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Sample records for predatory behavior

  1. Predatory Strategies and Behavioral Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekoff, Marc

    1983-01-01

    Briefly discusses the view that behavior may be thought of as a phenotypic adaptation that can be quantitatively studied, and then considered in more detail ways in which predatory animals, especially mammals, satisfy their need for food. Topics covered include predatory behavior, hunting modes, prey selection, hunting success, and others. (JN)

  2. Predatory luring behavior of odonates.

    PubMed

    Edgehouse, Michael; Brown, Christopher P

    2014-01-01

    Organisms in the order Odonata are highly predatory insects that have a wide distribution globally. To date, there has been zero evidence that odonates employ luring as a means of prey acquisition. However, in this study, we show that Aeshna palmata larvae use abdominal movements to lure larval Argia vivida, subsequently consuming the lured organism. We also present findings of a similar behavior from larval Ar. vivida in an attempt to lure larval A. palmata within striking distance. PMID:25347837

  3. Assaying Predatory Feeding Behaviors in Pristionchus and Other Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Lightfoot, James W; Wilecki, Martin; Okumura, Misako; Sommer, Ralf J

    2016-01-01

    This protocol provides multiple methods for the analysis and quantification of predatory feeding behaviors in nematodes. Many nematode species including Pristionchus pacificus display complex behaviors, the most striking of which is the predation of other nematode larvae. However, as these behaviors are absent in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans, they have thus far only recently been described in detail along with the development of reliable behavioral assays (1). These predatory behaviors are dependent upon phenotypically plastic but fixed mouth morphs making the correct identification and categorization of these animals essential. In P. pacificus there are two mouth types, the stenostomatous and eurystomatous morphs (2), with only the wide mouthed eurystomatous containing an extra tooth and being capable of killing other nematode larvae. Through the isolation of an abundance of size matched prey larvae and subsequent exposure to predatory nematodes, assays including both "corpse assays" and "bite assays" on correctly identified mouth morph nematodes are possible. These assays provide a means to rapidly quantify predation success rates and provide a detailed behavioral analysis of individual nematodes engaged in predatory feeding activities. In addition, with the use of a high-speed camera, visualization of changes in pharyngeal activity including tooth and pumping dynamics are also possible. PMID:27684744

  4. Physical evidence of predatory behavior in Tyrannosaurus rex.

    PubMed

    DePalma, Robert A; Burnham, David A; Martin, Larry D; Rothschild, Bruce M; Larson, Peter L

    2013-07-30

    Feeding strategies of the large theropod, Tyrannosaurus rex, either as a predator or a scavenger, have been a topic of debate previously compromised by lack of definitive physical evidence. Tooth drag and bone puncture marks have been documented on suggested prey items, but are often difficult to attribute to a specific theropod. Further, postmortem damage cannot be distinguished from intravital occurrences, unless evidence of healing is present. Here we report definitive evidence of predation by T. rex: a tooth crown embedded in a hadrosaurid caudal centrum, surrounded by healed bone growth. This indicates that the prey escaped and lived for some time after the injury, providing direct evidence of predatory behavior by T. rex. The two traumatically fused hadrosaur vertebrae partially enclosing a T. rex tooth were discovered in the Hell Creek Formation of South Dakota.

  5. Physical evidence of predatory behavior in Tyrannosaurus rex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePalma, Robert A., II; Burnham, David A.; Martin, Larry D.; Rothschild, Bruce M.; Larson, Peter L.

    2013-07-01

    Feeding strategies of the large theropod, Tyrannosaurus rex, either as a predator or a scavenger, have been a topic of debate previously compromised by lack of definitive physical evidence. Tooth drag and bone puncture marks have been documented on suggested prey items, but are often difficult to attribute to a specific theropod. Further, postmortem damage cannot be distinguished from intravital occurrences, unless evidence of healing is present. Here we report definitive evidence of predation by T. rex: a tooth crown embedded in a hadrosaurid caudal centrum, surrounded by healed bone growth. This indicates that the prey escaped and lived for some time after the injury, providing direct evidence of predatory behavior by T. rex. The two traumatically fused hadrosaur vertebrae partially enclosing a T. rex tooth were discovered in the Hell Creek Formation of South Dakota.

  6. Physical evidence of predatory behavior in Tyrannosaurus rex

    PubMed Central

    DePalma, Robert A.; Burnham, David A.; Martin, Larry D.; Rothschild, Bruce M.; Larson, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Feeding strategies of the large theropod, Tyrannosaurus rex, either as a predator or a scavenger, have been a topic of debate previously compromised by lack of definitive physical evidence. Tooth drag and bone puncture marks have been documented on suggested prey items, but are often difficult to attribute to a specific theropod. Further, postmortem damage cannot be distinguished from intravital occurrences, unless evidence of healing is present. Here we report definitive evidence of predation by T. rex: a tooth crown embedded in a hadrosaurid caudal centrum, surrounded by healed bone growth. This indicates that the prey escaped and lived for some time after the injury, providing direct evidence of predatory behavior by T. rex. The two traumatically fused hadrosaur vertebrae partially enclosing a T. rex tooth were discovered in the Hell Creek Formation of South Dakota. PMID:23858435

  7. Behavioral and neurochemical changes following predatory stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Belzung, C; El Hage, W; Moindrot, N; Griebel, G

    2001-09-01

    This article had several objectives. First it aimed at investigating the anxiogenic-like behaviors elicited by unavoidable cat exposure and/or cat odor across nine strains of mice (BALB/c, C57BL/6, C3H, CBA, DBA/2, NMRI, NZB, SJL, Swiss) in a modified version of the free-exploration test. The second objective was to investigate possible neurochemical changes following cat exposure in Swiss mice by measuring the turnover of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) in several brain regions known to be involved in the modulation of emotional processes (hippocampus, hypothalamus and striatum). Finally, the third objective was to examine the effects of anxiolytic drug treatments on the anxiogenic responses elicited by a cat odor (i.e. a feces) in Swiss mice previously exposed to a cat using the free-exploration test. Results from the strain comparison showed that mice could be divided into three distinct groups: two non-reactive strains (NZB and SJL) which were relatively insensitive to predatory exposure and/or odor; five intermediate-reactive strains (Swiss, NMRI, CBA, C3H and BALB/c) which displayed clear anxiogenic-like responses only when exposed to both cat and, subsequently, to feces; and two high reactive strains (C57BL/6 and DBA/2) which showed anxiogenic-like reactions following cat exposure, regardless of the stimulus (clay or feces) present in the free-exploration cage. Neurochemical data revealed that, while brain levels of NA, DA, 5-HT in cat exposed Swiss mice were not significantly different from those of control animals, turnover rates of these monoamines were increased in the hippocampus (NA and 5-HT), hypothalamus and striatum (DA) after cat exposure. Results from pharmacological experiments indicated that repeated administration of the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (5-20 mg/kg, twice a day, for 5 days) completely abolished avoidance of the cat feces in Swiss mice previously exposed to the predator. Neither acute nor repeated

  8. Genomic Response to Selection for Predatory Behavior in a Mammalian Model of Adaptive Radiation.

    PubMed

    Konczal, Mateusz; Koteja, Paweł; Orlowska-Feuer, Patrycja; Radwan, Jacek; Sadowska, Edyta T; Babik, Wiesław

    2016-09-01

    If genetic architectures of various quantitative traits are similar, as studies on model organisms suggest, comparable selection pressures should produce similar molecular patterns for various traits. To test this prediction, we used a laboratory model of vertebrate adaptive radiation to investigate the genetic basis of the response to selection for predatory behavior and compare it with evolution of aerobic capacity reported in an earlier work. After 13 generations of selection, the proportion of bank voles (Myodes [=Clethrionomys] glareolus) showing predatory behavior was five times higher in selected lines than in controls. We analyzed the hippocampus and liver transcriptomes and found repeatable changes in allele frequencies and gene expression. Genes with the largest differences between predatory and control lines are associated with hunger, aggression, biological rhythms, and functioning of the nervous system. Evolution of predatory behavior could be meaningfully compared with evolution of high aerobic capacity, because the experiments and analyses were performed in the same methodological framework. The number of genes that changed expression was much smaller in predatory lines, and allele frequencies changed repeatably in predatory but not in aerobic lines. This suggests that more variants of smaller effects underlie variation in aerobic performance, whereas fewer variants of larger effects underlie variation in predatory behavior. Our results thus contradict the view that comparable selection pressures for different quantitative traits produce similar molecular patterns. Therefore, to gain knowledge about molecular-level response to selection for complex traits, we need to investigate not only multiple replicate populations but also multiple quantitative traits.

  9. Genomic Response to Selection for Predatory Behavior in a Mammalian Model of Adaptive Radiation.

    PubMed

    Konczal, Mateusz; Koteja, Paweł; Orlowska-Feuer, Patrycja; Radwan, Jacek; Sadowska, Edyta T; Babik, Wiesław

    2016-09-01

    If genetic architectures of various quantitative traits are similar, as studies on model organisms suggest, comparable selection pressures should produce similar molecular patterns for various traits. To test this prediction, we used a laboratory model of vertebrate adaptive radiation to investigate the genetic basis of the response to selection for predatory behavior and compare it with evolution of aerobic capacity reported in an earlier work. After 13 generations of selection, the proportion of bank voles (Myodes [=Clethrionomys] glareolus) showing predatory behavior was five times higher in selected lines than in controls. We analyzed the hippocampus and liver transcriptomes and found repeatable changes in allele frequencies and gene expression. Genes with the largest differences between predatory and control lines are associated with hunger, aggression, biological rhythms, and functioning of the nervous system. Evolution of predatory behavior could be meaningfully compared with evolution of high aerobic capacity, because the experiments and analyses were performed in the same methodological framework. The number of genes that changed expression was much smaller in predatory lines, and allele frequencies changed repeatably in predatory but not in aerobic lines. This suggests that more variants of smaller effects underlie variation in aerobic performance, whereas fewer variants of larger effects underlie variation in predatory behavior. Our results thus contradict the view that comparable selection pressures for different quantitative traits produce similar molecular patterns. Therefore, to gain knowledge about molecular-level response to selection for complex traits, we need to investigate not only multiple replicate populations but also multiple quantitative traits. PMID:27401229

  10. The role of the vomeronasal organ in rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis oreganus) predatory behavior.

    PubMed

    Alving, W R; Kardong, K V

    1996-01-01

    During predatory behavior, rattlesnakes depend primarily upon thermal and visual cues to initially aim a strike. However, it has been hypothesized that prey-related odors sensed by the vomeronasal system act as releasing stimuli of the strike and that such vomodors are primary stimuli during poststrike trailing and swallowing of the envenomated rodent. To test this, northern Pacific rattlesnakes were rendered avomic by bilateral lesions of the vomeronasal nerves, and their vomic and avomic predatory behaviors were compared. Avomic rattlesnakes exhibited fewer strikes and complete elimination of trailing and swallowing behavior. These results support the hypothesis that vomodors sensed via the vomeronasal organ are capable of acting as releasing stimuli of selected rattlesnake predatory behaviors. Sensory input via the vomeronasal organ is important during prestrike/strike behavior, and it is a major route of sensory input during poststrike trailing and ingestion of envenomated prey.

  11. Predatory Personalities as Behavioral Mimics and Parasites: Mimicry-Deception Theory.

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel N

    2014-07-01

    Humans use a variety of deceptive tactics to extract resources from unsuspecting others. In this article, I suggest that much can be learned about patterns of human deception from predatory nonhuman animal behavior and parasitic infections. Nonhuman animals and parasitic infections utilize deceptive tactics to extract resources through two overarching strategies: (a) complex deception, slow resource extraction, heavy integration into a host or community, and low risk of detection, or (b) superficial deception, immediate resource extraction, little host or community specificity, and increased risk of detection. Predatory and parasitic human personalities may operate in analogous ways. Guided by analogies derived from nonhuman animal mimicry (such as color or behavioral deception) and micro-organismic infections, I have developed a theoretical framework to better understand deceptive and parasitic human behaviors as well as the characteristics defining them. Although applicable to areas of predatory and parasitic human behavior, two specific traits (psychopathy and Machiavellianism) are highlighted that have dire consequences for financial fraud, interpersonal harm, and organizational misbehavior. PMID:26173276

  12. Fin-tail coordination during escape and predatory behavior in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    McClenahan, Phil; Troup, Michael; Scott, Ethan K

    2012-01-01

    Larval zebrafish innately perform a suite of behaviors that are tightly linked to their evolutionary past, notably escape from threatening stimuli and pursuit and capture of prey. These behaviors have been carefully examined in the past, but mostly with regard to the movements of the trunk and tail of the larvae. Here, we employ kinematics analyses to describe the movements of the pectoral fins during escape and predatory behavior. In accord with previous studies, we find roles for the pectoral fins in slow swimming and immediately after striking prey. We find novel roles for the pectoral fins in long-latency, but not in short-latency C-bends. We also observe fin movements that occur during orienting J-turns and S-starts that drive high-velocity predatory strikes. Finally, we find that the use of pectoral fins following a predatory strike is scaled to the velocity of the strike, supporting a role for the fins in braking. The implications of these results for central control of coordinated movements are discussed, and we hope that these results will provide baselines for future analyses of cross-body coordination using mutants, morphants, and transgenic approaches.

  13. A proposed ethogram of large-carnivore predatory behavior, exemplified by the wolf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacNulty, D.R.; Mech, L.D.; Smith, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    Although predatory behavior is traditionally described by a basic ethogram composed of 3 phases (search, pursue, and capture), behavioral studies of large terrestrial carnivores generally use the concept of a "hunt" to classify and measure foraging. This approach is problematic because there is no consensus on what behaviors constitute a hunt. We therefore examined how the basic ethogram could be used as a common framework for classifying large-carnivore behavior. We used >2,150 h of observed wolf (Canis lupus) behavior in Yellowstone National Park, including 517 and 134 encounters with elk (Cervus elaphus) and American bison (Bison bison), respectively, to demonstrate the functional importance of several frequently described, but rarely quantified, patterns of large-carnivore behavior not explicitly described by the basic ethogram (approaching, watching, and attacking groups). To account for these additionally important behaviors we propose a modified form of the basic ethogram (search, approach, watch, attack-group, attack-individual, and capture). We tested the applicability of this ethogram by comparing it to 31 previous classifications and descriptions involving 7 other species and 5 other wolf populations. Close correspondence among studies suggests that this ethogram may provide a generally useful scheme for classifying large-carnivore predatory behavior that is behaviorally less ambiguous than the concept of a hunt. ?? 2007 American Society of Mammalogists.

  14. Functional mapping of the prosencephalic systems involved in organizing predatory behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Comoli, E; Ribeiro-Barbosa, E R; Negrão, N; Goto, M; Canteras, N S

    2005-01-01

    The study of the neural basis of predatory behavior has been largely neglected over the recent years. Using an ethologically based approach, we presently delineate the prosencephalic systems mobilized during predation by examining Fos immunoreactivity in rats performing insect hunting. These results were further compared with those obtained from animals killed after the early nocturnal surge of food ingestion. First, predatory behavior was associated with a distinct Fos up-regulation in the ventrolateral caudoputamen at intermediate rostro-caudal levels, suggesting a possible candidate to organize the stereotyped sequence of actions seen during insect hunting. Insect predation also presented conspicuous mobilization of a neural network formed by a distinct amygdalar circuit (i.e. the postpiriform-transition area, the anterior part of cortical nucleus, anterior part of basomedial nucleus, posterior part of basolateral nucleus, and medial part of central nucleus) and affiliated sites in the bed nuclei of the stria terminalis (i.e. the rhomboid nucleus) and in the hypothalamus (i.e. the parasubthalamic nucleus). Accordingly, this network is likely to encode prey-related motivational values, such as prey's odor and taste, and to influence autonomic and motor control accompanying predatory eating. Notably, regular food intake was also associated with a relatively weak Fos up-regulation in this network. However, during regular surge of food intake, we observed a much larger mobilization in hypothalamic sites related to the homeostatic control of eating, namely, the arcuate nucleus and autonomic parts of the paraventricular nucleus. Overall, the present findings suggest potential neural systems involved in integrating prey-related motivational values and in organizing the stereotyped sequences of action seen during predation. Moreover, the comparison with regular food intake contrasts putative neural mechanisms controlling predatory related eating vs. regular food intake.

  15. Tributyltin exposure influences predatory behavior, neurotransmitter content and receptor expression in Sebastiscus marmoratus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ang; Wang, Xinli; Zuo, Zhenghong; Cai, Jiali; Wang, Chonggang

    2013-03-15

    Tributyltin (TBT) is a ubiquitous marine contaminant due to its extensive use as a biocide, fungicide and antifouling agent. However, the neurotoxic effect of TBT has not been extensively studied, especially in marine fish. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of TBT (10, 100 and 1000 ng/L) on the predatory behavior of Sebastiscus marmoratus and to look into the mechanism involved. The results showed that TBT exposure depressed predatory activity after 50 days exposure. Dopamine levels in the fish brains increased in a dose-dependent manner, while 5-hydroxytryptamine and norepinephrine levels decreased significantly in the TBT exposure group compared to the control. The mRNA levels of dopamine receptors, which have functions such as cognition, motor activity, motivation and reward, mood, attention and learning, were significantly down-regulated by TBT exposure. Although the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters, including glutamate, did not show marked alteration, the expression of the glutamatergic signaling pathway such as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, a-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor, calmodulin, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases-II and cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element binding protein, was significantly reduced by TBT exposure, which indicated that central nerve activities were in a state of depression, thus affecting the predatory activities of the fish.

  16. Periaqueductal gray μ and κ opioid receptors determine behavioral selection from maternal to predatory behavior in lactating rats.

    PubMed

    Klein, Marianne Orlandini; Cruz, Aline de Mello; Machado, Franciele Corrêa; Picolo, Gisele; Canteras, Newton Sabino; Felicio, Luciano Freitas

    2014-11-01

    Every mother must optimize her time between caring for her young and her subsistence. The rostro lateral portion of the periaqueductal grey (rlPAG) is a critical site that modulates the switch between maternal and predatory behavior. Opioids play multiple roles in both maternal behavior and this switching process. The present study used a pharmacological approach to evaluate the functional role of rlPAG μ and κ opioid receptors in behavioral selection. Rat dams were implanted with a guide cannula in the rlPAG and divided into three experiments in which we tested the role of opioid agonists (Experiment 1), the influence of μ and κ opioid receptor blockade in the presence of morphine (Experiment 2), and the influence of μ and κ opioid receptor blockade (Experiment 3). After behavioral test, in Experiment 4, we evaluated rlPAG μ and κ receptor activation in all Experiments 1-3. The results showed that massive opioidergic activation induced by morphine in the rlPAG inhibited maternal behavior without interfering with predatory hunting. No behavioral changes and no receptor activation were promoted by the specific agonist alone. However, κ receptor blockade increased hunting behavior and increased the level of μ receptor activation in the rlPAG. Thus, endogenous opioidergic tone might be modulated by a functional interaction between opioid receptor subtypes. Such a compensatory receptor interaction appears to be relevant for behavioral selection among motivated behaviors. These findings indicate a role for multiple opioid receptor interactions in the modulation of behavioral selection between maternal and predatory behaviors in the PAG.

  17. Predatory behavior of grizzly bears feeding on elk calves in Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    French, Steven P.; French, Marilynn G.

    1990-01-01

    Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) were observed preying on elk calves (Cervus elaphus) on 60 occasions in Yellowstone National Park, with 29 confirmed kills. Some bears were deliberate predators and effectively preyed on elk calves for short periods each spring, killing up to 1 calf daily. Primary hunting techniques were searching and chasing although some bears used a variety of techniques during a single hunt. They hunted both day and night and preyed on calves in the open and in the woods. Excess killing occurred when circumstances permitted. One bear caught 5 calves in a 15-minute interval. Elk used a variety of antipredator defenses and occasionally attacked predacious bears. The current level of this feeding behavior appears to be greater than previously reported. This is probably related to the increased availability of calves providing a greater opportunity for learning, and the adaptation of a more predatory behavior by some grizzly bears in Yellowstone.

  18. Two weeks of predatory stress induces anxiety-like behavior with co-morbid depressive-like behavior in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Burgado, Jillybeth; Harrell, Constance S; Eacret, Darrell; Reddy, Renuka; Barnum, Christopher J; Tansey, Malú G; Miller, Andrew H; Wang, Huichen; Neigh, Gretchen N

    2014-12-15

    Psychological stress can have devastating and lasting effects on a variety of behaviors, especially those associated with mental illnesses such as anxiety and depression. Animal models of chronic stress are frequently used to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the relationship between stress and mental health disorders and to develop improved treatment options. The current study expands upon a novel chronic stress paradigm for mice: predatory stress. The predatory stress model incorporates the natural predator-prey relationship that exists among rats and mice and allows for greater interaction between the animals, in turn increasing the extent of the stressful experience. In this study, we evaluated the behavioral effects of exposure to 15 days of predatory stress on an array of behavioral indices. Up to 2 weeks after the end of stress, adult male mice showed an increase of anxiety-like behaviors as measured by the open field and social interaction tests. Animals also expressed an increase in depressive-like behavior in the sucrose preference test. Notably, performance on the novel object recognition task, a memory test, improved after predatory stress. Taken as a whole, our results indicate that 15 exposures to this innovative predatory stress paradigm are sufficient to elicit robust anxiety-like behaviors with evidence of co-morbid depressive-like behavior, as well as changes in cognitive behavior in male mice.

  19. Supermodeled sabercat, predatory behavior in Smilodon fatalis revealed by high-resolution 3D computer simulation.

    PubMed

    McHenry, Colin R; Wroe, Stephen; Clausen, Philip D; Moreno, Karen; Cunningham, Eleanor

    2007-10-01

    The American sabercat Smilodon fatalis is among the most charismatic of fossil carnivores. Despite broad agreement that its extraordinary anatomy reflects unique hunting techniques, after >150 years of study, many questions remain concerning its predatory behavior. Were the "sabers" used to take down large prey? Were prey killed with an eviscerating bite to the abdomen? Was its bite powerful or weak compared with that of modern big cats? Here we quantitatively assess the sabercat's biomechanical performance using the most detailed computer reconstructions yet developed for the vertebrate skull. Our results demonstrate that bite force driven by jaw muscles was relatively weak in S. fatalis, one-third that of a lion (Panthera leo) of comparable size, and its skull was poorly optimized to resist the extrinsic loadings generated by struggling prey. Its skull is better optimized for bites on restrained prey where the bite is augmented by force from the cervical musculature. We conclude that prey were brought to ground and restrained before a killing bite, driven in large part by powerful cervical musculature. Because large prey is easier to restrain if its head is secured, the killing bite was most likely directed to the neck. We suggest that the more powerful jaw muscles of P. leo may be required for extended, asphyxiating bites and that the relatively low bite forces in S. fatalis might reflect its ability to kill large prey more quickly, avoiding the need for prolonged bites.

  20. Nesting habits shape feeding preferences and predatory behavior in an ant genus.

    PubMed

    Dejean, Alain; Labrière, Nicolas; Touchard, Axel; Petitclerc, Frédéric; Roux, Olivier

    2014-04-01

    We tested if nesting habits influence ant feeding preferences and predatory behavior in the monophyletic genus Pseudomyrmex (Pseudomyrmecinae) which comprises terrestrial and arboreal species, and, among the latter, plant-ants which are obligate inhabitants of myrmecophytes (i.e., plants sheltering so-called plant-ants in hollow structures). A cafeteria experiment revealed that the diet of ground-nesting Pseudomyrmex consists mostly of prey and that of arboreal species consists mostly of sugary substances, whereas the plant-ants discarded all the food we provided. Workers forage solitarily, detecting prey from a distance thanks to their hypertrophied eyes. Approach is followed by antennal contact, seizure, and the manipulation of the prey to sting it under its thorax (next to the ventral nerve cord). Arboreal species were not more efficient at capturing prey than were ground-nesting species. A large worker size favors prey capture. Workers from ground- and arboreal-nesting species show several uncommon behavioral traits, each known in different ant genera from different subfamilies: leaping abilities, the use of surface tension strengths to transport liquids, short-range recruitment followed by conflicts between nestmates, the consumption of the prey's hemolymph, and the retrieval of entire prey or pieces of prey after having cut it up. Yet, we never noted group ambushing. We also confirmed that Pseudomyrmex plant-ants live in a kind of food autarky as they feed only on rewards produced by their host myrmecophyte, or on honeydew produced by the hemipterans they attend and possibly on the fungi they cultivate.

  1. Nesting habits shape feeding preferences and predatory behavior in an ant genus.

    PubMed

    Dejean, Alain; Labrière, Nicolas; Touchard, Axel; Petitclerc, Frédéric; Roux, Olivier

    2014-04-01

    We tested if nesting habits influence ant feeding preferences and predatory behavior in the monophyletic genus Pseudomyrmex (Pseudomyrmecinae) which comprises terrestrial and arboreal species, and, among the latter, plant-ants which are obligate inhabitants of myrmecophytes (i.e., plants sheltering so-called plant-ants in hollow structures). A cafeteria experiment revealed that the diet of ground-nesting Pseudomyrmex consists mostly of prey and that of arboreal species consists mostly of sugary substances, whereas the plant-ants discarded all the food we provided. Workers forage solitarily, detecting prey from a distance thanks to their hypertrophied eyes. Approach is followed by antennal contact, seizure, and the manipulation of the prey to sting it under its thorax (next to the ventral nerve cord). Arboreal species were not more efficient at capturing prey than were ground-nesting species. A large worker size favors prey capture. Workers from ground- and arboreal-nesting species show several uncommon behavioral traits, each known in different ant genera from different subfamilies: leaping abilities, the use of surface tension strengths to transport liquids, short-range recruitment followed by conflicts between nestmates, the consumption of the prey's hemolymph, and the retrieval of entire prey or pieces of prey after having cut it up. Yet, we never noted group ambushing. We also confirmed that Pseudomyrmex plant-ants live in a kind of food autarky as they feed only on rewards produced by their host myrmecophyte, or on honeydew produced by the hemipterans they attend and possibly on the fungi they cultivate. PMID:24566996

  2. Nesting habits shape feeding preferences and predatory behavior in an ant genus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejean, Alain; Labrière, Nicolas; Touchard, Axel; Petitclerc, Frédéric; Roux, Olivier

    2014-04-01

    We tested if nesting habits influence ant feeding preferences and predatory behavior in the monophyletic genus Pseudomyrmex (Pseudomyrmecinae) which comprises terrestrial and arboreal species, and, among the latter, plant-ants which are obligate inhabitants of myrmecophytes (i.e., plants sheltering so-called plant-ants in hollow structures). A cafeteria experiment revealed that the diet of ground-nesting Pseudomyrmex consists mostly of prey and that of arboreal species consists mostly of sugary substances, whereas the plant-ants discarded all the food we provided. Workers forage solitarily, detecting prey from a distance thanks to their hypertrophied eyes. Approach is followed by antennal contact, seizure, and the manipulation of the prey to sting it under its thorax (next to the ventral nerve cord). Arboreal species were not more efficient at capturing prey than were ground-nesting species. A large worker size favors prey capture. Workers from ground- and arboreal-nesting species show several uncommon behavioral traits, each known in different ant genera from different subfamilies: leaping abilities, the use of surface tension strengths to transport liquids, short-range recruitment followed by conflicts between nestmates, the consumption of the prey's hemolymph, and the retrieval of entire prey or pieces of prey after having cut it up. Yet, we never noted group ambushing. We also confirmed that Pseudomyrmex plant-ants live in a kind of food autarky as they feed only on rewards produced by their host myrmecophyte, or on honeydew produced by the hemipterans they attend and possibly on the fungi they cultivate.

  3. Diet and predatory behavior of the Asian ant-eating spider, Asceua (formerly Doosia) japonica (Araneae: Zodariidae).

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Several spider taxa are specialized to prey on ants. Some species of Zodariidae are known to use specialized tactics to capture ants. In this study, I assessed the diet difference and predatory behavior of the Japanese zodariid Asceua japonica. In a series of surveys, all observed individuals in the field preyed on tiny arboreal ants representing several subfamilies. In addition, the species used tactics similar to those of its European relatives for preying on ants. This is the first observation of myrmecophagy of Zodariidae in East Asia.

  4. Diet and predatory behavior of the Asian ant-eating spider, Asceua (formerly Doosia) japonica (Araneae: Zodariidae).

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Several spider taxa are specialized to prey on ants. Some species of Zodariidae are known to use specialized tactics to capture ants. In this study, I assessed the diet difference and predatory behavior of the Japanese zodariid Asceua japonica. In a series of surveys, all observed individuals in the field preyed on tiny arboreal ants representing several subfamilies. In addition, the species used tactics similar to those of its European relatives for preying on ants. This is the first observation of myrmecophagy of Zodariidae in East Asia. PMID:27247874

  5. Forelimb anatomy and the discrimination of the predatory behavior of carnivorous mammals: the thylacine as a case study.

    PubMed

    Janis, Christine M; Figueirido, Borja

    2014-12-01

    Carnivorous mammals use their forelimbs in different ways to capture their prey. Most terrestrial carnivores have some cursorial (running) adaptations, but ambush predators retain considerable flexibility in their forelimb movement, important for grappling with their prey. In contrast, predators that rely on pursuit to run down their prey have sacrificed some of this flexibility for locomotor efficiency, in the greater restriction of the forelimb motion to the parasagittal plane. In this article, we measured aspects of the forelimb anatomy (44 linear measurements) in 36 species of carnivorous mammals of known predatory behavior, and used multivariate analyses to investigate how well the forelimb anatomy reflects the predatory mode (ambush, pursuit, or pounce-pursuit). A prime intention of this study was to establish morphological correlates of behavior that could then be applied to fossil mammals: for this purpose, five individuals of the recently extinct thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus) were also included as unknowns. We show that the three different types of predators can be distinguished by their morphology, both in analyses where all the forelimb bones are included together, and in the separate analyses of each bone individually. Of particular interest is the ability to distinguish between the two types of more cursorial predators, pursuit and pounce-pursuit, which have previously been considered as primarily size-based categories. Despite a prior consideration of the thylacine as a "pounce-pursuit" or an "ambush" type of predator, the thylacines did not consistently cluster with any type of predatory carnivores in our analyses. Rather, the thylacines appeared to be more generalized in their morphology than any of the extant carnivores. The absence of a large diversity of large carnivorous mammals in Australia, past and present, may explain the thylacine's generalized morphology.

  6. Rattlesnake hunting behavior: correlations between plasticity of predatory performance and neuroanatomy.

    PubMed

    Kardong, K V; Berkhoudt, H

    1999-01-01

    Rattlesnakes may shift between visual (eyes) and infrared (facial pits) stimuli without significant loss of predatory performance during an envenomating strike. The relative equivalency of these proximate stimuli is correlated with the organization of the associated neural pathways in the central nervous system. Visual and infrared information, although gathered by different sensory organs, converges within the optic tectum in an orderly spatiotopical representation where bimodal neurons respond to both stimuli. In turn, the tectum sends efferent pathways directly to premotor areas (brainstem) and indirectly to motor areas (spinal cord) where axial muscles involved in the strike might be activated. On the other hand, rattlesnakes do not maintain a high level of equivalent predatory performance when switching between chemosensory stimuli i.e., olfactory, and vomeronasal information. Deprived of vomeronasal input, strikes drop by about half, and poststrike trailing is lost entirely. Surprisingly, compensation by switching to information delivered via an intact olfactory input does not occur, despite the convergence of chemosensory information within the central nervous system. Finally, the launch of a targeted, envenomating strike involves both these modalities: radiation reception (visual, infrared) and chemoreception (olfactory, vomeronasal). However, in the absence of chemosensory information, the radiation modalities do not completely compensate, nor does the animal maintain a high level of predatory performance. Similarly, in the absence of radiation information, the chemosensory modalities do not completely compensate, nor does the animal maintain a high level of predatory performance. The absence of compensation in this multimodal system is also correlated with an absence of convergence of radiation and chemical information, at least at the level of first and second-order neurons, in the central nervous system.

  7. Stimulus speed and order of presentation effect the visually released predatory behaviors of the praying mantis Sphodromantis lineola (Burr.).

    PubMed

    Prete, F R; Placek, P J; Wilson, M A; Mahaffey, R J; Nemcek, R R

    1993-01-01

    To assess the role of stimulus speed and order on the predatory behaviors of the praying mantis Sphodromantis lineola (Burr.), tethered adult females were presented with various flat black stimuli (lures) by means of a variable speed mechanical arm. Lure speed had a dramatic effect on mantis behavior: mantises emitted significantly more strikes to a 6 x 6 mm square and to 'worm' lures (i.e. length > width = 6 mm) moving at 34.3 cm/sec than they did to 'antiworm' lures (i.e. width > length = 6 mm), or to slower moving lures. These effects were consistent over lure directions (0-75 degrees relative to the mantis' long axis), and background patterns. On the other hand, mantises emitted significantly more approaching behavior to lures moving at 12 cm/sec than to lures moving at 36 cm/sec. This suggests that S. lineola extract distance information from retinal image velocity, as do other insects. Stimulus order also effected mantis predatory behavior: for instance, mantises were more likely to track a lure without striking at it on the first trial than on subsequent trials. However, after the first trial, they were also more likely to freeze (become immobile) when a lure was presented. Mantises were also less likely to strike at a preferred lure if it was preceded by one or two non-preferred lures. In a final experiment, intact, freely moving mantises were placed in an arena, presented with adult crickets, and video taped. The behaviors of the freely moving mantises were congruent with those of the tethered mantises in the previous experiments. This series of experiments demonstrates that the information processing capabilities of S. lineola are more complex than generally depicted, however, they can be explained by assuming a neural organization similar to that of other insects such as flies (Diptera) and dragonflies (Odonata). PMID:8275297

  8. Effect of acute low body temperature on predatory behavior and prey-capture efficiency in a plethodontid salamander.

    PubMed

    Marvin, Glenn A; Davis, Kayla; Dawson, Jacob

    2016-05-01

    The low-temperature limit for feeding in some salamander species (Desmognathus, Plethodontidae) has been inferred from field studies of seasonal variation in salamander activity and gut contents, which could not determine whether feeding is more dependent on environmental conditions influencing salamander foraging behavior or prey availability and movement. We performed two controlled laboratory experiments to examine the effect of short-term (acute) low body temperature on predatory behavior and prey-capture efficiency in a semiaquatic plethodontid salamander (Desmognathus conanti). In the first experiment, we quantified variation in the feeding responses of cold salamanders (at 1, 3, 5 and 7°C) to a video recording of a walking, warm (15°C) cricket to determine the lower thermal limit for predatory behavior, independent of any temperature effect on movement of prey. Experimental-group salamanders exhibited vigorous feeding responses at 5 and 7°C, large variation in feeding responses both among and within individuals (over time) at 3°C, and little to no feeding response at 1°C. Feeding responses at both 1 and 3°C were significantly less than at each higher temperature, whereas responses of control-group individuals at 15°C did not vary over time. In the second experiment, we quantified feeding by cold salamanders (at 3, 5, 7 and 11°C) on live, warm crickets to examine thermal effects on prey-capture ability. The mean feeding response to live crickets was significantly less at 3°C than at higher temperatures; however, 50% of salamanders captured and ingested prey with high efficiency at this temperature. We conclude that many individuals stalk and capture prey at very low temperatures (down to 3°C). Our results support a growing body of data that indicate many plethodontid salamanders feed at temperatures only a few degrees above freezing.

  9. Effect of acute low body temperature on predatory behavior and prey-capture efficiency in a plethodontid salamander.

    PubMed

    Marvin, Glenn A; Davis, Kayla; Dawson, Jacob

    2016-05-01

    The low-temperature limit for feeding in some salamander species (Desmognathus, Plethodontidae) has been inferred from field studies of seasonal variation in salamander activity and gut contents, which could not determine whether feeding is more dependent on environmental conditions influencing salamander foraging behavior or prey availability and movement. We performed two controlled laboratory experiments to examine the effect of short-term (acute) low body temperature on predatory behavior and prey-capture efficiency in a semiaquatic plethodontid salamander (Desmognathus conanti). In the first experiment, we quantified variation in the feeding responses of cold salamanders (at 1, 3, 5 and 7°C) to a video recording of a walking, warm (15°C) cricket to determine the lower thermal limit for predatory behavior, independent of any temperature effect on movement of prey. Experimental-group salamanders exhibited vigorous feeding responses at 5 and 7°C, large variation in feeding responses both among and within individuals (over time) at 3°C, and little to no feeding response at 1°C. Feeding responses at both 1 and 3°C were significantly less than at each higher temperature, whereas responses of control-group individuals at 15°C did not vary over time. In the second experiment, we quantified feeding by cold salamanders (at 3, 5, 7 and 11°C) on live, warm crickets to examine thermal effects on prey-capture ability. The mean feeding response to live crickets was significantly less at 3°C than at higher temperatures; however, 50% of salamanders captured and ingested prey with high efficiency at this temperature. We conclude that many individuals stalk and capture prey at very low temperatures (down to 3°C). Our results support a growing body of data that indicate many plethodontid salamanders feed at temperatures only a few degrees above freezing. PMID:26939728

  10. Cost-benefit analysis potential in feeding behavior of a predatory snail by integration of hunger, taste, and pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillette, Rhanor; Huang, Rong-Chi; Hatcher, Nathan; Moroz, Leonid L.

    2000-03-01

    Hunger/satiation state interacts with appetitive and noxious stimuli to determine feeding and avoidance responses. In the predatory marine snail Pleurobranchaea californica, food chemostimuli induced proboscis extension and biting at concentration thresholds that varied directly with satiation state. However, food stimuli also tended to elicit avoidance behavior (withdrawal and avoidance turns) at concentration thresholds that were relatively low and fixed. When the feeding threshold for active feeding (proboscis extension with biting) was exceeded, ongoing avoidance and locomotion were interrupted and suppressed. Noxious chemostimuli usually stimulated avoidance, but, in animals with lower feeding thresholds for food stimuli, they often elicited feeding behavior. Thus, sensory pathways mediating appetitive and noxious stimuli may have dual access to neural networks of feeding and avoidance behavior, but their final effects are regulated by satiation state. These observations suggest that a simple cost-benefit computation regulates behavioral switching in the animal's foraging behavior, where food stimuli above or below the incentive level for feeding tend to induce feeding or avoidance, respectively. This decision mechanism can weigh the animal's need for nutrients against the potential risk from other predators and the cost of relative energy outlay in an attack on prey. Stimulation of orienting and attack by low-level noxious stimuli in the hungriest animals may reflect risk-taking that can enhance prey capture success. A simple, hedonically structured neural network model captures this computation.

  11. The use of artificial crabs for testing predatory behavior and health in the octopus.

    PubMed

    Amodio, Piero; Andrews, Paul; Salemme, Marinella; Ponte, Giovanna; Fiorito, Graziano

    2014-01-01

    The willingness of the cephalopod mollusc Octopus vulgaris to attack a live crab is traditionally used as a method to assess the overall health and welfare of octopuses in the laboratory. This method requires placing a crab in the home tank of an animal, measuring the time (latency) taken for the octopus to initiate an attack and withdrawing the crab immediately prior to capture. The same crab is commonly used to assess multiple octopuses as part of daily welfare assessment. Growing concern for the welfare of crustaceans and a review of all laboratory practices for the care and welfare of cephalopods following the inclusion of this taxon in 2010/63/EU prompted a study of the utility of an artificial crab to replace a live crab in the assessment of octopus health. On consecutive days O. vulgaris (N=21) were presented with a live, a dead or an artificial crab, and the latency to attack measured. Despite differences in the predatory performance towards the three different crab alternatives, octopuses readily attacked the artificial (and the dead) crab, showing that they can generalize and respond appropriately towards artificial prey. Researchers should consider using an artificial crab to replace the use of a live crab as part of the routine health assessment of O. vulgaris.

  12. The use of artificial crabs for testing predatory behavior and health in the octopus.

    PubMed

    Amodio, Piero; Andrews, Paul; Salemme, Marinella; Ponte, Giovanna; Fiorito, Graziano

    2014-01-01

    The willingness of the cephalopod mollusc Octopus vulgaris to attack a live crab is traditionally used as a method to assess the overall health and welfare of octopuses in the laboratory. This method requires placing a crab in the home tank of an animal, measuring the time (latency) taken for the octopus to initiate an attack and withdrawing the crab immediately prior to capture. The same crab is commonly used to assess multiple octopuses as part of daily welfare assessment. Growing concern for the welfare of crustaceans and a review of all laboratory practices for the care and welfare of cephalopods following the inclusion of this taxon in 2010/63/EU prompted a study of the utility of an artificial crab to replace a live crab in the assessment of octopus health. On consecutive days O. vulgaris (N=21) were presented with a live, a dead or an artificial crab, and the latency to attack measured. Despite differences in the predatory performance towards the three different crab alternatives, octopuses readily attacked the artificial (and the dead) crab, showing that they can generalize and respond appropriately towards artificial prey. Researchers should consider using an artificial crab to replace the use of a live crab as part of the routine health assessment of O. vulgaris. PMID:24919978

  13. The role of synchronized swimming as affiliative and anti-predatory behavior in long-finned pilot whales.

    PubMed

    Senigaglia, Valeria; de Stephanis, Renaud; Verborgh, Phillippe; Lusseau, David

    2012-09-01

    Synchronized swimming in cetaceans has been hypothesized to play a role in affiliative processes as well as anti-predatory responses. We compared observed variation in synchronized swimming at two research sites in relation to disturbance exposure to test these two hypotheses. This study describes and quantifies pair synchronization in long-finned pilot whales at the Strait of Gibraltar, Spain and Cape Breton, Canada. Synchronization differed depending on the behavioral state and the response is different in the two sites leading to the conclusion that environment can shape the occurrence and magnitude of certain behaviors. We also analyzed intra-population variations in synchronization among 4 social units of Pilot whales in the Strait of Gibraltar and the results of this study confirmed the affiliative role of synchronization and highlighted an influence of disturbance on synchronization. We can conclude that synchronization is a common behavior in long-finned pilot whales that allow for close proximity and rapid coordinated response of individuals, with the multiple functions of showing affiliation and reacting to disturbance.

  14. On predatory wasps and zombie cockroaches: Investigations of "free will" and spontaneous behavior in insects.

    PubMed

    Gal, Ram; Libersat, Frederic

    2010-09-01

    Accumulating evidence suggest that nonhuman organisms, including invertebrates, possess the ability to make non-random choices based purely on ongoing and endogenously-created neuronal processes. We study this precursor of spontaneity in cockroaches stung by A. compressa, a parasitoid wasp that employs cockroaches as a live food supply for its offspring. This wasp uses a neurotoxic venom cocktail to 'hijack' the nervous system of its cockroach prey and manipulate specific features of its decision making process, thereby turning the cockroach into a submissive 'zombie' unable to self-initiate locomotion. We discuss different behavioral and physiological aspects of this venom-induced 'zombified state' and highlight at least one neuronal substrate involved in the regulation of spontaneous behavior in insects. PMID:21057640

  15. The predatory behavior of wintering Accipiter hawks: temporal patterns in activity of predators and prey.

    PubMed

    Roth, Timothy C; Lima, Steven L

    2007-05-01

    Studies focused on how prey trade-off predation and starvation risk are prevalent in behavioral ecology. However, our current understanding of these trade-offs is limited in one key respect: we know little about the behavior of predators. In this study, we provide some of the first detailed information on temporal patterns in the daily hunting behavior of bird-eating Accipiter hawks and relate that to their prey. During the winters of 1999-2004, twenty-one sharp-shinned hawks (A. striatus) and ten Cooper's hawks (A. cooperii) were intensively radio tracked in rural and urban habitats in western Indiana, USA. Cooper's hawks left roost before sunrise and usually returned to roost around sunset, while sharp-shinned hawks left roost at sunrise or later and returned to roost well before sunset. An overall measure of Cooper's-hawk-induced risk (a composite variable of attack rate and activity patterns) generally reflected the timing of prey activity, with peaks occurring around sunrise and sunset. In contrast, risk induced by the smaller sharp-shinned hawk did not strongly reflect the activity of their prey. Specifically, an early morning peak in prey activity did not correspond to a period with intense hawk activity. The lack of early morning hunting by sharp-shinned hawks may reflect the high risk of owl-induced predation experienced by these hawks. The net effect of this intraguild predation may be to "free" small birds from much hawk-induced predation risk prior to sunrise. This realization presents an alternative to energetics as an explanation for the early morning peak in small bird activity during the winter.

  16. The predatory behavior of wintering Accipiter hawks: temporal patterns in activity of predators and prey.

    PubMed

    Roth, Timothy C; Lima, Steven L

    2007-05-01

    Studies focused on how prey trade-off predation and starvation risk are prevalent in behavioral ecology. However, our current understanding of these trade-offs is limited in one key respect: we know little about the behavior of predators. In this study, we provide some of the first detailed information on temporal patterns in the daily hunting behavior of bird-eating Accipiter hawks and relate that to their prey. During the winters of 1999-2004, twenty-one sharp-shinned hawks (A. striatus) and ten Cooper's hawks (A. cooperii) were intensively radio tracked in rural and urban habitats in western Indiana, USA. Cooper's hawks left roost before sunrise and usually returned to roost around sunset, while sharp-shinned hawks left roost at sunrise or later and returned to roost well before sunset. An overall measure of Cooper's-hawk-induced risk (a composite variable of attack rate and activity patterns) generally reflected the timing of prey activity, with peaks occurring around sunrise and sunset. In contrast, risk induced by the smaller sharp-shinned hawk did not strongly reflect the activity of their prey. Specifically, an early morning peak in prey activity did not correspond to a period with intense hawk activity. The lack of early morning hunting by sharp-shinned hawks may reflect the high risk of owl-induced predation experienced by these hawks. The net effect of this intraguild predation may be to "free" small birds from much hawk-induced predation risk prior to sunrise. This realization presents an alternative to energetics as an explanation for the early morning peak in small bird activity during the winter. PMID:17216210

  17. Predatory behavior in a necrophagous bee Trigona hypogea (Hymenoptera; Apidae, Meliponini)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateus, Sidnei; Noll, Fernando B.

    Although most bees feed on nectar and pollen, several exceptions have been reported. The strangest of all is the habit found in some neotropical stingless bees, which have completely replaced pollen-eating by eating animal protein from corpses. For more than 20 years, it was believed that carrion was the only protein source for these bees. We report that these bees feed not only off dead animals, but on the living brood of social wasps and possibly other similar sources. Using well developed prey location and foraging behaviors, necrophagous bees discover recently abandoned wasps' nests and, within a few hours, prey upon all immatures found there.

  18. Predatory behavior of Polistes dominulus wasps in response to cardenolides and glucosinolates in Pieris napi caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Rayor, Linda S; Mooney, Larissa J; Renwick, J Alan

    2007-06-01

    To examine how plant allelochemicals in prey affect foraging choices made by generalist predator paper wasps, Polistes dominulus (Vespidae), we compared predation on Pieris napi (Pieridae) caterpillars reared on host plants with different allelochemicals. In naturalistic behavioral choice experiments, free-flying wasps chose between living pierids reared on cabbage (Brassica oleracea), which lacks deterrent allelochemicals, or alternate host plants with potentially deterrent allelochemicals. The alternative host plants were: wormwood mustard, (Erysimum cheiranthoides: Brassicaceae), which contains cardenolides; nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus: Tropaeolaceae) with high concentrations of chlorogenic acid; and black mustard (Brassica nigra: Brassicaceae) with high concentrations of the aliphatic glucosinolate, sinigrin. Although wasps captured equal numbers of caterpillars reared on cabbage and each alternate host plant, they spent significantly longer handling prey from the alternate host plants as they selectively removed the caterpillar's gut, which contained the plant material. This was true even if the caterpillar did not sequester toxins in its tissues, as revealed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of Erysimum-reared pierids. Because handling time is longer, predators that capture pierids containing non-sequestered allelochemicals experience an overall reduction in foraging rate that may translate into a fitness cost.

  19. The effects of bupropion on hybrid striped bass brain chemistry and predatory behavior.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Lauren E; Bisesi, Joseph H; Lei, E N Y; Lam, Michael H W; Klaine, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    Increased use of antidepressants has led to an increase in their detection in final treated wastewater effluents and receiving streams. Antidepressants are intended to modify human behavior by altering brain chemistry, and because of the high functional conservation of antidepressant target receptors in vertebrates, aquatic organisms may be at risk. The antidepressant bupropion is designed to alter brain norepinephrine and dopamine concentrations in humans. The objective of the present study was to understand if alteration of dopaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations in the hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis × Morone chrysops) brain by bupropion would alter this predator's ability to capture prey. The authors exposed hybrid striped bass to bupropion in a static system for 6 d, followed by a 6-d recovery period. During the present study's 12-d experiment, each hybrid striped bass was fed 4 unexposed fathead minnows every 3 d, and the time it took the hybrid striped bass to consume each of those 4 fathead minnows was quantified. After each feeding event, hybrid striped bass brains were harvested and analyzed for changes in several brain neurotransmitter concentrations, including serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine, and many of their metabolites. Although bupropion altered the concentration of dopamine and many of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter metabolite concentrations in the brains on day 3 of the exposure, it did not alter the time to capture prey. This suggests that alteration of dopaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations in the hybrid striped bass brain does not alter a predator's ability to capture prey. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2058-2065. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:26748934

  20. The effects of bupropion on hybrid striped bass brain chemistry and predatory behavior.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Lauren E; Bisesi, Joseph H; Lei, E N Y; Lam, Michael H W; Klaine, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    Increased use of antidepressants has led to an increase in their detection in final treated wastewater effluents and receiving streams. Antidepressants are intended to modify human behavior by altering brain chemistry, and because of the high functional conservation of antidepressant target receptors in vertebrates, aquatic organisms may be at risk. The antidepressant bupropion is designed to alter brain norepinephrine and dopamine concentrations in humans. The objective of the present study was to understand if alteration of dopaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations in the hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis × Morone chrysops) brain by bupropion would alter this predator's ability to capture prey. The authors exposed hybrid striped bass to bupropion in a static system for 6 d, followed by a 6-d recovery period. During the present study's 12-d experiment, each hybrid striped bass was fed 4 unexposed fathead minnows every 3 d, and the time it took the hybrid striped bass to consume each of those 4 fathead minnows was quantified. After each feeding event, hybrid striped bass brains were harvested and analyzed for changes in several brain neurotransmitter concentrations, including serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine, and many of their metabolites. Although bupropion altered the concentration of dopamine and many of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter metabolite concentrations in the brains on day 3 of the exposure, it did not alter the time to capture prey. This suggests that alteration of dopaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations in the hybrid striped bass brain does not alter a predator's ability to capture prey. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2058-2065. © 2016 SETAC.

  1. Effects of covering behavior and exposure to a predatory crab Charybdis japonica on survival and HSP70 expression of juvenile sea urchins Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chong; Ji, Nanjing; Zhang, Binglong; Sun, Ping; Feng, Wenping; Wei, Jing; Chang, Yaqing

    2014-01-01

    Predation is a complex process among predator, prey and environment. Juvenile sea urchins are more susceptible to predators than adults, which affects community structure. Behavior is involved in anti-predator responses by changes in the expression of anti-predator responsive genes. Here, we investigated the effects of exposure to a predatory crab Charybdis japonica and covering behavior on survival and HSP70 expression of juvenile sea urchins Strongylocentrotus intermedius. C. japonica consumed large numbers of juvenile S. intermedius in 12 hours with a mortality of 34.17±11.43%. Covering behavior did not significantly reduce predation. Exposure to C. japonica did not significantly upregulate HSP70 expression of juvenile S. intermedius in 12 hours. Covering behavior showed no significant regulative effect on the gene expression of HSP70 of juvenile S. intermedius exposed to C. japonica for 12 hours. The results indicate that the anti-predator function of covering behavior is limited and that HSP70 expression does not appear to play an important role in the anti-predator process of S. intermedius.

  2. Effects of Covering Behavior and Exposure to a Predatory Crab Charybdis japonica on Survival and HSP70 Expression of Juvenile Sea Urchins Strongylocentrotus intermedius

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chong; Ji, Nanjing; Zhang, Binglong; Sun, Ping; Feng, Wenping; Wei, Jing; Chang, Yaqing

    2014-01-01

    Predation is a complex process among predator, prey and environment. Juvenile sea urchins are more susceptible to predators than adults, which affects community structure. Behavior is involved in anti-predator responses by changes in the expression of anti-predator responsive genes. Here, we investigated the effects of exposure to a predatory crab Charybdis japonica and covering behavior on survival and HSP70 expression of juvenile sea urchins Strongylocentrotus intermedius. C. japonica consumed large numbers of juvenile S. intermedius in 12 hours with a mortality of 34.17±11.43%. Covering behavior did not significantly reduce predation. Exposure to C. japonica did not significantly upregulate HSP70 expression of juvenile S. intermedius in 12 hours. Covering behavior showed no significant regulative effect on the gene expression of HSP70 of juvenile S. intermedius exposed to C. japonica for 12 hours. The results indicate that the anti-predator function of covering behavior is limited and that HSP70 expression does not appear to play an important role in the anti-predator process of S. intermedius. PMID:24837036

  3. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Korp, Juliane; Vela Gurovic, María S

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism. PMID:27340451

  4. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria.

    PubMed

    Korp, Juliane; Vela Gurovic, María S; Nett, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism. PMID:27340451

  5. Predatory Online Behavior: Modus Operandi of Convicted Sex Offenders in Identifying Potential Victims and Contacting Minors over the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malesky, L. Alvin, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Sex offenders have used the Internet to identify and contact minors for sexual exploitation (Armagh, 1998; Hernandez, 2000; Lamb, 1998; Lanning, 1998). Yet little is known about how these individuals select their online victims. In order to gain a better understanding of this behavior, the online activity of 31 men who perpetrated or attempted to…

  6. Predatory online behavior: modus operandi of convicted sex offenders in identifying potential victims and contacting minors over the internet.

    PubMed

    Malesky, L Alvin

    2007-01-01

    Sex offenders have used the Internet to identify and contact minors for sexual exploitation (Armagh, 1998; Hernandez, 2000; Lamb, 1998; Lanning, 1998). Yet little is known about how these individuals select their online victims. In order to gain a better understanding of this behavior, the online activity of 31 men who perpetrated or attempted to perpetrate contact sex offenses against minors they communicated with via the Internet, was examined. Three-fourths of the participants monitored chat room dialogue and almost one-half reviewed online profiles of minors in an attempt to identify potential victims. Recommendations to increase the online safety of children and adolescents are discussed. PMID:17895230

  7. Effects of predatory fish on survival and behavior of larval gopher frogs (Rana capito) and Southern Leopard Frogs (Rana sphenocephala)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregoire, D.R.; Gunzburger, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    Southern Leopard Frogs, Rana sphenocephala, are habitat generalists occurring in virtually all freshwater habitats within their geographic range, whereas Gopher Frogs, Rana capito, typically breed in ponds that do not normally contain fish. To evaluate the potential for predation by fish to influence the distribution of these species, we conducted a randomized factorial experiment. We examined the survival rate and behavior of tadpoles when exposed to Warmouth Sunfish, Lepomis gulosus, Banded Sunfish, Enneacanthus obesus, and Eastern Mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki. We also conducted a choice experiment to examine the survival rate of the two species of tadpoles when a predator is given a choice of both species simultaneously. Lepomis gulosus consumed the most tadpoles and ate significantly more tadpoles of R. capito than R. sphenocephala. Gambusia holbrooki injured the most tadpoles, especially R. capito. Enneacanthus obesus did not have an effect on behavior or survival of either anuran species. Tadpoles of both anurans increased hiding when in the presence of L. gulosus and G. holbrooki, but a greater proportion of R. capito hid than did R. sphenocephala. Our results suggest that R. capito are more vulnerable to predation by fish than are R. sphenocephala. The introduction of fish may play a role in population declines of certain anurans breeding in normally fish-free wetlands, and even small fish, such as mosquitofish, may have significant negative effects on the tadpoles of R. capito. Copyright 2008 Society for the Study or Amphibians and Reptiles.

  8. Disruption of web structure and predatory behavior of a spider by plant-derived chemical defenses of an aposematic aphid.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, S B

    1989-06-01

    Two toxic and bitter-tasting cardenolides (cardiac-active steroids) were sequestered by the brightly colored oleander aphid,Aphis nerii B. de F., from the neotropical milkweed host plantAsclepias curassavica L. After feeding on milkweed-reared aphids, the orb-web spiderZygiella x-notata (Clerck) built severely disrupted webs and attacked fewer nontoxic, control aphids, whereas the webs of spiders fed only nontoxic aphids remained intact. The regularity and size of the prey-trapping area of webs were reduced significantly in proportion to the amount of toxic aphids eaten. The effects of toxic aphids on spider web structure were mimicked by feeding spiders the bitter-tasting cardenolide digitoxin, a cardenolide with similar steroidal structure and pharmacological activity to the two aphid cardenolides. These results show that the well-known effects of psychoactive drugs on spider web structure are more than interesting behavioral assays of drag activity. Similar effects, produced by plant-derived chemicals in the spider's aphid prey, are relevant to the ecology and evolution of interactions between prey defense and predator foraging.

  9. Predatory senescence in aging wolves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacNulty, Daniel R.; Smith, Douglas W.; Vucetich, John A.; Mech, L. David; Stahler, Daniel R.; Packer, Craig

    2009-01-01

    It is well established that ageing handicaps the ability of prey to escape predators, yet surprisingly little is known about how ageing affects the ability of predators to catch prey. Research into long-lived predators has assumed that adults have uniform impacts on prey regardless of age. Here we use longitudinal data from repeated observations of individually-known wolves (Canis lupus) hunting elk (Cervus elaphus) in Yellowstone National Park to demonstrate that adult predatory performance declines with age and that an increasing ratio of senescent individuals in the wolf population depresses the rate of prey offtake. Because this ratio fluctuates independently of population size, predatory senescence may cause wolf populations of equal size but different age structure to have different impacts on prey populations. These findings suggest that predatory senescence is an important, though overlooked, factor affecting predator-prey dynamics.

  10. Predatory senescence in ageing wolves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacNulty, D.R.; Smith, D.W.; Vucetich, J.A.; Mech, L.D.; Stahler, D.R.; Packer, C.

    2009-01-01

    It is well established that ageing handicaps the ability of prey to escape predators, yet surprisingly little is known about how ageing affects the ability of predators to catch prey. Research into long-lived predators has assumed that adults have uniform impacts on prey regardless of age. Here we use longitudinal data from repeated observations of individually-known wolves (Canis lupus) hunting elk (Cervus elaphus) in Yellowstone National Park to demonstrate that adult predatory performance declines with age and that an increasing ratio of senescent individuals in the wolf population depresses the rate of prey offtake. Because this ratio fluctuates independently of population size, predatory senescence may cause wolf populations of equal size but different age structure to have different impacts on prey populations. These findings suggest that predatory senescence is an important, though overlooked, factor affecting predator-prey dynamics. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  11. Predatory senescence in ageing wolves.

    PubMed

    MacNulty, Daniel R; Smith, Douglas W; Vucetich, John A; Mech, L David; Stahler, Daniel R; Packer, Craig

    2009-12-01

    It is well established that ageing handicaps the ability of prey to escape predators, yet surprisingly little is known about how ageing affects the ability of predators to catch prey. Research into long-lived predators has assumed that adults have uniform impacts on prey regardless of age. Here we use longitudinal data from repeated observations of individually-known wolves (Canis lupus) hunting elk (Cervus elaphus) in Yellowstone National Park to demonstrate that adult predatory performance declines with age and that an increasing ratio of senescent individuals in the wolf population depresses the rate of prey offtake. Because this ratio fluctuates independently of population size, predatory senescence may cause wolf populations of equal size but different age structure to have different impacts on prey populations. These findings suggest that predatory senescence is an important, though overlooked, factor affecting predator-prey dynamics. PMID:19780789

  12. Predatory senescence in ageing wolves.

    PubMed

    MacNulty, Daniel R; Smith, Douglas W; Vucetich, John A; Mech, L David; Stahler, Daniel R; Packer, Craig

    2009-12-01

    It is well established that ageing handicaps the ability of prey to escape predators, yet surprisingly little is known about how ageing affects the ability of predators to catch prey. Research into long-lived predators has assumed that adults have uniform impacts on prey regardless of age. Here we use longitudinal data from repeated observations of individually-known wolves (Canis lupus) hunting elk (Cervus elaphus) in Yellowstone National Park to demonstrate that adult predatory performance declines with age and that an increasing ratio of senescent individuals in the wolf population depresses the rate of prey offtake. Because this ratio fluctuates independently of population size, predatory senescence may cause wolf populations of equal size but different age structure to have different impacts on prey populations. These findings suggest that predatory senescence is an important, though overlooked, factor affecting predator-prey dynamics.

  13. Different feeding behaviors in a single predatory mite species. 1. Comparative life histories of three populations of Phytoseiulus longipes (Acari: Phytoseiidae) depending on prey species and plant substrate.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, M; Tixier, M S; Kreiter, S

    2014-03-01

    The spider mites Tetranychus evansi and T. urticae are key pests of tomato crops, for which no sustainable practical control strategy is available yet. A Brazilian (B) and an Argentinean (A) population of a phytoseiid predatory mite species, Phytoseiulus longipes, are able to develop and reproduce on T. evansi on tomato, whereas a Chilean (C) population is not. In order to better characterize the two distinct feeding behaviours of these three populations, life table data were assessed when the predator was offered T. evansi or T. urticae as prey on bean or tomato leaves. No effect of the prey offered nor the plant substrate was demonstrated on development durations of the three populations. However, immature mortality was low for the Argentinean and the Brazilian populations whatever the prey or plant substrate, whereas 89 % of P. longipes from Chile died before reaching adulthood when fed T. evansi on tomato. No difference in effect on female longevity was detected among the three populations. Finally, the demographic parameters of all populations were lower in presence of tomato compared to beans. Possible explanations for these results are discussed.

  14. Feltiella acarisuga (predatory gall midge)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The predatory gall midge, Feltiella acarisuga is one of the most effective and widespread natural enemies of spider mites. Because of their flying and prey detecting capabilities, and high feeding potential, it is considered an important natural enemy of the two-spotted spider mite in a number of cr...

  15. Dangerous Predatory Publishers Threaten Medical Research.

    PubMed

    Beall, Jeffrey

    2016-10-01

    This article introduces predatory publishers in the context of biomedical sciences research. It describes the characteristics of predatory publishers, including spamming and using fake metrics, and it describes the problems they cause for science and universities. Predatory journals often fail to properly manage peer review, allowing pseudo-science to be published dressed up as authentic science. Academic evaluation is also affected, as some researchers take advantage of the quick, easy, and cheap publishing predatory journals provide. By understanding how predatory publishers operate, researchers can avoid becoming victimized by them. PMID:27550476

  16. Dangerous Predatory Publishers Threaten Medical Research

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces predatory publishers in the context of biomedical sciences research. It describes the characteristics of predatory publishers, including spamming and using fake metrics, and it describes the problems they cause for science and universities. Predatory journals often fail to properly manage peer review, allowing pseudo-science to be published dressed up as authentic science. Academic evaluation is also affected, as some researchers take advantage of the quick, easy, and cheap publishing predatory journals provide. By understanding how predatory publishers operate, researchers can avoid becoming victimized by them. PMID:27550476

  17. Ranking Predatory Journals: Solve the Problem Instead of Removing It!

    PubMed Central

    Dadkhah, Mehdi; Bianciardi, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Predatory journals are a well-known issue for scholarly publishing and they are repositories for bogus research. In recent years, the number of predatory journals has risen and it is necessary to present a solution for this challenge. In this paper, we will discuss about a possible ranking of predatory journals. Our ranking approach is based on Beall’s criteria for detection of predatory journals and it can help editors to improve their journals or convert their questionable journals to non-predatory ones. Moreover, our approach could help young editors to protect their journals against predatory practice. Finally, we present a case study to clarify our approach. PMID:27123411

  18. Predatory prokaryotes: an emerging research opportunity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Mark O

    2002-09-01

    Predatory prokaryotes have evolved a unique strategy of obtaining energy and biosynthetic materials from their surroundings: acquiring them from other living bacterial cells. These types of microbes have been found in a diverse variety of environments, and may play an important role in modulating microbial population structure and dynamics, as has been hypothesized for marine viruses and possibly protists. Only one genus of predatory bacterium, Bdellovibrio, has been extensively described and studied, though several other examples have been reported in the literature. In this review, the four basic strategies used by currently described predatory prokaryotes will be discussed: "wolfpack" group predation, epibiotic attachment, direct cytoplasmic invasion, and periplasmic invasion. Special adaptations to each approach will be considered, and compared overall to the genetic and biochemical characteristics of symbiotic or pathogenic prokaryotes living within eukaryotic cells. Two specific examples of predatory microbes, Bdellovibrio and Ensifer, will be described in terms of predation strategy, association with host cells, and host range. The prospects for bringing to bear the tools of molecular microbial genetics to the study of predatory prokaryotes will be explored, using current research with Bdellovibrio and Ensifer as examples.

  19. Multiple Contaminant and Predatory Stressors in Experimental Pond Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeley, K.; Crumrine, P. W.; Barlow, P. F.

    2005-05-01

    Anthropogenic contaminants, such as agricultural pesticides found in aquatic systems, have the potential to negatively impact organisms via direct and indirect pathways. The magnitude of these indirect effects depends on the strength of the interactions through which they are propagated. We sought to determine how environmentally realistic levels of the insecticides endosulfan and malathion and the herbicide atrazine impact pond communities. We investigated the effects of these pesticides in mesocosm communities containing larval dragonflies (Anax junius), adult water bugs (Belostoma flumineum), and snails (Planorbella trivolvis). Dragonflies presented a moderate predatory threat to snails, as they affected snail behavior but not survival. Direct effects of pesticides on snails were limited, and pesticides only induced modest changes in snail behavior. All pesticides negatively influenced dragonfly survival and this was most pronounced in treatments with endosulfan. However, the reduction in dragonfly survival did not transmit benefits to snails that were detectable as changes in behavior or survival, as would be expected if dragonflies represented a stronger predatory threat. These results show that individuals in communities can be differentially impacted by contaminants, and indicate that strong indirect effects depend on the strength of underlying trophic interactions.

  20. Predatory Microorganisms Would Help Reclaim Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjaminson, Morris A.; Lehrer, Stanley

    1995-01-01

    Wastewater-reclamation systems of proposed type use predatory, nonpathogenic microorganisms to consume pathogenic microorganisms. Unlike some other wastewater-reclamation systems, these systems do not require use of toxic chemicals, intense heat, or ionizing radiation (conductivity rays or ultraviolet) to destroy microorganisms.

  1. Psychological Stress on Female Mice Diminishes the Developmental Potential of Oocytes: A Study Using the Predatory Stress Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Xiang; Cheng, Ya-Nan; Miao, Yi-Long; Wei, De-Li; Zhao, Li-Hua; Luo, Ming-Jiu; Tan, Jing-He

    2012-01-01

    Although the predatory stress experimental protocol is considered more psychological than the restraint protocol, it has rarely been used to study the effect of psychological stress on reproduction. Few studies exist on the direct effect of psychological stress to a female on developmental competence of her oocytes, and the direct effect of predatory maternal stress on oocytes has not been reported. In this study, a predatory stress system was first established for mice with cats as predators. Beginning 24 h after injection of equine chorionic gonadotropin, female mice were subjected to predatory stress for 24 h. Evaluation of mouse responses showed that the predatory stress system that we established increased anxiety-like behaviors and plasma cortisol concentrations significantly and continuously while not affecting food and water intake of the mice. In vitro experiments showed that whereas oocyte maturation and Sr2+ activation or fertilization were unaffected by maternal predatory stress, rate of blastocyst formation and number of cells per blastocyst decreased significantly in stressed mice compared to non-stressed controls. In vivo embryo development indicated that both the number of blastocysts recovered per donor mouse and the average number of young per recipient after embryo transfer of blastocysts with similar cell counts were significantly lower in stressed than in unstressed donor mice. It is concluded that the predatory stress system we established was both effective and durative to induce mouse stress responses. Furthermore, predatory stress applied during the oocyte pre-maturation stage significantly impaired oocyte developmental potential while exerting no measurable impact on nuclear maturation, suggesting that cytoplasmic maturation of mouse oocytes was more vulnerable to maternal stress than nuclear maturation. PMID:23118931

  2. Predatory cannibalism in Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    PubMed

    Vijendravarma, Roshan K; Narasimha, Sunitha; Kawecki, Tadeusz J

    2013-01-01

    Hunting live prey is risky and thought to require specialized adaptations. Therefore, observations of predatory cannibalism in otherwise non-carnivorous animals raise questions about its function, adaptive significance and evolutionary potential. Here we document predatory cannibalism on larger conspecifics in Drosophila melanogaster larvae and address its evolutionary significance. We found that under crowded laboratory conditions younger larvae regularly attack and consume 'wandering-stage' conspecifics, forming aggregations mediated by chemical cues from the attacked victim. Nutrition gained this way can be significant: an exclusively cannibalistic diet was sufficient for normal development from eggs to fertile adults. Cannibalistic diet also induced plasticity of larval mouth parts. Finally, during 118 generations of experimental evolution, replicated populations maintained under larval malnutrition evolved enhanced propensity towards cannibalism. These results suggest that, at least under laboratory conditions, predation on conspecifics in Drosophila is a functional, adaptive behaviour, which can rapidly evolve in response to nutritional conditions.

  3. Effects of experience and cage enrichment on predatory skills of black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vargas, A.; Anderson, S.H.

    1999-01-01

    We studied ontogeny of predatory skills of growing black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) raised under different captive conditions. To test effects of maturation, experience, and cage enrichment on predatory behavior, we exposed 70 juvenile black-footed ferrets to different numbers of live hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) throughout development. Both maturation and experience increased the likelihood of a black-footed ferret making a successful kill. Black-footed ferrets exposed to greater environmental complexity (enriched cage, including encouragement of food-searching behaviors) also were more likely to kill than ferrets raised in a deprived environment. Behavioral studies of captive-raised black-footed ferrets can help refine current breeding techniques and ultimately enhance efforts to recover this endangered carnivore.

  4. White Sharks Exploit the Sun during Predatory Approaches.

    PubMed

    Huveneers, Charlie; Holman, Dirk; Robbins, Rachel; Fox, Andrew; Endler, John A; Taylor, Alex H

    2015-04-01

    There is no conclusive evidence of any nonhuman animal using the sun as part of its predation strategy. Here, we show that the world's largest predatory fish-the white shark (Carcharodon carcharias)-exploits the sun when approaching baits by positioning the sun directly behind them. On sunny days, sharks reversed their direction of approach along an east-west axis from morning to afternoon but had uniformly distributed approach directions during overcast conditions. These results show that white sharks have sufficient behavioral flexibility to exploit fluctuating environmental features when predating. This sun-tracking predation strategy has a number of potential functional roles, including improvement of prey detection, avoidance of retinal overstimulation, and predator concealment.

  5. Medical Publishing Triage – Chronicling Predatory Open Access Publishers

    PubMed Central

    Beall, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    This editorial examines the problem of predatory publishers and how they have negatively affected scholarly communication. Society relies on high-quality, peer-reviewed articles for public policy, legal cases, and improving the public health. Researchers need to be aware of how predatory publishers operate and need to avoid falling into their traps. The editorial examines the recent history of predatory publishers and how they have become prominent in the world of scholarly journals. PMID:25737780

  6. Visual Detection of Speckles in the Fish Xenotoca variata by the Predatory Snake Thamnophis melanogaster in Water of Different Turbidity.

    PubMed

    Manjarrez, Javier; Rivas-González, Eric; Venegas-Barrera, Crystian S; Moyaho, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Semi-aquatic snakes integrate visual and chemical stimuli, and prey detection and capture success are therefore linked to the display of visual predatory behavior. The snake Thamnophis melanogaster responds preferentially to individuals of the fish Xenotoca variata with a greater number of bright, colorful spots (lateral speckles) compared with those with a smaller number; however, water turbidity can reduce underwater visibility and effect the vulnerability of fish. In this study, we tested whether the presence of iridescent speckles on the flanks of male X. variata interacted with water turbidity to modify the predatory behavior displayed by the snake T. melanogaster. We predicted that in an experimental laboratory test, the snakes would increase the frequency of their predatory behavior to the extent that the water turbidity decreases. The snakes were tested at six different levels of water turbidity, in combination with three categories of male fish (with few, a median number of, or many speckles). The results showed that in a pool with high or zero turbidity, the number of speckles is not a determining factor in the deployment of the predatory behavior of the snake T. melanogaster toward X. variata. Our findings suggest that snakes can view the fish at intermediate percentages of turbidity, but the number of speckles in male X. variata is irrelevant as an interspecific visual signal in environments with insufficient luminosity. The successful capture of aquatic prey is influenced by integration between chemical and visual signals, according to environmental factors that may influence the recognition of individual traits.

  7. Visual Detection of Speckles in the Fish Xenotoca variata by the Predatory Snake Thamnophis melanogaster in Water of Different Turbidity

    PubMed Central

    Manjarrez, Javier; Rivas-González, Eric; Venegas-Barrera, Crystian S.; Moyaho, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Semi-aquatic snakes integrate visual and chemical stimuli, and prey detection and capture success are therefore linked to the display of visual predatory behavior. The snake Thamnophis melanogaster responds preferentially to individuals of the fish Xenotoca variata with a greater number of bright, colorful spots (lateral speckles) compared with those with a smaller number; however, water turbidity can reduce underwater visibility and effect the vulnerability of fish. In this study, we tested whether the presence of iridescent speckles on the flanks of male X. variata interacted with water turbidity to modify the predatory behavior displayed by the snake T. melanogaster. We predicted that in an experimental laboratory test, the snakes would increase the frequency of their predatory behavior to the extent that the water turbidity decreases. The snakes were tested at six different levels of water turbidity, in combination with three categories of male fish (with few, a median number of, or many speckles). The results showed that in a pool with high or zero turbidity, the number of speckles is not a determining factor in the deployment of the predatory behavior of the snake T. melanogaster toward X. variata. Our findings suggest that snakes can view the fish at intermediate percentages of turbidity, but the number of speckles in male X. variata is irrelevant as an interspecific visual signal in environments with insufficient luminosity. The successful capture of aquatic prey is influenced by integration between chemical and visual signals, according to environmental factors that may influence the recognition of individual traits. PMID:26061294

  8. Do large predatory fish track ocean oxygenation?

    PubMed

    Dahl, Tais W; Hammarlund, Emma U

    2011-01-01

    The Devonian appearance of 1-10 meter long armored fish (placoderms) coincides with geochemical evidence recording a transition into fully oxygenated oceans.1 A comparison of extant fish shows that the large individuals are less tolerant to hypoxia than their smaller cousins. This leads us to hypothesize that Early Paleozoic O(2) saturation levels were too low to support >1 meter size marine, predatory fish. According to a simple model, both oxygen uptake and oxygen demand scale positively with size, but the demand exceeds supply for the largest fish with an active, predatory life style. Therefore, the largest individuals may lead us to a lower limit on oceanic O(2) concentrations. Our presented model suggests 2-10 meter long predators require >30-50% PAL while smaller fish would survive at <25% PAL. This is consistent with the hypothesis that low atmospheric oxygen pressure acted as an evolutionary barrier for fish to grow much above ∼1 meter before the Devonian oxygenation.

  9. Functional Diversification within a Predatory Species Flock

    PubMed Central

    Burress, Edward D.; Duarte, Alejandro; Serra, Wilson S.; Loueiro, Marcelo; Gangloff, Michael M.; Siefferman, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Ecological speciation is well-known from adaptive radiations in cichlid fishes inhabiting lentic ecosystems throughout the African rift valley and Central America. Here, we investigate the ecological and morphological diversification of a recently discovered lotic predatory Neotropical cichlid species flock in subtropical South America. We document morphological and functional diversification using geometric morphometrics, stable C and N isotopes, stomach contents and character evolution. This species flock displays species-specific diets and skull and pharyngeal jaw morphology. Moreover, this lineage appears to have independently evolved away from piscivory multiple times and derived forms are highly specialized morphologically and functionally relative to ancestral states. Ecological speciation played a fundamental role in this radiation and our data reveal novel conditions of ecological speciation including a species flock that evolved: 1) in a piscivorous lineage, 2) under lotic conditions and 3) with pronounced morphological novelties, including hypertrophied lips that appear to have evolved rapidly. PMID:24278349

  10. Prenatal Chemosensory Learning by the Predatory Mite Neoseiulus californicus

    PubMed Central

    Peralta Quesada, Paulo C.; Schausberger, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Prenatal or embryonic learning, behavioral change following experience made prior to birth, may have significant consequences for postnatal foraging behavior in a wide variety of animals, including mammals, birds, fish, amphibians, and molluscs. However, prenatal learning has not been previously shown in arthropods such as insects, spiders and mites. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined prenatal chemosensory learning in the plant-inhabiting predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus. We exposed these predators in the embryonic stage to two flavors (vanillin or anisaldehyde) or no flavor (neutral) by feeding their mothers on spider mite prey enriched with these flavors or not enriched with any flavor (neutral). After the predators reached the protonymphal stage, we assessed their prey choice through residence and feeding preferences in experiments, in which they were offered spider mites matching the maternal diet (neutral, vanillin or anisaldehyde spider mites) and non-matching spider mites. Predator protonymphs preferentially resided in the vicinity of spider mites matching the maternal diet irrespective of the type of maternal diet and choice situation. Across treatments, the protonymphs preferentially fed on spider mites matching the maternal diet. Prey and predator sizes did not differ among neutral, vanillin and anisaldehyde treatments, excluding the hypothesis that size-assortative predation influenced the outcome of the experiments. Conclusions/Significance Our study reports the first example of prenatal learning in arthropods. PMID:23300897

  11. Predatory aquatic beetles, suitable trace elements bioindicators.

    PubMed

    Burghelea, Carmen I; Zaharescu, Dragos G; Hooda, Peter S; Palanca-Soler, Antonio

    2011-05-01

    Predatory aquatic beetles are common colonizers of natural and managed aquatic environments. While as important components of the aquatic food webs they are prone to accumulate trace elements, they have been largely neglected from metal uptake studies. We aim to test the suitability of three dytiscid species, i.e.Hydroglyphus pusillus, Laccophilus minutus and Rhantus suturalis, as trace elements (Al, As, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se and Zn) bioindicators. The work was carried out in a case area representing rice paddies and control sites (reservoirs) from an arid region known for its land degradation (Monegros, NE Spain). Categorical principal component analysis (CATPCA) was tested as a nonlinear approach to identify significant relationships between metals, species and habitat conditions so as to examine the ability of these species to reflect differences in metal uptake. Except Se and As, the average concentrations of all other elements in the beetles were higher in the rice fields than in the control habitats. The CATPCA determined that H. pusillus had high capacity to accumulate Fe, Ni and Mn regardless of the habitat type, and hence may not be capable of distinguishing habitat conditions with regards to these metals. On the other hand, L. minutus was found less sensitive for Se in non-managed habitats (i.e. reservoirs), while R. suturalis was good in accumulating Al, Mo and Pb in rice fields. The latter seems to be a promising bioindicator of metal enrichment in rice fields. We conclude that predatory aquatic beetles are good candidates for trace elements bioindication in impacted and non-impacted environments and can be used in environmental monitoring studies. CATPCA proved to be a reliable approach to unveil trends in metal accumulation in aquatic invertebrates according to their habitat status.

  12. Serial murder and the case of Aileen Wuornos: attachment theory, psychopathy, and predatory aggression.

    PubMed

    Arrigo, Bruce A; Griffin, Ayanna

    2004-01-01

    The extant research on female homicide has yet to offer any systematic assessment of why women murder serially. Part of the explanation is attributed to existing literature focusing on justifiable and excusable homicide, or women who kill their abusive partners because they have been battered, fear that their lives are in danger, or are otherwise victimized. Thus, predatory homicide perpetrated by women has not received extensive attention in the relevant literature. This article aims to address this deficiency by providing a detailed case study analysis of Aileen Wuornos, a convicted serial murderer executed at Broward Correctional Institution in Pembroke Pines, FL, on October 9, 2002. By linking the literature on attachment theory with the research on psychopathy and predatory aggression, this article argues that Aileen Wuornos was a cold blooded and calculated killer: a serial offender responsible for her delinquent and criminal behavior. Generalizing from the case of Aileen Wuornos, several tentative recommendations are proposed as linked to clinical and forensic prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, as well as future research on women, psychopathy, and predatory serial homicide.

  13. The Predatory Ecology of Deinonychus and the Origin of Flapping in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Denver W.; Freedman, Elizabeth A.; Scannella, John B.; Kambic, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Most non-avian theropod dinosaurs are characterized by fearsome serrated teeth and sharp recurved claws. Interpretation of theropod predatory ecology is typically based on functional morphological analysis of these and other physical features. The notorious hypertrophied ‘killing claw’ on pedal digit (D) II of the maniraptoran theropod Deinonychus (Paraves: Dromaeosauridae) is hypothesized to have been a predatory adaptation for slashing or climbing, leading to the suggestion that Deinonychus and other dromaeosaurids were cursorial predators specialized for actively attacking and killing prey several times larger than themselves. However, this hypothesis is problematic as extant animals that possess similarly hypertrophied claws do not use them to slash or climb up prey. Here we offer an alternative interpretation: that the hypertrophied D-II claw of dromaeosaurids was functionally analogous to the enlarged talon also found on D-II of extant Accipitridae (hawks and eagles; one family of the birds commonly known as “raptors”). Here, the talon is used to maintain grip on prey of subequal body size to the predator, while the victim is pinned down by the body weight of the raptor and dismembered by the beak. The foot of Deinonychus exhibits morphology consistent with a grasping function, supportive of the prey immobilisation behavior model. Opposite morphological trends within Deinonychosauria (Dromaeosauridae + Troodontidae) are indicative of ecological separation. Placed in context of avian evolution, the grasping foot of Deinonychus and other terrestrial predatory paravians is hypothesized to have been an exaptation for the grasping foot of arboreal perching birds. Here we also describe “stability flapping”, a novel behaviour executed for positioning and stability during the initial stages of prey immobilisation, which may have been pivotal to the evolution of the flapping stroke. These findings overhaul our perception of predatory dinosaurs and

  14. Predatory publishing: what nurse executives need to know.

    PubMed

    Hill, Karen S

    2015-02-01

    Editors attending the 2014 meeting of the International Academy of Nursing Editors have coalesced to provide information to our readers regarding a recent trend in the publishing world, predatory publishing. PMID:25621744

  15. Physiological benefits of nectar-feeding by a predatory beetle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extrafloral nectar is an important food source for many animals, including predatory lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), although the physiological benefits of nectar consumption are poorly understood for most consumers. Under laboratory conditions, we confined new females of Coleomegilla macu...

  16. Predatory bacteria are nontoxic to the rabbit ocular surface

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Eric G.; Stella, Nicholas A.; Brothers, Kimberly M.; Yates, Kathleen A.; Funderburgh, Martha L.; Funderburgh, James L.; Gupta, Shilpi; Dharani, Sonal; Kadouri, Daniel E.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.

    2016-01-01

    Given the increasing emergence of antimicrobial resistant microbes and the near absent development of new antibiotic classes, innovative new therapeutic approaches to address this global problem are necessary. The use of predatory bacteria, bacteria that prey upon other bacteria, is gaining interest as an “out of the box” therapeutic treatment for multidrug resistant pathogenic bacterial infections. Before a new antimicrobial agent is used to treat infections, it must be tested for safety. The goal of this study was to test the tolerability of bacteria on the ocular surface using in vitro and in vivo models. Predatory bacteria Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus and Micavibrio aeruginosavorus were found to be non-toxic to human corneal stromal keratocytes in vitro; however, they did induce production of the proinflammatory chemokine IL-8 but not IL-1β. Predatory bacteria did not induce inflammation on the ocular surface of rabbit eyes, with and without corneal epithelial abrasions. Unlike a standard of care antibiotic vancomycin, predatory bacteria did not inhibit corneal epithelial wound healing or increase clinical inflammatory signs in vivo. Together these data support the safety of predatory bacteria on the ocular surface, but future studies are warranted regarding the use predatory bacteria in deeper tissues of the eye. PMID:27527833

  17. Predatory bacteria are nontoxic to the rabbit ocular surface.

    PubMed

    Romanowski, Eric G; Stella, Nicholas A; Brothers, Kimberly M; Yates, Kathleen A; Funderburgh, Martha L; Funderburgh, James L; Gupta, Shilpi; Dharani, Sonal; Kadouri, Daniel E; Shanks, Robert M Q

    2016-01-01

    Given the increasing emergence of antimicrobial resistant microbes and the near absent development of new antibiotic classes, innovative new therapeutic approaches to address this global problem are necessary. The use of predatory bacteria, bacteria that prey upon other bacteria, is gaining interest as an "out of the box" therapeutic treatment for multidrug resistant pathogenic bacterial infections. Before a new antimicrobial agent is used to treat infections, it must be tested for safety. The goal of this study was to test the tolerability of bacteria on the ocular surface using in vitro and in vivo models. Predatory bacteria Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus and Micavibrio aeruginosavorus were found to be non-toxic to human corneal stromal keratocytes in vitro; however, they did induce production of the proinflammatory chemokine IL-8 but not IL-1β. Predatory bacteria did not induce inflammation on the ocular surface of rabbit eyes, with and without corneal epithelial abrasions. Unlike a standard of care antibiotic vancomycin, predatory bacteria did not inhibit corneal epithelial wound healing or increase clinical inflammatory signs in vivo. Together these data support the safety of predatory bacteria on the ocular surface, but future studies are warranted regarding the use predatory bacteria in deeper tissues of the eye. PMID:27527833

  18. Predatory bird populations in the east Mojave Desert, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knight, R.L.; Camp, R.J.; Boarman, W.I.; Knight, H.A.L.

    1999-01-01

    We surveyed 7 species of predatory birds weekly during a 12-month period (December 1992 through November 1993) in the east Mojave Desert, California. The Common Raven (Corvus corax) was the most frequently observed species with an average of 6.9 sightings per 100 km. Turkey Vultures (Cathartes aura), Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), Loggerhead Shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus), American Kestrels (Falco sparverius), Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), and Prairie Falcons (Falco mexicanus) were seen in decreasing order of frequency of observation through the study period. Ravens, Red-tailed Hawks, Loggerhead Shrikes, American Kestrels, and Prairie Falcons were seen throughout the year. Turkey Vultures were not present during winter months, while Golden Eagles were seen only during November and December. Turkey Vultures, Red-tailed Hawks, and ravens were most numerous on agricultural lands, while Loggerhead Shrikes were most Common at urban areas. Raven numbers increased with increasing number of linear rights-of-way parallel to the survey route. Perching was the most common behavior type, although Turkey Vultures and ravens were often observed soaring, flying, or standing on the ground near highways. Transmission powerline towers and telephone poles were used as perch sites disproportionately to availability.

  19. Investigating the presence of predatory bacteria on algal bloom samples using a T6SS gene marker.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, J.; Sison-Mangus, M.; Mehic, S.; McMahon, E.

    2015-12-01

    Predation is considered to be a major driving force in evolution and ecology, which has been observed affecting individual organisms, communities, and entire ecosystems. The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is an intermembranal protein complex identified in certain bacteria, which appears to have evolved strictly as a mechanism of predation. The effects of bacteria on phytoplankton physiology are still understudied, however, studies have shown that the interactions between bacteria that inhabit the phycosphere of phytoplankton can possibly result in coevolution of native host and microbiota. It is unclear if bacteria can prey upon other bacteria to gain advantages during periods of high phytoplankton density. Here, we investigate the predatory interactions between bacteria and analyze environmental samples for the presence of predatory bacterial genes in an effort to understand bacteria-bacteria and phytoplankton interactions during algal blooms. DNA were extracted from bacterial samples collected weekly from size-fractionated samples using 3.0 um and 0.2 um membrane filters at the Santa Cruz wharf. PCR amplification and gel visualization for the presence of T6SS gene was carried out on bloom and non-bloom samples. Moreover, we carried out a lab- based experiment to observe bacteria-bacteria interaction that may hint for the presence of predatory behavior between bacterial taxa. We observed what appeared to be a predatory biofilm formation between certain bacterial species. These bacteria, however, did not contain the T6SS genes. On the contrary the T6SS gene was discovered in some of the bloom samples gathered from the Santa Cruz wharf. It is still unclear if the predatory mechanisms facilitate the abundance of certain groups of bacteria that contain the T6SS genes during algal blooms, but our evidence suggest that bacterial predation through T6SS mechanism is present during bloom events.

  20. Investigating the Responses of Human Epithelial Cells to Predatory Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Monnappa, Ajay K.; Bari, Wasimul; Choi, Seong Yeol; Mitchell, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    One beguiling alternative to antibiotics for treating multi-drug resistant infections are Bdellovibrio-and-like-organisms (BALOs), predatory bacteria known to attack human pathogens. Consequently, in this study, the responses from four cell lines (three human and one mouse) were characterized during an exposure to different predatory bacteria, Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100, Bacteriovorus BY1 and Bacteriovorax stolpii EB1. TNF-α levels were induced in Raw 264.7 mouse macrophage cultures with each predator, but paled in comparison to those obtained with E. coli. This was true even though the latter strain was added at an 11.1-fold lower concentration (p < 0.01). Likewise, E. coli led to a significant (54%) loss in the Raw 264.7 murine macrophage viability while the predatory strains had no impact. Tests with various epithelial cells, including NuLi-1 airway, Caco2, HT29 and T84 colorectal cells, gave similar results, with E. coli inducing IL-8 production. The viabilities of the NuLi-1 and Caco-2 cells were slightly reduced (8%) when exposed to the predators, while T84 viability remained steady. In no cases did the predatory bacteria induce actin rearrangement. These results clearly demonstrate the gentle natures of predatory bacteria and their impacts on human cells. PMID:27629536

  1. Body size and predatory performance in wolves: is bigger better?

    PubMed

    MacNulty, Daniel R; Smith, Douglas W; Mech, L David; Eberly, Lynn E

    2009-05-01

    1. Large body size hinders locomotor performance in ways that may lead to trade-offs in predator foraging ability that limit the net predatory benefit of larger size. For example, size-related improvements in handling prey may come at the expense of pursuing prey and thus negate any enhancement in overall predatory performance due to increasing size. 2. This hypothesis was tested with longitudinal data from repeated observations of 94 individually known wolves (Canis lupus) hunting elk (Cervus elaphus) in Yellowstone National Park, USA. Wolf size was estimated from an individually based sex-specific growth model derived from body mass measurements of 304 wolves. 3. Larger size granted individual wolves a net predatory advantage despite substantial variation in its effect on the performance of different predatory tasks; larger size improved performance of a strength-related task (grappling and subduing elk) but failed to improve performance of a locomotor-related task (selecting an elk from a group) for wolves > 39 kg. 4. Sexual dimorphism in wolf size also explained why males outperformed females in each of the three tasks considered (attacking, selecting, and killing). 5. These findings support the generalization that bigger predators are overall better hunters, but they also indicate that increasing size ultimately limits elements of predatory behaviour that require superior locomotor performance. We argue that this could potentially narrow the dietary niche of larger carnivores as well as limit the evolution of larger size if prey are substantially more difficult to pursue than to handle. PMID:19175444

  2. Body size and predatory performance in wolves: is bigger better?

    PubMed

    MacNulty, Daniel R; Smith, Douglas W; Mech, L David; Eberly, Lynn E

    2009-05-01

    1. Large body size hinders locomotor performance in ways that may lead to trade-offs in predator foraging ability that limit the net predatory benefit of larger size. For example, size-related improvements in handling prey may come at the expense of pursuing prey and thus negate any enhancement in overall predatory performance due to increasing size. 2. This hypothesis was tested with longitudinal data from repeated observations of 94 individually known wolves (Canis lupus) hunting elk (Cervus elaphus) in Yellowstone National Park, USA. Wolf size was estimated from an individually based sex-specific growth model derived from body mass measurements of 304 wolves. 3. Larger size granted individual wolves a net predatory advantage despite substantial variation in its effect on the performance of different predatory tasks; larger size improved performance of a strength-related task (grappling and subduing elk) but failed to improve performance of a locomotor-related task (selecting an elk from a group) for wolves > 39 kg. 4. Sexual dimorphism in wolf size also explained why males outperformed females in each of the three tasks considered (attacking, selecting, and killing). 5. These findings support the generalization that bigger predators are overall better hunters, but they also indicate that increasing size ultimately limits elements of predatory behaviour that require superior locomotor performance. We argue that this could potentially narrow the dietary niche of larger carnivores as well as limit the evolution of larger size if prey are substantially more difficult to pursue than to handle.

  3. Investigating the Responses of Human Epithelial Cells to Predatory Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Monnappa, Ajay K; Bari, Wasimul; Choi, Seong Yeol; Mitchell, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    One beguiling alternative to antibiotics for treating multi-drug resistant infections are Bdellovibrio-and-like-organisms (BALOs), predatory bacteria known to attack human pathogens. Consequently, in this study, the responses from four cell lines (three human and one mouse) were characterized during an exposure to different predatory bacteria, Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100, Bacteriovorus BY1 and Bacteriovorax stolpii EB1. TNF-α levels were induced in Raw 264.7 mouse macrophage cultures with each predator, but paled in comparison to those obtained with E. coli. This was true even though the latter strain was added at an 11.1-fold lower concentration (p < 0.01). Likewise, E. coli led to a significant (54%) loss in the Raw 264.7 murine macrophage viability while the predatory strains had no impact. Tests with various epithelial cells, including NuLi-1 airway, Caco2, HT29 and T84 colorectal cells, gave similar results, with E. coli inducing IL-8 production. The viabilities of the NuLi-1 and Caco-2 cells were slightly reduced (8%) when exposed to the predators, while T84 viability remained steady. In no cases did the predatory bacteria induce actin rearrangement. These results clearly demonstrate the gentle natures of predatory bacteria and their impacts on human cells. PMID:27629536

  4. Body size and predatory performance in wolves: Is bigger better?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacNulty, D.R.; Smith, D.W.; Mech, L.D.; Eberly, L.E.

    2009-01-01

    Large body size hinders locomotor performance in ways that may lead to trade-offs in predator foraging ability that limit the net predatory benefit of larger size. For example, size-related improvements in handling prey may come at the expense of pursuing prey and thus negate any enhancement in overall predatory performance due to increasing size. 2. This hypothesis was tested with longitudinal data from repeated observations of 94 individually known wolves (Canis lupus) hunting elk (Cervus elaphus) in Yellowstone National Park, USA. Wolf size was estimated from an individually based sex-specific growth model derived from body mass measurements of 304 wolves. 3. Larger size granted individual wolves a net predatory advantage despite substantial variation in its effect on the performance of different predatory tasks; larger size improved performance of a strength-related task (grappling and subduing elk) but failed to improve performance of a locomotor-related task (selecting an elk from a group) for wolves > 39 kg. 4. Sexual dimorphism in wolf size also explained why males outperformed females in each of the three tasks considered (attacking, selecting, and killing). 5. These findings support the generalization that bigger predators are overall better hunters, but they also indicate that increasing size ultimately limits elements of predatory behaviour that require superior locomotor performance. We argue that this could potentially narrow the dietary niche of larger carnivores as well as limit the evolution of larger size if prey are substantially more difficult to pursue than to handle. ?? 2009 British Ecological Society.

  5. The relative impacts of native and introduced predatory fish on a temporary wetland tadpole assemblage.

    PubMed

    Baber, Matthew J; Babbitt, Kimberly J

    2003-07-01

    Understanding the relative impacts of predators on prey may improve the ability to predict the effects of predator composition changes on prey assemblages. We experimentally examined the relative impact of native and introduced predatory fish on a temporary wetland amphibian assemblage to determine whether these predators exert distinct (unique or non-substitutable) or equivalent (similar) impacts on prey. Predatory fish included the eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki), golden topminnow (Fundulus chrysotus), flagfish ( Jordanella floridae), and the introduced walking catfish ( Clarias batrachus). The tadpole assemblage included four common species known to co-occur in temporary wetlands in south-central Florida, USA: the oak toad (Bufo quercicus), pinewoods treefrog (Hyla femoralis), squirrel treefrog (Hyla squirella), and eastern narrowmouth toad (Gastrophryne carolinensis). Tadpoles were exposed to different predators in wading pools under conditions similar to those found in surrounding temporary wetlands (particularly in terms of substrate type, the degree of habitat complexity, and temperature). Native predators were similar with respect to predation rate and prey selectivity, suggesting similar energy requirements and foraging behavior. Conversely, native fish predators, especially G. holbrooki, were distinct from the introduced C. batrachus. In contrast to expectations, C. batrachus were less voracious predators than native fish, particularly G. holbrooki. Moreover, survival of G. carolinensis and H. femoralis were higher in the presence of C. batrachus than G. holbrooki. We suggest that C. batrachus was a less efficient predator than native fish because the foraging behavior of this species resulted in low predator-prey encounter rates, and thus predation rate. In combination with a related field study, our results suggest that native predatory fish play a stronger role than C. batrachus in influencing the spatial distribution and abundance of

  6. Sexual Violence, Predatory Masculinity, and Medical Testimony in New Spain.

    PubMed

    Tortorici, Zeb

    2015-01-01

    This essay examines the medical and legal construction of predatory masculinity in New Spain by contrasting criminal cases of rape [estupro] with those of violent or coercive sodomy [sodomía]. In the context of male-female rape, the rulings of most criminal and ecclesiastical courts imply that predatory masculinity was a "natural" manifestation of male sexual desire, whereas in cases of sodomy and nonconsensual sexual acts between men, courts viewed such desire as "against nature." The processes by which the colonial state prosecuted certain sexual crimes simultaneously criminalized and validated predatory masculinity. By analyzing the roles of the medics, surgeons, and midwives who examined the bodies of the male and female victims in these cases, this essay argues for a commonality in the authoritative judgments based on medical evidence, whether conclusive or inconclusive.

  7. Sexual Violence, Predatory Masculinity, and Medical Testimony in New Spain.

    PubMed

    Tortorici, Zeb

    2015-01-01

    This essay examines the medical and legal construction of predatory masculinity in New Spain by contrasting criminal cases of rape [estupro] with those of violent or coercive sodomy [sodomía]. In the context of male-female rape, the rulings of most criminal and ecclesiastical courts imply that predatory masculinity was a "natural" manifestation of male sexual desire, whereas in cases of sodomy and nonconsensual sexual acts between men, courts viewed such desire as "against nature." The processes by which the colonial state prosecuted certain sexual crimes simultaneously criminalized and validated predatory masculinity. By analyzing the roles of the medics, surgeons, and midwives who examined the bodies of the male and female victims in these cases, this essay argues for a commonality in the authoritative judgments based on medical evidence, whether conclusive or inconclusive. PMID:27066628

  8. Behind the Spam: A "Spectral Analysis" of Predatory Publishers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beall, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    Most researchers today are bombarded with spam email solicitations from questionable scholarly publishers. These emails solicit article manuscripts, editorial board service, and even ad hoc peer reviews. These "predatory" publishers exploit the scholarly publishing process, patterning themselves after legitimate scholarly publishers yet performing little or no peer review and quickly accepting submitted manuscripts and collecting fees from submitting authors. These counterfeit publishers and journals have published much junk science — especially in the field of cosmology — threatening the integrity of the academic record. This presentation examines the current state of predatory publishing and related scams such as fake impact factors and advises researchers how to navigate scholarly publishing to best avoid predatory publishers and other scholarly publishing-related perils.

  9. Ultimate Drivers and Proximate Correlates of Polyandry in Predatory Mites

    PubMed Central

    Schausberger, Peter; Patiño-Ruiz, J. David; Osakabe, Masahiro; Murata, Yasumasa; Sugimoto, Naoya; Uesugi, Ryuji; Walzer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Polyandry is more widespread than anticipated from Bateman’s principle but its ultimate (evolutionary) causes and proximate (mechanistic) correlates are more difficult to pinpoint than those of polygyny. Here, we combined mating experiments, quantification of reproductive traits and microsatellite genotyping to determine the fitness implications of polyandry in two predatory mite species, where males are highly polygynous (up to 45 fertilized females during life), whereas females range from monandry to various polyandry levels. The medium-level polyandrous (up to eight male mates possible) Neoseiulus californicus received clear direct and indirect benefits: multiply mated females produced more offspring with higher survival chances over longer times than singly mated females. In contrast, singly and multiply mated females of the low-level polyandrous (commonly two male mates at maximum) Phytoseiulus persimilis produced similar numbers of offspring having similar survival chances. In both species, multiple mating resulted in mixed offspring paternities, opening the chance for indirect fitness benefits such as enhanced genetic compatibility, complementarity and/or variability. However, the female re-mating likelihood and the paternity chance of non-first male mates were lower in P. persimilis than in N. californicus. Regarding proximate factors, in both species first mating duration and female re-mating likelihood were negatively correlated. Based on occasional fertilization failure of first male mates in P. persimilis, and mixed offspring paternities in both species, we argue that fertilization assurance and the chance to gain indirect fitness benefits are the ultimate drivers of polyandry in P. persimilis, whereas those of N. californicus are higher offspring numbers coupled with enhanced offspring viability and possibly other indirect fitness benefits. Overall, the adaptive significance and proximate events well reflected the polyandry levels. Our study provides

  10. Educational Research and Predatory Tabloid Journalism: Authors Beware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchant, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines the nature of predatory open-access journals. These are journals that do not exist as vehicles to promote research or the efforts of scholarly organizations, but exist simply as a means for profit. As with many efforts in education and the social sciences, when financial incentive is the main driving force, quality and…

  11. Effect of Predatory Bacteria on Human Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shilpi; Tang, Chi; Tran, Michael; Kadouri, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Predatory bacteria are Gram-negative bacteria that prey on other Gram-negative bacteria and have been considered as potential therapeutic agents against multi-drug resistant pathogens. In vivo animal models have demonstrated that predatory bacteria are non-toxic and non-immunogenic in rodents. In order to consider the use of predatory bacteria as live antibiotics, it is important to investigate their effect on human cells. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus strains 109J and HD100, and Micavibrio aeruginosavorus strain ARL-13 on cell viability and inflammatory responses of five human cell lines, representative of clinically relevant tissues. We found that the predators were not cytotoxic to any of the human cell lines tested. Microscopic imaging showed no signs of cell detachment, as compared to predator-free cells. In comparison to an E. coli control, exposure to higher concentrations of the predators did not trigger a significant elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines in four of the five human cell lines tested. Our work underlines the non-pathogenic attributes of predatory bacteria on human cells and highlights their potential use as live antibiotics against human pathogens. PMID:27579919

  12. IN VITRO CULTURING OF THE PREDATORY SOIL NEMATODE CLARKUS PAPILLATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Clarkus papillatus is a widely distributed predatory soil nematode and is of interest in the study of soil ecology, yet very little information exists on its in vitro culturing. In this investigation, an artificial environment was created to maintain C. papillatus for multi-gener...

  13. Are plant trichomes harmful to predatory insects and mites?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants may use epidermal hairs (trichomes) to defend themselves from attack by herbivores. Predatory arthropods may serve as biocontrol agents against herbivores. Whether or not plant trichomes work in concert with predators is undocumented in many cases. We reviewed the peer-reviewed literature ...

  14. Purification and host specificity of predatory halobacteriovorax isolated from seawater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Halobacteriovorax (formerly Bacteriovorax) are small predatory bacteria found in the marine environment and may serve as biocontrol agents against pathogens in fish and shellfish. Four strains of Halobacteriovorax originally isolated in Vibrio parahaemolyticus O3:K6 host cells were separated from t...

  15. Benefit-cost Trade-offs of Early Learning in Foraging Predatory Mites Amblyseius Swirskii

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Inga C.; Szin, Sandra; Schausberger, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Learning is changed behavior following experience, and ubiquitous in animals including plant-inhabiting predatory mites (Phytoseiidae). Learning has many benefits but also incurs costs, which are only poorly understood. Here, we addressed learning, especially its costs, in the generalist predatory mite Amblyseius swirskii, a biocontrol agent of several herbivores, which can also survive on pollen. The goals of our research were (1) to scrutinize if A. swirskii is able to learn during early life in foraging contexts and, if so, (2) to determine the costs of early learning. In the experiments, we used one difficult-to-grasp prey, i.e., thrips, and one easy-to-grasp prey, i.e., spider mites. Our experiments show that A. swirskii is able to learn during early life. Adult predators attacked prey experienced early in life (i.e., matching prey) more quickly than they attacked unknown (i.e., non-matching) prey. Furthermore, we observed both fitness benefits and operating (physiological) costs of early learning. Predators receiving the matching prey produced the most eggs, whereas predators receiving the non-matching prey produced the least. Thrips-experienced predators needed the longest for juvenile development. Our findings may be used to enhance A. swirskii’s efficacy in biological control, by priming young predators on a specific prey early in life. PMID:27006149

  16. Repeated Evolution of Power-Amplified Predatory Strikes in Trap-Jaw Spiders.

    PubMed

    Wood, Hannah M; Parkinson, Dilworth Y; Griswold, Charles E; Gillespie, Rosemary G; Elias, Damian O

    2016-04-25

    Small animals possess intriguing morphological and behavioral traits that allow them to capture prey, including innovative structural mechanisms that produce ballistic movements by amplifying power [1-6]. Power amplification occurs when an organism produces a relatively high power output by releasing slowly stored energy almost instantaneously, resulting in movements that surpass the maximal power output of muscles [7]. For example, trap-jaw, power-amplified mechanisms have been described for several ant genera [5, 8], which have evolved some of the fastest known movements in the animal kingdom [6]. However, power-amplified predatory strikes were not previously known in one of the largest animal classes, the arachnids. Mecysmaucheniidae spiders, which occur only in New Zealand and southern South America, are tiny, cryptic, ground-dwelling spiders that rely on hunting rather than web-building to capture prey [9]. Analysis of high-speed video revealed that power-amplified mechanisms occur in some mecysmaucheniid species, with the fastest species being two orders of magnitude faster than the slowest species. Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed that power-amplified cheliceral strikes have evolved four times independently within the family. Furthermore, we identified morphological innovations that directly relate to cheliceral function: a highly modified carapace in which the cheliceral muscles are oriented horizontally; modification of a cheliceral sclerite to have muscle attachments; and, in the power-amplified species, a thicker clypeus and clypeal apodemes. These structural innovations may have set the stage for the parallel evolution of ballistic predatory strikes. PMID:27068421

  17. Benefit-cost Trade-offs of Early Learning in Foraging Predatory Mites Amblyseius Swirskii.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Inga C; Szin, Sandra; Schausberger, Peter

    2016-03-23

    Learning is changed behavior following experience, and ubiquitous in animals including plant-inhabiting predatory mites (Phytoseiidae). Learning has many benefits but also incurs costs, which are only poorly understood. Here, we addressed learning, especially its costs, in the generalist predatory mite Amblyseius swirskii, a biocontrol agent of several herbivores, which can also survive on pollen. The goals of our research were (1) to scrutinize if A. swirskii is able to learn during early life in foraging contexts and, if so, (2) to determine the costs of early learning. In the experiments, we used one difficult-to-grasp prey, i.e., thrips, and one easy-to-grasp prey, i.e., spider mites. Our experiments show that A. swirskii is able to learn during early life. Adult predators attacked prey experienced early in life (i.e., matching prey) more quickly than they attacked unknown (i.e., non-matching) prey. Furthermore, we observed both fitness benefits and operating (physiological) costs of early learning. Predators receiving the matching prey produced the most eggs, whereas predators receiving the non-matching prey produced the least. Thrips-experienced predators needed the longest for juvenile development. Our findings may be used to enhance A. swirskii's efficacy in biological control, by priming young predators on a specific prey early in life.

  18. Repeated Evolution of Power-Amplified Predatory Strikes in Trap-Jaw Spiders.

    PubMed

    Wood, Hannah M; Parkinson, Dilworth Y; Griswold, Charles E; Gillespie, Rosemary G; Elias, Damian O

    2016-04-25

    Small animals possess intriguing morphological and behavioral traits that allow them to capture prey, including innovative structural mechanisms that produce ballistic movements by amplifying power [1-6]. Power amplification occurs when an organism produces a relatively high power output by releasing slowly stored energy almost instantaneously, resulting in movements that surpass the maximal power output of muscles [7]. For example, trap-jaw, power-amplified mechanisms have been described for several ant genera [5, 8], which have evolved some of the fastest known movements in the animal kingdom [6]. However, power-amplified predatory strikes were not previously known in one of the largest animal classes, the arachnids. Mecysmaucheniidae spiders, which occur only in New Zealand and southern South America, are tiny, cryptic, ground-dwelling spiders that rely on hunting rather than web-building to capture prey [9]. Analysis of high-speed video revealed that power-amplified mechanisms occur in some mecysmaucheniid species, with the fastest species being two orders of magnitude faster than the slowest species. Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed that power-amplified cheliceral strikes have evolved four times independently within the family. Furthermore, we identified morphological innovations that directly relate to cheliceral function: a highly modified carapace in which the cheliceral muscles are oriented horizontally; modification of a cheliceral sclerite to have muscle attachments; and, in the power-amplified species, a thicker clypeus and clypeal apodemes. These structural innovations may have set the stage for the parallel evolution of ballistic predatory strikes.

  19. Predatory violence aiming at relief in a case of mass murder: Meloy's criteria for applied forensic practice.

    PubMed

    Declercq, Frédéric; Audenaert, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Mass murder is the result of the complex interaction of several factors. What seems ubiquitous within mass murder are extreme feelings of anger and revenge. Yet despite these intense affective states, mass murders are, as a rule, not behaviorally impulsive, but rather prepared. The presence of extreme hate and anger evokes an impulsive outburst of rage, whereas planning and premeditation point in the direction of a cognitive, rather unemotional deed. This inconsistency is also reflected in reports of offenders' emotional states during the execution of their crimes: while some mass murderers have been described as calm, focused and emotionless during the events, others have shown signs of hostility, confusion, and distress. Considering mass murder from the perspective of its violence mode might shed some light on its nature and dynamics. With respect to the differentiation between affective and predatory violence, Meloy (1988) developed a model for applied forensic practice. The fully documented case of mass murder discussed in this study contains nine indices of predatory violence and one of affective violence. Furious affects of hate and anger were present but appeared to precede the cold-blooded killings. As a matter of fact, it is argued that the offender carried out the predatory murder in order to alleviate the psychological tension and symptoms generated by these severe ego-dystonic affects. The offender thus didn't seem to strive for narcissistic gratification of omnipotence, but rather seemed to aim to solve a problem.

  20. Predatory violence aiming at relief in a case of mass murder: Meloy's criteria for applied forensic practice.

    PubMed

    Declercq, Frédéric; Audenaert, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Mass murder is the result of the complex interaction of several factors. What seems ubiquitous within mass murder are extreme feelings of anger and revenge. Yet despite these intense affective states, mass murders are, as a rule, not behaviorally impulsive, but rather prepared. The presence of extreme hate and anger evokes an impulsive outburst of rage, whereas planning and premeditation point in the direction of a cognitive, rather unemotional deed. This inconsistency is also reflected in reports of offenders' emotional states during the execution of their crimes: while some mass murderers have been described as calm, focused and emotionless during the events, others have shown signs of hostility, confusion, and distress. Considering mass murder from the perspective of its violence mode might shed some light on its nature and dynamics. With respect to the differentiation between affective and predatory violence, Meloy (1988) developed a model for applied forensic practice. The fully documented case of mass murder discussed in this study contains nine indices of predatory violence and one of affective violence. Furious affects of hate and anger were present but appeared to precede the cold-blooded killings. As a matter of fact, it is argued that the offender carried out the predatory murder in order to alleviate the psychological tension and symptoms generated by these severe ego-dystonic affects. The offender thus didn't seem to strive for narcissistic gratification of omnipotence, but rather seemed to aim to solve a problem. PMID:21748789

  1. Olfactory response of predatory mites to vegetative and reproductive parts of coconut palm infested by Aceria guerreronis.

    PubMed

    Melo, José Wagner S; Lima, Debora B; Pallini, Angelo; Oliveira, José Eudes M; Gondim, Manoel G C

    2011-10-01

    The phytophagous mite Aceria guerreronis Keifer is an important pest of coconut worldwide. A promising method of control for this pest is the use of predatory mites. Neoseiulus baraki (Athias-Henriot) and Proctolaelaps bickleyi Bram are predatory mites found in association with A. guerreronis in the field. To understand how these predators respond to olfactory cues from A. guerreronis and its host plant, the foraging behavior of the predatory mites was investigated in a Y-tube olfactometer and on T-shaped arenas. The predators were subjected to choose in an olfactometer: (1) isolated parts (leaflet, spikelet or fruit) of infested coconut plant or clean air stream; (2) isolated parts of non-infested or infested coconut plant; and (3) two different plant parts previously shown to be attractive. Using T-shaped arenas the predators were offered all possible binary combinations of discs of coconut fruit epidermis infested with A. guerreronis, non-infested discs or coconut pollen. The results showed that both predators were preferred (the volatile cues from) the infested plant parts over clean air. When subjected to odours from different infested or non-infested plant parts, predators preferred the infested parts. Among the infested plant parts, the spikelets induced the greatest attraction to predators. On the arenas, both predators preferred discs of coconut fruits infested with A. guerreronis over every other alternative. The results show that both predators are able to locate A. guerreronis by olfactory stimuli. Foraging strategies and implications for biological control are discussed. PMID:21499777

  2. Differential effects of NK1 receptors in the midbrain periaqueductal gray upon defensive rage and predatory attack in the cat.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Thomas R; Siegel, Allan

    2003-12-19

    This study utilized anatomical and behavioral-pharmacological methods to determine the role of NK(1)-Substance P receptors in the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) in defensive rage behavior in cats. For behavioral pharmacological experiments, monopolar stimulating electrodes were implanted in the medial hypothalamus for elicitation of defensive rage behavior and cannula-electrodes were implanted in the PAG for microinjections of receptor compounds. Microinjections of the NMDA antagonist, AP-7 (2 nmol), into the dorsal PAG blocked defensive rage elicited by medial hypothalamic stimulation, thus establishing the PAG as a synaptic region that receives hypothalamic inputs linked to defensive rage behavior. Microinjections of the NK(1) agonist, GR73632, into the same injection sites facilitated defensive rage in a dose-dependent manner, and also induced spontaneous hissing in five cats. The effects of GR73632 were reduced by pretreatment of the PAG with the NK(1) antagonist, GR82334 (16 nmol), microinjected into the same sites. Microinjections of GR73632 (8 nmol) into the PAG also suppressed predatory attack elicited by stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus. Immunohistochemical methods utilized to detect Substance P and Fos immunoreactivity revealed that neurons in the PAG activated after defensive rage-inducing medial hypothalamic stimulation lie in the same region as Substance-P-immunoreactive processes. Fos immunoreactivity was highest in the dorsomedial aspect of the rostral PAG after medial hypothalamic stimulation. Cats that were unstimulated or that exhibited predatory attack after lateral hypothalamic stimulation had low c-fos expression levels in the PAG. Substance P immunoreactivity was high throughout the dorsal PAG. The results indicate that NK(1) receptors in the PAG potentiate defensive rage and suppress predatory aggression in the cat. PMID:14642448

  3. Extrafloral nectar content alters foraging preferences of a predatory ant.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Shawn M; Eubanks, Micky D

    2010-04-23

    We tested whether the carbohydrate and amino acid content of extrafloral nectar affected prey choice by a predatory ant. Fire ants, Solenopsis invicta, were provided with artificial nectar that varied in the presence of carbohydrates and amino acids and were then provided with two prey items that differed in nutritional content, female and male crickets. Colonies of fire ants provided with carbohydrate supplements consumed less of the female crickets and frequently did not consume the high-lipid ovaries of female crickets. Colonies of fire ants provided with amino acid supplements consumed less of the male crickets. While a number of studies have shown that the presence of extrafloral nectar or honeydew can affect ant foraging activity, these results suggest that the nutritional composition of extrafloral nectar is also important and can affect subsequent prey choice by predatory ants. Our results suggest that, by altering the composition of extrafloral nectar, plants could manipulate the prey preferences of ants foraging on them.

  4. Divergent responses of exposed and naive Pacific tree frog tadpoles to invasive predatory crayfish.

    PubMed

    Pease, Katherine M; Wayne, Robert K

    2014-01-01

    Invasive predators can devastate native species and ecosystems. However, native species may be able to coexist with invasive predators through a variety of mechanisms, such as changes in morphology or behavior due to a plastic response or selection on fixed anti-predator traits. We examined whether exposed and naive populations of Pacific tree frog tadpoles (Pseudacris regilla) display divergent morphological and behavioral traits in response to the invasive predatory red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii). Tadpoles were collected from three study streams with and three without crayfish, in the Santa Monica Mountains of Southern California. We analyzed tadpole morphology and tested anti-predator behavior and survival in the laboratory. Tadpoles from streams with crayfish had shallower, narrower tails than tadpoles from streams without crayfish. Tadpoles from streams with and without crayfish were less active after exposure to crayfish chemical cues. The divergent morphology of naive and exposed tadpoles is consistent with tadpoles exhibiting a plastic response to crayfish or undergoing selection from crayfish predation. In laboratory predation experiments, we found no difference in survival between tadpoles from streams with and without crayfish but tadpoles that survived predation had deeper tail muscles than those that were killed or injured. Our results suggest that deeper tails are advantageous in the presence of crayfish, yet tadpoles from crayfish streams had shallower tails than those from crayfish-free streams. Shallower tails may have an alternative unmeasured advantage or there may be a physiological constraint to developing deeper tails in the wild. These results highlight the ability of a native frog to respond to an invasive predatory crayfish, potentially allowing for coexistence.

  5. Declines in predatory fish promote bloom-forming macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Britas Klemens; Ljunggren, Lars; Sandström, Alfred; Johansson, Gustav; Mattila, Johanna; Rubach, Anja; Råberg, Sonja; Snickars, Martin

    2009-12-01

    In the Baltic Sea, increased dominance of ephemeral and bloom-forming algae is presently attributed to increased nutrient loads. Simultaneously, coastal predatory fish are in strong decline. Using field data from nine areas covering a 700-km coastline, we examined whether formation of macroalgal blooms could be linked to the composition of the fish community. We then tested whether predator or nutrient availability could explain the field patterns in two small-scale field experiments, by comparing joint effects on algal net production from nutrient enrichment with agricultural fertilizer and exclusion of larger predatory fish with cages. We also manipulated the presence of invertebrate grazers. The abundance of piscivorous fish had a strong negative correlation with the large-scale distribution of bloom-forming macroalgae. Areas with depleted top-predator communities displayed massive increases in their prey, small-bodied fish, and high covers of ephemeral algae. Combining the results from the two experiments showed that excluding larger piscivorous fish: (1) increased the abundance of small-bodied predatory fish; (2) changed the size distribution of the dominating grazers, decreasing the smaller gastropod scrapers; and (3) increased the net production of ephemeral macroalgae. Effects of removing top predators and nutrient enrichment were similar and additive, together increasing the abundance of ephemeral algae many times. Predator effects depended on invertebrate grazers; in the absence of invertebrates there were no significant effects of predator exclusion on algal production. Our results provide strong support for regional declines of larger predatory fish in the Baltic Sea promoting algal production by decreasing invertebrate grazer control. This highlights the importance of trophic interactions for ecosystem responses to eutrophication. The view emerges that to achieve management goals for water quality we need to consider the interplay between top-down and

  6. Curvature facilitates prey fixation in predatory insect claws.

    PubMed

    Petie, Ronald; Muller, Mees

    2007-02-21

    Insects show a large variety in prey capture strategies, with a correspondingly large diversity in predatory adaptations. We studied a specific type of predatory claws, these can for example be found in praying mantis species. The claw is closeable over its entire length and the prey is fixed between the femur (upper arm) and the tibia (lower arm) of the insect leg. The morphology of these predatory claws is diverse. Some species have straight claws covered with spines, while other species have smooth, curved claws. We have studied the mechanics of this femur-tibia type of predatory insect claws, by making a physical model, eventually trying to explain why in some insect species the claws are curved instead of straight. The main results are (1) when comparing curved claws to straight claws, curvature leads to a strong reduction of forces driving the prey away from the pivoting point, thereby reducing the need for friction generating structures. (2) In the curved claw model a position exists where the resulting force on the prey is exactly zero. This is because the normal forces on the femur and tibia are opposed, and in line. At this position the prey is perfectly clamped and not driven out of the claw. This feature does not exist in straight claws. (3) In the curved claw, the prey cannot be placed at a position further than a certain maximum distance from the pivoting point. Near this maximum position, the resulting force on the prey reaches high values because moment arms are near zero. (4) Between the zero position and the maximum position the resulting force is directed toward the pivoting point, which stabilizes prey fixation. PMID:17056069

  7. Predatory prokaryotes: predation and primary consumption evolved in bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerrero, R.; Pedros-Alio, C.; Esteve, I.; Mas, J.; Chase, D.; Margulis, L.

    1986-01-01

    Two kinds of predatory bacteria have been observed and characterized by light and electron microscopy in samples from freshwater sulfurous lakes in northeastern Spain. The first bacterium, named Vampirococcus, is Gram-negative and ovoidal (0.6 micrometer wide). An anaerobic epibiont, it adheres to the surface of phototrophic bacteria (Chromatium spp.) by specific attachment structures and, as it grows and divides by fission, destroys its prey. An important in situ predatory role can be inferred for Vampirococcus from direct counts in natural samples. The second bacterium, named Daptobacter, is a Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic straight rod (0.5 x 1.5 micrometers) with a single polar flagellum, which collides, penetrates, and grows inside the cytoplasm of its prey (several genera of Chromatiaceae). Considering also the well-known case of Bdellovibrio, a Gram-negative, aerobic curved rod that penetrates and divides in the periplasmic space of many chemotrophic Gram-negative bacteria, there are three types of predatory prokaryotes presently known (epibiotic, cytoplasmic, and periplasmic). Thus, we conclude that antagonistic relationships such as primary consumption, predation, and scavenging had already evolved in microbial ecosystems prior to the appearance of eukaryotes. Furthermore, because they represent methods by which prokaryotes can penetrate other prokaryotes in the absence of phagocytosis, these associations can be considered preadaptation for the origin of intracellular organelles.

  8. Extinction, survival or recovery of large predatory fishes

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Ransom A.; Worm, Boris

    2005-01-01

    Large predatory fishes have long played an important role in marine ecosystems and fisheries. Overexploitation, however, is gradually diminishing this role. Recent estimates indicate that exploitation has depleted large predatory fish communities worldwide by at least 90% over the past 50–100 years. We demonstrate that these declines are general, independent of methodology, and even higher for sensitive species such as sharks. We also attempt to predict the future prospects of large predatory fishes. (i) An analysis of maximum reproductive rates predicts the collapse and extinction of sensitive species under current levels of fishing mortality. Sensitive species occur in marine habitats worldwide and have to be considered in most management situations. (ii) We show that to ensure the survival of sensitive species in the northwest Atlantic fishing mortality has to be reduced by 40–80%. (iii) We show that rapid recovery of community biomass and diversity usually occurs when fishing mortality is reduced. However, recovery is more variable for single species, often because of the influence of species interactions. We conclude that management of multi-species fisheries needs to be tailored to the most sensitive, rather than the more robust species. This requires reductions in fishing effort, reduction in bycatch mortality and protection of key areas to initiate recovery of severely depleted communities. PMID:15713586

  9. Predatory prokaryotes: Predation and primary consumption evolved in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Ricardo; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos; Esteve, Isabel; Mas, Jordi; Chase, David; Margulis, Lynn

    1986-01-01

    Two kinds of predatory bacteria have been observed and characterized by light and electron microscopy in samples from freshwater sulfurous lakes in northeastern Spain. The first bacterium, named Vampirococcus, is Gram-negative and ovoidal (0.6 μm wide). An anaerobic epibiont, it adheres to the surface of phototrophic bacteria (Chromatium spp.) by specific attachment structures and, as it grows and divides by fission, destroys its prey. An important in situ predatory role can be inferred for Vampirococcus from direct counts in natural samples. The second bacterium, named Daptobacter, is a Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic straight rod (0.5 × 1.5 μm) with a single polar flagellum, which collides, penetrates, and grows inside the cytoplasm of its prey (several genera of Chromatiaceae). Considering also the well-known case of Bdellovibrio, a Gram-negative, aerobic curved rod that penetrates and divides in the periplasmic space of many chemotrophic Gram-negative bacteria, there are three types of predatory prokaryotes presently known (epibiotic, cytoplasmic, and periplasmic). Thus, we conclude that antagonistic relationships such as primary consumption, predation, and scavenging had already evolved in microbial ecosystems prior to the appearance of eukaryotes. Furthermore, because they represent methods by which prokaryotes can penetrate other prokaryotes in the absence of phagocytosis, these associations can be considered preadaptations for the origin of intracellular organelles. Images PMID:11542073

  10. Extinction, survival or recovery of large predatory fishes.

    PubMed

    Myers, Ransom A; Worm, Boris

    2005-01-29

    Large predatory fishes have long played an important role in marine ecosystems and fisheries. Overexploitation, however, is gradually diminishing this role. Recent estimates indicate that exploitation has depleted large predatory fish communities worldwide by at least 90% over the past 50-100 years. We demonstrate that these declines are general, independent of methodology, and even higher for sensitive species such as sharks. We also attempt to predict the future prospects of large predatory fishes. (i) An analysis of maximum reproductive rates predicts the collapse and extinction of sensitive species under current levels of fishing mortality. Sensitive species occur in marine habitats worldwide and have to be considered in most management situations. (ii) We show that to ensure the survival of sensitive species in the northwest Atlantic fishing mortality has to be reduced by 40-80%. (iii) We show that rapid recovery of community biomass and diversity usually occurs when fishing mortality is reduced. However, recovery is more variable for single species, often because of the influence of species interactions. We conclude that management of multi-species fisheries needs to be tailored to the most sensitive, rather than the more robust species. This requires reductions in fishing effort, reduction in bycatch mortality and protection of key areas to initiate recovery of severely depleted communities.

  11. Acoustical mimicry in a predatory social parasite of ants.

    PubMed

    Barbero, F; Bonelli, S; Thomas, J A; Balletto, E; Schönrogge, K

    2009-12-01

    Rapid, effective communication between colony members is a key attribute that enables ants to live in dominant, fiercely protected societies. Their signals, however, may be mimicked by other insects that coexist as commensals with ants or interact with them as mutualists or social parasites. We consider the role of acoustics in ant communication and its exploitation by social parasites. Social parasitism has been studied mainly in the butterfly genus Maculinea, the final instar larvae of which are host-specific parasites of Myrmica ants, preying either on ant grubs (predatory Maculinea) or being fed by trophallaxis (cuckoo Maculinea). We found similar significant differences between the stridulations of model queen and worker ant castes in both Myrmica sabuleti and Myrmica scabrinodis to that previously reported for Myrmica schencki. However, the sounds made by queens of all three Myrmica species were indistinguishable, and among workers, stridulations did not differ significantly in two of three species-pairs tested. Sounds recorded from the predatory caterpillars and pupae of Maculinea arion had similar or closer patterns to the acoustics of their host Myrmica sabuleti than those previously reported for the cuckoo Maculinea rebeli and its host Myrmica schencki, even though Maculinea rebeli caterpillars live more intimately with their host. We conclude that chemical mimicry enables Maculinea larvae to be accepted as colony members by worker ants, but that caterpillars and pupae of both predatory and cuckoo butterflies employ acoustical mimicry of queen ant calls to elevate their status towards the highest attainable position within their host's social hierarchy. PMID:19946088

  12. Altered visual experience and acute visual deprivation affect predatory targeting by infrared-imaging Boid snakes.

    PubMed

    Grace, M S; Woodward, O M

    2001-11-23

    Boid and Crotaline snakes use both their eyes and infrared-imaging facial pit organs to target homeothermic prey. These snakes can target in complete darkness, but the eyes can also effectively direct predatory strikes. We investigated the behavioral correlates of boid snakes' simultaneous use of two imaging systems by testing whether congenital unilateral visual deprivation affects targeting performance. Normally sighted Burmese pythons exhibited average targeting angle of zero (on the midline axis of the head), but three unilaterally anophthalmic Burmese pythons targeted preferentially on the sighted side. A unilaterally anophthalmic amethystine python also targeted on the sighted side, and a unilaterally anophthalmic Brazilian rainbow boa tended to target on the sighted side, though its mean targeting angle was not significantly different from zero. When unilaterally anophthalmic Burmese pythons were temporarily blinded, mean strike angle changed to that of normally sighted snakes. These results show that while infrared-imaging snakes can shift between visual and infrared information under acute experimental conditions, loss of part of the visual field during development results in abnormal predatory targeting behavior. In contrast, normally sighted snakes subjected to temporary unilateral blinding do not target preferentially on the sighted side. Therefore, while loss of part of the visual field may be compensated for by infrared input in normal snakes, partial absence of visual input during development may alter central organization of visual information. Conversely, absence of half the visual field during development does not alter targeting performance based upon infrared input alone, suggesting that organization of the central infrared map does not depend upon normal organization of visual input.

  13. Purification and Host Specificity of Predatory Halobacteriovorax Isolates from Seawater

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Johnna P.; Uknalis, Joseph; Olanya, O. Modesto; Watson, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Halobacteriovorax (formerly Bacteriovorax) is a small predatory bacterium found in the marine environment and modulates bacterial pathogens in shellfish. Four strains of Halobacteriovorax originally isolated in Vibrio parahaemolyticus O3:K6 host cells were separated from their prey by an enrichment-filtration-dilution technique for specificity testing in other bacteria. This technique was essential, since 0.45-μm filtration alone was unable to remove infectious Vibrio minicells, as determined by scanning electron microscopy and cultural methods. Purified Halobacteriovorax strains were screened for predation against other V. parahaemolyticus strains and against Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio alginolyticus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104, all potential threats to seafood safety. They showed high host specificity and were predatory only against strains of V. parahaemolyticus. In addition, strains of Halobacteriovorax that were predatory for E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium DT104 were isolated from a tidal river at 5 ppt salinity. In a modified plaque assay agar, they killed their respective prey over a broad range of salinities (5 to 30 ppt). Plaques became smaller as the salinity levels rose, suggesting that the lower salinities were optimal for the predators' replication. These species also showed broader host specificity, infectious against each other's original hosts as well as against V. parahaemolyticus strains. In summary, this study characterized strains of Halobacteriovorax which may be considered for use in the development of broad-based biocontrol technologies to enhance the safety of commercially marketed shellfish and other foods. PMID:26590288

  14. Predatory Odor Disrupts Social Novelty Preference in Long-Evans Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Matthew J.; Layton, William B.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of predatory odor (cat urine) on social novelty preference in Long-Evans rats. Adult male subjects encountered a juvenile conspecific at training, were exposed to either clean cat litter (control) or litter soiled with cat urine (predatory odor), and were tested for social novelty preference. While the…

  15. Body condition predicts energy stores in apex predatory sharks

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Austin J.; Wagner, Dominique N.; Irschick, Duncan J.; Hammerschlag, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Animal condition typically reflects the accumulation of energy stores (e.g. fatty acids), which can influence an individual's decision to undertake challenging life-history events, such as migration and reproduction. Accordingly, researchers often use measures of animal body size and/or weight as an index of condition. However, values of condition, such as fatty acid levels, may not always reflect the physiological state of animals accurately. While the relationships between condition indices and energy stores have been explored in some species (e.g. birds), they have yet to be examined in top predatory fishes, which often undertake extensive and energetically expensive migrations. We used an apex predatory shark (Galeocerdo cuvier, the tiger shark) as a model species to evaluate the relationship between triglycerides (energy metabolite) and a metric of overall body condition. We captured, blood sampled, measured and released 28 sharks (size range 125–303 cm pre-caudal length). In the laboratory, we assayed each plasma sample for triglyceride values. We detected a positive and significant relationship between condition and triglyceride values (P < 0.02). This result may have conservation implications if the largest and highest-condition sharks are exploited in fisheries, because these individuals are likely to have the highest potential for successful reproduction. Our results suggest that researchers may use either plasma triglyceride values or an appropriate measure of body condition for assessing health in large sharks. PMID:27293643

  16. Loss of large predatory sharks from the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Francesco; Myers, Ransom A; Serena, Fabrizio; Lotze, Heike K

    2008-08-01

    Evidence for severe declines in large predatory fishes is increasing around the world. Because of its long history of intense fishing, the Mediterranean Sea offers a unique perspective on fish population declines over historical timescales. We used a diverse set of records dating back to the early 19th and mid 20th century to reconstruct long-term population trends of large predatory sharks in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. We compiled 9 time series of abundance indices from commercial and recreational fishery landings, scientific surveys, and sighting records. Generalized linear models were used to extract instantaneous rates of change from each data set, and a meta-analysis was conducted to compare population trends. Only 5 of the 20 species we considered had sufficient records for analysis. Hammerhead (Sphyrna spp.), blue (Prionace glauca), mackerel (Isurus oxyrinchus and Lamna nasus), and thresher sharks (Alopias vulpinus) declined between 96 and 99.99% relative to their former abundance. According to World Conservation Union (IUCN) criteria, these species would be considered critically endangered. So far, the lack of quantitative population assessments has impeded shark conservation in the Mediterranean Sea. Our study fills this critical information gap, suggesting that current levels of exploitation put large sharks at risk of extinction in the Mediterranean Sea. Possible ecosystem effects of these losses involve a disruption of top-down control and a release of midlevel consumers.

  17. By their genes ye shall know them: genomic signatures of predatory bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Zohar; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Rotem, Or; Gophna, Uri; Lurie-Weinberger, Mor N; Jurkevitch, Edouard

    2013-01-01

    Predatory bacteria are taxonomically disparate, exhibit diverse predatory strategies and are widely distributed in varied environments. To date, their predatory phenotypes cannot be discerned in genome sequence data thereby limiting our understanding of bacterial predation, and of its impact in nature. Here, we define the ‘predatome,' that is, sets of protein families that reflect the phenotypes of predatory bacteria. The proteomes of all sequenced 11 predatory bacteria, including two de novo sequenced genomes, and 19 non-predatory bacteria from across the phylogenetic and ecological landscapes were compared. Protein families discriminating between the two groups were identified and quantified, demonstrating that differences in the proteomes of predatory and non-predatory bacteria are large and significant. This analysis allows predictions to be made, as we show by confirming from genome data an over-looked bacterial predator. The predatome exhibits deficiencies in riboflavin and amino acids biosynthesis, suggesting that predators obtain them from their prey. In contrast, these genomes are highly enriched in adhesins, proteases and particular metabolic proteins, used for binding to, processing and consuming prey, respectively. Strikingly, predators and non-predators differ in isoprenoid biosynthesis: predators use the mevalonate pathway, whereas non-predators, like almost all bacteria, use the DOXP pathway. By defining predatory signatures in bacterial genomes, the predatory potential they encode can be uncovered, filling an essential gap for measuring bacterial predation in nature. Moreover, we suggest that full-genome proteomic comparisons are applicable to other ecological interactions between microbes, and provide a convenient and rational tool for the functional classification of bacteria. PMID:23190728

  18. Susceptibility of Select Agents to Predation by Predatory Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Riccardo; Chae, Richard; Mukherjee, Somdatta; Singleton, Eric J.; Occi, James L.; Kadouri, Daniel E.; Connell, Nancy D.

    2015-01-01

    Select Agents are microorganisms and toxins considered to be exploitable as biological weapons. Although infections by many Select Agents can be treated by conventional antibiotics, the risk of an emerging or engineered drug resistant strain is of great concern. One group of microorganisms that is showing potential to control drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria are the predatory bacteria from the genera Bdellovibrio spp. and Micavibrio spp. In this study, we have examined the ability of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus (B. bacteriovorus) strain 109J, HD100 and Micavibrio aeruginosavorus (M. aeruginosavorus) ARL-13 to prey on a variety of Select Agents. Our findings demonstrate that B. bacteriovorus and M. aeruginosavorus are able to prey efficiently on Yersinia pestis and Burkholderia mallei. Modest predation was also measured in co-cultures of B. bacteriovorus and Francisella tularensis. However, neither of the predators showed predation when Burkholderia pseudomallei and Brucella melitensis were used as prey.

  19. Optimal foraging for specific nutrients in predatory beetles

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kim; Mayntz, David; Toft, Søren; Clissold, Fiona J.; Hunt, John; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that animals should forage to maximize their fitness, which in predators is traditionally assumed equivalent to maximizing energy intake rather than balancing the intake of specific nutrients. We restricted female predatory ground beetles (Anchomenus dorsalis) to one of a range of diets varying in lipid and protein content, and showed that total egg production peaked at a target intake of both nutrients. Other beetles given a choice to feed from two diets differing only in protein and lipid composition selectively ingested nutrient combinations at this target intake. When restricted to nutritionally imbalanced diets, beetles balanced the over- and under-ingestion of lipid and protein around a nutrient composition that maximized egg production under those constrained circumstances. Selective foraging for specific nutrients in this predator thus maximizes its reproductive performance. Our findings have implications for predator foraging behaviour and in the structuring of ecological communities. PMID:22237910

  20. Susceptibility of Select Agents to Predation by Predatory Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Riccardo; Chae, Richard; Mukherjee, Somdatta; Singleton, Eric J.; Occi, James L.; Kadouri, Daniel E.; Connell, Nancy D.

    2015-01-01

    Select Agents are microorganisms and toxins considered to be exploitable as biological weapons. Although infections by many Select Agents can be treated by conventional antibiotics, the risk of an emerging or engineered drug resistant strain is of great concern. One group of microorganisms that is showing potential to control drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria are the predatory bacteria from the genera Bdellovibrio spp. and Micavibrio spp. In this study, we have examined the ability of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus (B. bacteriovorus) strain 109J, HD100 and Micavibrio aeruginosavorus (M. aeruginosavorus) ARL-13 to prey on a variety of Select Agents. Our findings demonstrate that B. bacteriovorus and M. aeruginosavorus are able to prey efficiently on Yersinia pestis and Burkholderia mallei. Modest predation was also measured in co-cultures of B. bacteriovorus and Francisella tularensis. However, neither of the predators showed predation when Burkholderia pseudomallei and Brucella melitensis were used as prey. PMID:27682124

  1. Cutting costs in response to predatory threat by Geoffroy's marmosets (Callithrix geoffroyi).

    PubMed

    Caine, N G

    1998-01-01

    Ideally, prey should respond to their predators efficiently, without over- or underreacting to the threat. This may be particularly important for small-bodied species for whom metabolic demands are high and predatory risk is great. In the current study, two family groups of Callithrix geoffroyi living outside in a rural setting at the Center for Reproduction of Endangered Species, San Diego Wild Animal Park, were observed before, during, and after ten presentations of a great horned owl model. The owl was mounted on a post on a nearby hillside, simulating a situation in which a real but nonimminent threat is posed. As controls, a model of a crow and a cloth bag were also presented, each for ten trials. During the 10 min presentations of the owl, rates of play and foraging decreased, and rates of locomotion and vigilant looking increased from baseline rates. Data on occupation of the best viewing area suggest that the marmosets shared the job of monitoring a potential threat. After the owl was removed, behavior quickly returned to baseline rates, with the exception of looking at the place where the owl had been, and play. Neither the bag nor the crow generated significant differences from the baseline condition that preceded it. Marmosets may reduce the costs of antipredator behavior by appropriately assessing the degree of risk and by quickly resuming important activities once a potential threat has passed. PMID:9802510

  2. Evidence for predatory control of the invasive round goby

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, C.P.; Stapanian, M.A.; Witzel, L.D.; Einhouse, D.W.; Pothoven, S.A.; Whitford, H.L.

    2011-01-01

    We coupled bioenergetics modeling with bottom trawl survey results to evaluate the capacity of piscivorous fish in eastern Lake Erie to exert predatory control of the invading population of round goby Neogobius melanostomus. In the offshore (>20 m deep) waters of eastern Lake Erie, burbot Lota lota is a native top predator, feeding on a suite of prey fishes. The round goby invaded eastern Lake Erie during the late 1990s, and round goby population size increased dramatically during 1999–2004. According to annual bottom trawl survey results, round goby abundance in offshore waters peaked in 2004, but then declined during 2004–2008. Coincidentally, round goby became an important component of burbot diet beginning in 2003. Using bottom trawling and gill netting, we estimated adult burbot abundance and age structure in eastern Lake Erie during 2007. Diet composition and energy density of eastern Lake Erie burbot were also determined during 2007. This information, along with estimates of burbot growth, burbot mortality, burbot water temperature regime, and energy densities of prey fish from the literature, were incorporated into a bioenergetics model application to estimate annual consumption of round goby by the adult burbot population. Results indicated that the adult burbot population in eastern Lake Erie annually consumed 1,361 metric tons of round goby. Based on the results of bottom trawling, we estimated the biomass of yearling and older round goby in offshore waters eastern Lake Erie during 2007–2008 to be 2,232 metric tons. Thus, the adult burbot population was feeding on round goby at an annual rate equal to 61% of the estimated round goby standing stock. We concluded that the burbot population had high potential to exert predatory control on round goby in offshore waters of eastern Lake Erie.

  3. Impaired memory following predatory stress in mice is improved by fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    El Hage, Wissam; Peronny, Sylvie; Griebel, Guy; Belzung, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    The first purpose of the present study was to investigate possible effects of predatory stress (i.e., 5-min cat exposure) on short-term learning abilities in Swiss mice using the object recognition test (ORT). The second aim was to evaluate the effects of anxiolytics (i.e., diazepam and fluoxetine) on learning/memory abilities in the ORT following predatory stress. Results showed that predatory exposure impaired learning and produced amnesia of acquired information or impairment to retrieve learned information (48 and 96 h poststressor). The learning impairment in the ORT in stressed mice was restored by acute fluoxetine treatment, but not by diazepam that instead affected learning in nonstressed animals. Taken together, these findings indicate that this animal model of exposure of mice to unavoidable predatory stimuli produces early cognitive changes analogous to those seen in patients with acute stress disorder (ASD). PMID:14687866

  4. Selective prey avoidance learning in the predatory sea slug Pleurobranchaea californica.

    PubMed

    Noboa, Vanessa; Gillette, Rhanor

    2013-09-01

    Predator-prey interactions involving aposematic signaling, where predators learn the warning cues of well-defended prey, are clear examples of cost-benefit decisions in foraging animals. However, knowledge of the selectivity of predator learning and the natural conditions where it occurs is lacking for those foragers simpler in brain and body plan. We pursued the question in the sea slug Pleurobranchaea californica, a generalist forager of marked simplicity of body form, nervous system and behavior. This predator exploits many different types of prey, some of which are costly to attack. When offered Flabellina iodinea, an aeolid nudibranch with a stinging defense, biting attack was followed by rapid rejection and aversive turns. The predatory sea slug rapidly learned avoidance. Notable exceptions were animals with extremely high or low feeding thresholds that either ignored F. iodinea or completely consumed it, respectively. Experienced slugs showed strong avoidance of F. iodinea for days after exposure. Aposematic odor learning was selective: avoidance was not linked to change in feeding thresholds, and trained animals readily attacked and consumed a related aeolid, Hermissenda crassicornis. For P. californica, aposematic learning is a cognitive adaptation in which sensation, motivation and memory are integrated to direct cost-benefit choice, and thereby lend flexibility to the generalist's foraging strategy. PMID:23661778

  5. Habitat changes and changing predatory habits in North American fossil canids.

    PubMed

    Figueirido, B; Martín-Serra, A; Tseng, Z J; Janis, C M

    2015-01-01

    The spread of open grassy habitats and the evolution of long-legged herbivorous mammals with high-crowned cheek teeth have been viewed as an example of coevolution. Previous studies indicate that specialized predatory techniques in carnivores do not correlate with the spread of open habitats in North America. Here we analyse new data on elbow-joint shape for North American canids over the past ∼37 million years and show that incipiently specialized species first appeared along with the initial spread of open habitats in the late Oligocene. Elbow-joint morphologies indicative of the behavior of modern pounce-pursuit predators emerged by the late Miocene coincident with a shift in plant communities from C3 to C4 grasses. Finally, pursuit canids first emerged during the Pleistocene. Our results indicate that climate change and its impact on vegetation and habitat structure can be critical for the emergence of ecological innovations and can alter the direction of lineage evolution. PMID:26285033

  6. Mucus trail tracking in a predatory snail: olfactory processing retooled to serve a novel sensory modality

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kinjal; Shaheen, Nagma; Witherspoon, Jessica; Robinson, Natallia; Harrington, Melissa A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The rosy wolfsnail (Euglandina rosea), a predatory land snail, finds prey snails and potential mates by following their mucus trails. Euglandina have evolved unique, mobile lip extensions that detect mucus and aid in following trails. Currently, little is known of the neural substrates of the trail-following behavior. Methods To investigate the neural correlates of trail following we used tract-tracing experiments in which nerves were backfilled with either nickel-lysine or Lucifer yellow, extracellular recording of spiking neurons in snail procerebra using a multielectrode array, and behavioral assays of trail following and movement toward the source of a conditioned odor. Results The tract-tracing experiments demonstrate that in Euglandina, the nerves carrying mucus signals innervate the same region of the central ganglia as the olfactory nerves, while the electrophysiology studies show that mucus stimulation of the sensory epithelium on the lip extensions alters the frequency and pattern of neural activity in the procerebrum in a manner similar to odor stimulation of the olfactory epithelium on the optic tentacles of another land snail species, Cantareus aspersa (previously known as Helix aspersa). While Euglandina learn to follow trails of novel chemicals that they contact with their lip extensions in one to three trials, these snails proved remarkably resistant to associative learning in the olfactory modality. Even after seven to nine pairings of odorant molecules with food, they showed no orientation toward the conditioned odor. This is in marked contrast to Cantareus snails, which reliably oriented toward conditioned odors after two to three trials. Conclusions The apparent inability of Euglandina to learn to associate food with odors and use odor cues to drive behavior suggests that the capability for sophisticated neural processing of nonvolatile mucus cues detected by the lip extensions has evolved at the expense of processing of odorant

  7. The ubiquity of intraguild predation among predatory arthropods.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Annie-Ève; Heimpel, George E; Brodeur, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Intraguild predation (IGP) occurs when one predator species attacks another predator species with which it competes for a shared prey species. Despite the apparent omnipresence of intraguild interactions in natural and managed ecosystems, very few studies have quantified rates of IGP in various taxa under field conditions. We used molecular analyses of gut contents to assess the nature and incidence of IGP among four species of coccinellid predators in soybean fields. Over half of the 368 predator individuals collected in soybean contained the DNA of other coccinellid species indicating that IGP was very common at our field site. Furthermore, 13.2% of the sampled individuals contained two and even three other coccinellid species in their gut. The interaction was reciprocal, as each of the four coccinellid species has the capacity to feed on the others. To our knowledge, this study represents the most convincing field evidence of a high prevalence of IGP among predatory arthropods. The finding has important implications for conservation biology and biological control.

  8. Prey-Induced Swimming Dynamics Changes among Predatory Algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J.; Sheng, J.; Malkiel, E.; Adolf, J.; Place, A.; Belas, R.

    2007-11-01

    High speed, cinematic digital holographic microscopy allows us to track thousands of microorganisms over a volume with substantial depth without loss of resolution. This technique enables us, for the first time, to examine, measure and characterize the swimming dynamics of microorganisms located within dense suspensions. The present experiments examine dense populations of predatory algae, K. veneficum and P. piscicida, prior to and after introducing prey. Swimming dynamics are characterized by radius and pitch of helical swimming trajectories, by translational and angular velocity, and their velocity spectra. K. veneficum moves in both left and right hand helices, while P. piscicida swims only in right hand helices. The radii increase with increasing velocity for both cases. Presented with its prey, K. veneficum reduces its velocity, radius and pitch, but increases its angular velocity. Conversely, P. piscicida increases its speed, radius and angular velocity. Power spectra of velocity reveal differences between scales of vertical velocity and those of horizontal components. Power spectra of velocity component aligned with the helix centerline reveals a shift in K. veneficum's swimming strategy from almost random-walk to a levy-walk as prey is introduced. P. piscicida always displays clear preference towards levy-walk, but spectral slope increases as prey is introduced.

  9. Plant cell piercing by a predatory mite: evidence and implications.

    PubMed

    Adar, E; Inbar, M; Gal, S; Issman, L; Palevsky, E

    2015-02-01

    Omnivorous arthropods can play an important role as beneficial natural enemies because they can sustain their populations on plants when prey is scarce, thereby providing prophylactic protection against an array of herbivores. Although some omnivorous mite species of the family Phytoseiidae consume plant cell-sap, the feeding mechanism and its influence on the plant are not known. Using scanning electron microscopy we demonstrated that the omnivorous predatory mite Euseius scutalis penetrates epidermal cells of pepper foliage and wax membranes. Penetration holes were teardrop shape to oval, of 2-5 µm diameter. The similarities between penetration holes in pollen grains and in epidermal cells implied that the same penetration mechanism is used for pollen feeding and plant cell-sap uptake. Variation in shape and size of penetration holes in leaves and a wax membrane were attributed to different mite life stages, depth of penetration or the number of chelicerae puncturing (one or both). Punctured stomata, epidermal and vein cells appeared flat and lacking turgor. When the mite penetrated and damaged a single cell, neighboring cells were most often intact. In a growth chamber experiment very large numbers of E. scutalis negatively affected the growth of young pepper plants. Consequently caution should be taken when applying cell-piercing predators to young plants. Further studies are needed to take advantage of the potential sustainability of plant cell-sap feeding predators.

  10. The Impact of Coffee and Pasture Agriculture on Predatory and Omnivorous Leaf-Litter Ants

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Nivia da Silva; Zanetti, Ronald; Santos, Mônica Silva; Peñaflor, Maria Fernanda Gomes Villalba; Broglio, Sônia Maria Forti; Delabie, Jacques Hubert Charles

    2013-01-01

    Ants are known to function as reliable biological indicators for habitat impact assessment. They play a wide range of ecological roles depending on their feeding and nesting habits. By clustering ants in guilds, it is possible both to assess how agriculture and forest fragmentation can disturb ant communities and to predict the ecological impacts due to losses of a specific guild. This study aimed at determining the impact of non-shaded coffee and pasture agriculture on predatory and omnivorous guilds of leaf-litter ants of Atlantic Forest fragments in Minas Gerais, Brazil. Both coffee and pasture agriculture influenced leaf-litter ant community, although coffee was more disruptive than pasture. Coffee agriculture not only disturbed the diversity of predatory ants, but also negatively affected the number of predatory and omnivorous ants when compared to forest fragments. In contrast, pasture agriculture only disrupted the abundance of predatory ants. Fragment edges skirting crops were negatively affected in terms of leaf-litter ant abundance, but not diversity. Cluster analysis showed that forest fragments were similar irrespective of the cultivation, but the borders were similar to the crop. The study assessed agriculture impact by surveying ant guilds, and revealed that the predatory guild is more susceptible than omnivorous ants. PMID:23902334

  11. Predatory feeding behaviour in Pristionchus nematodes is dependent on phenotypic plasticity and induced by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Wilecki, Martin; Lightfoot, James W; Susoy, Vladislav; Sommer, Ralf J

    2015-05-01

    Behavioural innovation and morphological adaptation are intrinsically linked but their relationship is often poorly understood. In nematodes, a huge diversity of feeding morphologies and behaviours can be observed to meet their distinctive dietary and environmental demands. Pristionchus and their relatives show varied feeding activities, both consuming bacteria and also predating other nematodes. In addition, Pristionchus nematodes display dimorphic mouth structures triggered by an irreversible developmental switch, which generates a narrower mouthed form with a single tooth and a wider mouthed form with an additional tooth. However, little is known about the specific predatory adaptations of these mouth forms or the associated mechanisms and behaviours. Through a mechanistic analysis of predation behaviours, in particular in the model organism Pristionchus pacificus, we reveal multifaceted feeding modes characterised by dynamic rhythmic switching and tooth stimulation. This complex feeding mode switch is regulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin in a previously uncharacterised role, a process that appears conserved across several predatory nematode species. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of starvation, prey size and prey preference on P. pacificus predatory feeding kinetics, revealing predation to be a fundamental component of the P. pacificus feeding repertoire, thus providing an additional rich source of nutrition in addition to bacteria. Finally, we found that mouth form morphology also has a striking impact on predation, suppressing predatory behaviour in the narrow mouthed form. Our results therefore hint at the regulatory networks involved in controlling predatory feeding and underscore P. pacificus as a model for understanding the evolution of complex behaviours.

  12. Neural mechanisms of predatory aggression in rats-implications for abnormal intraspecific aggression.

    PubMed

    Tulogdi, Aron; Biro, Laszlo; Barsvari, Beata; Stankovic, Mona; Haller, Jozsef; Toth, Mate

    2015-04-15

    Our recent studies showed that brain areas that are activated in a model of escalated aggression overlap with those that promote predatory aggression in cats. This finding raised the interesting possibility that the brain mechanisms that control certain types of abnormal aggression include those involved in predation. However, the mechanisms of predatory aggression are poorly known in rats, a species that is in many respects different from cats. To get more insights into such mechanisms, here we studied the brain activation patterns associated with spontaneous muricide in rats. Subjects not exposed to mice, and those which did not show muricide were used as controls. We found that muricide increased the activation of the central and basolateral amygdala, and lateral hypothalamus as compared to both controls; in addition, a ventral shift in periaqueductal gray activation was observed. Interestingly, these are the brain regions from where predatory aggression can be elicited, or enhanced by electrical stimulation in cats. The analysis of more than 10 other brain regions showed that brain areas that inhibited (or were neutral to) cat predatory aggression were not affected by muricide. Brain activation patterns partly overlapped with those seen earlier in the cockroach hunting model of rat predatory aggression, and were highly similar with those observed in the glucocorticoid dysfunction model of escalated aggression. These findings show that the brain mechanisms underlying predation are evolutionarily conservative, and indirectly support our earlier assumption regarding the involvement of predation-related brain mechanisms in certain forms of escalated social aggression in rats.

  13. Role of supplemental foods and habitat structural complexity in persistence and coexistence of generalist predatory mites.

    PubMed

    Pozzebon, Alberto; Loeb, Gregory M; Duso, Carlo

    2015-10-09

    Plant traits can influence the interactions between herbivore arthropods and their natural enemies. In these interactions generalist predators are often present, preying on herbivores and also on other arthropods in the same trophic guild. Variation in the strength of intraguild predation (IGP) may be related to habitat structural complexity and to additional resources outside the narrow predator-prey relationship. In this paper we study the food web interactions on grape, which involves two generalist predatory mites. We evaluated the effects of grape powdery mildew (GPM) as supplemental food, and habitat structural complexity provided by domatia. The inoculation of GPM resulted in higher predatory mite densities and reduced the negative impact of unfavorable leaf structure for one species. Access to domatia was the main factor in promoting population abundance and persistence of predatory mites. Access to domatia and GPM availability favored the coexistence of predatory mites at a low density of the intraguild prey. Our findings suggest that structural and nutritional diversity/complexity promote predatory mite abundance and can help to maintain the beneficial mites - plants association. The effect of these factors on coexistence between predators is influenced by the supplemental food quality and relative differences in body size of interacting species.

  14. Role of supplemental foods and habitat structural complexity in persistence and coexistence of generalist predatory mites

    PubMed Central

    Pozzebon, Alberto; Loeb, Gregory M.; Duso, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Plant traits can influence the interactions between herbivore arthropods and their natural enemies. In these interactions generalist predators are often present, preying on herbivores and also on other arthropods in the same trophic guild. Variation in the strength of intraguild predation (IGP) may be related to habitat structural complexity and to additional resources outside the narrow predator-prey relationship. In this paper we study the food web interactions on grape, which involves two generalist predatory mites. We evaluated the effects of grape powdery mildew (GPM) as supplemental food, and habitat structural complexity provided by domatia. The inoculation of GPM resulted in higher predatory mite densities and reduced the negative impact of unfavorable leaf structure for one species. Access to domatia was the main factor in promoting population abundance and persistence of predatory mites. Access to domatia and GPM availability favored the coexistence of predatory mites at a low density of the intraguild prey. Our findings suggest that structural and nutritional diversity/complexity promote predatory mite abundance and can help to maintain the beneficial mites - plants association. The effect of these factors on coexistence between predators is influenced by the supplemental food quality and relative differences in body size of interacting species. PMID:26450810

  15. The impact of coffee and pasture agriculture on predatory and omnivorous leaf-litter ants.

    PubMed

    Dias, Nivia da Silva; Zanetti, Ronald; Santos, Mônica Silva; Peñaflor, Maria Fernanda Gomes Villalba; Broglio, Sônia Maria Forti; Delabie, Jacques Hubert Charles

    2013-01-01

    Ants are known to function as reliable biological indicators for habitat impact assessment. They play a wide range of ecological roles depending on their feeding and nesting habits. By clustering ants in guilds, it is possible both to assess how agriculture and forest fragmentation can disturb ant communities and to predict the ecological impacts due to losses of a specific guild. This study aimed at determining the impact of non-shaded coffee and pasture agriculture on predatory and omnivorous guilds of leaf-litter ants of Atlantic Forest fragments in Minas Gerais, Brazil. Both coffee and pasture agriculture influenced leaf-litter ant community, although coffee was more disruptive than pasture. Coffee agriculture not only disturbed the diversity of predatory ants, but also negatively affected the number of predatory and omnivorous ants when compared to forest fragments. In contrast, pasture agriculture only disrupted the abundance of predatory ants. Fragment edges skirting crops were negatively affected in terms of leaf-litter ant abundance, but not diversity. Cluster analysis showed that forest fragments were similar irrespective of the cultivation, but the borders were similar to the crop. The study assessed agriculture impact by surveying ant guilds, and revealed that the predatory guild is more susceptible than omnivorous ants.

  16. Maize Benefits the Predatory Beetle, Propylea japonica (Thunberg), to Provide Potential to Enhance Biological Control for Aphids in Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Fang; Men, Xingyuan; Yang, Bing; Su, Jianwei; Zhang, Yongsheng; Zhao, Zihua; Ge, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Background Biological control provided by natural enemies play an important role in integrated pest management. Generalist insect predators provide an important biological service in the regulation of agricultural insect pests. Our goal is to understand the explicit process of oviposition preference, habitat selection and feeding behavior of predators in farmland ecosystem consisting of multiple crops, which is central to devising and delivering an integrated pest management program. Methodology The hypotheses was that maize can serve as habitat for natural enemies and benefits predators to provide potential to enhance biological control for pest insects in cotton. This explicit process of a predatory beetle, Propylea japonica, in agricultural ecosystem composed of cotton and maize were examined by field investigation and stable carbon isotope analysis during 2008–2010. Principal Finding Field investigation showed that P. japonica adults will search host plants for high prey abundance before laying eggs, indicating indirectly that P. japonica adults prefer to inhabit maize plants and travel to cotton plants to actively prey on aphids. The δ13C values of adult P. japonica in a dietary shift experiment found that individual beetles were shifting from a C3- to a C4-based diet of aphids reared on maize or cotton, respectively, and began to reflect the isotope ratio of their new C4 resources within one week. Approximately 80–100% of the diet of P. japonica adults in maize originated from a C3-based resource in June, July and August, while approximately 80% of the diet originated from a C4-based resource in September. Conclusion/Significance Results suggest that maize can serve as a habitat or refuge source for the predatory beetle, P. japonica, and benefits predators to provide potential to enhance biological control for insect pests in cotton. PMID:22984499

  17. The Dark Side of Dissemination: Traditional and Open Access Versus Predatory Journals

    PubMed Central

    Masten, Yondell B.; Ashcraft, Alyce S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract AIM The purpose of the article is to alert faculty about predatory online journals, review characteristics of three broad categories of journals, and provide suggestions for faculty evaluation of journals before submission of scholarship for publication. BACKGROUND The availability of online journals in recent years has rapidly increased the number of journals available for publication of faculty scholarship. However, not all online journals meet the same standards as traditional journals. METHOD The article is not a report for a research study. RESULTS Currently, there are three broad categories of journals for faculty scholarship publication: traditional, open access scholarly, and predatory open access journals. CONCLUSION Faculty authors need to carefully evaluate the journal characteristics and publisher business practices before submitting a manuscript for publication to prevent inadvertent submission to a predatory open access journal.

  18. The Dark Side of Dissemination: Traditional and Open Access Versus Predatory Journals

    PubMed Central

    Masten, Yondell B.; Ashcraft, Alyce S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract AIM The purpose of the article is to alert faculty about predatory online journals, review characteristics of three broad categories of journals, and provide suggestions for faculty evaluation of journals before submission of scholarship for publication. BACKGROUND The availability of online journals in recent years has rapidly increased the number of journals available for publication of faculty scholarship. However, not all online journals meet the same standards as traditional journals. METHOD The article is not a report for a research study. RESULTS Currently, there are three broad categories of journals for faculty scholarship publication: traditional, open access scholarly, and predatory open access journals. CONCLUSION Faculty authors need to carefully evaluate the journal characteristics and publisher business practices before submitting a manuscript for publication to prevent inadvertent submission to a predatory open access journal. PMID:27740559

  19. 40 CFR 180.1101 - Parasitic (parasitoid) and predatory insects; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... insects; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1101 Section 180.1101 Protection of... predatory insects; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Parasitic (parasitoid) and predatory insects are exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues when they are used in...

  20. 40 CFR 180.1101 - Parasitic (parasitoid) and predatory insects; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... insects; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1101 Section 180.1101 Protection of... predatory insects; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Parasitic (parasitoid) and predatory insects are exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues when they are used in...

  1. 40 CFR 180.1101 - Parasitic (parasitoid) and predatory insects; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... insects; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1101 Section 180.1101 Protection of... predatory insects; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Parasitic (parasitoid) and predatory insects are exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues when they are used in...

  2. 40 CFR 180.1101 - Parasitic (parasitoid) and predatory insects; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... insects; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1101 Section 180.1101 Protection of... predatory insects; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Parasitic (parasitoid) and predatory insects are exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues when they are used in...

  3. 40 CFR 180.1101 - Parasitic (parasitoid) and predatory insects; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... insects; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1101 Section 180.1101 Protection of... predatory insects; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Parasitic (parasitoid) and predatory insects are exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues when they are used in...

  4. Manipulating Each MreB of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus Gives Diverse Morphological and Predatory Phenotypes▿

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Andrew Karl; Lambert, Carey; Wagstaff, Peter Charles; Sockett, Renee Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    We studied the two mreB genes, encoding actinlike cytoskeletal elements, in the predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus. This bacterium enters and replicates within other Gram-negative bacteria by attack-phase Bdellovibrio squeezing through prey outer membrane, residing and growing filamentously in the prey periplasm forming an infective “bdelloplast,” and septating after 4 h, once the prey contents are consumed. This lifestyle brings challenges to the Bdellovibrio cytoskeleton. Both mreB genes were essential for viable predatory growth, but C-terminal green fluorescent protein tagging each separately with monomeric teal-fluorescent protein (mTFP) gave two strains with phenotypic changes at different stages in predatory growth and development. MreB1-mTFP cells arrested growth early in bdelloplast formation, despite successful degradation of prey nucleoid. A large population of stalled bdelloplasts formed in predatory cultures and predation proceeded very slowly. A small proportion of bdelloplasts lysed after several days, liberating MreB1-mTFP attack-phase cells of wild-type morphology; this process was aided by subinhibitory concentrations of an MreB-specific inhibitor, A22. MreB2-mTFP, in contrast, was predatory at an almost wild-type rate but yielded attack-phase cells with diverse morphologies, including spherical, elongated, and branched, the first time such phenotypes have been described. Wild-type predatory rates were seen for all but spherical morphotypes, and septation of elongated morphotypes was achieved by the addition of A22. PMID:20023029

  5. Mass Death of Predatory Carp, Chanodichthys erythropterus, Induced by Plerocercoid Larvae of Ligula intestinalis (Cestoda: Diphyllobothriidae).

    PubMed

    Sohn, Woon-Mok; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Jung, Soo Gun; Kim, Koo Hwan

    2016-06-01

    We describe here the mass death of predatory carp, Chanodichthys erythropterus, in Korea induced by plerocercoid larvae of Ligula intestinalis as a result of host manipulation. The carcasses of fish with ligulid larvae were first found in the river-edge areas of Chilgok-bo in Nakdong-gang (River), Korea at early February 2016. This ecological phenomena also occurred in the adjacent areas of 3 dams of Nakdong-gang, i.e., Gangjeong-bo, Dalseong-bo, and Hapcheon-Changnyeong-bo. Total 1,173 fish carcasses were collected from the 4 regions. To examine the cause of death, we captured 10 wondering carp in the river-edge areas of Hapcheon-Changnyeong-bo with a landing net. They were 24.0-28.5 cm in length and 147-257 g in weight, and had 2-11 plerocercoid larvae in the abdominal cavity. Their digestive organs were slender and empty, and reproductive organs were not observed at all. The plerocercoid larvae occupied almost all spaces of the abdominal cavity under the air bladders. The proportion of larvae per fish was 14.6-32.1% of body weight. The larvae were ivory-white, 21.5-63.0 cm long, and 6.0-13.8 g in weight. We suggest that the preference for the river-edge in infected fish during winter is a modified behavioral response by host manipulation of the tapeworm larvae. The life cycle of this tapeworm seems to be successfully continued as the infected fish can be easily eaten by avian definitive hosts. PMID:27417095

  6. Mass Death of Predatory Carp, Chanodichthys erythropterus, Induced by Plerocercoid Larvae of Ligula intestinalis (Cestoda: Diphyllobothriidae)

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Woon-Mok; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Jung, Soo Gun; Kim, Koo Hwan

    2016-01-01

    We describe here the mass death of predatory carp, Chanodichthys erythropterus, in Korea induced by plerocercoid larvae of Ligula intestinalis as a result of host manipulation. The carcasses of fish with ligulid larvae were first found in the river-edge areas of Chilgok-bo in Nakdong-gang (River), Korea at early February 2016. This ecological phenomena also occurred in the adjacent areas of 3 dams of Nakdong-gang, i.e., Gangjeong-bo, Dalseong-bo, and Hapcheon-Changnyeong-bo. Total 1,173 fish carcasses were collected from the 4 regions. To examine the cause of death, we captured 10 wondering carp in the river-edge areas of Hapcheon-Changnyeong-bo with a landing net. They were 24.0-28.5 cm in length and 147-257 g in weight, and had 2-11 plerocercoid larvae in the abdominal cavity. Their digestive organs were slender and empty, and reproductive organs were not observed at all. The plerocercoid larvae occupied almost all spaces of the abdominal cavity under the air bladders. The proportion of larvae per fish was 14.6-32.1% of body weight. The larvae were ivory-white, 21.5-63.0 cm long, and 6.0-13.8 g in weight. We suggest that the preference for the river-edge in infected fish during winter is a modified behavioral response by host manipulation of the tapeworm larvae. The life cycle of this tapeworm seems to be successfully continued as the infected fish can be easily eaten by avian definitive hosts. PMID:27417095

  7. A Fundamental Step in IPM on Grapevine: Evaluating the Side Effects of Pesticides on Predatory Mites.

    PubMed

    Pozzebon, Alberto; Tirello, Paola; Moret, Renzo; Pederiva, Marco; Duso, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge on side effects of pesticides on non-target beneficial arthropods is a key point in Integrated Pest Management (IPM). Here we present the results of four experiments conducted in vineyards where the effects of chlorpyrifos, thiamethoxam, indoxacarb, flufenoxuron, and tebufenozide were evaluated on the generalist predatory mites Typhlodromus pyri Scheuten and Amblyseius andersoni (Chant), key biocontrol agents of herbivorous mites on grapevines. Results show that indoxacarb and tebufenozide had a low impact on the predatory mites considered here, while a significant impact was observed for chlorpyrifos, flufenoxuron, and thiamethoxam. The information obtained here should be considered in the design of IPM strategies on grapevine. PMID:26466903

  8. A Fundamental Step in IPM on Grapevine: Evaluating the Side Effects of Pesticides on Predatory Mites

    PubMed Central

    Pozzebon, Alberto; Tirello, Paola; Moret, Renzo; Pederiva, Marco; Duso, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge on side effects of pesticides on non-target beneficial arthropods is a key point in Integrated Pest Management (IPM). Here we present the results of four experiments conducted in vineyards where the effects of chlorpyrifos, thiamethoxam, indoxacarb, flufenoxuron, and tebufenozide were evaluated on the generalist predatory mites Typhlodromus pyri Scheuten and Amblyseius andersoni (Chant), key biocontrol agents of herbivorous mites on grapevines. Results show that indoxacarb and tebufenozide had a low impact on the predatory mites considered here, while a significant impact was observed for chlorpyrifos, flufenoxuron, and thiamethoxam. The information obtained here should be considered in the design of IPM strategies on grapevine. PMID:26466903

  9. A new genus of predatory katydids (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Listroscelidinae) from the Amazonian Rainforest.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Diego Matheus De Mello; Chamorro-Rengifo, Juliana; Rafael, José Albertino

    2016-01-01

    Most of the predatory katydids Listroscelidini species known were described from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. Here a new genus and species from the Amazonian Rainforest is described. Based on its morphological characteristics, this new genus represents an intermediate form between two closely related genera, Listroscelis Serville and Monocerophora Walker. PMID:27615994

  10. The impact of insecticides applied in apple orchards on the predatory mite Kampimodromus aberrans (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    PubMed

    Duso, Carlo; Ahmad, Shakeel; Tirello, Paola; Pozzebon, Alberto; Klaric, Virna; Baldessari, Mario; Malagnini, Valeria; Angeli, Gino

    2014-03-01

    Kampimodromus aberrans is an effective predatory mite in fruit orchards. The side-effects of insecticides on this species have been little studied. Field and laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of insecticides on K. aberrans. Field experiments showed the detrimental effects of etofenprox, tau-fluvalinate and spinosad on predatory mites. Spider mite (Panonychus ulmi) populations reached higher densities on plots treated with etofenprox and tau-fluvalinate than in the other treatments. Single or multiple applications of neonicotinoids caused no detrimental effects on predatory mites. In the laboratory, spinosad and tau-fluvalinate caused 100 % mortality. Etofenprox caused a significant mortality and reduced fecundity. The remaining insecticides did not affect female survival except for imidacloprid. Thiamethoxam, clothianidin, thiacloprid, chlorpyrifos, lufenuron and methoxyfenozide were associated with a significant reduction in fecundity. No effect on fecundity was found for indoxacarb or acetamiprid. Escape rate of K. aberrans in laboratory was relatively high for etofenprox and spinosad, and to a lesser extent thiacloprid. The use of etofenprox, tau-fluvalinate and spinosad was detrimental for K. aberrans and the first two insecticides induced spider mite population increases. The remaining insecticides caused no negative effects on predatory mites in field trials. Some of them (reduced fecundity and repellence) should be considered with caution in integrated pest management programs.

  11. Empicoris subparallelus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae), a predatory bug new to the fauna of Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The predatory hemipteran Empicoris subparallelus McAtee and Malloch, belonging to the family Reduviidae, subfamily Emesinae is reported from Grassy Key, Key Largo, Long Point Key, and No Name Key in the Florida Keys. This is a new species record for the Florida fauna, and only the second state reco...

  12. The impact of insecticides applied in apple orchards on the predatory mite Kampimodromus aberrans (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    PubMed

    Duso, Carlo; Ahmad, Shakeel; Tirello, Paola; Pozzebon, Alberto; Klaric, Virna; Baldessari, Mario; Malagnini, Valeria; Angeli, Gino

    2014-03-01

    Kampimodromus aberrans is an effective predatory mite in fruit orchards. The side-effects of insecticides on this species have been little studied. Field and laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of insecticides on K. aberrans. Field experiments showed the detrimental effects of etofenprox, tau-fluvalinate and spinosad on predatory mites. Spider mite (Panonychus ulmi) populations reached higher densities on plots treated with etofenprox and tau-fluvalinate than in the other treatments. Single or multiple applications of neonicotinoids caused no detrimental effects on predatory mites. In the laboratory, spinosad and tau-fluvalinate caused 100 % mortality. Etofenprox caused a significant mortality and reduced fecundity. The remaining insecticides did not affect female survival except for imidacloprid. Thiamethoxam, clothianidin, thiacloprid, chlorpyrifos, lufenuron and methoxyfenozide were associated with a significant reduction in fecundity. No effect on fecundity was found for indoxacarb or acetamiprid. Escape rate of K. aberrans in laboratory was relatively high for etofenprox and spinosad, and to a lesser extent thiacloprid. The use of etofenprox, tau-fluvalinate and spinosad was detrimental for K. aberrans and the first two insecticides induced spider mite population increases. The remaining insecticides caused no negative effects on predatory mites in field trials. Some of them (reduced fecundity and repellence) should be considered with caution in integrated pest management programs. PMID:24114337

  13. Stealth predation and the predatory success of the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi.

    PubMed

    Colin, Sean P; Costello, John H; Hansson, Lars J; Titelman, Josefin; Dabiri, John O

    2010-10-01

    In contrast to higher metazoans such as copepods and fish, ctenophores are a basal metazoan lineage possessing a relatively narrow set of sensory-motor capabilities. Yet lobate ctenophores can capture prey at rates comparable to sophisticated predatory copepods and fish, and they are capable of altering the composition of coastal planktonic communities. Here, we demonstrate that the predatory success of the lobate ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi lies in its use of cilia to generate a feeding current that continuously entrains large volumes of fluid, yet is virtually undetectable to its prey. This form of stealth predation enables M. leidyi to feed as a generalist predator capturing prey, including microplankton (approximately 50 μm), copepods (approximately 1 mm), and fish larvae (>3 mm). The efficacy and versatility of this stealth feeding mechanism has enabled M. leidyi to be notoriously destructive as a predator and successful as an invasive species.

  14. Back from the dead; the curious tale of the predatory cyanobacterium Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus

    PubMed Central

    Soo, Rochelle M.; Woodcroft, Ben J.; Parks, Donovan H.; Tyson, Gene W.

    2015-01-01

    An uncultured non-photosynthetic basal lineage of the Cyanobacteria, the Melainabacteria, was recently characterised by metagenomic analyses of aphotic environmental samples. However, a predatory bacterium, Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus, originally described in 1972 appears to be the first cultured representative of the Melainabacteria based on a 16S rRNA sequence recovered from a lyophilised co-culture of the organism. Here, we sequenced the genome of V. chlorellavorus directly from 36 year-old lyophilised material that could not be resuscitated confirming its identity as a member of the Melainabacteria. We identified attributes in the genome that likely allow V. chlorellavorus to function as an obligate predator of the microalga Chlorella vulgaris, and predict that it is the first described predator to use an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-like conjugative type IV secretion system to invade its host. V. chlorellavorus is the first cyanobacterium recognised to have a predatory lifestyle and further supports the assertion that Melainabacteria are non-photosynthetic. PMID:26038723

  15. Stealth predation and the predatory success of the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi

    PubMed Central

    Colin, Sean P.; Costello, John H.; Hansson, Lars J.; Titelman, Josefin; Dabiri, John O.

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to higher metazoans such as copepods and fish, ctenophores are a basal metazoan lineage possessing a relatively narrow set of sensory-motor capabilities. Yet lobate ctenophores can capture prey at rates comparable to sophisticated predatory copepods and fish, and they are capable of altering the composition of coastal planktonic communities. Here, we demonstrate that the predatory success of the lobate ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi lies in its use of cilia to generate a feeding current that continuously entrains large volumes of fluid, yet is virtually undetectable to its prey. This form of stealth predation enables M. leidyi to feed as a generalist predator capturing prey, including microplankton (approximately 50 μm), copepods (approximately 1 mm), and fish larvae (>3 mm). The efficacy and versatility of this stealth feeding mechanism has enabled M. leidyi to be notoriously destructive as a predator and successful as an invasive species. PMID:20855619

  16. The lethal impacts of Roundup and predatory stress on six species of North American tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Relyea, R A

    2005-04-01

    The decline in amphibians across the globe has sparked a search for the causes, and recent evidence suggests a connection with pesticides. However, for most pesticides, tests on amphibians are rare and conducted only for short durations (1 to 4 days) and without natural stressors. Recent studies have discovered that the stress of predator cues in the water can make insecticides much more lethal to larval amphibians, but it is unknown whether this phenomenon can be generalized to other types of pesticides. Using six species of North American amphibian larvae (Rana sylvatica, R. pipiens, R. clamitans, R. catesbeiana, Bufo americanus, and Hyla versicolor), I examined the impact of a globally common herbicide (Roundup) on the survival of tadpoles for 16 days with and without the chemical cues emitted by predatory newts (Notophthalmus viridescens). LC50(16-d) estimates varied from 0.55 to 2.52 mg of active ingredient (AI)/L, which was considerably lower than the few previous studies using Roundup (1.5 to 15.5 mg AI/L). Moreover, in one of the six species tested (R. sylvatica), the addition of predatory stress made Roundup twice as lethal. This discovery suggests that synergistic interactions between predatory stress and pesticides may indeed be a generalizable phenomenon in amphibians that occurs with a wide variety of pesticides. PMID:15886853

  17. Fishery-Independent Data Reveal Negative Effect of Human Population Density on Caribbean Predatory Fish Communities

    PubMed Central

    Stallings, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Understanding the current status of predatory fish communities, and the effects fishing has on them, is vitally important information for management. However, data are often insufficient at region-wide scales to assess the effects of extraction in coral reef ecosystems of developing nations. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, I overcome this difficulty by using a publicly accessible, fisheries-independent database to provide a broad scale, comprehensive analysis of human impacts on predatory reef fish communities across the greater Caribbean region. Specifically, this study analyzed presence and diversity of predatory reef fishes over a gradient of human population density. Across the region, as human population density increases, presence of large-bodied fishes declines, and fish communities become dominated by a few smaller-bodied species. Conclusions/Significance Complete disappearance of several large-bodied fishes indicates ecological and local extinctions have occurred in some densely populated areas. These findings fill a fundamentally important gap in our knowledge of the ecosystem effects of artisanal fisheries in developing nations, and provide support for multiple approaches to data collection where they are commonly unavailable. PMID:19421312

  18. Who Eats Whom in a Pool? A Comparative Study of Prey Selectivity by Predatory Aquatic Insects

    PubMed Central

    Klecka, Jan; Boukal, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Predatory aquatic insects are a diverse group comprising top predators in small fishless water bodies. Knowledge of their diet composition is fragmentary, which hinders the understanding of mechanisms maintaining their high local diversity and of their impacts on local food web structure and dynamics. We conducted multiple-choice predation experiments using nine common species of predatory aquatic insects, including adult and larval Coleoptera, adult Heteroptera and larval Odonata, and complemented them with literature survey of similar experiments. All predators in our experiments fed selectively on the seven prey species offered, and vulnerability to predation varied strongly between the prey. The predators most often preferred dipteran larvae; previous studies further reported preferences for cladocerans. Diet overlaps between all predator pairs and predator overlaps between all prey pairs were non-zero. Modularity analysis separated all primarily nectonic predator and prey species from two groups of large and small benthic predators and their prey. These results, together with limited evidence from the literature, suggest a highly interconnected food web with several modules, in which similarly sized predators from the same microhabitat are likely to compete strongly for resources in the field (observed Pianka’s diet overlap indices >0.85). Our experiments further imply that ontogenetic diet shifts are common in predatory aquatic insects, although we observed higher diet overlaps than previously reported. Hence, individuals may or may not shift between food web modules during ontogeny. PMID:22679487

  19. Amblyseius andersoni Chant (Acari: Phytoseiidae), a successful predatory mite on Rosa spp.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, A

    2004-01-01

    Roses on commercial nurseries commonly suffer from attacks by the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, which have a negative influence on growth and quality. The aim of this project is to find natural enemies that are well adapted to roses, and may improve biological control. At different sites such as a plant collection garden, public parks and field boundaries, leaves were sampled from roses to identify the indigenous species of predatory mites. Amblyseius andersoni was amongst other species frequently found, which suggests that this species thrives well on roses. The possibility for biological control of spider mites with A. andersoni was investigated both in container roses outdoors and in glasshouses. In plots of outdoor roses artificially infested with spider mites, the following treatments were carried out: spider mites alone (untreated plot), Amblyseius andersoni Amblyseius andersoni and ice plants, Neoseiulus californicus, Neoseiulus californicus and ice plants. There were four replications of the treatments. The ice plants, Delosperma cooperi, were added to some treatments to supply pollen as extra food for the predatory mites. Natural enemies such as Chrysoperla spp., Conwentzia sp., Orius sp., Stethorus punctillum, and Feltiella acarisuga occurred naturally and contributed to the control of spider mites. After one month the spider mites were eradicated in all treatments. At the end of the trial, predatory mites were collected from all plots for identification. The ratio of Amblyseius andersoni to Neoseiulus californicus was approximately 9:1. There was no obvious effect of the ice plants on the number of predatory mites. On a nursery, where new roses are bred and selected, Amblyseius andersoni was released in three glasshouses after one early treatment with bifenazate against two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae. In two of these glasshouses Neoseiulus californicus was also released. Samples, which were taken in the summer months showed

  20. Predatory fish select for coordinated collective motion in virtual prey.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, C C; Guttal, V; Couzin, I D

    2012-09-01

    Movement in animal groups is highly varied and ranges from seemingly disordered motion in swarms to coordinated aligned motion in flocks and schools. These social interactions are often thought to reduce risk from predators, despite a lack of direct evidence. We investigated risk-related selection for collective motion by allowing real predators (bluegill sunfish) to hunt mobile virtual prey. By fusing simulated and real animal behavior, we isolated predator effects while controlling for confounding factors. Prey with a tendency to be attracted toward, and to align direction of travel with, near neighbors tended to form mobile coordinated groups and were rarely attacked. These results demonstrate that collective motion could evolve as a response to predation, without prey being able to detect and respond to predators.

  1. Interpreting the Intentions of Internet Predators: An Examination of Online Predatory Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcum, Catherine D.

    2007-01-01

    Internet predators are finding new ways to prey on the vulnerabilities of youth in chat rooms and lure them into sexual activities. This study will examine three chat room transcripts between adult predators and adult volunteers of the group "Perverted Justice" posing as youth. These conversations will be analyzed to interpret the underlying…

  2. Behaviorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, J.

    2011-01-01

    Early forms of psychology assumed that mental life was the appropriate subject matter for psychology, and introspection was an appropriate method to engage that subject matter. In 1913, John B. Watson proposed an alternative: classical S-R behaviorism. According to Watson, behavior was a subject matter in its own right, to be studied by the…

  3. Energetics of the yo-yo dives of predatory sharks.

    PubMed

    Iosilevskii, Gil; Papastamatiou, Yannis P; Meyer, Carl G; Holland, Kim N

    2012-02-01

    Sharks zigzag vertically through the water in a series of alternating ascending and descending segments, changing depth by a few tens of meters over a period of a few hundred seconds. This 'yo-yo' like behavior has several characteristic patterns, identifiable by the way the swimming and vertical velocities vary along the dive. We suggest that these patterns represent different optimal strategies minimizing the cost of locomotion under different constraints; moreover, these constraints can be inferred by matching the pattern of a dive with a (standard) optimal swimming strategy for which the constraints are known. We used three sets of constraints and two definitions of the 'cost of locomotion' to analytically generate four standard optimal strategies; we have used high resolution tracking data from four tiger sharks to identify two different yo-yo diving patterns. These patterns seem to match two of the standard strategies: one that maximizes range, given an alternating power supply (e.g., swimming actively on ascents and lazily on descents); and the other that maximizes range, given an alternating vertical velocity (implying an 'intentional' up-and-down motion).

  4. Strain Variants in Swimming Characteristics of a Predatory Algae Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jian; Katz, Joseph; Adolf, J.; Place, Allen

    2009-11-01

    Digital holographic microscopic cinematography is used for measuring the 3D, time resolved, swimming behavior of toxic and non-toxic strains of the marine dinoflagellates Karlodinium veneficum. The experiments are performed in a 3x3 mm square cuvette at densities of ˜150,000 cells/ml, and holograms are recorded at 120fps and 20X magnification for 12-20s. In each case, we simultaneously track 200-500 cells in the 3mm deep sample, at a spatial resolution of 0.4x0.4x2 μm. Results show that all strains prefer vertical migration during phototrophic growth and localized foraging in response to prey. Strains capable of swimming in both left and right hand helices show stronger tendency towards vertical motion than right handed strains. Swimming-induced dispersion computed from Lagrangian trajectories corroborates the observed migration trends, and suggests a mechanism for predation-induced cell aggregation into dense bloom. Velocity spectra and conditional sampling of swimming modes will also be presented to elucidate locomotion of dinoflagellates.

  5. A New Comparative-Genomics Approach for Defining Phenotype-Specific Indicators Reveals Specific Genetic Markers in Predatory Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Zohar; Ben Sasson, Tom; Cohen, Yossi; Segev, Elad; Jurkevitch, Edouard

    2015-01-01

    Predatory bacteria seek and consume other live bacteria. Although belonging to taxonomically diverse groups, relatively few bacterial predator species are known. Consequently, it is difficult to assess the impact of predation within the bacterial realm. As no genetic signatures distinguishing them from non-predatory bacteria are known, genomic resources cannot be exploited to uncover novel predators. In order to identify genes specific to predatory bacteria, we developed a bioinformatic tool called DiffGene. This tool automatically identifies marker genes that are specific to phenotypic or taxonomic groups, by mapping the complete gene content of all available fully-sequenced genomes for the presence/absence of each gene in each genome. A putative 'predator region' of ~60 amino acids in the tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) protein was found to probably be a predator-specific marker. This region is found in all known obligate predator and a few facultative predator genomes, and is absent from most facultative predators and all non-predatory bacteria. We designed PCR primers that uniquely amplify a ~180bp-long sequence within the predators' TDO gene, and validated them in monocultures as well as in metagenetic analysis of environmental wastewater samples. This marker, in addition to its usage in predator identification and phylogenetics, may finally permit reliable enumeration and cataloguing of predatory bacteria from environmental samples, as well as uncovering novel predators.

  6. Seasonal climatic variations influence the efficacy of predatory mites used for control of western flower thrips in greenhouse ornamental crops.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Laura C; Shipp, Les; Buitenhuis, Rose; Scott-Dupree, Cynthia

    2015-04-01

    The influence of seasonal greenhouse climate on the efficacy of predatory mites for thrips control was determined for potted chrysanthemum. Trials in controlled environment chambers, small-scale greenhouses and commercial greenhouses were conducted to determine which biological control agent-that is, Amblyseius swirskii Athias-Henriot or Neoseiulus cucumeris (Oudemans)-is more efficacious for control of western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), in different seasons. Under simulated summer conditions, no differences were observed in the predation and oviposition rates of both predatory mites in the laboratory trials. However, small-scale greenhouse trials showed that A. swirskii performed better than N. cucumeris in summer (i.e., more efficacious thrips control, higher predator abundance and less overall damage to the crop). Under simulated winter conditions, laboratory trials demonstrated variable differences in predation rates of the two predatory mites. The small-scale greenhouse trials in winter showed no differences in thrips control and predatory mite abundance between the two predatory mites, but plants with A. swirskii had less damage overall. The results from the small-scale trials were validated and confirmed in commercial greenhouse trials. Overall, A. swirskii performed better in the summer and equally good or better (less damage overall) under winter conditions, whereas N. cucumeris is a more cost effective biological control agent for winter months.

  7. Discriminating Between Legitimate and Predatory Open Access Journals: Report from the International Federation for Emergency Medicine Research Committee

    PubMed Central

    Hansoti, Bhakti; Langdorf, Mark I.; Murphy, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Open access (OA) medical publishing is growing rapidly. While subscription-based publishing does not charge the author, OA does. This opens the door for “predatory” publishers who take authors’ money but provide no substantial peer review or indexing to truly disseminate research findings. Discriminating between predatory and legitimate OA publishers is difficult. Methods We searched a number of library indexing databases that were available to us through the University of California, Irvine Libraries for journals in the field of emergency medicine (EM). Using criteria from Jeffrey Beall, University of Colorado librarian and an expert on predatory publishing, and the Research Committee of the International Federation for EM, we categorized EM journals as legitimate or likely predatory. Results We identified 150 journal titles related to EM from all sources, 55 of which met our criteria for OA (37%, the rest subscription based). Of these 55, 25 (45%) were likely to be predatory. We present lists of clearly legitimate OA journals, and, conversely, likely predatory ones. We present criteria a researcher can use to discriminate between the two. We present the indexing profiles of legitimate EM OA journals, to inform the researcher about degree of dissemination of research findings by journal. Conclusion OA journals are proliferating rapidly. About half in EM are legitimate. The rest take substantial money from unsuspecting, usually junior, researchers and provide no value for true dissemination of findings. Researchers should be educated and aware of scam journals. PMID:27625710

  8. Discriminating Between Legitimate and Predatory Open Access Journals: Report from the International Federation for Emergency Medicine Research Committee

    PubMed Central

    Hansoti, Bhakti; Langdorf, Mark I.; Murphy, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Open access (OA) medical publishing is growing rapidly. While subscription-based publishing does not charge the author, OA does. This opens the door for “predatory” publishers who take authors’ money but provide no substantial peer review or indexing to truly disseminate research findings. Discriminating between predatory and legitimate OA publishers is difficult. Methods We searched a number of library indexing databases that were available to us through the University of California, Irvine Libraries for journals in the field of emergency medicine (EM). Using criteria from Jeffrey Beall, University of Colorado librarian and an expert on predatory publishing, and the Research Committee of the International Federation for EM, we categorized EM journals as legitimate or likely predatory. Results We identified 150 journal titles related to EM from all sources, 55 of which met our criteria for OA (37%, the rest subscription based). Of these 55, 25 (45%) were likely to be predatory. We present lists of clearly legitimate OA journals, and, conversely, likely predatory ones. We present criteria a researcher can use to discriminate between the two. We present the indexing profiles of legitimate EM OA journals, to inform the researcher about degree of dissemination of research findings by journal. Conclusion OA journals are proliferating rapidly. About half in EM are legitimate. The rest take substantial money from unsuspecting, usually junior, researchers and provide no value for true dissemination of findings. Researchers should be educated and aware of scam journals.

  9. Sub-lethal effects of fenbutatin oxide on prey location by the predatory mite Iphiseiodes zuluagai (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    PubMed

    Teodoro, Adenir V; Pallini, Angelo; Oliveira, Claudinei

    2009-04-01

    We used a Y-tube olfactometer to assess the sub-lethal effects of the acaricide fenbutatin oxide on the olfactory response of the predatory mite Iphiseiodes zuluagai towards odours from: (1) air or undamaged coffee plants; (2) undamaged or red spider mite Oligonychus ilicis-infested coffee plants; (3) undamaged or false spider mite Brevipalpus phoenicis-infested coffee plants. Predatory mite adult females were exposed to residues of fenbutatin oxide or distilled water on leaf discs during a period of 72 h prior experiments. When exposed to distilled water (control treatments), predatory mites significantly preferred undamaged plants over air, O. ilicis-infested plants over undamaged plants, and they did not prefer B. phoenicis-infested plants over undamaged plants. However, predatory mites that had been exposed to residues of fenbutatin oxide were neither attracted towards undamaged plants nor to O. ilicis-infested plants. Thus, fenbutatin oxide affected negatively the olfactory response of I. zuluagai. We conclude that sub-lethal-effect studies should be considered in pesticide selectivity programs since the ability of predatory mites to locate their prey may be negatively affected by non-lethal concentrations of pesticides. PMID:19009359

  10. A New Comparative-Genomics Approach for Defining Phenotype-Specific Indicators Reveals Specific Genetic Markers in Predatory Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Zohar; Ben Sasson, Tom; Cohen, Yossi; Segev, Elad; Jurkevitch, Edouard

    2015-01-01

    Predatory bacteria seek and consume other live bacteria. Although belonging to taxonomically diverse groups, relatively few bacterial predator species are known. Consequently, it is difficult to assess the impact of predation within the bacterial realm. As no genetic signatures distinguishing them from non-predatory bacteria are known, genomic resources cannot be exploited to uncover novel predators. In order to identify genes specific to predatory bacteria, we developed a bioinformatic tool called DiffGene. This tool automatically identifies marker genes that are specific to phenotypic or taxonomic groups, by mapping the complete gene content of all available fully-sequenced genomes for the presence/absence of each gene in each genome. A putative ‘predator region’ of ~60 amino acids in the tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) protein was found to probably be a predator-specific marker. This region is found in all known obligate predator and a few facultative predator genomes, and is absent from most facultative predators and all non-predatory bacteria. We designed PCR primers that uniquely amplify a ~180bp-long sequence within the predators’ TDO gene, and validated them in monocultures as well as in metagenetic analysis of environmental wastewater samples. This marker, in addition to its usage in predator identification and phylogenetics, may finally permit reliable enumeration and cataloguing of predatory bacteria from environmental samples, as well as uncovering novel predators. PMID:26569499

  11. Do chimpanzee nests serve an anti-predatory function?

    PubMed

    Stewart, Fiona A; Pruetz, J D

    2013-06-01

    Sleep is a vulnerable state for animals as it compromises the ability to detect predators. The evolution of shelter construction in the great apes may have been a solution to the trade-off between restorative sleep and predation-risk, which allowed a large bodied ape to sleep recumbent in a safe, comfortable spot. In this article we review the evidence of predator pressure on great apes and specifically investigate the potential influence of predation-risk on chimpanzee nesting behavior by comparing nests between chimpanzees living in a habitat of several potential predators (Issa, Ugalla, Tanzania) and a habitat relatively devoid of predators (Fongoli, Senegal). Chimpanzees in Issa did not nest more frequently in forest vegetation than chimpanzees in Fongoli although forest vegetation is expected to provide greater opportunity for escape from terrestrial predators. Nor do chimpanzees in Issa nest in larger groups or aggregate together more than Fongoli chimpanzees, as would be expected if larger groups provide protection from or greater detection of predators. Nests in Issa also did not appear to provide greater opportunities for escape than nests in Fongoli. Chimpanzees in Issa nested more frequently within the same tree as other community members, which may indicate that these chimpanzees nest in greater proximity than chimpanzees in Fongoli. Finally, Issa chimpanzees built their nests proportionately higher and more peripherally within trees. The selection of high and peripheral nesting locations within trees may make Issa chimpanzees inaccessible to potential predators. Many factors influence nest site selection in chimpanzees, of which danger from terrestrial predators is likely to be one.

  12. High rate of prey consumption in a small predatory fish on coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeney, W. E.; Lönnstedt, O. M.; Bosiger, Y.; Martin, J.; Jones, G. P.; Rowe, R. J.; McCormick, M. I.

    2012-09-01

    Small piscivores are regarded as important regulators of the composition of coral reef fish communities, but few studies have investigated their predatory ecology or impact on assemblages of juvenile fishes. This study investigated the foraging ecology of a common coral reef predator, the dottyback Pseudochromis fuscus, using underwater focal animal observations. Observations were conducted at two times of year: the summer, when recruit fishes were an available food item and winter, when remaining juveniles had outgrown vulnerability to P. fuscus. During the summer, P. fuscus directed 76% of its strikes at invertebrates and 24% at recruiting juvenile fishes. When striking at fishes, P. fuscus exhibited two distinct feeding modes: an ambush (26% successful) and a pursuit mode (5% successful). Predator activity in the field peaked at midday, averaging 2.5 captures h-1 of juvenile fishes. Monitoring of activity and foraging in the laboratory over 24-h periods found that P. fuscus was a diurnal predator and was active for 13 h d-1 during the summer. The number of hours during which foraging was recorded differed greatly among individuals ( n = 10), ranging from 4 to 13 h. The number of predatory strikes did not increase with standard length, but the success rate and consumption rate of juvenile fishes did increase with size. Estimated hourly mortality on juvenile fish ranged from 0.49 fish h-1 in small P. fuscus individuals (30-39 mm standard length, SL; equating to 6.3 per 13 h day) to 2.4 fish h-1 in large P. fuscus individuals (55-65 mm SL; 30.6 per 13 h day). During the winter, P. fuscus struck at invertebrates with a similar rate to the summer period. These observations of the predatory ecology of P. fuscus support the hypothesis that in coral reef systems, small piscivores, because of their high metabolism and activity, are probably important regulators of coral reef fish community composition.

  13. Evidence of antibiotic resistance in free-swimming, top-level marine predatory fishes.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Jason K; Mitchell, Mark A; Blackburn, Mary-Claire Holley; Curtis, Andrew; Thompson, Bruce A

    2010-03-01

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a growing problem in both human and veterinary medicine. Several studies documented the presence of resistant bacteria in humans, livestock, and domestic animals; however, limited research is available on the presence of antibiotic drug resistance in wildlife species. A cross-sectional study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of resistant bacteria collected from wild-caught, marine predatory fishes. Seven species of sharks and a single teleost species were opportunistically sampled from six different study sites in coastal Belize, coastal and nearshore waters of Louisiana, the Florida Keys, and Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts. A total of 134 viable bacteria samples were isolated from the cloacal swabs of predatory fishes. Isolates were characterized by Gram-stain morphology and tested for resistance by using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Thirteen drugs (penicillin G, piperacillin, ticarcillin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ceftiofur, amikacin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, doxycycline, chloramphenicol, and sulfamethoxazole) were selected for this study. Prevalence was calculated as the total number of isolates resistant to one or more drugs against the total number of samples in that study area or fish population. Sharks sampled in the Florida Keys exhibited the greatest resistance to a wide selection of drugs. Resistance to at least one drug was found in each of the six study sites and in all of the fish species sampled. Multidrug resistance was also documented in most of the study sites. Interspecific comparisons between redfish, Sciaenops ocellata, and sharks from Louisiana offshore waters (which represent species of the Carcharhinus genus) demonstrated a significantly higher prevalence in redfish, which may be because of the older age of the population. The findings of this study confirmed the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in marine predatory fishes from multiple taxa and multiple geographic

  14. Evidence of antibiotic resistance in free-swimming, top-level marine predatory fishes.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Jason K; Mitchell, Mark A; Blackburn, Mary-Claire Holley; Curtis, Andrew; Thompson, Bruce A

    2010-03-01

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a growing problem in both human and veterinary medicine. Several studies documented the presence of resistant bacteria in humans, livestock, and domestic animals; however, limited research is available on the presence of antibiotic drug resistance in wildlife species. A cross-sectional study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of resistant bacteria collected from wild-caught, marine predatory fishes. Seven species of sharks and a single teleost species were opportunistically sampled from six different study sites in coastal Belize, coastal and nearshore waters of Louisiana, the Florida Keys, and Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts. A total of 134 viable bacteria samples were isolated from the cloacal swabs of predatory fishes. Isolates were characterized by Gram-stain morphology and tested for resistance by using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Thirteen drugs (penicillin G, piperacillin, ticarcillin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ceftiofur, amikacin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, doxycycline, chloramphenicol, and sulfamethoxazole) were selected for this study. Prevalence was calculated as the total number of isolates resistant to one or more drugs against the total number of samples in that study area or fish population. Sharks sampled in the Florida Keys exhibited the greatest resistance to a wide selection of drugs. Resistance to at least one drug was found in each of the six study sites and in all of the fish species sampled. Multidrug resistance was also documented in most of the study sites. Interspecific comparisons between redfish, Sciaenops ocellata, and sharks from Louisiana offshore waters (which represent species of the Carcharhinus genus) demonstrated a significantly higher prevalence in redfish, which may be because of the older age of the population. The findings of this study confirmed the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in marine predatory fishes from multiple taxa and multiple geographic

  15. Distribution of Po-210 in two species of predatory marine fish from the Brazilian coast.

    PubMed

    Mársico, E T; Ferreira, M S; São Clemente, S C; Gouvea, R C S; Jesus, E F O; Conti, C C; Conte, C A; Kelecom, A G A C

    2014-02-01

    Polonium-210 ((210)Po) concentration was quantified in the muscle tissue and organs of two predatory marine fishes (Genypterus brasiliensis and Cynoscion microlepidotus) from Cabo Frio, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The species C. microlepidotus, a benthic carnivore, registered higher (210)Po in its tissue. The organs associated with digestion displayed the maximum radionuclide compared with other organs. The average activity was 2 mBq kg(-1) for G. brasiliensis and it was 6 mBq kg(-1) for C. microlepidotus. The activity concentrations varied significantly between the species and among organs.

  16. Predatory Trading and Risk Minimisation: How to (B)Eat the Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Anita

    We present a model of predatory traders interacting with each other in the presence of a central reserve (which dissipates their wealth through say, taxation), as well as inflation. This model is examined on a network for the purposes of correlating complexity of interactions with systemic risk. We suggest the use of selective networking to enhance the survival rates of arbitrarily chosen traders. Our conclusions show that networking with `doomed' traders is the most risk-free scenario, and that if a trader is to network with peers, it is far better to do so with those who have less intrinsic wealth than himself to ensure individual, and perhaps systemic stability.

  17. Distribution of Po-210 in two species of predatory marine fish from the Brazilian coast.

    PubMed

    Mársico, E T; Ferreira, M S; São Clemente, S C; Gouvea, R C S; Jesus, E F O; Conti, C C; Conte, C A; Kelecom, A G A C

    2014-02-01

    Polonium-210 ((210)Po) concentration was quantified in the muscle tissue and organs of two predatory marine fishes (Genypterus brasiliensis and Cynoscion microlepidotus) from Cabo Frio, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The species C. microlepidotus, a benthic carnivore, registered higher (210)Po in its tissue. The organs associated with digestion displayed the maximum radionuclide compared with other organs. The average activity was 2 mBq kg(-1) for G. brasiliensis and it was 6 mBq kg(-1) for C. microlepidotus. The activity concentrations varied significantly between the species and among organs. PMID:24334195

  18. The predatory strike of free ranging praying mantises, Sphodromantis lineola (Burmeister). II: Strikes in the horizontal plane.

    PubMed

    Cleal, K S; Prete, F R

    1996-01-01

    The predatory behavior of free ranging praying mantises, Sphodromantis lineola (Burmeister), in response to prey at various positions in the horizontal plane was examined using high speed (200 frames per second) videography. We found that the movements of the meso- and metathoracic legs over the course of the strike were analogous in many respects to those made by the cockroach Periplaneta americana during escape turns. When mantises struck at prey directly ahead of them, they were propelled forward by extensions of the metathoracic femur-tibia, and the meso- and metathoracic coxa-femur joints (changes in the latter were determined indirectly via changes in the femur-pterothorax angles). This pattern of movements is similar to that of cockroach Type 1 turns. However, when prey lay to either side of the pterothorax-abdomen axis, mantises turned toward the prey as they stuck. These turning movements were the result, primarily, of changes in the femur-thorax angles. Specifically, as the mantises turned toward the prey, contralateral mesothoracic femora and metathoracic tibiae and femora extended, and the corresponding ipsilateral joints extended to a lesser degree or flexed. This pattern of movements is similar to that of cockroach Type 2 turns. In addition, these leg movements were accompanied by flexion of the prothorax-abdomen angle which turned the prothorax even further in the direction of the prey. We found a stronger relationship between mantis leg movements and the position of the prey in relationship to the pterothorax than between the leg movements and the position of the prey in the visual field. Our data suggest that the praying mantis' central nervous system integrates proprioceptive and visual information in order to determine the location of prey in "pterothorax-centered' rather than "head-centered' space. PMID:8886390

  19. The rhetorical construction of the predatorial virus: a Burkian analysis of nonfiction accounts of the Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Weldon, R A

    2001-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, a new subgenre of horror films, referred to as plague films, has turned our focus to the threat of a hemorrhagic viral pandemic, comparable to the Spanish Flu epidemic of 1916. Based on the Ebola viral outbreaks of 1976, various writers have presented their accounts under the guise of increasing interest and prevention strategies. Disregarding inappropriate health care practices as the cause of these epidemics, accountability is refocused onto the rhetorically constructed, predatory nature of the virus. By employing Burke's theory of dramatism and pentadic analysis, the author examines this rhetorical construction of Ebola as a predatorial virus and its implications for public perceptions of public health endeavors.

  20. Publishing Ethics and Predatory Practices: A Dilemma for All Stakeholders of Science Communication

    PubMed Central

    Yessirkepov, Marlen; Diyanova, Svetlana N.; Kitas, George D.

    2015-01-01

    Publishing scholarly articles in traditional and newly-launched journals is a responsible task, requiring diligence from authors, reviewers, editors, and publishers. The current generation of scientific authors has ample opportunities for publicizing their research. However, they have to selectively target journals and publish in compliance with the established norms of publishing ethics. Over the past few years, numerous illegitimate or predatory journals have emerged in most fields of science. By exploiting gold Open Access publishing, these journals paved the way for low-quality articles that threatened to change the landscape of evidence-based science. Authors, reviewers, editors, established publishers, and learned associations should be informed about predatory publishing practices and contribute to the trustworthiness of scholarly publications. In line with this, there have been several attempts to distinguish legitimate and illegitimate journals by blacklisting unethical journals (the Jeffrey Beall's list), issuing a statement on transparency and best publishing practices (the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association's and other global organizations' draft document), and tightening the indexing criteria by the Directory of Open Access Journals. None of these measures alone turned to be sufficient. All stakeholders of science communication should be aware of multiple facets of unethical practices and publish well-checked and evidence-based articles. PMID:26240476

  1. Publishing Ethics and Predatory Practices: A Dilemma for All Stakeholders of Science Communication.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Diyanova, Svetlana N; Kitas, George D

    2015-08-01

    Publishing scholarly articles in traditional and newly-launched journals is a responsible task, requiring diligence from authors, reviewers, editors, and publishers. The current generation of scientific authors has ample opportunities for publicizing their research. However, they have to selectively target journals and publish in compliance with the established norms of publishing ethics. Over the past few years, numerous illegitimate or predatory journals have emerged in most fields of science. By exploiting gold Open Access publishing, these journals paved the way for low-quality articles that threatened to change the landscape of evidence-based science. Authors, reviewers, editors, established publishers, and learned associations should be informed about predatory publishing practices and contribute to the trustworthiness of scholarly publications. In line with this, there have been several attempts to distinguish legitimate and illegitimate journals by blacklisting unethical journals (the Jeffrey Beall's list), issuing a statement on transparency and best publishing practices (the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association's and other global organizations' draft document), and tightening the indexing criteria by the Directory of Open Access Journals. None of these measures alone turned to be sufficient. All stakeholders of science communication should be aware of multiple facets of unethical practices and publish well-checked and evidence-based articles.

  2. Alterations of hippocampal place cells in foraging rats facing a "predatory" threat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Joo; Park, Mijeong; Kong, Mi-Seon; Park, Sang Geon; Cho, Jeiwon; Kim, Jeansok J

    2015-05-18

    Fear is an adaptive mechanism evolved to influence the primal decisions of foragers in "approach resource-avoid predator" conflicts. To survive and reproduce, animals must attain the basic needs (food, water, shelter, and mate) while avoiding the ultimate cost of predation. Consistent with this view, ecological studies have found that predatory threats cause animals to limit foraging to fewer places in their habitat and/or to restricted times. However, the neurophysiological basis through which animals alter their foraging boundaries when confronted with danger remains largely unknown. Here, we investigated place cells in the hippocampus, implicated in processing spatial information and memory, in male Long-Evans rats foraging for food under risky situations that would be common in nature. Specifically, place cells from dorsal cornu ammonis field 1 (CA1) were recorded while rats searched for food in a semi-naturalistic apparatus (consisting of a nest and a relatively large open area) before, during, and after encountering a "predatory" robot situated remotely from the nest. The looming robot induced remapping of place fields and increased the theta rhythm as the animals advanced toward the vicinity of threat, but not when they were around the safety of the nest. These neurophysiological effects on the hippocampus were prevented by lesioning of the amygdala. Based on these findings, we suggest that the amygdalar signaling of fear influences the stability of hippocampal place cells as a function of threat distance in rats foraging for food.

  3. Responses of herbivore and predatory mites to tomato plants exposed to jasmonic acid seed treatment.

    PubMed

    Smart, Lesley E; Martin, Janet L; Limpalaër, Marlène; Bruce, Toby J A; Pickett, John A

    2013-10-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) signalling can influence plant defense and the production of plant volatiles that mediate interactions with insects. Here, we tested whether a JA seed treatment could alter direct and indirect defenses. First, oviposition levels of herbivorous mites, Tetranychus urticae, on JA seed-treated and control tomato plants were compared. They were not significantly different on tomato cv. 'Moneymaker', however, there was a significant reduction in oviposition on treated plants in additional experiments with cv. 'Carousel'. Second, responses of predatory mites, Phytoseiulus persimilis, were assessed in a Y-tube olfactometer. Volatiles from JA seed-treated tomato cv. 'Moneymaker' plants were significantly more attractive than volatiles from control plants. Volatiles collected from plants were analysed by GC/MS, and samples from JA seed-treated plants contained more methyl salicylate and (E,E)-4,8,12-trimethyl-1,3,7,11-tridecatetraene (TMTT) than samples from control plants. Our results indicate that JA seed treatment can make tomato plants more attractive to predatory mites, but that direct effects on herbivorous mites are variable and cultivar dependent.

  4. Anystis baccarum: An Important Generalist Predatory Mite to be Considered in Apple Orchard Pest Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbertson, Andrew G. S.; Qiu, Bao-Li; Murchie, Archie K.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing concern over the continued use of pesticides is pressurising apple growers to look for alternatives to chemical pest control. The re-discovery, and subsequent conservation, of the beneficial predatory mite, Anystis baccarum (Linnaeus) (Acari: Anystidae), in Bramley apple orchards in Northern Ireland offers a potential alternative control component for incorporation into integrated pest management strategies. Anystis baccarum readily feeds upon economically important invertebrate pest species including European fruit tree red spider mite, Panonychus ulmi (Koch) (Acari: Tetranychidae) and show a level of compatibility with chemical pesticides. Recent mis-identification by apple growers of this beneficial mite species had resulted in unnecessary pesticide applications being applied within Northern Irish apple orchards. However, dissemination of information to the apple growers and promotion of the benefits this mite offers in apple orchards has helped to conserve its populations. Apple growers, across the United Kingdom, must be encouraged to be aware of A. baccarum, and indeed all predatory fauna, within their orchards and seek to conserve populations. In doing so, it will ensure that the British apple market remains an environmentally sustainable production system. PMID:26462829

  5. Anystis baccarum: An Important Generalist Predatory Mite to be Considered in Apple Orchard Pest Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    Cuthbertson, Andrew G S; Qiu, Bao-Li; Murchie, Archie K

    2014-07-24

    The increasing concern over the continued use of pesticides is pressurising apple growers to look for alternatives to chemical pest control. The re-discovery, and subsequent conservation, of the beneficial predatory mite, Anystis baccarum (Linnaeus) (Acari: Anystidae), in Bramley apple orchards in Northern Ireland offers a potential alternative control component for incorporation into integrated pest management strategies. Anystis baccarum readily feeds upon economically important invertebrate pest species including European fruit tree red spider mite, Panonychus ulmi (Koch) (Acari: Tetranychidae) and show a level of compatibility with chemical pesticides. Recent mis-identification by apple growers of this beneficial mite species had resulted in unnecessary pesticide applications being applied within Northern Irish apple orchards. However, dissemination of information to the apple growers and promotion of the benefits this mite offers in apple orchards has helped to conserve its populations. Apple growers, across the United Kingdom, must be encouraged to be aware of A. baccarum, and indeed all predatory fauna, within their orchards and seek to conserve populations. In doing so, it will ensure that the British apple market remains an environmentally sustainable production system.

  6. Publishing Ethics and Predatory Practices: A Dilemma for All Stakeholders of Science Communication.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Diyanova, Svetlana N; Kitas, George D

    2015-08-01

    Publishing scholarly articles in traditional and newly-launched journals is a responsible task, requiring diligence from authors, reviewers, editors, and publishers. The current generation of scientific authors has ample opportunities for publicizing their research. However, they have to selectively target journals and publish in compliance with the established norms of publishing ethics. Over the past few years, numerous illegitimate or predatory journals have emerged in most fields of science. By exploiting gold Open Access publishing, these journals paved the way for low-quality articles that threatened to change the landscape of evidence-based science. Authors, reviewers, editors, established publishers, and learned associations should be informed about predatory publishing practices and contribute to the trustworthiness of scholarly publications. In line with this, there have been several attempts to distinguish legitimate and illegitimate journals by blacklisting unethical journals (the Jeffrey Beall's list), issuing a statement on transparency and best publishing practices (the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association's and other global organizations' draft document), and tightening the indexing criteria by the Directory of Open Access Journals. None of these measures alone turned to be sufficient. All stakeholders of science communication should be aware of multiple facets of unethical practices and publish well-checked and evidence-based articles. PMID:26240476

  7. Responses of predatory invertebrates to seeding density and plant species richness in experimental tallgrass prairie restorations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nemec, Kristine T.; Allen, Craig R.; Danielson, Stephen D.; Helzer, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, agricultural producers and non-governmental organizations have restored thousands of hectares of former cropland in the central United States with native grasses and forbs. However, the ability of these grassland restorations to attract predatory invertebrates has not been well documented, even though predators provide an important ecosystem service to agricultural producers by naturally regulating herbivores. This study assessed the effects of plant richness and seeding density on the richness and abundance of surface-dwelling (ants, ground beetles, and spiders) and aboveground (ladybird beetles) predatory invertebrates. In the spring of 2006, twenty-four 55 m × 55 m-plots were planted to six replicates in each of four treatments: high richness (97 species typically planted by The Nature Conservancy), at low and high seeding densities, and low richness (15 species representing a typical Natural Resources Conservation Service Conservation Reserve Program mix, CP25), at low and high seeding densities. Ants, ground beetles, and spiders were sampled using pitfall traps and ladybird beetles were sampled using sweep netting in 2007–2009. The abundance of ants, ground beetles, and spiders showed no response to seed mix richness or seeding density but there was a significant positive effect of richness on ladybird beetle abundance. Seeding density had a significant positive effect on ground beetle and spider species richness and Shannon–Weaver diversity. These results may be related to differences in the plant species composition and relative amount of grass basal cover among the treatments rather than richness.

  8. Cloning and Functional Characterization of Two BTB Genes in the Predatory Mite Metaseiulus occidentalis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ke; Hoy, Marjorie A.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins containing the BTB (Bric-à-brac, tramtrack, and Broad Complex) domain typically share low sequence similarities and are involved in a wide range of cellular functions. We previously identified two putative and closely related BTB genes, BTB1 and BTB2, in the genome of the predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis. In the current study, full-length BTB1 and BTB2 cDNAs were cloned and sequenced. BTB1 and BTB2 encode proteins of 380 and 401 amino acids, respectively. BTB1 and BTB2 proteins each contain an N-terminal BTB domain and no other identifiable domains. Thus, they belong to a large category of BTB-domain proteins that are widely distributed in eukaryotes, yet with largely unknown function(s). BTB1 and BTB2 gene knockdowns in M. occidentalis females using RNAi reduced their fecundity by approximately 40% and 73%, respectively, whereas knockdown had no impact on their survival or the development of their offspring. These findings suggest these two proteins may be involved in processes related to egg production in this predatory mite, expanding the list of functions attributed to these diverse proteins. PMID:26640898

  9. Predatory activity of Pochonia chlamydosporia fungus on Toxocara (syn. Neoascaris) vitulorum eggs.

    PubMed

    Braga, Fabio R; Ferreira, Sebastião R; Araújo, Jackson V; Araujo, Juliana M; Silva, André R; Carvalho, Rogério O; Campos, Artur K; Freitas, Leandro G

    2010-02-01

    Toxocara (Neoascaris) vitulorum is a gastrointestinal nematode parasite of young ruminants, responsible for high mortality rates in parasitized cattle and buffalo calves. The objective of this work was to compare the predatory capacity under laboratory conditions of four fungal isolates of the nematophagous fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia (VC1, VC4, VC5 and VC12) on T. vitulorum eggs in 2% water-agar (2% WA). T. vitulorum eggs were plated on 2% WA Petri dishes which contained cultured fungal isolates and control plates without fungi. After 10 and 15 days one hundred eggs were removed and classified according to the following parameters: type 1, biochemical and physiological effect without morphological damage to the eggshell, type 2, lytic effect with morphological alteration of the eggshell and embryo and type 3, lytic effect with morphological alteration of eggshell and embryo in addition to hyphal penetration and internal egg colonization. The fungal isolates were effective in the destruction of T. vitulorum eggs presenting the type 3 effect at 10 and 15 days after contact with the fungus. No nematophagous fungi were observed in the control group during the experiment. There was no variation in the predatory capacity of the fungal isolates (P > 0.01) at the intervals of 10 and 15 days. These results indicate that P. chlamydosporia (VC1, VC4, VC5 and VC12) negatively influenced the development of T. vitulorum eggs and can be considered a potential candidate for the biological control of nematodes.

  10. Predatory activity of Pochonia chlamydosporia fungus on Toxocara (syn. Neoascaris) vitulorum eggs.

    PubMed

    Braga, Fabio R; Ferreira, Sebastião R; Araújo, Jackson V; Araujo, Juliana M; Silva, André R; Carvalho, Rogério O; Campos, Artur K; Freitas, Leandro G

    2010-02-01

    Toxocara (Neoascaris) vitulorum is a gastrointestinal nematode parasite of young ruminants, responsible for high mortality rates in parasitized cattle and buffalo calves. The objective of this work was to compare the predatory capacity under laboratory conditions of four fungal isolates of the nematophagous fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia (VC1, VC4, VC5 and VC12) on T. vitulorum eggs in 2% water-agar (2% WA). T. vitulorum eggs were plated on 2% WA Petri dishes which contained cultured fungal isolates and control plates without fungi. After 10 and 15 days one hundred eggs were removed and classified according to the following parameters: type 1, biochemical and physiological effect without morphological damage to the eggshell, type 2, lytic effect with morphological alteration of the eggshell and embryo and type 3, lytic effect with morphological alteration of eggshell and embryo in addition to hyphal penetration and internal egg colonization. The fungal isolates were effective in the destruction of T. vitulorum eggs presenting the type 3 effect at 10 and 15 days after contact with the fungus. No nematophagous fungi were observed in the control group during the experiment. There was no variation in the predatory capacity of the fungal isolates (P > 0.01) at the intervals of 10 and 15 days. These results indicate that P. chlamydosporia (VC1, VC4, VC5 and VC12) negatively influenced the development of T. vitulorum eggs and can be considered a potential candidate for the biological control of nematodes. PMID:19697149

  11. 75 FR 28814 - Owner of Record and Re-Sale Data To Preclude Predatory Lending Practices (Property Flipping) on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Owner of Record and Re-Sale Data To Preclude Predatory Lending Practices (Property... transaction does not involve any sale or assignment of the sales contract. For properties resold within one year of acquisition by the seller (with limited exceptions), or if the sales price exceeds...

  12. Effectiveness of heat treatment to protect introduced denitrifying bacteria from eukaryotic predatory microorganisms in a pilot-scale bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Ikeda-Ohtsubo, Wakako; Miyahara, Morio; Yamada, Takeshi; Watanabe, Akira; Fushinobu, Shinya; Wakagi, Takayoshi; Shoun, Hirofumi; Miyauchi, Keisuke; Endo, Ginro

    2013-12-01

    Bioaugmentation of bioreactor systems with pre-cultured bacteria has proven difficult because inoculated bacteria are easily eliminated by predatory eukaryotic-microorganisms. Here, we demonstrated an intermediate thermal treatment was effective for protecting introduced denitrifying bacteria from eukaryotic predators and consequently allowed the inoculated bacteria to survive longer in a denitrification reactor.

  13. Convergent evolution of eye ultrastructure and divergent evolution of vision-mediated predatory behaviour in jumping spiders.

    PubMed

    Su, K F; Meier, R; Jackson, R R; Harland, D P; Li, D

    2007-07-01

    All jumping spiders have unique, complex eyes with exceptional spatial acuity and some of the most elaborate vision-guided predatory strategies ever documented for any animal of their size. However, it is only recently that phylogenetic techniques have been used to reconstruct the relationships and key evolutionary events within the Salticidae. Here, we used data for 35 species and six genes (4.8 kb) for reconstructing the phylogenetic relationships between Spartaeinae, Lyssomaninae and Salticoida. We document a remarkable case of morphological convergence of eye ultrastructure in two clades with divergent predatory behaviour. We, furthermore, find evidence for a stepwise, gradual evolution of a complex predatory strategy. Divergent predatory behaviour ranges from cursorial hunting to building prey-catching webs and araneophagy with web invasion and aggressive mimicry. Web invasion and aggressive mimicry evolved once from an ancestral spartaeine that was already araneophagic and had no difficulty entering webs due to glue immunity. Web invasion and aggressive mimicry was lost once, in Paracyrba, which has replaced one highly specialized predation strategy with another (hunting mosquitoes). In contrast to the evolution of divergent behaviour, eyes with similarly high spatial acuity and ultrastructural design evolved convergently in the Salticoida and in Portia.

  14. Effects of sea hare ink secretion and its escapin-generated components on a variety of predatory fishes.

    PubMed

    Nusnbaum, Matthew; Derby, Charles D

    2010-06-01

    Sea hares, Aplysia californica, have a diversity of anti-predatory defenses. One is an actively released chemical defense: an ink secretion that is a mixture of two glandular products--ink from the ink gland and opaline from the opaline gland. The mechanisms of action of ink secretion and its components have recently been examined in detail against several predatory invertebrates. Our goal is to extend this mechanistic analysis to predatory vertebrates. Toward this end, the current study details the effects of ink, opaline, and one set of its components--the products of the reaction of escapin, an l-amino acid oxidase, with its natural substrates, L-lysine and L-arginine--on the palatability of food for five species of fishes: bluehead wrasses Thalassoma bifasciatum, señorita wrasses Oxyjulis californica, pinfish Lagodon rhomboides, mummichogs Fundulus heteroclitus, and bonnethead sharks Sphyrna tiburo. These fishes have different feeding styles, ranging from large fishes able to engulf sea hares to smaller fishes able to attack sea hares by pecking at them; and they live in a variety of habitats, including those that sea hares typically inhabit. We show that ink but not opaline significantly decreases the palatability of food for all five species, and that escapin products are mildly unpalatable to the two species of wrasses but not to the other species. These results, together with others, show that sea hare ink affects a diversity of predatory fishes, setting the stage for mechanistic studies using electrophysiological analysis of their chemosensory systems.

  15. Convergent evolution of eye ultrastructure and divergent evolution of vision-mediated predatory behaviour in jumping spiders.

    PubMed

    Su, K F; Meier, R; Jackson, R R; Harland, D P; Li, D

    2007-07-01

    All jumping spiders have unique, complex eyes with exceptional spatial acuity and some of the most elaborate vision-guided predatory strategies ever documented for any animal of their size. However, it is only recently that phylogenetic techniques have been used to reconstruct the relationships and key evolutionary events within the Salticidae. Here, we used data for 35 species and six genes (4.8 kb) for reconstructing the phylogenetic relationships between Spartaeinae, Lyssomaninae and Salticoida. We document a remarkable case of morphological convergence of eye ultrastructure in two clades with divergent predatory behaviour. We, furthermore, find evidence for a stepwise, gradual evolution of a complex predatory strategy. Divergent predatory behaviour ranges from cursorial hunting to building prey-catching webs and araneophagy with web invasion and aggressive mimicry. Web invasion and aggressive mimicry evolved once from an ancestral spartaeine that was already araneophagic and had no difficulty entering webs due to glue immunity. Web invasion and aggressive mimicry was lost once, in Paracyrba, which has replaced one highly specialized predation strategy with another (hunting mosquitoes). In contrast to the evolution of divergent behaviour, eyes with similarly high spatial acuity and ultrastructural design evolved convergently in the Salticoida and in Portia. PMID:17584241

  16. The influence of intraguild competitors on reproductive decisions by two predatory Heteroptera, Orius insidiosus (Anthocoridae) and Nabis americoferus (Nabidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relationship between the oviposition site preferences of predators in the face of intraguild competitors has received little attention, but it likely shapes the reproductive ecology of predatory species. In this study, oviposition intensity and the within-plant distribution of Orius insidiosus (...

  17. Best practices for scholarly authors in the age of predatory journals.

    PubMed

    Beall, J

    2016-02-01

    'Continuous effort, not strength or intelligence, is the key to understanding our potential.' Margaret J Wheatley. The focus of any academic or research author is to share his or her findings, and to gain respect and reward for publishing. The ideal journal is one that not only publishes an article quickly but also helps the author to improve the article before publication through peer review, selects only the best research so that the author's article lies alongside other high quality articles, and provides maximum (and long-term) visibility and access to the article. Unfortunately, in the real world, authors need to make tradeoffs between high quality journals, those that work quickly, those that are willing to accept the article and those that provide the best access. Into this mix has come the potential of open access as a means of increasing visibility: journals publish the article without a subscription barrier so anyone, anywhere, can read the article. However, the growth of open access (pushed by institutions, grant bodies and governments as a means of improving human health and knowledge) has come with some unforeseen consequences. In this article, Jeffrey Beall discusses one recent phenomenon that has arisen from the open access movement: that of 'predatory publishers'. These are individuals or companies that use the open access financial system (author pays, rather than library subscribes) to defraud authors and readers by promising reputable publishing platforms but delivering nothing of the sort. They frequently have imaginary editorial boards, do not operate any peer review or quality control, are unclear about payment requirements and opaque about ownership or location, include plagiarised content and publish whatever somebody will pay them to publish. Predatory publishers generally make false promises to authors and behave unethically. They also undermine the scholarly information and publishing environment with a deluge of poor quality, unchecked

  18. Best practices for scholarly authors in the age of predatory journals.

    PubMed

    Beall, J

    2016-02-01

    'Continuous effort, not strength or intelligence, is the key to understanding our potential.' Margaret J Wheatley. The focus of any academic or research author is to share his or her findings, and to gain respect and reward for publishing. The ideal journal is one that not only publishes an article quickly but also helps the author to improve the article before publication through peer review, selects only the best research so that the author's article lies alongside other high quality articles, and provides maximum (and long-term) visibility and access to the article. Unfortunately, in the real world, authors need to make tradeoffs between high quality journals, those that work quickly, those that are willing to accept the article and those that provide the best access. Into this mix has come the potential of open access as a means of increasing visibility: journals publish the article without a subscription barrier so anyone, anywhere, can read the article. However, the growth of open access (pushed by institutions, grant bodies and governments as a means of improving human health and knowledge) has come with some unforeseen consequences. In this article, Jeffrey Beall discusses one recent phenomenon that has arisen from the open access movement: that of 'predatory publishers'. These are individuals or companies that use the open access financial system (author pays, rather than library subscribes) to defraud authors and readers by promising reputable publishing platforms but delivering nothing of the sort. They frequently have imaginary editorial boards, do not operate any peer review or quality control, are unclear about payment requirements and opaque about ownership or location, include plagiarised content and publish whatever somebody will pay them to publish. Predatory publishers generally make false promises to authors and behave unethically. They also undermine the scholarly information and publishing environment with a deluge of poor quality, unchecked

  19. Evaluation of the predatory mite Amblyseius hainanensis (Acari: Phytoseiidae) and artificial rainfall for the management of Brevipalpus obovatus (Acari: Tenuipalpidae).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Da-Rui; Liu, Guang-Hua; Zhang, Run-Jie; Cuthbertson, Andrew G S; Qiu, Bao-Li

    2012-10-01

    Brevipalpus obovatus Donnadieu is an important pest mite on tea plants in South China. In the current study, predatory mites of B. obovatus in the tea gardens of Guangzhou were extensively surveyed. In total, 13 species of predatory mites (four families with seven genera) were recorded. The population proportion of Amblyseius hainanensis Wu et Qian was the highest (68.6 %), followed by that of Anystis baccarum (L.) (8.4 %) and A. theae Wu (6.3 %). The effects of starvation time, habitat size and pest population density on the predatory efficiency of the most dominant species, A. hainanensis, feeding on B. obovatus were assessed. In addition, the effectiveness of artificial rainfall in reducing B. obovatus populations was evaluated. After starvation for 48 h, the predatory efficiency of A. hainanensis was significantly higher than those that had been starved for 24 or 72 h when 30-50 B. obovatus eggs were made available. The predation of A. hainanensis on B. obovatus also increased with increasing prey density. The number of prey attacked by A. hainanensis in a 3.2 cm(2) habitat was significantly higher than in a 6.3 cm(2) habitat. The average predation of A. hainanensis was 31.7 eggs per day when offered 100 B. obovatus eggs on a tea leaf. This decreased to 17.8 eggs per day when four A. hainanensis shared 100 B. obovatus eggs. B. obovatus populations can be reduced by artificial rainfall, with the reduction affected by rainfall intensity. With an intensity of 40 mm in 15 min, 90.2 % mortality of B. obovatus occurred; lower mortalities were recorded (13.3 and 29.8 %) when the intensity was 2 or 4 mm in 15 min. Combination of the predatory mite A. hainanensis and artificial rainfall for the integrated pest management of B. obovatus is discussed.

  20. Evaluation of the predatory mite Amblyseius hainanensis (Acari: Phytoseiidae) and artificial rainfall for the management of Brevipalpus obovatus (Acari: Tenuipalpidae).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Da-Rui; Liu, Guang-Hua; Zhang, Run-Jie; Cuthbertson, Andrew G S; Qiu, Bao-Li

    2012-10-01

    Brevipalpus obovatus Donnadieu is an important pest mite on tea plants in South China. In the current study, predatory mites of B. obovatus in the tea gardens of Guangzhou were extensively surveyed. In total, 13 species of predatory mites (four families with seven genera) were recorded. The population proportion of Amblyseius hainanensis Wu et Qian was the highest (68.6 %), followed by that of Anystis baccarum (L.) (8.4 %) and A. theae Wu (6.3 %). The effects of starvation time, habitat size and pest population density on the predatory efficiency of the most dominant species, A. hainanensis, feeding on B. obovatus were assessed. In addition, the effectiveness of artificial rainfall in reducing B. obovatus populations was evaluated. After starvation for 48 h, the predatory efficiency of A. hainanensis was significantly higher than those that had been starved for 24 or 72 h when 30-50 B. obovatus eggs were made available. The predation of A. hainanensis on B. obovatus also increased with increasing prey density. The number of prey attacked by A. hainanensis in a 3.2 cm(2) habitat was significantly higher than in a 6.3 cm(2) habitat. The average predation of A. hainanensis was 31.7 eggs per day when offered 100 B. obovatus eggs on a tea leaf. This decreased to 17.8 eggs per day when four A. hainanensis shared 100 B. obovatus eggs. B. obovatus populations can be reduced by artificial rainfall, with the reduction affected by rainfall intensity. With an intensity of 40 mm in 15 min, 90.2 % mortality of B. obovatus occurred; lower mortalities were recorded (13.3 and 29.8 %) when the intensity was 2 or 4 mm in 15 min. Combination of the predatory mite A. hainanensis and artificial rainfall for the integrated pest management of B. obovatus is discussed. PMID:22527834

  1. Laboratory and field efficacy of Pedalium murex and predatory copepod, Mesocyclops longisetus on rural malaria vector, Anopheles culicifacies

    PubMed Central

    Chitra, Thangadurai; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Kumar, Arjunan Naresh; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Nataraj, Thiyagarajan; Indumathi, Duraisamy; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou

    2013-01-01

    Objective To test the potentiality of the leaf extract of Pedalium murex (P. murex) and predatory copepod Mesocyclops longisetus (M. longisetus) in individual and combination in controlling the rural malarial vector, Anopheles culicifacies (An. culicifacies) in laboratory and field studies. Methods P. murex leaves were collected from in and around Erode, Tamilnadu, India. The active compounds were extracted with 300 mL of methanol for 8 h in a Soxhlet apparatus. Laboratory studies on larvicidal and pupicidal effects of methanolic extract of P. murex tested against the rural malarial vector, An. culicifacies were significant. Results Evaluated lethal concentrations (LC50) of P. murex extract were 2.68, 3.60, 4.50, 6.44 and 7.60 mg/L for I, II, III, IV and pupae of An. culicifacies, respectively. Predatory copepod, M. longisetus was examined for their predatory efficacy against the malarial vector, An. culicifacies. M. longisetus showed effective predation on the early instar (47% and 36% on I and II instar) when compared with the later ones (3% and 1% on III and IV instar). Predatory efficacy of M. longisetus was increased (70% and 45% on I and II instar) when the application was along with the P. murex extract. Conclusions Predator survival test showed that the methanolic extract of P. murex is non-toxic to the predatory copepod, M. longisetus. Experiments were also conducted to evaluate the efficacy of methanolic extract of P. murex and M. longisetus in the direct breeding sites (paddy fields) of An. culicifacies. Reduction in larval density was very high and sustained for a long time in combined treatment of P. murex and M. longisetus.

  2. The skull of the giant predatory pliosaur Rhomaleosaurus cramptoni: implications for plesiosaur phylogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Adam S.; Dyke, Gareth J.

    2008-10-01

    The predatory pliosaurs were among the largest creatures ever to inhabit the oceans, some reaching gigantic proportions greater than 15 m in length. Fossils of this subclade of plesiosaurs are known from sediments all over the world, ranging in age from the Hettangian (approximately 198 Myr) to the Turonian (approximately 92 Myr). However, due to a lack of detailed studies and because only incomplete specimens are usually reported, pliosaur evolution remains poorly understood. In this paper, we describe the three dimensionally preserved skull of the giant Jurassic pliosaur Rhomaleosaurus cramptoni. The first phylogenetic analysis dedicated to in-group relationships of pliosaurs allows us to hypothesise a number of well-supported lineages that correlate with marine biogeography and the palaeoecology of these reptiles. Rhomaleosaurids comprised a short-lived and early diverging lineage within pliosaurs, whose open-water top-predator niche was filled by other pliosaur taxa by the mid-late Jurassic.

  3. Large predatory coral trout species unlikely to meet increasing energetic demands in a warming ocean.

    PubMed

    Johansen, J L; Pratchett, M S; Messmer, V; Coker, D J; Tobin, A J; Hoey, A S

    2015-09-08

    Increased ocean temperature due to climate change is raising metabolic demands and energy requirements of marine ectotherms. If productivity of marine systems and fisheries are to persist, individual species must compensate for this demand through increasing energy acquisition or decreasing energy expenditure. Here we reveal that the most important coral reef fishery species in the Indo-west Pacific, the large predatory coral trout Plectropomus leopardus (Serranidae), can behaviourally adjust food intake to maintain body-condition under elevated temperatures, and acclimate over time to consume larger meals. However, these increased energetic demands are unlikely to be met by adequate production at lower trophic levels, as smaller prey species are often the first to decline in response to climate-induced loss of live coral and structural complexity. Consequently, ubiquitous increases in energy consumption due to climate change will increase top-down competition for a dwindling biomass of prey, potentially distorting entire food webs and associated fisheries.

  4. A Devonian predatory fish provides insights into the early evolution of modern sarcopterygians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Zhu, Min; Ahlberg, Per Erik; Qiao, Tuo; Zhu, You’an; Zhao, Wenjin; Jia, Liantao

    2016-01-01

    Crown or modern sarcopterygians (coelacanths, lungfishes, and tetrapods) differ substantially from stem sarcopterygians, such as Guiyu and Psarolepis, and a lack of transitional fossil taxa limits our understanding of the origin of the crown group. The Onychodontiformes, an enigmatic Devonian predatory fish group, seems to have characteristics of both stem and crown sarcopterygians but is difficult to place because of insufficient anatomical information. We describe the new skull material of Qingmenodus, a Pragian (~409-million-year-old) onychodont from China, using high-resolution computed tomography to image internal structures of the braincase. In addition to its remarkable similarities with stem sarcopterygians in the ethmosphenoid portion, Qingmenodus exhibits coelacanth-like neurocranial features in the otic region. A phylogenetic analysis based on a revised data set unambiguously assigns onychodonts to crown sarcopterygians as stem coelacanths. Qingmenodus thus bridges the morphological gap between stem sarcopterygians and coelacanths and helps to illuminate the early evolution and diversification of crown sarcopterygians. PMID:27386576

  5. The predatory behaviour of the thylacine: Tasmanian tiger or marsupial wolf?

    PubMed

    Figueirido, Borja; Janis, Christine M

    2011-12-23

    The extinct thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus) and the extant grey wolf (Canis lupus) are textbook examples of convergence between marsupials and placentals. Craniodental studies confirm the thylacine's carnivorous diet, but little attention has been paid to its postcranial skeleton, which would confirm or refute rare eyewitness reports of a more ambushing predatory mode than the pack-hunting pursuit mode of wolves and other large canids. Here we show that thylacines had the elbow morphology typical of an ambush predator, and propose that the 'Tasmanian tiger' vernacular name might be more apt than the 'marsupial wolf'. The 'niche overlap hypothesis' with dingoes (Canis lupus dingo) as a main cause of thylacine extinction in mainland Australia is discussed in the light of this new information.

  6. A Devonian predatory fish provides insights into the early evolution of modern sarcopterygians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Zhu, Min; Ahlberg, Per Erik; Qiao, Tuo; Zhu, You'an; Zhao, Wenjin; Jia, Liantao

    2016-06-01

    Crown or modern sarcopterygians (coelacanths, lungfishes, and tetrapods) differ substantially from stem sarcopterygians, such as Guiyu and Psarolepis, and a lack of transitional fossil taxa limits our understanding of the origin of the crown group. The Onychodontiformes, an enigmatic Devonian predatory fish group, seems to have characteristics of both stem and crown sarcopterygians but is difficult to place because of insufficient anatomical information. We describe the new skull material of Qingmenodus, a Pragian (~409-million-year-old) onychodont from China, using high-resolution computed tomography to image internal structures of the braincase. In addition to its remarkable similarities with stem sarcopterygians in the ethmosphenoid portion, Qingmenodus exhibits coelacanth-like neurocranial features in the otic region. A phylogenetic analysis based on a revised data set unambiguously assigns onychodonts to crown sarcopterygians as stem coelacanths. Qingmenodus thus bridges the morphological gap between stem sarcopterygians and coelacanths and helps to illuminate the early evolution and diversification of crown sarcopterygians. PMID:27386576

  7. Tetrodotoxin levels in larval and metamorphosed newts (Taricha granulosa) and palatability to predatory dragonflies.

    PubMed

    Gall, Brian G; Stokes, Amber N; French, Susannah S; Schlepphorst, Elizabeth A; Brodie, Edmund D; Brodie, Edmund D

    2011-06-01

    Some populations of the newt Taricha granulosa possess extremely high concentrations of the neurotoxin tetrodotoxin (TTX). Tetrodotoxin is present in adult newts and their eggs, but has been assumed to be absent from the larval stage. We tested larval and metamorphosed juveniles for the presence of TTX and evaluated the palatability of these developmental stages to predatory dragonfly nymphs. All developmental stages retained substantial quantities of TTX and almost all individuals were unpalatable to dragonfly nymphs. Tetrodotoxin quantity varied greatly among individuals. When adjusted for mass, TTX concentrations declined steadily through metamorphosis. Several juveniles were palatable to dragonflies and these individuals had significantly lower TTX levels than unpalatable juveniles. These results suggest that despite previous assumptions, substantial quantities of TTX, originally deposited in the embryo, are retained by the developing larvae and metamorphosed juveniles and this quantity is enough to make them unpalatable to some potential predators.

  8. Predatory fish sounds can alter crab foraging behaviour and influence bivalve abundance

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, A. Randall; Mann, David A.; Kimbro, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The risk of predation can have large effects on ecological communities via changes in prey behaviour, morphology and reproduction. Although prey can use a variety of sensory signals to detect predation risk, relatively little is known regarding the effects of predator acoustic cues on prey foraging behaviour. Here we show that an ecologically important marine crab species can detect sound across a range of frequencies, probably in response to particle acceleration. Further, crabs suppress their resource consumption in the presence of experimental acoustic stimuli from multiple predatory fish species, and the sign and strength of this response is similar to that elicited by water-borne chemical cues. When acoustic and chemical cues were combined, consumption differed from expectations based on independent cue effects, suggesting redundancies among cue types. These results highlight that predator acoustic cues may influence prey behaviour across a range of vertebrate and invertebrate taxa, with the potential for cascading effects on resource abundance. PMID:24943367

  9. Rapid determination of scopolamine in evidence of recreational and predatory use.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, Jorge; Mai, Thanh Duc; López, María López; Bartolomé, Carmen; Hauser, Peter C; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, scopolamine has become a drug of common use for recreational and predatory purposes and several ways of administration have been devised. A method for the rapid analysis of suspicious samples was developed, using a portable capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection. The method allows the separation of scopolamine from atropine which has a similar structure and is present along with scopolamine in some samples. The method was demonstrated to be useful for the fast analysis of several types of evidential items which have recently been reported to have been abused with fatal consequences or employed for criminal purposes. An infusion of Datura stramonium L., in which scopolamine and atropine naturally coexist, was analyzed for being frequently consumed for recreational purposes. A spiked moisturizing cream and six spiked alcoholic beverages were also analyzed. In spite of the complexity of the specimens, the sample pre-treatment methods developed were simple and fast. PMID:24188342

  10. Large predatory coral trout species unlikely to meet increasing energetic demands in a warming ocean

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, J.L.; Pratchett, M.S.; Messmer, V.; Coker, D.J.; Tobin, A.J.; Hoey, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Increased ocean temperature due to climate change is raising metabolic demands and energy requirements of marine ectotherms. If productivity of marine systems and fisheries are to persist, individual species must compensate for this demand through increasing energy acquisition or decreasing energy expenditure. Here we reveal that the most important coral reef fishery species in the Indo-west Pacific, the large predatory coral trout Plectropomus leopardus (Serranidae), can behaviourally adjust food intake to maintain body-condition under elevated temperatures, and acclimate over time to consume larger meals. However, these increased energetic demands are unlikely to be met by adequate production at lower trophic levels, as smaller prey species are often the first to decline in response to climate-induced loss of live coral and structural complexity. Consequently, ubiquitous increases in energy consumption due to climate change will increase top-down competition for a dwindling biomass of prey, potentially distorting entire food webs and associated fisheries. PMID:26345733

  11. The predatory behaviour of the thylacine: Tasmanian tiger or marsupial wolf?

    PubMed

    Figueirido, Borja; Janis, Christine M

    2011-12-23

    The extinct thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus) and the extant grey wolf (Canis lupus) are textbook examples of convergence between marsupials and placentals. Craniodental studies confirm the thylacine's carnivorous diet, but little attention has been paid to its postcranial skeleton, which would confirm or refute rare eyewitness reports of a more ambushing predatory mode than the pack-hunting pursuit mode of wolves and other large canids. Here we show that thylacines had the elbow morphology typical of an ambush predator, and propose that the 'Tasmanian tiger' vernacular name might be more apt than the 'marsupial wolf'. The 'niche overlap hypothesis' with dingoes (Canis lupus dingo) as a main cause of thylacine extinction in mainland Australia is discussed in the light of this new information. PMID:21543392

  12. Large predatory coral trout species unlikely to meet increasing energetic demands in a warming ocean.

    PubMed

    Johansen, J L; Pratchett, M S; Messmer, V; Coker, D J; Tobin, A J; Hoey, A S

    2015-01-01

    Increased ocean temperature due to climate change is raising metabolic demands and energy requirements of marine ectotherms. If productivity of marine systems and fisheries are to persist, individual species must compensate for this demand through increasing energy acquisition or decreasing energy expenditure. Here we reveal that the most important coral reef fishery species in the Indo-west Pacific, the large predatory coral trout Plectropomus leopardus (Serranidae), can behaviourally adjust food intake to maintain body-condition under elevated temperatures, and acclimate over time to consume larger meals. However, these increased energetic demands are unlikely to be met by adequate production at lower trophic levels, as smaller prey species are often the first to decline in response to climate-induced loss of live coral and structural complexity. Consequently, ubiquitous increases in energy consumption due to climate change will increase top-down competition for a dwindling biomass of prey, potentially distorting entire food webs and associated fisheries. PMID:26345733

  13. Predatory fish sounds can alter crab foraging behaviour and influence bivalve abundance.

    PubMed

    Hughes, A Randall; Mann, David A; Kimbro, David L

    2014-08-01

    The risk of predation can have large effects on ecological communities via changes in prey behaviour, morphology and reproduction. Although prey can use a variety of sensory signals to detect predation risk, relatively little is known regarding the effects of predator acoustic cues on prey foraging behaviour. Here we show that an ecologically important marine crab species can detect sound across a range of frequencies, probably in response to particle acceleration. Further, crabs suppress their resource consumption in the presence of experimental acoustic stimuli from multiple predatory fish species, and the sign and strength of this response is similar to that elicited by water-borne chemical cues. When acoustic and chemical cues were combined, consumption differed from expectations based on independent cue effects, suggesting redundancies among cue types. These results highlight that predator acoustic cues may influence prey behaviour across a range of vertebrate and invertebrate taxa, with the potential for cascading effects on resource abundance.

  14. [In vitro predatory activity of 8 fungal isolates against the nematode Panagrellus redivivus].

    PubMed

    Flores Crespo, J; Herrera Rodríguez, D; Vázquez Prats, V; Flores Crespo, R; Líebano Hernández, E; Mendoza de Gives, P

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the predacious capacity in vitro of eight isolates of nematophagous fungi: four of Arthrobotrys sp., one of Arthrobotrys oligospora, one of Duddingtonia flagrans, one of Dactylaria sp. and one Monacrosporium eudermatum. Nine groups of Petri dishes with 13 repetitions each were set up. The fungi were seeded in fluor-corn-agar media, following this each Petri dish was added with 150 larvae of the free living nematode Panagrellus redivivus. Five days after larval addition these were collected by Baermannization and were quantified. A significant difference (p < 0.05) between all treated group was observed respect with the control. Isolates FTHO-8 D. flagrans, R6 M. eudermatum, DAC Dactylaria sp. as well as FTHO-4 and FTHO-6 Arthrobotrys sp., showed an excellent predatory activity (> 90%) and they could be considered as potential bio-control agents in future field trials. PMID:10932764

  15. Ink from longfin inshore squid, Doryteuthis pealeii, as a chemical and visual defense against two predatory fishes, summer flounder, Paralichthys dentatus, and sea catfish, Ariopsis felis.

    PubMed

    Derby, Charles D; Tottempudi, Mihika; Love-Chezem, Tiffany; Wolfe, Lanna S

    2013-12-01

    Chemical and visual defenses are used by many organisms to avoid being approached or eaten by predators. An example is inking molluscs-including gastropods such as sea hares and cephalopods such as squid, cuttlefish, and octopus-which release a colored ink upon approach or attack. Previous work showed that ink can protect molluscs through a combination of chemical, visual, and other effects. In this study, we examined the effects of ink from longfin inshore squid, Doryteuthis pealeii, on the behavior of two species of predatory fishes, summer flounder, Paralichthys dentatus, and sea catfish, Ariopsis felis. Using a cloud assay, we found that ink from longfin inshore squid affected the approach phase of predation by summer flounder, primarily through its visual effects. Using a food assay, we found that the ink affected the consummatory and ingestive phase of predation of both sea catfish and summer flounder, through the ink's chemical properties. Fractionation of ink showed that most of its deterrent chemical activity is associated with melanin granules, suggesting that either compounds adhering to these granules or melanin itself are the most biologically active. This work provides the basis for a comparative approach to identify deterrent molecules from inking cephalopods and to examine neural mechanisms whereby these chemicals affect behavior of fish, using the sea catfish as a chemosensory model.

  16. Molecular Diversity and Gene Evolution of the Venom Arsenal of Terebridae Predatory Marine Snails

    PubMed Central

    Gorson, Juliette; Ramrattan, Girish; Verdes, Aida; Wright, Elizabeth M.; Kantor, Yuri; Rajaram Srinivasan, Ramakrishnan; Musunuri, Raj; Packer, Daniel; Albano, Gabriel; Qiu, Wei-Gang; Holford, Mandë

    2015-01-01

    Venom peptides from predatory organisms are a resource for investigating evolutionary processes such as adaptive radiation or diversification, and exemplify promising targets for biomedical drug development. Terebridae are an understudied lineage of conoidean snails, which also includes cone snails and turrids. Characterization of cone snail venom peptides, conotoxins, has revealed a cocktail of bioactive compounds used to investigate physiological cellular function, predator-prey interactions, and to develop novel therapeutics. However, venom diversity of other conoidean snails remains poorly understood. The present research applies a venomics approach to characterize novel terebrid venom peptides, teretoxins, from the venom gland transcriptomes of Triplostephanus anilis and Terebra subulata. Next-generation sequencing and de novo assembly identified 139 putative teretoxins that were analyzed for the presence of canonical peptide features as identified in conotoxins. To meet the challenges of de novo assembly, multiple approaches for cross validation of findings were performed to achieve reliable assemblies of venom duct transcriptomes and to obtain a robust portrait of Terebridae venom. Phylogenetic methodology was used to identify 14 teretoxin gene superfamilies for the first time, 13 of which are unique to the Terebridae. Additionally, basic local algorithm search tool homology-based searches to venom-related genes and posttranslational modification enzymes identified a convergence of certain venom proteins, such as actinoporin, commonly found in venoms. This research provides novel insights into venom evolution and recruitment in Conoidean predatory marine snails and identifies a plethora of terebrid venom peptides that can be used to investigate fundamental questions pertaining to gene evolution. PMID:26025559

  17. Transcriptome Analysis in Venom Gland of the Predatory Giant Ant Dinoponera quadriceps: Insights into the Polypeptide Toxin Arsenal of Hymenopterans

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Cheong-Meng; Leung, Siu Wai; Prieto-da-Silva, Álvaro R. B.; Havt, Alexandre; Quinet, Yves P.; Martins, Alice M. C.; Lee, Simon M. Y.; Rádis-Baptista, Gandhi

    2014-01-01

    Background Dinoponera quadriceps is a predatory giant ant that inhabits the Neotropical region and subdues its prey (insects) with stings that deliver a toxic cocktail of molecules. Human accidents occasionally occur and cause local pain and systemic symptoms. A comprehensive study of the D. quadriceps venom gland transcriptome is required to advance our knowledge about the toxin repertoire of the giant ant venom and to understand the physiopathological basis of Hymenoptera envenomation. Results We conducted a transcriptome analysis of a cDNA library from the D. quadriceps venom gland with Sanger sequencing in combination with whole-transcriptome shotgun deep sequencing. From the cDNA library, a total of 420 independent clones were analyzed. Although the proportion of dinoponeratoxin isoform precursors was high, the first giant ant venom inhibitor cysteine-knot (ICK) toxin was found. The deep next generation sequencing yielded a total of 2,514,767 raw reads that were assembled into 18,546 contigs. A BLAST search of the assembled contigs against non-redundant and Swiss-Prot databases showed that 6,463 contigs corresponded to BLASTx hits and indicated an interesting diversity of transcripts related to venom gene expression. The majority of these venom-related sequences code for a major polypeptide core, which comprises venom allergens, lethal-like proteins and esterases, and a minor peptide framework composed of inter-specific structurally conserved cysteine-rich toxins. Both the cDNA library and deep sequencing yielded large proportions of contigs that showed no similarities with known sequences. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report of the venom gland transcriptome of the New World giant ant D. quadriceps. The glandular venom system was dissected, and the toxin arsenal was revealed; this process brought to light novel sequences that included an ICK-folded toxins, allergen proteins, esterases (phospholipases and carboxylesterases), and lethal

  18. Mercury Bioaccumulation Response to Recent Hg Pollution Abatement in an Oceanic Predatory Fish, Blue Marlin, Versus the Response in a Coastal Predatory Species, Bluefish, in the Western North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, R. T.; Cross, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    The consumption of marine fish, especially predatory species high in the food chain, is the major route through which people in developed countries are exposed to mercury. Recent work on a coastal species, bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix), determined that the mercury concentration in fish from the U. S. Mid-Atlantic coast decreased 43% from 1972 to 2011. This mercury decline in a coastal marine fish parallels the mercury decline in many freshwater fish in the U.S. and Canada during the same time period. The result heightens interest in determining whether or not there has been any change in mercury concentration in oceanic predatory fish species, that is, fish that are permanent residents of the open ocean, during the past four decades. To answer this question we compared mercury analyses we made in the 1970s on tournament-caught blue marlin (Makaira nigricans) with those we made from 1998 to 2013. This comparison indicates that from the 1970s to 2013 mercury concentration in blue marlin caught in the western North Atlantic Ocean off the U.S. east coast has declined about 45%, a decline that is remarkably similar to the decline reported in coastal bluefish. These results suggest that a large area of the western North Atlantic Ocean is responding to reductions in emissions of mercury in the U.S. and Canada with reduced mercury bioaccumulation in predatory fish.

  19. An Extended Cyclic Di-GMP Network in the Predatory Bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus

    PubMed Central

    Rotem, Or; Nesper, Jutta; Borovok, Ilya; Gorovits, Rena; Kolot, Mikhail; Pasternak, Zohar; Shin, Irina; Glatter, Timo; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Jenal, Urs

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Over the course of the last 3 decades the role of the second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) as a master regulator of bacterial physiology was determined. Although the control over c-di-GMP levels via synthesis and breakdown and the allosteric regulation of c-di-GMP over receptor proteins (effectors) and riboswitches have been extensively studied, relatively few effectors have been identified and most are of unknown functions. The obligate predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus has a peculiar dimorphic life cycle, in which a phenotypic transition from a free-living attack phase (AP) to a sessile, intracellular predatory growth phase (GP) is tightly regulated by specific c-di-GMP diguanylate cyclases. B. bacteriovorus also bears one of the largest complement of defined effectors, almost none of known functions, suggesting that additional proteins may be involved in c-di-GMP signaling. In order to uncover novel c-di-GMP effectors, a c-di-GMP capture-compound mass-spectroscopy experiment was performed on wild-type AP and host-independent (HI) mutant cultures, the latter serving as a proxy for wild-type GP cells. Eighty-four proteins were identified as candidate c-di-GMP binders. Of these proteins, 65 did not include any recognized c-di-GMP binding site, and 3 carried known unorthodox binding sites. Putative functions could be assigned to 59 proteins. These proteins are included in metabolic pathways, regulatory circuits, cell transport, and motility, thereby creating a potentially large c-di-GMP network. False candidate effectors may include members of protein complexes, as well as proteins binding nucleotides or other cofactors that were, respectively, carried over or unspecifically interacted with the capture compound during the pulldown. Of the 84 candidates, 62 were found to specifically bind the c-di-GMP capture compound in AP or in HI cultures, suggesting c-di-GMP control over the whole-cell cycle of the bacterium. High affinity and

  20. Artificial and factitious foods support the development and reproduction of the predatory mite Amblyseius swirskii.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc Tung; Vangansbeke, Dominiek; De Clercq, Patrick

    2014-02-01

    The generalist predatory mite Amblyseius swirskii Athias-Henriot (Acari: Phytoseiidae) was reared on Ephestia kuehniella Zeller eggs (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), decapsulated dry cysts of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana Kellogg (Anostraca: Artemiidae), and on meridic artificial diets (composed of honey, sucrose, tryptone, yeast extract, and egg yolk) supplemented with pupal hemolymph of the Chinese oak silkworm Antheraea pernyi (Guérin-Méneville) (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) (AD1), with E. kuehniella eggs (AD2) or with A. franciscana cysts (AD3). Development, reproduction and predation capacity of the predatory mites were assessed in the first (G1) and sixth generation (G6) of rearing on the different diets. Immature survival rates in G1 were similar on all diets (96.8-100 %). After six generations, however, survival of A. swirskii was significantly reduced on all diets except on A. franciscana cysts. Oviposition rates did not differ between generations when females were fed on E. kuehniella, AD2 or AD3. The total number of deposited eggs was similar among diets except in G6 where the females fed on A. franciscana cysts produced more eggs than those maintained on E. kuehniella eggs. On most diets the intrinsic rates of increase in G1 were superior to those in G6, except for predators supplied with A. franciscana cysts where no differences were observed among generations. Female mites did not lose their capacity to kill first instar Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) after six generations on the different diets, but predation rates in G6 on E. kuehniella were lower than in G1. In conclusion, the different factitious and artificial diets tested in the present study supported the development and reproduction of A. swirskii for a single generation but fitness losses occurred to a varying degree after several generations on E. kuehniella eggs or the artificial diets. Artificial diet enriched with A. franciscana cysts yielded better results

  1. Intraguild predation between Amblyseius swirskii and two native Chinese predatory mite species and their development on intraguild prey

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yingwei; Lv, Jiale; Jiang, Xiaohuan; Wang, Boming; Gao, Yulin; Wang, Endong; Xu, Xuenong

    2016-01-01

    Amblyseius swirskii, native to the east and southeast Mediterranean region, is a successful biological control agent of whiteflies. In this study, we investigated intraguild predations (IGP) between each stage of A. swirskii and each stage of two Phytoseiid species that occur in China, Amblyseius orientalis and Neoseiulus californicus. When there was no whitefly egg provided as the extraguild prey, IGP between A. swirskii and A. orientalis, and between A. swirskii and N. californicus, was observed in 10 and 20 out of 35 combinations, respectively. When IGP was observed, A. swirskii was the intraguild predator in 70% and 65% cases of A. orientalis and N. californicus predation, respectively. These results suggest that A. swirskii is a more aggressive intraguild predator compared to either A. orientalis or N. californicus. When whitefly eggs were provided as the extraguild prey, IGP between A. swirskii and N. californicus decreased greatly, but no significant decrease of IGP was observed between A. swirskii and A. orientalis. Amblyseius swirskii was able to complete development on both heterospecific predatory mites, and both heterospecific predatory mites completed their development on A. swirskii. Possible impacts that A. swirskii may have on local predatory mite populations in China are discussed. PMID:26972164

  2. A predatory bivalved euarthropod from the Cambrian (Stage 3) Xiaoshiba Lagerstätte, South China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Ortega-Hernández, Javier; Lan, Tian; Hou, Jin-bo; Zhang, Xi-guang

    2016-01-01

    Bivalved euarthropods represent a conspicuous component of exceptionally-preserved fossil biotas throughout the Lower Palaeozoic. However, most of these taxa are known from isolated valves, and thus there is a limited understanding of their morphological organization and palaeoecology in the context of early animal-dominated communities. The bivalved euarthropod Clypecaris serrata sp. nov., recovered from the Cambrian (Stage 3) Hongjingshao Formation in Kunming, southern China, is characterized by having a robust first pair of raptorial appendages that bear well-developed ventral-facing spines, paired dorsal spines on the trunk, and posteriorly oriented serrations on the anteroventral margins of both valves. The raptorial limbs of C. serrata were adapted for grasping prey employing a descending stroke for transporting it close the mouth, whereas the backwards-facing marginal serrations of the bivalved carapace may have helped to secure the food items during feeding. The new taxon offers novel insights on the morphology of the enigmatic genus Clypecaris, and indicates that the possession of paired dorsal spines is a diagnostic trait of the Family Clypecarididae within upper stem-group Euarthropoda. C. serrata evinces functional adaptations for an active predatory lifestyle within the context of Cambrian bivalved euarthropods, and contributes towards the better understanding of feeding diversity in early ecosystems. PMID:27283406

  3. A case of cellulitis of the hands caused by a predatory bird attack.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Adil Abbas; Farid, Mohammed; Sobani, Zain A; Ali, Syed Nadir; Malick, Huzaifa; Baqir, Maryam; Sharif, Hasanat; Beg, M Asim

    2011-04-01

    Many species have been drastically affected by rapid urbanization. Harris's hawks from their natural habitat of open spaces and a supply of rodents, lizards and other small prey have been forced to change their natural environment adapting to living in open spaces in sub- and peri-urban areas. Specific areas include playgrounds, parks and school courtyards. The migration of this predatory species into these areas poses a risk to individuals, and especially the children are often attacked by claws, talons and beaks intentionally or as collateral damage while attacking rodent prey. In addition, the diverse micro-organisms harbored in the beaks and talons can result in wound infections, presenting a challenge to clinical management. Here we would like to present a case of an 80-year-old man with cellulitis of both hands after sustaining minor injuries from the talons of a Harris's hawk and review the management options. We would also like to draw attention to the matter that, even though previously a rarity, more cases of injuries caused by birds of prey may be seen in hospital settings.

  4. Population-level effects of abamectin, azadirachtin and fenpyroximate on the predatory mite Neoseiulus baraki.

    PubMed

    Lima, Debora B; Melo, José W S; Gondim, Manoel G C; Guedes, Raul N C; Oliveira, José E M

    2016-10-01

    The coconut production system, in which the coconut mite Aceria guerreronis is considered a key pest, provides an interesting model for integration of biological and chemical control. In Brazil, the most promising biological control agent for the coconut mite is the phytoseiid predator Neoseiulus baraki. However, acaricides are widely used to control the coconut mite, although they frequently produce unsatisfactory results. In this study, we evaluated the simultaneous direct effect of dry residue contact and contaminated prey ingestion of the main acaricides used on coconut palms (i.e., abamectin, azadirachtin and fenpyroximate) on life-history traits of N. baraki and their offspring. These acaricides are registered, recommended and widely used against A. guerreronis in Brazil, and they were tested at their label rates. The offspring of the exposed predators was also evaluated by estimating the instantaneous rate of population increase (r i ). Abamectin compromised female performance, whereas fenpyroximate did not affect the exposed females (F0). Nonetheless, fenpyroximate strongly compromised the offspring (F1) net reproductive rate (R0), intrinsic rate of population growth (r i ), and doubling time (DT). In contrast, fenpyroximate did not have such effects on the 2nd generation (F2) of predators with acaricide-exposed grandparents. Azadirachtin did not affect the predators, suggesting that this acaricide can be used in association with biological control by this predatory species. In contrast, the use of abamectin and fenpyroximate is likely to lead to adverse consequences in the biological control of A. guerreronis using N. baraki. PMID:27495808

  5. A case of cellulitis of the hands caused by a predatory bird attack

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M Adil Abbas; Farid, Mohammed; Sobani, Zain A; Ali, Syed Nadir; Malick, Huzaifa; Baqir, Maryam; Sharif, Hasanat; Beg, M Asim

    2011-01-01

    Many species have been drastically affected by rapid urbanization. Harris's hawks from their natural habitat of open spaces and a supply of rodents, lizards and other small prey have been forced to change their natural environment adapting to living in open spaces in sub- and peri-urban areas. Specific areas include playgrounds, parks and school courtyards. The migration of this predatory species into these areas poses a risk to individuals, and especially the children are often attacked by claws, talons and beaks intentionally or as collateral damage while attacking rodent prey. In addition, the diverse micro-organisms harbored in the beaks and talons can result in wound infections, presenting a challenge to clinical management. Here we would like to present a case of an 80-year-old man with cellulitis of both hands after sustaining minor injuries from the talons of a Harris's hawk and review the management options. We would also like to draw attention to the matter that, even though previously a rarity, more cases of injuries caused by birds of prey may be seen in hospital settings. PMID:23569751

  6. Causes of mortality and unintentional poisoning in predatory and scavenging birds in California

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Terra R.; Poppenga, Robert H.; Woods, Leslie A.; Hernandez, Yvette Z.; Boyce, Walter M.; Samaniego, Francisco J.; Torres, Steve G.; Johnson, Christine K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We documented causes of mortality in an opportunistic sample of golden eagles, turkey vultures and common ravens, and assessed exposure to several contaminants that have been found in carrion and common prey for these species. Methods Dead birds were submitted for testing through wildlife rehabilitation centres and a network of wildlife biologists in California from 2007 to 2009. Results The leading causes of mortality in this study were collision-related trauma (63 per cent), lead intoxication (17 per cent) and anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning (8 per cent). Elevated liver lead concentration (≥2 µg/g) and bone lead concentration (>6 µg/g) were detected in 25 and 49 per cent of birds tested, respectively. Approximately 84 per cent of birds tested had detectable rodenticide residues. The majority of rodenticide exposure occurred in peri-urban areas, suggesting that retail sale and use of commensal rodent baits, particularly in residential and semi-residential areas in California, may provide a pathway of exposure. Conclusions Monitoring anthropogenic causes of mortality in predatory and scavenging bird species provides important data needed to inform on mitigation and regulatory efforts aimed at reducing threats to these populations. PMID:26392875

  7. Gut expansion and contraction in the predatory soil mite Pergamasus longicornis (Mesostigmata: Parasitidae): a stiff system.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Clive E

    2014-11-01

    Mite digestive processes are inferred from gut expansion and contraction time in the free-living predatory soil mite Pergamasus longicornis (Berlese), estimated using a temporal series of histological sections. Gut regions (bar the rectal vesicle) behave broadly in unison for rapid initial filling (ingestion half-life about 2-3 min; max 8 min), but behave heterogeneously when slowly emptying (digestion/egestion half-life from about 2-3 h; max 8.5 h). Anterior gut regions fill and empty the earliest. Posterior gut regions take the longest to fill and to empty. Switching first from filling-predominating to emptying-predominating in the gut occurs around 2 h from the start of feeding. Median time for the initial completion of gut filling and for the commencement of gut emptying is 10 min and 12.5 h, respectively, from the start of feeding. Three phases of gut changes are critically discussed: rapid filling, concentration by fluid loss (via coxal glands), and slow emptying. Independent corroboration of coxal droplet formation is included. Predictions to confirm or refute postulated mechanisms of salivary, coxal or rectal water balance are given. Overall total gut filling (ingestion) plus gut emptying (digestion/egestion) time in this poikilotherm is approximately 29-52.5 h (1+ - 2+ days) at room temperature from the start of feeding on large dipteran prey ([Formula: see text] gut emptyings per day). Pergamasus longicornis exhibits the stiff digestive system of an intermittent 'bolus' feeder.

  8. Response of predatory zooplankton populations to the experimental acidification of Little Rock Lake, Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Sierszen, M.E.; Frost, T.M.

    1993-01-01

    To assess the effects of lake acidification on large predatory zooplankton, the authors monitored population levels of four limnetic taxa for 6 years in a lake with two basins, one of which was experimentally acidified (2 years at each of three levels: pH 5.6, 5.2 and 4.7). Concentrations of phantom midge (Chaoborus spp.), the most abundant large predator, remained similar in the treatment and reference basins until the fourth year (pH 5.2) when they increased in the treatment basin. In contrast, Epischura lacustris and Leptodora kindtii disappeared from limnetic samples, and water mites declined to near zero upon acidification. Treatment basin populations of E. lacustris declined sharply during the second year of acidification. The nature of the decline suggested sensitivity of an early life stage during the first year at pH 5.6. Leptodora kindtii showed no population response at pH 5.6, but declined to essentially zero at pH 5.2. Treatment basin populations of water mites fluctuated until declining in the fifth and sixth years (pH 4.7). These changes indicate a variety of direct and indirect responses to lake acidification.

  9. Differences in predatory pressure on terrestrial snails by birds and mammals.

    PubMed

    Rosin, Zuzanna M; Olborska, Paulina; Surmacki, Adrian; Tryjanowski, Piotr

    2011-09-01

    The evolution of shell polymorphism in terrestrial snails is a classic textbook example of the effect of natural selection in which avian and mammalian predation represents an important selective force on gene frequency. However, many questions about predation remain unclear, especially in the case of mammals. We collected 2000 specimens from eight terrestrial gastropod species to investigate the predation pressure exerted by birds and mice on snails. We found evidence of avian and mammalian predation in 26.5% and 36.8% of the shells. Both birds and mammals were selective with respect to snail species, size and morphs. Birds preferred the brown-lipped banded snail Cepaea nemoralis (L.) and mice preferred the burgundy snail Helix pomatia L. Mice avoided pink mid-banded C. nemoralis and preferred brown mid-banded morphs, which were neglected by birds. In contrast to mice, birds chose larger individuals. Significant differences in their predatory pressure can influence the evolution and maintenance of shell size and polymorphism of shell colouration in snails.

  10. Food partitioning by coastal predatory teleosts in south-eastern Cape waters of South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smale, M. J.

    1987-02-01

    The results of complementary classification and multi-dimensional scaling analyses performed on the diets of eleven coastal predatory teleosts in the south-eastern Cape, South Africa, show that there is considerable overlap in prey use by most of the fishes. The predators belong to six families: Sparidae, Serranidae, Pomatomidae, Carangidae, Scombridae and Sciaenidae. Ontogenetic differences in prey taken are often as great as those between species. Although predators may be grouped according to habitat (pelagic, reef, soft substrates), the analyses indicate that groupings are not rigid. Not only does habitat vary during the life histories of the predators, but prey availability appears to have a pronounced influence on food choice. The mobility of both predators and prey between contiguous habitats allows interaction between species which are typical of a particular habitat. The highest degree of specialization to a habitat is seen in the tunas which feed almost exclusively on pelagic prey. Several predators share the relatively low number of prey species available and this explains the high degree of similarity between many of them.

  11. Population-level effects of abamectin, azadirachtin and fenpyroximate on the predatory mite Neoseiulus baraki.

    PubMed

    Lima, Debora B; Melo, José W S; Gondim, Manoel G C; Guedes, Raul N C; Oliveira, José E M

    2016-10-01

    The coconut production system, in which the coconut mite Aceria guerreronis is considered a key pest, provides an interesting model for integration of biological and chemical control. In Brazil, the most promising biological control agent for the coconut mite is the phytoseiid predator Neoseiulus baraki. However, acaricides are widely used to control the coconut mite, although they frequently produce unsatisfactory results. In this study, we evaluated the simultaneous direct effect of dry residue contact and contaminated prey ingestion of the main acaricides used on coconut palms (i.e., abamectin, azadirachtin and fenpyroximate) on life-history traits of N. baraki and their offspring. These acaricides are registered, recommended and widely used against A. guerreronis in Brazil, and they were tested at their label rates. The offspring of the exposed predators was also evaluated by estimating the instantaneous rate of population increase (r i ). Abamectin compromised female performance, whereas fenpyroximate did not affect the exposed females (F0). Nonetheless, fenpyroximate strongly compromised the offspring (F1) net reproductive rate (R0), intrinsic rate of population growth (r i ), and doubling time (DT). In contrast, fenpyroximate did not have such effects on the 2nd generation (F2) of predators with acaricide-exposed grandparents. Azadirachtin did not affect the predators, suggesting that this acaricide can be used in association with biological control by this predatory species. In contrast, the use of abamectin and fenpyroximate is likely to lead to adverse consequences in the biological control of A. guerreronis using N. baraki.

  12. Transcriptome and Difference Analysis of Fenpropathrin Resistant Predatory Mite, Neoseiulus barkeri (Hughes)

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Lin; Chen, Fei; Yu, Shijiang; Ding, Lili; Yang, Juan; Luo, Ren; Tian, Huixia; Li, Hongjun; Liu, Haoqiang; Ran, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Several fenpropathrin-resistant predatory mites have been reported. However, the molecular mechanism of the resistance remains unknown. In the present study, the Neoseiulus barkeri (N. barkeri) transcriptome was generated using the Illumina sequencing platform, 34,211 unigenes were obtained, and 15,987 were manually annotated. After manual annotation, attentions were attracted to resistance-related genes, such as voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC), cytochrome P450s (P450s), and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). A polymorphism analysis detected two point mutations (E1233G and S1282G) in the linker region between VGSC domain II and III. In addition, 43 putative P450 genes and 10 putative GST genes were identified from the transcriptome. Among them, two P450 genes, NbCYP4EV2 and NbCYP4EZ1, and four GST genes, NbGSTd01, NbGSTd02, NbGSTd03 and NbGSTm03, were remarkably overexpressed 3.64–46.69-fold in the fenpropathrin resistant strain compared to that in the susceptible strain. These results suggest that fenpropathrin resistance in N. barkeri is a complex biological process involving many genetic changes and provide new insight into the N. barkeri resistance mechanism. PMID:27240349

  13. Nature and Development of Membrane Systems in Food Vacuoles of Cellular Slime Molds Predatory upon Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hohl, H R

    1965-09-01

    Hohl, Hans R. (University of Hawaii, Honolulu). Nature and development of membrane systems in food vacuoles of cellular slime molds predatory upon bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 90:755-765. 1965.-During the digestion of bacteria by the myxamoebae of cellular slime molds, systems of concentric lamellae begin to appear within the food vacuoles. Each constituent lamella is a unit membrane of 75 to 85 A thickness. A study of these lamellae in Dictyostelium discoideum and Polysphondylium pallidum reveals that most of them do not represent original membranes of the ingested bacteria but are formed mainly in two ways. (i) After swelling and partial digestion of the bacteria, the first membranes appear adjacent to pre-existing membranes, e.g., the membrane lining the food vacuole and the cytoplasmic membrane surrounding the bacterium. Progressive addition of lamellae leads to the formation of the systems of concentric lamellae. (ii) After digestion of the bacteria has proceeded to a high degree, the concentric lamellae are formed spontaneously from clouds of amorphous material through condensation and orientation of precursor material. The study shows that, in biological systems, unit membranes may be formed from amorphous material through template action of pre-existing membranes, and does not necessarily involve fusion of membrane-bound vesicles.

  14. Reconciling morphological and molecular classification of predatory ciliates: Evolutionary taxonomy of dileptids (Ciliophora, Litostomatea, Rhynchostomatia).

    PubMed

    Vd'ačný, Peter; Rajter, L'ubomír

    2015-09-01

    The order Dileptida is a small group of predatory ciliates characterized by a proboscis serving for prey capture. Although monophyly of the order is strongly supported, generic relationships between dileptid taxa were left mostly unresolved in 18S rRNA gene phylogenies. To overcome this problem, we applied the synergistic effect of combining multiple molecular markers with morphological data. Furthermore, we inferred dileptid evolutionary history by a multifaceted analysis strategy, including tree-building methods, phylogenetic networks, split spectrum analysis, quartet likelihood mapping, and reconstruction of ancestral morphologies. This complex approach revealed: (1) monophyly of the families Dimacrocaryonidae and Dileptidae; (2) polyphyly of Microdileptus, Pseudomonilicaryon, and Rimaleptus; and (3) homoplastic nature of several generic diagnostic features, viz., macronuclear pattern, size of oral bulge opening, and orientation of preoral kineties. Controversies in the internal phylogeny of the family Dimacrocaryonidae could be elucidated after reconstruction of ancestral morphologies at deeper nodes of phylogenetic trees in a combination with budding evolutionary processes. Moreover, we solved the "Rimaleptus" dilemma by splitting the family Dimacrocaryonidae into two new subfamilies, the Dimacrocaryoninae with two-rowed dorsal brush and the Rimaleptinae with multi-rowed brush as well as by establishing a new genus, Rurikoplites, from whose species several dimacrocaryonid genera very likely evolved by budding.

  15. Physiological selectivity and activity reduction of insecticides by rainfall to predatory wasps of Tuta absoluta.

    PubMed

    Barros, Emerson C; Bacci, Leandro; Picanco, Marcelo C; Martins, Júlio C; Rosado, Jander F; Silva, Gerson A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we carried out three bioassays with nine used insecticides in tomato crops to identify their efficiency against tomato leaf miner Tuta absoluta, the physiological selectivity and the activity reduction of insecticides by three rain regimes to predatory wasps Protonectarina sylveirae and Polybia scutellaris. We assessed the mortality caused by the recommended doses of abamectin, beta-cyfluthrin, cartap, chlorfenapyr, etofenprox, methamidophos, permethrin, phenthoate and spinosad to T. absoluta and wasps at the moment of application. In addition, we evaluated the wasp mortality due to the insecticides for 30 days on plants that did not receive rain and on plants that received 4 or 125 mm of rain. Spinosad, cartap, chlorfenapyr, phenthoate, abamectin and methamidophos caused mortality higher than 90% to T. absoluta, whereas the pyrethroids beta-cyfluthrin, etofenprox and permethrin caused mortality between 8.5% and 46.25%. At the moment of application, all the insecticides were highly toxic to the wasps, causing mortality higher than 80%. In the absence of rain, all the insecticides continued to cause high mortality to the wasps for 30 days after the application. The toxicity of spinosad and methamidophos on both wasp species; beta-cyfluthrin on P. sylveirae and chlorfenapyr and abamectin on P. scutellaris, decreased when the plants received 4 mm of rain. In contrast, the other insecticides only showed reduced toxicity on the wasps when the plants received 125 mm of rain.

  16. The rape of boys and the impact of sexually predatory environments: review and case reports.

    PubMed

    Sageman, Sharon

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of rape and the impact of sexually predatory environments on young boys and the resulting sequelae in adulthood. It presents the literature and the case histories of Jeff and Todd to illustrate the psychic devastation that occurs, and the ensuing attempts at reestablishing boundaries and regaining a sense of autonomy and male identity. Issues including facing powerlessness, betrayal by trusted adults, and the effect of emasculation on developing sexual identity are explored. A study of almost 4,000 siblings by Nelson et al. (2002) showed that a twin who was not sexually abused himself but who grew up in the same milieu as his sexually abused twin, suffered similar psychopathologic symptoms, such as suicide attempts, alcohol dependence, and social anxiety. Todd spent his formative years in a Catholic boarding school where boys were physically and sexually abused by priests. His history illustrates the severe psychological damage this causes and is consistent with the findings of Nelson's study. PMID:14535618

  17. Snake (Colubridae: Thamnophis) predatory responses to chemical cues from native and introduced prey species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullin, S.J.; Imbert, H.; Fish, J.M.; Ervin, E.L.; Fisher, R.N.

    2004-01-01

    Several aquatic vertebrates have been introduced into freshwater systems in California over the past 100 years. Some populations of the two-striped garter snake (Thamnophis hammondii) have lived in sympatry with these species since their introduction; other populations have never encountered them. To assess the possible adaptation to a novel prey, we tested the predatory responses of T. hammondii from different populations to different chemosensory cues from native and introduced prey species. We presented chemical extracts from potential prey types and 2 control odors to individual snakes on cotton swabs and recorded the number of tongue flicks and attacks directed at each swab. Subject response was higher for prey odors than control substances. Odors from introduced centrarchid fish (Lepomis) elicited higher response levels than other prey types, including native anuran larvae (Pseudacris regilla). The pattern of response was similar for both populations of snakes (experienced and nai??ve, with respect to the introduced prey). We suggest that the generalist aquatic lifestyle of T. hammondii has allowed it to take advantage of increasing populations of introduced prey. Decisions on the management strategies for some of these introduced prey species should include consideration of how T. hammondii populations might respond in areas of sympatry.

  18. Palaeoanellus dimorphus gen. et sp. nov. (Deuteromycotina): a Cretaceous predatory fungus.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Alexander R; Dörfelt, Heinrich; Perrichot, Vincent

    2008-10-01

    In habitats where nitrogen is the limiting factor, carnivorous fungi gain an advantage by preying on nematodes and other microorganisms. These fungi are abundant in modern terrestrial ecosystems, but they are not predestined for preservation as fossils. Conclusions on their evolutionary history are therefore mainly based on molecular studies that are generally limited to those taxa that have survived until today. Here we present a fossil dimorphic fungus that was found in Late Albian amber from southwestern France. This fungus possessed unicellular hyphal rings as trapping devices and formed blastospores from which a yeast stage developed. The fossil probably represents an anamorph of an ascomycete and is described as Palaeoanellus dimorphus gen. et sp. nov. Because predatory fungi with regular yeast stages are not known from modern ecosystems, the fungus is assumed to not be related to any Recent carnivorous fungus and to belong to an extinct lineage of carnivorous fungi. The inclusions represent the only record of fossil fungi that developed trapping devices, so far. The fungus lived c. 100 million years ago in a limnetic-terrestrial microhabitat, and it was a part of a highly diverse biocenosis at the forest floor of a Cretaceous coastal amber forest. PMID:21632336

  19. PERCHLORATE TROPHIC TRANSFER INCREASES TISSUE CONCENTRATIONS ABOVE AMBIENT WATER EXPOSURE ALONE IN A PREDATORY FISH

    PubMed Central

    Furin, Christoff G.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Hagedorn, Birgit; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined effects of varying concentrations of the environmental contaminant perchlorate in northern pike (Esox lucius) based on exposure in water and/or from prey (threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus). Routes of exposure to pike were through contaminated water at 0, 10 or 100 mg/L perchlorate for 49 days and/or through feeding one stickleback per day over 14 days that were previously maintained in water at 0, 10 or 100 mg/L perchlorate. Both water and food significantly contributed to pike tissue concentrations of perchlorate as compared to controls, but, as expected for a water-soluble contaminant, perchlorate did not biomagnify from prey to predatory fish. Pike gastrointestinal tissue retained significantly more perchlorate than other tissues combined. Route of exposure and concentration of perchlorate in various media are important to consider in risk assessment when evaluating uptake and tissue concentration of perchlorate because significantly higher tissue concentrations may result from combined prey and water exposures than from prey or water exposures alone in a concentration dependent manner. PMID:24188192

  20. Combined effect of predatory zooplankton and allelopathic aquatic macrophytes on algal suppression.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Shengpeng; Wan, Kun; Ma, Sumin

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the combined effects of four typical predatory zooplankton and allelopathic aquatic macrophytes on algal control in a microcosm system. It would determine the effects of diverse species and biological restoration on the growth of harmful water-bloom microalgae in great lakes polluted by excess nutrients. It was found that the mixtures of each zooplankton and the floating plant Nymphoides peltatum had stronger inhibitory effects on harmful water-bloom microalgae than the individual species in clean or eutrophic water bodies. In addition, a community of four zooplankton types had a synergistic effect on algal inhibition. Algal suppression by the zooplankton community was enhanced significantly when the macrophyte was co-cultured in the microcosm. Furthermore, Chlorella pyrenoidosa was more susceptible than Microcystis aeruginosa when exposed to grazing by zooplankton and the allelopathic potential of the macrophyte. Algal inhibition was also weaker in eutrophic conditions compared with the control. These findings indicate that diverse species may enhance algal inhibition. Therefore, it is necessary to restore biological diversity and rebuild an ecologically balanced food chain or web to facilitate the control of harmful algal blooms in eutrophic lakes. PMID:25409583

  1. The Feeding Rate of Predatory Mites on Life Stages of Bemisia tabaci Mediterranean Species

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbertson, Andrew G. S.

    2014-01-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) continues to be a serious threat to crops worldwide. The UK holds Protected Zone status against this pest and, as a result, B. tabaci entering on plant material is subjected to a policy of eradication. There has recently been a shift from Middle East-Asia Minor 1 to the more chemical resistant Mediterranean species entering the UK. Predatory mites (Amblyseius swirskii, Transeius montdorensis and Typhlodromalus limonicus) were screened for their impact upon various lifestages of B. tabaci Mediterranean species. Approximately 30% of eggs were fed upon by A. swirskii following a 5 day period. Feeding rates slightly decreased for all mite species when feeding on first instar life-stages (27%, 24%, 16% respectively) and significantly decreased when feeding on second instars (8.5%, 8.5%, 8.7% respectively). Combining the two mite species (A. swirskii and T. montdorensis) increased mortality of Bemisia eggs to 36%. The potential of incorporating the mites into existing control strategies for B. tabaci is discussed. PMID:26462828

  2. Locomotion speeds from trackways: Predatory dinosaurs moved faster than herbivorous dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Scott A.

    2014-03-01

    Fossilized trackways from dinosaurs leaves evidence of their locomotion from the stride length S and foot length F which yields the leg length L. From studies of living animals, it is known that a walking animal has a relative stride length RSL (= S/L) less than 2 and a running animal has a RSL greater than 2. A statistical analysis was performed of trackways associated with three groups of herbivorous dinosaurs: sauropods (N = 23), the armored ankylosaurs and stegosaurs (N = 10), and the unarmored ornithopods (N = 23) as well as the predatory theropods (N = 35). The average RSL of the sauropods and the armored dinosaurs were both 0.9 +/- 0.3. The ornithopods had an average RSL of 1.2 +/- 0.2. None of the trackways associated with herbivorous dinosaurs have an RSL greater than 1.5, indicating that they were all walking. The theropods showed the fastest and most varied locomomtion: their highest average RSL was 1.8 +/- 0.7. Nine of the theropod trackways had an RSL greater than 2.0, indicating that the dinosaurs were running when they made those trackways. One of the theropod trackways had an RSL of 4.5, indicating that it was running very fast compared to its body length.

  3. Combined effect of predatory zooplankton and allelopathic aquatic macrophytes on algal suppression.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Shengpeng; Wan, Kun; Ma, Sumin

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the combined effects of four typical predatory zooplankton and allelopathic aquatic macrophytes on algal control in a microcosm system. It would determine the effects of diverse species and biological restoration on the growth of harmful water-bloom microalgae in great lakes polluted by excess nutrients. It was found that the mixtures of each zooplankton and the floating plant Nymphoides peltatum had stronger inhibitory effects on harmful water-bloom microalgae than the individual species in clean or eutrophic water bodies. In addition, a community of four zooplankton types had a synergistic effect on algal inhibition. Algal suppression by the zooplankton community was enhanced significantly when the macrophyte was co-cultured in the microcosm. Furthermore, Chlorella pyrenoidosa was more susceptible than Microcystis aeruginosa when exposed to grazing by zooplankton and the allelopathic potential of the macrophyte. Algal inhibition was also weaker in eutrophic conditions compared with the control. These findings indicate that diverse species may enhance algal inhibition. Therefore, it is necessary to restore biological diversity and rebuild an ecologically balanced food chain or web to facilitate the control of harmful algal blooms in eutrophic lakes.

  4. Devonian rise in atmospheric oxygen correlated to the radiations of terrestrial plants and large predatory fish.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Tais W; Hammarlund, Emma U; Anbar, Ariel D; Bond, David P G; Gill, Benjamin C; Gordon, Gwyneth W; Knoll, Andrew H; Nielsen, Arne T; Schovsbo, Niels H; Canfield, Donald E

    2010-10-19

    The evolution of Earth's biota is intimately linked to the oxygenation of the oceans and atmosphere. We use the isotopic composition and concentration of molybdenum (Mo) in sedimentary rocks to explore this relationship. Our results indicate two episodes of global ocean oxygenation. The first coincides with the emergence of the Ediacaran fauna, including large, motile bilaterian animals, ca. 550-560 million year ago (Ma), reinforcing previous geochemical indications that Earth surface oxygenation facilitated this radiation. The second, perhaps larger, oxygenation took place around 400 Ma, well after the initial rise of animals and, therefore, suggesting that early metazoans evolved in a relatively low oxygen environment. This later oxygenation correlates with the diversification of vascular plants, which likely contributed to increased oxygenation through the enhanced burial of organic carbon in sediments. It also correlates with a pronounced radiation of large predatory fish, animals with high oxygen demand. We thereby couple the redox history of the atmosphere and oceans to major events in animal evolution. PMID:20884852

  5. Gearing for speed slows the predatory strike of a mantis shrimp.

    PubMed

    McHenry, Matthew J; Claverie, Thomas; Rosario, Michael V; Patek, S N

    2012-04-01

    The geometry of an animal's skeleton governs the transmission of force to its appendages. Joints and rigid elements that create a relatively large output displacement per unit input displacement have been considered to be geared for speed, but the relationship between skeletal geometry and speed is largely untested. The present study explored this subject with experiments and mathematical modeling to evaluate how morphological differences in the raptorial appendage of a mantis shrimp (Gonodactylus smithii) affect the speed of its predatory strike. Based on morphological measurements and material testing, we computationally simulated the transmission of the stored elastic energy that powers a strike and the drag that resists this motion. After verifying the model's predictions against measurements of strike impulse, we conducted a series of simulations that varied the linkage geometry, but were provided with a fixed amount of stored elastic energy. We found that a skeletal geometry that creates a large output displacement achieves a slower maximum speed of rotation than a low-displacement system. This is because a large displacement by the appendage causes a relatively large proportion of its elastic energy to be lost to the generation of drag. Therefore, the efficiency of transmission from elastic to kinetic energy mediates the relationship between the geometry and the speed of a skeleton. We propose that transmission efficiency plays a similar role in form-function relationships for skeletal systems in a diversity of animals. PMID:22399669

  6. A new North American therizinosaurid and the role of herbivory in 'predatory' dinosaur evolution.

    PubMed

    Zanno, Lindsay E; Gillette, David D; Albright, L Barry; Titus, Alan L

    2009-10-01

    Historically, ecomorphological inferences regarding theropod (i.e. 'predatory') dinosaurs were guided by an assumption that they were singularly hypercarnivorous. A recent plethora of maniraptoran discoveries has produced evidence challenging this notion. Here, we report on a new species of maniraptoran theropod, Nothronychus graffami sp. nov. Relative completeness of this specimen permits a phylogenetic reassessment of Therizinosauria-the theropod clade exhibiting the most substantial anatomical evidence of herbivory. In the most comprehensive phylogenetic study of the clade conducted to date, we recover Therizinosauria as the basalmost maniraptoran lineage. Using concentrated changes tests, we present evidence for correlated character evolution among herbivorous and hypercarnivorous taxa and propose ecomorphological indicators for future interpretations of diet among maniraptoran clades. Maximum parsimony optimizations of character evolution within our study indicate an ancestral origin for dietary plasticity and facultative herbivory (omnivory) within the clade. These findings suggest that hypercarnivory in paravian dinosaurs is a secondarily derived dietary specialization and provide a potential mechanism for the invasion of novel morpho- and ecospace early in coelurosaurian evolution-the loss of obligate carnivory and origin of dietary opportunism.

  7. Predatory beetles facilitate plant growth by driving earthworms to lower soil layers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chuan; Griffin, John N; Wu, Xinwei; Sun, Shucun

    2013-07-01

    Theory suggests that predators of soil-improving, plant-facilitating detritivores (e.g. earthworms) should suppress plant growth via a negative tri-trophic cascade, but the empirical evidence is still largely lacking. We tested this prediction in an alpine meadow on the Tibetan Plateau by manipulating predatory beetles (presence/absence) and quantifying (i) direct effects on the density and behaviour of earthworms; and (ii) indirect effects on soil properties and above-ground plant biomass. In the absence of predators, earthworms improved soil properties, but did not significantly affect plant biomass. Surprisingly, the presence of predators strengthened the positive effect of earthworms on soil properties leading to the emergence of a positive indirect effect of predators on plant biomass. We attribute this counterintuitive result to: (i) the inability of predators to suppress overall earthworm density; and (ii) the predator-induced earthworm habitat shift from the upper to lower soil layer that enhanced their soil-modifying, plant-facilitating, effects. Our results reveal that plant-level consequences of predators as transmitted through detritivores can hinge on behaviour-mediated indirect interactions that have the potential to overturn predictions based solely on trophic interactions. This work calls for a closer examination of the effects of predators in detritus food webs and the development of spatially explicit theory capable of predicting the occurrence and consequences of predator-induced detritivore behavioural shifts.

  8. Trophic transfer of cadmium from a freshwater oligocheate Lumbriculus variegates to predatory stoneflies (Perlodidae and Perlidae).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwalter, D. B.; Cain, D. J.; Luoma, S. N.

    2005-05-01

    In trace metal-contaminated streams, insects accumulate metals from both aqueous and dietary sources. Previously, we demonstrated that aquatic insect species differ tremendously in their rates of dissolved metal accumulation in addition to metal efflux rates (after dissolved exposures). We have also observed large inter-specific differences in how dissolved metals are partitioned subcellularly, detoxified and stored. Our current work examines dietary metal exposures in predatory stonefly species. Specifically, we are exploring the extent to which stonefly species differ in their assimilation efficiencies of cadmium from their prey, and how widely their post-assimilation efflux rates vary. We also are comparing subcellular distributions of Cd from aqueous versus dietary sources, and are exploring these differences in a phylogenetic context, working with several species in both the Perlidae and Perlodidae. To date, consistencies have been observed among four perlid genera in terms of metal sub-cellular distributions. Cadmium is beter detoxified in the perlodids we have examined, than in the perlids. Ongoing work is being conducted to determine if Cd handling is consistent among different genera of these two families. We also ask whether generalizations about species' sensitivities at broad taxonomic levels are appropriate for heavy metal pollution.

  9. Devonian rise in atmospheric oxygen correlated to the radiations of terrestrial plants and large predatory fish

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Tais W.; Hammarlund, Emma U.; Anbar, Ariel D.; Bond, David P. G.; Gill, Benjamin C.; Gordon, Gwyneth W.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Nielsen, Arne T.; Schovsbo, Niels H.; Canfield, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of Earth’s biota is intimately linked to the oxygenation of the oceans and atmosphere. We use the isotopic composition and concentration of molybdenum (Mo) in sedimentary rocks to explore this relationship. Our results indicate two episodes of global ocean oxygenation. The first coincides with the emergence of the Ediacaran fauna, including large, motile bilaterian animals, ca. 550–560 million year ago (Ma), reinforcing previous geochemical indications that Earth surface oxygenation facilitated this radiation. The second, perhaps larger, oxygenation took place around 400 Ma, well after the initial rise of animals and, therefore, suggesting that early metazoans evolved in a relatively low oxygen environment. This later oxygenation correlates with the diversification of vascular plants, which likely contributed to increased oxygenation through the enhanced burial of organic carbon in sediments. It also correlates with a pronounced radiation of large predatory fish, animals with high oxygen demand. We thereby couple the redox history of the atmosphere and oceans to major events in animal evolution. PMID:20884852

  10. Physiological selectivity and activity reduction of insecticides by rainfall to predatory wasps of Tuta absoluta.

    PubMed

    Barros, Emerson C; Bacci, Leandro; Picanco, Marcelo C; Martins, Júlio C; Rosado, Jander F; Silva, Gerson A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we carried out three bioassays with nine used insecticides in tomato crops to identify their efficiency against tomato leaf miner Tuta absoluta, the physiological selectivity and the activity reduction of insecticides by three rain regimes to predatory wasps Protonectarina sylveirae and Polybia scutellaris. We assessed the mortality caused by the recommended doses of abamectin, beta-cyfluthrin, cartap, chlorfenapyr, etofenprox, methamidophos, permethrin, phenthoate and spinosad to T. absoluta and wasps at the moment of application. In addition, we evaluated the wasp mortality due to the insecticides for 30 days on plants that did not receive rain and on plants that received 4 or 125 mm of rain. Spinosad, cartap, chlorfenapyr, phenthoate, abamectin and methamidophos caused mortality higher than 90% to T. absoluta, whereas the pyrethroids beta-cyfluthrin, etofenprox and permethrin caused mortality between 8.5% and 46.25%. At the moment of application, all the insecticides were highly toxic to the wasps, causing mortality higher than 80%. In the absence of rain, all the insecticides continued to cause high mortality to the wasps for 30 days after the application. The toxicity of spinosad and methamidophos on both wasp species; beta-cyfluthrin on P. sylveirae and chlorfenapyr and abamectin on P. scutellaris, decreased when the plants received 4 mm of rain. In contrast, the other insecticides only showed reduced toxicity on the wasps when the plants received 125 mm of rain. PMID:25421627

  11. Levels of total mercury in predatory fish sold in Canada in 2005.

    PubMed

    Dabeka, R W; McKenzie, A D; Forsyth, D S

    2011-06-01

    Total mercury was analysed in 188 samples of predatory fish purchased at the retail level in Canada in 2005. The average concentrations (ng g(-1), range) were: sea bass 329 (38-1367), red snapper 148 (36-431), orange roughy 543 (279-974), fresh water trout 55 (20-430), grouper 360 (8-1060), black cod 284 (71-651), Arctic char 37 (28-54), king fish 440 (42-923), tilefish 601 (79-1164) and marlin 854 (125-2346). The Canadian standard for maximum total mercury allowed in the edible portions of fish sold at the retail level is 1000 ng g(-1) for shark, swordfish, marlin, orange roughy, escolar and both fresh and frozen tuna. The standard is 500 ng g(-1) for all other types of fish. In this study, despite the small number of samples of each species, the 1000 ng g(-1) maximum was exceeded in five samples of marlin (28%). The 500 ng g(-1) maximum was exceeded by six samples of sea bass (20%), four of tilefish (50%), five of grouper (24%), six of king fish (40%) and one of black cod (13%). PMID:21623497

  12. Canalization of body size matters for lifetime reproductive success of male predatory mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae)

    PubMed Central

    Walzer, Andreas; Schausberger, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The adaptive canalization hypothesis predicts that highly fitness-relevant traits are canalized via past selection, resulting in low phenotypic plasticity and high robustness to environmental stress. Accordingly, we hypothesized that the level of phenotypic plasticity of male body size of the predatory mites Phytoseiulus persimilis (low plasticity) and Neoseiulus californicus (high plasticity) reflects the effects of body size variation on fitness, especially male lifetime reproductive success (LRS). We first generated small and standard-sized males of P. persimilis and N. californicus by rearing them to adulthood under limited and ample prey supply, respectively. Then, adult small and standard-sized males were provided with surplus virgin females throughout life to assess their mating and reproductive traits. Small male body size did not affect male longevity or the number of fertilized females but reduced male LRS of P. persimilis but not N. californicus. Proximately, the lower LRS of small than standard-sized P. persimilis males correlated with shorter mating durations, probably decreasing the amount of transferred sperm. Ultimately, we suggest that male body size is more strongly canalized in P. persimilis than N. californicus because deviation from standard body size has larger detrimental fitness effects in P. persimilis than N. californicus. © 2014 The Authors. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2014, 111, 889–899. PMID:25132689

  13. Functional Response of Three Species of Predatory Pirate Bugs Attacking Eggs of Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae).

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Obiratanea S; Ramos, Rodrigo S; Gontijo, Lessando M; Picanço, Marcelo C

    2015-04-01

    The functional response and predation parameters of three species of predatory pirate bugs Amphiareus constrictus (Stal), Blaptostethus pallescens Poppius, and Orius tristicolor (White) (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) were evaluated at four different densities of eggs of Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae). Experiments were conducted in Petri dishes containing a tomato leaf disk infested with the pest eggs, and maintained inside growth chamber with environmental conditions of 25 ± 2 °C, 70 ± 10% relative humidity, and a photoperiod of 12:12 (L:D) h. A. constrictus and B. pallescens showed a type III functional response where predation increased at a decreasing rate after egg density was higher than 12 per leaf disk, reaching an upper plateau of 18.86 and 25.42 eggs per 24 hours, respectively. By contrast, O. tristicolor showed a type II functional response where the number of eggs preyed upon increased at a decreasing rate as egg density increased, reaching an upper limit of 15.20 eggs per 24 hours. The predator equations used in this study estimated handling time of 1.25, 0.87, 0.96 h for A. constrictus, B. pallescens, and O. tristicolor, respectively. The lower handling time and possible higher attack rate of B. pallescens suggests a higher efficiency and probably greater impact on the pest population. If conservation or classical biological control of T. absoluta is to be implemented, then prioritizing which natural enemy species is the most efficient is an important first step. PMID:26313178

  14. Devonian rise in atmospheric oxygen correlated to the radiations of terrestrial plants and large predatory fish.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Tais W; Hammarlund, Emma U; Anbar, Ariel D; Bond, David P G; Gill, Benjamin C; Gordon, Gwyneth W; Knoll, Andrew H; Nielsen, Arne T; Schovsbo, Niels H; Canfield, Donald E

    2010-10-19

    The evolution of Earth's biota is intimately linked to the oxygenation of the oceans and atmosphere. We use the isotopic composition and concentration of molybdenum (Mo) in sedimentary rocks to explore this relationship. Our results indicate two episodes of global ocean oxygenation. The first coincides with the emergence of the Ediacaran fauna, including large, motile bilaterian animals, ca. 550-560 million year ago (Ma), reinforcing previous geochemical indications that Earth surface oxygenation facilitated this radiation. The second, perhaps larger, oxygenation took place around 400 Ma, well after the initial rise of animals and, therefore, suggesting that early metazoans evolved in a relatively low oxygen environment. This later oxygenation correlates with the diversification of vascular plants, which likely contributed to increased oxygenation through the enhanced burial of organic carbon in sediments. It also correlates with a pronounced radiation of large predatory fish, animals with high oxygen demand. We thereby couple the redox history of the atmosphere and oceans to major events in animal evolution.

  15. Predatory activity of the nematophagous fungus Duddingtonia flagrans on horse cyathostomin infective larvae.

    PubMed

    Braga, Fabio R; Araújo, Jackson V; Silva, André R; Carvalho, Rogério O; Araujo, Juliana M; Ferreira, Sebastião R; Benjamin, Laércio A

    2010-08-01

    This work was performed to determine the predatory capacity in vitro of the nematophagous fungus Duddingtonia flagrans (isolate AC001) on cyathostomin infective larvae of horse (L(3)). The experimental assay was carried out on plates with 2% water-agar (2% WA). In the treated group, each plate contained 1.000 L(3) and 1.000 conidia of the fungus. The control group without fungus only contained 1.000 L(3) in the plates. Ten random fields (4 mm diameter) were examined per plate of treated and control groups, every 24 h for seven days under an optical microscope (10x and 40x objective lens) for non-predated L(3) counts. After 7 days, the non-predated L(3) were recovered from the Petri dishes using the Baermann method. The interaction there was a significant reduction (p < 0.01) of 93.64% in the cyathostomin L(3) recovered. The results showed that the D. flagrans is a potential candidate to the biological control of horse cyathostomin L(3). PMID:20213221

  16. Propensity towards cannibalism among Hypoaspis aculeifer and H. miles, two soil-dwelling predatory mite species.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Oliver; Meyhöfer, Rainer; Poehling, Hans-Michael

    2003-01-01

    In biological control programmes, the two predatory soil mites Hypoaspis aculeifer and H. miles are often applied against soil-borne pests like mushroom flies, springtails and mites. Although the mites show high consumption rates on varying prey types in Petri dish experiments and in greenhouses, their overall efficiency is sometimes limited. We hypothesized that intraspecific interactions, like cannibalism, could contribute to this decreased competence. Therefore, experiments were conducted to show the propensity of H. aculeifer and H. miles to cannibalise. Adult mites and nymphs were introduced as predators with conspecific eggs, larvae, nymphs, adult females or males as prey and the number of killed individuals was recorded. Additionally, the oviposition rate on conspecific prey was quantified and the correlation with the number of prey consumed was calculated to assess the influence of cannibalism on egg production. The results illustrate that cannibalism occurs infrequently in both Hypoaspis spp., the only exception being H. aculeifer nymphs, which cannibalised one conspecific egg per day. Moreover, cannibalism never occurred in the presence of alternative prey. Oviposition rate decreased during the experiment in both species but it was positively correlated with the cannibalism rate only for H. aculeifer. The benefit of cannibalism for populations of H. aculeifer and H. miles is discussed. PMID:14756396

  17. From repulsion to attraction: species- and spatial context-dependent threat sensitive response of the spider mite Tetranychus urticae to predatory mite cues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Ferrari, M. Celeste; Schausberger, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Prey perceiving predation risk commonly change their behavior to avoid predation. However, antipredator strategies are costly. Therefore, according to the threat-sensitive predator avoidance hypothesis, prey should match the intensity of their antipredator behaviors to the degree of threat, which may depend on the predator species and the spatial context. We assessed threat sensitivity of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, to the cues of three predatory mites, Phytoseiulus persimilis, Neoseiulus californicus, and Amblyseius andersoni, posing different degrees of risk in two spatial contexts. We first conducted a no-choice test measuring oviposition and activity of T. urticae exposed to chemical traces of predators or traces plus predator eggs. Then, we tested the site preference of T. urticae in choice tests, using artificial cages and leaves. In the no-choice test, T. urticae deposited their first egg later in the presence of cues of P. persimilis than of the other two predators and cue absence, indicating interspecific threat-sensitivity. T. urticae laid also fewer eggs in the presence of cues of P. persimilis and A. andersoni than of N. californicus and cue absence. In the artificial cage test, the spider mites preferred the site with predator traces, whereas in the leaf test, they preferentially resided on leaves without traces. We argue that in a nonplant environment, chemical predator traces do not indicate a risk for T. urticae, and instead, these traces function as indirect habitat cues. The spider mites were attracted to these cues because they associated them with the existence of a nearby host plant.

  18. From repulsion to attraction: species- and spatial context-dependent threat sensitive response of the spider mite Tetranychus urticae to predatory mite cues.

    PubMed

    Fernández Ferrari, M Celeste; Schausberger, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Prey perceiving predation risk commonly change their behavior to avoid predation. However, antipredator strategies are costly. Therefore, according to the threat-sensitive predator avoidance hypothesis, prey should match the intensity of their antipredator behaviors to the degree of threat, which may depend on the predator species and the spatial context. We assessed threat sensitivity of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, to the cues of three predatory mites, Phytoseiulus persimilis, Neoseiulus californicus, and Amblyseius andersoni, posing different degrees of risk in two spatial contexts. We first conducted a no-choice test measuring oviposition and activity of T. urticae exposed to chemical traces of predators or traces plus predator eggs. Then, we tested the site preference of T. urticae in choice tests, using artificial cages and leaves. In the no-choice test, T. urticae deposited their first egg later in the presence of cues of P. persimilis than of the other two predators and cue absence, indicating interspecific threat-sensitivity. T. urticae laid also fewer eggs in the presence of cues of P. persimilis and A. andersoni than of N. californicus and cue absence. In the artificial cage test, the spider mites preferred the site with predator traces, whereas in the leaf test, they preferentially resided on leaves without traces. We argue that in a nonplant environment, chemical predator traces do not indicate a risk for T. urticae, and instead, these traces function as indirect habitat cues. The spider mites were attracted to these cues because they associated them with the existence of a nearby host plant.

  19. Specific detection of the floodwater mosquitoes Aedes sticticus and Aedes vexans DNA in predatory diving beetles.

    PubMed

    Vinnersten, Thomas Z Persson; Halvarsson, Peter; Lundström, Jan O

    2015-08-01

    Floodwater mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are associated with periodically flooded wet meadows, marshes, and swamps in floodplains of major rivers worldwide, and their larvae are abundant in the shallow parts of flooded areas. The nuisance caused by the blood-seeking adult female mosquitoes motivates mosquito control. Larviciding with Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis is considered the most environmentally safe method. However, some concern has been raised whether aquatic predatory insects could be indirectly affected by this reduction in a potential vital prey. Top predators in the temporary wetlands in the River Dalälven floodplains are diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae), and Aedes sticticus and Ae. vexans are the target species for mosquito control. For detailed studies on this aquatic predator-prey system, we developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for detection of mosquito DNA in the guts of medium-sized diving beetles. Primers were designed for amplifying short mitochondrial DNA fragments of the cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (COI) gene in Ae. sticticus and Ae. vexans, respectively. Primer specificity was confirmed and half-life detectability of Ae. sticticus DNA in diving beetle guts was derived from a feeding and digestion experiment. The Ae. sticticus DNA within diving beetle guts was detected up to 12 h postfeeding, and half-life detectability was estimated to 5.6 h. In addition, field caught diving beetles were screened for Ae. sticticus and Ae. vexans DNA and in 14% of the diving beetles one or both mosquito species were detected, showing that these mosquito species are utilized as food by the diving beetles.

  20. Microbial community of predatory bugs of the genus Macrolophus (Hemiptera: Miridae)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The predatory mirids of the genus Macrolophus are key natural enemies of various economically important agricultural pests. Both M. caliginosus and M. pygmaeus are commercially available for the augmentative biological control of arthropod pests in European greenhouses. The latter species is known to be infected with Wolbachia -inducing cytoplasmic incompatibility in its host- but the presence of other endosymbionts has not been demonstrated. In the present study, the microbial diversity was examined in various populations of M. caliginosus and M. pygmaeus by 16S rRNA sequencing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Results Besides Wolbachia, a co-infection of 2 Rickettsia species was detected in all M. pygmaeus populations. Based on a concatenated alignment of the 16S rRNA gene, the gltA gene and the coxA gene, the first is phylogenetically related to Rickettsia bellii, whereas the other is closely related to Rickettsia limoniae. All M. caliginosus populations were infected with the same Wolbachia and limoniae-like Rickettsia strain as M. pygmaeus, but did not harbour the bellii-like Rickettsia strain. Interestingly, individuals with a single infection were not found. A PCR assay on the ovaries of M. pygmaeus and M. caliginosus indicated that all endosymbionts are vertically transmitted. The presence of Wolbachia and Rickettsia in oocytes was confirmed by a fluorescence in situ hybridisation. A bio-assay comparing an infected and an uninfected M. pygmaeus population suggested that the endosymbionts had minor effects on nymphal development of their insect host and did not influence its fecundity. Conclusion Two species of the palaearctic mirid genus Macrolophus are infected with multiple endosymbionts, including Wolbachia and Rickettsia. Independent of the origin, all tested populations of both M. pygmaeus and M. caliginosus were infected with three and two endosymbionts, respectively. There was no indication that infection with endosymbiotic

  1. Decomposing predation: testing for parameters that correlate with predatory performance by a social bacterium.

    PubMed

    Mendes-Soares, Helena; Velicer, Gregory J

    2013-02-01

    Predator-prey interactions presumably play major roles in shaping the composition and dynamics of microbial communities. However, little is understood about the population biology of such interactions or how predation-related parameters vary or correlate across prey environments. Myxococcus xanthus is a motile soil bacterium that feeds on a broad range of other soil microbes that vary greatly in the degree to which they support M. xanthus growth. In order to decompose predator-prey interactions at the population level, we quantified five predation-related parameters during M. xanthus growth on nine phylogenetically diverse bacterial prey species. The horizontal expansion rate of swarming predator colonies fueled by prey lawns served as our measure of overall predatory performance, as it incorporates both the searching (motility) and handling (killing and consumption of prey) components of predation. Four other parameters-predator population growth rate, maximum predator yield, maximum prey kill, and overall rate of prey death-were measured from homogeneously mixed predator-prey lawns from which predator populations were not allowed to expand horizontally by swarming motility. All prey species fueled predator population growth. For some prey, predator-specific prey death was detected contemporaneously with predator population growth, whereas killing of other prey species was detected only after cessation of predator growth. All four of the alternative parameters were found to correlate significantly with predator swarm expansion rate to varying degrees, suggesting causal interrelationships among these diverse predation measures. More broadly, our results highlight the importance of examining multiple parameters for thoroughly understanding the population biology of microbial predation.

  2. Social familiarity modulates group living and foraging behaviour of juvenile predatory mites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strodl, Markus A.; Schausberger, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Environmental stressors during early life may have persistent consequences for phenotypic development and fitness. In group-living species, an important stressor during juvenile development is the presence and familiarity status of conspecific individuals. To alleviate intraspecific conflicts during juvenile development, many animals evolved the ability to discriminate familiar and unfamiliar individuals based on prior association and use this ability to preferentially associate with familiar individuals. Assuming that familiar neighbours require less attention than unfamiliar ones, as predicted by limited attention theory, assorting with familiar individuals should increase the efficiency in other tasks. We assessed the influence of social familiarity on within-group association behaviour, development and foraging of juvenile life stages of the group-living, plant-inhabiting predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis. The observed groups consisted either of mixed-age familiar and unfamiliar juvenile mites or of age-synchronized familiar or unfamiliar juvenile mites or of pairs of familiar or unfamiliar larvae. Overall, familiar mites preferentially grouped together and foraged more efficiently, i.e. needed less prey at similar developmental speed and body size at maturity, than unfamiliar mites. Preferential association of familiar mites was also apparent in the inter-exuviae distances. Social familiarity was established by imprinting in the larval stage, was not cancelled or overridden by later conspecific contacts and persisted into adulthood. Life stage had an effect on grouping with larvae being closer together than nymphal stages. Ultimately, optimized foraging during the developmental phase may relax within-group competition, enhance current and future food supply needed for optimal development and optimize patch exploitation and leaving under limited food.

  3. Discovery of Bioactive Metabolites in Biofuel Microalgae That Offer Protection against Predatory Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bagwell, Christopher E; Abernathy, Amanda; Barnwell, Remy; Milliken, Charles E; Noble, Peter A; Dale, Taraka; Beauchesne, Kevin R; Moeller, Peter D R

    2016-01-01

    protection of biomass from predatory losses.

  4. High exposure rates of anticoagulant rodenticides in predatory bird species in intensively managed landscapes in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Thomas Kjær; Lassen, Pia; Elmeros, Morten

    2012-10-01

    The extensive use of anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) for rodent control has led to widespread secondary exposure in nontarget predatory wildlife species. We investigated exposure rates and concentrations of five ARs in liver samples from five raptors and six owls from Denmark. A total of 430 birds were analysed. ARs were detected in 84-100 % of individual birds within each species. Multiple AR exposure was detected in 73 % of all birds. Average number of substances detected in individual birds was 2.2 with no differences between owls and raptors. Difenacoum, bromadiolone, and brodifacoum were the most prevalent substances and occurred in the highest concentrations. Second-generation ARs made up 96 % of the summed AR burden. Among the six core species (sample size >30), summed AR concentrations were lower in rough-legged buzzard (Buteo lagopus) and long-eared owl (Asio otus) than in barn owl (Tyto alba), buzzard (B. buteo), kestrel (Falco tinnunculus), and tawny owl (Strix aluco). There was a strong tendency for seasonal variations in the summed AR concentration with levels being lowest during autumn, which is probably related to an influx of less-exposed migrating birds from northern Scandinavia during autumn. High hepatic AR residue concentrations (>100 ng/g wet weight), which have been associated with symptoms of rodenticide poisoning and increased mortality, were recorded high frequencies (12.9-37.4 %) in five of the six core species. The results suggest that the present use of ARs in Denmark, at least locally, may have adverse effects on reproduction and, ultimately, population status in some raptors and owls. PMID:22588365

  5. Subsurface observations of white shark Carcharodon carcharias predatory behaviour using an autonomous underwater vehicle.

    PubMed

    Skomal, G B; Hoyos-Padilla, E M; Kukulya, A; Stokey, R

    2015-12-01

    In this study, an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) was used to test this technology as a viable tool for directly observing the behaviour of marine animals and to investigate the behaviour, habitat use and feeding ecology of white sharks Carcharodon carcharias near Guadalupe Island off the coast of Mexico. During the period 31 October to 7 November 2013, six AUV missions were conducted to track one male and three female C. carcharias, ranging in estimated total length (LT ) from 3·9 to 5·7 m, off the north-east coast of Guadalupe Island. In doing so, the AUV generated over 13 h of behavioural data for C. carcharias at depths down to 90 m. The sharks remained in the area for the duration of each mission and moved through broad depth and temperature ranges from the surface to 163·8 m depth (mean ± S.D. = 112·5 ± 40·3 m) and 7·9-27·1° C (mean ± S.D. = 12·7 ± 2·9° C), respectively. Video footage and AUV sensor data revealed that two of the C. carcharias being tracked and eight other C. carcharias in the area approached (n = 17), bumped (n = 4) and bit (n = 9) the AUV during these tracks. This study demonstrated that an AUV can be used to effectively track and observe the behaviour of a large pelagic animal, C. carcharias. In doing so, the first observations of subsurface predatory behaviour were generated for this species. At its current state of development, this technology clearly offers a new and innovative tool for tracking the fine-scale behaviour of marine animals.

  6. Discovery of Bioactive Metabolites in Biofuel Microalgae That Offer Protection against Predatory Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bagwell, Christopher E; Abernathy, Amanda; Barnwell, Remy; Milliken, Charles E; Noble, Peter A; Dale, Taraka; Beauchesne, Kevin R; Moeller, Peter D R

    2016-01-01

    protection of biomass from predatory losses. PMID:27148205

  7. Discovery of Bioactive Metabolites in Biofuel Microalgae That Offer Protection against Predatory Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bagwell, Christopher E.; Abernathy, Amanda; Barnwell, Remy; Milliken, Charles E.; Noble, Peter A.; Dale, Taraka; Beauchesne, Kevin R.; Moeller, Peter D. R.

    2016-01-01

    protection of biomass from predatory losses. PMID:27148205

  8. Integration of multiple intraguild predator cues for oviposition decisions by a predatory mite

    PubMed Central

    Walzer, Andreas; Schausberger, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In mutual intraguild predation (IGP), the role of individual guild members is strongly context dependent and, during ontogeny, can shift from an intraguild (IG) prey to a food competitor or to an IG predator. Consequently, recognition of an offspring's predator is more complex for IG than classic prey females. Thus, IG prey females should be able to modulate their oviposition decisions by integrating multiple IG predator cues and by experience. Using a guild of plant-inhabiting predatory mites sharing the spider mite Tetranychus urticae as prey and passing through ontogenetic role shifts in mutual IGP, we assessed the effects of single and combined direct cues of the IG predator Amblyseius andersoni (eggs and traces left by a female on the substrate) on prey patch selection and oviposition behaviour of naïve and IG predator-experienced IG prey females of Phytoseiulus persimilis. The IG prey females preferentially resided in patches without predator cues when the alternative patch contained traces of predator females or the cue combination. Preferential egg placement in patches without predator cues was only apparent in the choice situation with the cue combination. Experience increased the responsiveness of females exposed to the IG predator cue combination, indicated by immediate selection of the prey patch without predator cues and almost perfect oviposition avoidance in patches with the cue combination. We argue that the evolution of the ability of IG prey females to evaluate offspring's IGP risk accurately is driven by the irreversibility of oviposition and the functionally complex relationships between predator guild members. PMID:23264692

  9. Hypoxia, Blackwater and Fish Kills: Experimental Lethal Oxygen Thresholds in Juvenile Predatory Lowland River Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Small, Kade; Kopf, R. Keller; Watts, Robyn J.; Howitt, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia represents a growing threat to biodiversity in freshwater ecosystems. Here, aquatic surface respiration (ASR) and oxygen thresholds required for survival in freshwater and simulated blackwater are evaluated for four lowland river fishes native to the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB), Australia. Juvenile stages of predatory species including golden perch Macquaria ambigua, silver perch Bidyanus bidyanus, Murray cod Maccullochella peelii, and eel-tailed catfish Tandanus tandanus were exposed to experimental conditions of nitrogen-induced hypoxia in freshwater and hypoxic blackwater simulations using dried river red gum Eucalyptus camaldulensis leaf litter. Australia's largest freshwater fish, M. peelii, was the most sensitive to hypoxia but given that we evaluated tolerances of juveniles (0.99±0.04 g; mean mass ±SE), the low tolerance of this species could not be attributed to its large maximum attainable body mass (>100,000 g). Concentrations of dissolved oxygen causing 50% mortality (LC50) in freshwater ranged from 0.25±0.06 mg l−1 in T. tandanus to 1.58±0.01 mg l−1 in M. peelii over 48 h at 25–26°C. Logistic models predicted that first mortalities may start at oxygen concentrations ranging from 2.4 mg l−1 to 3.1 mg l−1 in T. tandanus and M. peelii respectively within blackwater simulations. Aquatic surface respiration preceded mortality and this behaviour is documented here for the first time in juveniles of all four species. Despite the natural occurrence of hypoxia and blackwater events in lowland rivers of the MDB, juvenile stages of these large-bodied predators are vulnerable to mortality induced by low oxygen concentration and water chemistry changes associated with the decomposition of organic material. Given the extent of natural flow regime alteration and climate change predictions of rising temperatures and more severe drought and flooding, acute episodes of hypoxia may represent an underappreciated risk to riverine fish communities. PMID

  10. Subsurface observations of white shark Carcharodon carcharias predatory behaviour using an autonomous underwater vehicle.

    PubMed

    Skomal, G B; Hoyos-Padilla, E M; Kukulya, A; Stokey, R

    2015-12-01

    In this study, an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) was used to test this technology as a viable tool for directly observing the behaviour of marine animals and to investigate the behaviour, habitat use and feeding ecology of white sharks Carcharodon carcharias near Guadalupe Island off the coast of Mexico. During the period 31 October to 7 November 2013, six AUV missions were conducted to track one male and three female C. carcharias, ranging in estimated total length (LT ) from 3·9 to 5·7 m, off the north-east coast of Guadalupe Island. In doing so, the AUV generated over 13 h of behavioural data for C. carcharias at depths down to 90 m. The sharks remained in the area for the duration of each mission and moved through broad depth and temperature ranges from the surface to 163·8 m depth (mean ± S.D. = 112·5 ± 40·3 m) and 7·9-27·1° C (mean ± S.D. = 12·7 ± 2·9° C), respectively. Video footage and AUV sensor data revealed that two of the C. carcharias being tracked and eight other C. carcharias in the area approached (n = 17), bumped (n = 4) and bit (n = 9) the AUV during these tracks. This study demonstrated that an AUV can be used to effectively track and observe the behaviour of a large pelagic animal, C. carcharias. In doing so, the first observations of subsurface predatory behaviour were generated for this species. At its current state of development, this technology clearly offers a new and innovative tool for tracking the fine-scale behaviour of marine animals. PMID:26709209

  11. Interdependent effects of male and female body size plasticity on mating behaviour of predatory mites

    PubMed Central

    Walzer, Andreas; Schausberger, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive canalization hypothesis predicts that traits with low phenotypic plasticity are more fitness relevant, because they have been canalized via strong past selection, than traits with high phenotypic plasticity. Based on differing male body size plasticities of the predatory mites Phytoseiulus persimilis (low plasticity) and Neoseiulus californicus (high plasticity), we accordingly hypothesized that small male body size entails higher costs in female choice and male–male competition in P. persimilis than N. californicus. Males of both species are highly polygynous but females differ in the level of polyandry (low level in P. persimilis; medium level in N. californicus). We videotaped the mating interactions in triplets of either P. persimilis or N. californicus, consisting of a virgin female (small or standard-sized) and a small and a standard-sized male. Mating by both small and standard-sized P. persimilis females was biased towards standard-sized males, resulting from the interplay between female preference for standard-sized males and the inferiority of small males in male–male competition. In contrast, mating by N. californicus females was equally balanced between small and standard-sized males. Small N. californicus males were more aggressive (‘Napoleon complex’) in male–male competition, reducing the likelihood of encounter between the standard-sized male and the female, and thus counterbalancing female preference for standard-sized males. Our results support the hypothesis that male body size is more important to fitness in the low-level polyandrous P. persimilis than in the medium-level polyandrous N. californicus and provide a key example of the implications of sexually selected body size plasticity on mating behaviour. PMID:25673881

  12. Plant diversity and identity effects on predatory nematodes and their prey.

    PubMed

    Kostenko, Olga; Duyts, Henk; Grootemaat, Saskia; De Deyn, Gerlinde B; Bezemer, T Martijn

    2015-02-01

    There is considerable evidence that both plant diversity and plant identity can influence the level of predation and predator abundance aboveground. However, how the level of predation in the soil and the abundance of predatory soil fauna are related to plant diversity and identity remains largely unknown. In a biodiversity field experiment, we examined the effects of plant diversity and identity on the infectivity of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs, Heterorhabditis and Steinernema spp.), which prey on soil arthropods, and abundance of carnivorous non-EPNs, which are predators of other nematode groups. To obtain a comprehensive view of the potential prey/food availability, we also quantified the abundance of soil insects and nonpredatory nematodes and the root biomass in the experimental plots. We used structural equation modeling (SEM) to investigate possible pathways by which plant diversity and identity may affect EPN infectivity and the abundance of carnivorous non-EPNs. Heterorhabditis spp. infectivity and the abundance of carnivorous non-EPNs were not directly related to plant diversity or the proportion of legumes, grasses and forbs in the plant community. However, Steinernema spp. infectivity was higher in monocultures of Festuca rubra and Trifolium pratense than in monocultures of the other six plant species. SEM revealed that legumes positively affected Steinernema infectivity, whereas plant diversity indirectly affected the infectivity of HeterorhabditisEPNs via effects on the abundance of soil insects. The abundance of prey (soil insects and root-feeding, bacterivorous, and fungivorous nematodes) increased with higher plant diversity. The abundance of prey nematodes was also positively affected by legumes. These plant community effects could not be explained by changes in root biomass. Our results show that plant diversity and identity effects on belowground biota (particularly soil nematode community) can differ between organisms that belong to the

  13. Amblyseius swirskii: what made this predatory mite such a successful biocontrol agent?

    PubMed

    Calvo, F Javier; Knapp, Markus; van Houten, Yvonne M; Hoogerbrugge, Hans; Belda, José E

    2015-04-01

    The predatory mite Amblyseius swirskii quickly became one of the most successful biocontrol agents in protected cultivation after its introduction into the market in 2005 and is now released in more than 50 countries. There are several key factors contributing to this success: (1) it can control several major pests including the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, the whiteflies Bemisia tabaci and Trialeurodes vaporariorum and the broad mite, Polyphagotarsonemus latus, simultaneously in vegetables and ornamental crops; (2) it can develop and reproduce feeding on non-prey food sources such as pollen, which allows populations of the predator to build up on plants before the pests are present and to persist in the crop during periods when prey is scarce or absent; and (3) it can be easily reared on factitious prey, which allows economic mass production. However, despite the fact that A. swirskii provides growers with a robust control method, external demands were initially a key factor in promoting the use of this predator, particularly in Spain. In 2006, when exports of fresh vegetables from Spain were stopped due to the presence of pesticide residues, growers were forced to look for alternatives to chemical control. This resulted in the massive adoption of biological control-based integrated pest management programmes based on the use of A. swirskii in sweet pepper. Biological control increased from 5 % in 2005, 1 year before A. swirskii was commercially released, to almost 100 % of a total 6,000 ha of protected sweet pepper in Spain within 3 years. Later, it was demonstrated that A. swirskii was equally effective in other crops and countries, resulting in extensive worldwide use of A. swirskii in greenhouses.

  14. Specific detection of the floodwater mosquitoes Aedes sticticus and Aedes vexans DNA in predatory diving beetles.

    PubMed

    Vinnersten, Thomas Z Persson; Halvarsson, Peter; Lundström, Jan O

    2015-08-01

    Floodwater mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are associated with periodically flooded wet meadows, marshes, and swamps in floodplains of major rivers worldwide, and their larvae are abundant in the shallow parts of flooded areas. The nuisance caused by the blood-seeking adult female mosquitoes motivates mosquito control. Larviciding with Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis is considered the most environmentally safe method. However, some concern has been raised whether aquatic predatory insects could be indirectly affected by this reduction in a potential vital prey. Top predators in the temporary wetlands in the River Dalälven floodplains are diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae), and Aedes sticticus and Ae. vexans are the target species for mosquito control. For detailed studies on this aquatic predator-prey system, we developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for detection of mosquito DNA in the guts of medium-sized diving beetles. Primers were designed for amplifying short mitochondrial DNA fragments of the cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (COI) gene in Ae. sticticus and Ae. vexans, respectively. Primer specificity was confirmed and half-life detectability of Ae. sticticus DNA in diving beetle guts was derived from a feeding and digestion experiment. The Ae. sticticus DNA within diving beetle guts was detected up to 12 h postfeeding, and half-life detectability was estimated to 5.6 h. In addition, field caught diving beetles were screened for Ae. sticticus and Ae. vexans DNA and in 14% of the diving beetles one or both mosquito species were detected, showing that these mosquito species are utilized as food by the diving beetles. PMID:24895318

  15. Ocean Warming and CO₂-Induced Acidification Impact the Lipid Content of a Marine Predatory Gastropod.

    PubMed

    Valles-Regino, Roselyn; Tate, Rick; Kelaher, Brendan; Savins, Dale; Dowell, Ashley; Benkendorff, Kirsten

    2015-09-24

    Ocean warming and acidification are current global environmental challenges impacting aquatic organisms. A shift in conditions outside the optimal environmental range for marine species is likely to generate stress that could impact metabolic activity, with consequences for the biosynthesis of marine lipids. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in the lipid content of Dicathais orbita exposed to current and predicted future climate change scenarios. The whelks were exposed to a combination of temperature and CO₂-induced acidification treatments in controlled flowthrough seawater mesocosms for 35 days. Under current conditions, D. orbita foot tissue has an average of 6 mg lipid/g tissue, but at predicted future ocean temperatures, the total lipid content dropped significantly, to almost half. The fatty acid composition is dominated by polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA 52%) with an n-3:6 fatty acid ratio of almost 2, which remains unchanged under future ocean conditions. However, we detected an interactive effect of temperature and pCO₂ on the % PUFAs and n-3 and n-6 fatty acids were significantly reduced by elevated water temperature, while both the saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids were significantly reduced under increased pCO₂ acidifying conditions. The present study indicates the potential for relatively small predicted changes in ocean conditions to reduce lipid reserves and alter the fatty acid composition of a predatory marine mollusc. This has potential implications for the growth and survivorship of whelks under future conditions, but only minimal implications for human consumption of D. orbita as nutritional seafood are predicted.

  16. Optimization an Optimal Artificial Diet for the Predatory Bug Orius sauteri (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae)

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Su; Zhang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Background The flower bug Orius sauteri is an important polyphagous predator that is widely used for the biological control of mites and aphids. However, the optimal conditions for mass rearing of this insect are still unclear, thus limiting its application. Methodology In this study, we investigated the optimal ingredients of an artificial diet for raising O. sauteri using a microencapsulation technique. The ingredients included egg yolk (vitellus), whole-pupa homogenate of the Tussah silk moth (Antheraea paphia), honey, sucrose, rapeseed (Brassica napus) pollen and sinkaline. We tested 25 combinations of the above ingredients using an orthogonal experimental design. Using statistical analysis, we confirmed the main effect factors amongst the components, and selected five optimal combinations based on different biological and physiological characters. Principal Findings The results showed that, although different artificial diet formats significantly influenced the development and reproductive ability of O. sauteri, the complete development of O. sauteri to sexual maturity could only be achieved by optimizing the artificial diet according to specific biological characters. In general, pupae of A. paphia had more influence on O sauteri development than did artificial components. The results of a follow-up test of locomotory and respiratory capacity indicated that respiratory quotient, metabolic rate and average creeping speed were all influenced by different diets. Furthermore, the field evaluations of mating preference, predatory consumption and population dispersion also demonstrated the benefits that could be provided by optimal artificial diets. Conclusions A microencapsulated artificial diet overcame many of the difficulties highlighted by previous studies on the mass rearing of O. sauteri. Optimization of the microencapsulated artificial diet directly increased the biological and physiological characters investigated. Successive physiological tests and field

  17. Ocean Warming and CO2-Induced Acidification Impact the Lipid Content of a Marine Predatory Gastropod

    PubMed Central

    Valles-Regino, Roselyn; Tate, Rick; Kelaher, Brendan; Savins, Dale; Dowell, Ashley; Benkendorff, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Ocean warming and acidification are current global environmental challenges impacting aquatic organisms. A shift in conditions outside the optimal environmental range for marine species is likely to generate stress that could impact metabolic activity, with consequences for the biosynthesis of marine lipids. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in the lipid content of Dicathais orbita exposed to current and predicted future climate change scenarios. The whelks were exposed to a combination of temperature and CO2-induced acidification treatments in controlled flowthrough seawater mesocosms for 35 days. Under current conditions, D. orbita foot tissue has an average of 6 mg lipid/g tissue, but at predicted future ocean temperatures, the total lipid content dropped significantly, to almost half. The fatty acid composition is dominated by polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA 52%) with an n-3:6 fatty acid ratio of almost 2, which remains unchanged under future ocean conditions. However, we detected an interactive effect of temperature and pCO2 on the % PUFAs and n-3 and n-6 fatty acids were significantly reduced by elevated water temperature, while both the saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids were significantly reduced under increased pCO2 acidifying conditions. The present study indicates the potential for relatively small predicted changes in ocean conditions to reduce lipid reserves and alter the fatty acid composition of a predatory marine mollusc. This has potential implications for the growth and survivorship of whelks under future conditions, but only minimal implications for human consumption of D. orbita as nutritional seafood are predicted. PMID:26404318

  18. Hypoxia, blackwater and fish kills: experimental lethal oxygen thresholds in juvenile predatory lowland river fishes.

    PubMed

    Small, Kade; Kopf, R Keller; Watts, Robyn J; Howitt, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia represents a growing threat to biodiversity in freshwater ecosystems. Here, aquatic surface respiration (ASR) and oxygen thresholds required for survival in freshwater and simulated blackwater are evaluated for four lowland river fishes native to the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB), Australia. Juvenile stages of predatory species including golden perch Macquaria ambigua, silver perch Bidyanus bidyanus, Murray cod Maccullochella peelii, and eel-tailed catfish Tandanus tandanus were exposed to experimental conditions of nitrogen-induced hypoxia in freshwater and hypoxic blackwater simulations using dried river red gum Eucalyptus camaldulensis leaf litter. Australia's largest freshwater fish, M. peelii, was the most sensitive to hypoxia but given that we evaluated tolerances of juveniles (0.99 ± 0.04 g; mean mass ±SE), the low tolerance of this species could not be attributed to its large maximum attainable body mass (>100,000 g). Concentrations of dissolved oxygen causing 50% mortality (LC50) in freshwater ranged from 0.25 ± 0.06 mg l(-1) in T. tandanus to 1.58 ± 0.01 mg l(-1) in M. peelii over 48 h at 25-26 °C. Logistic models predicted that first mortalities may start at oxygen concentrations ranging from 2.4 mg l(-1) to 3.1 mg l(-1) in T. tandanus and M. peelii respectively within blackwater simulations. Aquatic surface respiration preceded mortality and this behaviour is documented here for the first time in juveniles of all four species. Despite the natural occurrence of hypoxia and blackwater events in lowland rivers of the MDB, juvenile stages of these large-bodied predators are vulnerable to mortality induced by low oxygen concentration and water chemistry changes associated with the decomposition of organic material. Given the extent of natural flow regime alteration and climate change predictions of rising temperatures and more severe drought and flooding, acute episodes of hypoxia may represent an underappreciated risk to riverine fish communities.

  19. Genome Sequencing of the Phytoseiid Predatory Mite Metaseiulus occidentalis Reveals Completely Atomized Hox Genes and Superdynamic Intron Evolution.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Marjorie A; Waterhouse, Robert M; Wu, Ke; Estep, Alden S; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Palmer, William J; Pomerantz, Aaron F; Simão, Felipe A; Thomas, Jainy; Jiggins, Francis M; Murphy, Terence D; Pritham, Ellen J; Robertson, Hugh M; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Gibbs, Richard A; Richards, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Metaseiulus occidentalis is an eyeless phytoseiid predatory mite employed for the biological control of agricultural pests including spider mites. Despite appearances, these predator and prey mites are separated by some 400 Myr of evolution and radically different lifestyles. We present a 152-Mb draft assembly of the M. occidentalis genome: Larger than that of its favored prey, Tetranychus urticae, but considerably smaller than those of many other chelicerates, enabling an extremely contiguous and complete assembly to be built-the best arachnid to date. Aided by transcriptome data, genome annotation cataloged 18,338 protein-coding genes and identified large numbers of Helitron transposable elements. Comparisons with other arthropods revealed a particularly dynamic and turbulent genomic evolutionary history. Its genes exhibit elevated molecular evolution, with strikingly high numbers of intron gains and losses, in stark contrast to the deer tick Ixodes scapularis Uniquely among examined arthropods, this predatory mite's Hox genes are completely atomized, dispersed across the genome, and it encodes five copies of the normally single-copy RNA processing Dicer-2 gene. Examining gene families linked to characteristic biological traits of this tiny predator provides initial insights into processes of sex determination, development, immune defense, and how it detects, disables, and digests its prey. As the first reference genome for the Phytoseiidae, and for any species with the rare sex determination system of parahaploidy, the genome of the western orchard predatory mite improves genomic sampling of chelicerates and provides invaluable new resources for functional genomic analyses of this family of agriculturally important mites. PMID:26951779

  20. Genome Sequencing of the Phytoseiid Predatory Mite Metaseiulus occidentalis Reveals Completely Atomized Hox Genes and Superdynamic Intron Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hoy, Marjorie A.; Waterhouse, Robert M.; Wu, Ke; Estep, Alden S.; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Palmer, William J.; Pomerantz, Aaron F.; Simão, Felipe A.; Thomas, Jainy; Jiggins, Francis M.; Murphy, Terence D.; Pritham, Ellen J.; Robertson, Hugh M.; Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Richards, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Metaseiulus occidentalis is an eyeless phytoseiid predatory mite employed for the biological control of agricultural pests including spider mites. Despite appearances, these predator and prey mites are separated by some 400 Myr of evolution and radically different lifestyles. We present a 152-Mb draft assembly of the M. occidentalis genome: Larger than that of its favored prey, Tetranychus urticae, but considerably smaller than those of many other chelicerates, enabling an extremely contiguous and complete assembly to be built—the best arachnid to date. Aided by transcriptome data, genome annotation cataloged 18,338 protein-coding genes and identified large numbers of Helitron transposable elements. Comparisons with other arthropods revealed a particularly dynamic and turbulent genomic evolutionary history. Its genes exhibit elevated molecular evolution, with strikingly high numbers of intron gains and losses, in stark contrast to the deer tick Ixodes scapularis. Uniquely among examined arthropods, this predatory mite’s Hox genes are completely atomized, dispersed across the genome, and it encodes five copies of the normally single-copy RNA processing Dicer-2 gene. Examining gene families linked to characteristic biological traits of this tiny predator provides initial insights into processes of sex determination, development, immune defense, and how it detects, disables, and digests its prey. As the first reference genome for the Phytoseiidae, and for any species with the rare sex determination system of parahaploidy, the genome of the western orchard predatory mite improves genomic sampling of chelicerates and provides invaluable new resources for functional genomic analyses of this family of agriculturally important mites. PMID:26951779

  1. Warring arthropod societies: Social spider colonies can delay annihilation by predatory ants via reduced apparency and increased group size.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Carl N; Wright, Colin M; Pruitt, Jonathan N

    2015-10-01

    Sociality provides individuals with benefits via collective foraging and anti-predator defense. One of the costs of living in large groups, however, is increased apparency to natural enemies. Here, we test how the individual-level and collective traits of spider societies can increase the risk of discovery and death by predatory ants. We transplanted colonies of the social spider Stegodyphus dumicola into a habitat dense with one of their top predators, the pugnacious ant Anoplolepis custodiens. With three different experiments, we test how colony-wide survivorship in a predator-dense habitat can be altered by colony apparency (i.e., the presence of a capture web), group size, and group composition (i.e., the proportion of bold and shy personality types present). We also test how spiders' social context (i.e., living solitarily vs. among conspecifics) modifies their behaviour toward ants in their capture web. Colonies with capture webs intact were discovered by predatory ants on average 25% faster than colonies with the capture web removed, and all discovered colonies eventually collapsed and succumbed to predation. However, the lag time from discovery by ants to colony collapse was greater for colonies containing more individuals. The composition of individual personality types in the group had no influence on survivorship. Spiders in a social group were more likely to approach ants caught in their web than were isolated spiders. Isolated spiders were more likely to attack a safe prey item (a moth) than they were to attack ants and were more likely to retreat from ants after contact than they were after contact with moths. Together, our data suggest that the physical structures produced by large animal societies can increase their apparency to natural enemies, though larger groups can facilitate a longer lag time between discovery and demise. Lastly, the interaction between spiders and predatory ants seems to depend on the social context in which spiders reside

  2. Warring arthropod societies: Social spider colonies can delay annihilation by predatory ants via reduced apparency and increased group size.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Carl N; Wright, Colin M; Pruitt, Jonathan N

    2015-10-01

    Sociality provides individuals with benefits via collective foraging and anti-predator defense. One of the costs of living in large groups, however, is increased apparency to natural enemies. Here, we test how the individual-level and collective traits of spider societies can increase the risk of discovery and death by predatory ants. We transplanted colonies of the social spider Stegodyphus dumicola into a habitat dense with one of their top predators, the pugnacious ant Anoplolepis custodiens. With three different experiments, we test how colony-wide survivorship in a predator-dense habitat can be altered by colony apparency (i.e., the presence of a capture web), group size, and group composition (i.e., the proportion of bold and shy personality types present). We also test how spiders' social context (i.e., living solitarily vs. among conspecifics) modifies their behaviour toward ants in their capture web. Colonies with capture webs intact were discovered by predatory ants on average 25% faster than colonies with the capture web removed, and all discovered colonies eventually collapsed and succumbed to predation. However, the lag time from discovery by ants to colony collapse was greater for colonies containing more individuals. The composition of individual personality types in the group had no influence on survivorship. Spiders in a social group were more likely to approach ants caught in their web than were isolated spiders. Isolated spiders were more likely to attack a safe prey item (a moth) than they were to attack ants and were more likely to retreat from ants after contact than they were after contact with moths. Together, our data suggest that the physical structures produced by large animal societies can increase their apparency to natural enemies, though larger groups can facilitate a longer lag time between discovery and demise. Lastly, the interaction between spiders and predatory ants seems to depend on the social context in which spiders reside.

  3. Laboratory tests for controlling poultry red mites (Dermanyssus gallinae) with predatory mites in small 'laying hen' cages.

    PubMed

    Lesna, Izabela; Sabelis, Maurice W; van Niekerk, Thea G C M; Komdeur, Jan

    2012-12-01

    To assess their potential to control poultry red mites (Dermanyssus gallinae), we tested selected predaceous mites (Androlaelaps casalis and Stratiolaelaps scimitus) that occur naturally in wild bird nests or sometimes spontaneously invade poultry houses. This was done under laboratory conditions in cages, each with 2-3 laying hens, initially 300 poultry red mites and later the release of 1,000 predators. These small-scale tests were designed to prevent mite escape from the cages and they were carried out in three replicates at each of three temperature regimes: 26, 30 (constant day and night) and 33-25 °C (day-night cycle). After 6 weeks total population sizes of poultry red mites and predatory mites were assessed. For the temperature regimes of 26 and 33/25 °C S. scimitus reduced the poultry red mite population relative to the control experiments by a factor 3 and 30, respectively, and A. casalis by a factor of 18 and 55, respectively. At 30 °C the predators had less effect on red mites, with a reduction of 1.3-fold for S. scimitus and 5.6-fold for A. casalis. This possibly reflected hen manure condition or an effect of other invertebrates in the hen feed. Poultry red mite control was not negatively affected by temperatures as high as 33 °C and was always better in trials with A. casalis than in those with S. scimitus. In none of the experiments predators managed to eradicate the population of poultry red mites. This may be due to a prey refuge effect since most predatory mites were found in and around the manure tray at the bottom of the cage, whereas most poultry red mites were found higher up in the cage (i.e. on the walls, the cover, the perch, the nest box and the food box). The efficacy of applying predatory mites in the poultry industry may be promoted by reducing this refuge effect, boosting predatory mite populations using alternative prey and prolonged predator release devices. Biocontrol success, however, will strongly depend on how the poultry is

  4. Laboratory tests for controlling poultry red mites (Dermanyssus gallinae) with predatory mites in small 'laying hen' cages.

    PubMed

    Lesna, Izabela; Sabelis, Maurice W; van Niekerk, Thea G C M; Komdeur, Jan

    2012-12-01

    To assess their potential to control poultry red mites (Dermanyssus gallinae), we tested selected predaceous mites (Androlaelaps casalis and Stratiolaelaps scimitus) that occur naturally in wild bird nests or sometimes spontaneously invade poultry houses. This was done under laboratory conditions in cages, each with 2-3 laying hens, initially 300 poultry red mites and later the release of 1,000 predators. These small-scale tests were designed to prevent mite escape from the cages and they were carried out in three replicates at each of three temperature regimes: 26, 30 (constant day and night) and 33-25 °C (day-night cycle). After 6 weeks total population sizes of poultry red mites and predatory mites were assessed. For the temperature regimes of 26 and 33/25 °C S. scimitus reduced the poultry red mite population relative to the control experiments by a factor 3 and 30, respectively, and A. casalis by a factor of 18 and 55, respectively. At 30 °C the predators had less effect on red mites, with a reduction of 1.3-fold for S. scimitus and 5.6-fold for A. casalis. This possibly reflected hen manure condition or an effect of other invertebrates in the hen feed. Poultry red mite control was not negatively affected by temperatures as high as 33 °C and was always better in trials with A. casalis than in those with S. scimitus. In none of the experiments predators managed to eradicate the population of poultry red mites. This may be due to a prey refuge effect since most predatory mites were found in and around the manure tray at the bottom of the cage, whereas most poultry red mites were found higher up in the cage (i.e. on the walls, the cover, the perch, the nest box and the food box). The efficacy of applying predatory mites in the poultry industry may be promoted by reducing this refuge effect, boosting predatory mite populations using alternative prey and prolonged predator release devices. Biocontrol success, however, will strongly depend on how the poultry is

  5. Risk assessment of Cry toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis on the predatory mites Euseius concordis and Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    PubMed

    de Castro, Thiago Rodrigues; Ausique, John Jairo Saldarriaga; Nunes, Daiane Heloisa; Ibanhes, Fernando Henrique; Delalibera Júnior, Italo

    2013-04-01

    Genetically modified plants carrying Cry toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely used for pest control. Possible adverse effects as a result of the use of this control technique to non-target organisms is still a concern; however, few studies have addressed the effects of Bt crops on phytoseiid predatory mites. Phytoseiids are important for the natural control of phytophagous mites, but they can also feed on pollen, plant exudates, etc. Thus, phytoseiids may ingest Bt toxins through several pathways. In this paper, we evaluate the direct effect of Bt-toxins by feeding the predators on Bt cell suspensions, on solution of a Bt toxin and the tri-trophic effect by Bt expressed in transgenic plants. We present a method of conducting toxicological tests with Phytoseiidae which can be useful in studies of risk analysis of toxins to be expressed by genetically engineered plants. This method was used to evaluate the potential effect of ingestion of suspensions of Bt (1.25 × 10(8) spores/ml) and of purified protein Cry1Ia12 (0.006 mg/ml and 0.018 mg/ml) on Euseius concordis, a predatory mite that develops and reproduces best on pollen. The effects of genetically modified Bollgard(®) cotton, which carries the Cry1Ac protein, on Neoseiulus californicus, a selective predator that feeds more on spider mites than on pollen or insects, was determined by feeding them with Tetranychus urticae reared in Bollgard(®) cotton and on the non-transgenic isoline. When E. concordis was fed with suspension of Bt isolate derived from product Dipel(®) PM, no significant effects were detected. Similarly, Cry1Ia12 Bt toxin, at a concentration of 0.006 mg/ml, did not affect E. concordis. At a concentration of 0.018 mg/ml, however, the intake of this protein reduced the reproduction of E. concordis. There were no effects of Bollgard(®) cotton on the biological traits and on the predatory capacity of N. californicus. Results indicate that the Cry toxins of B. thuringiensis

  6. Use of feathers to assess polychlorinated biphenyl and organochlorine pesticide exposure in top predatory bird species of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Naeem Akhtar; Eulaers, Igor; Jaspers, Veerle L B; Chaudhry, Muhammad Jamshed Iqbal; Frantz, Adrien; Ambus, Per Lennart; Covaci, Adrian; Malik, Riffat Naseem

    2016-11-01

    Little is known about the levels of organochlorines (OCs) in predatory bird species from Asia or the factors governing their concentrations. This study is the first report on concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in predatory birds of Pakistan. The concentrations of PCBs and OCPs were investigated using tail feathers of ten different species of predatory birds. In addition, concentration differences among body, tail, primary and secondary feathers were investigated for six individuals of black kite (Milvus migrans). Ranges of concentrations were highest for dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE: 0.11-2163ngg(-1) dry wt.) followed by dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT: 0.36-345ngg(-1) dry wt.), hexachlorobenzene (HCB: 0.02-34ngg(-1) dry wt.), ∑PCBs (0.03-16ngg(-1) dry wt.) and trans-nonachlor (TN; 0.01-0.13ngg(-1) dry wt.). CB 118, 153, 138, and 180 along with p,p'-DDE were found as the most prevalent compounds. ∑PCBs and ∑DDTs were significantly different among species (both p<0.01) and omnivorous, scavengers, carnivorous and piscivorous trophic guilds (all p<0.03). Only ∑PCBs were significantly differentamong different families of birds (p<0.01). Values of stable isotopes (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) differed significantly (all p<0.01) among species, families, trophic guilds as well as terrestrial and aquatic habitat but not between nocturnal and diurnal predators (p=0.22 for δ(13)C; p=0.50 for δ(15)N). Concentrations of ∑PCBs, ∑DDTs and trans-nonachlor, but not HCB (p=0.86), were significantly different among different feather types (all p<0.01). Trophic and taxonomic affiliation as well as dietary carbon sources (δ(13)C) for species were identified as the variables best explaining the observed variation in exposure to the studied compounds. The significance of contributing factors responsible for OC contamination differences in predatory birds should be further elucidated in future studies.

  7. Use of feathers to assess polychlorinated biphenyl and organochlorine pesticide exposure in top predatory bird species of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Naeem Akhtar; Eulaers, Igor; Jaspers, Veerle L B; Chaudhry, Muhammad Jamshed Iqbal; Frantz, Adrien; Ambus, Per Lennart; Covaci, Adrian; Malik, Riffat Naseem

    2016-11-01

    Little is known about the levels of organochlorines (OCs) in predatory bird species from Asia or the factors governing their concentrations. This study is the first report on concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in predatory birds of Pakistan. The concentrations of PCBs and OCPs were investigated using tail feathers of ten different species of predatory birds. In addition, concentration differences among body, tail, primary and secondary feathers were investigated for six individuals of black kite (Milvus migrans). Ranges of concentrations were highest for dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE: 0.11-2163ngg(-1) dry wt.) followed by dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT: 0.36-345ngg(-1) dry wt.), hexachlorobenzene (HCB: 0.02-34ngg(-1) dry wt.), ∑PCBs (0.03-16ngg(-1) dry wt.) and trans-nonachlor (TN; 0.01-0.13ngg(-1) dry wt.). CB 118, 153, 138, and 180 along with p,p'-DDE were found as the most prevalent compounds. ∑PCBs and ∑DDTs were significantly different among species (both p<0.01) and omnivorous, scavengers, carnivorous and piscivorous trophic guilds (all p<0.03). Only ∑PCBs were significantly differentamong different families of birds (p<0.01). Values of stable isotopes (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) differed significantly (all p<0.01) among species, families, trophic guilds as well as terrestrial and aquatic habitat but not between nocturnal and diurnal predators (p=0.22 for δ(13)C; p=0.50 for δ(15)N). Concentrations of ∑PCBs, ∑DDTs and trans-nonachlor, but not HCB (p=0.86), were significantly different among different feather types (all p<0.01). Trophic and taxonomic affiliation as well as dietary carbon sources (δ(13)C) for species were identified as the variables best explaining the observed variation in exposure to the studied compounds. The significance of contributing factors responsible for OC contamination differences in predatory birds should be further elucidated in future studies

  8. Effects of microplastics on juveniles of the common goby (Pomatoschistus microps): confusion with prey, reduction of the predatory performance and efficiency, and possible influence of developmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Carlos de Sá, Luís; Luís, Luís G; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    Microplastics (MP) are ubiquitous contaminants able to cause adverse effects on organisms. Three hypotheses were tested here: early Pomatoschistus microps juveniles can ingest MP; the presence of MP may reduce fish predatory performance and efficiency; developmental conditions may influence the preyselection capability of fish. Predatory bioassays were carried out with juveniles from two estuaries with differences in environmental conditions: Minho (M-est) and Lima (L-est) Rivers (NW Iberian coast). Polyethylene MP spheres (3 types) alone and in combination with Artemia nauplii were offered as prey.All the MP types were ingested, suggesting confusion with food. Under simultaneous exposure to MP and Artemia, L-est fish showed a significant reduction of the predatory performance (65%) and efficiency (upto 50%), while M-est fish did not, suggesting that developmental conditions may influence the preyselection capability of fish. The MP-induced reduction of food intake may decrease individual and population fitness. PMID:25463733

  9. Using a bank of predatory fish samples for bioindication of radioactive contamination of aquatic food chains in the area affected by the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Kryshev, I I; Ryabov, I N; Sazykina, T G

    1993-11-01

    From the analysis of experimental data on radioactive contamination of various fish, it is suggested that predatory fish specimens can be used as bioindicators of radionuclide accumulation in reservoir food chains of the Chernobyl emergency area. The increased content of cesium radionuclides were detected in the muscle tissue of predatory fish collected in various regions of the Chernobyl emergency area. In most of the water bodies studied, maximum contamination levels of predatory fish by radionuclides of cesium occurred in 1987-1988, whereas in 'nonpredatory' fish the concentration of cesium was maximum, as a rule, in the first year following the accident. The exposure doses of fish of various ecological groups and ages are estimated. The exposure doses of various population groups, using fish from contaminated water bodies, are also estimated. When forming the environmental data bank for the Chernobyl accident zone it is suggested that perch, pike-perch and pike be used as bioindicators of radioactive contamination of food chains.

  10. Effects of microplastics on juveniles of the common goby (Pomatoschistus microps): confusion with prey, reduction of the predatory performance and efficiency, and possible influence of developmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Carlos de Sá, Luís; Luís, Luís G; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    Microplastics (MP) are ubiquitous contaminants able to cause adverse effects on organisms. Three hypotheses were tested here: early Pomatoschistus microps juveniles can ingest MP; the presence of MP may reduce fish predatory performance and efficiency; developmental conditions may influence the preyselection capability of fish. Predatory bioassays were carried out with juveniles from two estuaries with differences in environmental conditions: Minho (M-est) and Lima (L-est) Rivers (NW Iberian coast). Polyethylene MP spheres (3 types) alone and in combination with Artemia nauplii were offered as prey.All the MP types were ingested, suggesting confusion with food. Under simultaneous exposure to MP and Artemia, L-est fish showed a significant reduction of the predatory performance (65%) and efficiency (upto 50%), while M-est fish did not, suggesting that developmental conditions may influence the preyselection capability of fish. The MP-induced reduction of food intake may decrease individual and population fitness.

  11. The use of the cannibalistic habit and elevated relative humidity to improve the storage and shipment of the predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    PubMed

    Ghazy, Noureldin Abuelfadl; Amano, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using the cannibalistic habits of the mite Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor) and controlling the relative humidity (RH) to prolong the survival time during the storage or shipment of this predatory mite. Three-day-old mated and unmated females were individually kept at 25 ± 1 °C in polypropylene vials (1.5 mL), each containing one of the following items or combinations of items: a kidney bean leaf disk (L), N. californicus eggs (E), and both a leaf disk and the eggs (LE). Because the leaf disk increased the RH in the vials, the RH was 95 ± 2 % under the L and LE treatments and 56 ± 6 % under the E treatment. The median lethal time (LT50) exceeded 50 days for the mated and unmated females under the LE treatment. However, it did not exceed 11 or 3 days for all females under the L or E treatments, respectively. Under the LE treatment, the mated and unmated females showed cannibalistic behavior and consumed an average of 5.2 and 4.6 eggs/female/10 days. Some of the females that survived for LT50 under each treatment were transferred and fed normally with a constant supply of Tetranychus urticae Koch. Unmated females were provided with adult males for 24 h for mating. Only females previously kept at LE treatment produced numbers of eggs equivalent to the control females (no treatment is applied). The results suggested that a supply of predator eggs and leaf material might have furnished nutrition and water vapor, respectively, and that this combination prolonged the survival time of N. californicus during storage. Moreover, this approach poses no risk of pest contamination in commercial products. PMID:27059865

  12. A Novel Treatment Protects Chlorella at Commercial Scale from the Predatory Bacterium Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus.

    PubMed

    Ganuza, Eneko; Sellers, Charles E; Bennett, Braden W; Lyons, Eric M; Carney, Laura T

    2016-01-01

    The predatory bacterium, Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus, can destroy a Chlorella culture in just a few days, rendering an otherwise robust algal crop into a discolored suspension of empty cell walls. Chlorella is used as a benchmark for open pond cultivation due to its fast growth. In nature, V. chlorellavorus plays an ecological role by controlling this widespread terrestrial and freshwater microalga, but it can have a devastating effect when it attacks large commercial ponds. We discovered that V. chlorellavorus was associated with the collapse of four pilot commercial-scale (130,000 L volume) open-pond reactors. Routine microscopy revealed the distinctive pattern of V. chlorellavorus attachment to the algal cells, followed by algal cell clumping, culture discoloration and ultimately, growth decline. The "crash" of the algal culture coincided with increasing proportions of 16s rRNA sequencing reads assigned to V. chlorellavorus. We designed a qPCR assay to predict an impending culture crash and developed a novel treatment to control the bacterium. We found that (1) Chlorella growth was not affected by a 15 min exposure to pH 3.5 in the presence of 0.5 g/L acetate, when titrated with hydrochloric acid and (2) this treatment had a bactericidal effect on the culture (2-log decrease in aerobic counts). Therefore, when qPCR results indicated a rise in V. chlorellavorus amplicons, we found that the pH-shock treatment prevented the culture crash and doubled the productive longevity of the culture. Furthermore, the treatment could be repeatedly applied to the same culture, at the beginning of at least two sequential batch cycles. In this case, the treatment was applied preventively, further increasing the longevity of the open pond culture. In summary, the treatment reversed the infection of V. chlorellavorus as confirmed by observations of bacterial attachment to Chlorella cells and by detection of V. chlorellavorus by 16s rRNA sequencing and qPCR assay. The p

  13. A Novel Treatment Protects Chlorella at Commercial Scale from the Predatory Bacterium Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus.

    PubMed

    Ganuza, Eneko; Sellers, Charles E; Bennett, Braden W; Lyons, Eric M; Carney, Laura T

    2016-01-01

    The predatory bacterium, Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus, can destroy a Chlorella culture in just a few days, rendering an otherwise robust algal crop into a discolored suspension of empty cell walls. Chlorella is used as a benchmark for open pond cultivation due to its fast growth. In nature, V. chlorellavorus plays an ecological role by controlling this widespread terrestrial and freshwater microalga, but it can have a devastating effect when it attacks large commercial ponds. We discovered that V. chlorellavorus was associated with the collapse of four pilot commercial-scale (130,000 L volume) open-pond reactors. Routine microscopy revealed the distinctive pattern of V. chlorellavorus attachment to the algal cells, followed by algal cell clumping, culture discoloration and ultimately, growth decline. The "crash" of the algal culture coincided with increasing proportions of 16s rRNA sequencing reads assigned to V. chlorellavorus. We designed a qPCR assay to predict an impending culture crash and developed a novel treatment to control the bacterium. We found that (1) Chlorella growth was not affected by a 15 min exposure to pH 3.5 in the presence of 0.5 g/L acetate, when titrated with hydrochloric acid and (2) this treatment had a bactericidal effect on the culture (2-log decrease in aerobic counts). Therefore, when qPCR results indicated a rise in V. chlorellavorus amplicons, we found that the pH-shock treatment prevented the culture crash and doubled the productive longevity of the culture. Furthermore, the treatment could be repeatedly applied to the same culture, at the beginning of at least two sequential batch cycles. In this case, the treatment was applied preventively, further increasing the longevity of the open pond culture. In summary, the treatment reversed the infection of V. chlorellavorus as confirmed by observations of bacterial attachment to Chlorella cells and by detection of V. chlorellavorus by 16s rRNA sequencing and qPCR assay. The p

  14. A Novel Treatment Protects Chlorella at Commercial Scale from the Predatory Bacterium Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus

    PubMed Central

    Ganuza, Eneko; Sellers, Charles E.; Bennett, Braden W.; Lyons, Eric M.; Carney, Laura T.

    2016-01-01

    The predatory bacterium, Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus, can destroy a Chlorella culture in just a few days, rendering an otherwise robust algal crop into a discolored suspension of empty cell walls. Chlorella is used as a benchmark for open pond cultivation due to its fast growth. In nature, V. chlorellavorus plays an ecological role by controlling this widespread terrestrial and freshwater microalga, but it can have a devastating effect when it attacks large commercial ponds. We discovered that V. chlorellavorus was associated with the collapse of four pilot commercial-scale (130,000 L volume) open-pond reactors. Routine microscopy revealed the distinctive pattern of V. chlorellavorus attachment to the algal cells, followed by algal cell clumping, culture discoloration and ultimately, growth decline. The “crash” of the algal culture coincided with increasing proportions of 16s rRNA sequencing reads assigned to V. chlorellavorus. We designed a qPCR assay to predict an impending culture crash and developed a novel treatment to control the bacterium. We found that (1) Chlorella growth was not affected by a 15 min exposure to pH 3.5 in the presence of 0.5 g/L acetate, when titrated with hydrochloric acid and (2) this treatment had a bactericidal effect on the culture (2-log decrease in aerobic counts). Therefore, when qPCR results indicated a rise in V. chlorellavorus amplicons, we found that the pH-shock treatment prevented the culture crash and doubled the productive longevity of the culture. Furthermore, the treatment could be repeatedly applied to the same culture, at the beginning of at least two sequential batch cycles. In this case, the treatment was applied preventively, further increasing the longevity of the open pond culture. In summary, the treatment reversed the infection of V. chlorellavorus as confirmed by observations of bacterial attachment to Chlorella cells and by detection of V. chlorellavorus by 16s rRNA sequencing and qPCR assay. The p

  15. Evidence for Avian Intrathoracic Air Sacs in a New Predatory Dinosaur from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Sereno, Paul C.; Martinez, Ricardo N.; Wilson, Jeffrey A.; Varricchio, David J.; Alcober, Oscar A.; Larsson, Hans C. E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Living birds possess a unique heterogeneous pulmonary system composed of a rigid, dorsally-anchored lung and several compliant air sacs that operate as bellows, driving inspired air through the lung. Evidence from the fossil record for the origin and evolution of this system is extremely limited, because lungs do not fossilize and because the bellow-like air sacs in living birds only rarely penetrate (pneumatize) skeletal bone and thus leave a record of their presence. Methodology/Principal Findings We describe a new predatory dinosaur from Upper Cretaceous rocks in Argentina, Aerosteon riocoloradensis gen. et sp. nov., that exhibits extreme pneumatization of skeletal bone, including pneumatic hollowing of the furcula and ilium. In living birds, these two bones are pneumatized by diverticulae of air sacs (clavicular, abdominal) that are involved in pulmonary ventilation. We also describe several pneumatized gastralia (“stomach ribs”), which suggest that diverticulae of the air sac system were present in surface tissues of the thorax. Conclusions/Significance We present a four-phase model for the evolution of avian air sacs and costosternal-driven lung ventilation based on the known fossil record of theropod dinosaurs and osteological correlates in extant birds: (1) Phase I—Elaboration of paraxial cervical air sacs in basal theropods no later than the earliest Late Triassic. (2) Phase II—Differentiation of avian ventilatory air sacs, including both cranial (clavicular air sac) and caudal (abdominal air sac) divisions, in basal tetanurans during the Jurassic. A heterogeneous respiratory tract with compliant air sacs, in turn, suggests the presence of rigid, dorsally attached lungs with flow-through ventilation. (3) Phase III—Evolution of a primitive costosternal pump in maniraptoriform theropods before the close of the Jurassic. (4) Phase IV—Evolution of an advanced costosternal pump in maniraptoran theropods before the close of the

  16. A trophic cascade induced by predatory ants in a fig-fig wasp mutualism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Geng, Xiang-Zong; Ma, Li-Bin; Cook, James M; Wang, Rui-Wu

    2014-09-01

    A trophic cascade occurs when predators directly decrease the densities, or change the behaviour, of herbivores and thus indirectly increase plant productivity. The predator-herbivore-plant context is well known, but some predators attack species beneficial to plants (e.g. pollinators) and/or enemies of herbivores (e.g. parasites), and their role in the dynamics of mutualisms remains largely unexplored. We surveyed the predatory ant species and studied predation by the dominant ant species, the weaver ant Oecophylla smaragdina, associated with the fig tree Ficus racemosa in southwest China. We then tested the effects of weaver ants on the oviposition behaviour of pollinating and non-pollinating fig wasps in an ant-exclusion experiment. The effects of weaver ants on fig wasp community structure and fig seed production were then compared between trees with and without O. smaragdina. Oecophylla smaragdina captured more non-pollinating wasps (Platyneura mayri) than pollinators as the insects arrived to lay eggs. When ants were excluded, more non-pollinators laid eggs into figs and fewer pollinators entered figs. Furthermore, trees with O. smaragdina produced more pollinator offspring and fewer non-pollinator offspring, shifting the community structure significantly. In addition, F. racemosa produced significantly more seeds on trees inhabited by weaver ants. Oecophylla smaragdina predation reverses the dominance of the two commonest wasp species at the egg-laying stage and favours the pollinators. This behavioural pattern is mirrored by wasp offspring production, with pollinators' offspring dominating figs produced by trees inhabited by weaver ants, and offspring of the non-pollinator P. mayri most abundant in figs on trees inhabited by other ants. Overall, our results suggest that predation by weaver ants limits the success of the non-pollinating P. mayri and therefore indirectly benefits the mutualism by increasing the reproductive success of both the

  17. The abiotic and biotic factors limiting establishment of predatory fishes at their expanding northern range boundaries in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Alofs, Karen M; Jackson, Donald A

    2015-06-01

    There is a poor understanding of the importance of biotic interactions in determining species distributions with climate change. Theory from invasion biology suggests that the success of species introductions outside of their historical ranges may be either positively (biotic acceptance) or negatively (biotic resistance) related to native biodiversity. Using data on fish community composition from two survey periods separated by approximately 28 years during which climate was warming, we examined the factors influencing the establishment of three predatory centrarchids: Smallmouth Bass (Micropterus dolomieu), Largemouth Bass (M. salmoides), and Rock Bass (Ambloplites rupestris) in lakes at their expanding northern range boundaries in Ontario. Variance partitioning demonstrated that, at a regional scale, abiotic factors play a stronger role in determining the establishment of these species than biotic factors. Pairing lakes within watersheds where each species had established with lakes sharing similar abiotic conditions where the species had not established revealed both positive and negative relationships between the establishment of centrarchids and the historical presence of other predatory species. The establishment of these species near their northern range boundaries is primarily determined by abiotic factors at a regional scale; however, biotic factors become important at the lake-to-lake scale. Studies of exotic species invasions have previously highlighted how spatial scale mediates the importance of abiotic vs. biotic factors on species establishment. Our study demonstrates how concepts from invasion biology can inform our understanding of the factors controlling species distributions with changing climate. PMID:25556555

  18. Variation in trace-element accumulation in predatory fishes from a stream contaminated by coal combustion waste.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Dean E; Lindell, Angela H; Stillings, Garrett K; Mills, Gary L; Blas, Susan A; McArthur, J Vaun

    2014-04-01

    Extensive and critical evaluation can be required to assess contaminant bioaccumulation in large predatory fishes. Species differences in habitat use, resource use, and trophic level, often influenced by body form, can result in diverging contaminant bioaccumulation patterns. Moreover, the broad size ranges inherent with large-bodied fish provide opportunity for trophic and habitat shifts within species that can further influence contaminant exposure. We compared contaminant bioaccumulation in four fish species, as well as two herbivorous invertebrates, from a coal combustion waste contaminated stream. Muscle, liver, and gonad tissue were analyzed from fish stratified across the broadest size ranges available. Effects of trophic position (δ (15)N), carbon sources (δ (13)C), and body size varied among and within species. Mercury and cesium concentrations were lowest in the invertebrates and increased with trophic level both among and within fish species. Other elements, such as vanadium, cadmium, barium, nickel, and lead, had greater levels in herbivorous invertebrates than in fish muscle. Sequestration by the fish livers averted accumulation in muscle. Consequently, fish liver tissue appeared to be a more sensitive indicator of bioavailability, but exceptions existed. Despite liver sequestration, within fishes, muscle concentrations of many elements still tended to increase by trophic level. Notable variation within some species was observed. These results illustrate the utility of stable isotope data in exploring differences of bioaccumulation within taxa. Our analyses suggest a need for further evaluation of the underlying sources of this variability to better understand contaminant bioaccumulation in large predatory fishes.

  19. Driving factors of the communities of phytophagous and predatory mites in a physic nut plantation and spontaneous plants associated.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Wilton P; Sarmento, Renato A; Teodoro, Adenir V; Neto, Marçal P; Ignacio, Maíra

    2013-08-01

    Seasonal changes in climate and plant diversity are known to affect the population dynamics of both pests and natural enemies within agroecosystems. In Brazil, spontaneous plants are usually tolerated in small-scale physic nut plantations over the year, which in turn may mediate interactions between pests and natural enemies within this agroecosystem. Here, we aimed to access the influence of seasonal variation of abiotic (temperature, relative humidity and rainfall) and biotic (diversity of spontaneous plants, overall richness and density of mites) factors on the communities of phytophagous and predatory mites found in a physic nut plantation and its associated spontaneous plants. Mite sampling was monthly conducted in dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous leaves of spontaneous plants as well as in physic nut shrubs over an entire year. In the dry season there was a higher abundance of phytophagous mites (Tenuipalpidae, Tarsonemidae and Tetranychidae) on spontaneous plants than on physic nut shrubs, while predatory mites (Phytoseiidae) showed the opposite pattern. The overall density of mites on spontaneous plants increased with relative humidity and diversity of spontaneous plants. Rainfall was the variable that most influenced the density of mites inhabiting physic nut shrubs. Agroecosystems comprising spontaneous plants associated with crops harbour a rich mite community including species of different trophic levels which potentially benefit natural pest control due to increased diversity and abundance of natural enemies.

  20. Driving factors of the communities of phytophagous and predatory mites in a physic nut plantation and spontaneous plants associated.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Wilton P; Sarmento, Renato A; Teodoro, Adenir V; Neto, Marçal P; Ignacio, Maíra

    2013-08-01

    Seasonal changes in climate and plant diversity are known to affect the population dynamics of both pests and natural enemies within agroecosystems. In Brazil, spontaneous plants are usually tolerated in small-scale physic nut plantations over the year, which in turn may mediate interactions between pests and natural enemies within this agroecosystem. Here, we aimed to access the influence of seasonal variation of abiotic (temperature, relative humidity and rainfall) and biotic (diversity of spontaneous plants, overall richness and density of mites) factors on the communities of phytophagous and predatory mites found in a physic nut plantation and its associated spontaneous plants. Mite sampling was monthly conducted in dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous leaves of spontaneous plants as well as in physic nut shrubs over an entire year. In the dry season there was a higher abundance of phytophagous mites (Tenuipalpidae, Tarsonemidae and Tetranychidae) on spontaneous plants than on physic nut shrubs, while predatory mites (Phytoseiidae) showed the opposite pattern. The overall density of mites on spontaneous plants increased with relative humidity and diversity of spontaneous plants. Rainfall was the variable that most influenced the density of mites inhabiting physic nut shrubs. Agroecosystems comprising spontaneous plants associated with crops harbour a rich mite community including species of different trophic levels which potentially benefit natural pest control due to increased diversity and abundance of natural enemies. PMID:23417700

  1. Etoxazole resistance in predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis A.-H. (Acari: Phytoseiidae): Cross-resistance, inheritance and biochemical resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yorulmaz Salman, Sibel; Aydınlı, Fatma; Ay, Recep

    2015-07-01

    Phytoseiulus persimilis of the family Phytoseiidae is an effective predatory mite species that is used to control pest mites. The LC50 and LC60 values of etoxazole were determined on P. persimilis using a leaf-disc method and spraying tower. A laboratory selection population designated ETO6 was found to have a 111.63-fold resistance to etoxazole following 6 selection cycles. This population developed low cross-resistance to spinosad, spiromesifen, acetamiprid, indoxacarb, chlorantraniliprole, milbemectin and moderate cross-resistance to deltamethrin. PBO, IBP and DEM synergised resistance 3.17-, 2.85- and 3.60-fold respectively. Crossing experiments revealed that etoxazole resistance in the ETO6 population was an intermediately dominant and polygenic. In addition, detoxifying enzyme activities were increased 2.71-fold for esterase, 3.09-fold for glutathione S-transferase (GST) and 2.76-fold for cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (P450) in the ETO6 population. Selection for etoxazole under laboratory conditions resulted in the development of etoxazole resistance in the predatory mite P. persimilis that are resistant to pesticides are considered valuable for use in resistance management programmes within integrated pest control strategies. PMID:26071813

  2. The abiotic and biotic factors limiting establishment of predatory fishes at their expanding northern range boundaries in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Alofs, Karen M; Jackson, Donald A

    2015-06-01

    There is a poor understanding of the importance of biotic interactions in determining species distributions with climate change. Theory from invasion biology suggests that the success of species introductions outside of their historical ranges may be either positively (biotic acceptance) or negatively (biotic resistance) related to native biodiversity. Using data on fish community composition from two survey periods separated by approximately 28 years during which climate was warming, we examined the factors influencing the establishment of three predatory centrarchids: Smallmouth Bass (Micropterus dolomieu), Largemouth Bass (M. salmoides), and Rock Bass (Ambloplites rupestris) in lakes at their expanding northern range boundaries in Ontario. Variance partitioning demonstrated that, at a regional scale, abiotic factors play a stronger role in determining the establishment of these species than biotic factors. Pairing lakes within watersheds where each species had established with lakes sharing similar abiotic conditions where the species had not established revealed both positive and negative relationships between the establishment of centrarchids and the historical presence of other predatory species. The establishment of these species near their northern range boundaries is primarily determined by abiotic factors at a regional scale; however, biotic factors become important at the lake-to-lake scale. Studies of exotic species invasions have previously highlighted how spatial scale mediates the importance of abiotic vs. biotic factors on species establishment. Our study demonstrates how concepts from invasion biology can inform our understanding of the factors controlling species distributions with changing climate.

  3. Impact of factitious foods and prey on the oviposition of the predatory mites Gaeolaelaps aculeifer and Stratiolaelaps scimitus (Acari: Laelapidae).

    PubMed

    Navarro-Campos, C; Wäckers, F L; Pekas, A

    2016-09-01

    The soil-dwelling predatory mites Gaeolaelaps aculeifer and Stratiolaelaps scimitus (Mesostigmata: Laelapidae) are important biocontrol agents of several pests (Astigmata, Thysanoptera, Diptera). There is little information regarding the use of factitious foods that potentially improve their mass rearing and population development once released in the field. Here we tested the suitability of several types of factitious food and prey for G. aculeifer and S. scimitus. Factitious foods included eggs of Ephestia kuehniella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), hydrated encapsulated cysts of the brine shrimp Artemia sp. (Anostraca: Artemiidae), two species of saprophytic nematodes (Panagrellus redivivus and Panagrellus sp.) (Nematoda: Panagrolaimidae) and pollen of cattail Typha angustifolia (Poales: Typhaceae). Parameters tested were oviposition over a 3-day period compared with controls provided with either second instars of the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) or a mix of instars of the commercially used prey mite Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Astigmatina: Acaridae) or the absence of food. Compared to the standard prey mite T. putrescentiae, G. aculeifer showed elevated oviposition when fed thrips larvae, E. kuehniella eggs, Artemia sp. cysts or the saprophytic P. redivivus. Oviposition by S. scimitus was high when provided with thrips larvae and P. redivivus, but not significantly different from oviposition on T. putrescentiae. Oviposition for both predatory mite species was very low or zero when provided with T. angustifolia pollen. Finally, G. aculeifer consumed significantly more thrips larvae than S. scimitus. The implication of these results for the mass-rearing of G. aculeifer and S. scimitus are discussed. PMID:27388446

  4. The predatory mite Neoseiulus paspalivorus (Phytoseiidae) in Brazil: taxonomic status, reproductive compatibility and morphological and molecular variability.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Daniela; Navia, Denise; Mendonça, Renata S; Melo, José W S; Gondim, Manoel G C

    2015-12-01

    The predatory mite Neoseiulus paspalivorus (De Leon) is often found in association with the coconut mite, Aceria guerreronis Keifer. The identification of natural enemies is essential for the definition of biological control strategies. Therefore, the present study aimed to confirm whether the mite populations from different Northeastern Brazilian states identified as N. paspalivorus belong to the same species. This determination was accomplished through the study of morphometric variability in 33 anatomical characters and of molecular variability in two DNA fragments: Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) rDNA and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) mtDNA. This study also determined whether there is reproductive isolation between the two most morphologically distinct populations (Rio Grande do Norte and Paraíba). Intraspecific morphometric variability was observed among the five populations of N. paspalivorus. Despite this variability, the crosses and backcrosses of the most morphologically distinct populations did not show reproductive incompatibility. The molecular analysis indicated the absence of genetic differences among the N. paspalivorus populations for the ITS fragment. Three haplotypes were identified for the COI fragment, and the genetic distance ranged from 0 to 0.2 %. Despite the morphometric differences, the results of the molecular and biological analysis corroborate the previous identification of N. paspalivorus for all of the studied populations. The present study contributes to the systematics of Phytoseiidae predatory mites and to the biological control of A. guerreronis by the accurate identification and characterization of one of its main natural enemies along extensive areas in Brazil.

  5. Functional responses and prey-stage preferences of a predatory gall midge and two predacious mites wtih twospotted spider mites, Tetranychus urticae as host

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae), is an important pest of vegetables and other crops. This study was conducted to evaluate and compare the potential role of three commercially available predators, predatory gall midge, Feltiella acarisuga (Vallot) (Diptera: Ceci...

  6. Ecological and spatial factors drive intra- and interspecific variation in exposure of subarctic predatory bird nestlings to persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Eulaers, Igor; Jaspers, Veerle L B; Bustnes, Jan O; Covaci, Adrian; Johnsen, Trond V; Halley, Duncan J; Moum, Truls; Ims, Rolf A; Hanssen, Sveinn A; Erikstad, Kjell E; Herzke, Dorte; Sonne, Christian; Ballesteros, Manuel; Pinxten, Rianne; Eens, Marcel

    2013-07-01

    Top predators in northern ecosystems may suffer from exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) as this exposure may synergistically interact with already elevated natural stress in these ecosystems. In the present study, we aimed at identifying biological (sex, body condition), ecological (dietary carbon source, trophic level) and spatial factors (local habitat, regional nest location) that may influence intra- and interspecific variation in exposure of subarctic predatory bird nestlings to polychlorinated biphenyl 153 (CB 153), polybrominated diphenyl ether 47 (BDE 47), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB). During three breeding seasons (2008-2010), we sampled body feathers from fully-grown nestlings of three ecologically distinct predatory bird species in subarctic Norway: Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis), White-tailed Eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) and Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos). The present study analysed, for the first time, body feathers for both POPs and carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) stable isotopes, thus integrating the dietary carbon source, trophic level and POP exposure for the larger part of the nestling stage. Intraspecific variation in exposure was driven by a combination of ecological and spatial factors, often different for individual compounds. In addition, combinations for individual compounds differed among species. Trophic level and local habitat were the predominant predictors for CB 153, p,p'-DDE and BDE 47, indicating their biomagnification and decreasing levels according to coast>fjord>inland. Variation in exposure may also have been driven by inter-annual variation arisen from primary sources (e.g. p,p'-DDE) and/or possible revolatilisation from secondary sources (e.g. HCB). Interspecific differences in POP exposure were best explained by a combination of trophic level (biomagnification), dietary carbon source (food chain discrimination) and regional nest location (historical POP

  7. Rattlesnake strike behavior: kinematics

    PubMed

    Kardong; v

    1998-03-01

    The predatory behavior of rattlesnakes includes many distinctive preparatory phases leading to an extremely rapid strike, during which venom is injected. The rodent prey is then rapidly released, removing the snake's head from retaliation by the prey. The quick action of the venom makes possible the recovery of the dispatched prey during the ensuing poststrike period. The strike is usually completed in less than 0.5 s, placing a premium on an accurate strike that produces no significant errors in fang placement that could result in poor envenomation and subsequent loss of the prey. To clarify the basis for effective strike performance, we examined the basic kinematics of the rapid strike using high-speed film analysis. We scored numerous strike variables. Four major results were obtained. (1) Neurosensory control of the strike is based primarily upon sensory inputs via the eyes and facial pits to launch the strike, and upon tactile stimuli after contact. Correction for errors in targeting occurs not by a change in strike trajectory, but by fang repositioning after the jaws have made contact with the prey. (2) The rattlesnake strike is based upon great versatility and variation in recruitment of body segments and body postures. (3) Forces generated during acceleration of the head are transferred to posterior body sections to decelerate the head before contact with the prey, thereby reducing impact forces upon the snake's jaws. (4) Body acceleration is based on two patterns of body displacement, one in which acute sections of the body open like a gate, the other in which body segments flow around postural curves similar to movements seen during locomotion. There is one major implication of these results: recruitment of body segments, launch postures and kinematic features of the strike may be quite varied from strike to strike, but the overall predatory success of each strike by a rattlesnake is very consistent.

  8. Toxicity effect of Delonix elata (Yellow Gulmohr) and predatory efficiency of Copepod, Mesocyclops aspericornis for the control of dengue vector, Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Vasugi, Chellamuthu; Kamalakannan, Siva; Murugan, Kadarkarai

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the toxicity, predatory efficiency of Delonix elata (D. elata) and Mesocyclops aspericornis (M. aspericornis) against dengue vector, Aedes aegypti (Ae. aegypti). Methods A mosquitocidal bioassay was conducted at different concentration of plant extract followed by WHO standard method. The probit analysis of each tested concentration and control were observed by using software SPSS 11 version package. The each tested concentration variable was assessed by DMRT method. The predatory efficiency of copepod was followed by Deo et al., 1988. The predator, M. aspericornis was observed for mortality, abnormalities, survival and swimming activity after 24 h treatment of plant and also predation on the mosquito larvae were observed. Results D. elata were tested for biological activity against the larvae, and pupae of Ae. aegypti. Significant mortality effects were observed in each life stage. The percentage of mortality was 100% in first and second instars whereas 96%, 92% in third and fourth instars. Fitted probit-mortality curves for larvae indicated the median and 90% lethal concentrations of D. elata for instars 1-4 to be 4.91 (8.13), 5.16 (8.44), 5.95 (7.76) and 6.87 (11.23), respectively. The results indicate that leaf extract exhibits significant biological activity against life stages. The present study revealed that D. elata is potentially important in the control of Ae. aegypti. Similar studies were conducted for predatory efficiency of Copepod, M. aspericornis against mosquito vector Ae. Aegypti. This study reported that the predatory copepod fed on 39% and 25% in I and III instar larvae of mosquito and in combined treatment of D. elata and copepod maximum control of mosquito larval states and at 83%, 80%, 75% and 53% in I, II, III and IV instars, respectively. Conclusions The combined action of plant extract and predatory copepod to effectively control mosquito population and reduce the dengue transmitting diseases.

  9. Predatory efficiency of the water bug Sphaerodema annulatum on mosquito larvae (Culex quinquefasciatus) and its effect on the adult emergence.

    PubMed

    Aditya, G; Bhattacharyya, S; Kundu, N; Saha, G K; Raut, S K

    2004-11-01

    The daily number of IV instar larva of Culex quinquefasciatus killed, rate of pupation and adult emergence was noted in presence of the predatory water bug Sphaerodema annulatum for a period of seven consecutive days, experimentally, in the laboratory. The rate of IV instar larva killed by the water bugs on an average was 65.17 per day. The rate of pupation ranged between 7.6 and 48 in control while in presence of water bugs it ranged between 6 and 35. The rate of adult emergence in control experiments varied between 1.4 and 4.8 per day, which was reduced to only 0.4-28.8 per day in case of the water bugs. The results clearly indicate that the water bugs on its way of predation reduces the rate of pupation and adult emergence of Cx. quinquefasciatus significantly which calls for an extensive field trials.

  10. Engineering a predatory bacterium as a proficient killer agent for intracellular bio-products recovery: The case of the polyhydroxyalkanoates.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Virginia; Herencias, Cristina; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Prieto, M Auxiliadora

    2016-01-01

    This work examines the potential of the predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100, an obligate predator of other Gram-negative bacteria, as an external cell-lytic agent for recovering valuable intracellular bio-products produced by prey cultures. The bio-product targets to be recovered were polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) produced naturally by Pseudomonas putida and Cupriavidus necator, or by recombinant Escherichia coli strains. B. bacteriovorus with a mutated PHA depolymerase gene to prevent the unwanted breakdown of the bio-product allowed the recovery of up to 80% of that accumulated by the prey bacteria, even at high biomass concentrations. This innovative downstream process highlights how B. bacteriovorus can be used as a novel, biological lytic agent for the inexpensive, industrial scale recovery of intracellular products from different Gram-negative prey cultures. PMID:27087466

  11. Engineering a predatory bacterium as a proficient killer agent for intracellular bio-products recovery: The case of the polyhydroxyalkanoates

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Virginia; Herencias, Cristina; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Prieto, M. Auxiliadora

    2016-01-01

    This work examines the potential of the predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100, an obligate predator of other Gram-negative bacteria, as an external cell-lytic agent for recovering valuable intracellular bio-products produced by prey cultures. The bio-product targets to be recovered were polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) produced naturally by Pseudomonas putida and Cupriavidus necator, or by recombinant Escherichia coli strains. B. bacteriovorus with a mutated PHA depolymerase gene to prevent the unwanted breakdown of the bio-product allowed the recovery of up to 80% of that accumulated by the prey bacteria, even at high biomass concentrations. This innovative downstream process highlights how B. bacteriovorus can be used as a novel, biological lytic agent for the inexpensive, industrial scale recovery of intracellular products from different Gram-negative prey cultures. PMID:27087466

  12. The spatial dynamics of crop and ground active predatory arthropods and their aphid prey in winter wheat.

    PubMed

    Holland, J M; Winder, L; Woolley, C; Alexander, C J; Perry, J N

    2004-10-01

    The distribution of aphid predators within arable fields has been previously examined using pitfall traps. With this technique predominantly larger invertebrate species are captured, especially Carabidae, but the technique provides no estimate of density unless mark-recapture is used. However, many other numerically important aphid predators occur in arable fields and relatively little is known about their distribution patterns nor whether they exhibit a density-dependent response to patches of cereal aphids. Identification of the most effective predators can allow management practices to be developed accordingly. In this study, the distribution of cereal aphids and their predators was examined by suction sampling within a field of winter wheat in Devon, UK, along with visual estimates of weed patchiness. Sampling was conducted on four occasions in 1999 across a grid of 128 sample locations. The distribution of 11 predatory taxa from the Carabidae, Staphylinidae and Linyphiidae was examined. Additionally, the total number of aphid predators and a predation index were used in these analyses. Carabid adults and larvae, along with staphylinid larvae showed the strongest aggregation into patches and the most temporal stability in their distribution. Other taxa had more ephemeral distributions as did the cereal aphids. The distribution of carabid larvae was disassociated from the distribution of cereal aphids for the first two sampling occasions indicating biocontrol was occurring. Other predatory groups showed both association and disassociation. Carabid larvae, Bathyphantes and total numbers of Linyphiidae showed a strong correlation with weed cover for two of the sample dates. Cereal aphids were disassociated from weed cover on three sampling occasions.

  13. Smells familiar: group-joining decisions of predatory mites are mediated by olfactory cues of social familiarity.

    PubMed

    Muleta, Muluken G; Schausberger, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Group-living animals frequently have to trade off the costs and benefits of leaving an established group and joining another group. Owing to their high fitness relevance, group-joining decisions are commonly nonrandom and may be based on traits of both individual members and the group such as life stage, body size, social status and group density or size, respectively. Many group-living animals are able to recognize and to associate preferentially with familiar individuals, i.e. those encountered before. Hence, after dispersing from established groups, animals commonly have to decide whether to join a new familiar or unfamiliar group. Using binary choice situations we assessed the effects of social familiarity on group-joining behaviour of the plant-inhabiting predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis. Group living in P. persimilis is brought about by the patchy distribution of its spider mite prey and mutual conspecific attraction. In the first experiment, gravid predator females given a choice between spider mite patches occupied by unfamiliar and familiar groups of females strongly preferred to join familiar groups and to deposit their eggs in these patches. Preference for socially familiar groups was robust across biases of spider mite prey densities between choice options. The second experiment revealed that the predatory mite females can smell social familiarity from a distance. Females subjected to odour choice situations in artificial cages were more strongly attracted to the odour of familiar than unfamiliar groups. We argue that P. persimilis females preferentially join socially familiar groups because a familiar social environment relaxes competition and optimizes foraging and reproduction. PMID:24027341

  14. Association between shell morphology of micro-land snails (genus Plectostoma) and their predator’s predatory behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Schilthuizen, Menno

    2014-01-01

    Predator–prey interactions are among the main ecological interactions that shape the diversity of biological form. In many cases, the evolution of the mollusc shell form is presumably driven by predation. However, the adaptive significance of several uncommon, yet striking, shell traits of land snails are still poorly known. These include the distorted coiled “tuba” and the protruded radial ribs that can be found in micro-landsnails of the genus Plectostoma. Here, we experimentally tested whether these shell traits may act as defensive adaptations against predators. We characterised and quantified the possible anti-predation behaviour and shell traits of Plectostoma snails both in terms of their properties and efficiencies in defending against the Atopos slug predatory strategies, namely, shell-apertural entry and shell-drilling. The results showed that Atopos slugs would first attack the snail by shell-apertural entry, and, should this fail, shift to the energetically more costly shell-drilling strategy. We found that the shell tuba of Plectostoma snails is an effective defensive trait against shell-apertural entry attack. None of the snail traits, such as resting behaviour, shell thickness, shell tuba shape, shell rib density and intensity can fully protect the snail from the slug’s shell-drilling attack. However, these traits could increase the predation costs to the slug. Further analysis on the shell traits revealed that the lack of effectiveness in these anti-predation shell traits may be caused by a functional trade-off between shell traits under selection of two different predatory strategies. PMID:24749008

  15. Dietary Studies on the Predatory Fishes of the Norman River Estuary, with Particular Reference to Penaeid Prawns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salini, J. P.; Brewer, D. T.; Blaber, S. J. M.

    1998-06-01

    The predatory fish community and their prey in the Norman Rivere estuary, Gulf of Carpentaria Australia, are compared with the communities of other tropical inshore areas, to investigate patterns of predation in tropical inshore areas particularly in relation to penaeid prawns. Abiotic factors (turbidity, freshwater input) and diversity of habitat types affect the composition of both prey and predator communities, resulting in large differences in the communities of tropical inshore waters. The stomach contents of 2059 predatory fish from the Norman River estuary were analysed over four sampling trips in the wet and dry seasons. The stomachs of 61% (1255 fish) of 54 species contained a total of 676·2 g (dry weight) of food, while 39% (804 fish) were empty. Teleosts were the main component of the diet (by dry weight) of 13 of the 22 species analysed, followed by annelids for two species. Five species had only teleosts in their stomachs. Most predator species ate benthic or bentho-pelagic prey, while three species— Rhizoprionodon taylori, Scomberoides commersonianusand Leptobrama mulleri—ate mainly pelagic prey. Although 19 species ate some penaeids, only Polydactylus sheridaniate little else. This species, Lates calcariferand Eleutheronema tetradactylumate 94·5% of all the penaeid prey and 97·9% of all the commercially important penaeid prey recorded in the study. Penaeid predation indices (calculated from gillnet catch rates, proportion of penaeids in the diet and a consumption rate of 3% body weight per day) were 0·23 g of penaeid per net-metre per day for P. sheridani, 0·15 for L. calcariferand 0·03 for E. tetradactylum. Commercially important penaeid predation indices were 0·11, 0·13 and 0·01, respectively. These values are intermediate between those previously recorded for the main penaeid predators in other inshore areas of the Gulf of Carpentaria (Embley River estuary and Groote Eylandt).

  16. Niche-specific cognitive strategies: object memory interferes with spatial memory in the predatory bat Myotis nattereri.

    PubMed

    Hulgard, Katrine; Ratcliffe, John M

    2014-09-15

    Related species with different diets are predicted to rely on different cognitive strategies: those best suited for locating available and appropriate foods. Here we tested two predictions of the niche-specific cognitive strategies hypothesis in bats, which suggests that predatory species should rely more on object memory than on spatial memory for finding food and that the opposite is true of frugivorous and nectivorous species. Specifically, we predicted that: (1) predatory bats would readily learn to associate shapes with palatable prey and (2) once bats had made such associations, these would interfere with their subsequent learning of a spatial memory task. We trained free-flying Myotis nattereri to approach palatable and unpalatable insect prey suspended below polystyrene objects. Experimentally naïve bats learned to associate different objects with palatable and unpalatable prey but performed no better than chance in a subsequent spatial memory experiment. Because experimental sequence was predicted to be of consequence, we introduced a second group of bats first to the spatial memory experiment. These bats learned to associate prey position with palatability. Control trials indicated that bats made their decisions based on information acquired through echolocation. Previous studies have shown that bat species that eat mainly nectar and fruit rely heavily on spatial memory, reflecting the relative consistency of distribution of fruit and nectar compared with insects. Our results support the niche-specific cognitive strategies hypothesis and suggest that for gleaning and clutter-resistant aerial hawking bats, learning to associate shape with food interferes with subsequent spatial memory learning. PMID:25013105

  17. Stage-dependent responses to emergent habitat heterogeneity: consequences for a predatory insect population in a coffee agroecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Liere, Heidi; Perfecto, Ivette; Vandermeer, John

    2014-01-01

    Interactions among members of biological communities can create spatial patterns that effectively generate habitat heterogeneity for other members in the community, and this heterogeneity might be crucial for their persistence. For example, stage-dependent vulnerability of a predatory lady beetle to aggression of the ant, Azteca instabilis, creates two habitat types that are utilized differently by the immature and adult life stages of the beetle. Due to a mutualistic association between A. instabilis and the hemipteran Coccus viridis – which is A. orbigera main prey in the area – only plants around ant nests have high C. viridis populations. Here, we report on a series of surveys at three different scales aimed at detecting how the presence and clustered distribution of ant nests affect the distribution of the different life stages of this predatory lady beetle in a coffee farm in Chiapas, Mexico. Both beetle adults and larvae were more abundant in areas with ant nests, but adults were restricted to the peripheries of highest ant activity and outside the reach of coffee bushes containing the highest densities of lady beetle larvae. The abundance of adult beetles located around trees with ants increased with the size of the ant nest clusters but the relationship is not significant for larvae. Thus, we suggest that A. orbigera undergoes an ontogenetic niche shift, not through shifting prey species, but through stage-specific vulnerability differences against a competitor that renders areas of abundant prey populations inaccessible for adults but not for larvae. Together with evidence presented elsewhere, this study shows how an important predator is not only dependent on the existence of two qualitatively distinct habitat types, but also on the spatial distribution of these habitats. We suggest that this dependency arises due to the different responses that the predator's life stages have to this emergent spatial pattern. PMID:25473473

  18. Effects of thermal stress on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme activities of the predatory mite, Neoseiulus cucumeris (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Hao; Liu, Huai; Wang, Jin-Jun; Wang, Zi-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Changes in temperature are known to cause a variety of physiological stress responses in insects and mites. Thermal stress responses are usually associated with the increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in oxidative damage. In this study, we examined the time-related effect (durations for 1, 2, 3, and 5 h) of thermal stress conditions-i.e., relatively low (0, 5, 10, and 15 °C) or high (35, 38, 41, and 44 °C) temperatures-on the activities of antioxidant enzymes including catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POX), glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) of the predatory mite Neoseiulus cucumeris. Also the lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels of the predatory mite were measured under thermal stress conditions. The results confirmed that thermal stress results in a condition of so-called oxidative stress and the four antioxidant enzymes play an important role in combating the accumulation of ROS in N. cucumeris. CAT and POX activity changed significantly when the mites were exposed to cold and heat shock, respectively. The elevated levels of SOD and GSTs activity, expressed in a time-dependent manner, may have an important role in the process of antioxidant response to thermal stress. However, the levels of LPO in N. cucumeris were high, serving as an important signal that these antioxidant enzyme-based defense mechanisms were not always adequate to counteract the surplus ROS. Thus, we hypothesize that thermal stress, especially extreme temperatures, may contribute much to the generation of ROS in N. cucumeris, and eventually to its death. PMID:24687176

  19. Metabarcoding dietary analysis of coral dwelling predatory fish demonstrates the minor contribution of coral mutualists to their highly partitioned, generalist diet.

    PubMed

    Leray, Matthieu; Meyer, Christopher P; Mills, Suzanne C

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of predators in food webs can be challenging in highly diverse predator/prey systems composed of small cryptic species. DNA based dietary analysis can supplement predator removal experiments and provide high resolution for prey identification. Here we use a metabarcoding approach to provide initial insights into the diet and functional role of coral-dwelling predatory fish feeding on small invertebrates. Fish were collected in Moorea (French Polynesia) where the BIOCODE project has generated DNA barcodes for numerous coral associated invertebrate species. Pyrosequencing data revealed a total of 292 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTU) in the gut contents of the arc-eye hawkfish (Paracirrhites arcatus), the flame hawkfish (Neocirrhites armatus) and the coral croucher (Caracanthus maculatus). One hundred forty-nine (51%) of them had species-level matches in reference libraries (>98% similarity) while 76 additional OTUs (26%) could be identified to higher taxonomic levels. Decapods that have a mutualistic relationship with Pocillopora and are typically dominant among coral branches, represent a minor contribution of the predators' diets. Instead, predators mainly consumed transient species including pelagic taxa such as copepods, chaetognaths and siphonophores suggesting non random feeding behavior. We also identified prey species known to have direct negative interactions with stony corals, such as Hapalocarcinus sp, a gall crab considered a coral parasite, as well as species of vermetid snails known for their deleterious effects on coral growth. Pocillopora DNA accounted for 20.8% and 20.1% of total number of sequences in the guts of the flame hawkfish and coral croucher but it was not detected in the guts of the arc-eye hawkfish. Comparison of diets among the three fishes demonstrates remarkable partitioning with nearly 80% of prey items consumed by only one predator. Overall, the taxonomic resolution provided by the metabarcoding approach

  20. Metabarcoding dietary analysis of coral dwelling predatory fish demonstrates the minor contribution of coral mutualists to their highly partitioned, generalist diet

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Christopher P.; Mills, Suzanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of predators in food webs can be challenging in highly diverse predator/prey systems composed of small cryptic species. DNA based dietary analysis can supplement predator removal experiments and provide high resolution for prey identification. Here we use a metabarcoding approach to provide initial insights into the diet and functional role of coral-dwelling predatory fish feeding on small invertebrates. Fish were collected in Moorea (French Polynesia) where the BIOCODE project has generated DNA barcodes for numerous coral associated invertebrate species. Pyrosequencing data revealed a total of 292 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTU) in the gut contents of the arc-eye hawkfish (Paracirrhites arcatus), the flame hawkfish (Neocirrhites armatus) and the coral croucher (Caracanthus maculatus). One hundred forty-nine (51%) of them had species-level matches in reference libraries (>98% similarity) while 76 additional OTUs (26%) could be identified to higher taxonomic levels. Decapods that have a mutualistic relationship with Pocillopora and are typically dominant among coral branches, represent a minor contribution of the predators’ diets. Instead, predators mainly consumed transient species including pelagic taxa such as copepods, chaetognaths and siphonophores suggesting non random feeding behavior. We also identified prey species known to have direct negative interactions with stony corals, such as Hapalocarcinus sp, a gall crab considered a coral parasite, as well as species of vermetid snails known for their deleterious effects on coral growth. Pocillopora DNA accounted for 20.8% and 20.1% of total number of sequences in the guts of the flame hawkfish and coral croucher but it was not detected in the guts of the arc-eye hawkfish. Comparison of diets among the three fishes demonstrates remarkable partitioning with nearly 80% of prey items consumed by only one predator. Overall, the taxonomic resolution provided by the metabarcoding approach

  1. Parasites alter freshwater communities in mesocosms by modifying invasive crayfish behavior.

    PubMed

    Reisinger, Lindsey S; Lodge, David M

    2016-06-01

    Parasites can alter communities by reducing densities of keystone hosts, but few studies have examined how trait-mediated indirect effects of parasites can alter ecological communities. We test how trematode parasites (Microphallus spp.) that affect invasive crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) behavior alter how crayfish impact lake littoral communities. O. rusticus drive community composition in north temperate lakes, and predatory fish can reduce crayfish activity and feeding. In laboratory studies, Microphallus parasites also alter O. rusticus behavior: infected O. rusticus eat fewer macroinvertebrates and are bolder near predatory fish than uninfected individuals. We used a 2 x 2 factorial experiment to test how predatory fish and parasites affect O. rusticus impacts in large mesocosms over 4 weeks. We predicted (1) that when predators were absent, infected crayfish would have lower impacts than uninfected crayfish on macrophytes and macroinvertebrates (as well as reduced growth and higher mortality). However, (2) when predators were present but unable to consume crayfish, infected crayfish would have greater impacts (as well as greater growth and lower mortality) than uninfected crayfish because of increased boldness. Because of its effect on crayfish feeding behavior, we also predicted (3) that infection would alter macrophyte and macroinvertebrate community composition. In contrast to our first hypothesis, we found that infected and uninfected crayfish had similar impacts on lower trophic levels when predators were absent. Across all treatments, infected crayfish were more likely to be outside shelters and had greater growth than uninfected crayfish, suggesting that the reduced feeding observed in short-term experiments does not occur over longer timescales. However, in support of the second hypothesis, when predatory fish were present, infected crayfish ate more macroinvertebrates than did uninfected crayfish, likely due to increased boldness. We also observed a

  2. Parasites alter freshwater communities in mesocosms by modifying invasive crayfish behavior.

    PubMed

    Reisinger, Lindsey S; Lodge, David M

    2016-06-01

    Parasites can alter communities by reducing densities of keystone hosts, but few studies have examined how trait-mediated indirect effects of parasites can alter ecological communities. We test how trematode parasites (Microphallus spp.) that affect invasive crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) behavior alter how crayfish impact lake littoral communities. O. rusticus drive community composition in north temperate lakes, and predatory fish can reduce crayfish activity and feeding. In laboratory studies, Microphallus parasites also alter O. rusticus behavior: infected O. rusticus eat fewer macroinvertebrates and are bolder near predatory fish than uninfected individuals. We used a 2 x 2 factorial experiment to test how predatory fish and parasites affect O. rusticus impacts in large mesocosms over 4 weeks. We predicted (1) that when predators were absent, infected crayfish would have lower impacts than uninfected crayfish on macrophytes and macroinvertebrates (as well as reduced growth and higher mortality). However, (2) when predators were present but unable to consume crayfish, infected crayfish would have greater impacts (as well as greater growth and lower mortality) than uninfected crayfish because of increased boldness. Because of its effect on crayfish feeding behavior, we also predicted (3) that infection would alter macrophyte and macroinvertebrate community composition. In contrast to our first hypothesis, we found that infected and uninfected crayfish had similar impacts on lower trophic levels when predators were absent. Across all treatments, infected crayfish were more likely to be outside shelters and had greater growth than uninfected crayfish, suggesting that the reduced feeding observed in short-term experiments does not occur over longer timescales. However, in support of the second hypothesis, when predatory fish were present, infected crayfish ate more macroinvertebrates than did uninfected crayfish, likely due to increased boldness. We also observed a

  3. Water-borne stimuli released by predatory crabs and damaged prey induce more predator-resistant shells in a marine gastropod

    PubMed Central

    Appleton, Robert D.; Palmer, A. Richard

    1988-01-01

    Individuals of the morphologically variable, rocky intertidal gastropod Thais (or Nucella) lamellosa developed larger apertural teeth when held in the presence of the predatory crab Cancer productus than when held in its absence, regardless of whether snails were fed or not. In addition, among fed snails larger apertural teeth were produced in the presence of crabs fed conspecific snails than in the presence of crabs fed frozen fish. Because all snails were held in containers through which water flowed from physically separated aquaria holding the crabs, these results indicate that water-soluble chemical cues released by this predatory crab and by damaged conspecifics induced T. lamellosa to improve the defense effectiveness of their shells. Finally, when allowed access to food, snails exposed to these stimuli ate fewer barnacles and grew less than those in the controls. Images PMID:16593946

  4. Neurotransmitters regulating feline aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Siegel, A; Schubert, K

    1995-01-01

    The experiments described in this review reveal that the expression and modulation of aggressive responses in the cat are organized by two distinct sets of pathways. One set of pathways is associated with the elicitation of a specific form of attack behavior. It includes the medial hypothalamus and its projections to the PAG for the expression of defensive rage behavior and the lateral hypothalamus and its descending projections for the expression of predatory attack behavior. The primary focus of the present review is upon the analysis of defensive rage behavior. It was demonstrated that the pathway from the medial hypothalamus to the PAG, which appears to be essential for elicitation of defensive rage, is powerfully excitatory and utilizes excitatory amino acids that act upon NMDA receptors within the PAG. The other pathways examined in this review arise from different nuclei of the amygdala and are modulatory in nature. Here, two facilitatory systems have been identified. The first involves a projection system from the basal complex of amygdala that projects directly to the PAG. Its excitatory effects are manifest through excitatory amino acids that act upon NMDA receptors within the PAG. The second facilitatory pathway arises from the medial nucleus of the amygdala. However, its projection system is directed to the medial hypothalamus rather than the PAG. Its neurotransmitter appears to be substance P that acts upon NK1 receptors within the medial hypothalamus (see Figure 10). It has yet to be determined whether substance P acts upon any of the other neurokinin receptor subtypes. It should also be pointed out that the substance P pathway from the medial amygdala to the medial hypothalamus functions to suppress predatory attack behavior elicited from the lateral hypothalamus. In this network, it is likely that the modulatory effects of the medial amygdala require the presence of a second, inhibitory pathway from the medial hypothalamus that innervates the

  5. Beyond body size: muscle biochemistry and body shape explain ontogenetic variation of anti-predatory behaviour in the lizard Salvator merianae.

    PubMed

    de Barros, Fábio Cury; de Carvalho, José Eduardo; Abe, Augusto Shinya; Kohlsdorf, Tiana

    2016-06-01

    Anti-predatory behaviour evolves under the strong action of natural selection because the success of individuals avoiding predation essentially defines their fitness. Choice of anti-predatory strategies is defined by prey characteristics as well as environmental temperature. An additional dimension often relegated in this multilevel equation is the ontogenetic component. In the tegu Salvator merianae, adults run away from predators at high temperatures but prefer fighting when it is cold, whereas juveniles exhibit the same flight strategy within a wide thermal range. Here, we integrate physiology and morphology to understand ontogenetic variation in the temperature-dependent shift of anti-predatory behaviour in these lizards. We compiled data for body shape and size, and quantified enzyme activity in hindlimb and head muscles, testing the hypothesis that morphophysiological models explain ontogenetic variation in behavioural associations. Our prediction is that juveniles exhibit body shape and muscle biochemistry that enhance flight strategies. We identified biochemical differences between muscles mainly in the LDH:CS ratio, whereby hindlimb muscles were more glycolytic than the jaw musculature. Juveniles, which often use evasive strategies to avoid predation, have more glycolytic hindlimb muscles and are much smaller when compared with adults 1-2 years old. Ontogenetic differences in body shape were identified but marginally contributed to behavioural variation between juvenile and adult tegus, and variation in anti-predatory behaviour in these lizards resides mainly in associations between body size and muscle biochemistry. Our results are discussed in the ecological context of predator avoidance by individuals differing in body size living at temperature-variable environments, where restrictions imposed by the cold could be compensated by specific phenotypes.

  6. Beyond body size: muscle biochemistry and body shape explain ontogenetic variation of anti-predatory behaviour in the lizard Salvator merianae.

    PubMed

    de Barros, Fábio Cury; de Carvalho, José Eduardo; Abe, Augusto Shinya; Kohlsdorf, Tiana

    2016-06-01

    Anti-predatory behaviour evolves under the strong action of natural selection because the success of individuals avoiding predation essentially defines their fitness. Choice of anti-predatory strategies is defined by prey characteristics as well as environmental temperature. An additional dimension often relegated in this multilevel equation is the ontogenetic component. In the tegu Salvator merianae, adults run away from predators at high temperatures but prefer fighting when it is cold, whereas juveniles exhibit the same flight strategy within a wide thermal range. Here, we integrate physiology and morphology to understand ontogenetic variation in the temperature-dependent shift of anti-predatory behaviour in these lizards. We compiled data for body shape and size, and quantified enzyme activity in hindlimb and head muscles, testing the hypothesis that morphophysiological models explain ontogenetic variation in behavioural associations. Our prediction is that juveniles exhibit body shape and muscle biochemistry that enhance flight strategies. We identified biochemical differences between muscles mainly in the LDH:CS ratio, whereby hindlimb muscles were more glycolytic than the jaw musculature. Juveniles, which often use evasive strategies to avoid predation, have more glycolytic hindlimb muscles and are much smaller when compared with adults 1-2 years old. Ontogenetic differences in body shape were identified but marginally contributed to behavioural variation between juvenile and adult tegus, and variation in anti-predatory behaviour in these lizards resides mainly in associations between body size and muscle biochemistry. Our results are discussed in the ecological context of predator avoidance by individuals differing in body size living at temperature-variable environments, where restrictions imposed by the cold could be compensated by specific phenotypes. PMID:26994181

  7. Effects of potential food sources on biological and demographic parameters of the predatory mites Kampimodromus aberrans, Typhlodromus pyri and Amblyseius andersoni.

    PubMed

    Lorenzon, Mauro; Pozzebon, Alberto; Duso, Carlo

    2012-11-01

    Kampimodromus aberrans, Typhlodromus pyri and Amblyseius andersoni are generalist predatory mites important in controlling tetranychid and eriophyoid mites in European vineyards. They can persist by exploiting various non-prey foods when their main prey is absent or scarce. A comparative analysis of the effects of various prey and non-prey foods on the life history of these predators is lacking. In the laboratory, predatory mites were reared on herbivorous mites (Panonychus ulmi, Eotetranychus carpini and Colomerus vitis), a potential alternative prey (Tydeus caudatus) and two non-prey foods, i.e. the pollen of Typha latifolia and the mycelium of Grape downy mildew (GDM) Plasmopara viticola. Developmental times, survival, sex ratio and fecundity as well as life table parameters were estimated. Kampimodromus aberrans developed faster on E. carpini, C. vitis or pollen than on P. ulmi and laid more eggs on pollen than on prey. Low numbers of this predator developed on GDM infected leaves. Tydeus caudatus was not suitable as prey for any of the three predatory mites. Kampimodromus aberrans showed the highest intrinsic rate of population increase when fed on pollen. Developmental times of T. pyri on prey or pollen were similar but fecundity was higher on pollen than on P. ulmi. Typhlodromus pyri had higher intrinsic rates of population increase on C. vitis and pollen than on P. ulmi; E. carpini showed intermediate values whereas GDM resulted in the lowest r ( m ) values. Development of A. andersoni females was faster on pollen and C. vitis than on P. ulmi and GDM. Fecundity was higher on pollen and mites compared to GDM. Life table parameters of A. andersoni did not differ when predators were fed with prey or pollen while GDM led to a lower r ( m ) value. On a specific diet A. andersoni exhibited faster development and higher fecundity than T. pyri and K. aberrans. These findings improve knowledge on factors affecting the potential of predatory mites in controlling

  8. Predatory activity of the fungi Duddingtonia flagrans, Monacrosporium thaumasium, Monacrosporium sinense and Arthrobotrys robusta on Angiostrongylus vasorum first-stage larvae.

    PubMed

    Braga, F R; Carvalho, R O; Araujo, J M; Silva, A R; Araújo, J V; Lima, W S; Tavela, A O; Ferreira, S R

    2009-12-01

    Angiostrongylus vasorum is a nematode that parasitizes domestic dogs and wild canids. We compared the predatory capacity of isolates from the predatory fungi Duddingtonia flagrans (AC001), Monacrosporium thaumasium (NF34), Monacrosporium sinense (SF53) and Arthrobotrys robusta (I31) on first-stage larvae (L1) of A. vasorum under laboratory conditions. L1 A. vasorum were plated on 2% water-agar (WA) Petri dishes marked into 4 mm diameter fields with the four grown isolates and a control without fungus. Plates of treated groups contained each 1000 L1 A. vasorum and 1000 conidia of the fungal isolates AC001, NF34, SF53 and I31 on 2% WA. Plates of the control group (without fungus) contained only 1000 L1 A. vasorum on 2% WA. Ten random fields (4 mm diameter) were examined per plate of treated and control groups, every 24 h for 7 days. Nematophagous fungi were not observed in the control group during the experiment. There was no variation in the predatory capacity among the tested fungal isolates (P>0.05) during the 7 days of the experiment. There was a significant reduction (P < 0.05) of 80.3%, 74.5%, 74.2% and 71.8% in the means of A. vasorum L1 recovered from treatments with isolates AC001, NF34, SF53 and I31, respectively, compared to the control without fungi. In this study, the four isolates of predatory fungi were efficient in the in vitro capture and destruction of A. vasorum L1, confirming previous work on the efficiency of nematophagous fungi in the control of nematode parasites of dogs and as a possible alternative method of biological control. PMID:19216825

  9. Influence of the preservation period in silica-gel on the predatory activity of the isolates of Duddingtonia flagrans on infective larvae of cyathostomins (Nematoda: Cyathostominae).

    PubMed

    Braga, Fabio Ribeiro; Araújo, Jackson Victor; Araujo, Juliana Milani; Tavela, Alexandre de Oliveira; Ferreira, Sebastião Rodrigo; Freitas Soares, Filippe E; Benjamin, Laércio dos Anjos; Frassy, Luiza Neme

    2011-08-01

    The continued maintenance of nematophagous fungi predatory activity under laboratory conditions is one of the basic requirements for a successful biological control. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of time on the preservation of the fungus Duddingtonia flagrans (AC001 and CG722) stored in silica-gel for 7 years and their subsequent predatory activity on cyathostomin L(3) larvae in 2% water-agar medium (2% WA). Samples of the isolates AC001 and CG722, originating from vials containing grains of silica-gel sterilized and stored for 7 years, were used. After obtaining fungal conidia, the predation test was conducted over 7 days on the surface of 9.0 cm Petri dishes filled with 2% WA. In the treated groups each Petri dish contained 500 cyathostomin L(3) and conidia of fungal isolates in 2% WA. In the control group (without fungi) the plates contained 500 L(3) in 2% WA. The experimental results showed that isolated AC001 and CG722 were efficient in preying on cyathostomin L(3) (p<0.01) compared to control (without fungus). However, no difference was observed (p>0.01) in the predatory activity of the fungal isolates tested. Comparing the groups, there was a significant reductions of cyathostomin L(3) (p<0.01) of 88.6% and 78.4% on average recovered from the groups treated with the isolates AC001 and CG722, respectively, after 7 days. The results of this test showed that the fungus D. flagrans (AC001 and CG722) stored in silica-gel for at least 7 years maintained its predatory activity on cyathostomin L(3). PMID:21627962

  10. Using a bank of predatory fish samples for bioindication of radioactive contamination of aquatic food chains in the area affected by the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Kryshev, I I; Ryabov, I N; Sazykina, T G

    1993-11-01

    From the analysis of experimental data on radioactive contamination of various fish, it is suggested that predatory fish specimens can be used as bioindicators of radionuclide accumulation in reservoir food chains of the Chernobyl emergency area. The increased content of cesium radionuclides were detected in the muscle tissue of predatory fish collected in various regions of the Chernobyl emergency area. In most of the water bodies studied, maximum contamination levels of predatory fish by radionuclides of cesium occurred in 1987-1988, whereas in 'nonpredatory' fish the concentration of cesium was maximum, as a rule, in the first year following the accident. The exposure doses of fish of various ecological groups and ages are estimated. The exposure doses of various population groups, using fish from contaminated water bodies, are also estimated. When forming the environmental data bank for the Chernobyl accident zone it is suggested that perch, pike-perch and pike be used as bioindicators of radioactive contamination of food chains. PMID:8272836

  11. Feeding Ecology of Predatory Fishes from Groote Eylandt in the Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia, with Special Reference to Predation on Penaeid Prawns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, D. T.; Blaber, S. J. M.; Salini, J. P.; Farmer, M. J.

    1995-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the feeding ecology of predatory fishes in the inshore waters of Groote Eylandt in the Gulf of Carpentaria, a large tropical bay in northern Australia. This knowledge will increase our understanding of trophic ecology of fishes in tropical waters and, in particular, their interactions with commercially important penaeid prawns. Several structurally complex habitats, including seagrass beds, mixed seagrass/reef habitats and mangrove areas, which support a diverse marine fauna, are found in these shallow waters. Consequently the diets of most predatory fishes in the region comprise a wide variety of fish and invertebrate prey. Juveniles of several species of penaeid live in seagrasses, where they are preyed on by, especially, Scomberoides commersonianusand the common shark species. However, the impact on juvenile penaeid populations is not as high as in the tropical estuaries of north-eastern Australia where fish abundances are lower. Many predatory fishes are size-selective and, in general, larger fish eat bigger penaeids. Seasonal and diel predation on penaeids is largely density-dependent. Evidence from this and previous studies indicates that individual species of tropical marine fishes eat similar prey (taxa and proportions) regardless of their habitat; any differences are chiefly only at the level of genus or species.

  12. Comparative study of predatory responses in blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis L.) produced in suspended long line cultures or collected from natural bottom mussel beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Helle Torp; Dolmer, Per; Petersen, Jens Kjerulf; Tørring, Ditte

    2012-03-01

    Blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis L.) are a valuable resource for commercial shellfish production and may also have uses as a tool in habitat improvement, because mussel beds can increase habitat diversity and complexity. A prerequisite for both commercial mussel production and habitat improvement is the availability of seed mussels collected with minimum impact on the benthic ecosystem. To examine whether mussels collected in suspended cultures can be used for bottom culture production and as tool in habitat improvement, the differences in predatory defence responses between suspended and bottom mussels exposed to the predatory shore crab ( Carcinus maenas L.) were tested in laboratory experiments and in the field. Predatory defence responses (byssal attachment and aggregation) and morphological traits were tested in laboratory, while growth and mortality were examined in field experiments. Suspended mussels had an active response in relation to the predator by developing a significantly firmer attachment to the substrate and a closer aggregated structure. Bottom mussels had a passive strategy by having a thicker shell and larger relative size of the adductor muscle. In a field experiment mussels originated from suspended cultures had a higher length increment and lower mortality when compared to bottom mussels. It is concluded that suspended mussels potentially are an alternative resource to bottom culture and can be used in habitat improvement of mussel beds, but that the use of suspended mussels has to be tested further in large-scale field experiments.

  13. Evaluation of predatory mite (Acari: Phytoseiidae) releases to suppress spruce spider mites, Oligonychus ununguis (Acari: Tetranychidae), on juniper.

    PubMed

    Shrewsbury, Paula M; Hardin, Mark R

    2003-12-01

    A laboratory trial evaluated four phytoseiid species for their potential as biological control agents of spruce spider mite, Oligonychus ununguis (Jacobi) (Acari: Tetranychidae). An augmentative biological control approach, using the predatory mites Neoseiulus fallacis Garman and Galendromus occidentalis Nesbitt (Acari: Phytoseiidae), was evaluated for reducing pest mite densities and injury, and economic costs on Juniperus chinensis 'Sargentii' A. Henry (Cupressaceae) in an outdoor nursery. Sequential releases of predator species, individually and in combination, were tested and compared with two commonly used miticides, a low-toxicity miticide, horticultural oil, and a conventional miticide, hexythiazox. Timing of treatments was based on grower-determined need, and predator release rates were based on guidelines in literature received from producers of beneficial organisms. Predator releases were more expensive and provided less effective suppression of spruce spider mites, resulting in greater spider mite injury to plants, compared with conventional pesticides. However, spider mite damage to plants did not differ in an economically meaningful way between treatments. Unsatisfactory levels of control seem related to under estimations of actual spider mite abundance based on grower perceptions and the beat sampling technique used to estimate predator release rates. These data suggest that when initial populations of spruce spider mite are high, it is unlikely that sequential releases of predator species, individually or in combination, will suppress spider mite populations. In this trial, augmentative biological control control was 2.5-7 times more expensive than chemical controls.

  14. Chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of the developmental switch gene eud-1 control predatory feeding plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Serobyan, Vahan; Xiao, Hua; Namdeo, Suryesh; Rödelsperger, Christian; Sieriebriennikov, Bogdan; Witte, Hanh; Röseler, Waltraud; Sommer, Ralf J.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has been suggested to act through developmental switches, but little is known about associated molecular mechanisms. In the nematode Pristionchus pacificus, the sulfatase eud-1 was identified as part of a developmental switch controlling mouth-form plasticity governing a predatory versus bacteriovorous mouth-form decision. Here we show that mutations in the conserved histone-acetyltransferase Ppa-lsy-12 and the methyl-binding-protein Ppa-mbd-2 mimic the eud-1 phenotype, resulting in the absence of one mouth-form. Mutations in both genes cause histone modification defects and reduced eud-1 expression. Surprisingly, Ppa-lsy-12 mutants also result in the down-regulation of an antisense-eud-1 RNA. eud-1 and antisense-eud-1 are co-expressed and further experiments suggest that antisense-eud-1 acts through eud-1 itself. Indeed, overexpression of the antisense-eud-1 RNA increases the eud-1-sensitive mouth-form and extends eud-1 expression. In contrast, this effect is absent in eud-1 mutants indicating that antisense-eud-1 positively regulates eud-1. Thus, chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of eud-1 control feeding plasticity in Pristionchus. PMID:27487725

  15. The Glutathione-S-Transferase, Cytochrome P450 and Carboxyl/Cholinesterase Gene Superfamilies in Predatory Mite Metaseiulus occidentalis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ke; Hoy, Marjorie A

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide-resistant populations of the predatory mite Metaseiulus (= Typhlodromus or Galendromus) occidentalis (Arthropoda: Chelicerata: Acari: Phytoseiidae) have been used in the biological control of pest mites such as phytophagous Tetranychus urticae. However, the pesticide resistance mechanisms in M. occidentalis remain largely unknown. In other arthropods, members of the glutathione-S-transferase (GST), cytochrome P450 (CYP) and carboxyl/cholinesterase (CCE) gene superfamilies are involved in the diverse biological pathways such as the metabolism of xenobiotics (e.g. pesticides) in addition to hormonal and chemosensory processes. In the current study, we report the identification and initial characterization of 123 genes in the GST, CYP and CCE superfamilies in the recently sequenced M. occidentalis genome. The gene count represents a reduction of 35% compared to T. urticae. The distribution of genes in the GST and CCE superfamilies in M. occidentalis differs significantly from those of insects and resembles that of T. urticae. Specifically, we report the presence of the Mu class GSTs, and the J' and J" clade CCEs that, within the Arthropoda, appear unique to Acari. Interestingly, the majority of CCEs in the J' and J" clades contain a catalytic triad, suggesting that they are catalytically active. They likely represent two Acari-specific CCE clades that may participate in detoxification of xenobiotics. The current study of genes in these superfamilies provides preliminary insights into the potential molecular components that may be involved in pesticide metabolism as well as hormonal/chemosensory processes in the agriculturally important M. occidentalis. PMID:27467523

  16. Effects of temperature, season and locality on wasting disease in the keystone predatory sea star Pisaster ochraceus.

    PubMed

    Bates, Amanda E; Hilton, Brett J; Harley, Christopher D G

    2009-11-01

    This study investigates wasting disease in the northeast Pacific keystone predatory sea star Pisaster ochraceus on the outer west coast of Vancouver Island (British Columbia, Canada). To quantify the effects of temperature, season and locality on the vulnerability of P. ochraceus to wasting disease, we conducted surveys and experiments in early and late summer. To test the prediction that a small increase in temperature would result in heightened infection intensities, we housed sea stars at different temperatures in the laboratory and caged sea stars subtidally at 2 depths. Prevalence and infection intensity were always higher in warm temperature treatments and did not differ between the sexes or with increasing size. Disease effects also varied with season and locality. Specimens held in aquaria displayed significantly higher disease prevalence and infection intensity in June versus August. Furthermore, sea stars from a sheltered inlet showed markedly higher prevalence of the disease in late summer, while wave-exposed sites had consistently low disease prevalence. Seasonal changes in reproductive potential, host condition and/or physiological acclimation, as well as differences in environmental regime among localities, may impact the dynamics of wasting disease. These results demonstrate that small increases in temperature could drive mass mortalities of Pisaster due to wasting disease, with vulnerability possibly reaching a peak in spring and in populations from sheltered localities. This is the most northern report of wasting disease in the class Asteroidea on the west coast of North America.

  17. Similarity of cuticular lipids between a caterpillar and its host plant: a way to make prey undetectable for predatory ants?

    PubMed

    Portugal, Augusto Henrique Arantes; Trigo, José Roberto

    2005-11-01

    Ithomiine butterflies (Nymphalidae) have long-lived, aposematic, chemically protected adults. However, little is known about the defense mechanisms in larvae and other juvenile stages. We showed that larvae Mechanitis polymnia are defended from ants by a chemical similarity between their cuticular lipids and those of the host plant, Solanum tabacifolium (Solanaceae). This is a novel defense mechanism in phytophagous insects. A field survey during one season showed that larval survivorship was up to 80%, which is high when compared with other juvenile stages. In a laboratory bioassay, live larvae on their host plant were not attacked by the predatory ant Camponotus crassus (Formicidae). Two experiments showed that the similarity between the cuticular lipids of M. polymnia and S. tabacifolium protected the larvae from C. crassus: (a) when the caterpillar was switched from a host plant to a non-host plant, the predation rate increased, and (b) when a palatable larva (Spodoptera frugiperda, Noctuidae) was coated with the cuticular lipids of M. polymnia and placed on S. tabacifolium leaves, it no longer experienced a high predation rate. This defensive mechanism can be defined as chemical camouflage, and may have a double adaptive advantage, namely, protection against predation and a reduction in the cost of sequestering toxic compounds from the host plant.

  18. Growth of a deep-water, predatory fish is influenced by the productivity of a boundary current system.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoang Minh; Rountrey, Adam N; Meeuwig, Jessica J; Coulson, Peter G; Feng, Ming; Newman, Stephen J; Waite, Anya M; Wakefield, Corey B; Meekan, Mark G

    2015-03-12

    The effects of climate change on predatory fishes in deep shelf areas are difficult to predict because complex processes may govern food availability and temperature at depth. We characterised the net impact of recent environmental changes on hapuku (Polyprion oxygeneios), an apex predator found in continental slope habitats (>200 m depth) by using dendrochronology techniques to develop a multi-decadal record of growth from otoliths. Fish were sampled off temperate south-western Australia, a region strongly influenced by the Leeuwin Current, a poleward-flowing, eastern boundary current. The common variance among individual growth records was relatively low (3.4%), but the otolith chronology was positively correlated (r = 0.61, p < 0.02) with sea level at Fremantle, a proxy for the strength of the Leeuwin Current. The Leeuwin Current influences the primary productivity of shelf ecosystems, with a strong current favouring growth in hapuku. Leeuwin Current strength is predicted to decline under climate change models and this study provides evidence that associated productivity changes may flow through to higher trophic levels even in deep water habitats.

  19. Growth of a deep-water, predatory fish is influenced by the productivity of a boundary current system

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hoang Minh; Rountrey, Adam N.; Meeuwig, Jessica J.; Coulson, Peter G.; Feng, Ming; Newman, Stephen J.; Waite, Anya M.; Wakefield, Corey B.; Meekan, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of climate change on predatory fishes in deep shelf areas are difficult to predict because complex processes may govern food availability and temperature at depth. We characterised the net impact of recent environmental changes on hapuku (Polyprion oxygeneios), an apex predator found in continental slope habitats (>200 m depth) by using dendrochronology techniques to develop a multi-decadal record of growth from otoliths. Fish were sampled off temperate south-western Australia, a region strongly influenced by the Leeuwin Current, a poleward-flowing, eastern boundary current. The common variance among individual growth records was relatively low (3.4%), but the otolith chronology was positively correlated (r = 0.61, p < 0.02) with sea level at Fremantle, a proxy for the strength of the Leeuwin Current. The Leeuwin Current influences the primary productivity of shelf ecosystems, with a strong current favouring growth in hapuku. Leeuwin Current strength is predicted to decline under climate change models and this study provides evidence that associated productivity changes may flow through to higher trophic levels even in deep water habitats. PMID:25761975

  20. Effect of temperature and photoperiod on the development, reproduction, and predation of the predatory ladybird Cheilomenes sexmaculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Su; Tan, Xiao-Ling; Guo, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Fan

    2013-12-01

    The polyphagous predatory ladybird Cheilomenes. sexmaculata (F.) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is distributed throughout southern China and has been investigated as a potential biological control agent against herbivorous insects in various agroecosystems. In the current study, we evaluated the preimaginal development, eclosion rate, reproduction, fertility, adult longevity, and prey consumption of C. sexmaculata under five temperature and five photoperiod regimens. The results showed that preadult developmental duration decreased significantly with increasing temperature and amount of daylight. Adult eclosion rate was highest at 35 degrees C and under conditions of complete darkness. Higher temperatures shortened the duration of copulation and preoviposition, prolonged the duration of oviposition, and increased the level of fecundity. Hatchability was highest at 30 degrees C. By contrast, the shortest copulation and oviposition duration and lowest level of fecundity and hatchability occurred with a completely dark photoperiod. Temperature and the gender of C. sexmaculata influenced adult longevity. In addition, there was a significant interaction effect of photoperiod and gender on adult longevity. Furthermore, prey consumption by fourth instar larvae and adult females both increased with increasing temperature and photoperiod. Our results reveal the high thermal and light sensitivities of C. sexmaculata, which highlight the importance of environment regulation in the mass rearing of this natural enemy for application as a biological control in agroecosystems in China.

  1. Metamorphic remodeling of a planktotrophic larva to produce the predatory feeding system of a cone snail (Mollusca, Neogastropoda).

    PubMed

    Page, Louise R

    2011-10-01

    I used histological sections and 3D reconstructions to document development through metamorphosis of the foregut and proboscis in the conoidean neogastropod Conus lividus. A goal was to determine how highly derived features of the post-metamorphic feeding system of this gastropod predator develop without interfering with larval structures for microherbivory. A second goal was to compare foregut development in this conoidean with previous observations on foregut development in the buccinoidean neogastropod Nassarius mendicus. These two neogastropods both have a feeding larval stage, but they show major differences in post-metamorphic foregut morphology. Basic events in development of the proboscis and proboscis sheath in C. lividus and N. mendicus were similar. However, the elongate buccal tube of C. lividus forms during metamorphosis as a composite of apical epidermal tissue that grows inward and ventral foregut tissue that extends outward. The larval mouth is not carried through metamorphosis. Comparative observations on foregut development in caenogastropods, which now include data on C. lividus, suggest that the foregut incorporates dorsal and ventral modules having different ontogenetic and functional fates. This developmental modularity may have facilitated evolutionary diversification of the post-metamorphic foregut. Foregut diversification in predatory gastropods may have been further fast-tracked by developmental uncoupling of larval and post-metamorphic mouths.

  2. Effect of Different Temperatures on Consumption of Two Spotted Mite, Tetranychus urticae, Eggs by the Predatory Thrips, Scolothrips longicornis

    PubMed Central

    Pakyari, Hajar; Enkegaard, Annie

    2012-01-01

    Environmental variables such as temperature are important factors affecting the efficacy of biological control agents. This study evaluated the predation rate of the predatory thrips Scolothrips longicornis Priesner (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) against the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) under laboratory conditions. Based on daily and total prey consumption of different life stages of S. longicornis on spider mite eggs at temperatures covering the range suitable for development and survival of the predator (15° C to 37° C, 60 ± 10% RH, 16:8 L:D), there was a significant effect of temperature on prey consumption. The number of prey consumed daily by first and second instar larvae increased linearly with increasing temperature from 15 °C to 37 °C, whereas daily consumption of preovipositing and postovipositing females was uninfluenced by temperature. Lower temperature thresholds for consumption by first and second instar larvae of S. longicornis was estimated to be 6.8 ± 0.04° C and 4.6 ± 0.03° C, respectively. The daily consumption of ovipositing females followed a nonlinear pattern, with maximum daily predation estimated at 32.8° C. From the model used to describe consumption of ovipositing females, an upper threshold for consumption of 41.4° C was estimated. The performance of S. longicornis at the different temperatures is discussed in relation to its practical use in integrated pest control programs. PMID:23425212

  3. Interspecific and geographical differences in anticoagulant rodenticide residues of predatory wildlife from the Mediterranean region of Spain.

    PubMed

    López-Perea, Jhon J; Camarero, Pablo R; Molina-López, Rafael A; Parpal, Luis; Obón, Elena; Solá, Jessica; Mateo, Rafael

    2015-04-01

    We studied the prevalence of anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) in the liver of 344 individuals representing 11 species of predatory wildlife that were found dead in the Mediterranean region of Spain (Catalonia and Majorca Island). Six different ARs (brodifacoum, bromadiolone, difenacoum, flocoumafen, difethialone, warfarin) were found in the liver of 216 (62.8%) animals and >1 AR co-occurred in 119 individuals (34.6%). The occurrence of ARs was positively correlated with the human population density. Catalonia and Majorca showed similar prevalence of AR detection (64.4 and 60.4%, respectively), but a higher prevalence was found in the resident population of Eurasian scops owl (Otus scops) from Majorca (57.7%) compared to the migratory population from Catalonia (14.3%). Birds of prey had lower levels of bromadiolone than hedgehogs, whereas no difference was found for other ARs. The risk of SGAR poisoning in wild predators in NE Spain is believed to be elevated, because 23.3% of the individuals exhibited hepatic concentration of ARs exceeding 200 ng/g. PMID:25546464

  4. Consequences of seasonal variation in reservoir water level for predatory fishes: linking visual foraging and prey densities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klobucar, Stephen L.; Budy, Phaedra

    2016-01-01

    In reservoirs, seasonal drawdown can alter the physical environment and may influence predatory fish performance. We investigated the performance of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in a western reservoir by coupling field measurements with visual foraging and bioenergetic models at four distinct states (early summer, mid-summer, late summer, and fall). The models suggested that lake trout prey, juvenile kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka), are limited seasonally by suitable temperature and dissolved oxygen. Accordingly, prey densities were greatest in late summer when reservoir volume was lowest and fish were concentrated by stratification. Prey encounter rates (up to 68 fish·day−1) and predator consumption are also predicted to be greatest during late summer. However, our models suggested that turbidity negatively correlates with prey detection and consumption across reservoir states. Under the most turbid conditions, lake trout did not meet physiological demands; however, during less turbid periods, predator consumption reached maximum bioenergetic efficiency. Overall, our findings demonstrate that rapid reservoir fluctuations and associated abiotic conditions can influence predator–prey interactions, and our models describe the potential impacts of water level fluctuation on valuable sport fishes.

  5. Distribution and excretion of Cd, Hg, methyl-Hg and ZS in the predatory beetle Pterostichus niger (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Lindqvist, L.; Block, M.; Tjaelve, H.

    1995-07-01

    Excretion and distribution of cadmium (Cd), and mercury (Hg), methylmercury (methyl-Hg), and zinc (Zn) were studied in the predatory beetle, Pterostichus niger. Specimens of P. niger were fed with insect larvae containing {sup 109}Cd, {sup 203}Hg, methyl-{sup 203}Hg, or {sup 65}Zn. After ingestion of the larvae, the metal contents in the beetles were measured daily for 30 d by {gamma}-spectrometry. Additional beetles were used for autoradiography 5, 15, and 19 d after ingestion of the metals. Excretion of the metals was fast during an initial interval but occurred thereafter at a slow rate. After 2 weeks, the contents of Cd and inorganic Hg had decreased to approximately 1% of the ingested amounts. For Zn and methyl-Hg, higher levels were retained in the beetles. Thus after 30 d, Zn content was 20% of the ingested amount, whereas for methyl-Hg 60% was retained in the body. Autoradiography showed high levels of all metals in the gut. For methyl-Hg, in contrast to inorganic Hg, there was also an evenly distributed labelling in most body tissues. This labelling was also seen for Zn, although at a lower lever than for methyl-Hg. Cadmium showed a localization in the integument, which was not seen for the other metals. The results show that patterns of uptake and excretion of the examined metals in P. niger vary considerably and that the distribution picture show specific features for the individual metals.

  6. Growth of a deep-water, predatory fish is influenced by the productivity of a boundary current system.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoang Minh; Rountrey, Adam N; Meeuwig, Jessica J; Coulson, Peter G; Feng, Ming; Newman, Stephen J; Waite, Anya M; Wakefield, Corey B; Meekan, Mark G

    2015-01-01

    The effects of climate change on predatory fishes in deep shelf areas are difficult to predict because complex processes may govern food availability and temperature at depth. We characterised the net impact of recent environmental changes on hapuku (Polyprion oxygeneios), an apex predator found in continental slope habitats (>200 m depth) by using dendrochronology techniques to develop a multi-decadal record of growth from otoliths. Fish were sampled off temperate south-western Australia, a region strongly influenced by the Leeuwin Current, a poleward-flowing, eastern boundary current. The common variance among individual growth records was relatively low (3.4%), but the otolith chronology was positively correlated (r = 0.61, p < 0.02) with sea level at Fremantle, a proxy for the strength of the Leeuwin Current. The Leeuwin Current influences the primary productivity of shelf ecosystems, with a strong current favouring growth in hapuku. Leeuwin Current strength is predicted to decline under climate change models and this study provides evidence that associated productivity changes may flow through to higher trophic levels even in deep water habitats. PMID:25761975

  7. Growth of a deep-water, predatory fish is influenced by the productivity of a boundary current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoang Minh; Rountrey, Adam N.; Meeuwig, Jessica J.; Coulson, Peter G.; Feng, Ming; Newman, Stephen J.; Waite, Anya M.; Wakefield, Corey B.; Meekan, Mark G.

    2015-03-01

    The effects of climate change on predatory fishes in deep shelf areas are difficult to predict because complex processes may govern food availability and temperature at depth. We characterised the net impact of recent environmental changes on hapuku (Polyprion oxygeneios), an apex predator found in continental slope habitats (>200 m depth) by using dendrochronology techniques to develop a multi-decadal record of growth from otoliths. Fish were sampled off temperate south-western Australia, a region strongly influenced by the Leeuwin Current, a poleward-flowing, eastern boundary current. The common variance among individual growth records was relatively low (3.4%), but the otolith chronology was positively correlated (r = 0.61, p < 0.02) with sea level at Fremantle, a proxy for the strength of the Leeuwin Current. The Leeuwin Current influences the primary productivity of shelf ecosystems, with a strong current favouring growth in hapuku. Leeuwin Current strength is predicted to decline under climate change models and this study provides evidence that associated productivity changes may flow through to higher trophic levels even in deep water habitats.

  8. Body size affects the predatory interactions between introduced American Bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) and native anurans in China: An experimental study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Y.; Guo, Z.; Pearl, C.A.; Li, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Introduced American Bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) have established breeding populations in several provinces in China since their introduction in 1959. Although Bullfrogs are viewed as a potentially important predator of Chinese native anurans, their impacts in the field are difficult to quantify. We used two experiments to examine factors likely to mediate Bullfrog predation on native anurans. First, we examined effects of Bullfrog size and sex on daily consumption of a common Chinese native (Rana limnocharis). Second, we examined whether Bullfrogs consumed similar proportions of four Chinese natives: Black-Spotted Pond Frog (Rana nigromaculata), Green Pond Frog (Rana plancyi plancyi), Rice Frog (R. limnocharis), and Zhoushan Toad (Bufo bufo gargarizans). We found that larger Rana catesbeiana consumed more R. limnocharis per day than did smaller R. catesbeiana, and that daily consumption of R. limnocharis was positively related to R. catesbeiana body size. When provided with adults of four anurans that differed significantly in body size, R. catesbeiana consumed more individuals of the smallest species (R. limnocharis). However, when provided with similarly sized juveniles of the same four species, R. catesbeiana did not consume any species more than expected by chance. Our results suggest that body size plays an important role in the predatory interactions between R. catesbeiana and Chinese native anurans and that, other things being equal, smaller species and individuals are at greater risk of predation by R. catesbeiana. Copyright 2007 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  9. Selection of reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis in a predatory biological control agent, Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunxiao; Pan, Huipeng; Noland, Jeffrey Edward; Zhang, Deyong; Zhang, Zhanhong; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Xuguo

    2015-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a reliable technique for quantifying gene expression across various biological processes, of which requires a set of suited reference genes to normalize the expression data. Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), is one of the most extensively used biological control agents in the field to manage arthropod pest species. In this study, expression profiles of 16 housekeeping genes selected from C. maculata were cloned and investigated. The performance of these candidates as endogenous controls under specific experimental conditions was evaluated by dedicated algorithms, including geNorm, Normfinder, BestKeeper, and ΔCt method. In addition, RefFinder, a comprehensive platform integrating all the above-mentioned algorithms, ranked the overall stability of these candidate genes. As a result, various sets of suitable reference genes were recommended specifically for experiments involving different tissues, developmental stages, sex, and C. maculate larvae treated with dietary double stranded RNA. This study represents the critical first step to establish a standardized RT-qPCR protocol for the functional genomics research in a ladybeetle C. maculate. Furthermore, it lays the foundation for conducting ecological risk assessment of RNAi-based gene silencing biotechnologies on non-target organisms; in this case, a key predatory biological control agent. PMID:26656102

  10. The Glutathione-S-Transferase, Cytochrome P450 and Carboxyl/Cholinesterase Gene Superfamilies in Predatory Mite Metaseiulus occidentalis

    PubMed Central

    Hoy, Marjorie A.

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide-resistant populations of the predatory mite Metaseiulus (= Typhlodromus or Galendromus) occidentalis (Arthropoda: Chelicerata: Acari: Phytoseiidae) have been used in the biological control of pest mites such as phytophagous Tetranychus urticae. However, the pesticide resistance mechanisms in M. occidentalis remain largely unknown. In other arthropods, members of the glutathione-S-transferase (GST), cytochrome P450 (CYP) and carboxyl/cholinesterase (CCE) gene superfamilies are involved in the diverse biological pathways such as the metabolism of xenobiotics (e.g. pesticides) in addition to hormonal and chemosensory processes. In the current study, we report the identification and initial characterization of 123 genes in the GST, CYP and CCE superfamilies in the recently sequenced M. occidentalis genome. The gene count represents a reduction of 35% compared to T. urticae. The distribution of genes in the GST and CCE superfamilies in M. occidentalis differs significantly from those of insects and resembles that of T. urticae. Specifically, we report the presence of the Mu class GSTs, and the J’ and J” clade CCEs that, within the Arthropoda, appear unique to Acari. Interestingly, the majority of CCEs in the J’ and J” clades contain a catalytic triad, suggesting that they are catalytically active. They likely represent two Acari-specific CCE clades that may participate in detoxification of xenobiotics. The current study of genes in these superfamilies provides preliminary insights into the potential molecular components that may be involved in pesticide metabolism as well as hormonal/chemosensory processes in the agriculturally important M. occidentalis. PMID:27467523

  11. Effect of temperature and photoperiod on the development, reproduction, and predation of the predatory ladybird Cheilomenes sexmaculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Su; Tan, Xiao-Ling; Guo, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Fan

    2013-12-01

    The polyphagous predatory ladybird Cheilomenes. sexmaculata (F.) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is distributed throughout southern China and has been investigated as a potential biological control agent against herbivorous insects in various agroecosystems. In the current study, we evaluated the preimaginal development, eclosion rate, reproduction, fertility, adult longevity, and prey consumption of C. sexmaculata under five temperature and five photoperiod regimens. The results showed that preadult developmental duration decreased significantly with increasing temperature and amount of daylight. Adult eclosion rate was highest at 35 degrees C and under conditions of complete darkness. Higher temperatures shortened the duration of copulation and preoviposition, prolonged the duration of oviposition, and increased the level of fecundity. Hatchability was highest at 30 degrees C. By contrast, the shortest copulation and oviposition duration and lowest level of fecundity and hatchability occurred with a completely dark photoperiod. Temperature and the gender of C. sexmaculata influenced adult longevity. In addition, there was a significant interaction effect of photoperiod and gender on adult longevity. Furthermore, prey consumption by fourth instar larvae and adult females both increased with increasing temperature and photoperiod. Our results reveal the high thermal and light sensitivities of C. sexmaculata, which highlight the importance of environment regulation in the mass rearing of this natural enemy for application as a biological control in agroecosystems in China. PMID:24498765

  12. Mitochondrial genome analysis of the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis and a revisit of the Metaseiulus occidentalis mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Dermauw, Wannes; Vanholme, Bartel; Tirry, Luc; Van Leeuwen, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    In this study we sequenced and analysed the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of the Chilean predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot (Chelicerata: Acari: Mesostigmata: Phytoseiidae: Amblyseiinae). The 16 199 bp genome (79.8% AT) contains the standard set of 13 protein-coding and 24 RNA genes. Compared with the ancestral arthropod mtDNA pattern, the gene order is extremely reshuffled (35 genes changed position) and represents a novel arrangement within the arthropods. This is probably related to the presence of several large noncoding regions in the genome. In contrast with the mt genome of the closely related species Metaseiulus occidentalis (Phytoseiidae: Typhlodrominae) - which was reported to be unusually large (24 961 bp), to lack nad6 and nad3 protein-coding genes, and to contain 22 tRNAs without T-arms - the genome of P. persimilis has all the features of a standard metazoan mt genome. Consequently, we performed additional experiments on the M. occidentalis mt genome. Our preliminary restriction digests and Southern hybridization data revealed that this genome is smaller than previously reported. In addition, we cloned nad3 in M. occidentalis and positioned this gene between nad4L and 12S-rRNA on the mt genome. Finally, we report that at least 15 of the 22 tRNAs in the M. occidentalis mt genome can be folded into canonical cloverleaf structures similar to their counterparts in P. persimilis.

  13. Feeding on Beauveria bassiana-treated Frankliniella occidentalis causes negative effects on the predatory mite Neoseiulus barkeri

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shengyong; Gao, Yulin; Xu, Xuenong; Wang, Dengjie; Li, Juan; Wang, Haihong; Wang, Endong; Lei, Zhongren

    2015-01-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana and the predatory mite Neoseiulus barkeri are both potential biocontrol agents for their shared host/prey Frankliniella occidentalis. The combination of the two agents may enhance biological control of F. occidentalis if the fungus does not negatively affect N. barkeri. This study evaluated the indirect effects of B. bassiana strain SZ-26 on N. barkeri mediated by F. occidentalis using the age-stage, two-sex life table. When fed on the first instar larvae of F. occidentalis that had been exposed for 12 h to the SZ-26 suspension, the developmental time of preadult N. barkeri was significantly longer, and the longevity and fecundity were significantly lower than that of N. barkeri fed on untreated F. occidentalis. The mean generation time (T), net reproductive rate (R0), finite rate of increase (λ), intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm) and predation rates were correspondingly affected. The data showed that B. bassiana has indirect negative effects on N. barkeri population dynamics via influencing their prey F. occidentalis larvae, which indicates that there is a risk in combining B. bassiana with N. barkeri simultaneously for the biocontrol of F. occidentalis. The probable mechanism for the negative effects is discussed. PMID:26153532

  14. Arginine: A Potent Prey Attractant to Predatory Newts in Mountain Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, R. P.; Zimmer, R. K.

    2005-05-01

    Chemoreception of aquatic organisms has been well-studied in the laboratory, but rarely in the field. The California newt, Taricha torosa, in natural stream habitats is an excellent animal for exploring behavioral responses to prey odors. Here, we selected 13 amino acids for field bioassays based on their concentrations in prey tissue extracts. Bioassays were calibrated for stimulus dilution by means of fluorescent dye releases and flow-through spectrofluorometry. Moreover, hydrodynamic properties of stream flows were determined using an electromagnetic current meter. Of all amino acids tested, only arginine, alanine and glycine were significantly attractive (relative to stream water controls). These three substances caused free-ranging newts to turn upstream and swim towards the odor sources. Additional experiments showed that arginine was the most effective attractant, evoking plume-tracking behavior at concentrations as low as 10 nM. In subsequent trials, nine arginine analogs were tested, but each compound failed to elicit a significant response. Even subtle changes to arginine, such as the addition of a single carbon to the side chain, destroyed all bioactivity. Within its natural habitat, the California newt thus exhibits keen sensitivity and narrow tuning to the free amino acid, arginine, a chemical signal of its prey.

  15. Hypoxic environments as refuge against predatory fish in the Amazonian floodplains.

    PubMed

    Anjos, M B; De Oliveira, R R; Zuanon, J

    2008-02-01

    Several groups of Amazonian fishes exhibit behavioral, morphological and physiological characteristics that allow occupying hypoxic environments, despite the energetic costs of living in such harsh conditions. One of the supposed advantages of occupying hypoxic habitats would be a lower predation pressure resulting from a lower number of piscivorous fishes in those environments. We tested this hypothesis in an area of the Amazon River floodplain through gill net fishing in normoxic and hypoxic habitats. From the 103 species caught, 38 were classified as piscivores. We found no difference in the number of piscivorous species captured in hypoxic and normoxic habitats (chi2 = 0.23; p = 0.63; df = 1) but piscivorous individuals were more numerous in normoxic than in hypoxic sampling stations (chi2 = 104.4; p < 0.001; df = 1). This indicates that environments submitted to low oxygen conditions may in fact function as refuges against piscivorous fishes in the Amazonian floodplains.

  16. Electric Organ Discharges of Mormyrid Fish as a Possible Cue for Predatory Catfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanika, S.; Kramer, B.

    During reproductive migration the electroreceptive African sharptooth catfish, Clarias gariepinus (Siluriformes), preys mainly on a weakly electric fish, the bulldog Marcusenius macrolepidotus (Mormyridae; Merron 1993). This is puzzling because the electric organ discharges of known Marcusenius species are pulses of a duration (<1ms) too short for being detected by the catfishes' low-frequency electroreceptive system (optimum sensitivity, 10-30Hz Peters and Bretschneider 1981). On the recent discovery that M. macrolepidotus males emit discharges lasting approximately ten times longer than those of females (Kramer 1997a) we determined behavioral thresholds for discharges of both sexes, using synthetic playbacks of field-recorded discharges. C. gariepinus detected M. macrolepidotus male discharges down to a field gradient of 103μVpeak-peak/cm and up to a distance of 1.5m at natural field conditions. In contrast, thresholds for female discharges were not reached with our setup, and we presume the bulldogs eaten by catfish are predominantly male.

  17. Prey and Pollen Food Choice Depends on Previous Diet in an Omnivorous Predatory Mite.

    PubMed

    Schuldiner-Harpaz, Tarryn; Coll, Moshe; Weintraub, Phyllis G

    2016-08-01

    The time allocated by omnivorous predators to consuming prey versus plant-provided foods (e.g., pollen) directly influences their efficacy as biocontrol agents of agricultural pests. Nonetheless, diet shifting between these two very different food sources remains poorly understood. We hypothesized that previous diet composition influences subsequent choice of prey and plant food types. We tested this hypothesis by observing the foraging choices of Amblyseius swirskii (Athias-Henriot) mites (Mesostigmata: Phytoseiidae), which were first maintained on either prey (broad mites) or corn pollen, and then offered familiar and unfamiliar foods. A. swirskii exhibited strong fidelity to familiar food, whether prey or pollen, suggesting there are physiological or behavioral costs involved in shifting between such different foods. Results illustrate the importance of previous diet for subsequent pest consumption by omnivorous natural enemies. PMID:27271945

  18. Strategy Dependent Swimming Dynamics Change among a Predatory Algae Species with Different Strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Joseph; Sheng, Jian; Malkiel, Edwin; Adolf, Jason; Place, Allen

    2008-11-01

    Digital holographic microscopic cinematography is used for measuring the 3D, time resolved, swimming behavior of toxic and non-toxic strains the marine dinoflagellate Karlodinium veneficum. We focus on the response of predators of the same species, but with different predation strategy, to the presence of prey, Storeatula major. Experiments are performed in a 3x3 mm cuvette, at densities extending to 100,000 cells/ml. Holograms are recorded at 60fps and at 20X magnification. In each case, we simultaneously track 200-500 cells in the 3mm deep sample, at a spatial resolution of 0.4x0.4x2 μm. We show that responses are largely dependent on the predation strategy. K. veneficum 2064, a toxic mixotroph, slows down and decreases the helix radius and clusters around the prey. Conversely, MD5, a non-toxic, autotrophic-like strain is completely oblivious to prey. Strain 1974, which is toxic and twice as motile, shows heterotrophic-like responses with characteristics of an active hunter. Also, on going spectral analysis of the 3-D motion provides quantitative insight on the swimming dynamics of microorganisms.

  19. When Herbivores Eat Predators: Predatory Insects Effectively Avoid Incidental Ingestion by Mammalian Herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ari, Matan; Inbar, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    The direct trophic links between mammalian herbivores and plant-dwelling insects have been practically ignored. Insects are ubiquitous on plants consumed by mammalian herbivores and are thus likely to face the danger of being incidentally ingested by a grazing mammal. A few studies have shown that some herbivorous hemipterans are able to avoid this peril by dropping to the ground upon detecting the heat and humidity on the mammal's breath. We hypothesized that if this risk affects the entire plant-dwelling insect community, other insects that share this habitat are expected to develop similar escape mechanisms. We assessed the ability of three species (adults and larvae) of coccinellid beetles, important aphid predators, to avoid incidental ingestion. Both larvae and adults were able to avoid incidental ingestion effectively by goats by dropping to the ground, demonstrating the importance of this behavior in grazed habitats. Remarkably, all adult beetles escaped by dropping off the plant and none used their functional wings to fly away. In controlled laboratory experiments, we found that human breath caused 60–80% of the beetles to drop. The most important component of mammalian herbivore breath in inducing adult beetles and larvae to drop was the combination of heat and humidity. The fact that the mechanism of dropping in response to mammalian breath developed in distinct insect orders and disparate life stages accentuates the importance of the direct influence of mammalian herbivores on plant-dwelling insects. This direct interaction should be given its due place when discussing trophic interactions. PMID:23424674

  20. Genome analysis of a simultaneously predatory and prey-independent, novel Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus from the River Tiber, supports in silico predictions of both ancient and recent lateral gene transfer from diverse bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Evolution equipped Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus predatory bacteria to invade other bacteria, digesting and replicating, sealed within them thus preventing nutrient-sharing with organisms in the surrounding environment. Bdellovibrio were previously described as “obligate predators” because only by mutations, often in gene bd0108, are 1 in ~1x107 of predatory lab strains of Bdellovibrio converted to prey-independent growth. A previous genomic analysis of B. bacteriovorus strain HD100 suggested that predatory consumption of prey DNA by lytic enzymes made Bdellovibrio less likely than other bacteria to acquire DNA by lateral gene transfer (LGT). However the Doolittle and Pan groups predicted, in silico, both ancient and recent lateral gene transfer into the B. bacteriovorus HD100 genome. Results To test these predictions, we isolated a predatory bacterium from the River Tiber- a good potential source of LGT as it is rich in diverse bacteria and organic pollutants- by enrichment culturing with E. coli prey cells. The isolate was identified as B. bacteriovorus and named as strain Tiberius. Unusually, this Tiberius strain showed simultaneous prey-independent growth on organic nutrients and predatory growth on live prey. Despite the prey-independent growth, the homolog of bd0108 did not have typical prey-independent-type mutations. The dual growth mode may reflect the high carbon content of the river, and gives B. bacteriovorus Tiberius extended non-predatory contact with the other bacteria present. The HD100 and Tiberius genomes were extensively syntenic despite their different cultured-terrestrial/freshly-isolated aquatic histories; but there were significant differences in gene content indicative of genomic flux and LGT. Gene content comparisons support previously published in silico predictions for LGT in strain HD100 with substantial conservation of genes predicted to have ancient LGT origins but little conservation of AT-rich genes predicted to be

  1. Distribution and Biology of Mallada desjardinsi (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) in India and Its Predatory Potential Against Aleurodicus dispersus (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae)

    PubMed Central

    Boopathi, T.; Singh, S. B.; Ravi, M.; Manju, T.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the prevalence of Mallada desjardinsi (Navas) in seven geographical regions of India and provide the first report of its kind outlining the preying of all stages of the spiraling whitefly, Aleurodicus dispersus Russell, by M. desjardinsi. Sampling was conducted in seven regions of two provinces in India, Bengaluru (Karnataka) and Tiruppur (Tamil Nadu), which demonstrated that M. desjardinsi populations were most dense at the former and least at the later. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of its kind outlining observations regarding the biology and feeding potential of M. desjardinsi on A. dispersus under laboratory conditions. It was observed that the second nymphal stadium of A. dispersus was most preferred prey for M. desjardinsi and the least preferred was the A. dispersus adult. It was also seen that the third stadium of M. desjardinsi consumed more A. dispersus individuals than any other life stages. The longevity of female and the total developmental period of M. desjardinsi were computed as 27.6 ± 1.69 and 24.1 ± 0.99 d, respectively. The average total number of eggs laid by the M. desjardinsi female was 211.1 ± 6.35 eggs. M. desjardinsi was observed to be extremely efficient in terms of prey searching and predatory potential with respect to A. dispersus. The results of this study indicate strongly that M. desjardinsi has the potential to be used for the control of A. dispersus. PMID:27417642

  2. Predatory Functional Morphology in Raptors: Interdigital Variation in Talon Size Is Related to Prey Restraint and Immobilisation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Denver W.; Freedman, Elizabeth A.; Scannella, John B.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of raptors in terrestrial ecosystems, many aspects of their predatory behaviour remain poorly understood. Surprisingly little is known about the morphology of raptor talons and how they are employed during feeding behaviour. Talon size variation among digits can be used to distinguish families of raptors and is related to different techniques of prey restraint and immobilisation. The hypertrophied talons on digits (D) I and II in Accipitridae have evolved primarily to restrain large struggling prey while they are immobilised by dismemberment. Falconidae have only modest talons on each digit and only slightly enlarged D-I and II. For immobilisation, Falconini rely more strongly on strike impact and breaking the necks of their prey, having evolved a ‘tooth’ on the beak to aid in doing so. Pandionidae have enlarged, highly recurved talons on each digit, an adaptation for piscivory, convergently seen to a lesser extent in fishing eagles. Strigiformes bear enlarged talons with comparatively low curvature on each digit, part of a suite of adaptations to increase constriction efficiency by maximising grip strength, indicative of specialisation on small prey. Restraint and immobilisation strategy change as prey increase in size. Small prey are restrained by containment within the foot and immobilised by constriction and beak attacks. Large prey are restrained by pinning under the bodyweight of the raptor, maintaining grip with the talons, and immobilised by dismemberment (Accipitridae), or severing the spinal cord (Falconini). Within all raptors, physical attributes of the feet trade off against each other to attain great strength, but it is the variable means by which this is achieved that distinguishes them ecologically. Our findings show that interdigital talon morphology varies consistently among raptor families, and that this is directly correlative with variation in their typical prey capture and restraint strategy. PMID:19946365

  3. Effects of air temperature and water vapor pressure deficit on storage of the predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    PubMed

    Ghazy, Noureldin Abuelfadl; Suzuki, Takeshi; Amano, Hiroshi; Ohyama, Katsumi

    2012-10-01

    To determine the optimum air temperature and water vapor pressure deficit (VPD) for the storage of the predatory mite, Neoseiulus californicus, 3-day-old mated females were stored at air temperatures of 0, 5, 10, or 15 °C and VPDs of 0.1, 0.3, or 0.5 kPa for 10, 20, or 30 days. At 10 °C and 0.1 kPa, 83 % of females survived after 30 days of storage; this percentage was the highest among all conditions. VPDs of 0.3 and 0.5 kPa regardless of air temperature, and an air temperature of 0 °C regardless of VPD were detrimental to the survival of the females during storage. Since the highest survival was observed at 10 °C and 0.1 kPa, the effect of the storage duration on the post-storage quality of the stored females and their progeny was investigated at 25 °C to evaluate the effectiveness of the storage condition. The oviposition ability of the stored females, hatchability, and sex ratio of their progeny were not affected even when the storage duration was extended to 30 days. Although a slight decrease in the survival during the immature stages of progeny was observed when the storage duration was ≥20 days, the population growth of N. californicus may not be affected when individuals stored in these conditions are applied to greenhouses and agricultural fields. The results indicate that mated N. californicus females can be stored at 10 °C and 0.1 kPa VPD for at least 30 days.

  4. Optimization and evaluation of microencapsulated artificial diet for mass rearing the predatory ladybird Propylea japonica (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiao-Ling; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Su; Zhang, Fan

    2015-02-01

    Artificial diet optimization is a key aspect in mass rearing of natural enemies since it influences the quality and feeding effectiveness, and thus the success of the biological control program. Here, we introduced the microencapsulation method to package liquid artificial diet for feeding of the ladybird Propylea japonica. An orthogonal test of the quality of microencapsulated artificial diets (ADMs) was performed on key variables in production; Ca-alginate concentration, chitosan concentration and weight ratio of wall material to inner diet. We compared the development and reproduction of P. japonica fed on the ADMs under different cold-stored periods with those fed on fresh aphids and liquid artificial diets, in addition to a comparison of respiration, locomotion and predation. Our results indicated that chitosan concentration and ratio of shell to core significantly influence the quality of ADMs. The optimal recipe is 1.0% Ca-alginate, 1.6% chitosan and shell : core = 1 : 2. Insects reared on fresh optimized ADMs were similar to those fed on fresh prey in all developmental and reproductive characteristics except for survival ratio and female fertility. ADMs appeared more beneficial than using a liquid artificial diet, although this may decrease with the prolonging of the cold-storage period. P. japonica fed either on fresh ADMs or fresh prey showed improved respiration and predation abilities compared to where liquid artificial diet was used. Our study indicates advantages of microencapsulation in the production of artificial diet for predatory ladybird rearing. A microencapsulated diet can directly increase the efficiency and stability of mass rearing. PMID:24376183

  5. Optimization and evaluation of microencapsulated artificial diet for mass rearing the predatory ladybird Propylea japonica (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiao-Ling; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Su; Zhang, Fan

    2015-02-01

    Artificial diet optimization is a key aspect in mass rearing of natural enemies since it influences the quality and feeding effectiveness, and thus the success of the biological control program. Here, we introduced the microencapsulation method to package liquid artificial diet for feeding of the ladybird Propylea japonica. An orthogonal test of the quality of microencapsulated artificial diets (ADMs) was performed on key variables in production; Ca-alginate concentration, chitosan concentration and weight ratio of wall material to inner diet. We compared the development and reproduction of P. japonica fed on the ADMs under different cold-stored periods with those fed on fresh aphids and liquid artificial diets, in addition to a comparison of respiration, locomotion and predation. Our results indicated that chitosan concentration and ratio of shell to core significantly influence the quality of ADMs. The optimal recipe is 1.0% Ca-alginate, 1.6% chitosan and shell : core = 1 : 2. Insects reared on fresh optimized ADMs were similar to those fed on fresh prey in all developmental and reproductive characteristics except for survival ratio and female fertility. ADMs appeared more beneficial than using a liquid artificial diet, although this may decrease with the prolonging of the cold-storage period. P. japonica fed either on fresh ADMs or fresh prey showed improved respiration and predation abilities compared to where liquid artificial diet was used. Our study indicates advantages of microencapsulation in the production of artificial diet for predatory ladybird rearing. A microencapsulated diet can directly increase the efficiency and stability of mass rearing.

  6. [Spiders and predatory mites in the canopies of organically managed Montenegrina tangerine trees, in Montenegro County, RS].

    PubMed

    de Morais, Rosana M; Ott, Ricardo; Ott, Ana P; Redaelli, Luiza R

    2007-01-01

    A survey was conducted to study the spider and predatory mite fauna occurring in the canopies of tangerine trees (Citrus deliciosa Tenore, cultivar Montenegrina) of an organically managed orchard, at Montenegro County, RS. During a year, fortnightly, 24 randomly trees were selected and sampled in two canopies areas, by using a sheet of white cloth (1 m(2)). A total of 3,129 arachnids were collected, being 2,559 spiders and 570 mites. Based on the adults, 53 species of Araneae were recognized, belonging to eight families. Among those, the most abundant were Sphecozone sp. (Linyphiidae) (21.8%) and Chrysso pulcherrima (Mello-Leitão) (Theridiidae) (9.9%). Autumn exhibited the greatest abundance of young and adults of Araneae (29.2%) and spring was the season richest in species (40). Margalef and Shannon-Wiener diversity indexes also showed the highest values in spring. The latter index did not show differences among seasons. Simpson complementary index was equal among seasons, reflecting the same degree of species dominance. In Acari, eight species were identified in three families. The most abundant species were the mites Leptus sp.1 (Erythraeidae) (59.4%) and Amblyseius saopaulus Denmark & Muma (Phytoseiidae) (30%). Autumn was the season richest in mite species (eight). The highest abundance (47%) was observed on winter and the lowest (0.88%) on summer. Among mites, Phytoseiidae showed the highest richness. Among the spiders, Anyphaenidae was the most abundant and Theridiidae had the highest species richness, following the patterns observed for the group.

  7. Symbionts, including pathogens, of the predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis: current and future analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Marjorie A; Jeyaprakash, A

    2008-12-01

    Metaseiulus (= Typhlodromus or Galendromus) occidentalis (Nesbitt) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is an effective natural enemy of pest mites in a variety of crops around the world, although it is considered to be endemic in the western USA. A broad understanding of much of its biology, ecology, behavior, and genetics has been obtained over the past 60 years, but the role(s) symbionts play, which includes pathogens and other microorganisms, remains to be resolved fully. Until molecular tools became available, analysis methods were limited primarily to microscopic observations; some viruses and rickettsia-like organisms were observed infecting 'diseased' M. occidentalis, but it is not clear which one(s) was the causal agent(s) of the disease(s). Subsequent to the development of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and genome sequencing, we identified putative gut symbionts and reproductive tract symbionts in M. occidentalis, as well as a microsporidian pathogen. A new phylogenetic analysis of the Bacteroidetes-Flavobacterium group suggests the unnamed Bacteroidetes in M. occidentalis is associated with the digestive tract. However, much of our current information about the role these microorganisms play in the biology of M. occidentalis is based on correlation, lacking the strength of fulfilling Koch's postulates. We also currently lack any knowledge of the importance of these microorganisms under field conditions. In the future, it should be possible to learn what role(s) these organisms play in the biology of this important predator using metagenomics approaches to analyze the transcriptome and to determine their relative abundance within their hosts with the quantitative PCR. We have just begun to resolve these relationships.

  8. The residual and direct effects of reduced-risk and conventional miticides on twospotted spider mites, Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae) and predatory mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Liburd, O.E.; White, J.C.; Rhodes, E.M.; Browdy, A.A.

    2007-03-15

    The residual effects of several reduced-risk and conventional miticides were evaluated in strawberries (Fragaria z ananassa Duchesne) on the twospotted spider mite (TSSM), Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) and on 2 predatory mites, Neoseiulus californicus McGregor and Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot (Acari: Phytoseiidae). Experiments were conducted in the laboratory and greenhouse. The greenhouse experiments also tested the direct effects of the miticides on TSSM. The efficacy of conventional and reduced-risk miticides was evaluated on strawberry leaf discs and on whole plants for control of TSSM. Furthermore, the residual effects of these miticides were evaluated on whole strawberry plants against selective predatory mites. For TSSM, 5 treatments were evaluated: a conventional miticide; fenbutatin-oxide (Vendex[reg]) and 3 reduced-risk miticides; binfenazate (Acramite 50WP[reg]), activated garlic extract (Repel[reg]), sesame seed and castor oil (Wipeout[reg]), and a water-treated control. For predatory mites, the residual effects of only Acramite[reg] and Vendex[reg] were evaluated. Acramite[reg] was the most effective acaricide in reducing TSSM populations in both the laboratory and greenhouse experiments. Vendex[reg] and Wipeout[reg] were also effective in the laboratory, but did not cause significant reduction of TSSM in the greenhouse. Repel[reg] was the least effective of the 4 pesticides evaluated. Neither Acramite[reg] nor Vendex[reg] had a significant effect on either predatory mite species. However, there appeared to be more predatory mites on the Vendex[reg]-treated plants than on the Acramite[reg]-treated plants. There were significantly more predatory mites of both species on the cue plants, which were inoculated with TSSM versus the non-cue plants, which were not inoculated. (author) [Spanish] Los efectos residuales en poblaciones de la 'arana roja', Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranichidae) y de los acaros predadores

  9. The rise of army ants and their relatives: diversification of specialized predatory doryline ants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    the Dorylinae, but additional molecular data and more complete species sampling are needed for confirmation. Our phylogeny now provides a basic framework for comparative biological analyses, but much additional study on the behavior and morphology of doryline species is needed, especially investigations directed at the non-army ant taxa. PMID:24886136

  10. Plant structural changes due to herbivory: Do changes in Aceria-infested coconut fruits allow predatory mites to move under the perianth?

    PubMed Central

    Aratchige, Nayanie S.; Lesna, Izabela

    2007-01-01

    Being minute in size, eriophyoid mites can reach places that are small enough to be inaccessible to their predators. The coconut mite, Aceria guerreronis, is a typical example; it finds partial refuge under the perianth of the coconut fruit. However, some predators can move under the perianth of the coconut fruits and attack the coconut mite. In Sri Lanka, the phytoseiid mite Neoseiulus baraki, is the most common predatory mite found in association with the coconut mite. The cross-diameter of this predatory mite is c. 3 times larger than that of the coconut mite. Nevertheless, taking this predator’s flat body and elongated idiosoma into account, it is—relative to many other phytoseiid mites—better able to reach the narrow space under the perianth of infested coconut fruits. On uninfested coconut fruits, however, they are hardly ever observed under the perianth. Prompted by earlier work on the accessibility of tulip bulbs to another eriophyoid mite and its predators, we hypothesized that the structure of the coconut fruit perianth is changed in response to damage by eriophyoid mites and as a result predatory mites are better able to enter under the perianth of infested coconut fruits. This was tested in an experiment where we measured the gap between the rim of the perianth and the coconut fruit surface in three cultivars (‘Sri Lanka Tall’, ‘Sri Lanka Dwarf Green’ and ‘Sri Lanka Dwarf Green × Sri Lanka Tall’ hybrid) that are cultivated extensively in Sri Lanka. It was found that the perianth-fruit gap in uninfested coconut fruits was significantly different between cultivars: the cultivar ‘Sri Lanka Dwarf Green’ with its smaller and more elongated coconut fruits had a larger perianth-fruit gap. In the uninfested coconut fruits this gap was large enough for the coconut mite to creep under the perianth, yet too small for its predator N. baraki. However, when the coconut fruits were infested by coconut mites, the perianth-rim-fruit gap was not

  11. Interactions between natural enemies: Effect of a predatory mite on transmission of the fungus Neozygites floridana in two-spotted spider mite populations.

    PubMed

    Trandem, Nina; Berdinesen, Ronny; Pell, Judith K; Klingen, Ingeborg

    2016-02-01

    Introducing the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis into two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, populations significantly increased the proportion of T. urticae infected with the spider mite pathogen Neozygites floridana in one of two experiments. By the final sampling occasion, the number of T. urticae in the treatment with both the predator and the pathogen had declined to zero in both experiments, while in the fungus-only treatment T. urticae populations still persisted (20-40 T. urticae/subsample). Releasing P. persimilis into crops in which N. floridana is naturally present has the potential to improve spider mite control more than through predation alone.

  12. Maternal intraguild predation risk affects offspring anti-predator behavior and learning in mites.

    PubMed

    Seiter, Michael; Schausberger, Peter

    2015-10-09

    Predation risk is a strong selective force shaping prey morphology, life history and behavior. Anti-predator behaviors may be innate, learned or both but little is known about the transgenerational behavioral effects of maternally experienced predation risk. We examined intraguild predation (IGP) risk-induced maternal effects on offspring anti-predator behavior, including learning, in the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis. We exposed predatory mite mothers during egg production to presence or absence of the IG predator Amblyseius andersoni and assessed whether maternal stress affects the anti-predator behavior, including larval learning ability, of their offspring as protonymphs. Protonymphs emerging from stressed or unstressed mothers, and having experienced IGP risk as larvae or not, were subjected to choice situations with and without IG predator traces. Predator-experienced protonymphs from stressed mothers were the least active and acted the boldest in site choice towards predator cues. We argue that the attenuated response of the protonymphs to predator traces alone represents optimized risk management because no immediate risk existed. Such behavioral adjustment could reduce the inherent fitness costs of anti-predator behaviors. Overall, our study suggests that P. persimilis mothers experiencing IGP risk may prime their offspring to behave more optimally in IGP environments.

  13. Multimodal communication, mismatched messages and the effects of turbidity on the antipredator behavior of the Barton Springs salamander, Eurycea sosorum.

    PubMed

    Zabierek, Kristina C; Gabor, Caitlin R

    2016-09-01

    Prey may use multiple sensory channels to detect predators, whose cues may differ in altered sensory environments, such as turbid conditions. Depending on the environment, prey may use cues in an additive/complementary manner or in a compensatory manner. First, to determine whether the purely aquatic Barton Springs salamander, Eurycea sosorum, show an antipredator response to visual cues, we examined their activity when exposed to either visual cues of a predatory fish (Lepomis cyanellus) or a non-predatory fish (Etheostoma lepidum). Salamanders decreased activity in response to predator visual cues only. Then, we examined the antipredator response of these salamanders to all matched and mismatched combinations of chemical and visual cues of the same predatory and non-predatory fish in clear and low turbidity conditions. Salamanders decreased activity in response to predator chemical cues matched with predator visual cues or mismatched with non-predator visual cues. Salamanders also increased latency to first move to predator chemical cues mismatched with non-predator visual cues. Salamanders decreased activity and increased latency to first move more in clear as opposed to turbid conditions in all treatment combinations. Our results indicate that salamanders under all conditions and treatments preferentially rely on chemical cues to determine antipredator behavior, although visual cues are potentially utilized in conjunction for latency to first move. Our results also have potential conservation implications, as decreased antipredator behavior was seen in turbid conditions. These results reveal complexity of antipredator behavior in response to multiple cues under different environmental conditions, which is especially important when considering endangered species. PMID:27370360

  14. Multimodal communication, mismatched messages and the effects of turbidity on the antipredator behavior of the Barton Springs salamander, Eurycea sosorum.

    PubMed

    Zabierek, Kristina C; Gabor, Caitlin R

    2016-09-01

    Prey may use multiple sensory channels to detect predators, whose cues may differ in altered sensory environments, such as turbid conditions. Depending on the environment, prey may use cues in an additive/complementary manner or in a compensatory manner. First, to determine whether the purely aquatic Barton Springs salamander, Eurycea sosorum, show an antipredator response to visual cues, we examined their activity when exposed to either visual cues of a predatory fish (Lepomis cyanellus) or a non-predatory fish (Etheostoma lepidum). Salamanders decreased activity in response to predator visual cues only. Then, we examined the antipredator response of these salamanders to all matched and mismatched combinations of chemical and visual cues of the same predatory and non-predatory fish in clear and low turbidity conditions. Salamanders decreased activity in response to predator chemical cues matched with predator visual cues or mismatched with non-predator visual cues. Salamanders also increased latency to first move to predator chemical cues mismatched with non-predator visual cues. Salamanders decreased activity and increased latency to first move more in clear as opposed to turbid conditions in all treatment combinations. Our results indicate that salamanders under all conditions and treatments preferentially rely on chemical cues to determine antipredator behavior, although visual cues are potentially utilized in conjunction for latency to first move. Our results also have potential conservation implications, as decreased antipredator behavior was seen in turbid conditions. These results reveal complexity of antipredator behavior in response to multiple cues under different environmental conditions, which is especially important when considering endangered species.

  15. Effects of habitat age and plant species on predatory mites (Acari, Mesostigmata) in grassy arable fallows in Eastern Austria

    PubMed Central

    Wissuwa, Janet; Salamon, Jörg-Alfred; Frank, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Density, diversity and assemblage structure of Mesostigmata (cohorts Gamasina and Uropodina) were investigated in nine grassy arable fallows according to a factorial design with age class (2–3, 6–8, 12–15 years) and plant species (legume: Medicago sativa, herb: Taraxacum officinale, grass: Bromus sterilis) as factors. The response of Mesostigmata to habitat age and plant species was explored because this group belongs to the dominant acarine predators playing a crucial role in soil food webs and being important as biological control agents. To our knowledge, this combination of factors has never been studied before for Mesostigmata. A further rarely applied aspect of the present study is the micro-scale approach investigating the Mesostigmata assemblage of the soil associated with single plants. Four plots were randomly chosen at each fallow in May 2008. At each plot plant roots and the adjacent soil of five randomly selected plant individuals per plant species were dug out with steel cylinders for heat extraction of soil fauna and measurement of environmental parameters. In total, 83 mite taxa were identified, with 50 taxa being new to Austria. GLM analysis revealed a significant effect of plant species on mite density, with significantly more mites in B. sterilis than in T. officinale samples, and M. sativa samples being intermediate. This was in contrast to the assumption that the mite density is highest in M. sativa samples due to the propagation of plant quality effects to higher trophic levels. These results were probably caused by a higher amount of fine roots in grass samples leading to high densities of Collembola, which are preferred prey of predatory mites. Mite density did not significantly differ between the three age classes. A canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) showed that the mite assemblage exhibited a weak yet significant separation between plant species, and a highly significant separation between age classes. Accordingly

  16. The endosymbionts Wolbachia and Cardinium and their effects in three populations of the predatory mite Neoseiulus paspalivorus.

    PubMed

    Famah Sourassou, Nazer; Hanna, Rachid; Breeuwer, Johannes A J; Negloh, Koffi; de Moraes, Gilberto J; Sabelis, Maurice W

    2014-10-01

    Whereas endosymbiont-induced incompatibility is known to occur in various arthropod taxa, such as spider mites, insects and isopods, it has been rarely reported in plant-inhabiting predatory mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae). Recent cross-breeding studies with the phytoseiid mite Neoseiulus paspalivorus De Leon revealed a complete post-mating reproductive isolation between specimens collected from three geographic origins-Northeast Brazil (South America), Benin and Ghana (West Africa)-even though they are morphologically similar. We carried out a study to assess to what extent these populations exhibit genetic differences and whether endosymbionts are involved in the incompatibility. First, we used the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene to assess genetic diversity among the three populations. Second, we used a PCR-based method to check for the presence of Wolbachia and/or Cardinium in these populations, and we determined their phylogenetic relationships using specific primers for Wolbachia and Cardinium 16S rDNA genes. Third, we also conducted a test using an antibiotic (tetracycline) in an attempt to eliminate the symbionts and evaluate their effects on the reproductive compatibility of their host. Based on the DNA sequences of their COI genes, specimens of the three populations appear to be genetically similar. However, the 16S rDNA gene sequences of their associated endosymbionts differed among the three populations: the Benin and Brazil populations harbour different strains of Wolbachia symbionts, whereas the Ghana population harbours Cardinium symbionts. In response to antibiotic treatment females of each of the three populations became incompatible with untreated males of their own population, similar to that observed in crossings between females from one geographic population and males from another. Compatibility was restored in crosses involving uninfected Brazil females and uninfected Benin males, whereas the reciprocal crosses remained incompatible

  17. Below-ground plant parts emit herbivore-induced volatiles: olfactory responses of a predatory mite to tulip bulbs infested by rust mites.

    PubMed

    Aratchige, N S; Lesna, I; Sabelis, M W

    2004-01-01

    Although odour-mediated interactions among plants, spider mites and predatory mites have been extensively studied above-ground, belowground studies are in their infancy. In this paper, we investigate whether feeding by rust mites (Aceria tulipae) cause tulip bulbs to produce odours that attract predatory mites (Neoseiulus cucumeris). Since our aim was to demonstrate such odours and not their relevance under soil conditions, the experiments were carried out using a classic Y-tube olfactometer in which the predators moved on a Y-shaped wire in open air. We found that food-deprived female predators can discriminate between odours from infested bulbs and odours from uninfested bulbs or artificially wounded bulbs. No significant difference in attractiveness to predators was found between clean bulbs and bulbs either wounded 30 min or 3 h before the experiment. These results indicate that it may not be simply the wounding of the bulbs, but rather the feeding by rust mites, which causes the bulb to release odours that attract N. cucumeris. Since bulbs are belowground plant structures, the olfactometer results demonstrate the potential for odour-mediated interactions in the soil. However, their importance in the actual soil medium remains to be demonstrated.

  18. An Entomopathogenic Strain of Beauveria bassiana against Frankliniella occidentalis with no Detrimental Effect on the Predatory Mite Neoseiulus barkeri: Evidence from Laboratory Bioassay and Scanning Electron Microscopic Observation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shengyong; Gao, Yulin; Zhang, Yaping; Wang, Endong; Xu, Xuenong; Lei, Zhongren

    2014-01-01

    Among 28 isolates of Beauveria bassiana tested for virulence against F. occidentalis in laboratory bioassays, we found strain SZ-26 as the most potent, causing 96% mortality in adults at 1×107 mL−1conidia after 4 days. The effect of the strain SZ-26 on survival, longevity and fecundity of the predatory mite Neoseiulus (Amblyseius) barkeri Hughes were studied under laboratory conditions. The bioassay results showed that the corrected mortalities were less than 4 and 8% at 10 days following inoculation of the adult and the larvae of the predator, respectively, with 1×107 conidia mL−1 of SZ-26. Furthermore, no fungal hyphae were found in dead predators. The oviposition and postoviposition durations, longevity, and fecundity displayed no significant differences after inoculation with SZ-26 using first-instar larvae of F. occidentalis as prey in comparison with untreated predator. In contrast, the preoviposition durations were significantly longer. Observations with a scanning electron microscope, revealed that many conidia were attached to the cuticles of F. occidentalis at 2 h after treatment with germ tubes oriented toward cuticle at 24 h, penetration of the insect cuticle at 36 h, and finally, fungal colonization of the whole insect body at 60 h. In contrast, we never observed penetration of the predator's cuticle and conidia were shed gradually from the body, further demonstrating that B. bassiana strain SZ-26 show high toxicity against F. occidentalis but no pathogenicity to predatory mite. PMID:24454744

  19. Multibehavioral analysis of fear and anxiety before, during, and after experimentally induced predatory stress in Callithrix penicillata.

    PubMed

    Barros, Marilia; de Souza Silva, Maria A; Huston, Joseph P; Tomaz, Carlos

    2004-06-01

    A detailed behavioral analysis of nine Callithrix penicillata was conducted in the Marmoset Predator Confrontation Test (MPCT) during (a) four habituation trials with no "predator," (b) six confrontation trials with the predator (taxidermized oncilla cat, Felis tigrina), and (c) four trials with the predator removed. The marmosets habituated to the test apparatus with significant decreases in locomotion, exploration and long calls. Initial exposure to the predator elicited mainly fear-related behaviors (proximic avoidance, tsik-tsik vocalization, swaying/tongue in-out), whereas repeated confrontations attenuated these behaviors, concomitant to an increase in anxiety-associated responses (scratching/grooming/scent marking). The initial behavioral repertoire, observed before confrontations, was fully restored only upon removal of the predator. This easily discernable complex defensive behavioral repertoire is hoped to provide a comprehensive baseline for studying the biological substrates of fear/anxiety parameters in nonhuman primates. PMID:15219778

  20. Beyond selectivity: are behavioral avoidance and hormesis likely causes of pyrethroid-induced outbreaks of the southern red mite Oligonychus ilicis?

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, E M G; de Moura, I L T; Fadini, M A M; Guedes, R N C

    2013-10-01

    Secondary pest outbreak is a counterintuitive ecological backlash of pesticide use in agriculture that takes place with the increase in abundance of a non-targeted pest species after pesticide application against a targeted pest species. Although the phenomenon was well recognized, its alternative causes are seldom considered. Outbreaks of the southern red mite Oligonychus ilicis are frequently reported in Brazilian coffee farms after the application of pyrethroid insecticides against the coffee leaf miner Leucoptera coffeella. Selectivity favoring the red mite against its main predatory mites is generally assumed as the outbreak cause, but this theory has never been tested. Here, we assessed the toxicity (and thus the selectivity) of deltamethrin against both mite species: the southern red mite and its phytoseid predator Amblyseius herbicolus. Additionally, behavioral avoidance and deltamethrin-induced hormesis were also tested as potential causes of red mite outbreak using free-choice behavioral walking bioassays with the predatory mite and life-table experiments with both mite species, respectively. Lethal toxicity bioassays indicated that the predatory mite was slightly more susceptible than its prey (1.5×), but in more robust demographic bioassays, the predator was three times more tolerant to deltamethrin than its prey, indicating that predator susceptibility to deltamethrin is not a cause of the reported outbreaks. The predator did not exhibit behavioral avoidance to deltamethrin; however insecticide-induced hormesis in the red mite led to its high population increase under low doses, which was not observed for the predatory mite. Therefore, deltamethrin-induced hormesis is a likely cause of the reported red mite outbreaks. PMID:23830118

  1. Defense function of pigment granules in the ciliate Blepharisma japonicum against two predatory protists, Amoeba proteus (Rhizopodea) and Climacostomum virens (Ciliata).

    PubMed

    Terazima, Masayo Noda; Harumoto, Terue

    2004-08-01

    The defense function of pigment granules in the red ciliate Blepharisma japonicum against two predatory protists, Amoeba proteus and Climacostomum virens, was investigated by (1) comparing normally-pigmented and albino mutant cells of B. japonicum as the prey of these predators and (2) comparing resistance of the predators to blepharismin, the toxic pigment contained in the pigment granules of B. japonicum. Normally pigmented cells which contained more blepharismin than albino cells were less vulnerable to A. proteus than albino cells, but not to C. virens. C. virens was more resistant than A. proteus to the lethal effect of blepharismin. The results indicate that pigment granules of B. japonicum function as defense organelles against A. proteus but not against C. virens and suggest that successful defense against a predator depends on the susceptibility of the predator to blepharismin.

  2. Fungi predatory activity on embryonated Toxocara canis eggs inoculated in domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) and destruction of second stage larvae.

    PubMed

    Hiura, Emy; Del Carmen Garcia Lopes, Aline; da Paz, Jeanne Saraiva; Gava, Maylla Garschagen; Flecher, Mayra Cunha; Colares, Manuela; de Freitas Soares, Filippe Elias; da Fonseca, Leandro Abreu; Lacerda, Tracy; de Araújo, Jackson Victor; Braga, Fabio Ribeiro

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the infectivity of Toxocara canis eggs after interacting with isolated nematophagous fungi of the species Duddingtonia flagrans (AC001) and Pochonia chlamydosporia (VC4), and test the predatory activity of the isolated AC001 on T. canis second stage larvae after 7 days of interaction. In assay A, 5000 embryonated T. canis eggs previously in contact with the AC001 and VC4 isolated for 10 days were inoculated into domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus), and then these animals were necropsied to collect material (digested liver, intestine, muscles and lungs) at 3-, 7-, 14-, and 21-day intervals after inoculation. In assay A, the results demonstrated that the prior interaction of the eggs with isolated AC001 and VC4 decreases the amount of larvae found in the collected organs. Difference (p < 0.01) was observed in the medium larvae counts recovered from liver, lung, intestine, and muscle of animals in the treated groups when compared to the animals in the control group. At the end of assay A, a percentage reduction of 87.1 % (AC001) and 84.5 % (VC4) respectively was recorded. In the result of assay B, the isolated AC001 showed differences (p < 0.01) compared to the control group, with a reduction of 53.4 % in the recovery of L2. Through these results, it is justified to mention that prior interaction of embryonated T. canis eggs with the tested fungal isolates were efficient in reducing the development and migration of this parasite, in addition to the first report of proven predatory activity on L2. PMID:26032943

  3. Relationships between plant diversity and the abundance and α-diversity of predatory ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) in a mature Asian temperate forest ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yi; Sang, Weiguo; Bai, Fan; Axmacher, Jan Christoph

    2013-01-01

    A positive relationship between plant diversity and both abundance and diversity of predatory arthropods is postulated by the Enemies Hypothesis, a central ecological top-down control hypothesis. It has been supported by experimental studies and investigations of agricultural and grassland ecosystems, while evidence from more complex mature forest ecosystems is limited. Our study was conducted on Changbai Mountain in one of the last remaining large pristine temperate forest environments in China. We used predatory ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) as target taxon to establish the relationship between phytodiversity and their activity abundance and diversity. Results showed that elevation was the only variable included in both models predicting carabid activity abundance and α-diversity. Shrub diversity was negatively and herb diversity positively correlated with beetle abundance, while shrub diversity was positively correlated with beetle α-diversity. Within the different forest types, a negative relationship between plant diversity and carabid activity abundance was observed, which stands in direct contrast to the Enemies Hypothesis. Furthermore, plant species density did not predict carabid α-diversity. In addition, the density of herbs, which is commonly believed to influence carabid movement, had little impact on the beetle activity abundance recorded on Changbai Mountain. Our study indicates that in a relatively large and heterogeneous mature forest area, relationships between plant and carabid diversity are driven by variations in environmental factors linked with altitudinal change. In addition, traditional top-down control theories that are suitable in explaining diversity patterns in ecosystems of low diversity appear to play a much less pronounced role in highly complex forest ecosystems.

  4. Anterior hypothalamic knife cut eliminates a specific component of the predatory behavior elicited by electrical stimulation of the posterior hypothalamus or ventral midbrain in the cat.

    PubMed

    Halliday, R; Bandler, R

    1981-01-20

    Following unilateral transection of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) within the anterior hypothalamic-preoptic region of cats, the biting attack upon a rat elicited by ipsilateral posterior hypothalamic or ventral midbrain stimulation is eliminated, although the cat continues to approach from 2.8 metres away to within several centimetres of the rat. In contrast, both the approach to and biting attack upon a rat elicited by contralateral posterior hypothalamic and ventral midbrain stimulation are unchanged. The results suggest that specific agents (biting, approach) of the elicited behaviour may be mediated by neural effects which proceed along anatomically distinct components of the ascending as well as the descending MFB.

  5. Acinonyx pardinensis (Carnivora, Felidae) from the Early Pleistocene of Pantalla (Italy): predatory behavior and ecological role of the giant Plio-Pleistocene cheetah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherin, Marco; Iurino, Dawid Adam; Sardella, Raffaele; Rook, Lorenzo

    2014-03-01

    The site of Pantalla (central Italy) yielded a rich late Villafranchian (Early Pleistocene) faunal assemblage, which includes some well-preserved large mammal skulls. We describe here two nearly complete crania and a left hemimandible of Acinonyx pardinensis from this locality, representing the most complete cranial material of this species in Europe. These finds allowed us to define more clearly the craniodental morphology of A. pardinensis. Similarly to the forms from North Africa and China, the giant cheetah from Pantalla has a more generalized skull than the living Acinonyx jubatus, showing some primitive, pantherine-like features such as the less domed dorsal outline of the cranium, the more developed sagittal and nuchal crests and the less bowed zygomatic arches. High-resolution CT scans of the specimens were used to obtain the first 3D model of a cranium with articulated mandible of A. pardinensis. Starting from the insertion areas on this model we reconstructed the jaw muscles of the Pantalla felid, confirming its affinities with pantherine felines. In the light of the musculoskeletal skull anatomy and the average body mass (about 80 kg), it is likely that A. pardinensis could kill large prey through a hunting strategy more similar to pantherine cats than to the living cheetah.

  6. A linguistic analysis of grooming strategies of online child sex offenders: Implications for our understanding of predatory sexual behavior in an increasingly computer-mediated world.

    PubMed

    Black, Pamela J; Wollis, Melissa; Woodworth, Michael; Hancock, Jeffrey T

    2015-06-01

    There is a large body of evidence to suggest that child sex offenders engage in grooming to facilitate victimization. It has been speculated that this step-by-step grooming process is also used by offenders who access their underage victims online; however, little research has been done to examine whether there are unique aspects of computer-mediated communication that impact the traditional face-to-face grooming process. This study considered the similarities and differences in the grooming process in online environments by analyzing the language used by online offenders when communicating with their victims. The transcripts of 44 convicted online offenders were analyzed to assess a proposed theory of the online grooming process (O'Connell, 2003). Using a stage-based approach, computerized text analysis examined the types of language used in each stage of the offender-victim interaction. The transcripts also were content analyzed to examine the frequency of specific techniques known to be employed by both face-to-face and online offenders, such as flattery. Results reveal that while some evidence of the strategies used by offenders throughout the grooming process are present in online environments, the order and timing of these stages appear to be different. The types (and potential underlying pattern) of strategies used in online grooming support the development of a revised model for grooming in online environments.

  7. A systematic survey of the integration of animal behavior into conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger-Tal, Oded; Blumstein, Daniel T.; Carroll, Scott; Fisher, Robert N.; Mesnick, Sarah L.; Owen, Megan A.; Saltz, David; St. Claire, Colleen Cassady; Swaisgood, Ronald R.

    2016-01-01

    The role of behavioral ecology in improving wildlife conservation and management has been the subject of much recent debate. We aim to answer two foundational questions about the current use of behavioral knowledge in conservation: 1. To what extent is behavioral knowledge used in wildlife conservation and management? 2. How does the use of behavior differ among conservation fields in both frequency and types of use? To answer these questions, we searched the literature for intersections between key fields of animal behavior and conservation biology and created a systematic ‘heat’ map to visualize relative efforts. Our analysis challenges previous suggestions that there is little association between the fields of behavioral ecology and conservation and reveals tremendous variation in the use of different behaviors in conservation. For instance, some behaviors, such as foraging and dispersal, are commonly considered, but other behaviors such as learning, social or anti-predatory behaviors are hardly considered. Our analysis suggests that in many cases awareness of the importance of behavior does not translate into applicable management tools. We recommend that researchers should focus on developing research in underutilized intersections of behavior and conservation themes for which preliminary work show a potential for improving conservation and management, on translating behavioral theory into applicable and testable predictions, and on creating systematic reviews to summarize the behavioral evidence within the behavior-conservation intersections for which many studies exist.

  8. Behavioral responses associated with a human-mediated predator shelter.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Graeme; Cordes, Line S; Hardy, Amanda R; Angeloni, Lisa M; Crooks, Kevin R

    2014-01-01

    Human activities in protected areas can affect wildlife populations in a similar manner to predation risk, causing increases in movement and vigilance, shifts in habitat use and changes in group size. Nevertheless, recent evidence indicates that in certain situations ungulate species may actually utilize areas associated with higher levels of human presence as a potential refuge from disturbance-sensitive predators. We now use four-years of behavioral activity budget data collected from pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) and elk (Cervus elephus) in Grand Teton National Park, USA to test whether predictable patterns of human presence can provide a shelter from predatory risk. Daily behavioral scans were conducted along two parallel sections of road that differed in traffic volume--with the main Teton Park Road experiencing vehicle use that was approximately thirty-fold greater than the River Road. At the busier Teton Park Road, both species of ungulate engaged in higher levels of feeding (27% increase in the proportion of pronghorn feeding and 21% increase for elk), lower levels of alert behavior (18% decrease for pronghorn and 9% decrease for elk) and formed smaller groups. These responses are commonly associated with reduced predatory threat. Pronghorn also exhibited a 30% increase in the proportion of individuals moving at the River Road as would be expected under greater exposure to predation risk. Our findings concur with the 'predator shelter hypothesis', suggesting that ungulates in GTNP use human presence as a potential refuge from predation risk, adjusting their behavior accordingly. Human activity has the potential to alter predator-prey interactions and drive trophic-mediated effects that could ultimately impact ecosystem function and biodiversity. PMID:24718624

  9. Behavioral Responses Associated with a Human-Mediated Predator Shelter

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Graeme; Cordes, Line S.; Hardy, Amanda R.; Angeloni, Lisa M.; Crooks, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Human activities in protected areas can affect wildlife populations in a similar manner to predation risk, causing increases in movement and vigilance, shifts in habitat use and changes in group size. Nevertheless, recent evidence indicates that in certain situations ungulate species may actually utilize areas associated with higher levels of human presence as a potential refuge from disturbance-sensitive predators. We now use four-years of behavioral activity budget data collected from pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) and elk (Cervus elephus) in Grand Teton National Park, USA to test whether predictable patterns of human presence can provide a shelter from predatory risk. Daily behavioral scans were conducted along two parallel sections of road that differed in traffic volume - with the main Teton Park Road experiencing vehicle use that was approximately thirty-fold greater than the River Road. At the busier Teton Park Road, both species of ungulate engaged in higher levels of feeding (27% increase in the proportion of pronghorn feeding and 21% increase for elk), lower levels of alert behavior (18% decrease for pronghorn and 9% decrease for elk) and formed smaller groups. These responses are commonly associated with reduced predatory threat. Pronghorn also exhibited a 30% increase in the proportion of individuals moving at the River Road as would be expected under greater exposure to predation risk. Our findings concur with the ‘predator shelter hypothesis’, suggesting that ungulates in GTNP use human presence as a potential refuge from predation risk, adjusting their behavior accordingly. Human activity has the potential to alter predator-prey interactions and drive trophic-mediated effects that could ultimately impact ecosystem function and biodiversity. PMID:24718624

  10. Effects of contaminated soils from a former iron mine (Ait Amar, Morocco) on enchytraeids (Enchytraeus bigeminus) and predatory mites (Hypoaspis aculeifer) in standard laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    Madani, Safoura; Coors, Anja; Haddioui, Abdelmajid; Ksibi, Mohamed; Pereira, Ruth; Paulo Sousa, José; Römbke, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    Mining activity is an important economic activity in several North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and North African countries. Within their territory derelict or active mining explorations represent risks to surrounding ecosystems, but engineered-based remediation processes are usually too expensive to be an option for the reclamation of these areas. A project funded by NATO was performed, with the aim of finding a more eco-friendly solution for reclamation of these areas. As part of an overall risk assessment, the risk of contaminated soils to selected soil organisms was evaluated. The main question addressed was: Does the metal-contaminated soils from a former iron mine located at Ait Amar (Morocco),which was abandoned in the mid-Sixties, affect the reproduction of enchytraeids (Enchytraeus bigeminus) and predatory mites (Hypoaspis aculeifer)? Soil samples were taken at 20 plots along four transects covering the mine area and at a reference site about 15km away from the mine. The soils were characterized pedologically and chemically, which showed a heterogeneous pattern of metal contamination (mainly cadmium, copper, and chromium, sometimes at concentrations higher than European soil trigger values). The reproduction of enchytraeids (Enchytraeus bigeminus) and predatory mites (Hypoaspis aculeifer) was studied using standard laboratory tests according to OECD guidelines 220 (2004) and 226 (2008). The number of juveniles of E. bigeminus was reduced at several plots with high concentrations of Cd or Cu (the latter in combination with low pH values). There was nearly no effect of the metal contaminated soils on the reproduction of H. aculeifer. The overall lack of toxicity at the majority of the studied plots is probably caused by the low availability of the metals in these soils unless soil pH was very low. Different exposure pathways are likely responsible for the different reaction of mites and enchytraeids (hard-bodied versus soft-bodied organisms). The

  11. A meal or a male: the ‘whispers’ of black widow males do not trigger a predatory response in females

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Female spiders are fine-tuned to detect and quickly respond to prey vibrations, presenting a challenge to courting males who must attract a female’s attention but not be mistaken for prey. This is likely particularly important at the onset of courtship when a male enters a female’s web. In web-dwelling spiders, little is known about how males solve this conundrum, or about their courtship signals. Here we used laser Doppler vibrometry to study the vibrations produced by males and prey (house flies and crickets) on tangle webs of the western black widow Latrodectus hesperus and on sheet webs of the hobo spider Tegenaria agrestis. We recorded the vibrations at the location typically occupied by a hunting female spider. We compared the vibrations produced by males and prey in terms of their waveform, dominant frequency, frequency bandwidth, amplitude and duration. We also played back recorded male and prey vibrations through the webs of female L. hesperus to determine the vibratory parameters that trigger a predatory response in females. Results We found overlap in waveform between male and prey vibrations in both L. hesperus and T. agrestis. In both species, male vibrations were continuous, of long duration (on average 6.35 s for T. agrestis and 9.31 s for L. hesperus), and lacked complex temporal patterning such as repeated motifs or syllables. Prey vibrations were shorter (1.38 - 2.59 s), sporadic and often percussive. Based on the parameters measured, courtship signals of male L. hesperus differed more markedly from prey cues than did those of T. agrestis. Courtship vibrations of L. hesperus males differed from prey vibrations in terms of dominant frequency, amplitude and duration. Vibrations of T. agrestis males differed from prey in terms of duration only. During a playback experiment, L. hesperus females did not respond aggressively to low-amplitude vibrations irrespective of whether the playback recording was from a prey or a male

  12. Effects of contaminated soils from a former iron mine (Ait Amar, Morocco) on enchytraeids (Enchytraeus bigeminus) and predatory mites (Hypoaspis aculeifer) in standard laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    Madani, Safoura; Coors, Anja; Haddioui, Abdelmajid; Ksibi, Mohamed; Pereira, Ruth; Paulo Sousa, José; Römbke, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    Mining activity is an important economic activity in several North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and North African countries. Within their territory derelict or active mining explorations represent risks to surrounding ecosystems, but engineered-based remediation processes are usually too expensive to be an option for the reclamation of these areas. A project funded by NATO was performed, with the aim of finding a more eco-friendly solution for reclamation of these areas. As part of an overall risk assessment, the risk of contaminated soils to selected soil organisms was evaluated. The main question addressed was: Does the metal-contaminated soils from a former iron mine located at Ait Amar (Morocco),which was abandoned in the mid-Sixties, affect the reproduction of enchytraeids (Enchytraeus bigeminus) and predatory mites (Hypoaspis aculeifer)? Soil samples were taken at 20 plots along four transects covering the mine area and at a reference site about 15km away from the mine. The soils were characterized pedologically and chemically, which showed a heterogeneous pattern of metal contamination (mainly cadmium, copper, and chromium, sometimes at concentrations higher than European soil trigger values). The reproduction of enchytraeids (Enchytraeus bigeminus) and predatory mites (Hypoaspis aculeifer) was studied using standard laboratory tests according to OECD guidelines 220 (2004) and 226 (2008). The number of juveniles of E. bigeminus was reduced at several plots with high concentrations of Cd or Cu (the latter in combination with low pH values). There was nearly no effect of the metal contaminated soils on the reproduction of H. aculeifer. The overall lack of toxicity at the majority of the studied plots is probably caused by the low availability of the metals in these soils unless soil pH was very low. Different exposure pathways are likely responsible for the different reaction of mites and enchytraeids (hard-bodied versus soft-bodied organisms). The

  13. Evaluating the landscape of fear between apex predatory sharks and mobile sea turtles across a large dynamic seascape.

    PubMed

    Hammerschlag, Neil; Broderick, Annette C; Coker, John W; Coyne, Michael S; Dodd, Mark; Frick, Michael G; Godfrey, Matthew H; Godley, Brendan J; Griffin, DuBose B; Hartog, Kyra; Murphy, Sally R; Murphy, Thomas M; Nelson, Emily Rose; Williams, Kristina L; Witt, Matthew J; Hawkes, Lucy A

    2015-08-01

    The "landscape of fear" model has been proposed as a unifying concept in ecology, describing, in part, how animals behave and move about in their environment. The basic model predicts that as an animal's landscape changes from low to high risk of predation, prey species will alter their behavior to risk avoidance. However, studies investigating and evaluating the landscape of fear model across large spatial scales (tens to hundreds of thousands of square kilometers) in dynamic, open, aquatic systems involving apex predators and highly mobile prey are lacking. To address this knowledge gap, we investigated predator-prey relationships between. tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) and loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) in the North Atlantic Ocean. This included the use of satellite tracking to examine shark and turtle distributions as well as their surfacing behaviors under varying levels of home range overlap. Our findings revealed patterns that deviated from our a priori predictions based on the landscape of fear model. Specifically, turtles did not alter their surfacing behaviors to risk avoidance when overlap in shark-turtle core home range was high. However, in areas of high overlap with turtles, sharks exhibited modified surfacing behaviors that may enhance predation opportunity. We suggest that turtles may be an important factor in determining shark,distribution, whereas for turtles, other life history trade-offs may play a larger role in defining their habitat use. We propose that these findings are a result of both biotic and physically driven factors that independently or synergistically affect predator-prey interactions in this system. These results have implications for evolutionary biology, community ecology; and wildlife conservation. Further, given the difficulty in studying highly migratory marine species, our approach and conclusions may be applied to the study of other predator-prey systems. PMID:26405737

  14. Evaluating the landscape of fear between apex predatory sharks and mobile sea turtles across a large dynamic seascape.

    PubMed

    Hammerschlag, Neil; Broderick, Annette C; Coker, John W; Coyne, Michael S; Dodd, Mark; Frick, Michael G; Godfrey, Matthew H; Godley, Brendan J; Griffin, DuBose B; Hartog, Kyra; Murphy, Sally R; Murphy, Thomas M; Nelson, Emily Rose; Williams, Kristina L; Witt, Matthew J; Hawkes, Lucy A

    2015-08-01

    The "landscape of fear" model has been proposed as a unifying concept in ecology, describing, in part, how animals behave and move about in their environment. The basic model predicts that as an animal's landscape changes from low to high risk of predation, prey species will alter their behavior to risk avoidance. However, studies investigating and evaluating the landscape of fear model across large spatial scales (tens to hundreds of thousands of square kilometers) in dynamic, open, aquatic systems involving apex predators and highly mobile prey are lacking. To address this knowledge gap, we investigated predator-prey relationships between. tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) and loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) in the North Atlantic Ocean. This included the use of satellite tracking to examine shark and turtle distributions as well as their surfacing behaviors under varying levels of home range overlap. Our findings revealed patterns that deviated from our a priori predictions based on the landscape of fear model. Specifically, turtles did not alter their surfacing behaviors to risk avoidance when overlap in shark-turtle core home range was high. However, in areas of high overlap with turtles, sharks exhibited modified surfacing behaviors that may enhance predation opportunity. We suggest that turtles may be an important factor in determining shark,distribution, whereas for turtles, other life history trade-offs may play a larger role in defining their habitat use. We propose that these findings are a result of both biotic and physically driven factors that independently or synergistically affect predator-prey interactions in this system. These results have implications for evolutionary biology, community ecology; and wildlife conservation. Further, given the difficulty in studying highly migratory marine species, our approach and conclusions may be applied to the study of other predator-prey systems.

  15. Vulnerability and behavioral response to ultraviolet radiation in the components of a foliar mite prey-predator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachi, Fuyuki; Osakabe, Masahiro

    2012-12-01

    Ambient ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation impacts plant-dwelling arthropods including herbivorous and predatory mites. However, the effects of UVB on prey-predator systems, such as that between the herbivorous spider mite and predatory phytoseiid mite, are poorly understood. A comparative study was conducted to determine the vulnerability and behavioral responses of these mites to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. First, we analyzed dose-response (cumulative irradiance-mortality) curves for the eggs of phytoseiid mites ( Neoseiulus californicus, Neoseiulus womersleyi, and Phytoseiulus persimilis) and the spider mite ( Tetranychus urticae) to UVB radiation from a UV lamp. This indicated that the phytoseiid mites were more vulnerable than the spider mite, although P. persimilis was slightly more tolerant than the other two phytoseiid mites. Second, we compared the avoidance behavior of adult female N. californicus and two spider mite species ( T. urticae, a lower leaf surface user; Panonychus citri, an upper leaf surface user) in response to solar UV and visible light. N. californicus actively avoided both types of radiation, whereas P. citri showed only minimal avoidance behavior. T. urticae actively avoided UV as well as N. californicus but exhibited a slow response to visible light as well as P. citri. Such variation in vulnerability and avoidance behavior accounts for differences in the species adaptations to solar UVB radiation. This may be the primary factor determining habitat use among these mites on host plant leaves, subsequently affecting accessibility by predators and also intraguild competition.

  16. Effects of neem oil (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) on midgut cells of predatory larvae Ceraeochrysa claveri (Navás, 1911) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    PubMed

    Scudeler, Elton Luiz; dos Santos, Daniela Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    The effects of ingested neem oil, a botanical insecticide obtained from the seeds of the neem tree, Azadirachta indica, on the midgut cells of predatory larvae Ceraeochrysa claveri were analyzed. C. claveri were fed on eggs of Diatraea saccharalis treated with neem oil at a concentration of 0.5%, 1% and 2% during throughout the larval period. Light and electron microscopy showed severe damages in columnar cells, which had many cytoplasmic protrusions, clustering and ruptured of the microvilli, swollen cells, ruptured cells, dilatation and vesiculation of rough endoplasmic reticulum, development of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, enlargement of extracellular spaces of the basal labyrinth, intercellular spaces and necrosis. The indirect ingestion of neem oil with prey can result in severe alterations showing direct cytotoxic effects of neem oil on midgut cells of C. claveri larvae. Therefore, the safety of neem oil to non-target species as larvae of C. claveri was refuted, thus the notion that plants derived are safer to non-target species must be questioned in future ecotoxicological studies.

  17. Maximum swimming speeds of sailfish and three other large marine predatory fish species based on muscle contraction time and stride length: a myth revisited

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, Morten B. S.; Domenici, Paolo; Marras, Stefano; Krause, Jens; Boswell, Kevin M.; Rodriguez-Pinto, Ivan; Wilson, Alexander D. M.; Kurvers, Ralf H. J. M.; Viblanc, Paul E.; Finger, Jean S.; Steffensen, John F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Billfishes are considered to be among the fastest swimmers in the oceans. Previous studies have estimated maximum speed of sailfish and black marlin at around 35 m s−1 but theoretical work on cavitation predicts that such extreme speed is unlikely. Here we investigated maximum speed of sailfish, and three other large marine pelagic predatory fish species, by measuring the twitch contraction time of anaerobic swimming muscle. The highest estimated maximum swimming speeds were found in sailfish (8.3±1.4 m s−1), followed by barracuda (6.2±1.0 m s−1), little tunny (5.6±0.2 m s−1) and dorado (4.0±0.9 m s−1); although size-corrected performance was highest in little tunny and lowest in sailfish. Contrary to previously reported estimates, our results suggest that sailfish are incapable of exceeding swimming speeds of 10-15 m s−1, which corresponds to the speed at which cavitation is predicted to occur, with destructive consequences for fin tissues. PMID:27543056

  18. The competitive and predatory impacts of the nonindigenous crab Carcinus maenas (L.) on early benthic phase Dungeness crab Cancer magister Dana.

    PubMed

    McDonald, P S.; Jensen, G C.; Armstrong, D A.

    2001-03-30

    We evaluate the potential competitive and predatory impacts of nonindigenous European green crab Carcinus maenas on native Dungeness crab Cancer magister in the northeast Pacific. The coastal estuaries of Washington State, USA, provide appropriate habitat for recently introduced green crab, yet these areas are important nursery grounds for Dungeness crab and contribute greatly to the coastal crab fishery. Juvenile Dungeness crabs are dependent on limited intertidal epibenthic shell for refuge habitat during early benthic life and experience increased mortality on open sand and mud as a result of predation by fish and birds. Early juveniles throughout the subtidal are similarly at risk due to predation by fish and especially adult conspecifics. Laboratory experiments and infrared video observations revealed that juvenile green crab displace Dungeness crab of equal size from shelters during one-on-one competition. Green crab also consistently win nocturnal foraging trials in which the species compete for fresh, damaged clams. Field and laboratory enclosure experiments show that juvenile Dungeness crab emigrate from oyster shell habitat as a result of competition and predation by adult green crab. Depending on the extent to which the two species overlap, interactions with the dominant nonindigenous species could have a negative influence on juvenile Dungeness crab survival and could conceivably impact recruitment to the fishery. However, current evidence indicates that the distribution of green crab in Washington State is far removed from nursery areas of Dungeness crab. PMID:11239624

  19. Molecular characterization and evolutionary insights into potential sex-determination genes in the western orchard predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis (Chelicerata: Arachnida: Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    PubMed

    Pomerantz, Aaron F; Hoy, Marjorie A; Kawahara, Akito Y

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the process of sex determination at the molecular level in species belonging to the subclass Acari, a taxon of arachnids that contains mites and ticks. The recent sequencing of the transcriptome and genome of the western orchard predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis allows investigation of molecular mechanisms underlying the biological processes of sex determination in this predator of phytophagous pest mites. We identified four doublesex-and-mab-3-related transcription factor (dmrt) genes, one transformer-2 gene, one intersex gene, and two fruitless-like genes in M. occidentalis. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted to infer the molecular relationships to sequences from species of arthropods, including insects, crustaceans, acarines, and a centipede, using available genomic data. Comparative analyses revealed high sequence identity within functional domains and confirmed that the architecture for certain sex-determination genes is conserved in arthropods. This study provides a framework for identifying potential target genes that could be implicated in the process of sex determination in M. occidentalis and provides insight into the conservation and change of the molecular components of sex determination in arthropods. PMID:25077523

  20. Validating the importance of two acetylcholinesterases in insecticide sensitivities by RNAi in Pardosa pseudoannulata, an important predatory enemy against several insect pests.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangkun; Li, Chunrui; Bao, Haibo; Fang, Jichao; Liu, Zewen; Zhang, Yixi

    2015-11-01

    The pond wolf spider (Pardosa pseudoannulata) is an important predatory enemy against several insect pests and showed relative different sensitivities to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides compared to insect pests. In our previous studies, two acetylcholinesterases were identified in P. pseudoannulata and played important roles in insecticide sensitivities. In order to understand the contributions of the two acetylcholinesterases to insecticide sensitivities, we firstly employed the RNAi technology in the spider. For a suitable microinjection RNAi method, the injection site, injection volume and interference time were optimized, which then demonstrated that the injection RNAi method was applicable in this spider. With the new RNAi method, it was revealed that both Pp-AChE1 and Pp-AChE2, encoded by genes Ppace1 and Ppace2, were the targets of organophosphate insecticides, but Pp-AChE1 would be more important. In contrast, the carbamate acted selectively on Pp-AChE1. The results showed that Pp-AChE1 was the major catalytic enzyme in P. pseudoannulata and the major target of organophosphate and carbamate insecticides. In a word, an RNAi method was established in the pond wolf spider, which further validated the importance of two acetylcholinesterases in insecticide sensitivities in this spider.

  1. Morphological, molecular and cross-breeding analysis of geographic populations of coconut-mite associated predatory mites identified as Neoseiulus baraki: evidence for cryptic species?

    PubMed

    Famah Sourassou, Nazer; Hanna, Rachid; Zannou, Ignace; Breeuwer, Johannes A J; de Moraes, Gilberto; Sabelis, Maurice W

    2012-05-01

    Surveys were conducted in Brazil, Benin and Tanzania to collect predatory mites as candidates for control of the coconut mite Aceria guerreronis Keifer, a serious pest of coconut fruits. At all locations surveyed, one of the most dominant predators on infested coconut fruits was identified as Neoseiulus baraki Athias-Henriot, based on morphological similarity with regard to taxonomically relevant characters. However, scrutiny of our own and published descriptions suggests that consistent morphological differences may exist between the Benin population and those from the other geographic origins. In this study, we combined three methods to assess whether these populations belong to one species or a few distinct, yet closely related species. First, multivariate analysis of 32 morphological characters showed that the Benin population differed from the other three populations. Second, DNA sequence analysis based on the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) showed the same difference between these populations. Third, cross-breeding between populations was unsuccessful in all combinations. These data provide evidence for the existence of cryptic species. Subsequent morphological research showed that the Benin population can be distinguished from the others by a new character (not included in the multivariate analysis), viz. the number of teeth on the fixed digit of the female chelicera.

  2. Effects of neem oil (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) on midgut cells of predatory larvae Ceraeochrysa claveri (Navás, 1911) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    PubMed

    Scudeler, Elton Luiz; dos Santos, Daniela Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    The effects of ingested neem oil, a botanical insecticide obtained from the seeds of the neem tree, Azadirachta indica, on the midgut cells of predatory larvae Ceraeochrysa claveri were analyzed. C. claveri were fed on eggs of Diatraea saccharalis treated with neem oil at a concentration of 0.5%, 1% and 2% during throughout the larval period. Light and electron microscopy showed severe damages in columnar cells, which had many cytoplasmic protrusions, clustering and ruptured of the microvilli, swollen cells, ruptured cells, dilatation and vesiculation of rough endoplasmic reticulum, development of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, enlargement of extracellular spaces of the basal labyrinth, intercellular spaces and necrosis. The indirect ingestion of neem oil with prey can result in severe alterations showing direct cytotoxic effects of neem oil on midgut cells of C. claveri larvae. Therefore, the safety of neem oil to non-target species as larvae of C. claveri was refuted, thus the notion that plants derived are safer to non-target species must be questioned in future ecotoxicological studies. PMID:22739123

  3. Species richness and diversity of the parasites of two predatory fish species - perch (Perca fluviatilis Linnaeus, 1758) and zander (Sander lucioperca Linnaeus, 1758) from the Pomeranian Bay.

    PubMed

    Bielat, Iwona; Legierko, Monika; Sobecka, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Pomeranian Bay as an ecotone is a transition zone between two different biocenoses, which is characterized by an increase in biodiversity and species density. Therefore, Pomeranian Bay is a destination of finding and reproductive migrations of fish from the rivers entered the area. The aim of the study was to compare parasitic fauna of two predatory fish species from the Pomeranian Bay, collected from the same fishing grounds at the same period. A total of 126 fish studied (53 perches and 73 zanders) were collected in the summer 2013. Parasitological examinations included: skin, fins, gills, vitreous humour and lens of the eye, mouth cavity, body cavity and internal organs. Apart from the prevalence and intensity of infection (mean, range) the parasite communities of both fish species were compared. European perch and zander were infected with parasites from five different taxonomic units. The most numerous parasites were Diplostomum spp. in European perch and Bucephalus polymorphus in zander. The prevalence of infection of European perch ranged from 5.7% (Diphyllobothrium latum) to 22.3% (Diplostomum spp.) and for zander from 1.4% (Ancyrocephalus paradoxus, Hysterothylacium aduncum) to 12.3% (Bucephalus polymorphus). Different composition of the parasitic fauna is likely due to the different biology of both fish species. PMID:26342503

  4. Spectrum-specific UV egg damage and dispersal responses in the phytoseiid predatory mite Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    PubMed

    Tachi, Fuyuki; Osakabe, Masahiro

    2014-06-01

    Solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation is deleterious to plant-dwelling mites. Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor) is a predominant predator of agriculturally important pest species of spider mite. However, phytoseiid mites are more vulnerable to UVB radiation than spider mites. Thus, the UVB radiation may influence decision making in foraging phytoseiid mites whether disperse or not. We tested the difference in impact and behavioral response among wavelengths of monochromatic UV radiation using a spectroscopic light source in N. californicus in the laboratory. We also examined whether the behavioral responses of N. californicus females to UV radiation varied based on the presence of prey (Tetranychus urticae Koch) eggs and residues (webs and excreta of T. urticae: foraging cue). The impact of UV radiation on the N. californicus egg hatchability varied drastically between wavelengths of ≤300 nm (0%) and ≥310 nm (100%). The N. californicus females escaped from UV radiation more quickly when they were irradiated with UV at shorter wavelength. Presence of T. urticae eggs had no effects arresting the escape of phytoseiid mites. In contrast, prey residues (including eggs) markedly detained N. californicus females from escaping under UV irradiation at ≥310 nm. However, N. californicus females quickly escaped when irradiated with UV at harmful 300 nm wavelength, regardless of prey cues. This indicates that the eyeless phytoseiid mite is capable of perceiving UV radiation, and whether escape or not is determined on the basis of harmful/harmless UV wavelength and presence/absence of foraging cues.

  5. Disruption of the Vasopressin 1b Receptor Gene Impairs the Attack Component of Aggressive Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wersinger, Scott R.; Caldwell, Heather K.; Christiansen, Matthew; Scott Young, W.

    2008-01-01

    Vasopressin affects behavior via its two brain receptors, the vasopressin 1a and vasopressin 1b receptors (Avpr1b). Recent work from our lab has shown that disruption of the Avpr1b gene reduces inter-male aggression and reduces social motivation. Here we further characterized the aggressive phenotype in Avpr1b −/− (knockout) mice. We tested maternal aggression and predatory behavior. We also analyzed the extent to which food deprivation and competition over food increases inter-male aggression. We quantified defensive behavior in Avpr1b −/− mice and later tested offensive aggression in these same mice. Our results show that attack behavior toward a conspecific is consistently reduced in Avpr1b −/− mice. Predatory behavior is normal, suggesting that the deficit is not due to a global inability to detect and attack stimuli. Food deprivation, competition for food, and previous experience increase aggression in both Avpr1b +/+ and −/− mice. However, in these circumstances the level of aggression seen in knockout mice is still less than that observed in wild-type mice. Defensive avoidance behaviors, such as boxing and fleeing, are largely intact in knockout mice. Avpr1b −/− mice do not display as many "retaliatory" attacks as the Avpr1b +/+ mice. Interestingly, when territorial aggression was measured following the defensive behavior testing, Avpr1b −/− mice typically show less initial aggressive behavior than wild-type mice, but do show a significant increase in aggression with repeated testing. These studies confirm that deficits in aggression in Avpr1b −/− mice are limited to aggressive behavior involving the attack of a conspecific. We hypothesize that Avpr1b plays an important role in the central processing that couples the detection and perception of social cues (which appears normal) with the appropriate behavioral response. PMID:17284170

  6. Behavioral and physiological antipredator responses of the San Marcos salamander, Eurycea nana.

    PubMed

    Davis, Drew R; Gabor, Caitlin R

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to predatory stimuli typically results in the elevation of circulating glucocorticoid levels and a behavioral response of freezing or escape behavior in many prey species. Corticosterone (CORT) is the main glucocorticoid in amphibians and is known to be important in modulating many behaviors and developmental functions. The federally threatened San Marcos salamander, Eurycea nana, decreases activity in response to both native and introduced predatory fish, however, experience may further influence these interactions. To better understand the indirect effects of fish predators on this salamander, we examined both the antipredator behavior and water-borne CORT release rates in response to chemical cues (kairomones) from two fish species that varied in temporal risk of predation: (1) a low encounter frequency predator (largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides), (2) a high encounter frequency predator (redbreast sunfish, Lepomis auritus), and (3) a blank water control. Salamanders reduced activity (antipredator response) after exposure to both predator treatments, but not to the blank water control, and the response to M. salmoides was significantly stronger than that to L. auritus. The CORT response (post-stimulus/pre-stimulus release rates) did not differ between the blank water control and L. auritus treatments, and both were significantly less than the CORT response to M. salmoides. Overall, E. nana showed a decreased antipredator response and no CORT response towards the high encounter frequency L. auritus as compared to the low encounter frequency M. salmoides. Eurycea nana may mute antipredator and CORT responses to high temporal frequency predators. There was, however, no correlation between CORT release rates and antipredator behavior, which suggests that the presence of predators may be affecting CORT response and behavior independently. PMID:25446225

  7. The mechanistic basis of Myxococcus xanthus rippling behavior and its physiological role during predation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyang; Vaksman, Zalman; Litwin, Douglas B; Shi, Peng; Kaplan, Heidi B; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2012-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus cells self-organize into periodic bands of traveling waves, termed ripples, during multicellular fruiting body development and predation on other bacteria. To investigate the mechanistic basis of rippling behavior and its physiological role during predation by this Gram-negative soil bacterium, we have used an approach that combines mathematical modeling with experimental observations. Specifically, we developed an agent-based model (ABM) to simulate rippling behavior that employs a new signaling mechanism to trigger cellular reversals. The ABM has demonstrated that three ingredients are sufficient to generate rippling behavior: (i) side-to-side signaling between two cells that causes one of the cells to reverse, (ii) a minimal refractory time period after each reversal during which cells cannot reverse again, and (iii) physical interactions that cause the cells to locally align. To explain why rippling behavior appears as a consequence of the presence of prey, we postulate that prey-associated macromolecules indirectly induce ripples by stimulating side-to-side contact-mediated signaling. In parallel to the simulations, M. xanthus predatory rippling behavior was experimentally observed and analyzed using time-lapse microscopy. A formalized relationship between the wavelength, reversal time, and cell velocity has been predicted by the simulations and confirmed by the experimental data. Furthermore, the results suggest that the physiological role of rippling behavior during M. xanthus predation is to increase the rate of spreading over prey cells due to increased side-to-side contact-mediated signaling and to allow predatory cells to remain on the prey longer as a result of more periodic cell motility.

  8. Behavioral and physiological antipredator responses of the San Marcos salamander, Eurycea nana.

    PubMed

    Davis, Drew R; Gabor, Caitlin R

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to predatory stimuli typically results in the elevation of circulating glucocorticoid levels and a behavioral response of freezing or escape behavior in many prey species. Corticosterone (CORT) is the main glucocorticoid in amphibians and is known to be important in modulating many behaviors and developmental functions. The federally threatened San Marcos salamander, Eurycea nana, decreases activity in response to both native and introduced predatory fish, however, experience may further influence these interactions. To better understand the indirect effects of fish predators on this salamander, we examined both the antipredator behavior and water-borne CORT release rates in response to chemical cues (kairomones) from two fish species that varied in temporal risk of predation: (1) a low encounter frequency predator (largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides), (2) a high encounter frequency predator (redbreast sunfish, Lepomis auritus), and (3) a blank water control. Salamanders reduced activity (antipredator response) after exposure to both predator treatments, but not to the blank water control, and the response to M. salmoides was significantly stronger than that to L. auritus. The CORT response (post-stimulus/pre-stimulus release rates) did not differ between the blank water control and L. auritus treatments, and both were significantly less than the CORT response to M. salmoides. Overall, E. nana showed a decreased antipredator response and no CORT response towards the high encounter frequency L. auritus as compared to the low encounter frequency M. salmoides. Eurycea nana may mute antipredator and CORT responses to high temporal frequency predators. There was, however, no correlation between CORT release rates and antipredator behavior, which suggests that the presence of predators may be affecting CORT response and behavior independently.

  9. Do predator cues influence turn alternation behavior in terrestrial isopods Porcellio laevis Latreille and Armadillidium vulgare Latreille?

    PubMed

    Hegarty, Kevin G; Kight, Scott L

    2014-07-01

    Terrestrial isopods (Crustacea: Oniscidea) make more alternating maze turns in response to negative stimuli, a navigational behavior that corrects divergence from a straight line. The present study investigates this behavioral pattern in two species, Porcellio laevis Latreille and Armadillidium vulgare Latreille, in response to short-term vs. long-term exposure to indirect cues from predatory ants. Neither isopod species increased the number of alternating turns in response to short-term indirect exposure to ants, but both species made significantly more alternating turns following continuous indirect exposure to ants for a period of one-week. These results are surprising given differences in behavioral and morphological predator defenses between these species (the Armadillidiidae curl into defensive postures when attacked, whereas the Porcellionidae flee). The marked similarity in alternating turn behavior of the two families suggests evolutionary conservation of antipredator navigation mechanisms. PMID:24954552

  10. Do predator cues influence turn alternation behavior in terrestrial isopods Porcellio laevis Latreille and Armadillidium vulgare Latreille?

    PubMed

    Hegarty, Kevin G; Kight, Scott L

    2014-07-01

    Terrestrial isopods (Crustacea: Oniscidea) make more alternating maze turns in response to negative stimuli, a navigational behavior that corrects divergence from a straight line. The present study investigates this behavioral pattern in two species, Porcellio laevis Latreille and Armadillidium vulgare Latreille, in response to short-term vs. long-term exposure to indirect cues from predatory ants. Neither isopod species increased the number of alternating turns in response to short-term indirect exposure to ants, but both species made significantly more alternating turns following continuous indirect exposure to ants for a period of one-week. These results are surprising given differences in behavioral and morphological predator defenses between these species (the Armadillidiidae curl into defensive postures when attacked, whereas the Porcellionidae flee). The marked similarity in alternating turn behavior of the two families suggests evolutionary conservation of antipredator navigation mechanisms.

  11. Specific loops D, E and F of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor beta1 subunit may confer imidacloprid selectivity between Myzus persicae and its predatory enemy Pardosa pseudoannulata.

    PubMed

    Song, Feng; You, Zhiqi; Yao, Xiangmei; Cheng, Jiagao; Liu, Zewen; Lin, Kejian

    2009-11-01

    One nicotinic acetylcholine receptor non-alpha subunit was cloned from the pond wolf spider, Pardosa pseudoannulata, an important predatory enemy of some insect pests with agricultural importance, such as the green peach aphid Myzus persicae. The subunit shows high amino acid identities to insect beta1 subunits (74-78%), and was denoted as Ppbeta1. Although high identities are found between Ppbeta1 and insect beta1 subunits, amino acid differences are found within loops D, E and F, important segments contributing to ligand binding. The effects of amino acid differences within these loops were evaluated by introducing loops of insect or spider beta1 subunits into rat beta2 subunit and co-expressing with insect alpha subunit. The corresponding regions of rat beta2 chimera beta2(Mpbeta1) (beta2 with loops D, E and F from M. persicae beta1 subunit Mpbeta1) were replaced by loops D, E and F of Ppbeta1 singly or together to construct different chimeras. When these chimeras were co-expressed with insect Nlalpha1, it was found that the replacement of loops D, E and F of beta2(Mpbeta1) by that of Ppbeta1 resulted in a right-ward shift of the imidacloprid dose-response curves, reflecting increases in EC(50), compared to Nlalpha1/beta2(Mpbeta1). By contrast, the influences on ACh potency were minimal. The further study showed that R81Q, N137G and F190W differences, within loops D, E and F respectively, contributed mainly to these sensitivity changes. This study contributes to our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying selectivity of neonicotinoids against insects over spiders.

  12. Integrated pest management of two-spotted mite Tetranychus urticae on greenhouse roses using petroleum spray oil and the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis.

    PubMed

    Nicetic; Watson, D M; Beattie, G A; Meats, A; Zheng, J

    2001-01-01

    From 1995 to 1999, four experiments were conducted on greenhouse roses to assess the effectiveness of the nC24 petroleum spray oil (PSO), D-C-Tron Plus, against two-spotted mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acarina: Tetranychidae), and to determine how the oil could be most efficiently and effectively used in combination with the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot (Acarina: Phytoseiidae) in an integrated pest management program. The results showed that 0.5% PSO applied fortnightly to roses gave excellent protection from T urticae infestation when the mite population was not already established. However, PSO applied after roses were infested with T. urticae above the economic threshold only stabilised populations without reducing them below that threshold. Populations of P. persimilis in the upper and lower canopies were unchanged after two sprays of PSO at 7-day intervals, and application of PSO to the upper canopy was as effective in controlling T. urticae in the presence of P persimilis as spraying the entire plant. Combining PSO with P. persimilis gave better control of T. urticae than using P. persimilis alone. The most cost-effective use of PSO in the presence of P. persimilis is, therefore, to apply spray only to the upper canopy. This will not affect control of powdery mildew with PSO. Comparison of a control program for T urticae based on the monitored use of synthetic miticides with that based on calendar application of PSO revealed that both gave equally effective control. The benefits of combining PSO and P. persimilis in an integrated pest management program for T. urticae on roses over a program based on synthetic fungicides are discussed.

  13. Persistence and extirpation in invaded landscapes: patch characteristics and connectivity determine effects of non-native predatory fish on native salamanders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pilliod, David S.; Arkle, Robert S.; Maxell, Bryce A.

    2012-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated negative effects of non-native, predatory fishes on native amphibians, yet it is still unclear why some amphibian populations persist, while others are extirpated, following fish invasion. We examined this question by developing habitat-based occupancy models for the long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum) and nonnative fish using survey data from 1,749 water bodies across 470 catchments in the Northern Rocky Mountains, USA. We first modeled the habitat associations of salamanders at 468 fishless water bodies in 154 catchments where non-native fish were historically, and are currently, absent from the entire catchment. Wethen applied this habitat model to the complete data set to predict the probability of salamander occupancy in each water body, removing any effect of fish presence. Finally, we compared field-observed occurrences of salamanders and fish to modeled probability of salamander occupancy. Suitability models indicated that fish and salamanders had similar habitat preferences, possibly resulting in extirpations of salamander populations from entire catchments where suitable habitats were limiting. Salamanders coexisted with non-native fish in some catchments by using marginal quality, isolated (no inlet or outlet) habitats that remained fishless. They rarely coexisted with fish within individual water bodies and only where habitat quality was highest. Connectivity of water bodies via streams resulted in increased probability of fish invasion and consequently reduced probability of salamander occupancy.These results could be used to identify and prioritize catchments and water bodies where control measures would be most effective at restoring amphibian populations. Our approach could be useful as a framework for improved investigations into questions of persistence and extirpation of native species when non-native species have already become established.

  14. A Comprehensive Selection of Reference Genes for RT-qPCR Analysis in a Predatory Lady Beetle, Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    PubMed Central

    Siegfried, Blair D.; Zhou, Xuguo

    2015-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a reliable, rapid, and reproducible technique for measuring and evaluating changes in gene expression. To facilitate gene expression studies and obtain more accurate RT-qPCR data, normalization relative to stable reference genes is required. In this study, expression profiles of seven candidate reference genes, including β-actin (Actin), elongation factor 1 α (EF1A), glyceralde hyde-3-phosphate dehydro-genase (GAPDH), cyclophilins A (CypA), vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (ATPase), 28S ribosomal RNA (28S), and 18S ribosomal RNA (18S) from Hippodamia convergens were investigated. H. convergens is an abundant predatory species in the New World, and has been widely used as a biological control agent against sap-sucking insect pests, primarily aphids. A total of four analytical methods, geNorm, Normfinder, BestKeeper, and the ΔCt method, were employed to evaluate the performance of these seven genes as endogenous controls under diverse experimental conditions. Additionally, RefFinder, a comprehensive evaluation platform integrating the four above mentioned algorithms, ranked the overall stability of these candidate genes. A suite of reference genes were specifically recommended for each experimental condition. Among them, 28S, EF1A, and CypA were the best reference genes across different development stages; GAPDH, 28S, and CypA were most stable in different tissues. GAPDH and CypA were most stable in female and male adults and photoperiod conditions, 28S and EF1A were most stable under a range of temperatures, Actin and CypA were most stable under dietary RNAi condition. This work establishes a standardized RT-qPCR analysis in H. convergens. Additionally, this study lays a foundation for functional genomics research in H. convergens and sheds light on the ecological risk assessment of RNAi-based biopesticides on this non-target biological control agent. PMID:25915640

  15. Selection of Nectar Plants for Use in Ecological Engineering to Promote Biological Control of Rice Pests by the Predatory Bug, Cyrtorhinus lividipennis, (Heteroptera: Miridae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pingyang; Lu, Zhongxian; Heong, Kongluen; Chen, Guihua; Zheng, Xusong; Xu, Hongxing; Yang, Yajun; Nicol, Helen I.; Gurr, Geoff M.

    2014-01-01

    Ecological engineering for pest management involves the identification of optimal forms of botanical diversity to incorporate into a farming system to suppress pests, by promoting their natural enemies. Whilst this approach has been extensively researched in many temperate crop systems, much less has been done for rice. This paper reports the influence of various plant species on the performance of a key natural enemy of rice planthopper pests, the predatory mirid bug, Cyrtorhinus lividipennis. Survival of adult males and females was increased by the presence of flowering Tagetes erecta, Trida procumbens, Emilia sonchifolia (Compositae), and Sesamum indicum (Pedaliaceae) compared with water or nil controls. All flower treatments resulted in increased consumption of brown plant hopper, Nilaparvata lugens, and for female C. lividipennis, S. indicum was the most favorable. A separate study with a wider range of plant species and varying densities of prey eggs showed that S. indicum most strongly promoted predation by C. lividipennis. Reflecting this, S. indicum gave a relatively high rate of prey search and low prey handling time. On this basis, S. indicum was selected for more detailed studies to check if its potential incorporation into the farming system would not inadvertently benefit Cnaphalocrocis medinalis and Marasmia patnalis, serious Lepidoptera pests of rice. Adult longevity and fecundity of both pests was comparable for S. indicum and water treatments and significantly lower than the honey solution treatment. Findings indicate that S. indicumis well suited for use as an ecological engineering plant in the margins of rice crops. Sesame indicum can be a valuable crop as well as providing benefits to C. lividipennis whilst denying benefit to key pests. PMID:25254377

  16. A first evaluation of the usefulness of feathers of nestling predatory birds for non-destructive biomonitoring of persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Eulaers, Igor; Covaci, Adrian; Herzke, Dorte; Eens, Marcel; Sonne, Christian; Moum, Truls; Schnug, Lisbeth; Hanssen, Sveinn Are; Johnsen, Trond Vidar; Bustnes, Jan Ove; Jaspers, Veerle L B

    2011-04-01

    In previous studies, feathers of adult predatory birds have been evaluated as valid non-destructive biomonitor matrices for persistent organic pollutants (POPs). In this study, we assessed for the first time the usefulness of nestling raptor feathers for non-destructive biomonitoring of POPs. For this purpose, we collected body feathers and blood of nestlings from three avian top predators from northern Norway: northern goshawks (Accipiter gentilis), white-tailed eagles (Haliaeetus albicilla) and golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos). We were able to detect a broad spectrum of legacy POPs in the nestling feathers of all three species (Σ PCBs: 6.78-140ng g(-1); DDE: 3.15-145ng g(-1); Σ PBDEs: 0.538-7.56ng g(-1)). However, these concentrations were lower compared to other studies on raptor species, probably due to the aspect of monitoring of nestlings instead of adults. Besides their analytical suitability, nestling feathers also appear to be biologically informative: concentrations of most POPs in nestling feathers showed strong and significant correlations with blood plasma concentrations in all species (p<0.050; 0.775

  17. Ontogenic behavioral consistency, individual variation and fitness consequences among lady beetles.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Alice S; Botina, Lisbetd; Nascimento, Carolina P; Gontijo, Lessando M; Torres, Jorge B; Guedes, Raul Narciso C

    2016-10-01

    The potential relevance of complete metamorphosis for the individual variation in sets of behavioral traits and their fitness consequences in predatory species led to the present study. A set of nine behavioral traits were assessed for the larvae and adults of a pyrethroid-resistant and a susceptible population of the lady beetle Eriopis connexa. The aim was to assess: 1) the average individual behavioral (pheno)types and their within-population variation, 2) their ontogenic behavioral consistency from larva to adult, and 3) whether the observed correlated sets of behavioral traits can impact fitness. The average behavioral type differed between populations. The pyrethroid-resistant population consistently exhibited lower aggressiveness (as larvae) and exploration, but showed higher activity, as well as larva sociality, and sometimes boldness than the susceptible population. Behavioral trait variation was higher among pyrethroid-resistant individuals, particularly during the larval stage, but there was significant behavior correlation between larvae and adults, regardless of the insect population. Reduced aggressiveness, and to a lesser extent intermediate levels of boldness against heterospecific individuals were associated with higher population growth. Besides shedding light on the ontogenic consistency of behavioral traits and their fitness impact, our results also suggest that reduced aggressiveness is associated with predator population increase, but may compromise its effectiveness as a biocontrol agent. PMID:27523284

  18. Factors affecting feeding behavior and survival of juvenile lake trout in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savino, Jacqueline F.; Henry, Mary G.; Kincaid, Harold L.

    1993-01-01

    We explored the importance of experience with feeding on live prey, of cataracts, of strain, and of maternally transferred contaminants for the feeding rate and predator avoidance behavior of young lake trout Salvelinus namaycush. Hatchery-reared and feral juvenile lake trout were tested separately as predators on lake trout fry in tanks with artificial cobble reefs. Feral fish captured more prey per day and more prey per strike than did hatchery lake trout. The predatory performance of hatchery and feral fish did not improve significantly with experience. Feeding rates did not differ between lake trout with unilateral cataracts and normal-eyed fish, but significantly diminished for lake trout with bilateral cataracts. Neither strain nor contaminant background affected the ability of fry to feed or to avoid predators. Of the factors studied, previous experience with live food under natural conditions (i.e., the experience of feral fish) was the most important factor affecting feeding behavior of young lake trout.

  19. Cloning and differential expression of five heat shock protein genes associated with thermal stress and development in the polyphagous predatory mite Neoseiulus cucumeris (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Li, Dunsong; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Yunlong; Wu, Wenjing; Zhang, Guren

    2015-09-01

    In order to explore the role of heat shock proteins (Hsps) during thermal stress and development in the predatory mite Neoseiulus cucumeris (Oudemans), we cloned and characterized five full-length Hsp genes. We investigated the expression levels of these genes by quantitative real-time PCR. The five genes characterized here were NcHsp90, NcHsp75, NcHsp70, NcHsp60, and NcHsp40. These Hsps showed high sequence conservation and had greatest identity with heat shock proteins of Metaseiulus occidentalis and other mite and insect species. All five NcHsp genes showed changes in their levels of expression during development. Higher levels of expression were observed in adult females than in adult males, but there were no significant changes between pre-oviposition and post-oviposition stages in the females. NcHsp90, NcHsp75, and NcHsp70 expression levels were up-regulated after a heat shock, and the increases in NcHsp75 and NcHsp70 expression levels were maintained for at least 3 h. Up-regulation of NcHsp60 and NcHsp40 was not detected after 1 h at a high temperature (35-45 °C); however, a significant down-regulation was observed after 3 h heat exposure at 35 °C and 3 h recovery at 25 °C. Cold shock treatment (-5 to 15 °C) for 1 h did not acute elicit changes in the expression levels of any of the genes. At 5 °C, the expression levels of NcHsp90 significantly increased after 6 or 24 h exposure compared to the levels after 1 h exposure. Thus, expression of Hsp genes in N. cucumeris reflected developmental changes, sexual difference, and variable induced response to thermal stress. Increased expression of Hsps might protect N. cucumeris individuals under extreme temperature conditions. Therefore, it may be possible to enhance the thermal tolerance of commercially available N. cucumeris using temperature acclimation. Treatment at 35 °C should be suitable for such acclimation.

  20. Lateralized behavior in the attacks of largemouth bass on Rhinogobius gobies corresponding to their morphological antisymmetry.

    PubMed

    Yasugi, Masaki; Hori, Michio

    2012-07-15

    Vertebrates show left-right biases in turning direction, limb usage, predator-escape response and use of sensory organs. In particular, some fishes are known to have lateral biases in predatory behaviors corresponding to their morphological antisymmetry. To reveal the effects of these laterally biased behaviors on predator-prey interaction, we conducted behavioral tests of predatory events between largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, and freshwater gobies, Rhinogobius sp., both of which have individuals with a well-developed left side and individuals with a well-developed right side. The left-developed bass tended to approach the goby clockwise from behind, whereas right-developed individuals tended to approach counterclockwise. Congruently, left-developed gobies began their escape maneuvers at a longer distance from bass when they were approached clockwise than when they were approached counterclockwise, whereas right-developed gobies showed the reverse tendency. The longer the distance between bass and gobies at the start of goby escape, the more the subsequent bass strike or dash was delayed. Under these conditions, predation should be more successful when a left (right)-developed bass meets a right (left)-developed goby, and less successful when a left (right)-developed bass meets a left (right)-developed goby. This prediction was consistent with the difference in predation success in our test and in field data from Lake Biwa, Japan. We conclude that lateral biases in the behavioral direction of each morphological type will generate bias in predation success between different combinations of predator and prey types, leading to the maintenance of antisymmetric dimorphism through negative frequency-dependent natural selection. PMID:22723477

  1. Lateralized behavior in the attacks of largemouth bass on Rhinogobius gobies corresponding to their morphological antisymmetry.

    PubMed

    Yasugi, Masaki; Hori, Michio

    2012-07-15

    Vertebrates show left-right biases in turning direction, limb usage, predator-escape response and use of sensory organs. In particular, some fishes are known to have lateral biases in predatory behaviors corresponding to their morphological antisymmetry. To reveal the effects of these laterally biased behaviors on predator-prey interaction, we conducted behavioral tests of predatory events between largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, and freshwater gobies, Rhinogobius sp., both of which have individuals with a well-developed left side and individuals with a well-developed right side. The left-developed bass tended to approach the goby clockwise from behind, whereas right-developed individuals tended to approach counterclockwise. Congruently, left-developed gobies began their escape maneuvers at a longer distance from bass when they were approached clockwise than when they were approached counterclockwise, whereas right-developed gobies showed the reverse tendency. The longer the distance between bass and gobies at the start of goby escape, the more the subsequent bass strike or dash was delayed. Under these conditions, predation should be more successful when a left (right)-developed bass meets a right (left)-developed goby, and less successful when a left (right)-developed bass meets a left (right)-developed goby. This prediction was consistent with the difference in predation success in our test and in field data from Lake Biwa, Japan. We conclude that lateral biases in the behavioral direction of each morphological type will generate bias in predation success between different combinations of predator and prey types, leading to the maintenance of antisymmetric dimorphism through negative frequency-dependent natural selection.

  2. Mechanical properties of the cuticles of three cockroach species that differ in their wind-evoked escape behavior

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The structural and material properties of insect cuticle remain largely unexplored, even though they comprise the majority (approximately 80%) of animals. Insect cuticle serves many functions, including protection against predatory attacks, which is especially beneficial to species failing to employ effective running escape responses. Despite recent advances in our understanding of insect escape behaviors and the biomechanics of insect cuticle, there are limited studies on the protective qualities of cuticle to extreme mechanical stresses and strains imposed by predatory attacks, and how these qualities vary between species employing different escape responses. Blattarians (cockroaches) provide an appropriate model system for such studies. Wind-evoked running escape responses are strong in Periplaneta americana, weak in Blaberus craniifer and absent in Gromphodorhina portentosa, putting the latter two species at greater risk of being struck by a predator. We hypothesized that the exoskeletons in these two larger species could provide more protection from predatory strikes relative to the exoskeleton of P. americana. We quantified the protective qualities of the exoskeletons by measuring the puncture resistance, tensile strength, strain energy storage, and peak strain in fresh samples of thoracic and abdominal cuticles from these three species. We found a continuum in puncture resistance, tensile strength, and strain energy storage between the three species, which were greatest in G. portentosa, moderate in B. craniifer, and smallest in P. americana. Histological measurements of total cuticle thickness followed this same pattern. However, peak strain followed a different trend between species. The comparisons in the material properties drawn between the cuticles of G. portentosa, B. craniifer, and P. americana demonstrate parallels between cuticular biomechanics and predator running escape responses. PMID:25101230

  3. Evidence that limbic neural plasticity in the right hemisphere mediates partial kindling induced lasting increases in anxiety-like behavior: effects of low frequency stimulation (quenching?) on long term potentiation of amygdala efferents and behavior following kindling.

    PubMed

    Adamec, R E

    1999-08-21

    Behavioral and physiological effects of partial kindling of the right ventral hippocampus by perforant path (PP) stimulation were investigated in the cat. Partial kindling produced lasting changes in affect (increased defensive response to rats) and predatory attack (decreased pawing and biting attack). Partial kindling also induced long term potentiation (LTP) of amygdala efferent transmission to ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and periaqueductal gray (PAG) in left and right hemispheres. LTP of field population spikes evoked in area CA3 by PP stimulation was also observed. LTP was detected using evoked potential methods. These findings parallel previous studies of left PP-CA3 partial kindling. Analysis of covariance removing effects of LTP from behavioral changes suggests that initiation of increased defensiveness at 2 days after completion of partial kindling depended on LTP of left and right amygdalo-VMH and right amygdalo-PAG transmission. From 6 days after kindling onward, increased defensiveness depended on LTP of right amygdalo-PAG transmission. Depotentiation of amygdala efferent LTP by bilateral low frequency amygdala stimulation (LFS) (900 pulses at 1 Hz, once daily for 7 days) selectively reduced LTP in right amygdala efferents. At the same time, defensive, but not predatory attack behavior, was returned to levels seen prior to partial kindling. Both depotentiation and reduction of defensiveness were transient. Defensiveness increased to post-kindling levels by 76 days after LFS. At the same time, LTP was restored in the right amygdalo-PAG pathway. In contrast LTP in the right amygdalo-VMH pathway remained depotentiated. Effects of LFS were not due to damage, as thresholds to evoke amygdala efferent response were unchanged. These findings suggest that lasting change in affect following partial hippocampal kindling depends on LTP of right amygdala efferent transmission to PAG. The findings parallel studies of non-convulsant pharmacological induction of

  4. Behavioral Coaching

    PubMed Central

    Seniuk, Holly A.; Witts, Benjamin N.; Williams, W. Larry.; Ghezzi, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    The term behavioral coaching has been used inconsistently in and outside the field of behavior analysis. In the sports literature, the term has been used to describe various intervention strategies, and in the organizational behavior management literature it has been used to describe an approach to training management personnel and staff. This inconsistency is problematic in terms of the replication of behavioral coaching across studies and aligning with Baer, Wolf, and Risley's (1968) technological dimension of applied behavior analysis. The current paper will outline and critique the discrepancies in the use of the term and suggest how Martin and Hrycaiko's (1983) characteristics of behavioral coaching in sports may be used to bring us closer to establishing a consistent definition of the term. In addition, we will suggest how these characteristics can also be applicable to the use of the term behavioral coaching in other domains of behavior analysis. PMID:25729141

  5. Verbal behavior

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Jack

    1984-01-01

    The recent history and current status of the area of verbal behavior are considered in terms of three major thematic lines: the operant conditioning of adult verbal behavior, learning to be an effective speaker and listener, and developments directly related to Skinner's Verbal Behavior. Other topics not directly related to the main themes are also considered: the work of Kurt Salzinger, ape-language research, and human operant research related to rule-governed behavior. PMID:16812395

  6. Behavioral Economics

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Derek D.; Niileksela, Christopher R.; Kaplan, Brent A.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, behavioral economics has gained much attention in psychology and public policy. Despite increased interest and continued basic experimental studies, the application of behavioral economics to therapeutic settings remains relatively sparse. Using examples from both basic and applied studies, we provide an overview of the principles comprising behavioral economic perspectives and discuss implications for behavior analysts in practice. A call for further translational research is provided. PMID:25729506

  7. Publishing corruption discussion: predatory journalism.

    PubMed

    Jones, James W; McCullough, Laurence B

    2014-02-01

    Dr Spock is a brilliant young vascular surgeon who is up for tenure next year. He has been warned by the chair of surgery that he needs to increase his list of publications to assure passage. He has recently had a paper reviewed by one of the top journals in his specialty, Journal X-special, with several suggestions for revision. He received an e-mail request for manuscript submission from a newly minted, open access, Journal of Vascular Disease Therapy, which promises a quick and likely favorable response for a fee. What should be done? A. Send the paper to another peer reviewed journal with the suggested revisions. B. Resubmit the paper to Journal X-special. C. Submit to the online journal as is to save time. D. Submit to the online journal and another regular journal. E. Look for another job.

  8. Behaviorally Speaking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Elias H.; Dutton, Darell W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Consists of two articles focusing on (1) a modern behavioral model that takes cues from Hippocrates' Four Temperaments and (2) use of a behavioral approach to improve the effectiveness of meetings. Lists positive and negative behaviors within the meeting context. (CH)

  9. Behavioral Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfield, Sol L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Contains 18 articles discussing the uses of behavioral medicine in such areas as obesity, smoking, hypertension, and headache. Reviews include discussions of behavioral medicine and insomnia, chronic pain, asthma, peripheral vascular disease, and coronary-prone behavior. Newly emerging topics include gastrointestinal disorders, arthritis,…

  10. Evidence of cue synergism in termite corpse response behavior.

    PubMed

    Ulyshen, Michael D; Shelton, Thomas G

    2012-02-01

    Subterranean termites of the genus Reticulitermes are known to build walls and tubes and move considerable amounts of soil into wood but the causes of this behavior remain largely unexplored. In laboratory assays, we tested the hypothesis that Reticulitermes virginicus (Banks) would carry more sand into wooden blocks containing corpses compared to corpse-free controls. We further predicted that the corpses of predatory ants would elicit a stronger response than those of a benign beetle species or nestmates. As hypothesized, significantly more sand was carried into blocks containing corpses and this material was typically used to build partitions separating the dead from the rest of the colony. Contrary to expectations, however, this behavior did not vary among corpse types. We then tested the hypothesis that oleic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid released during arthropod decay and used by ants and other arthropod taxa in corpse recognition, would induce a similar building response in R. virginicus. To additionally determine the role of foreign objects in giving rise to this behavior, the experiment was carried out with and without imitation corpses (i.e., small glass beads). As predicted, oleic acid induced building (a tenfold increase) but only when applied to beads, suggesting strong synergism between tactile and chemical cues. Oleic acid also significantly reduced the amount of wood consumed by R. virginicus and may possess useful repellent properties. PMID:22167071

  11. Evidence of cue synergism in termite corpse response behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulyshen, Michael D.; Shelton, Thomas G.

    2012-02-01

    Subterranean termites of the genus Reticulitermes are known to build walls and tubes and move considerable amounts of soil into wood but the causes of this behavior remain largely unexplored. In laboratory assays, we tested the hypothesis that Reticulitermes virginicus (Banks) would carry more sand into wooden blocks containing corpses compared to corpse-free controls. We further predicted that the corpses of predatory ants would elicit a stronger response than those of a benign beetle species or nestmates. As hypothesized, significantly more sand was carried into blocks containing corpses and this material was typically used to build partitions separating the dead from the rest of the colony. Contrary to expectations, however, this behavior did not vary among corpse types. We then tested the hypothesis that oleic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid released during arthropod decay and used by ants and other arthropod taxa in corpse recognition, would induce a similar building response in R. virginicus. To additionally determine the role of foreign objects in giving rise to this behavior, the experiment was carried out with and without imitation corpses (i.e., small glass beads). As predicted, oleic acid induced building (a tenfold increase) but only when applied to beads, suggesting strong synergism between tactile and chemical cues. Oleic acid also significantly reduced the amount of wood consumed by R. virginicus and may possess useful repellent properties.

  12. Making Behavioral Activation More Behavioral

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanter, Jonathan W.; Manos, Rachel C.; Busch, Andrew M.; Rusch, Laura C.

    2008-01-01

    Behavioral Activation, an efficacious treatment for depression, presents a behavioral theory of depression--emphasizing the need for clients to contact positive reinforcement--and a set of therapeutic techniques--emphasizing provision of instructions rather than therapeutic provision of reinforcement. An integration of Behavioral Activation with…

  13. Psychological behaviorism and behaviorizing psychology

    PubMed Central

    Staats, Arthur W.

    1994-01-01

    Paradigmatic or psychological behaviorism (PB), in a four-decade history of development, has been shaped by its goal, the establishment of a behaviorism that can also serve as the approach in psychology (Watson's original goal). In the process, PB has become a new generation of behaviorism with abundant heuristic avenues for development in theory, philosophy, methodology, and research. Psychology has resources, purview and problem areas, and nascent developments of many kinds, gathered in chaotic diversity, needing unification (and other things) that cognitivism cannot provide. Behaviorism can, within PB's multilevel framework for connecting and advancing both psychology and behaviorism. PMID:22478175

  14. Behavioral toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Needleman, H.L.

    1995-09-01

    The new fields of behavioral toxicology and behavioral teratology investigate the outcome of specific toxic exposures in humans and animals on learning, memory, and behavioral characteristics. Three important classes of behavioral neurotoxicants are metals, solvents, and pesticides. The clearest data on the deleterious effects of prenatal exposure to toxicants comes from the study of two metals, lead and mercury, and form epidemiological investigations of the effects of alcohol taken during pregnancy. Less complete data are available for two other groups of agents, solvents, and pesticides. What we do know about their effects on the fetal brain is convincing enough to make us demand caution in their distribution. 15 refs.

  15. Do warning displays predict striking behavior in a viperid snake, the cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus)?

    SciTech Connect

    Glaudas, X. and C.T. Winne

    2007-01-01

    Warning displays are defined as signals designed to intimidate predators or indicate a proclivity to fight. However, support for the idea that warning behaviors signal an intent to fight is largely based on anecdotes and isolated observations, and a complete understanding of antipredator behavior will only be achieved if specific hypotheses are experimentally tested. Herein, we tested in a North American viperid snake, the cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus), the hypothesis that warning displays serve as a reliable signal to potential predators that a snake will strike. The cottonmouth exhibits two stereotypical warning displays during predator confrontation, i.e., mouth gaping and tail vibrations, making it an ideal study organism to experimentally test the relationship between warning displays and defensive striking. To test this idea, we recorded the sequence of defensive behavior--gaping, tail vibrating, and striking--of cottonmouths towards a standardized predatory stimulus in the laboratory. As predicted, snakes that gaped during the trials were subsequently more likely to strike than snakes that did not. In contrast, striking behavior was independent of the occurrence of tail vibrations. Our results suggest that gaping behavior--but not tail-vibrating behavior--may provide an honest signal to would-be predators.

  16. Behavior Matters

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Edwin B.; Fitzgibbon, Marian L.; Glasgow, Russell E.; Haire-Joshu, Debra; Hayman, Laura L.; Kaplan, Robert M.; Nanney, Marilyn S.; Ockene, Judith K.

    2011-01-01

    Behavior has a broad and central role in health. Behavioral interventions can be effectively used to prevent disease, improve management of existing disease, increase quality of life, and reduce healthcare costs. A summary is presented of evidence for these conclusions in cardiovascular disease/diabetes, cancer, and HIV/AIDS as well as with key risk factors: tobacco use, poor diet, physical inactivity, and excessive alcohol consumption. For each, documentation is made of (1) moderation of genetic and other fundamental biological influences by behaviors and social–environmental factors, (2) impacts of behaviors on health, (3) success of behavioral interventions in prevention, (4) disease management, (5) and quality of life, and (6) improvements in the health of populations through behavioral health promotion programs. Evidence indicates the cost effectiveness and value of behavioral interventions, especially relative to other common health services, as well as the value they add in terms of quality of life. Pertinent to clinicians and their patients as well as to health policy and population health, the benefits of behavioral interventions extend beyond impacts on a particular disease or risk factor. Rather, they include broad effects and benefits on prevention, disease management, and well-being across the life span. Among priorities for dissemination research, the application of behavioral approaches is challenged by diverse barriers, including socioeconomic barriers linked to health disparities. However, behavioral approaches including those emphasizing community and social influences appear to be useful in addressing such challenges. In sum, behavioral approaches should have a central place in prevention and health care of the 21st century. PMID:21496745

  17. Decoding and Discrimination of Chemical Cues and Signals: Avoidance of Predation and Competition during Parental Care Behavior in Sympatric Poison Frogs.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Lisa M; Krauss, Martin; Lötters, Stefan; Schulze, Tobias; Brack, Werner

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of chemical communication and the discrimination between evolved functions (signals) and unintentional releases (cues) are among the most challenging issues in chemical ecology. The accurate classification of inter- or intraspecific chemical communication is often puzzling. Here we report on two different communication systems triggering the same parental care behavior in the poison frog Ranitomeya variabilis. This species deposits its tadpoles and egg clutches in phytotelmata and chemically recognizes and avoids sites with both predatory conspecific and non-predatory heterospecific tadpoles (of the species Hyloxalus azureiventris). Combining chemical analyses with in-situ bioassays, we identified the molecular formulas of the chemical compounds triggering this behavior. We found that both species produce distinct chemical compound combinations, suggesting two separate communication systems. Bringing these results into an ecological context, we classify the conspecific R. variabilis compounds as chemical cues, advantageous only to the receivers (the adult frogs), not the emitters (the tadpoles). The heterospecific compounds, however, are suggested to be chemical signals (or cues evolving into signals), being advantageous to the emitters (the heterospecific tadpoles) and likely also to the receivers (the adult frogs). Due to these assumed receiver benefits, the heterospecific compounds are possibly synomones which are advantageous to both emitter and receiver ‒ a very rare communication system between animal species, especially vertebrates.

  18. Decoding and Discrimination of Chemical Cues and Signals: Avoidance of Predation and Competition during Parental Care Behavior in Sympatric Poison Frogs

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Lisa M.; Krauss, Martin; Lötters, Stefan; Schulze, Tobias; Brack, Werner

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of chemical communication and the discrimination between evolved functions (signals) and unintentional releases (cues) are among the most challenging issues in chemical ecology. The accurate classification of inter- or intraspecific chemical communication is often puzzling. Here we report on two different communication systems triggering the same parental care behavior in the poison frog Ranitomeya variabilis. This species deposits its tadpoles and egg clutches in phytotelmata and chemically recognizes and avoids sites with both predatory conspecific and non-predatory heterospecific tadpoles (of the species Hyloxalus azureiventris). Combining chemical analyses with in-situ bioassays, we identified the molecular formulas of the chemical compounds triggering this behavior. We found that both species produce distinct chemical compound combinations, suggesting two separate communication systems. Bringing these results into an ecological context, we classify the conspecific R. variabilis compounds as chemical cues, advantageous only to the receivers (the adult frogs), not the emitters (the tadpoles). The heterospecific compounds, however, are suggested to be chemical signals (or cues evolving into signals), being advantageous to the emitters (the heterospecific tadpoles) and likely also to the receivers (the adult frogs). Due to these assumed receiver benefits, the heterospecific compounds are possibly synomones which are advantageous to both emitter and receiver ‒ a very rare communication system between animal species, especially vertebrates. PMID:26132416

  19. Behavioral economics.

    PubMed

    Hursh, S R

    1984-11-01

    Economics, like behavioral psychology, is a science of behavior, albeit highly organized human behavior. The value of economic concepts for behavioral psychology rests on (1) their empirical validity when tested in the laboratory with individual subjects and (2) their uniqueness when compared to established behavioral concepts. Several fundamental concepts are introduced and illustrated by reference to experimental data: open and closed economies, elastic and inelastic demand, and substitution versus complementarity. Changes in absolute response rate are analyzed in relation to elasticity and intensity of demand. The economic concepts of substitution and complementarity are related to traditional behavioral studies of choice and to the matching relation. The economic approach has many implications for the future of behavioral research and theory. In general, economic concepts are grounded on a dynamic view of reinforcement. The closed-economy methodology extends the generality of behavioral principles to situations in which response rate and obtained rate of reinforcement are interdependent. Analysis of results in terms of elasticity and intensity of demand promises to provide a more direct method for characterizing the effects of "motivational" variables. Future studies of choice should arrange heterogeneous reinforcers with varying elasticities, use closed economies, and modulate scarcity or income. The economic analysis can be extended to the study of performances that involve subtle discriminations or skilled movements that vary in accuracy or quality as opposed to rate or quantity, and thus permit examination of time/accuracy trade-offs.

  20. Behavioral economics.

    PubMed

    Camerer, Colin F

    2014-09-22

    Behavioral economics uses evidence from psychology and other social sciences to create a precise and fruitful alternative to traditional economic theories, which are based on optimization. Behavioral economics may interest some biologists, as it shifts the basis for theories of economic choice away from logical calculation and maximization and toward biologically plausible mechanisms.

  1. Changing Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Peter W.

    1993-01-01

    Provides a framework for examining problems where the solution involves changing human behavior. Topics addressed include the perspective of content versus the perspective of process; force field analysis; problems of omission and commission; and determinants of behavior, i.e., perceived effects and consequences. (LRW)

  2. Making behavioral activation more behavioral.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Jonathan W; Manos, Rachel C; Busch, Andrew M; Rusch, Laura C

    2008-11-01

    Behavioral Activation, an efficacious treatment for depression, presents a behavioral theory of depression--emphasizing the need for clients to contact positive reinforcement--and a set of therapeutic techniques--emphasizing provision of instructions rather than therapeutic provision of reinforcement. An integration of Behavioral Activation with another behavioral treatment, Functional Analytic Psychotherapy, addresses this mismatch. Functional Analytic Psychotherapy provides a process for the therapeutic provision of immediate and natural reinforcement. This article presents this integration and offers theoretical and practical therapist guidelines on its application. Although the integration is largely theoretical, empirical data are presented in its support when available. The article ends with a discussion of future research directions.

  3. The Scent of Blood: A Driver of Human Behavior?

    PubMed Central

    Moran, James K.; Dietrich, Daniel R.; Elbert, Thomas; Pause, Bettina M.; Kübler, Lisa; Weierstall, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The scent of blood is potentially one of the most fundamental and survival-relevant olfactory cues in humans. This experiment tests the first human parameters of perceptual threshold and emotional ratings in men and women of an artificially simulated smell of fresh blood in contact with the skin. We hypothesize that this scent of blood, with its association with injury, danger, death, and nutrition will be a critical cue activating fundamental motivational systems relating to either predatory approach behavior or prey-like withdrawal behavior, or both. The results show that perceptual thresholds are unimodally distributed for both sexes, with women being more sensitive. Furthermore, both women and men’s emotional responses to simulated blood scent divide strongly into positive and negative valence ratings, with negative ratings in women having a strong arousal component. For women, this split is related to the phase of their menstrual cycle and oral contraception (OC). Future research will investigate whether this split in both genders is context-dependent or trait-like. PMID:26397374

  4. Behavioral diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J S; Pyles, D A

    1989-01-01

    The contemporary behavior analyst, to operate ethically and effectively, must be aware of many more factors affecting behavior than simple consequences. Although the literature demonstrating the effectiveness of active behavior management is impressive, a compelling argument can be made that a great number of behavior problem seen in individuals with developmental disabilities may be attributable to factors other than consequences. Our experience has been more often than not that physiological, organic, medication, or situational variables are the actual culprits in maladaptive behavior. Individuals with severe or profound retardation may respond to aversive features of their environment by displaying noncompliance, tantrums, aggression, or self-injurious behavior. These antecedents can affect their behavior just as powerfully as can the consequences of their behavior. Behavior analysts must become sensitive to these potential factors and be prepared to employ behavioral diagnostic strategies in the search for the causes of maladaptive behavior. Finally, they must be prepared to design rather unconventional passive behavior management treatment programs involving the manipulation of the antecedent environment. In the case of Carrie, from the example at the beginning of this paper, the analysis yielded the hypothesis that her face scratching was a reaction to sinus blockage caused by seasonal allergies. Her treatment involved daily dosages of antihistamines administered by our nurses and subsequent elimination of the scratching. Tom was found to be suffering from "wheelchair fatigue." When he was allowed to recline on other surfaces (e.g., bean bag chair, mat, bolster) on a regular basis, he did not attempt any form of self-injury. Melissa was found to have a severe case of Pre Menstrual Syndrome as well as seizure disorder, and was treated with the appropriate medications. Her headbanging was reduced to a few minor incidents per month. Walter's tantrums on closer

  5. Behavioral addictions.

    PubMed

    Robbins, T W; Clark, L

    2015-02-01

    Behavioral addictions are slowly becoming recognized as a valid category of psychiatric disorder as shown by the recent allocation of pathological gambling to this category in DSM-5. However, several other types of psychiatric disorder proposed to be examples of behavioral addictions have yet to be accorded this formal acknowledgment and are dispersed across other sections of the DSM-5. This brief review marks this important point in the evolution of this concept and looks to future investigation of behavioral addictions with the theoretical frameworks currently being used successfully to investigate substance addiction and obsessive-compulsive disorder, in a potentially new spectrum of impulsive-compulsive disorders.

  6. Relating sexual sadism and psychopathy to one another, non-sexual violence, and sexual crime behaviors.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Carrie A; Knight, Raymond A

    2014-01-01

    Sexual sadism and psychopathy have been theoretically, clinically, and empirically linked to violence. Although both constructs are linked to predatory violence, few studies have sought to explore the covariation of the two constructs, and even fewer have sought to conceptualize the similarities of violence prediction in each. The current study considered all four Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) facets and employed well-defined, validated measures of sadism to elucidate the relation between sadism and psychopathy, as well as to determine the role of each in the prediction of non-sexual violence and sexual crime behaviors. Study 1 assessed 314 adult, male sex offenders using archival ratings, as well as the self-report Multidimensional Inventory of Development, Sex, and Aggression (the MIDSA). Study 2 used archival ratings to assess 599 adult, male sex offenders. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of crime scene descriptions yielded four sexual crime behavior factors: Violence, Physical Control, Sexual Behavior, and Paraphilic. Sadism and psychopathy covaried, but were not coextensive; sadism correlated with Total PCL-R, Facet 1, and Facet 4 scores. The constructs predicted all non-sexual violence measures, but predicted different sexual crime behavior factors. The PCL-R facets collectively predicted the Violence and Paraphilic factors, whereas sadism only predicted the Violence factor.

  7. Variation in nesting behavior of eight species of spider mites, Stigmaeopsis having sociality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yutaka; Zhang, Yan-Xuan; Mori, Kotaro; Ito, Katsura; Sato, Yukie; Chittenden, Anthony R.; Lin, Jian-Zhen; Chae, Younghae; Sakagami, Takane; Sahara, Ken

    2016-10-01

    Nesting behavior is considered to be an important element of social living in animals. The spider mites belonging to the genus Stigmaeopsis spend their lives within nests produced from silk threads. Several of these species show cooperative sociality, while the others are subsocial. In order to identify the origins of this social behavior, comparisons of nest sizes, nesting behaviors (making nests continuously or separately), and their associated traits (fecal deposition patterns) were made for eight cogeneric Stigmaeopsis species showing various levels of social development. All of these species inhabit bamboo plants (Poaceae). We initially addressed the proximate factor of nest size variation. The variation in nest size of the eight species corresponded well with the variation in dorsal seta sc1 length, suggesting that nest size variation among species may have a genetic basis. The time spent within a nest (nest duration) increased with nest size on the respective host plants. Nest arrangement patterns varied among species showing different sized nests: Large nest builders continuously extended their nests, while middle and small nest-building species built new separate nests, which resulted in different social interaction times among species, and is thought to be closely related to social development. Fecal deposition behaviors also varied among Stigmaeopsis species, suggesting diversity in anti-predatory adaptations. Finally, we discuss how the variation in sociality observed within this genus is likely the result of nest size variation that initially evolved as anti-predator strategies.

  8. Relating Sexual Sadism and Psychopathy to One Another, Non-Sexual Violence, and Sexual Crime Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Carrie A.; Knight, Raymond A.

    2014-01-01

    Sexual sadism and psychopathy have been theoretically, clinically, and empirically linked to violence. Although both constructs are linked to predatory violence, few studies have sought to explore the covariation of the two constructs, and even fewer have sought to conceptualize the similarities of violence prediction in each. The current study considered all four Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) facets and employed well-defined, validated measures of sadism to elucidate the relation between sadism and psychopathy, as well as to determine the role of each in the prediction of non-sexual violence and sexual crime behaviors. Study 1 assessed 314 adult, male sex offenders using archival ratings, as well as the self-report Multidimensional Inventory of Development, Sex, and Aggression (the MIDSA). Study 2 used archival ratings to assess 599 adult, male sex offenders. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of crime scene descriptions yielded four sexual crime behavior factors: Violence, Physical Control, Sexual Behavior, and Paraphilic. Sadism and psychopathy covaried, but were not coextensive; sadism correlated with Total PCL-R, Facet 1, and Facet 4 scores. The constructs predicted all non-sexual violence measures, but predicted different sexual crime behavior factors. The PCL-R facets collectively predicted the Violence and Paraphilic factors, whereas sadism only predicted the Violence factor. PMID:24019144

  9. Behavior Modification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boardman, Randolph M.

    2010-01-01

    In a perfect world, students would never talk back to school staff and never argue or fight with each other. They would complete all their assigned tasks, and disciplinary actions never would be needed. Unfortunately, people don't live in a perfect world. Student behavior is a daily concern. Teachers continue to refer students to the office as a…

  10. Developmental behavior.

    PubMed

    Crowell-Davis, S L

    1986-12-01

    Examination of the developmental changes that occur in the behavior of foals reveals three major periods that can be characterized by certain types of behavior. Although the beginnings and endings of these periods are not definitive, these periods may be conceptually useful in evaluating a foal's behavior. Period of Dependence. During the first 4 weeks of life, a foal is maximally dependent on its mother for sustenance, remains near her, and has little contact with other horses or ponies of any age. Period of Socialization. During the second and third months of life, foals have rapidly increasing contact with ponies and horses other than their mother, especially with other foals. Mutual-grooming peaks during this period, as does snapping, which is probably being carried out as a displacement activity during the stressful period of initial contact with non-mother horses. Period of Stabilization and Developing Independence. From the fourth month onward, foals gradually become more independent, both from their mother and from other herd members as they progress toward adult patterns of spatial relationships, social interactions, and maintenance behaviors. PMID:3492246

  11. Behavior Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and consequences. Give your child a specified reward (positive reinforcement) every time she shows the desired behavior. Give your child a consequence (unwanted result or punishment) consistently when she has ... in a positive way. Most experts recommend using both medication and ...

  12. The genus Anthia Weber in the Republic of South Africa, Identification, distribution, biogeography, and behavior (Coleoptera, Carabidae)

    PubMed Central

    Mawdsley, Jonathan R.; Erwin, Terry L.; Sithole, Hendrik; Mawdsley, James L.; Mawdsley, Alice S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A key is presented for the identification of the four species of Anthia Weber (Coleoptera: Carabidae) recorded from the Republic of South Africa: Anthia cinctipennis Lequien, Anthia circumscripta Klug, Anthia maxillosa (Fabricius), and Anthia thoracica (Thunberg). For each of these species, illustrations are provided of adult beetles of both sexes as well as illustrations of male reproductive structures, morphological redescriptions, discussions of morphological variation, annual activity histograms, and maps of occurrence localities in the Republic of South Africa. Maps of occurrence localities for these species are compared against ecoregional and vegetation maps of southern Africa; each species of Anthia shows a different pattern of occupancy across the suite of ecoregions and vegetation types in the Republic of South Africa. Information about predatory and foraging behaviors, Müllerian mimicry, and small-scale vegetation community associations is presented for Anthia thoracica based on field and laboratory studies in Kruger National Park, South Africa. PMID:22144866

  13. The genus Anthia Weber in the Republic of South Africa, Identification, distribution, biogeography, and behavior (Coleoptera, Carabidae).

    PubMed

    Mawdsley, Jonathan R; Erwin, Terry L; Sithole, Hendrik; Mawdsley, James L; Mawdsley, Alice S

    2011-01-01

    A key is presented for the identification of the four species of Anthia Weber (Coleoptera: Carabidae) recorded from the Republic of South Africa: Anthia cinctipennis Lequien, Anthia circumscripta Klug, Anthia maxillosa (Fabricius), and Anthia thoracica (Thunberg). For each of these species, illustrations are provided of adult beetles of both sexes as well as illustrations of male reproductive structures, morphological redescriptions, discussions of morphological variation, annual activity histograms, and maps of occurrence localities in the Republic of South Africa. Maps of occurrence localities for these species are compared against ecoregional and vegetation maps of southern Africa; each species of Anthia shows a different pattern of occupancy across the suite of ecoregions and vegetation types in the Republic of South Africa. Information about predatory and foraging behaviors, Müllerian mimicry, and small-scale vegetation community associations is presented for Anthia thoracica based on field and laboratory studies in Kruger National Park, South Africa.

  14. [Behavior therapy and neurotic behavior].

    PubMed

    Ylieff, M

    1977-01-01

    The first part of the lecture presents three classical aspects of behavior therapy: therapeutic efficiency, utilisation of well defined methods, rapidity of treatment. Emphasis is brought to the importance of behavior analysis and to the dangers arisen from insufficient knowledge or ignorance of learning theories and fundamental principles of behavior analysis. One insists on experimental analysis which is the basis for methods of action having as consequence for the therapeut: controlling strategy of treatment and direct responsibility concerning success and failure. Then, actual limitations of behaviour therapy are described. The second part deals with one of the most important working hypothesis on human neurosis originating from laboratory and clinical research. Behavior therapy refuses to elaborate hypothetical deductive constructions, unless working hypotheses to be verified. Then the four essential clues to behavioural psychotherapy are formulated. The main methods of action presently utilized are presented: aversive methods, operational and systematic desensitization technics through reciprocal inhibition. Finally, some of the main criticism usually made on behaviour therapy are being discussed.

  15. Rapid biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Crotalaria verrucosa leaves against the dengue vector Aedes aegypti: what happens around? An analysis of dragonfly predatory behaviour after exposure at ultra-low doses.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Sanoopa, C P; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Dinesh, Devakumar; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Roni, Mathath; Suresh, Udaiyan; Nicoletti, Marcello; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Munusamy, Murugan A; Higuchi, Akon; Kumar, Suresh; Perumalsamy, Haribalan; Ahn, Young-Joon; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Aedes aegypti is a primary vector of dengue, a mosquito-borne viral disease infecting 50-100 million people every year. Here, we biosynthesised mosquitocidal silver nanoparticles (AgNP) using the aqueous leaf extract of Crotalaria verrucosa. The green synthesis of AgNP was studied by UV-vis spectroscopy, SEM, EDX and FTIR. C. verrucosa-synthesised AgNPs were toxic against A. aegypti larvae and pupae. LC50 of AgNP ranged from 3.496 ppm (I instar larvae) to 17.700 ppm (pupae). Furthermore, we evaluated the predatory efficiency of dragonfly nymphs, Brachydiplax sobrina, against II and III instar larvae of A. aegypti in an aquatic environment contaminated with ultra-low doses of AgNP. Under standard laboratory conditions, predation after 24 h was 87.5% (II) and 54.7% (III). In an AgNP-contaminated environment, predation was 91 and 75.5%, respectively. Overall, C. verrucosa-synthesised AgNP could be employed at ultra-low doses to reduce larval population of dengue vectors enhancing predation rates of dragonfly nymphs. PMID:26284510

  16. Rapid biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Crotalaria verrucosa leaves against the dengue vector Aedes aegypti: what happens around? An analysis of dragonfly predatory behaviour after exposure at ultra-low doses.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Sanoopa, C P; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Dinesh, Devakumar; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Roni, Mathath; Suresh, Udaiyan; Nicoletti, Marcello; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Munusamy, Murugan A; Higuchi, Akon; Kumar, Suresh; Perumalsamy, Haribalan; Ahn, Young-Joon; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Aedes aegypti is a primary vector of dengue, a mosquito-borne viral disease infecting 50-100 million people every year. Here, we biosynthesised mosquitocidal silver nanoparticles (AgNP) using the aqueous leaf extract of Crotalaria verrucosa. The green synthesis of AgNP was studied by UV-vis spectroscopy, SEM, EDX and FTIR. C. verrucosa-synthesised AgNPs were toxic against A. aegypti larvae and pupae. LC50 of AgNP ranged from 3.496 ppm (I instar larvae) to 17.700 ppm (pupae). Furthermore, we evaluated the predatory efficiency of dragonfly nymphs, Brachydiplax sobrina, against II and III instar larvae of A. aegypti in an aquatic environment contaminated with ultra-low doses of AgNP. Under standard laboratory conditions, predation after 24 h was 87.5% (II) and 54.7% (III). In an AgNP-contaminated environment, predation was 91 and 75.5%, respectively. Overall, C. verrucosa-synthesised AgNP could be employed at ultra-low doses to reduce larval population of dengue vectors enhancing predation rates of dragonfly nymphs.

  17. Crisis behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Grinspoon, L.

    1984-04-01

    The Department of Defense has rules and procedures to minimize the opportunity for error and improper behavior among those with access to strategic weapons, but no psychiatric screening system can predict with assurance who will or will not behave rationally during a crisis. Personal problems and institutional decision-making pressures may destroy nuclear deterrence. Certain features of military life, including drug and alcohol abuse, heavy responsibility, tension, and group decision making, can destreoy rationality. 12 references.

  18. OPEC behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo

    This thesis aims to contribute to a further understanding of the real dynamics of OPEC production behavior and its impacts on the world oil market. A literature review in this area shows that the existing studies on OPEC still have some major deficiencies in theoretical interpretation and empirical estimation technique. After a brief background review in chapter 1, chapter 2 tests Griffin's market-sharing cartel model on the post-Griffin time horizon with a simultaneous system of equations, and an innovative hypothesis of OPEC's behavior (Saudi Arabia in particular) is then proposed based on the estimation results. Chapter 3 first provides a conceptual analysis of OPEC behavior under the framework of non-cooperative collusion with imperfect information. An empirical model is then constructed and estimated. The results of the empirical studies in this thesis strongly support the hypothesis that OPEC has operated as a market-sharing cartel since the early 1980s. In addition, the results also provide some support of the theory of non-cooperative collusion under imperfect information. OPEC members collude under normal circumstances and behave competitively at times in response to imperfect market signals of cartel compliance and some internal attributes. Periodic joint competition conduct plays an important role in sustaining the collusion in the long run. Saudi Arabia acts as the leader of the cartel, accommodating intermediate unfavorable market development and punishing others with a tit-for-tat strategy in extreme circumstances.

  19. Cholecystokinin B receptors in the periaqueductal gray potentiate defensive rage behavior elicited from the medial hypothalamus of the cat.

    PubMed

    Luo, B; Cheu, J W; Siegel, A

    1998-06-15

    Defensive rage behavior is mediated over a descending pathway from the medial hypothalamus to the dorsolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) where further integration of this response takes place. The present study sought to determine the roles of CCK-A and CCK-B receptor activation in the PAG in modulating defensive rage behavior. The 'hissing' component of the defensive rage response was used throughout the experiment as the measure of defensive rage behavior. The basic design of the experiment involved placement of monopolar electrodes into the medial hypothalamus from which defensive rage could be elicited and cannula electrodes into the dorsal PAG for purposes of identifying defensive rage sites in this region and for microinjections of CCK compounds into these sites at a later time. Microinjections of the selective CCK-B receptor antagonist, LY288513 (1.05, 4.2, 17.0 nmol/0.25 microliter), into the PAG suppressed the hissing response in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Microinjections of the CCK-B agonist, pentagastrin, (0.5 and 1.0 nmol/0.25 microliter) facilitated the occurrence of defensive rage behavior. Moreover, administration of LY288513 (17 nmol/0.25 microliter) 55 min prior to pentagastrin (1.0 nmol/0.25 microliter) delivery blocked the facilitatory effects of pentagastrin. Administration of the CCK-A antagonist, PD140548 (34 nmol/0.25 microliter), into the PAG failed to alter response latencies for defensive rage behavior. In contrast, microinjections of the CCK-B antagonist, LY288513 (4.2, 17.0 nmol/0.25 microliter), facilitated the occurrence of predatory attack behavior elicited from the lateral hypothalamus. This finding demonstrates the specificity of the effects of CCK-B receptor blockade upon hissing. A combination of immunocytochemical and retrograde tracing procedures using microinjections of Fluoro-Gold (8%, 6 microliters) into the PAG were employed to identify the possible loci of CCK neurons that project to the PAG. The data

  20. Moorea BIOCODE barcode library as a tool for understanding predator-prey interactions: insights into the diet of common predatory coral reef fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leray, M.; Boehm, J. T.; Mills, S. C.; Meyer, C. P.

    2012-06-01

    Identifying species involved in consumer-resource interactions is one of the main limitations in the construction of food webs. DNA barcoding of prey items in predator guts provides a valuable tool for characterizing trophic interactions, but the method relies on the availability of reference sequences to which prey sequences can be matched. In this study, we demonstrate that the COI sequence library of the Moorea BIOCODE project, an ecosystem-level barcode initiative, enables the identification of a large proportion of semi-digested fish, crustacean and mollusks found in the guts of three Hawkfish and two Squirrelfish species. While most prey remains lacked diagnostic morphological characters, 94% of the prey found in 67 fishes had >98% sequence similarity with BIOCODE reference sequences. Using this species-level prey identification, we demonstrate how DNA barcoding can provide insights into resource partitioning, predator feeding behaviors and the consequences of predation on ecosystem function.

  1. Effect of downed woody debris on small mammal anti-predator behavior.

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkleman, Travis, M.; Orrock, John, L.; Loeb, Susan, C.

    2011-10-01

    Anti-predator behavior can affect prey growth, reproduction, survival, and generate emergent effects in food webs. Small mammals often lower the cost of predation by altering their behavior in response to shrubs,but the importance of other microhabitat features, such as downed woody debris, for anti-predator behavior is unknown. We used givingup densities to quantify the degree to which downed woody debris alters perceived predation risk by small mammals in southeastern pineforests. We placed 14 foraging trays next to large downed woody debris,shrubs, and in open areas for 12 consecutive nights. Moon illumination, a common indicator of predation risk, led to a similar reduction in small mammal foraging in all three microhabitats (open, downed woody debris,and shrub). Small mammals perceived open microhabitats as riskier than shrub microhabitats, with downed woody debris habitats perceived as being of intermediate risk between shrub and open microhabitats. Despite the presumed benefits of the protective cover of downed woody debris, small mammals may perceive downed woody debris as a relatively risky foraging site in southeastern pine forests where the high diversity and abundance of rodent-eating snakes may provide a primary predatory threat.

  2. Sharks modulate their escape behavior in response to predator size, speed and approach orientation.

    PubMed

    Seamone, Scott; Blaine, Tristan; Higham, Timothy E

    2014-12-01

    Escape responses are often critical for surviving predator-prey interactions. Nevertheless, little is known about how predator size, speed and approach orientation impact escape performance, especially in larger prey that are primarily viewed as predators. We used realistic shark models to examine how altering predatory behavior and morphology (size, speed and approach orientation) influences escape behavior and performance in Squalus acanthias, a shark that is preyed upon by apex marine predators. Predator models induced C-start escape responses, and increasing the size and speed of the models triggered a more intense response (increased escape turning rate and acceleration). In addition, increased predator size resulted in greater responsiveness from the sharks. Among the responses, predator approach orientation had the most significant impact on escapes, such that the head-on approach, as compared to the tail-on approach, induced greater reaction distances and increased escape turning rate, speed and acceleration. Thus, the anterior binocular vision in sharks renders them less effective at detecting predators approaching from behind. However, it appears that sharks compensate by performing high-intensity escapes, likely induced by the lateral line system, or by a sudden visual flash of the predator entering their field of view. Our study reveals key aspects of escape behavior in sharks, highlighting the modulation of performance in response to predator approach.

  3. A revised and dated phylogeny of cobweb spiders (Araneae, Araneoidea, Theridiidae): A predatory Cretaceous lineage diversifying in the era of the ants (Hymenoptera, Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; May-Collado, Laura J; Pekár, Stano; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2016-01-01

    Cobweb spiders (Theridiidae) are highly diverse from the perspective of species richness, morphological diversity, variety of web architecture, and behavioral repertoires. The family includes over 50% of social spiders, a behavioral rarity among the order, and members of the family are furthermore the subject of research on venom, silk biomechanics, kleptoparasitism and web building, among other traits. Theridiidae is one of the most abundant groups of spiders, and thus key insect predators in many different ecosystems and is among relatively few spider families that show high degree of myrmecophagy. Modern comparative studies on all these fronts are best buttressed on a phylogenetic foundation. Our goal here is to offer a revised, dated, phylogenetic hypothesis for the family by summarizing previously published data from multiple molecular and morphological studies through data-mining, and adding novel data from several genera. We also test the hypothesis that the origin and diversification of cobweb spiders coincides with that of ants on which many species specialize as prey. The new phylogeny is largely congruent with prior studies and current taxonomy and should provide a useful tool for theridiid classification and for comparative analyses. Nevertheless, we also highlight the limitations of currently available data-the state of the art in Theridiidae phylogenetics-offering weak support for most of the deeper nodes in the phylogeny. Thus the need is clear for modern phylogenomic approaches to obtain a more solid understanding, especially of relationships among subfamilies. We recover the monophyly of currently recognized theridiid subfamilies with the exception of some enigmatic 'pholcommatines' (Styposis, Phoroncidia) and putative 'hadrotarsines' (Audifia, Tekellina) whose placement is uncertain in our analyses. Theridiidae dates back some 100 mya to the Cretaceous, a period of diversification in flowering plants and many groups of insects, including ants. The

  4. A revised and dated phylogeny of cobweb spiders (Araneae, Araneoidea, Theridiidae): A predatory Cretaceous lineage diversifying in the era of the ants (Hymenoptera, Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; May-Collado, Laura J; Pekár, Stano; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2016-01-01

    Cobweb spiders (Theridiidae) are highly diverse from the perspective of species richness, morphological diversity, variety of web architecture, and behavioral repertoires. The family includes over 50% of social spiders, a behavioral rarity among the order, and members of the family are furthermore the subject of research on venom, silk biomechanics, kleptoparasitism and web building, among other traits. Theridiidae is one of the most abundant groups of spiders, and thus key insect predators in many different ecosystems and is among relatively few spider families that show high degree of myrmecophagy. Modern comparative studies on all these fronts are best buttressed on a phylogenetic foundation. Our goal here is to offer a revised, dated, phylogenetic hypothesis for the family by summarizing previously published data from multiple molecular and morphological studies through data-mining, and adding novel data from several genera. We also test the hypothesis that the origin and diversification of cobweb spiders coincides with that of ants on which many species specialize as prey. The new phylogeny is largely congruent with prior studies and current taxonomy and should provide a useful tool for theridiid classification and for comparative analyses. Nevertheless, we also highlight the limitations of currently available data-the state of the art in Theridiidae phylogenetics-offering weak support for most of the deeper nodes in the phylogeny. Thus the need is clear for modern phylogenomic approaches to obtain a more solid understanding, especially of relationships among subfamilies. We recover the monophyly of currently recognized theridiid subfamilies with the exception of some enigmatic 'pholcommatines' (Styposis, Phoroncidia) and putative 'hadrotarsines' (Audifia, Tekellina) whose placement is uncertain in our analyses. Theridiidae dates back some 100 mya to the Cretaceous, a period of diversification in flowering plants and many groups of insects, including ants. The

  5. Role of behavior theory in behavioral medicine.

    PubMed

    Epstein, L H

    1992-08-01

    Behavioral medicine is a multidisciplinary field that combines research methods and findings from behavioral and biomedical sciences. Many investigators in the field have tended to emphasize the contribution of the biomedical more than the behavioral sciences. This is evident in the emphasis on biological rather than behavioral outcomes and on the reductionist approach within the field to reduce mechanisms responsible for behavioral effects and disease to biological influences. There has been a similar shift in psychology toward mechanistic, bottom-up approaches to understanding mechanisms responsible for integrated and dynamic behavior. These shifts in emphasis have stimulated investigators to examine the use of biomedical methods and findings as causes and explanations for behavior, rather than to utilize newer findings in behavioral sciences. New advances in basic research on learning are used to illustrate that findings from behavioral science have implications for the field of contemporary behavioral medicine. Finally, the importance of developing new technologies for measuring behavior is presented.

  6. Persistent behavioral impairment caused by embryonic methylphenidate exposure in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Levin, Edward D; Sledge, Damiyon; Roach, Stephanie; Petro, Ann; Donerly, Susan; Linney, Elwood

    2011-01-01

    As more adults take the stimulant medication methylphenidate to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) residual type, the risk arises with regard to exposure during early development if people taking the medication become pregnant. We studied the neurobehavioral effects of methylphenidate in zebrafish. Zebrafish offer cellular reporter systems, continuous visual access and molecular interventions such as morpholinos to help determine critical mechanisms underlying neurobehavioral teratogenicity. Previously, we had seen that persisting neurobehavioral impairment in zebrafish with developmental chlorpyrifos exposure was associated with disturbed dopamine systems. Because methylphenidate is an indirect dopamine agonist, it was thought that it might also cause persistent behavioral impairment after developmental exposure. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to the ADHD stimulant medication methylphenidate 0-5 days post fertilization (12.5-50mg/l). They were tested for long-term behavioral effects as adults. Methylphenidate exposure (50mg/l) caused significant increases in dopamine, norepinepherine and serotonin on day 6 but not day 30 after fertilization. In the novel tank diving test of predatory avoidance developmental methylphenidate (50mg/l) caused a significant reduction in the normal diving response. In the three-chamber spatial learning task early developmental methylphenidate (50mg/l) caused a significant impairment in choice accuracy. These data show that early developmental exposure of zebrafish to methylphenidate causes a long-term impairment in neurobehavioral plasticity. The identification of these functional deficits in zebrafish enables further studies with this model to determine how molecular and cellular mechanisms are disturbed to arrive at this compromised state.

  7. Behavior subtraction.

    PubMed

    Jodoin, Pierre-Marc; Saligrama, Venkatesh; Konrad, Janusz

    2012-09-01

    Background subtraction has been a driving engine for many computer vision and video analytics tasks. Although its many variants exist, they all share the underlying assumption that photometric scene properties are either static or exhibit temporal stationarity. While this works in many applications, the model fails when one is interested in discovering changes in scene dynamics instead of changes in scene's photometric properties; the detection of unusual pedestrian or motor traffic patterns are but two examples. We propose a new model and computational framework that assume the dynamics of a scene, not its photometry, to be stationary, i.e., a dynamic background serves as the reference for the dynamics of an observed scene. Central to our approach is the concept of an event, which we define as short-term scene dynamics captured over a time window at a specific spatial location in the camera field of view. Unlike in our earlier work, we compute events by time-aggregating vector object descriptors that can combine multiple features, such as object size, direction of movement, speed, etc. We characterize events probabilistically, but use low-memory, low-complexity surrogates in a practical implementation. Using these surrogates amounts to behavior subtraction, a new algorithm for effective and efficient temporal anomaly detection and localization. Behavior subtraction is resilient to spurious background motion, such as due to camera jitter, and is content-blind, i.e., it works equally well on humans, cars, animals, and other objects in both uncluttered and highly cluttered scenes. Clearly, treating video as a collection of events rather than colored pixels opens new possibilities for video analytics.

  8. A novel paradigm for nonassociative long-term memory in Drosophila: predator-induced changes in oviposition behavior.

    PubMed

    Kacsoh, Balint Z; Bozler, Julianna; Hodge, Sassan; Ramaswami, Mani; Bosco, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    Learning processes in Drosophila have been studied through the use of Pavlovian associative memory tests, and these paradigms have been extremely useful in identifying both genetic factors and neuroanatomical structures that are essential to memory formation. Whether these same genes and brain compartments also contribute to memory formed from nonassociative experiences is not well understood. Exposures to environmental stressors such as predators are known to induce innate behavioral responses and can lead to new memory formation that allows a predator response to persist for days after the predator threat has been removed. Here, we utilize a unique form of nonassociative behavior in Drosophila where female flies detect the presence of endoparasitoid predatory wasps and alter their oviposition behavior to lay eggs in food containing high levels of alcohol. The predator-induced change in fly oviposition preference is maintained for days after wasps are removed, and this persistence in behavior requires a minimum continuous exposure time of 14 hr. Maintenance of this behavior is dependent on multiple long-term memory genes, including orb2, dunce, rutabaga, amnesiac, and Fmr1. Maintenance of the behavior also requires intact synaptic transmission of the mushroom body. Surprisingly, synaptic output from the mushroom body (MB) or the functions of any of these learning and memory genes are not required for the change in behavior when female flies are in constant contact with wasps. This suggests that perception of this predator that leads to an acute change in oviposition behavior is not dependent on the MB or dependent on learning and memory gene functions. Because wasp-induced oviposition behavior can last for days and its maintenance requires a functional MB and the wild-type products of several known learning and memory genes, we suggest that this constitutes a paradigm for a bona fide form of nonassociative long-term memory that is not dependent on associated

  9. A Novel Paradigm for Nonassociative Long-Term Memory in Drosophila: Predator-Induced Changes in Oviposition Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kacsoh, Balint Z.; Bozler, Julianna; Hodge, Sassan; Ramaswami, Mani; Bosco, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Learning processes in Drosophila have been studied through the use of Pavlovian associative memory tests, and these paradigms have been extremely useful in identifying both genetic factors and neuroanatomical structures that are essential to memory formation. Whether these same genes and brain compartments also contribute to memory formed from nonassociative experiences is not well understood. Exposures to environmental stressors such as predators are known to induce innate behavioral responses and can lead to new memory formation that allows a predator response to persist for days after the predator threat has been removed. Here, we utilize a unique form of nonassociative behavior in Drosophila where female flies detect the presence of endoparasitoid predatory wasps and alter their oviposition behavior to lay eggs in food containing high levels of alcohol. The predator-induced change in fly oviposition preference is maintained for days after wasps are removed, and this persistence in behavior requires a minimum continuous exposure time of 14 hr. Maintenance of this behavior is dependent on multiple long-term memory genes, including orb2, dunce, rutabaga, amnesiac, and Fmr1. Maintenance of the behavior also requires intact synaptic transmission of the mushroom body. Surprisingly, synaptic output from the mushroom body (MB) or the functions of any of these learning and memory genes are not required for the change in behavior when female flies are in constant contact with wasps. This suggests that perception of this predator that leads to an acute change in oviposition behavior is not dependent on the MB or dependent on learning and memory gene functions. Because wasp-induced oviposition behavior can last for days and its maintenance requires a functional MB and the wild-type products of several known learning and memory genes, we suggest that this constitutes a paradigm for a bona fide form of nonassociative long-term memory that is not dependent on associated

  10. Transcriptome sequencing and annotation of the predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis (Acari: Phytoseiidae): a cautionary tale about possible contamination by prey sequences.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Marjorie A; Yu, Fahong; Meyer, Jason M; Tarazona, Oscar A; Jeyaprakash, A; Wu, Ke

    2013-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing was applied to the transcriptome of the phytoseiid Metaseiulus occidentalis to characterize gene expression in all life stages reared under different conditions to optimize the recovery of as many genes as possible. One production and one titration run produced a total of 862,069 reads (average size: 314.87 bp), which generated 255.6 Mbp of sequences on the GS-FLX Titanium sequencing platform. After removal of putative prey sequences 850,543 reads were used in NewBler and PTA assemblies to produce 74,172 non-redundant sequences, including 30,691 contigs and 43,481 singlets with 11,994 contigs consisting of more than 500 bp and 37,278 sequences >300 bp, constituting 48.7 % of all sequences. There were 25,888 hits with the NCBI non-redundant database and 15,376 unique transcripts. There were 26,225 hits with the Ixodes scapularis genome and 6,634 unique transcripts. There were 22,225 hits with the RefSeq of Homo sapiens with 6,465 unique transcripts, and 23,656 hits with the RefSeq of Drosophila melanogaster with 9,216 unique transcripts. Selected ESTs corresponding to genes of interest were analyzed including those related to transposable elements, GPCRs, Sox transcription factors, diapause and foraging behavior, and pesticide resistances. Novel and important genes appear to have been discovered that provide insight into the evolution, biology, and physiology of this important predator of pest mites in agriculture and will be useful in analyzing complete genome sequences of this natural enemy. PMID:22923144

  11. Some verbal behavior about verbal behavior

    PubMed Central

    Salzinger, Kurt

    2003-01-01

    Beginning with behavior analysts' tendency to characterize verbal behavior as “mere” verbal behavior, the author reviews his own attempt to employ it to influence both his staff and policies of our government. He then describes its role in psychopathology, its effect on speakers in healing themselves and on engendering creativity. The paper ends by calling to our attention the role of verbal behavior in the construction of behavior analysis. PMID:22478393

  12. Behavioral economics.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2009-01-01

    It is human nature to overestimate how rational we are, both in general and even when we are trying to be. Such irrationality is not random, and the search for and explanation of patterns of fuzzy thinking is the basis for a new academic discipline known as behavioral economics. Examples are given of some of the best understood of our foibles, including prospect theory, framing, anchoring, salience, confirmation bias, superstition, and ownership. Humans have two cognitive systems: one conscious, deliberate, slow, and rational; the other fast, pattern-based, emotionally tinged, and intuitive. Each is subject to its own kind of error. In the case of rational thought, we tend to exaggerate our capacity; for intuition, we fail to train it or recognize contexts where it is inappropriate. Humans are especially poor at estimating probabilities, or even understanding what they are. It is a common human failing to reason backwards from random outcomes that are favorable to beliefs about our power to predict the future. Five suggestions are offered for thinking within our means.

  13. Rate dependency, behavioral mechanisms, and behavioral pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Branch, M N

    1984-11-01

    Behavioral pharmacology has become increasingly independent of the experimental analysis of behavior. At its beginning, behavioral pharmacology was closely related to the experimental analysis of behavior, with developments in each field aiding the other. Early attempts to systematize data in behavioral pharmacology culminated with the development of the rate-dependency concept, but as this principle was found to have more limited generality than originally was hoped, a theoretical void developed. This circumstance was followed by increased reliance on pharmacological theory as a basis for experimentation and interpretation, with an attendant decrease in emphasis on environmental variables and behavioral interpretations. Lack of interplay between behavioral pharmacology and the experimental analysis of behavior is detrimental to both disciplines because each could contribute significantly to the other. The current trend might be reversed if more research were directed at elucidating behavioral mechanisms of drug action.

  14. Structure and mechanical behaviors of protective armored pangolin scales and effects of hydration and orientation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Q; Jiao, D; Weng, Z Y; Zhang, Z F

    2016-03-01

    As natural flexible dermal armor, pangolin scales provide effective protection against predatory threats and possess other notable properties such as anti-adhesion and wear-resistance. In this study, the structure, mechanical properties, deformation and damage behaviors of pangolin scales were systematically investigated with the effects of hydration and orientation evaluated. The scales are divided into three macro-layers constituted by overlapping keratin tiles with distinct lamellar arrangements which are further composed of lower-ordered lamellae. Both hardness and strength are significantly decreased by hydration; while the plasticity is markedly improved concomitantly, and as such, the mechanical damages are mitigated. The tensile strength invariably approximates to one third of hardness in value. The tensile deformation is dominated by lamellae stretching and pulling out under wet condition, which is distinct from the trans-lamellar fracture in dry samples. The compressive behaviors are featured by pronounced plasticity in both dry and wet scales; and notable strain-hardening capacity is introduced by hydration, especially along the thickness direction wherein kinking occurs. Inter-lamellar cracking is effectively alleviated in wet samples compared with the dry ones and both of them deform by macroscopic buckling. This study may help stimulate possible inspiration for the design of high-performance synthetic armor materials by mimicking pangolin scales. PMID:26703230

  15. The evolution of locomotory behavior in profitable and unprofitable simulated prey.

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Thomas N; Rashed, Arash; Beatty, Christopher D

    2004-01-01

    Prey that are unprofitable to attack (for example, those containing noxious chemicals) frequently exhibit slower and more predictable movement than species that lack these defenses. Possible explanations for the phenomenon include a lack of selection pressure on unprofitable prey to avoid predators and active selection on unprofitable prey to advertise their noxiousness. We explicitly tested these and other hypotheses using a novel "artificial world" in which the locomotory characteristics (step size, waiting time, and angular direction) of artificial profitable and unprofitable computer-generated prey were subject to continued selection by humans over a number of generations. Unprofitable prey evolved significantly slower movement behavior than profitable prey when they were readily recognized as unprofitable, and also when they frequently survived predatory attacks. This difference arose primarily as a consequence of more intense selection on profitable prey to avoid capture. When unprofitable prey were very similar (but not identical) in morphological appearance to profitable prey, unprofitable prey evolved particularly slow movement behavior, presumably because when they were slow-moving they could be more readily recognized as being unprofitable. When unprofitable prey were constrained to move slowly, a morphologically identical profitable prey species evolved locomotor mimicry only when it had no more effective means of avoiding predation. Overall, our results provide some of the first empirical support for a number of earlier hypotheses for differences in movement between unprofitable and profitable prey and demonstrate that locomotor mimicry is not an inevitable outcome of selection even in morphologically similar prey.

  16. Prey processing in amniotes: biomechanical and behavioral patterns of food reduction.

    PubMed

    Reilly, S M; McBrayer, L D; White, T D

    2001-03-01

    In this paper we examine the biomechanics of prey processing behavior in the amniotes. Whether amniotes swallow prey items whole or swallow highly processed slurries or boluses of food, they share a common biomechanical system where hard surfaces (teeth or beaks) are brought together on articulated jaws by the actions of adductor muscles to grasp and process food. How have amniotes modified this basic system to increase the chewing efficiency of the system? To address this question we first examine the primitive condition for prey processing representative of many of the past and present predatory amniotes. Because herbivory is expected to be related to improved prey processing in the jaws we review patterns of food processing mechanics in past and present herbivores. Herbivory has appeared numerous times in amniotes and several solutions to the task of chewing plant matter have appeared. Birds have abandoned jaw chewing in favor of a new way to chew--with the gut--so we will detour from the jaws to examine the appearance of gut chewing in the archosaurs. We will then fill in the gaps among amniote taxa with a look at some new data on patterns of prey processing behavior and jaw mechanics in lizards. Finally, we examine evolutionary patterns of amniote feeding mechanism and how correlates of chewing relate to the need to increase the efficiency of prey processing in order to facilitate increased metabolic rate and activity.

  17. Agonistic behavior among three stocked trout species in a novel reservoir fish community

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Budy, Phaedra; Hafen, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    The popularity of reservoirs to support sport fisheries has led to the stocking of species that did not co-evolve, creating novel reservoir fish communities. In Utah, the Bear Lake strain of Bonneville Cutthroat Trout Oncorhynchus clarkii utah and tiger trout (female Brown Trout Salmo trutta × male Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis) are being more frequently added to a traditional stocking regimen consisting primarily of Rainbow TroutO. mykiss. Interactions between these three predatory species are not well understood, and studies evaluating community interactions have raised concern for an overall decrease of trout condition. To evaluate the potential for negative interactions among these species, we tested aggression in laboratory aquaria using three-species and pairwise combinations at three densities. Treatments were replicated before and after feeding. During the three-species trials Rainbow Trout initiated 24.8 times more aggressive interactions than Cutthroat Trout and 10.2 times more aggressive interactions than tiger trout, and tiger trout exhibited slightly (1.9 times) more aggressive initiations than Cutthroat Trout. There was no significant difference in behavior before versus after feeding for any species, and no indication of increased aggression at higher densities. Although Rainbow Trout in aquaria may benefit from their bold, aggressive behavior, given observations of decreased relative survival in the field, these benefits may be outweighed in reservoirs, possibly through unnecessary energy expenditure and exposure to predators.

  18. Impact of acanthocephalan parasites on aggregation behavior of amphipods (Gammarus pseudolimnaeus).

    PubMed

    Lewis, Susan E; Hodel, Ashley; Sturdy, Thomas; Todd, Rachelle; Weigl, Cassandra

    2012-10-01

    Acanthocephalan parasites can manipulate the behavior of their amphipod intermediate hosts in ways that increase the amphipod's risk of being eaten by a predator that serves as the final host for the parasite. Some asocial amphipod species have been shown to increase the likelihood of aggregation in response to chemical cues associated with predators. If such aggregation has anti-predation benefits, it might be subject to manipulation by parasites. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the preference of parasitized and unparasitized amphipods (Gammarus pseudolimnaeus) for associating with a group of unparasitized conspecifics, both in the presence and absence of chemical cues from predatory brook sticklebacks (Culaea inconstans). Amphipods with encysted parasites (Corynosoma sp.) avoided aggregating, whereas unparasitized amphipods preferred to aggregate. We also found that the risk of predation by sticklebacks faced by an individual amphipod was significantly lower when the amphipod was in a group compared to when it was alone. This suggests that the aggregation response of unparasitized amphipods is an adaptive response to escape predation. This study provides evidence for a novel parasitic manipulation of intermediate host behavior that is likely to increase transmission to the definitive host.

  19. Structure and mechanical behaviors of protective armored pangolin scales and effects of hydration and orientation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Q; Jiao, D; Weng, Z Y; Zhang, Z F

    2016-03-01

    As natural flexible dermal armor, pangolin scales provide effective protection against predatory threats and possess other notable properties such as anti-adhesion and wear-resistance. In this study, the structure, mechanical properties, deformation and damage behaviors of pangolin scales were systematically investigated with the effects of hydration and orientation evaluated. The scales are divided into three macro-layers constituted by overlapping keratin tiles with distinct lamellar arrangements which are further composed of lower-ordered lamellae. Both hardness and strength are significantly decreased by hydration; while the plasticity is markedly improved concomitantly, and as such, the mechanical damages are mitigated. The tensile strength invariably approximates to one third of hardness in value. The tensile deformation is dominated by lamellae stretching and pulling out under wet condition, which is distinct from the trans-lamellar fracture in dry samples. The compressive behaviors are featured by pronounced plasticity in both dry and wet scales; and notable strain-hardening capacity is introduced by hydration, especially along the thickness direction wherein kinking occurs. Inter-lamellar cracking is effectively alleviated in wet samples compared with the dry ones and both of them deform by macroscopic buckling. This study may help stimulate possible inspiration for the design of high-performance synthetic armor materials by mimicking pangolin scales.

  20. Effect of ambient temperature in neonate aspic vipers: growth, locomotor performance and defensive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Aïdam, Aurélie; Michel, Catherine Louise; Bonnet, Xavier

    2013-07-01

    The impact of temperature during incubation and gestation has been tested in various reptiles; the postnatal period has been rarely investigated however. Three groups of newborn aspic vipers (Vipera aspis) were placed under contrasted thermal regimes during 7 months: (1) a cool 23°C constant regime, (2) a warm 28°C constant regime, and (3) an optimal regime with free-access to a wide range of temperatures. Later, all the snakes were placed under hibernation conditions (6°C) during 3 months. Finally all the snakes were placed in the optimal thermal regime during 2 additional months. The total duration of the experiment was of 12 months. Body mass and feeding rates were recorded weekly, body size was measured monthly. We also assessed locomotor performance and recorded several behavioral traits (e.g., defensive and predatory behaviors). As expected, snakes raised under cool temperatures exhibited low feeding rate, growth rate, body condition, and they exhibited poor locomotor performance; they also displayed marked defensive behaviors (e.g., high number of defensive bites) whilst hesitating during longer periods to bite a prey. Such behavioral effects were detected at the end of the experiment (i.e., 5 months after exposure to contrasted thermal treatments [3 months of hibernation plus 2 months of optimal regime]), revealing long term effects. Surprisingly, growth rate and locomotor performance were not different between the two other groups, warm constant 28°C versus optimal regimes (albeit several behavioral traits differed), suggesting that the access to a wide range of ambient temperatures was not a crucial factor.

  1. From Behaviorism to Selectionism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, Ernest A.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses behaviorism and the gradual shift to a theory of selectionism. Highlights include the development of behaviorism as a part of psychology, including Skinner's theories; varieties of behaviorism, including behavioral analysis; behaviorology in other disciplinary settings; effects of contingencies upon behavior; and the prospects for…

  2. Autistic behavior, behavior analysis, and the gene.

    PubMed

    Malott, Richard W

    2004-01-01

    This article addresses the meaning of autism, the etiology of autistic behavior and values, the nature-nurture debate, contingencies vs. genes, and resistance to a behavioral analysis of autism. PMID:22477285

  3. No evolutionary response to four generations of laboratory selection on antipredator behavior of Aedes albopictus: potential implications for biotic resistance to invasion.

    PubMed

    Kesavaraju, Banugopan; Juliano, Steven A

    2009-07-01

    Aedes albopictus (Skuse) is an invasive container-dwelling mosquito and an important disease vector that co-occurs with the native mosquito, Aedes triseriatus (Say), and the predatory midge, Corethrella appendiculata (Grabham). Larval Ae. triseriatus show significantly greater antipredatory responses when compared to larval Ae. albopictus in the presence of predation cues from C. appendiculata. The potential for evolution of antipredatory behavioral responses to C. appendiculata in Ae. albopictus is unknown. We used a controlled laboratory selection experiment to test whether Ae. albopictus could evolve antipredatory behavioral responses to C. appendiculata predation. We subjected replicate Ae. albopictus populations to four generations of predation by C. appendiculata or a predator-free control treatment and compared the behavior and life history of Ae. albopictus in the two treatments in each generation. There were no differences in Ae. albopictus behavioral responses between predation and control lines in any of the four generations. There was also no evidence of differences in life histories between predation and control lines. Ae.