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Sample records for precursor pathway engineering

  1. Designed biosynthesis of 36-methyl-FK506 by polyketide precursor pathway engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, Anna; Wilson, Micheal C.; Ban, Yeon Hee; Hwang, Jae-yeon; Yoon, Yeo Joon; Moore, Bradley S.

    2012-01-01

    The polyketide synthase (PKS) biosynthetic code has recently expanded to include a newly recognized group of extender unit substrates derived from α,β-unsaturated acyl-CoA molecules that deliver diverse side chain chemistry to polyketide backbones. Herein we report the identification of a three-gene operon responsible for the biosynthesis of the PKS building block isobutyrylmalonyl-CoA associated with the macrolide ansalactam A from the marine bacterium Streptomyces sp. CNH189. Using a synthetic biology approach, we engineered the production of unnatural 36-methyl-FK506 in Streptomyces sp. KCTC 11604BP by incorporating the branched extender unit into FK506 biosynthesis in place of its natural C-21 allyl side chain, which has been shown to be critical for FK506’s potent immunosuppressant and neurite outgrowth activities. PMID:23654255

  2. Precursors of Young Women's Family Formation Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amato, Paul R.; Landale, Nancy S.; Havasevich-Brooks, Tara C.; Booth, Alan; Eggebeen, David J.; Schoen, Robert; McHale, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    We used latent class analysis to create family formation pathways for women between the ages of 18 and 23. Input variables included cohabitation, marriage, parenthood, full-time employment, and attending school. Data (n = 2,290) came from Waves I and III of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). The analysis revealed…

  3. Precursors of Young Women's Family Formation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Paul R.; Landale, Nancy S.; Havasevich, Tara C.; Booth, Alan; Eggebeen, David J.; Schoen, Robert; McHale, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    We used latent class analysis to create family formation pathways for women between the ages of 18 and 23. Input variables included cohabitation, marriage, parenthood, full-time employment, and attending school. Data (n = 2,290) came from Waves I and III of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). The analysis revealed seven latent pathways: college-no family formation (29%), high school-no family formation (19%), cohabitation without children (15%), married mothers (14%), single mothers (10%), cohabiting mothers (8%), and inactive (6%). Three sets of variables distinguished between the groups: personal and social resources in adolescence, family socioeconomic resources and adolescent academic achievement, and conservative values and behavior in adolescence. PMID:22719134

  4. Protein design for pathway engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksen, DT; Lian, JZ; Zhao, HM

    2014-02-01

    Design and construction of biochemical pathways has increased the complexity of biosynthetically-produced compounds when compared to single enzyme biocatalysis. However, the coordination of multiple enzymes can introduce a complicated set of obstacles to overcome in order to achieve a high titer and yield of the desired compound. Metabolic engineering has made great strides in developing tools to optimize the flux through a target pathway, but the inherent characteristics of a particular enzyme within the pathway can still limit the productivity. Thus, judicious protein design is critical for metabolic and pathway engineering. This review will describe various strategies and examples of applying protein design to pathway engineering to optimize the flux through the pathway. The proteins can be engineered for altered substrate specificity/selectivity, increased catalytic activity, reduced mass transfer limitations through specific protein localization, and reduced substrate/product inhibition. Protein engineering can also be expanded to design biosensors to enable high through-put screening and to customize cell signaling networks. These strategies have successfully engineered pathways for significantly increased productivity of the desired product or in the production of novel compounds. (C) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Protein Design for Pathway Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Eriksen, Dawn T.; Lian, Jiazhang; Zhao, Huimin

    2013-01-01

    Design and construction of biochemical pathways has increased the complexity of biosynthetically-produced compounds when compared to single enzyme biocatalysis. However, the coordination of multiple enzymes can introduce a complicated set of obstacles to overcome in order to achieve a high titer and yield of the desired compound. Metabolic engineering has made great strides in developing tools to optimize the flux through a target pathway, but the inherent characteristics of a particular enzyme within the pathway can still limit the productivity. Thus, judicious protein design is critical for metabolic and pathway engineering. This review will describe various strategies and examples of applying protein design to pathway engineering to optimize the flux through the pathway. The proteins can be engineered for altered substrate specificity/selectivity, increased catalytic activity, reduced mass transfer limitations through specific protein localization, and reduced substrate/product inhibition. Protein engineering can also be expanded to design biosensors to enable high through-put screening and to customize cell signaling networks. These strategies have successfully engineered pathways for significantly increased productivity of the desired product or in the production of novel compounds. PMID:23558037

  6. Isoprenoid Pathway Optimization for Taxol Precursor Overproduction in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ajikumar, Parayil Kumaran; Xiao, Wen-Hai; Tyo, Keith E. J.; Wang, Yong; Simeon, Fritz; Leonard, Effendi; Mucha, Oliver; Phon, Too Heng; Pfeifer, Blaine; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Taxol (paclitaxel) is a potent anticancer drug first isolated from the Taxus brevifolia Pacific yew tree. Currently, cost-efficient production of Taxol and its analogs remains limited. Here, we report a multivariate-modular approach to metabolic-pathway engineering that succeeded in increasing titers of taxadiene—the first committed Taxol intermediate—approximately 1 gram per liter (~15,000-fold) in an engineered Escherichia coli strain. Our approach partitioned the taxadiene metabolic pathway into two modules: a native upstream methylerythritol-phosphate (MEP) pathway forming isopentenyl pyrophosphate and a heterologous downstream terpenoid–forming pathway. Systematic multivariate search identified conditions that optimally balance the two pathway modules so as to maximize the taxadiene production with minimal accumulation of indole, which is an inhibitory compound found here. We also engineered the next step in Taxol biosynthesis, a P450-mediated 5α-oxidation of taxadiene to taxadien-5α-ol. More broadly, the modular pathway engineering approach helped to unlock the potential of the MEP pathway for the engineered production of terpenoid natural products. PMID:20929806

  7. Pathways to adulthood and their precursors and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Skogbrott Birkeland, Marianne; Leversen, Ingrid; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Wold, Bente

    2014-02-01

    Norway has an extensive welfare system which may provide adolescents with many options and high levels of flexibility in terms of pathways to adulthood. This study aimed to describe Norwegian developmental pathways to adulthood, including changes in role statuses (such as living situations, education, work, marriage/cohabitation and parenthood) from 16 to 30 years of age, and their precursors and outcomes. Repeated measures latent class analysis of longitudinal data from 998 Norwegian individuals indicated three main pathways to adulthood among women and men. In both sexes, most individuals undertook a long period of education and postponed family formation. However, some individuals started working early, a group of women established families with partners and children early, and a group of men remained primarily single between 16 and 30 years of age. Furthermore, the results show that pathways to adulthood in Norway are surprisingly similar to pathways in other countries such as the US, UK and Finland. The results indicate that pathways to adulthood are influenced by social reproduction factors in a country with high levels of welfare benefits as well. In addition, the results suggest that pathways involving living with a partner and either higher education or work are associated with high life satisfaction at age 30.

  8. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  9. Selective overproduction of the proteasome inhibitor salinosporamide A via precursor pathway regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, Anna; Eustáquio, Alessandra S.; Gulder, Tobias A. M.; Hafner, Mathias; Moore, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    The chlorinated natural product salinosporamide A is a potent 20S proteasome inhibitor currently in clinical trials as an anticancer agent. To deepen our understanding of salinosporamide biosynthesis, we investigated the function of a LuxR-type pathway-specific regulatory gene, salR2, and observed a selective effect on the production of salinosporamide A over its less active aliphatic analogs. SalR2 was shown to specifically activate genes involved in the biosynthesis of the halogenated precursor chloroethylmalonyl-CoA, which is a dedicated precursor of salinosporamide A. Specifically, SalR2 activates transcription of two divergent operons – one of which contains the unique S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent chlorinase encoding gene salL. By applying this knowledge towards rational engineering, we were able to selectively double salinosporamide A production. This study exemplifies the specialized regulation of a polyketide precursor pathway and its application to the selective overproduction of a specific natural product congener. PMID:22195555

  10. Comparative Proteomics Analysis of Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae with Enhanced Biofuel Precursor Production

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoling; Feng, Huixing; Zhang, Jianhua; Chen, Wei Ning

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was metabolically modified for enhanced biofuel precursor production by knocking out genes encoding mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase and over-expression of a heterologous ATP-citrate lyase. A comparative iTRAQ-coupled 2D LC-MS/MS analysis was performed to obtain a global overview of ubiquitous protein expression changes in S. cerevisiae engineered strains. More than 300 proteins were identified. Among these proteins, 37 were found differentially expressed in engineered strains and they were classified into specific categories based on their enzyme functions. Most of the proteins involved in glycolytic and pyruvate branch-point pathways were found to be up-regulated and the proteins involved in respiration and glyoxylate pathway were however found to be down-regulated in engineered strains. Moreover, the metabolic modification of S. cerevisiae cells resulted in a number of up-regulated proteins involved in stress response and differentially expressed proteins involved in amino acid metabolism and protein biosynthesis pathways. These LC-MS/MS based proteomics analysis results not only offered extensive information in identifying potential protein-protein interactions, signal pathways and ubiquitous cellular changes elicited by the engineered pathways, but also provided a meaningful biological information platform serving further modification of yeast cells for enhanced biofuel production. PMID:24376832

  11. Reaction engineering and precursor film deposition for CIS synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanbery, B. J.; Davydov, A.; Chang, C. H.; Anderson, T. J.

    1997-02-01

    We present an analysis of alternative reaction pathways for the synthesis of CuInSe2-based films for photovoltaic applications based on our recent and ongoing investigations of the thermochemistry in the Cu-In-Se ternary, Na-Cu-In-Se quaternary, and constituent unary and binary systems. We also describe our efforts to determine the relationship between film growth conditions in our novel rotating-disc system and resultant phase constitution of precursor reactant films intended for subsequent ex-situ rapid thermal processing. A model for the phase chemistry of sodium in CIS films is presented.

  12. Men's and Women's Pathways to Adulthood and Their Adolescent Precursors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oesterle, Sabrina; Hawkins, J. David; Hill, Karl G.; Bailey, Jennifer A.

    2010-01-01

    This study compared men's and women's pathways to adulthood by examining how role transitions in education, work, marriage, and parenthood intersect and form developmental pathways from ages 18-30. The study investigated how sociodemographic factors and adolescent experiences were associated with these pathways. We used latent class analysis to…

  13. Pathways to an Engineering Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Willie, Jr.; Miller, Jon D.

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing data from the 20-year record of the Longitudinal Study of American Youth (LSAY), this analysis uses a set of variables to predict employment in engineering for a national sample of adults aged 34 to 37. The LSAY is one of the longest longitudinal studies of the impact of secondary education and postsecondary education conducted in the…

  14. Two distinct pathways for essential metabolic precursors for isoprenoid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    KUZUYAMA, Tomohisa; SETO, Haruo

    2012-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a diverse group of molecules found in all organisms, where they perform such important biological functions as hormone signaling (e.g., steroids) in mammals, antioxidation (e.g., carotenoids) in plants, electron transport (e.g., ubiquinone), and cell wall biosynthesis intermediates in bacteria. All isoprenoids are synthesized by the consecutive condensation of the five-carbon monomer isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) to its isomer, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). The biosynthetic pathway for the formation of IPP from acetyl-CoA (i.e., the mevalonate pathway) had been established mainly in mice and the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Curiously, most prokaryotic microorganisms lack homologs of the genes in the mevalonate pathway, even though IPP and DMAPP are essential for isoprenoid biosynthesis in bacteria. This observation provided an impetus to search for an alternative pathway to synthesize IPP and DMAPP, ultimately leading to the discovery of the mevalonate-independent 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway. This review article focuses on our significant contributions to a comprehensive understanding of the biosynthesis of IPP and DMAPP. PMID:22450534

  15. Combining metabolic and protein engineering of a terpenoid biosynthetic pathway for overproduction and selectivity control

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Effendi; Ajikumar, Parayil Kumaran; Thayer, Kelly; Xiao, Wen-Hai; Mo, Jeffrey D.; Tidor, Bruce; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Prather, Kristala L. J.

    2010-01-01

    A common strategy of metabolic engineering is to increase the endogenous supply of precursor metabolites to improve pathway productivity. The ability to further enhance heterologous production of a desired compound may be limited by the inherent capacity of the imported pathway to accommodate high precursor supply. Here, we present engineered diterpenoid biosynthesis as a case where insufficient downstream pathway capacity limits high-level levopimaradiene production in Escherichia coli. To increase levopimaradiene synthesis, we amplified the flux toward isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate precursors and reprogrammed the rate-limiting downstream pathway by generating combinatorial mutations in geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase and levopimaradiene synthase. The mutant library contained pathway variants that not only increased diterpenoid production but also tuned the selectivity toward levopimaradiene. The most productive pathway, combining precursor flux amplification and mutant synthases, conferred approximately 2,600-fold increase in levopimaradiene levels. A maximum titer of approximately 700 mg/L was subsequently obtained by cultivation in a bench-scale bioreactor. The present study highlights the importance of engineering proteins along with pathways as a key strategy in achieving microbial biosynthesis and overproduction of pharmaceutical and chemical products. PMID:20643967

  16. Mineral catalyzed hydrothermal reactions as precursors to extant anabolic pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, G. D.

    Investigations into hydrothermal reactions under conditions of moderate hydrostatic pressure and in the presence of transition metal sulfides reveal reaction pathways the bear remarkable similarity with extant anabolic reactions. First, it is seen that most common transition metal sulfides are capable of promoting all of the key reactions at the core of Acetyl Co-A synthesis. These include CO reduction to methyl groups and carbonyl insertion to form transferable acetyl groups. The synthesis of alpha-keto acids are also promoted, presumably by double carbonylation. A pathway starting with CO2 and H2 has been identified leading to the synthesis of citric acid. Citric acid provides a crucial abiotic, anabolic, branch point to the prebiotic synthesis of various amino acids, as well. As the pyrimidines, orotic acid and uracil. In many cases the abiotic reaction pathways differ slightly from extant anabolic pathways by shunting past particularly reactive intermediates, e.g. oxaloacetic acid. These reactions have the capacity to provide the prebiotic world with many, but not all, of the molecular constituents to aid the emergence of an RNA world.

  17. Phosphoketolase pathway engineering for carbon-efficient biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Henard, Calvin Andrew; Freed, Emily Frances; Guarnieri, Michael Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in metabolic engineering have facilitated the development of microbial biocatalysts capable of producing an array of bio-products, ranging from fuels to drug molecules. These bio-products are commonly generated through an acetyl-CoA intermediate, which serves as a key precursor in the biological conversion of carbon substrates. Conventional biocatalytic upgrading strategies proceeding through this route are limited by low carbon efficiencies, in large part due to carbon losses associated with pyruvate decarboxylation to acetyl-CoA. Bypass of pyruvate decarboxylation offers a means to dramatically enhance carbon yields and, in turn, bioprocess economics. Herein, we discuss recent advances and prospects for employing the phosphoketolase pathway for direct biosynthesis of acetyl-CoA from carbon substrates, and phosphoketolase-based metabolic engineering strategies for carbon efficient biocatalysis.

  18. Phosphoketolase pathway engineering for carbon-efficient biocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Henard, Calvin Andrew; Freed, Emily Frances; Guarnieri, Michael Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in metabolic engineering have facilitated the development of microbial biocatalysts capable of producing an array of bio-products, ranging from fuels to drug molecules. These bio-products are commonly generated through an acetyl-CoA intermediate, which serves as a key precursor in the biological conversion of carbon substrates. Moreover, conventional biocatalytic upgrading strategies proceeding through this route are limited by low carbon efficiencies, in large part due to carbon losses associated with pyruvate decarboxylation to acetyl-CoA. Bypass of pyruvate decarboxylation offers a means to dramatically enhance carbon yields and, in turn, bioprocess economics. Here, we discuss recent advances and prospects for employing the phosphoketolase pathway for direct biosynthesis of acetyl-CoA from carbon substrates, and phosphoketolase-based metabolic engineering strategies for carbon efficient biocatalysis.

  19. Adolescent Precursors of Pathways from School to Work

    PubMed Central

    Vuolo, Mike; Mortimer, Jeylan T.; Staff, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal data from the Youth Development Study is used to examine: (1) how young people establish work with self-identified career potential and how these patterns are linked to educational attainments; and (2) how adolescent achievement orientations, experiences in school and work, and sociodemographic background distinguish youth who establish themselves in careers and those who flounder during this transition. Multilevel latent class models reveal four school-to-work pathways from ages 18 to 31: two groups that attain careers through postsecondary education (via Bachelor’s or Associates-Vocational degrees) and two groups that do not (distinguished by attempting college). Multinomial logistic regression models demonstrate that academic orientations, socioeconomic background, and steady paid work during high school help adolescents avoid subsequent floundering during the school-to-work transition. PMID:24791132

  20. Pyrolysis Pathways of Sulfonated Polyethylene, an Alternative Carbon Fiber Precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Younker, Jarod M; Saito, Tomonori; Hunt, Marcus A; Beste, Ariana; Naskar, Amit K

    2013-01-01

    Sulfonated polyethylene is an emerging precursor for the production of carbon fibers. Pyrolysis of sulfonated polyethylene was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). n-heptane-4-sulfonic acid (H4S) was selected as a model compound for the study of sulfonated polyethylene. Density functional theory and conventional transition state theory were used to determine the rate constants of pyrolysis for H4S from 300-1000 K. Multiple reaction channels from two different mechanisms were explored: 1) internal five-centered elimination (Ei 5) and 2) radical chain reaction. The pyrolysis of H4S was simulated with kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) to obtain TGA plots that compared favorably to experiment. We observed that at tem- peratures < 550 K, the radical mechanism was dominant and yielded the trans-alkene, whereas cis-alkene was formed at higher temperatures from the internal elimination. The maximum rates of % mass loss became independent of initial OH radical concentration at 440-480 K. Experimentally, the maximum % mass loss occurred from 440-460 K (heating rate dependent). Activation energies derived from the kMC-simulated TGAs of H4S (26-29 kcal/mol) agreed with experiment for sulfonated polyethylene ( 31 kcal/mol). The simulations revealed that in this region, decomposition of radical HOSO2 became competitive to H abstraction by HOSO2, making OH the carrying radical for the reaction chain. The maximum rate of % mass loss for internal elimination was observed at temperatures > 600 K. Low-scale carbonization utilizes temperatures < 620 K; thus, internal elimination will not be competitive. Ei5 elimination has been studied for sulfoxides and sulfones, but this represents the first study of internal elimination in sulfonic acids. Nonlinear Arrhenius plots were found for all bimolecular reactions. The most significant nonlinear behavior was observed for reactions where the barrier was small. For reactions with low activation barriers, nonlinearity was traced to

  1. General low-temperature reaction pathway from precursors to monomers before nucleation of compound semiconductor nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kui; Liu, Xiangyang; Qi, Ting; Yang, Huaqing; Whitfield, Dennis M.; Y. Chen, Queena; Huisman, Erik J. C.; Hu, Changwei

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the molecular pathway to monomers of semiconductor nanocrystals. Here we report a general reaction pathway, which is based on hydrogen-mediated ligand loss for the precursor conversion to ‘monomers' at low temperature before nucleation. We apply 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to monitor the key phosphorous-containing products that evolve from MXn+E=PPh2H+HY mixtures, where MXn, E=PPh2H, and HY are metal precursors, chalcogenide precursors, and additives, respectively. Surprisingly, the phosphorous-containing products detected can be categorized into two groups, Ph2P–Y and Ph2P(E)–Y. On the basis of our experimental and theoretical results, we propose two competing pathways to the formation of M2En monomers, each of which is accompanied by one of the two products. Our study unravels the pathway of precursor evolution into M2En monomers, the stoichiometry of which directly correlates with the atomic composition of the final compound nanocrystals. PMID:27531507

  2. General low-temperature reaction pathway from precursors to monomers before nucleation of compound semiconductor nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kui; Liu, Xiangyang; Qi, Ting; Yang, Huaqing; Whitfield, Dennis M; Y Chen, Queena; Huisman, Erik J C; Hu, Changwei

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the molecular pathway to monomers of semiconductor nanocrystals. Here we report a general reaction pathway, which is based on hydrogen-mediated ligand loss for the precursor conversion to 'monomers' at low temperature before nucleation. We apply (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to monitor the key phosphorous-containing products that evolve from MXn+E=PPh2H+HY mixtures, where MXn, E=PPh2H, and HY are metal precursors, chalcogenide precursors, and additives, respectively. Surprisingly, the phosphorous-containing products detected can be categorized into two groups, Ph2P-Y and Ph2P(E)-Y. On the basis of our experimental and theoretical results, we propose two competing pathways to the formation of M2En monomers, each of which is accompanied by one of the two products. Our study unravels the pathway of precursor evolution into M2En monomers, the stoichiometry of which directly correlates with the atomic composition of the final compound nanocrystals. PMID:27531507

  3. General low-temperature reaction pathway from precursors to monomers before nucleation of compound semiconductor nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kui; Liu, Xiangyang; Qi, Ting; Yang, Huaqing; Whitfield, Dennis M.; Y. Chen, Queena; Huisman, Erik J. C.; Hu, Changwei

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about the molecular pathway to monomers of semiconductor nanocrystals. Here we report a general reaction pathway, which is based on hydrogen-mediated ligand loss for the precursor conversion to `monomers' at low temperature before nucleation. We apply 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to monitor the key phosphorous-containing products that evolve from MXn+E=PPh2H+HY mixtures, where MXn, E=PPh2H, and HY are metal precursors, chalcogenide precursors, and additives, respectively. Surprisingly, the phosphorous-containing products detected can be categorized into two groups, Ph2P-Y and Ph2P(E)-Y. On the basis of our experimental and theoretical results, we propose two competing pathways to the formation of M2En monomers, each of which is accompanied by one of the two products. Our study unravels the pathway of precursor evolution into M2En monomers, the stoichiometry of which directly correlates with the atomic composition of the final compound nanocrystals.

  4. Pathway Engineered Enzymatic de novo Purine Nucleotide Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Schultheisz, Heather L.; Szymczyna, Blair R.; Scott, Lincoln G.; Williamson, James R.

    2009-01-01

    A general method for isotopic labeling of the purine base moiety of nucleotides and RNA has been developed through biochemical pathway engineering in vitro. A synthetic scheme was designed and implemented utilizing recombinant enzymes from the pentose phosphate and de novo purine synthesis pathways, with regeneration of folate, aspartate, glutamine, ATP, and NADPH cofactors, in a single-pot reaction. Syntheses proceeded quickly and efficiently in comparison to chemical methods with isolated yields up to 66% for 13C, 15N enriched ATP and GTP. The scheme is robust and flexible, requiring only serine, NH4+, glucose and CO2 as stoichiometric precursors in labeled form. Using this approach, U-13C- GTP, U-13C,15N- GTP, 13C2,8- ATP and U-15N- GTP were synthesized on a millimole scale, and the utility of the isotope labeling is illustrated in NMR spectra of HIV-2 transactivation region (TAR) RNA containing 13C 2,8-adenosine and 15N-1,3,7,9,2-guanosine. Pathway engineering in vitro permits complex synthetic cascades to be effected expanding the applicability of enzymatic synthesis. PMID:18707057

  5. Bacterial exopolysaccharides: biosynthesis pathways and engineering strategies

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Jochen; Sieber, Volker; Rehm, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria produce a wide range of exopolysaccharides which are synthesized via different biosynthesis pathways. The genes responsible for synthesis are often clustered within the genome of the respective production organism. A better understanding of the fundamental processes involved in exopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the regulation of these processes is critical toward genetic, metabolic and protein-engineering approaches to produce tailor-made polymers. These designer polymers will exhibit superior material properties targeting medical and industrial applications. Exploiting the natural design space for production of a variety of biopolymer will open up a range of new applications. Here, we summarize the key aspects of microbial exopolysaccharide biosynthesis and highlight the latest engineering approaches toward the production of tailor-made variants with the potential to be used as valuable renewable and high-performance products for medical and industrial applications. PMID:26074894

  6. Engineered Plants Make Potential Precursor to Raw Material for Plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Shanklin, John

    2010-11-02

    In a first step toward achieving industrial-scale green production, scientists from BNL and collaborators at Dow AgroSciences report engineering a plant that produces industrially relevant levels of chemicals that could potentially be used to make plastics.

  7. Engineering the Microstructure of Solution Precursor Plasma-Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolissi, G.; Chazelas, C.; Bolelli, G.; Lusvarghi, L.; Vardelle, M.; Vardelle, A.

    2012-12-01

    This study examines the fundamental reactions that occur in-flight during the solution precursor plasma spraying (SPPS) of solutions containing Zr- and Y-based salts in water or ethanol solvent. The effect of plasma jet composition (pure Ar, Ar-H2 and Ar-He-H2 mixtures) on the mechanical break-up and thermal treatment of the solution, mechanically injected in the form of a liquid stream, was investigated. Observation of the size evolution of the solution droplets in the plasma flow by means of a laser shadowgraphy technique, showed that droplet break-up was more effective and solvent evaporation was faster when the ethanol-based solution was injected into binary or ternary plasma gas mixtures. In contrast with water-based solutions, residual liquid droplets were always detected at the substrate location. The morphology and structure of the material deposited onto stainless steel substrates during single-scan experiments were characterised by SEM, XRD and micro-Raman spectroscopy and were shown to be closely related to in-flight droplet behaviour. In-flight pyrolysis and melting of the precursor led to well-flattened splats, whereas residual liquid droplets at the substrate location turned into non pyrolysed inclusions. The latter, although subsequently pyrolysed by the plasma heat during the deposition of entire coatings, resulted in porous "sponge-like" structures in the deposit.

  8. Programmable genetic circuits for pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Moon, Tae Seok

    2015-12-01

    Synthetic biology has the potential to provide decisive advances in genetic control of metabolic pathways. However, there are several challenges that synthetic biologists must overcome before this vision becomes a reality. First, a library of diverse and well-characterized sensors, such as metabolite-sensing or condition-sensing promoters, must be constructed. Second, robust programmable circuits that link input conditions with a specific gene regulation response must be developed. Finally, multi-gene targeting strategies must be integrated with metabolically relevant sensors and complex, robust logic. Achievements in each of these areas, which employ the CRISPR/Cas system, in silico modeling, and dynamic sensor-regulators, among other tools, provide a strong basis for future research. Overall, the future for synthetic biology approaches in metabolic engineering holds immense promise.

  9. Customized optimization of metabolic pathways by combinatorial transcriptional engineering.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yongbo; Du, Jing; Zhao, Huimin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction of a heterologous metabolic pathway into a platform microorganism for applications in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology is often technically straightforward. However, the major challenge is to balance the flux in the pathway to obtain high yield and productivity in a target microorganism. To address this limitation, we recently developed a simple, efficient, and programmable approach named "customized optimization of metabolic pathways by combinatorial transcriptional engineering" (COMPACTER) for balancing the flux in a pathway under distinct metabolic backgrounds. Here we use two examples including a cellobiose-utilizing pathway and a xylose-utilizing pathway to illustrate the key steps in the COMPACTER method.

  10. Effect of Na-doped Mo on Selenization Pathways for CuGa/In Metallic Precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Rangarajan; Tong, Gabriel; Kim, Woo Kyoung; Payzant, E Andrew; Adelhelm, Christoph; Franzke, Enrico; Winkler, Jörg; Anderson, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Reaction pathways were followed for selenization of CuGa/In precursor structures using in-situ high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD). Precursor films were deposited on Na-free and Na-doped Mo (3 and 5 at %)/Na-free glass. The precursor film was constituted with CuIn, In, Cu9Ga4, Cu3Ga, Cu16In9 and Mo. HTXRD measurements during temperature ramp selenization showed CIS formation occurs first, followed by CGS formation, and then mixing on the group III sub-lattice to form CIGS. CIGS formation was observed to be complete at ~450 C for samples deposited on 5 at % Na-doped Mo substrates. MoSe2 formation was evidenced after the CIGS synthesis reaction was complete. The Ga distribution in the annealed CIGS was determined by Rietveld refinement. Isothermal reaction studies were conducted for CIGS (112) formation in the temperature range 260-320 C to estimate the rate constants.

  11. Pathway engineering strategies for production of beneficial carotenoids in microbial hosts.

    PubMed

    Ye, Victor M; Bhatia, Sujata K

    2012-08-01

    Carotenoids, such as lycopene, β-carotene, zeaxanthin, canthaxanthin and astaxanthin have many benefits for human health. In addition to the functional role of carotenoids as vitamin A precursors, adequate consumption of carotenoids prevents the development of a variety of serious diseases. Biosynthesis of carotenoids is a complex process and it starts with the common isoprene precursors. Condensation of these precursors and subsequent modifications, by introducing hydroxyl- and keto-groups, leads to the generation of diversified carotenoid structures. To improve carotenoid production, metabolic engineering has been explored in bacteria, yeast, and algae. The success of the pathway engineering effort depends on the host metabolism, specific enzymes used, the enzyme expression levels, and the strategies employed. Despite the difficulty of pathway engineering for carotenoid production, great progress has been made over the past decade. We review metabolic engineering approaches used in a variety of microbial hosts for carotenoid biosynthesis. These advances will greatly expedite our efforts to bring the health benefits of carotenoids and other nutritional compounds to our diet. PMID:22488437

  12. Precursor microRNA Programmed Silencing Complex Assembly Pathways in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuhang; Jin, Dong-Yan; McManus, Michael T.; Mourelatos, Zissimos

    2012-01-01

    Summary Assembly of microRNA Ribonucleoproteins (miRNPs) or RNA-Induced Silencing Complexes (RISCs) is essential for the function of miRNAs and initiates from processing of precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNAs) by Dicer or by Ago2. Here, we report an in-vitro miRNP/RISC assembly assay programmed by pre-miRNAs from mammalian cell lysates. Combining in-vivo studies in Dicer Knock-Out cells reconstituted with wild type or catalytically inactive Dicer, we find that the miRNA Loading Complex (miRLC) is the primary machinery linking pre-miRNA processing to miRNA loading. We show that a miRNA Precursor Deposit Complex (miPDC) plays a crucial role in Dicer-independent miRNA biogenesis and promotes miRNP assembly of certain Dicer-dependent miRNAs. Furthermore, we find that 5′-uridine, 3′-mid base pairing and 5′-mid mismatches within pre-miRNAs promote their assembly into miPDC. Our studies provide a comprehensive view of miRNP/RISC assembly pathways in mammals and our assay provides a versatile platform for further mechanistic dissection of such pathways in mammals. PMID:22503104

  13. Altered synaptic plasticity in the mossy fibre pathway of transgenic mice expressing mutant amyloid precursor protein

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Aβ peptides derived from the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein are widely believed to play an important role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. A common way to study the impact of these molecules on CNS function is to compare the physiology of transgenic mice that overproduce Aβ with non-transgenic animals. In the hippocampus, this approach has been frequently applied to the investigation of synaptic transmission and plasticity in the perforant and Schaffer collateral commissural pathways, the first and third components of the classical hippocampal trisynaptic circuit, respectively. Similar studies however have not been carried out on the remaining component of the trisynaptic circuit, the mossy fibre pathway. Using transverse hippocampal slices prepared from ~2 year old animals we have compared mossy fibre synaptic function in wild-type mice and their Tg2576 littermates which age-dependently overproduce Aβ. Input-output curves were not altered in slices from Tg2576 mice, but these animals exhibited a significant loss of the prominent frequency-facilitation expressed by the mossy fibre pathway. In addition to this change in short term synaptic plasticity, high frequency stimulation-induced, NMDA-receptor-independent LTP was absent in slices from the transgenic mice. These data represent the first description of functional deficits in the mossy fibre pathway of Aβ-overproducing transgenic mice. PMID:21040543

  14. Nicotine-induced plasticity in the retinocollicular pathway: Evidence for involvement of amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, R G J; Vasques, J F; Trindade, P; Serfaty, C A; Campello-Costa, P; Faria-Melibeu, A C

    2016-01-28

    During early postnatal development retinocollicular projections undergo activity-dependent synaptic refinement that results in the formation of precise topographical maps in the visual layers of the superior colliculus (SC). Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) is a widely expressed transmembrane glycoprotein involved in the regulation of several aspects of neural development, such as neurite outgrowth, synapse formation and plasticity. Stimulation of cholinergic system has been found to alter the expression and processing of APP in different cell lines. Herein, we investigated the effect of nicotine on the development of retinocollicular pathway and on APP metabolism in the SC of pigmented rats. Animals were submitted to intracranial Elvax implants loaded with nicotine or phosphate-buffered saline (vehicle) at postnatal day (PND) 7. The ipsilateral retinocollicular pathway of control and experimental groups was anterogradely labeled either 1 or 3 weeks after surgery (PND 14 or PND 28). Local nicotine exposure produces a transitory sprouting of uncrossed retinal axons outside their main terminal zones. Nicotine also increases APP content and its soluble neurotrophic fragment sAPPα. Furthermore, nicotine treatment upregulates nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 and β2 subunits. Taken together, these data indicate that nicotine disrupts the ordering and topographic mapping of axons in the retinocollicular pathway and facilitates APP processing through the nonamyloidogenic pathway, suggesting that sAPPα may act as a trophic agent that mediates nicotine-induced morphological plasticity.

  15. Customized optimization of metabolic pathways by combinatorial transcriptional engineering.

    PubMed

    Du, Jing; Yuan, Yongbo; Si, Tong; Lian, Jiazhang; Zhao, Huimin

    2012-10-01

    A major challenge in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology is to balance the flux of an engineered heterologous metabolic pathway to achieve high yield and productivity in a target organism. Here, we report a simple, efficient and programmable approach named 'customized optimization of metabolic pathways by combinatorial transcriptional engineering (COMPACTER)' for rapid tuning of gene expression in a heterologous pathway under distinct metabolic backgrounds. Specifically, a library of mutant pathways is created by de novo assembly of promoter mutants of varying strengths for each pathway gene in a target organism followed by high-throughput screening/selection. To demonstrate this approach, a single round of COMPACTER was used to generate both a xylose utilizing pathway with near-highest efficiency and a cellobiose utilizing pathway with highest efficiency that were ever reported in literature for both laboratory and industrial yeast strains. Interestingly, these engineered xylose and cellobiose utilizing pathways were all host-specific. Therefore, COMPACTER represents a powerful approach to tailor-make metabolic pathways for different strain backgrounds, which is difficult if not impossible to achieve by existing pathway engineering methods.

  16. Amyloid precursor protein–mediated endocytic pathway disruption induces axonal dysfunction and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Weissmiller, April M.; White, Joseph A.; Fang, Fang; Wang, Xinyi; Wu, Yiwen; Pearn, Matthew L.; Zhao, Xiaobei; Chen, Shengdi; Gunawardena, Shermali; Ding, Jianqing; Mobley, William C.

    2016-01-01

    The endosome/lysosome pathway is disrupted early in the course of both Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Down syndrome (DS); however, it is not clear how dysfunction in this pathway influences the development of these diseases. Herein, we explored the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which endosomal dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of AD and DS. We determined that full-length amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its β-C-terminal fragment (β-CTF) act though increased activation of Rab5 to cause enlargement of early endosomes and to disrupt retrograde axonal trafficking of nerve growth factor (NGF) signals. The functional impacts of APP and its various products were investigated in PC12 cells, cultured rat basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs), and BFCNs from a mouse model of DS. We found that the full-length wild-type APP (APPWT) and β-CTF both induced endosomal enlargement and disrupted NGF signaling and axonal trafficking. β-CTF alone induced atrophy of BFCNs that was rescued by the dominant-negative Rab5 mutant, Rab5S34N. Moreover, expression of a dominant-negative Rab5 construct markedly reduced APP-induced axonal blockage in Drosophila. Therefore, increased APP and/or β-CTF impact the endocytic pathway to disrupt NGF trafficking and signaling, resulting in trophic deficits in BFCNs. Our data strongly support the emerging concept that dysregulation of Rab5 activity contributes importantly to early pathogenesis of AD and DS. PMID:27064279

  17. Metabolite Valves: Dynamic Control of Metabolic Flux for Pathway Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Kristala

    2015-03-01

    Microbial strains have been successfully engineered to produce a wide variety of chemical compounds, several of which have been commercialized. As new products are targeted for biological synthesis, yield is frequently considered a primary driver towards determining feasibility. Theoretical yields can be calculated, establishing an upper limit on the potential conversion of starting substrates to target compounds. Such yields typically ignore loss of substrate to byproducts, with the assumption that competing reactions can be eliminated, usually by deleting the genes encoding the corresponding enzymes. However, when an enzyme encodes an essential gene, especially one involved in primary metabolism, deletion is not a viable option. Reducing gene expression in a static fashion is possible, but this solution ignores the metabolic demand needed for synthesis of the enzymes required for the desired pathway. We have developed Metabolite valves to address this challenge. The valves are designed to allow high flux through the essential enzyme during an initial period where growth is favored. Following an external perturbation, enzyme activity is then reduced, enabling a higher precursor pool to be diverted towards the pathway of interest. We have designed valves with control at both the transcriptional and post-translational levels. In both cases, key enzymes in glucose metabolism are regulated, and two different compounds are targeted for heterologous production. We have measured increased concentrations of intracellular metabolites once the valve is closed, and have demonstrated that these increased pools lead to increased product yields. These metabolite valves should prove broadly useful for dynamic control of metabolic flux, resulting in improvements in product yields.

  18. Distinct light-mediated pathways regulate the biosynthesis and exchange of isoprenoid precursors during Arabidopsis seedling development.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Forés, Oriol; Martinez-García, Jaime F; González, Victor; Phillips, Michael A; Ferrer, Albert; Boronat, Albert

    2004-01-01

    Plants synthesize an astonishing diversity of isoprenoids, some of which play essential roles in photosynthesis, respiration, and the regulation of growth and development. Two independent pathways for the biosynthesis of isoprenoid precursors coexist within the plant cell: the cytosolic mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway and the plastidial methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. In at least some plants (including Arabidopsis), common precursors are exchanged between the cytosol and the plastid. However, little is known about the signals that coordinate their biosynthesis and exchange. To identify such signals, we arrested seedling development by specifically blocking the MVA pathway with mevinolin (MEV) or the MEP pathway with fosmidomycin (FSM) and searched for MEV-resistant Arabidopsis mutants that also could survive in the presence of FSM. Here, we show that one such mutant, rim1, is a new phyB allele (phyB-m1). Although the MEV-resistant phenotype of mutant seedlings is caused by the upregulation of MVA synthesis, its resistance to FSM most likely is the result of an enhanced intake of MVA-derived isoprenoid precursors by the plastid. The analysis of other light-hyposensitive mutants showed that distinct light perception and signal transduction pathways regulate these two differential mechanisms for resistance, providing evidence for a coordinated regulation of the activity of the MVA pathway and the crosstalk between cell compartments for isoprenoid biosynthesis during the first stages of seedling development.

  19. Osteoprotegerin Induces Apoptosis of Osteoclasts and Osteoclast Precursor Cells via the Fas/Fas Ligand Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Xu, Chao; Zhao, Hongyan; Xia, Pengpeng; Song, Ruilong; Gu, Jianhong; Liu, Xuezhong; Bian, Jianchun; Yuan, Yan; Liu, Zongping

    2015-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is known to inhibit differentiation and activation of osteoclasts (OCs) by functioning as a decoy receptor blocking interactions between RANK and RANKL. However, the exact role of OPG in the survival/apoptosis of OCs remains unclear. OPG caused increased rates of apoptosis of both OCs and osteoclast precursor cells (OPCs). The expression of Fas and activated caspase-8 was increased by both 20 ng/mL and 40 ng/mL of OPG, but was markedly decreased at 80 ng/mL. Interestingly, we noted that while levels of Fas ligand (FasL) increased with increasing doses of OPG, the soluble form of FasL in the supernatant decreased. The results of a co-immunoprecipitation assay suggested that the decrease of sFasL might be caused by the binding of OPG. This would block the inhibition of the apoptosis of OCs and OPCs. Furthermore, changes in expression levels of Bax/Bcl-2, cleaved-caspase-9, cleaved-caspased-3 and the translocation of cytochrome c, illustrated that OPG induced apoptosis of OCs and OPCs via the classic Fas/FasL apoptosis pathway, and was mediated by mitochondria. Altogether, our results demonstrate that OPG induces OCs and OPCs apoptosis partly by the Fas/FasL signaling pathway.

  20. Differential Contribution of the First Two Enzymes of the MEP Pathway to the Supply of Metabolic Precursors for Carotenoid and Chlorophyll Biosynthesis in Carrot (Daucus carota).

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kevin; Quiroz, Luis F; Rodriguez-Concepción, Manuel; Stange, Claudia R

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids and chlorophylls are photosynthetic pigments synthesized in plastids from metabolic precursors provided by the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. The first two steps in the MEP pathway are catalyzed by the deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR) enzymes. While DXS has been recently shown to be the main flux-controlling step of the MEP pathway, both DXS and DXR enzymes have been proven to be able to promote an increase in MEP-derived products when overproduced in diverse plant systems. Carrot (Daucus carota) produces photosynthetic pigments (carotenoids and chlorophylls) in leaves and in light-exposed roots, whereas only carotenoids (mainly α- and β-carotene) accumulate in the storage root in darkness. To evaluate whether DXS and DXR activities influence the production of carotenoids and chlorophylls in carrot leaves and roots, the corresponding Arabidopsis thaliana genes were constitutively expressed in transgenic carrot plants. Our results suggest that DXS is limiting for the production of both carotenoids and chlorophylls in roots and leaves, whereas the regulatory role of DXR appeared to be minor. Interestingly, increased levels of DXS (but not of DXR) resulted in higher transcript abundance of endogenous carrot genes encoding phytoene synthase, the main rate-determining enzyme of the carotenoid pathway. These results support a central role for DXS on modulating the production of MEP-derived precursors to synthesize carotenoids and chlorophylls in carrot, confirming the pivotal relevance of this enzyme to engineer healthier, carotenoid-enriched products. PMID:27630663

  1. Differential Contribution of the First Two Enzymes of the MEP Pathway to the Supply of Metabolic Precursors for Carotenoid and Chlorophyll Biosynthesis in Carrot (Daucus carota)

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Kevin; Quiroz, Luis F.; Rodriguez-Concepción, Manuel; Stange, Claudia R.

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids and chlorophylls are photosynthetic pigments synthesized in plastids from metabolic precursors provided by the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. The first two steps in the MEP pathway are catalyzed by the deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR) enzymes. While DXS has been recently shown to be the main flux-controlling step of the MEP pathway, both DXS and DXR enzymes have been proven to be able to promote an increase in MEP-derived products when overproduced in diverse plant systems. Carrot (Daucus carota) produces photosynthetic pigments (carotenoids and chlorophylls) in leaves and in light-exposed roots, whereas only carotenoids (mainly α- and β-carotene) accumulate in the storage root in darkness. To evaluate whether DXS and DXR activities influence the production of carotenoids and chlorophylls in carrot leaves and roots, the corresponding Arabidopsis thaliana genes were constitutively expressed in transgenic carrot plants. Our results suggest that DXS is limiting for the production of both carotenoids and chlorophylls in roots and leaves, whereas the regulatory role of DXR appeared to be minor. Interestingly, increased levels of DXS (but not of DXR) resulted in higher transcript abundance of endogenous carrot genes encoding phytoene synthase, the main rate-determining enzyme of the carotenoid pathway. These results support a central role for DXS on modulating the production of MEP-derived precursors to synthesize carotenoids and chlorophylls in carrot, confirming the pivotal relevance of this enzyme to engineer healthier, carotenoid-enriched products. PMID:27630663

  2. Differential Contribution of the First Two Enzymes of the MEP Pathway to the Supply of Metabolic Precursors for Carotenoid and Chlorophyll Biosynthesis in Carrot (Daucus carota)

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Kevin; Quiroz, Luis F.; Rodriguez-Concepción, Manuel; Stange, Claudia R.

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids and chlorophylls are photosynthetic pigments synthesized in plastids from metabolic precursors provided by the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. The first two steps in the MEP pathway are catalyzed by the deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR) enzymes. While DXS has been recently shown to be the main flux-controlling step of the MEP pathway, both DXS and DXR enzymes have been proven to be able to promote an increase in MEP-derived products when overproduced in diverse plant systems. Carrot (Daucus carota) produces photosynthetic pigments (carotenoids and chlorophylls) in leaves and in light-exposed roots, whereas only carotenoids (mainly α- and β-carotene) accumulate in the storage root in darkness. To evaluate whether DXS and DXR activities influence the production of carotenoids and chlorophylls in carrot leaves and roots, the corresponding Arabidopsis thaliana genes were constitutively expressed in transgenic carrot plants. Our results suggest that DXS is limiting for the production of both carotenoids and chlorophylls in roots and leaves, whereas the regulatory role of DXR appeared to be minor. Interestingly, increased levels of DXS (but not of DXR) resulted in higher transcript abundance of endogenous carrot genes encoding phytoene synthase, the main rate-determining enzyme of the carotenoid pathway. These results support a central role for DXS on modulating the production of MEP-derived precursors to synthesize carotenoids and chlorophylls in carrot, confirming the pivotal relevance of this enzyme to engineer healthier, carotenoid-enriched products.

  3. Differential Contribution of the First Two Enzymes of the MEP Pathway to the Supply of Metabolic Precursors for Carotenoid and Chlorophyll Biosynthesis in Carrot (Daucus carota).

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kevin; Quiroz, Luis F; Rodriguez-Concepción, Manuel; Stange, Claudia R

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids and chlorophylls are photosynthetic pigments synthesized in plastids from metabolic precursors provided by the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. The first two steps in the MEP pathway are catalyzed by the deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR) enzymes. While DXS has been recently shown to be the main flux-controlling step of the MEP pathway, both DXS and DXR enzymes have been proven to be able to promote an increase in MEP-derived products when overproduced in diverse plant systems. Carrot (Daucus carota) produces photosynthetic pigments (carotenoids and chlorophylls) in leaves and in light-exposed roots, whereas only carotenoids (mainly α- and β-carotene) accumulate in the storage root in darkness. To evaluate whether DXS and DXR activities influence the production of carotenoids and chlorophylls in carrot leaves and roots, the corresponding Arabidopsis thaliana genes were constitutively expressed in transgenic carrot plants. Our results suggest that DXS is limiting for the production of both carotenoids and chlorophylls in roots and leaves, whereas the regulatory role of DXR appeared to be minor. Interestingly, increased levels of DXS (but not of DXR) resulted in higher transcript abundance of endogenous carrot genes encoding phytoene synthase, the main rate-determining enzyme of the carotenoid pathway. These results support a central role for DXS on modulating the production of MEP-derived precursors to synthesize carotenoids and chlorophylls in carrot, confirming the pivotal relevance of this enzyme to engineer healthier, carotenoid-enriched products.

  4. Import pathways of precursor proteins into mitochondria: multiple receptor sites are followed by a common membrane insertion site

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The precursor of porin, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, competes for the import of precursors destined for the three other mitochondrial compartments, including the Fe/S protein of the bc1- complex (intermembrane space), the ADP/ATP carrier (inner membrane), subunit 9 of the F0-ATPase (inner membrane), and subunit beta of the F1- ATPase (matrix). Competition occurs at the level of a common site at which precursors are inserted into the outer membrane. Protease- sensitive binding sites, which act before the common insertion site, appear to be responsible for the specificity and selectivity of mitochondrial protein uptake. We suggest that distinct receptor proteins on the mitochondrial surface specifically recognize precursor proteins and transfer them to a general insertion protein component (GIP) in the outer membrane. Beyond GIP, the import pathways diverge, either to the outer membrane or to translocation contact-sites, and then subsequently to the other mitochondrial compartments. PMID:2974457

  5. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways in Ecotoxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or incompletely characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, meabolic, signaling) t...

  6. Effect of temperature on the reaction pathway of calcium carbonate formation via precursor phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purgstaller, Bettina; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Konrad, Florian; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    It has been earlier postulated that some biogenic and sedimentary calcium carbonate (CaCO3) minerals (e.g. calcite and aragonite) are secondary in origin and have originally formed via a metastable calcium carbonate precursor phase (e.g. amorphous CaCO3, [1-2]). Such formation pathways are likely affected by various physicochemical parameters including aqueous Mg and temperature. In an effort to improve our understanding on the formation mechanism of CaCO3 minerals, precipitation experiments were carried out by the addition of a 0.6 M (Ca,Mg)Cl2 solution at distinct Mg/Ca ratios (1/4 and 1/8) into a 1 M NaHCO3 solution under constant pH conditions(8.3 ±0.1). The formation of CaCO3 was systematically examined as a function of temperature (6, 12, 18 and 25 ±0.3° C). During the experimental runs mineral precipitation was monitored by in situ Raman spectroscopy as well as by continuous sampling and analyzing of precipitates and reactive solutions. The results revealed two pathways of CaCO3 formation depending on the initial Mg/Ca ratio and temperature: (i) In experiments with a Mg/Ca ratio of 1/4 at ≤ 12° C as well as in experiments with a Mg/Ca ratio of 1/8 at ≤ 18° C, ikaite (CaCO3 6H2O) acts as a precursor phase for aragonite formation. (ii) In contrast higher temperatures induced the formation of Mg-rich amorphous CaCO3 (Mg-ACC) which was subsequently transformed to Mg-rich calcite. In situ Raman spectra showed that the transformation of Mg-ACC to Mg-calcite occurs at a higher rate (˜ 8 min) compared to that of ikaite to aragonite (> 2 h). Thus, the formation of aragonite rather than of Mg-calcite occurs due to the slower release of Ca2+and CO32- ions into the Mg-rich reactive solution during retarded ikaite dissolution. This behavior is generally consistent with the observation that calcite precipitation is inhibited at elevated aqueous Mg/Ca ratios. [1] Addadi L., Raz S. and Weiner S. (2003) Advanced Materials 15, 959-970. [2] Rodriguez-Blanco J. D

  7. Metabolic Engineering of a Novel Muconic Acid Biosynthesis Pathway via 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acid in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sudeshna; Goonewardena, Lakshani; Juturu, Veeresh

    2015-01-01

    cis,cis-Muconic acid (MA) is a commercially important raw material used in pharmaceuticals, functional resins, and agrochemicals. MA is also a potential platform chemical for the production of adipic acid (AA), terephthalic acid, caprolactam, and 1,6-hexanediol. A strain of Escherichia coli K-12, BW25113, was genetically modified, and a novel nonnative metabolic pathway was introduced for the synthesis of MA from glucose. The proposed pathway converted chorismate from the aromatic amino acid pathway to MA via 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHB). Three nonnative genes, pobA, aroY, and catA, coding for 4-hydroxybenzoate hydrolyase, protocatechuate decarboxylase, and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, respectively, were functionally expressed in E. coli to establish the MA biosynthetic pathway. E. coli native genes ubiC, aroFFBR, aroE, and aroL were overexpressed and the genes ptsH, ptsI, crr, and pykF were deleted from the E. coli genome in order to increase the precursors of the proposed MA pathway. The final engineered E. coli strain produced nearly 170 mg/liter of MA from simple carbon sources in shake flask experiments. The proposed pathway was proved to be functionally active, and the strategy can be used for future metabolic engineering efforts for production of MA from renewable sugars. PMID:26362984

  8. Metabolic engineering of a novel muconic acid biosynthesis pathway via 4-hydroxybenzoic acid in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Sudeshna; Jonnalagadda, Sudhakar; Goonewardena, Lakshani; Juturu, Veeresh

    2015-12-01

    cis,cis-Muconic acid (MA) is a commercially important raw material used in pharmaceuticals, functional resins, and agrochemicals. MA is also a potential platform chemical for the production of adipic acid (AA), terephthalic acid, caprolactam, and 1,6-hexanediol. A strain of Escherichia coli K-12, BW25113, was genetically modified, and a novel nonnative metabolic pathway was introduced for the synthesis of MA from glucose. The proposed pathway converted chorismate from the aromatic amino acid pathway to MA via 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHB). Three nonnative genes, pobA, aroY, and catA, coding for 4-hydroxybenzoate hydrolyase, protocatechuate decarboxylase, and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, respectively, were functionally expressed in E. coli to establish the MA biosynthetic pathway. E. coli native genes ubiC, aroF(FBR), aroE, and aroL were overexpressed and the genes ptsH, ptsI, crr, and pykF were deleted from the E. coli genome in order to increase the precursors of the proposed MA pathway. The final engineered E. coli strain produced nearly 170 mg/liter of MA from simple carbon sources in shake flask experiments. The proposed pathway was proved to be functionally active, and the strategy can be used for future metabolic engineering efforts for production of MA from renewable sugars. PMID:26362984

  9. APL-1, the Alzheimer's Amyloid precursor protein in Caenorhabditis elegans, modulates multiple metabolic pathways throughout development.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Collin Y; Raps, Daniel A; Li, Chris

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene or in genes that process APP are correlated with familial Alzheimer's disease (AD). The biological function of APP remains unclear. APP is a transmembrane protein that can be sequentially cleaved by different secretases to yield multiple fragments, which can potentially act as signaling molecules. Caenorhabditis elegans encodes one APP-related protein, APL-1, which is essential for viability. Here, we show that APL-1 signaling is dependent on the activity of the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12 and influences metabolic pathways such as developmental progression, body size, and egg-laying rate. Furthermore, apl-1(yn5) mutants, which produce high levels of the extracellular APL-1 fragment, show an incompletely penetrant temperature-sensitive embryonic lethality. In a genetic screen to isolate mutants in which the apl-1(yn5) lethality rate is modified, we identified a suppressor mutation in MOA-1/R155.2, a receptor-protein tyrosine phosphatase, and an enhancer mutation in MOA-2/B0495.6, a protein involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis. Knockdown of apl-1 in an apl-1(yn5) background caused lethality and molting defects at all larval stages, suggesting that apl-1 is required for each transitional molt. We suggest that signaling of the released APL-1 fragment modulates multiple metabolic states and that APL-1 is required throughout development.

  10. Engineering terpene biosynthesis in Streptomyces for production of the advanced biofuel precursor bisabolene.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Ryan M; Sekurova, Olga N; Keasling, Jay D; Zotchev, Sergey B

    2015-04-17

    The past decade has witnessed a large influx of research toward the creation of sustainable, biologically derived fuels. While significant effort has been exerted to improve production capacity in common hosts, such as Escherichia coli or Saccharomyces cerevisiae, studies concerning alternate microbes comparatively lag. In an effort to expand the breadth of characterized hosts for fuel production, we map the terpene biosynthetic pathway in a model actinobacterium, Streptomyces venezuelae, and further alter secondary metabolism to afford the advanced biofuel precursor bisabolene. Leveraging information gained from study of the native isoprenoid pathway, we were able to increase bisabolene titer nearly 5-fold over the base production strain, more than 2 orders of magnitude greater than the combined terpene yield in the wild-type host. We also explored production on carbon sources of varying complexity to, notably, define this host as one able to perform consolidated bioprocessing.

  11. Engineered biofiltration for the removal of disinfection by-product precursors and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    McKie, Michael J; Taylor-Edmonds, Liz; Andrews, Susan A; Andrews, Robert C

    2015-09-15

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed when naturally occurring organic matter reacts with chlorine used in drinking water treatment, and DBPs formed in chlorinated drinking water samples have been shown to cause a genotoxic response. The objective of the current study was to further understand the principles of biofiltration and the resulting impacts on the formation of DBPs and genotoxicity. Pilot-scale systems were utilized to assess the performance of engineered biofilters enhanced with hydrogen peroxide, in-line coagulants, and nutrients when compared to passively operated biofilters and conventional treatment (coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, non-biological filtration). Organic fractionation was completed using liquid chromatography-organic carbon detection (LC-OCD). Water samples were chlorinated after collection and examined for the removal of trihalomethane (THM), haloacetic acid (HAA), and adsorbable organic halide (AOX) precursors. Additionally, the formation potential of two halogenated furanones, 3-chloro-4(dichloromethyl)-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and mucochloric acid (MCA), and genotoxicity was determined. Biofiltration was shown to preferentially remove more DBP precursors than dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Formation potential of the unregulated DBPs, including MX and MCA, and genotoxic response was shown to be correlated to THM formation. These results infer that monitoring for THMs and HAAs provide insight to the formation of more mutagenic DBPs such as halogenated furanones, and that biofiltration may preferentially remove precursors to DBPs at a rate exceeding the removal of DOC.

  12. Engineered biofiltration for the removal of disinfection by-product precursors and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    McKie, Michael J; Taylor-Edmonds, Liz; Andrews, Susan A; Andrews, Robert C

    2015-09-15

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed when naturally occurring organic matter reacts with chlorine used in drinking water treatment, and DBPs formed in chlorinated drinking water samples have been shown to cause a genotoxic response. The objective of the current study was to further understand the principles of biofiltration and the resulting impacts on the formation of DBPs and genotoxicity. Pilot-scale systems were utilized to assess the performance of engineered biofilters enhanced with hydrogen peroxide, in-line coagulants, and nutrients when compared to passively operated biofilters and conventional treatment (coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, non-biological filtration). Organic fractionation was completed using liquid chromatography-organic carbon detection (LC-OCD). Water samples were chlorinated after collection and examined for the removal of trihalomethane (THM), haloacetic acid (HAA), and adsorbable organic halide (AOX) precursors. Additionally, the formation potential of two halogenated furanones, 3-chloro-4(dichloromethyl)-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and mucochloric acid (MCA), and genotoxicity was determined. Biofiltration was shown to preferentially remove more DBP precursors than dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Formation potential of the unregulated DBPs, including MX and MCA, and genotoxic response was shown to be correlated to THM formation. These results infer that monitoring for THMs and HAAs provide insight to the formation of more mutagenic DBPs such as halogenated furanones, and that biofiltration may preferentially remove precursors to DBPs at a rate exceeding the removal of DOC. PMID:26065391

  13. Discovery of Unclustered Fungal Indole Diterpene Biosynthetic Pathways through Combinatorial Pathway Reassembly in Engineered Yeast.

    PubMed

    Tang, Man-Cheng; Lin, Hsiao-Ching; Li, Dehai; Zou, Yi; Li, Jian; Xu, Wei; Cacho, Ralph A; Hillenmeyer, Maureen E; Garg, Neil K; Tang, Yi

    2015-11-01

    The structural diversity and biological activities of fungal indole diterpenes (IDTs) are generated in large part by the IDT cyclases (IDTCs). Identifying different IDTCs from IDT biosynthetic pathways is therefore important toward understanding how these enzymes introduce chemical diversity from a common linear precursor. However, IDTCs involved in the cyclization of the well-known aflavinine subgroup of IDTs have not been discovered. Here, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a heterologous host and a phylogenetically guided enzyme mining approach, we combinatorially assembled IDT biosynthetic pathways using IDTCs homologues identified from different fungal hosts. We identified the genetically standalone IDTCs involved in the cyclization of aflavinine and anominine and produced new IDTs not previously isolated. The cyclization mechanisms of the new IDTCs were proposed based on the yeast reconstitution results. Our studies demonstrate heterologous pathway assembly is a useful tool in the reconstitution of unclustered biosynthetic pathways.

  14. Effects of metabolic pathway precursors and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) on poly-(gamma)-glutamic acid production by Bacillus subtilis BL53.

    PubMed

    de Cesaro, Alessandra; da Silva, Suse Botelho; Ayub, Marco Antônio Záchia

    2014-09-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of the addition of metabolic precursors and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as an oxygen carrier to cultures of Bacillus subtilis BL53 during the production of γ-PGA. Kinetics analyses of cultivations of different media showed that B. subtilis BL53 is an exogenous glutamic acid-dependent strain. When the metabolic pathway precursors of γ-PGA synthesis, L-glutamine and a-ketoglutaric acid, were added to the culture medium, production of the biopolymer was increased by 20 % considering the medium without these precursors. The addition of 10 % of the oxygen carrier PDMS to cultures caused a two-fold increase in the volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient (kLa), improving γ-PGA production and productivity. Finally, bioreactor cultures of B. subtilis BL53 adopting the combination of optimized medium E, added of glutamine, α-ketoglutaric acid, and PDMS, showed a productivity of 1 g L(-1) h(-1) of g-PGA after only 24 h of cultivation. Results of this study suggest that the use of metabolic pathway precursors glutamine and a-ketolgutaric acid, combined with the addition of PDMS as an oxygen carrier in bioreactors, can improve γ-PGA production and productivity by Bacillus strains .

  15. Engineering the lactococcal mevalonate pathway for increased sesquiterpene production.

    PubMed

    Song, Adelene A; Abdullah, Janna Ong; Abdullah, Mohd P; Shafee, Norazizah; Othman, Roohaida; Noor, Normah Mohd; Rahim, Raha A

    2014-06-01

    Isoprenoids are a large, diverse group of secondary metabolites which has recently raised a renewed research interest due to genetic engineering advances, allowing specific isoprenoids to be produced and characterized in heterologous hosts. Many researches on metabolic engineering of heterologous hosts for increased isoprenoid production are focussed on Escherichia coli and yeasts. E. coli, as most prokaryotes, use the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway for isoprenoid production. Yeasts on the other hand, use the mevalonate pathway which is commonly found in eukaryotes. However, Lactococcus lactis is an attractive alternative host for heterologous isoprenoid production. Apart from being food-grade, this Gram-positive prokaryote uses the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid production instead of the MEP pathway. Previous studies have shown that L. lactis is able to produce sesquiterpenes through heterologous expression of plant sesquiterpene synthases. In this work, we analysed the gene expression of the lactococcal mevalonate pathway through RT-qPCR to successfully engineer L. lactis as an efficient host for isoprenoid production. We then overexpressed the mvk gene singly or co-expressed with the mvaA gene as an attempt to increase β-sesquiphellandrene production in L. lactis. It was observed that co-expression of mvk with mvaA doubled the amount of β-sesquiphellandrene produced. PMID:24828482

  16. RNase MRP is required for entry of 35S precursor rRNA into the canonical processing pathway.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Lasse; Bommankanti, Ananth; Li, Xing; Hayden, Lauren; Jones, Adrienne; Khan, Miriam; Oni, Tolulope; Zengel, Janice M

    2009-07-01

    RNase MRP is a nucleolar RNA-protein enzyme that participates in the processing of rRNA during ribosome biogenesis. Previous experiments suggested that RNase MRP makes a nonessential cleavage in the first internal transcribed spacer. Here we report experiments with new temperature-sensitive RNase MRP mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that show that the abundance of all early intermediates in the processing pathway is severely reduced upon inactivation of RNase MRP. Transcription of rRNA continues unabated as determined by RNA polymerase run-on transcription, but the precursor rRNA transcript does not accumulate, and appears to be unstable. Taken together, these observations suggest that inactivation of RNase MRP blocks cleavage at sites A0, A1, A2, and A3, which in turn, prevents precursor rRNA from entering the canonical processing pathway (35S > 20S + 27S > 18S + 25S + 5.8S rRNA). Nevertheless, at least some cleavage at the processing site in the second internal transcribed spacer takes place to form an unusual 24S intermediate, suggesting that cleavage at C2 is not blocked. Furthermore, the long form of 5.8S rRNA is made in the absence of RNase MRP activity, but only in the presence of Xrn1p (exonuclease 1), an enzyme not required for the canonical pathway. We conclude that RNase MRP is a key enzyme for initiating the canonical processing of precursor rRNA transcripts, but alternative pathway(s) might provide a backup for production of small amounts of rRNA.

  17. Chemical mechanism for high temperature combustion of engine relevant fuels with emphasis on soot precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Blanquart, G.; Pepiot-Desjardins, P.; Pitsch, H.

    2009-03-15

    This article presents a chemical mechanism for the high temperature combustion of a wide range of hydrocarbon fuels ranging from methane to iso-octane. The emphasis is placed on developing an accurate model for the formation of soot precursors for realistic fuel surrogates for premixed and diffusion flames. Species like acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}), propyne (C{sub 3}H{sub 4}), propene (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}), and butadiene (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}) play a major role in the formation of soot as their decomposition leads to the production of radicals involved in the formation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) and the further growth of soot particles. A chemical kinetic mechanism is developed to represent the combustion of these molecules and is validated against a series of experimental data sets including laminar burning velocities and ignition delay times. To correctly predict the formation of soot precursors from the combustion of engine relevant fuels, additional species should be considered. One normal alkane (n-heptane), one ramified alkane (iso-octane), and two aromatics (benzene and toluene) were chosen as chemical species representative of the components typically found in these fuels. A sub-mechanism for the combustion of these four species has been added, and the full mechanism has been further validated. Finally, the mechanism is supplemented with a sub-mechanism for the formation of larger PAH molecules up to cyclo[cd]pyrene. Laminar premixed and counterflow diffusion flames are simulated to assess the ability of the mechanism to predict the formation of soot precursors in flames. The final mechanism contains 149 species and 1651 reactions (forward and backward reactions counted separately). The mechanism is available with thermodynamic and transport properties as supplemental material. (author)

  18. Metabolic engineering of folate and its precursors in Mexican common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Ramírez Rivera, Naty G; García-Salinas, Carolina; Aragão, Francisco J L; Díaz de la Garza, Rocío Isabel

    2016-10-01

    Folate (vitamin B9) deficiency causes several health problems globally. However, folate biofortification of major staple crops is one alternative that can be used to improve vitamin intakes in populations at risk. We increased the folate levels in common bean by engineering the pteridine branch required for their biosynthesis. GTP cyclohydrolase I from Arabidopsis (AtGchI) was stably introduced into three common bean Pinto cultivars by particle bombardment. Seed-specific overexpression of AtGCHI caused significant increases of up to 150-fold in biosynthetic pteridines in the transformed lines. The pteridine boost enhanced folate levels in raw desiccated seeds by up to threefold (325 μg in a 100 g portion), which would represent 81% of the adult recommended daily allowance. Unexpectedly, the engineering also triggered a general increase in PABA levels, the other folate precursor. This was not observed in previous engineering studies and was probably caused by a feedforward mechanism that remains to be elucidated. Results from this work also show that common bean grains accumulate considerable amounts of oxidized pteridines that might represent products of folate degradation in desiccating seeds. Our study uncovers a probable different regulation of folate homoeostasis in these legume grains than that observed in other engineering works. Legumes are good sources of folates, and this work shows that they can be engineered to accumulate even greater amounts of folate that, when consumed, can improve folate status. Biofortification of common bean with folates and other micronutrients represents a promising strategy to improve the nutritional status of populations around the world.

  19. Natural variation in epigenetic pathways affects the specification of female gamete precursors in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Leal, Daniel; León-Martínez, Gloria; Abad-Vivero, Ursula; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2015-04-01

    In angiosperms, the transition to the female gametophytic phase relies on the specification of premeiotic gamete precursors from sporophytic cells in the ovule. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a single diploid cell is specified as the premeiotic female gamete precursor. Here, we show that ecotypes of Arabidopsis exhibit differences in megasporogenesis leading to phenotypes reminiscent of defects in dominant mutations that epigenetically affect the specification of female gamete precursors. Intraspecific hybridization and polyploidy exacerbate these defects, which segregate quantitatively in F2 populations derived from ecotypic hybrids, suggesting that multiple loci control cell specification at the onset of female meiosis. This variation in cell differentiation is influenced by the activity of ARGONAUTE9 (AGO9) and RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE6 (RDR6), two genes involved in epigenetic silencing that control the specification of female gamete precursors. The pattern of transcriptional regulation and localization of AGO9 varies among ecotypes, and abnormal gamete precursors in ovules defective for RDR6 share identity with ectopic gamete precursors found in selected ecotypes. Our results indicate that differences in the epigenetic control of cell specification lead to natural phenotypic variation during megasporogenesis. We propose that this mechanism could be implicated in the emergence and evolution of the reproductive alternatives that prevail in flowering plants.

  20. Natural Variation in Epigenetic Pathways Affects the Specification of Female Gamete Precursors in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Leal, Daniel; León-Martínez, Gloria; Abad-Vivero, Ursula; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    In angiosperms, the transition to the female gametophytic phase relies on the specification of premeiotic gamete precursors from sporophytic cells in the ovule. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a single diploid cell is specified as the premeiotic female gamete precursor. Here, we show that ecotypes of Arabidopsis exhibit differences in megasporogenesis leading to phenotypes reminiscent of defects in dominant mutations that epigenetically affect the specification of female gamete precursors. Intraspecific hybridization and polyploidy exacerbate these defects, which segregate quantitatively in F2 populations derived from ecotypic hybrids, suggesting that multiple loci control cell specification at the onset of female meiosis. This variation in cell differentiation is influenced by the activity of ARGONAUTE9 (AGO9) and RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE6 (RDR6), two genes involved in epigenetic silencing that control the specification of female gamete precursors. The pattern of transcriptional regulation and localization of AGO9 varies among ecotypes, and abnormal gamete precursors in ovules defective for RDR6 share identity with ectopic gamete precursors found in selected ecotypes. Our results indicate that differences in the epigenetic control of cell specification lead to natural phenotypic variation during megasporogenesis. We propose that this mechanism could be implicated in the emergence and evolution of the reproductive alternatives that prevail in flowering plants. PMID:25829442

  1. Natural variation in epigenetic pathways affects the specification of female gamete precursors in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Leal, Daniel; León-Martínez, Gloria; Abad-Vivero, Ursula; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2015-04-01

    In angiosperms, the transition to the female gametophytic phase relies on the specification of premeiotic gamete precursors from sporophytic cells in the ovule. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a single diploid cell is specified as the premeiotic female gamete precursor. Here, we show that ecotypes of Arabidopsis exhibit differences in megasporogenesis leading to phenotypes reminiscent of defects in dominant mutations that epigenetically affect the specification of female gamete precursors. Intraspecific hybridization and polyploidy exacerbate these defects, which segregate quantitatively in F2 populations derived from ecotypic hybrids, suggesting that multiple loci control cell specification at the onset of female meiosis. This variation in cell differentiation is influenced by the activity of ARGONAUTE9 (AGO9) and RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE6 (RDR6), two genes involved in epigenetic silencing that control the specification of female gamete precursors. The pattern of transcriptional regulation and localization of AGO9 varies among ecotypes, and abnormal gamete precursors in ovules defective for RDR6 share identity with ectopic gamete precursors found in selected ecotypes. Our results indicate that differences in the epigenetic control of cell specification lead to natural phenotypic variation during megasporogenesis. We propose that this mechanism could be implicated in the emergence and evolution of the reproductive alternatives that prevail in flowering plants. PMID:25829442

  2. Cofactor Engineering for Enhancing the Flux of Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, M. Kalim; Jones, Patrik R.

    2014-01-01

    The manufacture of a diverse array of chemicals is now possible with biologically engineered strains, an approach that is greatly facilitated by the emergence of synthetic biology. This is principally achieved through pathway engineering in which enzyme activities are coordinated within a genetically amenable host to generate the product of interest. A great deal of attention is typically given to the quantitative levels of the enzymes with little regard to their overall qualitative states. This highly constrained approach fails to consider other factors that may be necessary for enzyme functionality. In particular, enzymes with physically bound cofactors, otherwise known as holoenzymes, require careful evaluation. Herein, we discuss the importance of cofactors for biocatalytic processes and show with empirical examples why the synthesis and integration of cofactors for the formation of holoenzymes warrant a great deal of attention within the context of pathway engineering. PMID:25221776

  3. Metabolic engineering of biosynthetic pathway for production of renewable biofuels.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijai; Mani, Indra; Chaudhary, Dharmendra Kumar; Dhar, Pawan Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Metabolic engineering is an important area of research that involves editing genetic networks to overproduce a certain substance by the cells. Using a combination of genetic, metabolic, and modeling methods, useful substances have been synthesized in the past at industrial scale and in a cost-effective manner. Currently, metabolic engineering is being used to produce sufficient, economical, and eco-friendly biofuels. In the recent past, a number of efforts have been made towards engineering biosynthetic pathways for large scale and efficient production of biofuels from biomass. Given the adoption of metabolic engineering approaches by the biofuel industry, this paper reviews various approaches towards the production and enhancement of renewable biofuels such as ethanol, butanol, isopropanol, hydrogen, and biodiesel. We have also identified specific areas where more work needs to be done in the future.

  4. The biosynthetic pathway of curcuminoid in turmeric (Curcuma longa) as revealed by 13C-labeled precursors.

    PubMed

    Kita, Tomoko; Imai, Shinsuke; Sawada, Hiroshi; Kumagai, Hidehiko; Seto, Haruo

    2008-07-01

    In order to investigate the biosynthesis of curcuminoid in rhizomes of turmeric (Curcuma longa), we established an in vitro culture system of turmeric plants for feeding (13)C-labeled precursors. Analyses of labeled desmethoxycurcumin (DMC), an unsymmetrical curcuminoid, by (13)C-NMR, revealed that one molecule of acetic acid or malonic acid and two molecules of phenylalanine or phenylpropanoids, but not tyrosine, were incorporated into DMC. The incorporation efficiencies of the same precursors into DMC and curcumin were similar, and were in the order malonic acid > acetic acid, and cinnamic acid > p-coumaric acid > ferulic acid. These results suggest the possibility that the pathway to curcuminoids utilized two cinnamoyl CoAs and one malonyl CoA, and that hydroxy- and methoxy-functional groups on the aromatic rings were introduced after the formation of the curcuminoid skeleton.

  5. Engineered dermal equivalent tissue in vitro by assembly of microtissue precursors.

    PubMed

    Palmiero, Carmela; Imparato, Giorgia; Urciuolo, Francesco; Netti, Paolo

    2010-07-01

    Tissue-engineered constructs can be fabricated by the assembly of smaller building blocks in order to mimic much of the native biology that is often made from repeating functional units. Our aim was to realize a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue-like construct in vitro by inducing the assembly of functional micrometric tissue precursors (microTPs). MicroTPs were obtained by dynamic cell seeding of bovine fibroblasts on porous gelatine microcarriers using a spinner flask bioreactor. During the dynamic seeding, cells adhered, proliferated and synthesized a thin layer of extracellular matrix (ECM) in and around the macroporous beads, generating the microTPs. The analysis showed that the ECM produced was rich in type I collagen. The cells and ECM layer around the microTPs allowed their biological sintering via cell-cell and cell-matrix interaction after only a few days of dynamic seeding. The assembling ability of microTPs was exploited by placing them in a maturation chamber. After 1 week of culture disc-shaped constructs (1cm in diameter, 1mm in thickness) of completely assembled microTPs were collected. The biohybrid obtained presented both a homogeneous and compact aspect. Moreover, histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed an abundant ECM, rich in type I collagen, interconnecting the microTPs. The results obtained in this survey pave the way to realizing a 3-D dermal tissue equivalent by means of a bottom-up tissue engineering approach.

  6. Plasmid DNA-entrapped nanoparticles engineered from microemulsion precursors: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhengrong; Mumper, Russell J

    2002-01-01

    Nonviral gene therapy has been a rapidly growing field. However, delivery systems that can provide protection for pDNA and potential targeting are still desired. A novel pDNA-nanoparticle delivery system was developed by entrapping hydrophobized pDNA inside nanoparticles engineered from oil-in-water (O/W) microemulsion precursors. Plasmid DNA was hydrophobized by complexing with cationic surfactants DOTAP and DDAB. Warm O/W microemulsions were prepared at 50-55 degrees C with emulsifying wax, Brij 78, Tween 20, and Tween 80. Nanoparticles were engineered by simply cooling the O/W microemulsions containing the hydrophobized pDNA in the oil phase to room temperature while stirring. The nanoparticles were characterized by particle sizing, zeta-potential, and TEM. Nanoparticles were challenged with serum nucleases to assess pDNA stability. In addition, the nanoparticles were coincubated with simulated biological media to assess their stability. In vitro hepatocyte transfection studies were completed with uncoated nanoparticles or nanoparticles coated with pullulan, a hepatocyte targeting ligand. In vivo biodistribution of the nanoparticles containing I-125 labeled pDNA was monitored 30 min after tail-vein injection to Balb/C mice. Depending on the hydrophobizing lipid agent employed, uniform pDNA-entrapped nanoparticles (100-160 nm in diameter) were engineered within minutes from warm O/W microemulsion precursors. The nanoparticles were negatively charged (-6 to -15 mV) and spherical. An anionic exchange column was used to separate unentrapped pDNA from nanoparticles. Gel permeation chromatography of pDNA-entrapped and serum-digested nanoparticles showed that the incorporation efficiency was approximately 30%. Free 'naked' pDNA was completely digested by serum nucleases while the entrapped pDNA remained intact. Moreover, in vitro transfection studies in Hep G2 cells showed that pullulan-coated nanoparticles resulted in enhanced luciferase expression, compared to both p

  7. Plasmid DNA-entrapped nanoparticles engineered from microemulsion precursors: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhengrong; Mumper, Russell J

    2002-01-01

    Nonviral gene therapy has been a rapidly growing field. However, delivery systems that can provide protection for pDNA and potential targeting are still desired. A novel pDNA-nanoparticle delivery system was developed by entrapping hydrophobized pDNA inside nanoparticles engineered from oil-in-water (O/W) microemulsion precursors. Plasmid DNA was hydrophobized by complexing with cationic surfactants DOTAP and DDAB. Warm O/W microemulsions were prepared at 50-55 degrees C with emulsifying wax, Brij 78, Tween 20, and Tween 80. Nanoparticles were engineered by simply cooling the O/W microemulsions containing the hydrophobized pDNA in the oil phase to room temperature while stirring. The nanoparticles were characterized by particle sizing, zeta-potential, and TEM. Nanoparticles were challenged with serum nucleases to assess pDNA stability. In addition, the nanoparticles were coincubated with simulated biological media to assess their stability. In vitro hepatocyte transfection studies were completed with uncoated nanoparticles or nanoparticles coated with pullulan, a hepatocyte targeting ligand. In vivo biodistribution of the nanoparticles containing I-125 labeled pDNA was monitored 30 min after tail-vein injection to Balb/C mice. Depending on the hydrophobizing lipid agent employed, uniform pDNA-entrapped nanoparticles (100-160 nm in diameter) were engineered within minutes from warm O/W microemulsion precursors. The nanoparticles were negatively charged (-6 to -15 mV) and spherical. An anionic exchange column was used to separate unentrapped pDNA from nanoparticles. Gel permeation chromatography of pDNA-entrapped and serum-digested nanoparticles showed that the incorporation efficiency was approximately 30%. Free 'naked' pDNA was completely digested by serum nucleases while the entrapped pDNA remained intact. Moreover, in vitro transfection studies in Hep G2 cells showed that pullulan-coated nanoparticles resulted in enhanced luciferase expression, compared to both p

  8. Metabolic engineering of microbial pathways for advanced biofuels production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fuzhong; Rodriguez, Sarah; Keasling, Jay D

    2011-12-01

    Production of biofuels from renewable resources such as cellulosic biomass provides a source of liquid transportation fuel to replace petroleum-based fuels. This endeavor requires the conversion of cellulosic biomass into simple sugars, and the conversion of simple sugars into biofuels. Recently, microorganisms have been engineered to convert simple sugars into several types of biofuels, such as alcohols, fatty acid alkyl esters, alkanes, and terpenes, with high titers and yields. Here, we review recently engineered biosynthetic pathways from the well-characterized microorganisms Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of several advanced biofuels.

  9. Preparation and characterization of novel coenzyme Q10 nanoparticles engineered from microemulsion precursors.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Hsuan; Cui, Zhengrong; Mumper, Russell J; Jay, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to prepare and characterize nanoparticles into which Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) had been incorporated (CoQ10-NPs) using a simple and potentially scalable method. CoQ10-NPs were prepared by cooling warm microemulsion precursors composed of emulsifying wax, CoQ10, Brij 78, and/or Tween 20. The nanoparticles were lyophilized, and the stability of CoQ10-NPs in both lyophilized form and aqueous suspension was monitored over 7 days. The release of CoQ10 from the nanoparticles was investigated at 37 degrees C. Finally, an in vitro study of the uptake of CoQ10-NPs by mouse macrophage, J774A.1, was completed. The incorporation efficiency of CoQ10 was approximately 74% +/- 5%. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) showed that the nanoparticle was not a physical mixture of its individual components. The size of the nanoparticles increased over time if stored in aqueous suspension. However, enhanced stability was observed when the nanoparticles were stored at 4 degrees C. Storage in lyophilized form demonstrated the highest stability. The in vitro release profile of CoQ10 from the nanoparticles showed an initial period of rapid release in the first 9 hours followed by a period of slower and extended release. The uptake of CoQ10-NPs by the J774A.1 cells was over 4-fold higher than that of the CoQ10-free nanoparticles (P < .05). In conclusion, CoQ10-NPs with potential application for oral CoQ10 delivery were engineered readily from microemulsion precursors. PMID:14621964

  10. Preparation and characterization of novel coenzyme Q10 nanoparticles engineered from microemulsion precursors.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Hsuan; Cui, Zhengrong; Mumper, Russell J; Jay, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to prepare and characterize nanoparticles into which Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) had been incorporated (CoQ10-NPs) using a simple and potentially scalable method. CoQ10-NPs were prepared by cooling warm microemulsion precursors composed of emulsifying wax, CoQ10, Brij 78, and/or Tween 20. The nanoparticles were lyophilized, and the stability of CoQ10-NPs in both lyophilized form and aqueous suspension was monitored over 7 days. The release of CoQ10 from the nanoparticles was investigated at 37 degrees C. Finally, an in vitro study of the uptake of CoQ10-NPs by mouse macrophage, J774A.1, was completed. The incorporation efficiency of CoQ10 was approximately 74% +/- 5%. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) showed that the nanoparticle was not a physical mixture of its individual components. The size of the nanoparticles increased over time if stored in aqueous suspension. However, enhanced stability was observed when the nanoparticles were stored at 4 degrees C. Storage in lyophilized form demonstrated the highest stability. The in vitro release profile of CoQ10 from the nanoparticles showed an initial period of rapid release in the first 9 hours followed by a period of slower and extended release. The uptake of CoQ10-NPs by the J774A.1 cells was over 4-fold higher than that of the CoQ10-free nanoparticles (P < .05). In conclusion, CoQ10-NPs with potential application for oral CoQ10 delivery were engineered readily from microemulsion precursors.

  11. Engineering of methionine chain elongation part of glucoraphanin pathway in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Nadia; Crocoll, Christoph; Erik Olsen, Carl; Ann Halkier, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    The methionine-derived glucosinolate glucoraphanin is associated with the health-promoting properties of broccoli. This has developed a strong interest in producing this compound in high amounts from a microbial source. Glucoraphanin synthesis starts with a five-gene chain elongation pathway that converts methionine to dihomo-methionine, which is subsequently converted to glucoraphanin by the seven-gene glucosinolate core structure pathway. As dihomo-methionine is the precursor amino acid for glucoraphanin production, a first challenge is to establish an expression system for production of dihomo-methionine. In planta, the methionine chain elongation enzymes are physically separated within the cell with the first enzyme in the cytosol while the rest are located in the chloroplast. A de-compartmentalization approach was applied to produce dihomo-methionine by expression of the respective plant genes in Escherichia coli cytosol. Introduction of two plasmids encoding the methionine chain elongation pathway into E. coli resulted in production of 25mgL(-1) of dihomo-methionine. In addition to chain-elongated methionine products, side-products from chain elongation of leucine were produced. Methionine supplementation enhanced dihomo-methionine production to 57mgL(-1), while keeping a steady level of the chain-elongated leucine products. Engineering of the de-compartmentalized pathway of dihomo-methionine in E. coli cytosol provides an important first step for microbial production of the health-promoting glucoraphanin.

  12. Nomenclature, molecular genetics and clinical significance of the precursor lesions in the serrated polyp pathway of colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liang, John J; Alrawi, Sadir; Tan, Dongfeng

    2008-01-01

    Serrated adenomas (SAs) are part of the distinct serrated polyp pathway of colorectal carcinogenesis characterized by microsatellite instability and deficiency in DNA mismatch repair. Sessile SA is a recently recognized lesion that typically presents as a large sessile polyp, but lacks the conventional dysplasia. It is more frequently found on the right side than on the left side of the colon, and is thought to represent an intermediate form in the hyperplastic polyp to sessile SA, traditional SA, and colon cancer sequence. Many terms have been used and are still in use in the literature to describe this lesion, such as "hyperplastic polyposis", "giant hyperplastic polyposis," "large hyperplastic polyps," "hyperplastic-adenomatous polyposis syndrome," "giant hyperplastic polyp," and "mixed epithelial polyp." The purpose of this paper is to review and clarify the confusing nomenclature, and to provide a framework for understanding the genetic alterations and clinical significance of these precursor lesions in the serrated polyp pathway of colorectal caner.

  13. Engineering cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A supply in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Pathway stoichiometry, free-energy conservation and redox-cofactor balancing.

    PubMed

    van Rossum, Harmen M; Kozak, Barbara U; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2016-07-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important industrial cell factory and an attractive experimental model for evaluating novel metabolic engineering strategies. Many current and potential products of this yeast require acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) as a precursor and pathways towards these products are generally expressed in its cytosol. The native S. cerevisiae pathway for production of cytosolic acetyl-CoA consumes 2 ATP equivalents in the acetyl-CoA synthetase reaction. Catabolism of additional sugar substrate, which may be required to generate this ATP, negatively affects product yields. Here, we review alternative pathways that can be engineered into yeast to optimize supply of cytosolic acetyl-CoA as a precursor for product formation. Particular attention is paid to reaction stoichiometry, free-energy conservation and redox-cofactor balancing of alternative pathways for acetyl-CoA synthesis from glucose. A theoretical analysis of maximally attainable yields on glucose of four compounds (n-butanol, citric acid, palmitic acid and farnesene) showed a strong product dependency of the optimal pathway configuration for acetyl-CoA synthesis. Moreover, this analysis showed that combination of different acetyl-CoA production pathways may be required to achieve optimal product yields. This review underlines that an integral analysis of energy coupling and redox-cofactor balancing in precursor-supply and product-formation pathways is crucial for the design of efficient cell factories. PMID:27016336

  14. Engineering cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A supply in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Pathway stoichiometry, free-energy conservation and redox-cofactor balancing.

    PubMed

    van Rossum, Harmen M; Kozak, Barbara U; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2016-07-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important industrial cell factory and an attractive experimental model for evaluating novel metabolic engineering strategies. Many current and potential products of this yeast require acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) as a precursor and pathways towards these products are generally expressed in its cytosol. The native S. cerevisiae pathway for production of cytosolic acetyl-CoA consumes 2 ATP equivalents in the acetyl-CoA synthetase reaction. Catabolism of additional sugar substrate, which may be required to generate this ATP, negatively affects product yields. Here, we review alternative pathways that can be engineered into yeast to optimize supply of cytosolic acetyl-CoA as a precursor for product formation. Particular attention is paid to reaction stoichiometry, free-energy conservation and redox-cofactor balancing of alternative pathways for acetyl-CoA synthesis from glucose. A theoretical analysis of maximally attainable yields on glucose of four compounds (n-butanol, citric acid, palmitic acid and farnesene) showed a strong product dependency of the optimal pathway configuration for acetyl-CoA synthesis. Moreover, this analysis showed that combination of different acetyl-CoA production pathways may be required to achieve optimal product yields. This review underlines that an integral analysis of energy coupling and redox-cofactor balancing in precursor-supply and product-formation pathways is crucial for the design of efficient cell factories.

  15. Glycosphingolipid synthesis inhibitor represses cytokine-induced activation of the Ras-MAPK pathway in embryonic neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Makoto; Nakamura, Kazuo; Taga, Tetsuya

    2005-09-01

    Neuronal and glial cells in the central nervous system are generated from common neural precursor cells during development. To evaluate the functions of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) in neural precursor cells, neuroepithelial cells (NECs) were prepared from mouse embryos (E14.5), and the effects of an inhibitor of glucosylceramide synthesis, D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP), on NECs was investigated. In PDMP-treated NECs, the expression of GD3, a major ganglioside of NECs, disappeared. We found that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced proliferation and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation were repressed in PDMP-treated NECs. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-induced ERK activation was also abolished in PDMP-treated NECs, suggesting that PDMP specifically represses the Ras-MAPK pathway. bFGF-induced activation of the Ras-MAPK pathway in NECs is dependent on GSL-enriched microdomains, lipid rafts. The organization of lipid rafts and the distribution of Ras and Grb2-SOS in the microdomains were not affected. However, Ras activation was repressed in PDMP-treated NECs. In PDMP-treated NECs, some neuronal genes were up-regulated and glial genes were down-regulated. These results suggest that GSLs might be involved in the proliferation, survival, signal transduction and differentiation of NECs.

  16. Silencing of Amyloid Precursor Protein Expression Using a New Engineered Delta Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Ben Aissa, Manel; April, Marie-Claude; Bergeron, Lucien-Junior; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Levesque, Georges

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) etiological studies suggest that an elevation in amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) level contributes to aggregations of the peptide and subsequent development of the disease. The major constituent of these amyloid peptides is the 1 to 40–42 residue peptide (Aβ40−42) derived from amyloid protein precursor (APP). Most likely, reducing Aβ levels in the brain may block both its aggregation and neurotoxicity and would be beneficial for patients with AD. Among the several possible ways to lower Aβ accumulation in the cells, we have selectively chosen to target the primary step in the Aβ cascade, namely, to reduce APP gene expression. Toward this end, we engineered specific SOFA-HDV ribozymes, a new generation of catalytic RNA tools, to decrease APP mRNA levels. Additionally, we demonstrated that APP-ribozymes are effective at decreasing APP mRNA and protein levels as well as Aβ levels in neuronal cells. Our results could lay the groundwork for a new protective treatment for AD. PMID:22482079

  17. Murine Muscle Engineered from Dermal Precursors: An In Vitro Model for Skeletal Muscle Generation, Degeneration, and Fatty Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    García-Parra, Patricia; Naldaiz-Gastesi, Neia; Maroto, Marcos; Padín, Juan Fernando; Goicoechea, María; Aiastui, Ana; Fernández-Morales, José Carlos; García-Belda, Paula; Lacalle, Jaione; Álava, Jose Iñaki; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; García, Antonio G.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can be engineered by converting dermal precursors into muscle progenitors and differentiated myocytes. However, the efficiency of muscle development remains relatively low and it is currently unclear if this is due to poor characterization of the myogenic precursors, the protocols used for cell differentiation, or a combination of both. In this study, we characterized myogenic precursors present in murine dermospheres, and evaluated mature myotubes grown in a novel three-dimensional culture system. After 5–7 days of differentiation, we observed isolated, twitching myotubes followed by spontaneous contractions of the entire tissue-engineered muscle construct on an extracellular matrix (ECM). In vitro engineered myofibers expressed canonical muscle markers and exhibited a skeletal (not cardiac) muscle ultrastructure, with numerous striations and the presence of aligned, enlarged mitochondria, intertwined with sarcoplasmic reticula (SR). Engineered myofibers exhibited Na+- and Ca2+-dependent inward currents upon acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation and tetrodotoxin-sensitive spontaneous action potentials. Moreover, ACh, nicotine, and caffeine elicited cytosolic Ca2+ transients; fiber contractions coupled to these Ca2+ transients suggest that Ca2+ entry is activating calcium-induced calcium release from the SR. Blockade by d-tubocurarine of ACh-elicited inward currents and Ca2+ transients suggests nicotinic receptor involvement. Interestingly, after 1 month, engineered muscle constructs showed progressive degradation of the myofibers concomitant with fatty infiltration, paralleling the natural course of muscular degeneration. We conclude that mature myofibers may be differentiated on the ECM from myogenic precursor cells present in murine dermospheres, in an in vitro system that mimics some characteristics found in aging and muscular degeneration. PMID:23631552

  18. Engineering Heteromaterials to Control Lithium Ion Transport Pathways

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Yang; Vishniakou, Siarhei; Yoo, Jinkyoung; Dayeh, Shadi A.

    2015-12-21

    Safe and efficient operation of lithium ion batteries requires precisely directed flow of lithium ions and electrons to control the first directional volume changes in anode and cathode materials. Understanding and controlling the lithium ion transport in battery electrodes becomes crucial to the design of high performance and durable batteries. Recent work revealed that the chemical potential barriers encountered at the surfaces of heteromaterials play an important role in directing lithium ion transport at nanoscale. Here, we utilize in situ transmission electron microscopy to demonstrate that we can switch lithiation pathways from radial to axial to grain-by-grain lithiation through themore » systematic creation of heteromaterial combinations in the Si-Ge nanowire system. Lastly, our systematic studies show that engineered materials at nanoscale can overcome the intrinsic orientation-dependent lithiation, and open new pathways to aid in the development of compact, safe, and efficient batteries.« less

  19. Engineering Heteromaterials to Control Lithium Ion Transport Pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Vishniakou, Siarhei; Yoo, Jinkyoung; Dayeh, Shadi A

    2015-01-01

    Safe and efficient operation of lithium ion batteries requires precisely directed flow of lithium ions and electrons to control the first directional volume changes in anode and cathode materials. Understanding and controlling the lithium ion transport in battery electrodes becomes crucial to the design of high performance and durable batteries. Recent work revealed that the chemical potential barriers encountered at the surfaces of heteromaterials play an important role in directing lithium ion transport at nanoscale. Here, we utilize in situ transmission electron microscopy to demonstrate that we can switch lithiation pathways from radial to axial to grain-by-grain lithiation through the systematic creation of heteromaterial combinations in the Si-Ge nanowire system. Our systematic studies show that engineered materials at nanoscale can overcome the intrinsic orientation-dependent lithiation, and open new pathways to aid in the development of compact, safe, and efficient batteries. PMID:26686655

  20. Engineering Heteromaterials to Control Lithium Ion Transport Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Vishniakou, Siarhei; Yoo, Jinkyoung; Dayeh, Shadi A.

    2015-12-01

    Safe and efficient operation of lithium ion batteries requires precisely directed flow of lithium ions and electrons to control the first directional volume changes in anode and cathode materials. Understanding and controlling the lithium ion transport in battery electrodes becomes crucial to the design of high performance and durable batteries. Recent work revealed that the chemical potential barriers encountered at the surfaces of heteromaterials play an important role in directing lithium ion transport at nanoscale. Here, we utilize in situ transmission electron microscopy to demonstrate that we can switch lithiation pathways from radial to axial to grain-by-grain lithiation through the systematic creation of heteromaterial combinations in the Si-Ge nanowire system. Our systematic studies show that engineered materials at nanoscale can overcome the intrinsic orientation-dependent lithiation, and open new pathways to aid in the development of compact, safe, and efficient batteries.

  1. Engineering Heteromaterials to Control Lithium Ion Transport Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Vishniakou, Siarhei; Yoo, Jinkyoung; Dayeh, Shadi A.

    2015-12-21

    Safe and efficient operation of lithium ion batteries requires precisely directed flow of lithium ions and electrons to control the first directional volume changes in anode and cathode materials. Understanding and controlling the lithium ion transport in battery electrodes becomes crucial to the design of high performance and durable batteries. Recent work revealed that the chemical potential barriers encountered at the surfaces of heteromaterials play an important role in directing lithium ion transport at nanoscale. Here, we utilize in situ transmission electron microscopy to demonstrate that we can switch lithiation pathways from radial to axial to grain-by-grain lithiation through the systematic creation of heteromaterial combinations in the Si-Ge nanowire system. Lastly, our systematic studies show that engineered materials at nanoscale can overcome the intrinsic orientation-dependent lithiation, and open new pathways to aid in the development of compact, safe, and efficient batteries.

  2. Engineering Heteromaterials to Control Lithium Ion Transport Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Vishniakou, Siarhei; Yoo, Jinkyoung; Dayeh, Shadi A.

    2015-01-01

    Safe and efficient operation of lithium ion batteries requires precisely directed flow of lithium ions and electrons to control the first directional volume changes in anode and cathode materials. Understanding and controlling the lithium ion transport in battery electrodes becomes crucial to the design of high performance and durable batteries. Recent work revealed that the chemical potential barriers encountered at the surfaces of heteromaterials play an important role in directing lithium ion transport at nanoscale. Here, we utilize in situ transmission electron microscopy to demonstrate that we can switch lithiation pathways from radial to axial to grain-by-grain lithiation through the systematic creation of heteromaterial combinations in the Si-Ge nanowire system. Our systematic studies show that engineered materials at nanoscale can overcome the intrinsic orientation-dependent lithiation, and open new pathways to aid in the development of compact, safe, and efficient batteries. PMID:26686655

  3. Novel tomato flavours introduced by plastidial terpenoid pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    Mollet, Beat; Niederberger, Peter; Pétiard, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Until recently breeding efforts centred on high-yield production while sacrificing flavour and taste quality traits of mass produced food products, such as tomatoes. The recent publication of Davidovich-Rikanati et al. demonstrates the technical feasibility of the genetical engineering of pathways in tomato plants to modify their fruit flavour profile in a proof-of-concept approach. The reported work ranks among an increasing number of reported successful modifications of edible plants with a focus on the benefits to end-consumers.

  4. Career Pursuit Pathways among Emerging Adult Men and Women: Psychosocial Correlates and Precursors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulman, Shmuel; Barr, Tamuz; Livneh, Yaara; Nurmi, Jari-Erik; Vasalampi, Kati; Pratt, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined career pursuit pathways in 100 Israeli emerging adults (54 men) who were followed from age 22 to 29. Employing a semi-structured interview at the age of 29, participants were asked about current work and educational status, work and educational goals and status changes in recent years, and to reflect on the meaning of…

  5. Exploring the Engineering Student Experience: Findings from the Academic Pathways of People Learning Engineering Survey (APPLES). TR-10-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Sheri; Gilmartin, Shannon; Chen, Helen L.; Donaldson, Krista; Lichtenstein, Gary; Eris, Ozgur; Lande, Micah; Toye, George

    2010-01-01

    This report is based on data from the Academic Pathways of People Learning Engineering Survey (APPLES), administered to engineering students at 21 U.S. engineering colleges and schools in the spring of 2008. The first comprehensive set of analyses completed on the APPLES dataset presented here looks at how engineering students experience their…

  6. Extending shikimate pathway for the production of muconic acid and its precursor salicylic acid in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuheng; Sun, Xinxiao; Yuan, Qipeng; Yan, Yajun

    2014-05-01

    cis,cis-Muconic acid (MA) and salicylic acid (SA) are naturally-occurring organic acids having great commercial value. MA is a potential platform chemical for the manufacture of several widely-used consumer plastics; while SA is mainly used for producing pharmaceuticals (for example, aspirin and lamivudine) and skincare and haircare products. At present, MA and SA are commercially produced by organic chemical synthesis using petro-derived aromatic chemicals, such as benzene, as starting materials, which is not environmentally friendly. Here, we report a novel approach for efficient microbial production of MA via extending shikimate pathway by introducing the hybrid of an SA biosynthetic pathway with its partial degradation pathway. First, we engineered a well-developed phenylalanine producing Escherichia coli strain into an SA overproducer by introducing isochorismate synthase and isochorismate pyruvate lyase. The engineered strain is able to produce 1.2g/L of SA from simple carbon sources, which is the highest titer reported so far. Further, the partial SA degradation pathway involving salicylate 1-monoxygenase and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase is established to achieve the conversion of SA to MA. Finally, a de novo MA biosynthetic pathway is assembled by integrating the established SA biosynthesis and degradation modules. Modular optimization enables the production of up to 1.5g/L MA within 48h in shake flasks. This study not only establishes an efficient microbial platform for the production of SA and MA, but also demonstrates a generalizable pathway design strategy for the de novo biosynthesis of valuable degradation metabolites.

  7. Extending shikimate pathway for the production of muconic acid and its precursor salicylic acid in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuheng; Sun, Xinxiao; Yuan, Qipeng; Yan, Yajun

    2014-05-01

    cis,cis-Muconic acid (MA) and salicylic acid (SA) are naturally-occurring organic acids having great commercial value. MA is a potential platform chemical for the manufacture of several widely-used consumer plastics; while SA is mainly used for producing pharmaceuticals (for example, aspirin and lamivudine) and skincare and haircare products. At present, MA and SA are commercially produced by organic chemical synthesis using petro-derived aromatic chemicals, such as benzene, as starting materials, which is not environmentally friendly. Here, we report a novel approach for efficient microbial production of MA via extending shikimate pathway by introducing the hybrid of an SA biosynthetic pathway with its partial degradation pathway. First, we engineered a well-developed phenylalanine producing Escherichia coli strain into an SA overproducer by introducing isochorismate synthase and isochorismate pyruvate lyase. The engineered strain is able to produce 1.2g/L of SA from simple carbon sources, which is the highest titer reported so far. Further, the partial SA degradation pathway involving salicylate 1-monoxygenase and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase is established to achieve the conversion of SA to MA. Finally, a de novo MA biosynthetic pathway is assembled by integrating the established SA biosynthesis and degradation modules. Modular optimization enables the production of up to 1.5g/L MA within 48h in shake flasks. This study not only establishes an efficient microbial platform for the production of SA and MA, but also demonstrates a generalizable pathway design strategy for the de novo biosynthesis of valuable degradation metabolites. PMID:24583236

  8. Evaluation of Biosynthetic Pathway and Engineered Biosynthesis of Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Shinji; Sato, Michio; Tsunematsu, Yuta; Watanabe, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Varieties of alkaloids are known to be produced by various organisms, including bacteria, fungi and plants, as secondary metabolites that exhibit useful bioactivities. However, understanding of how those metabolites are biosynthesized still remains limited, because most of these compounds are isolated from plants and at a trace level of production. In this review, we focus on recent efforts in identifying the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of those nitrogen-containing natural products and elucidating the mechanisms involved in the biosynthetic processes. The alkaloids discussed in this review are ditryptophenaline (dimeric diketopiperazine alkaloid), saframycin (tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid), strictosidine (monoterpene indole alkaloid), ergotamine (ergot alkaloid) and opiates (benzylisoquinoline and morphinan alkaloid). This review also discusses the engineered biosynthesis of these compounds, primarily through heterologous reconstitution of target biosynthetic pathways in suitable hosts, such as Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans. Those heterologous biosynthetic systems can be used to confirm the functions of the isolated genes, economically scale up the production of the alkaloids for commercial distributions and engineer the biosynthetic pathways to produce valuable analogs of the alkaloids. In particular, extensive involvement of oxidation reactions catalyzed by oxidoreductases, such as cytochrome P450s, during the secondary metabolite biosynthesis is discussed in details. PMID:27548127

  9. Soluble amyloid precursor protein alpha inhibits tau phosphorylation through modulation of GSK3β signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Deng, Juan; Habib, Ahsan; Obregon, Demian F; Barger, Steven W; Giunta, Brian; Wang, Yan-Jiang; Hou, Huayan; Sawmiller, Darrell; Tan, Jun

    2015-11-01

    We recently found that sAPPα decreases amyloid-beta generation by directly associating with β-site amyloid precursor protein (APP)-converting enzyme 1 (BACE1), thereby modulating APP processing. Because inhibition of BACE1 decreases glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β)-mediated Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like tau phosphorylation in AD patient-derived neurons, we determined whether sAPPα also reduces GSK3β-mediated tau phosphorylation. We initially found increased levels of inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK3β (Ser9) in primary neurons from sAPPα over-expressing mice. Further, recombinant human sAPPα evoked the same phenomenon in SH-SY5Y cells. Further, in SH-SY5Y cells over-expressing BACE1, and HeLa cells over-expressing human tau, sAPPα reduced GSK3β activity and tau phosphorylation. Importantly, the reductions in GSK3β activity and tau phosphorylation elicited by sAPPα were prevented by BACE1 but not γ-secretase inhibition. In accord, AD mice over-expressing human sAPPα had less GSK3β activity and tau phosphorylation compared with controls. These results implicate a direct relationship between APP β-processing and GSK3β-mediated tau phosphorylation and further define the central role of sAPPα in APP autoregulation and AD pathogenesis. PMID:26342176

  10. Stepwise modular pathway engineering of Escherichia coli for efficient one-step production of (2S)-pinocembrin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junjun; Zhang, Xia; Dong, Mingsheng; Zhou, Jingwen

    2016-08-10

    Developing efficient microbial processes to produce flavonoids has been a metabolic engineering goal over the past decade due to their important functions. Previously, the de novo production of the main flavonoid precursor (2S)-pinocembrin was achieved. However, low productivity and two separate fermentation steps made it inappropriate for industrial scale low-cost production. Here, a stepwise modular engineering approach was introduced to systematically identify and eliminate metabolic pathway bottlenecks. The overall pathway was firstly divided into four modules and analysis then revealed that efficient conversion of l-phenylalanine to (2S)-pinocembrin is the major limiting factor. Therefore, the pathway from l-phenylalanine to (2S)-pinocembrin was re-cast into three modules to alleviate this bottleneck by modifying both the gene copy number and promoter strength. Furthermore, the expression of the rate-limiting enzyme PAL was found to be correlated with 5' region of mRNA structure. The efficiency of the synthetic pathway was then improved by customizing the PAL expression level based on modification of the mRNA secondary structure. Fed-batch cultivation of engineered strains in a 3-L fermentor resulted in a final (2S)-pinocembrin production of 432.4mg/L. The results presented here pave the way for the development of an economical and simple process for microbial production of flavonoids. PMID:27297547

  11. Engineered Biosynthesis of Plant Polyketides: Structure-Based and Precursor-Directed Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Ikuro

    benzoyl-CoA as a starter substrate. These results suggested that the engineered biosynthesis of plant polyketides by combination of the structure-based and the precursor-directed approach would lead to further production of chemically and structurally divergent unnatural novel polyketides.

  12. Drosophila adult muscle precursors form a network of interconnected cells and are specified by the rhomboid-triggered EGF pathway.

    PubMed

    Figeac, Nicolas; Jagla, Teresa; Aradhya, Rajaguru; Da Ponte, Jean Philippe; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2010-06-01

    In Drosophila, a population of muscle-committed stem-like cells called adult muscle precursors (AMPs) keeps an undifferentiated and quiescent state during embryonic life. The embryonic AMPs are at the origin of all adult fly muscles and, as we demonstrate here, they express repressors of myogenic differentiation and targets of the Notch pathway known to be involved in muscle cell stemness. By targeting GFP to the AMP cell membranes, we show that AMPs are tightly associated with the peripheral nervous system and with a subset of differentiated muscles. They send long cellular processes running along the peripheral nerves and, by the end of embryogenesis, form a network of interconnected cells. Based on evidence from laser ablation experiments, the main role of these cellular extensions is to maintain correct spatial positioning of AMPs. To gain insights into mechanisms that lead to AMP cell specification, we performed a gain-of-function screen with a special focus on lateral AMPs expressing the homeobox gene ladybird. Our data show that the rhomboid-triggered EGF signalling pathway controls both the specification and the subsequent maintenance of AMP cells. This finding is supported by the identification of EGF-secreting cells in the lateral domain and the EGF-dependent regulatory modules that drive expression of the ladybird gene in lateral AMPs. Taken together, our results reveal an unsuspected capacity of embryonic AMPs to form a cell network, and shed light on the mechanisms governing their specification and maintenance.

  13. Pathway engineering to improve ethanol production by thermophilic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Lynd, L.R.

    1998-12-31

    Continuation of a research project jointly funded by the NSF and DOE is proposed. The primary project goal is to develop and characterize strains of C. thermocellum and C. thermosaccharolyticum having ethanol selectivity similar to more convenient ethanol-producing organisms. An additional goal is to document the maximum concentration of ethanol that can be produced by thermophiles. These goals build on results from the previous project, including development of most of the genetic tools required for pathway engineering in the target organisms. As well, we demonstrated that the tolerance of C. thermosaccharolyticum to added ethanol is sufficiently high to allow practical utilization should similar tolerance to produced ethanol be demonstrated, and that inhibition by neutralizing agents may explain the limited concentrations of ethanol produced in studies to date. Task 1 involves optimization of electrotransformation, using either modified conditions or alternative plasmids to improve upon the low but reproducible transformation, frequencies we have obtained thus far.

  14. Mining and engineering natural-product biosynthetic pathways.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Barrie; Micklefield, Jason

    2007-07-01

    Natural products continue to fulfill an important role in the development of therapeutic agents. In addition, with the advent of chemical genetics and high-throughput screening platforms, these molecules have become increasingly valuable as tools for interrogating fundamental aspects of biological systems. To access the vast portion of natural-product structural diversity that remains unexploited for these and other applications, genome mining and microbial metagenomic approaches are proving particularly powerful. When these are coupled with recombineering and related genetic tools, large biosynthetic gene clusters that remain intractable or cryptic in the native host can be more efficiently cloned and expressed in a suitable heterologous system. For lead optimization and the further structural diversification of natural-product libraries, combinatorial biosynthetic engineering has also become indispensable. However, our ability to rationally redesign biosynthetic pathways is often limited by our lack of understanding of the structure, dynamics and interplay between the many enzymes involved in complex biosynthetic pathways. Despite this, recent structures of fatty acid synthases should allow a more accurate prediction of the likely architecture of related polyketide synthase and nonribosomal peptide synthetase multienzymes. PMID:17576425

  15. Microbial chemical factories: recent advances in pathway engineering for synthesis of value added chemicals.

    PubMed

    Dhamankar, Himanshu; Prather, Kristala L J

    2011-08-01

    The dwindling nature of petroleum and other fossil reserves has provided impetus towards microbial synthesis of fuels and value added chemicals from biomass-derived sugars as a renewable resource. Microbes have naturally evolved enzymes and pathways that can convert biomass into hundreds of unique chemical structures, a property that can be effectively exploited for their engineering into Microbial Chemical Factories (MCFs). De novo pathway engineering facilitates expansion of the repertoire of microbially synthesized compounds beyond natural products. In this review, we visit some recent successes in such novel pathway engineering and optimization, with particular emphasis on the selection and engineering of pathway enzymes and balancing of their accessory cofactors.

  16. New Biosynthetic Step in the Melanin Pathway of Wangiella (Exophiala) dermatitidis: Evidence for 2-Acetyl-1,3,6,8-Tetrahydroxynaphthalene as a Novel Precursor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The predominant cell wall melanin of Wangiella dermatitidis, a black fungal pathogen of humans, is synthesized from 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (D2HN). An early precursor, 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene (T4HN), in the pathway leading to D2HN is reportedly produced as a pentaketide directly by an iter...

  17. APL-1, the Alzheimer’s Amyloid Precursor Protein in Caenorhabditis elegans, Modulates Multiple Metabolic Pathways Throughout Development

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, Collin Y.; Raps, Daniel A.; Li, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene or in genes that process APP are correlated with familial Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The biological function of APP remains unclear. APP is a transmembrane protein that can be sequentially cleaved by different secretases to yield multiple fragments, which can potentially act as signaling molecules. Caenorhabditis elegans encodes one APP-related protein, APL-1, which is essential for viability. Here, we show that APL-1 signaling is dependent on the activity of the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12 and influences metabolic pathways such as developmental progression, body size, and egg-laying rate. Furthermore, apl-1(yn5) mutants, which produce high levels of the extracellular APL-1 fragment, show an incompletely penetrant temperature-sensitive embryonic lethality. In a genetic screen to isolate mutants in which the apl-1(yn5) lethality rate is modified, we identified a suppressor mutation in MOA-1/R155.2, a receptor-protein tyrosine phosphatase, and an enhancer mutation in MOA-2/B0495.6, a protein involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis. Knockdown of apl-1 in an apl-1(yn5) background caused lethality and molting defects at all larval stages, suggesting that apl-1 is required for each transitional molt. We suggest that signaling of the released APL-1 fragment modulates multiple metabolic states and that APL-1 is required throughout development. PMID:22466039

  18. Nrt1 and Tna1-independent export of NAD+ precursor vitamins promotes NAD+ homeostasis and allows engineering of vitamin production.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Peter; Stebbins, Rebecca; Bogan, Katrina L; Evans, Charles R; Brenner, Charles

    2011-05-11

    NAD(+) is both a co-enzyme for hydride transfer enzymes and a substrate of sirtuins and other NAD(+) consuming enzymes. NAD(+) biosynthesis is required for two different regimens that extend lifespan in yeast. NAD(+) is synthesized from tryptophan and the three vitamin precursors of NAD(+): nicotinic acid, nicotinamide and nicotinamide riboside. Supplementation of yeast cells with NAD(+) precursors increases intracellular NAD(+) levels and extends replicative lifespan. Here we show that both nicotinamide riboside and nicotinic acid are not only vitamins but are also exported metabolites. We found that the deletion of the nicotinamide riboside transporter, Nrt1, leads to increased export of nicotinamide riboside. This discovery was exploited to engineer a strain to produce high levels of extracellular nicotinamide riboside, which was recovered in purified form. We further demonstrate that extracellular nicotinamide is readily converted to extracellular nicotinic acid in a manner that requires intracellular nicotinamidase activity. Like nicotinamide riboside, export of nicotinic acid is elevated by the deletion of the nicotinic acid transporter, Tna1. The data indicate that NAD(+) metabolism has a critical extracellular element in the yeast system and suggest that cells regulate intracellular NAD(+) metabolism by balancing import and export of NAD(+) precursor vitamins.

  19. Nrt1 and Tna1-independent export of NAD+ precursor vitamins promotes NAD+ homeostasis and allows engineering of vitamin production.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Peter; Stebbins, Rebecca; Bogan, Katrina L; Evans, Charles R; Brenner, Charles

    2011-01-01

    NAD(+) is both a co-enzyme for hydride transfer enzymes and a substrate of sirtuins and other NAD(+) consuming enzymes. NAD(+) biosynthesis is required for two different regimens that extend lifespan in yeast. NAD(+) is synthesized from tryptophan and the three vitamin precursors of NAD(+): nicotinic acid, nicotinamide and nicotinamide riboside. Supplementation of yeast cells with NAD(+) precursors increases intracellular NAD(+) levels and extends replicative lifespan. Here we show that both nicotinamide riboside and nicotinic acid are not only vitamins but are also exported metabolites. We found that the deletion of the nicotinamide riboside transporter, Nrt1, leads to increased export of nicotinamide riboside. This discovery was exploited to engineer a strain to produce high levels of extracellular nicotinamide riboside, which was recovered in purified form. We further demonstrate that extracellular nicotinamide is readily converted to extracellular nicotinic acid in a manner that requires intracellular nicotinamidase activity. Like nicotinamide riboside, export of nicotinic acid is elevated by the deletion of the nicotinic acid transporter, Tna1. The data indicate that NAD(+) metabolism has a critical extracellular element in the yeast system and suggest that cells regulate intracellular NAD(+) metabolism by balancing import and export of NAD(+) precursor vitamins. PMID:21589930

  20. Scaling up: Taking the Academic Pathways of People Learning Engineering Survey (APPLES) National. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Krista M.; Chen, Helen L.; Toye, George; Clark, Mia; Sheppard, Sheri D.

    2008-01-01

    The Academic Pathways of People Learning Engineering Survey (APPLES) was deployed for a second time in spring 2008 to undergraduate engineering students at 21 US universities. The goal of the second deployment of APPLES was to corroborate and extend findings from the Academic Pathways Study (APS; 2003-2007) and the first deployment of APPLES…

  1. The non-canonical Wnt pathway negatively regulates dendritic cell differentiation by inhibiting the expansion of Flt3(+) lymphocyte-primed multipotent precursors.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jing; Zhou, Haibo; Wu, Ning; Wu, Li

    2016-09-01

    The differentiation of dendritic cells (DC) is affected by the aging process. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the alteration of DC development in aged mice have not been clarified. Recently, Wnt5a was reported to be an important aging-related molecule in hematopoietic systems. Here, we hypothesized that the increased expression of Wnt5a in aged hematopoietic precursors led to deficient DC differentiation in aged mice. The percentages and cell numbers of plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and CD172a(-)CD8α(+)conventional DC (cDC) were decreased in aged mice compared to young mice. Further analysis indicated that the hematopoietic precursors that gave rise to DC, including Flt3(+) lymphoid-primed multipotent precursors (LMPP), common lymphoid progenitors (CLP) and common DC precursors (CDP), were all decreased in the bone marrow of aged mice. Overexpression of Wnt5a in hematopoietic precursors strongly affected the differentiation of cDC and pDC in vivo. Treatment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) with Wnt5a led to a significant decrease in the differentiation of the LMPP, CLP and CDP populations that was similar to the decrease observed in the bone marrow (BM) HSC of aged mice. Molecular studies demonstrated that Wnt5a negatively regulated the expression of an array of genes important for DC differentiation, including Flt3, Gfi-1, Ikaros, Bcl11a, and IL-7R, by activating the Wnt5a-Cdc42 pathway. Finally, we rejuvenated DC differentiation from aged precursors by blocking the non-canonical Wnt pathway. Our study identified the key roles of the non-canonical Wnt pathway in DC differentiation and DC aging.

  2. The non-canonical Wnt pathway negatively regulates dendritic cell differentiation by inhibiting the expansion of Flt3+ lymphocyte-primed multipotent precursors

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jing; Zhou, Haibo; Wu, Ning; Wu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of dendritic cells (DC) is affected by the aging process. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the alteration of DC development in aged mice have not been clarified. Recently, Wnt5a was reported to be an important aging-related molecule in hematopoietic systems. Here, we hypothesized that the increased expression of Wnt5a in aged hematopoietic precursors led to deficient DC differentiation in aged mice. The percentages and cell numbers of plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and CD172a−CD8α+conventional DC (cDC) were decreased in aged mice compared to young mice. Further analysis indicated that the hematopoietic precursors that gave rise to DC, including Flt3+ lymphoid-primed multipotent precursors (LMPP), common lymphoid progenitors (CLP) and common DC precursors (CDP), were all decreased in the bone marrow of aged mice. Overexpression of Wnt5a in hematopoietic precursors strongly affected the differentiation of cDC and pDC in vivo. Treatment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) with Wnt5a led to a significant decrease in the differentiation of the LMPP, CLP and CDP populations that was similar to the decrease observed in the bone marrow (BM) HSC of aged mice. Molecular studies demonstrated that Wnt5a negatively regulated the expression of an array of genes important for DC differentiation, including Flt3, Gfi-1, Ikaros, Bcl11a, and IL-7R, by activating the Wnt5a-Cdc42 pathway. Finally, we rejuvenated DC differentiation from aged precursors by blocking the non-canonical Wnt pathway. Our study identified the key roles of the non-canonical Wnt pathway in DC differentiation and DC aging. PMID:26051474

  3. Precursor engineering and controlled conversion for the synthesis of monodisperse thiolate-protected metal nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yong; Yao, Qiaofeng; Luo, Zhentao; Yuan, Xun; Lee, Jim Yang; Xie, Jianping

    2013-05-01

    In very recent years, thiolate-protected metal nanoclusters (or thiolated MNCs) with core sizes smaller than 2 nm have emerged as a new direction in nanoparticle research due to their discrete and size dependent electronic structures and molecular-like properties, such as HOMO-LUMO transitions in optical absorptions, quantized charging, and strong luminescence. Synthesis of monodisperse thiolated MNCs in sufficiently large quantities (up to several hundred micrograms) is necessary for establishing reliable size-property relationships and exploring potential applications. This Feature Article reviews recent progress in the development of synthetic strategies for the production of monodisperse thiolated MNCs. The preparation of monodisperse thiolated MNCs is viewed as an engineerable process where both the precursors (input) and their conversion chemistry (processing) may be rationally designed to achieve the desired outcome - monodisperse thiolated MNCs (output). Several strategies for tailoring the precursor and the conversion process are analyzed to arrive at a unifying understanding of the processes involved.

  4. Four-way regulation of mosquito yolk protein precursor genes by juvenile hormone-, ecdysone-, nutrient-, and insulin-like peptide signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Immo A.; Attardo, Geoffrey M.; Rodriguez, Stacy D.; Drake, Lisa L.

    2014-01-01

    Anautogenous mosquito females require a meal of vertebrate blood in order to initiate the production of yolk protein precursors by the fat body. Yolk protein precursor gene expression is tightly repressed in a state-of-arrest before blood meal-related signals activate it and expression levels rise rapidly. The best understood example of yolk protein precursor gene regulation is the vitellogenin-A gene (vg) of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti. Vg-A is regulated by (1) juvenile hormone signaling, (2) the ecdysone-signaling cascade, (3) the nutrient sensitive target-of-rapamycin signaling pathway, and (4) the insulin-like peptide (ILP) signaling pathway. A plethora of new studies have refined our understanding of the regulation of yolk protein precursor genes since the last review on this topic in 2005 (Attardo et al., 2005). This review summarizes the role of these four signaling pathways in the regulation of vg-A and focuses upon new findings regarding the interplay between them on an organismal level. PMID:24688471

  5. Hybrid halide perovskite solar cell precursors: colloidal chemistry and coordination engineering behind device processing for high efficiency.

    PubMed

    Yan, Keyou; Long, Mingzhu; Zhang, Tiankai; Wei, Zhanhua; Chen, Haining; Yang, Shihe; Xu, Jianbin

    2015-04-01

    The precursor of solution-processed perovskite thin films is one of the most central components for high-efficiency perovskite solar cells. We first present the crucial colloidal chemistry visualization of the perovskite precursor solution based on analytical spectra and reveal that perovskite precursor solutions for solar cells are generally colloidal dispersions in a mother solution, with a colloidal size up to the mesoscale, rather than real solutions. The colloid is made of a soft coordination complex in the form of a lead polyhalide framework between organic and inorganic components and can be structurally tuned by the coordination degree, thereby primarily determining the basic film coverage and morphology of deposited thin films. By utilizing coordination engineering, particularly through employing additional methylammonium halide over the stoichiometric ratio for tuning the coordination degree and mode in the initial colloidal solution, along with a thermal leaching for the selective release of excess methylammonium halides, we achieved full and even coverage, the preferential orientation, and high purity of planar perovskite thin films. We have also identified that excess organic component can reduce the colloidal size of and tune the morphology of the coordination framework in relation to final perovskite grains and partial chlorine substitution can accelerate the crystalline nucleation process of perovskite. This work demonstrates the important fundamental chemistry of perovskite precursors and provides genuine guidelines for accurately controlling the high quality of hybrid perovskite thin films without any impurity, thereby delivering efficient planar perovskite solar cells with a power conversion efficiency as high as 17% without distinct hysteresis owing to the high quality of perovskite thin films.

  6. Engineering a monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase with high selectivity for the condensed lignin precursor coniferyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuanheng; Bhuiya, Mohammad-Wadud; Shanklin, John; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2015-10-30

    Lignin, a rigid biopolymer in plant cell walls, is derived from the oxidative polymerization of three monolignols. The composition of monolignol monomers dictates the degree of lignin condensation, reactivity, and thus the degradability of plant cell walls. Guaiacyl lignin is regarded as the condensed structural unit. Polymerization of lignin is initiated through the deprotonation of the para-hydroxyl group of monolignols. Therefore, preferentially modifying the para-hydroxyl of a specific monolignol to deprive its dehydrogenation propensity would disturb the formation of particular lignin subunits. Here, we test the hypothesis that specific remodeling the active site of a monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase would create an enzyme that specifically methylates the condensed guaiacyl lignin precursor coniferyl alcohol. Combining crystal structural information with combinatorial active site saturation mutagenesis and starting with the engineered promiscuous enzyme, MOMT5 (T133L/E165I/F175I/F166W/H169F), we incrementally remodeled its substrate binding pocket by the addition of four substitutions, i.e. M26H, S30R, V33S, and T319M, yielding a mutant enzyme capable of discriminately etherifying the para-hydroxyl of coniferyl alcohol even in the presence of excess sinapyl alcohol. The engineered enzyme variant has a substantially reduced substrate binding pocket that imposes a clear steric hindrance thereby excluding bulkier lignin precursors. The resulting enzyme variant represents an excellent candidate for modulating lignin composition and/or structure in planta. PMID:26378240

  7. Engineering a monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase with high selectivity for the condensed lignin precursor coniferyl alchohol

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cai, Yuanheng; Shanklin, John; Mohammad -Wadud Bhuiya; Liu, Chang -Jun

    2015-09-16

    Lignin, a rigid biopolymer in plant cell walls, is derived from the oxidative polymerization of three monolignols. The composition of monolignol monomers dictates the degree of lignin condensation, reactivity, and thus the degradability of plant cell walls. Guaiacyl lignin is regarded as the condensed structural unit. Polymerization of lignin is initiated through the deprotonation of the para-hydroxyl group of monolignols. Therefore, preferentially modifying the para-hydroxyl of a specific monolignol to deprive its dehydrogenation propensity would disturb the formation of particular lignin subunits. Here, we test the hypothesis that specific remodeling the active site of a monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase would create anmore » enzyme that specifically methylates the condensed guaiacyl lignin precursor coniferyl alcohol. Combining crystal structural information with combinatorial active site saturation mutagenesis and starting with the engineered promiscuous enzyme, MOMT5 (T133L/E165I/F175I/F166W/H169F), we incrementally remodeled its substrate binding pocket by the addition of four substitutions, i.e. M26H, S30R, V33S, and T319M, yielding a mutant enzyme capable of discriminately etherifying the para-hydroxyl of coniferyl alcohol even in the presence of excess sinapyl alcohol. The engineered enzyme variant has a substantially reduced substrate binding pocket that imposes a clear steric hindrance thereby excluding bulkier lignin precursors. Lastly, the resulting enzyme variant represents an excellent candidate for modulating lignin composition and/or structure in planta.« less

  8. Engineering a monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase with high selectivity for the condensed lignin precursor coniferyl alchohol

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yuanheng; Shanklin, John; Mohammad -Wadud Bhuiya; Liu, Chang -Jun

    2015-09-16

    Lignin, a rigid biopolymer in plant cell walls, is derived from the oxidative polymerization of three monolignols. The composition of monolignol monomers dictates the degree of lignin condensation, reactivity, and thus the degradability of plant cell walls. Guaiacyl lignin is regarded as the condensed structural unit. Polymerization of lignin is initiated through the deprotonation of the para-hydroxyl group of monolignols. Therefore, preferentially modifying the para-hydroxyl of a specific monolignol to deprive its dehydrogenation propensity would disturb the formation of particular lignin subunits. Here, we test the hypothesis that specific remodeling the active site of a monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase would create an enzyme that specifically methylates the condensed guaiacyl lignin precursor coniferyl alcohol. Combining crystal structural information with combinatorial active site saturation mutagenesis and starting with the engineered promiscuous enzyme, MOMT5 (T133L/E165I/F175I/F166W/H169F), we incrementally remodeled its substrate binding pocket by the addition of four substitutions, i.e. M26H, S30R, V33S, and T319M, yielding a mutant enzyme capable of discriminately etherifying the para-hydroxyl of coniferyl alcohol even in the presence of excess sinapyl alcohol. The engineered enzyme variant has a substantially reduced substrate binding pocket that imposes a clear steric hindrance thereby excluding bulkier lignin precursors. Lastly, the resulting enzyme variant represents an excellent candidate for modulating lignin composition and/or structure in planta.

  9. Combining chemoinformatics with bioinformatics: in silico prediction of bacterial flavor-forming pathways by a chemical systems biology approach "reverse pathway engineering".

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengjin; Bienfait, Bruno; Sacher, Oliver; Gasteiger, Johann; Siezen, Roland J; Nauta, Arjen; Geurts, Jan M W

    2014-01-01

    The incompleteness of genome-scale metabolic models is a major bottleneck for systems biology approaches, which are based on large numbers of metabolites as identified and quantified by metabolomics. Many of the revealed secondary metabolites and/or their derivatives, such as flavor compounds, are non-essential in metabolism, and many of their synthesis pathways are unknown. In this study, we describe a novel approach, Reverse Pathway Engineering (RPE), which combines chemoinformatics and bioinformatics analyses, to predict the "missing links" between compounds of interest and their possible metabolic precursors by providing plausible chemical and/or enzymatic reactions. We demonstrate the added-value of the approach by using flavor-forming pathways in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as an example. Established metabolic routes leading to the formation of flavor compounds from leucine were successfully replicated. Novel reactions involved in flavor formation, i.e. the conversion of alpha-hydroxy-isocaproate to 3-methylbutanoic acid and the synthesis of dimethyl sulfide, as well as the involved enzymes were successfully predicted. These new insights into the flavor-formation mechanisms in LAB can have a significant impact on improving the control of aroma formation in fermented food products. Since the input reaction databases and compounds are highly flexible, the RPE approach can be easily extended to a broad spectrum of applications, amongst others health/disease biomarker discovery as well as synthetic biology.

  10. Tyrosine phosphorylation is a mandatory proximal step in radiation-induced activation of the protein kinase C signaling pathway in human B-lymphocyte precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, F M; Schieven, G L; Tuel-Ahlgren, L M; Dibirdik, I; Myers, D E; Ledbetter, J A; Song, C W

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation triggers a signal in human B-lymphocyte precursors that is intimately linked to an active protein-tyrosine kinase regulatory pathway. We show that in B-lymphocyte precursors, irradiation with gamma-rays leads to (i) stimulation of phosphatidylinositol turnover; (ii) downstream activation by covalent modification of multiple serine-specific protein kinases, including protein kinase C; and (iii) activation of nuclear factor kappa B. All of the radiation-induced signals were effectively prevented by the protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and herbimycin A. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation is an important and perhaps mandatory proximal step in the activation of the protein kinase C signaling cascade in human B-lymphocyte precursors. Our report expands current knowledge of the radiation-induced signaling cascade by clarifying the chronological sequence of biochemical events that follow irradiation. Images PMID:8419931

  11. The isogene 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase 2 controls isoprenoid profiles, precursor pathway allocation, and density of tomato trichomes.

    PubMed

    Paetzold, Heike; Garms, Stefan; Bartram, Stefan; Wieczorek, Jenny; Urós-Gracia, Eva-Maria; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Boland, Wilhelm; Strack, Dieter; Hause, Bettina; Walter, Michael H

    2010-09-01

    Plant isoprenoids are formed from precursors synthesized by the mevalonate (MVA) pathway in the cytosol or by the methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway in plastids. Although some exchange of precursors occurs, cytosolic sesquiterpenes are assumed to derive mainly from MVA, while plastidial monoterpenes are produced preferentially from MEP precursors. Additional complexity arises in the first step of the MEP pathway, which is typically catalyzed by two divergent 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase isoforms (DXS1, DXS2). In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), the SlDXS1 gene is ubiquitously expressed with highest levels during fruit ripening, whereas SlDXS2 transcripts are abundant in only few tissues, including young leaves, petals, and isolated trichomes. Specific down-regulation of SlDXS2 expression was performed by RNA interference in transgenic plants to investigate feedback mechanisms. SlDXS2 down-regulation led to a decrease in the monoterpene β-phellandrene and an increase in two sesquiterpenes in trichomes. Moreover, incorporation of MVA-derived precursors into residual monoterpenes and into sesquiterpenes was elevated as determined by comparison of ¹³C to ¹²C natural isotope ratios. A compensatory up-regulation of SlDXS1 was not observed. Down-regulated lines also exhibited increased trichome density and showed less damage by leaf-feeding Spodoptera littoralis caterpillars. The results reveal novel, non-redundant roles of DXS2 in modulating isoprenoid metabolism and a pronounced plasticity in isoprenoid precursor allocation. PMID:20591838

  12. Zinc Deficiency Induces Apoptosis via Mitochondrial p53- and Caspase-Dependent Pathways in Human Neuronal Precursor Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seth, Rohit; Corniola, Rikki S.; Gower-Winter, Shannon D.; Morgan, Thomas J., Jr.; Bishop, Brian; Levenson, Cathy W.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that zinc deficiency leads to apoptosis of neuronal precursor cells in vivo and in vitro. In addition to the role of p53 as a nuclear transcription factor in zinc deficient cultured human neuronal precursors (NT-2), we have now identified the translocation of phosphorylated p53 to the mitochondria and p53-dependent…

  13. Chemical respiratory allergy: reverse engineering an adverse outcome pathway.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Ian; Dearman, Rebecca J; Basketter, David A; Boverhof, Darrell R

    2014-04-01

    Allergic sensitisation of the respiratory tract by chemicals is associated with rhinitis and asthma and remains an important occupational health issue. Although less than 80 chemicals have been confirmed as respiratory allergens the adverse health effects can be serious, and in rare instances can be fatal, and there are, in addition, related socioeconomic issues. The challenges that chemical respiratory allergy pose for toxicologists are substantial. No validated methods are available for hazard identification and characterisation, and this is due in large part to the fact that there remains considerable uncertainty and debate about the mechanisms through which sensitisation of the respiratory tract is acquired. Despite that uncertainty, there is a need to establish some common understanding of the key events and processes that are involved in respiratory sensitisation to chemicals and that might in turn provide the foundations for novel approaches to safety assessment. In recent years the concept of adverse outcome pathways (AOP) has gained some considerable interest among the toxicology community as a basis for outlining the key steps leading to an adverse health outcome, while also providing a framework for focusing future research, and for developing alternative paradigms for hazard characterisation. Here we explore application of the same general principles to an examination of the induction by chemicals of respiratory sensitisation. In this instance, however, we have chosen to adopt a reverse engineering approach and to model a possible AOP for chemical respiratory allergy working backwards from the elicitation of adverse health effects to the cellular and molecular mechanisms that are implicated in the acquisition of sensitisation.

  14. Directed evolution of a cellobiose utilization pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by simultaneously engineering multiple proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The optimization of metabolic pathways is critical for efficient and economical production of biofuels and specialty chemicals. One such significant pathway is the cellobiose utilization pathway, identified as a promising route in biomass utilization. Here we describe the optimization of cellobiose consumption and ethanol productivity by simultaneously engineering both proteins of the pathway, the β-glucosidase (gh1-1) and the cellodextrin transporter (cdt-1), in an example of pathway engineering through directed evolution. Results The improved pathway was assessed based on the strain specific growth rate on cellobiose, with the final mutant exhibiting a 47% increase over the wild-type pathway. Metabolite analysis of the engineered pathway identified a 49% increase in cellobiose consumption (1.78 to 2.65 g cellobiose/(L · h)) and a 64% increase in ethanol productivity (0.611 to 1.00 g ethanol/(L · h)). Conclusions By simultaneously engineering multiple proteins in the pathway, cellobiose utilization in S. cerevisiae was improved. This optimization can be generally applied to other metabolic pathways, provided a selection/screening method is available for the desired phenotype. The improved in vivo cellobiose utilization demonstrated here could help to decrease the in vitro enzyme load in biomass pretreatment, ultimately contributing to a reduction in the high cost of biofuel production. PMID:23802545

  15. Hafnium oxide and zirconium oxide atomic layer deposition: initial precursor and potential side-reaction product pathways with H/Si(100)-2 x 1.

    PubMed

    Fenno, Ryan D; Halls, Mathew D; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2005-03-24

    Hybrid density functional calculations have been carried out using cluster models of the H/Si(100)-2 x 1 surface to investigate the mechanistic details of the initial surface reactions occurring in the atomic layer deposition of hafnium and zirconium oxides (HfO2 and ZrO2). Reaction pathways involving the metal precursors ZrCl4, Zr(CH3)4, HfCl4, and Hf(CH3)4 have been examined. Pathways leading to the formation of a Zr-Si or Hf-Si linkage show a significant sensitivity to the identity of the leaving group, with chloride loss reactions being both kinetically and thermodynamically less favorable than reactions leading to the loss of a methyl group. The energetics of the Zr(CH3)4 and Hf(CH3)4 reactions are similar with an overall exothermicity of 0.3-0.4 eV and a classical barrier height of 1.1-1.2 eV. For the reaction between H2O and the H/Si(100)-2 x 1 surface, the activation energy and overall reaction enthalpy are 1.6 and -0.8 eV, respectively. Due to contamination, trace amounts of H2O may be encountered by metal precursors, leading to the formation of minor species that can lead to unanticipated side-reaction pathways. Such gas-phase reactions between the halogenated and alkylated metal precursors and H2O are exothermic with small or no reaction barriers, allowing for the possibility of metal precursor hydroxylation before the H/Si surface is encountered. Of the contaminant surface reaction pathways, the most kinetically favorable corresponds to the surface -OH deposition. Interestingly, for the hydroxylated metal precursors, a unique reaction pathway resulting in the direct formation of Si-O-Zr and Si-O-Hf linkages has been identified and found to be the most thermodynamically stable pathway available, being exothermic by approximately 1.0 eV.

  16. Engineering bacterial phenylalanine 4-hydroxylase for microbial synthesis of human neurotransmitter precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuheng; Sun, Xinxiao; Yuan, Qipeng; Yan, Yajun

    2014-07-18

    5-Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) is a drug that is clinically effective against depression, insomnia, obesity, chronic headaches, etc. It is only commercially produced by the extraction from the seeds of Griffonia simplicifolia because of a lack of synthetic methods. Here, we report the efficient microbial production of 5-HTP via combinatorial protein and metabolic engineering approaches. First, we reconstituted and screened prokaryotic phenylalanine 4-hydroxylase activity in Escherichia coli. Then, sequence- and structure-based protein engineering dramatically shifted its substrate preference, allowing for efficient conversion of tryptophan to 5-HTP. Importantly, E. coli endogenous tetrahydromonapterin (MH4) could be utilized as the coenzyme, when a foreign MH4 recycling mechanism was introduced. Whole-cell bioconversion allowed the high-level production of 5-HTP (1.1-1.2 g/L) from tryptophan in shake flasks. On this basis, metabolic engineering efforts were further made to achieve the de novo 5-HTP biosynthesis from glucose. This work not only holds great scale-up potential but also demonstrates a strategy for expanding the native metabolism of microorganisms.

  17. Targeting Undergraduate Students for Surveys: Lessons from the Academic Pathways of People Learning Engineering Survey (APPLES). Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Krista M.; Chen, Helen L.; Toye, George; Sheppard, Sheri D.

    2007-01-01

    The Academic Pathways of People Learning Engineering Survey (APPLES or APPLE survey) is a component of the Academic Pathways Study (APS) of the Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education (CAEE). The APS aims to provide a comprehensive account of how people become engineers by exploring key questions around the engineering learning…

  18. Partitioning the effects of an ecosystem engineer: kangaroo rats control community structure via multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Prugh, Laura R; Brashares, Justin S

    2012-05-01

    1. Ecosystem engineers impact communities by altering habitat conditions, but they can also have strong effects through consumptive, competitive and other non-engineering pathways. 2. Engineering effects can lead to fundamentally different community dynamics than non-engineering effects, but the relative strengths of these interactions are seldom quantified. 3. We combined structural equation modelling and exclosure experiments to partition the effects of a keystone engineer, the giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens), on plants, invertebrates and vertebrates in a semi-arid California grassland. 4. We separated the effects of burrow creation from kangaroo rat density and found that kangaroo rats increased the diversity and abundance of other species via both engineering and non-engineering pathways. 5. Engineering was the primary factor structuring plant and small mammal communities, whereas non-engineering effects structured invertebrate communities and increased lizard abundance. 6. These results highlight the importance of the non-engineering effects of ecosystem engineers and shed new light on the multiple pathways by which strong-interactors shape communities.

  19. LWRS Fuels Pathway: Engineering Design and Fuels Pathway Initial Testing of the Hot Water Corrosion System

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. John Garnier; Dr. Kevin McHugh

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development R&D pathway performs strategic research focused on cladding designs leading to improved reactor core economics and safety margins. The research performed is to demonstrate the nuclear fuel technology advancements while satisfying safety and regulatory limits. These goals are met through rigorous testing and analysis. The nuclear fuel technology developed will assist in moving existing nuclear fuel technology to an improved level that would not be practical by industry acting independently. Strategic mission goals are to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental nuclear fuel and cladding performance in nuclear power plants, and to apply this information in the development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels. These will result in improved safety, cladding, integrity, and nuclear fuel cycle economics. To achieve these goals various methods for non-irradiated characterization testing of advanced cladding systems are needed. One such new test system is the Hot Water Corrosion System (HWCS) designed to develop new data for cladding performance assessment and material behavior under simulated off-normal reactor conditions. The HWCS is capable of exposing prototype rodlets to heated, high velocity water at elevated pressure for long periods of time (days, weeks, months). Water chemistry (dissolved oxygen, conductivity and pH) is continuously monitored. In addition, internal rodlet heaters inserted into cladding tubes are used to evaluate repeated thermal stressing and heat transfer characteristics of the prototype rodlets. In summary, the HWCS provides rapid ex-reactor evaluation of cladding designs in normal (flowing hot water) and off-normal (induced cladding stress), enabling engineering and manufacturing improvements to cladding designs before initiation of the more expensive and time consuming in-reactor irradiation testing.

  20. Antisense against Amyloid-β Protein Precursor Reverses Memory Deficits and Alters Gene Expression in Neurotropic and Insulin-Signaling Pathways in SAMP8 Mice.

    PubMed

    Armbrecht, Harvey J; Siddiqui, Akbar M; Green, Michael; Farr, Susan A; Kumar, Vijaya B; Banks, William A; Patrick, Ping; Shah, Gul N; Morley, John E

    2015-01-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAMP8) strain exhibits an age-related decrease in memory accompanied by an increase in hippocampal amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) and amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). We have shown that administration of an antisense oligonucleotide against the Aβ region of AβPP (AβPP antisense) reverses the memory deficits. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of peripheral (IV) administration of AβPP antisense on hippocampal gene expression. The AβPP antisense reversed the memory deficits and altered expression of 944 hippocampal genes. Pathway analysis showed significant gene expression changes in nine pathways. These include the MAPK signaling pathway (p = 0.0078) and the phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway (p = 0.043), which we have previously shown to be altered in SAMP8 mice. The changes in these pathways contributed to significant changes in the neurotropin (p = 0.0083) and insulin signaling (p = 0.015) pathways, which are known to be important in learning and memory. Changes in these pathways were accompanied by phosphorylation changes in the downstream target proteins p70S6K, GSK3β, ERK, and CREB. These changes in hippocampal gene expression and protein phosphorylation may suggest specific new targets for antisense therapy aimed at improving memory.

  1. Pathways to Engineering: The Validation Experiences of Transfer Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yi; Ozuna, Taryn

    2015-01-01

    Community college engineering transfer students are a critical student population of engineering degree recipients and technical workforce in the United States. Focusing on this group of students, we adopted Rendón's (1994) validation theory to explore the students' experiences in community colleges prior to transferring to a four-year…

  2. Career Pathways of Science, Engineering and Technology Research Postgraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Marnie; Ski, Chantal; Vrdoljak, Davorin

    2009-01-01

    Suitably qualified scientists and engineers are essential for research and development, innovation and, in turn, the growth of the economy. Science, engineering and technology skills are therefore necessary for Australia to remain competitive in a global market. This article reports findings from a nationwide study investigating the career…

  3. A Survey of Career Pathways of Engineering Deans in the United States: Strategies for Leadership Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargrove, S. Keith

    2015-01-01

    The career pathways of deans in higher education seem to follow the traditional model in academia from a senior faculty position and/or department chair. This however may be different from deans in engineering education. The goal of this survey research is to assess the career paths of current Deans of Colleges/Schools of Engineering in the United…

  4. An engineered pathway for the biosynthesis of renewable propane

    PubMed Central

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Thiel, Kati; Akhtar, M. Kalim; Jones, Patrik R.

    2014-01-01

    The deployment of next-generation renewable biofuels can be enhanced by improving their compatibility with the current infrastructure for transportation, storage and utilization. Propane, the bulk component of liquid petroleum gas, is an appealing target as it already has a global market. In addition, it is a gas under standard conditions, but can easily be liquefied. This allows the fuel to immediately separate from the biocatalytic process after synthesis, yet does not preclude energy-dense storage as a liquid. Here we report, for the first time, a synthetic metabolic pathway for producing renewable propane. The pathway is based on a thioesterase specific for butyryl-acyl carrier protein (ACP), which allows native fatty acid biosynthesis of the Escherichia coli host to be redirected towards a synthetic alkane pathway. Propane biosynthesis is markedly stimulated by the introduction of an electron-donating module, optimizing the balance of O2 supply and removal of native aldehyde reductases. PMID:25181600

  5. An engineered pathway for the biosynthesis of renewable propane.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Thiel, Kati; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-01-01

    The deployment of next-generation renewable biofuels can be enhanced by improving their compatibility with the current infrastructure for transportation, storage and utilization. Propane, the bulk component of liquid petroleum gas, is an appealing target as it already has a global market. In addition, it is a gas under standard conditions, but can easily be liquefied. This allows the fuel to immediately separate from the biocatalytic process after synthesis, yet does not preclude energy-dense storage as a liquid. Here we report, for the first time, a synthetic metabolic pathway for producing renewable propane. The pathway is based on a thioesterase specific for butyryl-acyl carrier protein (ACP), which allows native fatty acid biosynthesis of the Escherichia coli host to be redirected towards a synthetic alkane pathway. Propane biosynthesis is markedly stimulated by the introduction of an electron-donating module, optimizing the balance of O2 supply and removal of native aldehyde reductases. PMID:25181600

  6. Detection of greenhouse gas precursors from diesel engines using electrochemical and photoacoustic sensors.

    PubMed

    Mothé, Geórgia; Castro, Maria; Sthel, Marcelo; Lima, Guilherme; Brasil, Laisa; Campos, Layse; Rocha, Aline; Vargas, Helion

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution is one of the worst threats to modern society. The consequences derived from different forms of atmospheric pollution vary from the local to the global scale, with deep impacts on climate, environment and human health. Several gaseous pollutants, even when present in trace concentrations, play a fundamental role in important processes that occur in atmosphere. Phenomena such as global warming, photochemical smog formation, acid rain and the depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer are strongly related to the increased concentration of certain gaseous species in the atmosphere. The transport sector significantly produces atmospheric pollution, mainly when diesel oil is used as fuel. Therefore, new methodologies based on selective and sensitive gas detection schemes must be developed in order to detect and monitor pollutant gases from this source. In this work, CO(2) Laser Photoacoustic Spectroscopy was used to evaluate ethylene emissions and electrochemical analyzers were used to evaluate the emissions of CO, NO(x) and SO(2) from the exhaust of diesel powered vehicles (rural diesel with 5% of biodiesel, in this paper called only diesel) at different engine rotation speeds. Concentrations in the range 6 to 45 ppmV for ethylene, 109 to 1,231 ppmV for carbon monoxide, 75 to 868 ppmV for nitrogen oxides and 3 to 354 ppmV for sulfur dioxide were obtained. The results indicate that the detection techniques used were sufficiently selective and sensitive to detect the gaseous species mentioned above in the ppmV range.

  7. Detection of Greenhouse Gas Precursors from Diesel Engines Using Electrochemical and Photoacoustic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Mothé, Geórgia; Castro, Maria; Sthel, Marcelo; Lima, Guilherme; Brasil, Laisa; Campos, Layse; Rocha, Aline; Vargas, Helion

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution is one of the worst threats to modern society. The consequences derived from different forms of atmospheric pollution vary from the local to the global scale, with deep impacts on climate, environment and human health. Several gaseous pollutants, even when present in trace concentrations, play a fundamental role in important processes that occur in atmosphere. Phenomena such as global warming, photochemical smog formation, acid rain and the depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer are strongly related to the increased concentration of certain gaseous species in the atmosphere. The transport sector significantly produces atmospheric pollution, mainly when diesel oil is used as fuel. Therefore, new methodologies based on selective and sensitive gas detection schemes must be developed in order to detect and monitor pollutant gases from this source. In this work, CO2 Laser Photoacoustic Spectroscopy was used to evaluate ethylene emissions and electrochemical analyzers were used to evaluate the emissions of CO, NOx and SO2 from the exhaust of diesel powered vehicles (rural diesel with 5% of biodiesel, in this paper called only diesel) at different engine rotation speeds. Concentrations in the range 6 to 45 ppmV for ethylene, 109 to 1,231 ppmV for carbon monoxide, 75 to 868 ppmV for nitrogen oxides and 3 to 354 ppmV for sulfur dioxide were obtained. The results indicate that the detection techniques used were sufficiently selective and sensitive to detect the gaseous species mentioned above in the ppmV range. PMID:22163437

  8. Metabolic engineering of a synergistic pathway for n-butanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shuobo; Si, Tong; Liu, Zihe; Zhang, Hongfang; Ang, Ee Lui; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    n-Butanol has several favourable properties as an advanced fuel or a platform chemical. Bio-based production of n-butanol is becoming increasingly important for sustainable chemical industry. Synthesis of n-butanol can be achieved via more than one metabolic pathway. Here we report the metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce n-butanol through a synergistic pathway: the endogenous threonine pathway and the introduced citramalate pathway. Firstly, we characterized and optimized the endogenous threonine pathway; then, a citramalate synthase (CimA) mediated pathway was introduced to construct the synergistic pathway; next, the synergistic pathway was optimized by additional overexpression of relevant genes identified previously; meanwhile, the n-butanol production was also improved by overexpression of keto-acid decarboxylases (KDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). After combining these strategies with co-expression of LEU1 (two copies), LEU4, LEU2 (two copies), LEU5, CimA, NFS1, ADH7 and ARO10*, we achieved an n-butanol production of 835 mg/L in the final engineered strain, which is almost 7-fold increase compared to the initial strain. Furthermore, the production showed a 3-fold of the highest titer ever reported in yeast. Therefore, the engineered yeast strain represents a promising alternative platform for n-butanol production. PMID:27161023

  9. Metabolic engineering of a synergistic pathway for n-butanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuobo; Si, Tong; Liu, Zihe; Zhang, Hongfang; Ang, Ee Lui; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    n-Butanol has several favourable properties as an advanced fuel or a platform chemical. Bio-based production of n-butanol is becoming increasingly important for sustainable chemical industry. Synthesis of n-butanol can be achieved via more than one metabolic pathway. Here we report the metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce n-butanol through a synergistic pathway: the endogenous threonine pathway and the introduced citramalate pathway. Firstly, we characterized and optimized the endogenous threonine pathway; then, a citramalate synthase (CimA) mediated pathway was introduced to construct the synergistic pathway; next, the synergistic pathway was optimized by additional overexpression of relevant genes identified previously; meanwhile, the n-butanol production was also improved by overexpression of keto-acid decarboxylases (KDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). After combining these strategies with co-expression of LEU1 (two copies), LEU4, LEU2 (two copies), LEU5, CimA, NFS1, ADH7 and ARO10(*), we achieved an n-butanol production of 835 mg/L in the final engineered strain, which is almost 7-fold increase compared to the initial strain. Furthermore, the production showed a 3-fold of the highest titer ever reported in yeast. Therefore, the engineered yeast strain represents a promising alternative platform for n-butanol production. PMID:27161023

  10. Enhanced isoprene biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by engineering of the native acetyl-CoA and mevalonic acid pathways with a push-pull-restrain strategy.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiaomei; Xie, Wenping; Lu, Wenqiang; Guo, Fei; Gu, Jiali; Yu, Hongwei; Ye, Lidan

    2014-09-30

    To explore the capacity of isoprene production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a rational push-pull-restrain strategy was proposed to engineer the mevalonic acid (MVA) and acetyl-CoA pathways. The strategy can be decomposed into the up-regulation of precursor supply in the acetyl-CoA module and the MVA pathway (push-strategy), increase of the isoprene branch flux (pull-strategy), and down-regulation of the competing pathway (restrain-strategy). Furthermore, to reduce the production cost arising from galactose addition and meanwhile maintain the high expression of Gal promoters, the galactose regulatory network was modulated by Gal80p deletion. Finally, the engineered strain YXM10-ispS-ispS could accumulate up to 37 mg/L isoprene (about 782-fold increase compared to the parental strain) under aerobic conditions with glycerol-sucrose as carbon source. In this way, a new potential platform for isoprene production was established via metabolic engineering of the yeast native pathways.

  11. Using decision pathway surveys to inform climate engineering policy choices.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Robin; Satterfield, Terre; Hasell, Ariel

    2016-01-19

    Over the coming decades citizens living in North America and Europe will be asked about a variety of new technological and behavioral initiatives intended to mitigate the worst impacts of climate change. A common approach to public input has been surveys whereby respondents' attitudes about climate change are explained by individuals' demographic background, values, and beliefs. In parallel, recent deliberative research seeks to more fully address the complex value tradeoffs linked to novel technologies and difficult ethical questions that characterize leading climate mitigation alternatives. New methods such as decision pathway surveys may offer important insights for policy makers by capturing much of the depth and reasoning of small-group deliberations while meeting standard survey goals including large-sample stakeholder engagement. Pathway surveys also can help participants to deepen their factual knowledge base and arrive at a more complete understanding of their own values as they apply to proposed policy alternatives. The pathway results indicate more fully the conditional and context-specific nature of support for several "upstream" climate interventions, including solar radiation management techniques and carbon dioxide removal technologies.

  12. Using decision pathway surveys to inform climate engineering policy choices

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Robin; Satterfield, Terre; Hasell, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Over the coming decades citizens living in North America and Europe will be asked about a variety of new technological and behavioral initiatives intended to mitigate the worst impacts of climate change. A common approach to public input has been surveys whereby respondents’ attitudes about climate change are explained by individuals’ demographic background, values, and beliefs. In parallel, recent deliberative research seeks to more fully address the complex value tradeoffs linked to novel technologies and difficult ethical questions that characterize leading climate mitigation alternatives. New methods such as decision pathway surveys may offer important insights for policy makers by capturing much of the depth and reasoning of small-group deliberations while meeting standard survey goals including large-sample stakeholder engagement. Pathway surveys also can help participants to deepen their factual knowledge base and arrive at a more complete understanding of their own values as they apply to proposed policy alternatives. The pathway results indicate more fully the conditional and context-specific nature of support for several “upstream” climate interventions, including solar radiation management techniques and carbon dioxide removal technologies. PMID:26729883

  13. Engineering key components in a synthetic eukaryotic signal transduction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Mauricio S; Morey, Kevin J; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Bowen, Tessa A; Smith, J Jeff; Webb, Colleen T; Hellinga, Homme W; Medford, June I

    2009-01-01

    Signal transduction underlies how living organisms detect and respond to stimuli. A goal of synthetic biology is to rewire natural signal transduction systems. Bacteria, yeast, and plants sense environmental aspects through conserved histidine kinase (HK) signal transduction systems. HK protein components are typically comprised of multiple, relatively modular, and conserved domains. Phosphate transfer between these components may exhibit considerable cross talk between the otherwise apparently linear pathways, thereby establishing networks that integrate multiple signals. We show that sequence conservation and cross talk can extend across kingdoms and can be exploited to produce a synthetic plant signal transduction system. In response to HK cross talk, heterologously expressed bacterial response regulators, PhoB and OmpR, translocate to the nucleus on HK activation. Using this discovery, combined with modification of PhoB (PhoB-VP64), we produced a key component of a eukaryotic synthetic signal transduction pathway. In response to exogenous cytokinin, PhoB-VP64 translocates to the nucleus, binds a synthetic PlantPho promoter, and activates gene expression. These results show that conserved-signaling components can be used across kingdoms and adapted to produce synthetic eukaryotic signal transduction pathways. PMID:19455134

  14. Using decision pathway surveys to inform climate engineering policy choices.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Robin; Satterfield, Terre; Hasell, Ariel

    2016-01-19

    Over the coming decades citizens living in North America and Europe will be asked about a variety of new technological and behavioral initiatives intended to mitigate the worst impacts of climate change. A common approach to public input has been surveys whereby respondents' attitudes about climate change are explained by individuals' demographic background, values, and beliefs. In parallel, recent deliberative research seeks to more fully address the complex value tradeoffs linked to novel technologies and difficult ethical questions that characterize leading climate mitigation alternatives. New methods such as decision pathway surveys may offer important insights for policy makers by capturing much of the depth and reasoning of small-group deliberations while meeting standard survey goals including large-sample stakeholder engagement. Pathway surveys also can help participants to deepen their factual knowledge base and arrive at a more complete understanding of their own values as they apply to proposed policy alternatives. The pathway results indicate more fully the conditional and context-specific nature of support for several "upstream" climate interventions, including solar radiation management techniques and carbon dioxide removal technologies. PMID:26729883

  15. Rapid Optimization of Engineered Metabolic Pathways with Serine Integrase Recombinational Assembly (SIRA).

    PubMed

    Merrick, C A; Wardrope, C; Paget, J E; Colloms, S D; Rosser, S J

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathway engineering in microbial hosts for heterologous biosynthesis of commodity compounds and fine chemicals offers a cheaper, greener, and more reliable method of production than does chemical synthesis. However, engineering metabolic pathways within a microbe is a complicated process: levels of gene expression, protein stability, enzyme activity, and metabolic flux must be balanced for high productivity without compromising host cell viability. A major rate-limiting step in engineering microbes for optimum biosynthesis of a target compound is DNA assembly, as current methods can be cumbersome and costly. Serine integrase recombinational assembly (SIRA) is a rapid DNA assembly method that utilizes serine integrases, and is particularly applicable to rapid optimization of engineered metabolic pathways. Using six pairs of orthogonal attP and attB sites with different central dinucleotide sequences that follow SIRA design principles, we have demonstrated that ΦC31 integrase can be used to (1) insert a single piece of DNA into a substrate plasmid; (2) assemble three, four, and five DNA parts encoding the enzymes for functional metabolic pathways in a one-pot reaction; (3) generate combinatorial libraries of metabolic pathway constructs with varied ribosome binding site strengths or gene orders in a one-pot reaction; and (4) replace and add DNA parts within a construct through targeted postassembly modification. We explain the mechanism of SIRA and the principles behind designing a SIRA reaction. We also provide protocols for making SIRA reaction components and practical methods for applying SIRA to rapid optimization of metabolic pathways.

  16. Metabolic Engineering of the Purine Pathway for Riboflavin Production in Ashbya gossypii†

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Alberto; Santos, María A.; Pompejus, Markus; Revuelta, José L.

    2005-01-01

    Purine nucleotides are essential precursors for living organisms because they are involved in many important processes, such as nucleic acid synthesis, energy supply, and the biosynthesis of several amino acids and vitamins such as riboflavin. GTP is the immediate precursor for riboflavin biosynthesis, and its formation through the purine pathway is subject to several regulatory mechanisms in different steps. Extracellular purines repress the transcription of most genes required for de novo ATP and GTP synthesis. Additionally, three enzymes of the pathway, phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP) amidotransferase, adenylosuccinate synthetase, and IMP dehydrogenase, are subject to feedback inhibition by their end products. Here we report the characterization and manipulation of the committed step in the purine pathway of the riboflavin overproducer Ashbya gossypii. We report that phosphoribosylamine biosynthesis in A. gossypii is negatively regulated at the transcriptional level by extracellular adenine. Furthermore, we show that ATP and GTP exert a strong inhibitory effect on the PRPP amidotransferase from A. gossypii. We constitutively overexpressed the AgADE4 gene encoding PRPP amidotransferase in A. gossypii, thereby abolishing the adenine-mediated transcriptional repression. In addition, we replaced the corresponding residues (aspartic acid310, lysine333, and alanine417) that have been described to be important for PRPP amidotransferase feedback inhibition in other organisms by site-directed mutagenesis. With these manipulations, we managed to enhance metabolic flow through the purine pathway and to increase the production of riboflavin in the triple mutant strain 10-fold (228 mg/liter). PMID:16204483

  17. Combination of Entner-Doudoroff Pathway with MEP Increases Isoprene Production in Engineered Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huaiwei; Sun, Yuanzhang; Ramos, Kristine Rose M.; Nisola, Grace M.; Valdehuesa, Kris Niño G.; Lee, Won–Keun; Park, Si Jae; Chung, Wook-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Embden-Meyerhof pathway (EMP) in tandem with 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway (MEP) is commonly used for isoprenoid biosynthesis in E. coli. However, this combination has limitations as EMP generates an imbalanced distribution of pyruvate and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P). Herein, four glycolytic pathways—EMP, Entner-Doudoroff Pathway (EDP), Pentose Phosphate Pathway (PPP) and Dahms pathway were tested as MEP feeding modules for isoprene production. Results revealed the highest isoprene production from EDP containing modules, wherein pyruvate and G3P were generated simultaneously; isoprene titer and yield were more than three and six times higher than those of the EMP module, respectively. Additionally, the PPP module that generates G3P prior to pyruvate was significantly more effective than the Dahms pathway, in which pyruvate production precedes G3P. In terms of precursor generation and energy/reducing-equivalent supply, EDP+PPP was found to be the ideal feeding module for MEP. These findings may launch a new direction for the optimization of MEP-dependent isoprenoid biosynthesis pathways. PMID:24376679

  18. An Engineered Rare Codon Device for Optimization of Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, You; Li, Chunying; Khan, Md. Rezaul Islam; Wang, Yushu; Ruan, Yunfeng; Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Bo; Ma, Xiaopan; Zhang, Kaisi; Zhao, Xiwen; Ye, Guanhao; Guo, Xizhi; Feng, Guoyin; He, Lin; Ma, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Rare codons generally arrest translation due to rarity of their cognate tRNAs. This property of rare codons can be utilized to regulate protein expression. In this study, a linear relationship was found between expression levels of genes and copy numbers of rare codons inserted within them. Based on this discovery, we constructed a molecular device in Escherichia coli using the rare codon AGG, its cognate tRNA (tRNAArg (CCU)), modified tRNAAsp (GUC → CCU), and truncated aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (TDRS) to switch the expression of reporter genes on or off as well as to precisely regulate their expression to various intermediate levels. To underscore the applicability of our work, we used the rare codon device to alter the expression levels of four genes of the fatty acid synthesis II (FASII) pathway (i.e. fabZ, fabG, fabI, and tesA’) in E. coli to optimize steady-state kinetics, which produced nearly two-fold increase in fatty acid yield. Thus, the proposed method has potential applications in regulating target protein expression at desired levels and optimizing metabolic pathways by precisely tuning in vivo molar ratio of relevant enzymes. PMID:26852704

  19. Efficacy of JAK/STAT pathway inhibition in murine xenograft models of early T-cell precursor (ETP) acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Shannon L.; Dolai, Sibasish; Delgado-Martin, Cristina; Vincent, Tiffaney; Robbins, Alissa; Selvanathan, Arthavan; Ryan, Theresa; Hall, Junior; Wood, Andrew C.; Tasian, Sarah K.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Loh, Mignon L.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Wood, Brent L.; Hermiston, Michelle L.; Grupp, Stephan A.; Lock, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Early T-cell precursor (ETP) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a recently described subtype of T-ALL characterized by a unique immunophenotype and genomic profile, as well as a high rate of induction failure. Frequent mutations in cytokine receptor and Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling pathways led us to hypothesize that ETP-ALL is dependent on JAK/STAT signaling. Here we demonstrate aberrant activation of the JAK/STAT pathway in ETP-ALL blasts relative to non-ETP T-ALL. Moreover, ETP-ALL showed hyperactivation of STAT5 in response to interleukin-7, an effect that was abrogated by the JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib. In vivo, ruxolitinib displayed activity in 6 of 6 patient-derived murine xenograft models of ETP-ALL, with profound single-agent efficacy in 5 models. Ruxolitinib treatment decreased peripheral blast counts relative to pretreatment levels and compared with control (P < .01) in 5 of 6 ETP-ALL xenografts, with marked reduction in mean splenic blast counts (P < .01) in 6 of 6 samples. Surprisingly, both JAK/STAT pathway activation and ruxolitinib efficacy were independent of the presence of JAK/STAT pathway mutations, raising the possibility that the therapeutic potential of ruxolitinib in ETP-ALL extends beyond those cases with JAK mutations. These findings establish the preclinical in vivo efficacy of ruxolitinib in ETP-ALL, a biologically distinct subtype for which novel therapies are needed. PMID:25645356

  20. Photosynthetic biomaterials: a pathway towards autotrophic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Schenck, Thilo Ludwig; Hopfner, Ursula; Chávez, Myra Noemi; Machens, Hans-Günther; Somlai-Schweiger, Ian; Giunta, Riccardo Enzo; Bohne, Alexandra Viola; Nickelsen, Jörg; Allende, Miguel L; Egaña, José Tomás

    2015-03-01

    Engineered tissues are highly limited by poor vascularization in vivo, leading to hypoxia. In order to overcome this challenge, we propose the use of photosynthetic biomaterials to provide oxygen. Since photosynthesis is the original source of oxygen for living organisms, we suggest that this could be a novel approach to provide a constant source of oxygen supply independently of blood perfusion. In this study we demonstrate that bioartificial scaffolds can be loaded with a solution containing the photosynthetic microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, showing high biocompatibility and photosynthetic activity in vitro. Furthermore, when photosynthetic biomaterials were engrafted in a mouse full skin defect, we observed that the presence of the microalgae did not trigger a native immune response in the host. Moreover, the analyses showed that the algae survived for at least 5 days in vivo, generating chimeric tissues comprised of algae and murine cells. The results of this study represent a crucial step towards the establishment of autotrophic tissue engineering approaches and suggest the use of photosynthetic cells to treat a broad spectrum of hypoxic conditions. PMID:25536030

  1. Analysis and Engineering of Metabolic Pathway Fluxes in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Christoph

    The Gram-positive soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum was discovered as a natural overproducer of glutamate about 50 years ago. Linked to the steadily increasing economical importance of this microorganism for production of glutamate and other amino acids, the quest for efficient production strains has been an intense area of research during the past few decades. Efficient production strains were created by applying classical mutagenesis and selection and especially metabolic engineering strategies with the advent of recombinant DNA technology. Hereby experimental and computational approaches have provided fascinating insights into the metabolism of this microorganism and directed strain engineering. Today, C. glutamicum is applied to the industrial production of more than 2 million tons of amino acids per year. The huge achievements in recent years, including the sequencing of the complete genome and efficient post genomic approaches, now provide the basis for a new, fascinating era of research - analysis of metabolic and regulatory properties of C. glutamicum on a global scale towards novel and superior bioprocesses.

  2. Proteome Profiling Reveals Potential Toxicity and Detoxification Pathways Following Exposure of BEAS-2B Cells to Engineered Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidative stress is known to play important roles in engineered nanomaterial induced cellular toxicity. However, the proteins and signaling pathways associated with the engineered nanomaterial mediated oxidative stress and toxicity are largely unknown. To identify these toxicity ...

  3. Roles of lipid rafts in integrin-dependent adhesion and gp130 signalling pathway in mouse embryonic neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Makoto; Nakamura, Kazuo; Taga, Tetsuya

    2004-09-01

    Neuronal and glial cells organizing the central nervous system are generated from common neural precursor cells present in the neuroepithelium during development. We tried to clarify functions of a cell surface microdomain, lipid raft, in neuroepithelial cells (NECs). NECs are suggested to adhere to fibronectin substratum dependently on integrin molecules. We found that beta1 integrin, a component of fibronectin receptors, was distributed in lipid rafts. Methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MBCD), an inhibitor of lipid raft formation, inhibited the integrin-fibronectin interaction-dependent adhesion of NECs. However, inhibition of synthesis of glycosphingolipids (GSL), components of lipid rafts, did not affect NEC adhesion. Leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF), an interleukin 6 type cytokine, induces astrocyte differentiation of NECs via activation of a transcription factor STAT3. We detected gp130, JAK1 and Ras but not STAT3 and ERK2 molecules in lipid rafts of NECs. Disruption of lipid rafts by MBCD inhibited LIF-induced ERK activation but not STAT3 activation. It is thus suggested that LIF-downstream molecules have differential lipid raft-dependency in terms of activation upon LIF-stimulation. In this study, we found functions of lipid rafts in cell adhesion and signal transduction in NECs. This is the first report that characterized functions of lipid rafts in embryonic neural precursor cells.

  4. Engineering of Metabolic Pathways by Artificial Enzyme Channels

    PubMed Central

    Pröschel, Marlene; Detsch, Rainer; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Application of industrial enzymes for production of valuable chemical compounds has greatly benefited from recent developments in Systems and Synthetic Biology. Both, in vivo and in vitro systems have been established, allowing conversion of simple into complex compounds. Metabolic engineering in living cells needs to be balanced which is achieved by controlling gene expression levels, translation, scaffolding, compartmentation, and flux control. In vitro applications are often hampered by limited protein stability/half-life and insufficient rates of substrate conversion. To improve stability and catalytic activity, proteins are post-translationally modified and arranged in artificial metabolic channels. Within the review article, we will first discuss the supramolecular organization of enzymes in living systems and second summarize current and future approaches to design artificial metabolic channels by additive manufacturing for the efficient production of desired products. PMID:26557643

  5. Engineering of Metabolic Pathways by Artificial Enzyme Channels.

    PubMed

    Pröschel, Marlene; Detsch, Rainer; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Application of industrial enzymes for production of valuable chemical compounds has greatly benefited from recent developments in Systems and Synthetic Biology. Both, in vivo and in vitro systems have been established, allowing conversion of simple into complex compounds. Metabolic engineering in living cells needs to be balanced which is achieved by controlling gene expression levels, translation, scaffolding, compartmentation, and flux control. In vitro applications are often hampered by limited protein stability/half-life and insufficient rates of substrate conversion. To improve stability and catalytic activity, proteins are post-translationally modified and arranged in artificial metabolic channels. Within the review article, we will first discuss the supramolecular organization of enzymes in living systems and second summarize current and future approaches to design artificial metabolic channels by additive manufacturing for the efficient production of desired products. PMID:26557643

  6. Engineering a biospecific communication pathway between cells and electrodes.

    PubMed

    Collier, Joel H; Mrksich, Milan

    2006-02-14

    Methods for transducing the cellular activities of mammalian cells into measurable electronic signals are important in many biotechnical applications, including biosensors, cell arrays, and other cell-based devices. This manuscript describes an approach for functionally integrating cellular activities and electrical processes in an underlying substrate. The cells are engineered with a cell-surface chimeric receptor that presents the nonmammalian enzyme cutinase. Action of this cell-surface cutinase on enzyme substrate self-assembled monolayers switches a nonelectroactive hydroxyphenyl ester to an electroactive hydroquinone, providing an electrical activity that can be identified with cyclic voltammetry. In this way, cell-surface enzymatic activity is transduced into electronic signals. The development of strategies to directly interface the activities of cells with materials will be important to enabling a broad class of hybrid microsystems that combine living and nonliving components. PMID:16461913

  7. Engineering a biospecific communication pathway between cells and electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Joel H.; Mrksich, Milan

    2006-02-01

    Methods for transducing the cellular activities of mammalian cells into measurable electronic signals are important in many biotechnical applications, including biosensors, cell arrays, and other cell-based devices. This manuscript describes an approach for functionally integrating cellular activities and electrical processes in an underlying substrate. The cells are engineered with a cell-surface chimeric receptor that presents the nonmammalian enzyme cutinase. Action of this cell-surface cutinase on enzyme substrate self-assembled monolayers switches a nonelectroactive hydroxyphenyl ester to an electroactive hydroquinone, providing an electrical activity that can be identified with cyclic voltammetry. In this way, cell-surface enzymatic activity is transduced into electronic signals. The development of strategies to directly interface the activities of cells with materials will be important to enabling a broad class of hybrid microsystems that combine living and nonliving components. biomaterial | extracellular matrix | signal transduction

  8. Engineering Emergency: African Americans and Hispanics Lack Pathways to Engineering. Vital Signs: Reports on the Condition of STEM Learning in the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Change the Equation, 2014

    2014-01-01

    A quality education that leads to good jobs offers a reliable pathway to economic security, yet the first step on that pathway remains inaccessible to far too many Americans, especially Americans of color. Nowhere is this inequity more apparent than in engineering. On average, people with engineering bachelor's degrees earn higher salaries than…

  9. Metabolic engineering of cottonseed oil biosynthesis pathway via RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhongping; Li, Jingwen; Guo, Xiaoping; Jin, Shuangxia; Zhang, Xianlong

    2016-01-01

    Cottonseed oil is recognized as an important oil in food industry for its unique characters: low flavor reversion and the high level of antioxidants (VitaminE) as well as unsaturated fatty acid. However, the cottonseed oil content of cultivated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) is only around 20%. In this study, we modified the accumulation of oils by the down-regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase 1 (GhPEPC1) via RNA interference in transgenic cotton plants. The qRT-PCR and enzyme activity assay revealed that the transcription and expression of GhPEPC1 was dramatically down-regulated in transgenic lines. Consequently, the cottonseed oil content in several transgenic lines showed a significant (P < 0.01) increase (up to 16.7%) without obvious phenotypic changes under filed condition when compared to the control plants. In order to elucidate the molecular mechanism of GhPEPC1 in the regulation of seed oil content, we quantified the expression of the carbon metabolism related genes of transgenic GhPEPC1 RNAi lines by transcriptome analysis. This analysis revealed the decrease of GhPEPC1 expression led to the increase expression of triacylglycerol biosynthesis-related genes, which eventually contributed to the lipid biosynthesis in cotton. This result provides a valuable information for cottonseed oil biosynthesis pathway and shows the potential of creating high cottonseed oil germplasm by RNAi strategy for cotton breeding. PMID:27620452

  10. Reverse engineering of Alzheimer's disease based on biomarker pathways analysis.

    PubMed

    Richens, Joanna L; Morgan, Kevin; O'Shea, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) poses an increasingly profound problem to society, yet progress toward a genuine understanding of the disease remains worryingly slow. Perhaps, the most outstanding problem with the biology of AD is the question of its mechanistic origins, that is, it remains unclear wherein the molecular failures occur that underlie the disease. We demonstrate how molecular biomarkers could help define the nature of AD in terms of the early biochemical events that correlate with disease progression. We use a novel panel of biomolecules that appears in cerebrospinal fluid of AD patients. As changes in the relative abundance of these molecular markers are associated with progression to AD from mild cognitive impairment, we make the assumption that by tracking their origins we can identify the biochemical conditions that predispose their presence and consequently cause the onset of AD. We couple these protein markers with an analysis of a series of genetic factors and together this hypothesis essentially allows us to redefine AD in terms of the molecular pathways that underlie the disease.

  11. Studies on xylitol production by metabolic pathway engineered Debaryomyces hansenii.

    PubMed

    Pal, Suksham; Choudhary, Vikas; Kumar, Anil; Biswas, Dipanwita; Mondal, Alok K; Sahoo, Debendra K

    2013-11-01

    Debaryomyces hansenii is one of the most promising natural xylitol producers. As the conversion of xylitol to xylulose mediated by NAD(+) cofactor dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) reduces its xylitol yield, xylitol dehydrogenase gene (DhXDH)-disrupted mutant of D. hansenii having potential for xylose assimilating pathway stopping at xylitol, was used to study the effects of co-substrates, xylose and oxygen availability on xylitol production. Compared to low cell growth and xylitol production in cultivation medium containing xylose as the only substrate, XDH disrupted mutants grown on glycerol as co-substrate accumulated 2.5-fold increased xylitol concentration over those cells grown on glucose as co-substrate. The oxygen availability, in terms of volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient, kLa (23.86-87.96 h(-1)), affected both xylitol productivity and yield, though the effect is more pronounced on the former. The addition of extra xylose at different phases of xylitol fermentation did not enhance xylitol productivity under experimental conditions.

  12. Metabolic engineering of cottonseed oil biosynthesis pathway via RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhongping; Li, Jingwen; Guo, Xiaoping; Jin, Shuangxia; Zhang, Xianlong

    2016-01-01

    Cottonseed oil is recognized as an important oil in food industry for its unique characters: low flavor reversion and the high level of antioxidants (VitaminE) as well as unsaturated fatty acid. However, the cottonseed oil content of cultivated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) is only around 20%. In this study, we modified the accumulation of oils by the down-regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase 1 (GhPEPC1) via RNA interference in transgenic cotton plants. The qRT-PCR and enzyme activity assay revealed that the transcription and expression of GhPEPC1 was dramatically down-regulated in transgenic lines. Consequently, the cottonseed oil content in several transgenic lines showed a significant (P < 0.01) increase (up to 16.7%) without obvious phenotypic changes under filed condition when compared to the control plants. In order to elucidate the molecular mechanism of GhPEPC1 in the regulation of seed oil content, we quantified the expression of the carbon metabolism related genes of transgenic GhPEPC1 RNAi lines by transcriptome analysis. This analysis revealed the decrease of GhPEPC1 expression led to the increase expression of triacylglycerol biosynthesis-related genes, which eventually contributed to the lipid biosynthesis in cotton. This result provides a valuable information for cottonseed oil biosynthesis pathway and shows the potential of creating high cottonseed oil germplasm by RNAi strategy for cotton breeding. PMID:27620452

  13. Kinetics of long-chain (sphingoid) base biosynthesis in intact LM cells: effects of varying the extracellular concentrations of serine and fatty acid precursors of this pathway.

    PubMed

    Merrill, A H; Wang, E; Mullins, R E

    1988-01-12

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.50) catalyzes the condensation of L-serine and palmitoyl-CoA to yield 3-ketosphinganine in the first unique reaction of long-chain (sphingoid) base biosynthesis. The kinetic effects of changing the extracellular concentrations of the precursors for this pathway were studied with LM cells by following the incorporation of L-[3-14C]serine into the long-chain base (i.e., sphinganine and sphingenine) backbones of complex sphingolipids. [14C]Serine was taken up by the cells and rapidly reached steady-state concentrations similar to those of the medium. From the cellular [14C]serine concentrations and specific activities, the apparent Vmax [14 pmol min-1 (10(6) cells)-1] and Km (0.23 mM) values for long-chain base synthesis were determined and found to be essentially identical with those for serine palmitoyltransferase assayed in vitro [i.e., 13 pmol min-1 (10(6) cells)-1 and 0.27 mM, respectively]. The other precursor, palmitic acid, was also taken up rapidly and increased long-chain base biosynthesis in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was limited to palmitic acid and matched the known specificity of serine palmitoyltransferase for saturated fatty acyl-CoA's of 16 +/- 1 carbon atoms. These studies delineate the influence of extracellular precursors on the formation of the sphingolipid backbone and suggest that the kinetic properties of serine palmitoyltransferase govern this behavior of long-chain base synthesis in intact cells. PMID:3126810

  14. Production of mesaconate in Escherichia coli by engineered glutamate mutase pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyu; Zhang, Kechun

    2015-07-01

    Mesaconate is an intermediate in the glutamate degradation pathway of microorganisms such as Clostridium tetanomorphum. However, metabolic engineering to produce mesaconate has not been reported previously. In this work, two enzymes involved in mesaconate production, glutamate mutase and 3-methylaspartate ammonia lyase from C. tetanomorphum, were recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. To improve mesaconate production, reactivatase of glutamate mutase was discovered and adenosylcobalamin availability was increased. In addition, glutamate mutase was engineered to improve the in vivo activity. These efforts led to efficient mesaconate production at a titer of 7.81 g/L in shake flask with glutamate feeding. Then a full biosynthetic pathway was constructed to produce mesaconate at a titer of 6.96 g/L directly from glucose. In summary, we have engineered an efficient system in E. coli for the biosynthesis of mesaconate.

  15. Rapid Optimization of Engineered Metabolic Pathways with Serine Integrase Recombinational Assembly (SIRA).

    PubMed

    Merrick, C A; Wardrope, C; Paget, J E; Colloms, S D; Rosser, S J

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathway engineering in microbial hosts for heterologous biosynthesis of commodity compounds and fine chemicals offers a cheaper, greener, and more reliable method of production than does chemical synthesis. However, engineering metabolic pathways within a microbe is a complicated process: levels of gene expression, protein stability, enzyme activity, and metabolic flux must be balanced for high productivity without compromising host cell viability. A major rate-limiting step in engineering microbes for optimum biosynthesis of a target compound is DNA assembly, as current methods can be cumbersome and costly. Serine integrase recombinational assembly (SIRA) is a rapid DNA assembly method that utilizes serine integrases, and is particularly applicable to rapid optimization of engineered metabolic pathways. Using six pairs of orthogonal attP and attB sites with different central dinucleotide sequences that follow SIRA design principles, we have demonstrated that ΦC31 integrase can be used to (1) insert a single piece of DNA into a substrate plasmid; (2) assemble three, four, and five DNA parts encoding the enzymes for functional metabolic pathways in a one-pot reaction; (3) generate combinatorial libraries of metabolic pathway constructs with varied ribosome binding site strengths or gene orders in a one-pot reaction; and (4) replace and add DNA parts within a construct through targeted postassembly modification. We explain the mechanism of SIRA and the principles behind designing a SIRA reaction. We also provide protocols for making SIRA reaction components and practical methods for applying SIRA to rapid optimization of metabolic pathways. PMID:27417934

  16. Multiplex metabolic pathway engineering using CRISPR/Cas9 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jakočiūnas, Tadas; Bonde, Ida; Herrgård, Markus; Harrison, Scott J; Kristensen, Mette; Pedersen, Lasse E; Jensen, Michael K; Keasling, Jay D

    2015-03-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 is a simple and efficient tool for targeted and marker-free genome engineering. Here, we report the development and successful application of a multiplex CRISPR/Cas9 system for genome engineering of up to 5 different genomic loci in one transformation step in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To assess the specificity of the tool we employed genome re-sequencing to screen for off-target sites in all single knock-out strains targeted by different gRNAs. This extensive analysis identified no more genome variants in CRISPR/Cas9 engineered strains compared to wild-type reference strains. We applied our genome engineering tool for an exploratory analysis of all possible single, double, triple, quadruple and quintuple gene disruption combinations to search for strains with high mevalonate production, a key intermediate for the industrially important isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway. Even though we did not overexpress any genes in the mevalonate pathway, this analysis identified strains with mevalonate titers greater than 41-fold compared to the wild-type strain. Our findings illustrate the applicability of this highly specific and efficient multiplex genome engineering approach to accelerate functional genomics and metabolic engineering efforts.

  17. Engineering a novel biosynthetic pathway in Escherichia coli for production of renewable ethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Brian; Zhang, Haoran; De Mey, Marjan; Lim, Chin Giaw; Li, Zheng-Jun; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-02-01

    Ethylene glycol (EG) is an important commodity chemical with broad industrial applications. It is presently produced from petroleum or natural gas feedstocks in processes requiring consumption of significant quantities of non-renewable resources. Here, we report a novel pathway for biosynthesis of EG from the renewable sugar glucose in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli. Serine-to-EG conversion was first achieved through a pathway comprising serine decarboxylase, ethanolamine oxidase, and glycolaldehyde reductase. Serine provision in E. coli was then enhanced by overexpression of the serine-biosynthesis pathway. The integration of these two parts into the complete EG-biosynthesis pathway in E. coli allowed for production of 4.1 g/L EG at a cumulative yield of 0.14 g-EG/g-glucose, establishing a foundation for a promising biotechnology.

  18. Identification of Wnt Pathway Target Genes Regulating the Division and Differentiation of Larval Seam Cells and Vulval Precursor Cells in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Gorrepati, Lakshmi; Krause, Michael W; Chen, Weiping; Brodigan, Thomas M; Correa-Mendez, Margarita; Eisenmann, David M

    2015-06-05

    The evolutionarily conserved Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays a fundamental role during metazoan development, regulating numerous processes including cell fate specification, cell migration, and stem cell renewal. Wnt ligand binding leads to stabilization of the transcriptional effector β-catenin and upregulation of target gene expression to mediate a cellular response. During larval development of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, Wnt/β-catenin pathways act in fate specification of two hypodermal cell types, the ventral vulval precursor cells (VPCs) and the lateral seam cells. Because little is known about targets of the Wnt signaling pathways acting during larval VPC and seam cell differentiation, we sought to identify genes regulated by Wnt signaling in these two hypodermal cell types. We conditionally activated Wnt signaling in larval animals and performed cell type-specific "mRNA tagging" to enrich for VPC and seam cell-specific mRNAs, and then used microarray analysis to examine gene expression compared to control animals. Two hundred thirty-nine genes activated in response to Wnt signaling were identified, and we characterized 50 genes further. The majority of these genes are expressed in seam and/or vulval lineages during normal development, and reduction of function for nine genes caused defects in the proper division, fate specification, fate execution, or differentiation of seam cells and vulval cells. Therefore, the combination of these techniques was successful at identifying potential cell type-specific Wnt pathway target genes from a small number of cells and at increasing our knowledge of the specification and behavior of these C. elegans larval hypodermal cells.

  19. Engineering and comparison of non-natural pathways for microbial phenol production.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brian; Machas, Michael; Nielsen, David R

    2016-08-01

    The non-renewable petrochemical phenol is used as a precursor to produce numerous fine and commodity chemicals, including various pharmaceuticals and phenolic resins. Microbial phenol biosynthesis has previously been established, stemming from endogenous tyrosine via tyrosine phenol lyase (TPL). TPL, however, suffers from feedback inhibition and equilibrium limitations, both of which contribute to reduced flux through the overall pathway. To address these limitations, two novel and non-natural phenol biosynthesis pathways, both stemming instead from chorismate, were constructed and comparatively evaluated. The first proceeds to phenol in one heterologous step via the intermediate p-hydroxybenzoic acid, while the second involves two heterologous steps and the associated intermediates isochorismate and salicylate. Maximum phenol titers achieved via these two alternative pathways reached as high as 377 ± 14 and 259 ± 31 mg/L in batch shake flask cultures, respectively. In contrast, under analogous conditions, phenol production via the established TPL-dependent route reached 377 ± 23 mg/L, which approaches the maximum achievable output reported to date under batch conditions. Additional strain development and optimization of relevant culture conditions with respect to each individual pathway is ultimately expected to result in further improved phenol production. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1745-1754. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26804162

  20. Efficient metabolic pathway engineering in transgenic tobacco and tomato plastids with synthetic multigene operons.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yinghong; Rijzaani, Habib; Karcher, Daniel; Ruf, Stephanie; Bock, Ralph

    2013-02-19

    The engineering of complex metabolic pathways requires the concerted expression of multiple genes. In plastids (chloroplasts) of plant cells, genes are organized in operons that are coexpressed as polycistronic transcripts and then often are processed further into monocistronic mRNAs. Here we have used the tocochromanol pathway (providing tocopherols and tocotrienols, collectively also referred to as "vitamin E") as an example to establish principles of successful multigene engineering by stable transformation of the chloroplast genome, a technology not afflicted with epigenetic variation and/or instability of transgene expression. Testing a series of single-gene constructs (encoding homogentisate phytyltransferase, tocopherol cyclase, and γ-tocopherol methyltransferase) and rationally designed synthetic operons in tobacco and tomato plants, we (i) confirmed previous results suggesting homogentisate phytyltransferase as the limiting enzymatic step in the pathway, (ii) comparatively characterized the bottlenecks in tocopherol biosynthesis in transplastomic leaves and tomato fruits, and (iii) achieved an up to tenfold increase in total tocochromanol accumulation. In addition, our results uncovered an unexpected light-dependent regulatory link between tocochromanol metabolism and the pathways of photosynthetic pigment biosynthesis. The synthetic operon design developed here will facilitate future synthetic biology applications in plastids, especially the design of artificial operons that introduce novel biochemical pathways into plants.

  1. Broad substrate specificity of phosphotransbutyrylase from Listeria monocytogenes: A potential participant in an alternative pathway for provision of acyl CoA precursors for fatty acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sirobhushanam, Sirisha; Galva, Charitha; Sen, Suranjana; Wilkinson, Brian J; Gatto, Craig

    2016-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, the causative organism of the serious food-borne disease listeriosis, has a membrane abundant in branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs). BCFAs are normally biosynthesized from branched-chain amino acids via the activity of branched chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (Bkd), and disruption of this pathway results in reduced BCFA content in the membrane. Short branched-chain carboxylic acids (BCCAs) added as media supplements result in incorporation of BCFAs arising from the supplemented BCCAs in the membrane of L. monocytogenes bkd mutant MOR401. High concentrations of the supplements also effect similar changes in the membrane of the wild type organism with intact bkd. Such carboxylic acids clearly act as fatty acid precursors, and there must be an alternative pathway resulting in the formation of their CoA thioester derivatives. Candidates for this are the enzymes phosphotransbutyrylase (Ptb) and butyrate kinase (Buk), the products of the first two genes of the bkd operon. Ptb from L. monocytogenes exhibited broad substrate specificity, a strong preference for branched-chain substrates, a lack of activity with acetyl CoA and hexanoyl CoA, and strict chain length preference (C3-C5). Ptb catalysis involved ternary complex formation. Additionally, Ptb could utilize unnatural branched-chain substrates such as 2-ethylbutyryl CoA, albeit with lower efficiency, consistent with a potential involvement of this enzyme in the conversion of the carboxylic acid additives into CoA primers for BCFA biosynthesis. PMID:27320015

  2. Utilization of economical substrate-derived carbohydrates by solventogenic clostridia: pathway dissection, regulation and engineering.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yang; Jiang, Yu; Yang, Sheng; Jiang, Weihong

    2014-10-01

    Solventogenic clostridia can produce acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) by using different carbohydrates. For economical reasons, the utilization of cheap and renewable biomass in clostridia-based ABE fermentation has recently attracted increasing interests. With the study of molecular microbiology and development of genetic tools, the understanding of carbohydrate metabolism in clostridia has increased in recent years. Here, we review the pioneering work in this field, with a focus on dissecting the pathways and describing the regulation of the metabolism of economical substrate-derived carbohydrates by clostridia. Recent progress in the metabolic engineering of carbohydrate utilization pathways is also described.

  3. More to Say: Analyzing Open-Ended Student Responses to the Academic Pathways of People Learning Engineering Survey. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lande, Micah; Parikh, Sarah; Sheppard, Sheri; Toye, George; Chen, Helen; Donaldson, Krista

    2009-01-01

    The Academic Pathways of People Learning Engineering Survey (APPLES2) was administered in Spring 2008 to undergraduate engineering students at 21 American universities. Students took the 10-minute online survey that asked mainly multiple choice questions related to their undergraduate engineering experience. A final optional open-ended question…

  4. From PIE to APPLES: The Evolution of a Survey Instrument to Explore Engineering Student Pathways. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Helen; Donaldson, Krista; Eris, Ozgur; Chachra, Debbie; Lichtenstein, Gary; Sheppard, Sheri; Toye, George

    2008-01-01

    The Academic Pathways Study (APS) of the NSF-funded Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education (CAEE) is a cross-university study that systematically examines how engineering students navigate their education, and how engineering skills and identity develop during their undergraduate careers. The APS has utilized a variety of methods…

  5. Engineering the central biosynthetic and secondary metabolic pathways of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1201 to improve phenazine-1-carboxylic acid production.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kaiming; Zhou, Lian; Jiang, Haixia; Sun, Shuang; Fang, Yunling; Liu, Jianhua; Zhang, Xuehong; He, Ya-Wen

    2015-11-01

    The secondary metabolite phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) is an important component of the newly registered biopesticide Shenqinmycin. We used a combined method involving gene, promoter, and protein engineering to modify the central biosynthetic and secondary metabolic pathways in the PCA-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA1201. The PCA yield of the resulting strain PA-IV was increased 54.6-fold via the following strategies: (1) blocking PCA conversion and enhancing PCA efflux pumping; (2) increasing metabolic flux towards the PCA biosynthetic pathway through the over-production of two DAHP synthases and blocking the synthesis of 21 secondary metabolites; (3) increasing the PCA precursor supply through the engineering of five chorismate-utilizing enzymes; (4) engineering the promoters of two PCA biosynthetic gene clusters. Strain PA-IV produced 9882 mg/L PCA in fed-batch fermentation, which is twice as much as that produced by the current industrial strain. Strain PA-IV was also genetically stable and comparable to Escherichia coli in cytotoxicity.

  6. [Engineering of the xylose metabolic pathway for microbial production of bio-based chemicals].

    PubMed

    Liu, Weixi; Fu, Jing; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Tao

    2013-08-01

    As the rapid development of economy necessitates a large number of oil, the contradiction between energy supply and demand is further exacerbated by the dwindling reserves of petroleum resource. Therefore, the research of the renewable cellulosic biomass resources is gaining unprecedented momentum. Because xylose is the second most abundant monosaccharide after glucose in lignocellulose hydrolyzes, high-efficiency bioconversion of xylose becomes one of the vital factors that affect the industrial prospects of lignocellulose application. According to the research progresses in recent years, this review summarized the advances in bioconversion of xylose, which included identification and redesign of the xylose metabolic pathway, engineering the xylose transport pathway and bio-based chemicals production. In order to solve the energy crisis and environmental pollution issues, the development of advanced bio-fuel technology, especially engineering the microbe able to metabolize xylose and produce ethanol by synthetic biology, is environmentally benign and sustainable. PMID:24364352

  7. Protein design and engineering of a de novo pathway for microbial production of 1,3-propanediol from glucose.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Geng, Feng; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-02-01

    Protein engineering to expand the substrate spectrum of native enzymes opens new possibilities for bioproduction of valuable chemicals from non-natural pathways. No natural microorganism can directly use sugars to produce 1,3-propanediol (PDO). Here, we present a de novo route for the biosynthesis of PDO from sugar, which may overcome the mentioned limitations by expanding the homoserine synthesis pathway. The accomplishment of pathway from homoserine to PDO is achieved by protein engineering of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and pyruvate decarboxylase to sequentially convert homoserine to 4-hydroxy-2-ketobutyrate and 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde. The latter is finally converted to PDO by using a native alcohol dehydrogenase. In this work, we report on experimental accomplishment of this non-natural pathway, especially by protein engineering of GDH for the key step of converting homoserine to 4-hydroxy-2-ketobutyrate. These results show the feasibility and significance of protein engineering for de novo pathway design and overproduction of desired industrial products.

  8. A portable expression resource for engineering cross-species genetic circuits and pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Manish; Salis, Howard M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic circuits and metabolic pathways can be reengineered to allow organisms to process signals and manufacture useful chemicals. However, their functions currently rely on organism-specific regulatory parts, fragmenting synthetic biology and metabolic engineering into host-specific domains. To unify efforts, here we have engineered a cross-species expression resource that enables circuits and pathways to reuse the same genetic parts, while functioning similarly across diverse organisms. Our engineered system combines mixed feedback control loops and cross-species translation signals to autonomously self-regulate expression of an orthogonal polymerase without host-specific promoters, achieving nontoxic and tuneable gene expression in diverse Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Combining 50 characterized system variants with mechanistic modelling, we show how the cross-species expression resource's dynamics, capacity and toxicity are controlled by the control loops' architecture and feedback strengths. We also demonstrate one application of the resource by reusing the same genetic parts to express a biosynthesis pathway in both model and non-model hosts. PMID:26184393

  9. Validation of RetroPath, a computer-aided design tool for metabolic pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    Fehér, Tamás; Planson, Anne-Gaëlle; Carbonell, Pablo; Fernández-Castané, Alfred; Grigoras, Ioana; Dariy, Ekaterina; Perret, Alain; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2014-11-01

    Metabolic engineering has succeeded in biosynthesis of numerous commodity or high value compounds. However, the choice of pathways and enzymes used for production was many times made ad hoc, or required expert knowledge of the specific biochemical reactions. In order to rationalize the process of engineering producer strains, we developed the computer-aided design (CAD) tool RetroPath that explores and enumerates metabolic pathways connecting the endogenous metabolites of a chassis cell to the target compound. To experimentally validate our tool, we constructed 12 top-ranked enzyme combinations producing the flavonoid pinocembrin, four of which displayed significant yields. Namely, our tool queried the enzymes found in metabolic databases based on their annotated and predicted activities. Next, it ranked pathways based on the predicted efficiency of the available enzymes, the toxicity of the intermediate metabolites and the calculated maximum product flux. To implement the top-ranking pathway, our procedure narrowed down a list of nine million possible enzyme combinations to 12, a number easily assembled and tested. One round of metabolic network optimization based on RetroPath output further increased pinocembrin titers 17-fold. In total, 12 out of the 13 enzymes tested in this work displayed a relative performance that was in accordance with its predicted score. These results validate the ranking function of our CAD tool, and open the way to its utilization in the biosynthesis of novel compounds.

  10. Genome Engineering of the 2,3-Butanediol Biosynthetic Pathway for Tight Regulation in Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Nozzi, Nicole E; Atsumi, Shota

    2015-11-20

    Cyanobacteria have gained popularity among the metabolic engineering community as a tractable photosynthetic host for renewable chemical production. However, though a number of successfully engineered production systems have been reported, long-term genetic stability remains an issue for cyanobacterial systems. The genetic engineering toolbox for cyanobacteria is largely lacking inducible systems for expression control. The characterization of tight regulation systems for use in cyanobacteria may help to alleviate this problem. In this work we explore the function of the IPTG inducible promoter P(L)lacO1 in the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 as well as the effect of gene order within an operon on pathway expression. According to our experiments, P(L)lacO1 functions well as an inducible promoter in S. elongatus. Additionally, we found that gene order within an operon can strongly influence control of expression of each gene.

  11. Implication of the calcium sensing receptor and the Phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway in the extracellular calcium-mediated migration of RAW 264.7 osteoclast precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Boudot, Cédric; Saidak, Zuzana; Boulanouar, Abdel Krim; Petit, Laurent; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Massy, Ziad; Brazier, Michel; Mentaverri, Romuald; Kamel, Saïd

    2010-05-01

    While the processes involved in the formation, maturation and apoptosis of osteoclasts have been investigated extensively in previous studies, little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the localization and homing of osteoclast precursor cells to the bone environment in order to initiate the bone remodeling process. Recent studies have suggested that the extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)(o)) concentration gradient present near the bone environment may be one of the participating factors, producing a chemoattractant effect on osteoclast precursors. Using the murine osteoclast precursor cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, the RAW 264.7 cell line, we have shown that Ca(2+)(o) increases the migration of these cells in a directional manner. The participation of the calcium sensing receptor (CaR) in this effect was tested by knocking down its expression through RNA interference, which resulted in an abolition of the migratory response. By the use of specific pathway inhibitors and western blot analysis, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and phospholipase Cbeta pathways were shown to be implicated in the migratory effect. The implication of the Akt pathway in the Ca(2+)(o)-induced chemoattraction of RAW 264.7 cells was also confirmed by transducing the cells with the fusion protein TAT-dominant negative-Akt, which decreased the migratory effect. In contrast, the MAPK pathways (ERK1/2, p38 and JNK) were not involved in the production of the migratory effect. We conclude that through the activation of the CaR and subsequent signaling via the PI3K/Akt pathway, Ca(2+)(o) produces a chemoattractant effect on the osteoclast precursor RAW 264.7 cells. These results suggest that the Ca(2+)(o) gradient present near the bone may be one of the initiating factors for the homing of osteoclast precursors to bone, thus possibly playing a role in the initiation of bone remodeling. PMID:20149906

  12. Cross-reactions between engineered xylose and galactose pathways in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Overexpression of the PGM2 gene encoding phosphoglucomutase (Pgm2p) has been shown to improve galactose utilization both under aerobic and under anaerobic conditions. Similarly, xylose utilization has been improved by overexpression of genes encoding xylulokinase (XK), enzymes from the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (non-ox PPP) and deletion of the endogenous aldose reductase GRE3 gene in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains carrying either fungal or bacterial xylose pathways. In the present study, we investigated how the combination of these traits affect xylose and galactose utilization in the presence or absence of glucose in S. cerevisiae strains engineered with the xylose reductase (XR)-xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) pathway. Results In the absence of PGM2 overexpression, the combined overexpression of XK, the non-ox PPP and deletion of the GRE3 gene significantly delayed aerobic growth on galactose, whereas no difference was observed between the control strain and the xylose-engineered strain when the PGM2 gene was overexpressed. Under anaerobic conditions, the overexpression of the PGM2 gene increased the ethanol yield and the xylose consumption rate in medium containing xylose as the only carbon source. The possibility of Pgm2p acting as a xylose isomerase (XI) could be excluded by measuring the XI activity in both strains. The additional copy of the PGM2 gene also resulted in a shorter fermentation time during the co-consumption of galactose and xylose. However, the effect was lost upon addition of glucose to the growth medium. Conclusions PGM2 overexpression was shown to benefit xylose and galactose fermentation, alone and in combination. In contrast, galactose fermentation was impaired in the engineered xylose-utilizing strain harbouring extra copies of the non-ox PPP genes and a deletion of the GRE3 gene, unless PGM2 was overexpressed. These cross-reactions are of particular relevance for the fermentation of mixed sugars from

  13. Hyperglycemia Diverts Dividing Osteoblastic Precursor Cells to an Adipogenic Pathway and Induces Synthesis of a Hyaluronan Matrix That Is Adhesive for Monocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Aimin; Midura, Ronald J.; Vasanji, Amit; Wang, Andrew J.; Hascall, Vincent C.

    2014-01-01

    Isolated rat bone marrow stromal cells cultured in osteogenic medium in which the normal 5.6 mm glucose is changed to hyperglycemic 25.6 mm glucose greatly increase lipid formation between 21–31 days of culture that is associated with decreased biomineralization, up-regulate expression of cyclin D3 and two adipogenic markers (CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ) within 5 days of culture, increase neutral and polar lipid synthesis within 5 days of culture, and form a monocyte-adhesive hyaluronan matrix through an endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced autophagic mechanism. Evidence is also provided that, by 4 weeks after diabetes onset in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model, there is a large loss of trabecular bone mineral density without apparent proportional changes in underlying collagen matrices, a large accumulation of a hyaluronan matrix within the trabecular bone marrow, and adipocytes and macrophages embedded in this hyaluronan matrix. These results support the hypothesis that hyperglycemia in bone marrow diverts dividing osteoblastic precursor cells (bone marrow stromal cells) to a metabolically stressed adipogenic pathway that induces synthesis of a hyaluronan matrix that recruits inflammatory cells and establishes a chronic inflammatory process that demineralizes trabecular cancellous bone. PMID:24569987

  14. Moving from Pipeline Thinking to Understanding Pathways: Findings from the Academic Pathways Study of Engineering Undergraduates. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atman, Cindy; Sheppard, Sheri; Fleming, Lorraine; Miller, Ron; Smith, Karl; Stevens, Reed; Streveler, Ruth; Loucks-Jaret, Tina; Lund, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    While engineering educators have engaged in many endeavors aimed at advancing engineering education and practice, much of this work has focused on broad curricular issues. Few studies focus on what it means to be an engineer or the process of what it takes to learn to engineer. In the last decade engineering educators have begun to focus on…

  15. Computer-assisted engineering of the synthetic pathway for biodegradation of a toxic persistent pollutant.

    PubMed

    Kurumbang, Nagendra Prasad; Dvorak, Pavel; Bendl, Jaroslav; Brezovsky, Jan; Prokop, Zbynek; Damborsky, Jiri

    2014-03-21

    Anthropogenic halogenated compounds were unknown to nature until the industrial revolution, and microorganisms have not had sufficient time to evolve enzymes for their degradation. The lack of efficient enzymes and natural pathways can be addressed through a combination of protein and metabolic engineering. We have assembled a synthetic route for conversion of the highly toxic and recalcitrant 1,2,3-trichloropropane to glycerol in Escherichia coli, and used it for a systematic study of pathway bottlenecks. Optimal ratios of enzymes for the maximal production of glycerol, and minimal toxicity of metabolites were predicted using a mathematical model. The strains containing the expected optimal ratios of enzymes were constructed and characterized for their viability and degradation efficiency. Excellent agreement between predicted and experimental data was observed. The validated model was used to quantitatively describe the kinetic limitations of currently available enzyme variants and predict improvements required for further pathway optimization. This highlights the potential of forward engineering of microorganisms for the degradation of toxic anthropogenic compounds.

  16. Designing RNA-based genetic control systems for efficient production from engineered metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jason T; Carothers, James M

    2015-02-20

    Engineered metabolic pathways can be augmented with dynamic regulatory controllers to increase production titers by minimizing toxicity and helping cells maintain homeostasis. We investigated the potential for dynamic RNA-based genetic control systems to increase production through simulation analysis of an engineered p-aminostyrene (p-AS) pathway in E. coli. To map the entire design space, we formulated 729 unique mechanistic models corresponding to all of the possible control topologies and mechanistic implementations in the system under study. Two thousand sampled simulations were performed for each of the 729 system designs to relate the potential effects of dynamic control to increases in p-AS production (total of 3 × 10(6) simulations). Our analysis indicates that dynamic control strategies employing aptazyme-regulated expression devices (aREDs) can yield >10-fold improvements over static control. We uncovered generalizable trends in successful control architectures and found that highly performing RNA-based control systems are experimentally tractable. Analyzing the metabolic control state space to predict optimal genetic control strategies promises to enhance the design of metabolic pathways. PMID:25314371

  17. Systems pathway engineering of Corynebacterium crenatum for improved L-arginine production

    PubMed Central

    Man, Zaiwei; Xu, Meijuan; Rao, Zhiming; Guo, Jing; Yang, Taowei; Zhang, Xian; Xu, Zhenghong

    2016-01-01

    L-arginine is an important amino acid in food and pharmaceutical industries. Until now, the main production method of L-arginine in China is the highly polluting keratin acid hydrolysis. The industrial level L-arginine production by microbial fermentation has become an important task. In previous work, we obtained a new L-arginine producing Corynebacterium crenatum (subspecies of Corynebacterium glutamicum) through screening and mutation breeding. In this work, we performed systems pathway engineering of C. crenatum for improved L-arginine production, involving amplification of L-arginine biosynthetic pathway flux by removal of feedback inhibition and overexpression of arginine operon; optimization of NADPH supply by modulation of metabolic flux distribution between glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway; increasing glucose consumption by strengthening the preexisting glucose transporter and exploitation of new glucose uptake system; channeling excess carbon flux from glycolysis into tricarboxylic acid cycle to alleviate the glucose overflow metabolism; redistribution of carbon flux at α-ketoglutarate metabolic node to channel more flux into L-arginine biosynthetic pathway; minimization of carbon and cofactor loss by attenuation of byproducts formation. The final strain could produce 87.3 g L−1 L-arginine with yield up to 0.431 g L-arginine g−1 glucose in fed-batch fermentation. PMID:27338253

  18. Systems pathway engineering of Corynebacterium crenatum for improved L-arginine production.

    PubMed

    Man, Zaiwei; Xu, Meijuan; Rao, Zhiming; Guo, Jing; Yang, Taowei; Zhang, Xian; Xu, Zhenghong

    2016-01-01

    L-arginine is an important amino acid in food and pharmaceutical industries. Until now, the main production method of L-arginine in China is the highly polluting keratin acid hydrolysis. The industrial level L-arginine production by microbial fermentation has become an important task. In previous work, we obtained a new L-arginine producing Corynebacterium crenatum (subspecies of Corynebacterium glutamicum) through screening and mutation breeding. In this work, we performed systems pathway engineering of C. crenatum for improved L-arginine production, involving amplification of L-arginine biosynthetic pathway flux by removal of feedback inhibition and overexpression of arginine operon; optimization of NADPH supply by modulation of metabolic flux distribution between glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway; increasing glucose consumption by strengthening the preexisting glucose transporter and exploitation of new glucose uptake system; channeling excess carbon flux from glycolysis into tricarboxylic acid cycle to alleviate the glucose overflow metabolism; redistribution of carbon flux at α-ketoglutarate metabolic node to channel more flux into L-arginine biosynthetic pathway; minimization of carbon and cofactor loss by attenuation of byproducts formation. The final strain could produce 87.3 g L(-1) L-arginine with yield up to 0.431 g L-arginine g(-1) glucose in fed-batch fermentation. PMID:27338253

  19. Heterologous xylose isomerase pathway and evolutionary engineering improve xylose utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xin; Zha, Jian; Liu, Gao-Gang; Zhang, Weiwen; Li, Bing-Zhi; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Xylose utilization is one key issue for the bioconversion of lignocelluloses. It is a promising approach to engineering heterologous pathway for xylose utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we constructed a xylose-fermenting yeast SyBE001 through combinatorial fine-tuning the expression of XylA and endogenous XKS1. Additional overexpression of genes RKI1, RPE1, TKL1, and TAL1 in the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) in SyBE001 increased the xylose consumption rate by 1.19-fold. By repetitive adaptation, the xylose utilization rate was further increased by ∼10-fold in the resultant strain SyBE003. Gene expression analysis identified a variety of genes with significantly changed expression in the PPP, glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in SyBE003. PMID:26539187

  20. A Decade of Molecular Understanding of Withanolide Biosynthesis and In vitro Studies in Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal: Prospects and Perspectives for Pathway Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Niha; Razdan, Sumeer; Rana, Satiander; Bhat, Wajid W.; Vishwakarma, Ram; Lattoo, Surrinder K.

    2015-01-01

    Withania somnifera, a multipurpose medicinal plant is a rich reservoir of pharmaceutically active triterpenoids that are steroidal lactones known as withanolides. Though the plant has been well-characterized in terms of phytochemical profiles as well as pharmaceutical activities, limited attempts have been made to decipher the biosynthetic route and identification of key regulatory genes involved in withanolide biosynthesis. This scenario limits biotechnological interventions for enhanced production of bioactive compounds. Nevertheless, recent emergent trends vis-à-vis, the exploration of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomics, and in vitro studies have opened new vistas regarding pathway engineering of withanolide production. During recent years, various strategic pathway genes have been characterized with significant amount of regulatory studies which allude toward development of molecular circuitries for production of key intermediates or end products in heterologous hosts. Another pivotal aspect covering redirection of metabolic flux for channelizing the precursor pool toward enhanced withanolide production has also been attained by deciphering decisive branch point(s) as robust targets for pathway modulation. With these perspectives, the current review provides a detailed overview of various studies undertaken by the authors and collated literature related to molecular and in vitro approaches employed in W. somnifera for understanding various molecular network interactions in entirety. PMID:26640469

  1. Yarrowia lipolytica: recent achievements in heterologous protein expression and pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    Madzak, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has become a recognized system for expression/secretion of heterologous proteins. This non-conventional yeast is currently being developed as a workhorse for biotechnology by several research groups throughout the world, especially for single-cell oil production, whole cell bioconversion and upgrading of industrial wastes. This mini-review presents established tools for protein expression in Y. lipolytica and highlights novel developments in the areas of promoter design, surface display, and host strain or metabolic pathway engineering. An overview of the industrial and commercial biotechnological applications of Y. lipolytica is also presented. PMID:25947247

  2. Reverse engineering the mechanical and molecular pathways in stem cell morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kai; Gordon, Richard; Cao, Tong

    2015-03-01

    The formation of relevant biological structures poses a challenge for regenerative medicine. During embryogenesis, embryonic cells differentiate into somatic tissues and undergo morphogenesis to produce three-dimensional organs. Using stem cells, we can recapitulate this process and create biological constructs for therapeutic transplantation. However, imperfect imitation of nature sometimes results in in vitro artifacts that fail to recapitulate the function of native organs. It has been hypothesized that developing cells may self-organize into tissue-specific structures given a correct in vitro environment. This proposition is supported by the generation of neo-organoids from stem cells. We suggest that morphogenesis may be reverse engineered to uncover its interacting mechanical pathway and molecular circuitry. By harnessing the latent architecture of stem cells, novel tissue-engineering strategies may be conceptualized for generating self-organizing transplants.

  3. Coral exoskeletons as a precursor material for the development of a calcium phosphate drug delivery system for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chou, Joshua; Hao, Jia; Ben-Nissan, Besim; Milthorpe, Bruce; Otsuka, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    With the global rise in aging of populations, the occurrence of osteoporosis will continue to increase. Biomaterial and pharmaceutical scientists continue to develop innovative strategies and materials to address this disease. In this article, we describe a new perspective and approach into the use of coral exoskeletons as a precursor material to synthesize a calcium phosphate-based drug delivery system. Studies detailing the methodology of the conversion methods and the strategies and approach for the development of these novel drug delivery systems are described. Furthermore, in vivo studies in osteoporotic mice using a drug loaded and chemically modified version of the biomimetic delivery system showed significant cortical and cancellous bone increases. These studies support the notion and the rationale for future research and development of the use of coral exoskeletons as materials for drug delivery applications.

  4. Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans Negatively Modulate Spinal Cord Neural Precursor Cells by Signaling Through LAR and RPTPσ and Modulation of the Rho/ROCK Pathway.

    PubMed

    Dyck, Scott M; Alizadeh, Arsalan; Santhosh, Kallivalappil T; Proulx, Evan H; Wu, Chia-Lun; Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila

    2015-08-01

    Multipotent adult neural precursor cells (NPCs) have tremendous intrinsic potential to repair the damaged spinal cord. However, evidence shows that the regenerative capabilities of endogenous and transplanted NPCs are limited in the microenvironment of spinal cord injury (SCI). We previously demonstrated that injury-induced upregulation of matrix chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) restricts the survival, migration, integration, and differentiation of NPCs following SCI. CSPGs are long-lasting components of the astroglial scar that are formed around the lesion. Our recent in vivo studies demonstrated that removing CSPGs from the SCI environment enhances the potential of transplanted and endogenous adult NPCs for spinal cord repair; however, the mechanisms by which CSPGs regulate NPCs remain unclear. In this study, using in vitro models recapitulating the extracellular matrix of SCI, we investigated the direct role of CSPGs in modulating the properties of adult spinal cord NPCs. We show that CSPGs significantly decrease NPCs growth, attachment, survival, proliferation, and oligodendrocytes differentiation. Moreover, using genetic models, we show that CSPGs regulate NPCs by signaling on receptor protein tyrosine phosphate sigma (RPTPσ) and leukocyte common antigen-related phosphatase (LAR). Intracellularly, CSPGs inhibitory effects are mediated through Rho/ROCK pathway and inhibition of Akt and Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Downregulation of RPTPσ and LAR and blockade of ROCK in NPCs attenuates the inhibitory effects of CSPGS. Our work provide novel evidence uncovering how upregulation of CSPGs challenges the response of NPCs in their post-SCI niche and identifies new therapeutic targets for enhancing NPC-based therapies for SCI repair.

  5. Disruption of kif3a results in defective osteoblastic differentiation in dental mesenchymal stem/precursor cells via the Wnt signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Sicong; Chen, Guoqing; Feng, Lian; Jiang, Zongting; Yu, Mei; Bao, Jinku; Tian, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The anterograde intraflagellar transport motor protein, kif3a, regulates the integrity of primary cilia and various cellular functions, however, the role of kif3a in dental mesenchymal stem/precursor cell differentiation remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, the expression of kif3a was knocked down in human dental follicle cells (hDFCs) and human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) using short hairpin RNA. The results of subsequent immunofluorescence revealed that knocking down kif3a resulted in the loss of primary cilia, which led to impairment of substantial mineralization and expression of the differentiation-associated markers, including alkaline phosphatase, Runt-related transcription factor 2, dentin matrix protein 1 and dentin sialophosphoprotein in the hDFCs and hDPCs. The results of reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses showed that the expression levels of Wnt3a-mediated active β-catenin and lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 were attenuated, whereas the expression of phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3β was enhanced, in the kif3a-knockdown cells. In addition, exogenous Wnt3a partially rescued osteoblastic differentiation in the hDFCs and hDPCs. These results demonstrated that inhibition of kif3a in the hDFCs and hDPCs disrupted primary cilia formation and/or function, and indicated that kif3a is important in the differentiation of hDFCs and hDPCs through the Wnt pathway. These findings not only enhance current understanding of tooth development and diseases of tooth mineralization, but also indicate possible strategies to regulate mineralization during tooth repair and regeneration. PMID:27432616

  6. Disruption of kif3a results in defective osteoblastic differentiation in dental mesenchymal stem/precursor cells via the Wnt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Sicong; Chen, Guoqing; Feng, Lian; Jiang, Zongting; Yu, Mei; Bao, Jinku; Tian, Weidong

    2016-09-01

    The anterograde intraflagellar transport motor protein, kif3a, regulates the integrity of primary cilia and various cellular functions, however, the role of kif3a in dental mesenchymal stem/precursor cell differentiation remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, the expression of kif3a was knocked down in human dental follicle cells (hDFCs) and human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) using short hairpin RNA. The results of subsequent immunofluorescence revealed that knocking down kif3a resulted in the loss of primary cilia, which led to impairment of substantial mineralization and expression of the differentiation‑associated markers, including alkaline phosphatase, Runt‑related transcription factor 2, dentin matrix protein 1 and dentin sialophosphoprotein in the hDFCs and hDPCs. The results of reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses showed that the expression levels of Wnt3a‑mediated active β‑catenin and lymphoid enhancer‑binding factor 1 were attenuated, whereas the expression of phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3β was enhanced, in the kif3a‑knockdown cells. In addition, exogenous Wnt3a partially rescued osteoblastic differentiation in the hDFCs and hDPCs. These results demonstrated that inhibition of kif3a in the hDFCs and hDPCs disrupted primary cilia formation and/or function, and indicated that kif3a is important in the differentiation of hDFCs and hDPCs through the Wnt pathway. These findings not only enhance current understanding of tooth development and diseases of tooth mineralization, but also indicate possible strategies to regulate mineralization during tooth repair and regeneration. PMID:27432616

  7. Metabolic engineering of light-driven cytochrome P450 dependent pathways into Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Wlodarczyk, Artur; Gnanasekaran, Thiyagarajan; Nielsen, Agnieszka Zygadlo; Zulu, Nodumo Nokolunga; Mellor, Silas Busck; Luckner, Manja; Thøfner, Jens Frederik Bang; Olsen, Carl Erik; Mottawie, Mohammed Saddik; Burow, Meike; Pribil, Mathias; Feussner, Ivo; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    Solar energy provides the energy input for the biosynthesis of primary and secondary metabolites in plants and other photosynthetic organisms. Some secondary metabolites are high value compounds, and typically their biosynthesis requires the involvement of cytochromes P450s. In this proof of concept work, we demonstrate that the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is an eminent heterologous host for expression of metabolically engineered cytochrome P450-dependent pathways exemplified by the dhurrin pathway from Sorghum bicolor comprising two membrane bound cytochromes P450s (CYP79A1 and CYP71E1) and a soluble glycosyltransferase (UGT85B1). We show that it is possible to express multiple genes incorporated into a bacterial-like operon by using a self-replicating expression vector in cyanobacteria. We demonstrate that eukaryotic P450s that typically reside in the endoplasmic reticulum membranes can be inserted in the prokaryotic membranes without affecting thylakoid membrane integrity. Photosystem I and ferredoxin replaces the native P450 oxidoreductase enzyme as an efficient electron donor for the P450s both in vitro and in vivo. The engineered strains produced up to 66mg/L of p-hydroxyphenylacetaldoxime and 5mg/L of dhurrin in lab-scale cultures after 3 days of cultivation and 3mg/L of dhurrin in V-shaped photobioreactors under greenhouse conditions after 9 days cultivation. All the metabolites were found to be excreted to the growth media facilitating product isolation.

  8. Pathway engineering for healthy phytochemicals leading to the production of novel flavonoids in tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Schijlen, Elio; Ric de Vos, C H; Jonker, Harry; van den Broeck, Hetty; Molthoff, Jos; van Tunen, Arjen; Martens, Stefan; Bovy, Arnaud

    2006-07-01

    Flavonoids are a large family of plant polyphenolic secondary metabolites. Although they are widespread throughout the plant kingdom, some flavonoid classes are specific for only a few plant species. Due to their presumed health benefits there is growing interest in the development of food crops with tailor-made levels and composition of flavonoids, designed to exert an optimal biological effect. In order to explore the possibilities of flavonoid engineering in tomato fruits, we have targeted this pathway towards classes of potentially healthy flavonoids which are novel for tomato. Using structural flavonoid genes (encoding stilbene synthase, chalcone synthase, chalcone reductase, chalcone isomerase and flavone synthase) from different plant sources, we were able to produce transgenic tomatoes accumulating new phytochemicals. Biochemical analysis showed that the fruit peel contained high levels of stilbenes (resveratrol and piceid), deoxychalcones (butein and isoliquiritigenin), flavones (luteolin-7-glucoside and luteolin aglycon) and flavonols (quercetin glycosides and kaempferol glycosides). Using an online high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) antioxidant detection system, we demonstrated that, due to the presence of the novel flavonoids, the transgenic tomato fruits displayed altered antioxidant profiles. In addition, total antioxidant capacity of tomato fruit peel with high levels of flavones and flavonols increased more than threefold. These results on genetic engineering of flavonoids in tomato fruit demonstrate the possibilities to change the levels and composition of health-related polyphenols in a crop plant and provide more insight in the genetic and biochemical regulation of the flavonoid pathway within this worldwide important vegetable. PMID:17177808

  9. Metabolic Engineering of an Aerobic Sulfate Reduction Pathway and Its Application to Precipitation of Cadmium on the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Clifford L.; Maratukulam, Priya D.; Lum, Amy M.; Clark, Douglas S.; Keasling, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    The conversion of sulfate to an excess of free sulfide requires stringent reductive conditions. Dissimilatory sulfate reduction is used in nature by sulfate-reducing bacteria for respiration and results in the conversion of sulfate to sulfide. However, this dissimilatory sulfate reduction pathway is inhibited by oxygen and is thus limited to anaerobic environments. As an alternative, we have metabolically engineered a novel aerobic sulfate reduction pathway for the secretion of sulfides. The assimilatory sulfate reduction pathway was redirected to overproduce cysteine, and excess cysteine was converted to sulfide by cysteine desulfhydrase. As a potential application for this pathway, a bacterium was engineered with this pathway and was used to aerobically precipitate cadmium as cadmium sulfide, which was deposited on the cell surface. To maximize sulfide production and cadmium precipitation, the production of cysteine desulfhydrase was modulated to achieve an optimal balance between the production and degradation of cysteine. PMID:11010904

  10. Enhancing GDP-fucose production in recombinant Escherichia coli by metabolic pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yafei; Han, Donglei; Pan, Ying; Wang, Shuaishuai; Fang, Junqiang; Wang, Peng; Liu, Xian-wei

    2015-02-01

    Guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-fucose is the indispensible donor substrate for fucosyltransferase-catalyzed synthesis of fucose-containing biomolecules, which have been found involving in various biological functions. In this work, the salvage pathway for GDP-fucose biosynthesis from Bacterioides fragilis was introduced into Escherichia coli. Besides, the biosynthesis of guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), an essential substrate for GDP-fucose biosynthesis, was enhanced via overexpression of enzymes involved in the salvage pathway of GTP biosynthesis. The production capacities of metabolically engineered strains bearing different combinations of recombinant enzymes were compared. The shake flask fermentation of the strain expressing Fkp, Gpt, Gmk and Ndk obtained the maximum GDP-fucose content of 4.6 ± 0.22 μmol/g (dry cell mass), which is 4.2 fold that of the strain only expressing Fkp. Through fed-batch fermentation, the GDP-fucose content further rose to 6.6 ± 0.14 μmol/g (dry cell mass). In addition to a better productivity than previous fermentation processes based on the de novo pathway for GDP-fucose biosynthesis, the established schemes in this work also have the advantage to be a potential avenue to GDP-fucose analogs encompassing chemical modification on the fucose residue.

  11. Pathway engineering of Propionibacterium jensenii for improved production of propionic acid

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Guan, Ningzi; Zhu, Gexin; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-dong; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Propionic acid (PA) is an important chemical building block widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries. In our previous study, a shuttle vector was developed as a useful tool for engineering Propionibacterium jensenii, and two key enzymes—glycerol dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase—were overexpressed to improve PA titer. Here, we aimed to improve PA production further via the pathway engineering of P. jensenii. First, the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene (ppc) from Klebsiella pneumoniae was overexpressed to access the one-step synthesis of oxaloacetate directly from phosphoenolpyruvate without pyruvate as intermediate. Next, genes encoding lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) and pyruvate oxidase (poxB) were deleted to block the synthesis of the by-products lactic acid and acetic acid, respectively. Overexpression of ppc and deleting ldh improved PA titer from 26.95 ± 1.21 g·L−1 to 33.21 ± 1.92 g·L−1 and 30.50 ± 1.63 g·L−1, whereas poxB deletion decreased it. The influence of this pathway engineering on gene transcription, enzyme expression, NADH/NAD+ ratio, and metabolite concentration was also investigated. Finally, PA production in P. jensenii with ppc overexpression as well as ldh deletion was investigated, which resulted in further increases in PA titer to 34.93 ± 2.99 g·L−1 in a fed-batch culture. PMID:26814976

  12. Multiplex iterative plasmid engineering for combinatorial optimization of metabolic pathways and diversification of protein coding sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Yifan; Gu, Qun; Lin, Zhenquan; Wang, Zhiwen; Chen, Tao; Zhao, Xueming

    2013-11-15

    Engineering complex biological systems typically requires combinatorial optimization to achieve the desired functionality. Here, we present Multiplex Iterative Plasmid Engineering (MIPE), which is a highly efficient and customized method for combinatorial diversification of plasmid sequences. MIPE exploits ssDNA mediated λ Red recombineering for the introduction of mutations, allowing it to target several sites simultaneously and generate libraries of up to 10(7) sequences in one reaction. We also describe "restriction digestion mediated co-selection (RD CoS)", which enables MIPE to produce enhanced recombineering efficiencies with greatly simplified coselection procedures. To demonstrate this approach, we applied MIPE to fine-tune gene expression level in the 5-gene riboflavin biosynthetic pathway and successfully isolated a clone with 2.67-fold improved production in less than a week. We further demonstrated the ability of MIPE for highly multiplexed diversification of protein coding sequence by simultaneously targeting 23 codons scattered along the 750 bp sequence. We anticipate this method to benefit the optimization of diverse biological systems in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering.

  13. Improved poly-γ-glutamic acid production in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens by modular pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Gu, Yanyan; Quan, Yufen; Cao, Mingfeng; Gao, Weixia; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Shufang; Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang

    2015-11-01

    A Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain with enhanced γ-PGA production was constructed by metabolically engineering its γ-PGA synthesis-related metabolic networks: by-products synthesis, γ-PGA degradation, glutamate precursor synthesis, γ-PGA synthesis and autoinducer synthesis. The genes involved in by-products synthesis were firstly deleted from the starting NK-1 strain. The obtained NK-E7 strain with deletions of the epsA-O (responsible for extracellular polysaccharide synthesis), sac (responsible for levan synthesis), lps (responsible for lipopolysaccharide synthesis) and pta (encoding phosphotransacetylase) genes, showed increased γ-PGA purity and slight increase of γ-PGA titer from 3.8 to 4.15 g/L. The γ-PGA degrading genes pgdS (encoding poly-gamma-glutamate depolymerase) and cwlO (encoding cell wall hydrolase) were further deleted. The obtained NK-E10 strain showed further increased γ-PGA production from 4.15 to 9.18 g/L. The autoinducer AI-2 synthetase gene luxS was deleted in NK-E10 strain and the resulting NK-E11 strain showed comparable γ-PGA titer to NK-E10 (from 9.18 to 9.54 g/L). In addition, we overexpressed the pgsBCA genes (encoding γ-PGA synthetase) in NK-E11 strain; however, the overexpression of these genes led to a decrease in γ-PGA production. Finally, the rocG gene (encoding glutamate dehydrogenase) and the glnA gene (glutamine synthetase) were repressed by the expression of synthetic small regulatory RNAs in NK-E11 strain. The rocG-repressed NK-anti-rocG strain exhibited the highest γ-PGA titer (11.04 g/L), which was 2.91-fold higher than that of the NK-1 strain. Fed-batch cultivation of the NK-anti-rocG strain resulted in a final γ-PGA titer of 20.3g/L, which was 5.34-fold higher than that of the NK-1 strain in shaking flasks. This work is the first report of a systematically metabolic engineering approach that significantly enhanced γ-PGA production in a B. amyloliquefaciens strain. The engineering strategies explored here are

  14. Improved poly-γ-glutamic acid production in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens by modular pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Gu, Yanyan; Quan, Yufen; Cao, Mingfeng; Gao, Weixia; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Shufang; Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang

    2015-11-01

    A Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain with enhanced γ-PGA production was constructed by metabolically engineering its γ-PGA synthesis-related metabolic networks: by-products synthesis, γ-PGA degradation, glutamate precursor synthesis, γ-PGA synthesis and autoinducer synthesis. The genes involved in by-products synthesis were firstly deleted from the starting NK-1 strain. The obtained NK-E7 strain with deletions of the epsA-O (responsible for extracellular polysaccharide synthesis), sac (responsible for levan synthesis), lps (responsible for lipopolysaccharide synthesis) and pta (encoding phosphotransacetylase) genes, showed increased γ-PGA purity and slight increase of γ-PGA titer from 3.8 to 4.15 g/L. The γ-PGA degrading genes pgdS (encoding poly-gamma-glutamate depolymerase) and cwlO (encoding cell wall hydrolase) were further deleted. The obtained NK-E10 strain showed further increased γ-PGA production from 4.15 to 9.18 g/L. The autoinducer AI-2 synthetase gene luxS was deleted in NK-E10 strain and the resulting NK-E11 strain showed comparable γ-PGA titer to NK-E10 (from 9.18 to 9.54 g/L). In addition, we overexpressed the pgsBCA genes (encoding γ-PGA synthetase) in NK-E11 strain; however, the overexpression of these genes led to a decrease in γ-PGA production. Finally, the rocG gene (encoding glutamate dehydrogenase) and the glnA gene (glutamine synthetase) were repressed by the expression of synthetic small regulatory RNAs in NK-E11 strain. The rocG-repressed NK-anti-rocG strain exhibited the highest γ-PGA titer (11.04 g/L), which was 2.91-fold higher than that of the NK-1 strain. Fed-batch cultivation of the NK-anti-rocG strain resulted in a final γ-PGA titer of 20.3g/L, which was 5.34-fold higher than that of the NK-1 strain in shaking flasks. This work is the first report of a systematically metabolic engineering approach that significantly enhanced γ-PGA production in a B. amyloliquefaciens strain. The engineering strategies explored here are

  15. Pathways to space: A mission to foster the next generation of scientists and engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, Kerrie; Oliver, Carol; Fergusson, Jennifer

    2014-06-01

    The first education project funded under the Australian Government's Australian Space Research Program (ASRP), Pathways to Space was a unique project combining education, science communication research and research in astrobiology and robotics. It drew upon the challenges of space exploration to inspire students to consider study and careers in science and engineering. A multi-faceted program, Pathways to Space provided hands-on opportunities for high school and university students to participate in realistic simulations of a robotic Mars exploration mission for astrobiology. Its development was a collaboration between the Australian Centre for Astrobiology (University of New South Wales), the Australian Centre for Field Robotics (University of Sydney), the Powerhouse Museum and industry partner, Cisco. Focused on students in Years 9-10 (15-16 years of age), this program provided them with the opportunity to engage directly with space engineers and astrobiologists, while carrying out a simulated Mars mission using the digital learning facilities available at the Powerhouse Museum. As a part of their program, the students operated robotic mini-rovers in the Powerhouse Museum's “Mars Yard”, a highly accurate simulation of the Martian surface, where university students also carry out the development and testing of experimental Mars roving vehicles. This aspect of the program has brought real science and engineering research into the public space of the museum. As they undertook the education program, the students participated in a research study aimed at understanding the effectiveness of the project in achieving its key objective - encouraging students to consider space related courses and careers. This paper outlines the development and operation of the Pathways to Space project over its 3-year funding period, during which it met and exceeded all the requirements of its ASRP grant. It will look at the goals of the project, the rationale behind the education and

  16. Expression and transfer of engineered catabolic pathways harbored by Pseudomonas spp. introuduced into activated sludge microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Nublein, K.; Maris, D.; Timmis, K.; Dwyer, D.F. )

    1992-10-01

    Two genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs), Pseudomonas sp. strain B13 FR1(pFRC20P) (FR120) and Pseudomonas putida KT2440(pWWO-EB62) (EB62), were introduced into activated sludge microcosms that had the level of aeration, nutrient makeup, and microbial community structure of activated sludge reactors. FR120 contains an experimentally assembled ortho cleavage route for simultaneous degradation of 3-chlorobenzoate (3CB) and 4-methyl benzoate (4MB); EB62 contains a derivative TOL plasmid-encoded degradative pathway for toluene experimentally evolved so that it additionally processes 4-ethyl benzoate (4EB). Experiments assessed survival of the GEMs, their ability to degrade target substrates, and lateral transfer of plasmid-encoded recombinant DNA.

  17. Heading in the right direction: thermodynamics-based network analysis and pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    Ataman, Meric; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2015-12-01

    Thermodynamics-based network analysis through the introduction of thermodynamic constraints in metabolic models allows a deeper analysis of metabolism and guides pathway engineering. The number and the areas of applications of thermodynamics-based network analysis methods have been increasing in the last ten years. We review recent applications of these methods and we identify the areas that such analysis can contribute significantly, and the needs for future developments. We find that organisms with multiple compartments and extremophiles present challenges for modeling and thermodynamics-based flux analysis. The evolution of current and new methods must also address the issues of the multiple alternatives in flux directionalities and the uncertainties and partial information from analytical methods.

  18. Recombinant protein expression in Pichia pastoris strains with an engineered methanol utilization pathway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Βackground The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris has become an important host organism for recombinant protein production and is able to use methanol as a sole carbon source. The methanol utilization pathway describes all the catalytic reactions, which happen during methanol metabolism. Despite the importance of certain key enzymes in this pathway, so far very little is known about possible effects of overexpressing either of these key enzymes on the overall energetic behavior, the productivity and the substrate uptake rate in P. pastoris strains. Results A fast and easy-to-do approach based on batch cultivations with methanol pulses was used to characterize different P. pastoris strains. A strain with MutS phenotype was found to be superior over a strain with Mut+ phenotype in both the volumetric productivity and the efficiency in expressing recombinant horseradish peroxidase C1A. Consequently, either of the enzymes dihydroxyacetone synthase, transketolase or formaldehyde dehydrogenase, which play key roles in the methanol utilization pathway, was co-overexpressed in MutS strains harboring either of the reporter enzymes horseradish peroxidase or Candida antarctica lipase B. Although the co-overexpression of these enzymes did not change the stoichiometric yields of the recombinant MutS strains, significant changes in the specific growth rate, the specific substrate uptake rate and the specific productivity were observed. Co-overexpression of dihydroxyacetone synthase yielded a 2- to 3-fold more efficient conversion of the substrate methanol into product, but also resulted in a reduced volumetric productivity. Co-overexpression of formaldehyde dehydrogenase resulted in a 2-fold more efficient conversion of the substrate into product and at least similar volumetric productivities compared to strains without an engineered methanol utilization pathway, and thus turned out to be a valuable strategy to improve recombinant protein production. Conclusions Co

  19. Engineering of the glycerol decomposition pathway and cofactor regulation in an industrial yeast improves ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Tang, Yan; Guo, Zhongpeng; Shi, Guiyang

    2013-10-01

    Glycerol is a major by-product of industrial ethanol production and its formation consumes up to 4 % of the sugar substrate. This study modified the glycerol decomposition pathway of an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to optimize the consumption of substrate and yield of ethanol. This study is the first to couple glycerol degradation with ethanol formation, to the best of our knowledge. The recombinant strain overexpressing GCY1 and DAK1, encoding glycerol dehydrogenase and dihydroxyacetone kinase, respectively, in glycerol degradation pathway, exhibited a moderate increase in ethanol yield (2.9 %) and decrease in glycerol yield (24.9 %) compared to the wild type with the initial glucose concentration of 15 % under anaerobic conditions. However, when the mhpF gene, encoding acetylating NAD⁺-dependent acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli, was co-expressed in the aforementioned recombinant strain, a further increase in ethanol yield by 5.5 % and decrease in glycerol yield by 48 % were observed for the resultant recombinant strain GDMS1 when acetic acid was added into the medium prior to inoculation compared to the wild type. The process outlined in this study which enhances glycerol consumption and cofactor regulation in an industrial yeast is a promising metabolic engineering strategy to increase ethanol production by reducing the formation of glycerol.

  20. In vivo activation of the p53 tumor suppressor pathway by an engineered cyclotide.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanbin; Majumder, Subhabrata; Millard, Melissa; Borra, Radhika; Bi, Tao; Elnagar, Ahmed Y; Neamati, Nouri; Shekhtman, Alexander; Camarero, Julio A

    2013-08-01

    The overexpression of Hdm2 and HdmX is a common mechanism used by many tumor cells to inactive the p53 tumor suppressor pathway promoting cell survival. Targeting Hdm2 and HdmX has emerged as a validated therapeutic strategy for treating cancers with wild-type p53. Small linear peptides mimicking the N-terminal fragment of p53 have been shown to be potent Hdm2/HdmX antagonists. The potential therapeutic use of these peptides, however, is limited by their poor stability and bioavailability. Here, we report the engineering of the cyclotide MCoTI-I to efficiently antagonize intracellular p53 degradation. The resulting cyclotide MCo-PMI was able to bind with low nanomolar affinity to both Hdm2 and HdmX, showed high stability in human serum, and was cytotoxic to wild-type p53 cancer cell lines by activating the p53 tumor suppressor pathway both in vitro and in vivo. These features make the cyclotide MCoTI-I an optimal scaffold for targeting intracellular protein-protein interactions.

  1. In vivo activation of the p53 tumor suppressor pathway by an engineered cyclotide

    PubMed Central

    Neamati, Nouri; Shekhtman, Alexander; Camarero, Julio A.

    2013-01-01

    The overexpression of Hdm2 and HdmX is a common mechanism used by many tumor cells to inactive the p53 tumor suppressor pathway promoting cell survival. Targeting Hdm2 and HdmX has emerged as a validated therapeutic strategy for treating cancers with wild-type p53. Small linear peptides mimicking the N-terminal fragment of p53 have been shown to be potent Hdm2/HdmX antagonists. The potential therapeutic use of these peptides, however, is limited by their poor stability and bioavailability. Here, we report the engineering of the cyclotide MCoTI-I to efficiently antagonize intracellular p53 degradation. The resulting cyclotide MCo-PMI was able to bind with low nanomolar affinity to both Hdm2 and HdmX, showed high stability in human serum and was cytotoxic to wild-type p53 cancer cell lines by activating the p53 tumor suppressor pathway both in vitro and in vivo. These features make the cyclotide MCoTI-I an optimal scaffold for targeting intracellular protein-protein interactions. PMID:23848581

  2. Biosynthesis of rare ketoses through constructing a recombination pathway in an engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiangang; Zhu, Yueming; Li, Jitao; Men, Yan; Sun, Yuanxia; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Rare sugars have various known biological functions and potential for applications in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, and food industries. Here we designed and constructed a recombination pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum, in which dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), an intermediate of the glycolytic pathway, and a variety of aldehydes were condensed to synthesize rare ketoses sequentially by rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase (RhaD) and fructose-1-phosphatase (YqaB) obtained from Escherichia coli. A wild-type strain harboring this artificial pathway had the ability to produce D-sorbose and D-psicose using D-glyceraldehyde and glucose as the substrates. The tpi gene, encoding triose phosphate isomerase was further deleted, and the concentration of DHAP increased to nearly 20-fold relative to that of the wild-type. After additional optimization of expression levels from rhaD and yqaB genes and of the fermentation conditions, the engineered strain SY6(pVRTY) exhibited preferable performance for rare ketoses production. Its yield increased to 0.59 mol/mol D-glyceraldehyde from 0.33 mol/mol D-glyceraldehyde and productivity to 2.35 g/L h from 0.58 g/L h. Moreover, this strain accumulated 19.5 g/L of D-sorbose and 13.4 g/L of D-psicose using a fed-batch culture mode under the optimal conditions. In addition, it was verified that the strain SY6(pVRTY) meanwhile had the ability to synthesize C4, C5, C6, and C7 rare ketoses when a range of representative achiral and homochiral aldehydes were applied as the substrates. Therefore, the platform strain exhibited the potential for microbial production of rare ketoses and deoxysugars.

  3. Induction of multiple pleiotropic drug resistance genes in yeast engineered to produce an increased level of anti-malarial drug precursor, artemisinic acid

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Dae-Kyun; Ouellet, Mario; Paradise, Eric M; Burd, Helcio; Eng, Diana; Paddon, Chris J; Newman, Jack D; Keasling, Jay D

    2008-01-01

    Background Due to the global occurrence of multi-drug-resistant malarial parasites (Plasmodium falciparum), the anti-malarial drug most effective against malaria is artemisinin, a natural product (sesquiterpene lactone endoperoxide) extracted from sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua). However, artemisinin is in short supply and unaffordable to most malaria patients. Artemisinin can be semi-synthesized from its precursor artemisinic acid, which can be synthesized from simple sugars using microorganisms genetically engineered with genes from A. annua. In order to develop an industrially competent yeast strain, detailed analyses of microbial physiology and development of gene expression strategies are required. Results Three plant genes coding for amorphadiene synthase, amorphadiene oxidase (AMO or CYP71AV1), and cytochrome P450 reductase, which in concert divert carbon flux from farnesyl diphosphate to artemisinic acid, were expressed from a single plasmid. The artemisinic acid production in the engineered yeast reached 250 μg mL-1 in shake-flask cultures and 1 g L-1 in bio-reactors with the use of Leu2d selection marker and appropriate medium formulation. When plasmid stability was measured, the yeast strain synthesizing amorphadiene alone maintained the plasmid in 84% of the cells, whereas the yeast strain synthesizing artemisinic acid showed poor plasmid stability. Inactivation of AMO by a point-mutation restored the high plasmid stability, indicating that the low plasmid stability is not caused by production of the AMO protein but by artemisinic acid synthesis or accumulation. Semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR and quantitative real time-PCR consistently showed that pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) genes, belonging to the family of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter, were massively induced in the yeast strain producing artemisinic acid, relative to the yeast strain producing the hydrocarbon amorphadiene alone. Global transcriptional analysis by

  4. Alternative Pathways to Engineering Success--Using Academic and Social Integration to Understand Two-Year Engineering Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marra, Rose M.; Tsai, Chia-Lin; Bogue, Barbara; Pytel, Jean Landa

    2015-01-01

    The need for educating engineers in the United States continues as the projected demand is rising the number of high school seniors planning to enter engineering careers has remained relatively stable (Sargent, 2014). Additionally, figures show that attrition rates in undergraduate engineering continue to be an area of concern, (Sargent, 2014;…

  5. Pathway construction and metabolic engineering for fermentative production of ectoine in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ning, Yike; Wu, Xuejiao; Zhang, Chenglin; Xu, Qingyang; Chen, Ning; Xie, Xixian

    2016-07-01

    Ectoine is a protective agent and stabilizer whose synthesis pathway exclusively exists in select moderate halophiles. A novel established process called "bacterial milking" efficiently synthesized ectoine in moderate halophiles, however, this method places high demands on equipment and is cost prohibitive. In this study, we constructed an ectoine producing strain by introducing the ectoine synthesis pathway into Escherichia coli and improved its production capacity. Firstly, the ectABC gene cluster from Halomonas elongata was introduced into E. coli W3110 and the resultant strain synthesized 4.9g/L ectoine without high osmolarity. Subsequently, thrA encoding the bifunctional aspartokinase/homoserine dehydrogenase was deleted to weaken the competitive l-threonine branch, resulting in an increase of ectoine titer by 109%. Furthermore, a feedback resistant lysC from Corynebacterium glutamicum encoding the aspartate kinase was introduced to complement the enzymatic activity deficiency caused by thrA deletion and a 9% increase of ectoine titer was obtained. Finally, the promoter of ppc that encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was replaced by a trc promoter, and iclR, a glyoxylate shunt transcriptional repressor gene, was deleted. The oxaloacetate pool, was thus reinforced and ectoine titer increased by 21%. The final engineered strain ECT05 (pTrcECT, pSTVLysC-CG) produced 25.1g/L ectoine by fed-batch fermentation in low salt concentration with glucose as a carbon source. The specific ectoine production and productivity was 0.8g/g DCW and 0.84gL(-)(1)h(-)(1) respectively. The overall ectoine yield was 0.11g/g of glucose. PMID:26969253

  6. Pathway construction and metabolic engineering for fermentative production of ectoine in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ning, Yike; Wu, Xuejiao; Zhang, Chenglin; Xu, Qingyang; Chen, Ning; Xie, Xixian

    2016-07-01

    Ectoine is a protective agent and stabilizer whose synthesis pathway exclusively exists in select moderate halophiles. A novel established process called "bacterial milking" efficiently synthesized ectoine in moderate halophiles, however, this method places high demands on equipment and is cost prohibitive. In this study, we constructed an ectoine producing strain by introducing the ectoine synthesis pathway into Escherichia coli and improved its production capacity. Firstly, the ectABC gene cluster from Halomonas elongata was introduced into E. coli W3110 and the resultant strain synthesized 4.9g/L ectoine without high osmolarity. Subsequently, thrA encoding the bifunctional aspartokinase/homoserine dehydrogenase was deleted to weaken the competitive l-threonine branch, resulting in an increase of ectoine titer by 109%. Furthermore, a feedback resistant lysC from Corynebacterium glutamicum encoding the aspartate kinase was introduced to complement the enzymatic activity deficiency caused by thrA deletion and a 9% increase of ectoine titer was obtained. Finally, the promoter of ppc that encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was replaced by a trc promoter, and iclR, a glyoxylate shunt transcriptional repressor gene, was deleted. The oxaloacetate pool, was thus reinforced and ectoine titer increased by 21%. The final engineered strain ECT05 (pTrcECT, pSTVLysC-CG) produced 25.1g/L ectoine by fed-batch fermentation in low salt concentration with glucose as a carbon source. The specific ectoine production and productivity was 0.8g/g DCW and 0.84gL(-)(1)h(-)(1) respectively. The overall ectoine yield was 0.11g/g of glucose.

  7. An Evaluation of Active Learning Causal Discovery Methods for Reverse-Engineering Local Causal Pathways of Gene Regulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sisi; Kemmeren, Patrick; Aliferis, Constantin F; Statnikov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Reverse-engineering of causal pathways that implicate diseases and vital cellular functions is a fundamental problem in biomedicine. Discovery of the local causal pathway of a target variable (that consists of its direct causes and direct effects) is essential for effective intervention and can facilitate accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Recent research has provided several active learning methods that can leverage passively observed high-throughput data to draft causal pathways and then refine the inferred relations with a limited number of experiments. The current study provides a comprehensive evaluation of the performance of active learning methods for local causal pathway discovery in real biological data. Specifically, 54 active learning methods/variants from 3 families of algorithms were applied for local causal pathways reconstruction of gene regulation for 5 transcription factors in S. cerevisiae. Four aspects of the methods' performance were assessed, including adjacency discovery quality, edge orientation accuracy, complete pathway discovery quality, and experimental cost. The results of this study show that some methods provide significant performance benefits over others and therefore should be routinely used for local causal pathway discovery tasks. This study also demonstrates the feasibility of local causal pathway reconstruction in real biological systems with significant quality and low experimental cost.

  8. An Evaluation of Active Learning Causal Discovery Methods for Reverse-Engineering Local Causal Pathways of Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Sisi; Kemmeren, Patrick; Aliferis, Constantin F.; Statnikov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Reverse-engineering of causal pathways that implicate diseases and vital cellular functions is a fundamental problem in biomedicine. Discovery of the local causal pathway of a target variable (that consists of its direct causes and direct effects) is essential for effective intervention and can facilitate accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Recent research has provided several active learning methods that can leverage passively observed high-throughput data to draft causal pathways and then refine the inferred relations with a limited number of experiments. The current study provides a comprehensive evaluation of the performance of active learning methods for local causal pathway discovery in real biological data. Specifically, 54 active learning methods/variants from 3 families of algorithms were applied for local causal pathways reconstruction of gene regulation for 5 transcription factors in S. cerevisiae. Four aspects of the methods’ performance were assessed, including adjacency discovery quality, edge orientation accuracy, complete pathway discovery quality, and experimental cost. The results of this study show that some methods provide significant performance benefits over others and therefore should be routinely used for local causal pathway discovery tasks. This study also demonstrates the feasibility of local causal pathway reconstruction in real biological systems with significant quality and low experimental cost. PMID:26939894

  9. Metabolic engineering of the omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthetic pathway into transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-López, Noemi; Sayanova, Olga; Napier, Johnathan A; Haslam, Richard P

    2012-04-01

    Omega-3 (ω-3) very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (VLC-PUFAs) such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5 Δ5,8,11,14,17) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6 Δ4,7,10,13,16,19) have been shown to have significant roles in human health. Currently the primary dietary source of these fatty acids are marine fish; however, the increasing demand for fish and fish oil (in particular the expansion of the aquaculture industry) is placing enormous pressure on diminishing marine stocks. Such overfishing and concerns related to pollution in the marine environment have directed research towards the development of a viable alternative sustainable source of VLC-PUFAs. As a result, the last decade has seen many genes encoding the primary VLC-PUFA biosynthetic activities identified and characterized. This has allowed the reconstitution of the VLC-PUFA biosynthetic pathway in oilseed crops, producing transgenic plants engineered to accumulate ω-3 VLC-PUFAs at levels approaching those found in native marine organisms. Moreover, as a result of these engineering activities, knowledge of the fundamental processes surrounding acyl exchange and lipid remodelling has progressed. The application of new technologies, for example lipidomics and next-generation sequencing, is providing a better understanding of seed oil biosynthesis and opportunities for increasing the production of unusual fatty acids. Certainly, it is now possible to modify the composition of plant oils successfully, and, in this review, the most recent developments in this field and the challenges of producing VLC-PUFAs in the seed oil of higher plants will be described.

  10. Enhanced Diterpene Tanshinone Accumulation and Bioactivity of Transgenic Salvia miltiorrhiza Hairy Roots by Pathway Engineering.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min; Luo, Xiuqin; Ju, Guanhua; Li, Leilei; Huang, Shengxiong; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Huizhong; Kai, Guoyin

    2016-03-30

    Tanshinones are health-promoting diterpenoids found in Salvia miltiorrhiza and have wide applications. Here, SmGGPPS (geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase) and SmDXSII (1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase) were introduced into hairy roots of S. miltiorrhiza. Overexpression of SmGGPPS and SmDXSII in hairy roots produces higher levels of tanshinone than control and single-gene transformed lines; tanshinone production in the double-gene transformed line GDII10 reached 12.93 mg/g dry weight, which is the highest tanshinone content that has been achieved through genetic engineering. Furthermore, transgenic hairy root lines showed higher antioxidant and antitumor activities than control lines. In addition, contents of chlorophylls, carotenoids, indoleacetic acid, and gibberellins were significantly elevated in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants. These results demonstrate a promising method to improve the production of diterpenoids including tanshinone as well as other natural plastid-derived isoprenoids in plants by genetic manipulation of the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway.

  11. Reducing natural organic matter and disinfection by-product precursors by alternating oxic and anoxic conditions during engineered short residence time riverbank filtration: A laboratory-scale column study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Farré, Maria José; Keller, Jurg; Gernjak, Wolfgang

    2016-09-15

    Riverbank filtration (RBF) with days to months of residence time has been successfully used as treatment or pre-treatment process to improve water quality for decades. However, its feasibility depends on the local hydrogeological conditions. Therefore, for sites unsuitable to traditional RBF, a smaller engineered RBF may be an option. This study evaluates the performance of engineered short residence time RBF on improving water quality, focusing on the removal of natural organic matter (NOM) and the reduction of precursors of carbon and nitrogen disinfection by-products (DBP). Lab-scale experiments were conducted with surface feed water from a drinking water plant. The results showed that within 6days hydraulic retention time (HRT), 60-70% dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and 70-80% ultraviolet absorbance at 254nm (UV254) could be removed. During the whole filtration process, biodegradation was responsible for the removal of organic matter, and it was found that alternating redox condition between oxic and anoxic was beneficial for the overall performance of the RBF. Dissolved oxygen (DO) had a substantial impact on the removal of DBP precursors. For carbon-containing DBP (C-DBP) precursors' removal, re-aeration after a sequence of oxic and anoxic conditions could further increase the removal efficiencies from 50%, 60%, and 60% to 80%, 90%, and 80% for trihalomethanes (THMs), chloral hydrate (CH), and haloketones (HKs). Prolonged anoxic conditions were however beneficial for the removal of nitrogen-containing DBP (N-DBP) precursors.

  12. STEM Career Cluster Engineering and Technology Education pathway in Georgia: Perceptions of Georgia engineering and technology education high school teachers and CTAE administrators as measured by the Characteristics of Engineering and Technology Education survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crenshaw, Mark VanBuren

    This study examined the perceptions held by Georgia Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Career Cluster Engineering and Technology Education (ETE) high school pathway teachers and Georgia's Career, Technical and Agriculture Education (CTAE) administrators regarding the ETE pathway and its effect on implementation within their district and schools. It provides strategies for ETE teaching methods, curriculum content, STEM integration, and how to improve the ETE pathway program of study. Current teaching and curricular trends were examined in ETE as well as the role ETE should play as related to STEM education. The study, using the Characteristics of Engineering and Technology Education Survey, was conducted to answer the following research questions: (a) Is there a significant difference in the perception of ETE teaching methodology between Georgia ETE high school teachers and CTAE administrators as measured by the Characteristics of Engineering and Technology Education Survey? (b) Is there a significant difference in the perception of ETE curriculum content between Georgia ETE high school teachers and CTAE administrators as measured by the Characteristics of Engineering and Technology Education Survey? (c) Is there a significant difference in the perception of STEM integration in the ETE high school pathway between Georgia ETE high school teachers and CTAE administrators as measured by the Characteristics of Engineering and Technology Education Survey? and (d) Is there a significant difference in the perception of how to improve the ETE high school pathway between Georgia ETE high school teachers and CTAE administrators as measured by the Characteristics of Engineering and Technology Education Survey? Suggestions for further research also were offered.

  13. Importance of understanding the main metabolic regulation in response to the specific pathway mutation for metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Yu; Shimizu, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Recent metabolic engineering practice was briefly reviewed in particular for the useful metabolite production such as natural products and biofuel productions. With the emphasis on systems biology approach, the metabolic regulation of the main metabolic pathways in E. coli was discussed from the points of view of enzyme level (allosteric and phosphorylation/ dephosphorylation) regulation, and gene level (transcriptional) regulation. Then the effects of the specific pathway gene knockout such as pts, pgi, zwf, gnd, pyk, ppc, pckA, lpdA, pfl gene knockout on the metabolism in E. coli were overviewed from the systems biology point of view with possible application for strain improvement point. PMID:24688678

  14. Targeted transcriptomic and metabolic profiling reveals temporal bottlenecks in the maize carotenoid pathway that may be addressed by multigene engineering.

    PubMed

    Farré, Gemma; Maiam Rivera, Sol; Alves, Rui; Vilaprinyo, Ester; Sorribas, Albert; Canela, Ramon; Naqvi, Shaista; Sandmann, Gerhard; Capell, Teresa; Zhu, Changfu; Christou, Paul

    2013-08-01

    Carotenoids are a diverse group of tetraterpenoid pigments found in plants, fungi, bacteria and some animals. They play vital roles in plants and provide important health benefits to mammals, including humans. We previously reported the creation of a diverse population of transgenic maize plants expressing various carotenogenic gene combinations and exhibiting distinct metabolic phenotypes. Here we performed an in-depth targeted mRNA and metabolomic analysis of the pathway to characterize the specific impact of five carotenogenic transgenes and their interactions with 12 endogenous genes in four transgenic lines representing distinct genotypes and phenotypes. We reconstructed the temporal profile of the carotenoid pathway during endosperm development at the mRNA and metabolic levels (for total and individual carotenoids), and investigated the impact of transgene expression on the endogenous pathway. These studies enabled us to investigate the extent of any interactions between the introduced transgenic and native partial carotenoid pathways during maize endosperm development. Importantly, we developed a theoretical model that explains these interactions, and our results suggest genetic intervention points that may allow the maize endosperm carotenoid pathway to be engineered in a more effective and predictable manner.

  15. Tailoring pathway modularity in the biosynthesis of erythromycin analogs heterologously engineered in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guojian; Li, Yi; Fang, Lei; Pfeifer, Blaine A.

    2015-01-01

    Type I modular polyketide synthases are responsible for potent therapeutic compounds that include avermectin (antihelinthic), rapamycin (immunosuppressant), pikromycin (antibiotic), and erythromycin (antibiotic). However, compound access and biosynthetic manipulation are often complicated by properties of native production organisms, prompting an approach (termed heterologous biosynthesis) illustrated in this study through the reconstitution of the erythromycin pathway through Escherichia coli. Using this heterologous system, 16 tailoring pathways were introduced, systematically producing eight chiral pairs of deoxysugar substrates. Successful analog formation for each new pathway emphasizes the remarkable flexibility of downstream enzymes to accommodate molecular variation. Furthermore, analogs resulting from three of the pathways demonstrated bioactivity against an erythromycin-resistant Bacillus subtilis strain. The approach and results support a platform for continued molecular diversification of the tailoring components of this and other complex natural product pathways in a manner that mirrors the modular nature of the upstream megasynthases responsible for aglycone polyketide formation. PMID:26601183

  16. Expanding the chemical diversity of natural esters by engineering a polyketide-derived pathway into Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Menendez-Bravo, Simón; Comba, Santiago; Sabatini, Martín; Arabolaza, Ana; Gramajo, Hugo

    2014-07-01

    Microbial fatty acid (FA)-derived molecules have emerged as promising alternatives to petroleum-based chemicals for reducing dependence on fossil hydrocarbons. However, native FA biosynthetic pathways often yield limited structural diversity, and therefore restricted physicochemical properties, of the end products by providing only a limited variety of usually linear hydrocarbons. Here we have engineered into Escherichia coli a mycocerosic polyketide synthase-based biosynthetic pathway from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and redefined its biological role towards the production of multi-methyl-branched-esters (MBEs) with novel chemical structures. Expression of FadD28, Mas and PapA5 enzymes enabled the biosynthesis of multi-methyl-branched-FA and their further esterification to an alcohol. The high substrate tolerance of these enzymes towards different FA and alcohol moieties resulted in the biosynthesis of a broad range of MBE. Further metabolic engineering of the MBE producer strain coupled this system to long-chain-alcohol biosynthetic pathways resulting in de novo production of branched wax esters following addition of only propionate.

  17. Expanding the chemical diversity of natural esters by engineering a polyketide-derived pathway into Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Menendez-Bravo, Simón; Comba, Santiago; Sabatini, Martín; Arabolaza, Ana; Gramajo, Hugo

    2014-07-01

    Microbial fatty acid (FA)-derived molecules have emerged as promising alternatives to petroleum-based chemicals for reducing dependence on fossil hydrocarbons. However, native FA biosynthetic pathways often yield limited structural diversity, and therefore restricted physicochemical properties, of the end products by providing only a limited variety of usually linear hydrocarbons. Here we have engineered into Escherichia coli a mycocerosic polyketide synthase-based biosynthetic pathway from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and redefined its biological role towards the production of multi-methyl-branched-esters (MBEs) with novel chemical structures. Expression of FadD28, Mas and PapA5 enzymes enabled the biosynthesis of multi-methyl-branched-FA and their further esterification to an alcohol. The high substrate tolerance of these enzymes towards different FA and alcohol moieties resulted in the biosynthesis of a broad range of MBE. Further metabolic engineering of the MBE producer strain coupled this system to long-chain-alcohol biosynthetic pathways resulting in de novo production of branched wax esters following addition of only propionate. PMID:24831705

  18. Tyrosine Binding Protein Sites Regulate the Intracellular Trafficking and Processing of Amyloid Precursor Protein through a Novel Lysosome-Directed Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Joshua H. K.; Cobb, M. Rebecca; Seah, Claudia; Pasternak, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    The amyloid hypothesis posits that the production of β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregates leads to neurodegeneration and cognitive decline associated with AD. Aβ is produced by sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretase. While nascent APP is well known to transit to the endosomal/ lysosomal system via the cell surface, we have recently shown that APP can also traffic to lysosomes intracellularly via its interaction with AP-3. Because AP-3 interacts with cargo protein via interaction with tyrosine motifs, we mutated the three tyrosines motif in the cytoplasmic tail of APP. Here, we show that the YTSI motif interacts with AP-3, and phosphorylation of the serine in this motif disrupts the interaction and decreases APP trafficking to lysosomes. Furthermore, we show that phosphorylation at this motif can decrease the production of neurotoxic Aβ 42. This demonstrates that reducing APP trafficking to lysosomes may be a strategy to reduce Aβ 42 in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:27776132

  19. Becoming an Engineer in Public Universities: Pathways for Women and Minorities. Palgrave Studies in Urban Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Kathryn M., Ed.; Tyson, Will, Ed.; Halperin, Rhoda H., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Based on research conducted in a three-year, mixed-method, multi-site National Science Foundation, Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Talent Expansion Program (STEP) Project, this book offers a comprehensive look into how engineering department culture and climate impacts the successful retention of female and under-represented…

  20. Ion-Ice Astrochemistry: Barrierless Low-Energy Deposition Pathways to HCOOH, CH3OH, and CO2 on Icy Grain Mantles from Precursor Cations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woon, David E.

    2011-01-01

    A new family of very favorable reaction pathways is explored involving the deposition of ions on icy grain mantles with very low energies. Quantum chemical cluster calculations at the MP2/6-31+G** level in 4H2O clusters and at the B3LYP/6-31+G** level in 17H2O clusters indicate that HCO+ and CH3 + are able to react spontaneously with one of the water molecules in the cluster to form protonated formic acid (HCOOH2 +) and protonated methanol (CH3OH2 +), respectively. It is furthermore found that these initial adducts spontaneously transfer their excess protons to the cluster to form neutral formic acid and methanol, plus solvated hydronium, H3O+. In the final case, if a CO molecule is bound to the surface of the cluster, OH+ may react with it to form protonated carbon dioxide (HCO2 +), which then loses its proton to yield CO2 and H3O+. In the present model, all of these processes were found to occur with no barriers. Discussion includes the analogous gas phase processes, which have been considered in previous studies, as well as the competitive abstraction pathway for HCO(+) + H2O.

  1. Modular control of multiple pathways using engineered orthogonal T7 polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Temme, Karsten; Hill, Rena; Segall-Shapiro, Thomas H.; Moser, Felix; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic genetic sensors and circuits enable programmable control over the timing and conditions of gene expression. They are being increasingly incorporated into the control of complex, multigene pathways and cellular functions. Here, we propose a design strategy to genetically separate the sensing/circuitry functions from the pathway to be controlled. This separation is achieved by having the output of the circuit drive the expression of a polymerase, which then activates the pathway from polymerase-specific promoters. The sensors, circuits and polymerase are encoded together on a ‘controller’ plasmid. Variants of T7 RNA polymerase that reduce toxicity were constructed and used as scaffolds for the construction of four orthogonal polymerases identified via part mining that bind to unique promoter sequences. This set is highly orthogonal and induces cognate promoters by 8- to 75-fold more than off-target promoters. These orthogonal polymerases enable four independent channels linking the outputs of circuits to the control of different cellular functions. As a demonstration, we constructed a controller plasmid that integrates two inducible systems, implements an AND logic operation and toggles between metabolic pathways that change Escherichia coli green (deoxychromoviridans) and red (lycopene). The advantages of this organization are that (i) the regulation of the pathway can be changed simply by introducing a different controller plasmid, (ii) transcription is orthogonal to host machinery and (iii) the pathway genes are not transcribed in the absence of a controller and are thus more easily carried without invoking evolutionary pressure. PMID:22743271

  2. Modular control of multiple pathways using engineered orthogonal T7 polymerases.

    PubMed

    Temme, Karsten; Hill, Rena; Segall-Shapiro, Thomas H; Moser, Felix; Voigt, Christopher A

    2012-09-01

    Synthetic genetic sensors and circuits enable programmable control over the timing and conditions of gene expression. They are being increasingly incorporated into the control of complex, multigene pathways and cellular functions. Here, we propose a design strategy to genetically separate the sensing/circuitry functions from the pathway to be controlled. This separation is achieved by having the output of the circuit drive the expression of a polymerase, which then activates the pathway from polymerase-specific promoters. The sensors, circuits and polymerase are encoded together on a 'controller' plasmid. Variants of T7 RNA polymerase that reduce toxicity were constructed and used as scaffolds for the construction of four orthogonal polymerases identified via part mining that bind to unique promoter sequences. This set is highly orthogonal and induces cognate promoters by 8- to 75-fold more than off-target promoters. These orthogonal polymerases enable four independent channels linking the outputs of circuits to the control of different cellular functions. As a demonstration, we constructed a controller plasmid that integrates two inducible systems, implements an AND logic operation and toggles between metabolic pathways that change Escherichia coli green (deoxychromoviridans) and red (lycopene). The advantages of this organization are that (i) the regulation of the pathway can be changed simply by introducing a different controller plasmid, (ii) transcription is orthogonal to host machinery and (iii) the pathway genes are not transcribed in the absence of a controller and are thus more easily carried without invoking evolutionary pressure. PMID:22743271

  3. Improving isobutanol production in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli by co-producing ethanol and modulation of pentose phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zichun; Liu, Pingping; Xiao, Dongguang; Zhang, Xueli

    2016-06-01

    Redox imbalance has been regarded as the key limitation for anaerobic isobutanol production in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli strains. In this work, the ethanol synthetic pathway was recruited to solve the NADH redundant problem while the pentose phosphate pathway was modulated to solve the NADPH deficient problem for anaerobic isobutanol production. Recruiting the ethanol synthetic pathway in strain AS108 decreased isobutanol yield from 0.66 to 0.29 mol/mol glucose. It was found that there was a negative correlation between aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE) activity and isobutanol production. Decreasing AdhE activity increased isobutanol yield from 0.29 to 0.6 mol/mol. On the other hand, modulation of the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene of the pentose phosphate pathway increased isobutanol yield from 0.29 to 0.41 mol/mol. Combination of these two strategies had a synergistic effect on improving isobutanol production. Isobutanol titer and yield of the best strain ZL021 were 53 mM and 0.74 mol/mol, which were 51 % and 12 % higher than the starting strain AS108, respectively. The total alcohol yield of strain ZL021 was 0.81 mol/mol, which was 23 % higher than strain AS108.

  4. Metabolic engineering of the purine biosynthetic pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum results in increased intracellular pool sizes of IMP and hypoxanthine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Purine nucleotides exhibit various functions in cellular metabolism. Besides serving as building blocks for nucleic acid synthesis, they participate in signaling pathways and energy metabolism. Further, IMP and GMP represent industrially relevant biotechnological products used as flavor enhancing additives in food industry. Therefore, this work aimed towards the accumulation of IMP applying targeted genetic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results Blocking of the degrading reactions towards AMP and GMP lead to a 45-fold increased intracellular IMP pool of 22 μmol gCDW-1. Deletion of the pgi gene encoding glucose 6-phosphate isomerase in combination with the deactivated AMP and GMP generating reactions, however, resulted in significantly decreased IMP pools (13 μmol gCDW-1). Targeted metabolite profiling of the purine biosynthetic pathway further revealed a metabolite shift towards the formation of the corresponding nucleobase hypoxanthine (102 μmol gCDW-1) derived from IMP degradation. Conclusions The purine biosynthetic pathway is strongly interconnected with various parts of the central metabolism and therefore tightly controlled. However, deleting degrading reactions from IMP to AMP and GMP significantly increased intracellular IMP levels. Due to the complexity of this pathway further degradation from IMP to the corresponding nucleobase drastically increased suggesting additional targets for future strain optimization. PMID:23092390

  5. Increased secreted amyloid precursor protein-α (sAPPα) in severe autism: proposal of a specific, anabolic pathway and putative biomarker.

    PubMed

    Ray, Balmiki; Long, Justin M; Sokol, Deborah K; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2011-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by deficits in verbal communication, social interactions, and the presence of repetitive, stereotyped and compulsive behaviors. Excessive early brain growth is found commonly in some patients and may contribute to disease phenotype. Reports of increased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and other neurotrophic-like factors in autistic neonates suggest that enhanced anabolic activity in CNS mediates this overgrowth effect. We have shown previously that in a subset of patients with severe autism and aggression, plasma levels of the secreted amyloid-β (Aβ) precursor protein-alpha form (sAPPα) were significantly elevated relative to controls and patients with mild-to-moderate autism. Here we further tested the hypothesis that levels of sAPPα and sAPPβ (proteolytic cleavage products of APP by α- and β-secretase, respectively) are deranged in autism and may contribute to an anabolic environment leading to brain overgrowth. We measured plasma levels of sAPPα, sAPPβ, Aβ peptides and BDNF by corresponding ELISA in a well characterized set of subjects. We included for analysis 18 control, 6 mild-to-moderate, and 15 severely autistic patient plasma samples. We have observed that sAPPα levels are increased and BDNF levels decreased in the plasma of patients with severe autism as compared to controls. Further, we show that Aβ1-40, Aβ1-42, and sAPPβ levels are significantly decreased in the plasma of patients with severe autism. These findings do not extend to patients with mild-to-moderate autism, providing a biochemical correlate of phenotypic severity. Taken together, this study provides evidence that sAPPα levels are generally elevated in severe autism and suggests that these patients may have aberrant non-amyloidogenic processing of APP. PMID:21731612

  6. Advances in metabolic pathway and strain engineering paving the way for sustainable production of chemical building blocks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Bio-based production of chemical building blocks from renewable resources is an attractive alternative to petroleum-based platform chemicals. Metabolic pathway and strain engineering is the key element in constructing robust microbial chemical factories within the constraints of cost effective production. Here we discuss how the development of computational algorithms, novel modules and methods, omics-based techniques combined with modeling refinement are enabling reduction in development time and thus advance the field of industrial biotechnology. We further discuss how recent technological developments contribute to the development of novel cell factories for the production of the building block chemicals: adipic acid, succinic acid and 3-hydroxypropionic acid.

  7. Metabolism of chlorofluorocarbons and polybrominated compounds by pseudomonas putida G786(pHG-2) via an engineered metabolic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, H.G.; Sadowsky, M.J.; Wackett, L.P.

    1994-11-01

    Polyhalogenated EPA Priority Pollutants are among the most toxic and persistent of the xenobiotic compounds found in the environment. In those instances when biodegradation does occure, it is typically via reductive dechlorination reactions in anaerobic sediments. These reactions are very slow and difficult to study. In this study, cytochrome P-450{sub cam} from Pseudomonas putida G786 and toluene dioxygenase from P. putida F1 were used to catalyze consecutive cometabolic dehalogenation reactions. New halogenated substrates for both were identified. The results demonstrate the metabolism of polybrominated compounds and chlorofluoroalkanes via the engineered metabolic pathway in P. putida G786(pHG-2). 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. The Drosophila T-box transcription factor Midline functions within the Notch–Delta signaling pathway to specify sensory organ precursor cell fates and regulates cell survival within the eye imaginal disc

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sudeshna; Chen, Q. Brent; Saucier, Joseph D.; Drescher, Brandon; Zong, Yan; Morgan, Sarah; Forstall, John; Meriwether, Andrew; Toranzo, Randy; Leal, Sandra M.

    2014-01-01

    We report that the T-box transcription factor Midline (Mid), an evolutionary conserved homolog of the vertebrate Tbx20 protein, functions within the Notch–Delta signaling pathway essential for specifying the fates of sensory organ precursor cells. This complements an established history of research showing that Mid regulates the cell-fate specification of diverse cell types within the developing heart, epidermis and central nervous system. Tbx20 has been detected in diverse neuronal and epithelial cells of embryonic eye tissues in both mice and humans. However, the mechanisms by which either Mid or Tbx20 function to regulate cell-fate specification or other critical aspects of eye development including cell survival have not yet been elucidated. We have also gathered preliminary evidence suggesting that Mid may play an indirect, but vital role in selecting SOP cells within the third-instar larval eye disc by regulating the expression of the proneural gene atonal. During subsequent pupal stages, Mid specifies SOP cell fates as a member of the Notch–Delta signaling hierarchy and is essential for maintaining cell viability within by inhibiting apoptotic pathways. We present several new hypotheses that seek to understand the role of Mid in regulating developmental processes downstream of the Notch receptor that are critical for specifying unique cell fates, patterning the adult eye and maintaining cellular homeostasis during eye disc morphogenesis. PMID:23962751

  9. Terpene metabolic engineering via nuclear or chloroplast genomes profoundly and globally impacts off-target pathways through metabolite signalling.

    PubMed

    Pasoreck, Elise K; Su, Jin; Silverman, Ian M; Gosai, Sager J; Gregory, Brian D; Yuan, Joshua S; Daniell, Henry

    2016-09-01

    The impact of metabolic engineering on nontarget pathways and outcomes of metabolic engineering from different genomes are poorly understood questions. Therefore, squalene biosynthesis genes FARNESYL DIPHOSPHATE SYNTHASE (FPS) and SQUALENE SYNTHASE (SQS) were engineered via the Nicotiana tabacum chloroplast (C), nuclear (N) or both (CN) genomes to promote squalene biosynthesis. SQS levels were ~4300-fold higher in C and CN lines than in N, but all accumulated ~150-fold higher squalene due to substrate or storage limitations. Abnormal leaf and flower phenotypes, including lower pollen production and reduced fertility, were observed regardless of the compartment or level of transgene expression. Substantial changes in metabolomes of all lines were observed: levels of 65-120 unrelated metabolites, including the toxic alkaloid nicotine, changed by as much as 32-fold. Profound effects of transgenesis on nontarget gene expression included changes in the abundance of 19 076 transcripts by up to 2000-fold in CN; 7784 transcripts by up to 1400-fold in N; and 5224 transcripts by as much as 2200-fold in C. Transporter-related transcripts were induced, and cell cycle-associated transcripts were disproportionally repressed in all three lines. Transcriptome changes were validated by qRT-PCR. The mechanism underlying these large changes likely involves metabolite-mediated anterograde and/or retrograde signalling irrespective of the level of transgene expression or end product, due to imbalance of metabolic pools, offering new insight into both anticipated and unanticipated consequences of metabolic engineering. PMID:27507797

  10. Engineering Plant Shikimate Pathway for Production of Tocotrienol and Improving Herbicide Resistance1

    PubMed Central

    Rippert, Pascal; Scimemi, Claire; Dubald, Manuel; Matringe, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Tocochromanols (tocopherols and tocotrienols), collectively known as vitamin E, are essential antioxidant components of both human and animal diets. Because of their potential health benefits, there is a considerable interest in plants with increased or customized vitamin E content. Here, we have explored a new strategy to reach this goal. In plants, phenylalanine is the precursor of a myriad of secondary compounds termed phenylpropanoids. In contrast, much less carbon is incorporated into tyrosine that provides p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate and homogentisate, the aromatic precursors of vitamin E. Therefore, we intended to increase the flux of these two compounds by deriving their synthesis directly at the level of prephenate. This was achieved by the expression of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) prephenate dehydrogenase gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants that already overexpress the Arabidopsis p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase coding sequence. A massive accumulation of tocotrienols was observed in leaves. These molecules, which were undetectable in wild-type leaves, became the major forms of vitamin E in the leaves of the transgenic lines. An increased resistance of the transgenic plants toward the herbicidal p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibitor diketonitril was also observed. This work demonstrates that the synthesis of p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate is a limiting step for the accumulation of vitamin E in plants. PMID:14684842

  11. Expanding the fluorine chemistry of living systems using engineered polyketide synthase pathways

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Mark C.; Thuronyi, Benjamin W.; Charkoudian, Louise K.; Lowry, Brian; Khosla, Chaitan; Chang, Michelle C. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Organofluorines represent a rapidly expanding proportion of molecules used in pharmaceuticals, diagnostics, agrochemicals, and materials. Despite the prevalence of fluorine in synthetic compounds, the known biological scope is limited to a single pathway that produces fluoroacetate. Here, we demonstrate that this pathway can be exploited as a source of fluorinated building blocks for introduction of fluorine into natural product scaffolds. Specifically, we have constructed pathways involving two polyketide synthase systems and show that fluoroacetate can be used to incorporate fluorine into the polyketide backbone in vitro. We further show that fluorine can be introduced site-selectively and introduced into polyketide products in vivo. These results highlight the prospects for the production of complex fluorinated natural products using synthetic biology. PMID:24009388

  12. Renewable energy from Cyanobacteria: energy production optimization by metabolic pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Naira; Van der Kooy, Frank; Van de Rhee, Miranda D; Voshol, Gerben P; Verpoorte, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The need to develop and improve sustainable energy resources is of eminent importance due to the finite nature of our fossil fuels. This review paper deals with a third generation renewable energy resource which does not compete with our food resources, cyanobacteria. We discuss the current state of the art in developing different types of bioenergy (ethanol, biodiesel, hydrogen, etc.) from cyanobacteria. The major important biochemical pathways in cyanobacteria are highlighted, and the possibility to influence these pathways to improve the production of specific types of energy forms the major part of this review.

  13. Metabolic engineering of the Stevia rebaudiana ent-kaurene biosynthetic pathway in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kong, Min Kyung; Kang, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Jin Ho; Oh, Soon Hwan; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2015-11-20

    The ent-kaurene is a dedicated precursor pool and is responsible for synthesizing natural sweeteners such as steviol glycosides. In this study, to produce ent-kaurene in Escherichia coli, we modularly constructed and expressed two ent-kaurene genes encoding ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPPS) and ent-kaurene synthase (KS) from Stevia rebaudiana known as a typical plant producing steviol glycoside. The CPPS and KS from S. rebaudiana were functionally expressed in a heterologous host E. coli. Furthermore, in order to enhance ent-kaurene production in E. coli, six geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthases (GGPPS) from various microorganisms and eight strains of E. coli as host were compared by measuring ent-kaurene production. The highest ent-kaurene production of approximately 41.1mg/L was demonstrated in E. coli strain MG1655 co-expressing synthetic CPPS-KS module and GGPPS from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The ent-kaurene production was further increased up to 179.6 mg/L by overexpression of the three key enzymes for isoprenoid precursor, 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS), farnesyl diphosphate synthase (IspA) and isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase (IDI) from E. coli. Finally, the highest titer of ent-kaurene (578 mg/L) with a specific yield of ent-kaurene of 143.5mg/g dry cell weight was obtained by culturing E. coli strain MG1655 co-expressing the ent-kaurene module, DXS, IDI and IspA in 1L bioreactor containing 20 g/L glycerol. PMID:26392384

  14. Metabolic engineering of the Stevia rebaudiana ent-kaurene biosynthetic pathway in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kong, Min Kyung; Kang, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Jin Ho; Oh, Soon Hwan; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2015-11-20

    The ent-kaurene is a dedicated precursor pool and is responsible for synthesizing natural sweeteners such as steviol glycosides. In this study, to produce ent-kaurene in Escherichia coli, we modularly constructed and expressed two ent-kaurene genes encoding ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPPS) and ent-kaurene synthase (KS) from Stevia rebaudiana known as a typical plant producing steviol glycoside. The CPPS and KS from S. rebaudiana were functionally expressed in a heterologous host E. coli. Furthermore, in order to enhance ent-kaurene production in E. coli, six geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthases (GGPPS) from various microorganisms and eight strains of E. coli as host were compared by measuring ent-kaurene production. The highest ent-kaurene production of approximately 41.1mg/L was demonstrated in E. coli strain MG1655 co-expressing synthetic CPPS-KS module and GGPPS from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The ent-kaurene production was further increased up to 179.6 mg/L by overexpression of the three key enzymes for isoprenoid precursor, 1-deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS), farnesyl diphosphate synthase (IspA) and isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase (IDI) from E. coli. Finally, the highest titer of ent-kaurene (578 mg/L) with a specific yield of ent-kaurene of 143.5mg/g dry cell weight was obtained by culturing E. coli strain MG1655 co-expressing the ent-kaurene module, DXS, IDI and IspA in 1L bioreactor containing 20 g/L glycerol.

  15. A cytosolic Arabidopsis D-xylulose kinase catalyzes the phosphorylation of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose into a precursor of the plastidial isoprenoid pathway.

    PubMed

    Hemmerlin, Andréa; Tritsch, Denis; Hartmann, Michael; Pacaud, Karine; Hoeffler, Jean-François; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rohmer, Michel; Bach, Thomas J

    2006-10-01

    Plants are able to integrate exogenous 1-deoxy-D-xylulose (DX) into the 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway, implicated in the biosynthesis of plastidial isoprenoids. Thus, the carbohydrate needs to be phosphorylated into 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate and translocated into plastids, or vice versa. An enzyme capable of phosphorylating DX was partially purified from a cell-free Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protein extract. It was identified by mass spectrometry as a cytosolic protein bearing D-xylulose kinase (XK) signatures, already suggesting that DX is phosphorylated within the cytosol prior to translocation into the plastids. The corresponding cDNA was isolated and enzymatic properties of a recombinant protein were determined. In Arabidopsis, xylulose kinases are encoded by a small gene family, in which only two genes are putatively annotated. The additional gene is coding for a protein targeted to plastids, as was proved by colocalization experiments using green fluorescent protein fusion constructs. Functional complementation assays in an Escherichia coli strain deleted in xk revealed that the cytosolic enzyme could exclusively phosphorylate xylulose in vivo, not the enzyme that is targeted to plastids. xk activities could not be detected in chloroplast protein extracts or in proteins isolated from its ancestral relative Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The gene encoding the plastidic protein annotated as "xylulose kinase" might in fact yield an enzyme having different phosphorylation specificities. The biochemical characterization and complementation experiments with DX of specific Arabidopsis knockout mutants seedlings treated with oxo-clomazone, an inhibitor of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, further confirmed that the cytosolic protein is responsible for the phosphorylation of DX in planta.

  16. A Cytosolic Arabidopsis d-Xylulose Kinase Catalyzes the Phosphorylation of 1-Deoxy-d-Xylulose into a Precursor of the Plastidial Isoprenoid Pathway1

    PubMed Central

    Hemmerlin, Andréa; Tritsch, Denis; Hartmann, Michael; Pacaud, Karine; Hoeffler, Jean-François; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rohmer, Michel; Bach, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Plants are able to integrate exogenous 1-deoxy-d-xylulose (DX) into the 2C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway, implicated in the biosynthesis of plastidial isoprenoids. Thus, the carbohydrate needs to be phosphorylated into 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate and translocated into plastids, or vice versa. An enzyme capable of phosphorylating DX was partially purified from a cell-free Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protein extract. It was identified by mass spectrometry as a cytosolic protein bearing d-xylulose kinase (XK) signatures, already suggesting that DX is phosphorylated within the cytosol prior to translocation into the plastids. The corresponding cDNA was isolated and enzymatic properties of a recombinant protein were determined. In Arabidopsis, xylulose kinases are encoded by a small gene family, in which only two genes are putatively annotated. The additional gene is coding for a protein targeted to plastids, as was proved by colocalization experiments using green fluorescent protein fusion constructs. Functional complementation assays in an Escherichia coli strain deleted in xk revealed that the cytosolic enzyme could exclusively phosphorylate xylulose in vivo, not the enzyme that is targeted to plastids. xk activities could not be detected in chloroplast protein extracts or in proteins isolated from its ancestral relative Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The gene encoding the plastidic protein annotated as “xylulose kinase” might in fact yield an enzyme having different phosphorylation specificities. The biochemical characterization and complementation experiments with DX of specific Arabidopsis knockout mutants seedlings treated with oxo-clomazone, an inhibitor of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, further confirmed that the cytosolic protein is responsible for the phosphorylation of DX in planta. PMID:16920870

  17. ALD/MLD of novel layer-engineered Zn-based inorganic-organic hybrid thin films using heterobifunctional 4-aminophenol as an organic precursor.

    PubMed

    Sood, Anjali; Sundberg, Pia; Karppinen, Maarit

    2013-03-21

    Here we present novel hybrid inorganic-organic thin films of the (-Zn-O-C(6)H(4)-NH-)(n) type deposited in an atomic/molecular layer-by-layer manner through sequential gas-surface reactions of separately introduced inorganic (diethyl zinc) and organic (4-aminophenol) precursor pulses. The organic precursor employed is heterobifunctional (containing both hydroxyl and amino groups) and possesses a rigid benzene backbone; these precursor characteristics are believed to suppress the unwanted double surface reactions and promote the ideal growth mechanism such that the film thickness is linearly controlled by the number of deposition cycles. The appreciably high growth rate of ~1.1 Å per cycle is found to remain constant in the deposition temperature range of 140-200 °C, but in practice our atomic/molecular layer deposition (ALD/MLD) process yields high-quality, uniform, smooth and relatively air-stable films even in a much wider temperature range from 140 up to 330 °C. The refractive index of the films is ~1.94 ± 0.01 independent of the deposition temperature and the density ranges within 1.5-1.7 g cm(-3).

  18. Engineering industrial oil biosynthesis: cloning and characterization of Kennedy pathway acyltransferases from novel oilseed species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For more than twenty years, various industrial, governmental, and academic laboratories have developed and refined genetic engineering strategies aimed at manipulating lipid metabolism in plants and microbes. The goal of these projects is to produce renewable specialized oils that can effectively c...

  19. Bioconversion of methanol to value-added mevalonate by engineered Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 containing an optimized mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen-Liang; Cui, Jin-Yu; Cui, Lan-Yu; Liang, Wei-Fan; Yang, Song; Zhang, Chong; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2016-03-01

    Methylotrophic biosynthesis using methanol as a feedstock is a promising and attractive method to solve the over-dependence of the bioindustry on sugar feedstocks derived from grains that are used for food. In this study, we introduced and engineered the mevalonate pathway into Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 to achieve high mevalonate production from methanol, which could be a platform for terpenoid synthesis. We first constructed a natural operon (MVE) harboring the mvaS and mvaE genes from Enterococcus faecalis as well as an artificial operon (MVH) harboring the hmgcs1 gene from Blattella germanica and the tchmgr gene from Trypanosoma cruzi that encoded enzymes with the highest reported activities. We achieved mevalonate titers of 56 and 66 mg/L, respectively, in flask cultivation. Introduction of the phaA gene from Ralstonia eutropha into the operon MVH increased the mevalonate titer to 180 mg/L, 3.2-fold higher than that of the natural operon MVE. Further modification of the expression level of the phaA gene by regulating the strength of the ribosomal binding site resulted in an additional 20 % increase in mevalonate production to 215 mg/L. A fed-batch fermentation of the best-engineered strain yielded a mevalonate titer of 2.22 g/L, which was equivalent to an overall yield and productivity of 28.4 mg mevalonate/g methanol and 7.16 mg/L/h, respectively. The production of mevalonate from methanol, which is the initial, but critical step linking methanol with valuable terpenoids via methylotrophic biosynthesis, represents a proof of concept for pathway engineering in M. extorquens AM1.

  20. Perturbing the metabolic dynamics of myo-inositol in developing Brassica napus seeds through in vivo methylation impacts its utilization as phytate precursor and affects downstream metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background myo-Inositol (Ins) metabolism during early stages of seed development plays an important role in determining the distributional relationships of some seed storage components such as the antinutritional factors, sucrose galactosides (also known as raffinose oligosaccharides) and phytic acid (PhA) (myo-inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate). The former is a group of oligosaccharides, which plays a role in desiccation at seed maturation. They are not easily digested by monogastric animals, hence their flatulence-causing properties. Phytic acid is highly negatively charged, which chelates positive ions of essential minerals and decreases their bioavailability. It is also a major cause of phosphate-related water pollution. Our aim was to investigate the influence of competitive diversion of Ins as common substrate on the biosynthesis of phytate and sucrose galactosides. Results We have studied the initial metabolic patterns of Ins in developing seeds of Brassica napus and determined that early stages of seed development are marked by rapid deployment of Ins into a variety of pathways, dominated by interconversion of polar (Ins phosphates) and non-polar (phospholipids) species. In a time course experiment at early stages of seed development, we show Ins to be a highly significant constituent of the endosperm and seed coat, but with no phytate biosynthesis occurring in either tissue. Phytate accumulation appears to be confined mainly within the embryo throughout seed development and maturation. In our approach, the gene for myo-inositol methyltransferase (IMT), isolated from Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (ice plant), was transferred to B. napus under the control of the seed-specific promoters, napin and phaseolin. Introduction of this new metabolic step during seed development prompted Ins conversion to the corresponding monomethyl ether, ononitol, and affected phytate accumulation. We were able to produce homozygous transgenic lines with 19% - 35% average

  1. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli to produce 2'-fucosyllactose via salvage pathway of guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-l-fucose.

    PubMed

    Chin, Young-Wook; Seo, Nari; Kim, Jae-Han; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2016-11-01

    2'-Fucosyllactose (2-FL) is one of the key oligosaccharides in human milk. In the present study, the salvage guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-l-fucose biosynthetic pathway from fucose was employed in engineered Escherichia coli BL21star(DE3) for efficient production of 2-FL. Introduction of the fkp gene coding for fucokinase/GDP-l-fucose pyrophosphorylase (Fkp) from Bacteroides fragilis and the fucT2 gene encoding α-1,2-fucosyltransferase from Helicobacter pylori allows the engineered E. coli to produce 2-FL from fucose, lactose and glycerol. To enhance the lactose flux to 2-FL production, the attenuated, and deleted mutants of β-galactosidase were employed. Moreover, the 2-FL yield and productivity were further improved by deletion of the fucI-fucK gene cluster coding for fucose isomerase (FucI) and fuculose kinase (FucK). Finally, fed-batch fermentation of engineered E. coli BL21star(DE3) deleting lacZ and fucI-fucK, and expressing fkp and fucT2 resulted in 23.1 g/L of extracellular concentration of 2-FL and 0.39 g/L/h productivity. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2443-2452. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27217241

  2. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli to produce 2'-fucosyllactose via salvage pathway of guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-l-fucose.

    PubMed

    Chin, Young-Wook; Seo, Nari; Kim, Jae-Han; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2016-11-01

    2'-Fucosyllactose (2-FL) is one of the key oligosaccharides in human milk. In the present study, the salvage guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-l-fucose biosynthetic pathway from fucose was employed in engineered Escherichia coli BL21star(DE3) for efficient production of 2-FL. Introduction of the fkp gene coding for fucokinase/GDP-l-fucose pyrophosphorylase (Fkp) from Bacteroides fragilis and the fucT2 gene encoding α-1,2-fucosyltransferase from Helicobacter pylori allows the engineered E. coli to produce 2-FL from fucose, lactose and glycerol. To enhance the lactose flux to 2-FL production, the attenuated, and deleted mutants of β-galactosidase were employed. Moreover, the 2-FL yield and productivity were further improved by deletion of the fucI-fucK gene cluster coding for fucose isomerase (FucI) and fuculose kinase (FucK). Finally, fed-batch fermentation of engineered E. coli BL21star(DE3) deleting lacZ and fucI-fucK, and expressing fkp and fucT2 resulted in 23.1 g/L of extracellular concentration of 2-FL and 0.39 g/L/h productivity. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2443-2452. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Exploring the folding pathway of green fluorescent protein through disulfide engineering.

    PubMed

    Pitman, Derek J; Banerjee, Shounak; Macari, Stephen J; Castaldi, Christopher A; Crone, Donna E; Bystroff, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    We have introduced two disulfide crosslinks into the loop regions on opposite ends of the beta barrel in superfolder green fluorescent protein (GFP) in order to better understand the nature of its folding pathway. When the disulfide on the side opposite the N/C-termini is formed, folding is 2× faster, unfolding is 2000× slower, and the protein is stabilized by 16 kJ/mol. But when the disulfide bond on the side of the termini is formed we see little change in the kinetics and stability. The stabilization upon combining the two crosslinks is approximately additive. When the kinetic effects are broken down into multiple phases, we observe Hammond behavior in the upward shift of the kinetic m-value of unfolding. We use these results in conjunction with structural analysis to assign folding intermediates to two parallel folding pathways. The data are consistent with a view that the two fastest transition states of folding are "barrel closing" steps. The slower of the two phases passes through an intermediate with the barrel opening occurring between strands 7 and 8, while the faster phase opens between 9 and 4. We conclude that disulfide crosslink-induced perturbations in kinetics are useful for mapping the protein folding pathway.

  4. Stable expression of silencing-suppressor protein enhances the performance and longevity of an engineered metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Naim, Fatima; Shrestha, Pushkar; Singh, Surinder P; Waterhouse, Peter M; Wood, Craig C

    2016-06-01

    Transgenic engineering of plants is important in both basic and applied research. However, the expression of a transgene can dwindle over time as the plant's small (s)RNA-guided silencing pathways shut it down. The silencing pathways have evolved as antiviral defence mechanisms, and viruses have co-evolved viral silencing-suppressor proteins (VSPs) to block them. Therefore, VSPs have been routinely used alongside desired transgene constructs to enhance their expression in transient assays. However, constitutive, stable expression of a VSP in a plant usually causes pronounced developmental abnormalities, as their actions interfere with endogenous microRNA-regulated processes, and has largely precluded the use of VSPs as an aid to stable transgene expression. In an attempt to avoid the deleterious effects but obtain the enhancing effect, a number of different VSPs were expressed exclusively in the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana alongside a three-step transgenic pathway for the synthesis of arachidonic acid (AA), an ω-6 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid. Results from independent transgenic events, maintained for four generations, showed that the VSP-AA-transformed plants were developmentally normal, apart from minor phenotypes at the cotyledon stage, and could produce 40% more AA than plants transformed with the AA transgene cassette alone. Intriguingly, a geminivirus VSP, V2, was constitutively expressed without causing developmental defects, as it acts on the siRNA amplification step that is not part of the miRNA pathway, and gave strong transgene enhancement. These results demonstrate that VSP expression can be used to protect and enhance stable transgene performance and has significant biotechnological application. PMID:26628000

  5. Optimization of isopropanol production by engineered cyanobacteria with a synthetic metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Yasutaka; Suzuki, Iwane; Hanai, Taizo

    2015-05-01

    Cyanobacterium is an attractive host for the production of various chemicals and alternative fuels using solar energy and carbon dioxide. In previous study, we succeeded to produce isopropanol using engineered Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 under dark and anaerobic conditions (0.43 mM, 26.5 mg/l). In the present study, we report the further optimization of this isopropanol producing condition. We then optimized growth conditions for production of isopropanol by the engineered cyanobacteria, including the use of cells in early stationary phase and buffering of the production medium to neutral pH. We observed that shifting of cultures from dark and anaerobic to light and aerobic conditions during the production phase dramatically increased isopropanol production by conversion to isopropanol from acetate, byproduct under dark and anaerobic condition. Under the optimized production conditions, the titer of isopropanol was elevated 6-fold, to 2.42 mM (146 mg/l).

  6. Pathways to excellence: A Federal strategy for science, mathematics, engineering, and technology education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This Strategic Plan was developed by the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering, and Technology (FCCSET) through its Committee on Education and Human Resources (CEHR), with representatives from 16 Federal agencies. Based on two years of coordinated interagency effort, the Plan confirms the Federal Government's commitment to ensuring the health and well-being of science, mathematics, engineering, and technology education at all levels and in all sectors (i.e., elementary and secondary, undergraduate, graduate, public understanding of science, and technology education). The Plan represents the Federal Government's efforts to develop a five-year planning framework and associated milestones that focus Federal planning and the resources of the participating agencies toward achieving the requisite or expected level of mathematics and science competence by all students. The priority framework outlines the strategic objectives, implementation priorities, and components for the Strategic Plan and serves as a road map for the Plan. The Plan endorses a broad range of ongoing activities, including continued Federal support for graduate education as the backbone of our country's research and development enterprise. The Plan also identifies three tiers of program activities with goals that address issues in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology education meriting special attention. Within each tier, individual agency programs play important and often unique roles that strengthen the aggregate portfolio. The three tiers are presented in descending order of priority: (1) reforming the formal education system; (2) expanding participation and access; and (3) enabling activities.

  7. Muscarine enhances soluble amyloid precursor protein secretion in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y by a pathway dependent on protein kinase C(alpha), src-tyrosine kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase but not phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Canet-Aviles, Rosa-Maria; Anderton, Mark; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J; Vaughan, Peter F T

    2002-06-15

    The signalling pathways by which muscarine and epidermal growth factor (EGF) regulate the secretion of the alpha-secretase cleavage product (sAPPalpha) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) were examined in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y. Using specific inhibitors it was found that over 80% of sAPPalpha secretion, enhanced by muscarine, occurred via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and was dependent on protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) and a member of the Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (Src-TK). In contrast the stimulation of sAPPalpha secretion by EGF was not affected by inhibitors of PKC nor Src-TK but was dependent on ERK1/2. In addition muscarine-enhanced sAPPalpha secretion and ERK1/2 activation were inhibited 60 and 80%, respectively, by micromolar concentrations of the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI-3K) inhibitor wortmannin. In comparison wortmannin decreased EGF stimulation of sAPPalpha secretion and ERK 1/2 activation by approximately 40%. Unexpectedly, U73122, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, did not inhibit muscarine enhancement of sAPPalpha secretion. These data are discussed in relation to a pathway for the enhancement of sAPPalpha secretion by muscarine which involves the activation of a Src-TK by G-protein beta/gamma-subunits leading to activation of PKCalpha, and ERK1/2 by a mechanism not involving phospholipase C. PMID:12191495

  8. METABOLIC ENGINEERING TO DEVELOP A PATHWAY FOR THE SELECTIVE CLEAVAGE OF CARBON-NITROGEN BONDS

    SciTech Connect

    John J. Kilbane III

    2003-12-01

    The objective of the project is to develop biochemical pathways for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. The initial phase of the project will focus on the isolation or development of an enzyme capable of cleaving the C-N bond in aromatic amides, specifically 2-aminobiphenyl. The objective of the second phase of the research will be to construct a biochemical pathway for the selective removal of nitrogen from carbazole by combining the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 with the gene(s) encoding an appropriate amidase. The objective of the final phase of the project will be to develop derivative CN bond cleaving enzymes that have broader substrate ranges and to demonstrate the use of such strains to selectively remove nitrogen from petroleum. The project is on schedule and no major difficulties have been encountered. During the first year of the project (October, 2002-September, 2003) enrichment culture experiments have resulted in the isolation of promising cultures that may be capable of cleaving C-N bonds in aromatic amides, several amidase genes have been cloned and are currently undergoing directed evolution to obtain derivatives that can cleave C-N bonds in aromatic amides, and the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11, and Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10 were cloned in vectors capable of replicating in Escherichia coli. Future research will address expression of these genes in Rhodococcus erythropolis. Enrichment culture experiments and directed evolution experiments continue to be a main focus of research activity and further work is required to obtain an appropriate amidase that will selectively cleave C-N bonds in aromatic substrates. Once an appropriate amidase gene is obtained it must be combined with genes encoding an enzyme capable of converting carbazole to 2'aminobiphenyl-2,3-diol: specifically carA genes. The carA genes from two sources have been cloned and are ready for construction of C-N bond cleavage pathway

  9. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for production of fatty acid short-chain esters through combination of the fatty acid and 2-keto acid pathways.

    PubMed

    Guo, Daoyi; Zhu, Jing; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Tiangang

    2014-03-01

    Fatty acid short-chain esters (FASEs) are biodiesels that are renewable, nontoxic, and biodegradable biofuels. A novel approach for the biosynthesis of FASEs has been developed using metabolically-engineered E. coli through combination of the fatty acid and 2-keto acid pathways. Several genetic engineering strategies were also developed to increase fatty acyl-CoA availability to improve FASEs production. Fed-batch cultivation of the engineered E. coli resulted in a titer of 1008 mg/L FASEs. Since the fatty acid and 2-keto acid pathways are native microbial synthesis pathways, this strategy can be implemented in a variety of microorganisms to produce various FASEs from cheap and readily-available, renewable, raw materials such as sugars and cellulose in the future.

  10. Metabolic Engineering to Develop a Pathway for the Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Nitrogen Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    John J. Kilbane II

    2005-10-01

    The objective of the project is to develop a biochemical pathway for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. Specifically a novel biochemical pathway will be developed for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in carbazole. The cleavage of the first C-N bond in carbazole is accomplished by the enzyme carbazole dioxygenase, that catalyzes the conversion of carbazole to 2-aminobiphenyl-2,3-diol. The genes encoding carbazole dioxygenase were cloned from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 and from Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10. The selective cleavage of the second C-N bond has been challenging, and efforts to overcome that challenge have been the focus of recent research in this project. Enrichment culture experiments succeeded in isolating bacterial cultures that can metabolize 2-aminobiphenyl, but no enzyme capable of selectively cleaving the C-N bond in 2-aminobiphenyl has been identified. Aniline is very similar to the structure of 2-aminobiphenyl and aniline dioxygenase catalyzes the conversion of aniline to catechol and ammonia. For the remainder of the project the emphasis of research will be to simultaneously express the genes for carbazole dioxygenase and for aniline dioxygenase in the same bacterial host and then to select for derivative cultures capable of using carbazole as the sole source of nitrogen.

  11. Engineering of an N-acetylneuraminic acid synthetic pathway in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kang, Junhua; Gu, Pengfei; Wang, Yang; Li, Yikui; Yang, Fan; Wang, Qian; Qi, Qingsheng

    2012-11-01

    N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc) has recently drawn much attention owing to its wide applications in many aspects. Besides extraction from natural materials, production of NeuAc was recently focused on enzymatic synthesis and whole-cell biocatalysis. In this study, we designed an artificial NeuAc biosynthetic pathway through intermediate N-acetylglucosamine 6-phosphate in Escherichia coli. In this pathway, N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase (slr1975) and glucosamine-6-phosphate acetyltransferase (GNA1) were heterologously introduced into E. coli from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae EBY100, respectively. By derepressing the feedback inhibition of glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase, increasing the accumulation of N-acetylglucosamine and pyruvate, and blocking the catabolism of NeuAc, we were able to produce 1.62 g l⁻¹ NeuAc in recombinant E. coli directly from glucose. The NeuAc yield reached 7.85g l⁻¹ in fed-batch fermentation. This process offered an efficient fermentative method to produce NeuAc in microorganisms using glucose as carbon source and can be optimized for further improvement.

  12. Advanced Precursor Reaction Processing for Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shafarman, William N.

    2015-10-12

    This project “Advanced Precursor Reaction Processing for Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 Solar Cells”, completed by the Institute of Energy Conversion (IEC) at the University of Delaware in collaboration with the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Florida, developed the fundamental understanding and technology to increase module efficiency and improve the manufacturability of Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 films using the precursor reaction approach currently being developed by a number of companies. Key results included: (1) development of a three-step H2Se/Ar/H2S reaction process to control Ga distribution through the film and minimizes back contact MoSe2 formation; (2) Ag-alloying to improve precursor homogeneity by avoiding In phase agglomeration, faster reaction and improved adhesion to allow wider reaction process window; (3) addition of Sb, Bi, and Te interlayers at the Mo/precursor junction to produce more uniform precursor morphology and improve adhesion with reduced void formation in reacted films; (4) a precursor structure containing Se and a reaction process to reduce processing time to 5 minutes and eliminate H2Se usage, thereby increasing throughput and reducing costs. All these results were supported by detailed characterization of the film growth, reaction pathways, thermodynamic assessment and device behavior.

  13. METABOLIC ENGINEERING TO DEVELOP A PATHWAY FOR THE SELECTIVE CLEAVAGE OF CARBON-NITROGEN BONDS

    SciTech Connect

    John J. Kilbane II

    2004-10-01

    The objective of the project is to develop biochemical pathways for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. The initial phase of the project was focused on the isolation or development of an enzyme capable of cleaving the C-N bond in aromatic amides, specifically 2-aminobiphenyl. The objective of the second phase of the research will be to construct a biochemical pathway for the selective removal of nitrogen from carbazole by combining the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 with the gene(s) encoding an appropriate deaminase. The objective of the final phase of the project will be to develop derivative C-N bond cleaving enzymes that have broader substrate ranges and to demonstrate the use of such strains to selectively remove nitrogen from petroleum. During the first year of the project (October, 2002-September, 2003) enrichment culture experiments resulted in the isolation of microbial cultures that utilize aromatic amides as sole nitrogen sources, several amidase genes were cloned and were included in directed evolution experiments to obtain derivatives that can cleave C-N bonds in aromatic amides, and the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11, and Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10 were cloned in vectors capable of replicating in Escherichia coli. During the second year of the project (October, 2003-September, 2004) enrichment culture experiments succeeded in isolating a mixed bacterial culture that can utilize 2-aminobiphenyl as a sole nitrogen source, directed evolution experiments were focused on the aniline dioxygenase enzyme that is capable of deaminating aniline, and expression vectors were constructed to enable the expression of genes encoding C-N bond cleaving enzymes in Rhodococcus hosts. The construction of a new metabolic pathway to selectively remove nitrogen from carbazole and other molecules typically found in petroleum should lead to the development of a process to improve oil refinery efficiency by reducing the

  14. Engineering Defect-Free Nanoporous Pd from Optimized Pd-Ni Precursor Alloy by Understanding Palladium-Hydrogen Interactions During Dealloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoop, Julius; Balk, T. John

    2014-04-01

    Thin films of nanoporous palladium (np-Pd) were produced from binary palladium-nickel (Pd-Ni) precursor alloys. A suitable precursor alloy and a method of dealloying to yield optimum nanoporosity (average pore/ligament size of 7 nm) were developed by studying the effects of various processing parameters on final microstructure. To obtain crack-free np-Pd, a 100 nm thin film of 20 at. pct Pd (80 at. pct Ni) can be dealloyed for ~5 hours in a 1 M solution of sulfuric acid, with oleic acid and oleylamine added as surfactants. Both shorter and longer dealloying times, as well as heating, inhibit the formation of crack-free np-Pd. Stress measurements at different stages of dealloying revealed that the necessary dealloying time is determined by the diffusion-controlled corrosion reaction occurring within the thin film during dealloying. Strong interaction between hydrogen and np-Pd was reflected in the stress evolution during dealloying. A mechanism is proposed for the formation of a Ni-rich dense top layer that results from H-induced swelling during initial dealloying and permits the development of defect-free np-Pd beneath, by limiting the speed of dealloying.

  15. Niche inheritance: a cooperative pathway to enhance cancer cell fitness through ecosystem engineering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kimberline R; Mooney, Steven M; Zarif, Jelani C; Coffey, Donald S; Taichman, Russell S; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2014-09-01

    Cancer cells can be described as an invasive species that is able to establish itself in a new environment. The concept of niche construction can be utilized to describe the process by which cancer cells terraform their environment, thereby engineering an ecosystem that promotes the genetic fitness of the species. Ecological dispersion theory can then be utilized to describe and model the steps and barriers involved in a successful diaspora as the cancer cells leave the original host organ and migrate to new host organs to successfully establish a new metastatic community. These ecological concepts can be further utilized to define new diagnostic and therapeutic areas for lethal cancers.

  16. The effect of photoinitiators on intracellular AKT signaling pathway in tissue engineering application

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Leyuan; Sheybani, Natasha; Yeudall, W. Andrew; Yang, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Free-radical photopolymerization initiated by photoinitiators is an important method to make tissue engineering scaffolds. To advance understanding of photoinitiator cytocompatibility, we examined three photoinitiators including 2,2-dimethoxy-2-phenylacetophenone (DMPA), Irgacure 2959 (I-2959), and eosin Y photoinitiating system (EY) in terms of their effects on viability of HN4 cells and expression levels of intracellular AKT and its phosphorylated form p-AKT. Our results show that the photoinitiators and their UV-exposed counterparts affect intracellular AKT signaling, which can be used in conjunction with cell viability for cytocompatibility assessment of photoinitiators. PMID:25709809

  17. Engineering Salidroside Biosynthetic Pathway in Hairy Root Cultures of Rhodiola crenulata Based on Metabolic Characterization of Tyrosine Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lingjiang; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Qiu, Fei; Zheng, Weilie; Quan, Hong; Liao, Zhihua; Chen, Min; Huang, Wenlin; Liu, Wanhong; Wang, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine decarboxylase initializes salidroside biosynthesis. Metabolic characterization of tyrosine decarboxylase gene from Rhodiola crenulata (RcTYDC) revealed that it played an important role in salidroside biosynthesis. Recombinant 53 kDa RcTYDC converted tyrosine into tyramine. RcTYDC gene expression was induced coordinately with the expression of RcUDPGT (the last gene involved in salidroside biosynthesis) in SA/MeJA treatment; the expression of RcTYDC and RcUDPGT was dramatically upregulated by SA, respectively 49 folds and 36 folds compared with control. MeJA also significantly increased the expression of RcTYDC and RcUDPGT in hairy root cultures. The tissue profile of RcTYDC and RcUDPGT was highly similar: highest expression levels found in stems, higher expression levels in leaves than in flowers and roots. The gene expressing levels were consistent with the salidroside accumulation levels. This strongly suggested that RcTYDC played an important role in salidroside biosynthesis in R. crenulata. Finally, RcTYDC was used to engineering salidroside biosynthetic pathway in R. crenulata hairy roots via metabolic engineering strategy of overexpression. All the transgenic lines showed much higher expression levels of RcTYDC than non-transgenic one. The transgenic lines produced tyramine, tyrosol and salidroside at higher levels, which were respectively 3.21–6.84, 1.50–2.19 and 1.27–3.47 folds compared with the corresponding compound in non-transgenic lines. In conclusion, RcTYDC overexpression promoted tyramine biosynthesis that facilitated more metabolic flux flowing toward the downstream pathway and as a result, the intermediate tyrosol was accumulated more that led to the increased production of the end-product salidroside. PMID:24124492

  18. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide turnover in natural and engineered microbial communities: biological pathways, chemical reactions, and novel technologies.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Frank; Wunderlin, Pascal; Udert, Kai M; Wells, George F

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) is an environmentally important atmospheric trace gas because it is an effective greenhouse gas and it leads to ozone depletion through photo-chemical nitric oxide (NO) production in the stratosphere. Mitigating its steady increase in atmospheric concentration requires an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation in natural and engineered microbial communities. N(2)O is formed biologically from the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH(2)OH) or the reduction of nitrite (NO(-) (2)) to NO and further to N(2)O. Our review of the biological pathways for N(2)O production shows that apparently all organisms and pathways known to be involved in the catabolic branch of microbial N-cycle have the potential to catalyze the reduction of NO(-) (2) to NO and the further reduction of NO to N(2)O, while N(2)O formation from NH(2)OH is only performed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In addition to biological pathways, we review important chemical reactions that can lead to NO and N(2)O formation due to the reactivity of NO(-) (2), NH(2)OH, and nitroxyl (HNO). Moreover, biological N(2)O formation is highly dynamic in response to N-imbalance imposed on a system. Thus, understanding NO formation and capturing the dynamics of NO and N(2)O build-up are key to understand mechanisms of N(2)O release. Here, we discuss novel technologies that allow experiments on NO and N(2)O formation at high temporal resolution, namely NO and N(2)O microelectrodes and the dynamic analysis of the isotopic signature of N(2)O with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS). In addition, we introduce other techniques that use the isotopic composition of N(2)O to distinguish production pathways and findings that were made with emerging molecular techniques in complex environments. Finally, we discuss how a combination of the presented tools might help to address important open questions on pathways and controls of nitrogen flow through complex microbial

  19. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide turnover in natural and engineered microbial communities: biological pathways, chemical reactions, and novel technologies

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Frank; Wunderlin, Pascal; Udert, Kai M.; Wells, George F.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an environmentally important atmospheric trace gas because it is an effective greenhouse gas and it leads to ozone depletion through photo-chemical nitric oxide (NO) production in the stratosphere. Mitigating its steady increase in atmospheric concentration requires an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation in natural and engineered microbial communities. N2O is formed biologically from the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) or the reduction of nitrite (NO−2) to NO and further to N2O. Our review of the biological pathways for N2O production shows that apparently all organisms and pathways known to be involved in the catabolic branch of microbial N-cycle have the potential to catalyze the reduction of NO−2 to NO and the further reduction of NO to N2O, while N2O formation from NH2OH is only performed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In addition to biological pathways, we review important chemical reactions that can lead to NO and N2O formation due to the reactivity of NO−2, NH2OH, and nitroxyl (HNO). Moreover, biological N2O formation is highly dynamic in response to N-imbalance imposed on a system. Thus, understanding NO formation and capturing the dynamics of NO and N2O build-up are key to understand mechanisms of N2O release. Here, we discuss novel technologies that allow experiments on NO and N2O formation at high temporal resolution, namely NO and N2O microelectrodes and the dynamic analysis of the isotopic signature of N2O with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS). In addition, we introduce other techniques that use the isotopic composition of N2O to distinguish production pathways and findings that were made with emerging molecular techniques in complex environments. Finally, we discuss how a combination of the presented tools might help to address important open questions on pathways and controls of nitrogen flow through complex microbial communities that eventually lead to N2O build

  20. Visualization of DC-SIGN-mediated entry pathway of engineered lentiviral vectors in target cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yarong; Tai, April; Joo, Kye-Il; Wang, Pin

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and therefore have enormous potential as vaccine targets. We have previously developed an engineered lentiviral vector (LV) that is pseudotyped with a mutated Sindbis virus glycoprotein (SVGmu), which is capable of targeting DCs through Dendritic Cell-specific ICAM3-grabbing Nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), a receptor that is predominantly expressed by DCs. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the internalization and trafficking mechanisms of this viral vector system through direct visualization of GFP-Vpr-tagged viral particles in target DCs, which was further corroborated by drug inhibition and dominant-negative mutants of cellular proteins that regulate the endocytic traffic. We demonstrated that our engineered LVs enter the cell via receptor-mediated clathrin- and dynamin-dependent endocytosis. Microtubule networks were also involved in a productive infection. Viral vector fusion was low-pH-dependent and occurred in the early endosomal stage of the intracellular transport. Autophagy was also examined for its effect on transduction efficiency, and we observed that enhanced autophage activity reduced vector infectivity, while suppressed autophagy boosted transduction efficiency. This study shed some light on the internalization and trafficking mechanisms of DC-directed LVs and offers some strategies to further improve the efficiency of LV-mediated gene therapy.

  1. Fatty Aldehydes in Cyanobacteria Are a Metabolically Flexible Precursor for a Diversity of Biofuel Products

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Brett K.; Carleton, Michael; Hickman, Jason W.; Miller, Cameron; Lawson, David; Budde, Mark; Warrener, Paul; Paredes, Angel; Mullapudi, Srinivas; Navarro, Patricia; Cross, Fred; Roberts, James M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe how pathway engineering can be used to convert a single intermediate derived from lipid biosynthesis, fatty aldehydes, into a variety of biofuel precursors including alkanes, free fatty acids and wax esters. In cyanobacteria, long-chain acyl-ACPs can be reduced to fatty aldehydes, and then decarbonylated to alkanes. We discovered a cyanobacteria class-3 aldehyde-dehydrogenase, AldE, that was necessary and sufficient to instead oxidize fatty aldehyde precursors into fatty acids. Overexpression of enzymes in this pathway resulted in production of 50 to 100 fold more fatty acids than alkanes, and the fatty acids were secreted from the cell. Co-expression of acyl-ACP reductase, an alcohol-dehydrogenase and a wax-ester-synthase resulted in a third fate for fatty aldehydes: conversion to wax esters, which accumulated as intracellular lipid bodies. Conversion of acyl-ACP to fatty acids using endogenous cyanobacterial enzymes may allow biofuel production without transgenesis. PMID:23505484

  2. Synthesis of Flavonoid O-Pentosides by Escherichia coli through Engineering of Nucleotide Sugar Pathways and Glycosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Han, So Hyun; Kim, Bong Gyu; Yoon, Jeong A.; Chong, Youhoon

    2014-01-01

    Plants produce two flavonoid O-pentoses, flavonoid O-xyloside and flavonoid O-arabinoside. However, analyzing their biological properties is difficult because flavonoids are not naturally produced in sufficient quantities. In this study, Escherichia coli was used to synthesize the plant-specific flavonoid O-pentosides quercetin 3-O-xyloside and quercetin 3-O-arabinoside. Two strategies were used. First, E. coli was engineered to express components of the biosynthetic pathways for UDP-xylose and UDP-arabinose. For UDP-xylose biosynthesis, two genes, UXS (UDP-xylose synthase) from Arabidopsis thaliana and ugd (UDP-glucose dehydrogenase) from E. coli, were overexpressed. In addition, the gene encoding ArnA (UDP-l-Ara4N formyltransferase/UDP-GlcA C-4″-decarboxylase), which competes with UXS for UDP-glucuronic acid, was deleted. For UDP-arabinose biosynthesis, UXE (UDP-xylose epimerase) was overexpressed. Next, we engineered UDP-dependent glycosyltransferases (UGTs) to ensure specificity for UDP-xylose and UDP-arabinose. The E. coli strains thus obtained synthesized approximately 160 mg/liter of quercetin 3-O-xyloside and quercetin 3-O-arabinoside. PMID:24561591

  3. Violet/blue chrysanthemums--metabolic engineering of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway results in novel petal colors.

    PubMed

    Brugliera, Filippa; Tao, Guo-Qing; Tems, Ursula; Kalc, Gianna; Mouradova, Ekaterina; Price, Kym; Stevenson, Kim; Nakamura, Noriko; Stacey, Iolanda; Katsumoto, Yukihisa; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Mason, John G

    2013-10-01

    Chrysanthemums (Chrysanthemum×morifolium Ramat.) are an important cut-flower and potted plant crop in the horticultural industry world wide. Chrysanthemums express the flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H) gene and thus accumulate anthocyanins derived from cyanidin in their inflorescences which appear pink/red. Delphinidin-based anthocyanins are lacking due to the deficiency of a flavonoid 3', 5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H), and so violet/blue chrysanthemum flower colors are not found. In this study, together with optimization of transgene expression and selection of the host cultivars and gene source, F3'5'H genes have been successfully utilized to produce transgenic bluish chrysanthemums that accumulate delphinidin-based anthocyanins. HPLC analysis and feeding experiments with a delphinidin precursor identified 16 cultivars of chrysanthemums out of 75 that were predicted to turn bluish upon delphinidin accumulation. A selection of eight cultivars were successfully transformed with F3'5'H genes under the control of different promoters. A pansy F3'5'H gene under the control of a chalcone synthase promoter fragment from rose resulted in the effective diversion of the anthocyanin pathway to produce delphinidin in transgenic chrysanthemum flower petals. The resultant petal color was bluish, with 40% of total anthocyanidins attributed to delphinidin. Increased delphinidin levels (up to 80%) were further achieved by hairpin RNA interference-mediated silencing of the endogenous F3'H gene. The resulting petal colors were novel bluish hues, not possible by hybridization breeding. This is the first report of the production of anthocyanins derived from delphinidin in chrysanthemum petals leading to novel flower color.

  4. Engineered Production of Short Chain Fatty Acid in Escherichia coli Using Fatty Acid Synthesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jawed, Kamran; Mattam, Anu Jose; Fatma, Zia; Wajid, Saima; Abdin, Malik Z.; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2016-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as butyric acid, have a broad range of applications in chemical and fuel industries. Worldwide demand of sustainable fuels and chemicals has encouraged researchers for microbial synthesis of SCFAs. In this study we compared three thioesterases, i.e., TesAT from Anaerococcus tetradius, TesBF from Bryantella formatexigens and TesBT from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, for production of SCFAs in Escherichia coli utilizing native fatty acid synthesis (FASII) pathway and modulated the genetic and bioprocess parameters to improve its yield and productivity. E. coli strain expressing tesBT gene yielded maximum butyric acid titer at 1.46 g L-1, followed by tesBF at 0.85 g L-1 and tesAT at 0.12 g L-1. The titer of butyric acid varied significantly depending upon the plasmid copy number and strain genotype. The modulation of genetic factors that are known to influence long chain fatty acid production, such as deletion of the fadD and fadE that initiates the fatty acid degradation cycle and overexpression of fadR that is a global transcriptional activator of fatty acid biosynthesis and repressor of degradation cycle, did not improve the butyric acid titer significantly. Use of chemical inhibitor cerulenin, which restricts the fatty acid elongation cycle, increased the butyric acid titer by 1.7-fold in case of TesBF, while it had adverse impact in case of TesBT. In vitro enzyme assay indicated that cerulenin also inhibited short chain specific thioesterase, though inhibitory concentration varied according to the type of thioesterase used. Further process optimization followed by fed-batch cultivation under phosphorous limited condition led to production of 14.3 g L-1 butyric acid and 17.5 g L-1 total free fatty acid at 28% of theoretical yield. This study expands our understanding of SCFAs production in E. coli through FASII pathway and highlights role of genetic and process optimization to enhance the desired product. PMID:27466817

  5. Engineered Production of Short Chain Fatty Acid in Escherichia coli Using Fatty Acid Synthesis Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jawed, Kamran; Mattam, Anu Jose; Fatma, Zia; Wajid, Saima; Abdin, Malik Z; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2016-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as butyric acid, have a broad range of applications in chemical and fuel industries. Worldwide demand of sustainable fuels and chemicals has encouraged researchers for microbial synthesis of SCFAs. In this study we compared three thioesterases, i.e., TesAT from Anaerococcus tetradius, TesBF from Bryantella formatexigens and TesBT from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, for production of SCFAs in Escherichia coli utilizing native fatty acid synthesis (FASII) pathway and modulated the genetic and bioprocess parameters to improve its yield and productivity. E. coli strain expressing tesBT gene yielded maximum butyric acid titer at 1.46 g L-1, followed by tesBF at 0.85 g L-1 and tesAT at 0.12 g L-1. The titer of butyric acid varied significantly depending upon the plasmid copy number and strain genotype. The modulation of genetic factors that are known to influence long chain fatty acid production, such as deletion of the fadD and fadE that initiates the fatty acid degradation cycle and overexpression of fadR that is a global transcriptional activator of fatty acid biosynthesis and repressor of degradation cycle, did not improve the butyric acid titer significantly. Use of chemical inhibitor cerulenin, which restricts the fatty acid elongation cycle, increased the butyric acid titer by 1.7-fold in case of TesBF, while it had adverse impact in case of TesBT. In vitro enzyme assay indicated that cerulenin also inhibited short chain specific thioesterase, though inhibitory concentration varied according to the type of thioesterase used. Further process optimization followed by fed-batch cultivation under phosphorous limited condition led to production of 14.3 g L-1 butyric acid and 17.5 g L-1 total free fatty acid at 28% of theoretical yield. This study expands our understanding of SCFAs production in E. coli through FASII pathway and highlights role of genetic and process optimization to enhance the desired product. PMID:27466817

  6. Engineering of an L-arabinose metabolic pathway in Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaochao; Wang, Xi; Chen, Shulin

    2016-07-01

    The oleaginous bacterium, Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 has attracted considerable attention due to its capability to accumulate significant levels of triacylglycerol as renewable hydrocarbon. To enable the strain to utilize arabinose derived from lignocellulosic biomass, the metabolic pathway of L-arabinose utilization was introduced into R. jostii RHA1 by heterogenous expression of the operon, araBAD from Escherichia coli. The results showed that recombinant bearing araBAD could grow on L-arabinose as the sole carbon source, and additional expression of araFGH encoding the arabinose transporter from E. coli could improve the cell biomass yield from high contents of arabinose. We further increased the content of lipid produced from arabinose in the recombinants from 47.9 to 56.8 % of the cell dry weight (CDW) by overexpression of a gene, atf1 encoding a diglyceride acyltransferase from R. opacus PD630. This work demonstrated the feasibility of producing lipid from arabinose by genetic modification of the rhodococci strain.

  7. Engineering an intracellular pathway for major histocompatibility complex class II presentation of antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T C; Guarnieri, F G; Staveley-O'Carroll, K F; Viscidi, R P; Levitsky, H I; Hedrick, L; Cho, K R; August, J T; Pardoll, D M

    1995-01-01

    The presentation of antigenic peptides by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules to CD4+ T cells is critical to the function of the immune system. In this study, we have utilized the sorting signal of the lysosomal-associated membrane protein LAMP-1 to target a model antigen, human papillomavirus 16 E7 (HPV-16 E7), into the endosomal and lysosomal compartments. The LAMP-1 sorting signal reroutes the antigen into the MHC class II processing pathway, resulting in enhanced presentation to CD4+ cells in vitro. In vivo immunization experiments in mice demonstrated that vaccinia containing the chimeric E7/LAMP-1 gene generated greater E7-specific lymphoproliferative activity, antibody titers, and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activities than vaccinia containing the wild-type HPV-16 E7 gene. These results suggest that specific targeting of an antigen to the endosomal and lysosomal compartments enhances MHC class II presentation and vaccine potency. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8524826

  8. Hydrology without hillslopes: runoff controls and pathways on a near-level, engineered landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzold, Halya; Ali, Genevieve

    2015-04-01

    Low relief, artificially drained landscapes like those of the Prairies in south-central Canada have received little consideration in hydrologic study. While topography is generally asserted as the main control of runoff generation, it is unknown whether this is also the case where relief is low, or if in the absence of high relief other landscape characteristics become relatively more influential. To address this knowledge gap, runoff behaviour was analysed via event rainfall-runoff hydrographs and perched water table level at 6 study sites to infer dominant runoff processes and their control factors. Instrumentation was deployed in the Catfish Creek watershed, a 642 km2 near-level, mixed land use and engineered Prairie watershed located 90 km northeast of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Specifically, surface water levels were measured at the outlet of six sub-watersheds while perched water table levels were monitored in riparian areas. At each site, rainfall events were delineated and rainfall-runoff parameters, perched water table maximum rise and antecedent rainfall variables (as surrogates for antecedent moisture conditions or AMCs) were calculated on an event basis. Landscape characteristics, including elevation, slope, and land use and land cover statistics, were also determined for each sub-watershed. Correlation analysis and principal component analysis were then carried out including all variables. Rainfall-runoff responses were highly variable across sites. Event hydrographs were generally characterized by short lag times and initial abstractions which correlated moderately to total event rainfall. However, sub-watersheds characteristics did not influence the different hydrograph characteristics recorded across sites. Threshold behaviour was observed only in the two study sub-watersheds of greatest relief. Runoff generation was hypothesized to occur predominantly as Hortonian overland flow, although the dominant runoff process shifted under certain moisture

  9. Physiology, Genomics, and Pathway Engineering of an Ethanol-Tolerant Strain of Clostridium phytofermentans.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Andrew C; Zuroff, Trevor R; Ramya, Mohandass; Boutard, Magali; Cerisy, Tristan; Curtis, Wayne R

    2015-08-15

    Novel processing strategies for hydrolysis and fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass in a single reactor offer large potential cost savings for production of biocommodities and biofuels. One critical challenge is retaining high enzyme production in the presence of elevated product titers. Toward this goal, the cellulolytic, ethanol-producing bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans was adapted to increased ethanol concentrations. The resulting ethanol-tolerant (ET) strain has nearly doubled ethanol tolerance relative to the wild-type level but also reduced ethanol yield and growth at low ethanol concentrations. The genome of the ET strain has coding changes in proteins involved in membrane biosynthesis, the Rnf complex, cation homeostasis, gene regulation, and ethanol production. In particular, purification of the mutant bifunctional acetaldehyde coenzyme A (CoA)/alcohol dehydrogenase showed that a G609D variant abolished its activities, including ethanol formation. Heterologous expression of Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase in the ET strain increased cellulose consumption and restored ethanol production, demonstrating how metabolic engineering can be used to overcome disadvantageous mutations incurred during adaptation to ethanol. We discuss how genetic changes in the ET strain reveal novel potential strategies for improving microbial solvent tolerance.

  10. Understanding the conditions that encourage the persistence of women in science, mathematics, and engineering career pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrick, Linda C.

    The purpose of this study was to determine which factors encourage the persistence of women in the pursuit of Science, Math, and Engineering (SME) careers. Surveys with 36 parallel pairs of theory and history questions regarding the importance and the aptness of variables identified in the literature were completed by 205 SME career women. The variables covered three educational levels: High School, Undergraduate and Graduate. Results reveal which variables fit the experiences of these women and were also believed by them to be important to women in the pursuit of an SME career goal. False Negatives, women who according to the SME literature should not have persisted but did, were identified. Their existence, together with the false positives identified in the SME literature, is evidence, according to Confirmation/Disconfirmation Theory, that important variables in SME persistence are yet to be discovered. Follow-up telephone interviews with nineteen respondents identified important affective variables. Love of math or science was in itself a powerful motivator. Respondents made suggestions for intervention programs that may help to develop that abiding interest. Mentors, role models, and social support networks were identified as important in building the confidence and sustaining the focus needed to cope with the rigorous curriculum and negative sex-bias encountered in SME programs. The qualitative and quantitative results were synthesized in a Causal Event Flow Network, a cognitive map of the longitudinal effects of both positive and negative push/pull vectors operating on women in pursuit of an SME career goal.

  11. Metabolic engineering of a 1,2-propanediol pathway in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Altaras, N E; Cameron, D C

    1999-03-01

    1,2-Propanediol (1,2-PD) is a major commodity chemical that is currently derived from propylene, a nonrenewable resource. A goal of our research is to develop fermentation routes to 1,2-PD from renewable resources. Here we report the production of enantiomerically pure R-1,2-PD from glucose in Escherichia coli expressing NADH-linked glycerol dehydrogenase genes (E. coli gldA or Klebsiella pneumoniae dhaD). We also show that E. coli overexpressing the E. coli methylglyoxal synthase gene (mgs) produced 1,2-PD. The expression of either glycerol dehydrogenase or methylglyoxal synthase resulted in the anaerobic production of approximately 0.25 g of 1,2-PD per liter. R-1,2-PD production was further improved to 0.7 g of 1,2-PD per liter when methylglyoxal synthase and glycerol dehydrogenase (gldA) were coexpressed. In vitro studies indicated that the route to R-1,2-PD involved the reduction of methylglyoxal to R-lactaldehyde by the recombinant glycerol dehydrogenase and the reduction of R-lactaldehyde to R-1, 2-PD by a native E. coli activity. We expect that R-1,2-PD production can be significantly improved through further metabolic and bioprocess engineering.

  12. Ethanol production from lignocellulosic hydrolysates using engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae harboring xylose isomerase-based pathway.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ja Kyong; Um, Youngsoon; Woo, Han Min; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Lee, Sun-Mi

    2016-06-01

    The efficient co-fermentation of glucose and xylose is necessary for the economically feasible bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. Even with xylose utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the efficiency of the lignocellulosic ethanol production remains suboptimal mainly due to the low conversion yield of xylose to ethanol. In this study, we evaluated the co-fermentation performances of SXA-R2P-E, a recently engineered isomerase-based xylose utilizing strain, in mixed sugars and in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. In a high-sugar fermentation with 70g/L of glucose and 40g/L of xylose, SXA-R2P-E produced 50g/L of ethanol with an yield of 0.43gethanol/gsugars at 72h. From dilute acid-pretreated hydrolysates of rice straw and hardwood (oak), the strain produced 18-21g/L of ethanol with among the highest yield of 0.43-0.46gethanol/gsugars ever reported. This study shows a highly promising potential of a xylose isomerase-expressing strain as an industrially relevant ethanol producer from lignocellulosic hydrolysates. PMID:26990396

  13. Development of an arabinose-fermenting Zymomonas mobilis strain by metabolic pathway engineering.

    PubMed Central

    Deanda, K; Zhang, M; Eddy, C; Picataggio, S

    1996-01-01

    The substrate fermentation range of the ethanologenic bacterium Zymomonas mobilis was expanded to include the pentose sugar, L-arabinose, which is commonly found in agricultural residues and other lignocellulosic biomass. Five genes, encoding L-arabinose isomerase (araA), L-ribulokinase (araB), L-ribulose-5-phosphate-4-epimerase (araD), transaldolase (talB), and transketolase (tktA), were isolated from Escherichia coli and introduced into Z. mobilis under the control of constitutive promoters that permitted their expression even in the presence of glucose. The engineered strain grew on and produced ethanol from L-arabinose as a sole C source at 98% of the maximum theoretical ethanol yield, based on the amount of consumed sugar. This indicates that arabinose was metabolized almost exclusively to ethanol as the sole fermentation product, with little by-product formation. Although no diauxic growth pattern was evident, the microorganism preferentially utilized glucose before arabinose, apparently reflecting the specificity of the indigenous facilitated diffusion transport system. This microorganism may be useful, along with the previously developed xylose-fermenting Z. mobilis (M. Zhang, C. Eddy, K. Deanda, M. Finkelstein, and S. Picataggio, Science 267:240-243, 1995), in a mixed culture for efficient fermentation of the predominant hexose and pentose sugars in agricultural residues and other lignocellulosic feedstocks to ethanol. PMID:8953718

  14. Metabolic engineering of a 1,2-propanediol pathway in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Altaras, N E; Cameron, D C

    1999-03-01

    1,2-Propanediol (1,2-PD) is a major commodity chemical that is currently derived from propylene, a nonrenewable resource. A goal of our research is to develop fermentation routes to 1,2-PD from renewable resources. Here we report the production of enantiomerically pure R-1,2-PD from glucose in Escherichia coli expressing NADH-linked glycerol dehydrogenase genes (E. coli gldA or Klebsiella pneumoniae dhaD). We also show that E. coli overexpressing the E. coli methylglyoxal synthase gene (mgs) produced 1,2-PD. The expression of either glycerol dehydrogenase or methylglyoxal synthase resulted in the anaerobic production of approximately 0.25 g of 1,2-PD per liter. R-1,2-PD production was further improved to 0.7 g of 1,2-PD per liter when methylglyoxal synthase and glycerol dehydrogenase (gldA) were coexpressed. In vitro studies indicated that the route to R-1,2-PD involved the reduction of methylglyoxal to R-lactaldehyde by the recombinant glycerol dehydrogenase and the reduction of R-lactaldehyde to R-1, 2-PD by a native E. coli activity. We expect that R-1,2-PD production can be significantly improved through further metabolic and bioprocess engineering. PMID:10049880

  15. Metabolic engineering tanshinone biosynthetic pathway in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy root cultures.

    PubMed

    Kai, Guoyin; Xu, Hui; Zhou, Congcong; Liao, Pan; Xiao, Jianbo; Luo, Xiuqin; You, Lijia; Zhang, Lin

    2011-05-01

    Tanshinone is a group of active diterpenes widely used in treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Here, we report the introduction of genes encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR), 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGPPS) involved in tanshinone biosynthesis into Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots by Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer technology. Overexpression of SmGGPPS and/or SmHMGR as well as SmDXS in transgenic hairy root lines can significantly enhance the production of tanshinone to levels higher than that of the control (P<0.05). SmDXS showed much more powerful pushing effect than SmHMGR in tanshinone production, while SmGGPPS plays a more important role in stimulating tanshinone accumulation than the upstream enzyme SmHMGR or SmDXS in S. miltiorrhiza. Co-expression of SmHMGR and SmGGPPS resulted in highest production of tanshinone (about 2.727 mg/g dw) in line HG9, which was about 4.74-fold higher than that of the control (0.475 mg/g dw). All the tested transgenic hairy root lines showed higher antioxidant activity than the control. To our knowledge, this is the first report on enhancement of tanshinone content and antioxidant activity achieved through metabolic engineering of hairy roots by push-pull strategy in S. miltiorrhiza.

  16. Evolution of hydrological pathways in engineered hillslopes due to soil and vegetation development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appels, Willemijn M.; Ireson, Andrew M.; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.; Barbour, S. Lee

    2015-04-01

    The structure and hydraulic properties of soils and bedrock within a hillslope combined with the timing and rates of water availability control the partitioning of precipitation into vertical and lateral flowpaths. In natural hillslope sites, heterogeneity in both soil texture and structure are the result of long-term landscape evolution processes and consequently can be assumed to be static relative to the timescale of rainfall-runoff processes. However; engineered hillslopes, constructed commonly as reclamation covers overlying mine waste, have been observed to undergo rapid changes in hydraulic properties over relatively short timescales (i.e. 3-5 years) as a result of weathering (e.g. freeze-thaw and wet-dry cycles) and vegetation growth (e.g. increasing rooting depth and density). Rainfall-runoff responses on such hillslopes would therefore not only be expected to reflect seasonal dynamics, but also the evolution of the system from a relatively homogeneous initial condition to a system with increasing heterogeneity of soil texture and structure. We present results of a combined field and modeling study of three prototype soil covers on a saline-sodic shale overburden dump at the Syncrude Canada Ltd. Mildred Lake mine, north of Fort McMurray, Canada. Since their construction in 1999, soil properties, hydrological response to atmospheric and vegetative demands, and vegetation properties have been extensively monitored. The three covers have undergone substantial evolution due to freeze-thaw processes and aggrading vegetation. In this work, we quantify hydrological processes in the reclamation covers, focusing on inter- and intra-annual patterns. To this purpose we analyzed the long-term hydrometric data with field sampling of the distribution of salts and the stable isotopes of water within soil water and subsurface flow in the base of the cover. We use a 2D Hydrus model to explore the co-evolution of soil and vegetation and quantify its effect on flow

  17. feh-1 and apl-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologues of mammalian Fe65 and beta-amyloid precursor protein genes, are involved in the same pathway that controls nematode pharyngeal pumping.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Nicola; Bimonte, Marida; Arbucci, Salvatore; Gianni, Davide; Russo, Tommaso; Bazzicalupo, Paolo

    2002-04-01

    The multigenic family of mammalian Fe65s encodes three highly similar proteins with the same modular organisation: a WW domain and two phosphotyrosine-binding domains. The PTB2 domain of these proteins binds to the cytosolic domains of the Alzheimer's beta-amyloid precursor protein APP and related proteins APLP1 and APLP2, generating a highly redundant system that is hard to dissect by reverse genetics. By searching potential Fe65-like genes in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified a single gene, feh-1 (Fe65 homolog-1), encoding a protein with a high sequence similarity to mammalian Fe65s. FEH-1 is also functionally related to mammalian orthologues; in fact its PTB2 domain binds to APL-1, the product of the C. elegans orthologue of APP. Staining with specific antibodies show that the neuromuscular structures of the pharynx are the sites in which FEH-1 is present at highest levels. Expression studies with reporters indicate that the feh-1 gene is also expressed by a subset of the worm neurons. We generated and isolated a deletion allele of feh-1, and the corresponding homozygous mutants arrest as late embryos or as L1 larvae, demonstrating for the first time an essential role for a Fe65-like gene in vivo. The pharynx of homozygous larvae does not contract and the worms cannot feed. Analysis of pharyngeal pumping in heterozygous worms and in feh-1 RNA-interfered worms indicates that dosage of feh-1 function affects the rate of pharyngeal contraction in C. elegans. Interference with apl-1 double-stranded RNA showed a similar effect on pharyngeal pumping, suggesting that FEH-1 and APL-1 are involved in the same pathway. The non-redundant system of the nematode will prove useful for studying the basic biology of the Fe65-APP interaction and the molecular events regulated by this evolutionarily conserved system of interacting proteins.

  18. Metabolic Engineering and Modeling of Metabolic Pathways to Improve Hydrogen Production by Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Y.; Navid, A.

    2014-12-19

    traits act as the biocatalysts of the process designed to both enhance the system efficiency of CO2 fixation and the net hydrogen production rate. Additionally we applied metabolic engineering approaches guided by computational modeling for the chosen model microorganisms to enable efficient hydrogen production.

  19. Efficient biosynthesis of (2S)-pinocembrin from d-glucose by integrating engineering central metabolic pathways with a pH-shift control strategy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junjun; Zhang, Xia; Zhou, Jingwen; Dong, Mingsheng

    2016-10-01

    Microbial fermentations promise to revolutionize the conventional extraction of (2S)-pinocembrin from natural plant sources. Previously an Escherichia coli fermentation system was developed for one-step (2S)-pinocembrin production. However, this fermentation platform need supplementation of expensive malonyl-CoA precursor malonate and requires morpholinopropane sulfonate to provide buffering capacity. Here, a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats interference was constructed to efficiently channel carbon flux toward malonyl-CoA. By exploring the effects of different culture pH on microbial fermentation, it was found that high pH values favored upstream pathway catalysis, while low pH values favored downstream pathway catalysis. Based on this theory, a two-stage pH control strategy was proposed. The pH was controlled at 7.0 during 0-10h, and was shifted to 6.5 after 10h. Finally, the (2S)-pinocembrin titers increased to 525.8mg/L. These results were attained in minimal medium without additional precursor supplementation, thus offering opportunities for industrial scale low-cost production of flavonoids. PMID:27450982

  20. Advances in the engineering science of immiscible polymer blends: A powder route for delicate polymer precursors and a highly renewable polyamide/terephthalate blend system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giancola, Giorgiana

    Powder processing of thermoplastic polymer composites is an effective way to achieve a high level of component homogenization in raw blends prior to melt processing, thus reducing the thermal and shear stress on the components. Polymer blends can be prepared that would otherwise not be possible due to thermodynamic incompatibility. Evaluation of this concept was conducted by processing PMMA and HDPE micron sized powders which were characterized using DSC and rheology. Optical microscopy and SEM, showed that high-quality, fine domain sized blends can be made by the compression molding process. Silica marker spheres were used to qualitatively assess the level dispersive mixing. EDS chemical analysis was effective in providing image contrast between PMMA and HDPE based on the carbonyl and ester oxygen. EDS image maps, combined with secondary electron images show that compression molding of blended powder precursors produces composites of comparable homogeneity and domain size as extrusion processing. FTIR proved valuable when assessing the intimacy of the constituents at the interface of the immiscible domains. The formation of an in-situ, PMMA nano-network structure resulting from solvent extraction and redeposition using DMF was uniquely found on the surface of these immiscible polymer blends. This work has shown that powder processing of polymers is an effective means to melt processed fragile polymers to high quality blends. Recently, efforts towards the development of sustainable materials have evolved due in part to the increase in price and limited supply of crude oil. Immiscible polymer blending is a paradigm that enables synergistic material performance in certain instances where the composite properties are superior to the sum of the constituents. The addition of PA6,10 to PTT offers an opportunity to increase the bio-based content of PTT while simultaneously maintaining or improving mechanical properties. PA6,10 and PTT are immiscible polymers that can be

  1. Engineering of a modular and synthetic phosphoketolase pathway for photosynthetic production of acetone from CO2 in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 under light and aerobic condition.

    PubMed

    Chwa, Jun-Won; Kim, Wook Jin; Sim, Sang Jun; Um, Youngsoon; Woo, Han Min

    2016-08-01

    Capture and conversion of CO2 to valuable chemicals is intended to answer global challenges on environmental issues, climate change and energy security. Engineered cyanobacteria have been enabled to produce industry-relevant chemicals from CO2 . However, the final products from cyanobacteria have often been mixed with fermented metabolites during dark fermentation. In this study, our engineering of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 enabled continuous conversion of CO2 to volatile acetone as sole product. This process occurred during lighted, aerobic culture via both ATP-driven malonyl-CoA synthesis pathway and heterologous phosphoketolase (PHK)-phosphotransacetylase (Pta) pathway. Because of strong correlations between the metabolic pathways of acetate and acetone, supplying the acetyl-CoA directly from CO2 in the engineered strain, led to sole production of acetone (22.48 mg/L ± 1.00) without changing nutritional constraints, and without an anaerobic shift. Our engineered S. elongatus strains, designed for acetone production, could be modified to create biosolar cell factories for sustainable photosynthetic production of acetyl-CoA-derived biochemicals. PMID:26879003

  2. Proteome Profiling Reveals Potential Toxicity and Detoxification Pathways Following Exposure of BEAS-2B Cells to Engineered Nanoparticle Titanium Dioxide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of toxicity pathways linked to chemical -exposure is critical for a better understanding of biological effects of the exposure, toxic mechanisms, and for enhancement of the prediction of chemical toxicity and adverse health outcomes. To identify toxicity pathways a...

  3. Tools for metabolic engineering in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Bekker, Valerie; Dodd, Amanda; Brady, Dean; Rumbold, Karl

    2014-01-01

    During the last few decades, Streptomycetes have shown to be a very important and adaptable group of bacteria for the production of various beneficial secondary metabolites. These secondary metabolites have been of great interest in academia and the pharmaceutical industries. To date, a vast variety of techniques and tools for metabolic engineering of relevant structural biosynthetic gene clusters have been developed. The main aim of this review is to summarize and discuss the published literature on tools for metabolic engineering of Streptomyces over the last decade. These strategies involve precursor engineering, structural and regulatory gene engineering, and the up or downregulation of genes, as well as genome shuffling and the use of genome scale metabolic models, which can reconstruct bacterial metabolic pathways to predict phenotypic changes and hence rationalize engineering strategies. These tools are continuously being developed to simplify the engineering strategies for this vital group of bacteria.

  4. Polyimide Precursor Solid Residuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A polyimide precursor solid residuum is an admixture of an aromatic dianhydride or derivative thereof and an aromatic diamine or derivative thereof plus a complexing agent, which is complexed with the admixture by hydrogen bonding. The polyimide precursor solid residuum is effectively employed in the preparation of polyimide foam and the fabrication of polyimide foam structures.

  5. Engineering ESPT pathways based on structural analysis of LSSmKate red fluorescent proteins with large Stokes shift.

    PubMed

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D; Malashkevich, Vladimir N; Almo, Steven C; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2010-08-11

    LSSmKate1 and LSSmKate2 are monomeric red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) with large Stokes shifts (LSSs), which allows for efficient separation of absorbance and emission maxima, as well as for excitation with conventional two-photon laser sources. These LSSmKates differ by a single amino acid substitution at position 160 and exhibit absorbance maxima around 460 nm, corresponding to a neutral DsRed-like chromophore. However, excitation at 460 nm leads to fluorescence emission above 600 nm. Structures of LSSmKate1 and LSSmKate2, determined at resolutions of 2.0 and 1.5 A, respectively, revealed that the predominant DsRed-chromophore configurations are cis for LSSmKate1 but trans for LSSmKate2. Crystallographic and mutagenesis analyses, as well as isotope and temperature dependences, suggest that an excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) is responsible for the LSSs observed in LSSmKates. Hydrogen bonding between the chromophore hydroxyl and Glu160 in LSSmKate1 and a proton relay involving the chromophore tyrosine hydroxyl, Ser158, and the Asp160 carboxylate in LSSmKate2 represent the putative ESPT pathways. Comparisons with mKeima LSS RFP suggest that similar proton relays could be engineered in other FPs. Accordingly, we mutated positions 158 and 160 in several conventional red-shifted FPs, including mNeptune, mCherry, mStrawberry, mOrange, and mKO, and the resulting FP variants exhibited LSS fluorescence emission in a wide range of wavelengths from 560 to 640 nm. These data suggest that different chromophores formed by distinct tripeptides in different environments can be rationally modified to yield RFPs with novel photochemical properties.

  6. Engineering ESPT pathways based on structural analysis of LSSmKate red fluorescent proteins with large Stokes shift

    PubMed Central

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D.; Malashkevich, Vladimir N.; Almo, Steven C.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2010-01-01

    LSSmKate1 and LSSmKate2 are monomeric red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) with large Stokes shifts (LSSs) which allows for efficient separation of absorbance and emission maxima, as well as for excitation with conventional two-photon laser sources. These LSSmKates differ by a single amino acid substitution at position 160 and exhibit absorbance maxima around 460 nm, corresponding to a neutral DsRed-like chromophore. However, excitation at 460 nm leads to fluorescence emission above 600 nm. Structures of LSSmKate1 and LSSmKate2, determined at resolutions of 2.0 Å and 1.5 Å, respectively, revealed that the predominant DsRed-chromophore configurations are cis for LSSmKate1 but trans for LSSmKate2. Crystallographic and mutagenesis analyses, as well as isotope and temperature dependences suggest that an excited state proton transfer (ESPT) is responsible for the LSSs observed in LSSmKates. Hydrogen bonding between the chromophore hydroxyl and Glu160 in LSSmKate1 and a proton relay involving the chromophore tyrosine hydroxyl, Ser158 and the Asp160 carboxylate in LSSmKate2 represent the putative ESPT pathways. Comparisons with mKeima LSS RFP suggest that similar proton relays could be engineered in other FPs. Accordingly, we mutated positions 158 and 160 in several conventional red-shifted FPs, including mNeptune, mCherry, mStrawberry, mOrange and mKO, and the resulting FP variants exhibited LSS fluorescence emission in a wide range of wavelengths from 560 to 640 nm. These data suggest that different chromophores formed by distinct tripeptides in different environments can be rationally modified to yield RFPs with novel photochemical properties. PMID:20681709

  7. Yeast secretory expression of insulin precursors.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, T

    2000-09-01

    Since the 1980s, recombinant human insulin for the treatment of diabetes mellitus has been produced using either the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae or the prokaryote Escherichia coli. Here, development of the insulin secretory expression system in S. cerevisiae and its subsequent optimisation is described. Expression of proinsulin in S. cerevisiae does not result in efficient secretion of proinsulin or insulin. However, expression of a cDNA encoding a proinsulin-like molecule with deletion of threonine(B30) as a fusion protein with the S. cerevisiae alpha-factor prepro-peptide (leader), followed either by replacement of the human proinsulin C-peptide with a small C-peptide (e.g. AAK), or by direct fusion of lysine(B29) to glycine(A1), results in the efficient secretion of folded single-chain proinsulin-like molecules to the culture supernatant. The secreted single-chain insulin precursor can then be purified and subsequently converted to human insulin by tryptic transpeptidation in organic aqueous medium in the presence of a threonine ester. The leader confers secretory competence to the insulin precursor, and constructed (synthetic) leaders have been developed for efficient secretory expression of the insulin precursor in the yeasts S. cerevisiae and Pichia pastories. The Kex2 endoprotease, specific for dibasic sites, cleaves the leader-insulin precursor fusion protein in the late secretory pathway and the folded insulin precursor is secreted to the culture supernatant. However, the Kex2 endoprotease processing of the pro-peptide-insulin precursor fusion protein is incomplete and a significant part of the pro-peptide-insulin precursor fusion protein is secreted to the culture supernatant in a hyperglycosylated form. A spacer peptide localised between the leader and the insulin precursor has been developed to optimise Kex2 endoprotease processing and insulin precursor fermentation yield. PMID:11030562

  8. Earthquakes: hydrogeochemical precursors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Manga, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake prediction is a long-sought goal. Changes in groundwater chemistry before earthquakes in Iceland highlight a potential hydrogeochemical precursor, but such signals must be evaluated in the context of long-term, multiparametric data sets.

  9. c-Kit+ progenitors generate vascular cells for tissue-engineered grafts through modulation of the Wnt/Klf4 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Campagnolo, Paola; Tsai, Tsung-Neng; Hong, Xuechong; Kirton, John Paul; So, Po-Wah; Margariti, Andriana; Di Bernardini, Elisabetta; Wong, Mei Mei; Hu, Yanhua; Stevens, Molly M.; Xu, Qingbo

    2015-01-01

    The development of decellularised scaffolds for small diameter vascular grafts is hampered by their limited patency, due to the lack of luminal cell coverage by endothelial cells (EC) and to the low tone of the vessel due to absence of a contractile smooth muscle cells (SMC). In this study, we identify a population of vascular progenitor c-Kit+/Sca-1- cells available in large numbers and derived from immuno-privileged embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We also define an efficient and controlled differentiation protocol yielding fully to differentiated ECs and SMCs in sufficient numbers to allow the repopulation of a tissue engineered vascular graft. When seeded ex vivo on a decellularised vessel, c-Kit+/Sca-1-derived cells recapitulated the native vessel structure and upon in vivo implantation in the mouse, markedly reduced neointima formation and mortality, restoring functional vascularisation. We showed that Krüppel-like transcription factor 4 (Klf4) regulates the choice of differentiation pathway of these cells through β-catenin activation and was itself regulated by the canonical Wnt pathway activator lithium chloride. Our data show that ESC-derived c-Kit+/Sca-1-cells can be differentiated through a Klf4/β-catenin dependent pathway and are a suitable source of vascular progenitors for the creation of superior tissue-engineered vessels from decellularised scaffolds. PMID:25985152

  10. Identification of Desirable Precursor Properties for Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muoto, Chigozie K.; Jordan, Eric H.; Gell, Maurice; Aindow, Mark

    2011-06-01

    In solution precursor plasma spray chemical precursor solutions are injected into a standard plasma torch and the final material is formed and deposited in a single step. This process has several attractive features, including the ability to rapidly explore new compositions and to form amorphous and metastable phases from molecularly mixed precursors. Challenges include: (a) moderate deposition rates due to the need to evaporate the precursor solvent, (b) dealing on a case by case basis with precursor characteristics that influence the spray process (viscosity, endothermic and exothermic reactions, the sequence of physical states through which the precursor passes before attaining the final state, etc.). Desirable precursor properties were identified by comparing an effective precursor for yttria-stabilized zirconia with four less effective candidate precursors for MgO:Y2O3. The critical parameters identified were a lack of major endothermic events during precursor decomposition and highly dense resultant particles.

  11. Data for rapid ethanol production at elevated temperatures by engineered thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus via the NADP(H)-preferring xylose reductase–xylitol dehydrogenase pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Biao; Zhang, Jia; Wang, Dongmei; Gao, Xiaolian; Sun, Lianhong; Hong, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    A thermo-tolerant NADP(H)-preferring xylose pathway was constructed in Kluyveromyces marxianus for ethanol production with xylose at elevated temperatures (Zhang et al., 2015 [25]). Ethanol production yield and efficiency was enhanced by pathway engineering in the engineered strains. The constructed strain, YZJ088, has the ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose for ethanol and xylitol production, which is a critical step toward enabling economic biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass. This study contains the fermentation results of strains using the metabolic pathway engineering procedure. The ethanol-producing abilities of various yeast strains under various conditions were compared, and strain YZJ088 showed the highest production and fastest productivity at elevated temperatures. The YZJ088 xylose fermentation results indicate that it fermented well with xylose at either low or high inoculum size. When fermented with an initial cell concentration of OD600=15 at 37 °C, YZJ088 consumed 200 g/L xylose and produced 60.07 g/L ethanol; when the initial cell concentration was OD600=1 at 37 °C, YZJ088 consumed 98.96 g/L xylose and produced 33.55 g/L ethanol with a productivity of 0.47 g/L/h. When fermented with 100 g/L xylose at 42 °C, YZJ088 produced 30.99 g/L ethanol with a productivity of 0.65 g/L/h, which was higher than that produced at 37 °C. PMID:26543879

  12. Data for rapid ethanol production at elevated temperatures by engineered thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus via the NADP(H)-preferring xylose reductase-xylitol dehydrogenase pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Biao; Zhang, Jia; Wang, Dongmei; Gao, Xiaolian; Sun, Lianhong; Hong, Jiong

    2015-12-01

    A thermo-tolerant NADP(H)-preferring xylose pathway was constructed in Kluyveromyces marxianus for ethanol production with xylose at elevated temperatures (Zhang et al., 2015 [25]). Ethanol production yield and efficiency was enhanced by pathway engineering in the engineered strains. The constructed strain, YZJ088, has the ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose for ethanol and xylitol production, which is a critical step toward enabling economic biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass. This study contains the fermentation results of strains using the metabolic pathway engineering procedure. The ethanol-producing abilities of various yeast strains under various conditions were compared, and strain YZJ088 showed the highest production and fastest productivity at elevated temperatures. The YZJ088 xylose fermentation results indicate that it fermented well with xylose at either low or high inoculum size. When fermented with an initial cell concentration of OD600=15 at 37 °C, YZJ088 consumed 200 g/L xylose and produced 60.07 g/L ethanol; when the initial cell concentration was OD600=1 at 37 °C, YZJ088 consumed 98.96 g/L xylose and produced 33.55 g/L ethanol with a productivity of 0.47 g/L/h. When fermented with 100 g/L xylose at 42 °C, YZJ088 produced 30.99 g/L ethanol with a productivity of 0.65 g/L/h, which was higher than that produced at 37 °C. PMID:26543879

  13. Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, H.B.

    1984-02-28

    An internal combustion engine has a piston rack depending from each piston. This rack is connected to a power output shaft through a mechanical rectifier so that the power output shaft rotates in only one direction. A connecting rod is pivotally connected at one end to the rack and at the other end to the crank of a reduced function crankshaft so that the crankshaft rotates at the same angular velocity as the power output shaft and at the same frequency as the pistons. The crankshaft has a size, weight and shape sufficient to return the pistons back into the cylinders in position for the next power stroke.

  14. Thermal Studies of New Precursors to Indium-tin Oxides for Use as Sensor Materials in the Detection of NO(x)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, J. C.; Kacik, T.; Hockensmith, C. M.

    1999-01-01

    Control of combustion product emissions in both sub and super-sonic jet engines can be facilitated by measurement of NO(x) levels with metal oxide sensors, In2O3, metal-doped SnO2, and SnO, (as well as other materials) show resistivity changes in the presence of NO(x), but often their sensitivity, stability, and selectivity are low. This study was designed to develop new synthetic pathways to precursors that produce high purity, two phase In2O3-SnO2. The precursors were formed by complexation of tin with any oxide ligands to give the ammonium salt (NH4). Thermal studies of these precursors were carried out by thermal gravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Further studies by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) were also conducted.

  15. The c4h, tat, hppr and hppd Genes Prompted Engineering of Rosmarinic Acid Biosynthetic Pathway in Salvia miltiorrhiza Hairy Root Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shouhong; Saechao, Saengking; Di, Peng; Chen, Junfeng; Chen, Wansheng

    2011-01-01

    Rational engineering to produce biologically active plant compounds has been greatly impeded by our poor understanding of the regulatory and metabolic pathways underlying the biosynthesis of these compounds. Here we capitalized on our previously described gene-to-metabolite network in order to engineer rosmarinic acid (RA) biosynthesis pathway for the production of beneficial RA and lithospermic acid B (LAB) in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy root cultures. Results showed their production was greatly elevated by (1) overexpression of single gene, including cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (c4h), tyrosine aminotransferase (tat), and 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate reductase (hppr), (2) overexpression of both tat and hppr, and (3) suppression of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (hppd). Co-expression of tat/hppr produced the most abundant RA (906 mg/liter) and LAB (992 mg/liter), which were 4.3 and 3.2-fold more than in their wild-type (wt) counterparts respectively. And the value of RA concentration was also higher than that reported before, that produced by means of nutrient medium optimization or elicitor treatment. It is the first report of boosting RA and LAB biosynthesis through genetic manipulation, providing an effective approach for their large-scale commercial production by using hairy root culture systems as bioreactors. PMID:22242141

  16. Gender and Ethnic Differences in Precollege Mathematics Coursework Related to Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    You, Sukkyung

    2013-01-01

    In 2004, the pattern in academic pathways for high school students in the USA showed that students were completing more demanding mathematics courses. Despite the upward pattern in advanced-level mathematics course-taking, disparities among racial/ethnic groups persisted between 1982 and 2004. Using data from the Education Longitudinal Study of…

  17. Enhanced expression of genes involved in initial xylose metabolism and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway in the improved xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae through evolutionary engineering.

    PubMed

    Zha, Jian; Shen, Minghua; Hu, Menglong; Song, Hao; Yuan, Yingjin

    2014-01-01

    Fermentation of xylose in lignocellulosic hydrolysates by Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been achieved through heterologous expression of the xylose reductase (XR)-xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) pathway. However, the fermentation efficiency is far from the requirement for industrial application due to high yield of the byproduct xylitol, low ethanol yield, and low xylose consumption rate. Through evolutionary engineering, an improved xylose-utilizing strain SyBE005 was obtained with 78.3 % lower xylitol production and a 2.6-fold higher specific ethanol production rate than those of the parent strain SyBE004, which expressed an engineered NADP(+)-preferring XDH. The transcriptional differences between SyBE005 and SyBE004 were investigated by quantitative RT-PCR. Genes including XYL1, XYL2, and XKS1 in the initial xylose metabolic pathway showed the highest up-regulation in SyBE005. The increased expression of XYL1 and XYL2 correlated with enhanced enzymatic activities of XR and XDH. In addition, the expression level of ZWF1 in the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway increased significantly in SyBE005, indicating an elevated demand for NADPH from XR. Genes involved in the TCA cycle (LAT1, CIT1, CIT2, KGD1, KGD, SDH2) and gluconeogenesis (ICL1, PYC1) were also up-regulated in SyBE005. Genomic analysis revealed that point mutations in transcriptional regulators CYC8 and PHD1 might be responsible for the altered expression. In addition, a mutation (Y89S) in ZWF1 was identified which might improve NADPH production in SyBE005. Our results suggest that increasing the expression of XYL1, XYL2, XKS1, and enhancing NADPH supply are promising strategies to improve xylose fermentation in recombinant S. cerevisiae.

  18. Integrated engineering of β-oxidation reversal and ω-oxidation pathways for the synthesis of medium chain ω-functionalized carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Clomburg, James M; Blankschien, Matthew D; Vick, Jacob E; Chou, Alexander; Kim, Seohyoung; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2015-03-01

    An engineered reversal of the β-oxidation cycle was exploited to demonstrate its utility for the synthesis of medium chain (6-10-carbons) ω-hydroxyacids and dicarboxylic acids from glycerol as the only carbon source. A redesigned β-oxidation reversal facilitated the production of medium chain carboxylic acids, which were converted to ω-hydroxyacids and dicarboxylic acids by the action of an engineered ω-oxidation pathway. The selection of a key thiolase (bktB) and thioesterase (ydiI) in combination with previously established core β-oxidation reversal enzymes, as well as the development of chromosomal expression systems for the independent control of pathway enzymes, enabled the generation of C6-C10 carboxylic acids and provided a platform for vector based independent expression of ω-functionalization enzymes. Using this approach, the expression of the Pseudomonas putida alkane monooxygenase system, encoded by alkBGT, in combination with all β-oxidation reversal enzymes resulted in the production of 6-hydroxyhexanoic acid, 8-hydroxyoctanoic acid, and 10-hydroxydecanoic acid. Following identification and characterization of potential alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases, chnD and chnE from Acinetobacter sp. strain SE19 were expressed in conjunction with alkBGT to demonstrate the synthesis of the C6-C10 dicarboxylic acids, adipic acid, suberic acid, and sebacic acid. The potential of a β-oxidation cycle with ω-oxidation termination pathways was further demonstrated through the production of greater than 0.8 g/L C6-C10 ω-hydroxyacids or about 0.5 g/L dicarboxylic acids of the same chain lengths from glycerol (an unrelated carbon source) using minimal media.

  19. The EM Earthquake Precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. B., II; Saxton, P. T.

    2013-12-01

    Many attempts have been made to determine a sound forecasting method regarding earthquakes and warn the public in turn. Presently, the animal kingdom leads the precursor list alluding to a transmission related source. By applying the animal-based model to an electromagnetic (EM) wave model, various hypotheses were formed, but the most interesting one required the use of a magnetometer with a differing design and geometry. To date, numerous, high-end magnetometers have been in use in close proximity to fault zones for potential earthquake forecasting; however, something is still amiss. The problem still resides with what exactly is forecastable and the investigating direction of EM. After the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake, American earthquake investigators predetermined magnetometer use and a minimum earthquake magnitude necessary for EM detection. This action was set in motion, due to the extensive damage incurred and public outrage concerning earthquake forecasting; however, the magnetometers employed, grounded or buried, are completely subject to static and electric fields and have yet to correlate to an identifiable precursor. Secondly, there is neither a networked array for finding any epicentral locations, nor have there been any attempts to find even one. This methodology needs dismissal, because it is overly complicated, subject to continuous change, and provides no response time. As for the minimum magnitude threshold, which was set at M5, this is simply higher than what modern technological advances have gained. Detection can now be achieved at approximately M1, which greatly improves forecasting chances. A propagating precursor has now been detected in both the field and laboratory. Field antenna testing conducted outside the NE Texas town of Timpson in February, 2013, detected three strong EM sources along with numerous weaker signals. The antenna had mobility, and observations were noted for recurrence, duration, and frequency response. Next, two

  20. Regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis in plants: evidence for a key role of hydroxymethylbutenyl diphosphate reductase in controlling the supply of plastidial isoprenoid precursors.

    PubMed

    Botella-Pavía, Patricia; Besumbes, Oscar; Phillips, Michael A; Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; Boronat, Albert; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2004-10-01

    Carotenoids are isoprenoid pigments that function as photoprotectors, precursors of the hormone abscisic acid (ABA), colorants and nutraceuticals. A major problem for the metabolic engineering of high carotenoid levels in plants is the limited supply of their isoprenoid precursor geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP), formed by condensation of isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) units usually synthesized by the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway in plastids. Our earlier work with three of the seven MEP pathway enzymes suggested that the first reaction of the pathway catalyzed by deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) is limiting for carotenoid biosynthesis during tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruit ripening. Here we investigate the contribution of the enzyme hydroxymethylbutenyl diphosphate reductase (HDR), which simultaneously synthesizes IPP and DMAPP in the last step of the pathway. A strong upregulation of HDR gene expression was observed in correlation with carotenoid production during both tomato fruit ripening and Arabidopsis thaliana seedling deetiolation. Constitutive overexpression of the tomato cDNA encoding HDR in Arabidopsis did not increase carotenoid levels in etioplasts. By contrast, light-grown transgenic plants showed higher carotenoid levels and an enhanced seed dormancy phenotype suggestive of increased ABA levels. The analysis of double transgenic Arabidopsis plants overproducing both the enzyme taxadiene synthase (which catalyzes the production of the non-native isoprenoid taxadiene from GGPP) and either HDR or DXS showed a twofold stronger effect of HDR in increasing taxadiene levels. Together, the data support a major role for HDR in controlling the production of MEP-derived precursors for plastid isoprenoid biosynthesis.

  1. Distributing a metabolic pathway among a microbial consortium enhances production of natural products

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kang; Qiao, Kangjian; Edgar, Steven; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic engineering of microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce high-value natural metabolites is often done through functional reconstitution of long metabolic pathways. Problems arise when parts of pathways require specialized environments or compartments for optimal function. Here we solve this problem through co-culture of engineered organisms, each of which contains the part of the pathway that it is best suited to hosting. In one example, we divided the synthetic pathway for the acetylated diol paclitaxel precursor into two modules, expressed in either S. cerevisiae or E. coli, neither of which can produce the paclitaxel precursor on their own. Stable co-culture in the same bioreactor was achieved by designing a mutualistic relationship between the two species in which a metabolic intermediate produced by E. coli was used and functionalized by yeast. This synthetic consortium produced 33 mg/L oxygenated taxanes, including a monoacetylated dioxygenated taxane. The same method was also used to produce tanshinone precursors and functionalized sesquiterpenes. PMID:25558867

  2. Enhancing a Pathway-Genome Database (PGDB) to Capture Subcellular Localization of Metabolites and Enzymes: The Nucleotide-Sugar Biosynthetic Pathways of Populus trichocarpa

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, A.; Karpinets, T. V.; Chang, C. H.; Bar-Peled, M.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how cellular metabolism works and is regulated requires that the underlying biochemical pathways be adequately represented and integrated with large metabolomic data sets to establish a robust network model. Genetically engineering energy crops to be less recalcitrant to saccharification requires detailed knowledge of plant polysaccharide structures and a thorough understanding of the metabolic pathways involved in forming and regulating cell-wall synthesis. Nucleotide-sugars are building blocks for synthesis of cell wall polysaccharides. The biosynthesis of nucleotide-sugars is catalyzed by a multitude of enzymes that reside in different subcellular organelles, and precise representation of these pathways requires accurate capture of this biological compartmentalization. The lack of simple localization cues in genomic sequence data and annotations however leads to missing compartmentalization information for eukaryotes in automatically generated databases, such as the Pathway-Genome Databases (PGDBs) of the SRI Pathway Tools software that drives much biochemical knowledge representation on the internet. In this report, we provide an informal mechanism using the existing Pathway Tools framework to integrate protein and metabolite sub-cellular localization data with the existing representation of the nucleotide-sugar metabolic pathways in a prototype PGDB for Populus trichocarpa. The enhanced pathway representations have been successfully used to map SNP abundance data to individual nucleotide-sugar biosynthetic genes in the PGDB. The manually curated pathway representations are more conducive to the construction of a computational platform that will allow the simulation of natural and engineered nucleotide-sugar precursor fluxes into specific recalcitrant polysaccharide(s).

  3. Improved Wood Properties Through Genetic Manipulation: Engineering of Syringyl Lignin in Softwood Species Through Xylem-Specific Expression of Hardwood Syringyl Monolignol Pathway Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrashekhar P. Joshi; Vincent L. Chiang

    2009-01-29

    Project Objective: Our long-term goal is to genetically engineer higher value raw materials with desirable wood properties to promote energy efficiency, international competitiveness, and environmental responsiveness of the U.S. forest products industry. The immediate goal of this project was to produce the first higher value softwood raw materials engineered with a wide range of syringyl lignin quantities. Summary: The most important wood property affecting directly the levels of energy, chemical and bleaching requirements for kraft pulp production is lignin. Softwoods contain almost exclusively chemically resistant guaiacyl (G) lignin, whereas hardwoods have more reactive or easily degradable lignins of the guaiacyl (G)-syringyl (S) type. It is also well established that the reactive S lignin component is the key factor that permits much lower effective alkali and temperature, shorter pulping time and less bleaching stages for processing hardwoods than for softwoods. Furthermore, our pulping kinetic study explicitly demonstrated that every increase in one unit of the lignin S/G ratio would roughly double the rate of lignin removal. These are clear evidence that softwoods genetically engineered with S lignin are keys to revolutionizing the energy efficiency and enhancing the environmental performance of this industry. Softwoods and hardwoods share the same genetic mechanisms for the biosynthesis of G lignin. However, in hardwoods, three additional genes branch out from the G-lignin pathway and become specifically engaged in regulating S lignin biosynthesis. In this research, we simultaneously transferred aspen S-specific genes into a model softwood, black spruce, to engineer S lignin.

  4. Metabolism of chlorofluorocarbons and polybrominated compounds by Pseudomonas putida G786(pHG-2) via an engineered metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hur, H G; Sadowsky, M J; Wackett, L P

    1994-11-01

    The recombinant bacterium Pseudomonas putida G786(pHG-2) metabolizes pentachloroethane to glyoxylate and carbon dioxide, using cytochrome P-450CAM and toluene dioxygenase to catalyze consecutive reductive and oxidative dehalogenation reactions (L.P. Wackett, M.J. Sadowsky, L.N. Newman, H.-G. Hur, and S. Li, Nature [London] 368:627-629, 1994). The present study investigated metabolism of brominated and chlorofluorocarbon compounds by the recombinant strain. Under anaerobic conditions, P. putida G786(pHG-2) reduced 1,1,2,2-tetrabromoethane, 1,2-dibromo-1,2-dichloroethane, and 1,1,1,2-tetrachloro-2,2-difluoroethane to products bearing fewer halogen substituents. Under aerobic conditions, P. putida G786(pHG-2) oxidized cis- and trans-1,2-dibromoethenes, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-difluoroethene, and 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethene. Several compounds were metabolized by sequential reductive and oxidative reactions via the constructed metabolic pathway. For example, 1,1,2,2-tetrabromoethane was reduced by cytochrome P-450CAM to 1,2-dibromoethenes, which were subsequently oxidized by toluene dioxygenase. The same pathway metabolized 1,1,1,2-tetrachloro-2,2-difluoroethane to oxalic acid as one of the final products. The results obtained in this study indicate that P. putida G786(pHG-2) metabolizes polyfluorinated, chlorinated, and brominated compounds and further demonstrates the value of using a knowledge of catabolic enzymes and recombinant DNA technology to construct useful metabolic pathways.

  5. Subsurface Pathway Flow and Transport Modeling for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area

    SciTech Connect

    Magnuson, Swen O

    2002-08-01

    Migration of contaminants through the complex subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area was simulated for an ongoing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability (CERCLA) assessment. A previously existing model for simulating flow and transport through the vadose zone for this site was updated to incorporate information obtained from recent characterization activities. Given the complexity of the subsurface at this site, the simulation results were acknowledged to be uncertain. Rather than attempt parametric approaches to quantify uncertainty, it was recognized that conceptual uncertainty involving the controlling processes was likely dominant. So, the effort focused on modeling different scenarios to evaluate the impact of the conceptual uncertainty.

  6. Subsurface Pathway Flow and Transport Modeling for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area

    SciTech Connect

    Magnuson, S.O.

    2002-05-10

    Migration of contaminants through the complex subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area was simulated for an ongoing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability (CERCLA) assessment. A previously existing model for simulating flow and transport through the vadose zone for this site was updated to incorporate information obtained from recent characterization activities. Given the complexity of the subsurface at this site, the simulation results were acknowledged to be uncertain. Rather than attempt parametric approaches to quantify uncertainty, it was recognized that conceptual uncertainty involving the controlling processes was likely dominant. So, the effort focused on modeling different scenarios to evaluate the impact of the conceptual uncertainty.

  7. Metabolic Engineering of a Glycerol-Oxidative Pathway in Lactobacillus panis PM1 for Utilization of Bioethanol Thin Stillage: Potential To Produce Platform Chemicals from Glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae Sun; Korber, Darren R.

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus panis PM1 has the ability to produce 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) from thin stillage (TS), which is the major waste material after bioethanol production, and is therefore of significance. However, the fact that L. panis PM1 cannot use glycerol as a sole carbon source presents a considerable problem in terms of utilization of this strain in a wide range of industrial applications. Accordingly, L. panis PM1 was genetically engineered to directly utilize TS as a fermentable substrate for the production of valuable platform chemicals without the need for exogenous nutrient supplementation (e.g., sugars and nitrogen sources). An artificial glycerol-oxidative pathway, comprised of glycerol facilitator, glycerol kinase, glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, triosephosphate isomerase, and NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase genes of Escherichia coli, was introduced into L. panis PM1 in order to directly utilize glycerol for the production of energy for growth and value-added chemicals. A pH 6.5 culture converted glycerol to mainly lactic acid (85.43 mM), whereas a significant amount of 1,3-propanediol (59.96 mM) was formed at pH 7.5. Regardless of the pH, ethanol (82.16 to 83.22 mM) was produced from TS fermentations, confirming that the artificial pathway metabolized glycerol for energy production and converted it into lactic acid or 1,3-PDO and ethanol in a pH-dependent manner. This study demonstrates the cost-effective conversion of TS to value-added chemicals by the engineered PM1 strain cultured under industrial conditions. Thus, application of this strain or these research findings can contribute to reduced costs of bioethanol production. PMID:25281374

  8. Assimilation of NAD(+) precursors in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Ma, Biao; Pan, Shih-Jung; Zupancic, Margaret L; Cormack, Brendan P

    2007-10-01

    The yeast pathogen Candida glabrata is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) auxotroph and its growth depends on the environmental supply of vitamin precursors of NAD(+). C. glabrata salvage pathways defined in this article allow NAD(+) to be synthesized from three compounds - nicotinic acid (NA), nicotinamide (NAM) and nicotinamide riboside (NR). NA is salvaged through a functional Preiss-Handler pathway. NAM is first converted to NA by nicotinamidase and then salvaged by the Preiss-Handler pathway. Salvage of NR in C. glabrata occurs via two routes. The first, in which NR is phosphorylated by the NR kinase Nrk1, is independent of the Preiss-Handler pathway. The second is a novel pathway in which NR is degraded by the nucleosidases Pnp1 and Urh1, with a minor role for Meu1, and ultimately converted to NAD(+) via the nicotinamidase Pnc1 and the Preiss-Handler pathway. Using C. glabrata mutants whose growth depends exclusively on the external NA or NR supply, we also show that C. glabrata utilizes NR and to a lesser extent NA as NAD(+) sources during disseminated infection. PMID:17725566

  9. Precursors of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, David G; Cheng, Liang

    2012-01-01

    High-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) is the only accepted precursor of prostatic adenocarcinoma, according to numerous studies of animal models and man; other proposed precursors include atrophy and malignancy-associated changes (with no morphologic changes). PIN is characterized by progressive abnormalities of phenotype and genotype that are intermediate between benign prostatic epithelium and cancer, indicating impairment of cell differentiation and regulatory control with advancing stages of prostatic carcinogenesis. The only method of detection of PIN is biopsy because it does not significantly elevate serum prostate-specific antigen concentration and cannot be detected by ultrasonography. The mean incidence of PIN in biopsies is 9% (range, 4%-16%), representing about 115,000 new cases of isolated PIN diagnosed each year in the United States. The clinical importance of PIN is its high predictive value as a marker for adenocarcinoma, and its identification warrants repeat biopsy for concurrent or subsequent carcinoma, especially when multifocal or observed in association with atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP). Carcinoma develops in most patients with PIN within 10 years. Androgen deprivation therapy and radiation therapy decrease the prevalence and extent of PIN, suggesting that these forms of treatment may play a role in prevention of subsequent cancer. Multiple clinical trials to date of men with PIN have had modest success in delaying or preventing subsequent cancer. PMID:22212075

  10. Precursors and pathogenesis of ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lim, D; Oliva, E

    2013-04-01

    The ultimate goal of defining cancer specific precursors is to facilitate early detection and intervention before the development of invasive malignancy. Unlike other malignancies involving the female genital tract such as cervical or endometrial carcinomas, precursor lesions of ovarian carcinomas have not been well characterised, resulting in a failure to develop effective screening programs. Recent clinicopathological and molecular studies have provided new insight into the origin and pathogenesis of ovarian carcinomas. It has been shown that ovarian cancer is comprised of different tumour types differing not only in morphology, but also in pathogenesis, molecular alterations and clinical progression. A dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis has been proposed. Type I tumours which include low grade serous, low grade endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous carcinomas and Brenner tumours, are generally indolent and tend to be genetically stable, although clear cell carcinoma would probably belong to an intermediate category. They demonstrate a step-wise progression from a benign precursor such as a benign to borderline tumour or endometriosis and are characterised by genetic aberrations targeting specific cell signalling pathways. Type II tumours comprise high grade serous, high grade endometrioid, and undifferentiated carcinomas as well as malignant mixed mesodermal tumours. They are clinically aggressive and exhibit high genetic instability with frequent p53 mutations. Mounting evidence suggests that many high grade serous carcinomas originate from the epithelium of the distal fallopian tube, and that serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) represents the putative precursor of these neoplasms. Low grade serous carcinomas arise via transformation of benign and borderline serous tumours, thought to be derived from inclusion cysts originating from the ovarian surface or tubal epithelium. Recently it has been suggested that papillary tubal hyperplasia may be a

  11. Enhanced levels of S-linalool by metabolic engineering of the terpenoid pathway in spike lavender leaves.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Poudereux, Isabel; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Navarro, Alicia; Arrillaga, Isabel; Segura, Juan

    2014-05-01

    Transgenic Lavandula latifolia plants overexpressing the linalool synthase (LIS) gene from Clarkia breweri, encoding the LIS enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of linalool were generated. Most of these plants increased significantly their linalool content as compared to controls, especially in the youngest leaves, where a linalool increase up to a 1000% was observed. The phenotype of increased linalool content observed in young leaves was maintained in those T1 progenies that inherit the LIS transgene, although this phenotype was less evident in the flower essential oil. Cross-pollination of transgenic spike lavender plants allowed the generation of double transgenic plants containing the DXS (1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-P synthase), coding for the first enzyme of the methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway, and LIS genes. Both essential oil yield and linalool content in double DXS-LIS transgenic plants were lower than that of their parentals, which could be due to co-suppression effects linked to the structures of the constructs used.

  12. Metabolic engineering of E.coli for the production of a precursor to artemisinin, an anti-malarial drug [Chapter 25 in Manual of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology, 3rd edition

    SciTech Connect

    Petzold, Christopher; Keasling, Jay

    2011-07-18

    This document is Chapter 25 in the Manual of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology, 3rd edition. Topics covered include: Incorporation of Amorpha-4,11-Diene Biosynthetic Pathway into E. coli; Amorpha-4,11-Diene Pathway Optimization; "-Omics" Analyses for Increased Amorpha-4,11-Diene Production; Biosynthetic Oxidation of Amorpha-4,11-Diene.

  13. Apicoplast isoprenoid precursor synthesis and the molecular basis of fosmidomycin resistance in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Sethu C.; Brooks, Carrie F.; Goodman, Christopher D.; Strurm, Angelika; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Sundriyal, Sandeep; Anglin, Justin L.; Song, Yongcheng; Moreno, Silvia N.J.

    2011-01-01

    Apicomplexa are important pathogens that include the causative agents of malaria, toxoplasmosis, and cryptosporidiosis. Apicomplexan parasites contain a relict chloroplast, the apicoplast. The apicoplast is indispensable and an attractive drug target. The apicoplast is home to a 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate (DOXP) pathway for the synthesis of isoprenoid precursors. This pathway is believed to be the most conserved function of the apicoplast, and fosmidomycin, a specific inhibitor of the pathway, is an effective antimalarial. Surprisingly, fosmidomycin has no effect on most other apicomplexans. Using Toxoplasma gondii, we establish that the pathway is essential in parasites that are highly fosmidomycin resistant. We define the molecular basis of resistance and susceptibility, experimentally testing various host and parasite contributions in T. gondii and Plasmodium. We demonstrate that in T. gondii the parasite plasma membrane is a critical barrier to drug uptake. In strong support of this hypothesis, we engineer de novo drug-sensitive T. gondii parasites by heterologous expression of a bacterial transporter protein. Mice infected with these transgenic parasites can now be cured from a lethal challenge with fosmidomycin. We propose that the varied extent of metabolite exchange between host and parasite is a crucial determinator of drug susceptibility and a predictor of future resistance. PMID:21690250

  14. An interstellar precursor mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.; Ivie, C.; Lewis, J. C.; Lipes, R. G.; Norton, H. N.; Stearns, J. W.; Stimpson, L.; Weissman, P.

    1977-01-01

    A mission out of the planetary system, with launch about the year 2000, could provide valuable scientific data as well as test some of the technology for a later mission to another star. Primary scientific objectives for the precursor mission concern characteristics of the heliopause, the interstellar medium, stellar distances (by parallax measurements), low energy cosmic rays, interplanetary gas distribution, and mass of the solar system. Secondary objectives include investigation of Pluto. Candidate science instruments are suggested. Individual spacecraft systems for the mission were considered, technology requirements and problem areas noted, and a number of recommendations made for technology study and advanced development. The most critical technology needs include attainment of 50-yr spacecraft lifetime and development of a long-life NEP system.

  15. Identified EM Earthquake Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kenneth, II; Saxton, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Many attempts have been made to determine a sound forecasting method regarding earthquakes and warn the public in turn. Presently, the animal kingdom leads the precursor list alluding to a transmission related source. By applying the animal-based model to an electromagnetic (EM) wave model, various hypotheses were formed, but the most interesting one required the use of a magnetometer with a differing design and geometry. To date, numerous, high-end magnetometers have been in use in close proximity to fault zones for potential earthquake forecasting; however, something is still amiss. The problem still resides with what exactly is forecastable and the investigating direction of EM. After a number of custom rock experiments, two hypotheses were formed which could answer the EM wave model. The first hypothesis concerned a sufficient and continuous electron movement either by surface or penetrative flow, and the second regarded a novel approach to radio transmission. Electron flow along fracture surfaces was determined to be inadequate in creating strong EM fields, because rock has a very high electrical resistance making it a high quality insulator. Penetrative flow could not be corroborated as well, because it was discovered that rock was absorbing and confining electrons to a very thin skin depth. Radio wave transmission and detection worked with every single test administered. This hypothesis was reviewed for propagating, long-wave generation with sufficient amplitude, and the capability of penetrating solid rock. Additionally, fracture spaces, either air or ion-filled, can facilitate this concept from great depths and allow for surficial detection. A few propagating precursor signals have been detected in the field occurring with associated phases using custom-built loop antennae. Field testing was conducted in Southern California from 2006-2011, and outside the NE Texas town of Timpson in February, 2013. The antennae have mobility and observations were noted for

  16. Nanoscale Mo- MoO3 Entrapped in Engineering Thermoplastic: Inorganic Pathway to Bactericidal and Fungicidal Action.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Nilam; Chaudhari, Ravindra; Mane, Pramod; Shinde, Manish; Jadakar, Sandesh; Rane, Sunit; Kale, Bharat; Bhalerao, Anand; Amalnerkar, Dinesh

    2016-04-01

    In our contemporary endeavor, metallic molybdenum (Mo) and semiconducting molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) nanostructures have been simultaneously generated via solid state reaction between molybdenum (III) chloride (MoCl3) and polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) at 285 (°)C in unimolar ratio for different time durations, namely, 6 h, 24 h, and 48 h. The resultant nanocomposites (NCs) revealed formation of predominantly metallic Mo for all the samples. However, MoO3 gradually gained prominent position as secondary phase with rise in reaction time. The present study was intended to investigate the antibacterial potential of metal-metal oxide-polymer NCs, i.e., Mo- MoO3-PPS against microorganisms, viz., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Aspergillus fumigatus. The antibacterial activity of the NCs was evaluated by agar well diffusion investigation. Maximum sensitivity concentrations of NCs were determined by finding out minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration (MBC/MFC). Moreover, the NCs prepared at reaction time of 48 h exhibited best MBC values and were tested with time kill assay which revealed that the growth of S. aureus was substantially inhibited by Mo- MoO3-PPS NCs. This synchronized formation of Mo- MoO3 nanostructures in an engineering thermoplastic may have potential antimicrobial applications in biomedical devices and components. Prima facie results on antifungal activity are indicative of the fact that these materials can show anti-cancer behavior. PMID:27164597

  17. Generation of Nonlinear Vortex Precursors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue-Yue; Feng, Xun-Li; Liu, Chengpu

    2016-07-01

    We numerically study the propagation of a few-cycle pulse carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) through a dense atomic system. Nonlinear precursors consisting of high-order vortex harmonics are generated in the transmitted field due to carrier effects associated with ultrafast Bloch oscillation. The nonlinear precursors survive to propagation effects and are well separated with the main pulse, which provides a straightforward way to measure precursors. By virtue of carrying high-order OAM, the obtained vortex precursors as information carriers have potential applications in optical information and communication fields where controllable loss, large information-carrying capacity, and high speed communication are required.

  18. Generation of Nonlinear Vortex Precursors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue-Yue; Feng, Xun-Li; Liu, Chengpu

    2016-07-01

    We numerically study the propagation of a few-cycle pulse carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) through a dense atomic system. Nonlinear precursors consisting of high-order vortex harmonics are generated in the transmitted field due to carrier effects associated with ultrafast Bloch oscillation. The nonlinear precursors survive to propagation effects and are well separated with the main pulse, which provides a straightforward way to measure precursors. By virtue of carrying high-order OAM, the obtained vortex precursors as information carriers have potential applications in optical information and communication fields where controllable loss, large information-carrying capacity, and high speed communication are required. PMID:27447507

  19. Generation, Release, and Uptake of the NAD Precursor Nicotinic Acid Riboside by Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, Veronika; Shabalin, Konstantin; Nerinovski, Kirill; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Yakimov, Alexander; Redpath, Philip; Khodorkovskiy, Mikhail; Migaud, Marie E; Ziegler, Mathias; Nikiforov, Andrey

    2015-11-01

    NAD is essential for cellular metabolism and has a key role in various signaling pathways in human cells. To ensure proper control of vital reactions, NAD must be permanently resynthesized. Nicotinamide and nicotinic acid as well as nicotinamide riboside (NR) and nicotinic acid riboside (NAR) are the major precursors for NAD biosynthesis in humans. In this study, we explored whether the ribosides NR and NAR can be generated in human cells. We demonstrate that purified, recombinant human cytosolic 5'-nucleotidases (5'-NTs) CN-II and CN-III, but not CN-IA, can dephosphorylate the mononucleotides nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NAMN) and thus catalyze NR and NAR formation in vitro. Similar to their counterpart from yeast, Sdt1, the human 5'-NTs require high (millimolar) concentrations of nicotinamide mononucleotide or NAMN for efficient catalysis. Overexpression of FLAG-tagged CN-II and CN-III in HEK293 and HepG2 cells resulted in the formation and release of NAR. However, NAR accumulation in the culture medium of these cells was only detectable under conditions that led to increased NAMN production from nicotinic acid. The amount of NAR released from cells engineered for increased NAMN production was sufficient to maintain viability of surrounding cells unable to use any other NAD precursor. Moreover, we found that untransfected HeLa cells produce and release sufficient amounts of NAR and NR under normal culture conditions. Collectively, our results indicate that cytosolic 5'-NTs participate in the conversion of NAD precursors and establish NR and NAR as integral constituents of human NAD metabolism. In addition, they point to the possibility that different cell types might facilitate each other's NAD supply by providing alternative precursors. PMID:26385918

  20. An engineered pathway for glyoxylate metabolism in tobacco plants aimed to avoid the release of ammonia in photorespiration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The photorespiratory nitrogen cycle in C3 plants involves an extensive diversion of carbon and nitrogen away from the direct pathways of assimilation. The liberated ammonia is re-assimilated, but up to 25% of the carbon may be released into the atmosphere as CO2. Because of the loss of CO2 and high energy costs, there has been considerable interest in attempts to decrease the flux through the cycle in C3 plants. Transgenic tobacco plants were generated that contained the genes gcl and hyi from E. coli encoding glyoxylate carboligase (EC 4.1.1.47) and hydroxypyruvate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.22) respectively, targeted to the peroxisomes. It was presumed that the two enzymes could work together and compete with the aminotransferases that convert glyoxylate to glycine, thus avoiding ammonia production in the photorespiratory nitrogen cycle. Results When grown in ambient air, but not in elevated CO2, the transgenic tobacco lines had a distinctive phenotype of necrotic lesions on the leaves. Three of the six lines chosen for a detailed study contained single copies of the gcl gene, two contained single copies of both the gcl and hyi genes and one line contained multiple copies of both gcl and hyi genes. The gcl protein was detected in the five transgenic lines containing single copies of the gcl gene but hyi protein was not detected in any of the transgenic lines. The content of soluble amino acids including glycine and serine, was generally increased in the transgenic lines growing in air, when compared to the wild type. The content of soluble sugars, glucose, fructose and sucrose in the shoot was decreased in transgenic lines growing in air, consistent with decreased carbon assimilation. Conclusions Tobacco plants have been generated that produce bacterial glyoxylate carboligase but not hydroxypyruvate isomerase. The transgenic plants exhibit a stress response when exposed to air, suggesting that some glyoxylate is diverted away from conversion to glycine in a

  1. Enhancing Biosynthesis of a Ginsenoside Precursor by Self-Assembly of Two Key Enzymes in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengcheng; Gao, Xin; Liu, Xinbin; Wang, Yong; Yang, Shengli; Wang, Fengqing; Ren, Yuhong

    2016-05-01

    Ginsenosides from the edible and medicinal plant ginseng have demonstrated various pharmacological activities. However, producing ginsenoside efficiently remains a challenge. Engineering metabolic pathways through protein assembly in yeast is a promising way for ginsenoside production. In the biosynthetic pathway of ginsenosides, dammarenediol-II synthase and squalene epoxidase are two key enzymes that determine the production rate of the dammarane-type ginsenoside precursor dammarenediol-II. In this work, a strategy to enhance the biosynthesis of dammarenediol-II in Pichia pastoris was developed by the self-assembly of the two key enzymes via protein-protein interaction. After being modified by interacting proteins, the two enzymes were successfully co-localized, resulting in a 2.1-fold enhancement in dammarenediol-II yields. PMID:27074597

  2. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of butanol isomers.

    PubMed

    Generoso, Wesley Cardoso; Schadeweg, Virginia; Oreb, Mislav; Boles, Eckhard

    2015-06-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has decisive advantages in industrial processes due to its tolerance to alcohols and fermentation conditions. Butanol isomers are considered as suitable fuel substitutes and valuable biomass-derived chemical building blocks. Whereas high production was achieved with bacterial systems, metabolic engineering of yeast for butanol production is in the beginning. For isobutanol synthesis, combination of valine biosynthesis and degradation, and complete pathway re-localisation into cytosol or mitochondria gave promising results. However, competing pathways, co-factor imbalances and FeS cluster assembly are still major issues. 1-Butanol production via the Clostridium pathway seems to be limited by cytosolic acetyl-CoA, its central precursor. Endogenous 1-butanol pathways have been discovered via threonine or glycine catabolism. 2-Butanol production was established but was limited by B12-dependence.

  3. An interstellar precursor mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.; Ivie, C.; Lewis, J. C.; Lipes, R.; Norton, H. N.; Stearns, J. W.; Stimpson, L. D.; Weissman, P.

    1980-01-01

    A mission out of the planetary system, launched about the year 2000, could provide valuable scientific data as well as test some of the technology for a later mission to another star. Primary scientific objectives for the precursor mission concern characteristics of the heliopause, the interstellar medium, stellar distances (by parallax measurements), low-energy cosmic rays, interplanetary gas distribution, and the mass of the solar system. Secondary objectives include investigation of Pluto. The mission should extend to 400-1000 AU from the sun. A heliocentric hyperbolic escape velocity of 50-100 km/sec or more is needed to attain this distance within a reasonable mission duration (20-50 years). The trajectory should be toward the incoming interstellar gas. For a year 2000 launch, a Pluto encounter and orbiter can be included. A second mission targeted parallel to the solar axis would also be worthwhile. The mission duration is 20 years, with an extended mission to a total of 50 years. A system using one or two stages of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) was selected as a possible baseline. The most promising alternatives are ultralight solar sails or laser sailing, with the lasers in earth orbit, for example. The NEP baseline design allows the option of carrying a Pluto orbiter as a daughter spacecraft.

  4. Metabolic engineering of an ATP-neutral Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum: growth restoration by an adaptive point mutation in NADH dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Komati Reddy, Gajendar; Lindner, Steffen N; Wendisch, Volker F

    2015-03-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum uses the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway of glycolysis and gains 2 mol of ATP per mol of glucose by substrate-level phosphorylation (SLP). To engineer glycolysis without net ATP formation by SLP, endogenous phosphorylating NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was replaced by nonphosphorylating NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapN) from Clostridium acetobutylicum, which irreversibly converts glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) to 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PG) without generating ATP. As shown recently (S. Takeno, R. Murata, R. Kobayashi, S. Mitsuhashi, and M. Ikeda, Appl Environ Microbiol 76:7154-7160, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.01464-10), this ATP-neutral, NADPH-generating glycolytic pathway did not allow for the growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum with glucose as the sole carbon source unless hitherto unknown suppressor mutations occurred; however, these mutations were not disclosed. In the present study, a suppressor mutation was identified, and it was shown that heterologous expression of udhA encoding soluble transhydrogenase from Escherichia coli partly restored growth, suggesting that growth was inhibited by NADPH accumulation. Moreover, genome sequence analysis of second-site suppressor mutants that were able to grow faster with glucose revealed a single point mutation in the gene of non-proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDH-II) leading to the amino acid change D213G, which was shared by these suppressor mutants. Since related NDH-II enzymes accepting NADPH as the substrate possess asparagine or glutamine residues at this position, D213G, D213N, and D213Q variants of C. glutamicum NDH-II were constructed and were shown to oxidize NADPH in addition to NADH. Taking these findings together, ATP-neutral glycolysis by the replacement of endogenous NAD-dependent GAPDH with NADP-dependent GapN became possible via oxidation of NADPH formed in this pathway by mutant NADPH

  5. Metabolic Engineering of Light and Dark Biochemical Pathways in Wild-Type and Mutant Strains of Synechocystis PCC 6803 for Maximal, 24-Hour Production of Hydrogen Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, Roger L.; Chaplen, Frank W.R.

    2014-03-11

    This project used the cyanobacterial species Synechocystis PCC 6803 to pursue two lines of inquiry, with each line addressing one of the two main factors affecting hydrogen (H2) production in Synechocystis PCC 6803: NADPH availability and O2 sensitivity. H2 production in Synechocystis PCC 6803 requires a very high NADPH:NADP+ ratio, that is, the NADP pool must be highly reduced, which can be problematic because several metabolic pathways potentially can act to raise or lower NADPH levels. Also, though the [NiFe]-hydrogenase in PCC 6803 is constitutively expressed, it is reversibly inactivated at very low O2 concentrations. Largely because of this O2 sensitivity and the requirement for high NADPH levels, a major portion of overall H2 production occurs under anoxic conditions in the dark, supported by breakdown of glycogen or other organic substrates accumulated during photosynthesis. Also, other factors, such as N or S limitation, pH changes, presence of other substances, or deletion of particular respiratory components, can affect light or dark H2 production. Therefore, in the first line of inquiry, under a number of culture conditions with wild type (WT) Synechocystis PCC 6803 cells and a mutant with impaired type I NADPH-dehydrogenase (NDH-1) function, we used H2 production profiling and metabolic flux analysis, with and without specific inhibitors, to examine systematically the pathways involved in light and dark H2 production. Results from this work provided rational bases for metabolic engineering to maximize photobiological H2 production on a 24-hour basis. In the second line of inquiry, we used site-directed mutagenesis to create mutants with hydrogenase enzymes exhibiting greater O2 tolerance. The research addressed the following four tasks: 1. Evaluate the effects of various culture conditions (N, S, or P limitation; light/dark; pH; exogenous organic carbon) on H2 production profiles of WT cells and an NDH-1 mutant; 2. Conduct metabolic flux analyses for

  6. Precursor-directed biosynthesis of novel triketide lactones.

    PubMed

    Regentin, Rika; Kennedy, Jonathan; Wu, Nicholas; Carney, John R; Licari, Peter; Galazzo, Jorge; Desai, Ruchir

    2004-01-01

    Precursor-directed biosynthesis was used to produce different triketide lactones (R-TKLs) in a fermentation process. Plasmids expressing engineered versions of the first subunit of 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase (DEBS1) fused to the terminal DEBS thioesterase (TE) were introduced into three different Streptomyces strains. The DEBS1 protein fused to TE had either an inactivated ketosynthase domain (KS1 degrees ) or a partial DEBS1 lacking module 1 but containing module 2 (M2+TE). Different synthetic precursors were examined for their effect on R-TKL production. An overproducing strain of S. coelicolor expressing the M2+TE protein was found to be best for production of R-TKLs. Racemic precursors were as effective as enantiomerically pure precursors in the fermentation process. The R group on the precursor significantly affected titer (propyl > chloromethyl > vinyl). The R-TKLs were unstable in fermentation broth at pH 6-8. A two-phase fermentation with a pH shift was implemented to stabilize the products. The fermentation pH initially was controlled at optimal values for cell growth (pH 6.5) and then shifted to 5.5 during production. This doubled peak titers and stabilized the product. Finally, the concentration of synthetic precursor in the fermentation was optimized to improve production. A maximum titer of 500 mg/L 5-chloromethyl-TKL was obtained using 3.5 g/L precursor. PMID:14763833

  7. PRECURSOR FLARES IN OJ 287

    SciTech Connect

    Pihajoki, P.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpaeae, A.; Takalo, L.; Valtonen, M.; Nilsson, K.; Zola, S.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D.; Liakos, A.; Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W.; Provencal, J.; Santangelo, M. M. M.; Salo, H.; Chandra, S.; Ganesh, S.; Baliyan, K. S.; and others

    2013-02-10

    We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black hole descending toward the accretion disk of the primary black hole from the observed side, with a mean z-component of approximately z{sub c} = 4000 AU. We use this model of precursor flares to predict that precursor flare of similar nature should happen around 2020.96 before the next major outburst in 2022.

  8. Rapid ethanol production at elevated temperatures by engineered thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus via the NADP(H)-preferring xylose reductase-xylitol dehydrogenase pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Dongmei; Gao, Xiaolian; Sun, Lianhong; Hong, Jiong

    2015-09-01

    Conversion of xylose to ethanol by yeasts is a challenge because of the redox imbalances under oxygen-limited conditions. The thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus grows well with xylose as a carbon source at elevated temperatures, but its xylose fermentation ability is weak. In this study, a combination of the NADPH-preferring xylose reductase (XR) from Neurospora crassa and the NADP(+)-preferring xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) mutant from Scheffersomyces stipitis (Pichia stipitis) was constructed. The xylose fermentation ability and redox balance of the recombinant strains were improved significantly by over-expression of several downstream genes. The intracellular concentrations of coenzymes and the reduced coenzyme/oxidized coenzyme ratio increased significantly in these metabolic strains. The byproducts, such as glycerol and acetic acid, were significantly reduced by the disruption of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1). The resulting engineered K. marxianus YZJ088 strain produced 44.95 g/L ethanol from 118.39 g/L xylose with a productivity of 2.49 g/L/h at 42 °C. Additionally, YZJ088 realized glucose and xylose co-fermentation and produced 51.43 g/L ethanol from a mixture of 103.97 g/L xylose and 40.96 g/L glucose with a productivity of 2.14 g/L/h at 42 °C. These promising results validate the YZJ088 strain as an excellent producer of ethanol from xylose through the synthetic xylose assimilation pathway. PMID:26253204

  9. Rapid ethanol production at elevated temperatures by engineered thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus via the NADP(H)-preferring xylose reductase-xylitol dehydrogenase pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Dongmei; Gao, Xiaolian; Sun, Lianhong; Hong, Jiong

    2015-09-01

    Conversion of xylose to ethanol by yeasts is a challenge because of the redox imbalances under oxygen-limited conditions. The thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus grows well with xylose as a carbon source at elevated temperatures, but its xylose fermentation ability is weak. In this study, a combination of the NADPH-preferring xylose reductase (XR) from Neurospora crassa and the NADP(+)-preferring xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) mutant from Scheffersomyces stipitis (Pichia stipitis) was constructed. The xylose fermentation ability and redox balance of the recombinant strains were improved significantly by over-expression of several downstream genes. The intracellular concentrations of coenzymes and the reduced coenzyme/oxidized coenzyme ratio increased significantly in these metabolic strains. The byproducts, such as glycerol and acetic acid, were significantly reduced by the disruption of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1). The resulting engineered K. marxianus YZJ088 strain produced 44.95 g/L ethanol from 118.39 g/L xylose with a productivity of 2.49 g/L/h at 42 °C. Additionally, YZJ088 realized glucose and xylose co-fermentation and produced 51.43 g/L ethanol from a mixture of 103.97 g/L xylose and 40.96 g/L glucose with a productivity of 2.14 g/L/h at 42 °C. These promising results validate the YZJ088 strain as an excellent producer of ethanol from xylose through the synthetic xylose assimilation pathway.

  10. Metabolic engineering of E. coli top 10 for production of vanillin through FA catabolic pathway and bioprocess optimization using RSM.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Debkumar; Gupta, Gaganjot; Kaur, Baljinder

    2016-12-01

    Metabolic engineering and construction of recombinant Escherichia coli strains carrying feruloyl-CoA synthetase and enoyl-CoA hydratase genes for the bioconversion of ferulic acid to vanillin offers an alternative way to produce vanillin. Isolation and designing of fcs and ech genes was carried out using computer assisted protocol and the designed vanillin biosynthetic gene cassette was cloned in pCCIBAC expression vector for introduction in E. coli top 10. Recombinant strain was implemented for the statistical optimization of process parameters influencing F A to vanillin biotransformation. CCD matrix constituted of process variables like FA concentration, time, temperature and biomass with intracellular, extracellular and total vanillin productions as responses. Production was scaled up and 68 mg/L of vanillin was recovered from 10 mg/L of FA using cell extracts from 1 mg biomass within 30 min. Kinetic activity of enzymes were characterized. From LCMS-ESI analysis a metabolic pathway of FA degradation and vanillin production was predicted. PMID:27591788

  11. Metabolic engineering of E. coli top 10 for production of vanillin through FA catabolic pathway and bioprocess optimization using RSM.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Debkumar; Gupta, Gaganjot; Kaur, Baljinder

    2016-12-01

    Metabolic engineering and construction of recombinant Escherichia coli strains carrying feruloyl-CoA synthetase and enoyl-CoA hydratase genes for the bioconversion of ferulic acid to vanillin offers an alternative way to produce vanillin. Isolation and designing of fcs and ech genes was carried out using computer assisted protocol and the designed vanillin biosynthetic gene cassette was cloned in pCCIBAC expression vector for introduction in E. coli top 10. Recombinant strain was implemented for the statistical optimization of process parameters influencing F A to vanillin biotransformation. CCD matrix constituted of process variables like FA concentration, time, temperature and biomass with intracellular, extracellular and total vanillin productions as responses. Production was scaled up and 68 mg/L of vanillin was recovered from 10 mg/L of FA using cell extracts from 1 mg biomass within 30 min. Kinetic activity of enzymes were characterized. From LCMS-ESI analysis a metabolic pathway of FA degradation and vanillin production was predicted.

  12. Metabolic engineering of Pediococcus acidilactici BD16 for production of vanillin through ferulic acid catabolic pathway and process optimization using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Baljinder; Chakraborty, Debkumar; Kumar, Balvir

    2014-10-01

    Occurrence of feruloyl-CoA synthetase (fcs) and enoyl-CoA hydratase (ech) genes responsible for the bioconversion of ferulic acid to vanillin have been reported and characterized from Amycolatopsis sp., Streptomyces sp., and Pseudomonas sp. Attempts have been made to express these genes in Escherichia coli DH5α, E. coli JM109, and Pseudomonas fluorescens. However, none of the lactic acid bacteria strain having GRAS status was previously proposed for heterologous expression of fcs and ech genes for production of vanillin through biotechnological process. Present study reports heterologous expression of vanillin synthetic gene cassette bearing fcs and ech genes in a dairy isolate Pediococcus acidilactici BD16. After metabolic engineering, statistical optimization of process parameters that influence ferulic acid to vanillin biotransformation in the recombinant strain was carried out using central composite design of response surface methodology. After scale-up of the process, 3.14 mM vanillin was recovered from 1.08 mM ferulic acid per milligram of recombinant cell biomass within 20 min of biotransformation. From LCMS-ESI spectral analysis, a metabolic pathway of phenolic biotransformations was predicted in the recombinant P. acidilactici BD16 (fcs (+)/ech (+)).

  13. Volatile science? Metabolic engineering of terpenoids in plants.

    PubMed

    Aharoni, Asaph; Jongsma, Maarten A; Bouwmeester, Harro J

    2005-12-01

    Terpenoids are important for plant survival and also possess biological properties that are beneficial to humans. Here, we describe the state of the art in terpenoid metabolic engineering, showing that significant progress has been made over the past few years. Subcellular targeting of enzymes has demonstrated that terpenoid precursors in subcellular compartments are not as strictly separated as previously thought and that multistep pathway engineering is feasible, even across cell compartments. These engineered plants show that insect behavior is influenced by terpenoids. In the future, we expect rapid progress in the engineering of terpenoid production in plants. In addition to commercial applications, such transgenic plants should increase our understanding of the biological relevance of these volatile secondary metabolites.

  14. An alternative pathway contributes to phenylalanine biosynthesis in plants via a cytosolic tyrosine:phenylpyruvate aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Heejin; Widhalm, Joshua R; Qian, Yichun; Maeda, Hiroshi; Cooper, Bruce R; Jannasch, Amber S; Gonda, Itay; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Rhodes, David; Dudareva, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Phenylalanine is a vital component of proteins in all living organisms, and in plants is a precursor for thousands of additional metabolites. Animals are incapable of synthesizing phenylalanine and must primarily obtain it directly or indirectly from plants. Although plants can synthesize phenylalanine in plastids through arogenate, the contribution of an alternative pathway via phenylpyruvate, as occurs in most microbes, has not been demonstrated. Here we show that plants also utilize a microbial-like phenylpyruvate pathway to produce phenylalanine, and flux through this route is increased when the entry point to the arogenate pathway is limiting. Unexpectedly, we find the plant phenylpyruvate pathway utilizes a cytosolic aminotransferase that links the coordinated catabolism of tyrosine to serve as the amino donor, thus interconnecting the extra-plastidial metabolism of these amino acids. This discovery uncovers another level of complexity in the plant aromatic amino acid regulatory network, unveiling new targets for metabolic engineering.

  15. The potential of the mevalonate pathway for enhanced isoprenoid production.

    PubMed

    Liao, Pan; Hemmerlin, Andréa; Bach, Thomas J; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-01-01

    The cytosol-localised mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway delivers the basic isoprene unit isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). In higher plants, this central metabolic intermediate is also synthesised by the plastid-localised methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. Both MVA and MEP pathways conspire through exchange of intermediates and regulatory interactions. Products downstream of IPP such as phytosterols, carotenoids, vitamin E, artemisinin, tanshinone and paclitaxel demonstrate antioxidant, cholesterol-reducing, anti-ageing, anticancer, antimalarial, anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities. Other isoprenoid precursors including isoprene, isoprenol, geraniol, farnesene and farnesol are economically valuable. An update on the MVA pathway and its interaction with the MEP pathway is presented, including the improvement in the production of phytosterols and other isoprenoid derivatives. Such attempts are for instance based on the bioengineering of microbes such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as plants. The function of relevant genes in the MVA pathway that can be utilised in metabolic engineering is reviewed and future perspectives are presented. PMID:26995109

  16. Pathways to Mathematics: Longitudinal Predictors of Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeFevre, Jo-Anne; Fast, Lisa; Skwarchuk, Sheri-Lynn; Smith-Chant, Brenda L.; Bisanz, Jeffrey; Kamawar, Deepthi; Penner-Wilger, Marcie

    2010-01-01

    A model of the relations among cognitive precursors, early numeracy skill, and mathematical outcomes was tested for 182 children from 4.5 to 7.5 years of age. The model integrates research from neuroimaging, clinical populations, and normal development in children and adults. It includes 3 precursor pathways: quantitative, linguistic, and spatial…

  17. Generation of Vibrationally Excited HCP from a Stable Synthetic Precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Alexander W.; Jiang, Jun; Erickson, Trevor J.; Womack, Carrie; Nava, Matthew; Cummins, Christopher; Field, Robert W.

    2015-06-01

    HCP belongs to a class of reactive small molecules with much interest to spectroscopists. It bears certain similarities to HCN, including a strong {A}(bent) - {X}(linear) ultraviolet transition, associated with the HCP-HPC isomerization pathway. HCP has traditionally been generated by the in situ reaction of PH_3 and acetylene. In this talk, we will discuss a recently developed synthetic precursor molecule, 1,1-((triphenylphosphoranylidene)methyl)-9,10-phosphanoanthracene. At temperatures above 200 degrees Celsius, this precursor is thought to release HCP in a vibrationally excited state. We will present preliminary spectra on this system obtained by LIF and chirped pulse millimeter wave spectroscopy.

  18. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath

    1998-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  19. Biosynthesis of lactate-containing polyesters by metabolically engineered bacteria.

    PubMed

    Park, Si Jae; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Tae Wan; Jung, Yu Kyung; Yang, Taek Ho

    2012-02-01

    Due to increasing concerns about environmental problems, climate change and limited fossil resources, bio-based production of chemicals and polymers is gaining attention as one of the solutions to these problems. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are polyesters that can be produced by microbial fermentation. PHAs are synthesized using monomer precursors provided from diverse metabolic pathways and are accumulated as distinct granules inside the cells. On the other hand, most so-called bio-based polymers including polybutylene succinate, polytrimethylene terephthalate, and polylactic acid (PLA) are synthesized by a chemical process using monomers produced by fermentation. PLA, an attractive biomass-derived plastic, is currently synthesized by heavy metal-catalyzed ring opening polymerization of L-lactide that is made from fermentation-derived L-lactic acid. Recently, a complete biological process for the production of PLA and PLA copolymers from renewable resources has been developed by direct fermentation of recombinant bacteria employing PHA biosynthetic pathways coupled with a novel metabolic pathway. This could be accomplished by establishing a pathway for generating lactyl-CoA and engineering PHA synthase to accept lactyl-CoA as a substrate combined with systems metabolic engineering. In this article, we review recent advances in the production of lactate-containing homo- and co-polyesters. Challenges remaining to efficiently produce PLA and its copolymers and strategies to overcome these challenges through metabolic engineering combined with enzyme engineering are discussed. PMID:22057878

  20. Conceptual Uncertainty and Parameter Sensitivity in Subsurface Pathway Flow and Transport Modeling for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnuson, S. O.

    2002-05-01

    As part of an ongoing CERCLA evaluation, the migration of contaminants through the hydrologically complex subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) were modeled. The 180-meter thick vadose zone beneath the SDA is primarily composed of extrusive basalt flows that are extensively fractured. These flows are interrupted by thin, mostly continuous sedimentary interbeds that were deposited through aeolian and fluvial processes during periods of volcanic quiescence. The subsurface pathway modeling for the CERCLA assessment has been conducted in phases utilizing the results of characterization activities. The most recent model for the SDA used an equivalent porous continuum approach in a three-dimensional domain to represent movement of water and contaminants in the subsurface. Given the complexity of the subsurface at this site, the simulation results were acknowledged to be uncertain. This presentation will provide an overview of the current modeling effort for the SDA and how conceptual uncertainty was addressed by modeling different scenarios. These scenarios included assignment of infiltration boundary conditions, the effect of superimposing gaps in the interbeds, including the effect within the vadose zone from Big Lost River water discharged to the spreading areas approximately 1 km away, and a simplistic approximation to represent facilitated transport. Parametric sensitivity simulations were used to determine possible effects from assigned transport parameters such as partition coefficients and solubility limits that can vary widely with presumed geochemical conditions. Comparisons of simulated transport results to measured field concentrations in both the vadose zone and in the underlying Snake River Plain aquifer were made to determine the representativeness of the model results. Results of the SDA subsurface transport modeling have been used in part to guide additional field characterization

  1. Heterologous production of ribostamycin derivatives in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kurumbang, Nagendra Prasad; Park, Je Won; Yoon, Yeo Joon; Liou, Kwangkyoung; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2010-09-01

    Aminoglycosides are a class of important antibiotic compounds used for various therapeutic indications. In recent times, their efficacy has been curtailed due to the rapid development of bacterial resistance. There is a need to develop novel derivatives with an improved spectrum of activity and higher sensitivity against pathogenic bacteria. Although efforts have been focused on the development of newer therapeutic agents by chemical synthesis, to our knowledge, there has been no attempt to harness the potential of microorganisms for this purpose. Escherichia coli affords a widely studied cellular system that could be utilized not only for understanding but also for attempting to engineer the biosynthetic pathway of secondary metabolites. The primary metabolic pathway of E. coli can be engineered to divert the precursor pool required for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Utilizing this approach previously, we engineered E. coli host and generated E. coli M1. Here, we produced a ribostamycin derivative in the engineered host by heterologous expression of the recombinants constructed from the genes encoding the biosynthetic pathway in aminoglycoside-producing strains. The products obtained from the transformants were isolated, analyzed and verified to be ribostamycin derivatives. The study further demonstrated the importance of E. coli as surrogate antibiotic producer and also offered future possibility for the production of other aminoglycoside derivatives through genetic engineering and expression in a heterologous background.

  2. In silico feasibility of novel biodegradation pathways for 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bioremediation offers a promising pollution treatment method in the reduction and elimination of man-made compounds in the environment. Computational tools to predict novel biodegradation pathways for pollutants allow one to explore the capabilities of microorganisms in cleaning up the environment. However, given the wealth of novel pathways obtained using these prediction methods, it is necessary to evaluate their relative feasibility, particularly within the context of the cellular environment. Results We have utilized a computational framework called BNICE to generate novel biodegradation routes for 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (1,2,4-TCB) and incorporated the pathways into a metabolic model for Pseudomonas putida. We studied the cellular feasibility of the pathways by applying metabolic flux analysis (MFA) and thermodynamic constraints. We found that the novel pathways generated by BNICE enabled the cell to produce more biomass than the known pathway. Evaluation of the flux distribution profiles revealed that several properties influenced biomass production: 1) reducing power required, 2) reactions required to generate biomass precursors, 3) oxygen utilization, and 4) thermodynamic topology of the pathway. Based on pathway analysis, MFA, and thermodynamic properties, we identified several promising pathways that can be engineered into a host organism to accomplish bioremediation. Conclusions This work was aimed at understanding how novel biodegradation pathways influence the existing metabolism of a host organism. We have identified attractive targets for metabolic engineers interested in constructing a microorganism that can be used for bioremediation. Through this work, computational tools are shown to be useful in the design and evaluation of novel xenobiotic biodegradation pathways, identifying cellularly feasible degradation routes. PMID:20122273

  3. Brillouin precursors in Debye media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macke, Bruno; Ségard, Bernard

    2015-05-01

    We theoretically study the formation of Brillouin precursors in Debye media. We point out that the precursors are visible only at propagation distances such that the impulse response of the medium is essentially determined by the frequency dependence of its absorption and is practically Gaussian. By simple convolution, we then obtain explicit analytical expressions of the transmitted waves generated by reference incident waves, distinguishing precursor and main signal by a simple examination of the long-time behavior of the overall signal. These expressions are in good agreement with the signals obtained in numerical or real experiments performed on water in the radio-frequency domain and explain in particular some observed shapes of the precursor. Results are obtained for other remarkable incident waves. In addition, we show quite generally that the shape of the Brillouin precursor appearing alone at sufficiently large propagation distance and the law giving its amplitude as a function of this distance do not depend on the precise form of the incident wave but only on its integral properties. The incidence of a static conductivity of the medium is also examined and explicit analytical results are again given in the limit of weak and strong conductivities.

  4. PECAM-1, apoptosis and CD34+ precursors.

    PubMed

    Zocchi, Maria R; Poggi, A

    2004-11-01

    Apoptosis is a physiological process that controls tissue homeostasis, in combination with survival signals delivered by distinct receptors that bind hormones, growth factors or extracellular matrix components. The extrinsic pathway of apoptosis is due to the triggering of death receptors and the activation of the caspase cascade; the intrinsic pathway is due to withdrawal of growth factors and mainly related to mitochondrial metabolism. The choice between survival or apoptosis, which is the result of such different integrated environmental signals, is crucial for the maintainance of bone marrow reservoir of hematopoietic precursors (HPC). CD34+ HPC can receive multiple survival signals during homing and maturation, due to different interactions with adhesion molecules expressed on endothelial and bone marrow stromal cells, proteins of the extracellular matrix and chemokines or growth factors. Among them, the signal delivered via platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) seems to contribute to the resistance of this cell population to starvation, and it is related to the maintainance of mitochondrial metabolism. Indeed, this molecule, originally described as an adhesion receptor belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily, capable of homophilic and heterophilic interactions, turned out to be a signalling molecule, containing an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIM) within its cytoplasmic domain. In particular, it has been shown that PECAM-1 binds to different kinases and phosphatases, including the phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase that phosphorylates Akt, which, in turn can upregulate transcription and function of antiapoptotic proteins, such as Bcl-2 and Bcl-x or A1, responsible for the rescue from mitochondrial apoptosis. The possible role of PECAM-1 engagement in the prevention of starvation-induced apoptosis of HPC precursors and in the maintainance of their survival is discussed. PMID:15512808

  5. The biosynthetic pathway of vitamin C in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, G L; Jones, M A; Smirnoff, N

    1998-05-28

    Vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) has important antioxidant and metabolic functions in both plants and animals, but humans, and a few other animal species, have lost the capacity to synthesize it. Plant-derived ascorbate is thus the major source of vitamin C in the human diet. Although the biosynthetic pathway of L-ascorbic acid in animals is well understood, the plant pathway has remained unknown-one of the few primary plant metabolic pathways for which this is the case. L-ascorbate is abundant in plants (found at concentrations of 1-5 mM in leaves and 25 mM in chloroplasts) and may have roles in photosynthesis and transmembrane electron transport. We found that D-mannose and L-galactose are efficient precursors for ascorbate synthesis and are interconverted by GDP-D-mannose-3,5-epimerase. We have identified an enzyme in pea and Arabidopsis thaliana, L-galactose dehydrogenase, that catalyses oxidation of L-galactose to L-galactono-1,4-lactone. We propose an ascorbate biosynthesis pathway involving GDP-D-mannose, GDP-L-galactose, L-galactose and L-galactono-1,4-lactone, and have synthesized ascorbate from GDP-D-mannose by way of these intermediates in vitro. The definition of this biosynthetic pathway should allow engineering of plants for increased ascorbate production, thus increasing their nutritional value and stress tolerance.

  6. Quaternary amines as nitrosamine precursors: a role for consumer products?

    PubMed

    Kemper, Jerome M; Walse, Spencer S; Mitch, William A

    2010-02-15

    Nitrosamine formation has been associated with wastewater-impacted waters, but specific precursors within wastewater effluents have not been identified. Experiments indicated that nitrosamines form in low yields from quaternary amines, and that the nitrosamines form from the quaternary amines themselves, not just lower order amine impurities. Polymeric and benzylated quaternary amines were more potent precursors than monomeric quaternary alkylamines. Pretreatment of quaternary amines with ozone or free chlorine, which deactivate lower order amine impurities, did not significantly reduce nitrosamine formation. The nitrosamine formation pathway is unclear but experiments indicated that transformation of quaternary amines to lower order amine precursors via Hofmann elimination was not involved. Experiments suggest that the pathway may involve quaternary amine degradation by amidogen or chloramino radicals formed from chloramines. Quaternary amines are significant constituents of consumer products, including shampoos, detergents, and fabric softeners. Although quaternary amines may be removed by sedimentation during wastewater treatment, their importance should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. The high loadings from consumer products may enable the portion not removed to serve as precursors. PMID:20085252

  7. Modular pathway rewiring of Saccharomyces cerevisiae enables high-level production of L-ornithine.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jiufu; Zhou, Yongjin J; Krivoruchko, Anastasia; Huang, Mingtao; Liu, Lifang; Khoomrung, Sakda; Siewers, Verena; Jiang, Bo; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an attractive cell factory for production of chemicals and biofuels. Many different products have been produced in this cell factory by reconstruction of heterologous biosynthetic pathways; however, endogenous metabolism by itself involves many metabolites of industrial interest, and de-regulation of endogenous pathways to ensure efficient carbon channelling to such metabolites is therefore of high interest. Furthermore, many of these may serve as precursors for the biosynthesis of complex natural products, and hence strains overproducing certain pathway intermediates can serve as platform cell factories for production of such products. Here we implement a modular pathway rewiring (MPR) strategy and demonstrate its use for pathway optimization resulting in high-level production of L-ornithine, an intermediate of L-arginine biosynthesis and a precursor metabolite for a range of different natural products. The MPR strategy involves rewiring of the urea cycle, subcellular trafficking engineering and pathway re-localization, and improving precursor supply either through attenuation of the Crabtree effect or through the use of controlled fed-batch fermentations, leading to an L-ornithine titre of 1,041±47 mg l(-1) with a yield of 67 mg (g glucose)(-1) in shake-flask cultures and a titre of 5.1 g l(-1) in fed-batch cultivations. Our study represents the first comprehensive study on overproducing an amino-acid intermediate in yeast, and our results demonstrate the potential to use yeast more extensively for low-cost production of many high-value amino-acid-derived chemicals. PMID:26345617

  8. Modular pathway rewiring of Saccharomyces cerevisiae enables high-level production of L-ornithine

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jiufu; Zhou, Yongjin J.; Krivoruchko, Anastasia; Huang, Mingtao; Liu, Lifang; Khoomrung, Sakda; Siewers, Verena; Jiang, Bo; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an attractive cell factory for production of chemicals and biofuels. Many different products have been produced in this cell factory by reconstruction of heterologous biosynthetic pathways; however, endogenous metabolism by itself involves many metabolites of industrial interest, and de-regulation of endogenous pathways to ensure efficient carbon channelling to such metabolites is therefore of high interest. Furthermore, many of these may serve as precursors for the biosynthesis of complex natural products, and hence strains overproducing certain pathway intermediates can serve as platform cell factories for production of such products. Here we implement a modular pathway rewiring (MPR) strategy and demonstrate its use for pathway optimization resulting in high-level production of L-ornithine, an intermediate of L-arginine biosynthesis and a precursor metabolite for a range of different natural products. The MPR strategy involves rewiring of the urea cycle, subcellular trafficking engineering and pathway re-localization, and improving precursor supply either through attenuation of the Crabtree effect or through the use of controlled fed-batch fermentations, leading to an L-ornithine titre of 1,041±47 mg l−1 with a yield of 67 mg (g glucose)−1 in shake-flask cultures and a titre of 5.1 g l−1 in fed-batch cultivations. Our study represents the first comprehensive study on overproducing an amino-acid intermediate in yeast, and our results demonstrate the potential to use yeast more extensively for low-cost production of many high-value amino-acid-derived chemicals. PMID:26345617

  9. Metabolic engineering of chloroplasts for artemisinic acid biosynthesis and impact on plant growth.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Bhawna; Subramaniyan, Mayavan; Malhotra, Karan; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar; Potlakayala, Shobha Devi; Kumar, Shashi

    2014-03-01

    Chloroplasts offer high-level transgene expression and transgene containment due to maternal inheritance, and are ideal hosts for biopharmaceutical biosynthesis via multigene engineering. To exploit these advantages, we have expressed 12 enzymes in chloroplasts for the biosynthesis of artemisinic acid (precursor of artemisinin, antimalarial drug) in an alternative plant system. Integration of transgenes into the tobacco chloroplast genome via homologous recombination was confirmed by molecular analysis, and biosynthesis of artemisinic acid in plant leaf tissues was detected with the help of 13C NMR and ESI-mass spectrometry. The excess metabolic flux of isopentenyl pyrophosphate generated by an engineered mevalonate pathway was diverted for the biosynthesis of artemisinic acid. However, expression of megatransgenes impacted the growth of the transplastomic plantlets. By combining two exogenous pathways, artemisinic acid was produced in transplastomic plants, which can be improved further using better metabolic engineering strategies for commercially viable yield of desirable isoprenoid products.

  10. A new synthetic biology approach allows transfer of an entire metabolic pathway from a medicinal plant to a biomass crop.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Paulina; Zhou, Fei; Erban, Alexander; Karcher, Daniel; Kopka, Joachim; Bock, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Artemisinin-based therapies are the only effective treatment for malaria, the most devastating disease in human history. To meet the growing demand for artemisinin and make it accessible to the poorest, an inexpensive and rapidly scalable production platform is urgently needed. Here we have developed a new synthetic biology approach, combinatorial supertransformation of transplastomic recipient lines (COSTREL), and applied it to introduce the complete pathway for artemisinic acid, the precursor of artemisinin, into the high-biomass crop tobacco. We first introduced the core pathway of artemisinic acid biosynthesis into the chloroplast genome. The transplastomic plants were then combinatorially supertransformed with cassettes for all additional enzymes known to affect flux through the artemisinin pathway. By screening large populations of COSTREL lines, we isolated plants that produce more than 120 milligram artemisinic acid per kilogram biomass. Our work provides an efficient strategy for engineering complex biochemical pathways into plants and optimizing the metabolic output. PMID:27296645

  11. Serrated and non-serrated precursor lesions of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Langner, Cord

    2015-01-01

    Although often viewed as a single disease, colorectal cancer more accurately represents a family of diseases with different precursor lesions. Conventional (tubular, tubulovillous and villous) adenomas are the most common neoplastic lesions occurring in the large intestine. They have adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations and arise from dysplastic aberrant crypt foci, initially as polyclonal lesions. In sporadic tumours, neoplastic progression follows the traditional pathway (chromosomal instability pathway), resulting in CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP)-negative, microsatellite-stable (MSS), BRAF and KRAS wild-type cancers. Germline mutations in the APC gene lead to familial adenomatous polyposis. Conventional adenomas are also the precursors of Lynch syndrome-associated microsatellite-instable (MSI-high) cancers. Sessile serrated adenoma/polyp (SSA/P) is the principal precursor lesion of the serrated pathway, in which BRAF mutation can lead to colorectal cancer with MSI-high CIMP-high or MSS CIMP-high phenotype. SSA/Ps have been associated with synchronous and metachronous invasive adenocarcinomas as well as so-called interval carcinomas. Serrated polyposis is rare but most likely underdiagnosed. Affected individuals bear an increased but unspecified risk for the development of colorectal cancer; close endoscopic surveillance is warranted. Traditional serrated adenomas (TSAs) are much less common than the other serrated lesions. Cancers originating from TSAs may show KRAS mutation with a CIMP-high MSS phenotype.

  12. A Whole-Cell Phenotypic Screening Platform for Identifying Methylerythritol Phosphate Pathway-Selective Inhibitors as Novel Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, L. Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Isoprenoid biosynthesis is essential for survival of all living organisms. More than 50,000 unique isoprenoids occur naturally, with each constructed from two simple five-carbon precursors: isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). Two pathways for the biosynthesis of IPP and DMAPP are found in nature. Humans exclusively use the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, while most bacteria, including all Gram-negative and many Gram-positive species, use the unrelated methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. Here we report the development of a novel, whole-cell phenotypic screening platform to identify compounds that selectively inhibit the MEP pathway. Strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium were engineered to have separately inducible MEP (native) and MVA (nonnative) pathways. These strains, RMC26 and CT31-7d, were then used to differentiate MVA pathway- and MEP pathway-specific perturbation. Compounds that inhibit MEP pathway-dependent bacterial growth but leave MVA-dependent growth unaffected represent MEP pathway-selective antibacterials. This screening platform offers three significant results. First, the compound is antibacterial and is therefore cell permeant, enabling access to the intracellular target. Second, the compound inhibits one or more MEP pathway enzymes. Third, the MVA pathway is unaffected, suggesting selectivity for targeting the bacterial versus host pathway. The cell lines also display increased sensitivity to two reported MEP pathway-specific inhibitors, further biasing the platform toward inhibitors selective for the MEP pathway. We demonstrate development of a robust, high-throughput screening platform that combines phenotypic and target-based screening that can identify MEP pathway-selective antibacterials simply by monitoring optical density as the readout for cell growth/inhibition. PMID:22777049

  13. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, R.

    1998-08-04

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products. 7 figs.

  14. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath; Blaugher, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals, such as nitrate salts of thallium, barium, calcium, and copper, which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of thallium in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  15. AaeAP1 and AaeAP2: Novel Antimicrobial Peptides from the Venom of the Scorpion, Androctonus aeneas: Structural Characterisation, Molecular Cloning of Biosynthetic Precursor-Encoding cDNAs and Engineering of Analogues with Enhanced Antimicrobial and Anticancer Activities

    PubMed Central

    Du, Qiang; Hou, Xiaojuan; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yingqi; Xi, Xinping; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Mei; Duan, Jinao; Wei, Minjie; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The main functions of the abundant polypeptide toxins present in scorpion venoms are the debilitation of arthropod prey or defence against predators. These effects are achieved mainly through the blocking of an array of ion channel types within the membranes of excitable cells. However, while these ion channel-blocking toxins are tightly-folded by multiple disulphide bridges between cysteine residues, there are additional groups of peptides in the venoms that are devoid of cysteine residues. These non-disulphide bridged peptides are the subject of much research interest, and among these are peptides that exhibit antimicrobial activity. Here, we describe two novel non-disulphide-bridged antimicrobial peptides that are present in the venom of the North African scorpion, Androctonus aeneas. The cDNAs encoding the biosynthetic precursors of both peptides were cloned from a venom-derived cDNA library using 3'- and 5'-RACE strategies. Both translated precursors contained open-reading frames of 74 amino acid residues, each encoding one copy of a putative novel nonadecapeptide, whose primary structures were FLFSLIPSVIAGLVSAIRN and FLFSLIPSAIAGLVSAIRN, respectively. Both peptides were C-terminally amidated. Synthetic versions of each natural peptide displayed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities, but were devoid of antiproliferative activity against human cancer cell lines. However, synthetic analogues of each peptide, engineered for enhanced cationicity and amphipathicity, exhibited increases in antimicrobial potency and acquired antiproliferative activity against a range of human cancer cell lines. These data clearly illustrate the potential that natural peptide templates provide towards the design of synthetic analogues for therapeutic exploitation. PMID:25626077

  16. AaeAP1 and AaeAP2: novel antimicrobial peptides from the venom of the scorpion, Androctonus aeneas: structural characterisation, molecular cloning of biosynthetic precursor-encoding cDNAs and engineering of analogues with enhanced antimicrobial and anticancer activities.

    PubMed

    Du, Qiang; Hou, Xiaojuan; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yingqi; Xi, Xinping; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Mei; Duan, Jinao; Wei, Minjie; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris

    2015-02-01

    The main functions of the abundant polypeptide toxins present in scorpion venoms are the debilitation of arthropod prey or defence against predators. These effects are achieved mainly through the blocking of an array of ion channel types within the membranes of excitable cells. However, while these ion channel-blocking toxins are tightly-folded by multiple disulphide bridges between cysteine residues, there are additional groups of peptides in the venoms that are devoid of cysteine residues. These non-disulphide bridged peptides are the subject of much research interest, and among these are peptides that exhibit antimicrobial activity. Here, we describe two novel non-disulphide-bridged antimicrobial peptides that are present in the venom of the North African scorpion, Androctonus aeneas. The cDNAs encoding the biosynthetic precursors of both peptides were cloned from a venom-derived cDNA library using 3'- and 5'-RACE strategies. Both translated precursors contained open-reading frames of 74 amino acid residues, each encoding one copy of a putative novel nonadecapeptide, whose primary structures were FLFSLIPSVIAGLVSAIRN and FLFSLIPSAIAGLVSAIRN, respectively. Both peptides were C-terminally amidated. Synthetic versions of each natural peptide displayed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities, but were devoid of antiproliferative activity against human cancer cell lines. However, synthetic analogues of each peptide, engineered for enhanced cationicity and amphipathicity, exhibited increases in antimicrobial potency and acquired antiproliferative activity against a range of human cancer cell lines. These data clearly illustrate the potential that natural peptide templates provide towards the design of synthetic analogues for therapeutic exploitation.

  17. Perfluoroalkyl Acids (PFAAs) and Selected Precursors in the Baltic Sea Environment: Do Precursors Play a Role in Food Web Accumulation of PFAAs?

    PubMed

    Gebbink, Wouter A; Bignert, Anders; Berger, Urs

    2016-06-21

    The present study examined the presence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) and selected precursors in the Baltic Sea abiotic environment and guillemot food web, and investigated the relative importance of precursors in food web accumulation of PFAAs. Sediment, water, zooplankton, herring, sprat, and guillemot eggs were analyzed for perfluoroalkane sulfonic acids (PFSAs; C4,6,8,10) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs; C6-15) along with six perfluoro-octane sulfonic acid (PFOS) precursors and 11 polyfluoroalkyl phosphoric acid diesters (diPAPs). FOSA, FOSAA and its methyl and ethyl derivatives (Me- and EtFOSAA), and 6:2/6:2 diPAP were detected in sediment and water. While FOSA and the three FOSAAs were detected in all biota, a total of nine diPAPs were only detected in zooplankton. Concentrations of PFOS precursors and diPAPs exceeded PFOS and PFCA concentrations, respectively, in zooplankton, but not in fish and guillemot eggs. Although PFOS precursors were present at all trophic levels, they appear to play a minor role in food web accumulation of PFOS based on PFOS precursor/PFOS ratios and PFOS and FOSA isomer patterns. The PFCA pattern in fish could not be explained by the intake pattern based on PFCAs and analyzed precursors, that is, diPAPs. Exposure to additional precursors might therefore be a dominant exposure pathway compared to direct PFCA exposure for fish.

  18. Perfluoroalkyl Acids (PFAAs) and Selected Precursors in the Baltic Sea Environment: Do Precursors Play a Role in Food Web Accumulation of PFAAs?

    PubMed

    Gebbink, Wouter A; Bignert, Anders; Berger, Urs

    2016-06-21

    The present study examined the presence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) and selected precursors in the Baltic Sea abiotic environment and guillemot food web, and investigated the relative importance of precursors in food web accumulation of PFAAs. Sediment, water, zooplankton, herring, sprat, and guillemot eggs were analyzed for perfluoroalkane sulfonic acids (PFSAs; C4,6,8,10) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs; C6-15) along with six perfluoro-octane sulfonic acid (PFOS) precursors and 11 polyfluoroalkyl phosphoric acid diesters (diPAPs). FOSA, FOSAA and its methyl and ethyl derivatives (Me- and EtFOSAA), and 6:2/6:2 diPAP were detected in sediment and water. While FOSA and the three FOSAAs were detected in all biota, a total of nine diPAPs were only detected in zooplankton. Concentrations of PFOS precursors and diPAPs exceeded PFOS and PFCA concentrations, respectively, in zooplankton, but not in fish and guillemot eggs. Although PFOS precursors were present at all trophic levels, they appear to play a minor role in food web accumulation of PFOS based on PFOS precursor/PFOS ratios and PFOS and FOSA isomer patterns. The PFCA pattern in fish could not be explained by the intake pattern based on PFCAs and analyzed precursors, that is, diPAPs. Exposure to additional precursors might therefore be a dominant exposure pathway compared to direct PFCA exposure for fish. PMID:27192404

  19. Overproduction of fatty acids in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Guo, Daoyi; Cheng, Yongbo; Zhu, Fayin; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Tiangang

    2014-09-01

    The long hydrocarbon fatty acyl chain is energy rich, making it an ideal precursor for liquid transportation fuels and high-value oleo chemicals. As Saccharomyces cerevisiae has many advantages for industrial production compared to Escherichia coli. Here, we attempted to engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae for overproduction of fatty acids. First, disruption of the beta-oxidation pathway, elimination of the acyl-CoA synthetases, overexpression of different thioesterases and acetyl-CoA carboxylase ACC1, and engineering the supply of precursor acetyl-CoA. The engineered strain XL122 produced more than 120 mg/L of fatty acids. In parallel, we inactivated ADH1, the dominant gene for ethanol production, to redirect the metabolic flux to fatty acids synthesis. The engineered strain DG005 produced about 140 mg/L fatty acids. Additionally, Acetyl-CoA carboxylase was identified as a critical bottleneck of fatty acids synthesis in S. cerevisiae with a cell-free system. However, overexpression of ACC1 has little effect on fatty acids biosynthesis. As it has been reported that phosphorylation of ACC1 may influent its activity, so phosphorylation sites of ACC1 were further identified. Although the regulatory mechanisms remain unclear, our results provide rationale for future studies to target this critical step. All these efforts, particularly the discovery of the limiting step are critical for developing a "cell factory" for the overproduction of fatty acids by using type I fatty acids synthase in yeast or other fungi. PMID:24752690

  20. Fuel from Tobacco and Arundo Donax: Synthetic Crop for Direct Drop-in Biofuel Production through Re-routing the Photorespiration Intermediates and Engineering Terpenoid Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    2012-02-15

    PETRO Project: Biofuels offer renewable alternatives to petroleum-based fuels that reduce net greenhouse gas emissions to nearly zero. However, traditional biofuels production is limited not only by the small amount of solar energy that plants convert through photosynthesis into biological materials, but also by inefficient processes for converting these biological materials into fuels. Farm-ready, non-food crops are needed that produce fuels or fuel-like precursors at significantly lower costs with significantly higher productivity. To make biofuels cost-competitive with petroleum-based fuels, biofuels production costs must be cut in half.

  1. Enhanced flux through the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway in Arabidopsis plants overexpressing deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase.

    PubMed

    Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; Cairó, Albert; Botella-Pavía, Patricia; Besumbes, Oscar; Campos, Narciso; Boronat, Albert; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2006-11-01

    The methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway synthesizes the precursors for an astonishing diversity of plastid isoprenoids, including the major photosynthetic pigments chlorophylls and carotenoids. Since the identification of the first two enzymes of the pathway, deoxyxylulose 5-phoshate (DXP) synthase (DXS) and DXP reductoisomerase (DXR), they both were proposed as potential control points. Increased DXS activity has been shown to up-regulate the production of plastid isoprenoids in all systems tested, but the relative contribution of DXR to the supply of isoprenoid precursors is less clear. In this work, we have generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants with altered DXS and DXR enzyme levels, as estimated from their resistance to clomazone and fosmidomycin, respectively. The down-regulation of DXR resulted in variegation, reduced pigmentation and defects in chloroplast development, whereas DXR-overexpressing lines showed an increased accumulation of MEP- derived plastid isoprenoids such as chlorophylls, carotenoids, and taxadiene in transgenic plants engineered to produce this non-native isoprenoid. Changes in DXR levels in transgenic plants did not result in changes in DXS gene expression or enzyme accumulation, confirming that the observed effects on plastid isoprenoid levels in DXR-overexpressing lines were not an indirect consequence of altering DXS levels. The results indicate that the biosynthesis of MEP (the first committed intermediate of the pathway) limits the production of downstream isoprenoids in Arabidopsis chloroplasts, supporting a role for DXR in the control of the metabolic flux through the MEP pathway.

  2. Synthesis of three advanced biofuels from ionic liquid-pretreated switchgrass using engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bokinsky, Gregory; Peralta-Yahya, Pamela P; George, Anthe; Holmes, Bradley M; Steen, Eric J; Dietrich, Jeffrey; Lee, Taek Soon; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle; Voigt, Christopher A; Simmons, Blake A; Keasling, Jay D

    2011-12-13

    One approach to reducing the costs of advanced biofuel production from cellulosic biomass is to engineer a single microorganism to both digest plant biomass and produce hydrocarbons that have the properties of petrochemical fuels. Such an organism would require pathways for hydrocarbon production and the capacity to secrete sufficient enzymes to efficiently hydrolyze cellulose and hemicellulose. To demonstrate how one might engineer and coordinate all of the necessary components for a biomass-degrading, hydrocarbon-producing microorganism, we engineered a microorganism naïve to both processes, Escherichia coli, to grow using both the cellulose and hemicellulose fractions of several types of plant biomass pretreated with ionic liquids. Our engineered strains express cellulase, xylanase, beta-glucosidase, and xylobiosidase enzymes under control of native E. coli promoters selected to optimize growth on model cellulosic and hemicellulosic substrates. Furthermore, our strains grow using either the cellulose or hemicellulose components of ionic liquid-pretreated biomass or on both components when combined as a coculture. Both cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic strains were further engineered with three biofuel synthesis pathways to demonstrate the production of fuel substitutes or precursors suitable for gasoline, diesel, and jet engines directly from ionic liquid-treated switchgrass without externally supplied hydrolase enzymes. This demonstration represents a major advance toward realizing a consolidated bioprocess. With improvements in both biofuel synthesis pathways and biomass digestion capabilities, our approach could provide an economical route to production of advanced biofuels. PMID:22123987

  3. Synthesis of three advanced biofuels from ionic liquid-pretreated switchgrass using engineered Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bokinsky, Gregory; Peralta-Yahya, Pamela P.; George, Anthe; Holmes, Bradley M.; Steen, Eric J.; Dietrich, Jeffrey; Soon Lee, Taek; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle; Voigt, Christopher A.; Simmons, Blake A.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2011-01-01

    One approach to reducing the costs of advanced biofuel production from cellulosic biomass is to engineer a single microorganism to both digest plant biomass and produce hydrocarbons that have the properties of petrochemical fuels. Such an organism would require pathways for hydrocarbon production and the capacity to secrete sufficient enzymes to efficiently hydrolyze cellulose and hemicellulose. To demonstrate how one might engineer and coordinate all of the necessary components for a biomass-degrading, hydrocarbon-producing microorganism, we engineered a microorganism naïve to both processes, Escherichia coli, to grow using both the cellulose and hemicellulose fractions of several types of plant biomass pretreated with ionic liquids. Our engineered strains express cellulase, xylanase, beta-glucosidase, and xylobiosidase enzymes under control of native E. coli promoters selected to optimize growth on model cellulosic and hemicellulosic substrates. Furthermore, our strains grow using either the cellulose or hemicellulose components of ionic liquid-pretreated biomass or on both components when combined as a coculture. Both cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic strains were further engineered with three biofuel synthesis pathways to demonstrate the production of fuel substitutes or precursors suitable for gasoline, diesel, and jet engines directly from ionic liquid-treated switchgrass without externally supplied hydrolase enzymes. This demonstration represents a major advance toward realizing a consolidated bioprocess. With improvements in both biofuel synthesis pathways and biomass digestion capabilities, our approach could provide an economical route to production of advanced biofuels. PMID:22123987

  4. Precursor polymer compositions comprising polybenzimidazole

    SciTech Connect

    Klaehn, John R.; Peterson, Eric S.; Orme, Christopher J.

    2015-07-14

    Stable, high performance polymer compositions including polybenzimidazole (PBI) and a melamine-formaldehyde polymer, such as methylated, poly(melamine-co-formaldehyde), for forming structures such as films, fibers and bulky structures. The polymer compositions may be formed by combining polybenzimidazole with the melamine-formaldehyde polymer to form a precursor. The polybenzimidazole may be reacted and/or intertwined with the melamine-formaldehyde polymer to form the polymer composition. For example, a stable, free-standing film having a thickness of, for example, between about 5 .mu.m and about 30 .mu.m may be formed from the polymer composition. Such films may be used as gas separation membranes and may be submerged into water for extended periods without crazing and cracking. The polymer composition may also be used as a coating on substrates, such as metal and ceramics, or may be used for spinning fibers. Precursors for forming such polymer compositions are also disclosed.

  5. The Innate Lymphoid Cell Precursor.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Isabel E; Constantinides, Michael G; Gudjonson, Herman; Bendelac, Albert

    2016-05-20

    The discovery of tissue-resident innate lymphoid cell populations effecting different forms of type 1, 2, and 3 immunity; tissue repair; and immune regulation has transformed our understanding of mucosal immunity and allergy. The emerging complexity of these populations along with compounding issues of redundancy and plasticity raise intriguing questions about their precise lineage relationship. Here we review advances in mapping the emergence of these lineages from early lymphoid precursors. We discuss the identification of a common innate lymphoid cell precursor characterized by transient expression of the transcription factor PLZF, and the lineage relationships of innate lymphoid cells with conventional natural killer cells and lymphoid tissue inducer cells. We also review the rapidly growing understanding of the network of transcription factors that direct the development of these lineages.

  6. Neurotransmitter precursors and brain function.

    PubMed

    Conlay, L A; Zeisel, S H

    1982-04-01

    Brain function can be affected by the availability of dietary precursors of neurotransmitters. This occurs because the rate-limiting synthetic enzymes are not "saturated" with substrate under normal circumstances. Tyrosine affects catecholaminergic neurons that fire rapidly, whether in the brain stem to decrease blood pressure in hypertension or in the adrenal gland to increase blood pressure in hypotension, and has been used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and depression. Choline forms acetylcholine and has been used successfully in the treatment of tardive dyskinesia and memory disorders. Tryptophan, which forms serotonin, has been used for chronic pain therapy, sleep disorders, depression, and appetite control. Although these substances may lack the potency of traditionally used agonists, they offer an increase in specificity because the enzymes necessary to convert them to neurotransmitters are found only in neurons. Precursors are also "physiological"; they are consumed as foods and, therefore, should be relatively safe therapeutic agents. PMID:6124895

  7. Precursors to glycogen in ovine fetuses

    SciTech Connect

    Levitsky, L.L.; Paton, J.B.; Fisher, D.E. )

    1988-11-01

    Postprandial hepatic glycogenesis in the adult animal is now felt to proceed largely through gluconeogenic pathways rather than directly from glucose. The ovine fetus, like the mature sheep, lacks specific hepatic glucokinase. Therefore, the authors examined the role of lactate as a fetal glycogenic precursor in seven chronically catheterized 125-day sheep fetuses. Fetuses were infused with L-(U-{sup 14}C)lactate and D-(3-{sup 3}H)glucose, while maternal glucose was maintained at 50 mg/dl. Mean fetal hepatic glycogen specific activity ({mu}Ci/mg {times} 10{sup 3}) was 0.82 {plus minus} 0.08 for {sup 14}C and 2.6 {plus minus} 0.4 for {sup 3}H, whereas fetal renal glycogen specific activity was 0.46 {plus minus} 0.22 for {sup 14}C and 0.78 {plus minus} 0.16 for {sup 3}H. In contrast, ({sup 14}C)glucose specific activity was undetectable in blood and mean ({sup 3}H)glucose specific activity was 8.9 {plus minus} 1.3 {mu}Ci/mg {times} 10{sup 3}. The least detectable specific activity of ({sup 14}C)glucose did not differ significantly from the ({sup 14}C)glycogen enrichment in liver, whereas ({sup 3}H)glucose specific activity was significantly greater than ({sup 3}H)glycogen enrichment. The authors conclude that glycogenesis from glucose is partly through the indirect gluconeogenic route and that lactate may be a glycogenic precursor in the ovine fetus.

  8. The Utilization of Glycolytic Intermediates as Precursors for Fatty Acid Biosynthesis by Pea Root Plastids.

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Q.; Kleppinger-Sparace, K. F.; Sparace, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    Radiolabeled pyruvate, glucose, glucose-6-phosphate, acetate, and malate are all variously utilized for fatty acid and glycerolipid biosynthesis by isolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) root plastids. At the highest concentrations tested (3-5mM), the rates of incorporation of these precursors into fatty acids were 183, 154, 125, 99 and 57 nmol h-1 mg-1 protein, respectively. In all cases, cold pyruvate consistently caused the greatest reduction, whereas cold acetate consistently caused the least reduction, in the amounts of each of the other radioactive precursors utilized for fatty acid biosynthesis. Acetate incorporation into fatty acids was approximately 55% dependent on exogenously supplied reduced nucleotides (NADH and NADPH), whereas the utilization of the remaining precursors was only approximately 10 and 20% dependent on added NAD(P)H. In contrast, the utilization of all precursors was greatly dependent (85-95%) on exogenously supplied ATP. Palmitate, stearate, and oleate were the only fatty acids synthesized from radioactive precursors. Higher concentrations of each precursor caused increased proportions of oleate and decreased proportions of palmitate synthesized. Radioactive fatty acids from all precursors were incorporated into glycerolipids. The data presented indicate that the entire pathway from glucose, including glycolysis, to fatty acids and glycerolipids is operating in pea root plastids. This pathway can supply both carbon and reduced nucleotides required for fatty acid biosynthesis but only a small portion of the ATP required PMID:12228367

  9. Engineering catechol 1, 2-dioxygenase by design for improving the performance of the cis, cis-muconic acid synthetic pathway in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Han, Li; Liu, Pi; Sun, Jixue; Wu, Yuanqing; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Wujiu; Lin, Jianping; Wang, Qinhong; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Regulating and ameliorating enzyme expression and activity greatly affects the performance of a given synthetic pathway. In this study, a new synthetic pathway for cis, cis-muconic acid (ccMA) production was reconstructed without exogenous induction by regulating the constitutive expression of the important enzyme catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (CatA). Next, new CatAs with significantly improved activities were developed to enhance ccMA production using structure-assisted protein design. Nine mutations were designed, simulated and constructed based on the analysis of the CatA crystal structure. These results showed that mutations at Gly72, Leu73 and/or Pro76 in CatA could improve enzyme activity, and the activity of the most effective mutant was 10-fold greater than that of the wild-type CatA from Acinetobacter sp. ADP1. The most productive synthetic pathway with a mutated CatA increased the titer of ccMA by more than 25%. Molecular dynamic simulation results showed that enlarging the entrance of the substrate-binding pocket in the mutants contributed to their increased enzyme activities and thus improved the performance of the synthetic pathway. PMID:26306712

  10. Engineering catechol 1, 2-dioxygenase by design for improving the performance of the cis, cis-muconic acid synthetic pathway in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Han, Li; Liu, Pi; Sun, Jixue; Wu, Yuanqing; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Wujiu; Lin, Jianping; Wang, Qinhong; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Regulating and ameliorating enzyme expression and activity greatly affects the performance of a given synthetic pathway. In this study, a new synthetic pathway for cis, cis-muconic acid (ccMA) production was reconstructed without exogenous induction by regulating the constitutive expression of the important enzyme catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (CatA). Next, new CatAs with significantly improved activities were developed to enhance ccMA production using structure-assisted protein design. Nine mutations were designed, simulated and constructed based on the analysis of the CatA crystal structure. These results showed that mutations at Gly72, Leu73 and/or Pro76 in CatA could improve enzyme activity, and the activity of the most effective mutant was 10-fold greater than that of the wild-type CatA from Acinetobacter sp. ADP1. The most productive synthetic pathway with a mutated CatA increased the titer of ccMA by more than 25%. Molecular dynamic simulation results showed that enlarging the entrance of the substrate-binding pocket in the mutants contributed to their increased enzyme activities and thus improved the performance of the synthetic pathway. PMID:26306712

  11. Precursors of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troja, E.; Rosswog, S.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-01-01

    We carried out a systematic search of precursors on the sample of short GRBs observed by Swift. We found that approx. 8-10% of short GRBs display such early episode of emission. One burst (GRB 090510) shows two precursor events, the former approx.13 s and the latter approx. 0.5 s before the GRB. We did not find any substantial difference between the precursor and the main GRB emission, and between short GRBs with and without precursors. We discuss possible mechanisms to reproduce the observed precursor emission within the scenario of compact object mergers. The implications of our results on quantum gravity constraints are also discussed.

  12. Precursor Lesions of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Michiyo; Yamada, Norishige; Goto, Masamichi

    2008-01-01

    This review article describes morphological aspects, gene abnormalities, and mucin expression profiles in precursor lesions such as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), and mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN) of the pancreas, as well as their relation to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The gene abnormalities in precursors of PDAC are summarized as follows: (1) KRAS mutation and p16/CDKN2A inactivation are early events whose frequencies increase with the dysplasia grade in both PanIN and IPMN; (2) TP53 mutation and SMAD4/DPC4 inactivation are late events observed in PanIN3 or carcinomatous change of IPMN in both PanIN and IPMN, although the frequency of the TP53 mutation is lower in IPMN than in PDAC; and (3) also in MCN, KRAS mutation is an early event whose frequency increases with the dysplasia grade, whereas TP53 mutation and SMAD4/DPC4 inactivation are evident only in the carcinoma. The mucin expression profiles in precursors of PDAC are summarized as follows: (1) MUC1 expression increases with the PanIN grade, and is high in PDAC; (2) the expression pattern of MUC2 differs markedly between the major subtypes of IPMN with different malignancy potentials (i.e., IPMN-intestinal type with MUC2+ expression and IPMN-gastric type with MUC2- expression); (3) MUC2 is not expressed in any grade of PanINs, which is useful for differentiating PanIN from intestinal-type IPMN; (4) de novo expression of MUC4, which appears to increase with the dysplasia grade; and (5) high de novo expression of MUC5AC in all grades of PanINs, all types of IPMN, MCN, and PDAC. PMID:20485640

  13. Tomato Fruits-A Platform for Metabolic Engineering of Terpenes.

    PubMed

    Gutensohn, M; Dudareva, N

    2016-01-01

    Terpenoids are a large and diverse class of plant metabolites including mono-, sesqui-, and diterpenes. They have numerous functions in basic physiological processes as well as the interaction of plants with their biotic and abiotic environment. Due to the tight regulation of biosynthetic pathways and the resulting limited natural availability of terpenes, there is a strong interest in increasing their production in plants by metabolic engineering for agricultural, pharmaceutical, and industrial applications. The tomato fruit system was developed as a platform for metabolic engineering of terpenes to overcome detrimental effects on overall plant growth and photosynthesis traits, which are affected when terpenoid engineering is performed in vegetative tissues. Here we describe how the use of fruit-specific promoters for transgene expression can avoid these unwanted effects. In addition, targeting the expression of the introduced terpene biosynthetic gene to fruit tissue can take advantage of the large precursor pool provided by the methylerythritol-phosphate (MEP) pathway, which is highly active during tomato fruit ripening to facilitate the accumulation of carotenoids. We also discuss how the production of high levels of target terpene compounds can be achieved in fruits by the expression of individual or a combination of (i) the MEP or mevalonic acid pathway enzymes, (ii) prenyltransferases, and/or (iii) terpene synthases. Finally, we provide a brief outline of how the emitted as well as internal pools of terpenes can be analyzed in transgenic tomato fruits. PMID:27480692

  14. Tomato Fruits-A Platform for Metabolic Engineering of Terpenes.

    PubMed

    Gutensohn, M; Dudareva, N

    2016-01-01

    Terpenoids are a large and diverse class of plant metabolites including mono-, sesqui-, and diterpenes. They have numerous functions in basic physiological processes as well as the interaction of plants with their biotic and abiotic environment. Due to the tight regulation of biosynthetic pathways and the resulting limited natural availability of terpenes, there is a strong interest in increasing their production in plants by metabolic engineering for agricultural, pharmaceutical, and industrial applications. The tomato fruit system was developed as a platform for metabolic engineering of terpenes to overcome detrimental effects on overall plant growth and photosynthesis traits, which are affected when terpenoid engineering is performed in vegetative tissues. Here we describe how the use of fruit-specific promoters for transgene expression can avoid these unwanted effects. In addition, targeting the expression of the introduced terpene biosynthetic gene to fruit tissue can take advantage of the large precursor pool provided by the methylerythritol-phosphate (MEP) pathway, which is highly active during tomato fruit ripening to facilitate the accumulation of carotenoids. We also discuss how the production of high levels of target terpene compounds can be achieved in fruits by the expression of individual or a combination of (i) the MEP or mevalonic acid pathway enzymes, (ii) prenyltransferases, and/or (iii) terpene synthases. Finally, we provide a brief outline of how the emitted as well as internal pools of terpenes can be analyzed in transgenic tomato fruits.

  15. Engineered biosynthesis of medium-chain esters in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yi-Shu; Xiong, Mingyong; Zhang, Kechun

    2015-01-01

    Medium-chain esters such as isobutyl acetate (IBAc) and isoamyl acetate (IAAc) are high-volume solvents, flavors and fragrances. In this work, we engineered synthetic metabolic pathways in Escherichia coli for the total biosynthesis of IBAc and IAAc directly from glucose. Our pathways harnessed the power of natural amino acid biosynthesis. In particular, the native valine and leucine pathways in E. coli were utilized to supply the precursors. Then alcohol acyltransferases from various organisms were investigated on their capability to catalyze esterification reactions. It was discovered that ATF1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the best enzyme for the formation of both IBAc and IAAc in E. coli. In vitro biochemical characterization of ATF1 confirmed the fermentation results and provided rational guidance for future enzyme engineering. We also performed strain improvement by removing byproduct pathways (Δldh, ΔpoxB, Δpta) and increased the production of both target chemicals. Then the best IBAc producing strain was used for scale-up fermentation in a 1.3-L benchtop bioreactor. 36g/L of IBAc was produced after 72h fermentation. This work demonstrates the feasibility of total biosynthesis of medium-chain esters as renewable chemicals. PMID:25447641

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered for xylose metabolism requires gluconeogenesis and the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway for aerobic xylose assimilation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saccharomyces strains engineered to ferment xylose using Scheffersomyces stipitis xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) genes appear to be limited by metabolic imbalances due to differing cofactor specificities of XR and XDH. The S. stipitis XR, which uses nicotinamide adenine dinucl...

  17. Comprehensive Assessment of Transcriptional Regulation Facilitates Metabolic Engineering of Isoprenoid Accumulation in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Iris; Poirier, Brenton C.; Herron, Blake K.; Lange, Bernd Markus

    2015-01-01

    In plants, two spatially separated pathways provide the precursors for isoprenoid biosynthesis. We generated transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lines with modulated levels of expression of each individual gene involved in the cytosolic/peroxisomal mevalonate and plastidial methylerythritol phosphate pathways. By assessing the correlation of transgene expression levels with isoprenoid marker metabolites (gene-to-metabolite correlation), we determined the relative importance of transcriptional control at each individual step of isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis. The accumulation patterns of metabolic intermediates (metabolite-to-gene correlation) were then used to infer flux bottlenecks in the sterol pathway. The extent of metabolic cross talk, the exchange of isoprenoid intermediates between compartmentalized pathways, was assessed by a combination of gene-to-metabolite and metabolite-to-metabolite correlation analyses. This strategy allowed the selection of genes to be modulated by metabolic engineering, and we demonstrate that the overexpression of predictable combinations of genes can be used to significantly enhance flux toward specific end products of the sterol pathway. Transgenic plants accumulating increased amounts of sterols are characterized by significantly elevated biomass, which can be a desirable trait in crop and biofuel plants. PMID:26282236

  18. The synergy of earthquake precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulinets, Sergey

    2011-12-01

    The system of geophysical shells (lithosphere, atmosphere, ionosphere) is considered as an open complex nonlinear system with dissipation where earthquake preparation could be regarded as a self-organizing process leading to the critical state of the system. The processes in atmosphere and ionosphere are considered from the point of view of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The intensive ionization of boundary layer of atmosphere (probably provided by radon in occasion of earthquake preparation) gives start to the synergetic sequence of coupling processes where the ionosphere and even magnetosphere are the last links in the chain of interactions. Every anomaly observed in different geophysical fields (surface temperature, latent heat flux, electromagnetic emissions, variations in ionosphere, particle precipitation, etc.) is not considered as an individual process but the part of the self-organizing process, the final goal of which is the reaching of the point of the maximum entropy. Radon anomaly before the Kobe earthquake is considered as a perfect example to satisfy the formal seismological determination of the earthquake precursor. What is genetically connected with radon through the ionization process can also be regarded as a precursor. The problem of co-seismic variations of the discussed parameters of atmosphere and ionosphere is considered as well.

  19. Annealing of aromatic polyimide precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakelyn, N. T.

    1975-01-01

    A study has been made of the thermal behavior of polyimide precursors: an isomeric pair of crystals of the complex formed by p-phenylenediamine with the separated isomers of the di-isopropyl ester of pyromellitic acid. Specimens of this material were isothermally annealed in the temperature range 120 C to 170 C for periods of time up to 1 week. Although this temperature range is well below that customarily used for imidizations, the working hypothesis was that it would be more likely that a polymer embodying at least part of the precursor structure could be formed if the molecular motion was minimized to that actually required for the formation of the imide linkage. The progress of the annealing was followed by: infrared spectroscopy, differential thermal analysis, powder X-ray diffraction, and thermal gravimetric analysis. Single crystal X-ray analysis of the meta monomer yields a structure of chains of alternating acid and base and suggests that this monomer is amenable to polymerization with a minimum of geometrical disruption.

  20. Metabolic engineering for isoprenoid-based biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P; Phulara, S C

    2015-09-01

    Sustainable economic and industrial growth is the need of the hour and it requires renewable energy resources having better performance and compatibility with existing fuel infrastructure from biological routes. Isoprenoids (C ≥ 5) can be a potential alternative due to their diverse nature and physiochemical properties similar to that of petroleum based fuels. In the past decade, extensive research has been done to utilize metabolic engineering strategies in micro-organisms primarily, (i) to overcome the limitations associated with their natural and non-natural production and (ii) to develop commercially competent microbial strain for isoprenoid-based biofuel production. This review briefly describes the engineered isoprenoid biosynthetic pathways in well-characterized microbial systems for the production of several isoprenoid-based biofuels and fuel precursors.

  1. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for the production of phenylpyruvate derivatives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang Ping; Zhang, Liang; Mao, Jian; Ding, Zhong Yang; Shi, Gui Yang

    2015-11-01

    Phenylpyruvate derivatives (PPD), such as phenylpropanoids, DL-phenylglycine, dl-phenylalanine, and styrene, are biosynthesized using phenylpyruvate as the precursor. They are widely used in human health and nutrition products. Recently, metabolic engineering provides effective strategies to develop PPD producers. Based on phenylpyruvate-producing chassis, genetically defined PPD producers have been successfully constructed. In this work, the most recent information on genetics and on the molecular mechanisms regulating phenylpyruvate synthesis pathways in Escherichia coli are summarized, and the engineering strategies to construct the PPD producers are also discussed. The enzymes and pathways are proposed for PPD-producer constructions, and potential difficulties in strain construction are also identified and discussed. With respect to recent advances in synthetic biology, future strategies to construct efficiently producers are discussed.

  2. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for the production of phenylpyruvate derivatives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang Ping; Zhang, Liang; Mao, Jian; Ding, Zhong Yang; Shi, Gui Yang

    2015-11-01

    Phenylpyruvate derivatives (PPD), such as phenylpropanoids, DL-phenylglycine, dl-phenylalanine, and styrene, are biosynthesized using phenylpyruvate as the precursor. They are widely used in human health and nutrition products. Recently, metabolic engineering provides effective strategies to develop PPD producers. Based on phenylpyruvate-producing chassis, genetically defined PPD producers have been successfully constructed. In this work, the most recent information on genetics and on the molecular mechanisms regulating phenylpyruvate synthesis pathways in Escherichia coli are summarized, and the engineering strategies to construct the PPD producers are also discussed. The enzymes and pathways are proposed for PPD-producer constructions, and potential difficulties in strain construction are also identified and discussed. With respect to recent advances in synthetic biology, future strategies to construct efficiently producers are discussed. PMID:26386181

  3. Genetically engineered fusion of MAP-1 and factor H domains 1-5 generates a potent dual upstream inhibitor of both the lectin and alternative complement pathways.

    PubMed

    Nordmaj, Mie Anemone; Munthe-Fog, Lea; Hein, Estrid; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Garred, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Inhibition of the complement cascade has emerged as an option for treatment of a range of diseases. Mannose-binding lectin/ficolin/collectin-associated protein (MAP-1) is a pattern recognition molecule (PRM)-associated inhibitor of the lectin pathway. The central regulator of the alternative pathway (AP) is complement factor H (FH). Our aim was to design a dual upstream inhibitor of both human lectin and APs by fusing MAP-1 with a part of FH. There were 2 different recombinant chimeric proteins comprising full-length human MAP-1 and the first 5 N-terminal domains of human FH designed. The FH domains were orientated either in the N- or C-terminal part of MAP-1. The complement inhibition potential in human serum was assessed. Both chimeric constructs displayed the characteristics of the native molecules and bound to the PRMs with an EC50 of ∼ 2 nM. However, when added to serum diluted 1:4 in a solid-phase functional assay, only the first 5 N-terminal domains of complement FH fused to the C-terminal part of full-length MAP-1 chimeric construct were able to combine inhibition of lectin and AP activation with an half maximal inhibitory concentration of ∼ 100 and 20 nM, respectively. No effect was seen on the classical pathway. Fusion of MAP-1 with FH domains represents a novel therapeutic approach for selective targeting upstream and central complement activation at sites of inflammation.

  4. Percolation-based precursors of transitions in extended systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Méndez, Víctor; Eguíluz M, Víctor M.; Hernández-García, Emilio; Ramasco, José J.

    2016-07-01

    Abrupt transitions are ubiquitous in the dynamics of complex systems. Finding precursors, i.e. early indicators of their arrival, is fundamental in many areas of science ranging from electrical engineering to climate. However, obtaining warnings of an approaching transition well in advance remains an elusive task. Here we show that a functional network, constructed from spatial correlations of the system’s time series, experiences a percolation transition way before the actual system reaches a bifurcation point due to the collective phenomena leading to the global change. Concepts from percolation theory are then used to introduce early warning precursors that anticipate the system’s tipping point. We illustrate the generality and versatility of our percolation-based framework with model systems experiencing different types of bifurcations and with Sea Surface Temperature time series associated to El Niño phenomenon.

  5. Percolation-based precursors of transitions in extended systems

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Méndez, Víctor; Eguíluz M, Víctor M.; Hernández-García, Emilio; Ramasco, José J.

    2016-01-01

    Abrupt transitions are ubiquitous in the dynamics of complex systems. Finding precursors, i.e. early indicators of their arrival, is fundamental in many areas of science ranging from electrical engineering to climate. However, obtaining warnings of an approaching transition well in advance remains an elusive task. Here we show that a functional network, constructed from spatial correlations of the system’s time series, experiences a percolation transition way before the actual system reaches a bifurcation point due to the collective phenomena leading to the global change. Concepts from percolation theory are then used to introduce early warning precursors that anticipate the system’s tipping point. We illustrate the generality and versatility of our percolation-based framework with model systems experiencing different types of bifurcations and with Sea Surface Temperature time series associated to El Niño phenomenon. PMID:27412567

  6. Percolation-based precursors of transitions in extended systems.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Méndez, Víctor; Eguíluz M, Víctor M; Hernández-García, Emilio; Ramasco, José J

    2016-01-01

    Abrupt transitions are ubiquitous in the dynamics of complex systems. Finding precursors, i.e. early indicators of their arrival, is fundamental in many areas of science ranging from electrical engineering to climate. However, obtaining warnings of an approaching transition well in advance remains an elusive task. Here we show that a functional network, constructed from spatial correlations of the system's time series, experiences a percolation transition way before the actual system reaches a bifurcation point due to the collective phenomena leading to the global change. Concepts from percolation theory are then used to introduce early warning precursors that anticipate the system's tipping point. We illustrate the generality and versatility of our percolation-based framework with model systems experiencing different types of bifurcations and with Sea Surface Temperature time series associated to El Niño phenomenon. PMID:27412567

  7. A fission-powered interstellar precursor mission

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, Ronald J.; Lenard, Roger X.; Wright, Steven A. West, John L.

    1999-01-01

    An {open_quotes}interstellar precursor mission{close_quotes} lays the groundwork for eventual interstellar exploration by studying the interstellar medium and by stretching technologies that have potential application for eventual interstellar exploration. The numerous scientific goals for such a mission include generating a 3-D stellar map of our galaxy, studying Kuiper-belt and Oort cloud objects, and observing distant objects using the sun{close_quote}s gravitational lens as the primary of an enormous telescope. System equations are developed for a space tug which propels a 2500-kg scientific payload to 550 astronomical units in about 20 years. The tug to transport this payload uses electric propulsion with an lsp of 15,000 seconds and a fission reactor with a closed Brayton cycle to generate the electricity. The optimal configuration may be to thrust for only about 6 years and then coast for the remaining 14 years. This spacecraft does not require any physics breakthroughs or major advances in technology. The fission power system can be engineered and built by drawing upon known technologies developed for related systems over the past 40 years. The tug system would eventually reach 1000 a.u in 33 years, and would have adequate power to relay large amounts of data throughout its journey. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. A Fission-Powered Interstellar Precursor Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Lenard, R.X.; Lipinski, R.J.; West, J.L.; Wright, S.A.

    1998-10-28

    An 'interstellar precursor mission' lays the groundwork for eventual interstellar exploration by studying the interstellar medium and by stretching technologies that have potential application for eventual interstellar exploration. The numerous scientific goals for such a mission include generating a 3-D stellar map of our galaxy, studying Kuiper-belt and Oort cloud objects, and observing distant objects using the sun's gravitational lens as the primary of an enormous telescope. System equations are developed for a space tug which propels a 2500-kg scientific payload to 550 astronomical units in about 20 years. The tug to transport this payload uses electric propulsion with an Isp of 15,000 seconds and a fission reactor with a closed Brayton cycle to genemte the electricity. The optimal configuration may be to thrust for only about 6 years and then coast for the remaining 14 pars. This spacecraft does not require any physics breakthroughs or major advances in technology. The fission power syslem can be engineered and built by drawing upon known technologies developed for relatgd systems over the past 40 years. The tug system would eventually reach 1000 a.u in 33 years, and would have adequate power to relay large amounts of data throughout its journey.

  9. Cellular Metabolism of Unnatural Sialic Acid Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Nam D.; Fermaintt, Charles S.; Rodriguez, Andrea C.; McCombs, Janet E.; Nischan, Nicole; Kohler, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates, in addition to their metabolic functions, serve important roles as receptors, ligands, and structural molecules for diverse biological processes. Insight into carbohydrate biology and mechanisms has been aided by metabolic oligosaccharide engineering (MOE). In MOE, unnatural carbohydrate analogs with novel functional groups are incorporated into cellular glycoconjugates and used to probe biological systems. While MOE has expanded knowledge of carbohydrate biology, limited metabolism of unnatural carbohydrate analogs restricts its use. Here we assess metabolism of SiaDAz, a diazirine-modified analog of sialic acid, and its cell-permeable precursor, Ac4ManNDAz. We show that the efficiency of Ac4ManNDAz and SiaDAz metabolism depends on cell type. Our results indicate that different cell lines can have different metabolic roadblocks in the synthesis of cell surface SiaDAz. These findings point to roles for promiscuous intracellular esterases, kinases, and phosphatases during unnatural sugar metabolism and provide guidance for ways to improve MOE. PMID:25957566

  10. JAK/Stat signaling regulates heart precursor diversification in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Aaron N.; Mokalled, Mayssa H.; Haden, Tom N.; Olson, Eric N.

    2011-01-01

    Intercellular signal transduction pathways regulate the NK-2 family of transcription factors in a conserved gene regulatory network that directs cardiogenesis in both flies and mammals. The Drosophila NK-2 protein Tinman (Tin) was recently shown to regulate Stat92E, the Janus kinase (JAK) and Signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) pathway effector, in the developing mesoderm. To understand whether the JAK/Stat pathway also regulates cardiogenesis, we performed a systematic characterization of JAK/Stat signaling during mesoderm development. Drosophila embryos with mutations in the JAK/Stat ligand upd or in Stat92E have non-functional hearts with luminal defects and inappropriate cell aggregations. Using strong Stat92E loss-of-function alleles, we show that the JAK/Stat pathway regulates tin expression prior to heart precursor cell diversification. tin expression can be subdivided into four phases and, in Stat92E mutant embryos, the broad phase 2 expression pattern in the dorsal mesoderm does not restrict to the constrained phase 3 pattern. These embryos also have an expanded pericardial cell domain. We show the E(spl)-C gene HLHm5 is expressed in a pattern complementary to tin during phase 3 and that this expression is JAK/Stat dependent. In addition, E(spl)-C mutant embryos phenocopy the cardiac defects of Stat92E embryos. Mechanistically, JAK/Stat signals activate E(spl)-C genes to restrict Tin expression and the subsequent expression of the T-box transcription factor H15 to direct heart precursor diversification. This study is the first to characterize a role for the JAK/Stat pathway during cardiogenesis and identifies an autoregulatory circuit in which tin limits its own expression domain. PMID:21965617

  11. Hydrodeoxygenation of coal using organometallic catalyst precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Stephen R.

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this dissertation was to determine the desirability of organometallic compounds for the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of coal during liquefaction. The primary focus of this study was the removal of phenol-like compounds from coal liquids for the production of a thermally stable jet fuel. Investigation of the HDO ability of an organometallic compound containing both cobalt and molybdenum (CoMo-T2) was achieved using a combination of model compound and coal experiments. Model compounds were chosen representing four oxygen functional groups present in a range of coals. Electron density and bond order calculations were performed for anthrone, dinaphthyl ether, xanthene, di-t-butylmethylphenol, and some of their derivatives to ascertain a potential order of hydrogenolysis and hydrogenation reactivity for these compounds. The four model compounds were then reacted with CoMo-T2, as well as ammonium tetrathiomolybdate (ATTM). Products of reaction were grouped as compounds that had undergone deoxygenation, those that had aromatic rings reduced, those that were products of both reaction pathways, and those produced through other routes. ATTM had an affinity for both reaction types. Its reaction order for the four model compounds with respect to deoxygenated compounds was the same as that estimated from electron density calculations for hydrogenolysis reactivity. CoMo-T2 appeared to show a preference toward hydrogenation, although deoxygenated products were still achieved in similar, or greater, yields, for almost all the model compounds. The reactivity order achieved for the four compounds with CoMo-T2 was similar to that estimated from bond order calculations for hydrogenation reactivity. Three coals were selected representing a range of coal ranks and oxygen contents. DECS-26 (Wyodak), DECS-24 (Illinois #6), and DECS-23 (Pittsburgh #8) were analyzed by CPMAS 13C NMR and pyrolysis-GC-MS to determine the functional groups comprising the oxygen content of these

  12. Precursors for Carbon Nitride Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Prashantha, M.; Gopal, E. S. R.; Ramesh, K.

    2011-07-15

    Nano structured carbon nitride films were prepared by pyrolysis assisted chemical vapour deposition. Pyrrole (C{sub 4}H{sub 5}N), Pyrrolidine (C{sub 4}H{sub 9}N), Azabenzimidazole (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}N{sub 3}) and Triazine (C{sub 6}H{sub 15}N{sub 3}) were used as precursors. The vibrational modes observed for C-N and C = N from FTIR spectra confirms the bonding of nitrogen with carbon. XPS core level spectra of C 1s and N 1s also show the formation of bonding between carbon and nitrogen atoms. The nitrogen content in the prepared samples was found to be around 25 atomic %.

  13. The de novo synthesis of ubiquitin: identification of deubiquitinases acting on ubiquitin precursors

    PubMed Central

    Grou, Cláudia P.; Pinto, Manuel P.; Mendes, Andreia V.; Domingues, Pedro; Azevedo, Jorge E.

    2015-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination, a major post-translational modification in eukaryotes, requires an adequate pool of free ubiquitin. Cells maintain this pool by two pathways, both involving deubiquitinases (DUBs): recycling of ubiquitin from ubiquitin conjugates and processing of ubiquitin precursors synthesized de novo. Although many advances have been made in recent years regarding ubiquitin recycling, our knowledge on ubiquitin precursor processing is still limited, and questions such as when are these precursors processed and which DUBs are involved remain largely unanswered. Here we provide data suggesting that two of the four mammalian ubiquitin precursors, UBA52 and UBA80, are processed mostly post-translationally whereas the other two, UBB and UBC, probably undergo a combination of co- and post-translational processing. Using an unbiased biochemical approach we found that UCHL3, USP9X, USP7, USP5 and Otulin/Gumby/FAM105b are by far the most active DUBs acting on these precursors. The identification of these DUBs together with their properties suggests that each ubiquitin precursor can be processed in at least two different manners, explaining the robustness of the ubiquitin de novo synthesis pathway. PMID:26235645

  14. Refining the pathway of carbide insertion into the nitrogenase M-cluster.

    PubMed

    Wiig, Jared A; Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W

    2015-08-11

    Carbide insertion plays a pivotal role in the biosynthesis of M-cluster, the cofactor of nitrogenase. Previously, we proposed a carbide insertion pathway involving methyltransfer from SAM to a FeS precursor and hydrogen abstraction from this methyl group that initiates the radical-based precursor maturation. Here we demonstrate that the methyl group is transferred to a precursor-associated sulfur before hydrogen abstraction, thereby refining the initial steps of the carbide insertion pathway.

  15. Refining the pathway of carbide insertion into the nitrogenase M-cluster

    PubMed Central

    Wiig, Jared A.; Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W.

    2015-01-01

    Carbide insertion plays a pivotal role in the biosynthesis of M-cluster, the cofactor of nitrogenase. Previously, we proposed a carbide insertion pathway involving methyltransfer from SAM to a FeS precursor and hydrogen abstraction from this methyl group that initiates the radical-based precursor maturation. Here we demonstrate that the methyl group is transferred to a precursor-associated sulfur before hydrogen abstraction, thereby refining the initial steps of the carbide insertion pathway. PMID:26259825

  16. Metabolic engineering of the L-phenylalanine pathway in Escherichia coli for the production of S- or R-mandelic acid

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mandelic acid (MA), an important component in pharmaceutical syntheses, is currently produced exclusively via petrochemical processes. Growing concerns over the environment and fossil energy costs have inspired a quest to develop alternative routes to MA using renewable resources. Herein we report the first direct route to optically pure MA from glucose via genetic modification of the L-phenylalanine pathway in E. coli. Results The introduction of hydroxymandelate synthase (HmaS) from Amycolatopsis orientalis into E. coli led to a yield of 0.092 g/L S-MA. By combined deletion of competing pathways, further optimization of S-MA production was achieved, and the yield reached 0.74 g/L within 24 h. To produce R-MA, hydroxymandelate oxidase (Hmo) from Streptomyces coelicolor and D-mandelate dehydrogenase (DMD) from Rhodotorula graminis were co-expressed in an S-MA-producing strain, and the resulting strain was capable of producing 0.68 g/L R-MA. Finally, phenylpyruvate feeding experiments suggest that HmaS is a potential bottleneck to further improvement in yields. Conclusions We have constructed E. coli strains that successfully accomplished the production of S- and R-MA directly from glucose. Our work provides the first example of the completely fermentative production of S- and R-MA from renewable feedstock. PMID:21910908

  17. Functional analyses and treatment of precursor behavior.

    PubMed

    Najdowski, Adel C; Wallace, Michele D; Ellsworth, Carrie L; MacAleese, Alicia N; Cleveland, Jackie M

    2008-01-01

    Functional analysis has been demonstrated to be an effective method to identify environmental variables that maintain problem behavior. However, there are cases when conducting functional analyses of severe problem behavior may be contraindicated. The current study applied functional analysis procedures to a class of behavior that preceded severe problem behavior (precursor behavior) and evaluated treatments based on the outcomes of the functional analyses of precursor behavior. Responding for all participants was differentiated during the functional analyses, and individualized treatments eliminated precursor behavior. These results suggest that functional analysis of precursor behavior may offer an alternative, indirect method to assess the operant function of severe problem behavior. PMID:18468282

  18. Functional Analyses and Treatment of Precursor Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Najdowski, Adel C; Wallace, Michele D; Ellsworth, Carrie L; MacAleese, Alicia N; Cleveland, Jackie M

    2008-01-01

    Functional analysis has been demonstrated to be an effective method to identify environmental variables that maintain problem behavior. However, there are cases when conducting functional analyses of severe problem behavior may be contraindicated. The current study applied functional analysis procedures to a class of behavior that preceded severe problem behavior (precursor behavior) and evaluated treatments based on the outcomes of the functional analyses of precursor behavior. Responding for all participants was differentiated during the functional analyses, and individualized treatments eliminated precursor behavior. These results suggest that functional analysis of precursor behavior may offer an alternative, indirect method to assess the operant function of severe problem behavior. PMID:18468282

  19. Microbial isoprenoid production: an example of green chemistry through metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Maury, Jérôme; Asadollahi, Mohammad A; Møller, Kasper; Clark, Anthony; Nielsen, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Saving energy, cost efficiency, producing less waste, improving the biodegradability of products, potential for producing novel and complex molecules with improved properties, and reducing the dependency on fossil fuels as raw materials are the main advantages of using biotechnological processes to produce chemicals. Such processes are often referred to as green chemistry or white biotechnology. Metabolic engineering, which permits the rational design of cell factories using directed genetic modifications, is an indispensable strategy for expanding green chemistry. In this chapter, the benefits of using metabolic engineering approaches for the development of green chemistry are illustrated by the recent advances in microbial production of isoprenoids, a diverse and important group of natural compounds with numerous existing and potential commercial applications. Accumulated knowledge on the metabolic pathways leading to the synthesis of the principal precursors of isoprenoids is reviewed, and recent investigations into isoprenoid production using engineered cell factories are described. PMID:16270655

  20. Hydrolysis of DFP and the nerve agent (S)-sarin by DFPase proceeds along two different reaction pathways: implications for engineering bioscavengers.

    PubMed

    Wymore, Troy; Field, Martin J; Langan, Paul; Smith, Jeremy C; Parks, Jerry M

    2014-05-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents such as (S)-sarin are among the most highly toxic compounds that have been synthesized. Engineering enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of nerve agents ("bioscavengers") is an emerging prophylactic approach to diminish their toxic effects. Although its native function is not known, diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) from Loligo vulgaris catalyzes the hydrolysis of OP compounds. Here, we investigate the mechanisms of diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) and (S)-sarin hydrolysis by DFPase with quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical umbrella sampling simulations. We find that the mechanism for hydrolysis of DFP involves nucleophilic attack by Asp229 on phosphorus to form a pentavalent intermediate. P-F bond dissociation then yields a phosphoacyl enzyme intermediate in the rate-limiting step. The simulations suggest that a water molecule, coordinated to the catalytic Ca(2+), donates a proton to Asp121 and then attacks the tetrahedral phosphoacyl intermediate to liberate the diisopropylphosphate product. In contrast, the calculated free energy barrier for hydrolysis of (S)-sarin by the same mechanism is highly unfavorable, primarily because of the instability of the pentavalent phosphoenzyme species. Instead, simulations suggest that hydrolysis of (S)-sarin proceeds by a mechanism in which Asp229 could activate an intervening water molecule for nucleophilic attack on the substrate. These findings may lead to improved strategies for engineering DFPase and related six-bladed β-propeller folds for more efficient degradation of OP compounds.

  1. Hydrolysis of DFP and the Nerve Agent (S)-Sarin by DFPase Proceeds Along Two Different Reaction Pathways: Implica-tions for Engineering Bioscavengers

    SciTech Connect

    Wymore, Troy W; Langan, Paul; Smith, Jeremy C; Field, Martin J.; Parks, Jerry M

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents such as (S)-sarin are among the most highly toxic compounds that have been synthesized. Engineering enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of nerve agents ( bioscavengers ) is an emerging prophylactic approach to diminishing their toxic effects. Although its native function is not known, diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) from Loligo vulgaris catalyzes the hydrolysis of OP compounds. Here, we investigate the mechanisms of diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) and (S)-sarin hydrolysis by DFPase with quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) umbrella sampling simulations. We find that the mechanism for hydrolysis of DFP involves nucleophilic attack by Asp229 on phosphorus to form a pentavalent intermediate. P F bond dissociation then yields a phosphoacyl enzyme intermediate in the rate-limiting step. The simulations suggest that a water molecule, coordinated to the catalytic Ca2+, donates a proton to Asp121 and then attacks the tetrahedral phosphoacyl intermediate to liberate the diisopropylphosphate product. In contrast, the calculated free energy barrier for hydrolysis of (S)-sarin by the same mechanism is highly unfavorable, primarily due to the instability of the pentavalent phosphoenzyme species. Instead, simulations suggest that hydrolysis of (S)-sarin proceeds by a mechanism in which Asp229 could activate an intervening water molecule for nucleophilic attack on the substrate. These findings may lead to improved strategies for engineering DFPase and related six-bladed -propeller folds for more efficient degradation of OP compounds.

  2. Hydrolysis of DFP and the nerve agent (S)-sarin by DFPase proceeds along two different reaction pathways: implications for engineering bioscavengers.

    PubMed

    Wymore, Troy; Field, Martin J; Langan, Paul; Smith, Jeremy C; Parks, Jerry M

    2014-05-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents such as (S)-sarin are among the most highly toxic compounds that have been synthesized. Engineering enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of nerve agents ("bioscavengers") is an emerging prophylactic approach to diminish their toxic effects. Although its native function is not known, diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) from Loligo vulgaris catalyzes the hydrolysis of OP compounds. Here, we investigate the mechanisms of diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) and (S)-sarin hydrolysis by DFPase with quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical umbrella sampling simulations. We find that the mechanism for hydrolysis of DFP involves nucleophilic attack by Asp229 on phosphorus to form a pentavalent intermediate. P-F bond dissociation then yields a phosphoacyl enzyme intermediate in the rate-limiting step. The simulations suggest that a water molecule, coordinated to the catalytic Ca(2+), donates a proton to Asp121 and then attacks the tetrahedral phosphoacyl intermediate to liberate the diisopropylphosphate product. In contrast, the calculated free energy barrier for hydrolysis of (S)-sarin by the same mechanism is highly unfavorable, primarily because of the instability of the pentavalent phosphoenzyme species. Instead, simulations suggest that hydrolysis of (S)-sarin proceeds by a mechanism in which Asp229 could activate an intervening water molecule for nucleophilic attack on the substrate. These findings may lead to improved strategies for engineering DFPase and related six-bladed β-propeller folds for more efficient degradation of OP compounds. PMID:24720808

  3. Migration of neuronal precursors from the telencephalic ventricular zone into the olfactory bulb in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Norihito; Alfaro-Cervello, Clara; Shimizu, Kohei; Asakawa, Kazuhide; Urasaki, Akihiro; Nonaka, Shigenori; Kawakami, Koichi; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Sawamoto, Kazunobu

    2011-12-01

    In the brain of adult mammals, neuronal precursors are generated in the subventricular zone in the lateral wall of the lateral ventricles and migrate into the olfactory bulbs (OBs) through a well-studied route called the rostral migratory stream (RMS). Recent studies have revealed that a comparable neural stem cell niche is widely conserved at the ventricular wall of adult vertebrates. However, little is known about the migration route of neuronal precursors in nonmammalian adult brains. Here, we show that, in the adult zebrafish, a cluster of neuronal precursors generated in the telencephalic ventricular zone migrates into the OB via a route equivalent to the mammalian RMS. Unlike the mammalian RMS, these neuronal precursors are not surrounded by glial tubes, although radial glial cells with a single cilium lined the telencephalic ventricular wall, much as in embryonic and neonatal mammals. To observe the migrating neuronal precursors in living brain tissue, we established a brain hemisphere culture using a zebrafish line carrying a GFP transgene driven by the neurogenin1 (ngn1) promoter. In these fish, GFP was observed in the neuronal precursors migrating in the RMS, some of which were aligned with blood vessels. Numerous ngn1:gfp-positive cells were observed migrating tangentially in the RMS-like route medial to the OB. Taken together, our results suggest that the RMS in the adult zebrafish telencephalon is a functional migratory pathway. This is the first evidence for the tangential migration of neuronal precursors in a nonmammalian adult telencephalon.

  4. Research on the metabolic engineering of the direct oxidation pathway for extraction of phosphate from ore has generated preliminary evidence for PQQ biosynthesis in Escherichia coli as well as a possible role for the highly conserved region of quinoprotein dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Alan; Lester, Trevor; Brown, Jacquelyn

    2003-04-11

    The ability of some bacteria to dissolve poorly soluble calcium phosphates (CaPs) has been termed 'mineral phosphate solubilizing' (MPS). Since most microorganisms and plants must assimilate P via membrane transport, biotransformation of CaP into soluble phosphate is considered an essential component of the global P cycle. In many Gram-negative bacteria, strong organic acids produced in the periplasm via the direct oxidation pathway have been shown to dissolve CaP in the adjacent environment. Therefore, the quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase (PQQGDH) may function in the ecophysiology of many soil bacteria. There is interest in using MPS bacteria for industrial bioprocessing of rock phosphate ore (a substituted fluroapatite) or even for direct inoculation of soils as a 'biofertilizer' analogous to nitrogen fixation. Our laboratory has spent 20 years studying superior MPS bacteria. Screening genomic libraries in the appropriate E. coli genetic background can 'trap' PQQ or GDH genes from these bacteria via functional complementation. In setting the 'trap' for PQQ genes, we have identified DNA fragments that apparently induce PQQGDH activity in E. coli with no sequence homology to known PQQ genes. These data suggest that E. coli may have an alternative, inducible PQQ biosynthesis pathway. Finally, a novel protein engineering strategy to increase the catalytic rate of PQQGDH has emerged and will be discussed.

  5. Physiological characterization of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the Aspergillus nidulans phosphoketolase pathway: validation of activity through 13C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Papini, Marta; Nookaew, Intawat; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-08-01

    Several bacterial species and filamentous fungi utilize the phosphoketolase pathway (PHK) for glucose dissimilation as an alternative to the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway. In Aspergillus nidulans, the utilization of this metabolic pathway leads to increased carbon flow towards acetate and acetyl CoA. In the first step of the PHK, the pentose phosphate pathway intermediate xylulose-5-phosphate is converted into acetylphosphate and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate through the action of xylulose-5-phosphate phosphoketolase, and successively acetylphosphate is converted into acetate by the action of acetate kinase. In the present work, we describe a metabolic engineering strategy used to express the fungal genes of the phosphoketolase pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the effects of the expression of this recombinant route in yeast. The phenotype of the engineered yeast strain MP003 was studied during batch and chemostat cultivations, showing a reduced biomass yield and an increased acetate yield during batch cultures. To establish whether the observed effects in the recombinant strain MP003 were due directly or indirectly to the expression of the phosphoketolase pathway, we resolved the intracellular flux distribution based on (13)C labeling during chemostat cultivations. From flux analysis it is possible to conclude that yeast is able to use the recombinant pathway. Our work indicates that the utilization of the phosphoketolase pathway does not interfere with glucose assimilation through the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway and that the expression of this route can contribute to increase the acetyl CoA supply, therefore holding potential for future metabolic engineering strategies having acetyl CoA as precursor for the biosynthesis of industrially relevant compounds.

  6. Bio-based production of monomers and polymers by metabolically engineered microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hannah; Yang, Jung Eun; Ha, Ji Yeon; Chae, Tong Un; Shin, Jae Ho; Gustavsson, Martin; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-12-01

    Recent metabolic engineering strategies for bio-based production of monomers and polymers are reviewed. In the case of monomers, we describe strategies for producing polyamide precursors, namely diamines (putrescine, cadaverine, 1,6-diaminohexane), dicarboxylic acids (succinic, glutaric, adipic, and sebacic acids), and ω-amino acids (γ-aminobutyric, 5-aminovaleric, and 6-aminocaproic acids). Also, strategies for producing diols (monoethylene glycol, 1,3-propanediol, and 1,4-butanediol) and hydroxy acids (3-hydroxypropionic and 4-hydroxybutyric acids) used for polyesters are reviewed. Furthermore, we review strategies for producing aromatic monomers, including styrene, p-hydroxystyrene, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and phenol, and propose pathways to aromatic polyurethane precursors. Finally, in vivo production of polyhydroxyalkanoates and recombinant structural proteins having interesting applications are showcased. PMID:26318077

  7. Leading time domain seismic precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucouvalas, A. C.; Gkasios, M.; Keskebes, A.; Tselikas, N. T.

    2014-08-01

    The problem of predicting the occurrence of earthquakes is threefold. On one hand it is necessary to predict the date and magnitude of an earthquake, and on the other hand the location of the epicenter. In this work after a brief review of the state of earthquake prediction research, we report on a new leading time precursor for determining time onset of earthquake occurrence. We report the linking between earthquakes of the past with those which happen in the future via Fibonacci, Dual and Lucas numbers (FDL) numbers. We demonstrate it here with two example seed earthquakes at least 100 years old. Using this leading indicator method we can predict significant earthquake events >6.5R, with good accuracy approximately +- 1 day somewhere in the world. From a single seed we produce at least 100 trials simultaneously of which 50% are correct to +- 1day. The indicator is based on Fibonacci, Dual and Lucas numbers (FDL). This result hints that the log periodic FDL numbers are at the root of the understanding of the earthquake mechanism. The theory is based on the assumption that each occurred earthquake discontinuity can be thought of as a generating source of FDL time series. (The mechanism could well be linked to planetary orbits). When future dates are derived from clustering and convergence from previous strong earthquake dates at an FDL time distance, then we have a high probability for an earthquake to occur on that date. We set up a real time system which generates FDL time series from each previous significant earthquake (>7R) and we produce a year to year calendar of high probability earthquake dates. We have tested this over a number of years with considerable success. We have applied this technique for strong (>7R) earthquakes across the globe as well as on a restricted region such as the Greek geographic region where the magnitude is small (>4R-6.5R). In both cases the success of the method is impressive. It is our belief that supplementing this method with

  8. Selective methanol or formate production during continuous CO₂ fermentation by the acetogen biocatalysts engineered via integration of synthetic pathways using Tn7-tool.

    PubMed

    Tyurin, Michael; Kiriukhin, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Methanol-resistant mutant acetogen Clostridium sp. MT1424 originally producing only 365 mM acetate from CO₂/CO was engineered to eliminate acetate production and spore formation using Cre-lox66/lox71-system to power subsequent methanol production via expressing synthetic methanol dehydrogenase, formaldehyde dehydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase, three copies of each, assembled in cluster and integrated to chromosome using Tn7-based approach. Production of 2.2 M methanol was steady (p < 0.005) in single step fermentations of 20 % CO₂ + 80 % H₂ blend (v/v) 25 day runs each in five independent repeats. If the integrated cluster comprised only three copies of formate dehydrogenase the respective recombinants produced 95 mM formate (p < 0.005) under the same conditions. For commercialization, the suggested source of inorganic carbon would be CO₂ waste of IGCC power plant. Hydrogen may be produced in situ via powered by solar panels electrolysis.

  9. Enhanced Levels of the Aroma and Flavor Compound S-Linalool by Metabolic Engineering of the Terpenoid Pathway in Tomato Fruits1

    PubMed Central

    Lewinsohn, Efraim; Schalechet, Fernond; Wilkinson, Jack; Matsui, Kenji; Tadmor, Yaakov; Nam, Kyoung-Hee; Amar, Orit; Lastochkin, Elena; Larkov, Olga; Ravid, Uzi; Hiatt, William; Gepstein, Shimon; Pichersky, Eran

    2001-01-01

    The aromas of fruits, vegetables, and flowers are mixtures of volatile metabolites, often present in parts per billion levels or less. We show here that tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) plants transgenic for a heterologous Clarkia breweri S-linalool synthase (LIS) gene, under the control of the tomato late-ripening-specific E8 promoter, synthesize and accumulate S-linalool and 8-hydroxylinalool in ripening fruits. Apart from the difference in volatiles, no other phenotypic alterations were noted, including the levels of other terpenoids such as γ- and α-tocopherols, lycopene, β-carotene, and lutein. Our studies indicate that it is possible to enhance the levels of monoterpenes in ripening fruits by metabolic engineering. PMID:11706204

  10. Selective methanol or formate production during continuous CO₂ fermentation by the acetogen biocatalysts engineered via integration of synthetic pathways using Tn7-tool.

    PubMed

    Tyurin, Michael; Kiriukhin, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Methanol-resistant mutant acetogen Clostridium sp. MT1424 originally producing only 365 mM acetate from CO₂/CO was engineered to eliminate acetate production and spore formation using Cre-lox66/lox71-system to power subsequent methanol production via expressing synthetic methanol dehydrogenase, formaldehyde dehydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase, three copies of each, assembled in cluster and integrated to chromosome using Tn7-based approach. Production of 2.2 M methanol was steady (p < 0.005) in single step fermentations of 20 % CO₂ + 80 % H₂ blend (v/v) 25 day runs each in five independent repeats. If the integrated cluster comprised only three copies of formate dehydrogenase the respective recombinants produced 95 mM formate (p < 0.005) under the same conditions. For commercialization, the suggested source of inorganic carbon would be CO₂ waste of IGCC power plant. Hydrogen may be produced in situ via powered by solar panels electrolysis. PMID:23519429

  11. Effect of detergents on streptolysin S precursor.

    PubMed

    Calandra, G B

    1980-08-01

    Group A streptococci which produce streptolysin S contain a cellular precursor to streptolysin S in the membranes and cytoplasm which is activatable by blending in a Vortex mixer with glass beads and ribonucleic acid (RNA)-core (RNA preparation from yeast). Although no activation of precursor occurred when it was mixed with detergents, it was activated when blended with glass beads and detergents such as Tergitol NP-40 and Brij 35. Maximum activation of precursor was achieved in 1 to 2% detergent, in pH 6.5 buffer, and after 8 min of blending. Detergents Tween 20, 40, 60, and 80, Brij 56, and Lubrol WX also activated precursor, but, of all the hemolysin preparations, those with Tween 40 or 60 or Lubrol WX were the most stable. The addition of RNA-core during or after blending of precursor with detergents enhanced the titer and stability of the hemolysin. This was due in part to the association of the hemolytic moiety with RNA-core. Activation of precursor in the membrane was better with a detergent, whereas that in the cytoplasm was better with RNA-core. Therefore, precursor from two different cellular locations can be differentiated by the effects of RNA-core and detergents on precursor titer.

  12. Precursors in gas-liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasenko, V. G.; Gorelik, R. S.; Nakoryakov, V. E.; Timkin, L. S.

    2013-10-01

    Two types of precursors propagating at the speed of sound in a pure liquid have been revealed in the experiments on the evolution of pressure pulses in a gas-liquid mixture; at the same time, the main pressure pulse propagates at a low equilibrium speed of sound and its evolution is described by the Burgers-Korteweg-de Vries equation. The first high-frequency precursor is a complete analog of a classical Sommerfeld precursor, because the resonance dispersion equation for a bubble mixture coincides with that for insulators in the Lorentz model, and oscillates at a frequency close to the "plasma frequency." The second low-frequency precursor has been revealed in this work. The frequency of the low-frequency precursor is close to the resonance frequency of pulsations of bubbles, which is almost an order of magnitude lower than the frequency of the high-frequency precursor. The low-frequency precursor has a much larger amplitude of pulsations and smaller damping and is not described within the homogeneous model of the gas-liquid mixture. The observed phenomenon of low-frequency precursors has been explained within a simple heterogeneous model of a bubble liquid.

  13. The Interrelationships of Mathematical Precursors in Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirino, Paul T.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the interrelations among cognitive precursors across quantitative, linguistic, and spatial attention domains that have been implicated for math achievement in young children. The dimensionality of the quantity precursors was evaluated in 286 kindergarteners via latent variable techniques, and the contribution of precursors…

  14. Combinatorial metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for terminal alkene production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Binbin; Lee, Dong-Yup; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2015-09-01

    Biological production of terminal alkenes has garnered a significant interest due to their industrial applications such as lubricants, detergents and fuels. Here, we engineered the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce terminal alkenes via a one-step fatty acid decarboxylation pathway and improved the alkene production using combinatorial engineering strategies. In brief, we first characterized eight fatty acid decarboxylases to enable and enhance alkene production. We then increased the production titer 7-fold by improving the availability of the precursor fatty acids. We additionally increased the titer about 5-fold through genetic cofactor engineering and gene expression tuning in rich medium. Lastly, we further improved the titer 1.8-fold to 3.7 mg/L by optimizing the culturing conditions in bioreactors. This study represents the first report of terminal alkene biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae, and the abovementioned combinatorial engineering approaches collectively increased the titer 67.4-fold. We envision that these approaches could provide insights into devising engineering strategies to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biochemicals in S. cerevisiae.

  15. Metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for methionine production by removing feedback inhibition and increasing NADPH level.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Cong, Hua; Liu, Bingnan; Song, Jinzhu; Sun, Xueying; Zhang, Junzheng; Yang, Qian

    2016-09-01

    Relieving the feedback inhibition of key enzymes in a metabolic pathway is frequently the first step of producer-strain construction by genetic engineering. However, the strict feedback regulation exercised by microorganisms in methionine biosynthesis often makes it difficult to produce methionine at a high level. In this study, Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 was metabolically engineered for methionine production. First, the metD gene encoding the methionine uptake system was deleted to achieve extracellular accumulation of methionine. Then, random mutagenesis was performed to remove feedback inhibition by metabolic end-products. The resulting strain C. glutamicum ENM-16 was further engineered to block or decrease competitive branch pathways by deleting the thrB gene and changing the start codon of the dapA gene, followed by point mutations of lysC (C932T) and pyc (G1A, C1372T) to increase methionine precursor supply. To enrich the NADPH pool, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in the pentose phosphate pathway were mutated to reduce their sensitivity to inhibition by intracellular metabolites. The resultant strain C. glutamicum LY-5 produced 6.85 ± 0.23 g methionine l(-1) with substrate-specific yield (Y P/S) of 0.08 mol per mol of glucose after 72 h fed-batch fermentation. The strategies described here will be useful for construction of methionine engineering strains. PMID:27255137

  16. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents. A status report, 1982--1983

    SciTech Connect

    Forester, J.A.; Mitchell, D.B.; Whitehead, D.W.

    1997-04-01

    This study is a continuation of earlier work that evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1994 events affecting commercial light-water reactors. One-hundred nine operational events that affected 51 reactors during 1982 and 1983 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 x 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer screening the 1982-83 licensee event reports from commercial light-water reactors to select events that could be precursors to core damage. Candidates underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. This report discusses the general rationale for the study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

  17. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1995 A status report

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.

    1997-04-01

    Ten operational events that affected 10 commercial light-water reactors during 1995 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 x 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer-screening the 1995 licensee event reports from commercial light-water reactors to identify those events that could potentially be precursors. Candidate precursors were selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1994 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

  18. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 22: Appendix I

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N.; Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. |

    1995-12-01

    Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1.

  19. Method of texturing a superconductive oxide precursor

    DOEpatents

    DeMoranville, Kenneth L.; Li, Qi; Antaya, Peter D.; Christopherson, Craig J.; Riley, Jr., Gilbert N.; Seuntjens, Jeffrey M.

    1999-01-01

    A method of forming a textured superconductor wire includes constraining an elongated superconductor precursor between two constraining elongated members placed in contact therewith on opposite sides of the superconductor precursor, and passing the superconductor precursor with the two constraining members through flat rolls to form the textured superconductor wire. The method includes selecting desired cross-sectional shape and size constraining members to control the width of the formed superconductor wire. A textured superconductor wire formed by the method of the invention has regular-shaped, curved sides and is free of flashing. A rolling assembly for single-pass rolling of the elongated precursor superconductor includes two rolls, two constraining members, and a fixture for feeding the precursor superconductor and the constraining members between the rolls. In alternate embodiments of the invention, the rolls can have machined regions which will contact only the elongated constraining members and affect the lateral deformation and movement of those members during the rolling process.

  20. Nicotiana benthamiana as a Production Platform for Artemisinin Precursors

    PubMed Central

    van Herpen, Teun W. J. M.; Cankar, Katarina; Nogueira, Marilise; Bosch, Dirk; Bouwmeester, Harro J.; Beekwilder, Jules

    2010-01-01

    Background Production of pharmaceuticals in plants provides an alternative for chemical synthesis, fermentation or natural sources. Nicotiana benthamiana is deployed at commercial scale for production of therapeutic proteins. Here the potential of this plant is explored for rapid production of precursors of artemisinin, a sesquiterpenoid compound that is used for malaria treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings Biosynthetic genes leading to artemisinic acid, a precursor of artemisinin, were combined and expressed in N. benthamiana by agro-infiltration. The first committed precursor of artemisinin, amorpha-4,11-diene, was produced upon infiltration of a construct containing amorpha-4,11-diene synthase, accompanied by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase and farnesyl diphosphate synthase. Amorpha-4,11-diene was detected both in extracts and in the headspace of the N. benthamiana leaves. When the amorphadiene oxidase CYP71AV1 was co-infiltrated with the amorphadiene-synthesizing construct, the amorpha-4,11-diene levels strongly decreased, suggesting it was oxidized. Surprisingly, no anticipated oxidation products, such as artemisinic acid, were detected upon GC-MS analysis. However, analysis of leaf extracts with a non-targeted metabolomics approach, using LC-QTOF-MS, revealed the presence of another compound, which was identified as artemisinic acid-12-β-diglucoside. This compound accumulated to 39.5 mg.kg−1 fwt. Apparently the product of the heterologous pathway that was introduced, artemisinic acid, is further metabolized efficiently by glycosyl transferases that are endogenous to N. benthamiana. Conclusion/Significance This work shows that agroinfiltration of N. bentamiana can be used as a model to study the production of sesquiterpenoid pharmaceutical compounds. The interaction between the ectopically introduced pathway and the endogenous metabolism of the plant is discussed. PMID:21151979

  1. Pathway engineering for production of aromatics in Escherichia coli: Confirmation of stoichiometric analysis by independent modulation of AroG, TktA, and Pps activities

    SciTech Connect

    Patnaik, R.; Spitzer, R.G.; Liao, J.C.

    1995-05-20

    The synthesis of 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate (DAHP) is the first commitment of resources toward aromatics production in Escherichia coli. DAHP is produced during the condensation reaction between phosphenolpyruvate (PEP) and erythrose 4-phosphate (E4P) catalyzed by DAHP synthases (coded by aroF, aroG, and aroH). Stoichiometric analysis has shown a severe PEP limitation in the theoretical yield of DAHP production from glucose due to the phosphotransferase system (PTS) for sugar uptake. In the present study the authors confirm the predictions of the stoichiometric analysis by introducing pps, tktA, and aroG into vectors under independently controlled promoters, In glucose medium, although TktA has some positive effect on the final DAHP concentration, it has no effect on the yield (percent conversion). With Pps overexpression, the DAHP concentration produced from glucose is increased almost twofold and the yield is approaching the theoretical maximum, the final DAHP concentration and the yield are completely determined by the AroG activity. TktA and Pps play no or insignificant roles, and the yield can reach the theoretical maximum without overexpression of these two enzymes. The results shown hare are important for both rational design of metabolic pathways and industrial production of aromatics such as tryptophan, phenylalanine, indigo, quinic acid, and catechol.

  2. Commitment and Differentiation of Osteoclast Precursor Cells by the Sequential Expression of C-Fms and Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor κb (Rank) Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Fumio; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Ohneda, Osamu; Inada, Tomohisa; Sudo, Tetsuo; Brasel, Kenneth; Miyata, Takashi; Anderson, Dirk M.; Suda, Toshio

    1999-01-01

    Osteoclasts are terminally differentiated cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells. However, how their precursor cells diverge from macrophagic lineages is not known. We have identified early and late stages of osteoclastogenesis, in which precursor cells sequentially express c-Fms followed by receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK), and have demonstrated that RANK expression in early-stage of precursor cells (c-Fms+RANK−) was stimulated by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). Although M-CSF and RANKL (ligand) induced commitment of late-stage precursor cells (c-Fms+RANK+) into osteoclasts, even late-stage precursors have the potential to differentiate into macrophages without RANKL. Pretreatment of precursors with M-CSF and delayed addition of RANKL showed that timing of RANK expression and subsequent binding of RANKL are critical for osteoclastogenesis. Thus, the RANK–RANKL system determines the osteoclast differentiation of bipotential precursors in the default pathway of macrophagic differentiation. PMID:10601350

  3. Heterologous expression and characterization of bacterial 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Simon; Ajikumar, Parayil Kumaran; Formenti, Luca Riccardo; Zhou, Kang; Phon, Too Heng; Nielsen, Michael Lynge; Lantz, Anna Eliasson; Kielland-Brandt, Morten C; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-07-01

    Transfer of a biosynthetic pathway between evolutionary distant organisms can create a metabolic shunt capable of bypassing the native regulation of the host organism, hereby improving the production of secondary metabolite precursor molecules for important natural products. Here, we report the engineering of Escherichia coli genes encoding the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway into the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the characterization of intermediate metabolites synthesized by the MEP pathway in yeast. Our UPLC-MS analysis of the MEP pathway metabolites from engineered yeast showed that the pathway is active until the synthesis of 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclodiphosphate, but appears to lack functionality of the last two steps of the MEP pathway, catalyzed by the [4Fe-4S] iron sulfur cluster proteins encoded by ispG and ispH. In order to functionalize the last two steps of the MEP pathway, we co-expressed the genes for the E. coli iron sulfur cluster (ISC) assembly machinery. By deleting ERG13, thereby incapacitating the mevalonate pathway, in conjunction with labeling experiments with U-¹³C₆ glucose and growth experiments, we found that the ISC assembly machinery was unable to functionalize ispG and ispH. However, we have found that leuC and leuD, encoding the heterodimeric iron-sulfur cluster protein, isopropylmalate isomerase, can complement the S. cerevisiae leu1 auxotrophy. To our knowledge, this is the first time a bacterial iron-sulfur cluster protein has been functionally expressed in the cytosol of S. cerevisiae under aerobic conditions and shows that S. cerevisiae has the capability to functionally express at least some bacterial iron-sulfur cluster proteins in its cytosol.

  4. Vitamins and aging: pathways to NAD+ synthesis.

    PubMed

    Denu, John M

    2007-05-01

    Recent genetic evidence reveals additional salvage pathways for NAD(+) synthesis. In this issue, Belenky et al. (2007) report that nicotinamide riboside, a new NAD(+) precursor, regulates Sir2 deacetylase activity and life span in yeast. The ability of nicotinamide riboside to enhance life span does not depend on calorie restriction. PMID:17482537

  5. Metabolic engineering of long chain-polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthetic pathway in oleaginous fungus for dihomo-gamma linolenic acid production.

    PubMed

    Chutrakul, Chanikul; Jeennor, Sukanya; Panchanawaporn, Sarocha; Cheawchanlertfa, Pattsarun; Suttiwattanakul, Sarinya; Veerana, Mayura; Laoteng, Kobkul

    2016-01-20

    Microbial lipids are promising alternative sources of long chain-polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) for food, feed, nutraceutical and pharmaceutical sectors. Dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (C20:3Δ(8,11,14); DGLA) is an important LC-PUFAs with anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects. To generate a DGLA-producing strain, fatty acid reconstitution in Aspergillus oryzae was performed by metabolic engineering through co-expression of codon-optimized Pythium Δ(6)-desaturase and Δ(6)-elongase, which had high conversion rates of substrates to respective products as compared to the native enzymes. The Δ(6)-desaturated and Δ(6)-elongated products, γ-linolenic acid (C18:3Δ(6,9,12); GLA) and DGLA, were accumulated in phospholipids rather than triacylglycerol. Interestingly, the manipulation of lipid quality in the oleaginous fungus did not affect growth and lipid phenotypes. This strategy might expand to development of the oleaginous fungal strain for producing other tailor-made oils with industrial applications. PMID:26686314

  6. Quenching Capabilities of Long-Chain Carotenoids in Light-Harvesting-2 Complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides with an Engineered Carotenoid Synthesis Pathway.

    PubMed

    Dilbeck, Preston L; Tang, Qun; Mothersole, David J; Martin, Elizabeth C; Hunter, C Neil; Bocian, David F; Holten, Dewey; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M

    2016-06-23

    Six light-harvesting-2 complexes (LH2) from genetically modified strains of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides were studied using static and ultrafast optical methods and resonance Raman spectroscopy. These strains were engineered to incorporate carotenoids for which the number of conjugated groups (N = NC═C + NC═O) varies from 9 to 15. The Rb. sphaeroides strains incorporate their native carotenoids spheroidene (N = 10) and spheroidenone (N = 11), as well as longer-chain analogues including spirilloxanthin (N = 13) and diketospirilloxantion (N = 15) normally found in Rhodospirillum rubrum. Measurements of the properties of the carotenoid first singlet excited state (S1) in antennas from the Rb. sphaeroides set show that carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) interactions are similar to those in LH2 complexes from various other bacterial species and thus are not significantly impacted by differences in polypeptide composition. Instead, variations in carotenoid-to-BChl a energy transfer are primarily regulated by the N-determined energy of the carotenoid S1 excited state, which for long-chain (N ≥ 13) carotenoids is not involved in energy transfer. Furthermore, the role of the long-chain carotenoids switches from a light-harvesting supporter (via energy transfer to BChl a) to a quencher of the BChl a S1 excited state B850*. This quenching is manifested as a substantial (∼2-fold) reduction of the B850* lifetime and the B850* fluorescence quantum yield for LH2 housing the longest carotenoids. PMID:27285777

  7. Metabolic engineering of long chain-polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthetic pathway in oleaginous fungus for dihomo-gamma linolenic acid production.

    PubMed

    Chutrakul, Chanikul; Jeennor, Sukanya; Panchanawaporn, Sarocha; Cheawchanlertfa, Pattsarun; Suttiwattanakul, Sarinya; Veerana, Mayura; Laoteng, Kobkul

    2016-01-20

    Microbial lipids are promising alternative sources of long chain-polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) for food, feed, nutraceutical and pharmaceutical sectors. Dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (C20:3Δ(8,11,14); DGLA) is an important LC-PUFAs with anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects. To generate a DGLA-producing strain, fatty acid reconstitution in Aspergillus oryzae was performed by metabolic engineering through co-expression of codon-optimized Pythium Δ(6)-desaturase and Δ(6)-elongase, which had high conversion rates of substrates to respective products as compared to the native enzymes. The Δ(6)-desaturated and Δ(6)-elongated products, γ-linolenic acid (C18:3Δ(6,9,12); GLA) and DGLA, were accumulated in phospholipids rather than triacylglycerol. Interestingly, the manipulation of lipid quality in the oleaginous fungus did not affect growth and lipid phenotypes. This strategy might expand to development of the oleaginous fungal strain for producing other tailor-made oils with industrial applications.

  8. Quenching Capabilities of Long-Chain Carotenoids in Light-Harvesting-2 Complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides with an Engineered Carotenoid Synthesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Six light-harvesting-2 complexes (LH2) from genetically modified strains of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides were studied using static and ultrafast optical methods and resonance Raman spectroscopy. These strains were engineered to incorporate carotenoids for which the number of conjugated groups (N = NC=C + NC=O) varies from 9 to 15. The Rb. sphaeroides strains incorporate their native carotenoids spheroidene (N = 10) and spheroidenone (N = 11), as well as longer-chain analogues including spirilloxanthin (N = 13) and diketospirilloxantion (N = 15) normally found in Rhodospirillum rubrum. Measurements of the properties of the carotenoid first singlet excited state (S1) in antennas from the Rb. sphaeroides set show that carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) interactions are similar to those in LH2 complexes from various other bacterial species and thus are not significantly impacted by differences in polypeptide composition. Instead, variations in carotenoid-to-BChl a energy transfer are primarily regulated by the N-determined energy of the carotenoid S1 excited state, which for long-chain (N ≥ 13) carotenoids is not involved in energy transfer. Furthermore, the role of the long-chain carotenoids switches from a light-harvesting supporter (via energy transfer to BChl a) to a quencher of the BChl a S1 excited state B850*. This quenching is manifested as a substantial (∼2-fold) reduction of the B850* lifetime and the B850* fluorescence quantum yield for LH2 housing the longest carotenoids. PMID:27285777

  9. A pathway from chromosome transfer to engineering resulting in human and mouse artificial chromosomes for a variety of applications to bio-medical challenges.

    PubMed

    Oshimura, Mitsuo; Uno, Narumi; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Katoh, Motonobu; Inoue, Toshiaki

    2015-02-01

    Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT) is a technique to transfer a chromosome from defined donor cells into recipient cells and to manipulate chromosomes as gene delivery vectors and open a new avenue in somatic cell genetics. However, it is difficult to uncover the function of a single specific gene via the transfer of an entire chromosome or fragment, because each chromosome or fragment contains a set of numerous genes. Thus, alternative tools are human artificial chromosome (HAC) and mouse artificial chromosome (MAC) vectors, which can carry a gene or genes of interest. HACs/MACs have been generated mainly by either a "top-down approach" (engineered creation) or a "bottom-up approach" (de novo creation). HACs/MACs with one or more acceptor sites exhibit several characteristics required by an ideal gene delivery vector, including stable episomal maintenance and the capacity to carry large genomic loci plus their regulatory elements, thus allowing the physiological regulation of the introduced gene in a manner similar to that of native chromosomes. The MMCT technique is also applied for manipulating HACs and MACs in donor cells and delivering them to recipient cells. This review describes the lessons learned and prospects identified from studies on the construction of HACs and MACs, and their ability to drive exogenous gene expression in cultured cells and transgenic animals via MMCT. New avenues for a variety of applications to bio-medical challenges are also proposed.

  10. Engineering of Tomato Glandular Trichomes for the Production of Specialized Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Kortbeek, R W J; Xu, J; Ramirez, A; Spyropoulou, E; Diergaarde, P; Otten-Bruggeman, I; de Both, M; Nagel, R; Schmidt, A; Schuurink, R C; Bleeker, P M

    2016-01-01

    Glandular trichomes are specialized tissues on the epidermis of many plant species. On tomato they synthesize, store, and emit a variety of metabolites such as terpenoids, which play a role in the interaction with insects. Glandular trichomes are excellent tissues for studying the biosynthesis of specialized plant metabolites and are especially suitable targets for metabolic engineering. Here we describe the strategy for engineering tomato glandular trichomes, first with a transient expression system to provide proof of trichome specificity of selected promoters. Using microparticle bombardment, the trichome specificity of a terpene-synthase promoter could be validated in a relatively fast way. Second, we describe a method for stable expression of genes of interest in trichomes. Trichome-specific expression of another terpene-synthase promoter driving the yellow-fluorescence protein-gene is presented. Finally, we describe a case of the overexpression of farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPS), specifically in tomato glandular trichomes, providing an important precursor in the biosynthetic pathway of sesquiterpenoids. FPS was targeted to the plastid aiming to engineer sesquiterpenoid production, but interestingly leading to a loss of monoterpenoid production in the transgenic tomato trichomes. With this example we show that trichomes are amenable to engineering though, even with knowledge of a biochemical pathway, the result of such engineering can be unexpected. PMID:27480691

  11. Proteasome inhibition blocks NF-κB and ERK1/2 pathways, restores antigen expression and sensitizes resistant human melanoma to TCR-engineered CTLs

    PubMed Central

    Jazirehi, Ali R.; Economou, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of ex vivo engineered autologous lymphocytes encoding high-affinity MART-1/HLA-A*0201-specific T-cell receptor (TCR) α/β chains (F5 CTL), densely infiltrate into sites of metastatic disease, mediating dramatic but partial clinical responses in melanoma patients. We hypothesized that MART-1 down-modulation in addition to aberrant apoptotic/survival signaling could confer resistance to death signals delivered by transgenic CTLs. To explore this hypothesis, we established an in vitro model of resistant (R) lines from MART-1+/HLA-A*0201+ F5 CTL-sensitive parental (P) lines under serial F5 CTL-selective pressure. We have recently reported that several melanoma R lines, while retaining MART-1 expression, exhibited constitutive NF-κB activation and over-expression of NF-κB-dependent resistance factors. Another established melanoma cell line M244, otherwise sensitive to F5 CTL, yielded R lines after serial F5 CTL selective pressure which had both reduced MART-1 expression levels, thus, could not be recognized, and were resistant to CTL-delivered apoptotic death signals. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib blocked NF-κB activity, decreased phopspho-ERK1/2, increased phospho-JNK levels, reduced expression of resistance-factors, restored MART-1 expression to sufficient levels, which in combination allowed M244R lines be sensitized to F5 CTL-killing. These findings suggest that proteasome inhibition in immune resistant tumors can restore proapoptotic signaling and improve tumor antigen expression. PMID:22532603

  12. Mitotic position and morphology of committed precursor cells in the zebrafish retina adapt to architectural changes upon tissue maturation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Isabell P; Ramos, Ana P; Strzyz, Paulina J; Leung, Louis C; Young, Stephen; Norden, Caren

    2014-04-24

    The development of complex neuronal tissues like the vertebrate retina requires the tight orchestration of cell proliferation and differentiation. Although the complexity of transcription factors and signaling pathways involved in retinogenesis has been studied extensively, the influence of tissue maturation itself has not yet been systematically explored. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of mitotic events during zebrafish retinogenesis that reveals three types of committed neuronal precursors in addition to the previously known apical progenitors. The identified precursor types present at distinct developmental stages and exhibit different mitotic location (apical versus nonapical), cleavage plane orientation, and morphology. Interestingly, the emergence of nonapically dividing committed bipolar cell precursors can be linked to an increase in apical crowding caused by the developing photoreceptor cell layer. Furthermore, genetic interference with neuronal subset specification induces ectopic divisions of committed precursors, underlining the finding that progressing morphogenesis can effect precursor division position.

  13. Atomic Layer Deposition from Dissolved Precursors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanlin; Döhler, Dirk; Barr, Maïssa; Oks, Elina; Wolf, Marc; Santinacci, Lionel; Bachmann, Julien

    2015-10-14

    We establish a novel thin film deposition technique by transferring the principles of atomic layer deposition (ALD) known with gaseous precursors toward precursors dissolved in a liquid. An established ALD reaction behaves similarly when performed from solutions. "Solution ALD" (sALD) can coat deep pores in a conformal manner. sALD offers novel opportunities by overcoming the need for volatile and thermally robust precursors. We establish a MgO sALD procedure based on the hydrolysis of a Grignard reagent.

  14. Synthesis and structures of metal chalcogenide precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Duraj, Stan A.; Eckles, William E.; Andras, Maria T.

    1990-01-01

    The reactivity of early transition metal sandwich complexes with sulfur-rich molecules such as dithiocarboxylic acids was studied. Researchers recently initiated work on precursors to CuInSe2 and related chalcopyrite semiconductors. Th every high radiation tolerance and the high absorption coefficient of CuInSe2 makes this material extremely attractive for lightweight space solar cells. Their general approach in early transition metal chemistry, the reaction of low-valent metal complexes or metal powders with sulfur and selenium rich compounds, was extended to the synthesis of chalcopyrite precursors. Here, the researchers describe synthesis, structures, and and routes to single molecule precursors to metal chalcogenides.

  15. Cloning and optimization of a nisin biosynthesis pathway for bacteriocin harvest.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wentao; Lu, Ting

    2014-07-18

    Nisin is an important antimicrobial peptide that has enormous applications in biotechnology. Despite many encouraging efforts, its overproduction has been a long-standing challenge due to the complexity of the underlying pathway and the difficulty in genetic modification of lactic acid bacteria. Here, we cloned an entire nisin biosynthesis pathway from a nisin-producing strain (Lactococcus lactis K29) into a plasmid and transplanted the plasmid into a nisin deficient strain Lactococcus lactis MG1363, resulting in successful heterologous expression of bioactive recombinant nisin. To increase nisin harvest, we also overexpressed nisA, a gene responsible for nisin precursor production, with a set of constitutive promoters. To further optimize nisin yield, we minimized the metabolic cost of the engineered strains by integrating nisA overexpression cassettes and the recombinant pathway into a single circuit. With our rational construction and optimization, our engineered optimized strain is able to produce bioactive nisin with a yield of 1098 IU/mL, which is more than six times higher than that of the original strain. PMID:24847677

  16. Cloning and optimization of a nisin biosynthesis pathway for bacteriocin harvest.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wentao; Lu, Ting

    2014-07-18

    Nisin is an important antimicrobial peptide that has enormous applications in biotechnology. Despite many encouraging efforts, its overproduction has been a long-standing challenge due to the complexity of the underlying pathway and the difficulty in genetic modification of lactic acid bacteria. Here, we cloned an entire nisin biosynthesis pathway from a nisin-producing strain (Lactococcus lactis K29) into a plasmid and transplanted the plasmid into a nisin deficient strain Lactococcus lactis MG1363, resulting in successful heterologous expression of bioactive recombinant nisin. To increase nisin harvest, we also overexpressed nisA, a gene responsible for nisin precursor production, with a set of constitutive promoters. To further optimize nisin yield, we minimized the metabolic cost of the engineered strains by integrating nisA overexpression cassettes and the recombinant pathway into a single circuit. With our rational construction and optimization, our engineered optimized strain is able to produce bioactive nisin with a yield of 1098 IU/mL, which is more than six times higher than that of the original strain.

  17. Metabolic engineering of carbon and redox flow in the production of small organic acids.

    PubMed

    Thakker, Chandresh; Martínez, Irene; Li, Wei; San, Ka-Yiu; Bennett, George N

    2015-03-01

    The review describes efforts toward metabolic engineering of production of organic acids. One aspect of the strategy involves the generation of an appropriate amount and type of reduced cofactor needed for the designed pathway. The ability to capture reducing power in the proper form, NADH or NADPH for the biosynthetic reactions leading to the organic acid, requires specific attention in designing the host and also depends on the feedstock used and cell energetic requirements for efficient metabolism during production. Recent work on the formation and commercial uses of a number of small mono- and diacids is discussed with redox differences, major biosynthetic precursors and engineering strategies outlined. Specific attention is given to those acids that are used in balancing cell redox or providing reduction equivalents for the cell, such as formate, which can be used in conjunction with metabolic engineering of other products to improve yields. Since a number of widely studied acids derived from oxaloacetate as an important precursor, several of these acids are covered with the general strategies and particular components summarized, including succinate, fumarate and malate. Since malate and fumarate are less reduced than succinate, the availability of reduction equivalents and level of aerobiosis are important parameters in optimizing production of these compounds in various hosts. Several other more oxidized acids are also discussed as in some cases, they may be desired products or their formation is minimized to afford higher yields of more reduced products. The placement and connections among acids in the typical central metabolic network are presented along with the use of a number of specific non-native enzymes to enhance routes to high production, where available alternative pathways and strategies are discussed. While many organic acids are derived from a few precursors within central metabolism, each organic acid has its own special requirements for high

  18. Sulfur Oxidation and Contrail Precursor Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth J.

    2003-01-01

    Sulfuric acid (H2SO4), formed in commercial aircraft operations via fuel-S (goes to) SO2 (goes to) SO3 (goes to) H2SO4 plays an important role in the formation of contrails. It is believed that the first step occurs inside the combustor, the second step in the engine exit nozzle, and the third step in the exhaust plume. Thus, measurements of the sulfur oxidation rates are critical to the understanding of contrail formation. Field measurements of contrails formed behind commercial aircraft indicate that significantly greater conversion of fuel-bound sulfur to sulfate aerosol occurs than can be explained by our current knowledge of contrail physics and chemistry. The conversion of sulfur from S(IV) to S(VI) oxidation state, required for sulfate aerosol formation, is thermodynamically favored for the conditions that exist within jet engines but is kinetically disfavored. The principal reaction pathway is O+SO2+M (goes to) SO3+M. The rates of this reaction have never been measured in the temperature and pressure regimes available to aircraft operation. In the first year (FY02) of this project, we performed a series of experiments to elucidate the rate information for the O+SO2+M (goes to) SO3+M reaction. The work performed is described following the proposed work plan. Because we used the H2/O2 system for an O-atom source and rate coefficients were obtained via computer simulation, construction of a reaction mechanism and either recalculation or estimation of thermodynamic properties of H(x)SO(y) species are described first.

  19. CD200 restrains macrophage attack on oligodendrocyte precursors via toll-like receptor 4 downregulation.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Pham, Loc-Duyen D; Seo, Ji Hae; Miyamoto, Nobukazu; Maki, Takakuni; Terasaki, Yasukazu; Sakadžić, Sava; Boas, David; van Leyen, Klaus; Waeber, Christian; Kim, Kyu-Won; Arai, Ken; Lo, Eng H

    2016-04-01

    There are numerous barriers to white matter repair after central nervous system injury and the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully understood. In this study, we propose the hypothesis that inflammatory macrophages in damaged white matter attack oligodendrocyte precursor cells via toll-like receptor 4 signaling thus interfering with this endogenous progenitor recovery mechanism. Primary cell culture experiments demonstrate that peritoneal macrophages can attack and digest oligodendrocyte precursor cells via toll-like receptor 4 signaling, and this phagocytosis of oligodendrocyte precursor cells can be inhibited by using CD200-Fc to downregulate toll-like receptor 4. In an in vivo model of white matter ischemia induced by endothelin-1, treatment with CD200-Fc suppressed toll-like receptor 4 expression in peripherally circulating macrophages, thus restraining macrophage phagocytosis of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and leading to improved myelination. Taken together, these findings suggest that deleterious macrophage effects may occur after white matter ischemia, whereby macrophages attack oligodendrocyte precursor cells and interfere with endogenous recovery responses. Targeting this pathway with CD200 may offer a novel therapeutic approach to amplify endogenous oligodendrocyte precursor cell-mediated repair of white matter damage in mammalian brain.

  20. Explorations Precursor Robotic Missions (xPRM)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Jay Jenkins delivers a presentation from the Exploration Precursor Robotic Missions (xPRM) study team on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX. The purpose...

  1. Photoacoustic infrared analysis of nickel catalysts precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasieczna, S.; Ryczkowski, J.

    2006-11-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (FT-IR/PAS) has been used for identification of different forms of nickel precursors formed during CIM (classical impregnation method) and DIM (double impregnation method) process and different pH of the solution containing nickel ions.

  2. Biochemical Removal of HAP Precursors From Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.; Tucker, L.; Richards, J.

    1997-07-01

    This project addresses DOE`s interest in advanced concepts for controlling emissions of air toxics from coal-fired utility boilers. We are determining the feasibility of developing a biochemical process for the precombustion removal of substantial percentages of 13 inorganic hazardous air pollutant (HAP) precursors from coal. These HAP precursors are Sb, As, Be, Cd, Cr, Cl, Co, F, Pb, Hg, Mn, Ni, and Se. Although rapid physical coal cleaning is done routinely in preparation plants, biochemical processes for removal of HAP precursors from coal potentially offer advantages of deeper cleaning, more specificity, and less coal loss. Compared to chemical processes for coal cleaning, biochemical processes potentially offer lower costs and milder process conditions. Pyrite oxidizing bacteria, most notably Thiobacillusferrooxidans, are being evaluated in this project for their ability to remove HAP precursors from U.S. coals.

  3. Progress in molecular precursors for electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Buhro, W.E.

    1996-09-01

    Molecular-precursor chemistry provides an essential underpinning to all electronic-materials technologies, including photovoltaics and related areas of direct interest to the DOE. Materials synthesis and processing is a rapidly developing field in which advances in molecular precursors are playing a major role. This article surveys selected recent research examples that define the exciting current directions in molecular-precursor science. These directions include growth of increasingly complex structures and stoichiometries, surface-selective growth, kinetic growth of metastable materials, growth of size-controlled quantum dots and quantum-dot arrays, and growth at progressively lower temperatures. Continued progress in molecular-precursor chemistry will afford precise control over the crystal structures, nanostructures, and microstructures of electronic materials.

  4. Engineering the central pathways in Lactococcus lactis: functional expression of the phosphofructokinase (pfk) and alternative oxidase (aox1) genes from Aspergillus niger in Lactococcus lactis facilitates improved carbon conversion rates under oxidizing conditions.

    PubMed

    Papagianni, Maria; Avramidis, Nicholaos

    2012-08-10

    The present work describes a novel central pathway engineering method that has been designed with the aim to increase the carbon conversion rates under oxidizing conditions in L. lactis fermentations. The nisin producer L. lactis ATCC11454 strain has been genetically engineered by cloning a truncated version of the phosphofructokinase gene (pfk13), along with the pkaC, encoding for the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, and the alternative oxidase (aox1) genes of A. niger. Functional expression of the above genes resulted in enhanced PFK activity and the introduction of AOX activity and alternative respiration in the presence of a source of heme in the substrate, under fully aerobic growth conditions. The constructed strain is capable of fermenting high concentrations of glucose as was demonstrated in a series of glucostat fed-batch fermentations with glucose levels maintained at 55, 138 and 277 mM. The high maximum specific uptake rate of glucose of 1.8 mMs(-1)gCDW(-1) at 277 mM glucose is characteristic of the improved ability of the microorganism to handle elevated glucose concentrations under conditions otherwise causing severe reduction of PFK activity. The increased carbon flow through glycolysis led to increased protein synthesis that was reflected in increased biomass and nisin levels. The pfk 13-pkaC-aox1-transformant strain's fermentation at 277 mM glucose gave a final biomass concentration of 7.5 g/l and nisin activity of 14,000 IU/ml which is, compared to the parental strain's production levels at its optimal 55 mM glucose, increased by a factor of 2.34 for biomass and 4.37 for nisin. PMID:22759530

  5. Engineering of Escherichia coli for Lycopene Production Through Promoter Engineering.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong-Jie; Hu, Jin-Jing; Li, Xi-Ran; Liu, Jian-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    The control of gene expression is critical for metabolic engineering. The multi-copy plasmids has been widely used for high-level expression of genes. However, plasmid-based expression systems are liable to genetic instability and require a selective pressure to assure plasmid stability. In this study, we first constructed a lycopene producer Escherichia coli through promoter engineering. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mevalonate (MEV) pathway was also optimized to balance expression of the top and bottom MEV pathway by using the different strength promoters. The chromosomal heterologous expression of the optimized S. cerevisiae MEV pathway can further improved lycopene production. The final engineered strain, E. coli LYCOP 20, produced lycopene of 529.45 mg/L and 20.25 mg per gram of dry cell weight in the fed-batch culture. The engineered strain does not have a plasmid or antibiotic marker. This strategy used in this study can be applied in pathway engineering of E. coli and other bacteria.

  6. Metabolic Engineering VII Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Korpics

    2012-12-04

    The aims of this Metabolic Engineering conference are to provide a forum for academic and industrial researchers in the field; to bring together the different scientific disciplines that contribute to the design, analysis and optimization of metabolic pathways; and to explore the role of Metabolic Engineering in the areas of health and sustainability. Presentations, both written and oral, panel discussions, and workshops will focus on both applications and techniques used for pathway engineering. Various applications including bioenergy, industrial chemicals and materials, drug targets, health, agriculture, and nutrition will be discussed. Workshops focused on technology development for mathematical and experimental techniques important for metabolic engineering applications will be held for more in depth discussion. This 2008 meeting will celebrate our conference tradition of high quality and relevance to both industrial and academic participants, with topics ranging from the frontiers of fundamental science to the practical aspects of metabolic engineering.

  7. Hydridosiloxanes as precursors to ceramic products

    DOEpatents

    Blum, Yigal D.; Johnson, Sylvia M.; Gusman, Michael I.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for preparing ceramic precursors from hydridosiloxane starting materials and then pyrolyzing these precursors to give rise to silicious ceramic materials. Si--H bonds present in the hydridosiloxane starting materials are catalytically activated, and the activated hydrogen atoms may then be replaced with nonhydrogen substituents. These preceramic materials are pyrolyzed in a selected atmosphere to give the desired ceramic product. Ceramic products which may be prepared by this technique include silica, silicon oxynitride, silicon carbide, metal silicates, and mullite.

  8. Hydridosiloxanes as precursors to ceramic products

    DOEpatents

    Blum, Y.D.; Johnson, S.M.; Gusman, M.I.

    1997-06-03

    A method is provided for preparing ceramic precursors from hydridosiloxane starting materials and then pyrolyzing these precursors to give rise to silicious ceramic materials. Si-H bonds present in the hydridosiloxane starting materials are catalytically activated, and the activated hydrogen atoms may then be replaced with nonhydrogen substituents. These preceramic materials are pyrolyzed in a selected atmosphere to give the desired ceramic product. Ceramic products which may be prepared by this technique include silica, silicon oxynitride, silicon carbide, metal silicates, and mullite.

  9. Caffeic acid production enhancement by engineering a phenylalanine over-producing Escherichia coli strain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qin; Lin, Yuheng; Yan, Yajun

    2013-12-01

    Caffeic acid is a plant-specific phenylpropanoic acid with multiple health-improving effects reported, and its therapeutic derivatives have also been studied throughout the last decade. To meet its market need and achieve high-level production, microbial production of caffeic acid approaches have been developed in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli. In our previous work, we have established the first artificial pathway that realized de novo production of caffeic acid using E. coli endogenous 4-hydroxyphenylacetate 3-hydroxylase (4HP3H). In this work, we exploited the catalytic potential of 4HPA3H in the whole-cell bioconversion study and produced 3.82 g/L (461.12 mg/L/OD) caffeic acid from p-coumaric acid, a direct precursor. We further engineered a phenylalanine over-producer into a tyrosine over-producer and then introduced the artificial pathway. After adjusting the expression strategy and optimizing the inoculants timing, de novo production of caffeic acid reached 766.68 mg/L. Both results from the direct precursor and simple carbon sources represent the highest titers of caffeic acid from microbial production so far.

  10. Heterologous expression of the mevalonic acid pathway in cyanobacteria enhances endogenous carbon partitioning to isoprene.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Fiona K; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Melis, Anastasios

    2014-01-01

    Heterologous expression of the isoprene synthase gene in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 conferred upon these microorganisms the property of photosynthetic isoprene (C₅H₈) hydrocarbons production. Continuous production of isoprene from CO₂ and H₂O was achieved in the light, occurring via the endogenous methylerythritol-phosphate (MEP) pathway, in tandem with the growth of Synechocystis. This work addressed the issue of photosynthetic carbon partitioning between isoprene and biomass in Synechocystis. Evidence is presented to show heterologous genomic integration and cellular expression of the mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway genes in Synechocystis endowing a non-native pathway for carbon flux amplification to isopentenyl-diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl-diphosphate (DMAPP) precursors of isoprene. Heterologous expression of the isoprene synthase in combination with the MVA pathway enzymes resulted in photosynthetic isoprene yield improvement by approximately 2.5-fold, compared with that measured in cyanobacteria transformed with the isoprene synthase gene only. These results suggest that the MVA pathway introduces a bypass in the flux of endogenous cellular substrate in Synechocystis to IPP and DMAPP, overcoming flux limitations of the native MEP pathway. The work employed a novel chromosomal integration and expression of synthetic gene operons in Synechocystis, comprising up to four genes under the control of a single promoter, and expressing three operons simultaneously. This is the first time an entire biosynthetic pathway with seven recombinant enzymes has been heterologously expressed in a photosynthetic microorganism. It constitutes contribution to the genetic engineering toolkit of photosynthetic microorganisms and a paradigm in the pursuit of photosynthetic approaches for the renewable generation of high-impact products.

  11. The Significance of Different Diacylgycerol Synthesis Pathways on Plant Oil Composition and Bioengineering

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Philip D.; Browse, John

    2012-01-01

    The unique properties of vegetable oils from different plants utilized for food, industrial feedstocks, and fuel is dependent on the fatty acid (FA) composition of triacylglycerol (TAG). Plants can use two main pathways to produce diacylglycerol (DAG), the immediate precursor molecule to TAG synthesis: (1) De novo DAG synthesis, and (2) conversion of the membrane lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) to DAG. The FA esterified to PC are also the substrate for FA modification (e.g., desaturation, hydroxylation, etc.), such that the FA composition of PC-derived DAG can be substantially different than that of de novo DAG. Since DAG provides two of the three FA in TAG, the relative flux of TAG synthesis from de novo DAG or PC-derived DAG can greatly affect the final oil FA composition. Here we review how the fluxes through these two alternate pathways of DAG/TAG synthesis are determined and present evidence that suggests which pathway is utilized in different plants. Additionally, we present examples of how the endogenous DAG synthesis pathway in a transgenic host plant can produce bottlenecks for engineering of plant oil FA composition, and discuss alternative strategies to overcome these bottlenecks to produce crop plants with designer vegetable oil compositions. PMID:22783267

  12. A review of metabolic and enzymatic engineering strategies for designing and optimizing performance of microbial cell factories

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Amanda K.; Freedman, Benjamin G.; Bevan, David R.; Senger, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial cell factories (MCFs) are of considerable interest to convert low value renewable substrates to biofuels and high value chemicals. This review highlights the progress of computational models for the rational design of an MCF to produce a target bio-commodity. In particular, the rational design of an MCF involves: (i) product selection, (ii) de novo biosynthetic pathway identification (i.e., rational, heterologous, or artificial), (iii) MCF chassis selection, (iv) enzyme engineering of promiscuity to enable the formation of new products, and (v) metabolic engineering to ensure optimal use of the pathway by the MCF host. Computational tools such as (i) de novo biosynthetic pathway builders, (ii) docking, (iii) molecular dynamics (MD) and steered MD (SMD), and (iv) genome-scale metabolic flux modeling all play critical roles in the rational design of an MCF. Genome-scale metabolic flux models are of considerable use to the design process since they can reveal metabolic capabilities of MCF hosts. These can be used for host selection as well as optimizing precursors and cofactors of artificial de novo biosynthetic pathways. In addition, recent advances in genome-scale modeling have enabled the derivation of metabolic engineering strategies, which can be implemented using the genomic tools reviewed here as well. PMID:25379147

  13. Precursor events and self-organization leading to landslide triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Peter; Or, Dani

    2010-05-01

    Hillslopes often consist of many interacting soil and land-cover elements differing in hydraulic properties and mechanical strength. Intense rainfall events may result in heterogeneous distribution of hydrologic loading and internal weakening leading to local failure and stress redistribution to neighboring intact units. For certain spatial distributions of hydro-mechanical properties and timing of local failure events, ‘local' failure may propagate across the entire system culminating in landslide release (a ‘global' failure). Such ‘global' event is often preceded by numerous small precursor events (local failures) that theoretically may contain statistical information regarding imminent ‘global' failure and thus could provide certain early warning. We model the system and precursor events by combining concepts of Self-Organized Criticality (SOC) and Fiber Bundle Models (FBM) in a physically-based hydro-mechanical framework. The model consists of hexagonal soil columns connected by fiber bundles at their base and between adjacent elements. Fiber bundles represent mechanical bonds made of numerous connections (fibers) representing friction, roots, cementing agents, water bridges and alike that impart soil strength. Hydrological pathways and load distribution are simulated enabling updating of stresses on fiber bundles. When a bundle fails at element base, stress is redistributed to adjacent connected elements which may initiate a cascade of failures similar to other SOC models (e.g. sand pile model). Increasing hydro-mechanical loads during a rainfall event results in gradual small local fiber failures whose statistics follow a power-law with exponent depending on proximity to global failure. Such state-dependent precursor event statistics could provide a physical basis for field monitoring networks for early warning and hazard prediction. Additionally, the SOC concepts provide a simple framework for landslide susceptibility mapping in space and time and

  14. Engineered Nanomaterials Elicit Cellular Stress Responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engineered nanomaterials are being developed continuously and incorporated into consumer products, resulting in increased human exposures. The study of engineered nanomaterials has focused largely on toxicity endpoints without further investigating potential mechanisms or pathway...

  15. Amorphous Ca-phosphate precursors for Ca-carbonate biominerals mediated by Chromohalobacter marismortui.

    PubMed

    Rivadeneyra, María Angustias; Martín-Algarra, Agustín; Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Sánchez-Navas, Antonio; Martín-Ramos, José Daniel

    2010-07-01

    Although diverse microbial metabolisms are known to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals, the mechanisms involved in the bacterial mediation, in particular nucleation, are still debated. The study of aragonite precipitation by Chromohalobacter marismortui during the early stages (3-7 days) of culture experiments, and its relation to bacterial metabolic pathways, shows that: (1) carbonate nucleation occurs after precipitation of an amorphous Ca phosphate precursor phase on bacterial cell surfaces and/or embedded in bacterial films; (2) precipitation of this precursor phase results from local high concentrations of PO(4)(3-) and Ca(2+) binding around bacterial cell envelopes; and (3) crystalline nanoparticles, a few hundred nanometres in diametre, form after dissolution of precursor phosphate globules, and later aggregate, allowing the accretion of aragonite bioliths.

  16. Engineering Encounters: Engineering Adaptations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatling, Anne; Vaughn, Meredith Houle

    2015-01-01

    Engineering is not a subject that has historically been taught in elementary schools, but with the emphasis on engineering in the "Next Generation Science Standards," curricula are being developed to explicitly teach engineering content and design. However, many of the scientific investigations already conducted with students have…

  17. AIP Career Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchak, Amanda

    2012-02-01

    American Institute of Physics (AIP) Career Pathways is a new project funded by the National Science Foundation. One of the goals of AIP Career Pathways is to prepare students to compete for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) careers with a bachelor's degree in physics. In order to do so, I reviewed and compiled useful resources on finding a STEM career with a bachelor's degree in physics. These resources not only supply the job seeker with job postings in STEM careers but also provide them with information on resumes, interviewing skills, and networking. Recently at the 2011 Industrial Physics Forum, I interviewed companies in the private sector to obtain a unique perspective on what types of skills potential employers expect an applicant to posses with a bachelor's degree in physics. Ultimately, these components will be used as supplements at student career workshops held at annual Society of Physics Students Zone Meetings.

  18. The role of amorphous precursors in the crystallization of La and Nd carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallina, Beatriz; Rodriguez-Blanco, Juan Diego; Brown, Andrew P.; Blanco, Jesus A.; Benning, Liane G.

    2015-07-01

    Crystalline La and Nd carbonates can be formed from poorly-ordered nanoparticulate precursors, termed amorphous lanthanum carbonate (ALC) and amorphous neodymium carbonate (ANC). When reacted in air or in aqueous solutions these precursors show highly variable lifetimes and crystallization pathways. We have characterized these precursors and the crystallization pathways and products with solid-state, spectroscopic and microscopic techniques to explain the differences in crystallization mechanisms between the La and Nd systems. ALC and ANC consist of highly hydrated, 10-20 nm spherical nanoparticles with a general formula of REE2(CO3)3.5H2O (REE = La, Nd). The stabilities differ by ~2 orders of magnitude, with ANC being far more stable than ALC. This difference is due to the Nd3+ ion having a far higher hydration energy compared to the La3+ ion. This, together with temperature and reaction times, leads to clear differences not only in the kinetics and mechanisms of crystallization of the amorphous precursor La- and Nd-carbonate phases but also in the resulting crystallite sizes and morphologies of the end products. All crystalline La and Nd carbonates developed spherulitic morphologies when crystallization occurred from hydrous phases in solution at temperatures above 60 °C (La system) and 95 °C (Nd system). We suggest that spherulitic growth occurs due to a rapid breakdown of the amorphous precursors and a concurrent rapid increase in supersaturation levels in the aqueous solution. The kinetic data show that the crystallization pathway for both La and Nd carbonate systems is dependent on the reaction temperature and the ionic potential of the REE3+ ion.Crystalline La and Nd carbonates can be formed from poorly-ordered nanoparticulate precursors, termed amorphous lanthanum carbonate (ALC) and amorphous neodymium carbonate (ANC). When reacted in air or in aqueous solutions these precursors show highly variable lifetimes and crystallization pathways. We have

  19. Overexpression of a homogeneous oligosaccharide with 13C labeling by genetically engineered yeast strain.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Sayoko; Chiba, Yasunori; Jigami, Yoshifumi; Kato, Koichi

    2011-08-01

    This report describes a novel method for overexpression of (13)C-labeled oligosaccharides using genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, in which a homogeneous high-mannose-type oligosaccharide accumulates because of deletions of genes encoding three enzymes involved in the processing pathway of asparagine-linked oligosaccharides in the Golgi complex. Using uniformly (13)C-labeled glucose as the sole carbon source in the culture medium of these engineered yeast cells, high yields of the isotopically labeled Man(8)GlcNAc(2) oligosaccharide could be successfully harvested from glycoprotein extracts of the cells. Furthermore, (13)C labeling at selected positions of the sugar residues in the oligosaccharide could be achieved using a site-specific (13)C-enriched glucose as the metabolic precursor, facilitating NMR spectral assignments. The (13)C-labeling method presented provides the technical basis for NMR analyses of structures, dynamics, and interactions of larger, branched oligosaccharides.

  20. Accident Precursor Analysis and Management: Reducing Technological Risk Through Diligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phimister, James R. (Editor); Bier, Vicki M. (Editor); Kunreuther, Howard C. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    Almost every year there is at least one technological disaster that highlights the challenge of managing technological risk. On February 1, 2003, the space shuttle Columbia and her crew were lost during reentry into the atmosphere. In the summer of 2003, there was a blackout that left millions of people in the northeast United States without electricity. Forensic analyses, congressional hearings, investigations by scientific boards and panels, and journalistic and academic research have yielded a wealth of information about the events that led up to each disaster, and questions have arisen. Why were the events that led to the accident not recognized as harbingers? Why were risk-reducing steps not taken? This line of questioning is based on the assumption that signals before an accident can and should be recognized. To examine the validity of this assumption, the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) undertook the Accident Precursors Project in February 2003. The project was overseen by a committee of experts from the safety and risk-sciences communities. Rather than examining a single accident or incident, the committee decided to investigate how different organizations anticipate and assess the likelihood of accidents from accident precursors. The project culminated in a workshop held in Washington, D.C., in July 2003. This report includes the papers presented at the workshop, as well as findings and recommendations based on the workshop results and committee discussions. The papers describe precursor strategies in aviation, the chemical industry, health care, nuclear power and security operations. In addition to current practices, they also address some areas for future research.

  1. Methylerythritol Phosphate Pathway of Isoprenoid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lishan; Chang, Wei-chen; Xiao, Youli; Liu, Hung-wen; Liu, Pinghua

    2016-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a class of natural products with more than 50,000 members. All isoprenoids are constructed from two precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and its isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). Two of the most important discoveries in isoprenoid biosynthetic studies in recent years are the elucidation of a second isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway) and a modified mevalonate (MVA) pathway. In this review, mechanistic insights on the MEP pathway enzymes are summarized. Since many isoprenoids have important biological activities, the need to produce them in sufficient quantities for downstream research efforts or commercial application is apparent. Recent advances in both the MVA and MEP pathway-based synthetic biology efforts are also illustrated by reviewing the landmark work of artemisinic acid and taxadien-5α-ol production through microbial fermentations. PMID:23746261

  2. Summer 2014 Pathways Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hand, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    Over the summer I had the exciting opportunity to work for NASA at the Kennedy Space Center as a Mission Assurance Engineering intern. When I was offered a position in mission assurance for the Safety and Mission Assurance directorate's Launch Services Division, I didn't really know what I would be doing, but I knew it would be an excellent opportunity to learn and grow professionally. In this report I will provide some background information on the Launch Services Division, as well as detail my duties and accomplishments during my time as an intern. Additionally, I will relate the significance of my work experience to my current academic work and future career goals. This report contains background information on Mission Assurance Engineering, a description of my duties and accomplishments over the summer of 2014, and relates the significance of my work experience to my school work and future career goals. It is a required document for the Pathways program.

  3. 40 CFR 766.38 - Reporting on precursor chemical substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting on precursor chemical... § 766.38 Reporting on precursor chemical substances. (a) Identification of precursor chemical substances. Precursor chemical substances are produced under conditions that will not yield HDDs and HDFs, but...

  4. Improving peppermint essential oil yield and composition by metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Lange, Bernd Markus; Mahmoud, Soheil Seyed; Wildung, Mark R; Turner, Glenn W; Davis, Edward M; Lange, Iris; Baker, Raymond C; Boydston, Rick A; Croteau, Rodney B

    2011-10-11

    Peppermint (Mentha × piperita L.) was transformed with various gene constructs to evaluate the utility of metabolic engineering for improving essential oil yield and composition. Oil yield increases were achieved by overexpressing genes involved in the supply of precursors through the 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Two-gene combinations to enhance both oil yield and composition in a single transgenic line were assessed as well. The most promising results were obtained by transforming plants expressing an antisense version of (+)-menthofuran synthase, which is critical for adjusting the levels of specific undesirable oil constituents, with a construct for the overexpression of the MEP pathway gene 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (up to 61% oil yield increase over wild-type controls with low levels of the undesirable side-product (+)-menthofuran and its intermediate (+)-pulegone). Elite transgenic lines were advanced to multiyear field trials, which demonstrated consistent oil yield increases of up to 78% over wild-type controls and desirable effects on oil composition under commercial growth conditions. The transgenic expression of a gene encoding (+)-limonene synthase was used to accumulate elevated levels of (+)-limonene, which allows oil derived from transgenic plants to be recognized during the processing of commercial formulations containing peppermint oil. Our study illustrates the utility of metabolic engineering for the sustainable agricultural production of high quality essential oils at a competitive cost. PMID:21963983

  5. Improving peppermint essential oil yield and composition by metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Lange, Bernd Markus; Mahmoud, Soheil Seyed; Wildung, Mark R; Turner, Glenn W; Davis, Edward M; Lange, Iris; Baker, Raymond C; Boydston, Rick A; Croteau, Rodney B

    2011-10-11

    Peppermint (Mentha × piperita L.) was transformed with various gene constructs to evaluate the utility of metabolic engineering for improving essential oil yield and composition. Oil yield increases were achieved by overexpressing genes involved in the supply of precursors through the 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Two-gene combinations to enhance both oil yield and composition in a single transgenic line were assessed as well. The most promising results were obtained by transforming plants expressing an antisense version of (+)-menthofuran synthase, which is critical for adjusting the levels of specific undesirable oil constituents, with a construct for the overexpression of the MEP pathway gene 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (up to 61% oil yield increase over wild-type controls with low levels of the undesirable side-product (+)-menthofuran and its intermediate (+)-pulegone). Elite transgenic lines were advanced to multiyear field trials, which demonstrated consistent oil yield increases of up to 78% over wild-type controls and desirable effects on oil composition under commercial growth conditions. The transgenic expression of a gene encoding (+)-limonene synthase was used to accumulate elevated levels of (+)-limonene, which allows oil derived from transgenic plants to be recognized during the processing of commercial formulations containing peppermint oil. Our study illustrates the utility of metabolic engineering for the sustainable agricultural production of high quality essential oils at a competitive cost.

  6. Sequestration and Transport of Lignin Monomeric Precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.J.; Miao, Y.-C.; Zhang, K.-W.

    2011-01-18

    Lignin is the second most abundant terrestrial biopolymer after cellulose. It is essential for the viability of vascular plants. Lignin precursors, the monolignols, are synthesized within the cytosol of the cell. Thereafter, these monomeric precursors are exported into the cell wall, where they are polymerized and integrated into the wall matrix. Accordingly, transport of monolignols across cell membranes is a critical step affecting deposition of lignin in the secondarily thickened cell wall. While the biosynthesis of monolignols is relatively well understood, our knowledge of sequestration and transport of these monomers is sketchy. In this article, we review different hypotheses on monolignol transport and summarize the recent progresses toward the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying monolignol sequestration and transport across membranes. Deciphering molecular mechanisms for lignin precursor transport will support a better biotechnological solution to manipulate plant lignification for more efficient agricultural and industrial applications of cell wall biomass.

  7. Nozzle designs with pitch precursor ablatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, H. R.; Bedard, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Recent developments in carbon phenolic ablatives for solid rocket motor nozzles have yielded a pitch precursor carbon fiber offering significant raw material availability and cost saving advantages as compared to conventional rayon precursor material. This paper discusses the results of an experimental program conducted to assess the thermal performance and characterize the thermal properties of pitch precursor carbon phenolic ablatives. The end result of this program is the complete thermal characterization of pitch fabric, pitch mat, hybrid pitch/rayon fabric and pitch mat molding compound. With these properties determined an analytic capability now exists for predicting the thermal performance of these materials in rocket nozzle liner applications. Further planned efforts to verify material performance and analytical prediction procedures through actual rocket motor firings are also discussed.

  8. Bioretrosynthetic construction of a didanosine biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Birmingham, William R.; Starbird, Chrystal A.; Panosian, Timothy D.; Nannemann, David P.; Iverson, T. M.; Bachmann, Brian O.

    2014-01-01

    Concatenation of engineered biocatalysts into multistep pathways dramatically increases their utility, but development of generalizable assembly methods remains a significant challenge. Herein we evaluate ‘bioretrosynthesis’, which is an application of the retrograde evolution hypothesis, for biosynthetic pathway construction. To test bioretrosynthesis, we engineered a pathway for synthesis of the antiretroviral nucleoside analog didanosine (2,3-dideoxyinosine). Applying both directed evolution and structure-based approaches, we began pathway construction with a retro-extension from an engineered purine nucleoside phosphorylase and evolved 1,5-phosphopentomutase to accept the substrate 2,3-dideoxyribose 5-phosphate with a 700-fold change in substrate selectivity and 3-fold increased turnover in cell lysate. A subsequent retrograde pathway extension, via ribokinase engineering, resulted in a didanosine pathway with a 9,500-fold change in nucleoside production selectivity and 50-fold increase in didanosine production. Unexpectedly, the result of this bioretrosynthetic step was not a retro-extension from phosphopentomutase, but rather the discovery of a fortuitous pathway-shortening bypass via the engineered ribokinase. PMID:24657930

  9. Combining Chemoinformatics with Bioinformatics: In Silico Prediction of Bacterial Flavor-Forming Pathways by a Chemical Systems Biology Approach “Reverse Pathway Engineering”

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengjin; Bienfait, Bruno; Sacher, Oliver; Gasteiger, Johann; Siezen, Roland J.; Nauta, Arjen; Geurts, Jan M. W.

    2014-01-01

    The incompleteness of genome-scale metabolic models is a major bottleneck for systems biology approaches, which are based on large numbers of metabolites as identified and quantified by metabolomics. Many of the revealed secondary metabolites and/or their derivatives, such as flavor compounds, are non-essential in metabolism, and many of their synthesis pathways are unknown. In this study, we describe a novel approach, Reverse Pathway Engineering (RPE), which combines chemoinformatics and bioinformatics analyses, to predict the “missing links” between compounds of interest and their possible metabolic precursors by providing plausible chemical and/or enzymatic reactions. We demonstrate the added-value of the approach by using flavor-forming pathways in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as an example. Established metabolic routes leading to the formation of flavor compounds from leucine were successfully replicated. Novel reactions involved in flavor formation, i.e. the conversion of alpha-hydroxy-isocaproate to 3-methylbutanoic acid and the synthesis of dimethyl sulfide, as well as the involved enzymes were successfully predicted. These new insights into the flavor-formation mechanisms in LAB can have a significant impact on improving the control of aroma formation in fermented food products. Since the input reaction databases and compounds are highly flexible, the RPE approach can be easily extended to a broad spectrum of applications, amongst others health/disease biomarker discovery as well as synthetic biology. PMID:24416282

  10. Precursors prior to type IIn supernova explosions are common: Precursor rates, properties, and correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Ofek, Eran O.; Steinbok, Aviram; Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Tal, David; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Yaron, Ofer; Sullivan, Mark; Shaviv, Nir J.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Nugent, Peter E.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Silverman, Jeffrey M.

    2014-07-10

    There is a growing number of Type IIn supernovae (SNe) which present an outburst prior to their presumably final explosion. These precursors may affect the SN display, and are likely related to poorly charted phenomena in the final stages of stellar evolution. By coadding Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) images taken prior to the explosion, here we present a search for precursors in a sample of 16 Type IIn SNe. We find five SNe IIn that likely have at least one possible precursor event (PTF 10bjb, SN 2010mc, PTF 10weh, SN 2011ht, and PTF 12cxj), three of which are reported here for the first time. For each SN we calculate the control time. We find that precursor events among SNe IIn are common: at the one-sided 99% confidence level, >50% of SNe IIn have at least one pre-explosion outburst that is brighter than 3 × 10{sup 7} L{sub ☉} taking place up to 1/3 yr prior to the SN explosion. The average rate of such precursor events during the year prior to the SN explosion is likely ≳ 1 yr{sup –1}, and fainter precursors are possibly even more common. Ignoring the two weakest precursors in our sample, the precursors rate we find is still on the order of one per year. We also find possible correlations between the integrated luminosity of the precursor and the SN total radiated energy, peak luminosity, and rise time. These correlations are expected if the precursors are mass-ejection events, and the early-time light curve of these SNe is powered by interaction of the SN shock and ejecta with optically thick circumstellar material.

  11. Single Source Precursors for Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banger, Kulbinder K.; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Harris, Jerry D.; Cowen, Jonathan; Buhro, William E.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2002-01-01

    The development of thin film solar cells on flexible, lightweight, space-qualified substrates provides an attractive cost solution to fabricating solar arrays with high specific power, (W/kg). The use of a polycrystalline chalcopyrite absorber layer for thin film solar cells is considered as the next generation photovoltaic devices. At NASA GRC we have focused on the development of new single source precursors (SSP) and their utility to deposit the chalcopyrite semi-conducting layer (CIS) onto flexible substrates for solar cell fabrication. The syntheses and thermal modulation of SSPs via molecular engineering is described. Thin-film fabrication studies demonstrate the SSPs can be used in a spray CVD (chemical vapor deposition) process, for depositing CIS at reduced temperatures, which display good electrical properties, suitable for PV (photovoltaic) devices.

  12. Cyanobacterial production of 1,3-propanediol directly from carbon dioxide using a synthetic metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Yasutaka; Maki, Yuki; Tatsuke, Tsuneyuki; Hanai, Taizo

    2016-03-01

    Production of chemicals directly from carbon dioxide using light energy is an attractive option for a sustainable future. The 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) production directly from carbon dioxide was achieved by engineered Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 with a synthetic metabolic pathway. Glycerol dehydratase catalyzing the conversion of glycerol to 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde in a coenzyme B12-dependent manner worked in S. elongatus PCC 7942 without addition of vitamin B12, suggesting that the intrinsic pseudovitamin B12 served as a substitute of coenzyme B12. The highest titers of 1,3-PDO (3.79±0.23 mM; 288±17.7 mg/L) and glycerol (12.62±1.55 mM; 1.16±0.14 g/L), precursor of 1,3-PDO, were reached after 14 days of culture under optimized conditions in this study. PMID:26769097

  13. Polymeric precursors for fibers and matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1992-01-01

    Candidate polymeric precursors for ceramic fiber and matrix processing are discussed, with a view to the advantages and disadvantages of this approach relative to existing alternatives. The properties of ceramic products thus derived are noted to strongly depend on the molecular weight and structure of the starting polymer; in particular, the ceramic's composition and morphology are dependent on the character and extent of crosslinking, as well as on the path of pyrolysis. While large and complex structural ceramic components may ultimately be obtainable by these means, the polymer-precursor method is still in its developmental infancy.

  14. High-Solids Polyimide Precursor Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Chun-Hua (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The invention is a highly concentrated stable solution of polymide precursors (monometers) having a solids content ranging from about 80 to 98 percent by weight in lower aliphatic alcohols i.e. methyl and/or ethylalcohol. the concentrated polyimide precursos solution comparisons effective amounts of at least one aromatic diamine, at least one aromatic dianhydride, and a monofunctional endcap including monoamines, monoanhydrides and lower alkyl esters of said monoanhydrides. These concentrated polyimide precursor solutions are particularly useful for the preparation of fibrous prepregs and composites for use in structural materials for military and civil applications.

  15. P120-Catenin Regulates Early Trafficking Stages of the N-Cadherin Precursor Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wehrendt, Diana P.; Carmona, Fernando; González Wusener, Ana E.; González, Ángela; Martínez, Juan M. Lázaro; Arregui, Carlos O.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that binding of p120 catenin to the cytoplasmic domain of surface cadherin prevents cadherin endocytosis and degradation, contributing to cell-cell adhesion. In the present work we show that p120 catenin bound to the N-cadherin precursor, contributes to its anterograde movement from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi complex. In HeLa cells, depletion of p120 expression, or blocking its binding to N-cadherin, increased the accumulation of the precursor in the ER, while it decreased the localization of mature N-cadherin at intercellular junctions. Reconstitution experiments in p120-deficient SW48 cells with all three major isoforms of p120 (1, 3 and 4) had similar capacity to promote the processing of the N-cadherin precursor to the mature form, and its localization at cell-cell junctions. P120 catenin and protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B facilitated the recruitment of the N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF), an ATPase involved in vesicular trafficking, to the N-cadherin precursor complex. Dominant negative NSF E329Q impaired N-cadherin trafficking, maturation and localization at cell-cell junctions. Our results uncover a new role for p120 catenin bound to the N-cadherin precursor ensuring its trafficking through the biosynthetic pathway towards the cell surface. PMID:27254316

  16. Kinetic and cytochemical identification of osteoclast precursors and their differentiation into multinucleated osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Baron, R; Neff, L; Tran Van, P; Nefussi, J R; Vignery, A

    1986-02-01

    Positive identification of osteoclast percursors has not yet been possible. The authors have, in the present report, used a model system in the rat in which it is possible to induce the formation of multinucleated osteoclasts at a predictable and reproducible site and time (Tran Van P, Vignery A, Baron R. Anat Rec 1982, 202:445-451; Cell Tissue Res 1982, 225:283-292). This system allowed the investigation of the cellular events occurring locally during the recruitment and differentiation of osteoclast precursors. Prior to the formation of multinucleated osteoclasts, mononuclear cells positive for fluoride-inhibitable nonspecific esterase and cells positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase increase in number locally. Double staining procedures demonstrated the presence of both enzymes in a number of cells, thereby suggesting that they are steps in the differentiation of a single cell population. Ultrastructural studies show that lysosomal enzymes are present in every compartment of the biosynthetic pathway, in small primary lysosomes and various forms of storage granules. As these precursors arrive at the bone surface, the storage granule lysosomes are markedly depleted. It is concluded that mononuclear precursors of the osteoclast are members of the mononuclear-phagocyte lineage and differentiate early to synthesize, store, and later secrete large quantities of lysosomal enzymes. The mature osteoclast, which, as its precursor, is positive for the mononuclear-phagocyte marker enzyme nonspecific esterase, results from the fusion of these mononuclear precursors, which occurs only after their attachment to the bone surface to be resorbed.

  17. Atomic layer deposition and chemical vapor deposition precursor selection method application to strontium and barium precursors.

    PubMed

    Holme, Timothy P; Prinz, Fritz B

    2007-08-23

    A new selection method for atomic layer deposition (ALD) or chemical vapor deposition (CVD) precursors is proposed and tested. Density functional theory was used to simulate Sr and Ba precursors, and several precursors were selected and used to grow films via ALD as test cases for the precursor selection method. The precursors studied were M(x)2 (M = Sr, Ba; x = tetramethylheptanedionate (tmhd), acetylacetonate (acac), hexafluoroacetylacetonate (hfac), cyclopentadienyl (H(5)C(5)), pentamethylcyclopentadienyl (Me(5)C(5)), n-propyltetramethylcyclopentadienyl (PrMe(4)C(5)), tris(isopropylcyclopentadienyl) (Pr(3)(i)H(2)C(5)), tris(isopropylcyclopentadienyl)(THF) (Pr(3)(i)H(2)C(5))(OC(4)H(8)), tris(isopropylcyclopentadienyl)(THF)2 (Pr(3)(i)H(2)C(5))(OC(4)H(8))2, tris(tert-butylcyclopentadienyl) (Bu(3)(t)H(2)C(5)), tris(tert-butylcyclopentadienyl)(THF) (Bu(3)(t)H(2)C(5))(OC(4)H(8)), heptafluoro-2,2-dimethyl-3,5-octanedionate (fod)). The energy required to break bonds between the metal atom and the ligands was calculated to find which precursors react most readily. In the case of tmhd and Cp precursors, the energy required to break bonds in the precursor ligand was studied to evaluate the most likely mechanism of carbon incorporation into the film. Trends for Ba and Sr followed each other closely, reflecting the similar chemistry among alkaline earth metals. The diketonate precursors have stronger bonds to the metals than the Cp precursors, but weaker bonds within the ligand, explaining the carbon contamination found in experimentally grown films. Atomic layer deposition of SrO was tested with Sr(tmhd)2 and Sr(PrMe(4)Cp)2 and oxygen, ozone, and water as oxygen sources. No deposition was measured with tmhd precursors, and SrO films were deposited with PrMe(4)Cp with a source temperature of 200 degrees C and at substrate temperatures between 250 and 350 degrees C with growth rates increasing for oxygen sources in this order: O2 < H2O < O2 + H2O. The experimental results

  18. Biocommodity Engineering.

    PubMed

    Lynd; Wyman; Gerngross

    1999-10-01

    xylose and other nonglucose sugars, and "consolidated bioprocessing" in which cellulase production, cellulose hydrolysis, and fermentation of soluble carbohydrates to desired products occur in a single process step. With respect to product diversification, a distinction is made between replacement of a fossil resource-derived chemical with a biomass-derived chemical of identical composition and substitution of a biomass-derived chemical with equivalent functional characteristics but distinct composition. The substitution strategy involves larger transition issues but is seen as more promising in the long term. Metabolic engineering pursuant to the production of biocommodity products requires host organisms with properties such as the ability to use low-cost substrates, high product yield, competitive fitness, and robustness in industrial environments. In many cases, it is likely to be more successful to engineer a desired pathway into an organism having useful industrial properties rather than trying to engineer such often multi-gene properties into host organisms that do not have them naturally. Identification of host organisms with useful industrial properties and development of genetic systems for these organisms is a research challenge distinctive to biocommodity engineering. Chemical catalysis and separations technologies have important roles to play in downstream processing of biocommodity products and involve a distinctive set of challenges relative to petrochemical processing. At its current nascent state of development, the definition and advancement of the biocommodity field can benefit from integration at multiple levels. These include technical issues associated with integrating unit operations with each other, integrating production of individual products into a multi-product biorefinery, and integrating biorefineries into the broader resource, economic, and environmental systems in which they function. We anticipate that coproduction of multiple products

  19. Remodeling the isoprenoid pathway in tobacco by expressing the cytoplasmic mevalonate pathway in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shashi; Hahn, Frederick M; Baidoo, Edward; Kahlon, Talwinder S; Wood, Delilah F; McMahan, Colleen M; Cornish, Katrina; Keasling, Jay D; Daniell, Henry; Whalen, Maureen C

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic engineering to enhance production of isoprenoid metabolites for industrial and medical purposes is an important goal. The substrate for isoprenoid synthesis in plants is produced by the mevalonate pathway (MEV) in the cytosol and by the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway in plastids. A multi-gene approach was employed to insert the entire cytosolic MEV pathway into the tobacco chloroplast genome. Molecular analysis confirmed the site-specific insertion of seven transgenes and homoplasmy. Functionality was demonstrated by unimpeded growth on fosmidomycin, which specifically inhibits the MEP pathway. Transplastomic plants containing the MEV pathway genes accumulated higher levels of mevalonate, carotenoids, squalene, sterols, and triacyglycerols than control plants. This is the first time an entire eukaryotic pathway with six enzymes has been transplastomically expressed in plants. Thus, we have developed an important tool to redirect metabolic fluxes in the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway and a viable multigene strategy for engineering metabolism in plants.

  20. Basics for Testing Large Earthquake Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romashkova, L. L.; Kossobokov, V. G.; Peresan, A.

    2008-12-01

    Earthquakes, the large or significant ones in particular, are extreme events that, by definition, are the rare ones. Testing candidates to large earthquake precursors implies investigation a small sample of case- histories with the support of specific and sensitive statistical methods and data of different quality, collected in various conditions. Regretfully, in many seismological studies the methods of mathematical statistics are used outside their applicability: earthquakes are evidently not independent events and have heterogeneous, perhaps fractal distribution in space and time. Moreover, the naïve or, conversely, delicately-designed models are considered as a full replacement of seismic phenomena. Although there are many claims of earthquake precursors, most of them should remain in the list of precursor candidates, which have never been tested in any rigorous way, and, in fact, are anecdotal cases of coincidental occurrence. To establish a precursory link between sequences of events of the same or different phenomena, it is necessary to accumulate enough statistics in a rigorous forecast/prediction test, which results, i.e. success-to-failure scores and space-time volume of alarms, must appeal for rejecting hypotheses of random coincidental appearance. We reiterate suggesting to use so-called "Seismic Roulette" null-hypothesis as the most adequate random alternative accounting for the empirical spatial distribution of earthquakes in question and illustrate a few outcomes of Testing Large Earthquake Precursors.

  1. Superconductor precursor mixtures made by precipitation method

    DOEpatents

    Bunker, Bruce C.; Lamppa, Diana L.; Voigt, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus for preparing highly pure homogeneous precursor powder mixtures for metal oxide superconductive ceramics. The mixes are prepared by instantaneous precipitation from stoichiometric solutions of metal salts such as nitrates at controlled pH's within the 9 to 12 range, by addition of solutions of non-complexing pyrolyzable cations, such as alkyammonium and carbonate ions.

  2. Processing of two homologous precursors, pro-neuropeptide Y and pro-pancreatic polypeptide, in transfected cell lines expressing different precursor convertases.

    PubMed

    Wulff, B S; Johansen, T E; Dalbøge, H; O'Hare, M M; Schwartz, T W

    1993-06-25

    The processing of two homologous precursors, pro-neuropeptide Y (pro-NPY) and pro-pancreatic poly-peptide (pro-PP), was studied in four neuroendocrine cell lines after transfection: CA-77 medullary thyroid carcinoma cells, AtT-20 corticotrope pituitary cells, RIN2A-19 pancreatic endocrine cells, and NB1 neuroblastoma cells. Northern blot analysis indicated that the AtT-20 cells only expressed precursor convertase 3; in contrast, NB1 cells only expressed precursor convertase 2, whereas the RIN2A-19 and CA-77 cells expressed both enzymes. Despite these differences in expression pattern of precursor convertases the four cell lines were, surprisingly, indistinguishable in respect to their processing of pro-PP and pro-NPY. In all four cell lines, pro-NPY was almost completely converted to NPY, and, in all four cell lines, only around 50% of the PP precursor was converted to PP. The relatively poor processing efficiency of pro-PP was rather similar to the processing efficiency of the endogenously produced precursors in the respective cell lines, pro-calcitonin (CA-77), proopiomelanocortin (AtT-20), proinsulin (RIN2A-19), and pro-vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (NB1). At least in the CA-77 cells, NPY and PP were apparently sorted to the regulated secretory pathway, as upon stimulation with secretagogue the release of the transfected peptides increased in parallel with the endogenously expressed peptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide. Mutagenesis studies showed that on the N-terminal side of the di-basic processing site, the otherwise important difference in structure between PP and NPY, a proline for glutamine in position 34, was not responsible for the difference in processing efficiency. On the C-terminal side of the processing site, the efficient processing of pro-NPY could not be transferred to pro-PP by exchanging the whole C-terminal domains of the precursors. It is concluded that pro-NPY is processed more efficiently than pro-PP in all neuroendocrine cell lines

  3. Detection of Chemical Precursors of Explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Certain selected chemicals associated with terrorist activities are too unstable to be prepared in final form. These chemicals are often prepared as precursor components, to be combined at a time immediately preceding the detonation. One example is a liquid explosive, which usually requires an oxidizer, an energy source, and a chemical or physical mechanism to combine the other components. Detection of the oxidizer (e.g. H2O2) or the energy source (e.g., nitromethane) is often possible, but must be performed in a short time interval (e.g., 5 15 seconds) and in an environment with a very small concentration (e.g.,1 100 ppm), because the target chemical(s) is carried in a sealed container. These needs are met by this invention, which provides a system and associated method for detecting one or more chemical precursors (components) of a multi-component explosive compound. Different carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are loaded (by doping, impregnation, coating, or other functionalization process) for detecting of different chemical substances that are the chemical precursors, respectively, if these precursors are present in a gas to which the CNTs are exposed. After exposure to the gas, a measured electrical parameter (e.g. voltage or current that correlate to impedance, conductivity, capacitance, inductance, etc.) changes with time and concentration in a predictable manner if a selected chemical precursor is present, and will approach an asymptotic value promptly after exposure to the precursor. The measured voltage or current are compared with one or more sequences of their reference values for one or more known target precursor molecules, and a most probable concentration value is estimated for each one, two, or more target molecules. An error value is computed, based on differences of voltage or current for the measured and reference values, using the most probable concentration values. Where the error value is less than a threshold, the system concludes that the target

  4. Microbial engineering for the production of fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives

    DOEpatents

    Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Abidi, Syed Hussain Imam

    2014-07-01

    Some aspects of this invention relate to methods useful for the conversion of a carbon source to a biofuel or biofuel precursor using engineered microbes. Some aspects of this invention relate to the discovery of a key regulator of lipid metabolism in microbes. Some aspects of this invention relate to engineered microbes for biofuel or biofuel precursor production.

  5. Engine Test and Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Chown Chou

    1999-01-01

    Although the importance of aerosols and their precursors are now well recognized, the characterization of current subsonic engines for these emissions is far from complete. Furthermore, since the relationship of engine operating parameters to aerosol emissions is not known, extrapolation to untested and unbuilt engines necessarily remains highly uncertain. 1997 NASA LaRC engine test, as well as the parallel 1997 NASA LaRC flight measurement, attempts to address both issues by expanding measurements of aerosols and aerosol precursors with fuels containing different levels of fuel sulfur content. The specific objective of the 1997 engine test is to obtain a database of sulfur oxides emissions as well as the non-volatile particulate emission properties as a function of fuel sulfur and engine operating conditions. Four diagnostic systems, extractive and non-intrusive (optical), will be assembled for the gaseous and particulate emissions characterization measurements study. NASA is responsible for the extractive gaseous emissions measurement system which contains an array of analyzers dedicated to examining the concentrations of specific gases (NO, NO(x), CO, CO2, O2, THC, SO2) and the smoke number. University of Missouri-Rolla uses the Mobile Aerosol Sampling System to measure aerosol/particulate total concentration, size distribution, volatility and hydration property. Air Force Research Laboratory uses the Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer to measure SO2, SO3/H2SO4, and HN03 Aerodyne Research, Inc. uses Infrared Tunable Diode Laser system to measure SO2, SO3, NO, H2O, and CO2.

  6. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 21: Main report and appendices A--H

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N.; Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. |

    1995-12-01

    Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1.

  7. Engineering acetyl coenzyme A supply: functional expression of a bacterial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the cytosol of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Barbara U; van Rossum, Harmen M; Luttik, Marijke A H; Akeroyd, Michiel; Benjamin, Kirsten R; Wu, Liang; de Vries, Simon; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2014-10-21

    The energetic (ATP) cost of biochemical pathways critically determines the maximum yield of metabolites of vital or commercial relevance. Cytosolic acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is a key precursor for biosynthesis in eukaryotes and for many industrially relevant product pathways that have been introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae, such as isoprenoids or lipids. In this yeast, synthesis of cytosolic acetyl-CoA via acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) involves hydrolysis of ATP to AMP and pyrophosphate. Here, we demonstrate that expression and assembly in the yeast cytosol of an ATP-independent pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) from Enterococcus faecalis can fully replace the ACS-dependent pathway for cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthesis. In vivo activity of E. faecalis PDH required simultaneous expression of E. faecalis genes encoding its E1α, E1β, E2, and E3 subunits, as well as genes involved in lipoylation of E2, and addition of lipoate to growth media. A strain lacking ACS that expressed these E. faecalis genes grew at near-wild-type rates on glucose synthetic medium supplemented with lipoate, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. A physiological comparison of the engineered strain and an isogenic Acs(+) reference strain showed small differences in biomass yields and metabolic fluxes. Cellular fractionation and gel filtration studies revealed that the E. faecalis PDH subunits were assembled in the yeast cytosol, with a subunit ratio and enzyme activity similar to values reported for PDH purified from E. faecalis. This study indicates that cytosolic expression and assembly of PDH in eukaryotic industrial microorganisms is a promising option for minimizing the energy costs of precursor supply in acetyl-CoA-dependent product pathways. Importance: Genetically engineered microorganisms are intensively investigated and applied for production of biofuels and chemicals from renewable sugars. To make such processes economically and environmentally sustainable, the energy

  8. Engineering acetyl coenzyme A supply: functional expression of a bacterial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the cytosol of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Barbara U; van Rossum, Harmen M; Luttik, Marijke A H; Akeroyd, Michiel; Benjamin, Kirsten R; Wu, Liang; de Vries, Simon; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2014-01-01

    The energetic (ATP) cost of biochemical pathways critically determines the maximum yield of metabolites of vital or commercial relevance. Cytosolic acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is a key precursor for biosynthesis in eukaryotes and for many industrially relevant product pathways that have been introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae, such as isoprenoids or lipids. In this yeast, synthesis of cytosolic acetyl-CoA via acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) involves hydrolysis of ATP to AMP and pyrophosphate. Here, we demonstrate that expression and assembly in the yeast cytosol of an ATP-independent pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) from Enterococcus faecalis can fully replace the ACS-dependent pathway for cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthesis. In vivo activity of E. faecalis PDH required simultaneous expression of E. faecalis genes encoding its E1α, E1β, E2, and E3 subunits, as well as genes involved in lipoylation of E2, and addition of lipoate to growth media. A strain lacking ACS that expressed these E. faecalis genes grew at near-wild-type rates on glucose synthetic medium supplemented with lipoate, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. A physiological comparison of the engineered strain and an isogenic Acs(+) reference strain showed small differences in biomass yields and metabolic fluxes. Cellular fractionation and gel filtration studies revealed that the E. faecalis PDH subunits were assembled in the yeast cytosol, with a subunit ratio and enzyme activity similar to values reported for PDH purified from E. faecalis. This study indicates that cytosolic expression and assembly of PDH in eukaryotic industrial microorganisms is a promising option for minimizing the energy costs of precursor supply in acetyl-CoA-dependent product pathways. Importance: Genetically engineered microorganisms are intensively investigated and applied for production of biofuels and chemicals from renewable sugars. To make such processes economically and environmentally sustainable, the energy

  9. Aniline is an inducer, and not a precursor, for indole derivatives in Rubrivivax benzoatilyticus JA2.

    PubMed

    Mujahid, Mohammed; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V

    2014-01-01

    Rubrivivax benzoatilyticus JA2 and other anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria produce indole derivatives when exposed to aniline, a xenobiotic compound. Though this phenomenon has been reported previously, the role of aniline in the production of indoles is still a biochemical riddle. The present study aims at understanding the specific role of aniline (as precursor or stimulator) in the production of indoles and elucidating the biochemical pathway of indoles in aniline-exposed cells by using stable isotope approaches. Metabolic profiling revealed tryptophan accumulation only in aniline exposed cells along with indole 3-acetic acid (IAA) and indole 3-aldehyde (IAld), the two major catabolites of tryptophan. Deuterium labelled aniline feeding studies revealed that aniline is not a precursor of indoles in strain JA2. Further, production of indoles only in aniline-exposed cells suggests that aniline is an indoles stimulator. In addition, production of indoles depended on the presence of a carbon source, and production enhanced when carbon sources were added to the culture. Isotope labelled fumarate feeding identified, fumarate as the precursor of indole, indicating de novo synthesis of indoles. Glyphosate (shikimate pathway inhibitor) inhibited the indoles production, accumulation of tryptophan, IAA and IAld indicating that indoles synthesis in strain JA2 occurs via the de novo shikimate pathway. The up-regulation of anthranilate synthase gene and induction of anthranilate synthase activity correlated well with tryptophan production in strain JA2. Induction of tryptophan aminotransferase and tryptophan 2-monooxygenase activities corroborated well with IAA levels, suggesting that tryptophan catabolism occurs simultaneously in aniline exposed cells. Our study demonstrates that aniline (stress) stimulates tryptophan/indoles synthesis via the shikimate pathway by possibly modulating the metabolic pathway.

  10. TAT-pathway-dependent lipoproteins as a niche-based adaptation in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Shruthi, Hamsanathan; Babu, Mohan Madan; Sankaran, Krishnan

    2010-04-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins, characterized by the N-terminal N-acyl S-diacylglyceryl Cysteine, are key membrane proteins in bacterial homeostasis. It is generally thought that during the modification lipoprotein precursors are translocated via the Sec-machinery in an unfolded state. The recent discovery of twin-arginine translocation (TAT) machinery, meant for exporting folded-proteins, and the presence of TAT-type signal sequences in co-factor-containing (hence already folded) lipoproteins, prompted us to investigate its role and significance in lipoprotein biosynthesis. We systematically analyzed 696 prokaryotic genomes using an algorithm based on DOLOP and TatP rules to predict TAT-pathway-dependent lipoprotein substrates. Occurrence of the deduced TAT-pathway-dependent lipoprotein substrates in relation to genome size, presence or absence of TAT machinery, and extent of its usage for lipoprotein export and habitat types revealed that unlike the host-obligates, the free-living prokaryotes in complex hostile environments (e.g., soil) depend more on TAT-exported lipoproteins. Functional classification of the predicted TAT-dependent lipoproteins revealed enrichment in hydrolases and oxido-reductases, which are fast-folding and co-factor-containing proteins. The role of the TAT pathway in the export of folded-lipoproteins and in niche-specific adaptation for survival has important implications not only in lipoprotein biosynthesis, but also for protein and metabolic engineering applications. PMID:20333370

  11. Engineering Escherichia coli to overproduce aromatic amino acids and derived compounds.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Alberto; Martínez, Juan A; Flores, Noemí; Escalante, Adelfo; Gosset, Guillermo; Bolivar, Francisco

    2014-09-09

    The production of aromatic amino acids using fermentation processes with recombinant microorganisms can be an advantageous approach to reach their global demands. In addition, a large array of compounds with alimentary and pharmaceutical applications can potentially be synthesized from intermediates of this metabolic pathway. However, contrary to other amino acids and primary metabolites, the artificial channelling of building blocks from central metabolism towards the aromatic amino acid pathway is complicated to achieve in an efficient manner. The length and complex regulation of this pathway have progressively called for the employment of more integral approaches, promoting the merge of complementary tools and techniques in order to surpass metabolic and regulatory bottlenecks. As a result, relevant insights on the subject have been obtained during the last years, especially with genetically modified strains of Escherichia coli. By combining metabolic engineering strategies with developments in synthetic biology, systems biology and bioprocess engineering, notable advances were achieved regarding the generation, characterization and optimization of E. coli strains for the overproduction of aromatic amino acids, some of their precursors and related compounds. In this paper we review and compare recent successful reports dealing with the modification of metabolic traits to attain these objectives.

  12. Deoxyxylulose 5-Phosphate Synthase Controls Flux through the Methylerythritol 4-Phosphate Pathway in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Louwrance P.; Rohwer, Johann M.; Ghirardo, Andrea; Hammerbacher, Almuth; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Raguschke, Bettina; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Phillips, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The 2-C-methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway supplies precursors for plastidial isoprenoid biosynthesis including carotenoids, redox cofactor side chains, and biogenic volatile organic compounds. We examined the first enzyme of this pathway, 1-deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS), using metabolic control analysis. Multiple Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lines presenting a range of DXS activities were dynamically labeled with 13CO2 in an illuminated, climate-controlled, gas exchange cuvette. Carbon was rapidly assimilated into MEP pathway intermediates, but not into the mevalonate pathway. A flux control coefficient of 0.82 was calculated for DXS by correlating absolute flux to enzyme activity under photosynthetic steady-state conditions, indicating that DXS is the major controlling enzyme of the MEP pathway. DXS manipulation also revealed a second pool of a downstream metabolite, 2-C-methylerythritol-2,4-cyclodiphosphate (MEcDP), metabolically isolated from the MEP pathway. DXS overexpression led to a 3- to 4-fold increase in MEcDP pool size but to a 2-fold drop in maximal labeling. The existence of this pool was supported by residual MEcDP levels detected in dark-adapted transgenic plants. Both pools of MEcDP are closely modulated by DXS activity, as shown by the fact that the concentration control coefficient of DXS was twice as high for MEcDP (0.74) as for 1-deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate (0.35) or dimethylallyl diphosphate (0.34). Despite the high flux control coefficient for DXS, its overexpression led to only modest increases in isoprenoid end products and in the photosynthetic rate. Diversion of flux via MEcDP may partly explain these findings and suggests new opportunities to engineer the MEP pathway. PMID:24987018

  13. A new synthetic biology approach allows transfer of an entire metabolic pathway from a medicinal plant to a biomass crop