radiotherapy. In response to irradiation the tumour nodule exhibits characteristic reoxygenation and re-depletion dynamics which we resolve with high spatio-temporal resolution. The reoxygenation follows specific timings, which should be respected in treatment in order to maximise the use of the oxygen enhancement effects. Oxygen dynamics within the tumour create windows of opportunity for the use of adjuvant chemotherapeutica and hypoxia-activated drugs. Overall, we show that by using modelling it is possible to follow the oxygenation dynamics beyond common resolution limits and predict beneficial strategies for therapy and in vitro verification. Models of cell cycle and oxygen dynamics in tumours should in the future be combined with imaging techniques, to allow for a systematic experimental study of possible improved schedules and to ultimately extend the reach of oxygenation monitoring available in clinical treatment. PMID:26273841

  20. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules.

  1. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.; Crawford, Daniel W.

    1984-01-01

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  2. Precision translator

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, R.P.; Crawford, D.W.

    1982-03-09

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  3. An in-line micro-pyrolysis system to remove contaminating organic species for precise and accurate water isotope analysis by spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, R. J.; Hsiao, G.

    2011-12-01

    Trace levels of organic contaminants such as short alcohols and terpenoids have been shown to cause spectral interference in water isotope analysis by spectroscopic techniques. The result is degraded precision and accuracy in both δD and δ18O for samples such as beverages, plant extracts or slightly contaminated waters. An initial approach offered by manufacturers is post-processing software that analyzes spectral features to identify and flag contaminated samples. However, it is impossible for this software to accurately reconstruct the water isotope signature, thus it is primarily a metric for data quality. Here, we describe a novel in-line pyrolysis system (Micro-Pyrolysis Technology, MPT) placed just prior to the inlet of a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer that effectively removes interfering organic molecules without altering the isotope values of the water. Following injection of the water sample, N2 carrier gas passes the sample through a micro-pyrolysis tube heated with multiple high temperature elements in an oxygen-free environment. The temperature is maintained above the thermal decomposition threshold of most organic compounds (≤ 900 oC), but well below that of water (~2000 oC). The main products of the pyrolysis reaction are non-interfering species such as elemental carbon and H2 gas. To test the efficacy and applicability of the system, waters of known isotopic composition were spiked with varying amounts of common interfering alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol, hexanol, trans-2-hexenol, cis-3-hexanol up to 5 % v/v) and common soluble plant terpenoids (carveol, linalool, geraniol, prenol). Spiked samples with no treatment to remove the organics show strong interfering absorption peaks that adversely affect the δD and δ18O values. However, with the MPT in place, all interfering absorption peaks are removed and the water absorption spectrum is fully restored. As a consequence, the δD and δ18O values also return to their original

  4. A novel technique using three-dimensionally documented biopsy mapping allows precise re-visiting of prostate cancer foci with serial surveillance of cell cycle progression gene panel.

    PubMed

    Ukimura, Osamu; Gross, Mitchell E; de Castro Abreu, Andre Luis; Azhar, Raed A; Matsugasumi, Toru; Ushijima, So; Kanazawa, Motohiro; Aron, Manju; Gill, Inderbir S

    2015-06-01

    Conventional systematic biopsy has the shortcoming of sampling error and reveals "no evidence of cancer" with a rate of >50% on active surveillance (AS). The objective of this study is to report our initial experience of applying a 3D-documented biopsy-mapping technology to precisely re-visit geographically documented low-risk prostate cancer and to perform serial analysis of cell-cycle-progression (CCP) gene-panel. Over a period of 40 months (1/2010-4/2013), the 3D-biopsy-mapping technique, in which the spatial location of biopsy-trajectory was digitally recorded (Koelis), was carried out. A pair of diagnostic (1st-look) and surveillance (2nd-look) biopsy were performed per subject (n = 25), with median interval of 12 months. The documented biopsy-trajectory was used as a target to guide the re-visiting biopsy from the documented cancer focus, as well as the targeted field-biopsy from the un-sampled prostatic field adjacent to negative diagnostic biopsies. The accuracy of re-visiting biopsy and biopsy-derived CCP signatures were evaluated in the pair of the serial biopsy-cores. The 1st-look-biopsy revealed a total of 43 cancer lesions (1.7 per patient). The accuracy of re-visiting cancer was 86% (37/43) per lesion, 76% (65/86) per core, and 80% (20/25) per patient. This technology also provided an opportunity for 3D-targeted field-biopsy in order to potentially minimize sampling errors. The CCP gene-panel of the 1st-look (-0.59) versus 2nd-look (-0.37) samples had no significant difference (P = 0.4); which suggested consistency in the molecular signature of the known cancer foci during the short-time interval of median 12 months. Any change in CCP of the same cancer foci would be likely due to change in sampling location from the less to more significant portion in the cancer foci rather than true molecular progression. The study limitations include a small number of the patients. The 3D-documented biopsy-mapping technology achieved an encouraging re

  5. Precision Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2017-04-01

    Preface; Notation and conventions; Part I. 100 Years of Cosmology: 1. Emerging cosmology; 2. The cosmic expansion; 3. The cosmic microwave background; 4. Recent cosmology; Part II. Newtonian Cosmology: 5. Newtonian cosmology; 6. Dark energy cosmological models; 7. The early universe; 8. The inhomogeneous universe; 9. The inflationary universe; Part III. Relativistic Cosmology: 10. Minkowski space; 11. The energy momentum tensor; 12. General relativity; 13. Space-time geometry and calculus; 14. The Einstein field equations; 15. Solutions of the Einstein equations; 16. The Robertson–Walker solution; 17. Congruences, curvature and Raychaudhuri; 18. Observing and measuring the universe; Part IV. The Physics of Matter and Radiation: 19. Physics of the CMB radiation; 20. Recombination of the primeval plasma; 21. CMB polarisation; 22. CMB anisotropy; Part V. Precision Tools for Precision Cosmology: 23. Likelihood; 24. Frequentist hypothesis testing; 25. Statistical inference: Bayesian; 26. CMB data processing; 27. Parametrising the universe; 28. Precision cosmology; 29. Epilogue; Appendix A. SI, CGS and Planck units; Appendix B. Magnitudes and distances; Appendix C. Representing vectors and tensors; Appendix D. The electromagnetic field; Appendix E. Statistical distributions; Appendix F. Functions on a sphere; Appendix G. Acknowledgements; References; Index.

  6. Fiducial marker guided prostate radiotherapy: a review.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Angela G M; Jain, Suneil; Hounsell, Alan R; O'Sullivan, Joe M

    2016-12-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is an essential tool in the accurate delivery of modern radiotherapy techniques. Prostate radiotherapy positioned using skin marks or bony anatomy may be adequate for delivering a relatively homogeneous whole-pelvic radiotherapy dose, but these surrogates are not reliable when using reduced margins, dose escalation or hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Fiducial markers (FMs) for prostate IGRT have been in use since the 1990s. They require surgical implantation and provide a surrogate for the position of the prostate gland. A variety of FMs are available and they can be used in a number of ways. This review aimed to establish the evidence for using prostate FMs in terms of feasibility, implantation procedures, types of FMs used, FM migration, imaging modalities used and the clinical impact of FMs. A search strategy was defined and a literature search was carried out in Medline. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, which resulted in 50 articles being included in this review. The evidence demonstrates that FMs provide a more accurate surrogate for the position of the prostate than either external skin marks or bony anatomy. A combination of FM alignment and soft-tissue analysis is currently the most effective and widely available approach to ensuring accuracy in prostate IGRT. FM implantation is safe and well tolerated. FM migration is possible but minimal. Standardization of all techniques and procedures in relation to the use of prostate FMs is required. Finally, a clinical trial investigating a non-surgical alternative to prostate FMs is introduced.

  7. SU-E-J-39: Comparison of PTV Margins Determined by In-Room Stereoscopic Image Guidance and by On-Board Cone Beam Computed Tomography Technique for Brain Radiotherapy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesh, T; Paul, S; Munshi, A; Sarkar, B; Krishnankutty, S; Sathya, J; George, S; Jassal, K; Roy, S; Mohanti, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Stereoscopic in room kV image guidance is a faster tool in daily monitoring of patient positioning. Our centre, for the first time in the world, has integrated such a solution from BrainLAB (ExacTrac) with Elekta's volumetric cone beam computed tomography (XVI). Using van Herk's formula, we compared the planning target volume (PTV) margins calculated by both these systems for patients treated with brain radiotherapy. Methods: For a total of 24 patients who received partial or whole brain radiotherapy, verification images were acquired for 524 treatment sessions by XVI and for 334 sessions by ExacTrac out of the total 547 sessions. Systematic and random errors were calculated in cranio-caudal, lateral and antero-posterior directions for both techniques. PTV margins were then determined using van Herk formula. Results: In the cranio-caudal direction, systematic error, random error and the calculated PTV margin were found to be 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.41 cm with XVI and 0.14 cm, 0.13 cm and 0.44 cm with ExacTrac. The corresponding values in lateral direction were 0.13 cm 0.1 cm and 0.4 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.42 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The same parameters for antero-posterior were for 0.1 cm, 0.11 cm and 0.34 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.16 cm and 0.43 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The margins estimated with the two imaging modalities were comparable within ± 1 mm limit. Conclusion: Verification of setup errors in the major axes by two independent imaging systems showed the results are comparable and within ± 1 mm. This implies that planar imaging based ExacTrac can yield equal accuracy in setup error determination as the time consuming volumetric imaging which is considered as the gold standard. Accordingly PTV margins estimated by this faster imaging technique can be confidently used in clinical setup.

  8. Full-band error control and crack-free surface fabrication techniques for ultra-precision fly cutting of large-aperture KDP crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F. H.; Wang, S. F.; An, C. H.; Wang, J.; Xu, Q.

    2017-06-01

    Large-aperture potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are widely used in the laser path of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems. The most common method of manufacturing half-meter KDP crystals is ultra-precision fly cutting. When processing KDP crystals by ultra-precision fly cutting, the dynamic characteristics of the fly cutting machine and fluctuations in the fly cutting environment are translated into surface errors at different spatial frequency bands. These machining errors should be suppressed effectively to guarantee that KDP crystals meet the full-band machining accuracy specified in the evaluation index. In this study, the anisotropic machinability of KDP crystals and the causes of typical surface errors in ultra-precision fly cutting of the material are investigated. The structures of the fly cutting machine and existing processing parameters are optimized to improve the machined surface quality. The findings are theoretically and practically important in the development of high-energy laser systems in China.

  9. [Recent developments in radiotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Seong, Jinsil

    2004-12-01

    With the accumulation of clinical experiences, the efficacy of radiotherapy has been recognized in management scheme for HCC. While hepatologists are beginning to show less reluctance for applying radiotherapy to the treatment of HCC, it is necessary that the hepatologists be informed of the rapid developments in technical strategy for radiation oncology. Recent advances in several technologies have opened a new era in radiation oncology. Modern imaging technologies can provide a 3-dimensional model of patient's anatomy, and this allows radiation oncologists to identify accurate tumor volumes as well as the tumors' relationship with the adjacent normal tissues. Moreover, the development of the computer-controlled multileaf collimator systems now enables physicians to perform precise beam shaping and to modulate the radiation dose distribution. A combination of these systems, 3-DCRT, is rapidly replacing the more conventional 2-D radiotherapy. 3-DCRT has evolved into a more sophisticated technology, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). In IMRT, with the powerful computer-aided optimization process, the radiation dose can be delivered to the target using highly complex isodose profiles. This new technology has been further developed into IGRT, which combines the CT-images scanning system and radiation equipments into one hardware package, and this system is currently ready for clinical application. In parallel with the radiation technologies described above, the strategy of stereotactic radiation has evolved from the conventional linear accelerator-based system to a gammaknife, and more recently, to a cyberknife. These systems are primarily based on the concept of radiosurgery. Currently, various radiation technologies have been adopted for the radiotherapy of HCC. In this article, each strategy will be discussed as well as the indications for radiotherapy and the radiation-related complications.

  10. Impact of the radiotherapy technique on the correlation between dose-volume histograms of the bladder wall defined on MRI imaging and dose-volume/surface histograms in prostate cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggio, Angelo; Carillo, Viviana; Cozzarini, Cesare; Perna, Lucia; Rancati, Tiziana; Valdagni, Riccardo; Gabriele, Pietro; Fiorino, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the ‘true’ absolute and relative dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the bladder wall, dose-wall histogram (DWH) defined on MRI imaging and other surrogates of bladder dosimetry in prostate cancer patients, planned both with 3D-conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques. For 17 prostate cancer patients, previously treated with radical intent, CT and MRI scans were acquired and matched. The contours of bladder walls were drawn by using MRI images. External bladder surfaces were then used to generate artificial bladder walls by performing automatic contractions of 5, 7 and 10 mm. For each patient a 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and an IMRT treatment plan was generated with a prescription dose of 77.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fr) and DVH of the whole bladder of the artificial walls (DVH-5/10) and dose-surface histograms (DSHs) were calculated and compared against the DWH in absolute and relative value, for both treatment planning techniques. A specific software (VODCA v. 4.4.0, MSS Inc.) was used for calculating the dose-volume/surface histogram. Correlation was quantified for selected dose-volume/surface parameters by the Spearman correlation coefficient. The agreement between %DWH and DVH5, DVH7 and DVH10 was found to be very good (maximum average deviations below 2%, SD < 5%): DVH5 showed the best agreement. The correlation was slightly better for absolute (R = 0.80-0.94) compared to relative (R = 0.66-0.92) histograms. The DSH was also found to be highly correlated with the DWH, although slightly higher deviations were generally found. The DVH was not a good surrogate of the DWH (R < 0.7 for most of parameters). When comparing the two treatment techniques, more pronounced differences between relative histograms were seen for IMRT with respect to 3DCRT (p < 0.0001).

  11. Dual-echo Z-shimmed proton resonance frequency-shift magnetic resonance thermometry near metallic ablation probes: Technique and temperature precision.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxin; Poorman, Megan E; Grissom, William A

    2017-02-10

    To improve the precision of proton resonance frequency-shift magnetic resonance thermometry near ablation probes by recovering near-probe image signals that are typically lost due to magnetic susceptibility-induced field distortions. A dual-echo gradient-recalled echo sequence was implemented, in which the first echo was under- or over-refocused in the slice dimension to recover image signal and temperature precision near a probe, and the second echo was fully refocused to obtain image signal everywhere else in the slice. A penalized maximum likelihood algorithm was implemented to estimate a single temperature map from both echoes. Agar phantom and ex vivo experiments with and without microwave heating at 3 T evaluated how much temperature precision was improved near a microwave ablator compared to a conventional single-echo scan as a function of slice and needle orientation in the magnet. The number of near-probe voxels with temperature standard deviation σ>1°C was decreased by 51% in the phantom experiment, averaged across orientations, and by 31% in the pork. Temperature maps near the probe were more smoother and more complete in all orientations. Dual-echo z-shimmed temperature imaging can recover image signal for more precise temperature mapping near metallic ablation probes. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Beard, Clair J.

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  13. Cardiac Side-effects From Breast Cancer Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C W; Kirby, A M

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer radiotherapy reduces the risk of cancer recurrence and death. However, it usually involves some radiation exposure of the heart and analyses of randomised trials have shown that it can increase the risk of heart disease. Estimates of the absolute risks of radiation-related heart disease are needed to help oncologists plan each individual woman's treatment. The risk for an individual woman varies according to her estimated cardiac radiation dose and her background risk of ischaemic heart disease in the absence of radiotherapy. When it is known, this risk can then be compared with the absolute benefit of the radiotherapy. At present, many UK cancer centres are already giving radiotherapy with mean heart doses of less than 3 Gy and for most women the benefits of the radiotherapy will probably far outweigh the risks. Technical approaches to minimising heart dose in breast cancer radiotherapy include optimisation of beam angles, use of multileaf collimator shielding, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, treatment in a prone position, treatment in deep inspiration (including the use of breath-hold and gating techniques), proton therapy and partial breast irradiation. The multileaf collimator is suitable for many women with upper pole left breast cancers, but for women with central or lower pole cancers, breath-holding techniques are now recommended in national UK guidelines. Ongoing work aims to identify ways of irradiating pan-regional lymph nodes that are effective, involve minimal exposure of organs at risk and are feasible to plan, deliver and verify. These will probably include wide tangent-based field-in-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy or arc radiotherapy techniques in combination with deep inspiratory breath-hold, and proton beam irradiation for women who have a high predicted heart dose from intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

  14. Stereotactic body radiotherapy in lung cancer: an update *

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Cintra Vita; Ferreira, Paula Pratti Rodrigues; de Moraes, Fabio Ynoe; Neves, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Gadia, Rafael; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Abstract For early-stage lung cancer, the treatment of choice is surgery. In patients who are not surgical candidates or are unwilling to undergo surgery, radiotherapy is the principal treatment option. Here, we review stereotactic body radiotherapy, a technique that has produced quite promising results in such patients and should be the treatment of choice, if available. We also present the major indications, technical aspects, results, and special situations related to the technique. PMID:26398758

  15. Dosimetric comparison between intra-cavitary breast brachytherapy techniques for accelerated partial breast irradiation and a novel stereotactic radiotherapy device for breast cancer: GammaPod™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ödén, Jakob; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana; Yu, Cedric X.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Regine, William F.; Mutaf, Yildirim D.

    2013-07-01

    The GammaPod™ device, manufactured by Xcision Medical Systems, is a novel stereotactic breast irradiation device. It consists of a hemispherical source carrier containing 36 Cobalt-60 sources, a tungsten collimator with two built-in collimation sizes, a dynamically controlled patient support table and a breast immobilization cup also functioning as the stereotactic frame for the patient. The dosimetric output of the GammaPod™ was modelled using a Monte Carlo based treatment planning system. For the comparison, three-dimensional (3D) models of commonly used intra-cavitary breast brachytherapy techniques utilizing single lumen and multi-lumen balloon as well as peripheral catheter multi-lumen implant devices were created and corresponding 3D dose calculations were performed using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group-43 formalism. Dose distributions for clinically relevant target volumes were optimized using dosimetric goals set forth in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-39. For clinical scenarios assuming similar target sizes and proximity to critical organs, dose coverage, dose fall-off profiles beyond the target and skin doses at given distances beyond the target were calculated for GammaPod™ and compared with the doses achievable by the brachytherapy techniques. The dosimetric goals within the protocol guidelines were fulfilled for all target sizes and irradiation techniques. For central targets, at small distances from the target edge (up to approximately 1 cm) the brachytherapy techniques generally have a steeper dose fall-off gradient compared to GammaPod™ and at longer distances (more than about 1 cm) the relation is generally observed to be opposite. For targets close to the skin, the relative skin doses were considerably lower for GammaPod™ than for any of the brachytherapy techniques. In conclusion, GammaPod™ allows adequate and more uniform dose coverage to centrally and peripherally

  16. Radiation-induced fibrosis in the boost area after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost technique for early-stage breast cancer: A multivariable prediction model.

    PubMed

    Hammer, C; Maduro, J H; Bantema-Joppe, E J; van der Schaaf, A; van der Laan, H P; Langendijk, J A; Crijns, A P G

    2017-01-01

    To develop a multivariable prediction model for the risk of grade⩾2 fibrosis in the boost area after breast conserving surgery (BCS) followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (RT) with a simultaneous integrated photon boost (3D-CRT-SIB), five years after RT. This prospective cohort study included 1,030 patients treated with RT for breast cancer (stage 0-III), after BCS. Data regarding physician-rated fibrosis and dose-volume parameters were available in 546 patients. A multivariable logistic regression model for grade⩾2 fibrosis was generated. At 5years, grade⩾2 fibrosis was observed in 13.4% of the patients. The multivariable analysis resulted in a prediction model for grade⩾2 fibrosis in the boost area including three independent variables: patient age, breast volume receiving⩾55Gy (V55 CTV breast) and the maximum radiation dose in the breast (Dmax). A multivariable prediction model was developed including age, V55 CTV breast and Dmax for grade⩾2 fibrosis in the boost area after breast cancer RT using a 3D-CRT-SIB technique. This model can be used to estimate the risk of fibrosis and to optimize dose distributions aiming at reducing this risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Axillary Irradiation with High Tangent Fields for Clinically Node-Negative Breast Cancer: Can 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy with a Field-in-Field Technique Better Control the Axilla?

    PubMed

    Sanuki, Naoko; Takeda, Atsuya; Amemiya, Atsushi; Ofuchi, Toru; Ono, Masato; Ogata, Haruki; Yamagami, Ryo; Hatayama, Jun; Eriguchi, Takahisa; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2013-10-01

    The target volume for postoperative breast irradiation is the remaining breast tissue, and the axillary region is not an intentional target volume. Between 2001 and 2009, eligible women with pT1-2cN0/pN0(sn) breast cancer underwent breast-conserving therapy without axillary dissection. Treatment outcomes between 2 radiotherapy planning groups, high tangent fields with 2-dimensional (2-D) simulation-based planning and 3-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography-based planning with a field-in-field technique, were compared. The correlating factors for axillary failure were also calculated. In total, 678 patients were eligible. As of May 2009, the median follow-up times for the 2-D (n = 346) and 3-D (n = 332) groups were 94 and 52 months, respectively. Patient characteristics were balanced, except for a younger population in the 2-D group and more lymphovascular invasion in the 3-D group. On multivariate analysis, 2-D planning was the only risk factor for axillary failure. In the 2-D and 3-D groups, the 5-year cumulative incidences of axillary failure were 8 (3.1%) and 1 (0.3%) (log-rank p = 0.009), respectively. The respective 5-year overall survival rates were 97.4 and 98.4% (p = 0.4). High tangent irradiation with 3-D planning improved axillary control compared to that with 2-D planning, suggesting that optimizing axillary dose distribution may impact outcomes.

  18. Recruitment in Radiotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeley, T. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Faculty Board of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Royal College of Radiobiologists surveyed the factors thought to influence recruitment into the specialty. Possible factors listed in replies of 36 questionnaires are offered. (LBH)

  19. Recruitment in Radiotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeley, T. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Faculty Board of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Royal College of Radiobiologists surveyed the factors thought to influence recruitment into the specialty. Possible factors listed in replies of 36 questionnaires are offered. (LBH)

  20. Planning a Radiotherapy Department.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, D

    2017-02-01

    The master planning of new radiotherapy facilities requires the input and engagement of a range of highly specialised professionals, both in the construction and health sector. Although radiation protection and safety aspects of radiotherapy services are universal, low and middle income countries are often presented with unique challenges that also need to be considered, e.g. competing needs within the health sector, lack of financial and human resources, environmental factors like poor provision of transport or electrical power, inadequate regulatory infrastructure, etc. Efforts to establish, upgrade or expand radiotherapy services should therefore not only focus on the technology that is appropriate and sustainable, but also be mindful of the need for quality, safety and optimal utilisation of technology. The workflow in a radiotherapy department can be facilitated by strategic placement of the main functional areas into the concept design. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Image-guided radiotherapy: from current concept to future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jaffray, David A

    2012-12-01

    Radiotherapy is a highly effective, targeted therapy for the management of cancer. Technological innovations have enabled the direct integration of imaging technology into the radiation treatment device to increase the precision and accuracy of radiation delivery. As well as addressing a clinical need to better control the placement of the dose within the body, image-guided radiotherapy has enabled innovators in the field to accelerate their exploration of a number of different paradigms of radiation delivery, including toxicity reduction, dose escalation, hypofractionation, voxelization, and adaptation. Although these approaches are already innovative trends in radiation oncology, it is anticipated that they will work synergistically with other innovations in cancer management (including biomarker strategies, novel systemic and local therapies) as part of the broader goal of personalized cancer medicine. This Review discusses the rationale for adopting image-guidance approaches in radiotherapy, and the technology for achieving precision and accuracy in the context of different paradigms within the evolving radiation oncology practice. It also examines exciting advances in radiotherapy technology that suggest a convergence of radiotherapy practice in which patient-specific radiotherapy treatment courses are one of the most personalized forms of intervention in cancer medicine.

  2. Operations experience at the Bevalac radiotherapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.; Criswell, T.L.; Howard, J.; Chu, W.T.; Singh, R.P.; Geller, D.; Nyman, M.

    1981-03-01

    During the first years of Bevalac operation the biomedical effort concentrated on radiobiology work, laying the foundation for patient radiotherapy. A dedicated radiotherapy area was created in 1978, and in 1979 full-scale patient treatment was begun. As of now over 500 treatments with carbon, neon and argon beams have been delivered to about 50 patients, some as boosts from other modalities and some as complete heavy ion treatments. Up to 12 patients per day have been treated in this facility. Continuing efforts in refining techniques and operating procedures are increasing efficiency and accuracy of treatments, and are contributing to the alleviation of scheduling difficulties caused by the unique requirements of radiotherapy with human patients.

  3. One hundred years of radiotherapy in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Dincer, M; Kuter, S

    2001-10-01

    The study and practice of radiology in Turkey began in 1897, only 2 years after the discovery of X-rays. A simple X-ray machine was constructed in Istanbul, consisting of a Crookes tube, a Ruhmkorff coil, and a home-made battery. This machine was first used on wounded soldiers, for diagnostic purposes. The first report of X-rays being used therapeutically in Turkey was published in a national journal in 1904. By 1933, the most up-to-date radiotherapy equipment of the time had been installed in every major city in the country. Innovative radiotherapy techniques, such as rotational treatment, were also being tried in 1930s. Today, there are 45 radiotherapy centres in Turkey, and 400 radiation oncologists and 80 medical physicists practise there.

  4. Improving radiotherapy in cancer treatment: Promises and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Helen H.W.; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2017-01-01

    Effective radiotherapy for cancer has relied on the promise of maximally eradicating tumor cells while minimally killing normal cells. Technological advancement has provided state-of-the-art instrumentation that enables delivery of radiotherapy with great precision to tumor lesions with substantial reduced injury to normal tissues. Moreover, better understanding of radiobiology, particularly the mechanisms of radiation sensitivity and resistance in tumor lesions and toxicity in normal tissues, has improved the treatment efficacy of radiotherapy. Previous mechanism-based studies have identified many cellular targets that can affect radiation sensitivity, notably reactive oxygen species, DNA-damaging response signals, and tumor microenvironments. Several radiation sensitizers and protectors have been developed and clinically evaluated; however, many of these results are inconclusive, indicating that improvement remains needed. In this era of personalized medicine in which patients’ genetic variations, transcriptome and proteomics, tumor metabolism and microenvironment, and tumor immunity are available. These new developments have provided opportunity for new target discovery. Several radiotherapy sensitivity-associated “gene signatures” have been reported although clinical validations are needed. Recently, several immune modifiers have been shown to associate with improved radiotherapy in preclinical models and in early clinical trials. Combination of radiotherapy and immunocheckpoint blockade has shown promising results especially in targeting metastatic tumors through abscopal response. In this article, we succinctly review recent advancements in the areas of mechanism-driven targets and exploitation of new targets from current radio-oncogenomic and radiation-immunotherapeutic approaches that bear clinical implications for improving the treatment efficacy of radiotherapy.

  5. Perspectives in Medical Applications of Monte Carlo Simulation Software for Clinical Practice in Radiotherapy Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschini, Matteo; Giani, Simone; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Rancoita, Pier-Giorgio

    2006-04-01

    We discuss the physics requirements to accurately model radiation dosimetry in the human body as performed for oncological radiotherapy treatment. Recent advancements in computing hardware and software simulation technology allow precise dose calculation in real-life imaging output, with speed suitable for clinical needs. An experimental programme, based on physics published literature, is proposed to demonstrate the actual possibility to improve the precision of radiotherapy treatment planning.

  6. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.; Doyle, Barney L.

    1996-01-01

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue.

  7. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.

    1996-08-20

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue. 25 figs.

  8. Estimating sparse precision matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin; Zhou, Harrison H.; O'Connell, Ross

    2016-08-01

    We apply a method recently introduced to the statistical literature to directly estimate the precision matrix from an ensemble of samples drawn from a corresponding Gaussian distribution. Motivated by the observation that cosmological precision matrices are often approximately sparse, the method allows one to exploit this sparsity of the precision matrix to more quickly converge to an asymptotic 1/sqrt{N_sim} rate while simultaneously providing an error model for all of the terms. Such an estimate can be used as the starting point for further regularization efforts which can improve upon the 1/sqrt{N_sim} limit above, and incorporating such additional steps is straightforward within this framework. We demonstrate the technique with toy models and with an example motivated by large-scale structure two-point analysis, showing significant improvements in the rate of convergence. For the large-scale structure example, we find errors on the precision matrix which are factors of 5 smaller than for the sample precision matrix for thousands of simulations or, alternatively, convergence to the same error level with more than an order of magnitude fewer simulations.

  9. WE-G-18C-07: Accelerated Water/fat Separation in MRI for Radiotherapy Planning Using Multi-Band Imaging Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Crijns, S; Stemkens, B; Sbrizzi, A; Lagendijk, J; Berg, C van den; Andreychenko, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Dixon sequences are used to characterize disease processes, obtain good fat or water separation in cases where fat suppression fails and to obtain pseudo-CT datasets. Dixon's method uses at least two images acquired with different echo times and thus requires prolonged acquisition times. To overcome associated problems (e.g., for DCE/cine-MRI), we propose to use a method for water/fat separation based on spectrally selective RF pulses. Methods: Two alternating RF pulses were used, that imposes a fat selective phase cycling over the phase encoding lines, which results in a spatial shift for fat in the reconstructed image, identical to that in CAIPIRINHA. Associated aliasing artefacts were resolved using the encoding power of a multi-element receiver array, analogous to SENSE. In vivo measurements were performed on a 1.5T clinical MR-scanner in a healthy volunteer's legs, using a four channel receiver coil. Gradient echo images were acquired with TE/TR = 2.3/4.7ms, flip angle 20°, FOV 45×22.5cm{sup 2}, matrix 480×216, slice thickness 5mm. Dixon images were acquired with TE,1/TE,2/TR=2.2/4.6/7ms. All image reconstructions were done in Matlab using the ReconFrame toolbox (Gyrotools, Zurich, CH). Results: RF pulse alternation yields a fat image offset from the water image. Hence the water and fat images fold over, which is resolved using in-plane SENSE reconstruction. Using the proposed technique, we achieved excellent water/fat separation comparable to Dixon images, while acquiring images at only one echo time. Conclusion: The proposed technique yields both inphase water and fat images at arbitrary echo times and requires only one measurement, thereby shortening the acquisition time by a factor 2. In future work the technique may be extended to a multi-band water/fat separation sequence that is able to achieve single point water/fat separation in multiple slices at once and hence yields higher speed-up factors.

  10. Radiotherapy and breast reconstruction: oncology, cosmesis and complications

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Mark W

    2012-01-01

    Breast reconstruction plays a highly important role in the management of patients with breast cancer, from a psycho-social and sexual stand-point. Given that immediate breast reconstruction does not impair the oncologic safety of breast cancer management, with no increase in local recurrence rates, and no delays in the initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy, the need to balance cosmesis in reconstruction with the oncologic needs of breast cancer patients is no more evident than in the discussion of radiotherapy. Radiotherapy is essential adjuvant therapy in the treatment of breast cancer, with the use of adjuvant radiotherapy widely shown to reduce local recurrence after both partial and total mastectomy and shown to prolong both disease-free and overall survival in patients with nodal disease. In the setting of breast reconstruction, the effects of radiotherapy are potentially two-fold, with consideration required of the impact of breast reconstruction on the administration of and the initiation of radiotherapy, as well as the effects of radiotherapy on operative complications and cosmetic outcome following immediate breast reconstruction. The current editorial piece aims to analyze this balance, contrasting both autologous and implant-based reconstruction. The literature is still evolving as to the relative role of autologous vs. alloplastic reconstruction in the setting of radiotherapy, and the more recent introduction of acellular dermal matrix and other compounds further complicate the evidence. Fat grafting and evolving techniques in breast reconstruction will herald new discussions on this front. PMID:25083434

  11. SU-E-T-59: A Novel Multi-Beam Dynamic IMRT with Fixed-Jaw Technique for Left Breast Cancer Patients with Regional Lymph Nodes Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Yang, Z; Hu, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study was to investigate the dosimetric benefit of a novel intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for irradiating the left breast and regional lymph node (RLN). Methods: The breast and RLN (internal mammary node and periclavicular node) and normal tissue were contoured for 16 consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients previously treated with RT after lumpectomy. Nine equi-spaced fields IMRT (9 -field IMRT), tangential multi-beam IMRT (tangential-IMRT) and IMRT with fixed-jaw technique (FJT-IMRT) were developed and compared with three-dimensional conformal RT (3DCRT). Prescribed dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose distributions and dose volume histograms were used to evaluate plans. Results: All IMRTs achieved similar target coverage and substantially reduced heart V30 and V20 compared to the 3DCRT. The average heart mean dose had different changes, which were 9.0Gy for 9-field IMRT, 5.7Gy for tangential-IMRT and 4.2Gy for FJT-IMRT. For the contralateral lung and breast, the 9-field IMRT has the highest mean dose; and the FJT-IMRT and tangential-IMRT had similar lower value. For the thyroid, both 9-field IMRT and FJT-IMRT had similar V30 (20% and 22%) and were significantly lower than that of 3DCRT (34%) and tangential-IMRT (46%). Moreover, the thyroid mean dose of FJT-IMRT is the lowest. For cervical esophagus and humeral head, the FJT-IMRT also had the best sparing. Conclusion: All 9-field IMRT, tangential-IMRT and FJT-IMRT had superiority for targets coverage and substantially reduced the heart volume of high dose irradiation. The FJT-IMRT showed advantages of avoiding the contralateral breast and lung irradiation and decreasing the thyroid, humeral head and cervical esophagus radiation dose at the expense of a slight monitor units (MUs) increasing.

  12. Initial Investigation into Microbleeds and White Matter Signal Changes following Radiotherapy for Low-Grade and Benign Brain Tumors Using Ultra-High-Field MRI Techniques.

    PubMed

    Belliveau, J-G; Bauman, G S; Tay, K Y; Ho, D; Menon, R S

    2017-09-28

    External beam radiation therapy is a common treatment for many brain neoplasms. While external beam radiation therapy adheres to dose limits to protect the uninvolved brain, areas of high dose to normal tissue still occur. Patients treated with chemoradiotherapy can have adverse effects such as microbleeds and radiation necrosis, but few studies exist of patients treated without chemotherapy. Ten patients were treated for low-grade or benign neoplasms with external beam radiation therapy only and scanned within 12-36 months following treatment with a 7T MR imaging scanner. A multiecho gradient-echo sequence was acquired and postprocessed into SWI, quantitative susceptibility mapping, and apparent transverse relaxation maps. Six patients returned for follow-up imaging approximately 18 months following their first research scan and were imaged with the same techniques. At the first visit, 7/10 patients had microbleeds evident on SWI, quantitative susceptibility mapping, and apparent transverse relaxation. All microbleeds were within a dose region of >45 Gy. Additionally, 4/10 patients had asymptomatic WM signal changes evident on standard imaging. Further analysis with our technique revealed that these lesions were venocentric, suggestive of a neuroinflammatory process. There exists a potential for microbleeds in patients treated with external beam radiation therapy without chemotherapy. This finding is of clinical relevance because it could be a precursor of future neurovascular disease and indicates that additional care should be taken when using therapies such as anticoagulants. Additionally, the appearance of venocentric WM lesions could be suggestive of a neuroinflammatory mechanism that has been suggested in diseases such as MS. Both findings merit further investigation in a larger population set. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  13. A passion for precision

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    For more than three decades, the quest for ever higher precision in laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom has inspired many advances in laser, optical, and spectroscopic techniques, culminating in femtosecond laser optical frequency combs  as perhaps the most precise measuring tools known to man. Applications range from optical atomic clocks and tests of QED and relativity to searches for time variations of fundamental constants. Recent experiments are extending frequency comb techniques into the extreme ultraviolet. Laser frequency combs can also control the electric field of ultrashort light pulses, creating powerful new tools for the emerging field of attosecond science.Organiser(s): L. Alvarez-Gaume / PH-THNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  14. A passion for precision

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-19

    For more than three decades, the quest for ever higher precision in laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom has inspired many advances in laser, optical, and spectroscopic techniques, culminating in femtosecond laser optical frequency combs  as perhaps the most precise measuring tools known to man. Applications range from optical atomic clocks and tests of QED and relativity to searches for time variations of fundamental constants. Recent experiments are extending frequency comb techniques into the extreme ultraviolet. Laser frequency combs can also control the electric field of ultrashort light pulses, creating powerful new tools for the emerging field of attosecond science.Organiser(s): L. Alvarez-Gaume / PH-THNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00.

  15. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer: how much does it really cost?

    PubMed

    Lievens, Yolande; Obyn, Caroline; Mertens, Anne-Sophie; Van Halewyck, Dries; Hulstaert, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Despite the lack of randomized evidence, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being accepted as superior to conventional radiotherapy for patients with T1-2N0 non-small-cell lung cancer in the periphery of the lung and unfit or unwilling to undergo surgery. To introduce SBRT in a system of coverage with evidence development, a correct financing had to be determined. A time-driven activity-based costing model for radiotherapy was developed. Resource cost calculation of all radiotherapy treatments, standard and innovative, was conducted in 10 Belgian radiotherapy centers in the second half of 2012. The average cost of lung SBRT across the 10 centers (6221&OV0556;) is in the range of the average costs of standard fractionated 3D-conformal radiotherapy (5919&OV0556;) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (7379&OV0556;) for lung cancer. Hypofractionated 3D-conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy schemes are less costly (3993&OV0556; respectively 4730&OV0556;). The SBRT cost increases with the number of fractions and is highly dependent of personnel and equipment use. SBRT cost varies more by centre than conventional radiotherapy cost, reflecting different technologies, stages in the learning curve and a lack of clear guidance in this field. Time-driven activity-based costing of radiotherapy is feasible in a multicentre setup, resulting in real-life resource costs that can form the basis for correct reimbursement schemes, supporting an early yet controlled introduction of innovative radiotherapy techniques in clinical practice.

  16. SU-E-T-587: Optimal Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Technique for Multiple Brain Metastases with Increasing Number of Arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, V; Hossain, S; Hildebrand, K; Ahmad, S; Larson, D; Ma, L; Sahgal, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To show improvements in dose conformity and normal brain tissue sparing using an optimal planning technique (OPT) against clinically acceptable planning technique (CAP) in the treatment of multiple brain metastases. Methods: A standardized international benchmark case with12 intracranial tumors was planned using two different VMAT optimization methods. Plans were split into four groups with 3, 6, 9, and 12 targets each planned with 3, 5, and 7 arcs using Eclipse TPS. The beam geometries were 1 full coplanar and half non-coplanar arcs. A prescription dose of 20Gy was used for all targets. The following optimization criteria was used (OPT vs. CAP): (No upper limit vs.108% upper limit for target volume), (priority 140–150 vs. 75–85 for normal-brain-tissue), and (selection of automatic sparing Normal-Tissue-Objective (NTO) vs. Manual NTO). Both had priority 50 to critical structures such as brainstem and optic-chiasm, and both had an NTO priority 150. Normal-brain-tissue doses along with Paddick Conformity Index (PCI) were evaluated. Results: In all cases PCI was higher for OPT plans. The average PCI (OPT,CAP) for all targets was (0.81,0.64), (0.81,0.63), (0.79,0.57), and (0.72,0.55) for 3, 6, 9, and 12 target plans respectively. The percent decrease in normal brain tissue volume (OPT/CAP*100) achieved by OPT plans was (reported as follows: V4, V8, V12, V16, V20) (184, 343, 350, 294, 371%), (192, 417, 380, 299, 360%), and (235, 390, 299, 281, 502%) for the 3, 5, 7 arc 12 target plans, respectively. The maximum brainstem dose decreased for the OPT plan by 4.93, 4.89, and 5.30 Gy for 3, 5, 7 arc 12 target plans, respectively. Conclusion: Substantial increases in PCI, critical structure sparing, and decreases in normal brain tissue dose were achieved by eliminating upper limits from optimization, using automatic sparing of normal tissue function with high priority, and a high priority to normal brain tissue.

  17. Challenge and Hope in Radiotherapy of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most critical global health issues. With frequent association of viral liver disease, HCC is highly complex, harboring both cancer and chronic liver disease. The tumor stage and underlying liver function are both major determinants of the treatment selection as well as prognosis in HCC patients, thus allowing no more than a 20% chance for potentially curative therapies. Radiotherapy technology has been evolved remarkably during the past decade, and radiation can be precisely delivered, thereby permitting higher doses to the tumour and reduced doses to surrounding normal tissues. There has been increasing interest in the merits of radiotherapy in HCC over the past few years, as indicated by a Pub Med search. Radiotherapy has been used as the definitive therapy with curative intent in early stage tumours. It has been used also in combination with TACE for intermediate stage tumours. In locally advanced tumours, radiotherapy has been combined with systemic agents. Despite its efficacy, radiotherapy has not yet been incorporated into the standard management guidelines of HCC. The lack of high evidence level data, especially randomized controlled trials, has posed an obstacle in including radiotherapy into the routine treatment schema of HCC. Therefore, well-designed prospective studies are strongly recommended using developing technology for radiotherapy alone or combination therapies. Also, many issues such as the optimal dose-fractionation, intra- or extrahepatic metastasis after radiotherapy, and radiation-induced hepatic dysfunction remain to be solved. In this review, current status of radiotherapy for HCC will be discussed with regard to technical consideration and combination strategy. The limitation and future perspectives will also be discussed. PMID:19881961

  18. Second cancers following radiotherapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, R.E.

    1997-03-01

    The study of second cancer risk after radiotherapy provides a unique opportunity to study carcinogenesis since large groups of humans are deliberately exposed to substantial doses of radiation in order to cure disease. Detailed radiotherapy records for cancer patients allow precise quantification of organ dose, and population-based cancer registries are frequently available to provide access to large groups of patients who are closely followed for long periods. Moreover, cancer patients treated with surgery alone (no radiation) are frequently available to serve as a non-irradiated comparison group. New information can be provided on relatively insensitive organs, and low dose exposures in the range of scientific interest are received by organs outside the radiation treatment fields. This paper will review several recently completed studies that characterize the risk of radiation-induced second cancers. Emphasis will be given to studies providing new information on the dose-response relationship of radiation-induced leukemia, breast cancer and lung cancer.

  19. A novel technique for the precise measurement of CO2 production rate in small aquatic organisms as validated on aeshnid dragonfly nymphs.

    PubMed

    Harter, Till S; Brauner, Colin J; Matthews, Philip G D

    2017-03-15

    The present study describes and validates a novel yet simple system for simultaneous in vivo measurements of rates of aquatic CO2 production (ṀCO2 ) and oxygen consumption (ṀO2 ), thus allowing the calculation of respiratory exchange ratios (RER). Diffusion of CO2 from the aquatic phase into a gas phase, across a hollow fibre membrane, enabled aquatic ṀCO2  measurements with a high-precision infrared gas CO2 analyser. ṀO2  was measured with a PO2  optode using a stop-flow approach. Injections of known amounts of CO2 into the apparatus yielded accurate and highly reproducible measurements of CO2 content (R(2)=0.997, P<0.001). The viability of in vivo measurements was demonstrated on aquatic dragonfly nymphs (Aeshnidae; wet mass 2.17 mg-1.46 g, n=15) and the apparatus produced precise ṀCO2  (R(2)=0.967, P<0.001) and ṀO2  (R(2)=0.957, P<0.001) measurements; average RER was 0.73±0.06. The described system is scalable, offering great potential for the study of a wide range of aquatic species, including fish.

  20. [Radiotherapy of larynx cancers].

    PubMed

    Pointreau, Y; Lafond, C; Legouté, F; Trémolières, P; Servagi-Vernat, S; Giraud, P; Maingon, P; Calais, G; Lapeyre, M

    2016-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is the gold standard in the treatment of larynx cancers (except T1 glottic tumour). Early T1 and T2 tumours may be treated by exclusive radiation or surgery. For tumours requiring total laryngectomy (T2 or T3), induction chemotherapy followed by exclusive radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy is possible. For T4 tumour, surgery must be proposed. The treatment of lymph nodes is based on the initial treatment of the primary tumour. In non-surgical procedure, in case of sequential radiotherapy, the curative dose is 70Gy and the prophylactic dose is 50Gy. An integrated simultaneous boost radiotherapy is allowed (70Gy in 2Gy per fraction and 56Gy in 1.8Gy per fraction or 70Gy in 2.12Gy per fraction). Postoperatively, radiotherapy is used in locally advanced cancer with dose levels based on pathologic criteria (66Gy for R1 resection, 50 to 54Gy for complete resection). Volume delineation was based on guidelines.

  1. Imaged-guided liver stereotactic body radiotherapy using VMAT and real-time adaptive tumor gating. Concerns about technique and preliminary clinical results.

    PubMed

    Llacer-Moscardo, Carmen; Riou, Olivier; Azria, David; Bedos, Ludovic; Ailleres, Norbert; Quenet, Francois; Rouanet, Philippe; Ychou, Marc; Fenoglietto, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Motion management is a major challenge in abdominal SBRT. We present our study of SBRT for liver tumors using intrafraction motion review (IMR) allowing simultaneous KV information and MV delivery to synchronize the beam during gated RapidArc treatment. Between May 2012 and March 2015, 41 patients were treated by liver SBRT using gated RapidArc technique in a Varian Novalis Truebeam STx linear accelerator. PTV was created by expanding 5 mm from the ITV. Dose prescription ranged from 40 to 50 Gy in 5-10 fractions. The prescribed dose and fractionation were chosen depending on hepatic function and dosimetric results. Thirty-four patients with a minimal follow-up of six months were analyzed for local control and toxicity. Accuracy for tumor repositioning was evaluated for the first ten patients. With a median follow-up of 13 months, the treatment was well tolerated and no patient presented RILD, perforation or gastrointestinal bleeding. Acute toxicity was found in 3 patients with G1 abdominal pain, 2 with G1 nausea, 10 with G1 asthenia and 1 with G2 asthenia. 6 patients presented asymptomatic transitory perturbation of liver enzymes. In-field local control was 90.3% with 7 complete responses, 14 partial responses and 7 stabilisations. 3 patients evolved "in field". 12 patients had an intrahepatic progression "out of field". Mean intrafraction deviation of fiducials in the craneo-caudal direction was 0.91 mm (0-6 mm). The clinical tolerance and oncological outcomes were favorable when using image-guided liver SBRT with real-time adaptive tumor gating.

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW Dosimetry for ion beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karger, Christian P.; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2010-11-01

    Recently, ion beam radiotherapy (including protons as well as heavier ions) gained considerable interest. Although ion beam radiotherapy requires dose prescription in terms of iso-effective dose (referring to an iso-effective photon dose), absorbed dose is still required as an operative quantity to control beam delivery, to characterize the beam dosimetrically and to verify dose delivery. This paper reviews current methods and standards to determine absorbed dose to water in ion beam radiotherapy, including (i) the detectors used to measure absorbed dose, (ii) dosimetry under reference conditions and (iii) dosimetry under non-reference conditions. Due to the LET dependence of the response of films and solid-state detectors, dosimetric measurements are mostly based on ion chambers. While a primary standard for ion beam radiotherapy still remains to be established, ion chamber dosimetry under reference conditions is based on similar protocols as for photons and electrons although the involved uncertainty is larger than for photon beams. For non-reference conditions, dose measurements in tissue-equivalent materials may also be necessary. Regarding the atomic numbers of the composites of tissue-equivalent phantoms, special requirements have to be fulfilled for ion beams. Methods for calibrating the beam monitor depend on whether passive or active beam delivery techniques are used. QA measurements are comparable to conventional radiotherapy; however, dose verification is usually single field rather than treatment plan based. Dose verification for active beam delivery techniques requires the use of multi-channel dosimetry systems to check the compliance of measured and calculated dose for a representative sample of measurement points. Although methods for ion beam dosimetry have been established, there is still room for developments. This includes improvement of the dosimetric accuracy as well as development of more efficient measurement techniques.

  3. A new three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) technique for large breast and/or high body mass index patients: evaluation of a novel fields assessment aimed to reduce extra–target-tissue irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Stimato, Gerardina; Ippolito, Edy; Silipigni, Sonia; Venanzio, Cristina Di; Gaudino, Diego; Fiore, Michele; Trodella, Lucio; D'Angelillo, Rolando Maria; Ramella, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop an alternative three-dimensional treatment plan with standardized fields class solution for whole-breast radiotherapy in patients with large/pendulous breast and/or high body mass index (BMI). Methods: Two treatment plans [tangential fields and standardized five-fields technique (S5F)] for a total dose of 50 Gy/25 fractions were generated for patients with large breasts [planning target volume (PTV) >1000 cm3 and/or BMI >25 kg m−2], supine positioned. S5F plans consist of two wedged tangential beams, anteroposterior: 20° for the right breast and 340° for the left breast, and posteroanterior: 181° for the right breast and 179° for the left breast. A field in field in medial–lateral beam and additional fields were added to reduce hot spot areas and extra–target-tissue irradiation and to improve dose distribution. The percentage of PTV receiving 95% of the prescribed dose (PTV V95%), percentage of PTV receiving 105% of the prescribed dose (PTV V105%), maximal dose to PTV (PTV Dmax), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index were recorded. V10%, V20%, V105% and V107% of a “proper” normal tissue structure (body-PTV healthy tissue) were recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using SYSTAT v.12.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL). Results: In 38 patients included, S5F improved HI (8.4 vs 10.1; p ≤ 0.001) and significantly reduced PTV Dmax and PTV V105%. The extra–target-tissue irradiation was significantly reduced using S5F for V105% (cm3) and V107% (cm3) with a very high difference in tissue irradiation (46.6 vs 3.0 cm3, p ≤ 0.001 for V105% and 12.2 vs 0.0 cm3, p ≤ 0.001 for V107% for tangential field and S5F plans, respectively). Only a slight increase in low-dose extra–target-tissue irradiation (V10%) was observed (2.2719 vs 1.8261 cm3, p = 0.002). Conclusion: The S5F technique in patients with large breast or high BMI increases HI and decreases hot spots in extra-target-tissues and can therefore be

  4. Preliminary Results on Setup Precision of Prone-Lateral Patient Positioning for Whole Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Veldeman, Liv; Speleers, Bruno; Bakker, Marlies; Jacobs, Filip; Coghe, Marc; De Gersem, Werner; Impens, Aline; Nechelput, Sarah; De Wagter, Carlos

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a rapid and reproducible technique for prone positioning and to compare dose-volume indices in prone and supine positions. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients underwent computed tomography imaging for radiotherapy planning in prone and supine position. Experience was gained in the first eight patients, which lead to modifications of the Horizon prone breast board (Civco Medical Solutions, Orange City, Iowa, USA) and the patient setup technique. A unilateral breast holder (U-BH) was developed (Van de Velde, Schellebelle, Belgium) to retract the contralateral breast away from the treated breast. The technique was then applied to an additional 10 patients. The setup precision was evaluated using daily cone-beam CT. Results: Modifications to the breast board were made to secure a prone-lateral rather then a pure prone position. We evolved from a classical setup using laser marks on the patients' body to a direct breast setup using marks on the breast only. The setup precision of the direct positioning procedure with the modified breast board and the U-BH is comparable to supine setup data in the literature. Dose-volume indices for heart and lung show significantly better results for prone than for supine position, and dose homogeneity within the treated breast did not differ according to the treatment position. Conclusions: The setup precision of our prone-lateral positioning technique is comparable to supine data in literature. Our data show the advantage of prone radiotherapy to spare the lung and heart. Further research is necessary to reduce the duration of prone setup.

  5. A Versatile Technique to Enable Sub-milli-Kelvin Instrument Stability for Precise Radial Velocity Measurements: Tests with the Habitable-zone Planet Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefansson, Gudmundur; Hearty, Frederick; Robertson, Paul; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Anderson, Tyler; Levi, Eric; Bender, Chad; Nelson, Matthew; Monson, Andrew; Blank, Basil; Halverson, Samuel; Henderson, Chuck; Ramsey, Lawrence; Roy, Arpita; Schwab, Christian; Terrien, Ryan

    2016-12-01

    Insufficient instrument thermomechanical stability is one of the many roadblocks for achieving 10 cm s-1 Doppler radial velocity precision, the precision needed to detect Earth-twins orbiting solar-type stars. Highly temperature and pressure stabilized spectrographs allow us to better calibrate out instrumental drifts, thereby helping in distinguishing instrumental noise from astrophysical stellar signals. We present the design and performance of the Environmental Control System (ECS) for the Habitable-zone Planet Finder (HPF), a high-resolution (R = 50,000) fiber-fed near-infrared (NIR) spectrograph for the 10 {{m}} Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory. HPF will operate at 180 {{K}}, driven by the choice of an H2RG NIR detector array with a 1.7 μ {{m}} cutoff. This ECS has demonstrated 0.6 {mK} rms stability over 15 days at both 180 and 300 {{K}}, and maintained high-quality vacuum (\\lt {10}-7 {Torr}) over months, during long-term stability tests conducted without a planned passive thermal enclosure surrounding the vacuum chamber. This control scheme is versatile and can be applied as a blueprint to stabilize future NIR and optical high-precision Doppler instruments over a wide temperature range from ˜77 {{K}} to elevated room temperatures. A similar ECS is being implemented to stabilize NEID, the NASA/NSF NN-EXPLORE spectrograph for the 3.5 {{m}} WIYN telescope at Kitt Peak, operating at 300 {{K}}. A [full SolidWorks 3D-CAD model] and a comprehensive parts list of the HPF ECS are included with this manuscript to facilitate the adaptation of this versatile environmental control scheme in the broader astronomical community. Certain commercial equipment, instruments, or materials are identified in this paper in order to specify the experimental procedure adequately. Such identification is not intended to imply recommendation or endorsement by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, nor is it intended to imply that the materials or equipment

  6. Brain necrosis after radiotherapy for primary intracerebral tumor.

    PubMed

    Hohwieler, M L; Lo, T C; Silverman, M L; Freidberg, S R

    1986-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a standard postoperative treatment for cerebral glioma. We have observed the onset of symptoms related to brain necrosis, as opposed to recurrent tumor, in surviving patients. This has been manifest as dementia with a computed tomographic pattern of low density in the frontal lobe uninvolved with tumor, but within the field of radiotherapy. Two patients presented with mass lesions also unrelated to recurrent tumor. We question the necessity of full brain irradiation and suggest that radiotherapy techniques be altered to target the tumor and not encompass the entire brain.

  7. Precision Cross Sections Measurement of 56Fe(n,n γ) at 14.1 MeV using Associated Particle Neutron Elemental Imaging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoyu; Koltick, David

    2017-01-01

    Integral production cross sections for 846.8 keV and 1238.3 keV prompt gamma rays from 14.1 MeV neutrons interactions on 56Fe and are reported, using Associated Particle Neutron Elemental Imaging technique. The experimental technique involves: (1) The development of a VME standard high speed DAQ system and a MATLAB parallel cluster for offline signal analysis with full control of data flow; (2) The advantage of the <1.5 ns coincidence timing resolution between the neutron production and the gamma ray detection to reject noise; (3) A large 30% solid angle gamma ray coverage by an array of NaI(Tl) detectors. The neutron flux is measured through detecting the associated alpha-particle from the D-T fusion reaction in the neutron generator. Present cross section measurements using other techniques with limited timing resolution and solid angle coverage are in agreement at neutron energies lower than 6 MeV. At higher neutron energies reported results can disagree by more than 20%. This more accurate technique presented can distinguish between the differences in the reported results based on pulse-mode neutron source and neutron time-of-flight techniques, at higher neutron energies.

  8. Radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bleehen, N.M.; Cox, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of lung cancer was reviewed at a workshop held in Cambridge, England, in June 1984. It was concluded that there was a continuing role for radiation therapy in the primary management of small cell lung cancer, including the loco-regional treatment for patients with limited disease. Radical radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell carcinoma could be curative for a proportion of patients with limited disease. Careful planning and quality control was essential. Palliative radiotherapy provided useful treatment for many other patients. Other related aspects of treatment are also presented.

  9. Fast Monte Carlo Electron-Photon Transport Method and Application in Accurate Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lijuan; Sun, Guangyao; Zheng, Huaqing; Song, Jing; Chen, Zhenping; Li, Gui

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is the most accurate computational method for dose calculation, but its wide application on clinical accurate radiotherapy is hindered due to its poor speed of converging and long computation time. In the MC dose calculation research, the main task is to speed up computation while high precision is maintained. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the calculation speed of MC method for electron-photon transport with high precision and ultimately to reduce the accurate radiotherapy dose calculation time based on normal computer to the level of several hours, which meets the requirement of clinical dose verification. Based on the existing Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC), developed by FDS Team, a fast MC method for electron-photon coupled transport was presented with focus on two aspects: firstly, through simplifying and optimizing the physical model of the electron-photon transport, the calculation speed was increased with slightly reduction of calculation accuracy; secondly, using a variety of MC calculation acceleration methods, for example, taking use of obtained information in previous calculations to avoid repeat simulation of particles with identical history; applying proper variance reduction techniques to accelerate MC method convergence rate, etc. The fast MC method was tested by a lot of simple physical models and clinical cases included nasopharyngeal carcinoma, peripheral lung tumor, cervical carcinoma, etc. The result shows that the fast MC method for electron-photon transport was fast enough to meet the requirement of clinical accurate radiotherapy dose verification. Later, the method will be applied to the Accurate/Advanced Radiation Therapy System ARTS as a MC dose verification module.

  10. Impact of stereotactic body radiotherapy on colorectal cancer with distant metastases.

    PubMed

    Hiraki, Masayuki; Nishimura, Junichi; Ohtsuka, Masahisa; Shiomi, Hiroya; Uemura, Mamoru; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Hata, Taishi; Hayashi, Taro; Takemasa, Ichiro; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Yamamoto, Hirofumi

    2014-02-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy is a minimally invasive technique for delivering highly focused ionizing radiation with extreme precision. This technique was initially developed in neurosurgical practice and applied to extracranial lesions in the 1990s, and was termed stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Studies have reported that the resection of distant metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) contributes to relatively long-term survival. However, the resection of pulmonary and liver metastases is not possible for various reasons. SBRT offers a therapeutic alternative to unresectable metastatic lesions. The present study describes three cases of distant metastasis from CRC that exhibited a complete response (CR) to SBRT. Case 1 is a 70-year-old man with recurrent liver metastases after surgery for rectal cancer with liver metastasis (S3: diameter 1.8 cm and volume 3.0 ml; S6: diameter 1.3 cm and volume 1.2 ml). Cases 2 and 3 were 65-year-old and 70-year-old men, respectively. Both patients had pulmonary metastasis after surgery for rectal and cecum cancer (Case 2: diameter 1.2 cm and volume 0.9 ml; Case 3: diameter 0.8 cm and volume 0.27 ml). All cases were moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas. No serious adverse side-effects were observed during the therapy. CR was obtained in all patients on the basis of computed tomography 15-33 months after radiotherapy. Our experience supports that SBRT is a safe and alternative technique for resection in patients with distant metastasis from CRC who have small metastatic tumor volume.

  11. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose-volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the "RadoncSpace") in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches.

  12. [Precision nutrition in the era of precision medicine].

    PubMed

    Chen, P Z; Wang, H

    2016-12-06

    Precision medicine has been increasingly incorporated into clinical practice and is enabling a new era for disease prevention and treatment. As an important constituent of precision medicine, precision nutrition has also been drawing more attention during physical examinations. The main aim of precision nutrition is to provide safe and efficient intervention methods for disease treatment and management, through fully considering the genetics, lifestyle (dietary, exercise and lifestyle choices), metabolic status, gut microbiota and physiological status (nutrient level and disease status) of individuals. Three major components should be considered in precision nutrition, including individual criteria for sufficient nutritional status, biomarker monitoring or techniques for nutrient detection and the applicable therapeutic or intervention methods. It was suggested that, in clinical practice, many inherited and chronic metabolic diseases might be prevented or managed through precision nutritional intervention. For generally healthy populations, because lifestyles, dietary factors, genetic factors and environmental exposures vary among individuals, precision nutrition is warranted to improve their physical activity and reduce disease risks. In summary, research and practice is leading toward precision nutrition becoming an integral constituent of clinical nutrition and disease prevention in the era of precision medicine.

  13. Radiotherapy in Glioblastoma: the Past, the Present and the Future.

    PubMed

    Gzell, C; Back, M; Wheeler, H; Bailey, D; Foote, M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review is to explore the changing utility of radiotherapy in the treatment of patients with glioblastoma over the past 60 years. Together with surgery, radiotherapy has always been the cornerstone of treatment of glioblastoma, but techniques have significantly advanced over this time. The exploration of early two-dimensional techniques, investigation of dose escalation, concomitant chemotherapy and modern techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image-guided radiotherapy, and volumetric-modulated arc therapy will be covered. In addition, current controversies including decreasing margin size, re-irradiation, treatment of elderly patients, and novel imaging tracers will be discussed. Future directions including immunotherapy and tumour treating fields are examined. Radiotherapy-based treatments cannot rely solely on advances in chemotherapy or immunotherapy to improve the overall survival of patients with glioblastoma. Radiation oncology needs to continue to develop and improve the delivery, target definition, and dose of radiotherapy to these patients to improve their survival and the toxicity associated with treatment.

  14. Errors in radiotherapy: motivation for development of new radiotherapy quality assurance paradigms.

    PubMed

    Fraass, Benedick A

    2008-01-01

    Modern radiotherapy practice has rapidly evolved during the past decade, making use of many highly complex and/or automated processes for planning and delivery, including new techniques, like intensity-modulated radiotherapy driven by inverse planning optimization methods, or near real-time image-guided adaptive therapy based on fluoroscopic or tomographic imaging on the treatment machine. In spite of the modern technology, or potentially because of it in some instances, errors and other problems continue to have a significant impact on the field. This report reviews example errors and problems, discusses some of the quality assurance issues that these types of problems raise, and motivates the development of more modern and sophisticated approaches to assure quality for our clinical radiotherapy treatment methods.

  15. Precision Rolled-Ink Nano-Technology; Development of a Direct Write Technique for the Fabrication of Thin Films and Conductive Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    inkjet technology is typical of consumer office printers that deposit water - based pigments or dyes, but are rarely used in direct writing...added a fifth category; direct penning. (1–5) Aerosol Jet* and Inkjet printing are common droplet- based techniques, which eject inks on to the...adds a heating element to the AFM tip allowing for the deposition of melted materials instead of water - based inks . DPN and tDPN provide for fine

  16. Radiotherapy for laryngeal cancer—technical aspects and alternate fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Gen; Nakamura, Satoaki; Yoshida, Ken; Konishi, Koji; Teshima, Teruki; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Early laryngeal, especially glottic, cancer is a good candidate for radiotherapy because obvious early symptoms (e.g. hoarseness) make earlier treatment possible and with highly successful localized control. This type of cancer is also a good model for exploring the basic principles of radiation oncology and several key findings (e.g. dose, fractionation, field size, patient fixation, and overall treatment time) have been noted. For example, unintended poor outcomes have been reported during transition from 60Cobalt to linear accelerator installation in the 1960s, with usage of higher energy photons causing poor dose distribution. In addition, shell fixation made precise dose delivery possible, but simultaneously elevated toxicity if a larger treatment field was necessary. Of particular interest to the radiation therapy community was altered fractionation gain as a way to improve local tumor control and survival rate. Unfortunately, this interest ceased with advancements in chemotherapeutic agents because alternate fractionation could not improve outcomes in chemoradiotherapy settings. At present, no form of acceleration can potentially compensate fully for the lack of concurrent chemotherapy. In addition, the substantial workload associated with this technique made it difficult to add extra fractionation routinely in busy clinical hospitals. Hypofractionation, on the other hand, uses a larger single fractionation dose (2–3 Gy), making it a reasonable and attractive option for T1–T2 early glottic cancer because it can improve local control without the additional workload. Recently, Japan Clinical Oncology Group study 0701 reprised its role in early T1–T2 glottic cancer research, demonstrating that this strategy could be an optional standard therapy. Herein, we review radiotherapy history from 60Cobalt to modern linear accelerator, with special focus on the role of alternate fractionation. PMID:28898958

  17. Radiotherapy for laryngeal cancer-technical aspects and alternate fractionation.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Suzuki, Gen; Nakamura, Satoaki; Yoshida, Ken; Konishi, Koji; Teshima, Teruki; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2017-07-01

    Early laryngeal, especially glottic, cancer is a good candidate for radiotherapy because obvious early symptoms (e.g. hoarseness) make earlier treatment possible and with highly successful localized control. This type of cancer is also a good model for exploring the basic principles of radiation oncology and several key findings (e.g. dose, fractionation, field size, patient fixation, and overall treatment time) have been noted. For example, unintended poor outcomes have been reported during transition from 60Cobalt to linear accelerator installation in the 1960s, with usage of higher energy photons causing poor dose distribution. In addition, shell fixation made precise dose delivery possible, but simultaneously elevated toxicity if a larger treatment field was necessary. Of particular interest to the radiation therapy community was altered fractionation gain as a way to improve local tumor control and survival rate. Unfortunately, this interest ceased with advancements in chemotherapeutic agents because alternate fractionation could not improve outcomes in chemoradiotherapy settings. At present, no form of acceleration can potentially compensate fully for the lack of concurrent chemotherapy. In addition, the substantial workload associated with this technique made it difficult to add extra fractionation routinely in busy clinical hospitals. Hypofractionation, on the other hand, uses a larger single fractionation dose (2-3 Gy), making it a reasonable and attractive option for T1-T2 early glottic cancer because it can improve local control without the additional workload. Recently, Japan Clinical Oncology Group study 0701 reprised its role in early T1-T2 glottic cancer research, demonstrating that this strategy could be an optional standard therapy. Herein, we review radiotherapy history from 60Cobalt to modern linear accelerator, with special focus on t