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Sample records for precursor protein regulates

  1. Manduca Contactin Regulates Amyloid Precursor Protein-Dependent Neuronal Migration.

    PubMed

    Ramaker, Jenna M; Swanson, Tracy L; Copenhaver, Philip F

    2016-08-17

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) was originally identified as the source of β-amyloid peptides that accumulate in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but it also has been implicated in the control of multiple aspects of neuronal motility. APP belongs to an evolutionarily conserved family of transmembrane proteins that can interact with a variety of adapter and signaling molecules. Recently, we showed that both APP and its insect ortholog [APPL (APP-Like)] directly bind the heterotrimeric G-protein Goα, supporting the model that APP can function as an unconventional Goα-coupled receptor. We also adapted a well characterized assay of neuronal migration in the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, to show that APPL-Goα signaling restricts ectopic growth within the developing nervous system, analogous to the role postulated for APP family proteins in controlling migration within the mammalian cortex. Using this assay, we have now identified Manduca Contactin (MsContactin) as an endogenous ligand for APPL, consistent with previous work showing that Contactins interact with APP family proteins in other systems. Using antisense-based knockdown protocols and fusion proteins targeting both proteins, we have shown that MsContactin is selectively expressed by glial cells that ensheath the migratory neurons (expressing APPL), and that MsContactin-APPL interactions normally prevent inappropriate migration and outgrowth. These results provide new evidence that Contactins can function as authentic ligands for APP family proteins that regulate APP-dependent responses in the developing nervous system. They also support the model that misregulated Contactin-APP interactions might provoke aberrant activation of Goα and its effectors, thereby contributing to the neurodegenerative sequelae that typify AD. Members of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) family participate in many aspects of neuronal development, but the ligands that normally activate APP signaling have remained controversial. This research

  2. Manduca Contactin Regulates Amyloid Precursor Protein-Dependent Neuronal Migration

    PubMed Central

    Ramaker, Jenna M.; Swanson, Tracy L.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) was originally identified as the source of β-amyloid peptides that accumulate in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but it also has been implicated in the control of multiple aspects of neuronal motility. APP belongs to an evolutionarily conserved family of transmembrane proteins that can interact with a variety of adapter and signaling molecules. Recently, we showed that both APP and its insect ortholog [APPL (APP-Like)] directly bind the heterotrimeric G-protein Goα, supporting the model that APP can function as an unconventional Goα-coupled receptor. We also adapted a well characterized assay of neuronal migration in the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, to show that APPL–Goα signaling restricts ectopic growth within the developing nervous system, analogous to the role postulated for APP family proteins in controlling migration within the mammalian cortex. Using this assay, we have now identified Manduca Contactin (MsContactin) as an endogenous ligand for APPL, consistent with previous work showing that Contactins interact with APP family proteins in other systems. Using antisense-based knockdown protocols and fusion proteins targeting both proteins, we have shown that MsContactin is selectively expressed by glial cells that ensheath the migratory neurons (expressing APPL), and that MsContactin–APPL interactions normally prevent inappropriate migration and outgrowth. These results provide new evidence that Contactins can function as authentic ligands for APP family proteins that regulate APP-dependent responses in the developing nervous system. They also support the model that misregulated Contactin–APP interactions might provoke aberrant activation of Goα and its effectors, thereby contributing to the neurodegenerative sequelae that typify AD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Members of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) family participate in many aspects of neuronal development, but the ligands that normally activate APP signaling have remained

  3. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) regulates synaptic structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Tyan, Sheue-Houy; Shih, Ann Yu-Jung; Walsh, Jessica J.; Murayama, Hiroko; Sarsoza, Floyd; Ku, Lawrence; Eggert, Simone; Hof, Patrick R.; Koo, Edward H.; Dickstein, Dara L.

    2012-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a critical role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. APP is proteolytically cleaved by β- and γ-secretases to generate the amyloid β-protein (Aβ), the core protein component of senile plaques in AD. It is also cleaved by α-secretase to release the large soluble APP (sAPP) luminal domain that has been shown to exhibit trophic properties. Increasing evidence points to the development of synaptic deficits and dendritic spine loss prior to deposition of amyloid in transgenic mouse models that overexpress APP and Aβ peptides. The consequence of loss of APP, however, is unsettled. In this study, we investigated whether APP itself plays a role in regulating synaptic structure and function using an APP knock-out (APP−/−) mouse model. We examined dendritic spines in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons and CA1 neurons of hippocampus from APP−/− mice. In the cultured neurons, there was a significant decrease (~35%) in spine density in neurons derived from APP−/− mice compared to littermate control neurons that were partially restored with sAPPα-conditioned medium. In APP−/− mice in vivo, spine numbers were also significantly reduced but by a smaller magnitude (~15%). Furthermore, apical dendritic length and dendritic arborization were markedly diminished in hippocampal neurons. These abnormalities in neuronal morphology were accompanied by reduction in long-term potentiation. Strikingly, all these changes in vivo were only seen in mice that were 12-15 months in age but not in younger animals. We propose that APP, specifically sAPP, is necessary for the maintenance of dendritic integrity in the hippocampus in an age-associated manner. Finally, these age-related changes may contribute to Alzheimer’s changes independent of Aβ-mediated synaptic toxicity. PMID:22884903

  4. Amyloid beta precursor protein regulates male sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Ho; Bonthius, Paul J; Tsai, Houng-Wei; Bekiranov, Stefan; Rissman, Emilie F

    2010-07-28

    Sexual behavior is variable between individuals, ranging from celibacy to sexual addictions. Within normal populations of individual men, ranging from young to middle aged, testosterone levels do not correlate with libido. To study the genetic mechanisms that contribute to individual differences in male sexual behavior, we used hybrid B6D2F1 male mice, which are a cross between two common inbred strains (C57BL/6J and DBA/2J). Unlike most laboratory rodent species in which male sexual behavior is highly dependent upon gonadal steroids, sexual behavior in a large proportion of these hybrid male mice after castration is independent of gonadal steroid hormones and their receptors; thus, we have the ability to discover novel genes involved in this behavior. Gene expression arrays, validation of gene candidates, and transgenic mice that overexpress one of the genes of interest were used to reveal genes involved in maintenance of male sexual behavior. Several genes related to neuroprotection and neurodegeneration were differentially expressed in the hypothalamus of males that continued to mate after castration. Male mice overexpressing the human form of one of these candidate genes, amyloid beta precursor protein (APP), displayed enhanced sexual behavior before castration and maintained sexual activity for a longer duration after castration compared with controls. Our results reveal a novel and unexpected relationship between APP and male sexual behavior. We speculate that declining APP during normal aging in males may contribute to the loss of sexual function.

  5. Post-transcriptional regulation of amyloid precursor protein by microRNAs and RNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruberti, Francesca; Barbato, Christian; Cogoni, Carlo

    2010-11-01

    Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) and its proteolytic product amyloid beta (Aβ) are critical in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). APP gene duplication and transcriptional upregulation are linked to AD. In addition, normal levels of APP appear to be required for some physiological functions in the developing brain. Several studies in mammalian cell lines and primary neuron cultures indicate that RNA binding proteins and microRNAs interacting with regulatory regions of the APP mRNA modulate expression of APP post-transcriptionally. However, when the various mechanisms of APP post-transcriptional regulation are recruited and which of them are acting in a synergistic fashion to balance APP protein levels, is unclear. Recent studies suggest that further investigation of the molecules and pathways involved in APP post-transcriptional regulation are warranted.

  6. Post-transcriptional regulation of amyloid precursor protein by microRNAs and RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Barbato, Christian; Cogoni, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) and its proteolytic product amyloid beta (Aβ) are critical in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). APP gene duplication and transcriptional upregulation are linked to AD. In addition, normal levels of APP appear to be required for some physiological functions in the developing brain. Several studies in mammalian cell lines and primary neuron cultures indicate that RNA binding proteins and microRNAs interacting with regulatory regions of the APP mRNA modulate expression of APP post-transcriptionally. However, when the various mechanisms of APP post-transcriptional regulation are recruited and which of them are acting in a synergistic fashion to balance APP protein levels, is unclear. Recent studies suggest that further investigation of the molecules and pathways involved in APP post-transcriptional regulation are warranted. PMID:21331224

  7. The Alzheimer Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) and Fe65, an APP-Binding Protein, Regulate Cell Movement

    PubMed Central

    Sabo, Shasta L.; Ikin, Annat F.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Greengard, Paul

    2001-01-01

    FE65 binds to the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP), but the function of this interaction has not been identified. Here, we report that APP and FE65 are involved in regulation of cell movement. APP and FE65 colocalize with actin and Mena, an Abl-associated signaling protein thought to regulate actin dynamics, in lamellipodia. APP and FE65 specifically concentrate with β1-integrin in dynamic adhesion sites known as focal complexes, but not in more static adhesion sites known as focal adhesions. Overexpression of APP accelerates cell migration in an MDCK cell wound–healing assay. Coexpression of APP and FE65 dramatically enhances the effect of APP on cell movement, probably by regulating the amount of APP at the cell surface. These data are consistent with a role for FE65 and APP, possibly in a Mena-containing macromolecular complex, in regulation of actin-based motility. PMID:11425871

  8. Amyloid Precursor Protein Translation Is Regulated by a 3'UTR Guanine Quadruplex.

    PubMed

    Crenshaw, Ezekiel; Leung, Brian P; Kwok, Chun Kit; Sharoni, Michal; Olson, Kalee; Sebastian, Neeraj P; Ansaloni, Sara; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Akins, Michael R; Bevilacqua, Philip C; Saunders, Aleister J

    2015-01-01

    A central event in Alzheimer's disease is the accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides generated by the proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). APP overexpression leads to increased Aβ generation and Alzheimer's disease in humans and altered neuronal migration and increased long term depression in mice. Conversely, reduction of APP expression results in decreased Aβ levels in mice as well as impaired learning and memory and decreased numbers of dendritic spines. Together these findings indicate that therapeutic interventions that aim to restore APP and Aβ levels must do so within an ideal range. To better understand the effects of modulating APP levels, we explored the mechanisms regulating APP expression focusing on post-transcriptional regulation. Such regulation can be mediated by RNA regulatory elements such as guanine quadruplexes (G-quadruplexes), non-canonical structured RNA motifs that affect RNA stability and translation. Via a bioinformatics approach, we identified a candidate G-quadruplex within the APP mRNA in its 3'UTR (untranslated region) at residues 3008-3027 (NM_201414.2). This sequence exhibited characteristics of a parallel G-quadruplex structure as revealed by circular dichroism spectrophotometry. Further, as with other G-quadruplexes, the formation of this structure was dependent on the presence of potassium ions. This G-quadruplex has no apparent role in regulating transcription or mRNA stability as wild type and mutant constructs exhibited equivalent mRNA levels as determined by real time PCR. Instead, we demonstrate that this G-quadruplex negatively regulates APP protein expression using dual luciferase reporter and Western blot analysis. Taken together, our studies reveal post-transcriptional regulation by a 3'UTR G-quadruplex as a novel mechanism regulating APP expression.

  9. Amyloid precursor protein in Drosophila glia regulates sleep and genes involved in glutamate recycling.

    PubMed

    Farca Luna, Abud Jose; Perier, Magali; Seugnet, Laurent

    2017-03-17

    The Amyloid Precursor Protein (App) plays a crucial role in Alzheimer disease (AD) via the production and deposition of toxic β-amyloid peptides. App is heavily expressed in neurons where the vast majority of studies investigating its function have been carried out, while almost nothing is known about its function in glia, where it is also expressed, and can potentially participate in the regulation of neuronal physiology. In this report, we investigated whether Appl, the Drosophila homolog of App, could influence sleep-wake regulation when its function is manipulated in glial cells. Appl inhibition in astrocyte-like and cortex glia resulted in higher sleep amounts and longer sleep bout duration during the night, while overexpression had the opposite effect. These sleep phenotypes were not the result of developmental defects, and were correlated with changes in expression in Glutamine Synthetase (GS) in astrocyte-like glia, and in changes in the gap-junction component innexin2 in cortex glia. Downregulating both GS and innexin2, but not either one individually, resulted in higher sleep amounts, similarly to Appl inhibition. Consistent with these results the expression of GS and innexin2 are increased following sleep deprivation indicating that these two genes are dynamically linked to vigilance states. Interestingly, the reduction of GS expression and the sleep phenotype observed upon Appl inhibition could be rescued by increasing the expression of the glutamate transporter dEaat1. In contrast, reducing dEaat1 expression severely disrupted sleep. These results associate glutamate recycling, sleep and a glial function for the App family proteins.StatementThe Amyloid Precursor Protein (App) has been intensively studied for its implication in Alzheimer Disease (AD). The attributed functions of App are linked to the physiology and cellular biology of neurons where the protein is predominantly expressed. Consequences on glia in AD are generally thought to be secondary

  10. MicroRNA-101 Regulates Amyloid Precursor Protein Expression in Hippocampal Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Vilardo, Elisa; Barbato, Christian; Ciotti, MariaTeresa; Cogoni, Carlo; Ruberti, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its proteolytic product amyloid beta (Aβ) are associated with both familial and sporadic forms of Alzheimer disease (AD). Aberrant expression and function of microRNAs has been observed in AD. Here, we show that in rat hippocampal neurons cultured in vitro, the down-regulation of Argonaute-2, a key component of the RNA-induced silencing complex, produced an increase in APP levels. Using site-directed mutagenesis, a microRNA responsive element (RE) for miR-101 was identified in the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of APP. The inhibition of endogenous miR-101 increased APP levels, whereas lentiviral-mediated miR-101 overexpression significantly reduced APP and Aβ load in hippocampal neurons. In addition, miR-101 contributed to the regulation of APP in response to the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-lβ). Thus, miR-101 is a negative regulator of APP expression and affects the accumulation of Aβ, suggesting a possible role for miR-101 in neuropathological conditions. PMID:20395292

  11. Regulation of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing by the Beclin 1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Philipp A.; Pickford, Fiona; Sun, Chung-Huan; Lucin, Kurt M.; Masliah, Eliezer; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation pathway that functions in protein and organelle turnover in response to starvation and cellular stress. Autophagy is initiated by the formation of a complex containing Beclin 1 (BECN1) and its binding partner Phosphoinositide-3-kinase, class 3 (PIK3C3). Recently, BECN1 deficiency was shown to enhance the pathology of a mouse model of Alzheimer Disease (AD). However, the mechanism by which BECN1 or autophagy mediate these effects are unknown. Here, we report that the levels of Amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its metabolites can be reduced through autophagy activation, indicating that they are a substrate for autophagy. Furthermore, we find that knockdown of Becn1 in cell culture increases the levels of APP and its metabolites. Accumulation of APP and APP C-terminal fragments (APP-CTF) are accompanied by impaired autophagosomal clearance. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagosomal-lysosomal degradation causes a comparable accumulation of APP and APP-metabolites in autophagosomes. Becn1 reduction in cell culture leads to lower levels of its binding partner Pik3c3 and increased presence of Microtubule-associated protein 1, light chain 3 (LC3). Overexpression of Becn1, on the other hand, reduces cellular APP levels. In line with these observations, we detected less BECN1 and PIK3C3 but more LC3 protein in brains of AD patients. We conclude that BECN1 regulates APP processing and turnover. BECN1 is involved in autophagy initiation and autophagosome clearance. Accordingly, BECN1 deficiency disrupts cellular autophagy and autophagosomal-lysosomal degradation and alters APP metabolism. Together, our findings suggest that autophagy and the BECN1-PIK3C3 complex regulate APP processing and play an important role in AD pathology. PMID:20559548

  12. Regulation of amyloid precursor protein processing by the Beclin 1 complex.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Philipp A; Pickford, Fiona; Sun, Chung-Huan; Lucin, Kurt M; Masliah, Eliezer; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2010-06-15

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation pathway that functions in protein and organelle turnover in response to starvation and cellular stress. Autophagy is initiated by the formation of a complex containing Beclin 1 (BECN1) and its binding partner Phosphoinositide-3-kinase, class 3 (PIK3C3). Recently, BECN1 deficiency was shown to enhance the pathology of a mouse model of Alzheimer Disease (AD). However, the mechanism by which BECN1 or autophagy mediate these effects are unknown. Here, we report that the levels of Amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its metabolites can be reduced through autophagy activation, indicating that they are a substrate for autophagy. Furthermore, we find that knockdown of Becn1 in cell culture increases the levels of APP and its metabolites. Accumulation of APP and APP C-terminal fragments (APP-CTF) are accompanied by impaired autophagosomal clearance. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagosomal-lysosomal degradation causes a comparable accumulation of APP and APP-metabolites in autophagosomes. Becn1 reduction in cell culture leads to lower levels of its binding partner Pik3c3 and increased presence of Microtubule-associated protein 1, light chain 3 (LC3). Overexpression of Becn1, on the other hand, reduces cellular APP levels. In line with these observations, we detected less BECN1 and PIK3C3 but more LC3 protein in brains of AD patients. We conclude that BECN1 regulates APP processing and turnover. BECN1 is involved in autophagy initiation and autophagosome clearance. Accordingly, BECN1 deficiency disrupts cellular autophagy and autophagosomal-lysosomal degradation and alters APP metabolism. Together, our findings suggest that autophagy and the BECN1-PIK3C3 complex regulate APP processing and play an important role in AD pathology.

  13. Epigenetic regulation in amyloid precursor protein and the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khue Vu

    2014-04-18

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is a neurogenetic disorder of purine metabolism in which the enzyme, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) is defective. A major unsolved question is how the loss of HPRT enzyme function affects the brain to cause the neurobehavioural syndrome in LNS and its attenuated variants (LNVs). To address this issue, a search for a link between LNS and the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is developed. Here, I identified, for the first time in fibroblasts from normal subjects as well as from LNS and LNV patients: (a) several APP-mRNA isoforms encoding divers APP protein isoforms ranging from 120 to 770 amino acids (with or without mutations and/or deletions) accounted for epigenetic mechanisms in the regulation of alternative APP pre-mRNA splicing and (b) five novel independent polymorphisms in the APP promoter: -956A>G, -1023T>C, -1161A>G, -2224G>A, -2335C>T relative to the transcription start site. A role for epistasis between mutated HPRT and APP genes affecting the regulation of alternative APP pre-mRNA splicing in LNS is suggested. An accurate quantification of various APP isoforms in brain tissues for detection of initial pathological changes or pathology development is needed. My findings may provide new directions not only for investigating the role of APP in neuropathology associated with HPRT-deficiency in LNS but also for the research in neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders by which various APP isoforms involved in the pathogenesis of the diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nuclear localization of amyloid-β precursor protein-binding protein Fe65 is dependent on regulated intramembrane proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Koistinen, Niina A.; Edlund, Anna K.; Menon, Preeti K.; Ivanova, Elena V.; Bacanu, Smaranda

    2017-01-01

    Fe65 is an adaptor protein involved in both processing and signaling of the Alzheimer-associated amyloid-β precursor protein, APP. Here, the subcellular localization was further investigated using TAP-tagged Fe65 constructs expressed in human neuroblastoma cells. Our results indicate that PTB2 rather than the WW domain is important for the nuclear localization of Fe65. Electrophoretic mobility shift of Fe65 caused by phosphorylation was not detected in the nuclear fraction, suggesting that phosphorylation could restrict nuclear localization of Fe65. Furthermore, both ADAM10 and γ-secretase inhibitors decreased nuclear Fe65 in a similar way indicating an important role also of α-secretase in regulating nuclear translocation. PMID:28323844

  15. Amyloid precursor protein expression and processing are differentially regulated during cortical neuron differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Petra; Agholme, Lotta; Nazir, Faisal Hayat; Satir, Tugce Munise; Toombs, Jamie; Wellington, Henrietta; Strandberg, Joakim; Bontell, Thomas Olsson; Kvartsberg, Hlin; Holmström, Maria; Boreström, Cecilia; Simonsson, Stina; Kunath, Tilo; Lindahl, Anders; Blennow, Kaj; Hanse, Eric; Portelius, Erik; Wray, Selina; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2016-07-07

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its cleavage product amyloid β (Aβ) have been thoroughly studied in Alzheimer's disease. However, APP also appears to be important for neuronal development. Differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) towards cortical neurons enables in vitro mechanistic studies on human neuronal development. Here, we investigated expression and proteolytic processing of APP during differentiation of human iPSCs towards cortical neurons over a 100-day period. APP expression remained stable during neuronal differentiation, whereas APP processing changed. α-Cleaved soluble APP (sAPPα) was secreted early during differentiation, from neuronal progenitors, while β-cleaved soluble APP (sAPPβ) was first secreted after deep-layer neurons had formed. Short Aβ peptides, including Aβ1-15/16, peaked during the progenitor stage, while processing shifted towards longer peptides, such as Aβ1-40/42, when post-mitotic neurons appeared. This indicates that APP processing is regulated throughout differentiation of cortical neurons and that amyloidogenic APP processing, as reflected by Aβ1-40/42, is associated with mature neuronal phenotypes.

  16. Amyloid precursor protein expression and processing are differentially regulated during cortical neuron differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Petra; Agholme, Lotta; Nazir, Faisal Hayat; Satir, Tugce Munise; Toombs, Jamie; Wellington, Henrietta; Strandberg, Joakim; Bontell, Thomas Olsson; Kvartsberg, Hlin; Holmström, Maria; Boreström, Cecilia; Simonsson, Stina; Kunath, Tilo; Lindahl, Anders; Blennow, Kaj; Hanse, Eric; Portelius, Erik; Wray, Selina; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its cleavage product amyloid β (Aβ) have been thoroughly studied in Alzheimer’s disease. However, APP also appears to be important for neuronal development. Differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) towards cortical neurons enables in vitro mechanistic studies on human neuronal development. Here, we investigated expression and proteolytic processing of APP during differentiation of human iPSCs towards cortical neurons over a 100-day period. APP expression remained stable during neuronal differentiation, whereas APP processing changed. α-Cleaved soluble APP (sAPPα) was secreted early during differentiation, from neuronal progenitors, while β-cleaved soluble APP (sAPPβ) was first secreted after deep-layer neurons had formed. Short Aβ peptides, including Aβ1-15/16, peaked during the progenitor stage, while processing shifted towards longer peptides, such as Aβ1-40/42, when post-mitotic neurons appeared. This indicates that APP processing is regulated throughout differentiation of cortical neurons and that amyloidogenic APP processing, as reflected by Aβ1-40/42, is associated with mature neuronal phenotypes. PMID:27383650

  17. Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Mediated Regulation of Ganglioside Homeostasis Linking Alzheimer's Disease Pathology with Ganglioside Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Marcus O. W.; Zinser, Eva G.; Grösgen, Sven; Hundsdörfer, Benjamin; Rothhaar, Tatjana L.; Burg, Verena K.; Kaestner, Lars; Bayer, Thomas A.; Lipp, Peter; Müller, Ulrike; Grimm, Heike S.; Hartmann, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Gangliosides are important players for controlling neuronal function and are directly involved in AD pathology. They are among the most potent stimulators of Aβ production, are enriched in amyloid plaques and bind amyloid beta (Aβ). However, the molecular mechanisms linking gangliosides with AD are unknown. Here we identified the previously unknown function of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), specifically its cleavage products Aβ and the APP intracellular domain (AICD), of regulating GD3-synthase (GD3S). Since GD3S is the key enzyme converting a- to b-series gangliosides, it therefore plays a major role in controlling the levels of major brain gangliosides. This regulation occurs by two separate and additive mechanisms. The first mechanism directly targets the enzymatic activity of GD3S: Upon binding of Aβ to the ganglioside GM3, the immediate substrate of the GD3S, enzymatic turnover of GM3 by GD3S was strongly reduced. The second mechanism targets GD3S expression. APP cleavage results, in addition to Aβ release, in the release of AICD, a known candidate for gene transcriptional regulation. AICD strongly down regulated GD3S transcription and knock-in of an AICD deletion mutant of APP in vivo, or knock-down of Fe65 in neuroblastoma cells, was sufficient to abrogate normal GD3S functionality. Equally, knock-out of the presenilin genes, presenilin 1 and presenilin 2, essential for Aβ and AICD production, or of APP itself, increased GD3S activity and expression and consequently resulted in a major shift of a- to b-series gangliosides. In addition to GD3S regulation by APP processing, gangliosides in turn altered APP cleavage. GM3 decreased, whereas the ganglioside GD3, the GD3S product, increased Aβ production, resulting in a regulatory feedback cycle, directly linking ganglioside metabolism with APP processing and Aβ generation. A central aspect of this homeostatic control is the reduction of GD3S activity via an Aβ-GM3 complex and AICD

  18. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) mediated regulation of ganglioside homeostasis linking Alzheimer's disease pathology with ganglioside metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Marcus O W; Zinser, Eva G; Grösgen, Sven; Hundsdörfer, Benjamin; Rothhaar, Tatjana L; Burg, Verena K; Kaestner, Lars; Bayer, Thomas A; Lipp, Peter; Müller, Ulrike; Grimm, Heike S; Hartmann, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Gangliosides are important players for controlling neuronal function and are directly involved in AD pathology. They are among the most potent stimulators of Aβ production, are enriched in amyloid plaques and bind amyloid beta (Aβ). However, the molecular mechanisms linking gangliosides with AD are unknown. Here we identified the previously unknown function of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), specifically its cleavage products Aβ and the APP intracellular domain (AICD), of regulating GD3-synthase (GD3S). Since GD3S is the key enzyme converting a- to b-series gangliosides, it therefore plays a major role in controlling the levels of major brain gangliosides. This regulation occurs by two separate and additive mechanisms. The first mechanism directly targets the enzymatic activity of GD3S: Upon binding of Aβ to the ganglioside GM3, the immediate substrate of the GD3S, enzymatic turnover of GM3 by GD3S was strongly reduced. The second mechanism targets GD3S expression. APP cleavage results, in addition to Aβ release, in the release of AICD, a known candidate for gene transcriptional regulation. AICD strongly down regulated GD3S transcription and knock-in of an AICD deletion mutant of APP in vivo, or knock-down of Fe65 in neuroblastoma cells, was sufficient to abrogate normal GD3S functionality. Equally, knock-out of the presenilin genes, presenilin 1 and presenilin 2, essential for Aβ and AICD production, or of APP itself, increased GD3S activity and expression and consequently resulted in a major shift of a- to b-series gangliosides. In addition to GD3S regulation by APP processing, gangliosides in turn altered APP cleavage. GM3 decreased, whereas the ganglioside GD3, the GD3S product, increased Aβ production, resulting in a regulatory feedback cycle, directly linking ganglioside metabolism with APP processing and Aβ generation. A central aspect of this homeostatic control is the reduction of GD3S activity via an Aβ-GM3 complex and AICD

  19. Expression and regulation of the 67-kda laminin-binding protein and its precursor gene in lymphoid-cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Zhang, X; Sobel, M; Kondoh, N; Papas, T; Bhat, N

    1993-12-01

    The 67-kDa laminin-binding protein is a non-integrin laminin-binding protein that mediates cancer cell adhesion and migration. The expression of the 67-kDa laminin-binding protein and of its putative precursor, a 37-kDa polypeptide, was studied in peripheral T-cells and T-lymphoma cell lines. Immunofluorescence experiments detected antigen in both the cytosol and on the cell membrane. On immunoblots of T-cell protein extracts, both the 37-kDa precursor and the mature 67-kDa protein were present. The mRNA for the precursor was expressed in both immature and mature thymocytes. In three independent T-lymphoma cell lines, the mRNA levels were decreased after prolonged stimulation with phorbol esters. Since the latter directly activate protein kinase C, it appears that regulation of the 37-kDa precursor in T-cells may be mediated by the signal transduction cascade associated with protein kinase C activation.

  20. HIV Protease Inhibitors Alter Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing via β-Site Amyloid Precursor Protein Cleaving Enzyme-1 Translational Up-Regulation.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Patrick J; Akay-Espinoza, Cagla; Yee, Alan C; Briand, Lisa A; Erickson, Michelle A; Gelman, Benjamin B; Gao, Yan; Haughey, Norman J; Zink, M Christine; Clements, Janice E; Kim, Nicholas S; Van De Walle, Gabriel; Jensen, Brigid K; Vassar, Robert; Pierce, R Christopher; Gill, Alexander J; Kolson, Dennis L; Diehl, J Alan; Mankowski, Joseph L; Jordan-Sciutto, Kelly L

    2017-01-01

    Mounting evidence implicates antiretroviral (ARV) drugs as potential contributors to the persistence and evolution of clinical and pathological presentation of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in the post-ARV era. Based on their ability to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in various cell types, we hypothesized that ARV-mediated ER stress in the central nervous system resulted in chronic dysregulation of the unfolded protein response and altered amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing. We used in vitro and in vivo models to show that HIV protease inhibitor (PI) class ARVs induced neuronal damage and ER stress, leading to PKR-like ER kinase-dependent phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α and enhanced translation of β-site APP cleaving enzyme-1 (BACE1). In addition, PIs induced β-amyloid production, indicative of increased BACE1-mediated APP processing, in rodent neuroglial cultures and human APP-expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells. Inhibition of BACE1 activity protected against neuronal damage. Finally, ARVs administered to mice and SIV-infected macaques resulted in neuronal damage and BACE1 up-regulation in the central nervous system. These findings implicate a subset of PIs as potential mediators of neurodegeneration in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

  1. Rbfox proteins regulate microRNA biogenesis by sequence-specific binding to their precursors and target downstream Dicer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Zubovic, Lorena; Yang, Fan; Godin, Katherine; Pavelitz, Tom; Castellanos, Javier; Macchi, Paolo; Varani, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Rbfox proteins regulate tissue-specific splicing by targeting a conserved GCAUG sequence within pre-mRNAs. We report here that sequence-specific binding of the conserved Rbfox RRM to miRNA precursors containing the same sequence motif in their terminal loops, including miR-20b and miR-107, suppresses their nuclear processing. The structure of the complex between precursor miR-20b and Rbfox RRM shows the molecular basis for recognition, and reveals changes in the stem-loop upon protein binding. In mammalian cells, Rbfox2 downregulates mature miR-20b and miR-107 levels and increases the expression of their downstream targets PTEN and Dicer, respectively, suggesting that Rbfox2 indirectly regulates many more cellular miRNAs. Thus, some of the widespread cellular functions of Rbfox2 protein are attributable to regulation of miRNA biogenesis, and might include the mis-regulation of miR-20b and miR-107 in cancer and neurodegeneration. PMID:27001519

  2. Acute ER stress regulates amyloid precursor protein processing through ubiquitin-dependent degradation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eun Sun; Hong, HyunSeok; Kim, Chaeyoung; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2015-03-05

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ), a major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP) through sequential cleavage by β-secretase and γ-secretase enzymes. APP is an integral membrane protein, and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of AD; however, the biological function of APP is still unclear. The present study shows that APP is rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in the CHO cell line in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, such as calcium ionophore, A23187, induced calcium influx. Increased levels of intracellular calcium by A23187 induces polyubiquitination of APP, causing its degradation. A23187-induced reduction of APP is prevented by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Furthermore, an increase in levels of the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) marker, E3 ubiquitin ligase HRD1, proteasome activity, and decreased levels of the deubiquitinating enzyme USP25 were observed during ER stress. In addition, we found that APP interacts with USP25. These findings suggest that acute ER stress induces degradation of full-length APP via the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway.

  3. Emerging roles for the amyloid precursor protein and derived peptides in the regulation of cellular and systemic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Czeczor, Juliane K; McGee, Sean L

    2017-03-28

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane protein that can be cleaved by proteases through two different pathways to yield a number of small peptides, each with distinct physiological properties and functions. It has been extensively studied in the context of Alzheimer's disease, with the APP-derived amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide being a major constituent of the amyloid plaques observed in this disease. It has been known for some time that APP can regulate neuronal metabolism, however this review will examine evidence that APP and its peptides can also regulate key metabolic processes such as insulin action, lipid synthesis and storage and mitochondrial function in peripheral tissues. This review will present a hypothesis that amyloidogenic processing of APP in peripheral tissues plays a key role in the response to nutrient excess and that this could contribute to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Delta-secretase cleaves amyloid precursor protein and regulates the pathogenesis in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhentao; Song, Mingke; Liu, Xia; Su Kang, Seong; Duong, Duc M.; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Cao, Xuebing; Cheng, Liming; Sun, Yi E.; Ping Yu, Shan; Jia, Jianping; Levey, Allan I.; Ye, Keqiang

    2015-01-01

    The age-dependent deposition of amyloid-β peptides, derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP), is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Despite age being the greatest risk factor for AD, the molecular mechanisms linking ageing to APP processing are unknown. Here we show that asparagine endopeptidase (AEP), a pH-controlled cysteine proteinase, is activated during ageing and mediates APP proteolytic processing. AEP cleaves APP at N373 and N585 residues, selectively influencing the amyloidogenic fragmentation of APP. AEP is activated in normal mice in an age-dependent manner, and is strongly activated in 5XFAD transgenic mouse model and human AD brains. Deletion of AEP from 5XFAD or APP/PS1 mice decreases senile plaque formation, ameliorates synapse loss, elevates long-term potentiation and protects memory. Blockade of APP cleavage by AEP in mice alleviates pathological and behavioural deficits. Thus, AEP acts as a δ-secretase, contributing to the age-dependent pathogenic mechanisms in AD. PMID:26549211

  5. ESCRTs regulate amyloid precursor protein sorting in multivesicular bodies and intracellular amyloid-β accumulation.

    PubMed

    Edgar, James R; Willén, Katarina; Gouras, Gunnar K; Futter, Clare E

    2015-07-15

    Intracellular amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation is a key feature of early Alzheimer's disease and precedes the appearance of Aβ in extracellular plaques. Aβ is generated through proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP), but the intracellular site of Aβ production is unclear. APP has been localized to multivesicular bodies (MVBs) where sorting of APP onto intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) could promote amyloidogenic processing, or reduce Aβ production or accumulation by sorting APP and processing products to lysosomes for degradation. Here, we show that APP localizes to the ILVs of a subset of MVBs that also traffic EGF receptor (EGFR), and that it is delivered to lysosomes for degradation. Depletion of the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) components, Hrs (also known as Hgs) or Tsg101, inhibited targeting of APP to ILVs and the subsequent delivery to lysosomes, and led to increased intracellular Aβ accumulation. This was accompanied by dramatically decreased Aβ secretion. Thus, the early ESCRT machinery has a dual role in limiting intracellular Aβ accumulation through targeting of APP and processing products to the lysosome for degradation, and promoting Aβ secretion.

  6. Amyloid precursor protein regulates migration and metalloproteinase gene expression in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • APP knockdown reduced proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells. • APP knockdown reduced expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. • APP overexpression promoted LNCaP cell migration. • APP overexpression increased expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. - Abstract: Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a type I transmembrane protein, and one of its processed forms, β-amyloid, is considered to play a central role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. We previously showed that APP is a primary androgen-responsive gene in prostate cancer and that its increased expression is correlated with poor prognosis for patients with prostate cancer. APP has also been implicated in several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying the pro-proliferative effects of APP on cancers is still not well-understood. In the present study, we explored a pathophysiological role for APP in prostate cancer cells using siRNA targeting APP (siAPP). The proliferation and migration of LNCaP and DU145 prostate cancer cells were significantly suppressed by siAPP. Differentially expressed genes in siAPP-treated cells compared to control siRNA-treated cells were identified by microarray analysis. Notably, several metalloproteinase genes, such as ADAM10 and ADAM17, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes, such as VIM, and SNAI2, were downregulated in siAPP-treated cells as compared to control cells. The expression of these genes was upregulated in LNCaP cells stably expressing APP when compared with control cells. APP-overexpressing LNCaP cells exhibited enhanced migration in comparison to control cells. These results suggest that APP may contribute to the proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells by modulating the expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes.

  7. Epigenetic Regulation in Amyloid Precursor Protein with Genomic Rearrangements and the Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khue Vu

    2015-01-01

    Recently, epigenetic regulation of alternative APP pre-mRNA splicing in the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) has been studied (see Ref. 7) and showed for the first time, the presence of several APP-mRNA isoforms encoding divers APP protein isoforms ranging from 120 to 770 amino acids (with or without mutations and/or deletions). Here, by continuing on this work, I identified, for the first time new APP-mRNA isoforms with a deletion followed by an insertion (INDELS) in LNS and LNVs patients: c.19_2295delinsG166TT…GAGTCC…CTTAGTC…TCT489,p.Leu7Valfs*2;c.19_2295 delinsG169TT…GAGACC…CTTGGTC…TCT492,p.Leu7Valfs*2;and c.16_2313delinsG84CC…CAT616,p.Leu7Hisfs*45. A role of genomic rearrangements of APP gene via the Fork Stalling and Template Switching (FoSTeS) mechanism leading to INDELS was suggested. Epistasis between mutated HPRT1 and APP genes could be one of the factors of epigenetic modifications responsible for genomic rearrangements of APP gene. My findings accounted for epigenetic mechanism in the regulation of alternative APP pre-mRNA splicing as well as for epigenetic control of genomic rearrangements of APP gene may provide therefore new directions not only for investigating the role of APP in neuropathology associated with HGprt-deficiency in LNS and LNVs patients but also for the research in neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders by which APP gene involved in the pathogenesis of the diseases such as autism, fragile X syndrome (FXS), and Alzheimer's disease (AD) with its diversity and complexity, especially for sporadic form of AD (SAD). An accurate quantification of various APP-mRNA isoforms in brain tissues for detection of initial pathological changes or pathology development is needed and antisense drugs are the potential treatments.

  8. The zebrafish bonnie and clyde gene encodes a Mix family homeodomain protein that regulates the generation of endodermal precursors

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Yutaka; Trinh, Le A.; Reiter, Jeremy F.; Alexander, Jonathan; Yelon, Deborah; Stainier, Didier Y.R.

    2000-01-01

    Vertebrate endoderm development has recently become the focus of intense investigation. In this report, we first show that the zebrafish bonnie and clyde (bon) gene plays a critical early role in endoderm formation. bon mutants exhibit a profound reduction in the number of sox17-expressing endodermal precursors formed during gastrulation, and, consequently, a profound reduction in gut tissue at later stages. The endodermal precursors that do form in bon mutants, however, appear to differentiate normally indicating that bon is not required at later steps of endoderm development. We further demonstrate that bon encodes a paired-class homeodomain protein of the Mix family that is expressed transiently before and during early gastrulation in both mesodermal and endodermal progenitors. Overexpression of bon can rescue endodermal gene expression and the formation of a gut tube in bon mutants. Analysis of a newly identified mutant allele reveals that a single amino acid substitution in the DNA recognition helix of the homeodomain creates a dominant interfering form of Bon when overexpressed. We also show through loss- and gain-of-function analyses that Bon functions exclusively downstream of cyclops and squint signaling. Together, our data demonstrate that Bon is a critical transcriptional regulator of early endoderm formation. PMID:10817762

  9. HtrA2 regulates beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolism through endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, Henri J; Guénette, Suzanne Y; Peach, Camilla; Greco, Christopher; Xia, Weiming; Kim, Doo Yeon; Barren, Cory; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Kovacs, Dora M

    2007-09-21

    Alzheimer disease-associated beta-amyloid peptide is generated from its precursor protein APP. By using the yeast two-hybrid assay, here we identified HtrA2/Omi, a stress-responsive chaperone-protease as a protein binding to the N-terminal cysteinerich region of APP. HtrA2 coimmunoprecipitates exclusively with immature APP from cell lysates as well as mouse brain extracts and degrades APP in vitro. A subpopulation of HtrA2 localizes to the cytosolic side of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane where it contributes to ER-associated degradation of APP together with the proteasome. Inhibition of the proteasome results in accumulation of retrotranslocated forms of APP and increased association of APP with HtrA2 and Derlin-1 in microsomal membranes. In cells lacking HtrA2, APP holoprotein is stabilized and accumulates in the early secretory pathway correlating with elevated levels of APP C-terminal fragments and increased Abeta secretion. Inhibition of ER-associated degradation (either HtrA2 or proteasome) promotes binding of APP to the COPII protein Sec23 suggesting enhanced trafficking of APP out of the ER. Based on these results we suggest a novel function for HtrA2 as a regulator of APP metabolism through ER-associated degradation.

  10. Novel Zinc-binding Site in the E2 Domain Regulates Amyloid Precursor-like Protein 1 (APLP1) Oligomerization*

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Magnus C.; Kaden, Daniela; Schauenburg, Linda; Hancock, Mark A.; Voigt, Philipp; Roeser, Dirk; Barucker, Christian; Than, Manuel E.; Schaefer, Michael; Multhaup, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the APP-like proteins 1 and 2 (APLP1 and APLP2) are a family of multidomain transmembrane proteins possessing homo- and heterotypic contact sites in their ectodomains. We previously reported that divalent metal ions dictate the conformation of the extracellular APP E2 domain (Dahms, S. O., Könnig, I., Roeser, D., Gührs, K.-H., Mayer, M. C., Kaden, D., Multhaup, G., and Than, M. E. (2012) J. Mol. Biol. 416, 438–452), but unresolved is the nature and functional importance of metal ion binding to APLP1 and APLP2. We found here that zinc ions bound to APP and APLP1 E2 domains and mediated their oligomerization, whereas the APLP2 E2 domain interacted more weakly with zinc possessing a less surface-exposed zinc-binding site, and stayed monomeric. Copper ions bound to E2 domains of all three proteins. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analyses examined the effect of metal ion binding to APP and APLPs in the cellular context in real time. Zinc ions specifically induced APP and APLP1 oligomerization and forced APLP1 into multimeric clusters at the plasma membrane consistent with zinc concentrations in the blood and brain. The observed effects were mediated by a novel zinc-binding site within the APLP1 E2 domain as APLP1 deletion mutants revealed. Based upon its cellular localization and its dominant response to zinc ions, APLP1 is mainly affected by extracellular zinc among the APP family proteins. We conclude that zinc binding and APP/APLP oligomerization are intimately linked, and we propose that this represents a novel mechanism for regulating APP/APLP protein function at the molecular level. PMID:24855651

  11. Intracellular trafficking of the amyloid β-protein precursor (APP) regulated by novel function of X11-like.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yuhki; Akiyama, Mayu; Araki, Yoichi; Sumioka, Akio; Shiono, Maki; Taru, Hidenori; Nakaya, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Tohru; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ), a causative peptide of Alzheimer's disease, is generated by intracellular metabolism of amyloid β-protein precursor (APP). In general, mature APP (mAPP, N- and O-glycosylated form) is subject to successive cleavages by α- or β-, and γ-secretases in the late protein secretory pathway and/or at plasma membrane, while immature APP (imAPP, N-glycosylated form) locates in the early secretory pathway such as endoplasmic reticulum or cis-Golgi, in which imAPP is not subject to metabolic cleavages. X11-like (X11L) is a neural adaptor protein composed of a phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) and two C-terminal PDZ domains. X11L suppresses amyloidogenic cleavage of mAPP by direct binding of X11L through its PTB domain, thereby generation of Aβ lowers. X11L expresses another function in the regulation of intracellular APP trafficking. In order to analyze novel function of X11L in intracellular trafficking of APP, we performed a functional dissection of X11L. Using cells expressing various domain-deleted X11L mutants, intracellular APP trafficking was examined along with analysis of APP metabolism including maturation (O-glycosylation), processing and localization of APP. X11L accumulates imAPP into the early secretory pathway by mediation of its C-terminal PDZ domains, without being bound to imAPP directly. With this novel function, X11L suppresses overall APP metabolism and results in further suppression of Aβ generation. Interestingly some of the accumulated imAPP in the early secretory pathway are likely to appear on plasma membrane by unidentified mechanism. Trafficking of imAPP to plasma membrane is observed in other X11 family proteins, X11 and X11L2, but not in other APP-binding partners such as FE65 and JIP1. It is herein clear that respective functional domains of X11L regulate APP metabolism at multiple steps in intracellular protein secretory pathways.

  12. Nucleation precursors in protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Vekilov, Peter G.; Vorontsova, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystal nucleation is a central problem in biological crystallography and other areas of science, technology and medicine. Recent studies have demonstrated that protein crystal nuclei form within crucial precursors. Here, methods of detection and characterization of the precursors are reviewed: dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy and Brownian microscopy. Data for several proteins provided by these methods have demonstrated that the nucleation precursors are clusters consisting of protein-dense liquid, which are metastable with respect to the host protein solution. The clusters are several hundred nanometres in size, the cluster population occupies from 10−7 to 10−3 of the solution volume, and their properties in solutions supersaturated with respect to crystals are similar to those in homogeneous, i.e. undersaturated, solutions. The clusters exist owing to the conformation flexibility of the protein molecules, leading to exposure of hydrophobic surfaces and enhanced intermolecular binding. These results indicate that protein conformational flexibility might be the mechanism behind the metastable mesoscopic clusters and crystal nucleation. Investigations of the cluster properties are still in their infancy. Results on direct imaging of cluster behaviors and characterization of cluster mechanisms with a variety of proteins will soon lead to major breakthroughs in protein biophysics. PMID:24598910

  13. O-GlcNAcylation of amyloid-β precursor protein at threonine 576 residue regulates trafficking and processing.

    PubMed

    Chun, Yoon Sun; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Chung, Sungkwon

    2017-08-19

    The pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) derived from proteolytic processing of amyloid-β precursor protein (APP). APP undergoes post-translational modification including N- and O-glycosylation. O-GlcNAcylation is a novel type of O-glycosylation, mediated by O-GlcNAc transferase attaching O-β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) to serine/threonine residues of the target proteins. O-GlcNAc is removed by O-GlcNAcase. We have previously reported that increasing O-GlcNAcylated APP using the O-GlcNAcase inhibitor, PUGNAc, increases its trafficking rate to the plasma membrane and decreases its endocytosis rate, resulting in decreased Aβ production. However, O-GlcNAc modification sites in APP are unknown. In this study, we mutated three predicted O-GlcNAc modification threonine residues of APP into alanines (T291A, T292A, and T576A) and expressed them in HeLa cells. These APP mutants showed reduced O-GlcNAcylation levels, indicating that these sites were endogenously O-GlcNAcylated. Thr 576 was the major O-GlcNAcylation site when cell was treated with PUGNAc. We also showed that the effects of PUGNAc on APP trafficking to the plasma membrane and Aβ production were prevented in the T576A mutant. These results implicate Thr 576 as the major O-GlcNAcylation site in APP and indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of this residue regulates its trafficking and processing. Thus, specific O-GlcNAcylation of APP at Thr 576 may be a novel and promising drug target for AD therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Tetraspanin 3: A central endocytic membrane component regulating the expression of ADAM10, presenilin and the amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Seipold, Lisa; Damme, Markus; Prox, Johannes; Rabe, Björn; Kasparek, Petr; Sedlacek, Radislav; Altmeppen, Hermann; Willem, Michael; Boland, Barry; Glatzel, Markus; Saftig, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Despite existing knowledge about the role of the A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase 10 (ADAM10) as the α-secretase involved in the non-amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Notch signalling we have only limited information about its regulation. In this study, we have identified ADAM10 interactors using a split ubiquitin yeast two hybrid approach. Tetraspanin 3 (Tspan3), which is highly expressed in the murine brain and elevated in brains of Alzheimer´s disease (AD) patients, was identified and confirmed to bind ADAM10 by co-immunoprecipitation experiments in mammalian cells in complex with APP and the γ-secretase protease presenilin. Tspan3 expression increased the cell surface levels of its interacting partners and was mainly localized in early and late endosomes. In contrast to the previously described ADAM10-binding tetraspanins, Tspan3 did not affect the endoplasmic reticulum to plasma membrane transport of ADAM10. Heterologous Tspan3 expression significantly increased the appearance of carboxy-terminal cleavage products of ADAM10 and APP, whereas N-cadherin ectodomain shedding appeared unaffected. Inhibiting the endocytosis of Tspan3 by mutating a critical cytoplasmic tyrosine-based internalization motif led to increased surface expression of APP and ADAM10. After its downregulation in neuroblastoma cells and in brains of Tspan3-deficient mice, ADAM10 and APP levels appeared unaltered possibly due to a compensatory increase in the expression of Tspans 5 and 7, respectively. In conclusion, our data suggest that Tspan3 acts in concert with other tetraspanins as a stabilizing factor of active ADAM10, APP and the γ-secretase complex at the plasma membrane and within the endocytic pathway.

  15. Amyloid precursor protein and amyloid precursor-like protein 2 in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Poomy; Sliker, Bailee; Peters, Haley L.; Tuli, Amit; Herskovitz, Jonathan; Smits, Kaitlin; Purohit, Abhilasha; Singh, Rakesh K.; Dong, Jixin; Batra, Surinder K.; Coulter, Donald W.; Solheim, Joyce C.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its family members amyloid precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1) and amyloid precursor-like protein 2 (APLP2) are type 1 transmembrane glycoproteins that are highly conserved across species. The transcriptional regulation of APP and APLP2 is similar but not identical, and the cleavage of both proteins is regulated by phosphorylation. APP has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease causation, and in addition to its importance in neurology, APP is deregulated in cancer cells. APLP2 is likewise overexpressed in cancer cells, and APLP2 and APP are linked to increased tumor cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. In this present review, we discuss the unfolding account of these APP family members’ roles in cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:26840089

  16. Bidirectional Regulation of Amyloid Precursor Protein-Induced Memory Defects by Nebula/DSCR1: A Protein Upregulated in Alzheimer's Disease and Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jillian L; Zhang, Shixing; Chang, Karen T

    2015-08-12

    Aging individuals with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by impaired memory. Memory problems in both DS and AD individuals usually develop slowly and progressively get worse with age, but the cause of this age-dependent memory impairment is not well understood. This study examines the functional interactions between Down syndrome critical region 1 (DSCR1) and amyloid-precursor protein (APP), proteins upregulated in both DS and AD, in regulating memory. Using Drosophila as a model, we find that overexpression of nebula (fly homolog of DSCR1) initially protects against APP-induced memory defects by correcting calcineurin and cAMP signaling pathways but accelerates the rate of memory loss and exacerbates mitochondrial dysfunction in older animals. We report that transient upregulation of Nebula/DSCR1 or acute pharmacological inhibition of calcineurin in aged flies protected against APP-induced memory loss. Our data suggest that calcineurin dyshomeostasis underlies age-dependent memory impairments and further imply that chronic Nebula/DSCR1 upregulation may contribute to age-dependent memory impairments in AD in DS. Most Down syndrome (DS) individuals eventually develop Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like dementia, but mechanisms underlying this age-dependent memory impairment remain poorly understood. This study examines Nebula/Down syndrome critical region 1 (DSCR1) and amyloid-precursor protein (APP), proteins upregulated in both DS and AD, in regulating memory. We uncover a previously unidentified role for Nebula/DSCR1 in modulating APP-induced memory defects during aging. We show that upregulation of Nebula/DSCR1, an inhibitor of calcineurin, rescues APP-induced memory defects in young flies but enhances memory loss of older flies. Excitingly, transient Nebula/DSCR1 overexpression or calcineurin inhibition in aged flies ameliorates APP-mediated memory problems. These results

  17. Bidirectional Regulation of Amyloid Precursor Protein-Induced Memory Defects by Nebula/DSCR1: A Protein Upregulated in Alzheimer's Disease and Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jillian L.; Zhang, Shixing

    2015-01-01

    Aging individuals with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by impaired memory. Memory problems in both DS and AD individuals usually develop slowly and progressively get worse with age, but the cause of this age-dependent memory impairment is not well understood. This study examines the functional interactions between Down syndrome critical region 1 (DSCR1) and amyloid-precursor protein (APP), proteins upregulated in both DS and AD, in regulating memory. Using Drosophila as a model, we find that overexpression of nebula (fly homolog of DSCR1) initially protects against APP-induced memory defects by correcting calcineurin and cAMP signaling pathways but accelerates the rate of memory loss and exacerbates mitochondrial dysfunction in older animals. We report that transient upregulation of Nebula/DSCR1 or acute pharmacological inhibition of calcineurin in aged flies protected against APP-induced memory loss. Our data suggest that calcineurin dyshomeostasis underlies age-dependent memory impairments and further imply that chronic Nebula/DSCR1 upregulation may contribute to age-dependent memory impairments in AD in DS. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Most Down syndrome (DS) individuals eventually develop Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like dementia, but mechanisms underlying this age-dependent memory impairment remain poorly understood. This study examines Nebula/Down syndrome critical region 1 (DSCR1) and amyloid-precursor protein (APP), proteins upregulated in both DS and AD, in regulating memory. We uncover a previously unidentified role for Nebula/DSCR1 in modulating APP-induced memory defects during aging. We show that upregulation of Nebula/DSCR1, an inhibitor of calcineurin, rescues APP-induced memory defects in young flies but enhances memory loss of older flies. Excitingly, transient Nebula/DSCR1 overexpression or calcineurin inhibition in aged flies ameliorates APP-mediated memory

  18. The cholesterol transport inhibitor U18666a regulates amyloid precursor protein metabolism and trafficking in N2aAPP "Swedish" cells.

    PubMed

    Davis, W

    2008-10-01

    Cholesterol transport is a key regulator of amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and beta-amyloid (Abeta production, implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Perturbation of cholesterol transport can be pharmacologically induced by the class II amphiphile 3-beta-[2-(diethylamino)ethoxy]androst-5-en-17-one, U18666a; however, the mechanisms by which U18666a controls APP metabolism and trafficking have not been elucidated. We proposed to determine how U18666a regulates APP holoprotein metabolism and trafficking in N2a mouse neuroblastoma cells stably expressing the human APP protein. Secretion of Abeta1-40 was reduced in U18666a-treated cells. U18666a elevated the steady state level of the APP holoprotein but not APP mRNA levels. U18666a increased sAPPalpha secretion and intracellular alpha-CTF/C83 levels but intracellular betaCTF/C99 levels were reduced. The increase in APP protein level was due to decreased catabolism rather than increased APP synthesis. Interestingly, U18666a regulated APP trafficking and increased the level of the holoprotein at the cell surface for alpha-secretase processing and reduced internalization for beta-secretase processing. These data demonstrate that U18666a effects on cholesterol transport function to regulate amyloid precursor protein metabolism and trafficking.

  19. Interleukin 1 regulates synthesis of amyloid beta-protein precursor mRNA in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Goldgaber, D; Harris, H W; Hla, T; Maciag, T; Donnelly, R J; Jacobsen, J S; Vitek, M P; Gajdusek, D C

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed the modulation of amyloid beta-protein precursor (APP) gene expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The level of the APP mRNA transcripts increased as HUVEC reached confluency. In confluent culture the half-life of the APP mRNA was 4 hr. Treatment of the cells with human-recombinant interleukin 1 (IL-1), phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, or heparin-binding growth factor 1 enhanced the expression of APP gene in these cells, but calcium ionophore A23187 and dexamethasone did not. The protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(isoquinolinsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H7) inhibited IL-1-mediated increase of the level of APP transcripts. To map IL-1-responsive elements of the APP promoter, truncated portions of the APP promoter were fused to the human growth hormone reporter gene. The recombinant plasmids were transfected into mouse neuroblastoma cells, and the cell medium was assayed for the human growth hormone. A 180-base-pair region of the APP promoter located between position -485 and -305 upstream from the transcription start site was necessary for IL-1-mediated induction of the reporter gene. This region contains the upstream transcription factor AP-1 binding site. These results suggest that IL-1 upregulates APP gene expression in HUVEC through a pathway mediated by protein kinase C, utilizing the upstream AP-1 binding site of the APP promoter. Images PMID:2508093

  20. Prion Protein Interacts with BACE1 Protein and Differentially Regulates Its Activity toward Wild Type and Swedish Mutant Amyloid Precursor Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Heledd H.; Whitehouse, Isobel J.; Baybutt, Herbert; Brown, Debbie; Kellett, Katherine A. B.; Jackson, Carolyn D.; Turner, Anthony J.; Piccardo, Pedro; Manson, Jean C.; Hooper, Nigel M.

    2011-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) accumulate in the brain. Cleavage of APP by the β-secretase BACE1 is the rate-limiting step in the production of Aβ. We have reported previously that the cellular prion protein (PrPC) inhibited the action of BACE1 toward human wild type APP (APPWT) in cellular models and that the levels of endogenous murine Aβ were significantly increased in PrPC-null mouse brain. Here we investigated the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this observation. PrPC interacted directly with the prodomain of the immature Golgi-localized form of BACE1. This interaction decreased BACE1 at the cell surface and in endosomes where it preferentially cleaves APPWT but increased it in the Golgi where it preferentially cleaves APP with the Swedish mutation (APPSwe). In transgenic mice expressing human APP with the Swedish and Indiana familial mutations (APPSwe,Ind), PrPC deletion had no influence on APP proteolytic processing, Aβ plaque deposition, or levels of soluble Aβ or Aβ oligomers. In cells, although PrPC inhibited the action of BACE1 on APPWT, it did not inhibit BACE1 activity toward APPSwe. The differential subcellular location of the BACE1 cleavage of APPSwe relative to APPWT provides an explanation for the failure of PrPC deletion to affect Aβ accumulation in APPSwe,Ind mice. Thus, although PrPC exerts no control on cleavage of APPSwe by BACE1, it has a profound influence on the cleavage of APPWT, suggesting that PrPC may be a key protective player against sporadic Alzheimer disease. PMID:21795680

  1. GLUTELIN PRECURSOR ACCUMULATION3 encodes a regulator of post-Golgi vesicular traffic essential for vacuolar protein sorting in rice endosperm.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yulong; Wang, Yihua; Liu, Feng; Zhou, Kunneng; Ding, Yu; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Ying; Liu, Kai; Gan, Lu; Ma, Weiwei; Han, Xiaohua; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiuping; Wu, Fuqing; Cheng, Zhijun; Wang, Jiulin; Lei, Cailin; Lin, Qibing; Jiang, Ling; Wu, Chuanyin; Bao, Yiqun; Wang, Haiyang; Wan, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    In seed plants, a major pathway for sorting of storage proteins to the protein storage vacuole (PSV) depends on the Golgi-derived dense vesicles (DVs). However, the molecular mechanisms regulating the directional trafficking of DVs to PSVs remain largely elusive. Here, we report the functional characterization of the rice (Oryza sativa) glutelin precursor accumulation3 (gpa3) mutant, which exhibits a floury endosperm phenotype and accumulates excess proglutelins in dry seeds. Cytological and immunocytochemistry studies revealed that in the gpa3 mutant, numerous proglutelin-containing DVs are misrouted to the plasma membrane and, via membrane fusion, release their contents into the apoplast to form a new structure named the paramural body. Positional cloning of GPA3 revealed that it encodes a plant-specific kelch-repeat protein that is localized to the trans-Golgi networks, DVs, and PSVs in the developing endosperm. In vitro and in vivo experiments verified that GPA3 directly interacts with the rice Rab5a-guanine exchange factor VPS9a and forms a regulatory complex with Rab5a via VPS9a. Furthermore, our genetic data support the notion that GPA3 acts synergistically with Rab5a and VPS9a to regulate DV-mediated post-Golgi traffic in rice. Our findings provide insights into the molecular mechanisms regulating the plant-specific PSV pathway and expand our knowledge of vesicular trafficking in eukaryotes.

  2. Phenserine regulates translation of β-amyloid precursor protein mRNA by a putative interleukin-1 responsive element, a target for drug development

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Karen T. Y.; Utsuki, Tadanobu; Rogers, Jack; Yu, Qian-Sheng; Sambamurti, Kumar; Brossi, Arnold; Ge, Yuan-Wen; Lahiri, Debomoy K.; Greig, Nigel H.

    2001-01-01

    The reduction in levels of the potentially toxic amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) has emerged as one of the most important therapeutic goals in Alzheimer's disease. Key targets for this goal are factors that affect the expression and processing of the Aβ precursor protein (βAPP). Earlier reports from our laboratory have shown that a novel cholinesterase inhibitor, phenserine, reduces βAPP levels in vivo. Herein, we studied the mechanism of phenserine's actions to define the regulatory elements in βAPP processing. Phenserine treatment resulted in decreased secretion of soluble βAPP and Aβ into the conditioned media of human neuroblastoma cells without cellular toxicity. The regulation of βAPP protein expression by phenserine was posttranscriptional as it suppressed βAPP protein expression without altering βAPP mRNA levels. However, phenserine's action was neither mediated through classical receptor signaling pathways, involving extracellular signal-regulated kinase or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation, nor was it associated with the anticholinesterase activity of the drug. Furthermore, phenserine reduced expression of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter fused to the 5′-mRNA leader sequence of βAPP without altering expression of a control chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter. These studies suggest that phenserine reduces Aβ levels by regulating βAPP translation via the recently described iron regulatory element in the 5′-untranslated region of βAPP mRNA, which has been shown previously to be up-regulated in the presence of interleukin-1. This study identifies an approach for the regulation of βAPP expression that can result in a substantial reduction in the level of Aβ. PMID:11404470

  3. Amyloid Precursor Protein Regulates Cav1.2 L-type Calcium Channel Levels and Function to Influence GABAergic Short-term Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Wang, Zilai; Wang, Baiping; Justice, Nicholas J.; Zheng, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although impaired synaptic function is believed to be an early and causative event in AD, how APP physiologically regulates synaptic properties remains poorly understood. Here, we report a critical role for APP in the regulation of L-type calcium channels (LTCC) in GABAergic inhibitory neurons in striatum and hippocampus. APP deletion in mice leads to an increase in the levels of Cav1.2, the pore-forming subunit of LTCCs, and subsequent increases in GABAergic calcium currents (ICa 2+) that can be reversed by re-introduction of APP. Upregulated levels of Cav1.2 result in reduced GABAergic paired-pulse inhibition (PPI) and increased GABAergic post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) in both striatal and hippocampal neurons, indicating that APP modulates synaptic properties of GABAergic neurons by regulating Cav1.2. Furthermore, APP physically interacts with Cav1.2, suggesting a mechanism in which loss of APP leads to an inappropriate accumulation and aberrant activity of Cav1.2. These results provide a direct link between APP and calcium signaling and might help explain how altered APP regulation leads to changes in synaptic function that occur with AD. PMID:20016080

  4. Cytoplasmic fragment of Alcadein α generated by regulated intramembrane proteolysis enhances amyloid β-protein precursor (APP) transport into the late secretory pathway and facilitates APP cleavage.

    PubMed

    Takei, Norio; Sobu, Yuriko; Kimura, Ayano; Urano, Satomi; Piao, Yi; Araki, Yoichi; Taru, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Tohru; Hata, Saori; Nakaya, Tadashi; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2015-01-09

    The neural type I membrane protein Alcadein α (Alcα), is primarily cleaved by amyloid β-protein precursor (APP) α-secretase to generate a membrane-associated carboxyl-terminal fragment (Alcα CTF), which is further cleaved by γ-secretase to secrete p3-Alcα peptides and generate an intracellular cytoplasmic domain fragment (Alcα ICD) in the late secretory pathway. By association with the neural adaptor protein X11L (X11-like), Alcα and APP form a ternary complex that suppresses the cleavage of both Alcα and APP by regulating the transport of these membrane proteins into the late secretory pathway where secretases are active. However, it has not been revealed how Alcα and APP are directed from the ternary complex formed largely in the Golgi into the late secretory pathway to reach a nerve terminus. Using a novel transgenic mouse line expressing excess amounts of human Alcα CTF (hAlcα CTF) in neurons, we found that expression of hAlcα CTF induced excess production of hAlcα ICD, which facilitated APP transport into the nerve terminus and enhanced APP metabolism, including Aβ generation. In vitro cell studies also demonstrated that excess expression of Alcα ICD released both APP and Alcα from the ternary complex. These results indicate that regulated intramembrane proteolysis of Alcα by γ-secretase regulates APP trafficking and the production of Aβ in vivo. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. A death receptor 6-amyloid precursor protein pathway regulates synapse density in the mature CNS but does not contribute to Alzheimer's disease-related pathophysiology in murine models.

    PubMed

    Kallop, Dara Y; Meilandt, William J; Gogineni, Alvin; Easley-Neal, Courtney; Wu, Tiffany; Jubb, Adrian M; Yaylaoglu, Murat; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Weimer, Robby M

    2014-05-07

    Recent studies implicate death receptor 6 (DR6) in an amyloid precursor protein (APP)-dependent pathway regulating developmental axon pruning, and in a pruning pathway operating during plastic rearrangements in adult brain. DR6 has also been suggested to mediate toxicity in vitro of Aβ peptides derived from APP. Given the link between APP, Aβ, and Alzheimer's disease (AD), these findings have raised the possibility that DR6 contributes to aspects of neurodegeneration in AD. To test this possibility, we have used mouse models to characterize potential function(s) of DR6 in the adult CNS and in AD-related pathophysiology. We show that DR6 is broadly expressed within the adult CNS and regulates the density of excitatory synaptic connections onto pyramidal neurons in a genetic pathway with APP. DR6 knock-out also gives rise to behavioral abnormalities, some of which are similar to those previously documented in APP knock-out animals. However, in two distinct APP transgenic models of AD, we did not observe any alteration in the formation of amyloid plaques, gliosis, synaptic loss, or cognitive behavioral deficits with genetic deletion of DR6, though we did observe a transient reduction in the degree of microglial activation in one model. Our results support the view that DR6 functions with APP to modulate synaptic density in the adult CNS, but do not provide evidence for a role of DR6 in the pathophysiology of AD.

  6. Tyrosine Binding Protein Sites Regulate the Intracellular Trafficking and Processing of Amyloid Precursor Protein through a Novel Lysosome-Directed Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Joshua H. K.; Cobb, M. Rebecca; Seah, Claudia; Pasternak, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    The amyloid hypothesis posits that the production of β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregates leads to neurodegeneration and cognitive decline associated with AD. Aβ is produced by sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretase. While nascent APP is well known to transit to the endosomal/ lysosomal system via the cell surface, we have recently shown that APP can also traffic to lysosomes intracellularly via its interaction with AP-3. Because AP-3 interacts with cargo protein via interaction with tyrosine motifs, we mutated the three tyrosines motif in the cytoplasmic tail of APP. Here, we show that the YTSI motif interacts with AP-3, and phosphorylation of the serine in this motif disrupts the interaction and decreases APP trafficking to lysosomes. Furthermore, we show that phosphorylation at this motif can decrease the production of neurotoxic Aβ 42. This demonstrates that reducing APP trafficking to lysosomes may be a strategy to reduce Aβ 42 in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:27776132

  7. The Amyloid Precursor Protein Controls PIKfyve Function.

    PubMed

    Balklava, Zita; Niehage, Christian; Currinn, Heather; Mellor, Laura; Guscott, Benjamin; Poulin, Gino; Hoflack, Bernard; Wassmer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    While the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease, its cellular function still remains largely unclear. It was our goal to establish APP function which will provide insights into APP's implication in Alzheimer's disease. Using our recently developed proteo-liposome assay we established the interactome of APP's intracellular domain (known as AICD), thereby identifying novel APP interactors that provide mechanistic insights into APP function. By combining biochemical, cell biological and genetic approaches we validated the functional significance of one of these novel interactors. Here we show that APP binds the PIKfyve complex, an essential kinase for the synthesis of the endosomal phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate. This signalling lipid plays a crucial role in endosomal homeostasis and receptor sorting. Loss of PIKfyve function by mutation causes profound neurodegeneration in mammals. Using C. elegans genetics we demonstrate that APP functionally cooperates with PIKfyve in vivo. This regulation is required for maintaining endosomal and neuronal function. Our findings establish an unexpected role for APP in the regulation of endosomal phosphoinositide metabolism with dramatic consequences for endosomal biology and important implications for our understanding of Alzheimer's disease.

  8. LDLR-related protein 10 (LRP10) regulates amyloid precursor protein (APP) trafficking and processing: evidence for a role in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Aβ peptide that accumulates in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP) following proteolysis by β- and γ-secretases. Substantial evidence indicates that alterations in APP trafficking within the secretory and endocytic pathways directly impact the interaction of APP with these secretases and subsequent Aβ production. Various members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family have been reported to play a role in APP trafficking and processing and are important risk factors in AD. We recently characterized a distinct member of the LDLR family called LDLR-related protein 10 (LRP10) that shuttles between the trans-Golgi Network (TGN), plasma membrane (PM), and endosomes. Here we investigated whether LRP10 participates in APP intracellular trafficking and Aβ production. Results In this report, we provide evidence that LRP10 is a functional APP receptor involved in APP trafficking and processing. LRP10 interacts directly with the ectodomain of APP and colocalizes with APP at the TGN. Increased expression of LRP10 in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells induces the accumulation of mature APP in the Golgi and reduces its presence at the cell surface and its processing into Aβ, while knockdown of LRP10 expression increases Aβ production. Mutations of key motifs responsible for the recycling of LRP10 to the TGN results in the aberrant redistribution of APP with LRP10 to early endosomes and a concomitant increase in APP β-cleavage into Aβ. Furthermore, expression of LRP10 is significantly lower in the post-mortem brain tissues of AD patients, supporting a possible role for LRP10 in AD. Conclusions The present study identified LRP10 as a novel APP sorting receptor that protects APP from amyloidogenic processing, suggesting that a decrease in LRP10 function may contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:22734645

  9. The spinal muscular atrophy with pontocerebellar hypoplasia gene VRK1 regulates neuronal migration through an amyloid-β precursor protein-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Vinograd-Byk, Hadar; Sapir, Tamar; Cantarero, Lara; Lazo, Pedro A; Zeligson, Sharon; Lev, Dorit; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Renbaum, Paul; Reiner, Orly; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat

    2015-01-21

    Spinal muscular atrophy with pontocerebellar hypoplasia (SMA-PCH) is an infantile SMA variant with additional manifestations, particularly severe microcephaly. We previously identified a nonsense mutation in Vaccinia-related kinase 1 (VRK1), R358X, as a cause of SMA-PCH. VRK1-R358X is a rare founder mutation in Ashkenazi Jews, and additional mutations in patients of different origins have recently been identified. VRK1 is a nuclear serine/threonine protein kinase known to play multiple roles in cellular proliferation, cell cycle regulation, and carcinogenesis. However, VRK1 was not known to have neuronal functions before its identification as a gene mutated in SMA-PCH. Here we show that VRK1-R358X homozygosity results in lack of VRK1 protein, and demonstrate a role for VRK1 in neuronal migration and neuronal stem cell proliferation. Using shRNA in utero electroporation in mice, we show that Vrk1 knockdown significantly impairs cortical neuronal migration, and affects the cell cycle of neuronal progenitors. Expression of wild-type human VRK1 rescues both proliferation and migration phenotypes. However, kinase-dead human VRK1 rescues only the migration impairment, suggesting the role of VRK1 in neuronal migration is partly noncatalytic. Furthermore, we found that VRK1 deficiency in human and mouse leads to downregulation of amyloid-β precursor protein (APP), a known neuronal migration gene. APP overexpression rescues the phenotype caused by Vrk1 knockdown, suggesting that VRK1 affects neuronal migration through an APP-dependent mechanism.

  10. A lentiviral sponge for miR-101 regulates RanBP9 expression and amyloid precursor protein metabolism in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Barbato, Christian; Pezzola, Silvia; Caggiano, Cinzia; Antonelli, Martina; Frisone, Paola; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Ruberti, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegeneration associated with amyloid β (Aβ) peptide accumulation, synaptic loss, and memory impairment are pathophysiological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Numerous microRNAs regulate amyloid precursor protein (APP) expression and metabolism. We previously reported that miR-101 is a negative regulator of APP expression in cultured hippocampal neurons. In this study, a search for predicted APP metabolism-associated miR-101 targets led to the identification of a conserved miR-101 binding site within the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the mRNA encoding Ran-binding protein 9 (RanBP9). RanBP9 increases APP processing by β-amyloid converting enzyme 1 (BACE1), secretion of soluble APPβ (sAPPβ), and generation of Aβ. MiR-101 significantly reduced reporter gene expression when co-transfected with a RanBP9 3′-UTR reporter construct, while site-directed mutagenesis of the predicted miR-101 target site eliminated the reporter response. To investigate the effect of stable inhibition of miR-101 both in vitro and in vivo, a microRNA sponge was developed to bind miR-101 and derepress its targets. Four tandem bulged miR-101 responsive elements (REs), located downstream of the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) open reading frame and driven by the synapsin promoter, were placed in a lentiviral vector to create the pLSyn-miR-101 sponge. Delivery of the sponge to primary hippocampal neurons significantly increased both APP and RanBP9 expression, as well as sAPPβ levels in the conditioned medium. Importantly, silencing of endogenous RanBP9 reduced sAPPβ levels in miR-101 sponge-containing hippocampal cultures, indicating that miR-101 inhibition may increase amyloidogenic processing of APP by RanBP9. Lastly, the impact of miR-101 on its targets was demonstrated in vivo by intrahippocampal injection of the pLSyn-miR-101 sponge into C57BL6 mice. This study thus provides the basis for studying the consequences of long-term miR-101 inhibition on the

  11. A macromolecular complex involving the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the cytosolic adapter FE65 is a negative regulator of axon branching

    PubMed Central

    Ikin, Annat F.; Sabo, Shasta L.; Lanier, Lorene M.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies suggest a role for the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis, but the downstream interactions that mediate the function of APP during neuron development are unknown. By introducing interaction-deficient FE65 into cultured hippocampal neurons using adenovirus, we show that a complex including APP, FE65 and an additional protein is involved in neurite outgrowth at early stages of neuronal development. Both FE65 that is unable to interact with APP (PID2 mutants) or a WW mutant increased axon branching. Although the FE65 mutants did not affect total neurite output, both mutants decreased axon segment length, consistent with an overall slowing of axonal growth cones. FE65 mutants did not alter the localization of either APP or FE65 in axonal growth cones, suggesting that the effects on neurite outgrowth are achieved by alterations in local complex formation within the axonal growth cone. PMID:17383198

  12. An Aberrant Phosphorylation of Amyloid Precursor Protein Tyrosine Regulates Its Trafficking and the Binding to the Clathrin Endocytic Complex in Neural Stem Cells of Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Ebbe T.; Iannuzzi, Filomena; Rasmussen, Helle F.; Maier, Thorsten J.; Enghild, Jan J.; Jørgensen, Arne L.; Matrone, Carmela

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia and is likely caused by defective amyloid precursor protein (APP) trafficking and processing in neurons leading to amyloid plaques containing the amyloid-β (Aβ) APP peptide byproducts. Understanding how APP is targeted to selected destinations inside neurons and identifying the mechanisms responsible for the generation of Aβ are thus the keys for the advancement of new therapies. We previously developed a mouse model with a mutation at tyrosine (Tyr) 682 in the C-terminus of APP. This residue is needed for APP to bind to the coating protein Clathrin and to the Clathrin adaptor protein AP2 as well as for the correct APP trafficking and sorting in neurons. By extending these findings to humans, we found that APP binding to Clathrin is decreased in neural stem cells from AD sufferers. Increased APP Tyr phosphorylation alters APP trafficking in AD neurons and it is associated to Fyn Tyr kinase activation. We show that compounds affecting Tyr kinase activity and counteracting defects in AD neurons can control APP location and compartmentalization. APP Tyr phosphorylation is thus a potential therapeutic target for AD. PMID:28360834

  13. Neuronal migration during development and the amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Copenhaver, Philip F; Ramaker, Jenna M

    2016-12-01

    The Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) is the source of amyloid peptides that accumulate in Alzheimer's disease. However, members of the APP family are strongly expressed in the developing nervous systems of invertebrates and vertebrates, where they regulate neuronal guidance, synaptic remodeling, and injury responses. In contrast to mammals, insects express only one APP ortholog (APPL), simplifying investigations into its normal functions. Recent studies have shown that APPL regulates neuronal migration in the developing insect nervous system, analogous to the roles ascribed to APP family proteins in the mammalian cortex. The comparative simplicity of insect systems offers new opportunities for deciphering the signaling mechanisms by which this enigmatic class of proteins contributes to the formation and function of the nervous system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Amyloid precursor protein and neural development.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Maya; Hassan, Bassem A

    2014-07-01

    Interest in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) has increased in recent years due to its involvement in Alzheimer's disease. Since its molecular cloning, significant genetic and biochemical work has focused on the role of APP in the pathogenesis of this disease. Thus far, however, these studies have failed to deliver successful therapies. This suggests that understanding the basic biology of APP and its physiological role during development might be a crucial missing link for a better comprehension of Alzheimer's disease. Here, we present an overview of some of the key studies performed in various model organisms that have revealed roles for APP at different stages of neuronal development. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of the interaction of amyloid precursor protein with Fe65 affects the production of beta-amyloid.

    PubMed

    Ando, K; Iijima, K I; Elliott, J I; Kirino, Y; Suzuki, T

    2001-10-26

    Neuronal Fe65 is an adapter protein that interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP). Although the interaction has been reported to occur between the second phosphotyrosine interaction domain of Fe65 and the YENPTY motif in the cytoplasmic domain of APP, the regulatory mechanism and biological function of this interaction remain unknown. We report here that (i) a single amino acid mutation at the Thr-668 residue of APP695, located 14 amino acids toward the amino-terminal end from the (682)YENPTY(687) motif, reduced the interaction between members of the Fe65 family of proteins and APP, whereas interaction of APP with the phosphotyrosine interaction domain of other APP binders such as X11-like and mammalian disabled-1 was not influenced by this mutation; (ii) the phosphorylation of APP at Thr-668 diminished the interaction of APP with Fe65 by causing a conformational change in the cytoplasmic domain that contains the Fe65-binding motif, YENPTY; and (iii) the expression of Fe65 slightly suppressed maturation of APP and decreased production of beta-amyloid (Abeta). Mutation at Thr-668 of APP abolished the effect of Fe65 on APP maturation. This mutation blocked the Fe65-dependent suppression of Abeta production and resulted in the release of increased levels of Abeta in the presence of Fe65. We previously reported that during maturation of APP in neurons, the protein is specifically phosphorylated at Thr-668 and undergoes O-glycosylation. The present results suggest that the phosphorylation of O-glycosylated mature APP at Thr-668 causes a conformational change in its cytoplasmic domain that prevents binding of Fe65 in neurons and may lead to an alteration in the production of Abeta.

  16. Amyloid Precursor Protein and Proinflammatory Changes Are Regulated in Brain and Adipose Tissue in a Murine Model of High Fat Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Kendra L.; Floden, Angela M.; Adhikari, Ramchandra; Golovko, Mikhail Y.; Combs, Colin K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Middle age obesity is recognized as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) although a mechanistic linkage remains unclear. Based upon the fact that obese adipose tissue and AD brains are both areas of proinflammatory change, a possible common event is chronic inflammation. Since an autosomal dominant form of AD is associated with mutations in the gene coding for the ubiquitously expressed transmembrane protein, amyloid precursor protein (APP) and recent evidence demonstrates increased APP levels in adipose tissue during obesity it is feasible that APP serves some function in both disease conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine whether diet-induced obesity produced proinflammatory changes and altered APP expression in brain versus adipose tissue, 6 week old C57BL6/J mice were maintained on a control or high fat diet for 22 weeks. Protein levels and cell-specific APP expression along with markers of inflammation and immune cell activation were compared between hippocampus, abdominal subcutaneous fat and visceral pericardial fat. APP stimulation-dependent changes in macrophage and adipocyte culture phenotype were examined for comparison to the in vivo changes. Conclusions/Significance Adipose tissue and brain from high fat diet fed animals demonstrated increased TNF-α and microglial and macrophage activation. Both brains and adipose tissue also had elevated APP levels localizing to neurons and macrophage/adipocytes, respectively. APP agonist antibody stimulation of macrophage cultures increased specific cytokine secretion with no obvious effects on adipocyte culture phenotype. These data support the hypothesis that high fat diet-dependent obesity results in concomitant pro-inflammatory changes in brain and adipose tissue that is characterized, in part, by increased levels of APP that may be contributing specifically to inflammatory changes that occur. PMID:22276186

  17. JAK/Stat signaling regulates heart precursor diversification in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Aaron N; Mokalled, Mayssa H; Haden, Tom N; Olson, Eric N

    2011-11-01

    Intercellular signal transduction pathways regulate the NK-2 family of transcription factors in a conserved gene regulatory network that directs cardiogenesis in both flies and mammals. The Drosophila NK-2 protein Tinman (Tin) was recently shown to regulate Stat92E, the Janus kinase (JAK) and Signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) pathway effector, in the developing mesoderm. To understand whether the JAK/Stat pathway also regulates cardiogenesis, we performed a systematic characterization of JAK/Stat signaling during mesoderm development. Drosophila embryos with mutations in the JAK/Stat ligand upd or in Stat92E have non-functional hearts with luminal defects and inappropriate cell aggregations. Using strong Stat92E loss-of-function alleles, we show that the JAK/Stat pathway regulates tin expression prior to heart precursor cell diversification. tin expression can be subdivided into four phases and, in Stat92E mutant embryos, the broad phase 2 expression pattern in the dorsal mesoderm does not restrict to the constrained phase 3 pattern. These embryos also have an expanded pericardial cell domain. We show the E(spl)-C gene HLHm5 is expressed in a pattern complementary to tin during phase 3 and that this expression is JAK/Stat dependent. In addition, E(spl)-C mutant embryos phenocopy the cardiac defects of Stat92E embryos. Mechanistically, JAK/Stat signals activate E(spl)-C genes to restrict Tin expression and the subsequent expression of the T-box transcription factor H15 to direct heart precursor diversification. This study is the first to characterize a role for the JAK/Stat pathway during cardiogenesis and identifies an autoregulatory circuit in which tin limits its own expression domain.

  18. Src Kinase Determines the Dynamic Exchange of the Docking Protein NEDD9 (Neural Precursor Cell Expressed Developmentally Down-regulated Gene 9) at Focal Adhesions*

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, Peta; Bach, Cuc T.; Paul, Andre; O'Neill, Geraldine M.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic exchange of molecules between the cytoplasm and integrin-based focal adhesions provides a rapid response system for modulating cell adhesion. Increased residency time of molecules that regulate adhesion turnover contributes to adhesion stability, ultimately determining migration speed across two-dimensional surfaces. In the present study we test the role of Src kinase in regulating dynamic exchange of the focal adhesion protein NEDD9/HEF1/Cas-L. Using either chemical inhibition or fibroblasts genetically null for Src together with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), we find that Src significantly reduces NEDD9 exchange at focal adhesions. Analysis of NEDD9 mutant constructs with the two major Src-interacting domains disabled revealed the greatest effects were due to the NEDD9 SH2 binding domain. This correlated with a significant change in two-dimensional migratory speed. Given the emerging role of NEDD9 as a regulator of focal adhesion stability, the time of NEDD9 association at the focal adhesions is key in modulating rates of migration and invasion. Our study suggests that Src kinase activity determines NEDD9 exchange at focal adhesions and may similarly modulate other focal adhesion-targeted Src substrates to regulate cell migration. PMID:25059660

  19. Membrane-microdomain localization of amyloid β-precursor protein (APP) C-terminal fragments is regulated by phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic Thr668 residue.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Takahide; Saito, Yuhki; Elliott, James I; Iijima-Ando, Kanae; Nishimura, Masaki; Kimura, Nobuyuki; Hata, Saori; Yamamoto, Tohru; Nakaya, Tadashi; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2012-06-01

    Amyloid β-precursor protein (APP) is primarily cleaved by α- or β-secretase to generate membrane-bound, C-terminal fragments (CTFs). In turn, CTFs are potentially subject to a second, intramembrane cleavage by γ-secretase, which is active in a lipid raft-like membrane microdomain. Mature APP (N- and O-glycosylated APP), the actual substrate of these secretases, is phosphorylated at the cytoplasmic residue Thr(668) and this phosphorylation changes the overall conformation of the cytoplasmic domain of APP. We found that phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated CTFs exist equally in mouse brain and are kinetically equivalent as substrates for γ-secretase, in vitro. However, in vivo, the level of the phosphorylated APP intracellular domain peptide (pAICD) generated by γ-cleavage of CTFs was very low when compared with the level of nonphosphorylated AICD (nAICD). Phosphorylated CTFs (pCTFs), rather than nonphosphorylated CTFs (nCTFs), were preferentially located outside of detergent-resistant, lipid raft-like membrane microdomains. The APP cytoplasmic domain peptide (APP(648-695)) with Thr(P)(668) did not associate with liposomes composed of membrane lipids from mouse brain to which the nonphosphorylated peptide preferentially bound. In addition, APP lacking the C-terminal 8 amino acids (APP-ΔC8), which are essential for membrane association, decreased Aβ generation in N2a cells. These observations suggest that the pCTFs and CTFΔC8 are relatively movable within the membrane, whereas the nCTFs are susceptible to being anchored into the membrane, an interaction made available as a consequence of not being phosphorylated. By this mechanism, nCTFs can be preferentially captured and cleaved by γ-secretase. Preservation of the phosphorylated state of APP-CTFs may be a potential treatment to lower the generation of Aβ in Alzheimer disease.

  20. Amyloid precursor protein modulates macrophage phenotype and diet-dependent weight gain

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Kendra L.; Brose, Stephen A.; Zhou, Xudong; Sens, Mary A.; Combs, Gerald F.; Jensen, Michael D.; Golovko, Mikhail Y.; Combs, Colin K.

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that mutations in the gene coding for amyloid precursor protein are responsible for autosomal dominant forms of Alzheimer’s disease. Proteolytic processing of the protein leads to a number of metabolites including the amyloid beta peptide. Although brain amyloid precursor protein expression and amyloid beta production are associated with the pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease, it is clear that amyloid precursor protein is expressed in numerous cell types and tissues. Here we demonstrate that amyloid precursor protein is involved in regulating the phenotype of both adipocytes and peripheral macrophages and is required for high fat diet-dependent weight gain in mice. These data suggest that functions of this protein include modulation of the peripheral immune system and lipid metabolism. This biology may have relevance not only to the pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease but also diet-associated obesity. PMID:28262782

  1. Amyloid Precursor Protein Expression Modulates Intestine Immune Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Kendra L.; Swigost, Adam J.; Zhou, Xudong; Sens, MaryAnn; Combs, Colin K.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is widely expressed across many tissue and cell types. Proteolytic processing of the protein gives rise to a plethora of protein fragments with varied biological activities. Although a large amount of data has been generated describing the metabolism of the protein in neurons, its role in regulating the phenotype of other cells remains unclear. Based upon prior work demonstrating that APP regulates the activation phenotype of monocytic lineage cells, we hypothesized that APP can regulate macrophage activation phenotype in tissues other than brain. Ileums of the small intestines from C57BL6/J wild type and APP−/− mice were compared as a representative tissue normally associated with abundant macrophage infiltration. APP−/− intestines demonstrated diminished CD68 immunoreactivity compared to wild type mice. This correlated with significantly less cycloxygenase-2 (cox-2), CD68, CD40, CD11c, and βIII-tubulin protein levels. Peritoneal macrophage from APP−/− mice demonstrated decreased in vitro migratory ability compared to wild type cells and diminished basal KC cytokine secretion. Whereas, APP−/− intestinal macrophage had an increase in basal KC cytokine secretion compared to wild type cells. Conversely, there was a significant decrease in multiple cytokine levels in APP−/− compared to wild type ileums. Finally, APP−/− mice demonstrated impaired absorption and increased motility compared to wild type mice. These data demonstrate the APP expression regulates immune cell secretions and phenotype and intestinal function. This data set describes a novel function for this protein or its metabolites that may be relevant not only for Alzheimer’s disease but a range of immune-related disorders. PMID:22124967

  2. D1 dopamine receptor regulation of the levels of the cell-cycle-controlling proteins, cyclin D, P27 and Raf-1, in cerebral cortical precursor cells is mediated through cAMP-independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Bai, Jie; Undie, Ashiwel S; Bergson, Clare; Lidow, Michael S

    2005-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) agonists inhibit epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced passage of mouse fetal cerebral cortical precursor cells from the G1 phase to the S phase of the cell cycle. Here, we report that this action of D1R agonists may involve regulation of cyclin D, and P27, which respectively promote and suppress the G1 to S transition. Furthermore, regulation of Raf-1, a component of the receptor tyrosine kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway engaged in the mitogenic activity of EGF, may also be involved. Specifically, levels of cyclin D and Raf-1 decrease, whereas those of P27 first increase and then decrease in a dose-dependent fashion in response to the D1R agonist, SKF38393. This agonist also promotes Raf-1 phosphorylation on serine 338 residue, suggesting increased activation of this protein. Only the latter effect can be blocked by adenylyl cyclase (AC) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors, and mimicked by agonists of the cAMP signaling pathway. Another D1R agonist, SKF83959, which stimulates phospholipase Cbeta (PLCbeta) but not AC, reduces levels of Raf-1 and cyclin D similar to SKF38393. However, we detected only down-regulation of P27 by this agonist. Additionally, the concentration-dependent patterns of both SKF38393- and SKF83959-induced alterations in the levels of P27 closely resemble the effects of these ligands on the levels of the D1R-PLCbeta-associated second-messenger cascades linker, calcyon. These findings suggest that D1R-induced suppression of the cell cycle progression in EGF-supported fetal cortical precursor cells represents a net effect of competing cell cycle promoting and inhibiting molecular changes, which involve cyclin D, P27 and Raf-1. The data also show that cAMP second messenger cascade is not engaged in the D1R-induced regulation of the levels of these three proteins. Such regulation probably involves PLCbeta-associated pathways.

  3. Regulation of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel by Rab4 protein through neural precursor cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated protein 4-2 (Nedd4-2).

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhi; Zhang, Shetuan

    2013-07-26

    The human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) encodes the pore-forming α-subunit of the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K(+) channel in the heart, which plays a critical role in cardiac action potential repolarization. Dysfunction of IKr causes long QT syndrome, a cardiac electrical disorder that predisposes affected individuals to fatal arrhythmias and sudden death. The homeostasis of hERG channels in the plasma membrane depends on a balance between protein synthesis and degradation. Our recent data indicate that hERG channels undergo enhanced endocytic degradation under low potassium (hypokalemia) conditions. The GTPase Rab4 is known to mediate rapid recycling of various internalized proteins to the plasma membrane. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Rab4 on the expression level of hERG channels. Our data revealed that overexpression of Rab4 decreases the expression level of hERG in the plasma membrane. Rab4 does not affect the expression level of the Kv1.5 or EAG K(+) channels. Mechanistically, our data demonstrate that overexpression of Rab4 increases the expression level of endogenous Nedd4-2, a ubiquitin ligase that targets hERG but not Kv1.5 or EAG channels for ubiquitination and degradation. Nedd4-2 undergoes self- ubiquitination and degradation. Rab4 interferes with Nedd4-2 degradation, resulting in an increased expression level of Nedd4-2, which targets hERG. In summary, the present study demonstrates a novel pathway for hERG regulation; Rab4 decreases the hERG density at the plasma membrane by increasing the endogenous Nedd4-2 expression.

  4. Phosphorylation of the transit sequence of chloroplast precursor proteins.

    PubMed

    Waegemann, K; Soll, J

    1996-03-15

    A protein kinase was located in the cytosol of pea mesophyll cells. The protein kinase phosphorylates, in an ATP-dependent manner, chloroplast-destined precursor proteins but not precursor proteins, which are located to plant mitochondria or plant peroxisomes. The phosphorylation occurs on either serine or threonine residues, depending on the precursor protein used. We demonstrate the specific phosphorylation of the precursor forms of the chloroplast stroma proteins ferredoxin (preFd), small subunit of ribulose-bisphosphate-carboxylase (preSSU), the thylakoid localized light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding protein (preLHCP), and the thylakoid lumen-localized proteins of the oxygen-evolving complex of 23 kDa (preOE23) and 33 kDa (preOE33). In the case of thylakoid lumen proteins which possess bipartite transit sequences, the phosphorylation occurs within the stroma-targeting domain. By using single amino acid substitution within the presequences of preSSU, preOE23, and preOE33, we were able to tentatively identify a consensus motif for the precursor protein protein kinase. This motif is (P/G)X(n)(R/K)X(n)(S/T)X(n) (S*/T*), were n = 0-3 amino acids spacer and S*/T* represents the phosphate acceptor. The precursor protein protein kinase is present only in plant extracts, e.g. wheat germ and pea, but not in a reticulocyte lysate. Protein import experiments into chloroplasts revealed that phosphorylated preSSU binds to the organelles, but dephosphorylation seems required to complete the translocation process and to obtain complete import. These results suggest that a precursor protein protein phosphatase is involved in chloroplast import and represents a so far unidentified component of the import machinery. In contrast to sucrose synthase, a cytosolic marker protein, the precursor protein protein kinase seems to adhere partially to the chloroplast surface. A phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle of chloroplast-destined precursor proteins might represent one step

  5. Amyloid precursor protein controls cholesterol turnover needed for neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Pierrot, Nathalie; Tyteca, Donatienne; D'auria, Ludovic; Dewachter, Ilse; Gailly, Philippe; Hendrickx, Aurélie; Tasiaux, Bernadette; Haylani, Laetitia El; Muls, Nathalie; N'Kuli, Francisca; Laquerrière, Annie; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste; Campion, Dominique; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Courtoy, Pierre J; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; Octave, Jean-Noël

    2013-01-01

    Perturbation of lipid metabolism favours progression of Alzheimer disease, in which processing of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) has important implications. APP cleavage is tightly regulated by cholesterol and APP fragments regulate lipid homeostasis. Here, we investigated whether up or down regulation of full-length APP expression affected neuronal lipid metabolism. Expression of APP decreased HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR)-mediated cholesterol biosynthesis and SREBP mRNA levels, while its down regulation had opposite effects. APP and SREBP1 co-immunoprecipitated and co-localized in the Golgi. This interaction prevented Site-2 protease-mediated processing of SREBP1, leading to inhibition of transcription of its target genes. A GXXXG motif in APP sequence was critical for regulation of HMGCR expression. In astrocytes, APP and SREBP1 did not interact nor did APP affect cholesterol biosynthesis. Neuronal expression of APP decreased both HMGCR and cholesterol 24-hydroxylase mRNA levels and consequently cholesterol turnover, leading to inhibition of neuronal activity, which was rescued by geranylgeraniol, generated in the mevalonate pathway, in both APP expressing and mevastatin treated neurons. We conclude that APP controls cholesterol turnover needed for neuronal activity. PMID:23554170

  6. Ubiquitylation of Fe65 adaptor protein by neuronal precursor cell expressed developmentally down regulated 4-2 (Nedd4-2) via the WW domain interaction with Fe65

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Jeoung; Hyun, Sunghee; Shin, Sung Hwa

    2009-01-01

    Fe65 has been characterized as an adaptor protein, originally identified as an expressed sequence tag (EST) corresponding to an mRNA expressed at high levels in the rat brain. It contains one WW domain and two phosphotyrosine interaction/phosphotyrosine binding domains (PID1/PID2). As the neuronal precursor cell expressed developmentally down regulated 4-2 (Nedd4-2) has a putative WW domain binding motif (72PPLP75) in the N-terminal domain, we hypothesized that Fe65 associates with Nedd4-2 through a WW domain interaction, which has the characteristics of E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase. In this paper, we present evidence for the interaction between Fe65 WW domain and Nedd4-2 through its specific motif, using a pull down approach and co-immunoprecipitation. Additionally, the co-localization of Fe65 and Nedd4-2 were observed via confocal microscopy. Co-localization of Fe65 and Nedd4-2 was disrupted by either the mutation of Fe65 WW domain or its putative binding motif of Nedd4-2. When the ubiquitin assay was performed, the interaction of Nedd4-2 (wt) with Fe65 is required for the cell apoptosis and the ubiquitylation of Fe65. We also observed that the ubiquitylation of Fe65 (wt) was augmented depending on Nedd4-2 expression levels, whereas the Fe65 WW domain mutant (W243KP245K) or the Nedd4-2 AL mutant (72PPLP75 was changed to 72APLA75) was under-ubiquitinated significantly. Thus, our observations implicated that the protein-protein interaction between the WW domain of Fe65 and the putative binding motif of Nedd4-2 down-regulates Fe65 protein stability and subcellular localization through its ubiquitylation, to contribute cell apoptosis. PMID:19381069

  7. Ubiquitylation of Fe65 adaptor protein by neuronal precursor cell expressed developmentally down regulated 4-2 (Nedd4-2) via the WW domain interaction with Fe65.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Jeoung; Hyun, Sunghee; Chun, Jaesun; Shin, Sung Hwa; Kang, Sang Sun

    2009-08-31

    Fe65 has been characterized as an adaptor protein, originally identified as an expressed sequence tag (EST) corresponding to an mRNA expressed at high levels in the rat brain. It contains one WW domain and two phosphotyrosine interaction/phosphotyrosine binding domains (PID1/PID2). As the neuronal precursor cell expressed developmentally down regulated 4-2 (Nedd4-2) has a putative WW domain binding motif ((72)PPLP(75)) in the N-terminal domain, we hypothesized that Fe65 associates with Nedd4-2 through a WW domain interaction, which has the characteristics of E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase. In this paper, we present evidence for the interaction between Fe65 WW domain and Nedd4-2 through its specific motif, using a pull down approach and co-immunoprecipitation. Additionally, the co-localization of Fe65 and Nedd4-2 were observed via confocal microscopy. Co-localization of Fe65 and Nedd4-2 was disrupted by either the mutation of Fe65 WW domain or its putative binding motif of Nedd4-2. When the ubiquitin assay was performed, the interaction of Nedd4-2 (wt) with Fe65 is required for the cell apoptosis and the ubiquitylation of Fe65. We also observed that the ubiquitylation of Fe65 (wt) was augmented depending on Nedd4-2 expression levels, whereas the Fe65 WW domain mutant (W243KP245K) or the Nedd4-2 AL mutant ((72)PPLP(75) was changed to (72)APLA(75)) was under-ubiquitinated significantly. Thus, our observations implicated that the protein-protein interaction between the WW domain of Fe65 and the putative binding motif of Nedd4-2 down-regulates Fe65 protein stability and subcellular localization through its ubiquitylation, to contribute cell apoptosis.

  8. Altered Processing of Amyloid Precursor Protein in Cells Undergoing Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Fiorelli, Tina; Kirouac, Lisa; Padmanabhan, Jaya

    2013-01-01

    Altered proteolysis of amyloid precursor protein is an important determinant of pathology development in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we describe the detection of two novel fragments of amyloid precursor protein in H4 neuroglioma cells undergoing apoptosis. Immunoreactivity of these 25–35 kDa fragments to two different amyloid precursor protein antibodies suggests that they contain the amyloid-β region and an epitope near the C-terminus of amyloid precursor protein. Generation of these fragments is associated with cleavage of caspase-3 and caspase-7, suggesting activation of these caspases. Studies in neurons undergoing DNA damage-induced apoptosis also showed similar results. Inclusion of caspase inhibitors prevented the generation of these novel fragments, suggesting that they are generated by a caspase-dependent mechanism. Molecular weight prediction and immunoreactivity of the fragments generated suggested that such fragments could not be generated by cleavage at any previously identified caspase, secretase, or calpain site on amyloid precursor protein. Bioinformatic analysis of the amino acid sequence of amyloid precursor protein revealed that fragments fitting the observed size and immunoreactivity could be generated by either cleavage at a novel, hitherto unidentified, caspase site or at a previously identified matrix metalloproteinase site in the extracellular domain. Proteolytic cleavage at any of these sites leads to a decrease in the generation of α-secretase cleaved secreted APP, which has both anti-apoptotic and neuroprotective properties, and thus may contribute to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23469123

  9. Amyloid precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1) exhibits stronger zinc-dependent neuronal adhesion than amyloid precursor protein and APLP2.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Magnus C; Schauenburg, Linda; Thompson-Steckel, Greta; Dunsing, Valentin; Kaden, Daniela; Voigt, Philipp; Schaefer, Michael; Chiantia, Salvatore; Kennedy, Timothy E; Multhaup, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its paralogs, amyloid precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1) and APLP2, are metalloproteins with a putative role both in synaptogenesis and in maintaining synapse structure. Here, we studied the effect of zinc on membrane localization, adhesion, and secretase cleavage of APP, APLP1, and APLP2 in cell culture and rat neurons. For this, we employed live-cell microscopy techniques, a microcontact printing adhesion assay and ELISA for protein detection in cell culture supernatants. We report that zinc induces the multimerization of proteins of the amyloid precursor protein family and enriches them at cellular adhesion sites. Thus, zinc facilitates the formation of de novo APP and APLP1 containing adhesion complexes, whereas it does not have such influence on APLP2. Furthermore, zinc-binding prevented cleavage of APP and APLPs by extracellular secretases. In conclusion, the complexation of zinc modulates neuronal functions of APP and APLPs by (i) regulating formation of adhesion complexes, most prominently for APLP1, and (ii) by reducing the concentrations of neurotrophic soluble APP/APLP ectodomains. Earlier studies suggest a function of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) family proteins in neuronal adhesion. We report here that adhesive function of these proteins is tightly regulated by zinc, most prominently for amyloid precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1). Zinc-mediated APLP1 multimerization, which induced formation of new neuronal contacts and decreased APLP1 shedding. This suggests that APLP1 could function as a zinc receptor processing zinc signals to stabilized or new neuronal contacts.

  10. The amyloid precursor protein and postnatal neurogenesis/neuroregeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yanan; Tang, Bor Luen . E-mail: bchtbl@nus.edu.sg

    2006-03-03

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is the source of amyloid-beta (A{beta}) peptide, produced via its sequential cleavage {beta}- and {gamma}-secretases. Various biophysical forms of A{beta} (and the mutations of APP which results in their elevated levels) have been implicated in the etiology and early onset of Alzheimer's disease. APP's evolutionary conservation and the existence of APP-like isoforms (APLP1 and APLP2) which lack the A{beta} sequence, however, suggest that these might have important physiological functions that are unrelated to A{beta} production. Soluble N-terminal fragments of APP have been known to be neuroprotective, and the interaction of its cytoplasmic C-terminus with a myriad of proteins associates it with diverse processes such as axonal transport and transcriptional regulation. The notion for an essential postnatal function of APP has been demonstrated genetically, as mice deficient in both APP and APLP2 or all three APP isoforms exhibit early postnatal lethality and neuroanatomical abnormalities. Recent findings have also brought to light two possible functions of the APP family in Brain-regulation of neural progenitor cell proliferation and axonal outgrowth after injury. Interestingly, these two apparently related neurogenic/neuroregenerative functions of APP involve two separate domains of the molecule.

  11. Analysis of peripheral amyloid precursor protein in Angelman Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Craig A; Wink, Logan K; Baindu, Bayon; Ray, Balmiki; Schaefer, Tori L; Pedapati, Ernest V; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2016-09-01

    Angelman Syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder associated with significant developmental and communication delays, high risk for epilepsy, motor dysfunction, and a characteristic behavioral profile. While Angelman Syndrome is known to be associated with the loss of maternal expression of the ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A gene, the molecular sequelae of this loss remain to be fully understood. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is involved in neuronal development and APP dysregulation has been implicated in the pathophysiology of other developmental disorders including fragile X syndrome and idiopathic autism. APP dysregulation has been noted in preclinical model of chromosome 15q13 duplication, a disorder whose genetic abnormality results in duplication of the region that is epigenetically silenced in Angelman Syndrome. In this duplication model, APP levels have been shown to be significantly reduced leading to the hypothesis that enhanced ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A expression may be associated with this phenomena. We tested the hypothesis that ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A regulates APP protein levels by comparing peripheral APP and APP derivative levels in humans with Angelman Syndrome to those with neurotypical development. We report that APP total, APP alpha (sAPPα) and A Beta 40 and 42 are elevated in the plasma of humans with Angelman Syndrome compared to neurotypical matched human samples. Additionally, we found that elevations in APP total and sAPPα correlated positively with peripheral brain derived neurotrophic factor levels previously reported in this same patient cohort. Our pilot report on APP protein levels in Angelman Syndrome warrants additional exploration and may provide a molecular target of treatment for the disorder. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by phospholipid precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, M A; Homann, M J; Bae-Lee, M S; Carman, G M

    1986-01-01

    The addition of ethanolamine or choline to inositol-containing growth medium of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type cells resulted in a reduction of membrane-associated phosphatidylserine synthase (CDPdiacylglycerol:L-serine O-phosphatidyltransferase, EC 2.7.8.8) activity in cell extracts. The reduction of activity did not occur when inositol was absent from the growth medium. Under the growth conditions where a reduction of enzyme activity occurred, there was a corresponding qualitative reduction of enzyme subunit as determined by immunoblotting with antiserum raised against purified phosphatidylserine synthase. Water-soluble phospholipid precursors did not effect purified phosphatidylserine synthase activity. Phosphatidylserine synthase (activity and enzyme subunit) was not regulated by the availability of water-soluble phospholipid precursors in S. cerevisiae VAL2C(YEp CHO1) and the opi1 mutant. VAL2C(YEp CHO1) is a plasmid-bearing strain that over produces phosphatidylserine synthase activity, and the opi1 mutant is an inositol biosynthesis regulatory mutant. The results of this study suggest that the regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase by the availability of phospholipid precursors occurs at the level of enzyme formation and not at the enzyme activity level. Furthermore, the regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase is coupled to inositol synthesis. Images PMID:3023284

  13. Amyloid precursor protein cooperates with c-KIT mutation/overexpression to regulate cell apoptosis in AML1-ETO-positive leukemia via the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guopan; Yin, Changxin; Jiang, Ling; Zheng, Zhongxin; Wang, Zhixiang; Wang, Chunli; Zhou, Hongsheng; Jiang, Xuejie; Liu, Qifa; Meng, Fanyi

    2016-09-01

    It has been reported that amyloid precursor protein (APP) promotes cell proliferation and metastasis in various types of solid cancers. In our previous study, we showed that APP is highly expressed and regulates leukemia cell migration in AML1‑ETO-positive (AE) leukemia. Whether APP is involved in the regulation of AE leukemia cell proliferation or apoptosis is unclear. In the present study we focused on the correlation of APP with c-KIT mutation/overexpression and cell proliferation and apoptosis in AE leukemia. APP and c-KIT expression detected by quantitative real-time (qPCR) method, and c-KIT mutations screened using PCR in bone marrow cells from 65 patients with AE leukemia before their first chemotherapy, were simultaneously assessed. Furthermore, the Kasumi-1 cell line was chosen as the cell model, and the APP gene was knocked down using siRNA technology. The correlation of cell cycle distribution and apoptosis and c-Kit expression with APP expression levels, as well as the regulation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway by APP were analyzed in the Kasumi-1 cell line. The results showed that peripheral white blood cell counts (P=0.008) and bone marrow cellularity (P=0.031), but not bone marrow blasts, were correlated with APP expression. Moreover, the patients with APP high expression had a significantly higher incidence of c-KIT mutations (P<0.001) and increased levels of c-KIT expression (P=0.001) and poorer disease outcome. In the Kasumi-1 cell line, as compared with the wild-type and negative control cells, cell apoptosis, both early (P<0.001) and late (P<0.001), was significantly increased when the APP gene was knocked down, concomitant with reduced levels of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and increased levels of caspase-3 and -9, however, no apparent change was observed in the cell cycle distribution (P>0.05). Moreover, the knockdown of APP markedly decreased c-KIT expression at both the transcription (as evidenced by qPCR analysis) and translation

  14. Analysis of Amyloid Precursor Protein Function in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Cassar, Marlène; Kretzschmar, Doris

    2016-01-01

    The Amyloid precursor protein (APP) has mainly been investigated in connection with its role in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) due to its cleavage resulting in the production of the Aβ peptides that accumulate in the plaques characteristic for this disease. However, APP is an evolutionary conserved protein that is not only found in humans but also in many other species, including Drosophila, suggesting an important physiological function. Besides Aβ, several other fragments are produced by the cleavage of APP; large secreted fragments derived from the N-terminus and a small intracellular C-terminal fragment. Although these fragments have received much less attention than Aβ, a picture about their function is finally emerging. In contrast to mammals, which express three APP family members, Drosophila expresses only one APP protein called APP-like or APPL. Therefore APPL functions can be studied in flies without the complication that other APP family members may have redundant functions. Flies lacking APPL are viable but show defects in neuronal outgrowth in the central and peripheral nervous system (PNS) in addition to synaptic changes. Furthermore, APPL has been connected with axonal transport functions. In the adult nervous system, APPL, and more specifically its secreted fragments, can protect neurons from degeneration. APPL cleavage also prevents glial death. Lastly, APPL was found to be involved in behavioral deficits and in regulating sleep/activity patterns. This review, will describe the role of APPL in neuronal development and maintenance and briefly touch on its emerging function in circadian rhythms while an accompanying review will focus on its role in learning and memory formation. PMID:27507933

  15. MiR-144-3p and Its Target Gene β-Amyloid Precursor Protein Regulate 1-Methyl-4-Phenyl-1,2-3,6-Tetrahydropyridine-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kuo; Zhang, Junling; Ji, Chunxue; Wang, Lixuan

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported to be involved in many neurodegenerative diseases. The present study focused on the role of hsa-miR-144-3p in one of the neurodegenerative diseases, Parkinson’s disease (PD). Our study showed a remarkable down-regulation of miR-144-3p expression in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated SH-SY5Y cells. MiR-144-3p was then overexpressed and silenced in human SH-SY5Y cells by miRNA-mimics and miRNA-inhibitor transfections, respectively. Furthermore, β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) was identified as a target gene of miR-144-3p via a luciferase reporter assay. We found that miR-144-3p overexpression significantly inhibited the protein expression of APP. Since mitochondrial dysfunction has been shown to be one of the major pathological events in PD, we also focused on the role of miR-144-3p and APP in regulating mitochondrial functions. Our study demonstrated that up-regulation of miR-144-3p increased expression of the key genes involved in maintaining mitochondrial function, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM). Moreover, there was also a significant increase in cellular ATP, cell viability and the relative copy number of mtDNA in the presence of miR-144-3p overexpression. In contrast, miR-144-3p silencing showed opposite effects. We also found that APP overexpression significantly decreased ATP level, cell viability, the relative copy number of mtDNA and the expression of these three genes, which reversed the effects of miR-144-3p overexpression. Taken together, these results show that miR-144-3p plays an important role in maintaining mitochondrial function, and its target gene APP is also involved in this process. PMID:27329039

  16. Mechanisms Regulating Protein Localization.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Nicholas C; Doetsch, Paul W; Corbett, Anita H

    2015-10-01

    Cellular functions are dictated by protein content and activity. There are numerous strategies to regulate proteins varying from modulating gene expression to post-translational modifications. One commonly used mode of regulation in eukaryotes is targeted localization. By specifically redirecting the localization of a pool of existing protein, cells can achieve rapid changes in local protein function. Eukaryotic cells have evolved elegant targeting pathways to direct proteins to the appropriate cellular location or locations. Here, we provide a general overview of these localization pathways, with a focus on nuclear and mitochondrial transport, and present a survey of the evolutionarily conserved regulatory strategies identified thus far. We end with a description of several specific examples of proteins that exploit localization as an important mode of regulation.

  17. Epigenetic mechanisms regulating differentiation of neural stem/precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Adefuin, Aliya Mari D; Kimura, Ayaka; Noguchi, Hirofumi; Nakashima, Kinichi; Namihira, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation of neural stem/precursor cells (NS/PCs) into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes during mammalian brain development is a carefully controlled and timed event. Increasing evidences suggest that epigenetic regulation is necessary to drive this. Here, we provide an overview of the epigenetic mechanisms involved in the developing mammalian embryonic forebrain. Histone methylation is a key factor but other epigenetic factors such as DNA methylation and noncoding RNAs also partake during fate determination. As numerous epigenetic modifications have been identified, future studies on timing and regional specificity of these modifications will further deepen our understanding of how intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms participate together to precisely control brain development.

  18. Comparative investigation of B-Protein and its probable precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Schweikert, A.; Bucovaz, E.

    1987-05-01

    B-Protein, discovered in 1976 by Bucovaz, appears to be a general biological marker for the detection of cancer. An assay procedure was developed to detect B-Protein which involves the interaction of B-Protein with a specific radiolabeled protein named binding protein, a substructure of the coenzyme A-synthesizing protein complex (CoA-SPC) of Bakers' yeast. A protein which may be the precursor of B-Protein is present normally in serum, whereas, a modified or altered protein, designated B-Protein, is present in the serum of cancer patients. Analysis of B-Protein and its relationship with the normal serum protein demonstrates a difference in solubility between B-Protein and the normal counterpart. Although physiochemical characteristics between both are very similar, i.e., electrophoretic mobility, molecular weight, pI, immunological recognition, there appears to be minor differences in the carbohydrate moiety of B-Protein as demonstrated by periodic acid-Schiff base staining and the binding of Wheat Germ Lectin. Lipid content has also been examined but has not been associated with the difference in solubility. Currently, the difference in B-Protein and its normal protein counterpart appears to be related to conformational differences in the tertiary structures.

  19. Precursor Polypeptides to Structural Proteins of Visna Virus

    PubMed Central

    Vigne, Robert; Filippi, Pierre; Quérat, Gilles; Sauze, Nicole; Vitu, Christian; Russo, Pierre; Delori, Pierre

    1982-01-01

    Visna virus is a retrovirus which replicates in fibroblast-like cells of the sheep choroid plexus through a lytic cycle. Visna virions contain three major low-molecular-weight proteins (p30, p16, and p14) which, together with the genomic RNA and several molecules of reverse transcriptase, constitute the core structure of the virions. The core is surrounded by an envelope containing a major glycoprotein (gp135). By analogy with the oncoviruses, these three groups of structural proteins (i.e., the internal proteins, the envelope glycoprotein, and the reverse transcriptase) are probably encoded by the gag, env, and pol genes, respectively. To elucidate the genetic organization of the visna virus genome and its expression, we studied the synthesis of viral proteins in infected sheep choroid plexus cells. Intracellular viral proteins were detected by immunoprecipitation of pulse-labeled cell extracts with monospecific sera raised against p30, p16, and gp135 and resolution of the proteins by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunoprecipitation with anti-p30 and anti-p16 sera allowed the characterization of the 55,000-dalton polypeptide precursor to internal virion proteins p30, p16, and p14 (Pr55gag). Tryptic peptide mapping confirmed the precursor-product relationship between Pr55gag and the three internal proteins. In addition, a gag-related polypeptide of 150,000 daltons was also detected. This polypeptide, which was less abundant than Pr55gag, is a likely precursor to the viral reverse transcriptase (Pr150gag-pol). Pr55gag and Pr150gag-pol are not glycosylated. The precursor related to major envelope protein gp135 is a glycosylated polypeptide with an average molecular weight of 150,000 (gPr150env). Pulse-chase experiments indicated that gPr150env matures into glycoprotein gp135 intracellularly; however, gp135 was never preponderant in cell extracts. The non-glycosylated from of gPr150env, which accumulated in the presence of 2-deoxy

  20. Current Development in Isoprenoid Precursor Biosynthesis and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-chen; Song, Heng; Liu, Hung-wen; Liu, Pinghua

    2013-01-01

    Isoprenoids are one of the largest classes of natural products and all of them are constructed from two precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and its isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). For decades, the mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway was proposed to be the only IPP and DMAPP biosynthetic pathway. This review summarizes the newly discovered IPP and DMAPP production pathways since late 1990s, their distribution among different kingdoms, and their roles in secondary metabolite production. These new IPP and DMAPP production pathways include the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway, a modified MVA pathway, and the 5-Methylthioadenosine shunt pathway. Relative to the studies on the MVA pathway, information on the MEP pathway regulation is limited and the mechanistic details of several of its novel transformations remain to be addressed. Current status on both MEP pathway regulation and mechanistic issues are also presented. PMID:23891475

  1. ApoER2 expression increases Aβ production while decreasing Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) endocytosis: Possible role in the partitioning of APP into lipid rafts and in the regulation of γ-secretase activity

    PubMed Central

    Fuentealba, Rodrigo A; Barría, Maria Ines; Lee, Jiyeon; Cam, Judy; Araya, Claudia; Escudero, Claudia A; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Bronfman, Francisca C; Bu, Guojun; Marzolo, Maria-Paz

    2007-01-01

    Background The generation of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) through the proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a central event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies highlight APP endocytosis and localization to lipid rafts as important events favoring amyloidogenic processing. However, the precise mechanisms underlying these events are poorly understood. ApoER2 is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) family exhibiting slow endocytosis rate and a significant association with lipid rafts. Despite the important neurophysiological roles described for ApoER2, little is known regarding how ApoER2 regulates APP trafficking and processing. Results Here, we demonstrate that ApoER2 physically interacts and co-localizes with APP. Remarkably, we found that ApoER2 increases cell surface APP levels and APP association with lipid rafts. The increase of cell surface APP requires the presence of ApoER2 cytoplasmic domain and is a result of decreased APP internalization rate. Unexpectedly, ApoER2 expression correlated with a significant increase in Aβ production and reduced levels of APP-CTFs. The increased Aβ production was dependent on the integrity of the NPxY endocytosis motif of ApoER2. We also found that expression of ApoER2 increased APP association with lipid rafts and increased γ-secretase activity, both of which might contribute to increased Aβ production. Conclusion These findings show that ApoER2 negatively affects APP internalization. However, ApoER2 expression stimulates Aβ production by shifting the proportion of APP from the non-rafts to the raft membrane domains, thereby promoting β-secretase and γ-secretase mediated amyloidogenic processing and also by incrementing the activity of γ-secretase. PMID:17620134

  2. ApoER2 expression increases Abeta production while decreasing Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) endocytosis: Possible role in the partitioning of APP into lipid rafts and in the regulation of gamma-secretase activity.

    PubMed

    Fuentealba, Rodrigo A; Barría, Maria Ines; Lee, Jiyeon; Cam, Judy; Araya, Claudia; Escudero, Claudia A; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Bronfman, Francisca C; Bu, Guojun; Marzolo, Maria-Paz

    2007-07-09

    The generation of the amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) through the proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a central event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies highlight APP endocytosis and localization to lipid rafts as important events favoring amyloidogenic processing. However, the precise mechanisms underlying these events are poorly understood. ApoER2 is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) family exhibiting slow endocytosis rate and a significant association with lipid rafts. Despite the important neurophysiological roles described for ApoER2, little is known regarding how ApoER2 regulates APP trafficking and processing. Here, we demonstrate that ApoER2 physically interacts and co-localizes with APP. Remarkably, we found that ApoER2 increases cell surface APP levels and APP association with lipid rafts. The increase of cell surface APP requires the presence of ApoER2 cytoplasmic domain and is a result of decreased APP internalization rate. Unexpectedly, ApoER2 expression correlated with a significant increase in Abeta production and reduced levels of APP-CTFs. The increased Abeta production was dependent on the integrity of the NPxY endocytosis motif of ApoER2. We also found that expression of ApoER2 increased APP association with lipid rafts and increased gamma-secretase activity, both of which might contribute to increased Abeta production. These findings show that ApoER2 negatively affects APP internalization. However, ApoER2 expression stimulates Abeta production by shifting the proportion of APP from the non-rafts to the raft membrane domains, thereby promoting beta-secretase and gamma-secretase mediated amyloidogenic processing and also by incrementing the activity of gamma-secretase.

  3. Down-regulation of cell surface insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1 phosphorylation by inhibitor of 90-kDa heat-shock protein family: endoplasmic reticulum retention of monomeric insulin receptor precursor with calnexin in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Tomokazu; Yanagita, Toshihiko; Shiraishi, Seiji; Yokoo, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Minami, Shin-Ichi; Onitsuka, Toshio; Wada, Akihiko

    2002-10-01

    Treatment (>/=6 h) of cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells with geldanamycin (GA) or herbimycin A (HA), an inhibitor of the 90-kDa heat-shock protein (Hsp90) family, decreased cell surface (125)I-insulin binding. The effect of GA was concentration (EC(50) = 84 nM)- and time (t(1/2) = 8.5 h)-dependent; GA (1 microM for 24 h) lowered the B(max) value of (125)I-insulin binding by 80%, without changing the K(d) value. Western blot analysis showed that GA (>/=3 h) lowered insulin receptor (IR) level by 83% (t(1/2) = 7.4 h; EC(50) = 74 nM), while raising IR precursor level by 100% (t(1/2) = 7.9 h; EC(50) = 300 nM). Pulse-label followed by reducing and nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that monomeric IR precursor (~190 kDa) developed into the homodimeric IR precursor (approximately 380 kDa) and the mature alpha(2)beta(2) IR (~410 kDa) in nontreated cells, but not in GA-treated cells; in GA-treated cells, the homodimerization-incompetent form of monomeric IR precursor was degraded via endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation. Immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblot analysis showed that IR precursor was associated with calnexin (CNX) to a greater extent in GA-treated cells, compared with nontreated cells. GA had no effect on IR mRNA levels and internalization rate of cell surface IRs. In GA-treated cells, insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) was attenuated by 77%, with no change in IRS-1 level. Thus, inhibition of the Hsp90 family by GA or HA interrupts homodimerization of monomeric IR precursor in the ER and increases retention of monomeric IR precursor with CNX; this event retards cell surface expression of IR and attenuates insulin-induced activation of IRS-1.

  4. AMYPdb: A database dedicated to amyloid precursor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pawlicki, Sandrine; Le Béchec, Antony; Delamarche, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Background Misfolding and aggregation of proteins into ordered fibrillar structures is associated with a number of severe pathologies, including Alzheimer's disease, prion diseases, and type II diabetes. The rapid accumulation of knowledge about the sequences and structures of these proteins allows using of in silico methods to investigate the molecular mechanisms of their abnormal conformational changes and assembly. However, such an approach requires the collection of accurate data, which are inconveniently dispersed among several generalist databases. Results We therefore created a free online knowledge database (AMYPdb) dedicated to amyloid precursor proteins and we have performed large scale sequence analysis of the included data. Currently, AMYPdb integrates data on 31 families, including 1,705 proteins from nearly 600 organisms. It displays links to more than 2,300 bibliographic references and 1,200 3D-structures. A Wiki system is available to insert data into the database, providing a sharing and collaboration environment. We generated and analyzed 3,621 amino acid sequence patterns, reporting highly specific patterns for each amyloid family, along with patterns likely to be involved in protein misfolding and aggregation. Conclusion AMYPdb is a comprehensive online database aiming at the centralization of bioinformatic data regarding all amyloid proteins and their precursors. Our sequence pattern discovery and analysis approach unveiled protein regions of significant interest. AMYPdb is freely accessible [1]. PMID:18544157

  5. Structural basis for precursor protein-directed ribosomal peptide macrocyclization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kunhua; Condurso, Heather L.; Li, Gengnan; Ding, Yousong; Bruner, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Macrocyclization is a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways including the diverse family of ribosomal peptides. Microviridins are architecturally complex cyanobacterial ribosomal peptides whose members target proteases with potent reversible inhibition. The product structure is constructed by three macrocyclizations catalyzed sequentially by two members of the ATP-grasp family, a unique strategy for ribosomal peptide macrocyclization. Here, we describe the detailed structural basis for the enzyme-catalyzed macrocyclizations in the microviridin J pathway of Microcystis aeruginosa. The macrocyclases, MdnC and MdnB, interact with a conserved α-helix of the precursor peptide using a novel precursor peptide recognition mechanism. The results provide insight into the unique protein/protein interactions key to the chemistry, suggest an origin of the natural combinatorial synthesis of microviridin peptides and provide a framework for future engineering efforts to generate designed compounds. PMID:27669417

  6. Structural basis for precursor protein-directed ribosomal peptide macrocyclization.

    PubMed

    Li, Kunhua; Condurso, Heather L; Li, Gengnan; Ding, Yousong; Bruner, Steven D

    2016-11-01

    Macrocyclization is a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways including the diverse family of ribosomal peptides. Microviridins are architecturally complex cyanobacterial ribosomal peptides that target proteases with potent reversible inhibition. The product structure is constructed via three macrocyclizations catalyzed sequentially by two members of the ATP-grasp family, a unique strategy for ribosomal peptide macrocyclization. Here we describe in detail the structural basis for the enzyme-catalyzed macrocyclizations in the microviridin J pathway of Microcystis aeruginosa. The macrocyclases MdnC and MdnB interact with a conserved α-helix of the precursor peptide using a novel precursor-peptide recognition mechanism. The results provide insight into the unique protein-protein interactions that are key to the chemistry, suggest an origin for the natural combinatorial synthesis of microviridin peptides, and provide a framework for future engineering efforts to generate designed compounds.

  7. Amyloid Precursor Proteins Interact with the Heterotrimeric G Protein Go in the Control of Neuronal Migration

    PubMed Central

    Ramaker, Jenna M.; Swanson, Tracy L.

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved transmembrane glycoproteins that has been proposed to regulate multiple aspects of cell motility in the nervous system. Although APP is best known as the source of β-amyloid fragments (Aβ) that accumulate in Alzheimer's disease, perturbations affecting normal APP signaling events may also contribute to disease progression. Previous in vitro studies showed that interactions between APP and the heterotrimeric G protein Goα-regulated Goα activity and Go-dependent apoptotic responses, independent of Aβ. However, evidence for authentic APP–Go interactions within the healthy nervous system has been lacking. To address this issue, we have used a combination of in vitro and in vivo strategies to show that endogenously expressed APP family proteins colocalize with Goα in both insect and mammalian nervous systems, including human brain. Using biochemical, pharmacological, and Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation assays, we have shown that insect APP (APPL) directly interacts with Goα in cell culture and at synaptic terminals within the insect brain, and that this interaction is regulated by Goα activity. We have also adapted a well characterized assay of neuronal migration in the hawkmoth Manduca to show that perturbations affecting APPL and Goα signaling induce the same unique pattern of ectopic, inappropriate growth and migration, analogous to defective migration patterns seen in mice lacking all APP family proteins. These results support the model that APP and its orthologs regulate conserved aspects of neuronal migration and outgrowth in the nervous system by functioning as unconventional Goα-coupled receptors. PMID:23761911

  8. Amyloid precursor proteins interact with the heterotrimeric G protein Go in the control of neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    Ramaker, Jenna M; Swanson, Tracy L; Copenhaver, Philip F

    2013-06-12

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved transmembrane glycoproteins that has been proposed to regulate multiple aspects of cell motility in the nervous system. Although APP is best known as the source of β-amyloid fragments (Aβ) that accumulate in Alzheimer's disease, perturbations affecting normal APP signaling events may also contribute to disease progression. Previous in vitro studies showed that interactions between APP and the heterotrimeric G protein Goα-regulated Goα activity and Go-dependent apoptotic responses, independent of Aβ. However, evidence for authentic APP-Go interactions within the healthy nervous system has been lacking. To address this issue, we have used a combination of in vitro and in vivo strategies to show that endogenously expressed APP family proteins colocalize with Goα in both insect and mammalian nervous systems, including human brain. Using biochemical, pharmacological, and Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation assays, we have shown that insect APP (APPL) directly interacts with Goα in cell culture and at synaptic terminals within the insect brain, and that this interaction is regulated by Goα activity. We have also adapted a well characterized assay of neuronal migration in the hawkmoth Manduca to show that perturbations affecting APPL and Goα signaling induce the same unique pattern of ectopic, inappropriate growth and migration, analogous to defective migration patterns seen in mice lacking all APP family proteins. These results support the model that APP and its orthologs regulate conserved aspects of neuronal migration and outgrowth in the nervous system by functioning as unconventional Goα-coupled receptors.

  9. Expression of β-amyloid precursor protein in refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sima, Xiutian; Xu, Jianguo; Li, Jinmei; Zhong, Weiying; You, Chao

    2014-04-01

    β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP), also known as Aβ peptide, has a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, and is also likely to be involved in the development of refractory epilepsy. The mechanism behind the association between β-APP and refractory epilepsy remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to examine the levels of APP mRNA and β-APP protein in patients with refractory epilepsy. Tissue samples were obtained from patients with chronic pharmacoresistant epilepsy who underwent surgery. Levels of APP mRNA and β-APP protein in epileptic temporal lobe and hippocampal tissue were assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. The expression levels of protein significantly increased in the temporal cortex and the hippocampus of the patients with epilepsy. β-APP may thus contribute to the pathogenesis of refractory epilepsy.

  10. Structural basis for precursor protein-directed ribosomal peptide macrocyclization

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kunhua; Condurso, Heather L.; Li, Gengnan; Ding, Yousong; Bruner, Steven D.

    2016-11-11

    Macrocyclization is a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways including the diverse family of ribosomal peptides. Microviridins are architecturally complex cyanobacterial ribosomal peptides that target proteases with potent reversible inhibition. The product structure is constructed via three macrocyclizations catalyzed sequentially by two members of the ATP-grasp family, a unique strategy for ribosomal peptide macrocyclization. Here we describe in detail the structural basis for the enzyme-catalyzed macrocyclizations in the microviridin J pathway of Microcystis aeruginosa. The macrocyclases MdnC and MdnB interact with a conserved α-helix of the precursor peptide using a novel precursor-peptide recognition mechanism. The results provide insight into the unique protein–protein interactions that are key to the chemistry, suggest an origin for the natural combinatorial synthesis of microviridin peptides, and provide a framework for future engineering efforts to generate designed compounds.

  11. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) affects global protein synthesis in dividing human cells.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Anna; Galluzzo, Paola; Liang, Shuang; Rambo, Brittany; Skucha, Sylvia; Weber, Megan J; Alani, Sara; Bocchetta, Maurizio

    2015-05-01

    Hypoxic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is dependent on Notch-1 signaling for survival. Targeting Notch-1 by means of γ-secretase inhibitors (GSI) proved effective in killing hypoxic NSCLC. Post-mortem analysis of GSI-treated, NSCLC-burdened mice suggested enhanced phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at threonines 37/46 in hypoxic tumor tissues. In vitro dissection of this phenomenon revealed that Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) inhibition was responsible for a non-canonical 4E-BP1 phosphorylation pattern rearrangement-a process, in part, mediated by APP regulation of the pseudophosphatase Styx. Upon APP depletion we observed modifications of eIF-4F composition indicating increased recruitment of eIF-4A to the mRNA cap. This phenomenon was supported by the observation that cells with depleted APP were partially resistant to silvestrol, an antibiotic that interferes with eIF-4A assembly into eIF-4F complexes. APP downregulation in dividing human cells increased the rate of global protein synthesis, both cap- and IRES-dependent. Such an increase seemed independent of mTOR inhibition. After administration of Torin-1, APP downregulation and Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC-1) inhibition affected 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and global protein synthesis in opposite fashions. Additional investigations indicated that APP operates independently of mTORC-1. Key phenomena described in this study were reversed by overexpression of the APP C-terminal domain. The presented data suggest that APP may be a novel regulator of protein synthesis in dividing human cells, both cancerous and primary. Furthermore, APP appears to affect translation initiation using mechanisms seemingly dissimilar to mTORC-1 regulation of cap-dependent protein synthesis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Affects Global Protein Synthesis in Dividing Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sobol, Anna; Galluzzo, Paola; Liang, Shuang; Rambo, Brittany; Skucha, Sylvia; Weber, Megan J.; Alani, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic non‐small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is dependent on Notch‐1 signaling for survival. Targeting Notch‐1 by means of γ‐secretase inhibitors (GSI) proved effective in killing hypoxic NSCLC. Post‐mortem analysis of GSI‐treated, NSCLC‐burdened mice suggested enhanced phosphorylation of 4E‐BP1 at threonines 37/46 in hypoxic tumor tissues. In vitro dissection of this phenomenon revealed that Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) inhibition was responsible for a non‐canonical 4E‐BP1 phosphorylation pattern rearrangement—a process, in part, mediated by APP regulation of the pseudophosphatase Styx. Upon APP depletion we observed modifications of eIF‐4F composition indicating increased recruitment of eIF‐4A to the mRNA cap. This phenomenon was supported by the observation that cells with depleted APP were partially resistant to silvestrol, an antibiotic that interferes with eIF‐4A assembly into eIF‐4F complexes. APP downregulation in dividing human cells increased the rate of global protein synthesis, both cap‐ and IRES‐dependent. Such an increase seemed independent of mTOR inhibition. After administration of Torin‐1, APP downregulation and Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC‐1) inhibition affected 4E‐BP1 phosphorylation and global protein synthesis in opposite fashions. Additional investigations indicated that APP operates independently of mTORC‐1. Key phenomena described in this study were reversed by overexpression of the APP C‐terminal domain. The presented data suggest that APP may be a novel regulator of protein synthesis in dividing human cells, both cancerous and primary. Furthermore, APP appears to affect translation initiation using mechanisms seemingly dissimilar to mTORC‐1 regulation of cap‐dependent protein synthesis. J. Cell. Physiol. 230: 1064–1074, 2015. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25283437

  13. Interaction of Alzheimer's beta -amyloid precursor family proteins with scaffold proteins of the JNK signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Taru, Hidenori; Iijima, Ko-Ichi; Hase, Momoko; Kirino, Yutaka; Yagi, Yoshimasa; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2002-05-31

    We have isolated a novel protein based on its association with Drosophila APP-like protein (APPL), a homolog of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) that is implicated in Alzheimer's disease. This novel APPL-interacting protein 1 (APLIP1) contains a Src homology 3 domain and a phosphotyrosine interaction domain and is expressed abundantly in neural tissues. The phosphotyrosine interaction domain of APLIP1 interacts with a sequence containing GYENPTY in the cytoplasmic domain of APPL. APLIP1 is highly homologous to the carboxyl-terminal halves of mammalian c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK)-interacting protein 1b (JIP1b) and 2 (JIP2), which also contain Src homology 3 and phosphotyrosine interaction domains. The similarity of APLIP1 to JIP1b and JIP2 includes interaction with component(s) of the JNK signaling pathway and with the motor protein kinesin and the formation of homo-oligomers. JIP1b interacts strongly with the cytoplasmic domain of APP (APPcyt), as APLIP1 does with APPL, but the interaction of JIP2 with APPcyt is weak. Overexpression of JIP1b slightly enhances the JNK-dependent threonine phosphorylation of APP in cultured cells, but that of JIP2 suppresses it. These observations suggest that the interactions of APP family proteins with APLIP1, JIP1b, and JIP2 are conserved and play important roles in the metabolism and/or the function of APPs including the regulation of APP phosphorylation by JNK. Analysis of APP family proteins and their associated proteins is expected to contribute to understanding the molecular process of neural degeneration in Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Downregulation of amyloid precursor protein inhibits neurite outgrowth in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane protein expressed in several cell types. In the nervous system, APP is expressed by glial and neuronal cells, and several lines of evidence suggest that it plays a role in normal and pathological phenomena. To address the question of the actual function of APP in normal developing neurons, we undertook a study aimed at blocking APP expression using antisense oligonucleotides. Oligonucleotide internalization was achieved by linking them to a vector peptide that translocates through biological membranes. This original technique, which is very efficient and gives direct access to the cell cytosol and nucleus, allowed us to work with extracellular oligonucleotide concentrations between 40 and 200 nM. Internalization of antisense oligonucleotides overlapping the origin of translation resulted in a marked but transient decrease in APP neosynthesis that was not observed with the vector peptide alone, or with sense oligonucleotides. Although transient, the decrease in APP neosynthesis was sufficient to provoke a distinct decrease in axon and dendrite outgrowth by embryonic cortical neurons developing in vitro. The latter decrease was not accompanied by changes in the spreading of the cell bodies. A single exposure to coupled antisense oligonucleotides at the onset of the culture was sufficient to produce significant morphological effects 6, 18, and 24 h later, but by 42 h, there were no remaining significant morphologic changes. This report thus demonstrates that amyloid precursor protein plays an important function in the morphological differentiation of cortical neurons in primary culture. PMID:7876315

  15. Regulation of a viral proteinase by a peptide and DNA in one-dimensional space: I. binding to DNA AND to hexon of the precursor to protein VI, pVI, of human adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Vito; McGrath, William J; Suomalainen, Maarit; Greber, Urs F; Freimuth, Paul; Blainey, Paul C; Luo, Guobin; Xie, X Sunney; Mangel, Walter F

    2013-01-18

    The precursor to adenovirus protein VI, pVI, is a multifunctional protein with different roles early and late in virus infection. Here, we focus on two roles late in infection, binding of pVI to DNA and to the major capsid protein hexon. pVI bound to DNA as a monomer independent of DNA sequence with an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant, K(d)((app)), of 46 nm. Bound to double-stranded DNA, one molecule of pVI occluded 8 bp. Upon the binding of pVI to DNA, three sodium ions were displaced from the DNA. A ΔG(0)(0) of -4.54 kcal/mol for the nonelectrostatic free energy of binding indicated that a substantial component of the binding free energy resulted from nonspecific interactions between pVI and DNA. The proteolytically processed, mature form of pVI, protein VI, also bound to DNA; its K(d)((app)) was much higher, 307 nm. The binding assays were performed in 1 mm MgCl(2) because in the absence of magnesium, the binding to pVI or protein VI to DNA was too tight to determine a K(d)((app)). Three molecules of pVI bound to one molecule of the hexon trimer with an equilibrium dissociation constant K(d)((app)) of 1.1 nm.

  16. Insights into the physiological function of the β-amyloid precursor protein: beyond Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Dawkins, Edgar; Small, David H

    2014-06-01

    The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been extensively studied for its role as the precursor of the β-amyloid protein (Aβ) of Alzheimer's disease. However, the normal function of APP remains largely unknown. This article reviews studies on the structure, expression and post-translational processing of APP, as well as studies on the effects of APP in vitro and in vivo. We conclude that the published data provide strong evidence that APP has a trophic function. APP is likely to be involved in neural stem cell development, neuronal survival, neurite outgrowth and neurorepair. However, the mechanisms by which APP exerts its actions remain to be elucidated. The available evidence suggests that APP interacts both intracellularly and extracellularly to regulate various signal transduction mechanisms. This article reviews studies on the structure, expression and post-translational processing of β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), as well as studies on the effects of APP in vitro and in vivo. We conclude that the published data provide strong evidence that APP has a trophic function. APP is likely to be involved in neural stem cell development, neuronal survival, neurite outgrowth and neurorepair. However, the mechanisms by which APP exerts its actions remain to be elucidated. The available evidence suggests that APP interacts both intracellularly and extracellularly to regulate various signal transduction mechanisms. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The International Society for Neurochemistry.

  17. Mutational Analysis of the Rift Valley Fever Virus Glycoprotein Precursor Proteins for Gn Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Phoenix, Inaia; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Nishiyama, Shoko; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) M-segment encodes the 78 kD, NSm, Gn, and Gc proteins. The 1st AUG generates the 78 kD-Gc precursor, the 2nd AUG generates the NSm-Gn-Gc precursor, and the 3rd AUG makes the NSm’-Gn-Gc precursor. To understand biological changes due to abolishment of the precursors, we quantitatively measured Gn secretion using a reporter assay, in which a Gaussia luciferase (gLuc) protein is fused to the RVFV M-segment pre-Gn region. Using the reporter assay, the relative expression of Gn/gLuc fusion proteins was analyzed among various AUG mutants. The reporter assay showed efficient secretion of Gn/gLuc protein from the precursor made from the 2nd AUG, while the removal of the untranslated region upstream of the 2nd AUG (AUG2-M) increased the secretion of the Gn/gLuc protein. Subsequently, recombinant MP-12 strains encoding mutations in the pre-Gn region were rescued, and virological phenotypes were characterized. Recombinant MP-12 encoding the AUG2-M mutation replicated slightly less efficiently than the control, indicating that viral replication is further influenced by the biological processes occurring after Gn expression, rather than the Gn abundance. This study showed that, not only the abolishment of AUG, but also the truncation of viral UTR, affects the expression of Gn protein by the RVFV M-segment. PMID:27231931

  18. Mutational Analysis of the Rift Valley Fever Virus Glycoprotein Precursor Proteins for Gn Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, Inaia; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Nishiyama, Shoko; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2016-05-24

    The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) M-segment encodes the 78 kD, NSm, Gn, and Gc proteins. The 1st AUG generates the 78 kD-Gc precursor, the 2nd AUG generates the NSm-Gn-Gc precursor, and the 3rd AUG makes the NSm'-Gn-Gc precursor. To understand biological changes due to abolishment of the precursors, we quantitatively measured Gn secretion using a reporter assay, in which a Gaussia luciferase (gLuc) protein is fused to the RVFV M-segment pre-Gn region. Using the reporter assay, the relative expression of Gn/gLuc fusion proteins was analyzed among various AUG mutants. The reporter assay showed efficient secretion of Gn/gLuc protein from the precursor made from the 2nd AUG, while the removal of the untranslated region upstream of the 2nd AUG (AUG2-M) increased the secretion of the Gn/gLuc protein. Subsequently, recombinant MP-12 strains encoding mutations in the pre-Gn region were rescued, and virological phenotypes were characterized. Recombinant MP-12 encoding the AUG2-M mutation replicated slightly less efficiently than the control, indicating that viral replication is further influenced by the biological processes occurring after Gn expression, rather than the Gn abundance. This study showed that, not only the abolishment of AUG, but also the truncation of viral UTR, affects the expression of Gn protein by the RVFV M-segment.

  19. Cell-type dependent modulation of Notch signaling by the amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sun Young; Chen, Ci-Di; Abraham, Carmela R

    2010-04-01

    The amyloid precursor protein is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane protein that has been long implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease but its normal biological function has remained elusive despite extensive effort. We have previously reported the identification of Notch2 as an amyloid precursor protein interacting protein in E18 rat neurons. Here, we sought to reveal the physiologic consequences of this interaction. We report a functional relationship between amyloid precursor protein and Notch1, which does not affect Delta ligand binding. First, we observed interactions between the amyloid precursor protein and Notch in mouse embryonic stem cells lacking both presenilin 1 and presenilin 2, the active proteolytic components of the gamma-secretase complex, suggesting that these two transmembrane proteins can interact in the absence of presenilin. Next, we demonstrated that the amyloid precursor protein affects Notch signaling by using Notch-dependent luciferase assays in two cell lines, the human embryonic kidney 293 and the monkey kidney, COS7. We found that the amyloid precursor protein exerts opposing effects on Notch signaling in human embryonic kidney 293 vs. COS7 cells. Finally, we show that more Notch Intracellular Domain is found in the nucleus in the presence of exogenous amyloid precursor protein or its intracellular domain, suggesting the mechanism by which the amyloid precursor protein affects Notch signaling in certain cells. Our results provide evidence of potentially important communications between the amyloid precursor protein and Notch.

  20. Impact of US and Canadian precursor regulation on methamphetamine purity in the United States.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, James K; Liu, Lon-Mu; Callaghan, Russell

    2009-03-01

    Reducing drug purity is a major, but largely unstudied, goal of drug suppression. This study examines whether US methamphetamine purity was impacted by the suppression policy of US and Canadian precursor chemical regulation. Autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA)-intervention time-series analysis. Continental United States and Hawaii (1985-May 2005). Interventions US federal regulations targeting precursors, ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, in forms used by large-scale producers were implemented in November 1989, August 1995 and October 1997. US regulations targeting precursors in forms used by small-scale producers (e.g. over-the-counter medications) were implemented in October 1996 and October 2001. Canada implemented federal precursor regulations in January 2003 and July 2003 and an essential chemical (e.g. acetone) regulation in January 2004. Monthly median methamphetamine purity series. US regulations targeting large-scale producers were associated with purity declines of 16-67 points; those targeting small-scale producers had little or no impact. Canada's precursor regulations were associated with purity increases of 13-15 points, while its essential chemical regulation was associated with a 13-point decrease. Hawaii's purity was consistently high, and appeared to vary little with the 1990s/2000s regulations. US precursor regulations targeting large-scale producers were associated with substantial decreases in continental US methamphetamine purity, while regulations targeting over-the-counter medications had little or no impact. Canada's essential chemical regulation was also associated with a decrease in continental US purity. However, Canada's precursor regulations were associated with purity increases: these regulations may have impacted primarily producers of lower-quality methamphetamine, leaving higher-purity methamphetamine on the market by default. Hawaii's well-known preference for 'ice' (high-purity methamphetamine) may have helped to

  1. Amyloid Precursor Protein Is Trafficked and Secreted via Synaptic Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Dietmar; Hua, Yunfeng; Hüve, Jana; Wilhelm, Benjamin G.; Klingauf, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    A large body of evidence has implicated amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its proteolytic derivatives as key players in the physiological context of neuronal synaptogenesis and synapse maintenance, as well as in the pathology of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Although APP processing and release are known to occur in response to neuronal stimulation, the exact mechanism by which APP reaches the neuronal surface is unclear. We now demonstrate that a small but relevant number of synaptic vesicles contain APP, which can be released during neuronal activity, and most likely represent the major exocytic pathway of APP. This novel finding leads us to propose a revised model of presynaptic APP trafficking that reconciles existing knowledge on APP with our present understanding of vesicular release and recycling. PMID:21556148

  2. Natural Modulators of Amyloid-Beta Precursor Protein Processing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Can; Tanzi, Rudolph E.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease and the primary cause of dementia, with no cure currently available. The pathogenesis of AD is believed to be primarily driven by Aβ, the principal component of senile plaques. Aβ is an ~4 kDa peptide generated from the amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) through proteolytic secretases. Natural products, particularly those utilized in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), have a long history alleviating common clinical disorders, including dementia. However, the cell/molecular pathways mediated by these natural products are largely unknown until recently when the underlying molecular mechanisms of the disorders begin to be elucidated. Here, the mechanisms with which natural products modulate the pathogenesis of AD are discussed, in particular, by focusing on their roles in the processing of APP. PMID:22998566

  3. Betaine suppressed Aβ generation by altering amyloid precursor protein processing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiu-Ping; Qian, Xiang; Xie, Yue; Qi, Yan; Peng, Min-Feng; Zhan, Bi-Cui; Lou, Zheng-Qing

    2014-07-01

    Betaine was an endogenous catabolite of choline, which could be isolated from vegetables and marine products. Betaine could promote the metabolism of homocysteine in healthy subjects and was used for hyperlipidemia, coronary atherosclerosis, and fatty liver in clinic. Recent findings shown that Betaine rescued neuronal damage due to homocysteine induced Alzheimer's disease (AD) like pathological cascade, including tau hyperphosphorylation and amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition. Aβ was derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, and was a triggering factor for AD pathological onset. Here, we demonstrated that Betaine reduced Aβ levels by altering APP processing in N2a cells stably expressing Swedish mutant of APP. Betaine increased α-secretase activity, but decreased β-secretase activity. Our data indicate that Betaine might play a protective role in Aβ production.

  4. Protein Interactions between Fe65, the LDL receptor-related protein and the amyloid precursor protein

    PubMed Central

    Mulvihill, Melinda; Guttman, Miklos; Komives, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    The adapter protein, Fe65 has been proposed to be the link between the intracellular domains of the amyloid precursor protein, APP (AICD) and the LDL receptor-related protein (LRP-CT). Functional linkage between these two proteins has been established and mutations within LRP-CT affect the amount of Aβ produced from APP. Previous work showed that the AICD binds to the protein interaction domain 2 (PID2) of Fe65. Although the structure of PID1 was solved recently all attempts to demonstrate LRP-CT binding to this domain failed. We used biophysical experiments and binding studies to investigate the binding between these three proteins. Full-length Fe65 bound more weakly to AICD than did N-terminally truncated forms, however the intramolecular domain-domain interactions that had been proposed to inhibit binding could not be observed using amide H/D exchange. Surprisingly, when the LRP-CT is phosphorylated at Tyr4507, it bound to Fe65-PID1 despite the fact that this domain belongs to the Dab-like subclass of PIDs that is not supposed to be phosphorylation dependent. Mutation of a critical arginine abolished binding providing further proof of the phosphorylation-dependence. The Fe65-PID1 domain thus provides a link between the Dab-like class and the IRS-like class of PID domains and is the first Dab-like family member to show phosphorylation-dependent binding. PMID:21650223

  5. Therapeutic Potential of Secreted Amyloid Precursor Protein APPsα

    PubMed Central

    Mockett, Bruce G.; Richter, Max; Abraham, Wickliffe C.; Müller, Ulrike C.

    2017-01-01

    Cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by α-secretase generates an extracellularly released fragment termed secreted APP-alpha (APPsα). Not only is this process of interest due to the cleavage of APP within the amyloid-beta sequence, but APPsα itself has many physiological properties that suggest its great potential as a therapeutic target. For example, APPsα is neurotrophic, neuroprotective, neurogenic, a stimulator of protein synthesis and gene expression, and enhances long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory. While most early studies have been conducted in vitro, effectiveness in animal models is now being confirmed. These studies have revealed that either upregulating α-secretase activity, acutely administering APPsα or chronic delivery of APPsα via a gene therapy approach can effectively treat mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other disorders such as traumatic head injury. Together these findings suggest the need for intensifying research efforts to harness the therapeutic potential of this multifunctional protein. PMID:28223920

  6. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human beta-amyloid protein precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, D R; Martin-Morris, L; Luo, L Q; White, K

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human beta-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development. Images PMID:2494667

  7. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human. beta. -amyloid protein precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, D.R.; Martin-Morris, L.; Luo, L.; White, K. )

    1989-04-01

    The authors have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development.

  8. Retinoic acid regulates the development of oligodendrocyte precursor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Laeng, P; Décimo, D; Pettmann, B; Janet, T; Labourdette, G

    1994-12-15

    Cultures of oligodendrocyte precursor cells can be grown from brain hemispheres of newborn rats. These cells, also called O-2A progenitor cells, can differentiate in vitro into oligodendrocytes or type 2 astrocytes. Basic FGF and PDGF are known to stimulate their proliferation and delay their differentiation. Lack or excess of retinoic acid (RA) has been known for a long time to alter brain development suggesting that this compound is involved in normal brain development. Here we report that RA partially inhibits both the proliferation and the differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. It also down-regulates the mitogenic effect of bFGF on these cells while keeping them in an immature stage. RA is more effective than bFGF in inhibiting myelin basic protein mRNA expression in these cells, and like bFGF, it preserves their bipotential character. RA nuclear receptors RAR-alpha and their transcripts are expressed in oligodendrocyte precursor cells as seen by Western blot, Northern blot and in situ hybridization. The expression of RAR-alpha transcripts is stimulated transiently by RA alone or associated to bFGF. The expression of RAR-beta transcripts is not constitutive and is induced by RA alone or associated to bFGF and to a lesser extent by bFGF alone. These results suggest that retinoids participate in the control of the development of glial cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage.

  9. Spatial regulation of a common precursor from two distinct genes generates metabolite diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Chun-Jun; Sun, Wei-Wen; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Oakley, Berl R.; Keller, Nancy P.; Wang, Clay C.

    2015-07-13

    In secondary metabolite biosynthesis, core synthetic genes such as polyketide synthase genes or non-ribosomal peptide synthase genes usually encode proteins that generate various backbone precursors. These precursors are modified by other tailoring enzymes to yield a large variety of different secondary metabolites. The number of core synthesis genes in a given species correlates, therefore, with the number of types of secondary metabolites the organism can produce. In our study, heterologous expression of all the A. terreus NRPS-like genes showed that two NRPS-like proteins, encoded by atmelA and apvA, release the same natural product, aspulvinone E. More interestingly, further experiments revealed that the aspulvinone E produced by two different genes accumulates in different fungal compartments. And this spatial control of aspulvinone E production is likely to be regulated by their own specific promoters. Comparative genomics indicates that atmelA and apvA might share a same ancestral gene and the gene apvA is inserted in a highly conserved region in Aspergillus species that contains genes coding for life-essential proteins. The study also identified one trans-prenyltransferase AbpB which is capable of prenylating two different substrates aspulvinones and butyrolactones. In total, our study shows the first example in which the locally distribution of the same natural product could lead to its incorporation into different SM pathways.

  10. Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer Disease: Role of Amyloid Precursor Protein and Presenilin 1 Intracellular Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nizzari, Mario; Thellung, Stefano; Corsaro, Alessandro; Villa, Valentina; Pagano, Aldo; Porcile, Carola; Russo, Claudio; Florio, Tullio

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder characterized by (1) progressive loss of synapses and neurons, (2) intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, composed of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein, and (3) amyloid plaques. Genetically, AD is linked to mutations in few proteins amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 and 2 (PS1 and PS2). The molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in AD as well as the physiological function of APP are not yet known. A recent theory has proposed that APP and PS1 modulate intracellular signals to induce cell-cycle abnormalities responsible for neuronal death and possibly amyloid deposition. This hypothesis is supported by the presence of a complex network of proteins, clearly involved in the regulation of signal transduction mechanisms that interact with both APP and PS1. In this review we discuss the significance of novel finding related to cell-signaling events modulated by APP and PS1 in the development of neurodegeneration. PMID:22496686

  11. Role of Drosophila Amyloid Precursor Protein in Memory Formation

    PubMed Central

    Preat, Thomas; Goguel, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a membrane protein engaged in complex proteolytic pathways. APP and its derivatives have been shown to play a central role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by memory decline. Despite a huge effort from the research community, the primary cause of AD remains unclear, making it crucial to better understand the physiological role of the APP pathway in brain plasticity and memory. Drosophila melanogaster is a model system well-suited to address this issue. Although relatively simple, the fly brain is highly organized, sustains several forms of learning and memory, and drives numerous complex behaviors. Importantly, molecules and mechanisms underlying memory processes are conserved from flies to mammals. The fly encodes a single non-essential APP homolog named APP-Like (APPL). Using in vivo inducible RNA interference strategies, it was shown that APPL knockdown in the mushroom bodies (MB)—the central integrative brain structure for olfactory memory—results in loss of memory. Several APPL derivatives, such as secreted and full-length membrane APPL, may play different roles in distinct types of memory phases. Furthermore, overexpression of Drosophila amyloid peptide exacerbates the memory deficit caused by APPL knockdown, thus potentiating memory decline. Data obtained in the fly support the hypothesis that APP acts as a transmembrane receptor, and that disruption of its normal function may contribute to cognitive impairment during early AD. PMID:28008309

  12. Pancortins interact with amyloid precursor protein and modulate cortical cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Heather C.; Townsend, Matthew; Bai, Jilin; Suth, Seiyam; Cavanaugh, William; Selkoe, Dennis J.; Young-Pearse, Tracy L.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal precursor cell migration in the developing mammalian brain is a complex process requiring the coordinated interaction of numerous proteins. We have recently shown that amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a role in migration into the cortical plate through its interaction with two cytosolic signaling proteins, disabled 1 (DAB1) and disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1). In order to identify extracellular factors that may signal through APP to regulate migration, we performed an unbiased mass spectrometry-based screen for factors that bind to the extracellular domain of APP in the rodent brain. Through this screen, we identified an interaction between APP and pancortins, proteins expressed throughout the developing and mature cerebral cortex. Via co-immunoprecipitation, we show that APP interacts with all four of the mammalian pancortin isoforms (AMY, AMZ, BMY, BMZ). We demonstrate that the BMZ and BMY isoforms of pancortin can specifically reduce β-secretase- but not α-secretase-mediated cleavage of endogenous APP in cell culture, suggesting a biochemical consequence of the association between pancortins and APP. Using in utero electroporation to overexpress and knock down specific pancortin isoforms, we reveal a novel role for pancortins in migration into the cortical plate. Interestingly, we observe opposing roles for alternate pancortin isoforms, with AMY overexpression and BMZ knock down both preventing proper migration of neuronal precursor cells. Finally, we show that BMZ can partially rescue a loss of APP expression and that APP can rescue effects of AMY overexpression, suggesting that pancortins act in conjunction with APP to regulate entry into the cortical plate. Taken together, these results suggest a biochemical and functional interaction between APP and pancortins, and reveal a previously unidentified role for pancortins in mammalian cortical development. PMID:22992957

  13. Gc protein (vitamin D-binding protein): Gc genotyping and GcMAF precursor activity.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Hideyuki; Okamura, Natsuko; Murakami, Aya; Kubo, Shinichi; Kirk, Kenneth L; Hori, Hitoshi

    2005-01-01

    The Gc protein (human group-specific component (Gc), a vitamin D-binding protein or Gc globulin), has important physiological functions that include involvement in vitamin D transport and storage, scavenging of extracellular G-actin, enhancement of the chemotactic activity of C5a for neutrophils in inflammation and macrophage activation (mediated by a GalNAc-modified Gc protein (GcMAF)). In this review, the structure and function of the Gc protein is focused on especially with regard to Gc genotyping and GcMAF precursor activity. A discussion of the research strategy "GcMAF as a target for drug discovery" is included, based on our own research.

  14. Amyloid precursor protein at node of Ranvier modulates nodal formation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, De-En; Zhang, Wen-Min; Yang, Zara Zhuyun; Zhu, Hong-Mei; Yan, Ke; Li, Shao; Bagnard, Dominique; Dawe, Gavin S; Ma, Quan-Hong; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP), commonly associated with Alzheimer disease, is upregulated and distributes evenly along the injured axons, and therefore, also known as a marker of demyelinating axonal injury and axonal degeneration. However, the physiological distribution and function of APP along myelinated axons was unknown. We report that APP aggregates at nodes of Ranvier (NOR) in the myelinated central nervous system (CNS) axons but not in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). At CNS NORs, APP expression co-localizes with tenascin-R and is flanked by juxtaparanodal potassium channel expression demonstrating that APP localized to NOR. In APP-knockout (KO) mice, nodal length is significantly increased, while sodium channels are still clustered at NORs. Moreover, APP KO and APP-overexpressing transgenic (APP TG) mice exhibited a decreased and an increased thickness of myelin in spinal cords, respectively, although the changes are limited in comparison to their littermate WT mice. The thickness of myelin in APP KO sciatic nerve also increased in comparison to that in WT mice. Our observations indicate that APP acts as a novel component at CNS NORs, modulating nodal formation and has minor effects in promoting myelination. PMID:25482638

  15. Altered localization of amyloid precursor protein under endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Takashi; Okumura, Masayo; Imaizumi, Kazunori; Araki, Wataru; Morihara, Takashi; Tanimukai, Hitoshi; Kamagata, Eiichiro; Tabuchi, Nobuhiko; Kimura, Ryo; Kanayama, Daisuke; Fukumori, Akio; Tagami, Shinji; Okochi, Masayasu; Kubo, Mikiko; Tanii, Hisashi; Tohyama, Masaya; Tabira, Takeshi; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2006-06-02

    Recent reports have shown that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is relevant to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Following the amyloid cascade hypothesis, we therefore attempted to investigate the effects of ER stress on amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) generation. In this study, we found that ER stress altered the localization of amyloid precursor protein (APP) from late compartments to early compartments of the secretory pathway, and decreased the level of Abeta 40 and Abeta 42 release by beta- and gamma-cutting. Transient transfection with BiP/GRP78 also caused a shift of APP and a reduction in Abeta secretion. It was revealed that the ER stress response facilitated binding of BiP/GRP78 to APP, thereby causing it to be retained in the early compartments apart from a location suitable for the cleavages of Abeta. These findings suggest that induction of BiP/GRP78 during ER stress may be one of the regulatory mechanisms of Abeta generation.

  16. Overexpression of human virus surface glycoprotein precursors induces cytosolic unfolded protein response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The expression of human virus surface proteins, as well as other mammalian glycoproteins, is much more efficient in cells of higher eukaryotes rather than yeasts. The limitations to high-level expression of active viral surface glycoproteins in yeast are not well understood. To identify possible bottlenecks we performed a detailed study on overexpression of recombinant mumps hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (MuHN) and measles hemagglutinin (MeH) in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, combining the analysis of recombinant proteins with a proteomic approach. Results Overexpressed recombinant MuHN and MeH proteins were present in large aggregates, were inactive and totally insoluble under native conditions. Moreover, the majority of recombinant protein was found in immature form of non-glycosylated precursors. Fractionation of yeast lysates revealed that the core of viral surface protein aggregates consists of MuHN or MeH disulfide-linked multimers involving eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) and is closely associated with small heat shock proteins (sHsps) that can be removed only under denaturing conditions. Complexes of large Hsps seem to be bound to aggregate core peripherally as they can be easily removed at high salt concentrations. Proteomic analysis revealed that the accumulation of unglycosylated viral protein precursors results in specific cytosolic unfolded protein response (UPR-Cyto) in yeast cells, characterized by different action and regulation of small Hsps versus large chaperones of Hsp70, Hsp90 and Hsp110 families. In contrast to most environmental stresses, in the response to synthesis of recombinant MuHN and MeH, only the large Hsps were upregulated whereas sHsps were not. Interestingly, the amount of eEF1A was also increased during this stress response. Conclusions Inefficient translocation of MuHN and MeH precursors through ER membrane is a bottleneck for high-level expression in yeast. Overexpression of these recombinant

  17. Inhibitory action of amyloid precursor protein against human Hageman factor (factor XII).

    PubMed

    Niwano, H; Embury, P B; Greenberg, B D; Ratnoff, O D

    1995-02-01

    Amyloid precursor protein forms that contain Kunitz protease inhibitor domains are released from activated platelets, T-lymphocytes, and leukocytes and inhibit trypsin, plasmin, and activated factor XI. We investigated the effects of amyloid precursor protein isoforms on activated Hageman factor (factor XII), activated factor X (Stuart factor), and thrombin. Recombinant amyloid precursor proteins with or without the Kunitz domain, 770 and 695 amino acids, respectively, were produced in insect cells by Baculovirus expression (BAC770 and BAC695). Neither BAC695 nor BAC770 inhibited human alpha-thrombin or activated factor X. The partial thromboplastin time was prolonged by both amyloid precursor proteins, only one of which, BAC770, contains the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain. Both forms of amyloid precursor proteins inhibited ellagic acid-induced activation of Hageman factor but did not inhibit activated Hageman factor. Bismuth subgallate, which is an insoluble analog of ellagic acid, lost its ability to activate Hageman factor on being exposed to BAC770. Inhibition of ellagic acid-induced activation of Hageman factor by both forms of amyloid precursor protein was enhanced by heparin. These findings suggested that the heparin-binding domain of amyloid precursor proteins is not in the Kunitz domain. This heparin-binding domain may block the activation of Hageman factor by negatively charged agents. Thus, amyloid precursor proteins may be involved in the control of hemostasis, properties not all dependent on the Kunitz domain.

  18. Increased gene expression of Alzheimer disease beta-amyloid precursor protein in senescent cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Adler, M J; Coronel, C; Shelton, E; Seegmiller, J E; Dewji, N N

    1991-01-01

    The pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease is the accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques in the brains of patients. Plaque cores contain a 4- to 5-kDa amyloid beta-protein fragment which is also found in the cerebral blood vessels of affected individuals. Since amyloid deposition in the brain increases with age even in normal people, we sought to establish whether the disease state bears a direct relationship with normal aging processes. As a model for biological aging, the process of cellular senescence in vitro was used. mRNA levels of beta-amyloid precursor protein associated with Alzheimer disease were compared in human fibroblasts in culture at early passage and when the same fibroblasts were grown to senescence after more than 52 population doublings. A dramatic increase in mRNA was observed in senescent IMR-90 fibroblasts compared with early-passage cells. Hybridization of mRNA from senescent and early proliferating fibroblasts with oligonucleotide probes specific for the three alternatively spliced transcripts of the gene gave similar results, indicating an increase during senescence of all three forms. A similar, though more modest, increase in message levels was also observed in early-passage fibroblasts made quiescent by serum deprivation; with repletion of serum, however, the expression returned to previous low levels. ELISAs were performed on cell extracts from senescent, early proliferating, and quiescent fibroblasts, and quiescent fibroblasts repleted with serum for over 48 hr, using polyclonal antibodies to a synthetic peptide of the beta-amyloid precursor. The results confirmed that the differences in mRNA expression were partially reflected at the protein level. Regulated expression of beta-amyloid precursor protein may be an important determinant of growth and metabolic responses to serum and growth factors under physiological as well as pathological conditions.

  19. AChE and the amyloid precursor protein (APP) - Cross-talk in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nalivaeva, Natalia N; Turner, Anthony J

    2016-11-25

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) are multi-faceted proteins with a wide range of vital functions, both crucially linked with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). APP is the precursor of the Aβ peptide, the pathological agent in AD, while AChE is linked to its pathogenesis either by increasing cholinergic deficit or exacerbating Aβ fibril formation and toxicity. As such, both proteins are the main targets in AD therapeutics with AChE inhibitors being currently the only clinically available AD drugs. In our studies we have demonstrated an important inter-relation in functioning of these proteins. Both can be released from the cell membrane and we have shown that AChE shedding involves a metalloproteinase-mediated mechanism which, like the α-secretase dependent cleavage of APP, is stimulated by cholinergic agonists. Overexpression of the neuronal specific isoform APP695 in neuronal cells substantially decreased levels of the AChE mRNA, protein and catalytic activity accompanied by a similar decrease in mRNA levels of the AChE membrane anchor, PRiMA (proline rich membrane anchor). We further established that this regulation does not involve APP processing and its intracellular domain (AICD) but requires the E1 region of APP, specifically its copper-binding domain. On the contrary, siRNA knock-down of APP in cholinergic SN56 cells resulted in a significant upregulation of AChE mRNA levels. Hence APP may influence AChE physiology while released AChE may regulate amyloidogenesis through multiple mechanisms suggesting novel therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Amyloid precursor protein modulates β-catenin degradation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuzhi; Bodles, Angela M

    2007-01-01

    Background The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is genetically associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Elucidating the function of APP should help understand AD pathogenesis and provide insights into therapeutic designs against this devastating neurodegenerative disease. Results We demonstrate that APP expression in primary neurons induces β-catenin phosphorylation at Ser33, Ser37, and Thr41 (S33/37/T41) residues, which is a prerequisite for β-catenin ubiquitinylation and proteasomal degradation. APP-induced phosphorylation of β-catenin resulted in the reduction of total β-catenin levels, suggesting that APP expression promotes β-catenin degradation. In contrast, treatment of neurons with APP siRNAs increased total β-catenin levels and decreased β-catenin phosphorylation at residues S33/37/T41. Further, β-catenin was dramatically increased in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells from APP knockout animals. Acute expression of wild type APP or of familial AD APP mutants in primary neurons downregulated β-catenin in membrane and cytosolic fractions, and did not appear to affect nuclear β-catenin or β-catenin-dependent transcription. Conversely, in APP knockout CA1 pyramidal cells, accumulation of β-catenin was associated with the upregulation of cyclin D1, a downstream target of β-catenin signaling. Together, these data establish that APP downregulates β-catenin and suggest a role for APP in sustaining neuronal function by preventing cell cycle reactivation and maintaining synaptic integrity. Conclusion We have provided strong evidence that APP modulates β-catenin degradation in vitro and in vivo. Future studies may investigate whether APP processing is necessary for β-catenin downregulation, and determine if excessive APP expression contributes to AD pathogenesis through abnormal β-catenin downregulation. PMID:18070361

  1. The Emerging Role of Tetraspanins in the Proteolytic Processing of the Amyloid Precursor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Seipold, Lisa; Saftig, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Tetraspanins are a family of ubiquitously expressed and conserved proteins, which are characterized by four transmembrane domains and the formation of a short and a large extracellular loop (LEL). Through interaction with other tetraspanins and transmembrane proteins such as growth factors, receptors and integrins, tetraspanins build a wide ranging and membrane spanning protein network. Such tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs) contribute to the formation and stability of functional signaling complexes involved in cell activation, adhesion, motility, differentiation, and malignancy. There is increasing evidence showing that the tetraspanins also regulate the proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by physically interacting with the APP secretases. CD9, CD63, CD81, Tspan12, Tspan15 are among the tetraspanins involved in the intracellular transport and in the stabilization of the gamma secretase complex or ADAM10 as the major APP alpha secretase. They also directly regulate, most likely in concert with other tetraspanins, the proteolytic function of these membrane embedded enzymes. Despite the knowledge about the interaction of tetraspanins with the secretases not much is known about their physiological role, their importance in Alzheimer's Disease and their exact mode of action. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge and open questions regarding the biology of tetraspanins and the understanding how these proteins interact with APP processing pathways. Ultimately, it will be of interest if tetraspanins are suitable targets for future therapeutical approaches. PMID:28066176

  2. The Actin Binding Protein Adseverin Regulates Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongqiang; Kuiper, Johannes W. P.; Glogauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Adseverin (Ads), a member of the Gelsolin superfamily of actin binding proteins, regulates the actin cytoskeleton architecture by severing and capping existing filamentous actin (F-actin) strands and nucleating the assembly of new F-actin filaments. Ads has been implicated in cellular secretion, exocytosis and has also been shown to regulate chondrogenesis and megakaryoblastic leukemia cell differentiation. Here we report for the first time that Ads is involved in regulating osteoclastogenesis (OCG). Ads is induced during OCG downstream of RANK-ligand (RANKL) stimulation and is highly expressed in mature osteoclasts. The D5 isoform of Ads is not involved in regulating OCG, as its expression is not induced in response to RANKL. Three clonal Ads knockdown RAW264.7 (RAW) macrophage cell lines with varying degrees of Ads expression and OCG deficiency were generated. The most drastic OCG defect was noted in the clonal cell line with the greatest degree of Ads knockdown as indicated by a lack of TRAcP staining and multinucleation. RNAi mediated knockdown of Ads in osteoclast precursors resulted in distinct morphological changes characterized by altered F-actin distribution and increased filopodia formation. Ads knockdown precursor cells experienced enhanced migration while fusion of knockdown precursors cells was limited. Transient reintroduction of de novo Ads back into the knockdown system was capable of rescuing TRAcP expression but not osteoclast multinucleation most likely due to the transient nature of Ads expression. This preliminary study allows us to conclude that Ads is a RANKL induced early regulator of OCG with a potential role in pre-osteoclast differentiation and fusion. PMID:25275604

  3. Spatial regulation of a common precursor from two distinct genes generates metabolite diversity

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Chun -Jun; Sun, Wei -Wen; Bruno, Kenneth S.; ...

    2015-07-13

    In secondary metabolite biosynthesis, core synthetic genes such as polyketide synthase genes usually encode proteins that generate various backbone precursors. These precursors are modified by other tailoring enzymes to yield a large variety of different secondary metabolites. The number of core synthesis genes in a given species correlates, therefore, with the number of types of secondary metabolites the organism can produce. In our study, heterologous expression of all the A. terreus NRPSlike genes showed that two NRPS-like proteins, encoded by atmelA and apvA, release the same natural product, aspulvinone E. In hyphae this compound is converted to aspulvinones whereas inmore » conidia it is converted to melanin. The genes are expressed in different tissues and this spatial control is probably regulated by their own specific promoters. Comparative genomics indicates that atmelA and apvA might share a same ancestral gene and the gene apvA is located in a highly conserved region in Aspergillus species that contains genes coding for life-essential proteins. Our data reveal the first case in secondary metabolite biosynthesis in which the tissue specific production of a single compound directs it into two separate pathways, producing distinct compounds with different functions. Our data also reveal that a single trans-prenyltransferase, AbpB, prenylates two substrates, aspulvinones and butyrolactones, revealing that genes outside of contiguous secondary metabolism gene clusters can modify more than one compound thereby expanding metabolite diversity. Our study raises the possibility of incorporation of spatial, cell-type specificity in expression of secondary metabolites of biological interest and provides new insight into designing and reconstituting their biosynthetic pathways.« less

  4. Spatial regulation of a common precursor from two distinct genes generates metabolite diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Chun -Jun; Sun, Wei -Wen; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Oakley, Berl R.; Keller, Nancy P.; Wang, Clay C. C.

    2015-07-13

    In secondary metabolite biosynthesis, core synthetic genes such as polyketide synthase genes usually encode proteins that generate various backbone precursors. These precursors are modified by other tailoring enzymes to yield a large variety of different secondary metabolites. The number of core synthesis genes in a given species correlates, therefore, with the number of types of secondary metabolites the organism can produce. In our study, heterologous expression of all the A. terreus NRPSlike genes showed that two NRPS-like proteins, encoded by atmelA and apvA, release the same natural product, aspulvinone E. In hyphae this compound is converted to aspulvinones whereas in conidia it is converted to melanin. The genes are expressed in different tissues and this spatial control is probably regulated by their own specific promoters. Comparative genomics indicates that atmelA and apvA might share a same ancestral gene and the gene apvA is located in a highly conserved region in Aspergillus species that contains genes coding for life-essential proteins. Our data reveal the first case in secondary metabolite biosynthesis in which the tissue specific production of a single compound directs it into two separate pathways, producing distinct compounds with different functions. Our data also reveal that a single trans-prenyltransferase, AbpB, prenylates two substrates, aspulvinones and butyrolactones, revealing that genes outside of contiguous secondary metabolism gene clusters can modify more than one compound thereby expanding metabolite diversity. Our study raises the possibility of incorporation of spatial, cell-type specificity in expression of secondary metabolites of biological interest and provides new insight into designing and reconstituting their biosynthetic pathways.

  5. Septins: Regulators of Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Vagin, Olga; Beenhouwer, David O.

    2016-01-01

    Septins are small GTPases that play a role in several important cellular processes. In this review, we focus on the roles of septins in protein stabilization. Septins may regulate protein stability by: (1) interacting with proteins involved in degradation pathways, (2) regulating the interaction between transmembrane proteins and cytoskeletal proteins, (3) affecting the mobility of transmembrane proteins in lipid bilayers, and (4) modulating the interaction of proteins with their adaptor or signaling proteins. In this context, we discuss the role of septins in protecting four different proteins from degradation. First we consider botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) and the contribution of septins to its extraordinarily long intracellular persistence. Next, we discuss the role of septins in stabilizing the receptor tyrosine kinases EGFR and ErbB2. Finally, we consider the contribution of septins in protecting hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) from degradation. PMID:28066764

  6. The Drosophila Homologue of the Amyloid Precursor Protein Is a Conserved Modulator of Wnt PCP Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Soldano, Alessia; Okray, Zeynep; Janovska, Pavlina; Tmejová, Kateřina; Reynaud, Elodie; Claeys, Annelies; Yan, Jiekun; Atak, Zeynep Kalender; De Strooper, Bart; Dura, Jean-Maurice; Bryja, Vítězslav; Hassan, Bassem A.

    2013-01-01

    Wnt Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) signaling is a universal regulator of polarity in epithelial cells, but it regulates axon outgrowth in neurons, suggesting the existence of axonal modulators of Wnt-PCP activity. The Amyloid precursor proteins (APPs) are intensely investigated because of their link to Alzheimer's disease (AD). APP's in vivo function in the brain and the mechanisms underlying it remain unclear and controversial. Drosophila possesses a single APP homologue called APP Like, or APPL. APPL is expressed in all neurons throughout development, but has no established function in neuronal development. We therefore investigated the role of Drosophila APPL during brain development. We find that APPL is involved in the development of the Mushroom Body αβ neurons and, in particular, is required cell-autonomously for the β-axons and non-cell autonomously for the α-axons growth. Moreover, we find that APPL is a modulator of the Wnt-PCP pathway required for axonal outgrowth, but not cell polarity. Molecularly, both human APP and fly APPL form complexes with PCP receptors, thus suggesting that APPs are part of the membrane protein complex upstream of PCP signaling. Moreover, we show that APPL regulates PCP pathway activation by modulating the phosphorylation of the Wnt adaptor protein Dishevelled (Dsh) by Abelson kinase (Abl). Taken together our data suggest that APPL is the first example of a modulator of the Wnt-PCP pathway specifically required for axon outgrowth. PMID:23690751

  7. The Drosophila homologue of the amyloid precursor protein is a conserved modulator of Wnt PCP signaling.

    PubMed

    Soldano, Alessia; Okray, Zeynep; Janovska, Pavlina; Tmejová, Kateřina; Reynaud, Elodie; Claeys, Annelies; Yan, Jiekun; Atak, Zeynep Kalender; De Strooper, Bart; Dura, Jean-Maurice; Bryja, Vítězslav; Hassan, Bassem A

    2013-01-01

    Wnt Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) signaling is a universal regulator of polarity in epithelial cells, but it regulates axon outgrowth in neurons, suggesting the existence of axonal modulators of Wnt-PCP activity. The Amyloid precursor proteins (APPs) are intensely investigated because of their link to Alzheimer's disease (AD). APP's in vivo function in the brain and the mechanisms underlying it remain unclear and controversial. Drosophila possesses a single APP homologue called APP Like, or APPL. APPL is expressed in all neurons throughout development, but has no established function in neuronal development. We therefore investigated the role of Drosophila APPL during brain development. We find that APPL is involved in the development of the Mushroom Body αβ neurons and, in particular, is required cell-autonomously for the β-axons and non-cell autonomously for the α-axons growth. Moreover, we find that APPL is a modulator of the Wnt-PCP pathway required for axonal outgrowth, but not cell polarity. Molecularly, both human APP and fly APPL form complexes with PCP receptors, thus suggesting that APPs are part of the membrane protein complex upstream of PCP signaling. Moreover, we show that APPL regulates PCP pathway activation by modulating the phosphorylation of the Wnt adaptor protein Dishevelled (Dsh) by Abelson kinase (Abl). Taken together our data suggest that APPL is the first example of a modulator of the Wnt-PCP pathway specifically required for axon outgrowth.

  8. Amyloid Precursor Protein family as unconventional Go-coupled receptors and the control of neuronal motility.

    PubMed

    Ramaker, Jenna M; Copenhaver, Philip F

    2017-01-01

    Cleavage of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) generates amyloid peptides that accumulate in Alzheimer Disease (AD), but APP is also upregulated by developing and injured neurons, suggesting that it regulates neuronal motility. APP can also function as a G protein-coupled receptor that signals via the heterotrimeric G protein Gαo, but evidence for APP-Gαo signaling in vivo has been lacking. Using Manduca as a model system, we showed that insect APP (APPL) regulates neuronal migration in a Gαo-dependent manner. Recently, we also demonstrated that Manduca Contactin (expressed by glial cells) induces APPL-Gαo retraction responses in migratory neurons, consistent with evidence that mammalian Contactins also interact with APP family members. Preliminary studies using cultured hippocampal neurons suggest that APP-Gαo signaling can similarly regulate growth cone motility. Whether Contactins (or other APP ligands) induce this response within the developing nervous system, and how this pathway is disrupted in AD, remains to be explored.

  9. MicroRNA-339-5p down-regulates protein expression of β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) in human primary brain cultures and is reduced in brain tissue specimens of Alzheimer disease subjects.

    PubMed

    Long, Justin M; Ray, Balmiki; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2014-02-21

    Alzheimer disease (AD) results, in part, from the excess accumulation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide as neuritic plaques in the brain. The short Aβ peptide is derived from the large transmembrane Aβ precursor protein (APP). The rate-limiting step in the production of Aβ from APP is mediated by the β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). Dysregulation of BACE1 levels leading to excess Aβ deposition is implicated in sporadic AD. Thus, elucidating the full complement of regulatory pathways that control BACE1 expression is key to identifying novel drug targets central to the Aβ-generating process. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are expected to participate in this molecular network. Here, we identified a known miRNA, miR-339-5p, as a key contributor to this regulatory network. Two distinct miR-339-5p target sites were predicted in the BACE1 3'-UTR by in silico analyses. Co-transfection of miR-339-5p with a BACE1 3'-UTR reporter construct resulted in significant reduction in reporter expression. Mutation of both target sites eliminated this effect. Delivery of the miR-339-5p mimic also significantly inhibited expression of BACE1 protein in human glioblastoma cells and human primary brain cultures. Delivery of target protectors designed against the miR-339-5p BACE1 3'-UTR target sites in primary human brain cultures significantly elevated BACE1 expression. Finally, miR-339-5p levels were found to be significantly reduced in brain specimens isolated from AD patients as compared with age-matched controls. Therefore, miR-339-5p regulates BACE1 expression in human brain cells and is most likely dysregulated in at least a subset of AD patients making this miRNA a novel drug target.

  10. Amyloid Precursor Protein Mediates a Tyrosine-kinase Dependent Activation Response in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Austin, S.A.; Sens, M.A.; Combs, C.K.

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a ubiquitously expressed type one integral membrane protein. It has the ability to bind numerous extracellular matrix components and propagate signaling responses via its cytoplasmic phosphotyrosine, 682YENPTY687, binding motif. We recently demonstrated increased protein levels of APP, phosphorylated APP (Tyr682), and beta-amyloid (Aβ) in brain vasculature of atherosclerotic and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) tissue co-localizing primarily within the endothelial layer. This study demonstrates similar APP changes in peripheral vasculature from human and mouse apoE−/− aorta suggesting APP-related changes are not restricted to brain vasculature. Therefore, primary mouse aortic endothelial cells (PAEC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used as a model system to examine the function of APP in endothelial cells. APP multimerization with an anti-N-terminal APP antibody, 22C11, to simulate ligand binding stimulated a Src kinase family dependent increase in protein phosphotyrosine levels, APP phosphorylation, and Aβ secretion. Furthermore, APP multimerization stimulated increased protein levels of the proinflammatory proteins, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 also in a Src kinase family dependent fashion. Endothelial APP was also involved in mediating monocytic cell adhesion. Collectively, these data demonstrate that endothelial APP regulates immune cell adhesion and stimulates a tyrosine kinase-dependent response driving acquisition of a reactive endothelial phenotype. These APP-mediated events may serve as therapeutic targets for intervention in progressive vascular changes common to cerebrovascular disease and AD. PMID:19923279

  11. Regulation of proliferation and histone acetylation in embryonic neural precursors by CREB/CREM signaling

    PubMed Central

    Parlato, Rosanna; Mandl, Claudia; Hölzl-Wenig, Gabriele; Liss, Birgit; Tucker, Kerry L; Ciccolini, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor CREB (cAMP-response element binding protein) regulates differentiation, migration, survival and activity-dependent gene expression in the developing and mature nervous system. However, its specific role in the proliferation of embryonic neural progenitors is still not completely understood. Here we investigated how CREB regulates proliferation of mouse embryonic neural progenitors by a conditional mutant lacking Creb gene in neural progenitors. In parallel, we explored possible compensatory effects by the genetic ablation of another member of the same gene family, the cAMP-responsive element modulator (Crem). We show that CREB loss differentially impaired the proliferation, clonogenic potential and self-renewal of precursors derived from the ganglionic eminence (GE), in comparison to those derived from the cortex. This phenotype was associated with a specific reduction of histone acetylation in the GE of CREB mutant mice, and this reduction was rescued in vivo by inhibition of histone deacetylation. These observations indicate that the impaired proliferation could be caused by a reduced acetyltransferase activity in Creb conditional knock-out mice. These findings support a crucial role of CREB in controlling embryonic neurogenesis and propose a novel mechanism by which CREB regulates embryonic neural development. PMID:27504469

  12. Plasmodium vivax: a monoclonal antibody recognizes a circumsporozoite protein precursor on the sporozoite surface.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Ceron, L; Rodriguez, M H; Wirtz, R A; Sina, B J; Palomeque, O L; Nettel, J A; Tsutsumi, V

    1998-11-01

    The major surface circumsporozoite (CS) proteins are known to play a role in malaria sporozoite development and invasion of invertebrate and vertebrate host cells. Plasmodium vivax CS protein processing during mosquito midgut oocyst and salivary gland sporozoite development was studied using monoclonal antibodies which recognize different CS protein epitopes. Monoclonal antibodies which react with the CS amino acid repeat sequences by ELISA recognized a 50-kDa precursor protein in immature oocyst and additional 47- and 42-kDa proteins in older oocysts. A 42-kDa CS protein was detected after initial sporozoite invasion of mosquito salivary glands and an additional 50-kDa precursor CS protein observed later in infected salivary glands. These data confirm previous results with other Plasmodium species, in which more CS protein precursors were detected in oocysts than in salivary gland sporozoites. A monoclonal antibody (PvPCS) was characterized which reacts with an epitope found only in the 50-kDa precursor CS protein. PvPCS reacted with all P. vivax sporozoite strains tested by indirect immunofluorescent assay, homogeneously staining the sporozoite periphery with much lower intensity than that produced by anti-CS repeat antibodies. Immunoelectron microscopy using PvPCS showed that the CS protein precursor was associated with peripheral cytoplasmic vacuoles and membranes of sporoblast and budding sporozoites in development oocysts. In salivary gland sporozoites, the CS protein precursor was primarily associated with micronemes and sporozoite membranes. Our results suggest that the 50-kDa CS protein precursor is synthesized intracellularly and secreted on the membrane surface, where it is proteolytically processed to form the 42-kDa mature CS protein. These data indicate that differences in CS protein processing in oocyst and salivary gland sporozoites development may occur.

  13. Trafficking regulation of proteins in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide has been postulated to be a key determinant in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Aβ is produced through sequential cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases. APP and relevant secretases are transmembrane proteins and traffic through the secretory pathway in a highly regulated fashion. Perturbation of their intracellular trafficking may affect dynamic interactions among these proteins, thus altering Aβ generation and accelerating disease pathogenesis. Herein, we review recent progress elucidating the regulation of intracellular trafficking of these essential protein components in AD. PMID:24410826

  14. Amyloid Precursor Protein Enhances Nav1.6 Sodium Channel Cell Surface Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Tan, Francis Chee Kuan; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng; Dawe, Gavin S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is commonly associated with Alzheimer disease, but its physiological function remains unknown. Nav1.6 is a key determinant of neuronal excitability in vivo. Because mouse models of gain of function and loss of function of APP and Nav1.6 share some similar phenotypes, we hypothesized that APP might be a candidate molecule for sodium channel modulation. Here we report that APP colocalized and interacted with Nav1.6 in mouse cortical neurons. Knocking down APP decreased Nav1.6 sodium channel currents and cell surface expression. APP-induced increases in Nav1.6 cell surface expression were Go protein-dependent, enhanced by a constitutively active Go protein mutant, and blocked by a dominant negative Go protein mutant. APP also regulated JNK activity in a Go protein-dependent manner. JNK inhibition attenuated increases in cell surface expression of Nav1.6 sodium channels induced by overexpression of APP. JNK, in turn, phosphorylated APP. Nav1.6 sodium channel surface expression was increased by T668E and decreased by T668A, mutations of APP695 mimicking and preventing Thr-668 phosphorylation, respectively. Phosphorylation of APP695 at Thr-668 enhanced its interaction with Nav1.6. Therefore, we show that APP enhances Nav1.6 sodium channel cell surface expression through a Go-coupled JNK pathway. PMID:25767117

  15. Arabidopsis protein arginine methyltransferase 3 is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting precursor ribosomal RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Runlai; Liu, Chunyan; Ahmad, Ayaz; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Falong; Cao, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental and tightly regulated cellular process, including synthesis, processing, and assembly of rRNAs with ribosomal proteins. Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) have been implicated in many important biological processes, such as ribosome biogenesis. Two alternative precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing pathways coexist in yeast and mammals; however, how PRMT affects ribosome biogenesis remains largely unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis PRMT3 (AtPRMT3) is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting pre-rRNA processing. Disruption of AtPRMT3 results in pleiotropic developmental defects, imbalanced polyribosome profiles, and aberrant pre-rRNA processing. We further identify an alternative pre-rRNA processing pathway in Arabidopsis and demonstrate that AtPRMT3 is required for the balance of these two pathways to promote normal growth and development. Our work uncovers a previously unidentified function of PRMT in posttranscriptional regulation of rRNA, revealing an extra layer of complexity in the regulation of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:25352672

  16. Calnuc binds to Alzheimer's beta-amyloid precursor protein and affects its biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ping; Li, Feng; Zhang, Yun-Wu; Huang, Haining; Tong, Gary; Farquhar, Marilyn Gist; Xu, Huaxi

    2007-03-01

    Calnuc, a Golgi calcium binding protein, plays a key role in the constitution of calcium storage. Abnormal calcium homeostasis has been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Excessive production and/or accumulation of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides that are proteolytically derived from the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) have been linked to the pathogenesis of AD. APP has also been indicated to play multiple physiological functions. In this study, we demonstrate that calnuc interacts with APP through direct binding to the carboxyl-terminal region of APP, possibly in a calcium-sensitive manner. Immunofluorescence study revealed that the two proteins co-localize in the Golgi in both cultured cells and mouse brains. Over-expression of calnuc in neuroblastoma cells significantly reduces the level of endogenous APP. Conversely, down-regulation of calnuc by siRNA increases cellular levels of APP. Additionally, we show that over-expression of calnuc down-regulates the APP mRNA level and inhibits APP biosynthesis, which in turn results in a parallel reduction of APP proteolytic metabolites, sAPP, CTFs and Abeta. Furthermore, we found that the level of calnuc was significantly decreased in the brain of AD patients as compared with that of age-matched non-AD controls. Our results suggest a novel function of calnuc in modulating the levels of APP and its proteolytic metabolites, which may further affect the patho/physiological functions of APP including AD pathogenesis.

  17. Increased KPI containing amyloid precursor protein in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis brains.

    PubMed

    Beilin, Orit; Karussis, Dimitrios M; Korczyn, Amos D; Gurwitz, David; Aronovich, Ramona; Mizrachi-Kol, Rachel; Chapman, Joab

    2007-04-16

    Amyloid precursor protein can be translated from three alternatively spliced mRNAs. We measured levels of amyloid precursor protein isoforms containing the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain (KPIAPP), and amyloid precursor protein without the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain (KPIAPP) in brain homogenates of acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice. At the preclinical phase of the disease, both KPIAPP and KPIAPP levels were significantly higher in homogenates from brains of autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice, whereas at the acute phase of the disease only KPIAPP remained significantly elevated compared with controls. At the recovery phase, no differences were observed between the groups. The early and isoform-specific elevation of KPIAPP in autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice suggests a possible role for amyloid precursor protein in the immune response mediating the disease.

  18. Proteolytic processing of the amyloid-beta protein precursor of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nunan, Janelle; Small, David H

    2002-01-01

    The proteolytic processing of the amyloid-beta protein precursor plays a key role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Cleavage of the amyloid-beta protein precursor may occur via two pathways, both of which involve the action of proteases called secretases. One pathway, involving beta- and gamma-secretase, liberates amyloid-beta protein, a protein associated with the neurodegeneration seen in Alzheimer's disease. The alternative pathway, involving alpha-secretase, precludes amyloid-beta protein formation. In this review, we describe the progress that has been made in identifying the secretases and their potential as therapeutic targets in the treatment or prevention of Alzheimer's disease.

  19. COPS5 (Jab1) protein increases β site processing of amyloid precursor protein and amyloid β peptide generation by stabilizing RanBP9 protein levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjie; Dey, Debleena; Carrera, Ivan; Minond, Dmitriy; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Xu, Shaohua; Lakshmana, Madepalli K

    2013-09-13

    Increased processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid β peptide (Aβ) in the brain is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, the identification of molecules that regulate Aβ generation is crucial for future therapeutic approaches for AD. We demonstrated previously that RanBP9 regulates Aβ generation in a number of cell lines and primary neuronal cultures by forming tripartite protein complexes with APP, low-density lipoprotein-related protein, and BACE1, consequently leading to increased amyloid plaque burden in the brain. RanBP9 is a scaffold protein that exists and functions in multiprotein complexes. To identify other proteins that may bind RanBP9 and regulate Aβ levels, we used a two-hybrid analysis against a human brain cDNA library and identified COPS5 as a novel RanBP9-interacting protein. This interaction was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation experiments in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells and mouse brain. Colocalization of COPS5 and RanBP9 in the same subcellular compartments further supported the interaction of both proteins. Furthermore, like RanBP9, COPS5 robustly increased Aβ generation, followed by increased soluble APP-β (sAPP-β) and decreased soluble-APP-α (sAPP-α) levels. Most importantly, down-regulation of COPS5 by siRNAs reduced Aβ generation, implying that endogenous COPS5 regulates Aβ generation. Finally, COPS5 levels were increased significantly in AD brains and APΔE9 transgenic mice, and overexpression of COPS5 strongly increased RanBP9 protein levels by increasing its half-life. Taken together, these results suggest that COPS5 increases Aβ generation by increasing RanBP9 levels. Thus, COPS5 is a novel RanBP9-binding protein that increases APP processing and Aβ generation by stabilizing RanBP9 protein levels.

  20. The intact Kunitz domain protects the amyloid precursor protein from being processed by matriptase-2.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Anna-Madeleine; Glebov, Konstantin; Walter, Jochen; Merkel, Olaf; Mangold, Martin; Schmidt, Frederike; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Gütschow, Michael; Stirnberg, Marit

    2016-08-01

    Proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) leads to amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. So far, the mechanism of APP processing is insufficiently characterized at the molecular level. Whereas the knowledge of Aβ generation by several proteases has been expanded, the contribution of the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor domain (KPI) present in two major APP isoforms to the complex proteolytic processing of APP is poorly understood. In this study, we have identified KPI-containing APP as a very potent, slow-binding inhibitor for the membrane-bound proteolytic regulator of iron homeostasis matriptase-2 by forming stable complexes with its target protease in HEK cells. Inhibition and complex formation depend on the intact KPI domain. By inhibiting matriptase-2, KPI-containing APP is protected from matriptase-2-mediated proteolysis within the Aβ region, thus preventing the generation of N-terminally truncated Aβ.

  1. Focally Elevated Creatine Detected in Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Transgenic Mice and Alzheimer Disease Brain Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Gallant,M.; Rak, M.; Szeghalmi, A.; Del Bigio, M.; Westaway, D.; Yang, J.; Julian, R.; Gough, K.

    2006-01-01

    The creatine/phosphocreatine system, regulated by creatine kinase, plays an important role in maintaining energy balance in the brain. Energy metabolism and the function of creatine kinase are known to be affected in Alzheimer diseased brain and in cells exposed to the {beta}-amyloid peptide. We used infrared microspectroscopy to examine hippocampal, cortical, and caudal tissue from 21-89-week-old transgenic mice expressing doubly mutant (K670N/M671L and V717F) amyloid precursor protein and displaying robust pathology from an early age. Microcrystalline deposits of creatine, suggestive of perturbed energetic status, were detected by infrared microspectroscopy in all animals with advanced plaque pathology. Relatively large creatine deposits were also found in hippocampal sections from post-mortem Alzheimer diseased human brain, compared with hippocampus from non-demented brain. We therefore speculate that this molecule is a marker of the disease process.

  2. Synthesis and intracellular transport of lectin and storage protein precursors in endosperm from castor bean.

    PubMed

    Lord, J M

    1985-01-15

    The biosynthesis of the lectins and the other major storage proteins, the 11S globulins and the 2S albumins, which are found in protein bodies has been studied in developing castor bean endosperm cells. Newly synthesized proteins were radiolabelled by incubating intact endosperm tissue with [35S]methionine. The intracellular distribution of radiolabelled proteins was determined after fractionating endosperm homogenates by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that all the major protein body components are initially segregated in precursor form into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. The lectin precursors appeared as a group of 64 000-68 000-Mr glycosylated polypeptides, the 11S globulins as a group of 46 000-55 000-Mr polypeptides and the 2S albumins as a single 32 500-Mr polypeptide. These precursors were transferred from the endoplasmic reticulum to a population of transporting vesicles. The subsequent disappearance of the precursors from this vesicle fraction was accompanied by the accumulation of mature polypeptides in the protein body matrix (lectins and 2S albumins) or in the insoluble protein body crystalloid complexes (11S globulins). The castor bean proteins studied all exist as heterodimers in the protein bodies. After intracellular transport an endoproteolytic step is required to release each subunit of the heterodimer from the appropriate single polypeptide precursor.

  3. Regulation of protein secretion by ... protein secretion?

    PubMed

    Atmakuri, Krishnamohan; Fortune, Sarah M

    2008-09-11

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires an alternative protein secretion system, ESX1, for virulence. Recently, Raghavan et al. (2008) reported a new regulatory circuit that may explain how ESX1 activity is controlled during infection. Mtb appears to regulate ESX1 by modulating transcription of associated genes rather than structural components of the secretion system itself.

  4. Neuronal overexpression of APPL, the Drosophila homologue of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), disrupts axonal transport.

    PubMed

    Torroja, L; Chu, H; Kotovsky, I; White, K

    1999-05-06

    The two pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, involve two apparently unrelated proteins, the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Tau. Although it is known that aberrant processing of APP is associated with Alzheimer's disease, the definitive role of APP in neurons is not yet clear. Tau regulates microtubule stabilization and assembly in axons and is, thus, an essential component of the microtubule-associated organelle transport machinery. Although several groups have reported physical interaction between APP and Tau, and induction of Tau phosphorylation by APP and beta-amyloid peptide, the functional connection between APP and Tau is unclear. To explore the possibility that the functions of these two proteins may somehow converge on the same cellular process, we overexpressed APPL, the Drosophila homologue of APP, along with Tau in Drosophila neurons. Panneural coexpression of APPL and Tau resulted in adults that, upon eclosion, failed to expand wings and harden the cuticle, which is suggestive of neuroendocrine dysfunction. We analyzed axonal transport when Tau and APPL were coexpressed and found that transport of axonal cargo was disrupted, as evidenced by increased retention of synaptic proteins in axons and scarcity of neuropeptide-containing vesicles in the distal processes of peptidergic neurons. In an independent approach, we demonstrated genetic interaction and phenotypic similarity between APPL overexpression and mutations in the Kinesin heavy chain (Khc) gene, the product of which is a motor for anterograde vesicle trafficking.

  5. Regulation of muscle protein synthesis in humans.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Bethan E; Hill, Derek S; Atherton, Philip J

    2012-01-01

    Investigations into the regulation of muscle protein synthesis (MPS) are a cornerstone of understanding the control of muscle mass. Rates of MPS are finely tuned according to levels of activity, nutrient availability and health status. For instance, rates of MPS are positively regulated by exercise and nutrition, and negatively regulated by inactivity (e.g. disuse), ageing (i.e. sarcopenia) and in muscle-wasting related diseases (e.g. cancer). Skeletal muscles display a high degree of intrinsic regulation. Increases in MPS after exercise occur independently of the systemic milieu for example growth hormone/testosterone concentrations. In the absence of exercise, increases in MPS after feeding are of finite duration despite enduring precursor availability; that is muscles can sense they are 'full'. Intriguingly, exercise delays this 'muscle-full' response to allow for building and repair. In contrast, muscle-wasting conditions exhibit a premature 'muscle-full' response to nutrition and exercise (i.e. anabolic resistance), which may cause atrophy. Observations of 'dissociations' between MPS and anabolic signalling pathways have cast doubt on how much we understand of the molecular regulation of human MPS. Anabolic and anticatabolic interventions in health and disease should be aimed at manipulating the 'muscle-full' set point to maximize muscle maintenance/hypertrophy.

  6. Cell cycle regulation during proliferation and differentiation of mammalian muscle precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Ciemerych, Maria A; Archacka, Karolina; Grabowska, Iwona; Przewoźniak, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of muscle precursor cells are intensively studied not only in the developing mouse embryo but also using models of skeletal muscle regeneration or analyzing in vitro cultured cells. These analyses allowed to show the universality of the cell cycle regulation and also uncovered tissue-specific interplay between major cell cycle regulators and factors crucial for the myogenic differentiation. Examination of the events accompanying proliferation and differentiation leading to the formation of functional skeletal muscle fibers allows understanding the molecular basis not only of myogenesis but also of skeletal muscle regeneration. This chapter presents the basis of the cell cycle regulation in proliferating and differentiating muscle precursor cells during development and after muscle injury. It focuses at major cell cycle regulators, myogenic factors, and extracellular environment impacting on the skeletal muscle.

  7. The Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Triplicated Gene Impairs Neuronal Precursor Differentiation and Neurite Development through Two Different Domains in the Ts65Dn Mouse Model for Down Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Trazzi, Stefania; Fuchs, Claudia; Valli, Emanuele; Perini, Giovanni; Bartesaghi, Renata; Ciani, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual disability in Down syndrome (DS) appears to be related to severe proliferation impairment during brain development. Recent evidence shows that it is not only cellular proliferation that is heavily compromised in DS, but also cell fate specification and dendritic maturation. The amyloid precursor protein (APP), a gene that is triplicated in DS, plays a key role in normal brain development by influencing neural precursor cell proliferation, cell fate specification, and neuronal maturation. APP influences these processes via two separate domains, the APP intracellular domain (AICD) and the soluble secreted APP. We recently found that the proliferation impairment of neuronal precursors (NPCs) from the Ts65Dn mouse model for DS was caused by derangement of the Shh pathway due to overexpression of patched1(Ptch1), its inhibitory regulator. Ptch1 overexpression was related to increased levels within the APP/AICD system. The overall goal of this study was to determine whether APP contributes to neurogenesis impairment in DS by influencing in addition to proliferation, cell fate specification, and neurite development. We found that normalization of APP expression restored the reduced neuronogenesis, the increased astrogliogenesis, and the reduced neurite length of trisomic NPCs, indicating that APP overexpression underpins all aspects of neurogenesis impairment. Moreover, we found that two different domains of APP impair neuronal differentiation and maturation in trisomic NPCs. The APP/AICD system regulates neuronogenesis and neurite length through the Shh pathway, whereas the APP/secreted AP system promotes astrogliogenesis through an IL-6-associated signaling cascade. These results provide novel insight into the mechanisms underlying brain development alterations in DS. PMID:23740250

  8. Amyloid Precursor Proteins Are Dynamically Trafficked and Processed during Neuronal Development

    PubMed Central

    Ramaker, Jenna M.; Cargill, Robert S.; Swanson, Tracy L.; Quirindongo, Hanil; Cassar, Marlène; Kretzschmar, Doris; Copenhaver, Philip F.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic processing of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) produces beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptide fragments that accumulate in Alzheimer's Disease (AD), but APP may also regulate multiple aspects of neuronal development, albeit via mechanisms that are not well understood. APP is a member of a family of transmembrane glycoproteins expressed by all higher organisms, including two mammalian orthologs (APLP1 and APLP2) that have complicated investigations into the specific activities of APP. By comparison, insects express only a single APP-related protein (APP-Like, or APPL) that contains the same protein interaction domains identified in APP. However, unlike its mammalian orthologs, APPL is only expressed by neurons, greatly simplifying an analysis of its functions in vivo. Like APP, APPL is processed by secretases to generate a similar array of extracellular and intracellular cleavage fragments, as well as an Aβ-like fragment that can induce neurotoxic responses in the brain. Exploiting the complementary advantages of two insect models (Drosophila melanogaster and Manduca sexta), we have investigated the regulation of APPL trafficking and processing with respect to different aspects of neuronal development. By comparing the behavior of endogenously expressed APPL with fluorescently tagged versions of APPL and APP, we have shown that some full-length protein is consistently trafficked into the most motile regions of developing neurons both in vitro and in vivo. Concurrently, much of the holoprotein is rapidly processed into N- and C-terminal fragments that undergo bi-directional transport within distinct vesicle populations. Unexpectedly, we also discovered that APPL can be transiently sequestered into an amphisome-like compartment in developing neurons, while manipulations targeting APPL cleavage altered their motile behavior in cultured embryos. These data suggest that multiple mechanisms restrict the bioavailability of the holoprotein to regulate APPL

  9. Amyloid Precursor Proteins Are Dynamically Trafficked and Processed during Neuronal Development.

    PubMed

    Ramaker, Jenna M; Cargill, Robert S; Swanson, Tracy L; Quirindongo, Hanil; Cassar, Marlène; Kretzschmar, Doris; Copenhaver, Philip F

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic processing of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) produces beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptide fragments that accumulate in Alzheimer's Disease (AD), but APP may also regulate multiple aspects of neuronal development, albeit via mechanisms that are not well understood. APP is a member of a family of transmembrane glycoproteins expressed by all higher organisms, including two mammalian orthologs (APLP1 and APLP2) that have complicated investigations into the specific activities of APP. By comparison, insects express only a single APP-related protein (APP-Like, or APPL) that contains the same protein interaction domains identified in APP. However, unlike its mammalian orthologs, APPL is only expressed by neurons, greatly simplifying an analysis of its functions in vivo. Like APP, APPL is processed by secretases to generate a similar array of extracellular and intracellular cleavage fragments, as well as an Aβ-like fragment that can induce neurotoxic responses in the brain. Exploiting the complementary advantages of two insect models (Drosophila melanogaster and Manduca sexta), we have investigated the regulation of APPL trafficking and processing with respect to different aspects of neuronal development. By comparing the behavior of endogenously expressed APPL with fluorescently tagged versions of APPL and APP, we have shown that some full-length protein is consistently trafficked into the most motile regions of developing neurons both in vitro and in vivo. Concurrently, much of the holoprotein is rapidly processed into N- and C-terminal fragments that undergo bi-directional transport within distinct vesicle populations. Unexpectedly, we also discovered that APPL can be transiently sequestered into an amphisome-like compartment in developing neurons, while manipulations targeting APPL cleavage altered their motile behavior in cultured embryos. These data suggest that multiple mechanisms restrict the bioavailability of the holoprotein to regulate APPL

  10. Tau isoforms imbalance impairs the axonal transport of the amyloid precursor protein in human neurons.

    PubMed

    Lacovich, Valentina; Espindola, Sonia L; Alloatti, Matías; Pozo Devoto, Victorio; Cromberg, Lucas; Čarná, Mária; Forte, Giancarlo; Gallo, Jean-Marc; Bruno, Luciana; Stokin, Gorazd B; Avale, M Elena; Falzone, Tomás L

    2016-11-11

    Tau, as a microtubule-associated protein, participates in key neuronal functions such as the regulation of microtubule dynamics, axonal transport and neurite outgrowth. Alternative splicing of exon 10 in the tau primary transcript gives rise to protein isoforms with three (3R) or four (4R) microtubule binding repeats. While tau isoforms are balanced in the normal adult human brain, imbalances in 3R:4R ratio have been tightly associated to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Several studies exploiting tau overexpression and/or mutations suggested that perturbations in tau metabolism impair axonal transport. Nevertheless, no physiological model has yet demonstrated the consequences of altering the endogenous relative content of tau isoforms over axonal transport regulation. Here we addressed this question using a trans-splicing strategy that allows modulating tau exon 10 inclusion/exclusion in differentiated human-derived neurons. Upon changes in 3R:4R tau relative content neurons showed no morphological changes, but live imaging studies revealed that the dynamics of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) were significantly impaired. Single trajectories analyses of the moving vesicles showed that predominance of 3R tau favored the anterograde movement of APP-vesicles, increasing anterograde run lengths and reducing retrograde runs and segmental velocities. Contrarely, the imbalance towards the 4R isoform promoted a retrograde bias by a significant reduction of anterograde velocities. These findings suggest that changes in 3R:4R tau ratio has an impact on the regulation of axonal transport and specifically in APP dynamics, which might link tau isoforms imbalances with APP abnormal metabolism in neurodegenerative processes.

  11. Tau Isoforms Imbalance Impairs the Axonal Transport of the Amyloid Precursor Protein in Human Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lacovich, Valentina; Espindola, Sonia L; Alloatti, Matías; Pozo Devoto, Victorio; Cromberg, Lucas E; Čarná, Mária E; Forte, Giancarlo; Gallo, Jean-Marc; Bruno, Luciana; Stokin, Gorazd B; Avale, M Elena; Falzone, Tomás L

    2017-01-04

    Tau, as a microtubule (MT)-associated protein, participates in key neuronal functions such as the regulation of MT dynamics, axonal transport, and neurite outgrowth. Alternative splicing of exon 10 in the tau primary transcript gives rise to protein isoforms with three (3R) or four (4R) MT binding repeats. Although tau isoforms are balanced in the normal adult human brain, imbalances in 3R:4R ratio have been tightly associated with the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Several studies exploiting tau overexpression and/or mutations suggested that perturbations in tau metabolism impair axonal transport. Nevertheless, no physiological model has yet demonstrated the consequences of altering the endogenous relative content of tau isoforms over axonal transport regulation. Here, we addressed this issue using a trans-splicing strategy that allows modulating tau exon 10 inclusion/exclusion in differentiated human-derived neurons. Upon changes in 3R:4R tau relative content, neurons showed no morphological changes, but live imaging studies revealed that the dynamics of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) were significantly impaired. Single trajectory analyses of the moving vesicles showed that predominance of 3R tau favored the anterograde movement of APP vesicles, increasing anterograde run lengths and reducing retrograde runs and segmental velocities. Conversely, the imbalance toward the 4R isoform promoted a retrograde bias by a significant reduction of anterograde velocities. These findings suggest that changes in 3R:4R tau ratio has an impact on the regulation of axonal transport and specifically in APP dynamics, which might link tau isoform imbalances with APP abnormal metabolism in neurodegenerative processes.

  12. Determination of Dideoxyosone Precursors of AGEs in Human Lens Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Linetsky, Mikhail; Johar, Kaid; Meltretter, Jasmin; Padmanabha, Smitha; Parmar, Trilok; Vasavada, Abhay R.; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Nagaraj, Ram H.

    2011-01-01

    Dideoxyosones (DDOs) are intermediates in the synthesis of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), such as pentosidine and glucosepane. Although the formation of pentosidine and glucosepane in the human lens has been firmly established, the formation of DDOs has not been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to develop a reliable method to detect DDOs in lens proteins. A specific DDO trapping agent, biotinyl-diaminobenzene (3,4-diamino-N-(3-{[5-(2-oxohexahydro-1H-thieno[3,4-d]imidazol-4-yl)pentanoyl]aminopropyl) benzamide) (BDAB) was added during in vitro protein glycation or during protein extraction from human lenses. In vitro glycated human lens protein showed strong reaction in monomeric and polymeric crosslinked proteins by western blot and ELISA. Glycation of BSA in the presence of BDAB resulted in covalent binding of BDAB to the protein and inhibited pentosidine formation. Mass spectrometric analysis of lysozyme glycated in the presence of BDAB showed the presence of quinoxalines at lysine residues at positions K1, K33, K96, and K116. The ELISA results indicated that cataractous lens proteins contain significantly higher levels of DDO than non-cataractous lenses (101.9±67.8 AU/mg protein vs. 31.7±19.5 AU/mg protein, p<0.0001). This study provides first direct evidence of DDO presence in human tissue proteins and establishes that AGE crosslink synthesis in the human lens occurs via DDO intermediates. PMID:21820400

  13. Paeonol attenuates H₂O₂-induced NF-κB-associated amyloid precursor protein expression.

    PubMed

    Su, Shan-Yu; Cheng, Chin-Yi; Tsai, Tung-Hu; Hsiang, Chien-Yun; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) has been shown to promote neurodegeneration by inducing the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In this study, NF-κB activation was induced by H₂O₂ in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Whether paeonol, one of the phenolic phytochemicals isolated from the Chinese herb Paeonia suffruticosa Andrews (MC), would attenuate the H₂O₂-induced NF-κB activity was investigated. Western blot results showed that paeonol inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB and the translocation of NF-κB into the nucleus. The ability of paeonol to reduce DNA binding ability and suppress the H₂O₂-induced NF-κB activation was confirmed by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and a luciferase reporter assay. Using a microarray combined with gene set analysis, we found that the suppression of NF-κB was associated with mature T cell up-regulated genes, the c-jun N-terminal kinase pathway, and two hypoxia-related gene sets, including the hypoxia up-regulated gene set and hypoxia inducible factor 1 targets. Moreover, using network analysis to investigate genes that were altered by H₂O₂ and reversely regulated by paeonol, we found that NF-κB was the primary center of the network and amyloid precursor protein (APP) was the secondary center. Western blotting showed that paeonol inhibited APP at the protein level. In conclusion, our work suggests that paeonol down-regulates H₂O₂-induced NF-κB activity, as well as NF-κB-associated APP expression. Furthermore, the gene expression profile accompanying the suppression of NF-κB by paeonol was identified. The new gene set that can be targeted by paeonol provided a potential use for this drug and a possible pharmacological mechanism for other phenolic compounds that protect against oxidative-related injury.

  14. Determination of dideoxyosone precursors of AGEs in human lens proteins.

    PubMed

    Linetsky, Mikhail; Kaid Johar, S R; Meltretter, Jasmin; Padmanabha, Smitha; Parmar, Trilok; Vasavada, Abhay R; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Nagaraj, Ram H

    2011-10-01

    Dideoxyosones (DDOs) are intermediates in the synthesis of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), such as pentosidine and glucosepane. Although the formation of pentosidine and glucosepane in the human lens has been firmly established, the formation of DDOs has not been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to develop a reliable method to detect DDOs in lens proteins. A specific DDO trapping agent, biotinyl-diaminobenzene (3,4-diamino-N-(3-[5-(2-oxohexahydro-1H-thieno[3,4-d]imidazol-4-yl)pentanoyl]aminopropyl)benzamide) (BDAB) was added during in vitro protein glycation or during protein extraction from human lenses. In vitro glycated human lens protein showed strong reaction in monomeric and polymeric crosslinked proteins by Western blot and ELISA. Glycation of BSA in the presence of BDAB resulted in covalent binding of BDAB to the protein and inhibited pentosidine formation. Mass spectrometric analysis of lysozyme glycated in the presence of BDAB showed the presence of quinoxalines at lysine residues at positions K1, K33, K96, and K116. The ELISA results indicated that cataractous lens proteins contain significantly higher levels of DDO than non-cataractous lenses (101.9±67.8 vs. 31.7±19.5AU/mg protein, p<0.0001). This study provides first direct evidence of DDO presence in human tissue proteins and establishes that AGE crosslink synthesis in the human lens occurs via DDO intermediates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Epigenetic regulation of protein glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Zoldoš, Vlatka; Grgurević, Srđana; Lauc, Gordan

    2010-10-01

    Protein N-glycosylation is an ancient metabolic pathway that still exists in all three domains of life (Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya). The covalent addition of one or more complex oligosaccharides (glycans) to protein backbones greatly diversifies their structures and makes the glycoproteome several orders of magnitude more complex than the proteome itself. Contrary to polypeptides, which are defined by a sequence of nucleotides in the corresponding genes, the glycan part of glycoproteins are encoded in a complex dynamic network of hundreds of proteins, whereby activity is defined by both genetic sequence and the regulation of gene expression. Owing to the complex nature of their biosynthesis, glycans are particularly versatile and apparently a large part of human variation derives from differences in protein glycosylation. Composition of the individual glycome appears to be rather stable, and thus differences in the pattern of glycan synthesis between individuals could originate either from genetic polymorphisms or from stable epigenetic regulation of gene expression in different individuals. Studies of epigenetic modification of genes involved in protein glycosylation are still scarce, but their results indicate that this process might be very important for the regulation of protein glycosylation.

  16. Regulation of miRNA-mediated gene silencing by miRNA precursors

    PubMed Central

    Roy-Chaudhuri, Biswajoy; Valdmanis, Paul N.; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Qing; Luo, Qingjun; Kay, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Processing of miRNAs from their precursors to the biologically active mature form is regulated during development and cancer. We show that mouse precursor-miR-151 can bind to and compete with mature miR-151-5p and miR-151-3p for binding sites contained within the complementary regions of the E2f6 mRNA 3′UTR. In agreement, E2f6 mRNA levels were regulated by precursor-miR-151. Conversely, the miR-151-mediated repression of ARHGDIA mRNA was only dependent on the mature miR-151 level as only the mature miRNA was able to bind to the 3′UTR. This suggests that processing of miR-151 can have different effects on separate mRNA targets within a cell. A bioinformatics pipeline revealed additional candidate regions where pre-miRNAs can compete with their mature miRNA counterparts. This was experimentally validated for miR-124 and the SNAI2 3′UTR. Hence, miRNA precursors can serve as post-transcriptional regulators of miRNA activity and are not mere biogenesis intermediates. PMID:25086740

  17. Mcl1 regulates the terminal mitosis of neural precursor cells in the mammalian brain through p27Kip1.

    PubMed

    Hasan, S M Mahmudul; Sheen, Ashley D; Power, Angela M; Langevin, Lisa Marie; Xiong, Jieying; Furlong, Michael; Day, Kristine; Schuurmans, Carol; Opferman, Joseph T; Vanderluit, Jacqueline L

    2013-08-01

    Cortical development requires the precise timing of neural precursor cell (NPC) terminal mitosis. Although cell cycle proteins regulate terminal mitosis, the factors that influence the cell cycle machinery are incompletely understood. Here we show in mice that myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl1), an anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein required for the survival of NPCs, also regulates their terminal differentiation through the cell cycle regulator p27(Kip1). A BrdU-Ki67 cell profiling assay revealed that in utero electroporation of Mcl1 into NPCs in the embryonic neocortex increased NPC cell cycle exit (the leaving fraction). This was further supported by a decrease in proliferating NPCs (Pax6(+) radial glial cells and Tbr2(+) neural progenitors) and an increase in differentiating cells (Dcx(+) neuroblasts and Tbr1(+) neurons). Similarly, BrdU birth dating demonstrated that Mcl1 promotes premature NPC terminal mitosis giving rise to neurons of the deeper cortical layers, confirming their earlier birthdate. Changes in Mcl1 expression within NPCs caused concomitant changes in the levels of p27(Kip1) protein, a key regulator of NPC differentiation. Furthermore, in the absence of p27(Kip1), Mcl1 failed to induce NPC cell cycle exit, demonstrating that p27(Kip1) is required for Mcl1-mediated NPC terminal mitosis. In summary, we have identified a novel physiological role for anti-apoptotic Mcl1 in regulating NPC terminal differentiation.

  18. C3G regulates the size of the cerebral cortex neural precursor population

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Anne K; Krebs, Danielle L; Thomas, Tim

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms regulating the size of the cerebral cortex are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the Rap1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor, C3G (Grf2, Rapgef1), controls the size of the cerebral precursor population. Mice lacking C3G show overproliferation of the cortical neuroepithelium. C3G-deficient neuroepithelial cells accumulate nuclear β-catenin and fail to exit the cell cycle in vivo. C3G mutant neural precursor cells fail to activate Rap1, exhibit activation of Akt/PKB, inhibition of the β-catenin-degrading enzyme, Gsk3β and accumulation of cytosolic and nuclear β-catenin when exposed to growth factors, in vitro. Our results show that the size of the cortical neural precursor population is controlled by C3G-mediated inhibition of the Ras signalling pathway. PMID:16858399

  19. Regulation of Asymmetric Cell Division in Mammalian Neural Stem and Cancer Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Daynac, Mathieu; Petritsch, Claudia K

    Stem and progenitor cells are characterized by their abilities to self-renew and produce differentiated progeny. The balance between self-renewal and differentiation is achieved through control of cell division mode, which can be either asymmetric or symmetric. Failure to properly control cell division mode may result in premature depletion of the stem/progenitor cell pool or abnormal growth and impaired differentiation. In many tissues, including the brain, stem cells and progenitor cells undergo asymmetric cell division through the establishment of cell polarity. Cell polarity proteins are therefore potentially critical regulators of asymmetric cell division. Decrease or loss of asymmetric cell division can be associated with reduced differentiation common during aging or impaired remyelination as seen in demyelinating diseases. Progenitor-like glioma precursor cells show decreased asymmetric cell division rates and increased symmetric divisions, which suggests that asymmetric cell division suppresses brain tumor formation. Cancer stem cells, on the other hand, still undergo low rates of asymmetric cell division, which may provide them with a survival advantage during therapy. These findings led to the hypotheses that asymmetric cell divisions are not always tumor suppressive but can also be utilized to maintain a cancer stem cell population. Proper control of cell division mode is therefore not only deemed necessary to generate cellular diversity during development and to maintain adult tissue homeostasis but may also prevent disease and determine disease progression. Since brain cancer is most common in the adult and aging population, we review here the current knowledge on molecular mechanisms that regulate asymmetric cell divisions in the neural and oligodendroglial lineage during development and in the adult brain.

  20. Intracellular trafficking of the β-secretase and processing of amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Pei; Chia, Pei Zhi Cheryl; Chia, Cheryl; Gleeson, Paul A

    2011-09-01

    The main component of the amyloid plaques found in the brains of those with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a polymerized form of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and is considered to play a central role in the pathogenesis of this neurodegenerative disorder. Aβ is derived from the proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Beta site APP-cleaving enzyme, BACE1 (also known as β-secretase) is a membrane-bound aspartyl protease responsible for the initial step in the generation of Aβ peptide and is thus a prime target for therapeutic intervention. Substantive evidence now indicates that the processing of APP by BACE1 is regulated by the intracellular sorting of the enzyme and, moreover, perturbations in these intracellular trafficking pathways have been linked to late-onset AD. In this review, we highlight the recent advances in the understanding of the regulation of the intracellular sorting of BACE1 and APP and illustrate why the trafficking of these cargos represent a key issue for understanding the membrane-mediated events associated with the generation of the neurotoxic Aβ products in AD. Copyright © 2011 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Physiological functions of the amyloid precursor protein secretases ADAM10, BACE1, and presenilin.

    PubMed

    Prox, Johannes; Rittger, Andrea; Saftig, Paul

    2012-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease causing mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) or in the Presenilin 1 (PS1) or Presenilin 2 (PS2) genes increase the production of amyloid peptides (Aβ) that precipitate in amyloid plaques. Since amyloid plaques are also a prominent feature of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD), abnormal proteolysis of APP and the generation of amyloid beta (Aβ) are key events in the pathogenesis of AD. The proteases (secretases) that cleave APP are therefore important therapeutic targets, both for the rare familial forms but likely also for the sporadic forms of AD. The identification and understanding of the (neuro)biological functions of the α-, β-, and presenilin/γ-secretase (complexes) is important for the development of drugs and the delineation of their associated side effects. The potential impact of this type of research exceeds the AD field since the function of these secretases are also linked to cellular pathways like ectodomain shedding of growth factors and regulated intramembrane proteolysis of receptors in developmental biology, tissue homeostasis, and tumorigenesis. The generation of mice deficient in presenilin 1, presenilin 2, the α-secretase ADAM10, and the β-secretases BACE1 and BACE2 were instrumental for the elucidation of the physiological functions of these proteases. Using these mouse models understanding how these secretases regulate amyloid peptide formation and how they exert their diverse biological functions could be significantly increased. This review attempts to summarize selected aspects of the current view of the multiple roles such proteases play in health and disease.

  2. Phospholipid biosynthesis in Candida albicans: Regulation by the precursors inositol and choline

    SciTech Connect

    Klig, L.S.; Friedli, L.; Schmid, E. )

    1990-08-01

    Phospholipid metabolism in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans was examined. The phospholipid biosynthetic pathways of C. albicans were elucidated and were shown to be similar to those of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, marked differences were seen between these two fungi in the regulation of the pathways in response to exogenously provided precursors inositol and choline. In S. cerevisiae, the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine via methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine appears to be regulated in response to inositol and choline; provision of choline alone does not repress the activity of this pathway. The same pathway in C. albicans responds to the exogenous provision of choline. Possible explanations for the observed differences in regulation are discussed.

  3. Precision biopolymers from protein precursors for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Seah Ling; Wu, Yuzhou; Weil, Tanja

    2013-03-12

    The synthesis of biohybrid materials with tailored functional properties represents a topic of emerging interest. Combining proteins as natural, macromolecular building blocks, and synthetic polymers opens access to giant brush-like biopolymers of high structural definition. The properties of these precision polypeptide copolymers can be tailored through various chemical modifications along their polypeptide backbone, which expands the repertoire of known protein-based materials to address biomedical applications. In this article, the synthetic strategies for the design of precision biopolymers from proteins through amino acid specific conjugation reagents are highlighted and the different functionalization strategies, their characterization, and applications are discussed. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Induced dimerization of the amyloid precursor protein leads to decreased amyloid-beta protein production.

    PubMed

    Eggert, Simone; Midthune, Brea; Cottrell, Barbara; Koo, Edward H

    2009-10-16

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a central role in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis because sequential cleavages by beta- and gamma-secretase lead to the generation of the amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, a key constituent in the amyloid plaques present in brains of AD individuals. In several studies APP has recently been shown to form homodimers, and this event appears to influence Abeta generation. However, these studies have relied on APP mutations within the Abeta sequence itself that may affect APP processing by interfering with secretase cleavages independent of dimerization. Therefore, the impact of APP dimerization on Abeta production remains unclear. To address this question, we compared the approach of constitutive cysteine-induced APP dimerization with a regulatable dimerization system that does not require the introduction of mutations within the Abeta sequence. To this end we generated an APP chimeric molecule by fusing a domain of the FK506-binding protein (FKBP) to the C terminus of APP. The addition of the synthetic membrane-permeant drug AP20187 induces rapid dimerization of the APP-FKBP chimera. Using this system we were able to induce up to 70% APP dimers. Our results showed that controlled homodimerization of APP-FKBP leads to a 50% reduction in total Abeta levels in transfected N2a cells. Similar results were obtained with the direct precursor of beta-secretase cleavage, C99/SPA4CT-FKBP. Furthermore, there was no modulation of different Abeta peptide species after APP dimerization in this system. Taken together, our results suggest that APP dimerization can directly affect gamma-secretase processing and that dimerization is not required for Abeta production.

  5. Active site targeting of hedgehog precursor protein with phenylarsine oxide.

    PubMed

    Owen, Timothy S; Xie, Xie Jian; Laraway, Benjamin; Ngoje, George; Wang, Chunyu; Callahan, Brian P

    2015-01-02

    Hedgehog proteins, signaling molecules implicated in human embryo development and cancer, can be inhibited at the stage of autoprocessing by the trivalent arsenical phenyl arsine oxide (PhAs(III) ). The interaction (apparent Ki , 4 × 10(-7) M) is characterized by an optical binding assay and by NMR spectroscopy. PhAs(III) appears to be the first validated inhibitor of hedgehog autoprocessing, which is unique to hedgehog proteins and essential for biological activity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Deficiency of sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase impairs lysosomal metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Ilker; Tamboli, Irfan Y; Glebov, Konstantin; Richter, Josefine; Fell, Lisa H; Grimm, Marcus O; Haupenthal, Viola J; Hartmann, Tobias; Gräler, Markus H; van Echten-Deckert, Gerhild; Walter, Jochen

    2014-06-13

    Progressive accumulation of the amyloid β protein in extracellular plaques is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease. Amyloid β is generated during sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases. In addition to the proteolytic processing by secretases, APP is also metabolized by lysosomal proteases. Here, we show that accumulation of intracellular sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) impairs the metabolism of APP. Cells lacking functional S1P-lyase, which degrades intracellular S1P, strongly accumulate full-length APP and its potentially amyloidogenic C-terminal fragments (CTFs) as compared with cells expressing the functional enzyme. By cell biological and biochemical methods, we demonstrate that intracellular inhibition of S1P-lyase impairs the degradation of APP and CTFs in lysosomal compartments and also decreases the activity of γ-secretase. Interestingly, the strong accumulation of APP and CTFs in S1P-lyase-deficient cells was reversed by selective mobilization of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum or lysosomes. Intracellular accumulation of S1P also impairs maturation of cathepsin D and degradation of Lamp-2, indicating a general impairment of lysosomal activity. Together, these data demonstrate that S1P-lyase plays a critical role in the regulation of lysosomal activity and the metabolism of APP.

  7. UV Irradiation Accelerates Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Processing and Disrupts APP Axonal Transport

    PubMed Central

    Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Falzone, Tomas L.; Shen, Zhouxin; Lillo, Concepcion; Killian, Rhiannon L.; Arreola, Angela S.; Niederst, Emily D.; Ng, Kheng S.; Kim, Sonia N.; Briggs, Steven P.; Williams, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression and/or abnormal cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) are linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD) development and progression. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating cellular levels of APP or its processing, and the physiological and pathological consequences of altered processing are not well understood. Here, using mouse and human cells, we found that neuronal damage induced by UV irradiation leads to specific APP, APLP1, and APLP2 decline by accelerating their secretase-dependent processing. Pharmacological inhibition of endosomal/lysosomal activity partially protects UV-induced APP processing implying contribution of the endosomal and/or lysosomal compartments in this process. We found that a biological consequence of UV-induced γ-secretase processing of APP is impairment of APP axonal transport. To probe the functional consequences of impaired APP axonal transport, we isolated and analyzed presumptive APP-containing axonal transport vesicles from mouse cortical synaptosomes using electron microscopy, biochemical, and mass spectrometry analyses. We identified a population of morphologically heterogeneous organelles that contains APP, the secretase machinery, molecular motors, and previously proposed and new residents of APP vesicles. These possible cargoes are enriched in proteins whose dysfunction could contribute to neuronal malfunction and diseases of the nervous system including AD. Together, these results suggest that damage-induced APP processing might impair APP axonal transport, which could result in failure of synaptic maintenance and neuronal dysfunction. PMID:24573290

  8. Amyloid precursor protein in human breast cancer: an androgen-induced gene associated with cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Kiyoshi; Ito, Shigehiro; Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Miki, Yasuhiro; Shibahara, Yukiko; Ishida, Takanori; Watanabe, Mika; Inoue, Satoshi; Sasano, Hironobu; Suzuki, Takashi

    2013-11-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane protein that is highly expressed in brain tissue. Recently, APP has been implicated in some human malignancies, and its regulation by androgens has also been demonstrated. Such findings suggest the importance of APP in hormone-dependent breast carcinoma, but APP has not yet been examined in breast carcinoma tissues. Therefore, in this study, we examined the biological and clinical significance of APP in breast carcinoma using immunohistochemistry and in vitro studies. APP immunoreactivity was detected in 57 out of 117 (49%) breast carcinoma tissues examined, and it was positively associated with androgen receptor (AR) expression. APP immunoreactivity was also significantly associated with Ki-67 LI and increased risk of recurrence in the estrogen receptor (ER)-positive cases, and was an independent prognostic factor in these patients. Subsequent in vitro experiments demonstrated that APP mRNA expression was significantly induced by biologically active androgen dihydrotestosterone in both a dose-dependent and a time-dependent manner in MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells, which was potently suppressed by an AR blocker hydroxyflutamide. Moreover, cell proliferation activity of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells was significantly associated with their APP expression level. These findings suggest that APP is an androgen-induced gene that promotes proliferation activity of breast carcinoma cells. Moreover, APP immunohistochemical status is considered a potent prognostic factor in ER-positive breast cancer patients. © 2013 Japanese Cancer Association.

  9. P120-Catenin Regulates Early Trafficking Stages of the N-Cadherin Precursor Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wehrendt, Diana P.; Carmona, Fernando; González Wusener, Ana E.; González, Ángela; Martínez, Juan M. Lázaro; Arregui, Carlos O.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that binding of p120 catenin to the cytoplasmic domain of surface cadherin prevents cadherin endocytosis and degradation, contributing to cell-cell adhesion. In the present work we show that p120 catenin bound to the N-cadherin precursor, contributes to its anterograde movement from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi complex. In HeLa cells, depletion of p120 expression, or blocking its binding to N-cadherin, increased the accumulation of the precursor in the ER, while it decreased the localization of mature N-cadherin at intercellular junctions. Reconstitution experiments in p120-deficient SW48 cells with all three major isoforms of p120 (1, 3 and 4) had similar capacity to promote the processing of the N-cadherin precursor to the mature form, and its localization at cell-cell junctions. P120 catenin and protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B facilitated the recruitment of the N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF), an ATPase involved in vesicular trafficking, to the N-cadherin precursor complex. Dominant negative NSF E329Q impaired N-cadherin trafficking, maturation and localization at cell-cell junctions. Our results uncover a new role for p120 catenin bound to the N-cadherin precursor ensuring its trafficking through the biosynthetic pathway towards the cell surface. PMID:27254316

  10. Chloroplast ribosomal proteins of Chlamydomonas synthesized in the cytoplasm are made as precursors

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Polyadenylated RNA from Chlamydomonas was translated in a cell-free rabbit reticulocyte system that employed [35S]methionine. Antibodies made to four chloroplast ribosomal proteins synthesized in the cytoplasm and imported into the organelle were used for indirect immunoprecipitation of the labeled translation products, which were subsequently visualized on fluorographs of SDS gels. The cytoplasmically synthesized chloroplast ribosomal proteins were first seen as precursors with apparent molecular weights of 1,000 to 6,000 greater than their respective mature forms. Processing of the ribosomal protein precursors to mature proteins was affected by adding a postribosomal supernatant that had been extracted from cells of Chlamydomonas. In contrast to the chloroplast ribosomal proteins synthesized in the cytoplasm, two such proteins made within the chloroplast were found to be synthesized in mature form in cell-free wheat germ translation systems programmed with nonpolyadenylated RNA. PMID:6202701

  11. Identification of European starling GnRH-I precursor mRNA and its seasonal regulation.

    PubMed

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; Cadigan, Penelope A; Wang, Ariel; Liu, Jennifer; Bentley, George E

    2009-07-01

    Songbirds show dynamic seasonal changes in their reproductive activities during the year. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I) is critical for the control of reproduction in vertebrates. The molecular mechanisms controlling reproduction are not well understood in songbirds, largely because the GnRH-I precursor polypeptide gene was unknown until now. Here, we report the complete sequence and seasonal regulation of GnRH-I precursor polypeptide mRNA in a songbird, European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). The translated starling GnRH-I precursor polypeptide contained an amino acid sequence that can be processed into chicken GnRH-I peptide (pEHWSYGLQPG-NH(2)). However, the overall homology of GnRH-I precursor polypeptide (including a 23 amino acid signal peptide, the decapeptide hormone and Gly-Lys-Arg cleavage site followed by 55 amino acid GnRH-associated peptide sequences) between starling and chicken was only 58%. GnRH-I mRNA and GnRH-I peptide were observed to be co-localized in the preoptic area of sexually mature birds using in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. GnRH-I mRNA exhibited large variance in photosensitive birds, and converged to a high level in photostimulated birds. Subsequently, GnRH-I mRNA decreased to below detectability in most of the photorefractory birds. Changes were also observed in GnRH-I peptide levels, although changes in GnRH-I peptide were not as marked. Our data indicate that GnRH-I mRNA synthesis commences but is variable in photosensitive birds, stabilizes in photostimulated birds, then ceases when birds become photorefractory. Finer-scale investigation into temporal regulation of GnRH-I precursor polypeptide mRNA will provide insight into its regulation by environmental, social and physiological cues.

  12. Strong precursor-pore interactions constrain models for mitochondrial protein import.

    PubMed Central

    Chauwin, J F; Oster, G; Glick, B S

    1998-01-01

    Mitochondrial precursor proteins are imported from the cytosol into the matrix compartment through a proteinaceous translocation pore. Import is driven by mitochondrial Hsp70 (mHsp70), a matrix-localized ATPase. There are currently two postulated mechanisms for this function of mHsp70: 1) The "Brownian ratchet" model proposes that the precursor chain diffuses within the pore, and that binding of mHsp70 to the lumenal portion of the chain biases this diffusion. 2) The "power stroke" model proposes that mHsp70 undergoes a conformational change that actively pulls the precursor chain through the pore. Here we formulate these two models quantitatively, and compare their performance in light of recent experimental evidence that precursor chains interact strongly with the walls of the translocation pore. Under these conditions the simulated Brownian ratchet is inefficient, whereas the power stroke mechanism seems to be a plausible description of the import process. PMID:9545036

  13. SNX27 and SORLA Interact to Reduce Amyloidogenic Subcellular Distribution and Processing of Amyloid Precursor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Timothy Y.; Zhao, Yingjun; Li, Xiaoguang; Wang, Xin; Tseng, I-Chu; Thompson, Robert; Tu, Shichun; Willnow, Thomas E.; Zhang, Yun-wu

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic generation of amyloidogenic amyloid β (Aβ) fragments from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) significantly contributes to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although amyloidogenic APP proteolysis can be affected by trafficking through genetically associated AD components such as SORLA, how SORLA functionally interacts with other trafficking components is yet unclear. Here, we report that SNX27, an endosomal trafficking/recycling factor and a negative regulator of the γ-secretase complex, binds to the SORLA cytosolic tail to form a ternary complex with APP. SNX27 enhances cell surface SORLA and APP levels in human cell lines and mouse primary neurons, and depletion of SNX27 or SORLA reduces APP endosome-to-cell surface recycling kinetics. SNX27 overexpression enhances the generation of cell surface APP cleavage products such as soluble alpha-APP C-terminal fragment (CTFα) in a SORLA-dependent manner. SORLA-mediated Aβ reduction is attenuated by downregulation of SNX27. This indicates that an SNX27/SORLA complex functionally interacts to limit APP distribution to amyloidogenic compartments, forming a non-amyloidogenic shunt to promote APP recycling to the cell surface. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many genes have been identified as risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and a large proportion of these genes function to limit production or toxicity of the AD-associated amyloid β (Aβ) peptide. Whether and how these genes precisely operate to limit AD onset remains an important question. We identify binding and trafficking interactions between two of these factors, SORLA and SNX27, and demonstrate that SNX27 can direct trafficking of SORLA and the Aβ precursor APP to the cell surface to limit the production of Aβ. Diversion APP to the cell surface through modulation of this molecular complex may represent a complimentary strategy for future development in AD treatment. PMID:27466343

  14. Cleavage sites within the poliovirus capsid protein precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, G.R.; Anderson, C.W.; Dorner, A.J.; Semler, B.L.; Wimmer, E.

    1982-01-01

    Partial amino-terminal sequence analysis was performed on radiolabeled poliovirus capsid proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3. A computer-assisted comparison of the amino acid sequences obtained with that predicted by the nucleotide sequence of the poliovirus genome allows assignment of the amino terminus of each capsid protein to a unique position within the virus polyprotein. Sequence analysis of trypsin-digested VP4, which has a blocked amino terminus, demonstrates that VP4 is encoded at or very near to the amino terminus of the polyprotein. The gene order of the capsid proteins is VP4-VP2-VP3-VP1. Cleavage of VP0 to VP4 and VP2 is shown to occur between asparagine and serine, whereas the cleavages that separate VP2/VP3 and VP3/VP1 occur between glutamine and glycine residues. This finding supports the hypothesis that the cleavage of VP0, which occurs during virion morphogenesis, is distinct from the cleavages that separate functional regions of the polyprotein.

  15. In vivo neuronal synthesis and axonal transport of Kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI)-containing forms of the amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Moya, K L; Confaloni, A M; Allinquant, B

    1994-11-01

    We have shown previously that the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is synthesized in retinal ganglion cells and is rapidly transported down the axons, and that different molecular weight forms of the precursor have different developmental time courses. Some APP isoforms contain a Kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI) domain, and APP that lacks the KPI domain is considered the predominant isoform in neurons. We now show that, among the various rapidly transported APPs, a 140-kDa isoform contains the KPI domain. This APP isoform is highly expressed in rapidly growing retinal axons, and it is also prominent in adult axon endings. This 140-kDa KPI-containing APP is highly sulfated compared with other axonally transported isoforms. These results show that APP with the KPI domain is a prominent isoform synthesized in neurons in vivo, and they suggest that the regulation of protease activity may be an important factor during the establishment of neuronal connections.

  16. Structural requirements for palmitoylation of surfactant protein C precursor.

    PubMed Central

    ten Brinke, Anja; Vaandrager, Arie B; Haagsman, Henk P; Ridder, Anja N J A; van Golde, Lambert M G; Batenburg, Joseph J

    2002-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein C (SP-C) propeptide (proSP-C) is a type II transmembrane protein that is palmitoylated on two cysteines adjacent to its transmembrane domain. To study the structural requirements for palmitoylation of proSP-C, His-tagged human proSP-C and mutant forms were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells and analysed by metabolic labelling with [3H]palmitate. Mutations were made in the amino acid sequence representing mature SP-C, as deletion of the N- and C-terminal propeptide parts showed that this sequence by itself could already be palmitoylated. Substitution of the transmembrane domain by an artificial transmembrane domain had no effect on palmitoylation. However, an inverse correlation was found between palmitoylation of proSP-C and the number of amino acids present between the cysteines and the transmembrane domain. Moreover, substitution by alanines of amino acids localized on the N-terminal side of the cysteines had drastic effects on palmitoylation, probably as a result of the removal of hydrophobic amino acids. These data, together with the observation that substitution by alanines of the amino acids localized between the cysteines and the transmembrane domain had no effect on palmitoylation, suggest that the palmitoylation of proSP-C depends not on specific sequence motifs, but more on the probability that the cysteine is in the vicinity of the membrane surface. This is probably determined not only by the number of amino acids between the cysteines and the transmembrane domain, but also by the hydrophobic interaction of the N-terminus with the membrane. This may also be the case for the palmitoylation of other transmembrane proteins. PMID:11802797

  17. Redox Regulation of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thu H.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases represent one of the largest families of genes found in eukaryotes. Kinases mediate distinct cellular processes ranging from proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Ligand-mediated activation of receptor kinases can lead to the production of endogenous H2O2 by membrane-bound NADPH oxidases. In turn, H2O2 can be utilized as a secondary messenger in signal transduction pathways. This review presents an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in redox regulation of protein kinases and its effects on signaling cascades. In the first half, we will focus primarily on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), whereas the latter will concentrate on downstream non-receptor kinases involved in relaying stimulant response. Select examples from the literature are used to highlight the functional role of H2O2 regarding kinase activity, as well as the components involved in H2O2 production and regulation during cellular signaling. In addition, studies demonstrating direct modulation of protein kinases by H2O2 through cysteine oxidation will be emphasized. Identification of these redox-sensitive residues may help uncover signaling mechanisms conserved within kinase subfamilies. In some cases, these residues can even be exploited as targets for the development of new therapeutics. Continued efforts in this field will further basic understanding of kinase redox regulation, and delineate the mechanisms involved in physiologic and pathological H2O2 responses. PMID:23639002

  18. Analysis of the Overall Structure of the Multi-Domain Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP)

    PubMed Central

    Coburger, Ina; Dahms, Sven O.; Roeser, Dirk; Gührs, Karl-Heinz; Hortschansky, Peter; Than, Manuel E.

    2013-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its processing by the α-, β- and γ-secretases is widely believed to play a central role during the development of Alzheimer´s disease. The three-dimensional structure of the entire protein, its physiologic function and the regulation of its proteolytic processing remain, however, largely unclear to date. To gain a deeper understanding of the structure of APP that underlies all of its functions, we first cloned and recombinantly expressed different constructs in E. coli. Using limited proteolysis followed by mass spectrometry and Edman degradation as well as analytical gel permeation chromatography coupled static light scattering, we experimentally analyzed the structural domain boundaries and determined that the large ectodomain of APP consists of exactly two rigidly folded domains – the E1-domain (Leu18-Ala190) and the E2-domain (Ser295-Asp500). Both, the acidic domain (AcD) connecting E1 and E2 as well as the juxtamembrane region (JMR) connecting E2 to the single transmembrane helix are highly flexible and extended. We identified in-between the E1-domain and the AcD an additional domain of conservation and partial flexibility that we termed extension domain (ED, Glu191-Glu227). Using Bio-layer interferometry, pull-down assays and analytical gel filtration experiments we demonstrated that the E1-domain does not tightly interact with the E2-domain, both in the presence and in the absence of heparin. APP hence forms an extended molecule that is flexibly tethered to the membrane. Its multi-domain architecture enables together with the many known functionalities the concomitant performance of several, independent functions, which might be regulated by cellular, compartment specific pH-changes. PMID:24324731

  19. Cellular processing of the nerve growth factor precursor by the mammalian pro-protein convertases.

    PubMed Central

    Seidah, N G; Benjannet, S; Pareek, S; Savaria, D; Hamelin, J; Goulet, B; Laliberte, J; Lazure, C; Chrétien, M; Murphy, R A

    1996-01-01

    In order to define the enzymes responsible for the maturation of the precursor of nerve growth factor (proNGF), its biosynthesis and intracellular processing by the pro-protein convertases furin, PC1, PC2, PACE4, PC5 and the PC5 isoform PC5/6-B were analysed using the vaccinia virus expression system in cells containing a regulated and/or a constitutive secretory pathway. Results demonstrate that in both cell types furin, and to a lesser extent PACE4 and PC5/6-B, are the best candidate proNGF convertases. Furthermore, two processed NGF forms of 16.5 and 13.5 kDa were evident in constitutively secreting cell lines such as LoVo and BSC40 cells, whereas only the 13.5 kDa form was observed in AtT20 cells, which contain secretory granules. Both forms display the same N-terminal sequence as mature NGF, and were also produced following site-directed mutagenesis of the C-terminal Arg-Arg sequence of NGF into Ala-Ala, suggesting that the difference between them is not at the C-terminus. Co-expression of proNGF with furin and either chromogranin B or secretogranin II (but not chromogranin A) in BSC40 cells eliminated the 16.5 kDa form. Data also show that N-glycosylation of the pro-segment of proNGF and trimming of the oligosaccharide chains are necessary for the exit of this precursor from the endoplasmic reticulum and its eventual processing and secretion. Sulphate labelling experiments demonstrated that proNGF is processed into mature NGF following the arrival of the precursor in the trans-Golgi network. This comparative study shows that the three candidate mammalian subtilisin/kexin-like convertases identified process proNGF into NGF and that the nature of the final processed products is dependent on the intracellular environment. PMID:8615794

  20. Nerve Growth Factor Increases mRNA Levels for the Prion Protein and the β -amyloid Protein Precursor in Developing Hamster Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, William C.; Neve, Rachael L.; Prusiner, Stanley B.; McKinley, Michael P.

    1988-12-01

    Deposition of amyloid filaments serves as a pathologic hallmark for some neurodegenerative disorders. The prion protein (PrP) is found in amyloid of animals with scrapie and humans with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease; the β protein is present in amyloid deposits in Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome patients. These two proteins are derived from precursors that in the brain are expressed primarily in neurons and are membrane bound. We found that gene expression for PrP and the β -protein precursor (β -PP) is regulated in developing hamster brain. Specific brain regions showed distinct patterns of ontogenesis for PrP and β -PP mRNAs. The increases in PrP and β -PP mRNAs in developing basal forebrain coincided with an increase in choline acetyltransferase activity, raising the possibility that these markers might be coordinately controlled in cholinergic neurons and regulated by nerve growth factor (NGF). Injections of NGF into the brains of neonatal hamsters increased both PrP and β -PP mRNA levels. Increased PrP and β -PP mRNA levels induced by NGF were confined to regions that contain NGF-responsive cholinergic neurons and were accompanied by elevations in choline acetyltransferase. It remains to be established whether or not exogenous NGF acts to increase PrP and β -PP gene expression selectively in forebrain cholinergic neurons in the developing hamster and endogenous NGF regulates expression of these genes.

  1. APL-1, a Caenorhabditis elegans protein related to the human β-amyloid precursor protein, is essential for viability

    PubMed Central

    Hornsten, Angela; Lieberthal, Jason; Fadia, Shruti; Malins, Richard; Ha, Lawrence; Xu, Xiaomeng; Daigle, Isabelle; Markowitz, Mindy; O'Connor, Gregory; Plasterk, Ronald; Li, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Dominant mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene are associated with rare cases of familial Alzheimer's disease; however, the normal functions of APP and related proteins remain unclear. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has a single APP-related gene, apl-1, that is expressed in multiple tissues. Loss of apl-1 disrupts several developmental processes, including molting and morphogenesis, and results in larval lethality. The apl-1 lethality can be rescued by neuronal expression of the extracellular domain of APL-1. These data highlight the importance of the extracellular domain of an APP family member and suggest that APL-1 acts noncell-autonomously during development. Overexpression of APL-1 also causes several defects, including a high level of larval lethality. Decreased activity of sel-12, a C. elegans homologue of the human γ-secretase component presenilin 1, partially rescues the lethality associated with APL-1 overexpression, suggesting that SEL-12 activity regulates APL-1 activity either directly or indirectly. PMID:17267616

  2. Schisandrin B protects PC12 cells by decreasing the expression of amyloid precursor protein and vacuolar protein sorting 35★

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Mingmin; Mao, Shanping; Dong, Huimin; Liu, Baohui; Zhang, Qian; Pan, Gaofeng; Fu, Zhiping

    2012-01-01

    PC12 cell injury was induced using 20 μM amyloid β-protein 25–35 to establish a model of Alzheimer's disease. The cells were then treated with 5, 10, and 25 μM Schisandrin B. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assays and Hoechst 33342 staining results showed that with increasing Schisandrin B concentration, the survival rate of PC12 cells injured by amyloid β-protein 25–35 gradually increased and the rate of apoptosis gradually decreased. Reverse transcription-PCR, immunocytochemical staining and western blot results showed that with increasing Schisandrin B concentration, the mRNA and protein expression of vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein were gradually decreased. Vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein showed a consistent trend for change. These findings suggest that 5, 10, and 25 μM Schisandrin B antagonizes the cellular injury induced by amyloid β-protein 25–35 in a dose-dependent manner. This may be caused by decreasing the expression of vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein. PMID:25745458

  3. Methamphetamine suppression and route of administration: precursor regulation impacts on snorting, smoking, swallowing and injecting.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, James K; Liu, Lon-Mu; Muramoto, Myra

    2008-07-01

    The route of drug administration affects risk for dependence and medical harm. This study examines whether routes used by methamphetamine treatment participants were impacted by a major drug suppression policy-federal regulation of the methamphetamine precursor chemicals ephedrine and pseudoephedrine. Autoregressive-integrated moving average (ARIMA) intervention time-series analysis. California (1992-2004). Ephedrine single-ingredient products regulation, implemented August 1995; ephedrine with other active medicinal ingredients regulation, implemented October 1996; pseudoephedrine products regulation, implemented October 1997. Monthly counts of non-coerced methamphetamine treatment admissions reporting snorting, smoking, swallowing or injecting. Findings After rising sharply, snorting, smoking, swallowing and injecting admissions dropped 50%, 43%, 26% and 26%, respectively, when the 1995 regulation was implemented. Snorting also dropped 38% at the time of the 1997 regulation. Snorting, swallowing and injecting remained at lower levels to the end of the study period. Smoking resurged (40%) at the time of the 1996 regulation and continued rising. Precursor regulation was associated with changes in the administration of methamphetamine. Injecting, the route with the greatest health risk, entered a long-term reduction. So, too, did snorting and swallowing, two routes with lower risk for dependence. In contrast, smoking, which has a relatively high risk for dependence, dropped, then rebounded and entered a long-term rise. A possible explanation is that injecting, snorting and swallowing were largely linked with US domestic methamphetamine production, which has yet to recover from the regulations. While Mexican production, which was impacted only temporarily by the regulations and has supplanted domestic production, may have helped to diffuse smoking, a route with which it is historically correlated.

  4. Positive Evolutionary Selection of an HD Motif on Alzheimer Precursor Protein Orthologues Suggests a Functional Role

    PubMed Central

    Miklós, István; Zádori, Zoltán

    2012-01-01

    HD amino acid duplex has been found in the active center of many different enzymes. The dyad plays remarkably different roles in their catalytic processes that usually involve metal coordination. An HD motif is positioned directly on the amyloid beta fragment (Aβ) and on the carboxy-terminal region of the extracellular domain (CAED) of the human amyloid precursor protein (APP) and a taxonomically well defined group of APP orthologues (APPOs). In human Aβ HD is part of a presumed, RGD-like integrin-binding motif RHD; however, neither RHD nor RXD demonstrates reasonable conservation in APPOs. The sequences of CAEDs and the position of the HD are not particularly conserved either, yet we show with a novel statistical method using evolutionary modeling that the presence of HD on CAEDs cannot be the result of neutral evolutionary forces (p<0.0001). The motif is positively selected along the evolutionary process in the majority of APPOs, despite the fact that HD motif is underrepresented in the proteomes of all species of the animal kingdom. Position migration can be explained by high probability occurrence of multiple copies of HD on intermediate sequences, from which only one is kept by selective evolutionary forces, in a similar way as in the case of the “transcription binding site turnover.” CAED of all APP orthologues and homologues are predicted to bind metal ions including Amyloid-like protein 1 (APLP1) and Amyloid-like protein 2 (APLP2). Our results suggest that HDs on the CAEDs are most probably key components of metal-binding domains, which facilitate and/or regulate inter- or intra-molecular interactions in a metal ion-dependent or metal ion concentration-dependent manner. The involvement of naturally occurring mutations of HD (Tottori (D7N) and English (H6R) mutations) in early onset Alzheimer's disease gives additional support to our finding that HD has an evolutionary preserved function on APPOs. PMID:22319430

  5. Cloning and characterization of human liver cDNA encoding a protein S precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Hoskins, J; Norman, D K; Beckmann, R J; Long, G L

    1987-01-01

    Human liver cDNA encoding a protein S precursor was isolated from two cDNA libraries by two different techniques. Based upon the frequency of positive clones, the abundance of mRNA for protein S is approximately 0.01%. Blot hybridization of electrophoretically fractionated poly(A)+ RNA revealed a major mRNA approximately 4 kilobases long and two minor forms of approximately 3.1 and approximately equal to 2.6 kilobases. One of the cDNA clones contains a segment encoding a 676 amino acid protein S precursor, as well as 108 and 1132 nucleotides of 5' and 3' noncoding sequence, respectively, plus a poly(A) region at the 3' end. The cDNAs are adenosine plus thymidine-rich (60%) except for the 5' noncoding region, where 78% of the nucleotides are guanosine or cytosine. The protein precursor consists of a 41 amino acid "leader" peptide followed by 635 amino acids corresponding to mature protein S. Comparison of the mature protein region with homologous vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins shows that it is composed of the following domains: an amino-terminal gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-rich region of 37 amino acids; a 36 amino acid linker region rich in hydroxy amino acids; four epidermal growth factor-like segments, each approximately 45 amino acids long; and a 387 amino acid carboxyl-terminal domain of unrecognized structure and unknown function. Images PMID:3467362

  6. Incorporation of DNA and protein precursors into macromolecules by bacteria at -15 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Christner, Brent C

    2002-12-01

    DNA and protein precursors were incorporated into trichloroacetic acid-precipitated material by bacterial cell suspensions during incubation for 50 to 100 days at -15 degrees C. Incorporation did not occur at -70 degrees C and was inhibited by antibiotics. The results demonstrate that bacteria can perform macromolecular synthesis under conditions that mimic entrapment in glacial ice.

  7. TatB functions as an oligomeric binding site for folded Tat precursor proteins.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Carlo; Panahandeh, Sascha; Jungkamp, Anna-Carina; Moser, Michael; Müller, Matthias

    2010-12-01

    Twin-arginine-containing signal sequences mediate the transmembrane transport of folded proteins. The cognate twin-arginine translocation (Tat) machinery of Escherichia coli consists of the membrane proteins TatA, TatB, and TatC. Whereas Tat signal peptides are recognized by TatB and TatC, little is known about molecular contacts of the mature, folded part of Tat precursor proteins. We have placed a photo-cross-linker into Tat substrates at sites predicted to be either surface-exposed or hidden in the core of the folded proteins. On targeting of these variants to the Tat machinery of membrane vesicles, all surface-exposed sites were found in close proximity to TatB. Correspondingly, incorporation of the cross-linker into TatB revealed multiple precursor-binding sites in the predicted transmembrane and amphipathic helices of TatB. Large adducts indicative of TatB oligomers contacting one precursor molecule were also obtained. Cross-linking of Tat substrates to TatB required an intact twin-arginine signal peptide and disappeared upon transmembrane translocation. Our collective data are consistent with TatB forming an oligomeric binding site that transiently accommodates folded Tat precursors.

  8. TatB Functions as an Oligomeric Binding Site for Folded Tat Precursor Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Carlo; Panahandeh, Sascha; Jungkamp, Anna-Carina; Moser, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Twin-arginine-containing signal sequences mediate the transmembrane transport of folded proteins. The cognate twin-arginine translocation (Tat) machinery of Escherichia coli consists of the membrane proteins TatA, TatB, and TatC. Whereas Tat signal peptides are recognized by TatB and TatC, little is known about molecular contacts of the mature, folded part of Tat precursor proteins. We have placed a photo-cross-linker into Tat substrates at sites predicted to be either surface-exposed or hidden in the core of the folded proteins. On targeting of these variants to the Tat machinery of membrane vesicles, all surface-exposed sites were found in close proximity to TatB. Correspondingly, incorporation of the cross-linker into TatB revealed multiple precursor-binding sites in the predicted transmembrane and amphipathic helices of TatB. Large adducts indicative of TatB oligomers contacting one precursor molecule were also obtained. Cross-linking of Tat substrates to TatB required an intact twin-arginine signal peptide and disappeared upon transmembrane translocation. Our collective data are consistent with TatB forming an oligomeric binding site that transiently accommodates folded Tat precursors. PMID:20926683

  9. Preparation of phytantriol cubosomes by solvent precursor dilution for the delivery of protein vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rizwan, S B; Assmus, D; Boehnke, A; Hanley, T; Boyd, B J; Rades, T; Hook, S

    2011-09-01

    Different delivery strategies to improve the immunogenicity of peptide/protein-based vaccines are currently under investigation. In this study, the preparation and physicochemical characterisation of cubosomes, a novel lipid-based particulate system currently being explored for vaccine delivery, was investigated. Cubosomes were prepared from a liquid precursor mixture containing phytantriol or glycerylmonooleate (GMO), F127 for particle stabilisation, and a hydrotrope (ethanol or polyethylene glycol (PEG(200)) or propylene glycol (PG)). Several liquid precursors were prepared, and the effect of varying the concentrations of F127 and the hydrotrope on cubosome formation was investigated. Formulations were prepared by fragmentation for comparison. The model protein ovalbumin (Ova) was also entrapped within selected formulations. Submicron-sized particles (180-300 nm) were formed spontaneously upon dilution of the liquid precursors, circumventing the need for the preformed cubic phase used in traditional fragmentation-based methods. The nanostructure of the phytantriol dispersions was determined to be cubic phase using SAXS whilst GMO dispersions had a reverse hexagonal nanostructure coexisting with cubic phase. The greatest entrapment of Ova was within phytantriol cubosomes prepared from liquid precursors. Release of Ova from the various formulations was sustained; however, release was significantly faster and the extent of release was greater from fragmented dispersions compared to liquid precursor formulations. Taken together, these results suggest that phytantriol cubosomes can be prepared using liquid precursors and that it is a suitable alternative to GMO. Furthermore, the high entrapment and the slow release of Ova in vitro highlight the potential of phytantriol cubosomes prepared using liquid precursors as a novel vaccine delivery system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigations on the in vitro import ability of mitochondrial precursor proteins synthesized in wheat germ transcription-translation extract.

    PubMed

    Dessi, Patrick; Pavlov, Pavel F; Wållberg, Fredrik; Rudhe, Charlotta; Brack, Simon; Whelan, James; Glaser, Elzbieta

    2003-05-01

    Mitochondrial precursor proteins synthesized in rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL) are readily imported into mitochondria, whereas the same precursors synthesized in wheat germ extract (WGE) fail to be imported. We have investigated factors that render import incompetence from WGE. A precursor that does not require addition of extramitochondrial ATP for import, the F(A)d ATP synthase subunit, is imported from WGE. Import of chimeric constructs between precursors of the F(A)d protein and alternative oxidase (AOX) with switched presequences revealed that the mature domain of the F(A)d precursor defines the import competence in WGE as only the construct containing the presequence of AOX and mature portion of F(A)d (pAOX-mF(A)d) could be imported. Import competence of F(A)d and pAOX-mF(A)d correlated with solubility of these precursors in WGE, however, solubilization of import-incompetent precursors with urea did not restore import competence. Addition of RRL to WGE-synthesized precursors did not stimulate import but addition of WGE to the RRL-synthesized precursors or to the over-expressed mitochondrial precursor derived from the F1beta ATP synthase precursor inhibited import into mitochondria. The dual-targeted glutathione reductase precursor synthesized in WGE was imported into chloroplasts, but not into mitochondria. Antibodies against the 14-3-3 guidance complex characterized for chloroplast targeting were able to immunoprecipitate all of the precursors tested except the F(A)d ATP synthase precursor. Our results point to the conclusion that the import incompetence of WGE-synthesized mitochondrial precursors is not presequence dependent and is a result of interaction of WGE inhibitory factors with the mature portion of precursor proteins.

  11. Cleavage of amyloid precursor protein by an archaeal presenilin homologue PSH

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Shangyu; Wu, Shenjie; Wang, Jiawei; Li, Hongbo; Huang, Min; He, Wei; Li, Yue-Ming; Wong, Catherine C. L.; Shi, Yigong

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by γ-secretase contributes to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. More than 200 disease-derived mutations have been identified in presenilin (the catalytic subunit of γ-secretase), making modulation of γ-secretase activity a potentially attractive therapeutic opportunity. Unfortunately, the technical challenges in dealing with intact γ-secretase have hindered discovery of modulators and demand a convenient substitute approach. Here we report that, similar to γ-secretase, the archaeal presenilin homolog PSH faithfully processes the substrate APP C99 into Aβ42, Aβ40, and Aβ38. The molar ratio of the cleavage products Aβ42 over Aβ40 by PSH is nearly identical to that by γ-secretase. The proteolytic activity of PSH is specifically suppressed by presenilin-specific inhibitors. Known modulators of γ-secretase also modulate PSH similarly in terms of the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio. Structural analysis reveals association of a known γ-secretase inhibitor with PSH between its two catalytic aspartate residues. These findings identify PSH as a surrogate protease for the screening of agents that may regulate the protease activity and the cleavage preference of γ-secretase. PMID:25733893

  12. Nicotine-induced plasticity in the retinocollicular pathway: Evidence for involvement of amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, R G J; Vasques, J F; Trindade, P; Serfaty, C A; Campello-Costa, P; Faria-Melibeu, A C

    2016-01-28

    During early postnatal development retinocollicular projections undergo activity-dependent synaptic refinement that results in the formation of precise topographical maps in the visual layers of the superior colliculus (SC). Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) is a widely expressed transmembrane glycoprotein involved in the regulation of several aspects of neural development, such as neurite outgrowth, synapse formation and plasticity. Stimulation of cholinergic system has been found to alter the expression and processing of APP in different cell lines. Herein, we investigated the effect of nicotine on the development of retinocollicular pathway and on APP metabolism in the SC of pigmented rats. Animals were submitted to intracranial Elvax implants loaded with nicotine or phosphate-buffered saline (vehicle) at postnatal day (PND) 7. The ipsilateral retinocollicular pathway of control and experimental groups was anterogradely labeled either 1 or 3 weeks after surgery (PND 14 or PND 28). Local nicotine exposure produces a transitory sprouting of uncrossed retinal axons outside their main terminal zones. Nicotine also increases APP content and its soluble neurotrophic fragment sAPPα. Furthermore, nicotine treatment upregulates nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 and β2 subunits. Taken together, these data indicate that nicotine disrupts the ordering and topographic mapping of axons in the retinocollicular pathway and facilitates APP processing through the nonamyloidogenic pathway, suggesting that sAPPα may act as a trophic agent that mediates nicotine-induced morphological plasticity.

  13. The 70-Kilodalton Heat Shock Cognate Can Act as a Molecular Chaperone during the Membrane Translocation of a Plant Secretory Protein Precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Miernyk, JA; Duck, NB; Shatters, RG; Folk, WR

    1992-01-01

    When a model secretory precursor was synthesized in vitro and analyzed by rate-zonal sedimentation, it appeared to be associated with other proteins present in a wheat germ extract. At least one of the associated proteins is a member of the 70-kD family of stress proteins. It was possible to immunoprecipitate the secretory precursor with anti-heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) antibodies in the absence but not in the presence of ATP, suggesting that the association was specific. ATP-sensitive association is one diagnostic characteristic of molecular chaperone-type proteins. Increasing incubation temperature decreased the amount of precursor associated with Hsc70. A method was developed for the removal of Hsc70 from a wheat germ in vitro translation mixture by immunoprecipitation. Cotranslational translocation and processing of the secretory precursor by maize endosperm microsomes were inefficient in the Hsc70-depleted system but were greatly stimulated by addition of purified preparations of various heat shock 70 proteins (Hsp70s). Cytosolic Hsc70 from maize endosperm was capable of autophosphorylation in vitro. Phosphorylated Hsc70 was much less efficient in promoting membrane translocation of the secretory precursor. These results suggest that chaperone function in vivo could be regulated by phosphorylation. PMID:12297663

  14. P2Y2 nucleotide receptors enhance alpha-secretase-dependent amyloid precursor protein processing.

    PubMed

    Camden, Jean M; Schrader, Ann M; Camden, Ryan E; González, Fernando A; Erb, Laurie; Seye, Cheikh I; Weisman, Gary A

    2005-05-13

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is proteolytically processed by beta- and gamma-secretases to release amyloid beta, the main component in senile plaques found in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease. Alternatively, APP can be cleaved within the amyloid beta domain by alpha-secretase releasing the non-amyloidogenic product sAPP alpha, which has been shown to have neuroprotective properties. Several G protein-coupled receptors are known to activate alpha-secretase-dependent processing of APP; however, the role of G protein-coupled nucleotide receptors in APP processing has not been investigated. Here it is demonstrated that activation of the G protein-coupled P2Y2 receptor (P2Y2R) subtype expressed in human 1321N1 astrocytoma cells enhanced the release of sAPP alpha in a time- and dose-dependent manner. P2Y2 R-mediated sAPP alpha release was dependent on extracellular calcium but was not affected by 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N,-trimethylammonium salt, an intracellular calcium chelator, indicating that P2Y2R-stimulated intracellular calcium mobilization was not involved. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) with GF109203 or by PKC down-regulation with phorbol ester pre-treatment had no effect on UTP-stimulated sAPP alpha release, indicating a PKC-independent mechanism. U0126, an inhibitor of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, partially inhibited sAPPalpha release by UTP, whereas inhibitors of Src-dependent epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation by P2Y2Rs had no effect. The metalloprotease inhibitors phenanthroline and TAPI-2 and the furin inhibitor decanoyl-Arg-Val-Lys-Arg-chloromethylketone also diminished UTP-induced sAPP alpha release. Furthermore, small interfering RNA silencing of an endogenous adamalysin, ADAM10 or ADAM17/TACE, partially suppressed P2Y2R-activated sAPP alpha release, whereas treatment of cells with both ADAM10 and ADAM17/TACE small interfering RNAs completely abolished UTP-activated sAPP alpha release

  15. CBP regulates the differentiation of interneurons from ventral forebrain neural precursors during murine development.

    PubMed

    Tsui, David; Voronova, Anastassia; Gallagher, Denis; Kaplan, David R; Miller, Freda D; Wang, Jing

    2014-01-15

    The mechanisms that regulate appropriate genesis and differentiation of interneurons in the developing mammalian brain are of significant interest not only because interneurons play key roles in the establishment of neural circuitry, but also because when they are deficient, this can cause epilepsy. In this regard, one genetic syndrome that is associated with deficits in neural development and epilepsy is Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome (RTS), where the transcriptional activator and histone acetyltransferase CBP is mutated and haploinsufficient. Here, we have asked whether CBP is necessary for the appropriate genesis and differentiation of interneurons in the murine forebrain, since this could provide an explanation for the epilepsy that is associated with RTS. We show that CBP is expressed in neural precursors within the embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), an area that generates the vast majority of interneurons for the cortex. Using primary cultures of MGE precursors, we show that knockdown of CBP causes deficits in differentiation of these precursors into interneurons and oligodendrocytes, and that overexpression of CBP is by itself sufficient to enhance interneuron genesis. Moreover, we show that levels of the neurotransmitter synthesis enzyme GAD67, which is expressed in inhibitory interneurons, are decreased in the dorsal and ventral forebrain of neonatal CBP(+/-) mice, indicating that CBP plays a role in regulating interneuron development in vivo. Thus, CBP normally acts to ensure the differentiation of appropriate numbers of forebrain interneurons, and when its levels are decreased, this causes deficits in interneuron development, providing a potential explanation for the epilepsy seen in individuals with RTS.

  16. Protein interactions among Fe65, the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein, and the amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Mulvihill, Melinda M; Guttman, Miklos; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2011-07-19

    The adapter protein Fe65 has been proposed to be the link between the intracellular domains of the amyloid precursor protein, APP (AICD), and the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP-CT). Functional linkage between these two proteins has been established, and mutations within LRP-CT affect the amount of Aβ produced from APP. Previous work showed that AICD binds to protein interaction domain 2 (PID2) of Fe65. Although the structure of PID1 was determined recently, all attempts to demonstrate LRP-CT binding to this domain failed. We used biophysical experiments and binding studies to investigate the binding among these three proteins. Full-length Fe65 bound more weakly to AICD than did N-terminally truncated forms; however, the intramolecular domain-domain interactions that had been proposed to inhibit binding could not be observed using amide H-D exchange. Surprisingly, when LRP-CT is phosphorylated at Tyr4507, it bound to Fe65 PID1 despite the fact that this domain belongs to the Dab-like subclass of PIDs that are not supposed to be phosphorylation-dependent. Mutation of a critical arginine abolished binding, providing further proof of the phosphorylation dependence. Fe65 PID1 thus provides a link between the Dab-like class and the IRS-like class of PIDs and is the first Dab-like family member to show phosphorylation-dependent binding.

  17. S1pr2/Gα13 signaling regulates the migration of endocardial precursors by controlling endoderm convergence.

    PubMed

    Xie, Huaping; Ye, Ding; Sepich, Diane; Lin, Fang

    2016-06-15

    Formation of the heart tube requires synchronized migration of endocardial and myocardial precursors. Our previous studies indicated that in S1pr2/Gα13-deficient embryos, impaired endoderm convergence disrupted the medial migration of myocardial precursors, resulting in the formation of two myocardial populations. Here we show that endoderm convergence also regulates endocardial migration. In embryos defective for S1pr2/Gα13 signaling, endocardial precursors failed to migrate towards the midline, and the presumptive endocardium surrounded the bilaterally-located myocardial cells rather than being encompassed by them. In vivo imaging of control embryos revealed that, like their myocardial counterparts, endocardial precursors migrated with the converging endoderm, though from a more anterior point, then moved from the dorsal to the ventral side of the endoderm (subduction), and finally migrated posteriorly towards myocardial precursors, ultimately forming the inner layer of the heart tube. In embryos defective for endoderm convergence due to an S1pr2/Gα13 deficiency, both the medial migration and the subduction of endocardial precursors were impaired, and their posterior migration towards the myocardial precursors was premature. This placed them medial to the myocardial populations, physically blocking the medial migration of the myocardial precursors. Furthermore, contact between the endocardial and myocardial precursor populations disrupted the epithelial architecture of the myocardial precursors, and thus their medial migration; in embryos depleted of endocardial cells, the myocardial migration defect was partially rescued. Our data indicate that endoderm convergence regulates the medial migration of endocardial precursors, and that premature association of the endocardial and myocardial populations contributes to myocardial migration defects observed in S1pr2/Gα13-deficient embryos. The demonstration that endoderm convergence regulates the synchronized

  18. Selective translational control of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein transcript by iron regulatory protein-1.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Hee; Cahill, Catherine M; Vanderburg, Charles R; Scherzer, Clemens R; Wang, Bin; Huang, Xudong; Rogers, Jack T

    2010-10-08

    Iron influx increases the translation of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP) via an iron-responsive element (IRE) RNA stem loop in its 5'-untranslated region. Equal modulated interaction of the iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) with canonical IREs controls iron-dependent translation of the ferritin subunits. However, our immunoprecipitation RT-PCR and RNA binding experiments demonstrated that IRP1, but not IRP2, selectively bound the APP IRE in human neural cells. This selective IRP1 interaction pattern was evident in human brain and blood tissue from normal and Alzheimer disease patients. We computer-predicted an optimal novel RNA stem loop structure for the human, rhesus monkey, and mouse APP IREs with reference to the canonical ferritin IREs but also the IREs encoded by erythroid heme biosynthetic aminolevulinate synthase and Hif-2α mRNAs, which preferentially bind IRP1. Selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension analysis was consistent with a 13-base single-stranded terminal loop and a conserved GC-rich stem. Biotinylated RNA probes deleted of the conserved CAGA motif in the terminal loop did not bind to IRP1 relative to wild type probes and could no longer base pair to form a predicted AGA triloop. An AGU pseudo-triloop is key for IRP1 binding to the canonical ferritin IREs. RNA probes encoding the APP IRE stem loop exhibited the same high affinity binding to rhIRP1 as occurs for the H-ferritin IRE (35 pm). Intracellular iron chelation increased binding of IRP1 to the APP IRE, decreasing intracellular APP expression in SH-SY5Y cells. Functionally, shRNA knockdown of IRP1 caused increased expression of neural APP consistent with IRP1-APP IRE-driven translation.

  19. Viral precursor protein P3 and its processed products perform discrete and essential functions in the poliovirus RNA replication complex

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The differential use of protein precursors and their products is a key strategy used during poliovirus replication. To characterize the role of protein precursors during replication, we examined the complementation profiles of mutants that inhibited 3D polymerase or 3C-RNA binding activity. We showe...

  20. Localization and Trafficking of Amyloid-β Protein Precursor and Secretases: Impact on Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Agostinho, Paula; Pliássova, Anna; Oliveira, Catarina R; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) affects almost 35 million people worldwide. One of the neuropathological features of AD is the presence of extracellular amyloid plaques, which are mainly composed of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. These peptides derive from the amyloidogenic proteolytic processing of the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), through the sequential action of β- and γ-secretases. However, AβPP can also be cleaved by a non-amyloidogenic pathway, involving an α-secretase, and in this case the Aβ formation is precluded. The production of Aβ and of other AβPP catabolites depends on the spatial and temporal co-localization of AβPP with α- or β-secretases and γ-secretase, which traffic through the secretory pathway in a highly regulated manner. Disturbances on AβPP and secretases intracellular trafficking and, consequently, in their localization may affect dynamic interactions between these proteins with consequences in the AD pathogenesis. In this article, we critically review the recent knowledge about the trafficking and co-localization of AβPP and related secretases in the brain under physiological and AD conditions. A particular focus is given to data concerning the distribution of AβPP and secretases in different types of synapses relatively to other neuronal or glial localizations. Furthermore, we discuss some possible signals that govern the dynamic encounter of AβPP with each group of secretases, such as AβPP mutations, estrogen deprivation, chronic stress, metabolic impairment, and alterations in sleep pattern-associated with aging. The knowledge of key signals that are responsible for the shifting of AβPP processing away from α-secretases and toward the β-secretases might be useful to develop AD therapeutic strategies.

  1. Mifepristone alters amyloid precursor protein processing to preclude amyloid beta and also reduces tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Baglietto-Vargas, David; Medeiros, Rodrigo; Martinez-Coria, Hilda; LaFerla, Frank M; Green, Kim N

    2013-09-01

    Increased circulating glucocorticoids are features of both aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD), and increased glucocorticoids accelerate the accumulation of AD pathologies. Here, we analyzed the effects of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone (RU486) in the 3xTg-AD mouse model at an age where hippocampal damage leads to high circulating corticosterone levels. The effects of mifepristone were investigated in 3xTg-AD mice using a combination of biochemical, histological, and behavior analyses. Mifepristone treatment rescues the pathologically induced cognitive impairments and markedly reduces amyloid beta (Aβ)-load and levels, as well as tau pathologies. Analysis of amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing revealed concomitant decreases in both APP C-terminal fragments C99 and C83 and the appearance of a larger 17-kDa C-terminal fragment. Hence, mifepristone induces a novel C-terminal cleavage of APP that prevents it being cleaved by α- or β-secretase, thereby precluding Aβ generation in the central nervous system; this cleavage and the production of the 17-kDa APP fragment was generated by a calcium-dependent cysteine protease. In addition, mifepristone treatment also reduced the phosphorylation and accumulation of tau, concomitant with reductions in p25. Notably, deficits in cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein signaling were restored with the treatment. These preclinical results point to a potential therapeutic role for mifepristone as an effective treatment for AD and further highlight the impact the glucocorticoid system has as a regulator of Aβ generation. Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Alterations in Gene Expression in Mutant Amyloid Precursor Protein Transgenic Mice Lacking Niemann-Pick Type C1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Maulik, Mahua; Thinakaran, Gopal; Kar, Satyabrata

    2013-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease, a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused mostly by mutation in NPC1 gene, is pathologically characterized by the accumulation of free cholesterol in brain and other tissues. This is accompanied by gliosis and loss of neurons in selected brain regions, including the cerebellum. Recent studies have shown that NPC disease exhibits intriguing parallels with Alzheimer’s disease, including the presence of neurofibrillary tangles and increased levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP)-derived β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in vulnerable brain neurons. To evaluate the role of Aβ in NPC disease, we determined the gene expression profile in selected brain regions of our recently developed bigenic ANPC mice, generated by crossing APP transgenic (Tg) mice with heterozygous Npc1-deficient mice. The ANPC mice exhibited exacerbated neuronal and glial pathology compared to other genotypes [i.e., APP-Tg, double heterozygous (Dhet), Npc1-null and wild-type mice]. Analysis of expression profiles of 86 selected genes using real-time RT-PCR arrays showed a wide-spectrum of alterations in the four genotypes compared to wild-type controls. The changes observed in APP-Tg and Dhet mice are limited to only few genes involved mostly in the regulation of cholesterol metabolism, whereas Npc1-null and ANPC mice showed alterations in the expression profiles of a number of genes regulating cholesterol homeostasis, APP metabolism, vesicular trafficking and cell death mechanism in both hippocampus and cerebellum compared to wild-type mice. Intriguingly, ANPC and Npc1-null mice, with some exceptions, exhibited similar changes, although more genes were differentially expressed in the affected cerebellum than the relatively spared hippocampus. The altered gene profiles were found to match with the corresponding protein levels. These results suggest that lack of Npc1 protein can alter the expression profile of selected transcripts as well as proteins, and APP

  3. Prion protein in ESC regulation.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Alberto; Pericuesta, Eva; Ramírez, Miguel Ángel; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    A large number of studies have analysed the putative functions of the prion protein (PrP(C)) in mammals. Although its sequence conservation over a wide range of different animals may indicate that this protein could have a key role in prion diseases, an absolutely accepted involvement has not been found so far. We have recently reported that PrP(C) regulates Nanog mRNA expression, the first non-redundant function of PrP(C) in embryonic stem cells (ESC), which translates into control of pluripotency and early differentiation. Contrary to what it is believed, the other two members of the prion protein family, Doppel and Shadoo, cannot replace the absence of PrP(C), causing the appearance of a new embryoid body (EB) population in our in vitro culture. The similarities between EB and an early post-implantation embryo suggest that this might also occur in vivo, enhancing the importance of this finding. On the other hand, our data may support the hypothesis of a relationship between the loss of PrP(C) function and neuronal degeneration in prion diseases. A reduction in brain stem cells pluripotency after PrP(C) is misfolded into the pathological conformation (PrP(Sc)) could lead to a delay or a disappearance of the normal brain damage recovery.

  4. IDPQuantify: Combining Precursor Intensity with Spectral Counts for Protein and Peptide Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao-Yi; Chambers, Matthew C.; Li, Ming; Ham, Amy-Joan L.; Turner, Jeffrey L.; Zhang, Bing; Tabb, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Differentiating and quantifying protein differences in complex samples produces significant challenges in sensitivity and specificity. Label-free quantification can draw from two different information sources: precursor intensities and spectral counts. Intensities are accurate for calculating protein relative abundance, but values are often missing due to peptides that are identified sporadically. Spectral counting can reliably reproduce difference lists, but differentiating peptides or quantifying all but the most concentrated protein changes is usually beyond its abilities. Here we developed new software, IDPQuantify, to align multiple replicates using principal component analysis, extract accurate precursor intensities from MS data, and combine intensities with spectral counts for significant gains in differentiation and quantification. We have applied IDPQuantify to three comparative proteomic datasets featuring gold standard protein differences spiked in complicated backgrounds. The software is able to associate peptides with peaks that are otherwise left unidentified to increase the efficiency of protein quantification, especially for low-abundance proteins. By combing intensities with spectral counts from IDPicker, it gains an average of 30% more true positive differences among top differential proteins. IDPQuantify quantifies protein relative abundance accurately in these test datasets to produce good correlations between known and measured concentrations. PMID:23879310

  5. Selective overproduction of the proteasome inhibitor salinosporamide A via precursor pathway regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, Anna; Eustáquio, Alessandra S.; Gulder, Tobias A. M.; Hafner, Mathias; Moore, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    The chlorinated natural product salinosporamide A is a potent 20S proteasome inhibitor currently in clinical trials as an anticancer agent. To deepen our understanding of salinosporamide biosynthesis, we investigated the function of a LuxR-type pathway-specific regulatory gene, salR2, and observed a selective effect on the production of salinosporamide A over its less active aliphatic analogs. SalR2 was shown to specifically activate genes involved in the biosynthesis of the halogenated precursor chloroethylmalonyl-CoA, which is a dedicated precursor of salinosporamide A. Specifically, SalR2 activates transcription of two divergent operons – one of which contains the unique S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent chlorinase encoding gene salL. By applying this knowledge towards rational engineering, we were able to selectively double salinosporamide A production. This study exemplifies the specialized regulation of a polyketide precursor pathway and its application to the selective overproduction of a specific natural product congener. PMID:22195555

  6. Specific Biarsenical Labeling of Cell Surface Proteins Allows Fluorescent- and Biotin-tagging of Amyloid Precursor Protein and Prion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Yuzuru; Shi, Zhen-Dan; Ruddy, Brian; Dorward, David W.; Greene, Lois

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent tagging is a powerful tool for imaging proteins in living cells. However, the steric effects imposed by fluorescent tags impair the behavior of many proteins. Here, we report a novel technique, Instant with DTT, EDT, And Low temperature (IDEAL)-labeling, for rapid and specific FlAsH-labeling of tetracysteine-tagged cell surface proteins by using prion protein (PrP) and amyloid precursor protein (APP) as models. In prion-infected cells, FlAsH-labeled tetracysteine-tagged PrP converted from the normal isoform (PrPsen) to the disease-associated isoform (PrPres), suggesting minimal steric effects of the tag. Pulse-chase analysis of PrP and APP by fluorescent gel imaging demonstrated the utility of IDEAL labeling in investigating protein metabolism by identifying an as-yet-unrecognized C-terminal fragment (C3) of PrPsen and by characterizing the kinetics of PrPres and APP metabolism. C3 generation and N-terminal truncation of PrPres were inhibited by the anti-prion compound E64, a cysteine protease inhibitor. Surprisingly, E64 did not inhibit the synthesis of new PrPres, providing insight into the mechanism by which E64 reduces steady-state PrPres levels in prion-infected cells. To expand the versatility of tetracysteine tagging, we created new Alexa Fluor- and biotin-conjugated tetracysteine-binding molecules that were applied to imaging PrP endocytosis and ultrastructural localization. IDEAL-labeling extends the use of biarsenical derivatives to extracellular proteins and beyond microscopic imaging. PMID:18987338

  7. Ablation of Prion Protein in Wild Type Human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Transgenic Mice Does Not Alter The Proteolysis of APP, Levels of Amyloid-β or Pathologic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Baybutt, Herbert; Diack, Abigail B.; Kellett, Katherine A. B.; Piccardo, Pedro; Manson, Jean C.

    2016-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) has been proposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. In cellular models PrPC inhibited the action of the β-secretase BACE1 on wild type amyloid precursor protein resulting in a reduction in amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Here we have assessed the effect of genetic ablation of PrPC in transgenic mice expressing human wild type amyloid precursor protein (line I5). Deletion of PrPC had no effect on the α- and β-secretase proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) nor on the amount of Aβ38, Aβ40 or Aβ42 in the brains of the mice. In addition, ablation of PrPC did not alter Aβ deposition or histopathology phenotype in this transgenic model. Thus using this transgenic model we could not provide evidence to support the hypothesis that PrPC regulates Aβ production. PMID:27447728

  8. Proteomic profiling of the mitochondrial ribosome identifies Atp25 as a composite mitochondrial precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Woellhaf, Michael W; Sommer, Frederik; Schroda, Michael; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-10-15

    Whereas the structure and function of cytosolic ribosomes are well characterized, we only have a limited understanding of the mitochondrial translation apparatus. Using SILAC-based proteomic profiling, we identified 13 proteins that cofractionated with the mitochondrial ribosome, most of which play a role in translation or ribosomal biogenesis. One of these proteins is a homologue of the bacterial ribosome-silencing factor (Rsf). This protein is generated from the composite precursor protein Atp25 upon internal cleavage by the matrix processing peptidase MPP, and in this respect, it differs from all other characterized mitochondrial proteins of baker's yeast. We observed that cytosolic expression of Rsf, but not of noncleaved Atp25 protein, is toxic. Our results suggest that eukaryotic cells face the challenge of avoiding negative interference from the biogenesis of their two distinct translation machineries.

  9. Mint proteins are required for synaptic activity-dependent amyloid precursor protein (APP) trafficking and amyloid β generation.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Sarah E; Dillon, Gregory M; Sullivan, Josefa M; Ho, Angela

    2014-05-30

    Aberrant amyloid β (Aβ) production plays a causal role in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis. A major cellular pathway for Aβ generation is the activity-dependent endocytosis and proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). However, the molecules controlling activity-dependent APP trafficking in neurons are less defined. Mints are adaptor proteins that directly interact with the endocytic sorting motif of APP and are functionally important in regulating APP endocytosis and Aβ production. We analyzed neuronal cultures from control and Mint knockout neurons that were treated with either glutamate or tetrodotoxin to stimulate an increase or decrease in neuronal activity, respectively. We found that neuronal activation by glutamate increased APP endocytosis, followed by elevated APP insertion into the cell surface, stabilizing APP at the plasma membrane. Conversely, suppression of neuronal activity by tetrodotoxin decreased APP endocytosis and insertion. Interestingly, we found that activity-dependent APP trafficking and Aβ generation were blocked in Mint knockout neurons. We showed that wild-type Mint1 can rescue APP internalization and insertion in Mint knockout neurons. In addition, we found that Mint overexpression increased excitatory synaptic activity and that APP was internalized predominantly to endosomes associated with APP processing. We demonstrated that presenilin 1 (PS1) endocytosis requires interaction with the PDZ domains of Mint1 and that this interaction facilitates activity-dependent colocalization of APP and PS1. These findings demonstrate that Mints are necessary for activity-induced APP and PS1 trafficking and provide insight into the cellular fate of APP in endocytic pathways essential for Aβ production. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Mint Proteins Are Required for Synaptic Activity-dependent Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Trafficking and Amyloid β Generation*

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Sarah E.; Dillon, Gregory M.; Sullivan, Josefa M.; Ho, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant amyloid β (Aβ) production plays a causal role in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis. A major cellular pathway for Aβ generation is the activity-dependent endocytosis and proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). However, the molecules controlling activity-dependent APP trafficking in neurons are less defined. Mints are adaptor proteins that directly interact with the endocytic sorting motif of APP and are functionally important in regulating APP endocytosis and Aβ production. We analyzed neuronal cultures from control and Mint knockout neurons that were treated with either glutamate or tetrodotoxin to stimulate an increase or decrease in neuronal activity, respectively. We found that neuronal activation by glutamate increased APP endocytosis, followed by elevated APP insertion into the cell surface, stabilizing APP at the plasma membrane. Conversely, suppression of neuronal activity by tetrodotoxin decreased APP endocytosis and insertion. Interestingly, we found that activity-dependent APP trafficking and Aβ generation were blocked in Mint knockout neurons. We showed that wild-type Mint1 can rescue APP internalization and insertion in Mint knockout neurons. In addition, we found that Mint overexpression increased excitatory synaptic activity and that APP was internalized predominantly to endosomes associated with APP processing. We demonstrated that presenilin 1 (PS1) endocytosis requires interaction with the PDZ domains of Mint1 and that this interaction facilitates activity-dependent colocalization of APP and PS1. These findings demonstrate that Mints are necessary for activity-induced APP and PS1 trafficking and provide insight into the cellular fate of APP in endocytic pathways essential for Aβ production. PMID:24742670

  11. Synthesis of albumin via a precursor protein in cell suspensions from rat liver.

    PubMed

    Edwards, K; Schreiber, G; Dryburgh, H; Urban, J; Inglis, A S

    1976-03-16

    The mechanism of the biosynthesis of albumin was studied in cell suspensions from rat liver. The cells were prepared by continuous perfusion of the liver in situ with 0.05% collagenase and 0.10% hyaluronidase and incubated under conditions optimized for the incorporation of amino acids into protein. Seven minutes after starting the incubation L-[1-14C]leucine was added, followed after 25 min by a 15 or 30-min chase with an 830-fold excess of non-radioactive L-leucine. Total protein, an albumin-like protein, and albumin were isolated from samples withdrawn immediately of total protein was found to remain constant after addition of the non-radioactive L-leucine, whereas that of the albumin-like protein decreased and that of albumin increased with incubation time. The increase in albumin radioactivity accounted for the decrease in radioactivity of the albumin-like protein, suggesting that the latter is a precursor of albumin. The precursor protein differed from albumin by an oligopeptide extension at the N-terminal end.

  12. Regulating the regulators: serine/arginine-rich proteins under scrutiny.

    PubMed

    Risso, Guillermo; Pelisch, Federico; Quaglino, Ana; Pozzi, Berta; Srebrow, Anabella

    2012-10-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are among the most studied splicing regulators. They constitute a family of evolutionarily conserved proteins that, apart from their initially identified and deeply studied role in splicing regulation, have been implicated in genome stability, chromatin binding, transcription elongation, mRNA stability, mRNA export and mRNA translation. Remarkably, this list of SR protein activities seems far from complete, as unexpected functions keep being unraveled. An intriguing aspect that awaits further investigation is how the multiple tasks of SR proteins are concertedly regulated within mammalian cells. In this article, we first discuss recent findings regarding the regulation of SR protein expression, activity and accessibility. We dive into recent studies describing SR protein auto-regulatory feedback loops involving different molecular mechanisms such asunproductive splicing, microRNA-mediated regulation and translational repression. In addition, we take into account another step of regulation of SR proteins, presenting new findings about a variety of post-translational modifications by proteomics approaches and how some of these modifications can regulate SR protein sub-cellular localization or stability. Towards the end, we focus in two recently revealed functions of SR proteins beyond mRNA biogenesis and metabolism, the regulation of micro-RNA processing and the regulation of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) conjugation. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Maf1-mediated regulation of yeast RNA polymerase III is correlated with CCA addition at the 3' end of tRNA precursors.

    PubMed

    Foretek, Dominika; Nuc, Przemysław; Żywicki, Marek; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Kudla, Grzegorz; Boguta, Magdalena

    2016-08-27

    In eukaryotic cells tRNA synthesis is negatively regulated by the protein Maf1, conserved from yeast to humans. Maf1 from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae mediates repression of trna transcription when cells are transferred from medium with glucose to medium with glycerol, a non-fermentable carbon source. The strain with deleted gene encoding Maf1 (maf1Δ) is viable but accumulates tRNA precursors. In this study tRNA precursors were analysed by RNA-Seq and Northern hybridization in wild type strain and maf1Δ mutant grown in glucose medium or upon shift to repressive conditions. A negative effect of maf1Δ mutant on the addition of the auxiliary CCA nucleotides to the 3' end of pre-tRNAs was observed in cells shifted to unfavourable growth conditions. This effect was reduced by overexpression of the yeast CCA1 gene encoding ATP(CTP):tRNA nucleotidyltransferase. The CCA sequence at the 3' end is important for export of tRNA precursors from the nucleus and essential for tRNA charging with amino acids. Data presented here indicate that CCA-addition to intron-containing end-processed tRNA precursors is a limiting step in tRNA maturation when there is no Maf1 mediated RNA polymerase III (Pol III) repression. The correlation between CCA synthesis and Pol III regulation by Maf1 could be important in coordination of tRNA transcription, processing and regulation of translation.

  14. Platelet amyloid precursor protein isoform expression in Alzheimer's disease: evidence for peripheral marker.

    PubMed

    Vignini, A; Sartini, D; Morganti, S; Nanetti, L; Luzzi, S; Provinciali, L; Mazzanti, L; Emanuelli, M

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive cognitive and memory decline. Among peripheral markers of AD, great interest has been focused on the amyloid precursor protein (APP). In this regard, platelets represent an important peripheral source of APP since it has been demonstrated that the three major isoforms, that are constituted of 770, 751 and 695 aa residues, are inserted in the membrane of resting platelets. APP 751 and APP 770 contain a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor domain (APP KPI) and APP 695 lacks this domain. To address this issue, we first examined the platelet APP isoform mRNAs prospectively as biomarker for the diagnosis of AD by means of real-time quantitative PCR, and then evaluated the correlation between APP mRNA expression levels and cognitive impairment of enrolled subjects. Differential gene expression measurements in the AD patient group (n=18) revealed a significant up-regulation of APP TOT (1.52-fold), APP KPI (1.32-fold), APP 770 (1.33-fold) and APP 751 (1.26-fold) compared to controls (n=22). Moreover, a statistically significant positive correlation was found between APP mRNA levels (TOT, KPI, 770 and 751) and cognitive impairment. Since AD definitive diagnosis still relies on pathological evaluation at autopsy, the present results are consistent with the hypothesis that platelet APP could be considered a potential reliable peripheral marker for studying AD and could contribute to define a signature for the presence of AD pathology.

  15. Inhibition of amyloid precursor protein processing enhances gemcitabine-mediated cytotoxicity in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Woods, Neha Kabra; Padmanabhan, Jaya

    2013-10-18

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma or pancreatic cancer is often diagnosed at a very late stage at which point treatment options are minimal. Current chemotherapeutic interventions prolong survival marginally, thereby emphasizing the acute need for better treatment options to effectively manage this disease. Studies from different laboratories have shown that the Alzheimer disease-associated amyloid precursor protein (APP) is overexpressed in various cancers but its significance is not known. Here we sought to determine the role of APP in pancreatic cancer cell survival and proliferation. Our results show that pancreatic cancer cells secrete high levels of sAPPα, the α-secretase cleaved ectodomain fragment of APP, as compared with normal non-cancerous cells. Treatment of cells with batimastat or GI254023X, inhibitors of the α-secretase ADAM10, prevented sAPPα generation and reduced cell survival. Additionally, inhibition of sAPPα significantly reduced anchorage independent growth of the cancer cells. The effect of batimastat on cell survival and colony formation was enhanced when sAPPα downregulation was combined with gemcitabine treatment. Moreover, treatment of batimastat-treated cells with recombinant sAPPα reversed the inhibitory effect of the drug thereby indicating that sAPPα can indeed induce proliferation of cancer cells. Down-regulation of APP and ADAM10 brought about similar results, as did batimastat treatment, thereby confirming that APP processing is important for growth and proliferation of these cells. These results suggest that inhibition of sAPPα generation might enhance the effectiveness of the existing chemotherapeutic regimen for a better outcome.

  16. Inhibition of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing Enhances Gemcitabine-mediated Cytotoxicity in Pancreatic Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Neha Kabra; Padmanabhan, Jaya

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma or pancreatic cancer is often diagnosed at a very late stage at which point treatment options are minimal. Current chemotherapeutic interventions prolong survival marginally, thereby emphasizing the acute need for better treatment options to effectively manage this disease. Studies from different laboratories have shown that the Alzheimer disease-associated amyloid precursor protein (APP) is overexpressed in various cancers but its significance is not known. Here we sought to determine the role of APP in pancreatic cancer cell survival and proliferation. Our results show that pancreatic cancer cells secrete high levels of sAPPα, the α-secretase cleaved ectodomain fragment of APP, as compared with normal non-cancerous cells. Treatment of cells with batimastat or GI254023X, inhibitors of the α-secretase ADAM10, prevented sAPPα generation and reduced cell survival. Additionally, inhibition of sAPPα significantly reduced anchorage independent growth of the cancer cells. The effect of batimastat on cell survival and colony formation was enhanced when sAPPα downregulation was combined with gemcitabine treatment. Moreover, treatment of batimastat-treated cells with recombinant sAPPα reversed the inhibitory effect of the drug thereby indicating that sAPPα can indeed induce proliferation of cancer cells. Down-regulation of APP and ADAM10 brought about similar results, as did batimastat treatment, thereby confirming that APP processing is important for growth and proliferation of these cells. These results suggest that inhibition of sAPPα generation might enhance the effectiveness of the existing chemotherapeutic regimen for a better outcome. PMID:24022491

  17. The insect homologue of the amyloid precursor protein interacts with the heterotrimeric G protein Go alpha in an identified population of migratory neurons.

    PubMed

    Swanson, T L; Knittel, L M; Coate, T M; Farley, S M; Snyder, M A; Copenhaver, P F

    2005-12-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is the source of Abeta fragments implicated in the formation of senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD). APP-related proteins are also expressed at high levels in the embryonic nervous system and may serve a variety of developmental functions, including the regulation of neuronal migration. To investigate this issue, we have cloned an orthologue of APP (msAPPL) from the moth, Manduca sexta, a preparation that permits in vivo manipulations of an identified set of migratory neurons (EP cells) within the developing enteric nervous system. Previously, we found that EP cell migration is regulated by the heterotrimeric G protein Goalpha: when activated by unknown receptors, Goalpha induces the onset of Ca2+ spiking in these neurons, which in turn down-regulates neuronal motility. We have now shown that msAPPL is first expressed by the EP cells shortly before the onset of migration and that this protein undergoes a sequence of trafficking, processing, and glycosylation events that correspond to discrete phases of neuronal migration and differentiation. We also show that msAPPL interacts with Goalpha in the EP cells, suggesting that msAPPL may serve as a novel G-protein-coupled receptor capable of modulating specific aspects of migration via Goalpha-dependent signal transduction.

  18. Alternative splicing regulation of APP exon 7 by RBFox proteins.

    PubMed

    Alam, Shafiul; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2014-12-01

    RBFox proteins are well-known alternative splicing regulators. We have shown previously that during neuronal differentiation of P19 cells induced by all-trans retinoic acid and cell aggregation, RBFox1 shows markedly increased temporal expression. To find its key splicing regulation, we examined the effect of RBFox1 on 33 previously reported and validated neuronal splicing events of P19 cells. We observed that alternative splicing of three genes, specifically, amyloid precursor protein (APP), disks large homolog 3 (DLG3), and G protein, alpha activating activity polypeptide O (GNAO1), was altered by transient RBFox1 expression in HEK293 and HeLa cells. Moreover, an RBFox1 mutant (RBFox1FA) that was unable to bind the target RNA sequence ((U)GCAUG) did not induce these splicing events. APP generates amyloid beta peptides that are involved in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease, and therefore we examined APP alternative splicing regulation by RBFox1 and other splicing regulators. Our results indicated that RBFox proteins promote the skipping of APP exon 7, but not the inclusion of exon 8. We made APP6789 minigenes and observed that two (U)GCAUG sequences, located upstream of exon 7 and in exon 7, functioned to induce skipping of exon 7 by RBFox proteins. Overall, RBFox proteins may shift APP from exon 7 containing isoforms, APP770 and APP751, toward the exon 7 lacking isoform, APP695, which is predominant in neural tissues.

  19. Multiplex Assay for Live-Cell Monitoring of Cellular Fates of Amyloid-β Precursor Protein (APP)

    PubMed Central

    Nykänen, Niko-Petteri; Yan, Xu; Sakha, Prasanna; Huttunen, Henri J.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) plays a central role in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. APP has a short half-life and undergoes complex proteolytic processing that is highly responsive to various stimuli such as changes in cellular lipid or energy homeostasis. Cellular trafficking of APP is controlled by its large protein interactome, including dozens of cytosolic adaptor proteins, and also by interactions with lipids. Currently, cellular regulation of APP is mostly studied based on appearance of APP-derived proteolytic fragments to conditioned media and cellular extracts. Here, we have developed a novel live-cell assay system based on several indirect measures that reflect altered APP trafficking and processing in cells. Protein-fragment complementation assay technology for detection of APP-BACE1 protein-protein interaction forms the core of the new assay. In a multiplex form, the assay can measure four endpoints: total cellular APP level, total secreted sAPP level in media, APP-BACE1 interaction in cells and in exosomes released by the cells. Functional validation of the assay with pharmacological and genetic tools revealed distinct patterns of cellular fates of APP, with immediate mechanistic implications. This new technology will facilitate functional genomics studies of late-onset Alzheimer's disease, drug discovery efforts targeting APP and characterization of the physiological functions of APP and its proteolytic fragments. PMID:24932508

  20. A Greek Tragedy: The Growing Complexity of Alzheimer Amyloid Precursor Protein Proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Robert J; Kellett, Katherine A B; Thinakaran, Gopal; Hooper, Nigel M

    2016-09-09

    Proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) liberates various fragments including the proposed initiator of Alzheimer disease-associated dysfunctions, amyloid-β. However, recent evidence suggests that the accepted view of APP proteolysis by the canonical α-, β-, and γ-secretases is simplistic, with the discovery of a number of novel APP secretases (including δ- and η-secretases, alternative β-secretases) and additional metabolites, some of which may also cause synaptic dysfunction. Furthermore, various proteins have been identified that interact with APP and modulate its cleavage by the secretases. Here, we give an overview of the increasingly complex picture of APP proteolysis.

  1. Plant serine/arginine-rich proteins: roles in precursor messenger RNA splicing, plant development, and stress responses.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Anireddy S N; Shad Ali, Gul

    2011-01-01

    Global analyses of splicing of precursor messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs) have revealed that alternative splicing (AS) is highly pervasive in plants. Despite the widespread occurrence of AS in plants, the mechanisms that control splicing and the roles of splice variants generated from a gene are poorly understood. Studies on plant serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins, a family of highly conserved proteins, suggest their role in both constitutive splicing and AS of pre-mRNAs. SR proteins have a characteristic domain structure consisting of one or two RNA recognition motifs at the N-terminus and a C-terminal RS domain rich in arginine/serine dipeptides. Plants have many more SR proteins compared to animals including several plant-specific subfamilies. Pre-mRNAs of plant SR proteins are extensively alternatively spliced to increase the transcript complexity by about six-fold. Some of this AS is controlled in a tissue- and development-specific manner. Furthermore, AS of SR pre-mRNAs is altered by various stresses, raising the possibility of rapid reprogramming of the whole transcriptome by external signals through regulation of the splicing of these master regulators of splicing. Most SR splice variants contain a premature termination codon and are degraded by up-frameshift 3 (UPF3)-mediated nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), suggesting a link between NMD and regulation of expression of the functional transcripts of SR proteins. Limited functional studies with plant SRs suggest key roles in growth and development and plant responses to the environment. Here, we discuss the current status of research on plant SRs and some promising approaches to address many unanswered questions about plant SRs.

  2. The systemin precursor gene regulates both defensive and developmental genes in Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    Narváez-Vasquez, Javier; Ryan, Clarence A

    2002-11-26

    Transformation of Solanum tuberosum, cv. Desiree, with the tomato prosystemin gene, regulated by the 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter, resulted in constitutive increase in defensive proteins in potato leaves, similar to its effects in tomato plants, but also resulted in a dramatic increase in storage protein levels in potato tubers. Tubers from selected transformed lines contained 4- to 5-fold increases in proteinase inhibitor I and II proteins, >50% more soluble and dry weight protein, and >50% more total nitrogen and total free amino acids than found in wild-type tubers. These results suggest that the prosystemin gene plays a dual role in potato plants in regulating proteinase inhibitor synthesis in leaves in response to wounding and in regulating storage protein synthesis in potato tubers in response to developmental cues. The results indicated that components of the systemin signaling pathway normally found in leaves have been recruited by potato plants to be developmentally regulated to synthesize and accumulate large quantities of storage proteins in tubers.

  3. The systemin precursor gene regulates both defensive and developmental genes in Solanum tuberosum

    PubMed Central

    Narváez-Vásquez, Javier; Ryan, Clarence A.

    2002-01-01

    Transformation of Solanum tuberosum, cv. Desiree, with the tomato prosystemin gene, regulated by the 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter, resulted in constitutive increase in defensive proteins in potato leaves, similar to its effects in tomato plants, but also resulted in a dramatic increase in storage protein levels in potato tubers. Tubers from selected transformed lines contained 4- to 5-fold increases in proteinase inhibitor I and II proteins, >50% more soluble and dry weight protein, and >50% more total nitrogen and total free amino acids than found in wild-type tubers. These results suggest that the prosystemin gene plays a dual role in potato plants in regulating proteinase inhibitor synthesis in leaves in response to wounding and in regulating storage protein synthesis in potato tubers in response to developmental cues. The results indicated that components of the systemin signaling pathway normally found in leaves have been recruited by potato plants to be developmentally regulated to synthesize and accumulate large quantities of storage proteins in tubers. PMID:12426402

  4. A multipurpose fusion tag derived from an unstructured and hyperacidic region of the amyloid precursor protein

    PubMed Central

    Sangawa, Takeshi; Tabata, Sanae; Suzuki, Kei; Saheki, Yasushi; Tanaka, Keiji; Takagi, Junichi

    2013-01-01

    Expression and purification of aggregation-prone and disulfide-containing proteins in Escherichia coli remains as a major hurdle for structural and functional analyses of high-value target proteins. Here, we present a novel gene-fusion strategy that greatly simplifies purification and refolding procedure at very low cost using a unique hyperacidic module derived from the human amyloid precursor protein. Fusion with this polypeptide (dubbed FATT for Flag-Acidic-Target Tag) results in near-complete soluble expression of variety of extracellular proteins, which can be directly refolded in the crude bacterial lysate and purified in one-step by anion exchange chromatography. Application of this system enabled preparation of functionally active extracellular enzymes and antibody fragments without the need for condition optimization. PMID:23526492

  5. Altered expression and phosphorylation of amyloid precursor protein in heat shocked neuronal PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G; Refolo, L M; Merril, C R; Wallace, W

    1993-07-01

    The pathology of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, including amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and neuronal degeneration, indicates that neurons affected by AD exist under conditions of stress. In fact, the brains of AD patients undergo many changes classically associated with the heat shock response, which is one form of a stress response. These changes include reduced protein synthesis, disrupted cytoskeleton, increased number of proteins associated with ubiquitin, and the induction of heat shock proteins. To investigate the response of neurons to stress, we examined neuronal PC12 cells incubated at either 37 degrees C (control cells) or 45 degrees C (heat-shocked cells). After a 30 min exposure at 45 degrees C, the heat-shocked cells exhibited several features characteristic of the classical heat shock response including a 45% reduction in total protein synthesis, the induction of heat shock protein 72, and an increased phosphorylation of the protein synthesis initiation factor eIF-2 alpha. We used this cellular model system to study the neuronal response to stress specifically focusing on protein synthesis elongation factor 2 (EF-2) and the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein (APP), the precursor form of beta-amyloid peptide. Hyperphosphorylation of EF-2 has been observed in the neocortex and hippocampus of AD brain. However, in our system, we find no hyperphosphorylation of EF-2 in response to heat shock. Heat-shocked neuronal PC12 cells exhibited two additional APP-like polypeptides not present in controls. We also found a significant decrease in the phosphorylation state of APP in response to heat shock.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Identification of embryonic precursor cells that differentiate into thymic epithelial cells expressing autoimmune regulator

    PubMed Central

    Takizawa, Nobukazu; Miyauchi, Maki; Yanai, Hiromi; Tateishi, Ryosuke; Shinzawa, Miho; Yoshinaga, Riko; Kurihara, Masaaki; Yasuda, Hisataka; Sakamoto, Reiko; Yoshida, Nobuaki

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) expressing autoimmune regulator (Aire) are critical for preventing the onset of autoimmunity. However, the differentiation program of Aire-expressing mTECs (Aire+ mTECs) is unclear. Here, we describe novel embryonic precursors of Aire+ mTECs. We found the candidate precursors of Aire+ mTECs (pMECs) by monitoring the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK), which is required for Aire+ mTEC differentiation. pMECs unexpectedly expressed cortical TEC molecules in addition to the mTEC markers UEA-1 ligand and RANK and differentiated into mTECs in reaggregation thymic organ culture. Introduction of pMECs in the embryonic thymus permitted long-term maintenance of Aire+ mTECs and efficiently suppressed the onset of autoimmunity induced by Aire+ mTEC deficiency. Mechanistically, pMECs differentiated into Aire+ mTECs by tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6-dependent RANK signaling. Moreover, nonclassical nuclear factor-κB activation triggered by RANK and lymphotoxin-β receptor signaling promoted pMEC induction from progenitors exhibiting lower RANK expression and higher CD24 expression. Thus, our findings identified two novel stages in the differentiation program of Aire+ mTECs. PMID:27401343

  7. Identification of embryonic precursor cells that differentiate into thymic epithelial cells expressing autoimmune regulator.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Nobuko; Takizawa, Nobukazu; Miyauchi, Maki; Yanai, Hiromi; Tateishi, Ryosuke; Shinzawa, Miho; Yoshinaga, Riko; Kurihara, Masaaki; Demizu, Yosuke; Yasuda, Hisataka; Yagi, Shintaro; Wu, Guoying; Matsumoto, Mitsuru; Sakamoto, Reiko; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Penninger, Josef M; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Jun-Ichiro; Akiyama, Taishin

    2016-07-25

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) expressing autoimmune regulator (Aire) are critical for preventing the onset of autoimmunity. However, the differentiation program of Aire-expressing mTECs (Aire(+) mTECs) is unclear. Here, we describe novel embryonic precursors of Aire(+) mTECs. We found the candidate precursors of Aire(+) mTECs (pMECs) by monitoring the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK), which is required for Aire(+) mTEC differentiation. pMECs unexpectedly expressed cortical TEC molecules in addition to the mTEC markers UEA-1 ligand and RANK and differentiated into mTECs in reaggregation thymic organ culture. Introduction of pMECs in the embryonic thymus permitted long-term maintenance of Aire(+) mTECs and efficiently suppressed the onset of autoimmunity induced by Aire(+) mTEC deficiency. Mechanistically, pMECs differentiated into Aire(+) mTECs by tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6-dependent RANK signaling. Moreover, nonclassical nuclear factor-κB activation triggered by RANK and lymphotoxin-β receptor signaling promoted pMEC induction from progenitors exhibiting lower RANK expression and higher CD24 expression. Thus, our findings identified two novel stages in the differentiation program of Aire(+) mTECs.

  8. Yeast Two-Hybrid Screening for Proteins that Interact with the Extracellular Domain of Amyloid Precursor Protein.

    PubMed

    Yu, You; Li, Yinan; Zhang, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder in which amyloid β plaques are a pathological characteristic. Little is known about the physiological functions of amyloid β precursor protein (APP). Based on its structure as a type I transmembrane protein, it has been proposed that APP might be a receptor, but so far, no ligand has been reported. In the present study, 9 proteins binding to the extracellular domain of APP were identified using a yeast two-hybrid system. After confirming the interactions in the mammalian system, mutated PLP1, members of the FLRT protein family, and KCTD16 were shown to interact with APP. These proteins have been reported to be involved in Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) and axon guidance. Therefore, our results shed light on the mechanisms of physiological function of APP in AD, PMD, and axon guidance.

  9. Highly conserved residues in the helical domain of dengue virus type 1 precursor membrane protein are involved in assembly, precursor membrane (prM) protein cleavage, and entry.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Szu-Chia; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Zou, Gang; Nerurkar, Vivek R; Shi, Pei-Yong; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2014-11-28

    The envelope and precursor membrane (prM) proteins of dengue virus (DENV) are present on the surface of immature virions. During maturation, prM protein is cleaved by furin protease into pr peptide and membrane (M) protein. Although previous studies mainly focusing on the pr region have identified several residues important for DENV replication, the functional role of M protein, particularly the α-helical domain (MH), which is predicted to undergo a large conformational change during maturation, remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of nine highly conserved MH domain residues in the replication cycle of DENV by site-directed mutagenesis in a DENV1 prME expression construct and found that alanine substitutions introduced to four highly conserved residues at the C terminus and one at the N terminus of the MH domain greatly affect the production of both virus-like particles and replicon particles. Eight of the nine alanine mutants affected the entry of replicon particles, which correlated with the impairment in prM cleavage. Moreover, seven mutants were found to have reduced prM-E interaction at low pH, which may inhibit the formation of smooth immature particles and exposure of prM cleavage site during maturation, thus contributing to inefficient prM cleavage. Taken together, these results are the first report showing that highly conserved MH domain residues, located at 20-38 amino acids downstream from the prM cleavage site, can modulate the prM cleavage, maturation of particles, and virus entry. The highly conserved nature of these residues suggests potential targets of antiviral strategy.

  10. Lumbar Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Posthemorrhagic Hydrocephalus of Prematurity: Amyloid Precursor Protein, Soluble Amyloid Precursor Protein α, and L1 Cell Adhesion Molecule.

    PubMed

    Morales, Diego M; Silver, Shawgi A; Morgan, Clinton D; Mercer, Deanna; Inder, Terri E; Holtzman, David M; Wallendorf, Michael J; Rao, Rakesh; McAllister, James P; Limbrick, David D

    2017-01-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is the most frequent, severe neurological complication of prematurity and is associated with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH) in up to half of cases. PHH requires lifelong neurosurgical care and is associated with significant cognitive and psychomotor disability. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers may provide both diagnostic information for PHH and novel insights into its pathophysiology. To explore the diagnostic ability of candidate CSF biomarkers for PHH. Concentrations of amyloid precursor protein (APP), soluble APPα (sAPPα), soluble APPβ, neural cell adhesion molecule-1 (NCAM-1), L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM), tau, phosphorylated tau, and total protein (TP) were measured in lumbar CSF from neonates in 6 groups: (1) no known neurological disease (n = 33); (2) IVH grades I to II (n = 13); (3) IVH grades III to IV (n = 12); (4) PHH (n = 12); (5) ventricular enlargement without hydrocephalus (n = 10); and (6) hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (n = 13). CSF protein levels were compared using analysis of variance, and logistic regression was performed to examine the predictive ability of each marker for PHH. Lumbar CSF levels of APP, sAPPα, L1CAM, and TP were selectively increased in PHH compared with all other conditions (all P < .001). The sensitivity, specificity, and odds ratios of candidate CSF biomarkers for PHH were determined for APP, sAPPα, and L1CAM; cut points of 699, 514, and 113 ng/mL yielded odds ratios for PHH of 80.0, 200.0, and 68.75, respectively. Lumbar CSF APP, sAPPα, L1CAM, and TP were selectively increased in PHH. These proteins, and sAPPα, in particular, hold promise as biomarkers of PHH and provide novel insight into PHH-associated neural injury and repair.

  11. Olig2 regulates Sox10 expression in oligodendrocyte precursors through an evolutionary conserved distal enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Küspert, Melanie; Hammer, Alexander; Bösl, Michael R.; Wegner, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The HMG-domain transcription factor Sox10 is expressed throughout oligodendrocyte development and is an important component of the transcriptional regulatory network in these myelin-forming CNS glia. Of the known Sox10 regulatory regions, only the evolutionary conserved U2 enhancer in the distal 5′-flank of the Sox10 gene exhibits oligodendroglial activity. We found that U2 was active in oligodendrocyte precursors, but not in mature oligodendrocytes. U2 activity also did not mediate the initial Sox10 induction after specification arguing that Sox10 expression during oligodendroglial development depends on the activity of multiple regulatory regions. The oligodendroglial bHLH transcription factor Olig2, but not the closely related Olig1 efficiently activated the U2 enhancer. Olig2 bound U2 directly at several sites including a highly conserved one in the U2 core. Inactivation of this site abolished the oligodendroglial activity of U2 in vivo. In contrast to Olig2, the homeodomain transcription factor Nkx6.2 repressed U2 activity. Repression may involve recruitment of Nkx6.2 to U2 and inactivation of Olig2 and other activators by protein–protein interactions. Considering the selective expression of Nkx6.2 at the time of specification and in differentiated oligodendrocytes, Nkx6.2 may be involved in limiting U2 activity to the precursor stage during oligodendrocyte development. PMID:20959288

  12. Recruitment of the Mint3 Adaptor Is Necessary for Export of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) from the Golgi Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Caster, Amanda H.; Kahn, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a ubiquitously expressed single-pass transmembrane protein that undergoes proteolytic processing by secretases to generate the pathogenic amyloid-β peptide, the major component in Alzheimer plaques. The traffic of APP through the cell determines its exposure to secretases and consequently the cleavages that generate the pathogenic or nonpathogenic peptide fragments. Despite the likely importance of APP traffic to Alzheimer disease, we still lack clear models for the routing and regulation of APP in cells. Like the traffic of most transmembrane proteins, the binding of adaptors to its cytoplasmic tail, which is 47 residues long and contains at least four distinct sorting motifs, regulates that of APP. We tested each of these for effects on the traffic of APP from the Golgi by mutating key residues within them and examining adaptor recruitment at the Golgi and traffic to post-Golgi site(s). We demonstrate strict specificity for recruitment of the Mint3 adaptor by APP at the Golgi, a critical role for Tyr-682 (within the YENPTY motif) in Mint3 recruitment and export of APP from the Golgi, and we identify LAMP1+ structures as the proximal destination of APP after leaving the Golgi. Together, these data provide a detailed view of the first sorting step in its route to the cell surface and processing by secretases and further highlight the critical role played by Mint3. PMID:23965993

  13. TIRET microscopy: monitoring protein (amyloid precursor protein and beta-secretase) interaction on the surface of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Arnim, Christine; Wagner, Michael; Weber, Petra; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2007-02-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) and non-radiative energy transfer (FRET) measurements have been combined in order to examine co-localization of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the β-site APPcleaving enzyme (BACE) in human glioblastoma cells. So far, these proteins have been co-localized within whole cells (depending on the intracellular amount of cholesterol) and in some cases also within their plasma membranes. This supports the present hypothesis of localization within lipid domains on the cell surface and co-internalization via endocytosis.

  14. Hedgehog signaling establishes precursors for germline stem cell niches by regulating cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kun-Yang; Kao, Shih-Han

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells require different types of supporting cells, or niches, to control stem cell maintenance and differentiation. However, little is known about how those niches are formed. We report that in the development of the Drosophila melanogaster ovary, the Hedgehog (Hh) gradient sets differential cell affinity for somatic gonadal precursors to specify stromal intermingled cells, which contributes to both germline stem cell maintenance and differentiation niches in the adult. We also report that Traffic Jam (an orthologue of a large Maf transcription factor in mammals) is a novel transcriptional target of Hh signaling to control cell–cell adhesion by negative regulation of E-cadherin expression. Our results demonstrate the role of Hh signaling in niche establishment by segregating somatic cell lineages for differentiation. PMID:28363970

  15. Amino-terminal precursor sequence modulates canine distemper virus fusion protein function.

    PubMed

    von Messling, Veronika; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2002-05-01

    The fusion (F) proteins of most paramyxoviruses are classical type I glycoproteins with a short hydrophobic leader sequence closely following the translation initiation codon. The predicted reading frame of the canine distemper virus (CDV) F protein is more complex, with a short hydrophobic sequence beginning 115 codons downstream of the first AUG. To verify if the sequence between the first AUG and the hydrophobic region is translated, we produced a specific antiserum that indeed detected a short-lived F protein precursor that we named PreF(0). A peptide resulting from PreF(0) cleavage was identified and named Pre, and its half-life was measured to be about 30 min. PreF(0) cleavage was completed before proteolytic activation of F(0) into its F(1) and F(2) subunits by furin. To test the hypothesis that the Pre peptide may influence protein activity, we compared the function of F proteins synthesized with that peptide to that of F proteins synthesized with a shorter amino-terminal signal sequence. F proteins synthesized with the Pre peptide were more stable and less active. Thus, the Pre peptide modulates the function of the CDV F protein. Interestingly, a distinct two-hit activation process has been recently described for human respiratory syncytial virus, another paramyxovirus.

  16. Interactome of the amyloid precursor protein APP in brain reveals a protein network involved in synaptic vesicle turnover and a close association with Synaptotagmin-1.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Bernhard M; Pflieger, Delphine; Mueller, Lukas N; Carbonetti, Giovanni; Aebersold, Ruedi; Nitsch, Roger M; Konietzko, Uwe

    2012-08-03

    Knowledge of the protein networks interacting with the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in vivo can shed light on the physiological function of APP. To date, most proteins interacting with the APP intracellular domain (AICD) have been identified by Yeast Two Hybrid screens which only detect direct interaction partners. We used a proteomics-based approach by biochemically isolating tagged APP from the brains of transgenic mice and subjecting the affinity-purified complex to mass spectrometric (MS) analysis. Using two different quantitative MS approaches, we compared the protein composition of affinity-purified samples isolated from wild-type mice versus transgenic mice expressing tagged APP. This enabled us to assess truly enriched proteins in the transgenic sample and yielded an overlapping set of proteins containing the major proteins involved in synaptic vesicle endo- and exocytosis. Confocal microscopy analyses of cotransfected primary neurons showed colocalization of APP with synaptic vesicle proteins in vesicular structures throughout the neurites. We analyzed the interaction of APP with these proteins using pulldown experiments from transgenic mice or cotransfected cells followed by Western blotting. Synaptotagmin-1 (Stg1), a resident synaptic vesicle protein, was found to directly bind to APP. We fused Citrine and Cerulean to APP and the candidate proteins and measured fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. Differentially tagged APPs showed clear sensitized FRET emission, in line with the described dimerization of APP. Among the candidate APP-interacting proteins, again only Stg1 was in close proximity to APP. Our results strongly argue for a function of APP in synaptic vesicle turnover in vivo. Thus, in addition to the APP cleavage product Aβ, which influences synaptic transmission at the postsynapse, APP interacts with the calcium sensor of synaptic vesicles and might thus play a role in the regulation of synaptic

  17. Preparation of hydroxyapatite rod-like crystals by protein precursor method

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yingchao; Li Shipu . E-mail: zlhyc@yahoo.com.cn; Wang Xinyu; Jia Li; He Jianhua

    2007-06-05

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) rod-like crystals were successfully prepared by thermolysis of bovine serum albumin (BSA)/calcium-phosphate (CaP) colloidal precursors. The precursors were obtained by precipitation method from Ca(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and Ca(OH){sub 2}, in which BSA was added as regulation additive and ultrasound irradiation was utilized as assistant technology. The properties of the precursors, such as size distribution, morphology, thermodynamic changes, were determined by DLS, SPM and TGA-DTA. The characterization results from DLS, SPM, TG-DTA, XRD and SEM indicated that BSA interacted with CaP particles and formed about 7-130 nm BSA/CaP hybrid colloidal particles between 2 and 4 g/L of BSA concentration. With the increasing of sintering temperature, BSA disintegrated and burned out, and rod-like HAP crystals formed at about 600 deg. C. With the increasing of BSA concentration, the phase composition of products did not change and the HAP crystals became more uniform and smaller. The ratio of length to width ranged from 7.6 to 12 at 4 g/L BSA concentration. This method provides for a controllable bottom-up fabrication of HAP rod-like crystals.

  18. The Amyloid Precursor Protein Forms Plasmalemmal Clusters via Its Pathogenic Amyloid-β Domain

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Arne; Fischer, Sebastian; Lang, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a large, ubiquitous integral membrane protein with a small amyloid-β (Aβ) domain. In the human brain, endosomal processing of APP produces neurotoxic Aβ-peptides, which are involved in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we show that the Aβ sequence exerts a physiological function when still present in the unprocessed APP molecule. From the extracellular site, Aβ concentrates APP molecules into plasmalemmal membrane protein clusters. Moreover, Aβ stabilization of clusters is a prerequisite for their targeting to endocytic clathrin structures. Therefore, we conclude that the Aβ domain directly mediates a central step in APP trafficking, driving its own conversion into neurotoxic peptides. PMID:22455924

  19. Trehalose Alters Subcellular Trafficking and the Metabolism of the Alzheimer-associated Amyloid Precursor Protein.

    PubMed

    Tien, Nguyen T; Karaca, Ilker; Tamboli, Irfan Y; Walter, Jochen

    2016-05-13

    The disaccharide trehalose is commonly considered to stimulate autophagy. Cell treatment with trehalose could decrease cytosolic aggregates of potentially pathogenic proteins, including mutant huntingtin, α-synuclein, and phosphorylated tau that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we demonstrate that trehalose also alters the metabolism of the Alzheimer disease-related amyloid precursor protein (APP). Cell treatment with trehalose decreased the degradation of full-length APP and its C-terminal fragments. Trehalose also reduced the secretion of the amyloid-β peptide. Biochemical and cell biological experiments revealed that trehalose alters the subcellular distribution and decreases the degradation of APP C-terminal fragments in endolysosomal compartments. Trehalose also led to strong accumulation of the autophagic marker proteins LC3-II and p62, and decreased the proteolytic activation of the lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin D. The combined data indicate that trehalose decreases the lysosomal metabolism of APP by altering its endocytic vesicular transport.

  20. Regulation of coat protein polymerization by the scaffolding protein of bacteriophage P22

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, M.T.; King, J.

    1980-10-01

    In the morphogenesis of double stranded DNA phages, a precursor protein shell empty of DNA is first assembled and then filled with DNA. The assembly of the correctly dimensioned precursor shell (procapsid) of Salmonella bacteriophage P22 requires the interaction of some 420 coat protein subunits with approx. 200 scaffolding protein subunits to form a double shelled particle with the scaffolding protein on the inside. In the course of DNA packaging, all of the scaffolding protein subunits exit from the procapsid and participate in further rounds of procapsid assembly. To study the mechanism of shell assembly we have purified the coat and scaffolding protein subunits by selective dissociation of isolated procapsids. Both proteins can be obtained as soluble sununits in Tris buffer at near neutral pH. The coat protein sedimented in sucrose gradients as a roughly spherical monomer, while the scaffolding protein sedimented as if it were an elongated monomer. When the two proteins were mixed together in 1.5 M guanidine hydrochloride and dialyzed back to buffer at room temperature, procapsids formed which were very similar in morphology, sedimentation behavior, and protein composition to procapsids formed in vivo. Incubation of either protein alone under the same conditions did not yield any large structures. We interpret these results to mean that the assembly of the shell involves a switching of both proteins from their nonaggregating to their aggregating forms through their mutual interaction. The results are discussed in terms of the general problem of self-regulated assembly and the control of protein polymerization in morphogenesis.

  1. LKB1 Regulates Cerebellar Development by Controlling Sonic Hedgehog-mediated Granule Cell Precursor Proliferation and Granule Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Men, Yuqin; Zhang, Aizhen; Li, Haixiang; Jin, Yecheng; Sun, Xiaoyang; Li, Huashun; Gao, Jiangang

    2015-01-01

    The Liver Kinase B1 (LKB1) gene plays crucial roles in cell differentiation, proliferation and the establishment of cell polarity. We created LKB1 conditional knockout mice (LKB1Atoh1 CKO) to investigate the function of LKB1 in cerebellar development. The LKB1Atoh1 CKO mice displayed motor dysfunction. In the LKB1Atoh1 CKO cerebellum, the overall structure had a larger volume and morelobules. LKB1 inactivationled to an increased proliferation of granule cell precursors (GCPs), aberrant granule cell migration and overproduction of unipolar brush cells. To investigate the mechanism underlying the abnormal foliation, we examined sonic hedgehog signalling (Shh) by testing its transcriptional mediators, the Gli proteins, which regulate the GCPs proliferation and cerebellar foliation during cerebellar development. The expression levels of Gli genes were significantly increased in the mutant cerebellum. In vitro assays showed that the proliferation of cultured GCPs from mutant cerebellum significantly increased, whereas the proliferation of mutant GCPs significantly decreased in the presence of a Shh inhibitor GDC-0049. Thus, LKB1 deficiency in the LKB1Atoh1 CKO mice enhanced Shh signalling, leading to the excessive GCP proliferation and the formation of extra lobules. We proposed that LKB1 regulates cerebellar development by controlling GCPs proliferation through Shh signalling during cerebellar development. PMID:26549569

  2. Citrus psorosis virus 24K protein interacts with citrus miRNA precursors, affects their processing and subsequent miRNA accumulation and target expression.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Carina A; Ocolotobiche, Eliana E; Marmisollé, Facundo E; Robles Luna, Gabriel; Borniego, María B; Bazzini, Ariel A; Asurmendi, Sebastian; García, María L

    2016-04-01

    Sweet orange (Citrus sinensis), one of the most important fruit crops worldwide, may suffer from disease symptoms induced by virus infections, thus resulting in dramatic economic losses. Here, we show that the infection of sweet orange plants with two isolates of Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV) expressing different symptomatology alters the accumulation of a set of endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs). Within these miRNAs, miR156, miR167 and miR171 were the most down-regulated, with almost a three-fold reduction in infected samples. This down-regulation led to a concomitant up-regulation of some of their targets, such as Squamosa promoter-binding protein-like 9 and 13, as well as Scarecrow-like 6. The processing of miRNA precursors, pre-miR156 and pre-miR171, in sweet orange seems to be affected by the virus. For instance, virus infection increases the level of unprocessed precursors, which is accompanied by a concomitant decrease in mature species accumulation. miR156a primary transcript accumulation remained unaltered, thus strongly suggesting a processing deregulation for this transcript. The co-immunoprecipitation of viral 24K protein with pre-miR156a or pre-miR171a suggests that the alteration in the processing of these precursors might be caused by a direct or indirect interaction with this particular viral protein. This result is also consistent with the nuclear localization of both miRNA precursors and the CPsV 24K protein. This study contributes to the understanding of the manner in which a virus can alter host regulatory mechanisms, particularly miRNA biogenesis and target expression. © 2015 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Function and regulation of Rnd proteins.

    PubMed

    Chardin, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    The Rnd proteins, which form a distinct sub-group of the Rho family of small GTP-binding proteins, have been shown to regulate the organization of the actin cytoskeleton in several tissues. In the brain, they participate in neurite extension, whereas in smooth muscle, they modulate contractility. Recent evidence has shown that Rnd3 (RhoE) is also involved in the regulation of cell-cycle progression and transformation, indicating that these proteins might have other, as yet unexplored roles.

  4. Adaptor protein 2-mediated endocytosis of the β-secretase BACE1 is dispensable for amyloid precursor protein processing.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Yogikala; Burgos, Patricia V; Schindler, Christina; Farías, Ginny G; Magadán, Javier G; Bonifacino, Juan S

    2012-06-01

    The β-site amyloid precursor protein (APP)-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is a transmembrane aspartyl protease that catalyzes the proteolytic processing of APP and other plasma membrane protein precursors. BACE1 cycles between the trans-Golgi network (TGN), the plasma membrane, and endosomes by virtue of signals contained within its cytosolic C-terminal domain. One of these signals is the DXXLL-motif sequence DISLL, which controls transport between the TGN and endosomes via interaction with GGA proteins. Here we show that the DISLL sequence is embedded within a longer [DE]XXXL[LI]-motif sequence, DDISLL, which mediates internalization from the plasma membrane by interaction with the clathrin-associated, heterotetrameric adaptor protein 2 (AP-2) complex. Mutation of this signal or knockdown of either AP-2 or clathrin decreases endosomal localization and increases plasma membrane localization of BACE1. Remarkably, internalization-defective BACE1 is able to cleave an APP mutant that itself cannot be delivered to endosomes. The drug brefeldin A reversibly prevents BACE1-catalyzed APP cleavage, ruling out that this reaction occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or ER-Golgi intermediate compartment. Taken together, these observations support the notion that BACE1 is capable of cleaving APP in late compartments of the secretory pathway.

  5. The dREAM/Myb-MuvB complex and Grim are key regulators of the programmed death of neural precursor cells at the Drosophila posterior wing margin.

    PubMed

    Rovani, Margritte K; Brachmann, Carrie Baker; Ramsay, Gary; Katzen, Alisa L

    2012-12-01

    Successful development of a multicellular organism depends on the finely tuned orchestration of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis from embryogenesis through adulthood. The MYB-gene family encodes sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors that have been implicated in the regulation of both normal and neoplastic growth. The Drosophila Myb protein, DMyb (and vertebrate B-Myb protein), has been shown to be part of the dREAM/MMB complex, a large multi-subunit complex, which in addition to four Myb-interacting proteins including Mip130, contains repressive E2F and pRB proteins. This complex has been implicated in the regulation of DNA replication within the context of chorion gene amplification and transcriptional regulation of a wide array of genes. Detailed phenotypic analysis of mutations in the Drosophila myb gene, Dm myb, has revealed a previously undiscovered function for the dREAM/MMB complex in regulating programmed cell death (PCD). In cooperation with the pro-apoptotic protein Grim and dREAM/MMB, DMyb promotes the PCD of specified sensory organ precursor daughter cells in at least two different settings in the peripheral nervous system: the pIIIb precursor of the neuron and sheath cells in the posterior wing margin and the glial cell in the thoracic microchaete lineage. Unlike previously analyzed settings, in which the main role of DMyb has been to antagonize the activities of other dREAM/MMB complex members, it appears to be the critical effector in promoting PCD. The finding that Dm myb and grim are both involved in regulating PCD in two distinct settings suggests that these two genes may often work together to mediate PCD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Amyloid Precursor Protein Protects Neuronal Network Function after Hypoxia via Control of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Hefter, Dimitri; Kaiser, Martin; Weyer, Sascha W; Papageorgiou, Ismini E; Both, Martin; Kann, Oliver; Müller, Ulrike C; Draguhn, Andreas

    2016-08-10

    Acute cerebral ischemia and chronic neurovascular diseases share various common mechanisms with neurodegenerative diseases, such as disturbed cellular calcium and energy homeostasis and accumulation of toxic metabolites. A link between these conditions may be constituted by amyloid precursor protein (APP), which plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, but has also been associated with the response to acute hypoxia and regulation of calcium homeostasis. We therefore studied hypoxia-induced loss of function and recovery upon reoxygenation in hippocampal slices of mice lacking APP (APP(-/-)) or selectively expressing its soluble extracellular domain (APPsα-KI). Transient hypoxia disrupted electrical activity at the network and cellular level. In mice lacking APP, these impairments were significantly more severe, showing increased rise of intracellular calcium, faster loss of function, and higher incidence of spreading depression. Likewise, functional recovery upon reoxygenation was much slower and less complete than in controls. Most of these deficits were rescued by selective expression of the soluble extracellular fragment APPsα, or by pharmacological block of L-type calcium channels. We conclude that APP supports neuronal resistance toward acute hypoxia. This effect is mediated by the secreted APPsα-domain and involves L-type calcium channels. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease, but its normal function in the brain remains elusive. Here, we describe a neuroprotective role of the protein in acute hypoxia. Functional recovery of mouse hippocampal networks after transient reduction of oxygen supply was strongly impaired in animals lacking APP. Most protective effects are mediated by the soluble extracellular fragment APPsα and involve L-type calcium channels. Thus, APP contributes to calcium homeostasis in situations of metabolic stress. This finding may shed light on the physiological

  7. A major protein precursor of zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) byssus: deduced sequence and significance.

    PubMed

    Anderson, K E; Waite, J H

    1998-04-01

    The zebra mussel is a nonindigenous invader of North American lakes and rivers and one of the few freshwater bivalve molluscs having a byssus--a sclerotized organ used by the mussel for opportunistic attachment to hard surfaces. We have sequenced a foot-specific cDNA whose composite protein sequence was deduced from a series of overlapping but occasionally nonidentical cDNA fragments. The overall deduced sequence matches tryptic peptides from a major byssal precursor protein--Dreissena polymorpha foot protein 1 (Dpfp1). The calculated mass of Dpfp1 is 49 kDa; but this is known to be extensively hydroxylated and O-glycosylated during maturation. Purified native Dpfp1 analyzed using matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization mass spectrometry with time-of-flight indicates that the protein occurs as at least two size variants with masses of 48.6 and 54.5 kDa. In all probability, the sequence variants reported in this study are related to the larger mass variant. Dpfp1 has a block copolymer-like structure defined by two consensus motifs that are sharply segregated into domains. The N-terminal side of Dpfp1 has 22 tandem repeats of a heptapeptide consensus (P-[V/E]-Y-P-[T/S/delta]-[K/Q]-X); the C-terminal side has 16 repeats of a tridecapeptide motif (K-P-G-P-Y-D-Y-D-G-P-Y-D-K). Both consensus repeats are unique, with some limited homology to other proteins functioning in tension: marine mussel adhesives, plant extensins, titin, and trematode eggshell precursors.

  8. A role for amyloid precursor protein translation to restore iron homeostasis and ameliorate lead (Pb) neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jack T; Venkataramani, Vivek; Washburn, Cecilia; Liu, Yanyan; Tummala, Vinusha; Jiang, Hong; Smith, Ann; Cahill, Catherine M

    2016-08-01

    Iron supplementation ameliorates the neurotoxicity of the environmental contaminant lead (Pb); however, the mechanism remains undefined. Iron is an essential nutrient but high levels are toxic due to the catalytic generation of destructive hydroxyl radicals. Using human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells to model human neurons, we investigated the effect of Pb on proteins of iron homeostasis: the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein (APP), which stabilizes the iron exporter ferroportin 1; and, the heavy subunit of the iron-storage protein, ferritin (FTH). Lead (Pb(II) and Pb(IV) inhibited APP translation and raised cytosolic iron(II). Lead also increased iron regulatory protein-1 binding to the cognate 5'untranslated region-specific iron-responsive element (IRE) of APP and FTH mRNAs. Concurrent iron treatment rescued cells from Pb toxicity by specifically restoring APP synthesis, i.e. levels of the APP-related protein, APLP-2, were unchanged. Significantly, iron/IRE-independent over-expression of APP695  protected SH-SY5Y cells from Pb toxicity, demonstrating that APP plays a key role in maintaining safe levels of intracellular iron. Overall, our data support a model of neurotoxicity where Pb enhances iron regulatory protein/IRE-mediated repression of APP and FTH translation. We propose novel treatment options for Pb poisoning to include chelators and the use of small molecules to maintain APP and FTH translation. We propose the following cascade for Lead (Pb) toxicity to neurons; by targeting the interaction between Iron regulatory protein-1 and Iron-responsive elements, Pb caused translational repression of proteins that control intracellular iron homeostasis, including the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein (APP) that stabilizes the iron exporter ferroportin, and the ferroxidase heavy subunit of the iron-storage protein, ferritin. When unregulated, IRE-independent over-expression of APP695 protected SH-SY5Y neurons from Pb toxicity. There is a novel and key role

  9. The propeptide precursor proSAAS is involved in fetal neuropeptide processing and body weight regulation.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Daniel J; Wei, Suwen; Gomes, Ivone; Czyzyk, Traci; Mzhavia, Nino; Pan, Hui; Devi, Lakshmi A; Fricker, Lloyd D; Pintar, John E

    2010-06-01

    Mice with a targeted mutation in proSAAS have been generated to investigate whether peptides derived from this precursor could function as an inhibitor of prohormone convertase 1/3 (PC1/3) in vivo as well as to determine any alternate roles for proSAAS in nervous and endocrine tissues. Fetal mice lacking proSAAS exhibit complete, adult-like processing of prodynorphin in the prenatal brain instead of the incomplete processing seen in the brains of wild-type fetal mice where inhibitory proSAAS intermediates are transiently accumulated. This study provides evidence that proSAAS is directly involved in the prenatal regulation of neuropeptide processing in vivo. However, adult mice lacking proSAAS have normal levels of all peptides detected using a peptidomics approach, suggesting that PC1/3 activity is not affected by the absence of proSAAS in adult mice. ProSAAS knockout mice exhibit decreased locomotion and a male-specific 10-15% decrease in body weight, but maintain normal fasting blood glucose levels and are able to efficiently clear glucose from the blood in response to a glucose challenge. This work suggests that proSAAS-derived peptides can inhibit PC1/3 in embryonic brain, but in the adult brain proSAAS peptides may function as neuropeptides that regulate body weight and potentially other behaviors.

  10. Regulation of TET Protein Stability by Calpains

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Zhang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA methylation at the fifth position of cytosine (5mC) is an important epigenetic modification that affects chromatin structure and gene expression. Recent studies have established a critical function of the Ten-eleven translocation (Tet) family of proteins in regulating DNA methylation dynamics. Three Tet genes have been identified in mammals, and they all encode for proteins capable of oxidizing 5mC as part of the DNA demethylation process. While regulation of Tet expression at the transcriptional level is well documented, how TET proteins are regulated at post-translational level is poorly understood. In this study, we report that all three TET proteins are direct substrates of calpains, a family of calcium-dependent proteases. Specifically, calpain1 mediates TET1 and TET2 turnover in mouse ES cells, and calpain2 regulates TET3 level during differentiation. This study provides the first evidence that TET proteins are subject to calpain-mediated degradation. PMID:24412366

  11. Isolated plant mitochondria import chloroplast precursor proteins in vitro with the same efficiency as chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Suzanne P; Tan, Fui-Ching; Nakrieko, Kerry-Ann; Thompson, Simon J; Mullineaux, Philip M; Creissen, Gary P; von Stedingk, Erik; Glaser, Elzbieta; Smith, Alison G; Robinson, Colin

    2002-02-15

    Most chloroplast and mitochondrial proteins are synthesized with N-terminal presequences that direct their import into the appropriate organelle. In this report we have analyzed the specificity of standard in vitro assays for import into isolated pea chloroplasts and mitochondria. We find that chloroplast protein import is highly specific because mitochondrial proteins are not imported to any detectable levels. Surprisingly, however, pea mitochondria import a range of chloroplast protein precursors with the same efficiency as chloroplasts, including those of plastocyanin, the 33-kDa photosystem II protein, Hcf136, and coproporphyrinogen III oxidase. These import reactions are dependent on the Deltaphi across the inner mitochondrial membrane, and furthermore, marker enzyme assays and Western blotting studies exclude any import by contaminating chloroplasts in the preparation. The pea mitochondria specifically recognize information in the chloroplast-targeting presequences, because they also import a fusion comprising the presequence of coproporphyrinogen III oxidase linked to green fluorescent protein. However, the same construct is targeted exclusively into chloroplasts in vivo indicating that the in vitro mitochondrial import reactions are unphysiological, possibly because essential specificity factors are absent in these assays. Finally, we show that disruption of potential amphipathic helices in one presequence does not block import into pea mitochondria, indicating that other features are recognized.

  12. Effect of heat-treated titanium surfaces on protein adsorption and osteoblast precursor cell initial attachment.

    PubMed

    Kern, Travis; Yang, Yunzhi; Glover, Renee; Ong, Joo L

    2005-03-01

    The clinical success of dental implants is governed in part by surface properties of implants and their interactions with the surrounding tissues. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of heat-treated titanium surfaces on protein adsorption and osteoblast precursor cell attachment in vitro. Passivated titanium samples used in this study were either non heat treated or heat treated at 750 degrees C for 90 minutes. It was observed that the contact angle on heat-treated titanium surfaces was statistically lower compared with the non-heat-treated titanium surfaces. The non-heat-treated titanium surface was also observed to be amorphous oxide, whereas heat treatment of titanium resulted in the conversion of amorphous oxide to crystalline anatase oxide. No significant difference in albumin and fibronectin adsorption was observed between the heat-treated and non-heat-treated titanium surfaces. In addition, no significant difference in initial cell attachment was observed between the two groups. It was concluded that heat treatment of titanium resulted in significantly more hydrophilic surfaces compared to non-heat-treated titanium surfaces. However, differences in oxide crystallinity and wettability were not observed to affect protein adsorption and initial osteoblast precursor cell attachment.

  13. Dietary (-)-epicatechin as a potent inhibitor of βγ-secretase amyloid precursor protein processing.

    PubMed

    Cox, Carla J; Choudhry, Fahd; Peacey, Eleanor; Perkinton, Michael S; Richardson, Jill C; Howlett, David R; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F; Francis, Paul T; Williams, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids, a group of dietary polyphenols have been shown to possess cognitive health benefits. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that they could play a role in risk reduction in dementia. Amyloid precursor protein processing and the subsequent generation of amyloid beta (Aβ) are central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, as soluble, oligomeric Aβ is thought to be the toxic species driving disease progression. We undertook an in vitro screen to identify flavonoids with bioactivity at βγ-mediated amyloid precursor protein processing, which lead to identification of a number of flavonoids bioactive at 100 nM. Because of known bioavailability, we investigated the catechin family further and identified epigallocatechin and (-)-epicatechin as potent (nanomolar) inhibitors of amyloidogenic processing. Supporting this finding, we have shown reduced Aβ pathology and Aβ levels following short term, a 21-day oral delivery of (-)-epicatechin in 7-month-old TASTPM mice. Further, in vitro mechanistic studies suggest this is likely because of indirect BACE1 inhibition. Taken together, our results suggest that orally delivered (-)-epicatechin may be a potential prophylactic for Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Structure of Alzheimer’s disease amyloid precursor protein copper-binding domain at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Geoffrey Kwai-Wai; Adams, Julian J.; Cappai, Roberto; Parker, Michael W.

    2007-10-01

    An atomic resolution structure of the copper-binding domain of the Alzheimer’s disease amyloid precursor protein is presented. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, as its cleavage generates the Aβ peptide that is toxic to cells. APP is able to bind Cu{sup 2+} and reduce it to Cu{sup +} through its copper-binding domain (CuBD). The interaction between Cu{sup 2+} and APP leads to a decrease in Aβ production and to alleviation of the symptoms of the disease in mouse models. Structural studies of CuBD have been undertaken in order to better understand the mechanism behind the process. Here, the crystal structure of CuBD in the metal-free form determined to ultrahigh resolution (0.85 Å) is reported. The structure shows that the copper-binding residues of CuBD are rather rigid but that Met170, which is thought to be the electron source for Cu{sup 2+} reduction, adopts two different side-chain conformations. These observations shed light on the copper-binding and redox mechanisms of CuBD. The structure of CuBD at atomic resolution provides an accurate framework for structure-based design of molecules that will deplete Aβ production.

  15. The roles of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in neurogenesis: Implications to pathogenesis and therapy of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi-dong; Chan, Christine Hui-shan; Ma, Quan-hong; Xu, Xiao-hong; Xiao, Zhi-cheng; Tan, Eng-king

    2011-01-01

    The amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide is the derivative of amyloid precursor protein (APP) generated through sequential proteolytic processing by β- and γ-secretases. Excessive accumulation of Aβ, the main constituent of amyloid plaques, has been implicated in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It was found recently that the impairments of neurogenesis in brain were associated with the pathogenesis of AD. Furthermore recent findings implicated that APP could function to influence proliferation of neural progenitor cells (NPC) and might regulate transcriptional activity of various genes. Studies demonstrated that influence of neurogenesis by APP is conferred differently via its two separate domains, soluble secreted APPs (sAPPs, mainly sAPPα) and APP intracellular domain (AICD). The sAPPα was shown to be neuroprotective and important to neurogenesis, whereas AICD was found to negatively modulate neurogenesis. Furthermore, it was demonstrated recently that microRNA could function to regulate APP expression, APP processing, Aβ accumulation and subsequently influence neurotoxicity and neurogenesis related to APP, which was implicated to AD pathogenesis, especially for sporadic AD. Based on data accumulated, secretase balances were proposed. These secretase balances could influence the downstream balance related to regulation of neurogenesis by AICD and sAPPα as well as balance related to influence of neuron viability by Aβ and sAPPα. Disruption of these secretase balances could be culprits to AD onset.

  16. The roles of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in neurogenesis, implications to pathogenesis and therapy of Alzheimer disease (AD)

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Quan-hong; Xu, Xiao-hong

    2011-01-01

    The amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide is the derivative of amyloid precursor protein (APP) generated through sequential proteolytic processing by β- and γ-secretases. Excessive accumulation of Aβ, the main constituent of amyloid plaques, has been implicated in the etiology of Alzheimer disease (AD). It was found recently that the impairments of neurogenesis in brain were associated with the pathogenesis of AD. Furthermore recent findings implicated that APP could function to influence proliferation of neural progenitor cells (NPC) and might regulate transcriptional activity of various genes. Studies demonstrated that influence of neurogenesis by APP is conferred differently via its two separate domains, soluble secreted APPs (sAPPs, mainly sAPPα) and APP intracellular domain (AICD). The sAPPα was shown to be neuroprotective and important to neurogenesis, whereas AICD was found to negatively modulate neurogenesis. Furthermore, it was demonstrated recently that microRNA could function to regulate APP expression, APP processing, Aβ accumulation and subsequently influence neurotoxicity and neurogenesis related to APP, which was implicated to AD pathogenesis, especially for sporadic AD. Based on data accumulated, secretase balances were proposed. These secretase balances could influence the downstream balance related to regulation of neurogenesis by AICD and sAPPα as well as balance related to influence of neuron viability by Aβ and sAPPα. Disruption of these secretase balances could be culprits to AD onset. PMID:21785276

  17. [Hereditary Alzheimer's disease with amyloid angiopathy caused by amyloid precursor protein locus].

    PubMed

    Axer, H; Hüge, S; Wilhelm, C; Axer, M; Kunze, A; Reichenbach, J R; Freesmeyer, M; Kohlhase, J; Sauer, H; Bär, K-J

    2009-01-01

    We report a patient with early-onset autosomal dominant dementia. The CSF showed increased levels of tau protein and decreased amyloid beta (ratio 42:40) typical for Alzheimer's disease. Cerebral MRI revealed vascular lesions and white-matter changes around the posterior horns of the ventricles with only moderate atrophy of the brain. Susceptibility-weighted imaging detected multiple small hemorrhagic changes. Gene analysis revealed amyloid precursor protein (APP) locus duplication as the cause of hereditary Alzheimer's dementia. The co-occurrence of CSF changes typical for Alzheimer's disease and MRI findings of cerebral amyloid angiopathy is remarkable, as it is also described for APP locus duplication. In conjunction with a family history suggestive of hereditary dementia, such a constellation should lead to enhanced gene analysis.

  18. [Prokaryotic expression and activity identification of gene recombinant protein of brain-derivedneurotrophic factor precursor].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Liang, Xiaomin; Xu, Zhiqiang

    2014-08-19

    To generate the gene recombinant protein of brain-derived neurotrophic factor precursor (proBDNF) in prokaryotic cells and investigate its biological activity. Rat-derived cDNA of proBDNF with point mutation was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into plasmid pET-28a for expression in E. coli BL21. Western blot was used to identify the product and DAPI performed to test its effect on apoptosis of PC12 cells. PCR product of recombinant gene was successfully expressed in E. coli. And the product agreed with the target protein in molecular weight and showed reactivity with its specific antibody. Apoptosis of PC12 cells was induced by a certain concentration of recombinant proBDNF. The prokaryotic expression vector has been successfully constructed for recombinant gene of proBDNF. And the product has biological toxicity and it may induce the apoptosis of PC12 cells.

  19. A canine model of Alzheimer's disease generated by overexpressing a mutated human amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Lee, Geun-Shik; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Kim, Joung Joo; Park, Sun Woo; Ko, Kyeong Hee; Kang, Mina; Kim, Yu Kyung; Jung, Eui-Man; Moon, Changjong; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Hwang, Kyu-Chan; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Shin, Taeyoung; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2014-04-01

    Canines are considered the most authentic model for studying multifactorial human diseases, as these animals typically share a common environment with man. Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology along with genetic engineering of nuclear donor cells provides a unique opportunity for examining human diseases using transgenic canines. In the present study, we generated transgenic canines that overexpressed the human amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene containing well-characterized familial Alzheimer's disease (AD) mutations. We successfully obtained five out of six live puppies by SCNT. This was confirmed by observing the expression of green fluorescence protein in the body as a visual transgenic marker and the overexpression of the mutated APP gene in the brain. The transgenic canines developed AD-like symptoms, such as enlarged ventricles, an atrophied hippocampus, and β-amyloid plaques in the brain. Thus, the transgenic canines we created can serve as a novel animal model for studying human AD.

  20. The Flavivirus Precursor Membrane-Envelope Protein Complex: Structure and Maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Long; Lok, Shee-Mei; Yu, I-Mei; Zhang, Ying; Kuhn, Richard J.; Chen, Jue; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2008-09-17

    Many viruses go through a maturation step in the final stages of assembly before being transmitted to another host. The maturation process of flaviviruses is directed by the proteolytic cleavage of the precursor membrane protein (prM), turning inert virus into infectious particles. We have determined the 2.2 angstrom resolution crystal structure of a recombinant protein in which the dengue virus prM is linked to the envelope glycoprotein E. The structure represents the prM-E heterodimer and fits well into the cryo-electron microscopy density of immature virus at neutral pH. The pr peptide {beta}-barrel structure covers the fusion loop in E, preventing fusion with host cell membranes. The structure provides a basis for identifying the stages of its pH-directed conformational metamorphosis during maturation, ending with release of pr when budding from the host.

  1. Structure and Synaptic Function of Metal Binding to the Amyloid Precursor Protein and its Proteolytic Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Klemens; August, Alexander; Pietrzik, Claus U.; Kins, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is ultimately linked to the amyloid precursor protein (APP). However, current research reveals an important synaptic function of APP and APP-like proteins (APLP1 and 2). In this context various neurotrophic and neuroprotective functions have been reported for the APP proteolytic fragments sAPPα, sAPPβ and the monomeric amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ). APP is a metalloprotein and binds copper and zinc ions. Synaptic activity correlates with a release of these ions into the synaptic cleft and dysregulation of their homeostasis is linked to different neurodegenerative diseases. Metal binding to APP or its fragments affects its structure and its proteolytic cleavage and therefore its physiological function at the synapse. Here, we summarize the current data supporting this hypothesis and provide a model of how these different mechanisms might be intertwined with each other. PMID:28197076

  2. Increased asynchronous release and aberrant calcium channel activation in amyloid precursor protein deficient neuromuscular synapses.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Wang, B; Long, C; Wu, G; Zheng, H

    2007-11-23

    Despite the critical roles of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, its physiological function remains poorly established. Our previous studies implicated a structural and functional activity of the APP family of proteins in the developing neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Here we performed comprehensive analyses of neurotransmission in mature neuromuscular synapse of APP deficient mice. We found that APP deletion led to reduced paired-pulse facilitation and increased depression of synaptic transmission with repetitive stimulation. Readily releasable pool size and total releasable vesicles were not affected, but probability of release was significantly increased. Strikingly, the amount of asynchronous release, a measure sensitive to presynaptic calcium concentration, was dramatically increased, and pharmacological studies revealed that it was attributed to aberrant activation of N- and L-type Ca(2+) channels. We propose that APP modulates synaptic transmission at the NMJ by ensuring proper Ca(2+) channel function.

  3. Identification of a neuropeptide precursor protein that gives rise to a "cocktail" of peptides that bind Cu(II) and generate metal-linked dimers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher E; Zandawala, Meet; Semmens, Dean C; Anderson, Sarah; Hanson, Graeme R; Janies, Daniel A; Elphick, Maurice R

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides with an Amino Terminal Cu(II), Ni(II) Binding (ATCUN) motif (H2N-xxH) bind Cu(II)/Ni(II) ions. Here we report the novel discovery of a neuropeptide precursor that gives rise to a "cocktail" of peptides that bind Cu(II)/Ni(II) and form ternary complexes--the L-type SALMFamide precursor in the starfish Asterias rubens. Echinoderm transcriptome sequence data were analysed to identify transcripts encoding precursors of SALMFamide-type neuropeptides. The sequence of the L-type SALMFamide precursor in the starfish Asterias rubens was confirmed by cDNA sequencing and peptides derived from this precursor (e.g. AYHSALPF-NH2, GYHSGLPF-NH2 and LHSALPF-NH2) were synthesized. The ability of these peptides to bind metals was investigated using UV/Vis, NMR, circular dichroism and EPR spectroscopy. AYHSALPF-NH2 and GYHSGLPF-NH2 bind Cu(II) and Ni(II) and generate metal-linked dimers to form ternary complexes with LHSALPF-NH2. Investigation of the evolutionary history of the histidine residue that confers these properties revealed that it can be traced to the common ancestor of echinoderms, which is estimated to have lived ~500 million years ago. However, L-type precursors comprising multiple SALMFamides with the histidine residue forming an ATCUN motif appears to be a feature that has evolved uniquely in starfish (Asteroidea). The discovery of a SALMFamide-type neuropeptide precursor protein that gives rise to a "cocktail" of peptides that bind metal ions and generate metal-linked dimers provides a new insight on ATCUN motif-containing neuropeptides. This property of L-type SALMFamides in the Asteroidea may be associated with a role in regulation of the unusual extra-oral feeding behaviour of starfish. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Elevated Hippocampal Cholinergic Neurostimulating Peptide Precursor Protein (HCNP-pp) mRNA in the amygdala in major depression

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, Sabrina; Seney, Marianne L.; Argibay, Pablo; Sibille, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    The amygdala is innervated by the cholinergic system and is involved in major depressive disorder (MDD). Evidence suggests a hyper-activate cholinergic system in MDD. Hippocampal Cholinergic Neurostimulating Peptide (HCNP) regulates acetylcholine synthesis. The aim of the present work was to investigate expression levels of HCNP-precursor protein (HCNP-pp) mRNA and other cholinergic-related genes in the postmortem amygdala of MDD patients and matched controls (females: N=16 pairs; males: N=12 pairs), and in the mouse unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) model that induced elevated anxiety-/depressive-like behaviors (females: N=6 pairs; males: N=6 pairs). Results indicate an up-regulation of HCNP-pp mRNA in the amygdala of women with MDD (p<0.0001), but not males, and of UCMS-exposed mice (males and females; p=0.037). HCNP-pp protein levels were investigated in the human female cohort, but no difference was found. There were no differences in gene expression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), muscarinic (mAChRs) or nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) between MDD subjects and controls or UCMS and control mice, except for an up-regulation of AChE in UCMS-exposed mice (males and females; p=0.044). Exploratory analyses revealed a baseline expression difference of cholinergic signaling-related genes between women and men (p<0.0001). In conclusion, elevated amygdala HCNP-pp expression may contribute to mechanisms of MDD in women, potentially independently from regulating the cholinergic system. The differential expression of genes between women and men could also contribute to the increased vulnerability of females to develop MDD. PMID:25819500

  5. Time-dependent changes in gene expression induced by secreted amyloid precursor protein-alpha in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Differential processing of the amyloid precursor protein liberates either amyloid-ß, a causative agent of Alzheimer’s disease, or secreted amyloid precursor protein-alpha (sAPPα), which promotes neuroprotection, neurotrophism, neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity. The underlying molecular mechanisms recruited by sAPPα that underpin these considerable cellular effects are not well elucidated. As these effects are enduring, we hypothesised that regulation of gene expression may be of importance and examined temporally specific gene networks and pathways induced by sAPPα in rat hippocampal organotypic slice cultures. Slices were exposed to 1 nM sAPPα or phosphate buffered saline for 15 min, 2 h or 24 h and sAPPα-associated gene expression profiles were produced for each time-point using Affymetrix Rat Gene 1.0 ST arrays (moderated t-test using Limma: p < 0.05, and fold change ± 1.15). Results Treatment of organotypic hippocampal slice cultures with 1 nM sAPPα induced temporally distinct gene expression profiles, including mRNA and microRNA associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Having demonstrated that treatment with human recombinant sAPPα was protective against N-methyl d-aspartate-induced toxicity, we next explored the sAPPα-induced gene expression profiles. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis predicted that short-term exposure to sAPPα elicited a multi-level transcriptional response, including upregulation of immediate early gene transcription factors (AP-1, Egr1), modulation of the chromatin environment, and apparent activation of the constitutive transcription factors CREB and NF-κB. Importantly, dynamic regulation of NF-κB appears to be integral to the transcriptional response across all time-points. In contrast, medium and long exposure to sAPPα resulted in an overall downregulation of gene expression. While these results suggest commonality between sAPPα and our previously reported analysis of plasticity-related gene expression, we

  6. apl-1, a Caenorhabditis elegans gene encoding a protein related to the human beta-amyloid protein precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, I; Li, C

    1993-01-01

    The major component of senile plaques found in the brains of Alzheimer disease patients is the beta-amyloid peptide, which is derived from a larger amyloid precursor protein (APP). Recently, a number of APP and APP-related proteins have been identified in different organisms and constitute the family of APP proteins. We have isolated several cDNAs encoding an APP-related protein in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and have designated the corresponding gene as apl-1. The apl-1 transcripts undergo two forms of posttranscriptional modification: trans-splicing and alternative polyadenylylation. In vitro translation of an apl-1 cDNA results in a protein of approximately the expected size. Similar to the Drosophila, human, and mouse APP-related proteins, APL-1 does not appear to contain the beta-amyloid peptide. Because APP-related proteins seem to be conserved through evolution, the apl-1 gene from C. elegans should be important for determining the normal function of human APP. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8265668

  7. BECN1/Beclin 1 sorts cell-surface APP/amyloid β precursor protein for lysosomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Gayathri; Zhu, Wan; Plowey, Edward D

    2016-12-01

    The regulation of plasma membrane (PM)-localized transmembrane protein/receptor trafficking has critical implications for cell signaling, metabolism and survival. In this study, we investigated the role of BECN1 (Beclin 1) in the degradative trafficking of PM-associated APP (amyloid β precursor protein), whose metabolism to amyloid-β, an essential event in Alzheimer disease, is dependent on divergent PM trafficking pathways. We report a novel interaction between PM-associated APP and BECN1 that recruits macroautophagy/endosomal regulatory proteins PIK3C3 and UVRAG. We found that BECN1 promotes surface APP internalization and sorting predominantly to endosomes and endolysosomes. BECN1 also promotes the targeting of a smaller fraction of internalized APP to LC3-positive phagophores, suggesting a role for BECN1-dependent PM macroautophagy in APP degradation. Furthermore, BECN1 facilitates lysosomal degradation of surface APP and reduces the secretion of APP metabolites (soluble ectodomains, sAPP). The association between APP and BECN1 is dependent on the evolutionarily conserved domain (ECD) of BECN1 (amino acids 267-337). Deletion of a BECN1 ECD subregion (amino acids 285-299) did not impair BECN1- PIK3C3 interaction, PtdIns3K function or macroautophagy, but was sufficient to impair the APP-BECN1 interaction and BECN1's effects on surface APP internalization and degradation, resulting in increased secretion of sAPPs. Interestingly, both the BECN1-APP association and BECN1-dependent APP endocytosis and degradative trafficking were negatively regulated by active AKT. Our results further implicate phosphorylation of the BECN1 Ser295 residue in the inhibition of APP degradation by AKT. Our studies reveal a novel function for BECN1 in the sorting of a plasma membrane protein for endolysosomal and macroautophagic degradation.

  8. BECN1/Beclin 1 sorts cell-surface APP/amyloid β precursor protein for lysosomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Gayathri; Zhu, Wan; Plowey, Edward D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The regulation of plasma membrane (PM)-localized transmembrane protein/receptor trafficking has critical implications for cell signaling, metabolism and survival. In this study, we investigated the role of BECN1 (Beclin 1) in the degradative trafficking of PM-associated APP (amyloid β precursor protein), whose metabolism to amyloid-β, an essential event in Alzheimer disease, is dependent on divergent PM trafficking pathways. We report a novel interaction between PM-associated APP and BECN1 that recruits macroautophagy/endosomal regulatory proteins PIK3C3 and UVRAG. We found that BECN1 promotes surface APP internalization and sorting predominantly to endosomes and endolysosomes. BECN1 also promotes the targeting of a smaller fraction of internalized APP to LC3-positive phagophores, suggesting a role for BECN1-dependent PM macroautophagy in APP degradation. Furthermore, BECN1 facilitates lysosomal degradation of surface APP and reduces the secretion of APP metabolites (soluble ectodomains, sAPP). The association between APP and BECN1 is dependent on the evolutionarily conserved domain (ECD) of BECN1 (amino acids 267–337). Deletion of a BECN1 ECD subregion (amino acids 285–299) did not impair BECN1- PIK3C3 interaction, PtdIns3K function or macroautophagy, but was sufficient to impair the APP-BECN1 interaction and BECN1's effects on surface APP internalization and degradation, resulting in increased secretion of sAPPs. Interestingly, both the BECN1-APP association and BECN1-dependent APP endocytosis and degradative trafficking were negatively regulated by active AKT. Our results further implicate phosphorylation of the BECN1 Ser295 residue in the inhibition of APP degradation by AKT. Our studies reveal a novel function for BECN1 in the sorting of a plasma membrane protein for endolysosomal and macroautophagic degradation. PMID:27715386

  9. APL-1, the Alzheimer's Amyloid precursor protein in Caenorhabditis elegans, modulates multiple metabolic pathways throughout development.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Collin Y; Raps, Daniel A; Li, Chris

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene or in genes that process APP are correlated with familial Alzheimer's disease (AD). The biological function of APP remains unclear. APP is a transmembrane protein that can be sequentially cleaved by different secretases to yield multiple fragments, which can potentially act as signaling molecules. Caenorhabditis elegans encodes one APP-related protein, APL-1, which is essential for viability. Here, we show that APL-1 signaling is dependent on the activity of the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12 and influences metabolic pathways such as developmental progression, body size, and egg-laying rate. Furthermore, apl-1(yn5) mutants, which produce high levels of the extracellular APL-1 fragment, show an incompletely penetrant temperature-sensitive embryonic lethality. In a genetic screen to isolate mutants in which the apl-1(yn5) lethality rate is modified, we identified a suppressor mutation in MOA-1/R155.2, a receptor-protein tyrosine phosphatase, and an enhancer mutation in MOA-2/B0495.6, a protein involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis. Knockdown of apl-1 in an apl-1(yn5) background caused lethality and molting defects at all larval stages, suggesting that apl-1 is required for each transitional molt. We suggest that signaling of the released APL-1 fragment modulates multiple metabolic states and that APL-1 is required throughout development.

  10. Quantification of Amyloid Precursor Protein Isoforms Using Quantification Concatamer Internal Standard

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junjun; Wang, Meiyao; Turko, Illarion V.

    2014-01-01

    It is likely that expression and/or post-translational generation of various protein isoforms can be indicative of initial pathological changes or pathology development. However, selective quantification of individual protein isoforms remains a challenge, because they simultaneously possess common and unique amino acid sequences. Quantification concatamer (QconCAT) internal standards were originally designed for a large-scale proteome quantification and are artificial proteins that are concatamers of tryptic peptides for several proteins. We developed a QconCAT for quantification of various isoforms of amyloid precursor protein (APP). APP-QconCAT includes tryptic peptides that are common for all isoforms of APP concatenated with those tryptic peptides that are unique for specific APP isoforms. Isotope-labeled APP-QconCAT was expressed, purified, characterized, and further used for quantification of total APP, APP695, and amyloid-β (Aβ) in the human frontal cortex from control and severe Alzheimer’s disease donors. Potential biological implications of our quantitative measurements are discussed. It is also expected that using APP-QconCAT(s) will advance our understanding of biological mechanism by which various APP isoforms involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23186391

  11. High expression of functional adenovirus DNA polymerase and precursor terminal protein using recombinant vaccinia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Stunnenberg, H G; Lange, H; Philipson, L; van Miltenburg, R T; van der Vliet, P C

    1988-01-01

    Initiation of Adenovirus (Ad) DNA replication occurs by a protein-priming mechanism in which the viral precursor terminal protein (pTP) and DNA polymerase (pol) as well as two nuclear DNA-binding proteins from uninfected HeLa cells are required. Biochemical studies on the pTP and DNA polymerase proteins separately have been hampered due to their low abundance and their presence as a pTP-pol complex in Ad infected cells. We have constructed a genomic sequence containing the large open reading frame from the Ad5 pol gene to which 9 basepairs from a putative exon were ligated. When inserted behind a modified late promoter of vaccinia virus the resulting recombinant virus produced enzymatically active 140 kDa Ad DNA polymerase. The same strategy was applied to express the 80 kDa pTP gene in a functional form. Both proteins were overexpressed at least 30-fold compared to extracts from Adenovirus infected cells and, when combined, were fully active for initiation in an in vitro Adenovirus DNA replication system. Images PMID:3362670

  12. Analysis of the adenovirus type 5 terminal protein precursor and DNA polymerase by linker insertion mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Roovers, D J; van der Lee, F M; van der Wees, J; Sussenbach, J S

    1993-01-01

    A series of adenovirus type 5 precursor terminal protein (pTP) and DNA polymerase (Ad pol) genes with linker insertion mutations were separately introduced into the vaccinia virus genome under the control of a late vaccinia virus promoter. The recombinant viruses were used for overexpression of the mutant genes in HeLa cells. In total, 22 different mutant pTP and 10 different Ad pol vaccinia virus recombinants were constructed, including some that expressed carboxyl-terminus-truncated forms of both proteins and one that produced the mutant H5ts149 Ad pol. To investigate the structure-function relationships of both proteins, extracts from cells infected with the recombinant viruses were tested for in vitro complementation of the initiation and elongation steps in adenovirus DNA replication. The results were in accordance with those of earlier in vivo experiments with these insertion mutants and indicate that multiple regions of both proteins are essential for adenovirus DNA replication. The carboxyl termini of both pTP and Ad pol were shown to be essential for proper functioning of these proteins during initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. Three different DNA replication-negative pTP mutants were shown to have residual activity in the initiation assay, suggesting not only that pTP is required for initiation but also that it may play a role in DNA replication after the deoxycytidylation step. Images PMID:8416372

  13. Quantification of amyloid precursor protein isoforms using quantification concatamer internal standard.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junjun; Wang, Meiyao; Turko, Illarion V

    2013-01-02

    It is likely that expression and/or post-translational generation of various protein isoforms can be indicative of initial pathological changes or pathology development. However, selective quantification of individual protein isoforms remains a challenge, because they simultaneously possess common and unique amino acid sequences. Quantification concatamer (QconCAT) internal standards were originally designed for a large-scale proteome quantification and are artificial proteins that are concatamers of tryptic peptides for several proteins. We developed a QconCAT for quantification of various isoforms of amyloid precursor protein (APP). APP-QconCAT includes tryptic peptides that are common for all isoforms of APP concatenated with those tryptic peptides that are unique for specific APP isoforms. Isotope-labeled APP-QconCAT was expressed, purified, characterized, and further used for quantification of total APP, APP695, and amyloid-β (Aβ) in the human frontal cortex from control and severe Alzheimer's disease donors. Potential biological implications of our quantitative measurements are discussed. It is also expected that using APP-QconCAT(s) will advance our understanding of biological mechanism by which various APP isoforms involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) interacting protein 1 (JIP1) binds the cytoplasmic domain of the Alzheimer's beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP).

    PubMed

    Scheinfeld, Meir H; Roncarati, Roberta; Vito, Pasquale; Lopez, Peter A; Abdallah, Mona; D'Adamio, Luciano

    2002-02-01

    The familial Alzheimer's disease gene product amyloid beta precursor protein (APP) is sequentially processed by beta- and gamma-secretases to generate the Abeta peptide. The biochemical pathway leading to Abeta formation has been extensively studied since extracellular aggregates of Abeta peptides are considered the culprit of Alzheimer's disease. Aside from its pathological relevance, the biological role of APP processing is unknown. Cleavage of APP by gamma-secretase releases, together with Abeta, a COOH-terminal APP intracellular domain, termed AID. This peptide has recently been identified in brain tissue of normal control and patients with sporadic Alzheimer's disease. We have previously shown that AID acts as a positive regulator of apoptosis. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism by which AID regulates this process remains unknown. Hoping to gain clues about the function of APP, we used the yeast two-hybrid system to identify interaction between the AID region of APP and JNK-interacting protein-1 (JIP1). This molecular interaction is confirmed in vitro, in vivo by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and in mouse brain lysates. These data provide a link between APP and its processing by gamma-secretase, and stress kinase signaling pathways. These pathways are known regulators of apoptosis and may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  15. DSP-PP Precursor Protein Cleavage by Tolloid-Related-1 Protein and by Bone Morphogenetic Protein-1

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Helena H.; Yee, Colin T.; Tang, Xu-na; Dong, Zhihong; Fuller, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and phosphophoryn (PP), acidic proteins critical to dentin mineralization, are translated from a single transcript as a DSP-PP precursor that undergoes specific proteolytic processing to generate DSP and PP. The cleavage mechanism continues to be controversial, in part because of the difficulty of obtaining DSP-PP from mammalian cells and dentin matrix. We have infected Sf9 cells with a recombinant baculovirus to produce large amounts of secreted DSP-PP240, a variant form of rat DSP-PP. Mass spectrometric analysis shows that DSP-PP240 secreted by Sf9 cells undergoes specific cleavage at the site predicted from the N-terminal sequence of PP extracted from dentin matrix: SMQG447↓D448DPN. DSP-PP240 is cleaved after secretion by a zinc-dependent activity secreted by Sf9 cells, generating DSP430 and PP240 products that are stable in the medium. DSP-PP processing activity is constitutively secreted by Sf9 cells, but secretion is diminished 3 days after infection. Using primers corresponding to the highly conserved catalytic domain of Drosophila melanogaster tolloid (a mammalian BMP1 homolog), we isolated a partial cDNA for a Spodopotera frugiperda tolloid-related-1 protein (TLR1) that is 78% identical to Drosophila TLR1 but only 65% identical to Drosophila tolloid. Tlr1 mRNA decreased rapidly in Sf9 cells after baculovirus infection and was undetectable 4d after infection, paralleling the observed decrease in secretion of the DSP-PP240 processing activity after infection. Human BMP1 is more similar to Sf9 and Drosophila TLR1 than to tolloid, and Sf9 TLR1 is more similar to BMP1 than to other mammalian homologs. Recombinant human BMP1 correctly processed baculovirus-expressed DSP-PP240 in a dose-dependent manner. Together, these data suggest that the physiologically accurate cleavage of mammalian DSP-PP240 in the Sf9 cell system represents the action of a conserved processing enzyme and support the proposed role of BMP1 in processing DSP-PP in

  16. DSP-PP precursor protein cleavage by tolloid-related-1 protein and by bone morphogenetic protein-1.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Helena H; Yee, Colin T; Tang, Xu-Na; Dong, Zhihong; Fuller, Robert S

    2012-01-01

    Dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and phosphophoryn (PP), acidic proteins critical to dentin mineralization, are translated from a single transcript as a DSP-PP precursor that undergoes specific proteolytic processing to generate DSP and PP. The cleavage mechanism continues to be controversial, in part because of the difficulty of obtaining DSP-PP from mammalian cells and dentin matrix. We have infected Sf9 cells with a recombinant baculovirus to produce large amounts of secreted DSP-PP(240), a variant form of rat DSP-PP. Mass spectrometric analysis shows that DSP-PP(240) secreted by Sf9 cells undergoes specific cleavage at the site predicted from the N-terminal sequence of PP extracted from dentin matrix: SMQG(447)↓D(448)DPN. DSP-PP(240) is cleaved after secretion by a zinc-dependent activity secreted by Sf9 cells, generating DSP(430) and PP(240) products that are stable in the medium. DSP-PP processing activity is constitutively secreted by Sf9 cells, but secretion is diminished 3 days after infection. Using primers corresponding to the highly conserved catalytic domain of Drosophila melanogaster tolloid (a mammalian BMP1 homolog), we isolated a partial cDNA for a Spodopotera frugiperda tolloid-related-1 protein (TLR1) that is 78% identical to Drosophila TLR1 but only 65% identical to Drosophila tolloid. Tlr1 mRNA decreased rapidly in Sf9 cells after baculovirus infection and was undetectable 4d after infection, paralleling the observed decrease in secretion of the DSP-PP(240) processing activity after infection. Human BMP1 is more similar to Sf9 and Drosophila TLR1 than to tolloid, and Sf9 TLR1 is more similar to BMP1 than to other mammalian homologs. Recombinant human BMP1 correctly processed baculovirus-expressed DSP-PP(240) in a dose-dependent manner. Together, these data suggest that the physiologically accurate cleavage of mammalian DSP-PP(240) in the Sf9 cell system represents the action of a conserved processing enzyme and support the proposed role of BMP1 in

  17. BMP signaling and spadetail regulate exit of muscle precursors from the zebrafish tailbud.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Katelyn; Thorpe, Chris

    2013-03-15

    The tailbud is a population of stem cells in the posterior embryonic tail. During zebrafish development, these stem cells give rise to the main structures of the embryo's posterior body, including the tail somites. Progenitor cells reside in the tailbud for variable amounts of time before they exit and begin to differentiate. There must be a careful balance between cells that leave the tailbud and cells that are held back in order to give rise to later somites. However, this meticulous process is not well understood. A gene that has shed some light on this area is the t-box transcription factor spadetail (spt). When spt is mutated, embryos develop an enlarged tailbud and are only able to form roughly half of their somites. This phenotype is due to the fact that some of the somitic precursors are not able to leave the tailbud or differentiate. Another factor involved in tail morphogenesis is the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) pathway. BMPs are important for many processes during early development, including cell migration. Chordino (chd) is a secreted protein that inhibits BMP signaling. BMPs are upregulated in chd mutants, however, these mutants are able to form organized somites. In embryos where chd and spt are mutated, somites are completely absent. These double mutants also develop a large tailbud due to the accumulation of progenitor cells that are never able to leave or differentiate. To study the dynamics of cells in the tailbud and their role in somite formation, we have analyzed the genetic factors and pathway interactions involved, conducted transplant experiments to look at behavior of mutant cells in different genetic backgrounds, and used time lapse microscopy to characterize cell movements and behavior in wild type and mutant tailbuds. These data suggest that spt expression and BMP inhibition are both required for somitic precursors to exit the tailbud. They also elucidate that chd;spt tailbud mesodermal progenitor cells (MPC) behave autonomously

  18. NEDD4 REGULATES PAX7 LEVELS PROMOTING ACTIVATION OF THE DIFFERENTIATION PROGRAM IN SKELETAL MUSCLE PRECURSORS

    PubMed Central

    Bustos, Francisco; de la Vega, Eduardo; Cabezas, Felipe; Thompson, James; Cornelison, DDW; Olwin, Bradley B.; Yates, John R.; Olguín, Hugo C.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor Pax7 regulates skeletal muscle stem cell (satellite cells) specification and maintenance through various mechanisms, including repressing the activity of the muscle regulatory factor MyoD. Hence, Pax7-to-MyoD protein ratios can determine maintenance of the committed-undifferentiated state or activation of the differentiation program. Pax7 expression decreases sharply in differentiating myoblasts but is maintained in cells (re)acquiring quiescence, yet the mechanisms regulating Pax7 levels based on differentiation status are not well understood. Here we show that Pax7 levels are directly regulated by the ubiquitin-ligase Nedd4. Our results indicate that Nedd4 is expressed in quiescent and activated satellite cells, that Nedd4 and Pax7 physically interact during early muscle differentiation – correlating with Pax7 ubiquitination and decline – and that Nedd4 loss of function prevented this effect. Furthermore, even transient nuclear accumulation of Nedd4 induced a drop in Pax7 levels and precocious muscle differentiation. Consequently, we propose that Nedd4 functions as a novel Pax7 regulator, which activity is temporally and spatially controlled to modulate the Pax7 protein levels and therefore satellite cell fate. PMID:26304770

  19. Alzheimer's disease therapeutics targeted to the control of amyloid precursor protein translation: maintenance of brain iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Rogers, Jack T

    2014-04-15

    The neurotoxicity of amyloid beta (Aβ), a major cleavage product of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is enhanced by iron, as found in the amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. By contrast, the long-known neuroprotective activity of APP is evident after α-secretase cleavage of the precursor to release sAPPα, and depends on the iron export actions of APP itself. The latter underlie its neurotrophic and protective effects in facilitating the homeostatic actions of ferroportin mediated-iron export. Thus APP-dependent iron export may alleviate oxidative stress by minimizing labile iron thus protecting neurons from iron overload during stroke and hemorrhage. Consistent with this, altered phosphorylation of iron-regulatory protein-1 (IRP1) and its signaling processes play a critical role in modulating APP translation via the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of its transcript. The APP 5'UTR region encodes a functional iron-responsive element (IRE) RNA stem loop that represents a potential target for modulating APP production. Targeted regulation of APP gene expression via the modulation of 5'UTR sequence function represents a novel approach for the potential treatment of AD since altering APP translation can be used to improve both the protective brain iron balance and provide anti-amyloid efficacy. Approved drugs including paroxetine and desferrioxamine and several novel compounds have been identified that suppress abnormal metal-promoted Aβ accumulation with a subset of these acting via APP 5'UTR-dependent mechanisms to modulate APP translation and cleavage to generate the non-toxic sAPPα.

  20. Regulated protein aggregation: stress granules and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The protein aggregation that occurs in neurodegenerative diseases is classically thought to occur as an undesirable, nonfunctional byproduct of protein misfolding. This model contrasts with the biology of RNA binding proteins, many of which are linked to neurodegenerative diseases. RNA binding proteins use protein aggregation as part of a normal regulated, physiological mechanism controlling protein synthesis. The process of regulated protein aggregation is most evident in formation of stress granules. Stress granules assemble when RNA binding proteins aggregate through their glycine rich domains. Stress granules function to sequester, silence and/or degrade RNA transcripts as part of a mechanism that adapts patterns of local RNA translation to facilitate the stress response. Aggregation of RNA binding proteins is reversible and is tightly regulated through pathways, such as phosphorylation of elongation initiation factor 2α. Microtubule associated protein tau also appears to regulate stress granule formation. Conversely, stress granule formation stimulates pathological changes associated with tau. In this review, I propose that the aggregation of many pathological, intracellular proteins, including TDP-43, FUS or tau, proceeds through the stress granule pathway. Mutations in genes coding for stress granule associated proteins or prolonged physiological stress, lead to enhanced stress granule formation, which accelerates the pathophysiology of protein aggregation in neurodegenerative diseases. Over-active stress granule formation could act to sequester functional RNA binding proteins and/or interfere with mRNA transport and translation, each of which might potentiate neurodegeneration. The reversibility of the stress granule pathway also offers novel opportunities to stimulate endogenous biochemical pathways to disaggregate these pathological stress granules, and perhaps delay the progression of disease. PMID:23164372

  1. A peptide zipcode sufficient for anterograde transport within amyloid precursor protein

    PubMed Central

    Satpute-Krishnan, Prasanna; DeGiorgis, Joseph A.; Conley, Michael P.; Jang, Marcus; Bearer, Elaine L.

    2006-01-01

    Fast anterograde transport of membrane-bound organelles delivers molecules synthesized in the neuronal cell body outward to distant synapses. Identification of the molecular “zipcodes” on organelles that mediate attachment and activation of microtubule-based motors for this directed transport is a major area of inquiry. Here we identify a short peptide sequence (15 aa) from the cytoplasmic C terminus of amyloid precursor protein (APP-C) sufficient to mediate the anterograde transport of peptide-conjugated beads in the squid giant axon. APP-C beads travel at fast axonal transport rates (0.53 μm/s average velocity, 0.9 μm/s maximal velocity) whereas beads coupled to other peptides coinjected into the same axon remain stationary at the injection site. This transport appears physiologic, because it mimics behavior of endogenous squid organelles and of beads conjugated to C99, a polypeptide containing the full-length cytoplasmic domain of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Beads conjugated to APP lacking the APP-C domain are not transported. Coinjection of APP-C peptide reduces C99 bead motility by 75% and abolishes APP-C bead motility, suggesting that the soluble peptide competes with protein-conjugated beads for axoplasmic motor(s). The APP-C domain is conserved (13/15 aa) from squid to human, and peptides from either squid or human APP behave similarly. Thus, we have identified a conserved peptide zipcode sufficient to direct anterograde transport of exogenous cargo and suggest that one of APP's roles may be to recruit and activate axonal machinery for endogenous cargo transport. PMID:17062754

  2. The gap junctional protein INX-14 functions in oocyte precursors to promote C. elegans sperm guidance

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Johnathan W.; McKinney, Shauna L.; Prasain, Jeevan K.; Miller, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Innexins are the subunits of invertebrate gap junctions. Here we show that the innexin INX-14 promotes sperm guidance to the fertilization site in the C. elegans hermaphrodite reproductive tract. inx-14 loss causes cell nonautonomous defects in sperm migration velocity and directional velocity. Results from genetic and immunocytochemical analyses provide strong evidence that INX-14 acts in transcriptionally active oocyte precursors in the distal gonad, not in transcriptionally inactive oocytes that synthesize prostaglandin sperm-attracting cues. Somatic gonadal sheath cell interaction is necessary for INX-14 function, likely via INX-8 and INX-9 expressed in sheath cells. However, electron microscopy has not identified gap junctions in oocyte precursors, suggesting that INX-14 acts in a channel-independent manner or INX-14 channels are difficult to document. INX-14 promotes prostaglandin signaling to sperm at a step after F-series prostaglandin synthesis in oocytes. Taken together, our results support the model that INX-14 functions in a somatic gonad/germ cell signaling mechanism essential for sperm function. We propose that this mechanism regulates the transcription of a factor(s) that modulates prostaglandin metabolism, transport, or activity in the reproductive tract. PMID:21889935

  3. SOX2-LIN28/let-7 pathway regulates proliferation and neurogenesis in neural precursors.

    PubMed

    Cimadamore, Flavio; Amador-Arjona, Alejandro; Chen, Connie; Huang, Chun-Teng; Terskikh, Alexey V

    2013-08-06

    The transcription factor SRY (sex-determining region)-box 2 (SOX2) is an important functional marker of neural precursor cells (NPCs) and plays a critical role in self-renewal and neuronal differentiation; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its functions are poorly understood. Using human embryonic stem cell-derived NPCs to model neurogenesis, we found that SOX2 is required to maintain optimal levels of LIN28, a well-characterized suppressor of let-7 microRNA biogenesis. Exogenous LIN28 expression rescued the NPC proliferation deficit, as well as the early but not the late stages of the neurogenic deficit associated with the loss of SOX2. We found that SOX2 binds to a proximal site in the LIN28 promoter region and regulates LIN28 promoter acetylation, likely through interactions with the histone acetyltransferase complex. Misexpression of let-7 microRNAs in NPCs reduced proliferation and inhibited neuronal differentiation, phenocopying the loss of SOX2. In particular, we identified let-7i as a novel and potent inhibitor of neuronal differentiation that targets MASH1 and NGN1, two well-characterized proneural genes. In conclusion, we discovered the SOX2-LIN28/let-7 pathway as a unique molecular mechanism governing NPC proliferation and neurogenic potential.

  4. SOX2–LIN28/let-7 pathway regulates proliferation and neurogenesis in neural precursors

    PubMed Central

    Cimadamore, Flavio; Amador-Arjona, Alejandro; Chen, Connie; Huang, Chun-Teng; Terskikh, Alexey V.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor SRY (sex-determining region)-box 2 (SOX2) is an important functional marker of neural precursor cells (NPCs) and plays a critical role in self-renewal and neuronal differentiation; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its functions are poorly understood. Using human embryonic stem cell-derived NPCs to model neurogenesis, we found that SOX2 is required to maintain optimal levels of LIN28, a well-characterized suppressor of let-7 microRNA biogenesis. Exogenous LIN28 expression rescued the NPC proliferation deficit, as well as the early but not the late stages of the neurogenic deficit associated with the loss of SOX2. We found that SOX2 binds to a proximal site in the LIN28 promoter region and regulates LIN28 promoter acetylation, likely through interactions with the histone acetyltransferase complex. Misexpression of let-7 microRNAs in NPCs reduced proliferation and inhibited neuronal differentiation, phenocopying the loss of SOX2. In particular, we identified let-7i as a novel and potent inhibitor of neuronal differentiation that targets MASH1 and NGN1, two well-characterized proneural genes. In conclusion, we discovered the SOX2–LIN28/let-7 pathway as a unique molecular mechanism governing NPC proliferation and neurogenic potential. PMID:23884650

  5. Peripheral Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Precursor Regulates Pain as an Inflammatory Mediator

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Cong; Zhong, Xiao-Lin; Zhou, Fiona H.; Li, Jia-yi; Zhou, Pei; Xu, Jun-Mei; Song, Bo; Li, Chang-Qi; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Dai, Ru-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The precursor of brain derived neurotrophic factor (proBDNF), the unprocessed BDNF gene product, binds to its receptors and exerts the opposing biologic functions of mature BDNF. proBDNF is expressed in the peripheral tissues but the functions of peripheral proBDNF remain elusive. Here we showed that proBDNF and its predominant receptor, p75 pan-neurotrophin receptor were upregulated in the nerve fibers and inflammatory cells in the local tissue in inflammatory pain. Neutralization of proBDNF by polyclonal antibody attenuated pain in different models of inflammatory pain. Unilateral intra-plantar supplementation of proBDNF by injecting exogenous proBDNF or ectopic overexpression resulted in pain hypersensitivity and induced spinal phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation. Exogenous proBDNF injection induced the infiltration of inflammatory cells and the activation of proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting that inflammatory reaction contributed to the pro-algesic effect of proBDNF. Finally, we generated monoclonal anti-proBDNF antibody that could biologically block proBDNF. Administration of monoclonal Ab-proBDNF attenuated various types of inflammatory pain and surgical pain. Thus, peripheral proBDNF is a potential pain mediator and anti-proBDNF pretreatment may alleviate the development of inflammatory pain. PMID:27251195

  6. Essential roles for the FE65 amyloid precursor protein-interacting proteins in brain development

    PubMed Central

    Guénette, Suzanne; Chang, Yang; Hiesberger, Thomas; Richardson, James A; Eckman, Christopher B; Eckman, Elizabeth A; Hammer, Robert E; Herz, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    Targeted deletion of two members of the FE65 family of adaptor proteins, FE65 and FE65L1, results in cortical dysplasia. Heterotopias resembling those found in cobblestone lissencephalies in which neuroepithelial cells migrate into superficial layers of the developing cortex, aberrant cortical projections and loss of infrapyramidal mossy fibers arise in FE65/FE65L1 compound null animals, but not in single gene knockouts. The disruption of pial basal membranes underlying the heterotopias and poor organization of fibrillar laminin by isolated meningeal fibroblasts from double knockouts suggests that FE65 proteins are involved in basement membrane assembly. A similar phenotype is observed in triple mutant mice lacking the APP family members APP, APLP1 and APLP2, all of which interact with FE65 proteins, suggesting that this phenotype may be caused by decreased transmission of an APP-dependent signal through the FE65 proteins. The defects observed in the double knockout may also involve the family of Ena/Vasp proteins, which participate in actin cytoskeleton remodeling and interact with the WW domains of FE65 proteins. PMID:16407979

  7. Sorting of the Alzheimer's Disease Amyloid Precursor Protein Mediated by the AP-4 Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Burgos, Patricia V.; Mardones, Gonzalo A.; Rojas, Adriana L.; daSilva, Luis L.P.; Prabhu, Yogikala; Hurley, James H.; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2010-08-12

    Adaptor protein 4 (AP-4) is the most recently discovered and least well-characterized member of the family of heterotetrameric adaptor protein (AP) complexes that mediate sorting of transmembrane cargo in post-Golgi compartments. Herein, we report the interaction of an YKFFE sequence from the cytosolic tail of the Alzheimer's disease amyloid precursor protein (APP) with the {micro}4 subunit of AP-4. Biochemical and X-ray crystallographic analyses reveal that the properties of the APP sequence and the location of the binding site on 4 are distinct from those of other signal-adaptor interactions. Disruption of the APP-AP-4 interaction decreases localization of APP to endosomes and enhances {gamma}-secretase-catalyzed cleavage of APP to the pathogenic amyloid-{beta} peptide. These findings demonstrate that APP and AP-4 engage in a distinct type of signal-adaptor interaction that mediates transport of APP from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to endosomes, thereby reducing amyloidogenic processing of the protein.

  8. Import of a precursor protein into chloroplasts is inhibited by the herbicide glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Della-Cioppa, G; Kishore, G M

    1988-05-01

    Import of the precursor to 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (pEPSPS) into chloroplasts is inhibited by the herbicide glyphosate. Inhibition of import is maximal at glyphosate concentrations of >/=10 mum and occurs only when pEPSPS is present as a ternary complex of enzyme-shikimate-3-phosphate-glyphosate. Glyphosate alone had no effect on the import of pEPSPS since it is not known to interact with the enzyme in the absence of shikimate-3-phosphate. Experiments with wild-type and glyphosate-resistant mutant forms of pEPSPS show that inhibition of import is directly proportional to the binding constants for glyphosate. Inhibition of import is thus a direct consequence of glyphosate binding to the enzyme-shikimate-3-phosphate complex. The potential for non-specific effects of glyphosate on the chloroplast transport mechanism has been discounted by showing that import of another chloroplast-designated protein was unaffected by high concentrations of glyphosate and shikimate-3-phosphate. The mechanism of import inhibition by glyphosate is consistent with a precursor unfolding/refolding model.

  9. Variability of doublecortin-associated dendrite maturation in adult hippocampal neurogenesis is independent of the regulation of precursor cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Plümpe, Tobias; Ehninger, Dan; Steiner, Barbara; Klempin, Friederike; Jessberger, Sebastian; Brandt, Moritz; Römer, Benedikt; Rodriguez, Gerardo Ramirez; Kronenberg, Golo; Kempermann, Gerd

    2006-01-01

    Background In the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis most regulation takes place during the phase of doublecortin (DCX) expression, either as pro-proliferative effect on precursor cells or as survival-promoting effect on postmitotic cells. We here obtained quantitative data about the proliferative population and the dynamics of postmitotic dendrite development during the period of DCX expression. The question was, whether any indication could be obtained that the initiation of dendrite development is timely bound to the exit from the cell cycle. Alternatively, the temporal course of morphological maturation might be subject to additional regulatory events. Results We found that (1) 20% of the DCX population were precursor cells in cell cycle, whereas more than 70% were postmitotic, (2) the time span until newborn cells had reached the most mature stage associated with DCX expression varied between 3 days and several weeks, (3) positive or negative regulation of precursor cell proliferation did not alter the pattern and dynamics of dendrite development. Dendrite maturation was largely independent of close contacts to astrocytes. Conclusion These data imply that dendrite maturation of immature neurons is initiated at varying times after cell cycle exit, is variable in duration, and is controlled independently of the regulation of precursor cell proliferation. We conclude that in addition to the major regulatory events in cell proliferation and selective survival, additional micro-regulatory events influence the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:17105671

  10. Variability of doublecortin-associated dendrite maturation in adult hippocampal neurogenesis is independent of the regulation of precursor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Plümpe, Tobias; Ehninger, Dan; Steiner, Barbara; Klempin, Friederike; Jessberger, Sebastian; Brandt, Moritz; Römer, Benedikt; Rodriguez, Gerardo Ramirez; Kronenberg, Golo; Kempermann, Gerd

    2006-11-15

    In the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis most regulation takes place during the phase of doublecortin (DCX) expression, either as pro-proliferative effect on precursor cells or as survival-promoting effect on postmitotic cells. We here obtained quantitative data about the proliferative population and the dynamics of postmitotic dendrite development during the period of DCX expression. The question was, whether any indication could be obtained that the initiation of dendrite development is timely bound to the exit from the cell cycle. Alternatively, the temporal course of morphological maturation might be subject to additional regulatory events. We found that (1) 20% of the DCX population were precursor cells in cell cycle, whereas more than 70% were postmitotic, (2) the time span until newborn cells had reached the most mature stage associated with DCX expression varied between 3 days and several weeks, (3) positive or negative regulation of precursor cell proliferation did not alter the pattern and dynamics of dendrite development. Dendrite maturation was largely independent of close contacts to astrocytes. These data imply that dendrite maturation of immature neurons is initiated at varying times after cell cycle exit, is variable in duration, and is controlled independently of the regulation of precursor cell proliferation. We conclude that in addition to the major regulatory events in cell proliferation and selective survival, additional micro-regulatory events influence the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

  11. Mitosis-specific phosphorylation of amyloid precursor protein at Threonine 668 leads to its altered processing and association with centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Atypical expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the molecular mechanisms by which they induce neurodegeneration are not well understood. We examined transgenic mice expressing human amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PS1) for changes in cell cycle regulatory proteins to determine whether there is a correlation between cell cycle activation and pathology development in AD. Results Our studies in the AD transgenic mice show significantly higher levels of cyclin E, cyclin D1, E2F1, and P-cdc2 in the cells in the vicinity of the plaques where maximum levels of Threonine 668 (Thr668)-phosphorylated APP accumulation was observed. This suggests that the cell cycle regulatory proteins might be influencing plaque pathology by affecting APP phosphorylation. Using neuroglioma cells overexpressing APP we demonstrate that phosphorylation of APP at Thr668 is mitosis-specific. Cells undergoing mitosis show altered cellular distribution and localization of P-APP at the centrosomes. Also, Thr668 phosphorylation in mitosis correlates with increased processing of APP to generate Aβ and the C-terminal fragment of APP, which is prevented by pharmacological inhibitors of the G1/S transition. Conclusions The data presented here suggests that cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of APP may affect its normal cellular function. For example, association of P-APP with the centrosome may affect spindle assembly and cell cycle progression, further contributing to the development of pathology in AD. The experiments with G1/S inhibitors suggest that cell cycle inhibition may impede the development of Alzheimer's pathology by suppressing modification of βAPP, and thus may represent a novel approach to AD treatment. Finally, the cell cycle regulated phosphorylation and processing of APP into Aβ and the C-terminal fragment suggest that these proteins may have a normal function during mitosis. PMID:22112898

  12. BAR domain proteins regulate Rho GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aspenström, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    BAR proteins comprise a heterogeneous group of multi-domain proteins with diverse biological functions. The common denominator is the Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain that not only confers targeting to lipid bilayers, but also provides scaffolding to mold lipid membranes into concave or convex surfaces. This function of BAR proteins is an important determinant in the dynamic reconstruction of membrane vesicles, as well as of the plasma membrane. Several BAR proteins function as linkers between cytoskeletal regulation and membrane dynamics. These links are provided by direct interactions between BAR proteins and actin-nucleation-promoting factors of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family and the Diaphanous-related formins. The Rho GTPases are key factors for orchestration of this intricate interplay. This review describes how BAR proteins regulate the activity of Rho GTPases, as well as how Rho GTPases regulate the function of BAR proteins. This mutual collaboration is a central factor in the regulation of vital cellular processes, such as cell migration, cytokinesis, intracellular transport, endocytosis, and exocytosis. PMID:25483303

  13. Impact of Canadian federal methamphetamine precursor and essential chemical regulations on methamphetamine-related acute-care hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Russell C; Cunningham, James K; Victor, J Charles; Liu, Lon-Mu

    2009-12-01

    In response to its domestic methamphetamine problems and an emerging international consensus that methamphetamine precursor and essential chemicals should be controlled, Canada regulated its import/export of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine (precursor chemicals) in January 2003, its domestic distribution of those chemicals in July 2003, and its import/export and manufacturing of essential chemicals (e.g., toluene) in January 2004. This study examines the regulations' impact on the problem of methamphetamine-related hospital admissions in Canada. ARIMA-based intervention time-series analysis was used to assess impacts on monthly counts of Canada's methamphetamine-related acute-care hospital admissions (04/1996 to 03/2005). Cocaine-, heroin/opioid-, and alcohol-related hospital admissions were examined as quasi-control time-series. No impact was found for the January 2003 regulation. The July 2003 and January 2004 regulations were associated with 20% and 21% increases, respectively, in methamphetamine-related admissions. No impacts on the quasi-control time-series were found. This study indicates that Canada's regulations were not associated with reductions in methamphetamine-related hospital admissions. The January 2003 regulation's focus on imports/exports rather than domestic distribution may help explain its lack of impact. In contrast, the two other regulations had salient domestic foci--domestic precursor sales (July 2003) and domestic essential chemical manufacturing (January 2004). Both regulations, however, were associated with increases in admissions, rather than declines. Government reports indicate that a shift in methamphetamine production, from smaller-scale operators to more sophisticated crime organizations (groups better able to circumvent the regulations), occurred around the times of the regulations. Such a shift could increase supply and possibly admissions.

  14. FET proteins regulate lifespan and neuronal integrity

    PubMed Central

    Therrien, Martine; Rouleau, Guy A.; Dion, Patrick A.; Parker, J. Alex

    2016-01-01

    The FET protein family includes FUS, EWS and TAF15 proteins, all of which have been linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a fatal neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons. Here, we show that a reduction of FET proteins in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans causes synaptic dysfunction accompanied by impaired motor phenotypes. FET proteins are also involved in the regulation of lifespan and stress resistance, acting partially through the insulin/IGF-signalling pathway. We propose that FET proteins are involved in the maintenance of lifespan, cellular stress resistance and neuronal integrity. PMID:27117089

  15. SET protein (TAF1beta, I2PP2A) is involved in neuronal apoptosis induced by an amyloid precursor protein cytoplasmic subdomain.

    PubMed

    Madeira, A; Pommet, J M; Prochiantz, A; Allinquant, B

    2005-11-01

    When overexpressed, a short cytoplasmic domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), normally unmasked in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients, activates caspase-3 and induces neuronal death. Death induction by this "Jcasp" domain is lost when tyrosine 653 is changed into an aspartate, suggesting specific interactions with unknown partners. To identify these putative partners and start to elucidate the mechanisms involved in Jcasp-induced cell death, we internalized a biotinylated version of the peptide into primary neurons and analyzed intracellular interacting proteins by pull-down and mass spectrometry. We find that SET protein, also called template-activating factor (TAF1beta) or phosphatase 2A inhibitor 2 (I2(PP2A)), specifically binds Jcasp early after internalization and that SET and Jcasp interact directly in vitro. Down-regulation of SET reduces Jcasp-induced cell death, confirming a role of this protein in Jcasp-induced apoptosis. Conversely, SET gain of function increases cell death, which suggests that SET level is crucial for neuronal survival/death. Taken together, these results suggest that SET is part of a neuronal apoptotic pathway related to Alzheimer's disease and provides a new entry in the analysis of this pathology.

  16. MicroRNA 22 Regulates Cell Cycle Length in Cerebellar Granular Neuron Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Berenguer, Jordi; Herrera, Antonio; Vuolo, Laura; Torroba, Blanca; Llorens, Franc; Sumoy, Lauro

    2013-01-01

    During cerebellum development, Sonic hedgehog (Shh)-induced proliferation of cerebellar granular neuronal precursors (CGNPs) is potently inhibited by bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). We have previously reported the upregulation of TIEG-1 and Mash1, two antimitotic factors that modulate MYCN transcription and N-Myc activity, in response to BMP2. To gain further insight into the BMP antimitotic mechanism, we used microRNA (miRNA) arrays to compare the miRNAs of CGNPs proliferating in response to Shh with those of CGNPs treated with Shh plus BMP2. The array analysis revealed that miRNA 11 (miR-22) levels significantly increased in cells treated with BMP2. Additionally, in P7 mouse cerebellum, miR-22 distribution mostly recapitulated the combination of BMP2 and BMP4 expression patterns. Accordingly, in CGNP cultures, miR-22 overexpression significantly reduced cell proliferation, whereas miR-22 suppression diminished BMP2 antiproliferative activity. In contrast to BMP2, miR-22 did not induce neural differentiation but instead significantly increased cell cycle length. Consistent with the central role played by N-myc on CGNP proliferation, Max was revealed as a direct target of miR-22, and miR-22 expression caused a significant reduction of Max protein levels and N-myc/Max-dependent promoter activity. Therefore, we conclude that, in addition to the previously described mechanisms, miR-22 plays a specific role on downstream BMPs through cerebellum growth. PMID:23671190

  17. Association of the macrophage activating factor (MAF) precursor activity with polymorphism in vitamin D-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Hideko; Sasaki, Hideyuki; Uto, Yoshihiro; Kubo, Shinichi; Hori, Hitoshi

    2004-01-01

    Serum vitamin D-binding protein (Gc protein or DBP) is a highly expressed polymorphic protein, which is a precursor of the inflammation-primed macrophage activating factor, GcMAF, by a cascade of carbohydrate processing reactions. In order to elucidate the relationship between Gc polymorphism and GcMAF precursor activity, we estimated the phagocytic ability of three homotypes of Gc protein, Gc1F-1F, Gc1S-1S and Gc2-2, through processing of their carbohydrate moiety. We performed Gc typing of human serum samples by isoelectric focusing (IEF). Gc protein from human serum was purified by affinity chromatography with 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-sepharose. A phagocytosis assay of Gc proteins, modified using beta-glycosidase and sialidase, was carried out. The Gc1F-1F phenotype was revealed to possess Galbeta1-4GalNAc linkage by the analysis of GcMAF precursor activity using beta1-4 linkage-specific galactosidase from jack bean. The GcMAF precursor activity of the Gc1F-1F phenotype was highest among three Gc homotypes. The Gc polymorphism and carbohydrate diversity of Gc protein are significant for its pleiotropic effects.

  18. A Repressor Protein Complex Regulates Leaf Growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Nathalie; Pauwels, Laurens; Baekelandt, Alexandra; De Milde, Liesbeth; Van Leene, Jelle; Besbrugge, Nienke; Heyndrickx, Ken S.; Pérez, Amparo Cuéllar; Durand, Astrid Nagels; De Clercq, Rebecca; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Eeckhout, Dominique; Gevaert, Kris; Vandepoele, Klaas; De Jaeger, Geert; Goossens, Alain; Inzé, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Cell number is an important determinant of final organ size. In the leaf, a large proportion of cells are derived from the stomatal lineage. Meristemoids, which are stem cell-like precursor cells, undergo asymmetric divisions, generating several pavement cells adjacent to the two guard cells. However, the mechanism controlling the asymmetric divisions of these stem cells prior to differentiation is not well understood. Here, we characterized PEAPOD (PPD) proteins, the only transcriptional regulators known to negatively regulate meristemoid division. PPD proteins interact with KIX8 and KIX9, which act as adaptor proteins for the corepressor TOPLESS. D3-type cyclin encoding genes were identified among direct targets of PPD2, being negatively regulated by PPDs and KIX8/9. Accordingly, kix8 kix9 mutants phenocopied PPD loss-of-function producing larger leaves resulting from increased meristemoid amplifying divisions. The identified conserved complex might be specific for leaf growth in the second dimension, since it is not present in Poaceae (grasses), which also lack the developmental program it controls. PMID:26232487

  19. The Kunitz-protease inhibitor domain in amyloid precursor protein reduces cellular mitochondrial enzymes expression and function.

    PubMed

    Chua, Li-Min; Lim, Mei-Li; Wong, Boon-Seng

    2013-08-09

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and this can be contributed by aberrant metabolic enzyme function. But, the mechanism causing this enzymatic impairment is unclear. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is known to be alternatively spliced to produce three major isoforms in the brain (APP695, APP751, APP770). Both APP770 and APP751 contain the Kunitz Protease Inhibitory (KPI) domain, but the former also contain an extra OX-2 domain. APP695 on the other hand, lacks both domains. In AD, up-regulation of the KPI-containing APP isoforms has been reported. But the functional contribution of this elevation is unclear. In the present study, we have expressed and compared the effect of the non-KPI containing APP695 and the KPI-containing APP751 on mitochondrial function. We found that the KPI-containing APP751 significantly decreased the expression of three major mitochondrial metabolic enzymes; citrate synthase, succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase (COX IV). This reduction lowers the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, COX IV activity and mitochondrial membrane potential. Overall, this study demonstrated that up-regulation of the KPI-containing APP isoforms is likely to contribute to the impairment of metabolic enzymes and mitochondrial function in AD.

  20. β-Amyloid precursor protein: function in stem cell development and Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Small, David H; Hu, Yanling; Bolós, Marta; Dawkins, Edgar; Foa, Lisa; Young, Kaylene M

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapy may be a suitable approach for the treatment of many neurodegenerative diseases. However, one major impediment to the development of successful cell-based therapies is our limited understanding of the mechanisms that instruct neural stem cell behaviour, such as proliferation and cell fate specification. The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) of Alzheimer's disease (AD) may play an important role in neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Our recent work shows that in vitro, APP stimulates neural stem or progenitor cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation. The effect on proliferation is mediated by an autocrine factor that we have identified as cystatin C. As cystatin C expression is also reported to inhibit the development of amyloid pathology in APP transgenic mice, our finding has implications for the possible use of cystatin C for the therapy of AD.

  1. Amyloid precursor proteins inhibit heme oxygenase activity and augment neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M; Doré, S; Ferris, C D; Tomita, T; Sawa, A; Wolosker, H; Borchelt, D R; Iwatsubo, T; Kim, S H; Thinakaran, G; Sisodia, S S; Snyder, S H

    2000-11-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) generates the beta-amyloid peptide, postulated to participate in the neurotoxicity of Alzheimer's disease. We report that APP and APLP bind to heme oxygenase (HO), an enzyme whose product, bilirubin, is antioxidant and neuroprotective. The binding of APP inhibits HO activity, and APP with mutations linked to the familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) provides substantially greater inhibition of HO activity than wild-type APP. Cortical cultures from transgenic mice expressing Swedish mutant APP have greatly reduced bilirubin levels, establishing that mutant APP inhibits HO activity in vivo. Oxidative neurotoxicity is markedly greater in cerebral cortical cultures from APP Swedish mutant transgenic mice than wild-type cultures. These findings indicate that augmented neurotoxicity caused by APP-HO interactions may contribute to neuronal cell death in Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Replica-Exchange Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Amyloid Precursor Protein Dimer in Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Naoyuki; Sugita, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    Aggregation of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) in the brain is the primary element in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ is derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the membrane due to the cleavages by β- and γ-secretases. Here, we predict the transmembrane structures of the wild-type and mutant APP in the biological membrane by replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations illustrate large conformational differences between the wild type and mutant APP fragments in the membrane. Dimerization of the wild type occurs due to the Cα-H⋯O hydrogen bonds at the Gly-XXX-Gly motifs between two APP fragments, whereas the mutant dimer is stabilized by the interactions between hydrophobic side chains. We also observe the downward shift of γ-cleavage site in the mutant APP, which may cause the prohibition of Aβ production.

  3. Amine oxidase activity of β-amyloid precursor protein modulates systemic and local catecholamine levels.

    PubMed

    Duce, J A; Ayton, S; Miller, A A; Tsatsanis, A; Lam, L Q; Leone, L; Corbin, J E; Butzkueven, H; Kilpatrick, T J; Rogers, J T; Barnham, K J; Finkelstein, D I; Bush, A I

    2013-02-01

    The catecholamines dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E) are neurotransmitters and hormones that mediate stress responses in tissues and plasma. The expression of β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) is responsive to stress and is high in tissues rich in catecholamines. We recently reported that APP is a ferroxidase, subsuming, in neurons and other cells, the iron-export activity that ceruloplasmin mediates in glia. Here we report that, like ceruloplasmin, APP also oxidizes synthetic amines and catecholamines catalytically (K(m) NE=0.27 mM), through a site encompassing its ferroxidase motif and selectively inhibited by zinc. Accordingly, APP knockout mice have significantly higher levels of DA, NE and E in brain, plasma and select tissues. Consistent with this, these animals have increased resting heart rate and systolic blood pressure as well as suppressed prolactin and lymphocyte levels. These findings support a role for APP in extracellular catecholaminergic clearance.

  4. Roles of amyloid precursor protein family members in neuroprotection, stress signaling and aging.

    PubMed

    Kögel, Donat; Deller, Thomas; Behl, Christian

    2012-04-01

    The roles of amyloid precursor protein (APP) family members in normal brain function are poorly understood. Under physiological conditions the majority of APP appears to be processed along the non-amyloidogenic pathway leading to the formation of the secreted N-terminal APP fragment sAPPα. This cleavage product of APP has been implicated in several physiological processes such as neuroprotection, synaptic plasticity, neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis. In this review we focus on the role of APP family members in neuroprotection and summarize the cellular and molecular mechanisms which are believed to mediate this effect. We propose that a reduction of APP processing along the non-amyloidogenic pathway during brain aging could result in an enhanced susceptibility of neurons to cellular stress and could contribute to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Early stages of probable Alzheimer disease are associated with changes in platelet amyloid precursor protein forms.

    PubMed

    Borroni, B; Colciaghi, F; Corsini, P; Akkawi, N; Rozzini, L; Del Zotto, E; Talarico, G; Cattabeni, F; Lenzi, G L; Di Luca, M; Padovani, A

    2002-12-01

    Previous findings demonstrated an altered pattern of amyloid precursor protein (APP) forms in platelets of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients, compared both with healthy control subjects or patients with non-Alzheimer-type dementia. The present study aims to evaluate whether platelet APP form ratio (APPr) is altered in patients with early stage AD. We selected 40 patients with early stage AD and 40 age-matched healthy controls. Compared with controls (mean+/-SD=0.91+/-0.3), mean APPr was decreased in AD (mean+/-SD=0.46+/-0.26, p<0.0001). Sixteen very mild AD patients (clinical dementia rating=0.5), identified among the AD group, showed a significant decrease of APPr values (mean+/-SD=0.50+/-0.3, p<0.0001). These findings indicate that alteration of APP processing in platelets is an early event and suggest that this assay might be of diagnostic value in differentiating mild AD from normal ageing.

  6. Blood cell markers in Alzheimer Disease: Amyloid Precursor Protein form ratio in platelets.

    PubMed

    Borroni, Barbara; Agosti, Chiara; Marcello, Elena; Di Luca, Monica; Padovani, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    A correct clinical diagnosis in the early stage of Alzheimer Disease (AD) is mandatory given the current available treatment with acetylcholine esterase inhibitors. Moreover, a early to preclinical diagnosis would allow to identify patients eligible for future disease-modifying therapies. In the last ten years, we have focused our attention on peripheral markers, evaluating the role of platelet Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) forms as a reliable tool for AD diagnosis since preclinical stages. APP is the key player in AD pathogenesis, and platelets contain all the enzymatic machinery to its processing, thus being the ideal candidate where to study AD pathogenetic mechanisms. In this review, we summarise the published data regarding the usefulness of platelet APP form ratio in the diagnosis of early AD. Approaches combining APP form ratio along with neuroimaging markers show the promise to accurately identify AD, even in the pre-symptomatic stage.

  7. Regulation of cardiac C-protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms of cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic responses were addressed by studying subcellular changes in protein phosphorylation, cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity and protein phosphatase activity in frog hearts. B-adrenergic agonists increased and muscarinic cholinergic agonists decreased (/sup 32/P)phosphate incorporation into C-protein, a thick filament component. Regulation of protein phosphatase activity by Iso and methacholine (MCh) was assayed using extracts of drug treated frog hearts and (/sup 32/P)phospho-C-protein as substrate. Total phosphatase activity decreased 21% in extracts from hearts perfused with 0.1 ..mu..M Iso and 17% in hearts exposed to Iso plus 1 ..mu..M methacholine. This decrease reflected decreased phosphatase-2A activity. No changes in total phosphatase activity were measurable in broken cells treated with Iso or MCh. The results suggest adrenergic stimulation changes contractile activity in frog hearts by activating cAMP-dependent protein kinase associated with particulate cellular elements and inactivating soluble protein phosphatase-2A. This is the first demonstration of coordinated regulation of these enzymes by B-adrenergic agonists favoring phosphorylation of effector proteins. Coordinated regulation by methacholine in the presence of Iso was not observed.

  8. Analysis of cleavage-site patterns in protein precursor sequences with a perceptron-type neural network.

    PubMed

    Schneider, G; Röhlk, S; Wrede, P

    1993-07-30

    A method for feature extraction from protein sequences has been developed which is based on an artificial neural filter system. Amino acid sequences are analyzed with regard to physicochemical residue properties. This alternative representation of a sequence allows an interpretation of the networks' weight values in a comprehensive and biochemically meaningful way by displaying the optimized network weights in Hinton diagrams. Signal peptidase cleavage sites of E.coli periplasmic proteins, human mitochondrial precursors and chloroplast precursors from spinach have been investigated. The network for E.coli periplasmic protein precursors classified both training and test data with 100% accuracy. The interpretation of its network weights clearly confirms the "-3,-1 rule" and the existence of a hydrophobic core region starting at position -6. Further striking features and dominant positions can be found for all three types of cleavage sites.

  9. Pathology associated memory deficits in Swedish mutant genome-based amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hock, Brian J; Lattal, K Matthew; Kulnane, Laura Shapiro; Abel, Ted; Lamb, Bruce T

    2009-12-01

    To gain insight into the relationship between pathological alterations and memory deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD), a number of amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic animal models have been generated containing familial AD mutations. The most commonly utilized method involves a cDNA-based approach, utilizing heterologous promoters to drive expression of specific APP isoforms. As a result of the assumptions inherent in the design of each model, the different cDNA-based transgenic mouse models have revealed different relationships between the biochemical, pathological and behavioral alterations observed in these models. Here we provide further characterization of a genomic-based, amyloid precursor protein yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mouse model of AD, R1.40, that makes few assumptions regarding disease pathogenesis to study the relationship between brain pathology and altered behavior. Aged R1.40 transgenic and control mice were tested for learning and memory in the Morris water maze and for working memory in the Y maze. Results from the water maze demonstrated intact learning in the both control and R1.40 mice, but impairments in the long-term retention of this information in the transgenic mice, but not controls. Interestingly, however, long-term memory deficits did not correlate with the presence of Abeta deposits within the group of animals examined. By contrast, age-related working memory impairments were also observed in the Y maze in the R1.40 mice, and these deficits correlated with the presence of Abeta deposits. Our results demonstrate unique behavioral alterations in the R1.40 mouse model of AD that are likely both dependent and independent of Abeta deposition.

  10. Homocysteine metabolism is associated with cerebrospinal fluid levels of soluble amyloid precursor protein and amyloid beta.

    PubMed

    Oikonomidi, Aikaterini; Lewczuk, Piotr; Kornhuber, Johannes; Smulders, Yvo; Linnebank, Michael; Semmler, Alexander; Popp, Julius

    2016-10-01

    Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may contribute to amyloidogenesis by modulating the amyloid precursor protein (APP) production and processing. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationships between cerebral amyloid production and both blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of the homocysteine metabolism. We assessed CSF concentrations of soluble APPα, soluble APPβ, and amyloid β1-42 (Aβ1-42), as well as plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcys), total vitamin B12, and folate, and CSF concentrations of homocysteine (Hcys-CSF), 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF), S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) in 59 subjects with normal cognition. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess associations between homocysteine metabolism parameters and amyloid production. The study was approved by the Ethical Committee of the University of Bonn. After controlling for age, gender, APOEe4 status, and albumin ratio (Qalb), higher Aβ1-42 CSF levels were associated with high Hcys and low vitamin B12 plasma levels as well as with high Hcys, high SAH, and low 5-MTHF CSF levels. Higher CSF concentrations of sAPPα and sAPPβ were associated with high SAH levels. The results suggest that disturbed homocysteine metabolism is related to increased CSF levels of sAPP forms and Aβ1-42, and may contribute to the accumulation of amyloid pathology in the brain. Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may contribute to amyloidogenesis by modulating the amyloid precursor protein (APP) production and processing. We found associations between CSF levels of soluble APP forms and Aβ1-42, and markers of the homocysteine metabolism in both plasma and CSF in adults with normal cognition. Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may represent a target for preventive and early disease-modifying interventions in Alzheimer's disease. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. Amyloid precursor protein metabolism and inflammation markers in preclinical Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Alcolea, Daniel; Martínez-Lage, Pablo; Sánchez-Juan, Pascual; Olazarán, Javier; Antúnez, Carmen; Izagirre, Andrea; Ecay-Torres, Mirian; Estanga, Ainara; Clerigué, Montserrat; Guisasola, Maria Concepción; Sánchez Ruiz, Domingo; Marín Muñoz, Juan; Calero, Miguel; Blesa, Rafael; Clarimón, Jordi; Carmona-Iragui, María; Morenas-Rodríguez, Estrella; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Eloy; Vázquez Higuera, José Luis; Fortea, Juan; Lleó, Alberto

    2015-08-18

    To investigate CSF markers involved in amyloid precursor protein processing, neuronal damage, and neuroinflammation in the preclinical stages of Alzheimer disease (AD) and participants with suspected non-Alzheimer pathology (SNAP). We collected CSF from 266 cognitively normal volunteers participating in a cross-sectional multicenter study (the SIGNAL study) to investigate markers involved in amyloid precursor protein processing (Aβ42, sAPPβ, β-secretase activity), neuronal damage (total-tau [t-tau], phospho-tau [p-tau]), and neuroinflammation (YKL-40). We analyzed the relationship among biomarkers, clinical variables, and the APOE genotype, and compared biomarker levels across the preclinical stages of the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association classification: stage 0, 1, 2, 3, and SNAP. The median age in the whole cohort was 58.8 years (range 39.8-81.6). Participants in stages 2-3 and SNAP had higher levels of YKL-40 than those in stages 0 and 1. Participants with SNAP had higher levels of sAPPβ than participants in stage 0 and 1. No differences were found between stages 0, 1, and 2-3 in sAPPβ and β-secretase activity in CSF. Age correlated with t-tau, p-tau, and YKL-40. It also correlated with Aβ42, but only in APOE ε4 carriers. Aβ42 correlated positively with t-tau, sAPPβ, and YKL-40 in participants with normal Aβ42. Our findings suggest that inflammation in the CNS increases in normal aging and is intimately related to markers of neurodegeneration in the preclinical stages of AD and SNAP. sAPPβ and β-secretase activity are not useful diagnostic or staging markers in preclinical AD. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  12. Induction of serine racemase expression and D-serine release from microglia by secreted amyloid precursor protein (sAPP).

    PubMed

    Wu, Shengzhou; Basile, Anthony S; Barger, Steven W

    2007-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves neuronal loss and reduction of synaptic density in specific brain region. Some of the neuronal deaths are associated with excitotoxicity. We previously reported that amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) induced release of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) co-agonists, including glutamate and D-serine. The induction of D-serine production by Abeta involves transcriptional and/or translational regulation of serine racemase gene. Similarly, we report here that conditioned medium from microglia treated with secreted amyloid precursor protein (sAPP) contained elevated levels of D-serine. In microglia, sAPP increased the steady-state dimeric protein level of serine racemase. Promoter-reporter and mRNA analyses suggested that serine racemase is transcriptionally induced by sAPP. These data extend the link between excitotoxicity and neuroinflammation. D-serine may cooperate with glutamate to link neuroinflammation with excitotoxicity, suggesting a pathogenic mechanism applicable to neuronal death in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Brown fat determination and development from muscle precursor cells by novel action of bone morphogenetic protein 6.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ankur; Huard, Christine; Vernochet, Cecile; Ziemek, Daniel; Knowlton, Kelly M; Tyminski, Edyta; Paradis, Theresa; Zhang, Ying; Jones, Jessica E C; von Schack, David; Brown, Christopher T; Milos, Patrice M; Coyle, Anthony J; Tremblay, Frederic; Martinez, Robert V

    2014-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays a pivotal role in promoting energy expenditure by the virtue of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1) that differentiates BAT from its energy storing white adipose tissue (WAT) counterpart. The clinical implication of "classical" BAT (originates from Myf5 positive myoblastic lineage) or the "beige" fat (originates through trans-differentiation of WAT) activation in improving metabolic parameters is now becoming apparent. However, the inducers and endogenous molecular determinants that govern the lineage commitment and differentiation of classical BAT remain obscure. We report here that in the absence of any forced gene expression, stimulation with bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6) induces brown fat differentiation from skeletal muscle precursor cells of murine and human origins. Through a comprehensive transcriptional profiling approach, we have discovered that two days of BMP6 stimulation in C2C12 myoblast cells is sufficient to induce genes characteristic of brown preadipocytes. This developmental switch is modulated in part by newly identified regulators, Optineurin (Optn) and Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox2). Furthermore, pathway analyses using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE) identified additional potential causal drivers of this BMP6 induced commitment switch. Subsequent analyses to decipher key pathway that facilitates terminal differentiation of these BMP6 primed cells identified a key role for Insulin Like Growth Factor-1 Receptor (IGF-1R). Collectively these data highlight a therapeutically innovative role for BMP6 by providing a means to enhance the amount of myogenic lineage derived brown fat.

  14. Brown Fat Determination and Development from Muscle Precursor Cells by Novel Action of Bone Morphogenetic Protein 6

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ankur; Huard, Christine; Vernochet, Cecile; Ziemek, Daniel; Knowlton, Kelly M.; Tyminski, Edyta; Paradis, Theresa; Zhang, Ying; Jones, Jessica E. C.; von Schack, David; Brown, Christopher T.; Milos, Patrice M.; Coyle, Anthony J.; Tremblay, Frederic; Martinez, Robert V.

    2014-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays a pivotal role in promoting energy expenditure by the virtue of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1) that differentiates BAT from its energy storing white adipose tissue (WAT) counterpart. The clinical implication of “classical” BAT (originates from Myf5 positive myoblastic lineage) or the “beige” fat (originates through trans-differentiation of WAT) activation in improving metabolic parameters is now becoming apparent. However, the inducers and endogenous molecular determinants that govern the lineage commitment and differentiation of classical BAT remain obscure. We report here that in the absence of any forced gene expression, stimulation with bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6) induces brown fat differentiation from skeletal muscle precursor cells of murine and human origins. Through a comprehensive transcriptional profiling approach, we have discovered that two days of BMP6 stimulation in C2C12 myoblast cells is sufficient to induce genes characteristic of brown preadipocytes. This developmental switch is modulated in part by newly identified regulators, Optineurin (Optn) and Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox2). Furthermore, pathway analyses using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE) identified additional potential causal drivers of this BMP6 induced commitment switch. Subsequent analyses to decipher key pathway that facilitates terminal differentiation of these BMP6 primed cells identified a key role for Insulin Like Growth Factor-1 Receptor (IGF-1R). Collectively these data highlight a therapeutically innovative role for BMP6 by providing a means to enhance the amount of myogenic lineage derived brown fat. PMID:24658703

  15. Isolation of a complementary DNA clone encoding a precursor to human eosinophil major basic protein

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    A 14-kD protein was purified from human PMNs and its NH2-terminal sequence was determined. Comparison of a portion of the NH2-terminal sequence of this protein to the recently reported NH2-terminal sequence of eosinophil major basic protein (MBP) showed them to be identical. To aid further characterization of the structural and functional properties of this molecule, we isolated from an HL-60 cDNA library a single class of cDNA clones whose sequence matched exactly the NH2- terminal amino acid sequence of the 14-kD polypeptide. Northern analysis of HL-60 cells suggests that MBP is constitutively expressed in HL-60 cells and is highly transcribed from a single copy gene. The sequence of the full-length cDNA clones predicts that MBP is synthesized as a 23-kD precursor form (pro-MBP) which is subsequently cleaved to release the mature 14-kD MBP. The putative pro-MBP has a predicted pI of 6.0, but both the charged and the hydrophobic residues are asymmetrically distributed, creating a bipolar molecule. The NH2- terminal half has a predicted pI of 3.7 and is hydrophilic, while the COOH-terminal half (corresponding to mature MBP) has a predicted pI of 11.1 and is hydrophobic. PMID:3199069

  16. Drosophila amyloid precursor protein-like is required for long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Goguel, Valérie; Belair, Anne-Laure; Ayaz, Derya; Lampin-Saint-Amaux, Aurélie; Scaplehorn, Niki; Hassan, Bassem A; Preat, Thomas

    2011-01-19

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays an important role in Alzheimer's disease (AD), a progressive neurodegenerative pathology that first manifests as a decline of memory. While the main hypothesis for AD pathology centers on the proteolytic processing of APP, very little is known about the physiological function of the APP protein in the adult brain. Likewise, whether APP loss of function contributes to AD remains unclear. Drosophila has been used extensively as a model organism to study neuronal function and pathology. In addition, many of the molecular mechanisms underlying memory are thought to be conserved from flies to mammals, prompting us to study the function of APPL, the fly APP ortholog, during associative memory. It was previously shown that APPL expression is highly enriched in the mushroom bodies (MBs), a specialized brain structure involved in olfactory memory. We analyzed memory in flies in which APPL expression has been silenced specifically and transiently in the adult MBs. Our results show that in adult flies, APPL is not required for learning but is specifically involved in long-term memory, a long lasting memory whose formation requires de novo protein synthesis and is thought to require synaptic structural plasticity. These data support the hypothesis that disruption of normal APP function may contribute to early AD cognitive impairment.

  17. Amyloid-β precursor protein: Multiple fragments, numerous transport routes and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Muresan, Virgil; Ladescu Muresan, Zoia

    2015-05-15

    This review provides insight into the intraneuronal transport of the Amyloid-β Precursor Protein (APP), the prototype of an extensively posttranslationally modified and proteolytically cleaved transmembrane protein. Uncovering the intricacies of APP transport proves to be a challenging endeavor of cell biology research, deserving increased priority, since APP is at the core of the pathogenic process in Alzheimer's disease. After being synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum in the neuronal soma, APP enters the intracellular transport along the secretory, endocytic, and recycling routes. Along these routes, APP undergoes cleavage into defined sets of fragments, which themselves are transported - mostly independently - to distinct sites in neurons, where they exert their functions. We review the currently known routes and mechanisms of transport of full-length APP, and of APP fragments, commenting largely on the experimental challenges posed by studying transport of extensively cleaved proteins. The review emphasizes the interrelationships between the proteolytic and posttranslational modifications, the intracellular transport, and the functions of the APP species. A goal remaining to be addressed in the future is the incorporation of the various views on APP transport into a coherent picture. In this review, the disease context is only marginally addressed; the focus is on the basic biology of APP transport under normal conditions. As shown, the studies of APP transport uncovered numerous mechanisms of transport, some of them conventional, and others, novel, awaiting exploration.

  18. A role for 12/15 lipoxygenase in the amyloid beta precursor protein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Succol, Francesca; Praticò, Domenico

    2007-10-01

    12/15 Lipoxygenase (12/15LO) protein levels and activity are increased in pathologically affected regions of Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains, compared with controls. Its metabolic products are elevated in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with AD and individuals with mild cognitive impairment, suggesting that this enzyme may be involved early in AD pathogenesis. Herein, we investigate the effect of pharmacologic inhibition of 12/15LO on the amyloid beta precursor protein (APP) metabolism. To this end, we used CHO and N2A cells stably expressing human APP with the Swedish mutant, and two structurally distinct and selective 12/15LO inhibitors, PD146176 and CDC. Our results demonstrated that both drugs dose-dependently reduced Abeta formation without affecting total APP levels. Interestingly, in the same cells we observed a significant reduction in secreted (s)APPbeta and beta-secretase (BACE), but not sAPPalpha and ADAM10 protein levels. Together, these data show for the first time that this enzymatic pathway influences Abeta formation whereby modulating the BACE proteolytic cascade. We conclude that specific pharmacologic inhibition of 12/15LO could represent a novel therapeutic target for treating or preventing AD pathology in humans.

  19. ASP1 (BACE2) cleaves the amyloid precursor protein at the beta-secretase site.

    PubMed

    Hussain, I; Powell, D J; Howlett, D R; Chapman, G A; Gilmour, L; Murdock, P R; Tew, D G; Meek, T D; Chapman, C; Schneider, K; Ratcliffe, S J; Tattersall, D; Testa, T T; Southan, C; Ryan, D M; Simmons, D L; Walsh, F S; Dingwall, C; Christie, G

    2000-11-01

    Sequential proteolytic processing of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) by beta- and gamma-secretases generates the 4-kDa amyloid (A beta) peptide, a key component of the amyloid plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We and others have recently reported the identification and characterisation of an aspartic proteinase, Asp2 (BACE), as beta-secretase. Here we describe the characterization of a second highly related aspartic proteinase, Asp1 as a second beta-secretase candidate. Asp1 is expressed in brain as detected at the mRNA level and at the protein level. Transient expression of Asp1 in APP-expressing cells results in an increase in the level of beta-secretase-derived soluble APP and the corresponding carboxy-terminal fragment. Paradoxically there is a decrease in the level of soluble A beta secreted from the cells. Asp1 colocalizes with APP in the Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum compartments of cultured cells. Asp1, when expressed as an Fc fusion protein (Asp1-Fc), has the N-terminal sequence ALEP..., indicating that it has lost the prodomain. Asp1-Fc exhibits beta-secretase activity by cleaving both wild-type and Swedish variant (KM/NL) APP peptides at the beta-secretase site.

  20. Production, purification and functional validation of human secreted amyloid precursor proteins for use as neuropharmacological reagents.

    PubMed

    Turner, Paul R; Bourne, Katie; Garama, Daniel; Carne, Alan; Abraham, Wickliffe C; Tate, Warren P

    2007-08-15

    The secreted fragment of the amyloid precursor protein (sAPPalpha) generated following cleavage by alpha-secretase is an important mediator of cell function and is both neurotrophic and neuroprotective. HEK 293T cells have been stably integrated with a fragment of the APP gene to produce and secrete either sAPPalpha, or the alternative cleavage product sAPPbeta. Heparin binding domains on the proteins have been utilised to develop a one-step fast-performance-liquid-chromatography (FPLC) purification of sAPPs from the conditioned media. Immunoblotting analyses with a sAPP specific antibody coupled with highly sensitive silver staining techniques have validated the expression and purification strategy. Functional activity of the purified fragments was demonstrated by their ability to protect COS-7 and SH-SY5Y (neuroblastoma) cells against the adverse effects of glucose deprivation in a cell viability assay. The purified sAPPs also activated the NFkappaB transcription factor in COS-7 cells transfected with a luciferase reporter plasmid, with sAPPalpha the more potent activator as expected. The simple protocol to produce these mammalian expressed proteins will facilitate their use as potential neuropharmacological reagents in the elucidation of biochemical pathways modulated by sAPPs, and in the study of Alzheimer's disease mechanisms in general.

  1. The beta-amyloid domain is essential for axonal sorting of amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Tienari, P J; De Strooper, B; Ikonen, E; Simons, M; Weidemann, A; Czech, C; Hartmann, T; Ida, N; Multhaup, G; Masters, C L; Van Leuven, F; Beyreuther, K; Dotti, C G

    1996-01-01

    We have analysed the axonal sorting signals of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Wild-type and mutant versions of human APP were expressed in hippocampal neurons using the Semliki forest virus system. We show that wild-type APP and mutations implicated in Alzheimer's disease and another brain beta-amyloidosis are sorted to the axon. By analysis of deletion mutants we found that the membrane-inserted APP ectodomain but not the cytoplasmic tail is required for axonal sorting. Systematic deletions of the APP ectodomain identified two regions required for axonal delivery: one encoded by exons 11-15 in the carbohydrate domain, the other encoded by exons 16-17 in the juxtamembraneous beta-amyloid domain. Treatment of the cells with the N-glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin induced missorting of wild-type APP, supporting the importance of glycosylation in axonal sorting of APP. The data revealed a hierarchy of sorting signals on APP: the beta-amyloid-dependent membrane proximal signal was the major contributor to axonal sorting, while N-glycosylation had a weaker effect. Furthermore, recessive somatodendritic signals, most likely in the cytoplasmic tail, directed the protein to the dendrites when the ectodomain was deleted. Analysis of detergent solubility of APP and another axonally delivered protein, hemagglutinin, demonstrated that only hemagglutinin formed CHAPS-insoluble complexes, suggesting distinct mechanisms of axonal sorting for these two proteins. This study is the first delineation of sorting requirements of an axonally targeted protein in polarized neurons and indicates that the beta-amyloid domain plays a major role in axonal delivery of APP. Images PMID:8895567

  2. Protein mechanics: how force regulates molecular function.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Christian; Gräter, Frauke

    2013-10-01

    Regulation of proteins is ubiquitous and vital for any organism. Protein activity can be altered chemically, by covalent modifications or non-covalent binding of co-factors. Mechanical forces are emerging as an additional way of regulating proteins, by inducing a conformational change or by partial unfolding. We review some advances in experimental and theoretical techniques to study protein allostery driven by mechanical forces, as opposed to the more conventional ligand driven allostery. In this respect, we discuss recent single molecule pulling experiments as they have substantially augmented our view on the protein allostery by mechanical signals in recent years. Finally, we present a computational analysis technique, Force Distribution Analysis, that we developed to reveal allosteric pathways in proteins. Any kind of external perturbation, being it ligand binding or mechanical stretching, can be viewed as an external force acting on the macromolecule, rendering force-based experimental or computational techniques, a very general approach to the mechanics involved in protein allostery. This unifying view might aid to decipher how complex allosteric protein machineries are regulated on the single molecular level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Regulators of G protein signalling proteins in the human myometrium.

    PubMed

    Ladds, Graham; Zervou, Sevasti; Vatish, Manu; Thornton, Steven; Davey, John

    2009-05-21

    The contractile state of the human myometrium is controlled by extracellular signals that promote relaxation or contraction. Many of these signals function through G protein-coupled receptors at the cell surface, stimulating heterotrimeric G proteins and leading to changes in the activity of effector proteins responsible for bringing about the response. G proteins can interact with multiple receptors and many different effectors and are key players in the response. Regulators of G protein signalling (RGS) proteins are GTPase activating proteins for heterotrimeric G proteins and help terminate the signal. Little is known about the function of RGS proteins in human myometrium and we have therefore analysed transcript levels for RGS proteins at various stages of pregnancy (non-pregnant, preterm, term non-labouring, term labouring). RGS2 and RGS5 were the most abundantly expressed isolates in each of the patient groups. The levels of RGS4 and RGS16 (and to a lesser extent RGS2 and RGS14) increased in term labouring samples relative to the other groups. Yeast two-hybrid analysis and co-immunoprecipitation in myometrial cells revealed that both RGS2 and RGS5 interact directly with the cytoplasmic tail of the oxytocin receptor, suggesting they might help regulate signalling through this receptor.

  4. Regulation of protein turnover by heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Bozaykut, Perinur; Ozer, Nesrin Kartal; Karademir, Betul

    2014-12-01

    Protein turnover reflects the balance between synthesis and degradation of proteins, and it is a crucial process for the maintenance of the cellular protein pool. The folding of proteins, refolding of misfolded proteins, and also degradation of misfolded and damaged proteins are involved in the protein quality control (PQC) system. Correct protein folding and degradation are controlled by many different factors, one of the most important of which is the heat shock protein family. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are in the class of molecular chaperones, which may prevent the inappropriate interaction of proteins and induce correct folding. On the other hand, these proteins play significant roles in the degradation pathways, including endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD), the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and autophagy. This review focuses on the emerging role of HSPs in the regulation of protein turnover; the effects of HSPs on the degradation machineries ERAD, autophagy, and proteasome; as well as the role of posttranslational modifications in the PQC system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Global transcriptional repression in C. elegans germline precursors by regulated sequestration of TAF-4.

    PubMed

    Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Nishi, Yuichi; Robertson, Scott M; Lin, Rueyling

    2008-10-03

    In C. elegans, four asymmetric divisions, beginning with the zygote (P0), generate transcriptionally repressed germline blastomeres (P1-P4) and somatic sisters that become transcriptionally active. The protein PIE-1 represses transcription in the later germline blastomeres but not in the earlier germline blastomeres P0 and P1. We show here that OMA-1 and OMA-2, previously shown to regulate oocyte maturation, repress transcription in P0 and P1 by binding to and sequestering in the cytoplasm TAF-4, a component critical for assembly of TFIID and the pol II preinitiation complex. OMA-1/2 binding to TAF-4 is developmentally regulated, requiring phosphorylation by the DYRK kinase MBK-2, which is activated at meiosis II after fertilization. OMA-1/2 are normally degraded after the first mitosis, but ectopic expression of wild-type OMA-1 is sufficient to repress transcription in both somatic and later germline blastomeres. We propose that phosphorylation by MBK-2 serves as a developmental switch, converting OMA-1/2 from oocyte to embryo regulators.

  6. Activation of extrasynaptic, but not synaptic, NMDA receptors modifies amyloid precursor protein expression pattern and increases amyloid-ß production.

    PubMed

    Bordji, Karim; Becerril-Ortega, Javier; Nicole, Olivier; Buisson, Alain

    2010-11-24

    Calcium is a key mediator controlling essential neuronal functions depending on electrical activity. Altered neuronal calcium homeostasis affects metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP), leading to increased production of β-amyloid (Aβ), and contributing to the initiation of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A linkage between excessive glutamate receptor activation and neuronal Aβ release was established, and recent reports suggest that synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation may have distinct consequences in plasticity, gene regulation, and neuronal death. Here, we report for the first time that prolonged activation of extrasynaptic NMDAR, but not synaptic NMDAR, dramatically increased the neuronal production of Aβ. This effect was preceded by a shift from APP695 to Kunitz protease inhibitory domain (KPI) containing APPs (KPI-APPs), isoforms exhibiting an important amyloidogenic potential. Conversely, after synaptic NMDAR activation, we failed to detect any KPI-APP expression and neuronal Aβ production was not modified. Calcium imaging data showed that intracellular calcium concentration after extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation was lower than after synaptic activation. This suggests distinct signaling pathways for each pool of receptors. We found that modification of neuronal APP expression pattern triggered by extrasynaptic NMDAR activation was regulated at an alternative splicing level involving calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV, but overall APP expression remained identical. Finally, memantine dose-dependently inhibited extrasynaptic NMDAR-induced KPI-APPs expression as well as neuronal Aβ release. Altogether, these data suggest that a chronic activation of extrasynaptic NMDAR promotes amyloidogenic KPI-APP expression leading to neuronal Aβ release, representing a causal risk factor for developing AD.

  7. Apolipoprotein E forms stable complexes with recombinant Alzheimer's disease beta-amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, C; Cazorla, P; Miguel, C D; Valdivieso, F; Vázquez, J

    1997-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE), a protein genetically linked to the incidence of Alzheimer's disease, forms SDS-stable complexes in vitro with beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta), the primary component of senile plaques. In the present study, we investigated whether apoE was able to bind full-length Abeta precursor protein (APP). Using a maltose-binding-protein-APP fusion protein and human very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), we detected an interaction of apoE with APP that was inhibited by Abeta or anti-apoE antibody. Saturation-binding experiments indicated a single binding equilibrium with an apparent 1:1 stoichiometry and a dissociation constant of 15 nM. An interaction was also observed using apoE from cerebrospinal fluid or delipidated VLDL, as well as recombinant apoE. APP.apoE complexes were SDS-stable, and their formation was not inhibited by reducing conditions; however, they were dissociated by SDS under reducing conditions. ApoE.APP complexes formed high-molecular-mass aggregates, and competition experiments suggested that amino acids 14-23 of Abeta are responsible for complex-formation. Finally, no differences were found when studying the interaction of APP with apoE3 or apoE4. Taken together, our results demonstrate that apoE may form stable complexes with the Abeta moiety of APP with characteristics similar to those of complexes formed with isolated Abeta, and suggest the intriguing possibility that apoE-APP interactions may be pathologically relevant in vivo. PMID:9224643

  8. Endothelium-specific amyloid precursor protein deficiency causes endothelial dysfunction in cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    d'Uscio, Livius V; He, Tongrong; Santhanam, Anantha V; Katusic, Zvonimir S

    2017-01-01

    The exact physiological function of amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) in endothelial cells is unknown. Endothelium-specific APP-deficient (eAPP(-/-)) mice were created to gain new insights into the role of APP in the control of vascular endothelial function. Endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine were significantly impaired in basilar arteries of global APP knockout (APP(-/-)) and eAPP(-/-) mice ( P < 0.05). In contrast, endothelium-independent relaxations to nitric oxide (NO)-donor diethylamine-NONOate were unchanged. Western blot analysis revealed that protein expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was significantly downregulated in large cerebral arteries of APP(-/-) mice and eAPP(-/-) mice as compared to respective wild-type littermates ( P < 0.05). Furthermore, basal levels of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) were also significantly reduced in large cerebral arteries of APP-deficient mice ( P < 0.05). In contrast, protein expression of prostacyclin synthase as well as levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was not affected by genetic inactivation of APP in endothelial cells. By using siRNA to knockdown APP in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells we also found a significant downregulation of eNOS mRNA and protein expressions in APP-deficient endothelium ( P < 0.05). These findings indicate that under physiological conditions, expression of APP in cerebral vascular endothelium plays an important protective function by maintaining constitutive expression of eNOS .

  9. A γ-Secretase-independent Mechanism of Signal Transduction by the Amyloid Precursor Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Matthew R.; Yankner, Bruce A.

    2006-01-01

    It has been proposed that γ-secretase-mediated release of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) intracellular domain (AICD) results in nuclear translocation and signaling through a complex with the adaptor protein Fe65 and the histone acetyltransferase Tip60. Here, we show that APP and Fe65 activate transcription through a Gal4-Tip60 reporter in presenilin-1/2-deficient cells lacking generation of AICD. APP and Fe65 also activated transcription in the presence of γ-secretase inhibitors that prevent amyloid β-peptide production in human embryonic kidney 293 and SH-SY5Y cells. In contrast to the transcriptionally active Notch intracellular domain, expression of AICD did not activate transcription. An alternative mechanism for APP signal transduction is suggested by the identification of essential cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) phosphorylation sites in Tip60. Mutation of these Tip60 phosphorylation sites or treatment with the CDK inhibitor roscovitine blocked the ability of APP to signal through Tip60. Moreover, APP stabilized Tip60 through CDK-dependent phosphorylation. Subcellular fractionation and confocal immunofluorescence showed that APP recruited Tip60 to membrane compartments. Thus, APP may signal to the nucleus by a γ-secretase-independent mechanism that involves membrane sequestration and phosphorylation of Tip60. PMID:16103124

  10. LINGO-1 promotes lysosomal degradation of amyloid-β protein precursor.

    PubMed

    de Laat, Rian; Meabon, James S; Wiley, Jesse C; Hudson, Mark P; Montine, Thomas J; Bothwell, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Sequential proteolytic cleavages of amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) by β-secretase and γ-secretase generate amyloid β (Aβ) peptides, which are thought to contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Much of this processing occurs in endosomes following endocytosis of AβPP from the plasma membrane. However, this pathogenic mode of processing AβPP may occur in competition with lysosomal degradation of AβPP, a common fate of membrane proteins trafficking through the endosomal system. Following up on published reports that LINGO-1 binds and promotes the amyloidogenic processing of AβPP we have examined the consequences of LINGO-1/AβPP interactions. We report that LINGO-1 and its paralogs, LINGO-2 and LINGO-3, decrease processing of AβPP in the amyloidogenic pathway by promoting lysosomal degradation of AβPP. We also report that LINGO-1 levels are reduced in AD brain, representing a possible pathogenic mechanism stimulating the generation of Aβ peptides in AD.

  11. Mitochondrial γ-secretase participates in the metabolism of mitochondria-associated amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Pavel F; Wiehager, Birgitta; Sakai, Jun; Frykman, Susanne; Behbahani, Homira; Winblad, Bengt; Ankarcrona, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mitochondria were found to be the target both for amyloid precursor protein (APP) that accumulates in the mitochondrial import channels and for Aβ that interacts with several proteins inside mitochondria and leads to mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we have studied the role of mitochondrial γ-secretase in processing different substrates. We found that a significant proportion of APP is associated with mitochondria in cultured cells and that γ-secretase cleaves the shedded C-terminal part of APP identified as C83 associated with the outer membrane of mitochondria (OMM). Moreover, we have established the topology of the C83 in the OMM and found the APP intracellular domain (AICD) to be located inside mitochondria. Our data show for the first time that APP is a substrate for the mitochondrial γ-secretase and that AICD is produced inside mitochondria. Thus, we provide a mechanistic view of the mitochondria-associated APP metabolism where AICD, P3 peptide and potentially Aβ are produced locally and may contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction in AD.

  12. Cholesterol-induced astrocyte activation is associated with increased amyloid precursor protein expression and processing.

    PubMed

    Avila-Muñoz, Evangelina; Arias, Clorinda

    2015-06-19

    Cholesterol is essential for maintaining lipid raft integrity and has been regarded as a crucial regulatory factor for amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The vast majority of studies on amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolism and amyloid β-protein (Aβ) production have focused on neurons. The role of astrocytes remains largely unexplored, despite the presence of activated astrocytes in the brains of most patients with AD and in transgenic models of the disease. The role of cholesterol in Aβ production has been thoroughly studied in neurons and attributed to the participation of lipid rafts in APP metabolism. Thus, in this study, we analyzed the effect of cholesterol loading in astrocytes and analyzed the expression and processing of APP. We found that cholesterol exposure induced astrocyte activation, increased APP content, and enhanced the interaction of APP with BACE-1. These effects were associated with an enrichment of ganglioside GM1-cholesterol patches in the astrocyte membrane and with increased ROS production. GLIA 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The Amyloid Precursor Protein Is a Conserved Receptor for Slit to Mediate Axon Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongmei; Mutlu, Sena A.; Bowser, Devon A.; Wang, Meng C.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a receptor-like membrane protein. Although APP processing and β-amyloid production play a central role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis, the physiological function of APP remains elusive. Here, we identify APP as a novel receptor for Slit that mediates axon guidance and neural circuit formation. APP deficiency abolishes the Slit repulsive effect in a 3D olfactory explant culture, consistent with its callosal projection deficit in vivo and reminiscent of Slit loss. Inactivation of APP ortholog APL-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans results in pioneer axon mistargeting and genetic analysis places APL-1 in the SLT-1 (Slit)/SAX-3 (Robo) repulsive pathway. Slit binds to APP through the E1 domain, which triggers APP ectodomain shedding and recruitment of the intracellular FE65 and Pak1 complex and associated Rac1 GTPase activation. Our study establishes APP as a novel receptor for Slit ligand mediating axon guidance and neural circuit formation. PMID:28785723

  14. Amyloid precursor proteins, neural differentiation of pluripotent stem cells and its relevance to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Khandekar, Neeta; Lie, Khun Hong; Sachdev, Perminder S; Sidhu, Kuldip S

    2012-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a leading cause of age-related dementia that is characterized by an extensive loss of neurons and synaptic transmission. The pathological hallmarks of AD are neurofibrillary tangles and deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques. Previous research has investigated how Aβ fragments disrupt synaptic mechanisms in the vulnerable regions of the brain. There is a tremendous potential for stem cell technology to extend upon this research, not only in terms of developing therapeutic applications, but also in modeling AD. Indeed, the advent of induced pluripotent stem cell technology has opened up exciting new avenues for generating patient and disease-specific cell lines from somatic cells that may be used to model AD. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a key protein in neuronal development and this article reviews the role of APP in AD. Stem cell technology offers the opportunity to make use of APP in the directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells into functional neurons, a process that may help generate a model of AD and thereby facilitate an understanding of the mechanisms underlying this disease.

  15. Overproduction, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of human Fe65-PTB2 in complex with the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain

    SciTech Connect

    Radzimanowski, Jens; Beyreuther, Konrad; Sinning, Irmgard; Wild, Klemens

    2008-05-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which releases the aggregation-prone amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and liberates the intracellular domain (AICD) that interacts with various adaptor proteins. The crystallized AICD–Fe65-PTB2 complex is of central importance for APP translocation, nuclear signalling, processing and Aβ generation. Alzheimer’s disease is associated with typical brain deposits (senile plaques) that mainly contain the neurotoxic amyloid β peptide. This peptide results from proteolytic processing of the type I transmembrane protein amyloid precursor protein (APP). During this proteolytic pathway the APP intracellular domain (AICD) is released into the cytosol, where it associates with various adaptor proteins. The interaction of the AICD with the C-terminal phosphotyrosine-binding domain of Fe65 (Fe65-PTB2) regulates APP translocation, signalling and processing. Human AICD and Fe65-PTB2 have been cloned, overproduced and purified in large amounts in Escherichia coli. A complex of Fe65-PTB2 with the C-terminal 32 amino acids of the AICD gave well diffracting hexagonal crystals and data have been collected to 2.1 Å resolution. Initial phases obtained by the molecular-replacement method are of good quality and revealed well defined electron density for the substrate peptide.

  16. Small molecule regulators of protein arginine methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Donghang; Yadav, Neelu; King, Randall W; Swanson, Maurice S; Weinstein, Edward J; Bedford, Mark T

    2004-06-04

    Here we report the identification of small molecules that specifically inhibit protein arginine N-methyltransferase (PRMT) activity. PRMTs are a family of proteins that either monomethylate or dimethylate the guanidino nitrogen atoms of arginine side chains. This common post-translational modification is implicated in protein trafficking, signal transduction, and transcriptional regulation. Most methyltransferases use the methyl donor, S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet), as a cofactor. Current methyltransferase inhibitors display limited specificity, indiscriminately targeting all enzymes that use AdoMet. In this screen we have identified a primary compound, AMI-1, that specifically inhibits arginine, but not lysine, methyltransferase activity in vitro and does not compete for the AdoMet binding site. Furthermore, AMI-1 prevents in vivo arginine methylation of cellular proteins and can modulate nuclear receptor-regulated transcription from estrogen and androgen response elements, thus operating as a brake on certain hormone actions.

  17. Characterization of the beta amyloid precursor protein-like gene in the central nervous system of the crab Chasmagnathus. Expression during memory consolidation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Human β-amyloid, the main component in the neuritic plaques found in patients with Alzheimer's disease, is generated by cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein. Beyond the role in pathology, members of this protein family are synaptic proteins and have been associated with synaptogenesis, neuronal plasticity and memory, both in vertebrates and in invertebrates. Consolidation is necessary to convert a short-term labile memory to a long-term and stable form. During consolidation, gene expression and de novo protein synthesis are regulated in order to produce key proteins for the maintenance of plastic changes produced during the acquisition of new information. Results Here we partially cloned and sequenced the beta-amyloid precursor protein like gene homologue in the crab Chasmagnathus (cappl), showing a 37% of identity with the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster homologue and 23% with Homo sapiens but with much higher degree of sequence similarity in certain regions. We observed a wide distribution of cappl mRNA in the nervous system as well as in muscle and gills. The protein localized in all tissues analyzed with the exception of muscle. Immunofluorescence revealed localization of cAPPL in associative and sensory brain areas. We studied gene and protein expression during long-term memory consolidation using a well characterized memory model: the context-signal associative memory in this crab species. mRNA levels varied at different time points during long-term memory consolidation and correlated with cAPPL protein levels Conclusions cAPPL mRNA and protein is widely distributed in the central nervous system of the crab and the time course of expression suggests a role of cAPPL during long-term memory formation. PMID:20809979

  18. The microtubule destabilizing protein stathmin controls the transition from dividing neuronal precursors to postmitotic neurons during adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Boekhoorn, Karin; van Dis, Vera; Goedknegt, Erika; Sobel, André; Lucassen, Paul J; Hoogenraad, Casper C

    2014-12-01

    The hippocampus is one of the two areas in the mammalian brain where adult neurogenesis occurs. Adult neurogenesis is well known to be involved in hippocampal physiological functions as well as pathophysiological conditions. Microtubules (MTs), providing intracellular transport, stability, and transmitting force, are indispensable for neurogenesis by facilitating cell division, migration, growth, and differentiation. Although there are several examples of MT-stabilizing proteins regulating different aspects of adult neurogenesis, relatively little is known about the function of MT-destabilizing proteins. Stathmin is such a MT-destabilizing protein largely restricted to the CNS, and in contrast to its developmental family members, stathmin is also expressed at significant levels in the adult brain, notably in areas involved in adult neurogenesis. Here, we show an important role for stathmin during adult neurogenesis in the subgranular zone of the mouse hippocampus. After carefully mapping stathmin expression in the adult dentate gyrus (DG), we investigated its role in hippocampal neurogenesis making use of stathmin knockout mice. Although hippocampus development appears normal in these animals, different aspects of adult neurogenesis are affected. First, the number of proliferating Ki-67+ cells is decreased in stathmin knockout mice, as well as the expression of the immature markers Nestin and PSA-NCAM. However, newborn cells that do survive express more frequently the adult marker NeuN and have a more mature morphology. Furthermore, our data suggest that migration in the DG might be affected. We propose a model in which stathmin controls the transition from neuronal precursors to early postmitotic neurons.

  19. Nucleotidylylation of the VPg Protein of a Human Norovirus by its Proteinase-Polymerase Precursor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Belliot, Gaël; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; McPhie, Peter; Green, Kim Y.

    2008-01-01

    Caliciviruses have a positive strand RNA genome covalently-linked at the 5’-end to a small protein, VPg. This study examined the biochemical modification of VPg by the ProPol form of the polymerase of human norovirus strain MD145 (GII.4). Recombinant norovirus VPg was shown to be nucleotidylylated in the presence of Mn2+ by MD145 ProPol. Phosphodiesterase I treatment of the nucleotidylylated VPg released the incorporated UMP, which was consistent with linkage of RNA to VPg via a phosphodiester bond. Mutagenesis analysis of VPg identified Tyrosine 27 as the target amino acid for this linkage, and suggested that VPg conformation was important for the reaction. Nucleotidylylation was inefficient in the presence of Mg2+; however the addition of full- and subgenomic-length MD145 RNA transcripts led to a marked enhancement of the nucleotidylylation efficiency in the presence of this divalent cation. Furthermore, evidence was found for the presence of an RNA element near the 3’-end of the polyadenylated genome that enhanced the efficiency of nucleotidylylation in the presence of Mg2+. PMID:18234264

  20. Nucleotidylylation of the VPg protein of a human norovirus by its proteinase-polymerase precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Belliot, Gaël; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; McPhie, Peter; Green, Kim Y

    2008-04-25

    Caliciviruses have a positive strand RNA genome covalently-linked at the 5'-end to a small protein, VPg. This study examined the biochemical modification of VPg by the ProPol form of the polymerase of human norovirus strain MD145 (GII.4). Recombinant norovirus VPg was shown to be nucleotidylylated in the presence of Mn2+ by MD145 ProPol. Phosphodiesterase I treatment of the nucleotidylylated VPg released the incorporated UMP, which was consistent with linkage of RNA to VPg via a phosphodiester bond. Mutagenesis analysis of VPg identified Tyrosine 27 as the target amino acid for this linkage, and suggested that VPg conformation was important for the reaction. Nucleotidylylation was inefficient in the presence of Mg2+; however the addition of full- and subgenomic-length MD145 RNA transcripts led to a marked enhancement of the nucleotidylylation efficiency in the presence of this divalent cation. Furthermore, evidence was found for the presence of an RNA element near the 3'-end of the polyadenylated genome that enhanced the efficiency of nucleotidylylation in the presence of Mg2+.

  1. Heme precursor injection is effective for Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase fusion protein production by a silkworm expression system.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kounosuke; Lee, Jae Man; Tomozoe, Yusuke; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Kamiya, Noriho

    2015-10-01

    Recombinant peroxidase from Arthromyces ramosus, fused with domains of antibody-binding proteins, was successfully obtained by a silkworm larvae expression system. The catalytic activity of the fusion peroxidase was increased 6-fold with the injection of 5-aminolevulinic acid into silkworm larvae as a heme precursor. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Manipulations of Amyloid Precursor Protein Cleavage Disrupt the Circadian Clock in Aging Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Matthew R.; Holbrook, Scott D.; Kotwica-Rolinska, Joanna; Chow, Eileen; Kretzschmar, Doris; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by severe cognitive deterioration. While causes of AD pathology are debated, a large body of evidence suggests that increased cleavage of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) producing the neurotoxic Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide plays a fundamental role in AD pathogenesis. One of the detrimental behavioral symptoms commonly associated with AD is the fragmentation of sleep-activity cycles with increased nighttime activity and daytime naps in humans. Sleep-activity cycles, as well as physiological and cellular rhythms, which may be important for neuronal homeostasis, are generated by a molecular system known as the circadian clock. Links between AD and the circadian system are increasingly evident but not well understood. Here we examined whether genetic manipulations of APP-like (APPL) protein cleavage in Drosophila melanogaster affect rest-activity rhythms and core circadian clock function in this model organism. We show that the increased β-cleavage of endogenous APPL by the β-secretase (dBACE) severely disrupts circadian behavior and leads to reduced expression of clock protein PER in central clock neurons of aging flies. Our data suggest that behavioral rhythm disruption is not a product of APPL-derived Aβ production but rather may be caused by a mechanism common to both α and β-cleavage pathways. Specifically, we show that increased production of the endogenous Drosophila Amyloid Intracellular Domain (dAICD) caused disruption of circadian rest-activity rhythms, while flies overexpressing endogenous APPL maintained stronger circadian rhythms during aging. In summary, our study offers a novel entry point toward understanding the mechanism of circadian rhythm disruption in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25766673

  3. Moderate blast exposure alters gene expression and levels of amyloid precursor protein

    PubMed Central

    Cashion, Ann; Osier, Nicole; Arcurio, Lindsay; Motamedi, Vida; Dell, Kristine C.; Carr, Walter; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Yun, Sijung; Walker, Peter; Ahlers, Stephen; LoPresti, Matthew; Yarnell, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To explore gene expression after moderate blast exposure (vs baseline) and proteomic changes after moderate- (vs low-) blast exposure. Methods: Military personnel (N = 69) donated blood for quantification of protein level, and peak pressure exposures were detected by helmet sensors before and during a blast training program (10 days total). On day 7, some participants (n = 29) sustained a moderate blast (mean peak pressure = 7.9 psi) and were matched to participants with no/low-blast exposure during the training (n = 40). PAXgene tubes were collected from one training site at baseline and day 10; RNA-sequencing day 10 expression was compared with each participant's own baseline samples to identify genes and pathways differentially expressed in moderate blast-exposed participants. Changes in amyloid precursor protein (APP) from baseline to the day of blast and following 2 days were evaluated. Symptoms were assessed using a self-reported form. Results: We identified 1,803 differentially expressed genes after moderate blast exposure; the most altered network was APP. Significantly reduced levels of peripheral APP were detected the day after the moderate blast exposure and the following day. Protein concentrations correlated with the magnitude of the moderate blast exposure on days 8 and 9. APP concentrations returned to baseline levels 3 days following the blast, likely due to increases in the genetic expression of APP. Onset of concentration problems and headaches occurred after moderate blast. Conclusions: Moderate blast exposure results in a signature biological profile that includes acute APP reductions, followed by genetic expression increases and normalization of APP levels; these changes likely influence neuronal recovery. PMID:28975156

  4. Oxidation of cholesterol by amyloid precursor protein and beta-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Thomas J; Alkon, Daniel L

    2005-02-25

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by accumulation of the neurotoxic peptide beta-amyloid, which is produced by proteolysis of amyloid precursor protein (APP). APP is a large membrane-bound copper-binding protein that is essential in maintaining synaptic function and may play a role in synaptogenesis. beta-Amyloid has been shown to contribute to the oxidative stress that accompanies AD. Later stages of AD are characterized by neuronal apoptosis. However, the biochemical function of APP and the mechanism of the toxicity of beta-amyloid are still unclear. In this study, we show that both beta-amyloid and APP can oxidize cholesterol to form 7beta-hydroxycholesterol, a proapoptotic oxysterol that was neurotoxic at nanomolar concentrations. 7beta-Hydroxycholesterol inhibited secretion of soluble APP from cultured rat hippocampal H19-7/IGF-IR neuronal cells and inhibited tumor necrosis factor-alpha-converting enzyme alpha-secretase activity but had no effect on beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 activity. 7beta-Hydroxycholesterol was also a potent inhibitor of alpha-protein kinase C, with a K(i) of approximately 0.2 nm. The rate of reaction between cholesterol and beta-amyloid was comparable to the rates of cholesterol-metabolizing enzymes (k(cat) = 0.211 min(-)1). The rate of production of 7beta-hydroxycholesterol by APP was approximately 200 times lower than by beta-amyloid. Oxidation of cholesterol was accompanied by stoichiometric production of hydrogen peroxide and required divalent copper. The results suggest that a function of APP may be to produce low levels of 7-hydroxycholesterol. Higher levels produced by beta-amyloid could contribute to the oxidative stress and cell loss observed in Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Granulin-epithelin precursor and ATP-dependent binding cassette (ABC)B5 regulate liver cancer cell chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Siu Tim; Cheung, Phyllis F Y; Cheng, Christine K C; Wong, Nicholas C L; Fan, Sheung Tat

    2011-01-01

    Chemotherapy is used to treat unresectable liver cancer with marginal efficacy; this might result from hepatic cancer cells with stem cell and chemoresistant features. Gene expression profiling studies have shown that hepatic cancer cells express granulin-epithelin precursor (GEP); we investigated its role in hepatic cancer stem cell functions and chemoresistance. The effects of GEP and drug transporter signaling on chemoresistance were investigated in hepatic cancer stem cells. We analyzed the expression patterns of 142 clinical samples from liver tumors, adjacent nontumorous liver tissue, and liver tissue from patients who did not have cancer. GEP regulated the expression of the adenosine triphosphate-dependent binding cassette (ABC)B5 drug transporter in liver cancer cells. Chemoresistant cells that expressed GEP had increased levels of ABCB5; suppression of ABCB5 sensitized the cells to doxorubicin uptake and apoptosis. Most cells that expressed GEP and ABCB5 also expressed the hepatic cancer stem cell markers CD133 and EpCAM; blocking ABCB5 reduced their expression. Expression levels of GEP and ABCB5 were correlated in human liver tumor samples. ABCB5 levels were increased in liver cancer cells compared with nontumor liver tissue from patients with cirrhosis or hepatitis, or normal liver tissue. ABCB5 expression was associated with the recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after partial hepatectomy. Expression of GEP and ABCB5 in liver cancer stem cells is associated with chemoresistance and reduced survival times of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Reagents designed to target these proteins might be developed as therapeutics and given in combination with chemotherapy to patients with liver cancer. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The γ-secretase-generated intracellular domain of β-amyloid precursor protein binds Numb and inhibits Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roncarati, Roberta; Šestan, Nenad; Scheinfeld, Meir H.; Berechid, Bridget E.; Lopez, Peter A.; Meucci, Olimpia; McGlade, Jane C.; Rakic, Pasko; D'Adamio, Luciano

    2002-01-01

    The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the Notch receptor undergo intramembranous proteolysis by the Presenilin-dependent γ-secretase. The cleavage of APP by γ-secretase releases amyloid-β peptides, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, and the APP intracellular domain (AID), for which the function is not yet well understood. A similar γ-secretase-mediated cleavage of the Notch receptor liberates the Notch intracellular domain (NICD). NICD translocates to the nucleus and activates the transcription of genes that regulate the generation, differentiation, and survival of neuronal cells. Hence, some of the effects of APP signaling and Alzheimer's disease pathology may be mediated by the interaction of APP and Notch. Here, we show that membrane-tethered APP binds to the cytosolic Notch inhibitors Numb and Numb-like in mouse brain lysates. AID also binds Numb and Numb-like, and represses Notch activity when released by APP. Thus, γ-secretase may have opposing effects on Notch signaling; positive by cleaving Notch and generating NICD, and negative by processing APP and generating AID, which inhibits the function of NICD. PMID:12011466

  7. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibition promotes lysosomal biogenesis and autophagic degradation of the amyloid-β precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Parr, Callum; Carzaniga, Raffaela; Gentleman, Steve M; Van Leuven, Fred; Walter, Jochen; Sastre, Magdalena

    2012-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been associated with altered activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) isozymes, which are proposed to contribute to both neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaque formation. However, the molecular basis by which GSK3 affects the formation of Aβ remains unknown. Our aim was to identify the underlying mechanisms of GSK3-dependent effects on the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP). For this purpose, N2a cells stably expressing APP carrying the Swedish mutation were treated with specific GSK3 inhibitors or transfected with GSK3α/β short interfering RNA. We show that inhibition of GSK3 leads to decreased expression of APP by enhancing its degradation via an increase in the number of lysosomes. This induction of the lysosomal/autophagy pathway was associated with nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis. Our data indicate that GSK3 inhibition reduces Aβ through an increase of the degradation of APP and its carboxy-terminal fragment (CTF) by activation of the lysosomal/autophagy pathway. These results suggest that an increased propensity toward autophagic/lysosomal alterations in AD patients could have consequences for neuronal function.

  8. A Role for SC35 and hnRNPA1 in the Determination of Amyloid Precursor Protein Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Donev, Rossen; Newall, Alistair; Thome, Johannes; Sheer, Denise

    2009-01-01

    The β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) that accumulates in senile plaques in Alzheimer’s disease is formed by cleavage of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP). The APP gene has several intronic Alu elements inserted in either the sense or antisense orientation. In this study, we demonstrate that binding of SC35 and hnRNPA1 to Alu elements on either side of exon 7 in the transcribed pre-mRNA is involved in alternative splicing of APP exons 7 and 8. Neuronal cells transfected with the full-length form of APP secrete higher levels of Aβ than cells transfected with the APP695 isoform lacking exons 7 and 8. Finally, we show that treatment of neuronal cells with estradiol results in increased expression of APP695, SC35, hnRNPA1, and lowers the level of secreted Aβ. An understanding of the regulation of splicing of APP may lead to the identification of new targets for treating Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:17353911

  9. Cyclopamine Modulates γ-Secretase-mediated Cleavage of Amyloid Precursor Protein by Altering Its Subcellular Trafficking and Lysosomal Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Vorobyeva, Anna G.; Lee, Randall; Miller, Sean; Longen, Charles; Sharoni, Michal; Kandelwal, Preeti J.; Kim, Felix J.; Marenda, Daniel R.; Saunders, Aleister J.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease leading to memory loss. Numerous lines of evidence suggest that amyloid-β (Aβ), a neurotoxic peptide, initiates a cascade that results in synaptic dysfunction, neuronal death, and eventually cognitive deficits. Aβ is generated by the proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), and alterations to this processing can result in Alzheimer disease. Using in vitro and in vivo models, we identified cyclopamine as a novel regulator of γ-secretase-mediated cleavage of APP. We demonstrate that cyclopamine decreases Aβ generation by altering APP retrograde trafficking. Specifically, cyclopamine treatment reduced APP-C-terminal fragment (CTF) delivery to the trans-Golgi network where γ-secretase cleavage occurs. Instead, cyclopamine redirects APP-CTFs to the lysosome. These data demonstrate that cyclopamine treatment decreases γ-secretase-mediated cleavage of APP. In addition, cyclopamine treatment decreases the rate of APP-CTF degradation. Together, our data demonstrate that cyclopamine alters APP processing and Aβ generation by inducing changes in APP subcellular trafficking and APP-CTF degradation. PMID:25281744

  10. C-Terminal Cleavage of the Amyloid-β Protein Precursor at Asp664: A Switch Associated with Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Banwait, Surita; Galvan, Veronica; Zhang, Junli; Gorostiza, Olivia F.; Ataie, Marina; Huang, Wei; Crippen, Danielle; Koo, Edward H.; Bredesen, Dale E.

    2009-01-01

    In addition to the proteolytic cleavages that give rise to amyloid-β (Aβ), the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) is cleaved at Asp664 intracytoplasmically. This cleavage releases a cytotoxic peptide, APP-C31, removes AβPP-interaction motifs required for signaling and internalization, and is required for the generation of AD-like deficits in a mouse model of the disease. Although we and others had previously shown that Asp664 cleavage of AβPP is increased in AD brains, the distribution of the Asp664-cleaved forms of AβPP in non-diseased and AD brains at different ages had not been determined. Confirming previous reports, we found that Asp664-cleaved forms of AβPP were increased in neuronal cytoplasm and nuclei in early-stage AD brains but were absent in age-matched, non-diseased control brains and in late-stage AD brains. Remarkably, however, Asp664-cleaved AβPP was prominent in neuronal somata and in processes in entorhinal cortex and hippocampus of non-diseased human brains at ages <45 years. Our observations suggest that Asp664 cleavage of AβPP may be part of the normal proteolytic processing of AβPP in young (<45 years) human brain and that this cleavage is down-regulated with normal aging, but is aberrantly increased and altered in location in early AD. PMID:18334752

  11. C-terminal cleavage of the amyloid-beta protein precursor at Asp664: a switch associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Banwait, Surita; Galvan, Veronica; Zhang, Junli; Gorostiza, Olivia F; Ataie, Marina; Huang, Wei; Crippen, Danielle; Koo, Edward H; Bredesen, Dale E

    2008-02-01

    In addition to the proteolytic cleavages that give rise to amyloid-beta (Abeta), the amyloid-beta protein precursor (AbetaPP) is cleaved at Asp664 intracytoplasmically. This cleavage releases a cytotoxic peptide, APP-C31, removes AbetaPP-interaction motifs required for signaling and internalization, and is required for the generation of AD-like deficits in a mouse model of the disease. Although we and others had previously shown that Asp664 cleavage of AbetaPP is increased in AD brains, the distribution of the Asp664-cleaved forms of AbetaPP in non-diseased and AD brains at different ages had not been determined. Confirming previous reports, we found that Asp664-cleaved forms of AbetaPP were increased in neuronal cytoplasm and nuclei in early-stage AD brains but were absent in age-matched, non-diseased control brains and in late-stage AD brains. Remarkably, however, Asp664-cleaved AbetaPP was prominent in neuronal somata and in processes in entorhinal cortex and hippocampus of non-diseased human brains at ages <45 years. Our observations suggest that Asp664 cleavage of AbetaPP may be part of the normal proteolytic processing of AbetaPP in young (<45 years) human brain and that this cleavage is down-regulated with normal aging, but is aberrantly increased and altered in location in early AD.

  12. The crystal structure of DR6 in complex with the amyloid precursor protein provides insight into death receptor activation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Kai; Olsen, Olav; Tzvetkova-Robev, Dorothea; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Nikolov, Dimitar B.

    2015-04-02

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has garnered considerable attention due to its genetic links to Alzheimer's disease. Death receptor 6 (DR6) was recently shown to bind APP via the protein extracellular regions, stimulate axonal pruning, and inhibit synapse formation. Here, we report the crystal structure of the DR6 ectodomain in complex with the E2 domain of APP and show that it supports a model for APP-induced dimerization and activation of cell surface DR6.

  13. ORMDL proteins regulate ceramide levels during sterile inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lin; Oyeniran, Clement; Biswas, Debolina D; Allegood, Jeremy; Milstien, Sheldon; Kordula, Tomasz; Maceyka, Michael; Spiegel, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    The bioactive sphingolipid metabolite, ceramide, regulates physiological processes important for inflammation and elevated levels of ceramide have been implicated in IL-1-mediated events. Although much has been learned about ceramide generation by activation of sphingomyelinases in response to IL-1, the contribution of the de novo pathway is not completely understood. Because yeast ORM1 and ORM2 proteins negatively regulate ceramide levels through inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase, the first committed step in ceramide biosynthesis, we examined the functions of individual mammalian ORM orthologs, ORM (yeast)-like (ORMDL)1-3, in regulation of ceramide levels. In HepG2 liver cells, downregulation of ORMDL3 markedly increased the ceramide precursors, dihydrosphingosine and dihydroceramide, primarily from de novo biosynthesis based on [U-(13)C]palmitate incorporation into base-labeled and dual-labeled dihydroceramides, whereas downregulation of each isoform increased dihydroceramides [(13)C]labeled in only the amide-linked fatty acid. IL-1 and the IL-6 family cytokine, oncostatin M, increased dihydroceramide and ceramide levels in HepG2 cells and concomitantly decreased ORMDL proteins. Moreover, during irritant-induced sterile inflammation in mice leading to induction of the acute-phase response, which is dependent on IL-1, expression of ORMDL proteins in the liver was strongly downregulated and accompanied by increased ceramide levels in the liver and accumulation in the blood. Together, our results suggest that ORMDLs may be involved in regulation of ceramides during IL-1-mediated sterile inflammation. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation.

  15. Cell cycle regulation by protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Koepp, Deanna M

    2014-01-01

    Cell division is controlled by a highly regulated program to accurately duplicate and segregate chromosomes. An important feature of the cell cycle regulatory program is that key cell cycle proteins are present and active during specific cell cycle stages but are later removed or inhibited to maintain appropriate timing. The ubiquitin-proteasome system has emerged as an important mechanism to target cell cycle proteins for degradation at critical junctures during cell division. Two key E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes that target key cell cycle proteins are the Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein complex and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. This chapter focuses on the role of these E3 ubiquitin ligases and how ubiquitin-dependent degradation of central cell cycle regulatory proteins advances the cell cycle.

  16. The amyloid precursor protein-binding protein APP-BP1 drives the cell cycle through the S-M checkpoint and causes apoptosis in neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; McPhie, D L; Hirschberg, J; Neve, R L

    2000-03-24

    APP-BP1 binds to the amyloid precursor protein (APP) carboxyl-terminal domain. Recent work suggests that APP-BP1 participates in a novel ubiquitinylation-related pathway involving the ubiquitin-like molecule NEDD8. We show here that, in vivo in mammalian cells, APP-BP1 interacts with hUba3, its presumptive partner in the NEDD8 activation pathway, and that the APP-BP1 binding site for hUba3 is within amino acids 443-479. We also provide evidence that the human APP-BP1 molecule can rescue the ts41 mutation in Chinese hamster cells. This mutation previously has been shown to lead to successive S phases of the cell cycle without intervening G(2), M, and G(1), suggesting that the product of this gene negatively regulates entry into the S phase and positively regulates entry into mitosis. We show that expression of APP-BP1 in ts41 cells drives the cell cycle through the S-M checkpoint and that this function requires both hUba3 and hUbc12. Overexpression of APP-BP1 in primary neurons causes apoptosis via the same pathway. A specific caspase-6 inhibitor blocks this apoptosis. These findings are discussed in the context of abnormalities in the cell cycle that have been observed in Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Regulation of cardiomyocyte signaling by RGS proteins: differential selectivity towards G proteins and susceptibility to regulation.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jianming; Michalek, Christina; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Ming; Xu, Xiaomei; Mende, Ulrike

    2006-07-01

    Many signals that regulate cardiomyocyte growth, differentiation and function are mediated via heterotrimeric G proteins, which are under the control of RGS proteins (Regulators of G protein Signaling). Several RGS proteins are expressed in the heart, but so far little is known about their function and regulation. Using adenoviral gene transfer, we conducted the first comprehensive analysis of the capacity and selectivity of the major cardiac RGS proteins (RGS2-RGS5) to regulate central G protein-mediated signaling pathways in adult ventricular myocytes (AVM). All four RGS proteins potently inhibited Gq/11-mediated phospholipase C beta stimulation and cell growth (assessed in neonatal myocytes). Importantly, RGS2 selectively inhibited Gq/11 signaling, whereas RGS3, RGS4 and RGS5 had the capacity to regulate both Gq/11 and Gi/o signaling (carbachol-induced cAMP inhibition). Gs signaling was unaffected, and, contrary to reports in other cell lines, RGS2-RGS5 did not appear to regulate adenylate cyclase directly in AVM. Since RGS proteins can be highly regulated in their expression by many different stimuli, we also tested the hypothesis that RGS expression is subject to G protein-mediated regulation in AVM and determined the specificity with which enhanced G protein signaling alters endogenous RGS expression in AVM. RGS2 mRNA and protein were markedly but transiently up-regulated by enhanced Gq/11 signaling (alpha1-adrenergic stimulation or Galphaq* overexpression), possibly by a negative feedback mechanism. In contrast, the other negative regulators of Gq/11 signaling (RGS3-RGS5) were unchanged. Endogenous RGS2 (but not RGS3-RGS5) expression was also up-regulated in cells with enhanced AC signaling (beta-adrenergic or forskolin stimulation). Taken together, these findings suggest diverse roles of RGS proteins in regulating myocyte signaling. RGS2 emerged as the only selective and highly regulated inhibitor of Gq/11 signaling that could potentially become a promising

  18. Regulation of apoptosis by heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Donna; Jäger, Richard; Mosser, Dick D; Samali, Afshin

    2014-05-01

    Thermotolerance, the acquired resistance of cells to stress, is a well-established phenomenon. Studies of the key mediators of this response, the heat shock proteins (HSPs), have led to the discovery of the important roles played by these proteins in the regulation of apoptotic cell death. Apoptosis is critical for normal tissue homeostasis and is involved in diverse processes including development and immune clearance. Apoptosis is tightly regulated by both proapoptotic and antiapoptotic factors, and dysregulation of apoptosis plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of many diseases. In the recent years, HSPs have been identified as key determinants of cell survival, which can modulate apoptosis by directly interacting with components of the apoptotic machinery. Therefore, manipulation of the HSPs could represent a viable strategy for the treatment of diseases. Here, we review the current knowledge with regard to the mechanisms of HSP-mediated regulation of apoptosis. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. Role of prostacyclin signaling in endothelial production of soluble amyloid precursor protein-α in cerebral microvessels.

    PubMed

    He, Tongrong; Santhanam, Anantha Vijay R; Lu, Tong; d'Uscio, Livius V; Katusic, Zvonimir S

    2017-01-01

    We tested hypothesis that activation of the prostacyclin (PGI2) receptor (IP receptor) signaling pathway in cerebral microvessels plays an important role in the metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP). In human brain microvascular endothelial cells activation of IP receptor with the stable analogue of PGI2, iloprost, stimulated expression of amyloid precursor protein and a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10), resulting in an increased production of the neuroprotective and anticoagulant molecule, soluble APPα (sAPPα). Selective agonist of IP receptor, cicaprost, and adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin, also enhanced expression of amyloid precursor protein and ADAM10. Notably, in cerebral microvessels of IP receptor knockout mice, protein levels of APP and ADAM10 were reduced. In addition, iloprost increased protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) in human brain microvascular endothelial cells. PPARδ-siRNA abolished iloprost-augmented protein expression of ADAM10. In contrast, GW501516 (a selective agonist of PPARδ) upregulated ADAM10 and increased production of sAPPα. Genetic deletion of endothelial PPARδ (ePPARδ(-/-)) in mice significantly reduced cerebral microvascular expression of ADAM10 and production of sAPPα. In vivo treatment with GW501516 increased sAPPα content in hippocampus of wild type mice but not in hippocampus of ePPARδ(-/-) mice. Our findings identified previously unrecognized role of IP-PPARδ signal transduction pathway in the production of sAPPα in cerebral microvasculature. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Distribution of precursor amyloid-. beta. -protein messenger RNA in human cerebral cortex: relationship to neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.A.; Higgins, G.A.; Young, W.G.; Goldgaber, D.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Wilson, M.C.; Morrison, J.H.

    1988-03-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and neuritic plaques (NP), two neuropathological markers of Alzheimer disease, may both contain peptide fragments derived from the human amyloid ..beta.. protein. However, the nature of the relationship between NFT and NP and the source of the amyloid ..beta.. proteins found in each have remained unclear. The authors used in situ hybridization techniques to map the anatomical distribution of precursor amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA in the neocortex of brains from three subjects with no known neurologic disease and from five patients with Alzheimer disease. In brains from control subjects, positively hybridizing neurons were present in cortical regions and layers that contain a high density of neuropathological markers in Alzheimer disease, as well as in those loci that contain NP but few NFT. Quantitative analyses of in situ hybridization patterns within layers III and V of the superior frontal cortex revealed that the presence of high numbers of NFT in Alzheimer-diseased brains was associated with a decrease in the number of positively hybridizing neurons compared to controls and Alzheimer-diseased brains with few NFT. These findings suggest that the expression of precursor amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA may be a necessary but is clearly not a sufficient prerequisite for NFT formation. In addition, these results may indicate that the amyloid ..beta.. protein, present in NP in a given region or layer of cortex, is not derived from the resident neuronal cell bodies that express the mRNA for the precursor protein.

  1. Reversible and irreversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitors cause changes in neuronal amyloid precursor protein processing and protein kinase C level in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pakaski, M; Rakonczay, Z; Kasa, P

    2001-03-01

    The alternative routes of cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) result in the generation and secretion of both soluble APP and beta-amyloid, the latter being the main component of the amyloid deposits in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study examined the question of whether acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors can alter the processing of APP and the level of protein kinase C (PKC) in primary rat basal forebrain cultures. Western blotting was used to test two AChE inhibitors (reversible and irreversible) for their ability to enhance the release of APP and PKC content. These inhibitors were ambenonium (AMB) and metrifonate (MTF), at different concentrations. A significant increase was found in the cell-associated APP level in a basal forebrain neuronal culture, and there was an elevation of the APP release into the medium. Increases were similarly observed in the PKC levels after AMB or MTF treatment. The results suggest that these AChE inhibitors promote the non-amyloidogenic route of APP processing, which may be due to their stimulatory effects on PKC. The PKC activation may enhance the alpha-secretase activity and consequently the production of the N-terminal APP. Since both a decreased level of APP secretion and a low activity and level of PKC may be involved in the pathogenesis of AD, it is concluded that the administration of AChE inhibitors to AD patients may facilitate the memory processes and exert a neuroprotective effect.

  2. Specific Binding of Cholesterol to C99 Domain of Amyloid Precursor Protein Depends Critically on Charge State of Protein.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Afra; Bandara, Asanga; Pantelopulos, George A; Dominguez, Laura; Straub, John E

    2016-09-15

    Recent NMR chemical shift measurements of the 99 residue C-terminal fragment of amyloid precursor protein (APP-C99) in the presence of cholesterol provide evidence of binary complex formation between C99 and cholesterol in membrane mimetic environments. It has also been observed that the production of Aβ protein is enhanced under conditions of high cholesterol concentration. In this study, we investigated the impact of the charge state of C99 on the structure and stability of the C99-cholesterol complex. We observed that the binding of C99 to cholesterol depends critically on the charge state of Glu 693 (E22) and Asp 694 (D23). Evaluation of the pKa values of the Asp and Glu side chains suggests that these residues may be predominantly neutral in existing experimental observations of a stable C99-cholesterol complex at lower pH (characteristic of the endosomal environment), while binding is destabilized near neutral pH (characteristic of the cytoplasm). These observations suggest that specific binding of cholesterol to C99 is a sensitive function of the pH encountered in vivo, with key E22 and D23 residues serving as a "pH switch" controlling C99-cholesterol binding.

  3. High Fat Diet Enhances β-Site Cleavage of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) via Promoting β-Site APP Cleaving Enzyme 1/Adaptor Protein 2/Clathrin Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Maesako, Masato; Uemura, Maiko; Tashiro, Yoshitaka; Sasaki, Kazuki; Watanabe, Kiwamu; Noda, Yasuha; Ueda, Karin; Asada-Utsugi, Megumi; Kubota, Masakazu; Okawa, Katsuya; Ihara, Masafumi; Shimohama, Shun; Uemura, Kengo; Kinoshita, Ayae

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are risk factors of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We reported that a high fat diet (HFD) promotes amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleavage by β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) without increasing BACE1 levels in APP transgenic mice. However, the detailed mechanism had remained unclear. Here we demonstrate that HFD promotes BACE1/Adaptor protein-2 (AP-2)/clathrin complex formation by increasing AP-2 levels in APP transgenic mice. In Swedish APP overexpressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells as well as in SH-SY5Y cells, overexpression of AP-2 promoted the formation of BACE1/AP-2/clathrin complex, increasing the level of the soluble form of APP β (sAPPβ). On the other hand, mutant D495R BACE1, which inhibits formation of this trimeric complex, was shown to decrease the level of sAPPβ. Overexpression of AP-2 promoted the internalization of BACE1 from the cell surface, thus reducing the cell surface BACE1 level. As such, we concluded that HFD may induce the formation of the BACE1/AP-2/clathrin complex, which is followed by its transport of BACE1 from the cell surface to the intracellular compartments. These events might be associated with the enhancement of β-site cleavage of APP in APP transgenic mice. Here we present evidence that HFD, by regulation of subcellular trafficking of BACE1, promotes APP cleavage. PMID:26414661

  4. Dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) stimulates Aβ42 generation by promoting amyloid precursor protein axonal transport during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sunmin; Nah, Jihoon; Han, Jonghee; Choi, Seon-Guk; Kim, Hyunjoo; Park, Jaesang; Pyo, Ha-Kyung; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2016-06-01

    Amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is generated through the sequential cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases. Hypoxia is a known risk factor for AD and stimulates Aβ generation by γ-secretase; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we showed that dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) regulates Aβ generation through changes in subcellular localization of the γ-secretase complex and its substrate C99 under hypoxic conditions. DUSP26 was identified as a novel γ-secretase regulator from a genome-wide functional screen using a cDNA expression library. The phosphatase activity of DUSP26 was required for the increase in Aβ42 generation through γ-secretase, but this regulation did not affect the amount of the γ-secretase complex. Interestingly, DUSP26 induced the accumulation of C99 in the axons by stimulating anterograde transport of C99-positive vesicles. Additionally, DUSP26 induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation for APP processing and axonal transport of C99. Under hypoxic conditions, DUSP26 expression levels were elevated together with JNK activation, and treatment with JNK inhibitor SP600125, or the DUSP26 inhibitor NSC-87877, reduced hypoxia-induced Aβ generation by diminishing vesicle trafficking of C99 to the axons. Finally, we observed enhanced DUSP26 expression and JNK activation in the hippocampus of AD patients. Our results suggest that DUSP26 mediates hypoxia-induced Aβ generation through JNK activation, revealing a new regulator of γ-secretase-mediated APP processing under hypoxic conditions. We propose the role of phosphatase dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26) in the selective regulation of Aβ42 production in neuronal cells under hypoxic stress. Induction of DUSP26 causes JNK-dependent shift in the subcellular localization of γ-secretase and C99 from the cell body to axons for Aβ42 generation. These findings provide a

  5. Amyloid precursor protein mRNA levels in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Preece, Paul; Virley, David J; Costandi, Moheb; Coombes, Robert; Moss, Stephen J; Mudge, Anne W; Jazin, Elena; Cairns, Nigel J

    2004-03-17

    Insoluble beta-amyloid deposits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain are proteolytically derived from the membrane bound amyloid precursor protein (APP). The APP gene is differentially spliced to produce isoforms that can be classified into those containing a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor domain (K(+), APP(751), APP(770), APRP(365) and APRP(563)), and those without (K(-), APP(695) and APP(714)). Given the hypothesis that Abeta is a result of aberrant catabolism of APP, differential expression of mRNA isoforms containing protease inhibitors might play an active role in the pathology of AD. We took 513 cerebral cortex samples from 90 AD and 81 control brains and quantified the mRNA isoforms of APP with TaqMan real-time RT-PCR. After adjustment for age at death, brain pH and gender we found a change in the ratio of KPI(+) to KPI(-) mRNA isoforms of APP. Three separate probes, designed to recognise only KPI(+) mRNA species, gave increases of between 28% and 50% in AD brains relative to controls (p=0.002). There was no change in the mRNA levels of KPI-(APP 695) (p=0.898). Therefore, whilst KPI-mRNA levels remained stable the KPI(+) species increased specifically in the AD brains.

  6. Specific Inhibition of β-Secretase Processing of the Alzheimer Disease Amyloid Precursor Protein.

    PubMed

    Ben Halima, Saoussen; Mishra, Sabyashachi; Raja, K Muruga Poopathi; Willem, Michael; Baici, Antonio; Simons, Kai; Brüstle, Oliver; Koch, Philipp; Haass, Christian; Caflisch, Amedeo; Rajendran, Lawrence

    2016-03-08

    Development of disease-modifying therapeutics is urgently needed for treating Alzheimer disease (AD). AD is characterized by toxic β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides produced by β- and γ-secretase-mediated cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). β-secretase inhibitors reduce Aβ levels, but mechanism-based side effects arise because they also inhibit β-cleavage of non-amyloid substrates like Neuregulin. We report that β-secretase has a higher affinity for Neuregulin than it does for APP. Kinetic studies demonstrate that the affinities and catalytic efficiencies of β-secretase are higher toward non-amyloid substrates than toward APP. We show that non-amyloid substrates are processed by β-secretase in an endocytosis-independent manner. Exploiting this compartmentalization of substrates, we specifically target the endosomal β-secretase by an endosomally targeted β-secretase inhibitor, which blocked cleavage of APP but not non-amyloid substrates in many cell systems, including induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons. β-secretase inhibitors can be designed to specifically inhibit the Alzheimer process, enhancing their potential as AD therapeutics without undesired side effects.

  7. Incorporation of Precursors into Ribonucleic Acid, Protein, Glycoprotein, and Lipoprotein of Avian Myeloblastosis Virions

    PubMed Central

    Baluda, M. A.; Nayak, D. P.

    1969-01-01

    Freshly explanted leukemic myeloblasts produce avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV) at a constant rate without any obvious cytopathic effect; therefore, subviral components are continually synthesized at a steady rate. The incorporation of various radioactive precursors into virions was monitored by determination of radioactivity in purified virus after density equilibrium sedimentation in preformed sucrose gradients. The kinetics of incorporation of 3H-uridine have shown that there is an average time interval of 3 to 4 hr (half-life) between the time viral ribo-nucleic acid (RNA) is synthesized and the time it is released as a mature virus particle; this represents the average time interval spent by AMV-RNA in an intracellular pool. Studies with 14C-phenylalanine have revealed that some protein synthesis takes place at or near the cell surface immediately prior to maturation and release of virus. 14C-glucosamine also appears to be incorporated into the outer viral envelope shortly before maturation. On the other hand, there is an average lag of about 16 to 20 hr before 14C-ethanolamine incorporated into intracellular lipoprotein appears in free virions; this probably reflects the kinetics of replacement of cellular surface membrane. Actinomycin D inhibits AMV-RNA within 30 min but permits the maturation of AMV to continue for at least 2 hr. AMV released in the presence of actinomycin D contains AMV-RNA synthesized before the addition of the drug. PMID:4311791

  8. Precursor-product discrimination by La protein during tRNA metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bayfield, Mark A.; Maraia, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY La proteins bind pre-tRNAs at their UUU-3'OH ends, facilitating their maturation. While the mechanism by which La binds pre-tRNA 3' trailers is known, the function of the RNA-binding β-sheet surface of RRM1 is unknown. How La dissociates from UUU-3'OH-containing trailers after 3' processing is also unknown. La preferentially binds pre-tRNAs over processed tRNAs or 3' trailer products through coupled use of two sites: one on the La motif and another on the RRM1 β surface that binds elsewhere on tRNA. Two sites provide stable pre-tRNA binding while processed tRNA and 3' trailer are released from their single sites relatively fast. RRM1 loop-3 mutations decrease affinity for pre-tRNA and tRNA but not UUU-3'OH trailer, and impair tRNA maturation in vivo. We propose that RRM1 functions in activities that are more complex than UUU-3'OH binding. Accordingly, the RRM1 mutations also impair a RNA chaperone activity of La. The results suggest how La distinguishes precursor from product RNAs, allowing it to recycle onto a new pre-tRNA. PMID:19287396

  9. Precursor-product discrimination by La protein during tRNA metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bayfield, Mark A; Maraia, Richard J

    2009-04-01

    La proteins bind pre-tRNAs at their UUU-3'OH ends, facilitating their maturation. Although the mechanism by which La binds pre-tRNA 3' trailers is known, the function of the RNA binding beta-sheet surface of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM1) is unknown. How La dissociates from UUU-3'OH-containing trailers after 3' processing is also unknown. Here we show that La preferentially binds pre-tRNAs over processed tRNAs or 3' trailer products through coupled use of two sites: one on the La motif and another on the RRM1 beta-surface that binds elsewhere on tRNA. Two sites provide stable pre-tRNA binding, whereas the processed tRNA and 3' trailer are released from their single sites relatively fast. RRM1 loop-3 mutations decrease affinity for pre-tRNA and tRNA, but not for the UUU-3'OH trailer, and impair tRNA maturation in vivo. We propose that RRM1 functions in activities that are more complex than UUU-3'OH binding. Accordingly, the RRM1 mutations also impair an RNA chaperone activity of La. The results suggest how La distinguishes precursor from product RNAs, allowing it to recycle onto a new pre-tRNA.

  10. Lost region in amyloid precursor protein (APP) through TALEN-mediated genome editing alters mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajie; Wu, Fengyi; Pan, Haining; Zheng, Wenzhong; Feng, Chi; Wang, Yunfu; Deng, Zixin; Wang, Lianrong; Luo, Jie; Chen, Shi

    2016-02-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in the brain. Aβ plaques are produced through sequential β/γ cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP), of which there are three main APP isoforms: APP695, APP751 and APP770. KPI-APPs (APP751 and APP770) are known to be elevated in AD, but the reason remains unclear. Transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) induce mutations with high efficiency at specific genomic loci, and it is thus possible to knock out specific regions using TALENs. In this study, we designed and expressed TALENs specific for the C-terminus of APP in HeLa cells, in which KPI-APPs are predominantly expressed. The KPI-APP mutants lack a 12-aa region that encompasses a 5-aa trans-membrane (TM) region and 7-aa juxta-membrane (JM) region. The mutated KPI-APPs exhibited decreased mitochondrial localization. In addition, mitochondrial morphology was altered, resulting in an increase in spherical mitochondria in the mutant cells through the disruption of the balance between fission and fusion. Mitochondrial dysfunction, including decreased ATP levels, disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential, increased ROS generation and impaired mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity, was also found. These results suggest that specific regions of KPI-APPs are important for mitochondrial localization and function.

  11. Overexpression of amyloid precursor protein increases copper content in HEK293 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suazo, Miriam; Hodar, Christian; Morgan, Carlos; Cerpa, Waldo; Cambiazo, Veronica; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Gonzalez, Mauricio

    2009-05-15

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane glycoprotein widely expressed in mammalian tissues and plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease. However, its physiological function remains elusive. Cu{sup 2+} binding and reduction activities have been described in the extracellular APP135-156 region, which might be relevant for cellular copper uptake and homeostasis. Here, we assessed Cu{sup 2+} reduction and {sup 64}Cu uptake in two human HEK293 cell lines overexpressing APP. Our results indicate that Cu{sup 2+} reduction increased and cells accumulated larger levels of copper, maintaining cell viability at supra-physiological levels of Cu{sup 2+} ions. Moreover, wild-type cells exposed to both Cu{sup 2+} ions and APP135-155 synthetic peptides increased copper reduction and uptake. Complementation of function studies in human APP751 transformed Fre1 defective Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells rescued low Cu{sup 2+} reductase activity and increased {sup 64}Cu uptake. We conclude that Cu{sup 2+} reduction activity of APP facilitates copper uptake and may represent an early step in cellular copper homeostasis.

  12. Region-Specific Differences in Amyloid Precursor Protein Expression in the Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Del Turco, Domenico; Paul, Mandy H.; Schlaudraff, Jessica; Hick, Meike; Endres, Kristina; Müller, Ulrike C.; Deller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The physiological role of amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been extensively investigated in the rodent hippocampus. Evidence suggests that APP plays a role in synaptic plasticity, dendritic and spine morphogenesis, neuroprotection and—at the behavioral level—hippocampus-dependent forms of learning and memory. Intriguingly, however, studies focusing on the role of APP in synaptic plasticity have reported diverging results and considerable differences in effect size between the dentate gyrus (DG) and area CA1 of the mouse hippocampus. We speculated that regional differences in APP expression could underlie these discrepancies and studied the expression of APP in both regions using immunostaining, in situ hybridization (ISH), and laser microdissection (LMD) in combination with quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blotting. In sum, our results show that APP is approximately 1.7-fold higher expressed in pyramidal cells of Ammon’s horn than in granule cells of the DG. This regional difference in APP expression may explain why loss-of-function approaches using APP-deficient mice revealed a role for APP in Hebbian plasticity in area CA1, whereas this could not be shown in the DG of the same APP mutants. PMID:27965537

  13. Altered β-Amyloid Precursor Protein Isoforms in Mexican Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-González, V. J.; Ortiz, G. G.; Gallegos-Arreola, P.; Macías-Islas, M. A.; Arias-Merino, E. D.; Loera-Castañeda, V.; Martínez-Cano, E.; Velázquez-Brizuela, I. E.; Rosales-Corral, S. A.; Curiel-Ortega, C. R.; Pacheco-Moisés, F.; García, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the β-amyloid precursor protein (βAPP) isoforms ratio as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s Disease and to assess its relationship with demographic and genetic variables of the disease. Methods: Blood samples from 26 patients fulfilling NINCDS-ADRDA diagnostic criteria for AD and 46 healthy control subjects were collected for Western blotting for βAPP. A ratio of βAPP isoforms, in optical densities, between the upper band (130 Kd) and the lower bands (106–110 Kd) was obtained. Odds ratios were obtained to determine risk factor of this component. Results: βAPP ratio on AD subjects was lower than that of control subjects: 0.3662 ± 0.1891 vs. 0.6769 ± 0.1021 (mean ± SD, p<0.05). A low βAPP ratio (<0.6) showed an OR of 4.63 (95% CI 1.45 ± 15.33). When onset of disease was taken into account, a βAPP ratio on EOAD subjects of 0.3965 ± 0.1916 was found vs. 0.3445 ± 0.1965 on LOAD subjects (p>0.05). Conclusions: Altered βAPP isoforms is a high risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease, although it has no influence on the time of onset of the disease. PMID:16788245

  14. Lead exposure in pheochromocytoma cells induces persistent changes in amyloid precursor protein gene methylation patterns.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Tian; Wan, Yanjian; Xu, Shun-qing

    2012-08-01

    It has been suggested that lead (Pb) exposure in early life may increase amyloid precursor protein (APP) expression and promote the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease in old age. The current study examined whether the DNA methylation patterns of APP gene in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells changed after Pb acetate exposure. Undifferentiated PC12 cells were exposed to three doses of Pb acetate (50, 250, and 500 nM) and one control for 2 days or 1 week. The methylation patterns of APP promoter and global DNA methylation were analyzed. The DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) expression and the level of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) were also investigated. The results showed that the exposure of the three concentrations of Pb acetate could make the APP promoter hypomethylated. The global DNA methylation level and the expression of DNMT1 were changed in the 500 nM group after 2 days exposure and in the 250 and 500 nM group after 7 days exposure. Thus, Pb may exert neurotoxic effects through mechanisms that alter the global and promoter methylation patterns of APP gene. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2012. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Neuroglobins, Pivotal Proteins Associated with Emerging Neural Systems and Precursors of Metazoan Globin Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Lechauve, Christophe; Jager, Muriel; Laguerre, Laurent; Kiger, Laurent; Correc, Gaëlle; Leroux, Cédric; Vinogradov, Serge; Czjzek, Mirjam; Marden, Michael C.; Bailly, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Neuroglobins, previously thought to be restricted to vertebrate neurons, were detected in the brain of a photosymbiotic acoel, Symsagittifera roscoffensis, and in neurosensory cells of the jellyfish Clytia hemisphaerica. For the neuroglobin of S. roscoffensis, a member of a lineage that originated either at the base of the bilateria or of the deuterostome clade, we report the ligand binding properties, crystal structure at 2.3 Å, and brain immunocytochemical pattern. We also describe in situ hybridizations of two neuroglobins specifically expressed in differentiating nematocytes (neurosensory cells) and in statocytes (ciliated mechanosensory cells) of C. hemisphaerica, a member of the early branching animal phylum cnidaria. In silico searches using these neuroglobins as queries revealed the presence of previously unidentified neuroglobin-like sequences in most metazoan lineages. Because neural systems are almost ubiquitous in metazoa, the constitutive expression of neuroglobin-like proteins strongly supports the notion of an intimate association of neuroglobins with the evolution of animal neural systems and hints at the preservation of a vitally important function. Neuroglobins were probably recruited in the first protoneurons in early metazoans from globin precursors. Neuroglobins were identified in choanoflagellates, sponges, and placozoans and were conserved during nervous system evolution. Because the origin of neuroglobins predates the other metazoan globins, it is likely that neuroglobin gene duplication followed by co-option and subfunctionalization led to the emergence of globin families in protostomes and deuterostomes (i.e. convergent evolution). PMID:23288852

  16. Proteomic analysis of the amyloid precursor protein fragment C99: expression in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Sparvero, Louis J.; Patz, Sarah; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Coughlan, Christina M.

    2008-01-01

    The accumulation and aggregation of fragments of amyloid precursor protein (APP) are central to the development of Alzheimer's disease. The production of the small fragment C99 is thought to form the rate-limiting step in the APP processing pathway, which can lead to the production of the toxic Aβ peptide. It has also been suggested that the proteasome contributes to APP catabolism. While the identities and aggregation propensities of many APP fragments have been studied in vitro, the sequences, structures, and cellular sources of fragments generated in vivo remains poorly elucidated. To better identify the specific APP fragments generated in vivo and to elucidate the role of the proteasome in APP processing, we developed a C99 yeast expression system. Using Zip Tip immunocapture, a specific anti-Aβ antiserum (6E10), and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization- time of flight mass spectrometry, we identified over one dozen APP-generated peptide fragments in wild-type yeast (PRE1PRE2) and over three dozen unique fragments in proteasome mutant cells (pre1- 1pre2-1) expressing C99. Based on the identities of the immunocaptured species, we propose that defects in proteasome function are compensated by other proteases and that the combination of techniques described here will be invaluable to further delineate the APP processing pathway in vivo. PMID:17869211

  17. Region-Specific Differences in Amyloid Precursor Protein Expression in the Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Del Turco, Domenico; Paul, Mandy H; Schlaudraff, Jessica; Hick, Meike; Endres, Kristina; Müller, Ulrike C; Deller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The physiological role of amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been extensively investigated in the rodent hippocampus. Evidence suggests that APP plays a role in synaptic plasticity, dendritic and spine morphogenesis, neuroprotection and-at the behavioral level-hippocampus-dependent forms of learning and memory. Intriguingly, however, studies focusing on the role of APP in synaptic plasticity have reported diverging results and considerable differences in effect size between the dentate gyrus (DG) and area CA1 of the mouse hippocampus. We speculated that regional differences in APP expression could underlie these discrepancies and studied the expression of APP in both regions using immunostaining, in situ hybridization (ISH), and laser microdissection (LMD) in combination with quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blotting. In sum, our results show that APP is approximately 1.7-fold higher expressed in pyramidal cells of Ammon's horn than in granule cells of the DG. This regional difference in APP expression may explain why loss-of-function approaches using APP-deficient mice revealed a role for APP in Hebbian plasticity in area CA1, whereas this could not be shown in the DG of the same APP mutants.

  18. Alzheimer's disease. Beta-amyloid precursor protein expression in the nucleus basalis of Meynert.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, G. M.; Greenberg, B. D.; Ellis, W. G.; Forno, L. S.; Salamat, S. M.; Gonzalez-DeWhitt, P. A.; Lowery, D. E.; Tinklenberg, J. R.; Eng, L. F.

    1992-01-01

    The nucleus basalis of Meynert (nbM) was examined using immunocytochemistry for beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta APP) expression in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In mild AD cases, light labeling of the cell body and proximal processes was observed, and small intracellular structures were labeled rarely. In the more severe cases, intense cytoplasmic beta APP labeling was seen, often along with small beta APP-positive structures. Double-labeling experiments demonstrated that in the more severe cases these small structures were also decorated by a neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) antiserum. Other neurons in the severe cases showed incorporation of beta APP into large inclusions, which were also labeled with the NFT antiserum. However, some large inclusions in the severe cases were labeled by the NFT antiserum but contained no beta APP. Extraneuronal NFTs did not show beta APP labeling and did not react with an antibody to the beta-amyloid peptide. These results suggest that increased expression of beta APP coincides with intracellular NFT formation in the nbM, but that the formation of extraneuronal NFTs results in a loss of beta APP immunoreactivity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1386714

  19. Oxidative stress affects processing of amyloid precursor protein in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Muche, Abebe; Arendt, Thomas; Schliebs, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is thought to be a key player in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative dementia, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). It has been assumed that oxidative stress contributes to the ß-amyloid deposition in cerebral blood vessels. In order to prove this hypothesis, we examined the effect of oxidative stress on the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in primary endothelial cells (EC) derived from cerebral cortical tissue of transgenic Tg2576 mice. Following exposure of EC by 1 μM hydrogen peroxide for up to 48 hours, formation and secretion of APP cleavage products sAPPα and sAPPß into the culture medium as well as the expression of endothelial APP were assessed. Oxidative stress resulted in enhanced secretion of sAPPß into the culture medium as compared to controls (absence of hydrogen peroxide), which was accompanied by an increased APP expression, induction of VEGF synthesis, nitric oxide and oxygen free radicals productions, and differential changes of endothelial phospo-p42/44 MAPK expression. The data suggest that oxidative stress may represent a major risk factor in causing Aß deposition in the brain vascular system by initiating the amyloidogenic route of endothelial APP processing. The enhanced β-secretase activity following oxidative stress exposure, possibly promoted by phosphorylation of p42/44 MAPK.

  20. Amyloid Precursor Protein and Alpha Synuclein Translation, Implications for Iron and Inflammation in Neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Catherine M.; Lahiri, Debomoy K.; Huang, Xudong; Rogers, Jack T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Recent studies that alleles in the hemochromatosis gene may accelerate the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by five years have validated interest in the model in which metals (particularly iron) accelerate disease course. Biochemical and biophysical measurements demonstrated the presence of elevated levels of neurotoxic copper, zinc and iron in the brains of AD patients. Intracellular levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP) holoprotein were shown to be modulated via iron by a mechanism that is similar to the translation control of the ferritin L- and H mRNAs by Iron-responsive Element (IRE) RNA stem loops in their 5′untranslated regions (5′UTRs). Recently, we reported a putative IRE-like sequence to be present in the 5′UTR of the Parkinson's disease (PD) specific alpha synuclein (ASYN) transcript. ASYN encodes the non-Aβ component (NAC) of amyloid plaques. The demonstration of iron-dependent translation of APP mRNA, the involvement of metals in the plaque of AD patients and of increased iron in striatal neurons in the Substantia nigra (SN) of PD patients, have each encouraged the development of metal attenuating agents and iron chelators as a major new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of these neurodegenerative diseases. In the case of AD, metal based therapeutics may ultimately prove more cost effective than the use of an amyloid vaccine as the preferred anti-amyloid therapeutic strategy to ameliorate the cognitive decline of AD patients. PMID:19166904

  1. Insulin-degrading enzyme rapidly removes the beta-amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain (AICD).

    PubMed

    Edbauer, Dieter; Willem, Michael; Lammich, Sven; Steiner, Harald; Haass, Christian

    2002-04-19

    The intramembranous gamma-secretase cleavage of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) is dependent on biologically active presenilins (PS). Notch also undergoes a similar PS-dependent gamma-secretase-like cleavage, resulting in the liberation of the Notch intracellular domain (NICD), which is critically required for developmental signal transduction. gamma-Secretase processing of APP results in the production of a similar fragment called AICD (APP intracellular domain), which may function in nuclear signaling as well. AICD, like NICD, is rapidly removed. By using a battery of protease inhibitors we demonstrate that AICD, in contrast to NICD, is degraded by a cytoplasmic metalloprotease. In vitro degradation of AICD can be reconstituted with cytoplasmic fractions obtained from neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Taking into account the inhibition profile and the cytoplasmic localization, we identified three candidate enzymes (neurolysin, thimet oligopeptidase, and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), also known as insulysin), which all are involved in the degradation of bioactive peptides in the brain. When insulin, a well characterized substrate of IDE, was added to the in vitro degradation assay, removal of AICD was efficiently blocked. Moreover, overexpression of IDE resulted in enhanced degradation of AICD, whereas overexpression of the inactive IDE E111Q mutant did not affect AICD degradation. Finally, immunodepletion of IDE significantly reduced the AICD degrading activity. Therefore our data demonstrate that IDE, which is one of the proteases implicated in the removal of extracellular Abeta, also removes the cytoplasmic product of gamma-secretase cleaved APP.

  2. Altered beta-amyloid precursor protein isoforms in Mexican Alzheimer's Disease patients.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-González, V J; Ortiz, G G; Gallegos-Arreola, P; Macías-Islas, M A; Arias-Merino, E D; Loera-Castañeda, V; Martínez-Cano, E; Velázquez-Brizuela, I E; Rosales-Corral, S A; Curiel-Ortega, C R; Pacheco-Moisés, F; García, J J

    2006-01-01

    To determine the beta-amyloid precursor protein (betaAPP) isoforms ratio as a risk factor for Alzheimer's Disease and to assess its relationship with demographic and genetic variables of the disease. Blood samples from 26 patients fulfilling NINCDS-ADRDA diagnostic criteria for AD and 46 healthy control subjects were collected for Western blotting for betaAPP. A ratio of betaAPP isoforms, in optical densities, between the upper band (130 Kd) and the lower bands (106-110 Kd) was obtained. Odds ratios were obtained to determine risk factor of this component. betaAPP ratio on AD subjects was lower than that of control subjects: 0.3662 +/- 0.1891 vs. 0.6769 +/- 0.1021 (mean +/- SD, p<0.05). A low betaAPP ratio (<0.6) showed an OR of 4.63 (95% CI 1.45-15.33). When onset of disease was taken into account, a betaAPP ratio on EOAD subjects of 0.3965 +/- 0.1916 was found vs. 0.3445 +/- 0.1965 on LOAD subjects (p>0.05). Altered betaAPP isoforms is a high risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, although it has no influence on the time of onset of the disease.

  3. β-Amyloid precursor protein staining of the brain in sudden infant and early childhood death.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lisbeth Lund; Banner, Jytte; Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm; Byard, Roger W

    2014-06-01

    To develop and validate a scoring method for assessing β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) staining in cerebral white matter and to investigate the occurrence, amount and deposition pattern based on the cause of death in infants and young children. Archival cerebral tissue was examined from a total of 176 cases (0 to 3 years of age). Each of the APP-stained sections was graded according to a simple scoring system based on the number and type of changes in eight anatomical regions. Examination of the sections revealed some degree of APP staining in 95% of the cases. The highest mean APP scores were found in cases of head trauma, and the lowest scores were found in the cases of drowning. APP staining, although sometimes minimal, was found in all 48 cases of and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Patterns of APP staining (the amount and distribution) were different in cases of head trauma, infection and SIDS but were similar in the SIDS and asphyxia groups. This study demonstrates the use of an integrated scoring system that was developed to assess APP staining in the brain. APP staining was seen in a high proportion of cases, including relatively sudden deaths. The amount of APP was significantly higher in cases of trauma than in nontraumatic deaths. However, APP was detected within all groups. The pattern of APP staining was similar in infants who had died of SIDS and from mechanical asphyxia. © 2013 British Neuropathological Society.

  4. The pro-inflammatory signalling regulator Stat4 promotes vasculogenesis of great vessels derived from endothelial precursors

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhao-Zheng; Liu, Wei; Xia, Yu; Yin, Hui-Min; Zhang, Chi-Yuan; Su, Dan; Yan, Li-Feng; Gu, Ai-Hua; Zhou, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Vasculogenic defects of great vessels (GVs) are a major cause of congenital cardiovascular diseases. However, genetic regulators of endothelial precursors in GV vasculogenesis remain largely unknown. Here we show that Stat4, a transcription factor known for its regulatory role of pro-inflammatory signalling, promotes GV vasculogenesis in zebrafish. We find stat4 transcripts highly enriched in nkx2.5+ endothelial precursors in the pharynx and demonstrate that genetic ablation of stat4 causes stenosis of pharyngeal arch arteries (PAAs) by suppressing PAAs 3–6 angioblast development. We further show that stat4 is a downstream target of nkx2.5 and that it autonomously promotes proliferation of endothelial precursors of the mesoderm. Mechanistically, stat4 regulates the emerging PAA angioblasts by inhibiting the expression of hdac3 and counteracting the effect of stat1a. Altogether, our study establishes a role for Stat4 in zebrafish great vessel development, and suggests that Stat4 may serve as a therapeutic target for GV defects. PMID:28256502

  5. Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors: Phosphorylation and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Karen S. Browning

    2009-06-15

    The initiation of the synthesis of proteins is a fundamental process shared by all living organisms. Each organism has both shared and unique mechanisms for regulation of this vital process. Higher plants provide for a major amount of fixation of carbon from the environment and turn this carbon into food and fuel sources for our use. However, we have very little understanding of how plants regulate the synthesis of the proteins necessary for these metabolic processes. The research carried out during the grant period sought to address some of these unknowns in the regulation of protein synthesis initiation. Our first goal was to determine if phosphorylation plays a significant role in plant initiation of protein synthesis. The role of phosphorylation, although well documented in mammalian protein synthesis regulation, is not well studied in plants. We showed that several of the factors necessary for the initiation of protein synthesis were targets of plant casein kinase and showed differential phosphorylation by the plant specific isoforms of this kinase. In addition, we identified and confirmed the phosphorylation sites in five of the plant initiation factors. Further, we showed that phosphorylation of one of these factors, eIF5, affected the ability of the factor to participate in the initiation process. Our second goal was to develop a method to make initiation factor 3 (eIF3) using recombinant methods. To date, we successfully cloned and expressed 13/13 subunits of wheat eIF3 in E. coli using de novo gene construction methods. The final step in this process is to place the subunits into three different plasmid operons for co-expression. Successful completion of expression of eIF3 will be an invaluable tool to the plant translation community.

  6. Novel Roles of Amyloid-Beta Protein Precursor Metabolites in Fragile X Syndrome and Autism

    PubMed Central

    Westmark, Cara J.; Sokol, Deborah K.; Maloney, Bryan; Lahiri, Debomoy K.

    2017-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability and is associated with up to 5% of autism cases. Several promising drugs are in preclinical testing for FXS; however, bench-to-bedside plans for the clinic are severely limited due to lack of validated biomarkers and outcome measures. Published work from our laboratories has demonstrated altered levels of amyloid-beta (Aβ) protein precursor (APP) and its metabolites in FXS and idiopathic autism. Westmark and colleagues have focused on β-secretase (amyloidogenic) processing and the accumulation of Aβ peptides in adult FXS models while Lahiri and Sokol have studied α-secretase (nonamyloidogenic or anabolic) processing and altered levels of sAPPα and Aβ in pediatric autism and FXS. Thus, our groups have hypothesized a pivotal role for these Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-related proteins in the neurodevelopmental disorders of FXS and autism. In this review, we discuss the contribution of APP metabolites to FXS and autism pathogenesis as well as the potential use of these metabolites as blood-based biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Our future focus is to identify key underlying mechanisms through which APP metabolites contribute to FXS and autism condition-to-disease pathology. Positive outcomes will support utilizing APP metabolites as blood-based biomarkers in clinical trials as well as testing drugs that modulate APP processing as potential disease therapeutics. Our studies to understand the role of APP metabolites in developmental conditions such as FXS and autism are a quantum leap for the neuroscience field, which has traditionally restricted any role of APP to AD and aging. PMID:27573877

  7. Trafficking of cell surface beta-amyloid precursor protein: retrograde and transcytotic transport in cultured neurons

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Amyloid beta-protein (A beta), the principal constituent of senile plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD), is derived by proteolysis from the beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta PP). The mechanism of A beta production in neurons, which are hypothesized to be a rich source of A beta in brain, remains to be defined. In this study, we describe a detailed localization of cell surface beta PP and its subsequent trafficking in primary cultured neurons. Full-length cell surface beta PP was present primarily on perikarya and axons, the latter with a characteristic discontinuous pattern. At growth cones, cell surface beta PP was inconsistently detected. By visualizing the distribution of beta PP monoclonal antibodies added to intact cultures, beta PP was shown to be internalized from distal axons or terminals and retrogradely transported back to perikarya in organelles which colocalized with fluid-phase endocytic markers. Retrograde transport of beta PP was shown in both hippocampal and peripheral sympathetic neurons, the latter using a compartment culture system that isolated cell bodies from distal axons and terminals. In addition, we demonstrated that beta PP from distal axons was transcytotically transported to the surface of perikarya from distal axons in sympathetic neurons. Indirect evidence of this transcytotic pathway was obtained in hippocampal neurons using antisense oligonucleotide to the kinesin heavy chain to inhibit anterograde beta PP transport. Taken together, these results demonstrate novel aspects of beta PP trafficking in neurons, including retrograde axonal transport and transcytosis. Moreover, the axonal predominance of cell surface beta PP is unexpected in view of the recent report of polarized sorting of beta PP to the basolateral domain of MDCK cells. PMID:7721945

  8. Neural stem cells isolated from amyloid precursor protein-mutated mice for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Baldassarro, Vito Antonio; Lizzo, Giulia; Paradisi, Michela; Fernández, Mercedes; Giardino, Luciana; Calzà, Laura

    2013-10-26

    To develop an in vitro model based on neural stem cells derived from transgenic animals, to be used in the study of pathological mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease and for testing new molecules. Neural stem cells (NSCs) were isolated from the subventricular zone of Wild type (Wt) and Tg2576 mice. Primary and secondary neurosphere generation was studied, analysing population doubling and the cell yield per animal. Secondary neurospheres were dissociated and plated on MCM Gel Cultrex 2D and after 6 d in vitro (DIVs) in mitogen withdrawal conditions, spontaneous differentiation was studied using specific neural markers (MAP2 and TuJ-1 for neurons, GFAP for astroglial cells and CNPase for oligodendrocytes). Gene expression pathways were analysed in secondary neurospheres, using the QIAGEN PCR array for neurogenesis, comparing the Tg2576 derived cell expression with the Wt cells. Proteins encoded by the altered genes were clustered using STRING web software. As revealed by 6E10 positive staining, all Tg2576 derived cells retain the expression of the human transgenic Amyloid Precursor Protein. Tg2576 derived primary neurospheres show a decrease in population doubling. Morphological analysis of differentiated NSCs reveals a decrease in MAP2- and an increase in GFAP-positive cells in Tg2576 derived cells. Analysing the branching of TuJ-1 positive cells, a clear decrease in neurite number and length is observed in Tg2576 cells. The gene expression neurogenesis pathway revealed 11 altered genes in Tg2576 NSCs compared to Wt. Tg2576 NSCs represent an appropriate AD in vitro model resembling some cellular alterations observed in vivo, both as stem and differentiated cells.

  9. LRAD3, a Novel LDL Receptor Family Member that Modulates Amyloid Precursor Protein Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Sripriya; Noyes, Nathaniel C.; Migliorini, Mary; Winkles, Jeffrey A.; Battey, Frances D.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Smith, Elizabeth; Yepes, Manuel; Mikhailenko, Irina; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2011-01-01

    We have identified a novel LDL receptor family member, termed LDL receptor class A domain containing 3 (LRAD3), which is expressed in neurons. The LRAD3 gene encodes an approximately 50 kDa type I transmembrane receptor with an ectodomain containing three LDLa repeats, a transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic domain containing a conserved dileucine internalization motif and two polyproline motifs with potential to interact with WW domain containing proteins. Immunohistochemical analysis of mouse brain reveals LRAD3 expression in the cortex and hippocampus. In the mouse hippocampal derived cell line, HT22, LRAD3 partially co-localizes with amyloid precursor protein (APP), and interacts with APP as revealed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. To identify the portion of APP that interacts with LRAD3, we employed solid phase binding assays which demonstrated that LRAD3 failed to bind to a soluble APP fragment (sAPPα) released following α-secretase cleavage. In contrast, C99, the β-secretase product that remains cell associated, co-precipitated with LRAD3, confirming that regions within this portion of APP are important for associating with LRAD3. The association of LRAD3 with APP increases the amyloidogenic pathway of APP processing, resulting in a decrease in sAPPα production and increased Aβ peptide production. Pulse-chase experiments confirm that LRAD3 expression significantly decreases the cellular half-live of mature APP. These results reveal that LRAD3 influences APP processing and raises the possibility that LRAD3 alters APP function in neurons including its downstream signaling. PMID:21795536

  10. Introduction of yeast artificial chromosomes containing mutant human amyloid precursor protein genes into transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Call, L.M.; Lamb, B.T.; Boese, K.F.

    1994-09-01

    Several hypothetical mechanisms have been proposed for the generation and deposition of the amyloid beta (A{beta}) peptide in Alzheimer`s disease (AD). These include overexpression of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene, as suggested by Down Syndrome (DS, trisomy 21), and mutation of APP, as suggested by mutations associated with the presence of disease/amyloid deposition in some cases of familial AD (FAD). Although numerous in vitro studies have lead to certain insights into the molecular basis for amyloid deposition, the mechanisms(s) of amyloidogenesis in vivo remains poorly defined. To examine the effect of FAD mutations on amyloidogenesis in an animal model, we have focused on producing APP YAC transgenic mice containing the human APP gene with FAD mutations. These APP YAC transgenics are being produced by introduction of a 650 kb APP YAC through lipid-mediated transfection of ES cells. This strategy has two principal advantages: the APP genomic sequences contain transcriptional regulatory elements required for proper spatial and temporal expression and contain appropriate splice donor and acceptor sites needed to generate the entire spectrum of alternatively spliced APP transcripts. As a first step, we cloned the genomic regions surrounding APP exons 16 and 17 from an APP YAC sublibrary. Both the Swedish and the 717 mutations were then introduced into exons 16 and 17, respectively, by PCR mutagenesis, and subsequently transferred into the 650 kb APP YAC by a two step gene replacement in yeast. The mutant YACs have been introduced into ES cells, and we have determined that these cells are expressing human mutant APP mRNA and protein. These cells are being used to generate transgenic mice. This paradigm should provide the appropriate test of whether a mutant APP gene is capable of producing AD-like pathology in a mouse model.

  11. Regulation of protein function by native metastability

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheolju; Park, Soon-Ho; Lee, Min-Youn; Yu, Myeong-Hee

    2000-01-01

    In common globular proteins, the native form is in its most stable state. In contrast, each native form exists in a metastable state in inhibitory serpins (serine protease inhibitors) and some viral membrane fusion proteins. Metastability in these proteins is critical to their biological functions. Mutational analyses and structural examination have previously revealed unusual interactions, such as side-chain overpacking, buried polar groups, and cavities as the structural basis of the native metastability. However, the mechanism by which these structural defects regulate protein functions has not been elucidated. We report here characterization of cavity-filling mutations of α1-antitrypsin, a prototype serpin. Conformational stability of the molecule increased linearly with the van der Waals volume of the side chains. Increasing conformational stability is correlated with decreasing inhibitory activity. Moreover, the activity loss appears to correlate with the decrease in the rate of the conformational switch during complex formation with a target protease. These results strongly suggest that the native metastability of proteins is indeed a structural design that regulates protein functions. PMID:10884404

  12. CHIP stabilizes amyloid precursor protein via proteasomal degradation and p53-mediated trans-repression of β-secretase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amir Kumar; Pati, Uttam

    2015-08-01

    In patient with Alzheimer's disease (AD), deposition of amyloid-beta Aβ, a proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β-secretase/BACE1, forms senile plaque in the brain. BACE1 activation is caused due to oxidative stresses and dysfunction of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), which is linked to p53 inactivation. As partial suppression of BACE1 attenuates Aβ generation and AD-related pathology, it might be an ideal target for AD treatment. We have shown that both in neurons and in HEK-APP cells, BACE1 is a new substrate of E3-ligase CHIP and an inverse relation exists between CHIP and BACE1 level. CHIP inhibits ectopic BACE1 level by promoting its ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, thus reducing APP processing; it stabilizes APP in neurons, thus reducing Aβ. CHIP(U) (box) domain physically interacts with BACE1; however, both U-box and TPR domain are essential for ubiquitination and degradation of BACE1. Further, BACE1 is a downstream target of p53 and overexpression of p53 decreases BACE1 level. In HEK-APP cells, CHIP is shown to negatively regulate BACE1 promoter through stabilization of p53's DNA-binding conformation and its binding upon 5' UTR element (+127 to +150). We have thus discovered that CHIP regulates p53-mediated trans-repression of BACE1 at both transcriptional and post-translational level. We propose that a CHIP-BACE1-p53 feedback loop might control APP stabilization, which could further be utilized for new therapeutic intervention in AD. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. CHIP stabilizes amyloid precursor protein via proteasomal degradation and p53-mediated trans-repression of β-secretase

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amir Kumar; Pati, Uttam

    2015-01-01

    In patient with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), deposition of amyloid-beta Aβ, a proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β-secretase/BACE1, forms senile plaque in the brain. BACE1 activation is caused due to oxidative stresses and dysfunction of ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS), which is linked to p53 inactivation. As partial suppression of BACE1 attenuates Aβ generation and AD-related pathology, it might be an ideal target for AD treatment. We have shown that both in neurons and in HEK-APP cells, BACE1 is a new substrate of E3-ligase CHIP and an inverse relation exists between CHIP and BACE1 level. CHIP inhibits ectopic BACE1 level by promoting its ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, thus reducing APP processing; it stabilizes APP in neurons, thus reducing Aβ. CHIPUbox domain physically interacts with BACE1; however, both U-box and TPR domain are essential for ubiquitination and degradation of BACE1. Further, BACE1 is a downstream target of p53 and overexpression of p53 decreases BACE1 level. In HEK-APP cells, CHIP is shown to negatively regulate BACE1 promoter through stabilization of p53’s DNA-binding conformation and its binding upon 5′ UTR element (+127 to +150). We have thus discovered that CHIP regulates p53-mediated trans-repression of BACE1 at both transcriptional and post-translational level. We propose that a CHIP–BACE1–p53 feedback loop might control APP stabilization, which could further be utilized for new therapeutic intervention in AD. PMID:25773675

  14. Acute heat stress up-regulates neuropeptide Y precursor mRNA expression and alters brain and plasma concentrations of free amino acids in chicks.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kentaro; Bahry, Mohammad A; Hui, Yang; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Chowdhury, Vishwajit S

    2015-09-01

    Heat stress causes an increase in body temperature and reduced food intake in chickens. Several neuropeptides and amino acids play a vital role in the regulation of food intake. However, the responses of neuropeptides and amino acids to heat-stress-induced food-intake regulation are poorly understood. In the current study, the hypothalamic mRNA expression of some neuropeptides related to food intake and the content of free amino acids in the brain and plasma was examined in 14-day-old chicks exposed to a high ambient temperature (HT; 40±1 °C for 2 or 5 h) or to a control thermoneutral temperature (CT; 30±1 °C). HT significantly increased rectal temperature and plasma corticosterone level and suppressed food intake. HT also increased the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-signaling protein (ASIP) precursor mRNA, while no change was observed in pro-opiomelanocortin, cholecystokinin, ghrelin, or corticotropin-releasing hormone precursor mRNA. It was further found that the diencephalic content of free amino acids - namely, tryptophan, leucine, isoleucine, valine and serine - was significantly higher in HT chicks with some alterations in their plasma amino acids in comparison with CT chicks. The induction of NPY and ASIP expression and the alteration of some free amino acids during HT suggest that these changes can be the results or causes the suppression of food intake.

  15. Temporal gene expression profile of human precursor B leukemia cells induced by adhesion receptor: identification of pathways regulating B-cell survival.

    PubMed

    Astier, Anne Laurence; Xu, Ronghui; Svoboda, Marek; Hinds, Esther; Munoz, Olivier; de Beaumont, Rosalie; Crean, Colin Daniel; Gabig, Theodore; Freedman, Arnold Stephen

    2003-02-01

    The physical interactions between B cells and stromal cells from the lymphoid tissue microenvironment are critical to the survival of normal and malignant B cells. They are principally mediated by integrins expressed on B cells and counterreceptors on stromal cells. Specifically, alpha4beta1 integrin engagement rescues B cells from physiological or drug-induced apoptosis. Therefore, in order to understand the mechanisms by which integrins prevent apoptosis in leukemia B cells, we compared the temporal gene expression profiles induced by beta1-integrin ligation with fibronectin (Fn) or adhesion by poly-L-Lysine in serum-starved precursor B leukemia cells. Among the 38 selected differentially expressed genes, 6 genes involved in adhesion (VAV2, EPB41L1, CORO1A), proliferation (FRAP1, CCT4), and intercellular communication (GJB3) were validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-Q-PCR). Gene expression modulation could also be validated at the protein level for 5 other genes. We show that integrin stimulation up-regulated FBI-1 expression but inhibited CD79a, Requiem, c-Fos, and caspase 7 induction when the cells underwent apoptosis. We further demonstrate that Fn stimulation also inhibits caspase 3 activation but increases XIAP and survivin expression. Moreover, integrin stimulation also prevents caspase activation induced by doxorubicin. Therefore, we identified genes modulated by adhesion of human precursor B leukemia cells that regulate proliferation and apoptosis, highlighting new pathways that might provide insights into future therapy aiming at targeting apoptosis of leukemia cells.

  16. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)-induced processing of amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP) and APP-like protein 2 is mediated by different metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Kristin T; Adlerz, Linda; Multhaup, Gerd; Iverfeldt, Kerstin

    2010-04-02

    alpha-Secretase cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is of great interest because it prevents the formation of the Alzheimer-linked amyloid-beta peptide. APP belongs to a conserved gene family including the two paralogues APP-like protein (APLP) 1 and 2. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) stimulates the shedding of all three proteins. IGF-1-induced shedding of both APP and APLP1 is dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), whereas APLP2 shedding is independent of this signaling pathway. Here, we used human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells to investigate the involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) in the proteolytic processing of endogenously expressed members of the APP family. Processing was induced by IGF-1 or retinoic acid, another known stimulator of APP alpha-secretase shedding. Our results show that stimulation of APP and APLP1 processing involves multiple signaling pathways, whereas APLP2 processing is mainly dependent on PKC. Next, we wanted to investigate whether the difference in the regulation of APLP2 shedding compared with APP shedding could be due to involvement of different processing enzymes. We focused on the two major alpha-secretase candidates ADAM10 and TACE, which both are members of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family. Shedding was analyzed in the presence of the ADAM10 inhibitor GI254023X, or after transfection with small interfering RNAs targeted against TACE. The results clearly demonstrate that different alpha-secretases are involved in IGF-1-induced processing. APP is mainly cleaved by ADAM10, whereas APLP2 processing is mediated by TACE. Finally, we also show that IGF-1 induces PKC-dependent phosphorylation of TACE.

  17. Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1)-induced Processing of Amyloid-β Precursor Protein (APP) and APP-like Protein 2 Is Mediated by Different Metalloproteinases*

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Kristin T.; Adlerz, Linda; Multhaup, Gerd; Iverfeldt, Kerstin

    2010-01-01

    α-Secretase cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is of great interest because it prevents the formation of the Alzheimer-linked amyloid-β peptide. APP belongs to a conserved gene family including the two paralogues APP-like protein (APLP) 1 and 2. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) stimulates the shedding of all three proteins. IGF-1-induced shedding of both APP and APLP1 is dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), whereas APLP2 shedding is independent of this signaling pathway. Here, we used human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells to investigate the involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) in the proteolytic processing of endogenously expressed members of the APP family. Processing was induced by IGF-1 or retinoic acid, another known stimulator of APP α-secretase shedding. Our results show that stimulation of APP and APLP1 processing involves multiple signaling pathways, whereas APLP2 processing is mainly dependent on PKC. Next, we wanted to investigate whether the difference in the regulation of APLP2 shedding compared with APP shedding could be due to involvement of different processing enzymes. We focused on the two major α-secretase candidates ADAM10 and TACE, which both are members of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family. Shedding was analyzed in the presence of the ADAM10 inhibitor GI254023X, or after transfection with small interfering RNAs targeted against TACE. The results clearly demonstrate that different α-secretases are involved in IGF-1-induced processing. APP is mainly cleaved by ADAM10, whereas APLP2 processing is mediated by TACE. Finally, we also show that IGF-1 induces PKC-dependent phosphorylation of TACE. PMID:20139073

  18. Measurement of thrombus precursor protein in septic patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation and liver disease.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyung Soon; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Song, Jae Woo

    2002-10-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a syndrome characterized by systemic intravascular activation of coagulation leading to the widespread deposition of fibrin in the circulation. Therefore, the determination of soluble fibrin is crucial for the diagnosis of DIC. Thrombus precursor protein (TpP) levels can be determined as a measure of soluble polymers, which are the immediate precursors of insoluble fibrin. In this study, the potential diagnostic usefulness of this TpP test was investigated in septic patients with DIC and liver diseases. TpP analysis was performed on 155 plasma samples from 95 septic patients, including 72 patients without liver disease and 23 patients with liver diseases, and on 42 plasma samples from normal healthy subjects. The study population was subdivided according to three phases of DIC described as compensated, decompensated and full-blown DIC. Plasma TpP level was determined using a new assay, the TpPTM (American Biogenetic Sciences, USA), which is based on an ELISA method. Septic patients with decompensated (16.1 9.1 mg/mL) or full- blown (20.9 12.4 mg/mL) phases of DIC had significantly higher TpP levels than those with the compensated (5.6 6.2 mg/mL) phase of DIC or healthy controls (2.9 1.6 mg/mL). In septic patients with liver disease, a significant difference was found between the TpP levels of patients with full- blown DIC (21.6 10.6 mg/mL) and those of patients with the decompensated phase (13.4 6.5 mg/mL). Plasma TpP levels correlated significantly with other DIC parameters including platelet count, fibrinogen, antithrombin and TAT, and correlated weakly with D-dimer. Our findings indicate that septic patients who developed decompensated or full-blown DIC or organ dysfunction have significantly higher plasma levels of TpP, and suggest the potential usefulness of the TpP assay as an aid to the diagnosis of DIC in cases of sepsis and liver disease complicated by sepsis.

  19. Increased Amyloid Precursor Protein and Tau Expression Manifests as Key Secondary Cell Death in Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Sandra A; Tajiri, Naoki; Sanberg, Paul R; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2017-03-01

    In testing the hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like pathology in late stage traumatic brain injury (TBI), we evaluated AD pathological markers in late stage TBI model. Sprague-Dawley male rats were subjected to moderate controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury, and 6 months later euthanized and brain tissues harvested. Results from H&E staining revealed significant 33% and 10% reduction in the ipsilateral and contralateral hippocampal CA3 interneurons, increased MHCII-activated inflammatory cells in many gray matter (8-20-fold increase) and white matter (6-30-fold increased) regions of both the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres, decreased cell cycle regulating protein marker by 1.6- and 1-fold in the SVZ and a 2.3- and 1.5-fold reductions in the ipsilateral and contralateral dentate gyrus, diminution of immature neuronal marker by two- and onefold in both the ipsilateral and contralateral SVZ and dentate gyrus, and amplified amyloid precursor protein (APP) distribution volumes in white matter including corpus callosum, fornix, and internal capsule (4-38-fold increase), as well as in the cortical gray matter, such as the striatum hilus, SVZ, and dentate gyrus (6-40-fold increase) in TBI animals compared to controls (P's < 0.001). Surrogate AD-like phenotypic markers revealed a significant accumulation of phosphorylated tau (AT8) and oligomeric tau (T22) within the neuronal cell bodies in ipsilateral and contralateral cortex, and dentate gyrus relative to sham control, further supporting the rampant neurodegenerative pathology in TBI secondary cell death. These findings indicate that AD-like pathological features may prove to be valuable markers and therapeutic targets for late stage TBI. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 665-677, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Sorting for storage in myeloid cells of nonmyeloid proteins and chimeras with the propeptide of myeloperoxidase precursor.

    PubMed

    Bülow, E; Nauseef, W M; Goedken, M; McCormick, S; Calafat, J; Gullberg, U; Olsson, I

    2002-02-01

    During formation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils, proteins are synthesized for storage in granules. Whereas sorting of proteins into distinct subtypes of cytoplasmic granules may reflect the coordinated expression of the proteins contained in them, still the mechanism(s) for the retrieval of proteins from the constitutive secretion is unknown. To investigate the mechanisms of retrieval, nonmyeloid secretory proteins were expressed in myeloid cell lines, and their subcellular fate was assessed. The contribution of the propeptide (MPOpro) of the myeloperoxidase (MPO) precursor was investigated by determining the fate of chimeras containing MPOpro. The nonmyeloid protein alpha(1)-microglobulin (alpha(1)-m) was targeted to storage organelles in 32D cells and colocalized with the lysosomal marker LAMP-1, whereas soluble TNF receptor 1 (sTNFR1) was secreted without granule targeting. Fusion of MPOpro to alpha(1)-m delayed exit from endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but subsequent targeting to dense organelles was indistinguishable from that of alpha(1)-m alone. Fusion proteins between MPOpro and sTNFR1 or green fluorescent protein expressed in myeloid 32D, K562, or PLB-985 cells did not associate stably with calreticulin or calnexin, molecular chaperones that normally interact transiently with the MPO precursor, but were still efficiently retained in the ER followed by degradation. We conclude that normally secreted, nonmyeloid proteins can be targeted efficiently to storage organelles in myeloid cells, that myeloid cells selectively target some proteins for storage but not others, and that MPOpro may contribute to the prolonged ER retention of the MPO precursor independent of the ER-molecular chaperones calreticulin and calnexin.

  1. Elevated expression of beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 2 in brains of patients with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Motonaga, Kozo; Itoh, Masayuki; Becker, Laurence E; Goto, Yu-ichi; Takashima, Sachio

    2002-06-21

    The gene encoding the beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 2 (BACE2) has been determined to be located on the long arm of chromosome 21 at 21q22.3. BACE2 cleaves the amyloid precursor protein at the beta-secretase site and is thought to contribute to amyloid beta protein production. In the present study, changes in the expression of BACE2 were investigated immunohistochemically in the frontal cortex of patients with Down syndrome (DS). The immunoreactivity for BACE2 was detected in neurofibrillary tangle-bearing neurons from the elderly DS brains with Alzheimer-type neuropathology, but were not detected in those of DS brains without Alzheimer-type neuropathology or of control brains of any age. This suggests the possibility that the elevated expression of BACE2 is involved in the Alzheimer-type neuropathology of DS.

  2. Identification of mitochondrial proteins and some of their precursors in two-dimensional electrophoretic maps of human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.

    1981-04-01

    A set of at least 30 proteins disappears from the two-dimensional electrophoretic pattern of human lymphoid cells treated with various antimitochondrial agents. This set is similar to the set of proteins found in isolated mitochondria (except for the presence of actin in the latter group), indicating that the inhibitor effect stops production of a majority of mature mitochondrial proteins. Several proteins having the characteristics of precursors to the major cytoplasmically synthesized mitochondrial proteins can be observed in cells during fast-pulse experiments and in a reticulocyte lysate system fed with total lymphoid cell RNA. In the three major instances of mitochondrial precursor-product processing, the removal peptide is quite basic in each case, suggesting that a lysine- or arginine-rich terminal sequence may be necessary for initial recognition by the mitochondrial protein uptake apparatus. The inhibitor effect allows easy identification of a large set of mitochondrial proteins in two-dimensional maps of various cells, thereby specifying a particularly tractable and functionally distinctive subset of the cellular proteins. The nature and wide scope of the effect support the concept of energy-dependent vectorial processing and indicate that such a mechanism is generally applicable to the major class of cytoplasmically synthesized mitochondrial proteins in mammalian cells.

  3. Purification and characterization of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin-like protease inhibitor that regulates prohormone thiol protease involved in enkephalin precursor processing.

    PubMed

    Hook, V Y; Purviance, R T; Azaryan, A V; Hubbard, G; Krieger, T J

    1993-09-25

    Evidence is presented showing that alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) inhibits a novel prohormone thiol protease (PTP) involved in processing the enkephalin precursor. Colocalization of ACT immunoreactivity with PTP within isolated secretory vesicles of bovine adrenal medulla and pituitary indicated that endogenous ACT could regulate PTP in vivo. The endogenous 60 kDa bovine ACT (bACT)-like protein was purified from pituitary by chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose, chromatofocusing, butyl-Sepharose, and Sephacryl S-200. Characterization showed that the bACT-like protein was a potent inhibitor of PTP (Ki,app value of 2.2 nM) as well as an effective inhibitor of chymotrypsin (Ki,app value of 2.3 nM). Furthermore, the bACT-like protein formed sodium dodecyl sulfate-stable complexes with chymotrypsin, which is typical of serpin protease inhibitors. Importantly, PTP formed sodium dodecyl sulfate-stable complexes with human ACT, suggesting that PTP's cleavage specificity may resemble the reactive center of ACT. PTP cleavage of enkephalin-containing peptides at the NH2-terminal side of paired basic residues (Lys-Arg, Arg-Arg, Lys-Lys), flanking the COOH terminus of (Met)enkephalin (Tyr-Gly-GLy-Phe-Met), indicates methionine at the P1 position. PTP cleavage of peptide-methylcoumarin amide and peptide-p-nitroanilide substrates demonstrated specificity for paired basic and monobasic residues, as well as a role for methionine in PTP's cleavage site. These results showing PTP's ability for processing at a methionine residue which resembles the P1 specificity of ACT are compatible with inhibition of PTP by ACT. These findings are the first demonstration of the involvement of a protease inhibitor in neuropeptide precursor processing. The known developmental regulation of ACT in brain and significant amounts of ACT in amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's disease suggest a possible role for PTP in the maturation of peptidergic neurons.

  4. Proteolytic processing of a precursor protein for a growth-promoting peptide by a subtilisin serine protease in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Renu; Liu, Jian-Xiang; Howell, Stephen H

    2008-10-01

    Phytosulfokines (PSKs) are secreted, sulfated peptide hormones derived from larger prepropeptide precursors. Proteolytic processing of one of the precursors, AtPSK4, was demonstrated by cleavage of a preproAtPSK4-myc transgene product to AtPSK4-myc. Cleavage of proAtPSK4 was induced by placing root explants in tissue culture. The processing of proAtPSK4 was dependent on AtSBT1.1, a subtilisin-like serine protease, encoded by one of 56 subtilase genes in Arabidopsis. The gene encoding AtSBT1.1 was up-regulated following the transfer of root explants to tissue culture, suggesting that activation of the proteolytic machinery that cleaves proAtPSK4 is dependent on AtSBT1.1 expression. We also demonstrated that a fluorogenic peptide representing the putative subtilase recognition site in proAtPSK4 is cleaved in vitro by affinity-purified AtSBT1.1. An alanine scan through the recognition site peptide indicated that AtSBT1.1 is fairly specific for the AtPSK4 precursor. Thus, this peptide growth factor, which promotes callus formation in culture, is proteolytically cleaved from its precursor by a specific plant subtilase encoded by a gene that is up-regulated during the process of transferring root explants to tissue culture.

  5. The tumour suppressor APC promotes HIV-1 assembly via interaction with Gag precursor protein

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Kei; Nishi, Mayuko; Matsunaga, Satoko; Okayama, Akiko; Anraku, Masaki; Kudoh, Ayumi; Hirano, Hisashi; Kimura, Hirokazu; Morikawa, Yuko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Ono, Akira; Ryo, Akihide

    2017-01-01

    Diverse cellular proteins and RNAs are tightly regulated in their subcellular localization to exert their local function. Here we report that the tumour suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli protein (APC) directs the localization and assembly of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 Gag polyprotein at distinct membrane components to enable the efficient production and spread of infectious viral particles. A proteomic analysis and subsequent biomolecular interaction assay reveals that the carboxyl terminus of APC interacts with the matrix region of Gag. Ectopic expression of APC, but not its familial adenomatous polyposis-related truncation mutant, prominently enhances HIV-1 production. Conversely, the depletion of APC leads to a significant decrease in membrane targeting of viral components, resulting in the severe loss of production of infectious virions. Furthermore, APC promotes the directional assembly of viral components at virological synapses, thereby facilitating cell-to-cell viral transmission. These findings reveal an unexpected role of APC in the directional spread of HIV-1. PMID:28134256

  6. Nogo-a regulates neural precursor migration in the embryonic mouse cortex.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Carole; Schröter, Aileen; Thallmair, Michaela; Schwab, Martin E

    2010-10-01

    Although Nogo-A has been intensively studied for its inhibitory effect on axonal regeneration in the adult central nervous system, little is known about its function during brain development. In the embryonic mouse cortex, Nogo-A is expressed by radial precursor/glial cells and by tangentially migrating as well as postmigratory neurons. We studied radially migrating neuroblasts in wild-type and Nogo-A knockout (KO) mouse embryos. In vitro analysis showed that Nogo-A and its receptor components NgR, Lingo-1, TROY, and p75 are expressed in cells emigrating from embryonic forebrain-derived neurospheres. Live imaging revealed an increased cell motility when Nogo-A was knocked out or blocked with antibodies. Antibodies blocking NgR or Lingo-1 showed the same motility-enhancing effect supporting a direct role of surface Nogo-A on migration. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling of embryonic day (E)15.5 embryos demonstrated that Nogo-A influences the radial migration of neuronal precursors. At E17.5, the normal transient accumulation of radially migrating precursors within the subventricular zone was not detectable in the Nogo-A KO mouse cortex. At E19, migration to the upper cortical layers was disturbed. These findings suggest that Nogo-A and its receptor complex play a role in the interplay of adhesive and repulsive cell interactions in radial migration during cortical development.

  7. Viral precursor protein P3 and its processed products perform discrete and essential functions in the poliovirus RNA replication complex.

    PubMed

    Spear, Allyn; Ogram, Sushma A; Morasco, B Joan; Smerage, Lucia Eisner; Flanegan, James B

    2015-11-01

    The differential use of protein precursors and their products is a key strategy used during poliovirus replication. To characterize the role of protein precursors during replication, we examined the complementation profiles of mutants that inhibited 3D polymerase or 3C-RNA binding activity. We showed that 3D entered the replication complex in the form of its precursor, P3 (or 3CD), and was cleaved to release active 3D polymerase. Furthermore, our results showed that P3 is the preferred precursor that binds to the 5'CL. Using reciprocal complementation assays, we showed that one molecule of P3 binds the 5'CL and that a second molecule of P3 provides 3D. In addition, we showed that a second molecule of P3 served as the VPg provider. These results support a model in which P3 binds to the 5'CL and recruits additional molecules of P3, which are cleaved to release either 3D or VPg to initiate RNA replication.

  8. Mechanism and regulation of eukaryotic protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Merrick, W C

    1992-01-01

    This review presents a description of the numerous eukaryotic protein synthesis factors and their apparent sequential utilization in the processes of initiation, elongation, and termination. Additionally, the rare use of reinitiation and internal initiation is discussed, although little is known biochemically about these processes. Subsequently, control of translation is addressed in two different settings. The first is the global control of translation, which is effected by protein phosphorylation. The second is a series of specific mRNAs for which there is a direct and unique regulation of the synthesis of the gene product under study. Other examples of translational control are cited but not discussed, because the general mechanism for the regulation is unknown. Finally, as is often seen in an active area of investigation, there are several observations that cannot be readily accommodated by the general model presented in the first part of the review. Alternate explanations and various lines of experimentation are proposed to resolve these apparent contradictions. PMID:1620067

  9. Teaching resources. Regulation of protein translation.

    PubMed

    Landau, Emmanuel M

    2006-03-07

    This Teaching Resource provides a summary and slides derived from a lecture on protein translation and is part of the course "Cell Signaling Systems: A Course for Graduate Students." The lecture begins with a discussion of the various components that perform the translation process and then proceeds to describe the initiation, scanning, and ribosomal entry processes. The lecture concludes with the signaling mechanisms underlying translation regulation.

  10. Anti-amyloid precursor protein immunoglobulins inhibit amyloid-β production by steric hindrance.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rhian S; Liddell, J Eryl; Kidd, Emma J

    2011-01-01

    The cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases results in the production of amyloid-β (Aβ) in Alzheimer's disease. We raised two monoclonal antibodies, 2B3 and 2B12, that recognize the β-secretase cleavage site on APP but not Aβ. We hypothesized that these antibodies would reduce Aβ levels via steric hindrance of β-secretase. Both antibodies decreased extracellular Aβ levels from astrocytoma cells, but 2B3 was more potent than 2B12. Levels of soluble sAPPα from the nonamyloidogenic α-secretase pathway and intracellular APP were not affected by either antibody nor were there any effects on cell viability. 2B3 exhibited a higher affinity for APP than 2B12 and its epitope appeared to span the cleavage site, whereas 2B12 bound slightly upstream. Both of these factors probably contribute to its greater effect on Aβ levels. After 60 min incubation at pH 4.0, most 2B3 and 2B12 remained bound to their antigen, suggesting that the antibodies will remain bound to APP in the acidic endosomes where β-secretase cleavage probably occurs. Only 2B3 and 2B12, but not control antibodies, inhibited the cleavage of sAPPα by β-secretase in a cell-free assay where the effects of antibody internalization and intracellular degradation were excluded. 2B3 virtually abolished this cleavage. In addition, levels of C-terminal APP fragments, generated following β-secretase cleavage (βCTF), were significantly reduced in cells after incubation with 2B3. These results strongly suggest that anti-cleavage site IgGs can generically reduce Aβ levels via inhibition of β-secretase by steric hindrance and may provide a novel alternative therapy for Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Novel effects of FCCP [carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone] on amyloid precursor protein processing.

    PubMed

    Connop, B P; Thies, R L; Beyreuther, K; Ida, N; Reiner, P B

    1999-04-01

    Amyloidogenic processing of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Because it has been suggested that catabolic processing of the APP holoprotein occurs in acidic intracellular compartments, we studied the effects of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) and the H+-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 on APP catabolism in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing either wild-type or "Swedish" mutant APP. Unlike bafilomycin A1, which inhibits beta-amyloid production in cells expressing mutant but not wild-type APP, FCCP inhibited beta-amyloid production in both cell types. Moreover, the effects of FCCP were independent of alterations in total cellular APP levels or APP maturation, and the concentrations used did not alter either cellular ATP levels or cell viability. Bafilomycin A1, which had no effect on beta-amyloid production in wild-type cells, inhibited endocytosis of fluorescent transferrin, whereas concentrations of FCCP that inhibited beta-amyloid production in these cells had no effect on endosomal function. Thus, in wild-type-expressing cells it appears that the beta-amyloid peptide is not produced in the classically defined endosome. Although bafilomycin A1 decreased beta-amyloid release from cells expressing mutant APP but not wild-type APP, it altered lysosomal function in both cell types, suggesting that in normal cells beta-amyloid is not produced in the lysosome. Although inhibition of beta-amyloid production by bafilomycin A1 in mutant cells may occur via changes in endosomal/lysosomal pH, our data suggest that FCCP inhibits wild-type beta-amyloid production by acting on a bafilomycin A1-insensitive acidic compartment that is distinct from either the endosome or the lysosome.

  12. Altered temporal patterns of anxiety in aged and amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Bedrosian, Tracy A.; Herring, Kamillya L.; Weil, Zachary M.; Nelson, Randy J.

    2011-01-01

    Both normal aging and dementia are associated with dysregulation of the biological clock, which contributes to disrupted circadian organization of physiology and behavior. Diminished circadian organization in conjunction with the loss of cholinergic input to the cortex likely contributes to impaired cognition and behavior. One especially notable and relatively common circadian disturbance among the aged is “sundowning syndrome,” which is characterized by exacerbated anxiety, agitation, locomotor activity, and delirium during the hours before bedtime. Sundowning has been reported in both dementia patients and cognitively intact elderly individuals living in institutions; however, little is known about temporal patterns in anxiety and agitation, and the neurobiological basis of these rhythms remains unspecified. In the present study, we explored the diurnal pattern of anxiety-like behavior in aged and amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. We then attempted to treat the observed behavioral disturbances in the aged mice using chronic nightly melatonin treatment. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that time-of-day differences in acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase expression and general neuronal activation (i.e., c-Fos expression) coincide with the behavioral symptoms. Our results show a temporal pattern of anxiety-like behavior that emerges in elderly mice. This behavioral pattern coincides with elevated locomotor activity relative to adult mice near the end of the dark phase, and with time-dependent changes in basal forebrain acetylcholinesterase expression. Transgenic APP mice show a similar behavioral phenomenon that is not observed among age-matched wild-type mice. These results may have useful applications to the study and treatment of age- and dementia-related circadian behavioral disturbances, namely, sundowning syndrome. PMID:21709248

  13. Altered temporal patterns of anxiety in aged and amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Bedrosian, Tracy A; Herring, Kamillya L; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2011-07-12

    Both normal aging and dementia are associated with dysregulation of the biological clock, which contributes to disrupted circadian organization of physiology and behavior. Diminished circadian organization in conjunction with the loss of cholinergic input to the cortex likely contributes to impaired cognition and behavior. One especially notable and relatively common circadian disturbance among the aged is "sundowning syndrome," which is characterized by exacerbated anxiety, agitation, locomotor activity, and delirium during the hours before bedtime. Sundowning has been reported in both dementia patients and cognitively intact elderly individuals living in institutions; however, little is known about temporal patterns in anxiety and agitation, and the neurobiological basis of these rhythms remains unspecified. In the present study, we explored the diurnal pattern of anxiety-like behavior in aged and amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. We then attempted to treat the observed behavioral disturbances in the aged mice using chronic nightly melatonin treatment. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that time-of-day differences in acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase expression and general neuronal activation (i.e., c-Fos expression) coincide with the behavioral symptoms. Our results show a temporal pattern of anxiety-like behavior that emerges in elderly mice. This behavioral pattern coincides with elevated locomotor activity relative to adult mice near the end of the dark phase, and with time-dependent changes in basal forebrain acetylcholinesterase expression. Transgenic APP mice show a similar behavioral phenomenon that is not observed among age-matched wild-type mice. These results may have useful applications to the study and treatment of age- and dementia-related circadian behavioral disturbances, namely, sundowning syndrome.

  14. Overexpression of heparanase lowers the amyloid burden in amyloid-β precursor protein transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Jendresen, Charlotte B; Cui, Hao; Zhang, Xiao; Vlodavsky, Israel; Nilsson, Lars N G; Li, Jin-Ping

    2015-02-20

    Heparan sulfate (HS) and HS proteoglycans (HSPGs) colocalize with amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits in Alzheimer disease brain and in Aβ precursor protein (AβPP) transgenic mouse models. Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that specifically degrades the unbranched glycosaminoglycan side chains of HSPGs. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that HS and HSPGs are active participators of Aβ pathogenesis in vivo. We therefore generated a double-transgenic mouse model overexpressing both human heparanase and human AβPP harboring the Swedish mutation (tgHpa*Swe). Overexpression of heparanase did not affect AβPP processing because the steady-state levels of Aβ1-40, Aβ1-42, and soluble AβPP β were the same in 2- to 3-month-old double-transgenic tgHpa*Swe and single-transgenic tgSwe mice. In contrast, the Congo red-positive amyloid burden was significantly lower in 15-month-old tgHpa*Swe brain than in tgSwe brain. Likewise, the Aβ burden, measured by Aβx-40 and Aβx-42 immunohistochemistry, was reduced significantly in tgHpa*Swe brain. The intensity of HS-stained plaques correlated with the Aβx-42 burden and was reduced in tgHpa*Swe mice. Moreover, the HS-like molecule heparin facilitated Aβ1-42-aggregation in an in vitro Thioflavin T assay. The findings suggest that HSPGs contribute to amyloid deposition in tgSwe mice by increasing Aβ fibril formation because heparanase-induced fragmentation of HS led to a reduced amyloid burden. Therefore, drugs interfering with Aβ-HSPG interactions might be a potential strategy for Alzheimer disease treatment.

  15. The multifaceted nature of amyloid precursor protein and its proteolytic fragments: friends and foes

    PubMed Central

    Nhan, Hoang S.; Chiang, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has occupied a central position in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathophysiology, in large part due to the seminal role of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), a proteolytic fragment derived from APP. Although the contribution of Aβ to AD pathogenesis is accepted by many in the research community, recent studies have unveiled a more complicated picture of APP’s involvement in neurodegeneration in that other APP-derived fragments have been shown to exert pathological influences on neuronal function. However, not all APP-derived peptides are neurotoxic, and some even harbor neuroprotective effects. In this review, we will explore this complex picture by first discussing the pleiotropic effects of the major APP-derived peptides cleaved by multiple proteases, including soluble APP peptides (sAPPα, sAPPβ), various C- and N-terminal fragments, p3, and APP intracellular domain fragments. In addition, we will highlight two interesting sequences within APP that likely contribute to this duality in APP function. First, it has been found that caspase-mediated cleavage of APP in the cytosolic region may release a cytotoxic peptide, C31, which plays a role in synapse loss and neuronal death. Second, recent studies have implicated the –YENPTY– motif in the cytoplasmic region as a domain that modulates several APP activities through phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the first tyrosine residue. Thus, this review summarizes the current understanding of various APP proteolytic products and the interplay among them to gain deeper insights into the possible mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and AD pathophysiology. PMID:25287911

  16. Anti-amyloid precursor protein antibodies inhibit amyloid-β production by steric hindrance

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Rhian S.; Liddell, J. Eryl; Kidd, Emma J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases results in the production of amyloid-β (Aβ) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We raised two monoclonal antibodies, 2B3 and 2B12, that recognise the β-secretase cleavage site on APP but not Aβ. We hypothesised that these antibodies would reduce Aβ levels via steric hindrance of β-secretase. Both antibodies decreased extracellular Aβ levels from astrocytoma cells, but 2B3 was more potent than 2B12. Levels of soluble sAPPα from the non-amyloidogenic α-secretase pathway and intracellular APP were not affected by either antibody nor were there any effects on cell viability. 2B3 exhibited a higher affinity for APP than 2B12 and its epitope appeared to span the cleavage site while 2B12 bound slightly upstream. Both of these factors probably contribute to its greater effect on Aβ levels. After 60 minutes incubation at pH 4.0, most 2B3 and 2B12 remained bound to their antigen, suggesting that the antibodies will remain bound to APP in the acidic endosomes where β-secretase cleavage probably occurs. Only 2B3 and 2B12, but not control antibodies, inhibited the cleavage of sAPPα by β-secretase in a cell-free assay where effects of antibody internalisation and intracellular degradation were excluded. 2B3 virtually abolished this cleavage. In addition, levels of C-terminal APP fragments, βCTF, generated following β-secretase cleavage, were significantly reduced in cells after incubation with 2B3. These results strongly suggest that anti-cleavage site antibodies can generically reduce Aβ levels via inhibition of β-secretase by steric hindrance and may provide a novel alternative therapy for AD. PMID:21122073

  17. Therapeutic targeting of amyloid precursor protein and its processing enzymes for breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Syed Mohd Danish; Hussain, Talib; Subaiea, Gehad M; Shakil, Shazi; Ahmad, Adnan

    2017-08-28

    Breast cancer cases in women are increasing at an alarming rate globally and extensive research is being conducted to identify a breakthrough medicine against this dreadful disease. In fact, researchers are looking for fresh targets to develop novel treatment strategies for cancer of the breasts. In this article, 'amyloid precursor protein' or (APP) and its processing enzymes are deeply studied so as to explore the same as prospective targets for breast cancer treatment. Even though most of the studies on APP and its processing enzymes have been performed on neuronal cells owing to their linkage with Alzheimer's disease, they are omnipresent on various non-neuronal cells also. Interestingly, APP and its processing enzymes have a role in the proliferation of cancer cells as well as in their growth, adherence and movement. Over-synthesis of APP and its processing enzymes are emerging as important hallmark features in breast cancer. It has been found that APP and its processing enzymes, i.e., g-secretase and a-secretase are strongly linked with breast cancer via Akt phosporylation and Notch signaling pathways. Thus, targeting APP or g-secretase or a-secretase could be considered as an effective strategy to treat breast cancer and even metastasis. There are various clinical trials which are in progress to explore the potential of g-secretase inhibitor against breast cancer. Hence, the present review is composed of two sections, one section deals with all the possible linkages of APP and APP processing enzymes (a-secretase, b-secretase and g-secretase) with breast cancer. However, the other section provides recent information on breast cancer treatment strategy using APP and APP processing enzymes as targets. We strongly believe that compilation of these studies would be beneficial to the scientist working in the field of 'breast cancer-treatment'. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. sAPPα rescues deficits in amyloid precursor protein knockout mice following focal traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Frances; Vink, Robert; Blumbergs, Peter C; Masters, Colin L; Cappai, Roberto; van den Heuvel, Corinna

    2012-07-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is thought to be neuroprotective following traumatic brain injury (TBI), although definitive evidence at moderate to severe levels of injury is lacking. In the current study, we investigated histological and functional outcomes in APP-/- mice compared with APP+/+ mice following a moderate focal injury, and whether administration of sAPPα restored the outcomes in knockout animals back to the wildtype state. Following moderate controlled cortical impact injury, APP-/- mice demonstrated greater impairment in motor and cognitive outcome as determined by the ledged beam and Barnes Maze tests respectively (p < 0.05). This corresponded with the degree of neuronal damage, with APP-/- mice having significantly greater lesion volume (25.0 ± 1.6 vs. 20.3 ± 1.6%, p < 0.01) and hippocampal damage, with less remaining CA neurons (839 ± 245 vs. 1353 ± 142 and 1401 ± 263). This was also associated with an impaired neuroreparative response, with decreased GAP-43 immunoreactivity within the cortex around the lesion edge compared with APP+/+ mice. The deficits observed in the APP-/- mice related to a lack of sAPPα, as treatment with exogenously added sAPPα post-injury improved APP-/- mice histological and functional outcome to the point that they were no longer significantly different to APP+/+ mice (p < 0.05). This study shows that endogenous APP is potentially protective at moderate levels of TBI, and that this neuroprotective activity is related to the presence of sAPPα. Importantly, it indicates that the mechanism of action of exogenously added sAPPα is independent of the presence of endogenous APP.

  19. Quantitative Real-Time PCR Analysis of MicroRNAs and Their Precursors Regulated by TGF-β Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hara; Hata, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    The signaling pathway of TGF-β and its family member BMP has been implicated in vascular development and maintenance of homeostasis by modulating expression of small noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs). MiRNAs repress target genes, which play a critical role in regulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) growth, phenotype, and function. To understand the mechanisms by which specific miRNAs control the TGF-β and BMP signaling pathway in VSMC, it is essential to quantitate levels of specific miRNAs and their precursors whose expression are controlled by TGF-β/BMP signaling. Here, we describe a real-time quantization method for accurate and sensitive detection of miRNAs and their precursors, such as primary transcripts of miRNAs (pri-miRNAs) and precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNAs). This method requires two steps; synthesis of single-stranded complementary DNAs (cDNAs) from total RNA samples and quantization of specific pri-, pre-, or mature miRNAs by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a real-time PCR machine.

  20. Regulation of protein phosphorylation in oat mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, C.; Kopeck, K.; Sceppa, E. )

    1989-04-01

    We sought to identify phosphorylated proteins in isolated oat mitocchondria and to characterize the enzymatic and regulatory properties of the protein kinase(s). Mitochondria from oats (Avena sativa L. cv. Garry) were purified on Percoll gradients. Mitochondria were incubated with {sup 32}P-{gamma}-ATP; proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. A small number of bands was detected on autoradiograms, most prominently at 70 kD and 42 kD; the latter band has been tentatively identified as a subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, a well-known phosphoprotein. The protein kinase(s) could also phosphorylate casein, but not histone. Spermine enhanced the phosphorylation of casein and inhibited the phosphorylation of the 42 kD band. These studies were carried out on both intact and burst mitochondria. Control by calcium and other ions was investigated. The question of the action of regulators on protein kinase or protein phosphatase was studied by the use of {sup 35}S-adenosine thiotriphosphate.

  1. Accumulation of amyloid precursor protein-like immunoreactivity in rat brain in response to thiamine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Calingasan, N Y; Gandy, S E; Baker, H; Sheu, K F; Kim, K S; Wisniewski, H M; Gibson, G E

    1995-04-17

    Thiamine deficiency (TD) is a classical model of impaired cerebral oxidation. As in Alzheimer's disease (AD), TD is characterized by selective neuronal loss, decreased activities of thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes, cholinergic deficits and memory loss. Amyloid beta-protein (A beta), a approximately 4 kDa fragment of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP), accumulates in the brains of patients with AD or Down's syndrome. In the current study, we examined APP and A beta immunoreactivity in the brains of thiamine-deficient rats. Animals received thiamine-deficient diet ad libitum and daily injections of the thiamine antagonist, pyrithiamine. Immunocytochemical staining and immunoblotting utilized a rabbit polyclonal antiserum against human APP645-694 (numbering according to APP695 isoform). Three, 6 and 9 days of TD did not appear to damage any brain region nor change APP-like immunoreactivity. However, 13 days of TD led to pathological lesions mainly in the thalamus, mammillary body, inferior colliculus and some periventricular areas. While immunocytochemistry and thioflavine S histochemistry failed to show fibrillar beta-amyloid, APP-like immunoreactivity accumulated in aggregates of swollen, abnormal neurites and perikarya along the periphery of the infarct-like lesion in the thalamus and medial geniculate nucleus. Immunoblotting of the thalamic region around the lesion revealed increased APP-like holoprotein immunoreactivity. APP-like immunoreactive neurites were scattered in the mammillary body and medial vestibular nuclei where the lesion did not resemble infarcts. In the inferior colliculus, increased perikaryal APP-like immunostaining occurred in neurons surrounding necrotic areas. Regions without apparent pathological lesions showed no alteration in APP-like immunoreactivity. Thus, the oxidative insult associated with cell loss, hemorrhage and infarct-like lesions during TD leads to altered APP metabolism. This is the first report to show a

  2. The polarity protein Par3 regulates APP trafficking and processing through the endocytic adaptor protein Numb.

    PubMed

    Sun, Miao; Asghar, Suwaiba Z; Zhang, Huaye

    2016-09-01

    The processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) into β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is a key step in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and trafficking dysregulations of APP and its secretases contribute significantly to altered APP processing. Here we show that the cell polarity protein Par3 plays an important role in APP processing and trafficking. We found that the expression of full length Par3 is significantly decreased in AD patients. Overexpression of Par3 promotes non-amyloidogenic APP processing, while depletion of Par3 induces intracellular accumulation of Aβ. We further show that Par3 functions by regulating APP trafficking. Loss of Par3 decreases surface expression of APP by targeting APP to the late endosome/lysosome pathway. Finally, we show that the effects of Par3 are mediated through the endocytic adaptor protein Numb, and Par3 functions by interfering with the interaction between Numb and APP. Together, our studies show a novel role for Par3 in regulating APP processing and trafficking. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The polarity protein Par3 regulates APP trafficking and processing through the endocytic adaptor protein Numb

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Miao; Asghar, Suwaiba Z.; Zhang, Huaye

    2016-01-01

    The processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) into β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is a key step in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and trafficking dysregulations of APP and its secretases contribute significantly to altered APP processing. Here we show that the cell polarity protein Par3 plays an important role in APP processing and trafficking. We found that the expression of full length Par3 is significantly decreased in AD patients. Overexpression of Par3 promotes non-amyloidogenic APP processing while depletion of Par3 induces intracellular accumulation of Aβ. We further show that Par3 functions by regulating APP trafficking. Loss of Par3 decreases surface expression of APP by targeting APP to the late endosome/lysosome pathway. Finally, we show that the effects of Par3 are mediated through the endocytic adaptor protein Numb, and Par3 functions by interfering with the interaction between Numb and APP. Together, our studies show a novel role for Par3 in regulating APP processing and trafficking. PMID:27072891

  4. Increased expression of reticulon 3 in neurons leads to reduced axonal transport of β site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1.

    PubMed

    Deng, Minzi; He, Wanxia; Tan, Ya; Han, Hailong; Hu, Xiangyou; Xia, Kun; Zhang, Zhuohua; Yan, Riqiang

    2013-10-18

    BACE1 is the sole enzyme responsible for cleaving amyloid precursor protein at the β-secretase site, and this cleavage initiates the generation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Because amyloid precursor protein is predominantly expressed by neurons and deposition of Aβ aggregates in the human brain is highly correlated with the Aβ released at axonal terminals, we focused our investigation of BACE1 localization on the neuritic region. We show that BACE1 was not only enriched in the late Golgi, trans-Golgi network, and early endosomes but also in both axons and dendrites. BACE1 was colocalized with the presynaptic vesicle marker synaptophysin, indicating the presence of BACE1 in synapses. Because the excessive release of Aβ from synapses is attributable to an increase in amyloid deposition, we further explored whether the presence of BACE1 in synapses was regulated by reticulon 3 (RTN3), a protein identified previously as a negative regulator of BACE1. We found that RTN3 is not only localized in the endoplasmic reticulum but also in neuritic regions where no endoplasmic reticulum-shaping proteins are detected, implicating additional functions of RTN3 in neurons. Coexpression of RTN3 with BACE1 in cultured neurons was sufficient to reduce colocalization of BACE1 with synaptophysin. This reduction correlated with decreased anterograde transport of BACE1 in axons in response to overexpressed RTN3. Our results in this study suggest that altered RTN3 levels can impact the axonal transport of BACE1 and demonstrate that reducing axonal transport of BACE1 in axons is a viable strategy for decreasing BACE1 in axonal terminals and, perhaps, reducing amyloid deposition.

  5. Amyloid Precursor Protein in the Cerebral Cortex is Rapidly and Persistently Induced by Loss of Subcortical Innervation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    IS. NUMBER OF PAGES Amyloid precursor protein; nucleus basalis of Meynert; 5 Alzheimer disease , Acetylcholine 16. PRICE’CODE 17. SECURITY...observed in Alzheimer disease . Dawley rats (-225-250 g) purchased from Charles River Breeding Laboratories were subcortically lesioned at the Among...the most prominent features of Alzheimer disease following sites: (i) unilateral lesions of the nbM with (AD) are profound deficits in cortical

  6. Differential interactions of cerebellin precursor protein (Cbln) subtypes and neurexin variants for synapse formation of cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jae-Yeol; Lee, Sung-Jin; Uemura, Takeshi; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Yasumura, Misato; Watanabe, Masahiko; Mishina, Masayoshi

    2011-03-25

    Trans-synaptic interaction of postsynaptic glutamate receptor δ2 and presynaptic neurexins (NRXNs) through cerebellin precursor protein (Cbln) 1 mediates synapse formation in the cerebellum [T. Uemura, S.J. Lee, M. Yasumura, T. Takeuchi, T. Yoshida, M. Ra, R. Taguchi, K. Sakimura, M. Mishina, Cell 141 (2010) 1068-1079]. This finding raises a question whether other Cbln family members interact with NRXNs to regulate synapse formation in the forebrain. Here, we showed that Cbln1 and Cbln2 induced presynaptic differentiation of cultured cortical neurons, while Cbln4 exhibited little activity. When compared with neuroligin 1, Cbln1 and Cbln2 induced preferentially inhibitory presynaptic differentiation rather than excitatory one in cortical cultures. The synaptogenic activities of Cbln1 and Cbln2 were suppressed by the addition of the extracellular domain of NRXN1β to the cortical neuron cultures. Consistently, Cbln1 and Cbln2 showed robust binding activities to NRXN1α and three β-NRXNs, while only weak interactions were observed between Cbln4 and NRXNs. The interactions of Cbln1, Cbln2 and Cbln4 were selective for NRXN variants containing splice segment (S) 4. Affinities for NRXNs estimated by surface plasmon resonance analysis were variable among Cbln subtypes. Cbln1 showed higher affinities to NRXNs than Cbln2, while the binding ability of Cbln4 was much lower than those of Cbln1 and Cbln2. The affinities of Cbln1 and Cbln2 were comparable between NRXN1α and NRXN1β, but those for NRXN2β and NRXN3β were lower. These results suggest that Cbln subtypes exert synaptogenic activities in cortical neurons by differentially interacting with NRXN variants containing S4.

  7. Kinesin Light Chain 1 Suppression Impairs Human Embryonic Stem Cell Neural Differentiation and Amyloid Precursor Protein Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Killian, Rhiannon L.; Flippin, Jessica D.; Herrera, Cheryl M.; Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) is largely unknown, although evidence implicates the pathological hallmark molecules amyloid beta (Aβ) and phosphorylated Tau. Work in animal models suggests that altered axonal transport caused by Kinesin-1 dysfunction perturbs levels of both Aβ and phosphorylated Tau in neural tissues, but the relevance of Kinesin-1 dependent functions to the human disease is unknown. To begin to address this issue, we generated human embryonic stem cells (hESC) expressing reduced levels of the kinesin light chain 1 (KLC1) Kinesin-1 subunit to use as a source of human neural cultures. Despite reduction of KLC1, undifferentiated hESC exhibited apparently normal colony morphology and pluripotency marker expression. Differentiated neural cultures derived from KLC1-suppressed hESC contained neural rosettes but further differentiation revealed obvious morphological changes along with reduced levels of microtubule-associated neural proteins, including Tau and less secreted Aβ, supporting the previously established connection between KLC1, Tau and Aβ. Intriguingly, KLC1-suppressed neural precursors (NPs), isolated using a cell surface marker signature known to identify cells that give rise to neurons and glia, unlike control cells, failed to proliferate. We suggest that KLC1 is required for normal human neural differentiation, ensuring proper metabolism of AD-associated molecules APP and Tau and for proliferation of NPs. Because impaired APP metabolism is linked to AD, this human cell culture model system will not only be a useful tool for understanding the role of KLC1 in regulating the production, transport and turnover of APP and Tau in neurons, but also in defining the essential function(s) of KLC1 in NPs and their progeny. This knowledge should have important implications for human neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22272245

  8. Is the serum amyloid A protein in acute phase plasma high density lipoprotein the precursor of AA amyloid fibrils?

    PubMed Central

    Baltz, M L; Rowe, I F; Caspi, D; Turnell, W G; Pepys, M B

    1986-01-01

    Serum amyloid A protein (SAA), an apolipoprotein of high density lipoprotein (HDL), is generally considered to be the precursor of AA protein, which forms the fibrils in reactive systemic amyloidosis in man and animals. This view is based on amino acid sequence identity between AA and the amino-terminal portion of SAA. However, in extensive and well-controlled studies of experimentally induced murine AA amyloidosis, we were unable to demonstrate a direct precursor-product relationship between SAA, in SAA-rich HDL preparations from acute phase or amyloidotic mouse or human serum, and AA protein in the amyloid deposits. This raises the possibility that SAA in its usual form, as an apolipoprotein of HDL synthesized during the acute phase response, may not be the major precursor of AA fibrils. The amyloidogenic forms of circulating SAA molecules may not be isolated during the preparation of HDL. Alternatively, particularly in the light of recent evidence that SAA mRNA is expressed in many different tissues throughout the body of appropriately stimulated animals, amyloidogenic SAA may be derived from sources other than the liver cells in which SAA-rich HDL is synthesized. PMID:3105937

  9. Involvement of the TetR-Type Regulator PaaR in the Regulation of Pristinamycin I Biosynthesis through an Effect on Precursor Supply in Streptomyces pristinaespiralis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yawei; Feng, Rongrong; Zheng, Guosong; Tian, Jinzhong; Ruan, Lijun; Ge, Mei; Jiang, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pristinamycin I (PI), produced by Streptomyces pristinaespiralis, is a streptogramin type B antibiotic, which contains two proteinogenic and five aproteinogenic amino acid precursors. PI is coproduced with pristinamycin II (PII), a member of streptogramin type A antibiotics. The PI biosynthetic gene cluster has been cloned and characterized. However, thus far little is understood about the regulation of PI biosynthesis. In this study, a TetR family regulator (encoded by SSDG_03033) was identified as playing a positive role in PI biosynthesis. Its homologue, PaaR, from Corynebacterium glutamicum serves as a transcriptional repressor of the paa genes involved in phenylacetic acid (PAA) catabolism. Herein, we also designated the identified regulator as PaaR. Deletion of paaR led to an approximately 70% decrease in PI production but had little effect on PII biosynthesis. Identical to the function of its homologue from C. glutamicum, PaaR is also involved in the suppression of paa expression. Given that phenylacetyl coenzyme A (PA-CoA) is the common intermediate of the PAA catabolic pathway and the biosynthetic pathway of l-phenylglycine (l-Phg), the last amino acid precursor for PI biosynthesis, we proposed that derepression of the transcription of paa genes in a ΔpaaR mutant possibly diverts more PA-CoA to the PAA catabolic pathway, thereby with less PA-CoA metabolic flux toward l-Phg formation, thus resulting in lower PI titers. This hypothesis was verified by the observations that PI production of a ΔpaaR mutant was restored by l-Phg supplementation as well as by deletion of the paaABCDE operon in the ΔpaaR mutant. Altogether, this study provides new insights into the regulation of PI biosynthesis by S. pristinaespiralis. IMPORTANCE A better understanding of the regulation mechanisms for antibiotic biosynthesis will provide valuable clues for Streptomyces strain improvement. Herein, a TetR family regulator PaaR, which serves as the repressor of the

  10. Regulation of longevity by regulator of G-protein signaling protein, Loco.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuh-Ru; Kim, Keetae; Yang, Yanfei; Ivessa, Andreas; Sadoshima, Junichi; Park, Yongkyu

    2011-06-01

    Regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins contribute to G-protein signaling pathways as activators or repressors with GTPase-activating protein (GAP) activity. To characterize whether regulation of RGS proteins influences longevity in several species, we measured stress responses and lifespan of RGS-overexpressing and RGS-lacking mutants. Reduced expression of Loco, a RGS protein of Drosophila melanogaster, resulted in a longer lifespan for both male and female flies, also exhibiting stronger resistance to three different stressors (starvation, oxidation, and heat) and higher manganese-containing superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity. In addition, this reduction in Loco expression increased fat content and diminished cAMP levels. In contrast, overexpression of both genomic and cDNA loco gene significantly shortened the lifespan with weaker stress resistance and lower fat content. Deletion analysis of the Loco demonstrated that its RGS domain is required for the regulation of longevity. Consistently, when expression of RGS14, mammalian homologue of Loco, was reduced in rat fibroblast cells, the resistance to oxidative stress increased with higher MnSOD expression. The changes of yeast Rgs2 expression, which shares a conserved RGS domain with the fly Loco protein, also altered lifespan and stress resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we provide the first evidence that RGS proteins with GAP activity affect both stress resistance and longevity in several species.

  11. Retinoblastoma protein regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, and endoreduplication in plants.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-A; Ahn, Joon-Woo; Kim, Yu-Kyung; Kim, Su Jung; Kim, Ju-Kon; Kim, Woo Taek; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2005-04-01

    Retinoblastoma protein (Rb) plays a key role in cell cycle control, cell differentiation, and apoptosis in animals. In this study, we used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to investigate the cellular functions of Rb in higher plants. VIGS of NbRBR1, which encodes the Nicotiana benthamiana Rb homolog, resulted in growth retardation and abnormal organ development. At the cellular level, Rb suppression caused prolonged cell proliferation in tissues that are normally differentiated, which indicates that Rb is a negative regulator of plant cell division. Furthermore, differentiation of the epidermal pavement cells and trichomes was partially retarded, and stomatal clusters formed in the epidermis, likely due to uncontrolled cell division of stomata precursor cells. Rb suppression also caused extra DNA replication in endoreduplicating leaf cells, suggesting a role of Rb in the endocycle. These Rb phenotypes were accompanied by stimulated transcription of E2F and E2F-regulated S-phase genes. Thus, disruption of Rb function in plants leads to ectopic cell division in major organs that correlates with a delay in cell differentiation as well as increased endoreduplication, which indicates that Rb coordinates these processes in plant organ development.

  12. Heat Shock Protein 90 Modulates Lipid Homeostasis by Regulating the Stability and Function of Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) and SREBP Cleavage-activating Protein.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yen-Chou; Hashidume, Tsutomu; Shibata, Takahiro; Uchida, Koji; Shimizu, Makoto; Inoue, Jun; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2017-02-17

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are the key transcription factors that modulate lipid biosynthesis. SREBPs are synthesized as endoplasmic reticulum-bound precursors that require proteolytic activation in the Golgi apparatus. The stability and maturation of precursor SREBPs depend on their binding to SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), which escorts the SCAP-SREBP complex to the Golgi apparatus. In this study, we identified heat shock protein (HSP) 90 as a novel SREBP regulator that binds to and stabilizes SCAP-SREBP. In HepG2 cells, HSP90 inhibition led to proteasome-dependent degradation of SCAP-SREBP, which resulted in