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Sample records for predict individual efficiency

  1. Specialization does not predict individual efficiency in an ant.

    PubMed

    Dornhaus, Anna

    2008-11-18

    The ecological success of social insects is often attributed to an increase in efficiency achieved through division of labor between workers in a colony. Much research has therefore focused on the mechanism by which a division of labor is implemented, i.e., on how tasks are allocated to workers. However, the important assumption that specialists are indeed more efficient at their work than generalist individuals--the "Jack-of-all-trades is master of none" hypothesis--has rarely been tested. Here, I quantify worker efficiency, measured as work completed per time, in four different tasks in the ant Temnothorax albipennis: honey and protein foraging, collection of nest-building material, and brood transports in a colony emigration. I show that individual efficiency is not predicted by how specialized workers were on the respective task. Worker efficiency is also not consistently predicted by that worker's overall activity or delay to begin the task. Even when only the worker's rank relative to nestmates in the same colony was used, specialization did not predict efficiency in three out of the four tasks, and more specialized workers actually performed worse than others in the fourth task (collection of sand grains). I also show that the above relationships, as well as median individual efficiency, do not change with colony size. My results demonstrate that in an ant species without morphologically differentiated worker castes, workers may nevertheless differ in their ability to perform different tasks. Surprisingly, this variation is not utilized by the colony--worker allocation to tasks is unrelated to their ability to perform them. What, then, are the adaptive benefits of behavioral specialization, and why do workers choose tasks without regard for whether they can perform them well? We are still far from an understanding of the adaptive benefits of division of labor in social insects.

  2. Predictive information speeds up visual awareness in an individuation task by modulating threshold setting, not processing efficiency.

    PubMed

    De Loof, Esther; Van Opstal, Filip; Verguts, Tom

    2016-04-01

    Theories on visual awareness claim that predicted stimuli reach awareness faster than unpredicted ones. In the current study, we disentangle whether prior information about the upcoming stimulus affects visual awareness of stimulus location (i.e., individuation) by modulating processing efficiency or threshold setting. Analogous research on stimulus identification revealed that prior information modulates threshold setting. However, as identification and individuation are two functionally and neurally distinct processes, the mechanisms underlying identification cannot simply be extrapolated directly to individuation. The goal of this study was therefore to investigate how individuation is influenced by prior information about the upcoming stimulus. To do so, a drift diffusion model was fitted to estimate the processing efficiency and threshold setting for predicted versus unpredicted stimuli in a cued individuation paradigm. Participants were asked to locate a picture, following a cue that was congruent, incongruent or neutral with respect to the picture's identity. Pictures were individuated faster in the congruent and neutral condition compared to the incongruent condition. In the diffusion model analysis, the processing efficiency was not significantly different across conditions. However, the threshold setting was significantly higher following an incongruent cue compared to both congruent and neutral cues. Our results indicate that predictive information about the upcoming stimulus influences visual awareness by shifting the threshold for individuation rather than by enhancing processing efficiency.

  3. Predicting Individual Fuel Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhenhong; Greene, David L

    2011-01-01

    To make informed decisions about travel and vehicle purchase, consumers need unbiased and accurate information of the fuel economy they will actually obtain. In the past, the EPA fuel economy estimates based on its 1984 rules have been widely criticized for overestimating on-road fuel economy. In 2008, EPA adopted a new estimation rule. This study compares the usefulness of the EPA's 1984 and 2008 estimates based on their prediction bias and accuracy and attempts to improve the prediction of on-road fuel economies based on consumer and vehicle attributes. We examine the usefulness of the EPA fuel economy estimates using a large sample of self-reported on-road fuel economy data and develop an Individualized Model for more accurately predicting an individual driver's on-road fuel economy based on easily determined vehicle and driver attributes. Accuracy rather than bias appears to have limited the usefulness of the EPA 1984 estimates in predicting on-road MPG. The EPA 2008 estimates appear to be equally inaccurate and substantially more biased relative to the self-reported data. Furthermore, the 2008 estimates exhibit an underestimation bias that increases with increasing fuel economy, suggesting that the new numbers will tend to underestimate the real-world benefits of fuel economy and emissions standards. By including several simple driver and vehicle attributes, the Individualized Model reduces the unexplained variance by over 55% and the standard error by 33% based on an independent test sample. The additional explanatory variables can be easily provided by the individuals.

  4. Neuroanatomy Predicts Individual Risk Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Gilaie-Dotan, Sharon; Tymula, Agnieszka; Cooper, Nicole; Kable, Joseph W.; Glimcher, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Over the course of the last decade a multitude of studies have investigated the relationship between neural activations and individual human decision-making. Here we asked whether the anatomical features of individual human brains could be used to predict the fundamental preferences of human choosers. To that end, we quantified the risk attitudes of human decision-makers using standard economic tools and quantified the gray matter cortical volume in all brain areas using standard neurobiological tools. Our whole-brain analysis revealed that the gray matter volume of a region in the right posterior parietal cortex was significantly predictive of individual risk attitudes. Participants with higher gray matter volume in this region exhibited less risk aversion. To test the robustness of this finding we examined a second group of participants and used econometric tools to test the ex ante hypothesis that gray matter volume in this area predicts individual risk attitudes. Our finding was confirmed in this second group. Our results, while being silent about causal relationships, identify what might be considered the first stable biomarker for financial risk-attitude. If these results, gathered in a population of midlife northeast American adults, hold in the general population, they will provide constraints on the possible neural mechanisms underlying risk attitudes. The results will also provide a simple measurement of risk attitudes that could be easily extracted from abundance of existing medical brain scans, and could potentially provide a characteristic distribution of these attitudes for policy makers. PMID:25209279

  5. Individual alerting efficiency modulates time perception

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peiduo; Yang, Wenjing; Yuan, Xiangyong; Bi, Cuihua; Chen, Antao; Huang, Xiting

    2015-01-01

    Time perception plays a fundamental role in human perceptual and motor activities, and can be influenced by various factors, such as selective attention and arousal. However, little is known about the influence of individual alerting efficiency on perceived duration. In this study, we explored this question by running two experiments. The Attentional Networks Test was used to evaluate individual differences in alerting efficiency in each experiment. Temporal bisection (Experiment 1) and time generalization task (Experiment 2) were used to explore the participants’ perception of duration. The results indicated that subjects in the high alerting efficiency group overestimated interval durations and estimated durations more accurately compared with subjects in the low alerting efficiency group. The two experiments showed that the sensitivity of time was not influenced by individual alerting efficiency. Based on previous studies and current findings, we infer that individual differences in alerting efficiency may influence time perception through modulating the latency of the attention-controlled switch and the speed of the peacemaker within the framework of the internal clock model. PMID:25904881

  6. Categories Influence Predictions about Individual Consistency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Marjorie; Gelman, Susan A.

    2008-01-01

    Predicting how people will behave in the future is a critical social-cognitive task. In four studies (N = 150, ages preschool to adult), young children (ages 4-5) used category information to guide their expectations about individual consistency. They predicted that psychological properties (preferences and fears) would remain consistent over time…

  7. Predicting individual fusional range from optometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endrikhovski, Serguei; Jin, Elaine; Miller, Michael E.; Ford, Robert W.

    2005-03-01

    A model was developed to predict the range of disparities that can be fused by an individual user from optometric measurements. This model uses parameters, such as dissociated phoria and fusional reserves, to calculate an individual user"s fusional range (i.e., the disparities that can be fused on stereoscopic displays) when the user views a stereoscopic stimulus from various distances. This model is validated by comparing its output with data from a study in which the individual fusional range of a group of users was quantified while they viewed a stereoscopic display from distances of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 meters. Overall, the model provides good data predictions for the majority of the subjects and can be generalized for other viewing conditions. The model may, therefore, be used within a customized stereoscopic system, which would render stereoscopic information in a way that accounts for the individual differences in fusional range. Because the comfort of an individual user also depends on the user"s ability to fuse stereo images, such a system may, consequently, improve the comfort level and viewing experience for people with different stereoscopic fusional capabilities.

  8. Energy efficiency: Perspectives on individual behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Kempton, W.; Neiman, M.

    1986-01-01

    A collection of research papers on the personal behavior and attitudes that affect residential energy use. Articles in the first section address the factors that affect decision-making by consumers; convenience and personal opinions often override rational economic choices. The research in the second section uses aggregate survey data to gain insight into energy behavior. Papers in the third section use detailed monitoring of individual households to analyze personal behavior and home energy management, and the fourth section includes papers on the interaction of building systems with occupants. These papers demonstrate that, to be successful, energy conservation programs must consider the ''human factor'' in addition to the conventional energy parameters (e.g. weather, insulation, and appliance efficiencies). Main emphasis was given to: energy conservation; consumers; personal behavior; economic decision-making; buildings; energy policy; hot water use; thermostats; attitudes; applied anthropology.

  9. Structural network efficiency predicts conversion to dementia

    PubMed Central

    Tuladhar, Anil M.; van Uden, Ingeborg W.M.; Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C.A.; Lawrence, Andrew; van der Holst, Helena; van Norden, Anouk; de Laat, Karlijn; van Dijk, Ewoud; Claassen, Jurgen A.H.R.; Kessels, Roy P.C.; Markus, Hugh S.; Norris, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether structural network connectivity at baseline predicts incident all-cause dementia in a prospective hospital-based cohort of elderly participants with MRI evidence of small vessel disease (SVD). Methods: A total of 436 participants from the Radboud University Nijmegen Diffusion Tensor and Magnetic Resonance Cohort (RUN DMC), a prospective hospital-based cohort of elderly without dementia with cerebral SVD, were included in 2006. During follow-up (2011–2012), dementia was diagnosed. The structural network was constructed from baseline diffusion tensor imaging followed by deterministic tractography and measures of efficiency using graph theory were calculated. Cox proportional regression analyses were conducted. Results: During 5 years of follow-up, 32 patients developed dementia. MRI markers for SVD were strongly associated with network measures. Patients with dementia showed lower total network strength and global and local efficiency at baseline as compared with the group without dementia. Lower global network efficiency was independently associated with increased risk of incident all-cause dementia (hazard ratio 0.63, 95% confidence interval 0.42–0.96, p = 0.032); in contrast, individual SVD markers including lacunes, white matter hyperintensities volume, and atrophy were not independently associated. Conclusions: These results support a role of network disruption playing a pivotal role in the genesis of dementia in SVD, and suggest network analysis of the connectivity of white matter has potential as a predictive marker in the disease. PMID:26888983

  10. Neural Variability Quenching Predicts Individual Perceptual Abilities.

    PubMed

    Arazi, Ayelet; Censor, Nitzan; Dinstein, Ilan

    2017-01-04

    Neural activity during repeated presentations of a sensory stimulus exhibits considerable trial-by-trial variability. Previous studies have reported that trial-by-trial neural variability is reduced (quenched) by the presentation of a stimulus. However, the functional significance and behavioral relevance of variability quenching and the potential physiological mechanisms that may drive it have been studied only rarely. Here, we recorded neural activity with EEG as subjects performed a two-interval forced-choice contrast discrimination task. Trial-by-trial neural variability was quenched by ∼40% after the presentation of the stimulus relative to the variability apparent before stimulus presentation, yet there were large differences in the magnitude of variability quenching across subjects. Individual magnitudes of quenching predicted individual discrimination capabilities such that subjects who exhibited larger quenching had smaller contrast discrimination thresholds and steeper psychometric function slopes. Furthermore, the magnitude of variability quenching was strongly correlated with a reduction in broadband EEG power after stimulus presentation. Our results suggest that neural variability quenching is achieved by reducing the amplitude of broadband neural oscillations after sensory input, which yields relatively more reproducible cortical activity across trials and enables superior perceptual abilities in individuals who quench more.

  11. Estimating Energy Expenditure using Individualized, Power-Specific Gross Efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Homestead, E P; Peterman, J E; Kane, L A; Contini, E J; Byrnes, W C

    2016-12-01

    Our purpose was to determine if using an individual's power-specific gross efficiency improves the accuracy of estimating energy expenditure from cycling power. 30 subjects performed a graded cycling test to develop 4 gross efficiencies: individual power-specific gross efficiencies, a group mean power-specific gross efficiency, individual fixed gross efficiencies, and a group mean fixed gross efficiency. Energy expenditure was estimated from power using these different gross efficiencies and compared to measured energy expenditure during moderate- and hard-intensity constant-power and 2 variable-power cycling bouts. Estimated energy expenditures using individual or group mean power-specific gross efficiencies were not different from measured energy expenditure across all cycling bouts (p>0.05). To examine the intra-individual variability of the estimates, absolute difference scores (absolute value of estimated minus measured energy expenditure) were compared, where values closer to zero represent more accurate individual estimates. The absolute difference score using individual power-specific gross efficiencies was significantly lower compared to the other gross efficiencies across all cycling bouts (p<0.01). Significant and strong correlations (r≥0.97, p<0.001) were found across all cycling bouts between estimated and measured energy expenditures using individual power-specific gross efficiencies. In conclusion, using an individual's power-specific gross efficiency significantly improves their energy expenditure estimate across different power outputs.

  12. Effect of Individual Component Life Distribution on Engine Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Soditus, Sherry M.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of individual engine component life distributions on engine life prediction was determined. A Weibull-based life and reliability analysis of the NASA Energy Efficient Engine was conducted. The engine s life at a 95 and 99.9 percent probability of survival was determined based upon the engine manufacturer s original life calculations and assumed values of each of the component s cumulative life distributions as represented by a Weibull slope. The lives of the high-pressure turbine (HPT) disks and blades were also evaluated individually and as a system in a similar manner. Knowing the statistical cumulative distribution of each engine component with reasonable engineering certainty is a condition precedent to predicting the life and reliability of an entire engine. The life of a system at a given reliability will be less than the lowest-lived component in the system at the same reliability (probability of survival). Where Weibull slopes of all the engine components are equal, the Weibull slope had a minimal effect on engine L(sub 0.1) life prediction. However, at a probability of survival of 95 percent (L(sub 5) life), life decreased with increasing Weibull slope.

  13. Intrinsic functional connectivity predicts individual differences in distractibility.

    PubMed

    Poole, Victoria N; Robinson, Meghan E; Singleton, Omar; DeGutis, Joseph; Milberg, William P; McGlinchey, Regina E; Salat, David H; Esterman, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Distractor suppression, the ability to filter and ignore task-irrelevant information, is critical for efficient task performance. While successful distractor suppression relies on a balance of activity in neural networks responsible for attention maintenance (dorsal attention network; DAN), reorientation (ventral attention network; VAN), and internal thought (default mode network, DMN), the degree to which intrinsic connectivity within and between these networks contributes to individual differences in distractor suppression ability is not well-characterized. For the purposes of understanding these interactions, the current study collected resting-state fMRI data from 32 Veterans and, several months later (7±5 months apart), performance on the additional singleton paradigm, a measure of distractor suppression. Using multivariate support vector regression models composed of resting state connectivity between regions of the DAN, VAN, and DMN, and a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation procedure, we were able to predict an individual's task performance, yielding a significant correlation between the actual and predicted distractor suppression (r=0.48, p=0.0053). Network-level analyses revealed that greater within-network DMN connectivity was predictive of better distractor suppression, while greater connectivity between the DMN and attention networks was predictive of poorer distractor suppression. The strongest connection hubs were determined to be the right frontal eye field and temporoparietal junction of the DAN and VAN, respectively, and medial (ventromedial prefrontal and posterior cingulate cortices) and bilateral prefrontal regions of the DMN. These results are amongst a small but growing number of studies demonstrating that resting state connectivity is related to stable individual differences in cognitive ability, and suggest that greater integrity and independence of the DMN is related to better attentional ability.

  14. Extraversion predicts individual differences in face recognition.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingguang; Tian, Moqian; Fang, Huizhen; Xu, Miao; Li, He; Liu, Jia

    2010-07-01

    In daily life, one of the most common social tasks we perform is to recognize faces. However, the relation between face recognition ability and social activities is largely unknown. Here we ask whether individuals with better social skills are also better at recognizing faces. We found that extraverts who have better social skills correctly recognized more faces than introverts. However, this advantage was absent when extraverts were asked to recognize non-social stimuli (e.g., flowers). In particular, the underlying facet that makes extraverts better face recognizers is the gregariousness facet that measures the degree of inter-personal interaction. In addition, the link between extraversion and face recognition ability was independent of general cognitive abilities. These findings provide the first evidence that links face recognition ability to our daily activity in social communication, supporting the hypothesis that extraverts are better at decoding social information than introverts.

  15. Computationally Efficient Prediction of Ionic Liquid Properties.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2014-06-05

    Due to fundamental differences, room-temperature ionic liquids (RTIL) are significantly more viscous than conventional molecular liquids and require long simulation times. At the same time, RTILs remain in the liquid state over a much broader temperature range than the ordinary liquids. We exploit the ability of RTILs to stay liquid at several hundred degrees Celsius and introduce a straightforward and computationally efficient method for predicting RTIL properties at ambient temperature. RTILs do not alter phase behavior at 600-800 K. Therefore, their properties can be smoothly extrapolated down to ambient temperatures. We numerically prove the validity of the proposed concept for density and ionic diffusion of four different RTILs. This simple method enhances the computational efficiency of the existing simulation approaches as applied to RTILs by more than an order of magnitude.

  16. Group-regularized individual prediction: theory and application to pain.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Martin A; Krishnan, Anjali; López-Solà, Marina; Jepma, Marieke; Woo, Choong-Wan; Koban, Leonie; Roy, Mathieu; Atlas, Lauren Y; Schmidt, Liane; Chang, Luke J; Reynolds Losin, Elizabeth A; Eisenbarth, Hedwig; Ashar, Yoni K; Delk, Elizabeth; Wager, Tor D

    2017-01-15

    Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) has become an important tool for identifying brain representations of psychological processes and clinical outcomes using fMRI and related methods. Such methods can be used to predict or 'decode' psychological states in individual subjects. Single-subject MVPA approaches, however, are limited by the amount and quality of individual-subject data. In spite of higher spatial resolution, predictive accuracy from single-subject data often does not exceed what can be accomplished using coarser, group-level maps, because single-subject patterns are trained on limited amounts of often-noisy data. Here, we present a method that combines population-level priors, in the form of biomarker patterns developed on prior samples, with single-subject MVPA maps to improve single-subject prediction. Theoretical results and simulations motivate a weighting based on the relative variances of biomarker-based prediction-based on population-level predictive maps from prior groups-and individual-subject, cross-validated prediction. Empirical results predicting pain using brain activity on a trial-by-trial basis (single-trial prediction) across 6 studies (N=180 participants) confirm the theoretical predictions. Regularization based on a population-level biomarker-in this case, the Neurologic Pain Signature (NPS)-improved single-subject prediction accuracy compared with idiographic maps based on the individuals' data alone. The regularization scheme that we propose, which we term group-regularized individual prediction (GRIP), can be applied broadly to within-person MVPA-based prediction. We also show how GRIP can be used to evaluate data quality and provide benchmarks for the appropriateness of population-level maps like the NPS for a given individual or study.

  17. Measuring the operational efficiency of individual theme park attractions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changhee; Kim, Soowook

    2016-01-01

    This study assesses the operation efficiency of theme park attractions using the data envelopment analysis, utilizing actual data on 15 attractions at Samsung Everland located in Yongin-si, Republic of Korea. In particular, this study identifies crowding and waiting time as one of the main causes of visitor's satisfaction, and analyzes the efficiency of individual attractions in terms of waiting time. The installation area, installation cost, and annual repair cost are set as input factors and the number of annual users and customer satisfaction as output factors. The results show that the roller coaster-type attractions were less efficient than other types of attractions while rotating-type attractions were relatively more efficient. However, an importance performance analysis on individual attraction's efficiency and satisfaction showed that operational efficiency should not be the sole consideration in attraction installation. In addition, the projection points for input factors for efficient use of attractions and the appropriate reference set for benchmarking are provided as guideline for attraction efficiency management.

  18. Functional brain network efficiency predicts intelligence.

    PubMed

    Langer, Nicolas; Pedroni, Andreas; Gianotti, Lorena R R; Hänggi, Jürgen; Knoch, Daria; Jäncke, Lutz

    2012-06-01

    The neuronal causes of individual differences in mental abilities such as intelligence are complex and profoundly important. Understanding these abilities has the potential to facilitate their enhancement. The purpose of this study was to identify the functional brain network characteristics and their relation to psychometric intelligence. In particular, we examined whether the functional network exhibits efficient small-world network attributes (high clustering and short path length) and whether these small-world network parameters are associated with intellectual performance. High-density resting state electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded in 74 healthy subjects to analyze graph-theoretical functional network characteristics at an intracortical level. Ravens advanced progressive matrices were used to assess intelligence. We found that the clustering coefficient and path length of the functional network are strongly related to intelligence. Thus, the more intelligent the subjects are the more the functional brain network resembles a small-world network. We further identified the parietal cortex as a main hub of this resting state network as indicated by increased degree centrality that is associated with higher intelligence. Taken together, this is the first study that substantiates the neural efficiency hypothesis as well as the Parieto-Frontal Integration Theory (P-FIT) of intelligence in the context of functional brain network characteristics. These theories are currently the most established intelligence theories in neuroscience. Our findings revealed robust evidence of an efficiently organized resting state functional brain network for highly productive cognitions.

  19. Efficient temporal and interlayer parameter prediction for weighted prediction in scalable high efficiency video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Sik-Ho; Chan, Yui-Lam; Siu, Wan-Chi

    2017-01-01

    Weighted prediction (WP) is an efficient video coding tool that was introduced since the establishment of the H.264/AVC video coding standard, for compensating the temporal illumination change in motion estimation and compensation. WP parameters, including a multiplicative weight and an additive offset for each reference frame, are required to be estimated and transmitted to the decoder by slice header. These parameters cause extra bits in the coded video bitstream. High efficiency video coding (HEVC) provides WP parameter prediction to reduce the overhead. Therefore, WP parameter prediction is crucial to research works or applications, which are related to WP. Prior art has been suggested to further improve the WP parameter prediction by implicit prediction of image characteristics and derivation of parameters. By exploiting both temporal and interlayer redundancies, we propose three WP parameter prediction algorithms, enhanced implicit WP parameter, enhanced direct WP parameter derivation, and interlayer WP parameter, to further improve the coding efficiency of HEVC. Results show that our proposed algorithms can achieve up to 5.83% and 5.23% bitrate reduction compared to the conventional scalable HEVC in the base layer for SNR scalability and 2× spatial scalability, respectively.

  20. Predicting individual brain functional connectivity using a Bayesian hierarchical model.

    PubMed

    Dai, Tian; Guo, Ying

    2017-02-15

    Network-oriented analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), especially resting-state fMRI, has revealed important association between abnormal connectivity and brain disorders such as schizophrenia, major depression and Alzheimer's disease. Imaging-based brain connectivity measures have become a useful tool for investigating the pathophysiology, progression and treatment response of psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Recent studies have started to explore the possibility of using functional neuroimaging to help predict disease progression and guide treatment selection for individual patients. These studies provide the impetus to develop statistical methodology that would help provide predictive information on disease progression-related or treatment-related changes in neural connectivity. To this end, we propose a prediction method based on Bayesian hierarchical model that uses individual's baseline fMRI scans, coupled with relevant subject characteristics, to predict the individual's future functional connectivity. A key advantage of the proposed method is that it can improve the accuracy of individualized prediction of connectivity by combining information from both group-level connectivity patterns that are common to subjects with similar characteristics as well as individual-level connectivity features that are particular to the specific subject. Furthermore, our method also offers statistical inference tools such as predictive intervals that help quantify the uncertainty or variability of the predicted outcomes. The proposed prediction method could be a useful approach to predict the changes in individual patient's brain connectivity with the progression of a disease. It can also be used to predict a patient's post-treatment brain connectivity after a specified treatment regimen. Another utility of the proposed method is that it can be applied to test-retest imaging data to develop a more reliable estimator for individual

  1. Efficient computation of volume in flow predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, M.; Kordulla, W.

    1983-01-01

    An efficient method for calculating cell volumes for time-dependent three-dimensional flow predictions by finite volume calculations is presented. Eight arbitrary corner points are considered and the shape face is divided into two planar triangles. The volume is then dependent on the orientation of the partitioning. In the case of a hexahedron, it is noted that any open surface with a boundary that is a closed curve possesses a surface vector independent of the surface shape. Expressions are defined for the surface vector, which is independent of the partitioning surface diagonal used to quantify the volume. Using a decomposition of the cell volume involving two corners, with each the vertex of three diagonals and six corners which are vertices of one diagonal, gives portions which are tetrahedra. The resultant mesh is can be used for time-dependent finite volume calculations one requires less computer time than previous methods.

  2. Individual Differences in Statistical Learning Predict Children's Comprehension of Syntax

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Evan; Arciuli, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Variability in children's language acquisition is likely due to a number of cognitive and social variables. The current study investigated whether individual differences in statistical learning (SL), which has been implicated in language acquisition, independently predicted 6- to 8-year-old's comprehension of syntax. Sixty-eight (N = 68)…

  3. Individual Factors Predicting Mental Health Court Diversion Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhaaff, Ashley; Scott, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study examined which individual factors predict mental health court diversion outcome among a sample of persons with mental illness participating in a postcharge diversion program. Method: The study employed secondary analysis of existing program records for 419 persons with mental illness in a court diversion program. Results:…

  4. Auditory working memory predicts individual differences in absolute pitch learning.

    PubMed

    Van Hedger, Stephen C; Heald, Shannon L M; Koch, Rachelle; Nusbaum, Howard C

    2015-07-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is typically defined as the ability to label an isolated tone as a musical note in the absence of a reference tone. At first glance the acquisition of AP note categories seems like a perceptual learning task, since individuals must assign a category label to a stimulus based on a single perceptual dimension (pitch) while ignoring other perceptual dimensions (e.g., loudness, octave, instrument). AP, however, is rarely discussed in terms of domain-general perceptual learning mechanisms. This is because AP is typically assumed to depend on a critical period of development, in which early exposure to pitches and musical labels is thought to be necessary for the development of AP precluding the possibility of adult acquisition of AP. Despite this view of AP, several previous studies have found evidence that absolute pitch category learning is, to an extent, trainable in a post-critical period adult population, even if the performance typically achieved by this population is below the performance of a "true" AP possessor. The current studies attempt to understand the individual differences in learning to categorize notes using absolute pitch cues by testing a specific prediction regarding cognitive capacity related to categorization - to what extent does an individual's general auditory working memory capacity (WMC) predict the success of absolute pitch category acquisition. Since WMC has been shown to predict performance on a wide variety of other perceptual and category learning tasks, we predict that individuals with higher WMC should be better at learning absolute pitch note categories than individuals with lower WMC. Across two studies, we demonstrate that auditory WMC predicts the efficacy of learning absolute pitch note categories. These results suggest that a higher general auditory WMC might underlie the formation of absolute pitch categories for post-critical period adults. Implications for understanding the mechanisms that underlie the

  5. Predicting muscle forces of individuals with hemiparesis following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kesar, Trisha M; Ding, Jun; Wexler, Anthony S; Perumal, Ramu; Maladen, Ryan; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A

    2008-01-01

    Background Functional electrical stimulation (FES) has been used to improve function in individuals with hemiparesis following stroke. An ideal functional electrical stimulation (FES) system needs an accurate mathematical model capable of designing subject and task-specific stimulation patterns. Such a model was previously developed in our laboratory and shown to predict the isometric forces produced by the quadriceps femoris muscles of able-bodied individuals and individuals with spinal cord injury in response to a wide range of clinically relevant stimulation frequencies and patterns. The aim of this study was to test our isometric muscle force model on the quadriceps femoris, ankle dorsiflexor, and ankle plantar-flexor muscles of individuals with post-stroke hemiparesis. Methods Subjects were seated on a force dynamometer and isometric forces were measured in response to a range of stimulation frequencies (10 to 80-Hz) and 3 different patterns. Subject-specific model parameter values were obtained by fitting the measured force responses from 2 stimulation trains. The model parameters thus obtained were then used to obtain predicted forces for a range of frequencies and patterns. Predicted and measured forces were compared using intra-class correlation coefficients, r2 values, and model error relative to the physiological error (variability of measured forces). Results Results showed excellent agreement between measured and predicted force-time responses (r2 >0.80), peak forces (ICCs>0.84), and force-time integrals (ICCs>0.82) for the quadriceps, dorsiflexor, and plantar-fexor muscles. The model error was within or below the +95% confidence interval of the physiological error for >88% comparisons between measured and predicted forces. Conclusion Our results show that the model has potential to be incorporated as a feed-forward controller for predicting subject-specific stimulation patterns during FES. PMID:18304360

  6. Predicting Individual Differences in Response to Sleep Loss

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-15

    2011 4. TITLE Predicting Individual Differences in Response to Sleep Loss 5a. Contract Number: 5b. Grant Number: 5c. Program Element Number: 5d...ADDRESS(ES) Naval Medical Reserach Unit – Dayton 2624 Q St., Bldg. 851, Area B Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION... Program Department of the Navy 2300 E Street, NW Washington, DC 20372-5300 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) BUMED 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT

  7. Stress responsiveness predicts individual variation in mate selectivity.

    PubMed

    Vitousek, Maren N; Romero, L Michael

    2013-06-15

    Steroid hormones, including glucocorticoids, mediate a variety of behavioral and physiological processes. Circulating hormone concentrations vary substantially within populations, and although hormone titers predict reproductive success in several species, little is known about how individual variation in circulating hormone concentrations is linked with most reproductive behaviors in free-living organisms. Mate choice is an important and often costly component of reproduction that also varies substantially within populations. We examined whether energetically costly mate selection behavior in female Galápagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) was associated with individual variation in the concentrations of hormones previously shown to differ between reproductive and non-reproductive females during the breeding season (corticosterone and testosterone). Stress-induced corticosterone levels - which are suppressed in female marine iguanas during reproduction - were individually repeatable throughout the seven-week breeding period. Mate selectivity was strongly predicted by individual variation in stress-induced corticosterone: reproductive females that secreted less corticosterone in response to a standardized stressor assessed more displaying males. Neither baseline corticosterone nor testosterone predicted variation in mate selectivity. Scaled body mass was not significantly associated with mate selectivity, but females that began the breeding period in lower body condition showed a trend towards being less selective about potential mates. These results provide the first evidence that individual variation in the corticosterone stress response is associated with how selective females are in their choice of a mate, an important contributor to fitness in many species. Future research is needed to determine the functional basis of this association, and whether transient acute increases in circulating corticosterone directly mediate mate choice behaviors.

  8. Who punishes? Personality traits predict individual variation in punitive sentiment.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S Craig; Vakirtzis, Antonios; Kristjánsdóttir, Lilja; Havlíček, Jan

    2013-02-18

    Cross-culturally, participants in public goods games reward participants and punish defectors to a degree beyond that warranted by rational, profit-maximizing considerations. Costly punishment, where individuals impose costs on defectors at a cost to themselves, is thought to promote the maintenance of cooperation. However, despite substantial variation in the extent to which people punish, little is known about why some individuals, and not others, choose to pay these costs. Here, we test whether personality traits might contribute to variation in helping and punishment behavior. We first replicate a previous study using public goods scenarios to investigate effects of sex, relatedness and likelihood of future interaction on willingness to help a group member or to punish a transgressor. As in the previous study, we find that individuals are more willing to help related than unrelated needy others and that women are more likely to express desire to help than men. Desire to help was higher if the probability of future interaction is high, at least among women. In contrast, among these variables, only participant sex predicted some measures of punitive sentiment. Extending the replication, we found that punitive sentiment, but not willingness to help, was predicted by personality traits. Most notably, participants scoring lower on Agreeableness expressed more anger towards and greater desire to punish a transgressor, and were more willing to engage in costly punishment, at least in our scenario. Our results suggest that some personality traits may contribute to underpinning individual variation in social enforcement of cooperation.

  9. Masting promotes individual- and population-level reproduction by increasing pollination efficiency.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Xoaquín; Abdala-Roberts, Luis; Linhart, Yan B; Mooney, Kailen A

    2014-04-01

    Masting is a reproductive strategy defined as the intermittent and synchronized production of large seed crops by a plant population. The pollination efficiency hypothesis proposes that masting increases pollination success in plants. Despite its general appeal, no previous studies have used long-term data together with population- and individual-level analyses to assess pollination efficiency between mast and non-mast events. Here we rigorously tested the pollination efficiency hypothesis in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), a long-lived monoecious, wind-pollinated species, using a data set on 217 trees monitored annually for 20 years. Relative investment in male and female function by individual trees did not vary between mast and non-mast years. At both the population and individual level, the rate of production of mature female cones relative to male strobili production was higher in mast than non-mast years, consistent with the predicted benefit of reproductive synchrony on reproductive success. In addition, at the individual level we found a higher conversion of unfertilized female conelets into mature female cones during a mast year compared to a non-mast year. Collectively, parallel results at the population and individual tree level provide robust evidence for the ecological, and potentially also evolutionary, benefits of masting through increased pollination efficiency.

  10. Efficient Methods to Compute Genomic Predictions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efficient methods for processing genomic data were developed to increase reliability of estimated breeding values and simultaneously estimate thousands of marker effects. Algorithms were derived and computer programs tested on simulated data for 50,000 markers and 2,967 bulls. Accurate estimates of ...

  11. Individual Identifiability Predicts Population Identifiability in Forensic Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Algee-Hewitt, Bridget F B; Edge, Michael D; Kim, Jaehee; Li, Jun Z; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2016-04-04

    Highly polymorphic genetic markers with significant potential for distinguishing individual identity are used as a standard tool in forensic testing [1, 2]. At the same time, population-genetic studies have suggested that genetically diverse markers with high individual identifiability also confer information about genetic ancestry [3-6]. The dual influence of polymorphism levels on ancestry inference and forensic desirability suggests that forensically useful marker sets with high levels of individual identifiability might also possess substantial ancestry information. We study a standard forensic marker set-the 13 CODIS loci used in the United States and elsewhere [2, 7-9]-together with 779 additional microsatellites [10], using direct population structure inference to test whether markers with substantial individual identifiability also produce considerable information about ancestry. Despite having been selected for individual identification and not for ancestry inference [11], the CODIS markers generate nontrivial model-based clustering patterns similar to those of other sets of 13 tetranucleotide microsatellites. Although the CODIS markers have relatively low values of the F(ST) divergence statistic, their high heterozygosities produce greater ancestry inference potential than is possessed by less heterozygous marker sets. More generally, we observe that marker sets with greater individual identifiability also tend toward greater population identifiability. We conclude that population identifiability regularly follows as a byproduct of the use of highly polymorphic forensic markers. Our findings have implications for the design of new forensic marker sets and for evaluations of the extent to which individual characteristics beyond identification might be predicted from current and future forensic data.

  12. Individual efficiency for the use of feed resources in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Piles, M; García-Tomás, M; Rafel, O; Ramon, J; Ibañez-Escriche, N; Varona, L

    2007-11-01

    A Bayesian procedure, which allows consideration of the individual variation in the feed resource allocation pattern, is described and implemented in 2 sire lines of rabbit (Caldes and R). The procedure is based on a hierarchical Bayesian scheme, where the first stage of the model consists of a multiple regression model of feed intake on metabolic BW and BW gain. In a second stage, an animal model was assumed including batch, parity order, litter size, and common environmental litter effects. Animals were reared during the fattening period (from weaning at 32 d of age to 60 d of age) in individual cages on an experimental farm, and were fed ad libitum with a commercial diet. Body weight (g) and cumulative feed intake (g) were recorded weekly. Individual BW gain (g) and average BW (ABW, g) were calculated from these data for each 7-d period. Metabolic BW (g(0.75)) was estimated as ABW(0.75). The number of animals actually measured was 444 and 445 in the Caldes and R lines, respectively. Marginal posterior distributions of the genetic parameters were obtained by Gibbs sampling. Posterior means (posterior SD) for heritabilities for partial coefficients of regression of feed intake on metabolic BW and feed intake on BW gain were estimated to be 0.35 (0.17) and 0.40 (0.17), respectively, in the Caldes line and 0.26 (0.19) and 0.27 (0.14), respectively, in line R. The estimated posterior means (posterior SD) for the proportion of the phenotypic variance due to common litter environmental effects of the same coefficients of regression were respectively, 0.39 (0.14) and 0.28 (0.13) in the Caldes line and 0.44 (0.22) and 0.49 (0.14) in line R. These results suggest that efficiency of use of feed resources could be improved by including these coefficients in an index of selection.

  13. Efficient Coding of the Prediction Residual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-27

    Page I. Average of Fundamental and Formant Frequencies and Formant Amplitudes of Vowels by 76 Speakers .. ........... ... 28 II. Representation of IPA...0, 1, ..., M-1 p - Order of the LPC filter F1, F2, ... - Formant frequencies r,(m) - Output of the ith bandpass filter m = 0, 1, ..., M-l; z = 1, 2...correlation coefficients and other parameters that represent the formant frequency characteristics. The other waveform is the prediction residual. Figure

  14. Individualized Risk Prediction Model for Lung Cancer in Korean Men

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sohee; Nam, Byung-Ho; Yang, Hye-Ryung; Lee, Ji An; Lim, Hyunsun; Han, Jun Tae; Park, Il Su; Shin, Hai-Rim; Lee, Jin Soo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in Korea. The objective of the present study was to develop an individualized risk prediction model for lung cancer in Korean men using population-based cohort data. Methods From a population-based cohort study of 1,324,804 Korean men free of cancer at baseline, the individualized absolute risk of developing lung cancer was estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model. We checked the validity of the model using C statistics and the Hosmer–Lemeshow chi-square test on an external validation dataset. Results The risk prediction model for lung cancer in Korean men included smoking exposure, age at smoking initiation, body mass index, physical activity, and fasting glucose levels. The model showed excellent performance (C statistic = 0.871, 95% CI = 0.867–0.876). Smoking was significantly associated with the risk of lung cancer in Korean men, with a four-fold increased risk in current smokers consuming more than one pack a day relative to non-smokers. Age at smoking initiation was also a significant predictor for developing lung cancer; a younger age at initiation was associated with a higher risk of developing lung cancer. Conclusion This is the first study to provide an individualized risk prediction model for lung cancer in an Asian population with very good model performance. In addition to current smoking status, earlier exposure to smoking was a very important factor for developing lung cancer. Since most of the risk factors are modifiable, this model can be used to identify those who are at a higher risk and who can subsequently modify their lifestyle choices to lower their risk of lung cancer. PMID:23408946

  15. Folk beliefs about genetic variation predict avoidance of biracial individuals

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sonia K.; Plaks, Jason E.; Remedios, Jessica D.

    2015-01-01

    People give widely varying estimates for the amount of genetic overlap that exists between humans. While some laypeople believe that humans are highly genetically similar to one another, others believe that humans share very little genetic overlap. These studies examine how beliefs about genetic overlap affect neural and evaluative reactions to racially-ambiguous and biracial targets. In Study 1, we found that lower genetic overlap estimates predicted a stronger neural avoidance response to biracial compared to monoracial targets. In Study 2, we found that lower genetic overlap estimates predicted longer response times to classify biracial (vs. monoracial) faces into racial categories. In Study 3, we manipulated genetic overlap beliefs and found that participants in the low overlap condition explicitly rated biracial targets more negatively than those in the high overlap condition. Taken together, these data suggest that genetic overlap beliefs influence perceivers’ processing fluency and evaluation of biracial and racially-ambiguous individuals. PMID:25904875

  16. Individual differences in time perspective predict autonoetic experience.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Kathleen M; McDermott, Kathleen B; Szpunar, Karl K

    2011-09-01

    Tulving (1985) posited that the capacity to remember is one facet of a more general capacity-autonoetic (self-knowing) consciousness. Autonoetic consciousness was proposed to underlie the ability for "mental time travel" both into the past (remembering) and into the future to envision potential future episodes (episodic future thinking). The current study examines whether individual differences can predict autonoetic experience. Specifically, the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI, Zimbardo & Boyd, 1999) was administered to 133 undergraduate students, who also rated phenomenological experiences accompanying autobiographical remembering and episodic future thinking. Scores on two of the five subscales of the ZTPI (Future and Present-Hedonistic) predicted the degree to which people reported feelings of mentally traveling backward (or forward) in time and the degree to which they reported re- or pre-experiencing the event, but not ten other rated properties less related to autonoetic consciousness.

  17. Individual differences during acquisition predict shifts in generalization.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Matthew G; Church, Barbara A; Mercado, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    Learning to distinguish subtle differences in objects or events can impact how one generalizes. In some cases, training can cause novel events to appear more familiar or attractive than those actually experienced during training: the peak shift effect. This study examined whether individual differences in learning led to systematic patterns of generalization. Participants were trained to identify simulated birdsongs, and then tested on their ability to identify a target song presented among several similar songs that differed in pitch. Initial analysis showed that those attaining moderate proficiency at discriminating songs during training were more likely to shift than those performing poorly or proficiently. However, a neural network trained to output individuals' gradient dynamics using only performance during training as input found an additional set of training variables that predicted shift. Specifically, one subset of shifters had highly conservative response biases accompanied by very little change to perceptual sensitivity in training. These findings suggest that discrimination learning may only lead to generalization shifts in some individuals, and that all individuals who shift may not do so for the same reason.

  18. Numerical prediction of Pelton turbine efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jošt, D.; Mežnar, P.; Lipej, A.

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical analysis of flow in a 2 jet Pelton turbine with horizontal axis. The analysis was done for the model at several operating points in different operating regimes. The results were compared to the results of a test of the model. Analysis was performed using ANSYS CFX-12.1 computer code. A k-ω SST turbulent model was used. Free surface flow was modelled by two-phase homogeneous model. At first, a steady state analysis of flow in the distributor with two injectors was performed for several needle strokes. This provided us with data on flow energy losses in the distributor and the shape and velocity of jets. The second step was an unsteady analysis of the runner with jets. Torque on the shaft was then calculated from pressure distribution data. Averaged torque values are smaller than measured ones. Consequently, calculated turbine efficiency is also smaller than the measured values, the difference is about 4 %. The shape of the efficiency diagram conforms well to the measurements.

  19. Prediction and Quantification of Individual Athletic Performance of Runners

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel, quantitative view on the human athletic performance of individual runners. We obtain a predictor for running performance, a parsimonious model and a training state summary consisting of three numbers by application of modern validation techniques and recent advances in machine learning to the thepowerof10 database of British runners’ performances (164,746 individuals, 1,417,432 performances). Our predictor achieves an average prediction error (out-of-sample) of e.g. 3.6 min on elite Marathon performances and 0.3 seconds on 100 metres performances, and a lower error than the state-of-the-art in performance prediction (30% improvement, RMSE) over a range of distances. We are also the first to report on a systematic comparison of predictors for running performance. Our model has three parameters per runner, and three components which are the same for all runners. The first component of the model corresponds to a power law with exponent dependent on the runner which achieves a better goodness-of-fit than known power laws in the study of running. Many documented phenomena in quantitative sports science, such as the form of scoring tables, the success of existing prediction methods including Riegel’s formula, the Purdy points scheme, the power law for world records performances and the broken power law for world record speeds may be explained on the basis of our findings in a unified way. We provide strong evidence that the three parameters per runner are related to physiological and behavioural parameters, such as training state, event specialization and age, which allows us to derive novel physiological hypotheses relating to athletic performance. We conjecture on this basis that our findings will be vital in exercise physiology, race planning, the study of aging and training regime design. PMID:27336162

  20. Predictability and heritability of individual differences in fear learning.

    PubMed

    Shumake, Jason; Furgeson-Moreira, Sergio; Monfils, Marie H

    2014-09-01

    Our objective was to characterize individual differences in fear conditioning and extinction in an outbred rat strain, to test behavioral predictors of these individual differences, and to assess their heritability. We fear-conditioned 100 Long-Evans rats, attempted to extinguish fear the next day, and tested extinction recall on the third day. The distribution of freezing scores after fear conditioning was skewed, with most rats showing substantial freezing; after fear extinction, the distribution was bimodal with most rats showing minimal freezing, but a substantial portion showing maximal freezing. Longer rearing episodes measured prior to conditioning predicted less freezing at the beginning of extinction, but differences in extinction learning were not predicted by any baseline exploratory behaviors. We tested the heritability of extinction differences by breeding rats from the top and bottom 20% of freezing scores during extinction recall. We then ran the offspring through the same conditioning/extinction procedure, with the addition of recording ultrasonic vocalizations throughout training and testing. Only a minority of rats emitted distress vocalizations during fear acquisition, but the incidence was less frequent in the offspring of good extinguishers than in poor extinguishers or randomly bred controls. The occurrence of distress vocalizations during acquisition predicted higher levels of freezing during fear recall regardless of breeding line, but the relationship between vocalization and freezing was no longer evident following extinction training, at which point freezing levels were influenced only by breeding and not by vocalization. The heritability (h(2)) of extinction recall was estimated at 0.36, consistent with human estimates.

  1. Individual differences in intrinsic brain connectivity predict decision strategy.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Kelly Anne; Anderson, Kevin M; Plitt, Mark; Martin, Alex

    2014-10-15

    When humans are provided with ample time to make a decision, individual differences in strategy emerge. Using an adaptation of a well-studied decision making paradigm, motion direction discrimination, we probed the neural basis of individual differences in strategy. We tested whether strategies emerged from moment-to-moment reconfiguration of functional brain networks involved in decision making with task-evoked functional MRI (fMRI) and whether intrinsic properties of functional brain networks, measured at rest with functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI), were associated with strategy use. We found that human participants reliably selected one of two strategies across 2 days of task performance, either continuously accumulating evidence or waiting for task difficulty to decrease. Individual differences in decision strategy were predicted both by the degree of task-evoked activation of decision-related brain regions and by the strength of pretask correlated spontaneous brain activity. These results suggest that spontaneous brain activity constrains strategy selection on perceptual decisions.

  2. Predicting Smartphone Operating System from Personality and Individual Differences.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Heather; Ellis, David A; Kendrick, Libby-Rae; Ziegler, Fenja; Wiseman, Richard

    2016-12-01

    Android and iPhone devices account for over 90 percent of all smartphones sold worldwide. Despite being very similar in functionality, current discourse and marketing campaigns suggest that key individual differences exist between users of these two devices; however, this has never been investigated empirically. This is surprising, as smartphones continue to gain momentum across a variety of research disciplines. In this article, we consider if individual differences exist between these two distinct groups. In comparison to Android users, we found that iPhone owners are more likely to be female, younger, and increasingly concerned about their smartphone being viewed as a status object. Key differences in personality were also observed with iPhone users displaying lower levels of Honesty-Humility and higher levels of emotionality. Following this analysis, we were also able to build and test a model that predicted smartphone ownership at above chance level based on these individual differences. In line with extended self-theory, the type of smartphone owned provides some valuable information about its owner. These findings have implications for the increasing use of smartphones within research particularly for those working within Computational Social Science and PsychoInformatics, where data are typically collected from devices and applications running a single smartphone operating system.

  3. Predicting the use of Individualized Risk Assessment for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bartle-Haring, Suzanne; Toviessi, Paula; Katafiasz, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the decision to obtain individualized risk assessment after a breast cancer education session. Methods A sample of both African American and Caucasian women was used to determine if there were differences by race/ethnicity in uptake of the assessment and differences in the variables that were most predictive of uptake. The sample included 166 women between the ages of 18 and 80. Sixty-two percent of the sample were African American women. Key Findings The results suggested that African American women and Caucasian women used different factors and used other factors differently to decide whether or not to obtain an individualized risk assessment. Conclusions and Implications These results are discussed within the context of health disparities among ethnic minority and Caucasian women with implications for breast cancer control programs. The results of this study would suggest that knowledge alone does not lead to opting for a personalized risk assessment, and that African American and Caucasian women use different pieces of information, or information differently to make decision about getting more personalized information about risk. PMID:18319147

  4. A Multi-Scale Modeling Framework for Individualized, Spatiotemporal Prediction of Drug Effects and Toxicological Risk

    PubMed Central

    Diaz Ochoa, Juan G.; Bucher, Joachim; Péry, Alexandre R. R.; Zaldivar Comenges, José M.; Niklas, Jens; Mauch, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we focus on a novel multi-scale modeling approach for spatiotemporal prediction of the distribution of substances and resulting hepatotoxicity by combining cellular models, a 2D liver model, and whole body model. As a case study, we focused on predicting human hepatotoxicity upon treatment with acetaminophen based on in vitro toxicity data and potential inter-individual variability in gene expression and enzyme activities. By aggregating mechanistic, genome-based in silico cells to a novel 2D liver model and eventually to a whole body model, we predicted pharmacokinetic properties, metabolism, and the onset of hepatotoxicity in an in silico patient. Depending on the concentration of acetaminophen in the liver and the accumulation of toxic metabolites, cell integrity in the liver as a function of space and time as well as changes in the elimination rate of substances were estimated. We show that the variations in elimination rates also influence the distribution of acetaminophen and its metabolites in the whole body. Our results are in agreement with experimental results. What is more, the integrated model also predicted variations in drug toxicity depending on alterations of metabolic enzyme activities. Variations in enzyme activity, in turn, reflect genetic characteristics or diseases of individuals. In conclusion, this framework presents an important basis for efficiently integrating inter-individual variability data into models, paving the way for personalized or stratified predictions of drug toxicity and efficacy. PMID:23346056

  5. Culture and self in South Africa: individualism-collectivism predictions.

    PubMed

    Eaton, L; Louw, J

    2000-04-01

    People from collectivist cultures may have more concrete and interdependent self-concepts than do people from individualist cultures (G. Hofstede, 1980). African cultures are considered collectivist (H. C. Triandis, 1989), but research on self-concept and culture has neglected this continent. The authors attempted a partial replication in an African context of cross-cultural findings on the abstract-concrete and independent-interdependent dimensions of self-construal (referred to as the abstract-specific and the autonomous-social dimensions, respectively, by E. Rhee, J. S. Uleman, H. K. Lee, & R. J. Roman, 1995). University students in South Africa took the 20 Statements Test (M. Kuhn & T. S. McPartland, 1954; Rhee et al.); home languages were rough indicators of cultural identity. The authors used 3 coding schemes to analyze the content of 78 protocols from African-language speakers and 77 protocols from English speakers. In accord with predictions from individualism-collectivism theory, the African-language speakers produced more interdependent and concrete self-descriptions than did the English speakers. Additional findings concerned the orthogonality of the 2 dimensions and the nature and assessment of the social self-concept.

  6. An Improved Methodology for Individualized Performance Prediction of Sleep-Deprived Individuals with the Two-Process Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    process model of sleep regulation for developing individualized biomathematical models that predict performance impairment for individuals subjected to total sleep loss. This new method advances our previous work in two important ways. First, it enables model customization to start as soon as the first performance measurement from an individual becomes available. This was achieved by optimally combining the performance information obtained from the individual’s performance measurements with a priori performance information using a Bayesian framework, while retaining

  7. Hepcidin level predicts hemoglobin concentration in individuals undergoing repeated phlebotomy.

    PubMed

    Mast, Alan E; Schlumpf, Karen S; Wright, David J; Johnson, Bryce; Glynn, Simone A; Busch, Michael P; Olbina, Gordana; Westerman, Mark; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2013-08-01

    Dietary iron absorption is regulated by hepcidin, an iron regulatory protein produced by the liver. Hepcidin production is regulated by iron stores, erythropoiesis and inflammation, but its physiology when repeated blood loss occurs has not been characterized. Hepcidin was assayed in plasma samples obtained from 114 first-time/reactivated (no blood donations in preceding 2 years) female donors and 34 frequent (≥3 red blood cell donations in preceding 12 months) male donors as they were phlebotomized ≥4 times over 18-24 months. Hepcidin levels were compared to ferritin and hemoglobin levels using multivariable repeated measures regression models. Hepcidin, ferritin and hemoglobin levels declined with increasing frequency of donation in the first-time/reactivated females. Hepcidin and ferritin levels correlated well with each other (Spearman's correlation of 0.74), but on average hepcidin varied more between donations for a given donor relative to ferritin. In a multivariable repeated measures regression model the predicted inter-donation decline in hemoglobin varied as a function of hepcidin and ferritin; hemoglobin was 0.51 g/dL lower for subjects with low (>45.7 ng/mL) or decreasing hepcidin and low ferritin (>26 ng/mL), and was essentially zero for other subjects including those with high (>45.7 ng/mL) or increasing hepcidin and low ferritin (>26 ng/mL) levels (P<0.001). In conclusion, hepcidin levels change rapidly in response to dietary iron needed for erythropoiesis. The dynamic regulation of hepcidin in the presence of a low levels of ferritin suggests that plasma hepcidin concentration may provide clinically useful information about an individual's iron status (and hence capacity to tolerate repeated blood donations) beyond that of ferritin alone. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00097006.

  8. Predicting Change in Postpartum Depression: An Individual Growth Curve Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Trey

    Recently, methodologists interested in examining problems associated with measuring change have suggested that developmental researchers should focus upon assessing change at both intra-individual and inter-individual levels. This study used an application of individual growth curve analysis to the problem of maternal postpartum depression.…

  9. Individual cell heterogeneity in Predictive Food Microbiology: Challenges in predicting a "noisy" world.

    PubMed

    Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P; Aspridou, Zafiro

    2017-01-02

    Gene expression is a fundamentally noisy process giving rise to a significant cell to cell variability at the phenotype level. The phenotypic noise is manifested in a wide range of microbial traits. Heterogeneous behavior of individual cells is observed at the growth, survival and inactivation responses and should be taken into account in the context of Predictive Food Microbiology (PMF). Recent methodological advances can be employed for the study and modeling of single cell dynamics leading to a new generation of mechanistic models which can provide insight into the link between phenotype, gene-expression, protein and metabolic functional units at the single cell level. Such models however, need to deal with an enormous amount of interactions and processes that influence each other, forming an extremely complex system. In this review paper, we discuss the importance of noise and present the future challenges in predicting the "noisy" microbial responses in foods.

  10. Artificial neural networks reveal efficiency in genetic value prediction.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, L A; Bhering, L L; Cruz, C D

    2015-06-18

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for predicting genetic value in experiments carried out in randomized blocks. Sixteen scenarios were simulated with different values of heritability (10, 20, 30, and 40%), coefficient of variation (5 and 10%), and the number of genotypes per block (150 and 200 for validation, and 5000 for neural network training). One hundred validation populations were used in each scenario. Accuracy of ANNs was evaluated by comparing the correlation of network value with genetic value, and of phenotypic value with genetic value. Neural networks were efficient in predicting genetic value with a 0.64 to 10.3% gain compared to the phenotypic value, regardless the simulated population size, heritability, or coefficient of variation. Thus, the artificial neural network is a promising technique for predicting genetic value in balanced experiments.

  11. On the uncertainty of individual prediction because of sampling predictors.

    PubMed

    Shen, Changyu; Li, Xiaochun

    2016-05-30

    Prediction of an outcome for a given unit based on prediction models built on a training sample plays a major role in many research areas. The uncertainty of the prediction is predominantly characterized by the subject sampling variation in current practice, where prediction models built on hypothetically re-sampled units yield variable predictions for the same unit of interest. It is almost always true that the predictors used to build prediction models are simply a subset of the entirety of factors related to the outcome. Following the frequentist principle, we can account for the variation because of hypothetically re-sampled predictors used to build the prediction models. This is particularly important in medicine where the prediction has important and sometime life-death consequences on a patient's health status. In this article, we discuss some rationale along this line in the context of medicine. We propose a simple approach to estimate the standard error of the prediction that accounts for the variation because of sampling both subjects and predictors under logistic and Cox regression models. A simulation study is presented to support our argument and demonstrate the performance of our method. The concept and method are applied to a real data set. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Predicting Optimal Preference Assessment Methods for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Kendra M.; Czarnecki, Diana; Martin, Toby L.; Yu, C. T.; Martin, Garry L.

    2007-01-01

    The single-stimulus (SS) preference assessment procedure has been described as more appropriate than the paired stimulus (PS) procedure for "lower functioning" individuals, but this guideline's vagueness limits its usefulness. We administered the SS and PS preference assessment procedures with food items to seven individuals with severe…

  13. pcrEfficiency: a Web tool for PCR amplification efficiency prediction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Relative calculation of differential gene expression in quantitative PCR reactions requires comparison between amplification experiments that include reference genes and genes under study. Ignoring the differences between their efficiencies may lead to miscalculation of gene expression even with the same starting amount of template. Although there are several tools performing PCR primer design, there is no tool available that predicts PCR efficiency for a given amplicon and primer pair. Results We have used a statistical approach based on 90 primer pair combinations amplifying templates from bacteria, yeast, plants and humans, ranging in size between 74 and 907 bp to identify the parameters that affect PCR efficiency. We developed a generalized additive model fitting the data and constructed an open source Web interface that allows the obtention of oligonucleotides optimized for PCR with predicted amplification efficiencies starting from a given sequence. Conclusions pcrEfficiency provides an easy-to-use web interface allowing the prediction of PCR efficiencies prior to web lab experiments thus easing quantitative real-time PCR set-up. A web-based service as well the source code are provided freely at http://srvgen.upct.es/efficiency.html under the GPL v2 license. PMID:22014212

  14. An analytical method to predict efficiency of aircraft gearboxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, N. E.; Loewenthal, S. H.; Black, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    A spur gear efficiency prediction method previously developed by the authors was extended to include power loss of planetary gearsets. A friction coefficient model was developed for MIL-L-7808 oil based on disc machine data. This combined with the recent capability of predicting losses in spur gears of nonstandard proportions allows the calculation of power loss for complete aircraft gearboxes that utilize spur gears. The method was applied to the T56/501 turboprop gearbox and compared with measured test data. Bearing losses were calculated with large scale computer programs. Breakdowns of the gearbox losses point out areas for possible improvement.

  15. Eye blink rate predicts individual differences in pseudoneglect

    PubMed Central

    Slagter, Heleen A.; Davidson, Richard J.; Tomer, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Most healthy individuals display a subtle spatial attentional bias, exhibiting relative inattention for stimuli on one side of the visual field, a phenomenon known as pseudoneglect. Prior work in animals and patients has implicated dopamine in spatial attention asymmetries. The current study therefore examined - in healthy individuals - the relationship between the attentional bias and spontaneous eye-blink rate (EBR), a putative measure of central dopaminergic function. We found that those individuals, who blinked more often under resting conditions, displayed greater preference for the right side of the visual display in a subsequent attention task. This finding may support the idea that the observed attentional bias in healthy individuals reflects asymmetries in dopaminergic circuits, and corroborates previous findings implicating dopamine in spatial attention. PMID:20036680

  16. Efficient clustering of identity-by-descent between multiple individuals

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yu; Browning, Brian L.; Browning, Sharon R.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Most existing identity-by-descent (IBD) detection methods only consider haplotype pairs; less attention has been paid to considering multiple haplotypes simultaneously, even though IBD is an equivalence relation on haplotypes that partitions a set of haplotypes into IBD clusters. Multiple-haplotype IBD clusters may have advantages over pairwise IBD in some applications, such as IBD mapping. Existing methods for detecting multiple-haplotype IBD clusters are often computationally expensive and unable to handle large samples with thousands of haplotypes. Results: We present a clustering method, efficient multiple-IBD, which uses pairwise IBD segments to infer multiple-haplotype IBD clusters. It expands clusters from seed haplotypes by adding qualified neighbors and extends clusters across sliding windows in the genome. Our method is an order of magnitude faster than existing methods and has comparable performance with respect to the quality of clusters it uncovers. We further investigate the potential application of multiple-haplotype IBD clusters in association studies by testing for association between multiple-haplotype IBD clusters and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort. Using our multiple-haplotype IBD cluster approach, we found an association with a genomic interval covering the PCSK9 gene in these data that is missed by standard single-marker association tests. Previously published studies confirm association of PCSK9 with low-density lipoprotein. Availability and implementation: Source code is available under the GNU Public License http://cs.au.dk/~qianyuxx/EMI/. Contact: qianyuxx@gmail.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24363374

  17. A new protein structure representation for efficient protein function prediction.

    PubMed

    Maghawry, Huda A; Mostafa, Mostafa G M; Gharib, Tarek F

    2014-12-01

    One of the challenging problems in bioinformatics is the prediction of protein function. Protein function is the main key that can be used to classify different proteins. Protein function can be inferred experimentally with very small throughput or computationally with very high throughput. Computational methods are sequence based or structure based. Structure-based methods produce more accurate protein function prediction. In this article, we propose a new protein structure representation for efficient protein function prediction. The representation is based on three-dimensional patterns of protein residues. In the analysis, we used protein function based on enzyme activity through six mechanistically diverse enzyme superfamilies: amidohydrolase, crotonase, haloacid dehalogenase, isoprenoid synthase type I, and vicinal oxygen chelate. We applied three different classification methods, naïve Bayes, k-nearest neighbors, and random forest, to predict the enzyme superfamily of a given protein. The prediction accuracy using the proposed representation outperforms a recently introduced representation method that is based only on the distance patterns. The results show that the proposed representation achieved prediction accuracy up to 98%, with improvement of about 10% on average.

  18. Coherent Motion Sensitivity Predicts Individual Differences in Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boets, Bart; De Smedt, Bert; Ghesquiere, Pol

    2011-01-01

    Recent findings suggest deficits in coherent motion sensitivity, an index of visual dorsal stream functioning, in children with poor mathematical skills or dyscalculia, a specific learning disability in mathematics. We extended these data using a longitudinal design to unravel whether visual dorsal stream functioning is able to "predict"…

  19. Predicting Eighth-Grade Algebra Students with Individualized Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, Valerie N.; Crossland, Cathy L.; Stiff, Lee V.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which student performance and teacher perception of student performance affect placement in eighth-grade mathematics classes for students with disabilities. Authors used the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study--Kindergarten dataset to investigate how each of the following factors predicted placement in…

  20. TPV efficiency measurements and predictions for a closed cavity geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gethers, C.K.; Ballinger, C.T.; Postlethwait, M.A.; DePoy, D.M.; Baldasaro, P.F.

    1997-05-01

    A thermophotovoltaic (TPV) efficiency measurement, within a closed cavity, is an integrated test which incorporates four fundamental parameters of TPV direct energy conversion. These are: (1) the TPV devices, (2) spectral control, (3) a radiation/photon source, and (4) closed cavity geometry effects. The overall efficiency of the TPV device is controlled by the TP cell performance, the spectral control characteristics, the radiator temperature and the geometric arrangement. Controlled efficiency measurements and predictions provide valuable feedback on all four. This paper describes and compares two computer codes developed to model 16, 1 cm{sup 2} TPV cells (in a 4 x 4 configuration) in a cavity geometry. The first code, subdivides the infrared spectrum into several bands and then numerically integrates over the spectrum to provide absorbed heat flux and cell electrical output performance predictions (assuming infinite parallel plates). The second code, utilizes a Monte Carlo Photon Transport code that tracks photons, from birth at the radiation source, until they either escape or are absorbed. Absorption depends upon energy dependent reflection probabilities assigned to every geometrical surface within the cavity. The model also has the capability of tallying above and below bandgap absorptions (as a function of location) and can support various radiator temperature profiles. The arrays were fabricated using 0.55 eV InGaAs cells with Si/SiO interference filters for spectral control and at steady state conditions, array efficiency was calculated as the ratio of the load matched power to its absorbed heat flux. Preliminary experimental results are also compared with predictions.

  1. TPV efficiency predictions and measurements for a closed cavity geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gethers, C.K.; Ballinger, C.T.; Postlethwait, M.A.; DePoy, D.M.; Baldasaro, P.F.

    1997-05-01

    A thermophotovoltaic (TPV) efficiency measurement, within a closed cavity, is an integrated test which incorporates four fundamental parameters of TPV direct energy conversion. These are: (1) the TPV devices, (2) spectral control, (3) a radiation/photon source, and (4) closed cavity geometry affects. The overall efficiency of the TPV device is controlled by the TPV cell performance, the spectral control characteristics, the radiator temperature and the geometric arrangement. Controlled efficiency measurements and predictions provide valuable feedback on all four. This paper describes and compares two computer codes developed to model 16, 1 cm{sup 2} TPV cells (in a 4x4 configuration) in a cavity geometry. The first code subdivides the infrared spectrum into several bands and then numerically integrates over the spectrum to provide absorbed heat flux and cell performance predictions (assuming infinite parallel plates). The second utilizes a Monte Carlo Ray-Tracing code that tracks photons, from birth at the radiation source, until they either escape or are absorbed. Absorption depends upon energy dependent reflection probabilities assigned to every geometrical surface within the cavity. The model also has the capability of tallying above and below bandgap absorptions (as a function of location) and can support various radiator temperature profiles. The arrays are fabricated using 0.55 eV InGaAs cells with Si/SiO interference filters for spectral control and at steady state conditions, array efficiency was calculated as the ratio of the load matched power to its absorbed heat flux. Preliminary experimental results are also compared with predictions.

  2. Individual differences in individualism and collectivism predict ratings of virtual cities' liveability and environmental quality.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Mark; Morrison, Tessa

    2014-01-01

    The present research investigated individual differences in individualism and collectivism as predictors of people's reactions to cities. Psychology undergraduate students (N = 148) took virtual guided tours around historical cities. They then evaluated the cities' liveability and environmental quality and completed measures of individualism and collectivism. Mediation analyses showed that people who scored high in self-responsibility (individualism) rated the cities as more liveable because they perceived them to be richer and better resourced. In contrast, people who scored high in collectivism rated the cities as having a better environmental quality because they perceived them to (1) provide a greater potential for community and social life and (2) allow people to express themselves. These results indicate that people's evaluations of virtual cities are based on the degree to which certain aspects of the cities are perceived to be consistent with individualist and collectivist values.

  3. Predicting individual affect of health interventions to reduce HPV prevalence.

    PubMed

    Corley, Courtney D; Mihalcea, Rada; Mikler, Armin R; Sanfilippo, Antonio P

    2011-01-01

    Recently, human papilloma virus (HPV) has been implicated to cause several throat and oral cancers and HPV is established to cause most cervical cancers. A human papilloma virus vaccine has been proven successful to reduce infection incidence in FDA clinical trials, and it is currently available in the USA. Current intervention policy targets adolescent females for vaccination; however, the expansion of suggested guidelines may extend to other age groups and males as well. This research takes a first step toward automatically predicting personal beliefs, regarding health intervention, on the spread of disease. Using linguistic or statistical approaches, sentiment analysis determines a text's affective content. Self-reported HPV vaccination beliefs published in web and social media are analyzed for affect polarity and leveraged as knowledge inputs to epidemic models. With this in mind, we have developed a discrete-time model to facilitate predicting impact on the reduction of HPV prevalence due to arbitrary age- and gender-targeted vaccination schemes.

  4. Predicting Individual Affect of Health Interventions to Reduce HPV Prevalence

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Courtney D.; Mihalcea, Rada; Mikler, Armin R.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

    2011-04-01

    Recently, human papilloma virus has been implicated to cause several throat and oral cancers and hpv is established to cause most cervical cancers. A human papilloma virus vaccine has been proven successful to reduce infection incidence in FDA clinical trials and it is currently available in the United States. Current intervention policy targets adolescent females for vaccination; however, the expansion of suggested guidelines may extend to other age groups and males as well. This research takes a first step towards automatically predicting personal beliefs, regarding health intervention, on the spread of disease. Using linguistic or statistical approaches, sentiment analysis determines a texts affective content. Self-reported HPV vaccination beliefs published in web and social media are analyzed for affect polarity and leveraged as knowledge inputs to epidemic models. With this in mind, we have developed a discrete-time model to facilitate predicting impact on the reduction of HPV prevalence due to arbitrary age and gender targeted vaccination schemes.

  5. Socioeconomic gradients predict individual differences in neurocognitive abilities.

    PubMed

    Noble, Kimberly G; McCandliss, Bruce D; Farah, Martha J

    2007-07-01

    Socioeconomic status (SES) is associated with childhood cognitive achievement. In previous research we found that this association shows neural specificity; specifically we found that groups of low and middle SES children differed disproportionately in perisylvian/language and prefrontal/executive abilities relative to other neurocognitive abilities. Here we address several new questions: To what extent does this disparity between groups reflect a gradient of SES-related individual differences in neurocognitive development, as opposed to a more categorical difference? What other neurocognitive systems differ across individuals as a function of SES? Does linguistic ability mediate SES differences in other systems? And how do specific prefrontal/executive subsystems vary with SES? One hundred and fifty healthy, socioeconomically diverse first-graders were administered tasks tapping language, visuospatial skills, memory, working memory, cognitive control, and reward processing. SES explained over 30% of the variance in language, and a smaller but highly significant portion of the variance in most other systems. Statistically mediating factors and possible interventional approaches are discussed.

  6. Individual differences predict low prevalence visual search performance.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Chad; Becker, Mark W

    2017-01-01

    Critical real-world visual search tasks such as radiology and baggage screening rely on the detection of rare targets. When targets are rare, observers search for a relatively short amount of time and have a high miss rate, a pattern of results known as the low prevalence effect. Attempts to improve the search for rare targets have been unsuccessful or resulted in an increase in detections at the price of more false alarms. As an alternative to improving visual search performance through experimental manipulations, an individual differences approach found that those with higher working memory capacity were better at finding rare targets. We build on the individual differences approach and assess 141 observers' visual working memory capacity (vWMC), vigilance, attentional control, big five personality traits, and performance in both high and low prevalence search tasks. vWMC, vigilance, attentional control, high prevalence visual search performance, and level of introversion were all significant predictors of low prevalence search accuracy, and together account for more than 50% of the variance in search performance. With the exception of vigilance, these factors are also significant predictors of reaction time; better performance was associated with longer reaction times, suggesting these factors identify observers who maintain relatively high quitting thresholds, even with low target prevalence. Our results suggest that a quick and easy-to-administer battery of tasks can identify observers who are likely to perform well in low prevalence search tasks, and these predictor variables are associated with higher quitting thresholds, leading to higher accuracy.

  7. Machined immersion grating with theoretically predicted diffraction efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yuji; Kobayashi, Naoto; Sarugaku, Yuki; Sukegawa, Takashi; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Kaji, Sayumi; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Kondo, Sohei; Yasui, Chikako; Kataza, Hirokazu; Nakagawa, Takao; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2015-06-01

    An immersion grating composed of a transmissive material with a high refractive index (n>2) is a powerful device for high-resolution spectroscopy in the infrared region. Although the original idea is attributed to Fraunhofer about 200 years ago, an immersion grating with high diffraction efficiency has never been realized due to the difficulty in processing infrared crystals that are mostly brittle. While anisotropic etching is one successful method for fabricating a fine groove pattern on Si crystal, machining is necessary for realizing the ideal groove shape on any kind of infrared crystal. In this paper, we report the realization of the first, to the best of our knowledge, machined immersion grating made of single-crystal CdZnTe with a high diffraction efficiency that is almost identical to that theoretically predicted by rigorous coupled-wave analysis.

  8. Measurement and prediction of Energy Efficient Engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavin, S. P.; Ho, P. Y.; Chamberlin, R.

    1984-01-01

    The NASA/GE Energy Efficient Engine (E3) static noise levels were measured in an acoustic arena on the Integrated Core and Low Spool Test System. These measured levels were scaled to the appropriate size to power four study aircraft and were projected to flight for evaluation of noise levels relative to FAR36, Stage III limits. As a result of these evaluations, it is predicted that the NASA/GE E3 engine with a wide spacing cut-on blade/vane ratio fan and a forced mixer nozzle can meet FAR36 Stage III limits with sufficient design margin.

  9. Time-and-Spatially Adapting Simulations for Efficient Dynamic Stall Predictions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    SIMULATIONS FOR EFFICIENTDYNAMIC STALL PREDICTIONS The ability to accurately and efficiently predict the occurrence and severity of dynamic stall...The ability to accurately and efficiently predict the occurrence and severity of dynamic stall remains a major roadblock in the design and analysis...SPATIALLY ADAPTING SIMULATIONS FOR EFFICIENT DYNAMIC STALL PREDICTIONS Marilyn J. Smith Professor Georgia Tech Rohit Jain Aerospace Engineer US Army

  10. Individual differences in impulsivity predict anticipatory eye movements.

    PubMed

    Cirilli, Laetitia; de Timary, Philippe; Lefèvre, Phillipe; Missal, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Impulsivity is the tendency to act without forethought. It is a personality trait commonly used in the diagnosis of many psychiatric diseases. In clinical practice, impulsivity is estimated using written questionnaires. However, answers to questions might be subject to personal biases and misinterpretations. In order to alleviate this problem, eye movements could be used to study differences in decision processes related to impulsivity. Therefore, we investigated correlations between impulsivity scores obtained with a questionnaire in healthy subjects and characteristics of their anticipatory eye movements in a simple smooth pursuit task. Healthy subjects were asked to answer the UPPS questionnaire (Urgency Premeditation Perseverance and Sensation seeking Impulsive Behavior scale), which distinguishes four independent dimensions of impulsivity: Urgency, lack of Premeditation, lack of Perseverance, and Sensation seeking. The same subjects took part in an oculomotor task that consisted of pursuing a target that moved in a predictable direction. This task reliably evoked anticipatory saccades and smooth eye movements. We found that eye movement characteristics such as latency and velocity were significantly correlated with UPPS scores. The specific correlations between distinct UPPS factors and oculomotor anticipation parameters support the validity of the UPPS construct and corroborate neurobiological explanations for impulsivity. We suggest that the oculomotor approach of impulsivity put forth in the present study could help bridge the gap between psychiatry and physiology.

  11. Individual variability in behavioral flexibility predicts sign-tracking tendency

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, Helen M.; Chen, Yu-Wei; Fiscella, Kimberly; Calu, Donna J.

    2015-01-01

    Sign-tracking rats show heightened sensitivity to food- and drug-associated cues, which serve as strong incentives for driving reward seeking. We hypothesized that this enhanced incentive drive is accompanied by an inflexibility when incentive value changes. To examine this we tested rats in Pavlovian outcome devaluation or second-order conditioning prior to the assessment of sign-tracking tendency. To assess behavioral flexibility we trained rats to associate a light with a food outcome. After the food was devalued by pairing with illness, we measured conditioned responding (CR) to the light during an outcome devaluation probe test. The level of CR during outcome devaluation probe test correlated with the rats' subsequent tracking tendency, with sign-tracking rats failing to suppress CR to the light after outcome devaluation. To assess Pavlovian incentive learning, we trained rats on first-order (CS+, CS−) and second-order (SOCS+, SOCS−) discriminations. After second-order conditioning, we measured CR to the second-order cues during a probe test. Second-order conditioning was observed across all rats regardless of tracking tendency. The behavioral inflexibility of sign-trackers has potential relevance for understanding individual variation in vulnerability to drug addiction. PMID:26578917

  12. Individual differences in nonverbal number skills predict math anxiety.

    PubMed

    Lindskog, Marcus; Winman, Anders; Poom, Leo

    2017-02-01

    Math anxiety (MA) involves negative affect and tension when solving mathematical problems, with potentially life-long consequences. MA has been hypothesized to be a consequence of negative learning experiences and cognitive predispositions. Recent research indicates genetic and neurophysiological links, suggesting that MA stems from a basic level deficiency in symbolic numerical processing. However, the contribution of evolutionary ancient purely nonverbal processes is not fully understood. Here we show that the roots of MA may go beyond symbolic numbers. We demonstrate that MA is correlated with precision of the Approximate Number System (ANS). Individuals high in MA have poorer ANS functioning than those low in MA. This correlation remains significant when controlling for other forms of anxiety and for cognitive variables. We show that MA mediates the documented correlation between ANS precision and math performance, both with ANS and with math performance as independent variable in the mediation model. In light of our results, we discuss the possibility that MA has deep roots, stemming from a non-verbal number processing deficiency. The findings provide new evidence advancing the theoretical understanding of the developmental etiology of MA.

  13. Baseline BOLD correlation predicts individuals' stimulus-evoked BOLD responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Chen, Wei

    2011-02-01

    To investigate whether individuals' ongoing neuronal activity at resting state can affect their response to brain stimulation, fMRI BOLD signals were imaged from the human visual cortex of fifteen healthy subjects in the absence and presence of visual stimulation. It was found that the temporal correlation strength but not amplitude of baseline BOLD signal fluctuations acquired under the eyes-fixed condition is positively correlated with the amplitude of stimulus-evoked BOLD responses across subjects. Moreover, the spatiotemporal correlations of baseline BOLD signals imply a coherent network covering the visual system, which is topographically indistinguishable from the "resting-state visual network" observed under the eyes-closed condition. The overall findings suggest that the synchronization of ongoing brain activity plays an important role in determining stimulus-evoked brain activity even at an early stage of the sensory system. The tight relationship between baseline BOLD correlation and stimulus-evoked BOLD amplitude provides an essential basis for understanding and interpreting the large inter-subject BOLD variability commonly observed in numerous fMRI studies and potentially for improving group fMRI analysis. This study highlights the importance to integrate the information from both resting-state coherent networks and task-evoked neural responses for a better understanding of how the brain functions.

  14. Optimal Predictions in Everyday Cognition: The Wisdom of Individuals or Crowds?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mozer, Michael C.; Pashler, Harold; Homaei, Hadjar

    2008-01-01

    Griffiths and Tenenbaum (2006) asked individuals to make predictions about the duration or extent of everyday events (e.g., cake baking times), and reported that predictions were optimal, employing Bayesian inference based on veridical prior distributions. Although the predictions conformed strikingly to statistics of the world, they reflect…

  15. Predictive Models of Alcohol Use Based on Attitudes and Individual Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Castillo Rodríguez, José A. García; López-Sánchez, Carmen; Soler, M. Carmen Quiles; Del Castillo-López, Álvaro García; Pertusa, Mónica Gázquez; Campos, Juan Carlos Marzo; Inglés, Cándido J.

    2013-01-01

    Two predictive models are developed in this article: the first is designed to predict people' attitudes to alcoholic drinks, while the second sets out to predict the use of alcohol in relation to selected individual values. University students (N = 1,500) were recruited through stratified sampling based on sex and academic discipline. The…

  16. Photosynthetic efficiency predicts toxic effects of metal nanomaterials in phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert J; Muller, Erik B; Cole, Bryan; Martin, Tyronne; Nisbet, Roger; Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K; Jarvis, Tayler A; Keller, Arturo A; Cherr, Gary; Lenihan, Hunter S

    2017-02-01

    High Throughput Screening (HTS) using in vitro assessments at the subcellular level has great promise for screening new chemicals and emerging contaminants to identify high-risk candidates, but their linkage to ecological impacts has seldom been evaluated. We tested whether a battery of subcellular HTS tests could be used to accurately predict population-level effects of engineered metal nanoparticles (ENPs) on marine phytoplankton, important primary producers that support oceanic food webs. To overcome well-known difficulties of estimating ecologically meaningful toxicity parameters, we used novel Dynamic Energy Budget and Toxicodynamic (DEBtox) modeling techniques to evaluate impacts of ENPs on population growth rates. Our results show that population growth was negatively impacted by all four ENPs tested, but the HTS tests assessing many cell/physiological functions lacked predictive power at the population level. However, declining photosynthetic efficiency, a traditional physiological endpoint for photoautotrophs, was a good predictor of population level effects in phytoplankton. DEBtox techniques provided robust estimates of EC10 for population growth rates in exponentially growing batch cultures of phytoplankton, and should be widely useful for ecotoxicological testing. Adoption of HTS approaches for ecotoxicological assessment should carefully evaluate the predictive power of specific assays to minimize the risk that effects at higher levels of biological organization may go undetected.

  17. Prediction aluminum corrosion inhibitor efficiency using artificial neural network (ANN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Sh; Kalhor, E. G.; Nabavi, S. R.; Alamiparvin, L.; Pogaku, R.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, activity of some Schiff bases as aluminum corrosion inhibitor was investigated using artificial neural network (ANN). Hence, corrosion inhibition efficiency of Schiff bases (in any type) were gathered from different references. Then these molecules were drawn and optimized in Hyperchem software. Molecular descriptors generating and descriptors selection were fulfilled by Dragon software and principal component analysis (PCA) method, respectively. These structural descriptors along with environmental descriptors (ambient temperature, time of exposure, pH and the concentration of inhibitor) were used as input variables. Furthermore, aluminum corrosion inhibition efficiency was used as output variable. Experimental data were split into three sets: training set (for model building) and test set (for model validation) and simulation (for general model). Modeling was performed by Multiple linear regression (MLR) methods and artificial neural network (ANN). The results obtained in linear models showed poor correlation between experimental and theoretical data. However nonlinear model presented satisfactory results. Higher correlation coefficient of ANN (R > 0.9) revealed that ANN can be successfully applied for prediction of aluminum corrosion inhibitor efficiency of Schiff bases in different environmental conditions.

  18. Individual but not fragile: individual differences in task control predict Stroop facilitation.

    PubMed

    Kalanthroff, E; Henik, A

    2013-06-01

    The Stroop effect is composed of interference and facilitation effects. The facilitation is less stable and thus many times is referred to as a "fragile effect". Here we suggest the facilitation effect is highly vulnerable to individual differences in control over the task conflict (between relevant color naming and irrelevant word reading in the Stroop task). We replicated previous findings of a significant correlation between stop-signal reaction time (SSRT) and Stroop interference, and also found a significant correlation between SSRT and the Stroop facilitation effect-participants with low inhibitory control (i.e., long SSRT) had no facilitation effect or even a reversed one. These results shed new light on the "fragile" facilitation effect and highlight the necessity of awareness of task conflict, especially in the Stroop task.

  19. Energy-efficient container handling using hybrid model predictive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Jianbin; Negenborn, Rudy R.; Lodewijks, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    The performance of container terminals needs to be improved to adapt the growth of containers while maintaining sustainability. This paper provides a methodology for determining the trajectory of three key interacting machines for carrying out the so-called bay handling task, involving transporting containers between a vessel and the stacking area in an automated container terminal. The behaviours of the interacting machines are modelled as a collection of interconnected hybrid systems. Hybrid model predictive control (MPC) is proposed to achieve optimal performance, balancing the handling capacity and energy consumption. The underlying control problem is hereby formulated as a mixed-integer linear programming problem. Simulation studies illustrate that a higher penalty on energy consumption indeed leads to improved sustainability using less energy. Moreover, simulations illustrate how the proposed energy-efficient hybrid MPC controller performs under different types of uncertainties.

  20. Predicting how individuals approach enrichment: regulatory focus in cotton-top tamarins (Sanguinus oedipus).

    PubMed

    Franks, Becca; Reiss, Diana; Cole, Patricia; Friedrich, Volney; Thompson, Nicole; Higgins, E Tory

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is mounting that personality is associated with health and well-being in humans and other animals. In a step towards increasing our understanding of this link, we applied regulatory focus theory, a motivational perspective from social psychology, to the behavior of zoo-housed cotton top tamarins. We tested whether regulatory focus "personality," that is stable differences in whether an individual is motivated by gains versus safety, would 1) produce individual differences in behavior and 2) predict how individuals interact with enrichment. First, we characterized individuals with respect to several key behaviors: eating in the open, hiding, and time spent near the front of the exhibit. The monkeys were consistent in their behavioral tendencies across the 6-month study, allowing regulatory focus classification. One monkey showed evidence of being a promotion-individual, that is, more motivated by gains than safety. One monkey showed evidence of being a prevention-individual, that is, more motivated by safety than gains. The other monkeys were stable in their behavior and showed evidence of being intermediate-individuals, that is, they favored neither gains nor safety. Using these characterizations, we predicted distinct patterns of individual-object interactions with enrichment. For example, we predicted that a promotion-individual (favoring gains over safety) would approach potential gains faster than a prevention-individual (favoring safety over gains). Counter-intuitively, however, we also predicted that a promotion-individual would approach non-gains slower than a prevention-individual concerned with safety. We found support for our predictions, which suggests that regulatory focus theory could be a useful tool for understanding how and why individuals interact with environmental enrichment.

  1. Student personality traits predicting individuation in relation to mothers and fathers.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Maja; Kavčič, Tina

    2014-07-01

    The role of personality traits in 674 emerging adult students' (aged 18 to 28; 80% female) individuation in relation to parents was investigated cross-sectionally. Self-reports were obtained by the Big Five Inventory and the Individuation Test for Emerging Adults. Personality was predictive of measures of individuation, over and above the students' background characteristics, suggesting that personality can be viewed as an inner resource shaping experiences of individuation. Agreeableness contributed to support seeking, and connectedness with both parents, and Extraversion predicted connectedness with mothers. Conscientiousness was related negatively to both perceptions of parental intrusiveness and fear of disappointing the mother, whereas Neuroticism was predictive of perceptions of maternal intrusiveness, and fear of disappointing the parents. Openness was associated with self-reliance in relationships with both parents, and demonstrated negative links with support seeking and connectedness with mothers. Few moderating effects of age and gender on Extraversion-individuation associations were revealed.

  2. Predicting the peak growth velocity in the individual child: validation of a new growth model.

    PubMed

    Busscher, Iris; Kingma, Idsart; de Bruin, Rob; Wapstra, Frits Hein; Verkerke, Gijsvertus J; Veldhuizen, Albert G

    2012-01-01

    Predicting the peak growth velocity in an individual patient with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is essential or determining the prognosis of the disorder and timing of the (surgical) treatment. Until the present time, no accurate method has been found to predict the timing and magnitude of the pubertal growth spurt in the individual child. A mathematical model was developed in which the partial individual growth velocity curve was linked to the generic growth velocity curve. The generic curve was shifted and stretched or shrunk, both along the age axis and the height velocity axis. The individual age and magnitude of the PGV were obtained from the new predicted complete growth velocity curve. Predictions were made using 2, 1.5, 1 and 0.5 years of the available longitudinal data of the individual child, starting at different ages. The predicted values of 210 boys and 162 girls were compared to the child's own original values of the PGV. The individual differences were compared to differences obtained when using the generic growth velocity curve as a standard. Using 2 years of data as input for the model, all predictions of the age of the PGV in boys and girls were significantly better in comparison to using the generic values. Using only 0.5 years of data as input, the predictions with a starting age from 13 to 15.5 years in boys and from 9.5 to 14.5 years in girls were significantly better. Similar results were found for the predictions of the magnitude of the PGV. This model showed highly accurate results in predicting the individual age and magnitude of the PGV, which can be used in the treatment of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

  3. Can the theory of planned behaviour predict the physical activity behaviour of individuals?

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Nicola; Dixon, Diane; Johnston, Marie; Howie, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The theory of planned behaviour (TPB) can identify cognitions that predict differences in behaviour between individuals. However, it is not clear whether the TPB can predict the behaviour of an individual person. This study employs a series of n-of-1 studies and time series analyses to examine the ability of the TPB to predict physical activity (PA) behaviours of six individuals. Six n-of-1 studies were conducted, in which TPB cognitions and up to three PA behaviours (walking, gym workout and a personally defined PA) were measured twice daily for six weeks. Walking was measured by pedometer step count, gym attendance by self-report with objective validation of gym entry and the personally defined PA behaviour by self-report. Intra-individual variability in TPB cognitions and PA behaviour was observed in all participants. The TPB showed variable predictive utility within individuals and across behaviours. The TPB predicted at least one PA behaviour for five participants but had no predictive utility for one participant. Thus, n-of-1 designs and time series analyses can be used to test theory in an individual.

  4. Striatal structure and function predict individual biases in learning to avoid pain

    PubMed Central

    Eldar, Eran; Hauser, Tobias U.; Dayan, Peter; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2016-01-01

    Pain is an elemental inducer of avoidance. Here, we demonstrate that people differ in how they learn to avoid pain, with some individuals refraining from actions that resulted in painful outcomes, whereas others favor actions that helped prevent pain. These individual biases were best explained by differences in learning from outcome prediction errors and were associated with distinct forms of striatal responses to painful outcomes. Specifically, striatal responses to pain were modulated in a manner consistent with an aversive prediction error in individuals who learned predominantly from pain, whereas in individuals who learned predominantly from success in preventing pain, modulation was consistent with an appetitive prediction error. In contrast, striatal responses to success in preventing pain were consistent with an appetitive prediction error in both groups. Furthermore, variation in striatal structure, encompassing the region where pain prediction errors were expressed, predicted participants’ predominant mode of learning, suggesting the observed learning biases may reflect stable individual traits. These results reveal functional and structural neural components underlying individual differences in avoidance learning, which may be important contributors to psychiatric disorders involving pathological harm avoidance behavior. PMID:27071092

  5. Use of posterior predictive checks as an inferential tool for investigating individual heterogeneity in animal population vital rates

    PubMed Central

    Chambert, Thierry; Rotella, Jay J; Higgs, Megan D

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of individual heterogeneity in vital rates has recently received growing attention among population ecologists. Individual heterogeneity in wild animal populations has been accounted for and quantified by including individually varying effects in models for mark–recapture data, but the real need for underlying individual effects to account for observed levels of individual variation has recently been questioned by the work of Tuljapurkar et al. (Ecology Letters, 12, 93, 2009) on dynamic heterogeneity. Model-selection approaches based on information criteria or Bayes factors have been used to address this question. Here, we suggest that, in addition to model-selection, model-checking methods can provide additional important insights to tackle this issue, as they allow one to evaluate a model's misfit in terms of ecologically meaningful measures. Specifically, we propose the use of posterior predictive checks to explicitly assess discrepancies between a model and the data, and we explain how to incorporate model checking into the inferential process used to assess the practical implications of ignoring individual heterogeneity. Posterior predictive checking is a straightforward and flexible approach for performing model checks in a Bayesian framework that is based on comparisons of observed data to model-generated replications of the data, where parameter uncertainty is incorporated through use of the posterior distribution. If discrepancy measures are chosen carefully and are relevant to the scientific context, posterior predictive checks can provide important information allowing for more efficient model refinement. We illustrate this approach using analyses of vital rates with long-term mark–recapture data for Weddell seals and emphasize its utility for identifying shortfalls or successes of a model at representing a biological process or pattern of interest. We show how posterior predictive checks can be used to strengthen inferences in

  6. Automation to improve efficiency of field expedient injury prediction screening.

    PubMed

    Teyhen, Deydre S; Shaffer, Scott W; Umlauf, Jon A; Akerman, Raymond J; Canada, John B; Butler, Robert J; Goffar, Stephen L; Walker, Michael J; Kiesel, Kyle B; Plisky, Phillip J

    2012-07-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are a primary source of disability in the U.S. Military. Physical training and sports-related activities account for up to 90% of all injuries, and 80% of these injuries are considered overuse in nature. As a result, there is a need to develop an evidence-based musculoskeletal screen that can assist with injury prevention. The purpose of this study was to assess the capability of an automated system to improve the efficiency of field expedient tests that may help predict injury risk and provide corrective strategies for deficits identified. The field expedient tests include survey questions and measures of movement quality, balance, trunk stability, power, mobility, and foot structure and mobility. Data entry for these tests was automated using handheld computers, barcode scanning, and netbook computers. An automated algorithm for injury risk stratification and mitigation techniques was run on a server computer. Without automation support, subjects were assessed in 84.5 ± 9.1 minutes per subject compared with 66.8 ± 6.1 minutes per subject with automation and 47.1 ± 5.2 minutes per subject with automation and process improvement measures (p < 0.001). The average time to manually enter the data was 22.2 ± 7.4 minutes per subject. An additional 11.5 ± 2.5 minutes per subject was required to manually assign an intervention strategy. Automation of this injury prevention screening protocol using handheld devices and netbook computers allowed for real-time data entry and enhanced the efficiency of injury screening, risk stratification, and prescription of a risk mitigation strategy.

  7. Individualized relapse prediction: personality measures and striatal and insular activity during reward-processing robustly predict relapse*

    PubMed Central

    Gowin, Joshua L.; Ball, Tali M.; Wittmann, Marc; Tapert, Susan F.; Paulus, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nearly half of individuals with substance use disorders relapse in the year after treatment. A diagnostic tool to help clinicians make decisions regarding treatment does not exist for psychiatric conditions. Identifying individuals with high risk for relapse to substance use following abstinence has profound clinical consequences. This study aimed to develop neuroimaging as a robust tool to predict relapse. Methods 68 methamphetamine-dependent adults (15 female) were recruited from 28-day inpatient treatment. During treatment, participants completed a functional MRI scan that examined brain activation during reward processing. Patients were followed 1 year later to assess abstinence. We examined brain activation during reward processing between relapsing and abstaining individuals and employed three random forest prediction models (clinical and personality measures, neuroimaging measures, a combined model) to generate predictions for each participant regarding their relapse likelihood. Results 18 individuals relapsed. There were significant group by reward-size interactions for neural activation in the left insula and right striatum for rewards. Abstaining individuals showed increased activation for large, risky relative to small, safe rewards, whereas relapsing individuals failed to show differential activation between reward types. All three random forest models yielded good test characteristics such that a positive test for relapse yielded a likelihood ratio 2.63, whereas a negative test had a likelihood ratio of 0.48. Conclusions These findings suggest that neuroimaging can be developed in combination with other measures as an instrument to predict relapse, advancing tools providers can use to make decisions about individualized treatment of substance use disorders. PMID:25977206

  8. Brain ERP components predict which individuals progress to Alzheimer’s disease and which do not

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Robert M.; McCrary, John W.; Gardner, Margaret N.; Sandoval, Tiffany C.; Guillily, Maria D.; Reilly, Lindsey A.; DeGrush, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Predicting which individuals will progress to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is important in both clinical and research settings. We used brain Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) obtained in a perceptual/cognitive paradigm with various processing demands to predict which individual Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) subjects will develop AD versus which will not. ERP components, including P3, memory “storage” component, and other earlier and later components, were identified and measured by Principal Components Analysis. When measured for particular task conditions, a weighted set of eight ERP component_conditions performed well in discriminant analysis at predicting later AD progression with good accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity. The predictions for most individuals (79%) had high posterior probabilities and were accurate (88%). This method, supported by a cross-validation where the prediction accuracy was 70–78%, features the posterior probability for each individual as a method of determining the likelihood of progression to AD. Empirically obtained prediction accuracies rose to 94% when the computed posterior probabilities for individuals were 0.90 or higher (which was found for 40% of our MCI sample). PMID:20005599

  9. Task-free MRI predicts individual differences in brain activity during task performance.

    PubMed

    Tavor, I; Parker Jones, O; Mars, R B; Smith, S M; Behrens, T E; Jbabdi, S

    2016-04-08

    When asked to perform the same task, different individuals exhibit markedly different patterns of brain activity. This variability is often attributed to volatile factors, such as task strategy or compliance. We propose that individual differences in brain responses are, to a large degree, inherent to the brain and can be predicted from task-independent measurements collected at rest. Using a large set of task conditions, spanning several behavioral domains, we train a simple model that relates task-independent measurements to task activity and evaluate the model by predicting task activation maps for unseen subjects using magnetic resonance imaging. Our model can accurately predict individual differences in brain activity and highlights a coupling between brain connectivity and function that can be captured at the level of individual subjects.

  10. Individualized prediction of lung-function decline in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Zafari, Zafar; Sin, Don D.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Löfdahl, Claes-Göran; Vonk, Judith; Bryan, Stirling; Lam, Stephen; Tammemagi, C. Martin; Khakban, Rahman; Man, S.F. Paul; Tashkin, Donald; Wise, Robert A.; Connett, John E.; McManus, Bruce; Ng, Raymond; Hollander, Zsuszanna; Sadatsafavi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background: The rate of lung-function decline in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) varies substantially among individuals. We sought to develop and validate an individualized prediction model for forced expiratory volume at 1 second (FEV1) in current smokers with mild-to-moderate COPD. Methods: Using data from a large long-term clinical trial (the Lung Health Study), we derived mixed-effects regression models to predict future FEV1 values over 11 years according to clinical traits. We modelled heterogeneity by allowing regression coefficients to vary across individuals. Two independent cohorts with COPD were used for validating the equations. Results: We used data from 5594 patients (mean age 48.4 yr, 63% men, mean baseline FEV1 2.75 L) to create the individualized prediction equations. There was significant between-individual variability in the rate of FEV1 decline, with the interval for the annual rate of decline that contained 95% of individuals being −124 to −15 mL/yr for smokers and −83 to 15 mL/yr for sustained quitters. Clinical variables in the final model explained 88% of variation around follow-up FEV1. The C statistic for predicting severity grades was 0.90. Prediction equations performed robustly in the 2 external data sets. Interpretation: A substantial part of individual variation in FEV1 decline can be explained by easily measured clinical variables. The model developed in this work can be used for prediction of future lung health in patients with mild-to-moderate COPD. Trial registration: Lung Health Study — ClinicalTrials.gov, no. NCT00000568; Pan-Canadian Early Detection of Lung Cancer Study — ClinicalTrials.gov, no. NCT00751660 PMID:27486205

  11. Cognitive trait anxiety, situational stress, and mental effort predict shifting efficiency: Implications for attentional control theory.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Elizabeth J; Edwards, Mark S; Lyvers, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Attentional control theory (ACT) predicts that trait anxiety and situational stress interact to impair performance on tasks that involve attentional shifting. The theory suggests that anxious individuals recruit additional effort to prevent shortfalls in performance effectiveness (accuracy), with deficits becoming evident in processing efficiency (the relationship between accuracy and time taken to perform the task). These assumptions, however, have not been systematically tested. The relationship between cognitive trait anxiety, situational stress, and mental effort in a shifting task (Wisconsin Card Sorting Task) was investigated in 90 participants. Cognitive trait anxiety was operationalized using questionnaire scores, situational stress was manipulated through ego threat instructions, and mental effort was measured using a visual analogue scale. Dependent variables were performance effectiveness (an inverse proportion of perseverative errors) and processing efficiency (an inverse proportion of perseverative errors divided by response time on perseverative error trials). The predictors were not associated with performance effectiveness; however, we observed a significant 3-way interaction on processing efficiency. At higher mental effort (+1 SD), higher cognitive trait anxiety was associated with poorer efficiency independently of situational stress, whereas at lower effort (-1 SD), this relationship was highly significant and most pronounced for those in the high-stress condition. These results are important because they provide the first systematic test of the relationship between trait anxiety, situational stress, and mental effort on shifting performance. The data are also consistent with the notion that effort moderates the relationship between anxiety and shifting efficiency, but not effectiveness.

  12. Predicting Individuals' Learning Success from Patterns of Pre-Learning MRI Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Loan T. K.; Walther, Dirk B.; Kramer, Arthur F.; Erickson, Kirk I.; Boot, Walter R.; Voss, Michelle W.; Prakash, Ruchika S.; Lee, Hyunkyu; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele; Simons, Daniel J.; Sutton, Bradley P.; Wang, Michelle Y.

    2011-01-01

    Performance in most complex cognitive and psychomotor tasks improves with training, yet the extent of improvement varies among individuals. Is it possible to forecast the benefit that a person might reap from training? Several behavioral measures have been used to predict individual differences in task improvement, but their predictive power is limited. Here we show that individual differences in patterns of time-averaged T2*-weighted MRI images in the dorsal striatum recorded at the initial stage of training predict subsequent learning success in a complex video game with high accuracy. These predictions explained more than half of the variance in learning success among individuals, suggesting that individual differences in neuroanatomy or persistent physiology predict whether and to what extent people will benefit from training in a complex task. Surprisingly, predictions from white matter were highly accurate, while voxels in the gray matter of the dorsal striatum did not contain any information about future training success. Prediction accuracy was higher in the anterior than the posterior half of the dorsal striatum. The link between trainability and the time-averaged T2*-weighted signal in the dorsal striatum reaffirms the role of this part of the basal ganglia in learning and executive functions, such as task-switching and task coordination processes. The ability to predict who will benefit from training by using neuroimaging data collected in the early training phase may have far-reaching implications for the assessment of candidates for specific training programs as well as the study of populations that show deficiencies in learning new skills. PMID:21264257

  13. Driving Green: Toward the Prediction and Influence of Efficient Driving Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsome, William D.

    Sub-optimal efficiency in activities involving the consumption of fossil fuels, such as driving, contribute to a miscellany of negative environmental, political, economic and social externalities. Demonstrations of the effectiveness of feedback interventions can be found in countless organizational settings, as can demonstrations of individual differences in sensitivity to feedback interventions. Mechanisms providing feedback to drivers about fuel economy are becoming standard equipment in most new vehicles, but vary considerably in their constitution. A keystone of Radical Behaviorism is the acknowledgement that verbal behavior appears to play a role in mediating apparent susceptibility to influence by contingencies of varying delay. In the current study, samples of verbal behavior (rules) were collected in the context of a feedback intervention to improve driving efficiency. In an analysis of differences in individual responsiveness to the feedback intervention, the rate of novel rules per week generated by drivers is revealed to account for a substantial proportion of the variability in relative efficiency gains across participants. The predictive utility of conceptual tools, such as the basic distinction among contingency-shaped and rule governed behavior, the elaboration of direct-acting and indirect-acting contingencies, and the psychological flexibility model, is bolstered by these findings.

  14. Clinical Neurochemistry of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Toward Predicting Individual Outcomes via Biomarkers of Brain Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tholance, Yannick; Barcelos, Gleicy; Dailler, Frederic; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Renaud, Bernard

    2015-12-16

    The functional outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage is difficult to predict at the individual level. The monitoring of brain energy metabolism has proven to be useful in improving the pathophysiological understanding of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Nonetheless, brain energy monitoring has not yet clearly been included in official guidelines for the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, likely because previous studies compared only biological data between two groups of patients (unfavorable vs favorable outcomes) and did not determine decision thresholds that could be useful in clinical practice. Therefore, this Viewpoint discusses recent findings suggesting that monitoring biomarkers of brain energy metabolism at the level of individuals can be used to predict the outcomes of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. Indeed, by taking into account specific neurochemical patterns obtained by local or global monitoring of brain energy metabolism, it may become possible to predict routinely, and with sufficient sensitivity and specificity, the individual outcomes of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. Moreover, combining both local and global monitoring improves the overall performance of individual outcome prediction. Such a combined neurochemical monitoring approach may become, after prospective clinical validation, an important component in the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients to adapt individualized therapeutic interventions.

  15. Efficient Reduction and Analysis of Model Predictive Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, J.

    2006-12-01

    Most groundwater models are calibrated against historical measurements of head and other system states before being used to make predictions in a real-world context. Through the calibration process, parameter values are estimated or refined such that the model is able to reproduce historical behaviour of the system at pertinent observation points reasonably well. Predictions made by the model are deemed to have greater integrity because of this. Unfortunately, predictive integrity is not as easy to achieve as many groundwater practitioners would like to think. The level of parameterisation detail estimable through the calibration process (especially where estimation takes place on the basis of heads alone) is strictly limited, even where full use is made of modern mathematical regularisation techniques such as those encapsulated in the PEST calibration package. (Use of these mechanisms allows more information to be extracted from a calibration dataset than is possible using simpler regularisation devices such as zones of piecewise constancy.) Where a prediction depends on aspects of parameterisation detail that are simply not inferable through the calibration process (which is often the case for predictions related to contaminant movement, and/or many aspects of groundwater/surface water interaction), then that prediction may be just as much in error as it would have been if the model had not been calibrated at all. Model predictive error arises from two sources. These are (a) the presence of measurement noise within the calibration dataset through which linear combinations of parameters spanning the "calibration solution space" are inferred, and (b) the sensitivity of the prediction to members of the "calibration null space" spanned by linear combinations of parameters which are not inferable through the calibration process. The magnitude of the former contribution depends on the level of measurement noise. The magnitude of the latter contribution (which often

  16. On-line individual differences in statistical learning predict language processing.

    PubMed

    Misyak, Jennifer B; Christiansen, Morten H; Tomblin, J Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Considerable individual differences in language ability exist among normally developing children and adults. Whereas past research have attributed such differences to variations in verbal working memory or experience with language, we test the hypothesis that individual differences in statistical learning may be associated with differential language performance. We employ a novel paradigm for studying statistical learning on-line, combining a serial-reaction time task with artificial grammar learning. This task offers insights into both the timecourse of and individual differences in statistical learning. Experiment 1 charts the micro-level trajectory for statistical learning of nonadjacent dependencies and provides an on-line index of individual differences therein. In Experiment 2, these differences are then shown to predict variations in participants' on-line processing of long-distance dependencies involving center-embedded relative clauses. The findings suggest that individual differences in the ability to learn from experience through statistical learning may contribute to variations in linguistic performance.

  17. Predicting Teen Motherhood and Teen Fatherhood: Individual Characteristics and Peer Affiliations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xie, Hongling; Cairns, Beverley D.; Cairns, Robert B.

    2001-01-01

    Examined 475 adolescents from Grade 7 through early adulthood to identify antecedents and pathways of teen parenthood. Found that teen fatherhood and motherhood were predicted by individual and peer configurations such as a combination of high aggression, low academic competence, low popularity, and low family SES. Peer characteristics, race, and…

  18. Genetic programming as alternative for predicting development effort of individual software projects.

    PubMed

    Chavoya, Arturo; Lopez-Martin, Cuauhtemoc; Andalon-Garcia, Irma R; Meda-Campaña, M E

    2012-01-01

    Statistical and genetic programming techniques have been used to predict the software development effort of large software projects. In this paper, a genetic programming model was used for predicting the effort required in individually developed projects. Accuracy obtained from a genetic programming model was compared against one generated from the application of a statistical regression model. A sample of 219 projects developed by 71 practitioners was used for generating the two models, whereas another sample of 130 projects developed by 38 practitioners was used for validating them. The models used two kinds of lines of code as well as programming language experience as independent variables. Accuracy results from the model obtained with genetic programming suggest that it could be used to predict the software development effort of individual projects when these projects have been developed in a disciplined manner within a development-controlled environment.

  19. Predictive models of alcohol use based on attitudes and individual values.

    PubMed

    García del Castillo Rodríguez, José A; López-Sánchez, Carmen; Quiles Soler, M Carmen; García del Castillo-López, Alvaro; Gázquez Pertusa, Mónica; Marzo Campos, Juan Carlos; Inglés, Candido J

    2013-01-01

    Two predictive models are developed in this article: the first is designed to predict people's attitudes to alcoholic drinks, while the second sets out to predict the use of alcohol in relation to selected individual values. University students (N = 1,500) were recruited through stratified sampling based on sex and academic discipline. The questionnaire used obtained information on participants' alcohol use, attitudes and personal values. The results show that the attitudes model correctly classifies 76.3% of cases. Likewise, the model for level of alcohol use correctly classifies 82% of cases. According to our results, we can conclude that there are a series of individual values that influence drinking and attitudes to alcohol use, which therefore provides us with a potentially powerful instrument for developing preventive intervention programs.

  20. Assessment of the genomic prediction accuracy for feed efficiency traits in meat-type chickens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Ma, Jie; Shu, Dingming; Lund, Mogens Sandø; Su, Guosheng; Qu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Feed represents the major cost of chicken production. Selection for improving feed utilization is a feasible way to reduce feed cost and greenhouse gas emissions. The objectives of this study were to investigate the efficiency of genomic prediction for feed conversion ratio (FCR), residual feed intake (RFI), average daily gain (ADG) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) and to assess the impact of selection for feed efficiency traits FCR and RFI on eviscerating percentage (EP), breast muscle percentage (BMP) and leg muscle percentage (LMP) in meat-type chickens. Genomic prediction was assessed using a 4-fold cross-validation for two validation scenarios. The first scenario was a random family sampling validation (CVF), and the second scenario was a random individual sampling validation (CVR). Variance components were estimated based on the genomic relationship built with single nucleotide polymorphism markers. Genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) were predicted using a genomic best linear unbiased prediction model. The accuracies of GEBV were evaluated in two ways: the correlation between GEBV and corrected phenotypic value divided by the square root of heritability, i.e., the correlation-based accuracy, and model-based theoretical accuracy. Breeding values were also predicted using a conventional pedigree-based best linear unbiased prediction model in order to compare accuracies of genomic and conventional predictions. The heritability estimates of FCR and RFI were 0.29 and 0.50, respectively. The heritability estimates of ADG, ADFI, EP, BMP and LMP ranged from 0.34 to 0.53. In the CVF scenario, the correlation-based accuracy and the theoretical accuracy of genomic prediction for FCR were slightly higher than those for RFI. The correlation-based accuracies for FCR, RFI, ADG and ADFI were 0.360, 0.284, 0.574 and 0.520, respectively, and the model-based theoretical accuracies were 0.420, 0.414, 0.401 and 0.382, respectively. In the CVR scenario, the correlation

  1. Internalizing and externalizing traits predict changes in sleep efficiency in emerging adulthood: an actigraphy study

    PubMed Central

    Yaugher, Ashley C.; Alexander, Gerianne M.

    2015-01-01

    Research on psychopathology and experimental studies of sleep restriction support a relationship between sleep disruption and both internalizing and externalizing disorders. The objective of the current study was to extend this research by examining sleep, impulsivity, antisocial personality traits, and internalizing traits in a university sample. Three hundred and eighty six individuals (161 males) between the ages of 18 and 27 years (M = 18.59, SD = 0.98) wore actigraphs for 7 days and completed established measures of disorder-linked personality traits and sleep quality (i.e., Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI), Triarchic Psychopathy Measure, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index). As expected, sleep measures and questionnaire scores fell within the normal range of values and sex differences in sleep and personality were consistent with previous research results. Similar to findings in predominantly male forensic psychiatric settings, higher levels of impulsivity predicted poorer subjective sleep quality in both women and men. Consistent with well-established associations between depression and sleep, higher levels of depression in both sexes predicted poorer subjective sleep quality. Bidirectional analyses showed that better sleep efficiency decreases depression. Finally, moderation analyses showed that gender does have a primary role in sleep efficiency and marginal effects were found. The observed relations between sleep and personality traits in a typical university sample add to converging evidence of the relationship between sleep and psychopathology and may inform our understanding of the development of psychopathology in young adulthood. PMID:26500575

  2. Using clinical information to make individualized prognostic predictions in people at ultra high risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Mechelli, Andrea; Lin, Ashleigh; Wood, Stephen; McGorry, Patrick; Amminger, Paul; Tognin, Stefania; McGuire, Philip; Young, Jonathan; Nelson, Barnaby; Yung, Alison

    2016-12-04

    Recent studies have reported an association between psychopathology and subsequent clinical and functional outcomes in people at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis. This has led to the suggestion that psychopathological information could be used to make prognostic predictions in this population. However, because the current literature is based on inferences at group level, the translational value of the findings for everyday clinical practice is unclear. Here we examined whether psychopathological information could be used to make individualized predictions about clinical and functional outcomes in people at UHR. Participants included 416 people at UHR followed prospectively at the Personal Assessment and Crisis Evaluation (PACE) Clinic in Melbourne, Australia. The data were analysed using Support Vector Machine (SVM), a supervised machine learning technique that allows inferences at the individual level. SVM predicted transition to psychosis with a specificity of 60.6%, a sensitivity of 68.6% and an accuracy of 64.6% (p<0.001). In addition, SVM predicted functioning with a specificity of 62.5%, a sensitivity of 62.5% and an accuracy of 62.5% (p=0.008). Prediction of transition was driven by disorder of thought content, attenuated positive symptoms and functioning, whereas functioning was best predicted by attention disturbances, anhedonia-asociality and disorder of thought content. These results indicate that psychopathological information allows individualized prognostic predictions with statistically significant accuracy. However, this level of accuracy may not be sufficient for clinical translation in real-world clinical practice. Accuracy might be improved by combining psychopathological information with other types of data using a multivariate machine learning framework.

  3. An efficient link prediction index for complex military organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Changjun; Liu, Zhong; Lu, Xin; Xiu, Baoxin; Chen, Qing

    2017-03-01

    Quality of information is crucial for decision-makers to judge the battlefield situations and design the best operation plans, however, real intelligence data are often incomplete and noisy, where missing links prediction methods and spurious links identification algorithms can be applied, if modeling the complex military organization as the complex network where nodes represent functional units and edges denote communication links. Traditional link prediction methods usually work well on homogeneous networks, but few for the heterogeneous ones. And the military network is a typical heterogeneous network, where there are different types of nodes and edges. In this paper, we proposed a combined link prediction index considering both the nodes' types effects and nodes' structural similarities, and demonstrated that it is remarkably superior to all the 25 existing similarity-based methods both in predicting missing links and identifying spurious links in a real military network data; we also investigated the algorithms' robustness under noisy environment, and found the mistaken information is more misleading than incomplete information in military areas, which is different from that in recommendation systems, and our method maintained the best performance under the condition of small noise. Since the real military network intelligence must be carefully checked at first due to its significance, and link prediction methods are just adopted to purify the network with the left latent noise, the method proposed here is applicable in real situations. In the end, as the FINC-E model, here used to describe the complex military organizations, is also suitable to many other social organizations, such as criminal networks, business organizations, etc., thus our method has its prospects in these areas for many tasks, like detecting the underground relationships between terrorists, predicting the potential business markets for decision-makers, and so on.

  4. Predicting high harmonic ion cyclotron heating efficiency in Tokamak plasmas.

    PubMed

    Green, D L; Berry, L A; Chen, G; Ryan, P M; Canik, J M; Jaeger, E F

    2011-09-30

    Observations of improved radio frequency (rf) heating efficiency in ITER relevant high-confinement (H-)mode plasmas on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment are investigated by whole-device linear simulation. The steady-state rf electric field is calculated for various antenna spectra and the results examined for characteristics that correlate with observations of improved or reduced rf heating efficiency. We find that launching toroidal wave numbers that give fast-wave propagation in the scrape-off plasma excites large amplitude (∼kV m(-1)) coaxial standing modes between the confined plasma density pedestal and conducting vessel wall. Qualitative comparison with measurements of the stored plasma energy suggests that these modes are a probable cause of degraded heating efficiency.

  5. PREDICTING INDIVIDUAL WELL-BEING THROUGH THE LANGUAGE OF SOCIAL MEDIA.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, H Andrew; Sap, Maarten; Kern, Margaret L; Eichstaedt, Johannes C; Kapelner, Adam; Agrawal, Megha; Blanco, Eduardo; Dziurzynski, Lukasz; Park, Gregory; Stillwell, David; Kosinski, Michal; Seligman, Martin E P; Ungar, Lyle H

    2016-01-01

    We present the task of predicting individual well-being, as measured by a life satisfaction scale, through the language people use on social media. Well-being, which encompasses much more than emotion and mood, is linked with good mental and physical health. The ability to quickly and accurately assess it can supplement multi-million dollar national surveys as well as promote whole body health. Through crowd-sourced ratings of tweets and Facebook status updates, we create message-level predictive models for multiple components of well-being. However, well-being is ultimately attributed to people, so we perform an additional evaluation at the user-level, finding that a multi-level cascaded model, using both message-level predictions and userlevel features, performs best and outperforms popular lexicon-based happiness models. Finally, we suggest that analyses of language go beyond prediction by identifying the language that characterizes well-being.

  6. Anthelmintic efficiency of doramectin, fenbendazole, and nitroxynil, in combination or individually, in sheep worm control.

    PubMed

    Holsback, Luciane; Luppi, Pedro Alex Ramsey; Silva, Camile Sanches; Negrão, Gustavo Kremer; Conde, Gabriel; Gabriel, Hugo Vinícius; Balestrieri, João Vitor; Tomazella, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    The anthelmintic efficiency of doramectin, fenbendazole, and nitroxynil, used individually or in combination, was determined by the Fecal Egg Count Reduction (FECR) test and cultivation of larvae of anthelminthic-treated sheep grouped as follows: G1 (doramectin), G2 (fenbendazole), G3 (nitroxynil), G4 (doramectin + fenbendazole), G5 (doramectin + nitroxynil), G6 (fenbendazole + nitroxynil), G7 (doramectin + nitroxynil + fenbendazole), G8 (untreated). In addition to individually used doramectin and fenbendazole, the helminths were also resistant to the combination of doramectin + fenbendazole; nitroxynil + fenbendazole; and doramectin + nitroxynil + fenbendazole, with their FECR rates ranging from 62-83%. The helminths showed possible nitroxynil-resistance, but had low resistance when the drug was administered in combination with doramectin. The evaluation of individual helminth species revealed that fenbendazole was fully effective against Cooperia; doramectin (G1), moderately effective against Haemonchus and insufficiently active against Cooperia; nitroxynil, effective against Haemonchus and insufficiently active against Cooperia. It was concluded from the results that herd nematodes are resistant to doramectin, fenbendazole, and nitroxynil, and that the combined use of the drugs not only fails to significantly improve the anthelmintic efficiency against Haemonchus and Cooperia, but is also cost-ineffective.

  7. Doing It Your Way: How Individual Movement Styles Affect Action Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Atesh; Ansuini, Caterina; Becchio, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Individuals show significant variations in performing a motor act. Previous studies in the action observation literature have largely ignored this ubiquitous, if often unwanted, characteristic of motor performance, assuming movement patterns to be highly similar across repetitions and individuals. In the present study, we examined the possibility that individual variations in motor style directly influence the ability to understand and predict others’ actions. To this end, we first recorded grasping movements performed with different intents and used a two-step cluster analysis to identify quantitatively ‘clusters’ of movements performed with similar movement styles (Experiment 1). Next, using videos of the same movements, we proceeded to examine the influence of these styles on the ability to judge intention from action observation (Experiments 2 and 3). We found that motor styles directly influenced observers’ ability to ‘read’ others’ intention, with some styles always being less ‘readable’ than others. These results provide experimental support for the significance of motor variability for action prediction, suggesting that the ability to predict what another person is likely to do next directly depends on her individual movement style. PMID:27780259

  8. Restructuring the navigational field: individual predisposition towards field independence predicts preferred navigational strategy.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Maddalena; Piccardi, Laura; D'Alessandro, Adele; Nori, Raffaella; Guariglia, Cecilia

    2017-03-10

    To successfully navigate within an environment, individuals have to organize the spatial information in terms of salient landmarks, paths and general layout of the navigational environment. They may differ in the strategy they adopt to orientate themselves, with some individuals preferring to use salient landmarks (landmark spatial style, L-SS), others preferring to plan routes or paths through an egocentric strategy in which landmarks are connected with each other (route spatial style, R-SS) and others still create a global map-like configuration of the environment regardless of their own position in the environment (survey spatial style, S-SS). Here, we assessed whether Field independence (FI), that is the extent to which the individual perceives part of a field as discrete from the surrounding field rather than embedded in the field, predicted the individual's spatial style. We assessed the individual's spatial style using the spatial cognitive style test (SCST) and measured FI using the group embedded figure test (GEFT). We found that FI predicted general spatial ability, with a higher level of FI being associated with better performances on the SCST. Also, Field-independent individuals showed a marked preference for an S-SS. These results suggest that a higher level of FI is associated with better performance on higher level spatial tasks (i.e. R-SS and S-SS) that is tasks requiring individuals to restructure the "navigational field" according to the navigational goal. The results also suggest that a higher level of FI makes individuals more prone to use a global and complex map-like representation of the environment.

  9. Efficient prediction strategies for disturbance compensation in stochastic MPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouvaritakis, Basil; Cannon, Mark; Muñoz-Carpintero, Diego

    2013-07-01

    The optimisation of predicted control policies in model predictive control (MPC) enables the use of information on uncertainty that, though not available at current time, will be so at a future point on the prediction horizon. Optimisation over feedback laws is however prohibitively computationally expensive. The so-called affine-in-the-disturbance strategies provide a compromise and this article considers the use of disturbance compensation in the context of stochastic MPC. Unlike the earlier approaches, compensation here is applied over the entire prediction horizon (extending to infinity) thereby leading to a significant constraint relaxation which makes more control authority available for the optimisation of performance. In addition, our compensation has a striped lower triangular dependence on the uncertainty on account of which the relevant gains can be obtained sequentially, thereby reducing computational complexity. Further reduction in computation is achieved by performing this computation offline. Simulation results show that this reduction can be gained at a negligible cost in terms of closed-loop performance.

  10. Genome-Wide Prediction of Traits with Different Genetic Architecture Through Efficient Variable Selection

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Valentin; Lehermeier, Christina; Albrecht, Theresa; Auinger, Hans-Jürgen; Wang, Yu; Schön, Chris-Carolin

    2013-01-01

    In genome-based prediction there is considerable uncertainty about the statistical model and method required to maximize prediction accuracy. For traits influenced by a small number of quantitative trait loci (QTL), predictions are expected to benefit from methods performing variable selection [e.g., BayesB or the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO)] compared to methods distributing effects across the genome [ridge regression best linear unbiased prediction (RR-BLUP)]. We investigate the assumptions underlying successful variable selection by combining computer simulations with large-scale experimental data sets from rice (Oryza sativa L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and Arabidopsis thaliana (L.). We demonstrate that variable selection can be successful when the number of phenotyped individuals is much larger than the number of causal mutations contributing to the trait. We show that the sample size required for efficient variable selection increases dramatically with decreasing trait heritabilities and increasing extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD). We contrast and discuss contradictory results from simulation and experimental studies with respect to superiority of variable selection methods over RR-BLUP. Our results demonstrate that due to long-range LD, medium heritabilities, and small sample sizes, superiority of variable selection methods cannot be expected in plant breeding populations even for traits like FRIGIDA gene expression in Arabidopsis and flowering time in rice, assumed to be influenced by a few major QTL. We extend our conclusions to the analysis of whole-genome sequence data and infer upper bounds for the number of causal mutations which can be identified by LASSO. Our results have major impact on the choice of statistical method needed to make credible inferences about genetic architecture and prediction accuracy of complex traits. PMID:23934883

  11. Prediction of daily sea surface temperature using efficient neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Kalpesh; Deo, Makaranad Chintamani

    2017-02-01

    Short-term prediction of sea surface temperature (SST) is commonly achieved through numerical models. Numerical approaches are more suitable for use over a large spatial domain than in a specific site because of the difficulties involved in resolving various physical sub-processes at local levels. Therefore, for a given location, a data-driven approach such as neural networks may provide a better alternative. The application of neural networks, however, needs a large experimentation in their architecture, training methods, and formation of appropriate input-output pairs. A network trained in this manner can provide more attractive results if the advances in network architecture are additionally considered. With this in mind, we propose the use of wavelet neural networks (WNNs) for prediction of daily SST values. The prediction of daily SST values was carried out using WNN over 5 days into the future at six different locations in the Indian Ocean. First, the accuracy of site-specific SST values predicted by a numerical model, ROMS, was assessed against the in situ records. The result pointed out the necessity for alternative approaches. First, traditional networks were tried and after noticing their poor performance, WNN was used. This approach produced attractive forecasts when judged through various error statistics. When all locations were viewed together, the mean absolute error was within 0.18 to 0.32 °C for a 5-day-ahead forecast. The WNN approach was thus found to add value to the numerical method of SST prediction when location-specific information is desired.

  12. Relationship functioning and home and work demands predict individual differences in diurnal cortisol patterns in women.

    PubMed

    Adam, E K; Gunnar, M R

    2001-02-01

    In 70 middle-class mothers of 2-year-old children, individual differences in mothers' morning cortisol levels, cortisol decreases across the day and average cortisol levels were predicted from demographic and medical control variables, maternal relationship functioning and home and work demands. For two days, salivary cortisol levels were measured in the morning immediately after wakeup, four times in the afternoon, and in the evening immediately prior to bedtime. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) growth curve analyses were used to estimate the intercept (early morning level), slope (steepness of decline in cortisol values across the day), and the average height of each mother's cortisol curve across the waking hours. HLM and multiple regression techniques were then used to predict individual differences in these parameters from the variables of interest. Time of day accounted for 72% of the variation in mothers' observed cortisol values across the day. After controlling for demographic and medical variables, positive relationship functioning was associated with higher morning cortisol levels and a steeper decline in cortisol across the day, while greater hours of maternal employment and a greater number of children in the household were associated with lower morning cortisol values and a less steep decline in cortisol levels across the day. Variables predicting higher morning values also predicted higher average cortisol levels, while variables predicting lower morning cortisol predicted lower average cortisol levels. The full model including selected control, relationship functioning and home and work demand variables accounted for 40% of the variance in mothers' morning cortisol values, 43% of the variance in cortisol slopes and 35% of the variability in mothers' average cortisol levels. This study presents the first evidence of associations between psychological variables and individual differences in the organization of cortisol levels across the waking day

  13. Cortical Response Similarities Predict which Audiovisual Clips Individuals Viewed, but Are Unrelated to Clip Preference

    PubMed Central

    Bridwell, David A.; Roth, Cullen; Gupta, Cota Navin; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical responses to complex natural stimuli can be isolated by examining the relationship between neural measures obtained while multiple individuals view the same stimuli. These inter-subject correlation’s (ISC’s) emerge from similarities in individual’s cortical response to the shared audiovisual inputs, which may be related to their emergent cognitive and perceptual experience. Within the present study, our goal is to examine the utility of using ISC’s for predicting which audiovisual clips individuals viewed, and to examine the relationship between neural responses to natural stimuli and subjective reports. The ability to predict which clips individuals viewed depends on the relationship of the EEG response across subjects and the nature in which this information is aggregated. We conceived of three approaches for aggregating responses, i.e. three assignment algorithms, which we evaluated in Experiment 1A. The aggregate correlations algorithm generated the highest assignment accuracy (70.83% chance = 33.33%) and was selected as the assignment algorithm for the larger sample of individuals and clips within Experiment 1B. The overall assignment accuracy was 33.46% within Experiment 1B (chance = 06.25%), with accuracies ranging from 52.9% (Silver Linings Playbook) to 11.75% (Seinfeld) within individual clips. ISC’s were significantly greater than zero for 15 out of 16 clips, and fluctuations within the delta frequency band (i.e. 0-4 Hz) primarily contributed to response similarities across subjects. Interestingly, there was insufficient evidence to indicate that individuals with greater similarities in clip preference demonstrate greater similarities in cortical responses, suggesting a lack of association between ISC and clip preference. Overall these results demonstrate the utility of using ISC’s for prediction, and further characterize the relationship between ISC magnitudes and subjective reports. PMID:26030422

  14. Personality traits and individual differences predict threat-induced changes in postural control.

    PubMed

    Zaback, Martin; Cleworth, Taylor W; Carpenter, Mark G; Adkin, Allan L

    2015-04-01

    This study explored whether specific personality traits and individual differences could predict changes in postural control when presented with a height-induced postural threat. Eighty-two healthy young adults completed questionnaires to assess trait anxiety, trait movement reinvestment (conscious motor processing, movement self-consciousness), physical risk-taking, and previous experience with height-related activities. Tests of static (quiet standing) and anticipatory (rise to toes) postural control were completed under low and high postural threat conditions. Personality traits and individual differences significantly predicted height-induced changes in static, but not anticipatory postural control. Individuals less prone to taking physical risks were more likely to lean further away from the platform edge and sway at higher frequencies and smaller amplitudes. Individuals more prone to conscious motor processing were more likely to lean further away from the platform edge and sway at larger amplitudes. Individuals more self-conscious about their movement appearance were more likely to sway at smaller amplitudes. Evidence is also provided that relationships between physical risk-taking and changes in static postural control are mediated through changes in fear of falling and physiological arousal. Results from this study may have indirect implications for balance assessment and treatment; however, further work exploring these factors in patient populations is necessary.

  15. Highly efficient exfoliation of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes by biocompatible phenoxylated dextran.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Taeyun; Lee, Gyudo; Choi, Hyerim; Strano, Michael S; Kim, Woo-Jae

    2013-08-07

    Highly efficient exfoliation of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was successfully demonstrated by utilizing biocompatible phenoxylated dextran, a kind of polysaccharide, as a SWNT dispersion agent. Phenoxylated dextran shows greater ability in producing individual SWNTs from raw materials than any other dispersing agent, including anionic surfactants and another polysaccharide. Furthermore, with this novel polymer, SWNT bundles or impurities present in raw materials are removed under much milder processing conditions compared to those of ultra-centrifugation procedures. There exists an optimal composition of phenoxy groups (∼13.6 wt%) that leads to the production of high-quality SWNT suspensions, as confirmed by UV-vis-nIR absorption and nIR fluorescence spectroscopy. Furthermore, phenoxylated dextran strongly adsorbs onto SWNTs, enabling SWNT fluorescence even in solid-state films in which metallic SWNTs co-exist. By bypassing ultra-centrifugation, this low-energy dispersion scheme can potentially be scaled up to industrial production levels.

  16. Structured Set Intra Prediction With Discriminative Learning in a Max-Margin Markov Network for High Efficiency Video Coding

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wenrui; Xiong, Hongkai; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Chen, Chang Wen

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel model on intra coding for High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC), which simultaneously predicts blocks of pixels with optimal rate distortion. It utilizes the spatial statistical correlation for the optimal prediction based on 2-D contexts, in addition to formulating the data-driven structural interdependences to make the prediction error coherent with the probability distribution, which is desirable for successful transform and coding. The structured set prediction model incorporates a max-margin Markov network (M3N) to regulate and optimize multiple block predictions. The model parameters are learned by discriminating the actual pixel value from other possible estimates to maximize the margin (i.e., decision boundary bandwidth). Compared to existing methods that focus on minimizing prediction error, the M3N-based model adaptively maintains the coherence for a set of predictions. Specifically, the proposed model concurrently optimizes a set of predictions by associating the loss for individual blocks to the joint distribution of succeeding discrete cosine transform coefficients. When the sample size grows, the prediction error is asymptotically upper bounded by the training error under the decomposable loss function. As an internal step, we optimize the underlying Markov network structure to find states that achieve the maximal energy using expectation propagation. For validation, we integrate the proposed model into HEVC for optimal mode selection on rate-distortion optimization. The proposed prediction model obtains up to 2.85% bit rate reduction and achieves better visual quality in comparison to the HEVC intra coding. PMID:25505829

  17. Predicting Efficient Antenna Ligands for Tb(III) Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, Amanda P.S.; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-10-06

    A series of highly luminescent Tb(III) complexes of para-substituted 2-hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (5LI-IAM-X) has been prepared (X = H, CH{sub 3}, (C=O)NHCH{sub 3}, SO{sub 3}{sup -}, NO{sub 2}, OCH{sub 3}, F, Cl, Br) to probe the effect of substituting the isophthalamide ring on ligand and Tb(III) emission in order to establish a method for predicting the effects of chromophore modification on Tb(III) luminescence. The energies of the ligand singlet and triplet excited states are found to increase linearly with the {pi}-withdrawing ability of the substituent. The experimental results are supported by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations performed on model systems, which predict ligand singlet and triplet energies within {approx}5% of the experimental values. The quantum yield ({Phi}) values of the Tb(III) complex increases with the triplet energy of the ligand, which is in part due to the decreased non-radiative deactivation caused by thermal repopulation of the triplet. Together, the experimental and theoretical results serve as a predictive tool that can be used to guide the synthesis of ligands used to sensitize lanthanide luminescence.

  18. Predicting high harmonic ion cyclotron heating efficiency in Tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Green, David L; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, Lee A; Chen, Guangye; Ryan, Philip Michael; Canik, John

    2011-01-01

    Observations of improved radio frequency (RF) heating efficiency in high-confinement (H-) mode plasmas on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) are investigated by whole-device linear simulation. We present the first full-wave simulation to couple kinetic physics of the well confined core plasma to the poorly confined scrape-off plasma. The new simulation is used to scan the launched fast-wave spectrum and examine the steady-state electric wave field structure for experimental scenarios corresponding to both reduced, and improved RF heating efficiency. We find that launching toroidal wave-numbers that required for fast-wave propagation excites large amplitude (kVm 1 ) coaxial standing modes in the wave electric field between the confined plasma density pedestal and conducting vessel wall. Qualitative comparison with measurements of the stored plasma energy suggest these modes are a probable cause of degraded heating efficiency. Also, the H-mode density pedestal and fast-wave cutoff within the confined plasma allow for the excitation of whispering gallery type eigenmodes localised to the plasma edge.

  19. Quantitative Prediction of Individual Psychopathology in Trauma Survivors Using Resting-State fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Qiyong; Li, Lingjiang; Du, Mingying; Pettersson-Yeo, William; Crossley, Nicolas; Yang, Xun; Li, Jing; Huang, Xiaoqi; Mechelli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging techniques hold the promise that they may one day aid the clinical assessment of individual psychiatric patients. However, the vast majority of studies published so far have been based on average differences between groups. This study employed a multivariate approach to examine the potential of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data for making accurate predictions about psychopathology in survivors of the 2008 Sichuan earthquake at an individual level. Resting-state functional MRI data was acquired for 121 survivors of the 2008 Sichuan earthquake each of whom was assessed for symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) using the 17-item PTSD Checklist (PCL). Using a multivariate analytical method known as relevance vector regression (RVR), we examined the relationship between resting-state functional MRI data and symptom scores. We found that the use of RVR allowed quantitative prediction of clinical scores with statistically significant accuracy (correlation=0.32, P=0.006; mean squared error=176.88, P=0.001). Accurate prediction was based on functional activation in a number of prefrontal, parietal, and occipital regions. This is the first evidence that neuroimaging techniques may inform the clinical assessment of trauma-exposed individuals by providing an accurate and objective quantitative estimation of psychopathology. Furthermore, the significant contribution of parietal and occipital regions to such estimation challenges the traditional view of PTSD as a disorder specific to the fronto-limbic network. PMID:24064470

  20. A network of amygdala connections predict individual differences in trait anxiety.

    PubMed

    Greening, Steven G; Mitchell, Derek G V

    2015-12-01

    In this study we demonstrate that the pattern of an amygdala-centric network contributes to individual differences in trait anxiety. Individual differences in trait anxiety were predicted using maximum likelihood estimates of amygdala structural connectivity to multiple brain targets derived from diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) and probabilistic tractography on 72 participants. The prediction was performed using a stratified sixfold cross validation procedure using a regularized least square regression model. The analysis revealed a reliable network of regions predicting individual differences in trait anxiety. Higher trait anxiety was associated with stronger connections between the amygdala and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, an area implicated in the generation of emotional reactions, and inferior temporal gyrus and paracentral lobule, areas associated with perceptual and sensory processing. In contrast, higher trait anxiety was associated with weaker connections between amygdala and regions implicated in extinction learning such as medial orbitofrontal cortex, and memory encoding and environmental context recognition, including posterior cingulate cortex and parahippocampal gyrus. Thus, trait anxiety is not only associated with reduced amygdala connectivity with prefrontal areas associated with emotion modulation, but also enhanced connectivity with sensory areas. This work provides novel anatomical insight into potential mechanisms behind information processing biases observed in disorders of emotion.

  1. Quantitative prediction of individual psychopathology in trauma survivors using resting-state FMRI.

    PubMed

    Gong, Qiyong; Li, Lingjiang; Du, Mingying; Pettersson-Yeo, William; Crossley, Nicolas; Yang, Xun; Li, Jing; Huang, Xiaoqi; Mechelli, Andrea

    2014-02-01

    Neuroimaging techniques hold the promise that they may one day aid the clinical assessment of individual psychiatric patients. However, the vast majority of studies published so far have been based on average differences between groups. This study employed a multivariate approach to examine the potential of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data for making accurate predictions about psychopathology in survivors of the 2008 Sichuan earthquake at an individual level. Resting-state functional MRI data was acquired for 121 survivors of the 2008 Sichuan earthquake each of whom was assessed for symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) using the 17-item PTSD Checklist (PCL). Using a multivariate analytical method known as relevance vector regression (RVR), we examined the relationship between resting-state functional MRI data and symptom scores. We found that the use of RVR allowed quantitative prediction of clinical scores with statistically significant accuracy (correlation=0.32, P=0.006; mean squared error=176.88, P=0.001). Accurate prediction was based on functional activation in a number of prefrontal, parietal, and occipital regions. This is the first evidence that neuroimaging techniques may inform the clinical assessment of trauma-exposed individuals by providing an accurate and objective quantitative estimation of psychopathology. Furthermore, the significant contribution of parietal and occipital regions to such estimation challenges the traditional view of PTSD as a disorder specific to the fronto-limbic network.

  2. Collective Prediction of Individual Mobility Traces for Users with Short Data History

    PubMed Central

    Sitko, Izabela; Kazakopoulos, Pavlos; Beinat, Euro

    2017-01-01

    We present and test a sequential learning algorithm for the prediction of human mobility that leverages large datasets of sequences to improve prediction accuracy, in particular for users with a short and non-repetitive data history such as tourists in a foreign country. The algorithm compensates for the difficulty of predicting the next location when there is limited evidence of past behavior by leveraging the availability of sequences of other users in the same system that provide redundant records of typical behavioral patterns. We test the method on a dataset of 10 million roaming mobile phone users in a European country. The average prediction accuracy is significantly higher than that of individual sequence prediction algorithms, primarily constant order Markov models derived from the user’s own data, that have been shown to achieve high accuracy in previous studies of human mobility. The proposed algorithm is generally applicable to improve any sequential prediction when there is a sufficiently rich and diverse dataset of sequences. PMID:28135289

  3. Performance of a Portable Sleep Monitoring Device in Individuals with High Versus Low Sleep Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Markwald, Rachel R.; Bessman, Sara C.; Reini, Seth A.; Drummond, Sean P.A.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Portable and automated sleep monitoring technology is becoming widely available to consumers, and one wireless system (WS) has recently surfaced as a research tool for sleep and sleep staging assessment outside the hospital/laboratory; however, previous research findings indicate low sensitivity for wakefulness detection. Because difficulty discriminating between wake and sleep is likely to affect staging performance, we sought to further evaluate the WS by comparing it to the gold-standard polysomnography (PSG) and actigraphy (ACT) for overall sleep/wakefulness detection and sleep staging, within high and low sleep efficiency sleepers. Methods: Twenty-nine healthy adults (eight females) underwent concurrent WS, PSG, and ACT assessment in an overnight laboratory study. Epoch-by-epoch agreement was determined by comparing sleep/wakefulness decisions between the WS to both PSG and ACT, and for detection of light, deep, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep stages between the WS and PSG. Results: Sensitivity for wakefulness was low (40%), and an overestimation of total sleep time and underestimation of wake after sleep onset was observed. Prevalence and bias adjusted kappa statistic indicated moderate-to-high agreement between the WS and PSG for sleep staging. However, upon further inspection, WS performance varied by sleep efficiency, with the best performance during high sleep efficiency. Conclusions: The benefit of the WS as a sleep monitoring device over ACT is the ability to assess sleep stages, and our findings suggest this benefit is only realized within high sleep efficiency. Care should be taken to collect data under conditions where this is expected. Citation: Markwald RR, Bessman SC, Reini SA, Drummond SP. Performance of a portable sleep monitoring device in individuals with high versus low sleep efficiency. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(1):95–103. PMID:26285110

  4. Prediction of the period of psychotic episode in individual schizophrenics by simulation-data construction approach.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Jung; Wang, Hsiao-Fan; Chiu, Hsien-Jane; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Hu, Tsung-Ming; Loh, El-Wui

    2010-10-01

    Although schizophrenia can be treated, most patients still experience inevitable psychotic episodes from time to time. Precautious actions can be taken if the next onset can be predicted. However, sufficient information is always lacking in the clinical scenario. A possible solution is to use the virtual data generated from limited of original data. Data construction method (DCM) has been shown to generate the virtual felt earthquake data effectively and used in the prediction of further events. Here we investigated the performance of DCM in deriving the membership functions and discrete-event simulations (DES) in predicting the period embracing the initiation and termination time-points of the next psychotic episode of 35 individual schizophrenic patients. The results showed that 21 subjects had a success of simulations (RSS) ≥70%. Further analysis demonstrated that the co-morbidity of coronary heart diseases (CHD), risks of CHD, and the frequency of previous psychotic episodes increased the RSS.

  5. Modelling and Bayesian adaptive prediction of individual patients' tumour volume change during radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Imran; Chen, Tao; Kirkby, Norman F; Jena, Rajesh

    2016-03-07

    The aim of this study is to develop a mathematical modelling method that can predict individual patients’ response to radiotherapy, in terms of tumour volume change during the treatment. The main concept is to start from a population-average model, which is subsequently updated from an individual’s tumour volume measurement. The model becomes increasingly personalized and so too does the prediction it produces. This idea of adaptive prediction was realised by using a Bayesian approach for updating the model parameters. The feasibility of the developed method was demonstrated on the data from 25 non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with helical tomotherapy, during which tumour volume was measured from daily imaging as part of the image-guided radiotherapy. The method could provide useful information for adaptive treatment planning and dose scheduling based on the patient’s personalised response.

  6. Prediction of individual response to antidepressants and antipsychotics: an integrated concept

    PubMed Central

    Preskorn, Sheldon H.

    2014-01-01

    In both clinical trials and daily practice, there can be substantial inter- and even intraindividual variability in response—whether beneficial or adverse—to antidepressants and antipsychotic medications. So far, no tools have become available to predict the outcome of these treatments in specific patients. This is because the causes of such variability are often not known, and when they are, there is no way of predicting the effects of their various potential combinations in an individual. Given this background, this paper presents a conceptual framework for understanding known factors and their combinations so that eventually clinicians can better predict what medication(s) to select and at what dose they can optimize the outcome for a given individual. This framework is flexible enough to be readily adaptable as new information becomes available. The causes of variation in patient response are grouped into four categories: (i) genetics; (ii) age; (iii) disease; and (iv) environment (internal). Four cases of increasing complexity are used to illustrate the applicability of this framework in a clinically relevant way In addition, this paper reviews tools that the clinician can use to assess for and quantify such inter- and intraindividual variability. With the information gained, treatment can be adjusted to compensate for such variability, in order to optimize outcome. Finally, the limitations of existing antidepressant and antipsychotic therapy and the way they reduce current ability to predict response is discussed. PMID:25733958

  7. Prediction of individual response to antidepressants and antipsychotics: an integrated concept.

    PubMed

    Preskorn, Sheldon H

    2014-12-01

    In both clinical trials and daily practice, there can be substantial inter- and even intraindividual variability in response--whether beneficial or adverse--to antidepressants and antipsychotic medications. So far, no tools have become available to predict the outcome of these treatments in specific patients. This is because the causes of such variability are often not known, and when they are, there is no way of predicting the effects of their various potential combinations in an individual. Given this background, this paper presents a conceptual framework for understanding known factors and their combinations so that eventually clinicians can better predict what medication(s) to select and at what dose they can optimize the outcome for a given individual. This framework is flexible enough to be readily adaptable as new information becomes available. The causes of variation in patient response are grouped into four categories: (i) genetics; (ii) age; (iii) disease; and (iv) environment (internal). Four cases of increasing complexity are used to illustrate the applicability of this framework in a clinically relevant way In addition, this paper reviews tools that the clinician can use to assess for and quantify such inter- and intraindividual variability. With the information gained, treatment can be adjusted to compensate for such variability, in order to optimize outcome. Finally, the limitations of existing antidepressant and antipsychotic therapy and the way they reduce current ability to predict response is discussed.

  8. Individual differences in electrophysiological responses to performance feedback predict AB magnitude.

    PubMed

    MaClean, Mary H; Arnell, Karen M

    2013-06-01

    The attentional blink (AB) is observed when report accuracy for a second target (T2) is reduced if T2 is presented within approximately 500 ms of a first target (T1), but accuracy is relatively unimpaired at longer T1-T2 separations. The AB is thought to represent a transient cost of attending to a target, and reliable individual differences have been observed in its magnitude. Some models of the AB have suggested that cognitive control contributes to production of the AB, such that greater cognitive control is associated with larger AB magnitudes. Performance-monitoring functions are thought to modulate the strength of cognitive control, and those functions are indexed by event-related potentials in response to both endogenous and exogenous performance evaluation. Here we examined whether individual differences in the amplitudes to internal and external response feedback predict individual AB magnitudes. We found that electrophysiological responses to externally provided performance feedback, measured in two different tasks, did predict individual differences in AB magnitude, such that greater feedback-related N2 amplitudes were associated with larger AB magnitudes, regardless of the valence of the feedback.

  9. RESIDUA UPGRADING EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT MODELS: COKE FORMATION PREDICTABILITY MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; A. Troy Pauli; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.

    2002-05-01

    The dispersed particle solution model of petroleum residua structure was used to develop predictors for pyrolytic coke formation. Coking Indexes were developed in prior years that measure how near a pyrolysis system is to coke formation during the coke formation induction period. These have been demonstrated to be universally applicable for residua regardless of the source of the material. Coking onset is coincidental with the destruction of the ordered structure and the formation of a multiphase system. The amount of coke initially formed appears to be a function of the free solvent volume of the original residua. In the current work, three-dimensional coke make predictability maps were developed at 400 C, 450 C, and 500 C (752 F, 842 F, and 932 F). These relate residence time and free solvent volume to the amount of coke formed at a particular pyrolysis temperature. Activation energies for two apparent types of zero-order coke formation reactions were estimated. The results provide a new tool for ranking residua, gauging proximity to coke formation, and predicting initial coke make tendencies.

  10. Efficient Unstructured Grid Adaptation Methods for Sonic Boom Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Carter, Melissa B.; Deere, Karen A.; Waithe, Kenrick A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the use of two grid adaptation methods to improve the accuracy of the near-to-mid field pressure signature prediction of supersonic aircraft computed using the USM3D unstructured grid flow solver. The first method (ADV) is an interactive adaptation process that uses grid movement rather than enrichment to more accurately resolve the expansion and compression waves. The second method (SSGRID) uses an a priori adaptation approach to stretch and shear the original unstructured grid to align the grid with the pressure waves and reduce the cell count required to achieve an accurate signature prediction at a given distance from the vehicle. Both methods initially create negative volume cells that are repaired in a module in the ADV code. While both approaches provide significant improvements in the near field signature (< 3 body lengths) relative to a baseline grid without increasing the number of grid points, only the SSGRID approach allows the details of the signature to be accurately computed at mid-field distances (3-10 body lengths) for direct use with mid-field-to-ground boom propagation codes.

  11. Efficient Reconstruction of Predictive Consensus Metabolic Network Models

    PubMed Central

    Martins dos Santos, Vitor A. P.; Stelling, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Understanding cellular function requires accurate, comprehensive representations of metabolism. Genome-scale, constraint-based metabolic models (GSMs) provide such representations, but their usability is often hampered by inconsistencies at various levels, in particular for concurrent models. COMMGEN, our tool for COnsensus Metabolic Model GENeration, automatically identifies inconsistencies between concurrent models and semi-automatically resolves them, thereby contributing to consolidate knowledge of metabolic function. Tests of COMMGEN for four organisms showed that automatically generated consensus models were predictive and that they substantially increased coherence of knowledge representation. COMMGEN ought to be particularly useful for complex scenarios in which manual curation does not scale, such as for eukaryotic organisms, microbial communities, and host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27563720

  12. Human brain structure predicts individual differences in preconscious evaluation of facial dominance and trustworthiness

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Ryota; Bahrami, Bahador; Rees, Geraint

    2015-01-01

    Social cues conveyed by the human face, such as eye gaze direction, are evaluated even before they are consciously perceived. While there is substantial individual variability in such evaluation, its neural basis is unknown. Here we asked whether individual differences in preconscious evaluation of social face traits were associated with local variability in brain structure. Adult human participants (n = 36) monocularly viewed faces varying in dominance and trustworthiness, which were suppressed from awareness by a dynamic noise pattern shown to the other eye. The time taken for faces to emerge from suppression and become visible (t2e) was used as a measure of potency in competing for visual awareness. Both dominant and untrustworthy faces resulted in slower t2e than neutral faces, with substantial individual variability in these effects. Individual differences in t2e were correlated with gray matter volume in right insula for dominant faces, and with gray matter volume in medial prefrontal cortex, right temporoparietal junction and bilateral fusiform face area for untrustworthy faces. Thus, individual differences in preconscious social processing can be predicted from local brain structure, and separable correlates for facial dominance and untrustworthiness suggest distinct mechanisms of preconscious processing. PMID:25193945

  13. Human brain structure predicts individual differences in preconscious evaluation of facial dominance and trustworthiness.

    PubMed

    Getov, Spas; Kanai, Ryota; Bahrami, Bahador; Rees, Geraint

    2015-05-01

    Social cues conveyed by the human face, such as eye gaze direction, are evaluated even before they are consciously perceived. While there is substantial individual variability in such evaluation, its neural basis is unknown. Here we asked whether individual differences in preconscious evaluation of social face traits were associated with local variability in brain structure. Adult human participants (n = 36) monocularly viewed faces varying in dominance and trustworthiness, which were suppressed from awareness by a dynamic noise pattern shown to the other eye. The time taken for faces to emerge from suppression and become visible (t2e) was used as a measure of potency in competing for visual awareness. Both dominant and untrustworthy faces resulted in slower t2e than neutral faces, with substantial individual variability in these effects. Individual differences in t2e were correlated with gray matter volume in right insula for dominant faces, and with gray matter volume in medial prefrontal cortex, right temporoparietal junction and bilateral fusiform face area for untrustworthy faces. Thus, individual differences in preconscious social processing can be predicted from local brain structure, and separable correlates for facial dominance and untrustworthiness suggest distinct mechanisms of preconscious processing.

  14. Evaluation of the efficiency of artificial neural networks for genetic value prediction.

    PubMed

    Silva, G N; Tomaz, R S; Sant'Anna, I C; Carneiro, V Q; Cruz, C D; Nascimento, M

    2016-03-28

    Artificial neural networks have shown great potential when applied to breeding programs. In this study, we propose the use of artificial neural networks as a viable alternative to conventional prediction methods. We conduct a thorough evaluation of the efficiency of these networks with respect to the prediction of breeding values. Therefore, we considered eight simulated scenarios, and for the purpose of genetic value prediction, seven statistical parameters in addition to the phenotypic mean in a network designed as a multilayer perceptron. After an evaluation of different network configurations, the results demonstrated the superiority of neural networks compared to estimation procedures based on linear models, and indicated high predictive accuracy and network efficiency.

  15. Predicting individual contrast sensitivity functions from acuity and letter contrast sensitivity measurements

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Steven M.; Davey, Pinakin Gunvant; McCray, Kaydee Lynn; Paronian, Violeta; Seitz, Aaron R.

    2016-01-01

    Contrast sensitivity (CS) is widely used as a measure of visual function in both basic research and clinical evaluation. There is conflicting evidence on the extent to which measuring the full contrast sensitivity function (CSF) offers more functionally relevant information than a single measurement from an optotype CS test, such as the Pelli–Robson chart. Here we examine the relationship between functional CSF parameters and other measures of visual function, and establish a framework for predicting individual CSFs with effectively a zero-parameter model that shifts a standard-shaped template CSF horizontally and vertically according to independent measurements of high contrast acuity and letter CS, respectively. This method was evaluated for three different CSF tests: a chart test (CSV-1000), a computerized sine-wave test (M&S Sine Test), and a recently developed adaptive test (quick CSF). Subjects were 43 individuals with healthy vision or impairment too mild to be considered low vision (acuity range of −0.3 to 0.34 logMAR). While each test demands a slightly different normative template, results show that individual subject CSFs can be predicted with roughly the same precision as test–retest repeatability, confirming that individuals predominantly differ in terms of peak CS and peak spatial frequency. In fact, these parameters were sufficiently related to empirical measurements of acuity and letter CS to permit accurate estimation of the entire CSF of any individual with a deterministic model (zero free parameters). These results demonstrate that in many cases, measuring the full CSF may provide little additional information beyond letter acuity and contrast sensitivity. PMID:28006065

  16. An efficient genetic algorithm for structure prediction at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Lazauskas, Tomas; Sokol, Alexey A; Woodley, Scott M

    2017-03-17

    We have developed and implemented a new global optimization technique based on a Lamarckian genetic algorithm with the focus on structure diversity. The key process in the efficient search on a given complex energy landscape proves to be the removal of duplicates that is achieved using a topological analysis of candidate structures. The careful geometrical prescreening of newly formed structures and the introduction of new mutation move classes improve the rate of success further. The power of the developed technique, implemented in the Knowledge Led Master Code, or KLMC, is demonstrated by its ability to locate and explore a challenging double funnel landscape of a Lennard-Jones 38 atom system (LJ38). We apply the redeveloped KLMC to investigate three chemically different systems: ionic semiconductor (ZnO)1-32, metallic Ni13 and covalently bonded C60. All four systems have been systematically explored on the energy landscape defined using interatomic potentials. The new developments allowed us to successfully locate the double funnels of LJ38, find new local and global minima for ZnO clusters, extensively explore the Ni13 and C60 (the buckminsterfullerene, or buckyball) potential energy surfaces.

  17. Predicting the efficacy of radiotherapy in individual glioblastoma patients in vivo: a mathematical modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockne, R.; Rockhill, J. K.; Mrugala, M.; Spence, A. M.; Kalet, I.; Hendrickson, K.; Lai, A.; Cloughesy, T.; Alvord, E. C., Jr.; Swanson, K. R.

    2010-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant form of primary brain tumors known as gliomas. They proliferate and invade extensively and yield short life expectancies despite aggressive treatment. Response to treatment is usually measured in terms of the survival of groups of patients treated similarly, but this statistical approach misses the subgroups that may have responded to or may have been injured by treatment. Such statistics offer scant reassurance to individual patients who have suffered through these treatments. Furthermore, current imaging-based treatment response metrics in individual patients ignore patient-specific differences in tumor growth kinetics, which have been shown to vary widely across patients even within the same histological diagnosis and, unfortunately, these metrics have shown only minimal success in predicting patient outcome. We consider nine newly diagnosed GBM patients receiving diagnostic biopsy followed by standard-of-care external beam radiation therapy (XRT). We present and apply a patient-specific, biologically based mathematical model for glioma growth that quantifies response to XRT in individual patients in vivo. The mathematical model uses net rates of proliferation and migration of malignant tumor cells to characterize the tumor's growth and invasion along with the linear-quadratic model for the response to radiation therapy. Using only routinely available pre-treatment MRIs to inform the patient-specific bio-mathematical model simulations, we find that radiation response in these patients, quantified by both clinical and model-generated measures, could have been predicted prior to treatment with high accuracy. Specifically, we find that the net proliferation rate is correlated with the radiation response parameter (r = 0.89, p = 0.0007), resulting in a predictive relationship that is tested with a leave-one-out cross-validation technique. This relationship predicts the tumor size post-therapy to within inter

  18. Individual differences in cognitive style and strategy predict similarities in the patterns of brain activity between individuals.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michael B; Donovan, Christa-Lynn; Bennett, Craig M; Aminoff, Elissa M; Mayer, Richard E

    2012-01-02

    Neuroimaging is being used increasingly to make inferences about an individual. Yet, those inferences are often confounded by the fact that topographical patterns of task-related brain activity can vary greatly from person to person. This study examined two factors that may contribute to the variability across individuals in a memory retrieval task: individual differences in cognitive style and individual differences in encoding strategy. Cognitive style was probed using a battery of assessments focused on the individual's tendency to visualize or verbalize written material. Encoding strategy was probed using a series of questions designed to assess typical strategies that an individual might utilize when trying to remember a list of words. Similarity in brain activity was assessed by cross-correlating individual t-statistic maps contrasting the BOLD response during retrieval to the BOLD response during fixation. Individual differences in cognitive style and encoding strategy accounted for a significant portion of the variance in similarity. This was true above and beyond individual differences in anatomy and memory performance. These results demonstrate the need for a multidimensional approach in the use of fMRI to make inferences about an individual.

  19. Stereotyped behaviors predicting self-injurious behavior in individuals with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Barnard-Brak, Lucy; Rojahn, Johannes; Richman, David M; Chesnut, Steven R; Wei, Tianlan

    2014-11-11

    We examined the relation between stereotyped behavior and self-injurious behavior (SIB) for 1871 individuals with intellectual disabilities who had a score of >0 on the Behavior Problem Inventory (BPI-01; Rojahn et al., 2001). We report three main findings: First, structural equation modeling techniques (SEM) revealed that the BPI-01stereotyped behavior subscale scores predicted BPI-01 SIB subscale scores. Second, when stereotyped behavior was modeled as a predictor of SIB, mixture-modeling techniques revealed two groups of individuals: one in which stereotyped behavior was a strong, statistically significant predictor of SIB (69% of the sample), and another one in which stereotyped behavior was not a predictor of SIB (31%). Finally, two specific stereotyped behavior topographies (i.e., body rocking and yelling) were identified that significantly predicted five different SIB topographies (i.e., self-biting, head hitting, body hitting, self-pinching, and hair pulling). Results are discussed in terms of future research needed to identify bio-behavioral variables correlated with cases of SIB that can, and cannot, be predicted by the presence of stereotyped behavior.

  20. Assessing risk prediction models using individual participant data from multiple studies.

    PubMed

    Pennells, Lisa; Kaptoge, Stephen; White, Ian R; Thompson, Simon G; Wood, Angela M

    2014-03-01

    Individual participant time-to-event data from multiple prospective epidemiologic studies enable detailed investigation into the predictive ability of risk models. Here we address the challenges in appropriately combining such information across studies. Methods are exemplified by analyses of log C-reactive protein and conventional risk factors for coronary heart disease in the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration, a collation of individual data from multiple prospective studies with an average follow-up duration of 9.8 years (dates varied). We derive risk prediction models using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis stratified by study and obtain estimates of risk discrimination, Harrell's concordance index, and Royston's discrimination measure within each study; we then combine the estimates across studies using a weighted meta-analysis. Various weighting approaches are compared and lead us to recommend using the number of events in each study. We also discuss the calculation of measures of reclassification for multiple studies. We further show that comparison of differences in predictive ability across subgroups should be based only on within-study information and that combining measures of risk discrimination from case-control studies and prospective studies is problematic. The concordance index and discrimination measure gave qualitatively similar results throughout. While the concordance index was very heterogeneous between studies, principally because of differing age ranges, the increments in the concordance index from adding log C-reactive protein to conventional risk factors were more homogeneous.

  1. Labour-Efficient In Vitro Lymphocyte Population Tracking and Fate Prediction Using Automation and Manual Review

    PubMed Central

    Chakravorty, Rajib; Rawlinson, David; Zhang, Alan; Markham, John; Dowling, Mark R.; Wellard, Cameron; Zhou, Jie H. S.; Hodgkin, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    Interest in cell heterogeneity and differentiation has recently led to increased use of time-lapse microscopy. Previous studies have shown that cell fate may be determined well in advance of the event. We used a mixture of automation and manual review of time-lapse live cell imaging to track the positions, contours, divisions, deaths and lineage of 44 B-lymphocyte founders and their 631 progeny in vitro over a period of 108 hours. Using this data to train a Support Vector Machine classifier, we were retrospectively able to predict the fates of individual lymphocytes with more than 90% accuracy, using only time-lapse imaging captured prior to mitosis or death of 90% of all cells. The motivation for this paper is to explore the impact of labour-efficient assistive software tools that allow larger and more ambitious live-cell time-lapse microscopy studies. After training on this data, we show that machine learning methods can be used for realtime prediction of individual cell fates. These techniques could lead to realtime cell culture segregation for purposes such as phenotype screening. We were able to produce a large volume of data with less effort than previously reported, due to the image processing, computer vision, tracking and human-computer interaction tools used. We describe the workflow of the software-assisted experiments and the graphical interfaces that were needed. To validate our results we used our methods to reproduce a variety of published data about lymphocyte populations and behaviour. We also make all our data publicly available, including a large quantity of lymphocyte spatio-temporal dynamics and related lineage information. PMID:24404133

  2. Efficient Helicopter Aerodynamic and Aeroacoustic Predictions on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wissink, Andrew M.; Lyrintzis, Anastasios S.; Strawn, Roger C.; Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents parallel implementations of two codes used in a combined CFD/Kirchhoff methodology to predict the aerodynamics and aeroacoustics properties of helicopters. The rotorcraft Navier-Stokes code, TURNS, computes the aerodynamic flowfield near the helicopter blades and the Kirchhoff acoustics code computes the noise in the far field, using the TURNS solution as input. The overall parallel strategy adds MPI message passing calls to the existing serial codes to allow for communication between processors. As a result, the total code modifications required for parallel execution are relatively small. The biggest bottleneck in running the TURNS code in parallel comes from the LU-SGS algorithm that solves the implicit system of equations. We use a new hybrid domain decomposition implementation of LU-SGS to obtain good parallel performance on the SP-2. TURNS demonstrates excellent parallel speedups for quasi-steady and unsteady three-dimensional calculations of a helicopter blade in forward flight. The execution rate attained by the code on 114 processors is six times faster than the same cases run on one processor of the Cray C-90. The parallel Kirchhoff code also shows excellent parallel speedups and fast execution rates. As a performance demonstration, unsteady acoustic pressures are computed at 1886 far-field observer locations for a sample acoustics problem. The calculation requires over two hundred hours of CPU time on one C-90 processor but takes only a few hours on 80 processors of the SP2. The resultant far-field acoustic field is analyzed with state of-the-art audio and video rendering of the propagating acoustic signals.

  3. Hurst exponent and prediction based on weak-form efficient market hypothesis of stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Cheoljun; Choi, Sunghoon; Oh, Gabjin; Jung, Woo-Sung

    2008-07-01

    We empirically investigated the relationships between the degree of efficiency and the predictability in financial time-series data. The Hurst exponent was used as the measurement of the degree of efficiency, and the hit rate calculated from the nearest-neighbor prediction method was used for the prediction of the directions of future price changes. We used 60 market indexes of various countries. We empirically discovered that the relationship between the degree of efficiency (the Hurst exponent) and the predictability (the hit rate) is strongly positive. That is, a market index with a higher Hurst exponent tends to have a higher hit rate. These results suggested that the Hurst exponent is useful for predicting future price changes. Furthermore, we also discovered that the Hurst exponent and the hit rate are useful as standards that can distinguish emerging capital markets from mature capital markets.

  4. Thalamic functional connectivity predicts seizure laterality in individual TLE patients: application of a biomarker development strategy.

    PubMed

    Barron, Daniel S; Fox, Peter T; Pardoe, Heath; Lancaster, Jack; Price, Larry R; Blackmon, Karen; Berry, Kristen; Cavazos, Jose E; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Devinsky, Orrin; Thesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive markers of brain function could yield biomarkers in many neurological disorders. Disease models constrained by coordinate-based meta-analysis are likely to increase this yield. Here, we evaluate a thalamic model of temporal lobe epilepsy that we proposed in a coordinate-based meta-analysis and extended in a diffusion tractography study of an independent patient population. Specifically, we evaluated whether thalamic functional connectivity (resting-state fMRI-BOLD) with temporal lobe areas can predict seizure onset laterality, as established with intracranial EEG. Twenty-four lesional and non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy patients were studied. No significant differences in functional connection strength in patient and control groups were observed with Mann-Whitney Tests (corrected for multiple comparisons). Notwithstanding the lack of group differences, individual patient difference scores (from control mean connection strength) successfully predicted seizure onset zone as shown in ROC curves: discriminant analysis (two-dimensional) predicted seizure onset zone with 85% sensitivity and 91% specificity; logistic regression (four-dimensional) achieved 86% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The strongest markers in both analyses were left thalamo-hippocampal and right thalamo-entorhinal cortex functional connection strength. Thus, this study shows that thalamic functional connections are sensitive and specific markers of seizure onset laterality in individual temporal lobe epilepsy patients. This study also advances an overall strategy for the programmatic development of neuroimaging biomarkers in clinical and genetic populations: a disease model informed by coordinate-based meta-analysis was used to anatomically constrain individual patient analyses.

  5. Efficient removal of chromate and arsenate from individual and mixed system by malachite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Jiban; Saha, Bedabrata; Das, Gopal

    2011-02-15

    Malachite nanoparticles of 100-150 nm have been efficiently and for the first time used as an adsorbent for the removal of toxic arsenate and chromate. We report a high adsorption capacity for chromate and arsenate on malachite nanoparticle from both individual and mixed solution in pH ∼4-5. However, the adsorption efficiency decreases with the increase of solution pH. Batch studies revealed that initial pH, temperature, malachite nanoparticles dose and initial concentration of chromate and arsenate were important parameters for the adsorption process. Thermodynamic analysis showed that adsorption of chromate and arsenate on malachite nanoparticles is endothermic and spontaneous. The adsorption of these anions has also been investigated quantitatively with the help of adsorption kinetics, isotherm, and selectivity coefficient (K) analysis. The adsorption data for both chromate and arsenate were fitted well in Langmuir isotherm and preferentially followed the second order kinetics. The binding affinity of chromate is found to be slightly higher than arsenate in a competitive adsorption process which leads to the comparatively higher adsorption of chromate on malachite nanoparticles surface.

  6. Efficient Method of Achieving Agreements between Individuals and Organizations about RFID Privacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Shi-Cho

    This work presents novel technical and legal approaches that address privacy concerns for personal data in RFID systems. In recent years, to minimize the conflict between convenience and the privacy risk of RFID systems, organizations have been requested to disclose their policies regarding RFID activities, obtain customer consent, and adopt appropriate mechanisms to enforce these policies. However, current research on RFID typically focuses on enforcement mechanisms to protect personal data stored in RFID tags and prevent organizations from tracking user activity through information emitted by specific RFID tags. A missing piece is how organizations can obtain customers' consent efficiently and flexibly. This study recommends that organizations obtain licenses automatically or semi-automatically before collecting personal data via RFID technologies rather than deal with written consents. Such digitalized and standard licenses can be checked automatically to ensure that collection and use of personal data is based on user consent. While individuals can easily control who has licenses and license content, the proposed framework provides an efficient and flexible way to overcome the deficiencies in current privacy protection technologies for RFID systems.

  7. The predictive nature of individual differences in early associative learning and emerging social behavior.

    PubMed

    Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany C; Levitt, Pat; Fox, Nathan A

    2012-01-01

    Across the first year of life, infants achieve remarkable success in their ability to interact in the social world. The hierarchical nature of circuit and skill development predicts that the emergence of social behaviors may depend upon an infant's early abilities to detect contingencies, particularly socially-relevant associations. Here, we examined whether individual differences in the rate of associative learning at one month of age is an enduring predictor of social, imitative, and discriminative behaviors measured across the human infant's first year. One-month learning rate was predictive of social behaviors at 5, 9, and 12 months of age as well as face-evoked discriminative neural activity at 9 months of age. Learning was not related to general cognitive abilities. These results underscore the importance of early contingency learning and suggest the presence of a basic mechanism underlying the ontogeny of social behaviors.

  8. Individual differences in (non-visual) processing style predict the face inversion effect.

    PubMed

    Wyer, Natalie A; Martin, Douglas; Pickup, Tracey; Macrae, C Neil

    2012-03-01

    Recent research suggests that individuals with relatively weak global precedence (i.e., a smaller propensity to view visual stimuli in a configural manner) show a reduced face inversion effect (FIE). Coupled with such findings, a number of recent studies have demonstrated links between an advantage for feature-based processing and the presentation of traits associated with autism among the general population. The present study sought to bridge these findings by investigating whether a relationship exists between the possession of autism-associated traits (i.e., as indicated by individuals'"autism quotient" [(AQ) and the size of the FIE. Participants completed an on-line study in which the AQ was measured prior to a standard face recognition task where half of the faces were inverted at test. The results confirmed that higher AQ levels were predictive of smaller FIEs. Implications for a common underlying factor relating to processing orientation are discussed.

  9. Pre-trauma individual differences in extinction learning predict posttraumatic stress.

    PubMed

    Lommen, Miriam J J; Engelhard, Iris M; Sijbrandij, Marit; van den Hout, Marcel A; Hermans, Dirk

    2013-02-01

    In the aftermath of a traumatic event, many people suffer from psychological distress, but only a minority develops posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Pre-trauma individual differences in fear conditioning, most notably reduced extinction learning, have been proposed as playing an important role in the etiology of PTSD. However, prospective data are lacking. In this study, we prospectively tested whether reduced extinction was a predictor for later posttraumatic stress. Dutch soldiers (N = 249) were administered a conditioning task before their four-month deployment to Afghanistan to asses individual differences in extinction learning. After returning home, posttraumatic stress was measured. Results showed that reduced extinction learning before deployment predicted subsequent PTSD symptom severity, over and beyond degree of pre-deployment stress symptoms, neuroticism, and exposure to stressors on deployment. The findings suggest that reduced extinction learning may play a role in the development of PTSD.

  10. Individual differences in response of dorsomedial prefrontal cortex predict daily social behavior

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Robert S.; Heatherton, Todd F.

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to accurately infer the thoughts and intentions of other people is critical for effective social interaction, and neural activity in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) has long been linked with the extent to which people engage in mental state attribution. In this study, we combined functional neuroimaging and experience sampling methodologies to test the predictive value of this neural response for daily social behaviors. We found that individuals who displayed greater activity in dmPFC when viewing social scenes spent more time around other people on a daily basis. These findings suggest a specific role for the neural mechanisms that support the capacity to mentalize in guiding individuals toward situations containing valuable social outcomes. PMID:26206505

  11. Acceleration response spectrum for prediction of structural vibration due to individual bouncing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Lei; Racic, Vitomir; Lou, Jiayue

    2016-08-01

    This study is designed to develop an acceleration response spectrum that can be used in vibration serviceability assessment of civil engineering structures, such as floors and grandstands those are dynamically excited by individual bouncing. The spectrum is derived from numerical simulations and statistical analysis of acceleration responses of a single degree of freedom system with variable natural frequency and damping under a large number of experimentally measured individual bouncing loads. Its mathematical representation is fit for fast yet reliable application in design practice and is comprised of three equations that describe three distinct frequency regions observed in the actual data: the first resonant plateau (2-3.5 Hz), the second resonant plateau (4-7 Hz) and a descension region (7-15 Hz). Finally, this paper verifies the proposed response spectrum approach to predict structural vibration by direct comparison against numerical simulations and experimental results.

  12. Population PBPK modelling of trastuzumab: a framework for quantifying and predicting inter-individual variability.

    PubMed

    Malik, Paul R V; Hamadeh, Abdullah; Phipps, Colin; Edginton, Andrea N

    2017-03-04

    In this work we proposed a population physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (popPBPK) framework for quantifying and predicting inter-individual pharmacokinetic variability using the anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) trastuzumab as an example. First, a PBPK model was developed to account for the possible mechanistic sources of variability. Within the model, five key factors that contribute to variability were identified and the nature of their contribution was quantified with local and global sensitivity analyses. The five key factors were the concentration of membrane-bound HER2 ([Formula: see text]), the convective flow rate of mAb through vascular pores ([Formula: see text]), the endocytic transport rate of mAb through vascular endothelium ([Formula: see text]), the degradation rate of mAb-HER2 complexes ([Formula: see text]) and the concentration of shed HER2 extracellular domain in circulation ([Formula: see text]). [Formula: see text] was the most important parameter governing trastuzumab distribution into tissues and primarily affected variability in the first 500 h post-administration. [Formula: see text] was the most significant contributor to variability in clearance. These findings were used together with population generation methods to accurately predict the observed variability in four experimental trials with trastuzumab. To explore anthropometric sources of variability, virtual populations were created to represent participants in the four experimental trials. Using populations with only their expected anthropometric diversity resulted in under-prediction of the observed inter-individual variability. Adapting the populations to include literature-based variability around the five key parameters enabled accurate predictions of the variability in the four trials. The successful application of this framework demonstrates the utility of popPBPK methods to understand the mechanistic underpinnings of pharmacokinetic variability.

  13. Predicting Efficiency of Travel in Young, Visually Impaired Children from Their Other Spatial Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Anita; And Others

    1985-01-01

    To test ways of predicting how efficiently visually impaired children learn travel skills, a criteria checklist of spatial skills was developed for close-body space, local space, and geographical/travel space. Comparison was made between predictors of efficient learning including subjective ratings of teachers, personal qualities and factors of…

  14. Comparison of Prediction Models for Lynch Syndrome Among Individuals With Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Rohit P.; Leenen, Celine; Alvero, Carmelita; Mercado, Rowena C.; Balmaña, Judith; Valenzuela, Irene; Balaguer, Francesc; Green, Roger; Lindor, Noralane M.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Newcomb, Polly; Win, Aung Ko; Jenkins, Mark; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Bertario, Lucio; Sala, Paola; Hampel, Heather; Syngal, Sapna; Steyerberg, Ewout W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent guidelines recommend the Lynch Syndrome prediction models MMRPredict, MMRPro, and PREMM1,2,6 for the identification of MMR gene mutation carriers. We compared the predictive performance and clinical usefulness of these prediction models to identify mutation carriers. Methods: Pedigree data from CRC patients in 11 North American, European, and Australian cohorts (6 clinic- and 5 population-based sites) were used to calculate predicted probabilities of pathogenic MLH1, MSH2, or MSH6 gene mutations by each model and gene-specific predictions by MMRPro and PREMM1,2,6. We examined discrimination with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), calibration with observed to expected (O/E) ratio, and clinical usefulness using decision curve analysis to select patients for further evaluation. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Mutations were detected in 539 of 2304 (23%) individuals from the clinic-based cohorts (237 MLH1, 251 MSH2, 51 MSH6) and 150 of 3451 (4.4%) individuals from the population-based cohorts (47 MLH1, 71 MSH2, 32 MSH6). Discrimination was similar for clinic- and population-based cohorts: AUCs of 0.76 vs 0.77 for MMRPredict, 0.82 vs 0.85 for MMRPro, and 0.85 vs 0.88 for PREMM1,2,6. For clinic- and population-based cohorts, O/E deviated from 1 for MMRPredict (0.38 and 0.31, respectively) and MMRPro (0.62 and 0.36) but were more satisfactory for PREMM1,2,6 (1.0 and 0.70). MMRPro or PREMM1,2,6 predictions were clinically useful at thresholds of 5% or greater and in particular at greater than 15%. Conclusions: MMRPro and PREMM1,2,6 can well be used to select CRC patients from genetics clinics or population-based settings for tumor and/or germline testing at a 5% or higher risk. If no MMR deficiency is detected and risk exceeds 15%, we suggest considering additional genetic etiologies for the cause of cancer in the family. PMID:26582061

  15. Predictability of the individual clinical outcome of extracorporeal shock wave therapy for cellulite

    PubMed Central

    Schlaudraff, Kai-Uwe; Kiessling, Maren C; Császár, Nikolaus BM; Schmitz, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal shock wave therapy has been successfully introduced for the treatment of cellulite in recent years. However, it is still unknown whether the individual clinical outcome of cellulite treatment with extracorporeal shock wave therapy can be predicted by the patient’s individual cellulite grade at baseline, individual patient age, body mass index (BMI), weight, and/or height. Methods Fourteen Caucasian females with cellulite were enrolled in a prospective, single-center, randomized, open-label Phase II study. The mean (± standard error of the mean) cellulite grade at baseline was 2.5±0.09 and mean BMI was 22.8±1.17. All patients were treated with radial extracorporeal shock waves using the Swiss DolorClast® device (Electro Medical Systems, S.A., Nyon, Switzerland). Patients were treated unilaterally with 2 weekly treatments for 4 weeks on a randomly selected side (left or right), totaling eight treatments on the selected side. Treatment was performed at 3.5–4.0 bar, with 15,000 impulses per session applied at 15 Hz. Impulses were homogeneously distributed over the posterior thigh and buttock area (resulting in 7,500 impulses per area). Treatment success was evaluated after the last treatment and 4 weeks later by clinical examination, photographic documentation, contact thermography, and patient satisfaction questionnaires. Results The mean cellulite grade improved from 2.5±0.09 at baseline to 1.57±0.18 after the last treatment (ie, mean δ-1 was 0.93 cellulite grades) and 1.68±0.16 at follow-up (ie, mean δ-2 was 0.82 cellulite grades). Compared with baseline, no patient’s condition worsened, the treatment was well tolerated, and no unwanted side effects were observed. No statistically significant (ie, P<0.05) correlation was found between individual values for δ-1 and δ-2 and cellulite grade at baseline, BMI, weight, height, or age. Conclusion Radial shock wave therapy is a safe and effective treatment option for cellulite. The

  16. Age-related and individual differences in the use of prediction during language comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Federmeier, Kara D.; Kutas, Marta; Schul, Rina

    2010-01-01

    During sentence comprehension, older adults are less likely than younger adults to predict features of likely upcoming words. A pair of experiments assessed whether such differences would extend to tasks with reduced working memory demands and time pressures. In Experiment 1, event-related brain potentials were measured as younger and older adults read short phrases cuing antonyms or category exemplars, followed three seconds later by targets that were either congruent or incongruent and, for congruent category exemplars, of higher or lower typicality. When processing the less expected low typicality targets, younger – but not older – adults elicited a prefrontal positivity (500–900 ms) that has been linked to processing consequences of having predictions disconfirmed. Thus, age-related changes in prediction during comprehension generalize across task circumstances. Analyses of individual differences revealed that older adults with higher category fluency were more likely to show the young-like pattern. Experiment 2 showed that these age-related differences were not due to simple slowing of language production mechanisms, as older adults generated overt responses to the cues as quickly as – and more accurately than – younger adults. However, older adults who were relatively faster to produce category exemplars in Experiment 2 were more likely to have shown predictive processing patterns in Experiment 1. Taken together, the results link prediction during language comprehension to language production mechanisms and suggest that although older adults can produce speeded language output on demand, they are less likely to automatically recruit these mechanisms during comprehension unless top-down circuitry is particularly strong. PMID:20728207

  17. Individual differences in bodily freezing predict emotional biases in decision making.

    PubMed

    Ly, Verena; Huys, Quentin J M; Stins, John F; Roelofs, Karin; Cools, Roshan

    2014-01-01

    Instrumental decision making has long been argued to be vulnerable to emotional responses. Literature on multiple decision making systems suggests that this emotional biasing might reflect effects of a system that regulates innately specified, evolutionarily preprogrammed responses. To test this hypothesis directly, we investigated whether effects of emotional faces on instrumental action can be predicted by effects of emotional faces on bodily freezing, an innately specified response to aversive relative to appetitive cues. We tested 43 women using a novel emotional decision making task combined with posturography, which involves a force platform to detect small oscillations of the body to accurately quantify postural control in upright stance. On the platform, participants learned whole body approach-avoidance actions based on monetary feedback, while being primed by emotional faces (angry/happy). Our data evidence an emotional biasing of instrumental action. Thus, angry relative to happy faces slowed instrumental approach relative to avoidance responses. Critically, individual differences in this emotional biasing effect were predicted by individual differences in bodily freezing. This result suggests that emotional biasing of instrumental action involves interaction with a system that controls innately specified responses. Furthermore, our findings help bridge (animal and human) decision making and emotion research to advance our mechanistic understanding of decision making anomalies in daily encounters as well as in a wide range of psychopathology.

  18. Individual differences in white matter anatomy predict dissociable components of reading skill in adults.

    PubMed

    Welcome, Suzanne E; Joanisse, Marc F

    2014-08-01

    We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate relationships between white matter anatomy and different reading subskills in typical-reading adults. A series of analytic approaches revealed that phonological decoding ability is associated with anatomical markers that do not relate to other reading-related cognitive abilities. Thus, individual differences in phonological decoding might relate to connectivity between a network of cortical regions, while skills like sight word reading might rely less strongly on integration across regions. Specifically, manually-drawn ROIs and probabilistic tractography revealed an association between the volume and integrity of white matter underlying primary auditory cortex and nonword reading ability. In a related finding, more extensive cross-hemispheric connections through the isthmus of the corpus callosum predicted better phonological decoding. Atlas-based white matter ROIs demonstrated that relationships with nonword reading were strongest in the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and uncinate fasciculus that connect occipital and anterior temporal cortex with inferior frontal cortex. In contrast, tract volume underlying the left angular gyrus was related to nonverbal IQ. Finally, connectivity underlying functional ROIs that are differentially active during phonological and semantic processing predicted nonword reading and reading comprehension, respectively. Together, these results provide important insights into how white matter anatomy may relate to both typical reading subskills, and perhaps a roadmap for understanding neural connectivity in individuals with reading impairments.

  19. Individual differences in bodily freezing predict emotional biases in decision making

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Verena; Huys, Quentin J. M.; Stins, John F.; Roelofs, Karin; Cools, Roshan

    2014-01-01

    Instrumental decision making has long been argued to be vulnerable to emotional responses. Literature on multiple decision making systems suggests that this emotional biasing might reflect effects of a system that regulates innately specified, evolutionarily preprogrammed responses. To test this hypothesis directly, we investigated whether effects of emotional faces on instrumental action can be predicted by effects of emotional faces on bodily freezing, an innately specified response to aversive relative to appetitive cues. We tested 43 women using a novel emotional decision making task combined with posturography, which involves a force platform to detect small oscillations of the body to accurately quantify postural control in upright stance. On the platform, participants learned whole body approach-avoidance actions based on monetary feedback, while being primed by emotional faces (angry/happy). Our data evidence an emotional biasing of instrumental action. Thus, angry relative to happy faces slowed instrumental approach relative to avoidance responses. Critically, individual differences in this emotional biasing effect were predicted by individual differences in bodily freezing. This result suggests that emotional biasing of instrumental action involves interaction with a system that controls innately specified responses. Furthermore, our findings help bridge (animal and human) decision making and emotion research to advance our mechanistic understanding of decision making anomalies in daily encounters as well as in a wide range of psychopathology. PMID:25071491

  20. Factors Motivating Individuals to Consider Genetic Testing for Type 2 Diabetes Risk Prediction.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Jennifer; Gupta, Jyoti; de Groot, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify attitudes and perceptions of willingness to participate in genetic testing for type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk prediction in the general population. Adults (n = 598) were surveyed on attitudes about utilizing genetic testing to predict future risk of T2D. Participants were recruited from public libraries (53%), online registry (37%) and a safety net hospital emergency department (10%). Respondents were 37 ± 11 years old, primarily White (54%), female (69%), college educated (46%), with an annual income ≥$25,000 (56%). Half of participants were interested in genetic testing for T2D (52%) and 81% agreed/strongly agreed genetic testing should be available to the public. Only 57% of individuals knew T2D is preventable. A multivariate model to predict interest in genetic testing was adjusted for age, gender, recruitment location and BMI; significant predictors were motivation (high perceived personal risk of T2D [OR = 4.38 (1.76, 10.9)]; family history [OR = 2.56 (1.46, 4.48)]; desire to know risk prior to disease onset [OR = 3.25 (1.94, 5.42)]; and knowing T2D is preventable [OR = 2.11 (1.24, 3.60)], intention (if the cost is free [OR = 10.2 (4.27, 24.6)]; and learning T2D is preventable [OR = 5.18 (1.95, 13.7)]) and trust of genetic testing results [OR = 0.03 (0.003, 0.30)]. Individuals are interested in genetic testing for T2D risk which offers unique information that is personalized. Financial accessibility, validity of the test and availability of diabetes prevention programs were identified as predictors of interest in T2D testing.

  1. Individual differences in cortisol stress response predict increases in voice pitch during exam stress.

    PubMed

    Pisanski, Katarzyna; Nowak, Judyta; Sorokowski, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    Despite a long history of empirical research, the potential vocal markers of stress remain unclear. Previous studies examining speech under stress most consistently report an increase in voice pitch (the acoustic correlate of fundamental frequency, F0), however numerous studies have failed to replicate this finding. In the present study we tested the prediction that these inconsistencies are tied to variation in the severity of the stress response, wherein voice changes may be observed predominantly among individuals who show a cortisol stress response (i.e., an increase in free cortisol levels) above a critical threshold. Voice recordings and saliva samples were collected from university psychology students at baseline and again immediately prior to an oral examination. Voice recordings included both read and spontaneous speech, from which we measured mean, minimum, maximum, and the standard deviation in F0. We observed an increase in mean and minimum F0 under stress in both read and spontaneous speech, whereas maximum F0 and its standard deviation showed no systematic changes under stress. Our results confirmed that free cortisol levels increased by an average of 74% (ranging from 0 to 270%) under stress. Critically, increases in cortisol concentrations significantly predicted increases in mean F0 under stress for both speech types, but did not predict variation in F0 at baseline. On average, stress-induced increases in voice pitch occurred only when free cortisol levels more than doubled their baseline concentrations. Our results suggest that researchers examining speech under stress should control for individual differences in the magnitude of the stress response.

  2. Single Trial EEG Patterns for the Prediction of Individual Differences in Fluid Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Emad-ul-Haq; Hussain, Muhammad; Aboalsamh, Hatim; Malik, Aamir Saeed; Amin, Hafeez Ullah; Bamatraf, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Assessing a person's intelligence level is required in many situations, such as career counseling and clinical applications. EEG evoked potentials in oddball task and fluid intelligence score are correlated because both reflect the cognitive processing and attention. A system for prediction of an individual's fluid intelligence level using single trial Electroencephalography (EEG) signals has been proposed. For this purpose, we employed 2D and 3D contents and 34 subjects each for 2D and 3D, which were divided into low-ability (LA) and high-ability (HA) groups using Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices (RAPM) test. Using visual oddball cognitive task, neural activity of each group was measured and analyzed over three midline electrodes (Fz, Cz, and Pz). To predict whether an individual belongs to LA or HA group, features were extracted using wavelet decomposition of EEG signals recorded in visual oddball task and support vector machine (SVM) was used as a classifier. Two different types of Haar wavelet transform based features have been extracted from the band (0.3 to 30 Hz) of EEG signals. Statistical wavelet features and wavelet coefficient features from the frequency bands 0.0–1.875 Hz (delta low) and 1.875–3.75 Hz (delta high), resulted in the 100 and 98% prediction accuracies, respectively, both for 2D and 3D contents. The analysis of these frequency bands showed clear difference between LA and HA groups. Further, discriminative values of the features have been validated using statistical significance tests and inter-class and intra-class variation analysis. Also, statistical test showed that there was no effect of 2D and 3D content on the assessment of fluid intelligence level. Comparisons with state-of-the-art techniques showed the superiority of the proposed system. PMID:28163676

  3. Sibling configuration predicts individual and descendant socioeconomic success in a modern post-industrial society.

    PubMed

    Lawson, David W; Makoli, Arijeta; Goodman, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Growing up with many siblings, at least in the context of modern post-industrial low fertility, low mortality societies, is predictive of relatively poor performance on school tests in childhood, lower levels of educational attainment, and lower income throughout adulthood. Recent studies further indicate these relationships hold across generations, so that the descendants of those who grow up with many siblings are also at an apparent socioeconomic disadvantage. In this paper we add to this literature by considering whether such relationships interact with the sex and relative age of siblings. To do this we utilise a unique Swedish multigenerational birth cohort study that provides sibling configuration data on over 10,000 individuals born in 1915-1929, plus all their direct genetic descendants to the present day. Adjusting for parental and birth characteristics, we find that the 'socioeconomic cost' of growing up in a large family is independent of both the sex of siblings and the sex of the individual. However, growing up with several older as opposed to several younger siblings is predictive of relatively poor performance on school tests and a lower likelihood of progression to tertiary education. This later-born disadvantage also holds across generations, with the children of those with many older siblings achieving lower levels of educational attainment. Despite these differences, we find that while individual and descendant income is negatively related to the number of siblings, it is not influenced by the relative age of siblings. Thus, our findings imply that the educational disadvantage of later-born children, demonstrated here and in numerous other studies, does not necessarily translate into reduced earnings in adulthood. We discuss potential explanations for this pattern of results, and consider some important directions for future research into sibling configuration and wellbeing in modern societies.

  4. Probing photo-carrier collection efficiencies of individual silicon nanowire diodes on a wafer substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, S. W.; Brönstrup, G.; Shalev, G.; Srivastava, S. K.; Bashouti, M. Y.; Döhler, G. H.; Christiansen, S. H.

    2014-06-01

    Vertically aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) diodes are promising candidates for the integration into various opto-electronic device concepts for e.g. sensing or solar energy conversion. Individual SiNW p-n diodes have intensively been studied, but to date an assessment of their device performance once integrated on a silicon substrate has not been made. We show that using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with a nano-manipulator and an optical fiber feed-through for tunable (wavelength, power using a tunable laser source) sample illumination, the dark and illuminated current-voltage (I-V) curve of individual SiNW diodes on the substrate wafer can be measured. Surprisingly, the I-V-curve of the serially coupled system composed of SiNW/wafers is accurately described by an equivalent circuit model of a single diode and diode parameters like series and shunting resistivity, diode ideality factor and photocurrent can be retrieved from a fit. We show that the photo-carrier collection efficiency (PCE) of the integrated diode illuminated with variable wavelength and intensity light directly gives insight into the quality of the device design at the nanoscale. We find that the PCE decreases for high light intensities and photocurrent densities, due to the fact that considerable amounts of photo-excited carriers generated within the substrate lead to a decrease in shunting resistivity of the SiNW diode and deteriorate its rectification. The PCE decreases systematically for smaller wavelengths of visible light, showing the possibility of monitoring the effectiveness of the SiNW device surface passivation using the shown measurement technique. The integrated device was pre-characterized using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), TCAD simulations and electron beam induced current (EBIC) measurements to validate the properties of the characterized material at the single SiNW diode level.Vertically aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) diodes are promising candidates for

  5. Individualized Prediction of Changes in 6-Minute Walk Distance for Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Goemans, Nathalie; vanden Hauwe, Marleen; Signorovitch, James; Swallow, Elyse; Song, Jinlin

    2016-01-01

    Background Deficits in ambulatory function progress at heterogeneous rates among individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The resulting inherent variability in ambulatory outcomes has complicated the design of drug efficacy trials and clouded the interpretation of trial results. We developed a prediction model for 1-year change in the six minute walk distance (6MWD) among DMD patients, and compared its predictive value to that of commonly used prognostic factors (age, baseline 6MWD, and steroid use). Methods Natural history data were collected from DMD patients at routine follow up visits approximately every 6 months over the course of 2–5 years. Assessments included ambulatory function and steroid use. The annualized change in 6MWD (Δ6MWD) was studied between all pairs of visits separated by 8–16 months. Prediction models were developed using multivariable regression for repeated measures, and evaluated using cross-validation. Results Among n = 191 follow-up intervals (n = 39 boys), mean starting age was 9.4 years, mean starting 6MWD was 351.8 meters, and 75% had received steroids for at least one year. Over the subsequent 8–16 months, mean Δ6MWD was -37.0 meters with a standard deviation (SD) of 93.7 meters. Predictions based on a composite of age, baseline 6MWD, and steroid use explained 28% of variation in Δ6MWD (R2 = 0.28, residual SD = 79.4 meters). A broadened prognostic model, adding timed 10-meter walk/run, 4-stair climb, and rise from supine, as well as height and weight, significantly improved prediction, explaining 59% of variation in Δ6MWD after cross-validation (R2 = 0.59, residual SD = 59.7 meters). Conclusions A prognostic model incorporating timed function tests significantly improved prediction of 1-year changes in 6MWD. Explained variation was more than doubled compared to predictions based only on age, baseline 6MWD, and steroid use. There is significant potential for composite prognostic models to inform DMD clinical trials

  6. Impairment variables predicting activity limitation in individuals with lower limb amputation.

    PubMed

    Raya, Michele A; Gailey, Robert S; Fiebert, Ira M; Roach, Kathyrn E

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether measures of impairment (i.e., muscle strength, balance), personal factors (i.e., comorbidities, demographic information) and amputation specific variables (i.e., time since amputation, cause of amputation, level of amputation) were able to predict performance on the six-minute walk test, a measure of activity limitation, in individuals with lower limb amputation. A total of 72 individuals with lower limb amputation ranging in age from 21-83 were tested for balance, limb muscle strength and function. Medical comorbidities were recorded and activity limitation was measured using the six-minute walk test. Data were analyzed and multivariate relationships were examined using multiple linear regression. Impairment variables of strength, balance, subject demographics, time since amputation, cause of amputation and level of amputation were all significant predictors and explained 72% of the variance in the outcome variable. Strength of the hip extensors was the strongest predictor, accounting for 30.9% of the total variance. Multiple factors impact six minute walk scores in individuals with lower limb amputation. Impairments in hip strength and balance appear to be the two most significant. The findings of this study support the use of the six-minute walk test to underscore impairments of the musculoskeletal system that can affect ambulation ability in the amputee.

  7. Individual differences in left parietal white matter predict math scores on the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test.

    PubMed

    Matejko, Anna A; Price, Gavin R; Mazzocco, Michèle M M; Ansari, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    Mathematical skills are of critical importance, both academically and in everyday life. Neuroimaging research has primarily focused on the relationship between mathematical skills and functional brain activity. Comparatively few studies have examined which white matter regions support mathematical abilities. The current study uses diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to test whether individual differences in white matter predict performance on the math subtest of the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT). Grades 10 and 11 PSAT scores were obtained from 30 young adults (ages 17-18) with wide-ranging math achievement levels. Tract based spatial statistics was used to examine the correlation between PSAT math scores, fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD) and axial diffusivity (AD). FA in left parietal white matter was positively correlated with math PSAT scores (specifically in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus, left superior corona radiata, and left corticospinal tract) after controlling for chronological age and same grade PSAT critical reading scores. Furthermore, RD, but not AD, was correlated with PSAT math scores in these white matter microstructures. The negative correlation with RD further suggests that participants with higher PSAT math scores have greater white matter integrity in this region. Individual differences in FA and RD may reflect variability in experience dependent plasticity over the course of learning and development. These results are the first to demonstrate that individual differences in white matter are associated with mathematical abilities on a nationally administered scholastic aptitude measure.

  8. Using individual patient anatomy to predict protocol compliance for prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Caine, Hannah; Whalley, Deborah; Kneebone, Andrew; McCloud, Philip; Eade, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    If a prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plan has protocol violations, it is often a challenge knowing whether this is due to unfavorable anatomy or suboptimal planning. This study aimed to create a model to predict protocol violations based on patient anatomical variables and their potential relationship to target and organ at risk (OAR) end points in the setting of definitive, dose-escalated IMRT/VMAT prostate planning. Radiotherapy plans from 200 consecutive patients treated with definitive radiation for prostate cancer using IMRT or VMAT were analyzed. The first 100 patient plans (hypothesis-generating cohort) were examined to identify anatomical variables that predict for dosimetric outcome, in particular OAR end points. Variables that scored significance were further assessed for their ability to predict protocol violations using a Classification and Regression Tree (CART) analysis. These results were then validated in a second group of 100 patients (validation cohort). In the initial analysis of the hypothesis-generating cohort, percentage of rectum overlap in the planning target volume (PTV) (%OR) and percentage of bladder overlap in the PTV (%OB) were highlighted as significant predictors of rectal and bladder dosimetry. Lymph node treatment was also significant for bladder outcomes. For the validation cohort, CART analysis showed that %OR of < 6%, 6% to 9% and > 9% predicted a 13%, 63%, and 100% rate of rectal protocol violations respectively. For the bladder, %OB of < 9% vs > 9% is associated with 13% vs 88% rate of bladder constraint violations when lymph nodes were not treated. If nodal irradiation was delivered, plans with a %OB of < 9% had a 59% risk of violations. Percentage of rectum and bladder within the PTV can be used to identify individual plan potential to achieve dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints. A model based on these factors could be used to reduce planning time, improve

  9. Multimodal Learning and Intelligent Prediction of Symptom Development in Individual Parkinson’s Patients

    PubMed Central

    Przybyszewski, Andrzej W.; Kon, Mark; Szlufik, Stanislaw; Szymanski, Artur; Habela, Piotr; Koziorowski, Dariusz M.

    2016-01-01

    We still do not know how the brain and its computations are affected by nerve cell deaths and their compensatory learning processes, as these develop in neurodegenerative diseases (ND). Compensatory learning processes are ND symptoms usually observed at a point when the disease has already affected large parts of the brain. We can register symptoms of ND such as motor and/or mental disorders (dementias) and even provide symptomatic relief, though the structural effects of these are in most cases not yet understood. It is very important to obtain early diagnosis, which can provide several years in which we can monitor and partly compensate for the disease’s symptoms, with the help of various therapies. In the case of Parkinson’s disease (PD), in addition to classical neurological tests, measurements of eye movements are diagnostic. We have performed measurements of latency, amplitude, and duration in reflexive saccades (RS) of PD patients. We have compared the results of our measurement-based diagnoses with standard neurological ones. The purpose of our work was to classify how condition attributes predict the neurologist’s diagnosis. For n = 10 patients, the patient age and parameters based on RS gave a global accuracy in predictions of neurological symptoms in individual patients of about 80%. Further, by adding three attributes partly related to patient ‘well-being’ scores, our prediction accuracies increased to 90%. Our predictive algorithms use rough set theory, which we have compared with other classifiers such as Naïve Bayes, Decision Trees/Tables, and Random Forests (implemented in KNIME/WEKA). We have demonstrated that RS are powerful biomarkers for assessment of symptom progression in PD. PMID:27649187

  10. Predicting brain activation patterns associated with individual lexical concepts based on five sensory-motor attributes

    PubMed Central

    Fernandino, Leonardo; Humphries, Colin J.; Seidenberg, Mark S.; Gross, William L.; Conant, Lisa L.; Binder, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    While major advances have been made in uncovering the neural processes underlying perceptual representations, our grasp of how the brain gives rise to conceptual knowledge remains relatively poor. Recent work has provided strong evidence that concepts rely, at least in part, on the same sensory and motor neural systems through which they were acquired, but it is still unclear whether the neural code for concept representation uses information about sensory-motor features to discriminate between concepts. In the present study, we investigate this question by asking whether an encoding model based on five semantic attributes directly related to sensory-motor experience – sound, color, visual motion, shape, and manipulation – can successfully predict patterns of brain activation elicited by individual lexical concepts. We collected ratings on the relevance of these five attributes to the meaning of 820 words, and used these ratings as predictors in a multiple regression model of the fMRI signal associated with the words in a separate group of participants. The five resulting activation maps were then combined by linear summation to predict the distributed activation pattern elicited by a novel set of 80 test words. The encoding model predicted the activation patterns elicited by the test words significantly better than chance. As expected, prediction was successful for concrete but not for abstract concepts. Comparisons between encoding models based on different combinations of attributes indicate that all five attributes contribute to the representation of concrete concepts. Consistent with embodied theories of semantics, these results show, for the first time, that the distributed activation pattern associated with a concept combines information about different sensory-motor attributes according to their respective relevance. Future research should investigate how additional features of phenomenal experience contribute to the neural representation of conceptual

  11. Overview of Heat Addition and Efficiency Predictions for an Advanced Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Reid, Terry; Schifer, Nicholas; Briggs, Maxwell

    2011-01-01

    Past methods of predicting net heat input needed to be validated. Validation effort pursued with several paths including improving model inputs, using test hardware to provide validation data, and validating high fidelity models. Validation test hardware provided direct measurement of net heat input for comparison to predicted values. Predicted value of net heat input was 1.7 percent less than measured value and initial calculations of measurement uncertainty were 2.1 percent (under review). Lessons learned during validation effort were incorporated into convertor modeling approach which improved predictions of convertor efficiency.

  12. Olfactory Performance Is Predicted by Individual Sex-Atypicality, but Not Sexual Orientation

    PubMed Central

    Nováková, Lenka; Varella Valentová, Jaroslava; Havlíček, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Many previous studies have reported robust sex differences in olfactory perception. However, both men and women can be expected to vary in the degree to which they exhibit olfactory performance considered typical of their own or the opposite sex. Sex-atypicality is often described in terms of childhood gender nonconformity, which, however, is not a perfect correlate of non-heterosexual orientation. Here we explored intrasexual variability in psychophysical olfactory performance in a sample of 156 individuals (83 non-heterosexual) and found the lowest odor identification scores in heterosexual men. However, when childhood gender nonconformity was entered in the model along with sexual orientation, better odor identification scores were exhibited by gender-nonconforming men, and greater olfactory sensitivity by gender-conforming women, irrespective of their sexual orientation. Thus, sex-atypicality, but not sexual orientation predicts olfactory performance, and we propose that this might not be limited to olfaction, but represent a more general phenomenon. PMID:24244657

  13. Energy-Efficient Integration of Continuous Context Sensing and Prediction into Smartwatches.

    PubMed

    Rawassizadeh, Reza; Tomitsch, Martin; Nourizadeh, Manouchehr; Momeni, Elaheh; Peery, Aaron; Ulanova, Liudmila; Pazzani, Michael

    2015-09-08

    As the availability and use of wearables increases, they are becoming a promising platform for context sensing and context analysis. Smartwatches are a particularly interesting platform for this purpose, as they offer salient advantages, such as their proximity to the human body. However, they also have limitations associated with their small form factor, such as processing power and battery life, which makes it difficult to simply transfer smartphone-based context sensing and prediction models to smartwatches. In this paper, we introduce an energy-efficient, generic, integrated framework for continuous context sensing and prediction on smartwatches. Our work extends previous approaches for context sensing and prediction on wrist-mounted wearables that perform predictive analytics outside the device. We offer a generic sensing module and a novel energy-efficient, on-device prediction module that is based on a semantic abstraction approach to convert sensor data into meaningful information objects, similar to human perception of a behavior. Through six evaluations, we analyze the energy efficiency of our framework modules, identify the optimal file structure for data access and demonstrate an increase in accuracy of prediction through our semantic abstraction method. The proposed framework is hardware independent and can serve as a reference model for implementing context sensing and prediction on small wearable devices beyond smartwatches, such as body-mounted cameras.

  14. Energy-Efficient Integration of Continuous Context Sensing and Prediction into Smartwatches

    PubMed Central

    Rawassizadeh, Reza; Tomitsch, Martin; Nourizadeh, Manouchehr; Momeni, Elaheh; Peery, Aaron; Ulanova, Liudmila; Pazzani, Michael

    2015-01-01

    As the availability and use of wearables increases, they are becoming a promising platform for context sensing and context analysis. Smartwatches are a particularly interesting platform for this purpose, as they offer salient advantages, such as their proximity to the human body. However, they also have limitations associated with their small form factor, such as processing power and battery life, which makes it difficult to simply transfer smartphone-based context sensing and prediction models to smartwatches. In this paper, we introduce an energy-efficient, generic, integrated framework for continuous context sensing and prediction on smartwatches. Our work extends previous approaches for context sensing and prediction on wrist-mounted wearables that perform predictive analytics outside the device. We offer a generic sensing module and a novel energy-efficient, on-device prediction module that is based on a semantic abstraction approach to convert sensor data into meaningful information objects, similar to human perception of a behavior. Through six evaluations, we analyze the energy efficiency of our framework modules, identify the optimal file structure for data access and demonstrate an increase in accuracy of prediction through our semantic abstraction method. The proposed framework is hardware independent and can serve as a reference model for implementing context sensing and prediction on small wearable devices beyond smartwatches, such as body-mounted cameras. PMID:26370997

  15. FKBP5 and Emotional Neglect Interact to Predict Individual Differences in Amygdala Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    White, Michael G.; Bogdan, Ryan; Fisher, Patrick M.; Muñoz, Karen; Williamson, Douglas E.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2013-01-01

    Individual variation in physiological responsiveness to stress mediates risk for mental illness and is influenced by both experiential and genetic factors. Common polymorphisms in the human gene for FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5), which is involved in transcriptional regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, have been shown to interact with childhood abuse and trauma to predict stress-related psychopathology. In the current study, we examined if such gene-environment interaction effects may be related to variability in the threat-related reactivity of the amygdala, which plays a critical role in mediating physiological and behavioral adaptions to stress including modulation of the HPA axis. To this end 139 healthy, Caucasian youth completed a BOLD fMRI probe of amygdala reactivity and self-report assessments of emotional neglect (EN) and other forms of maltreatment. These individuals were genotyped for six FKBP5 polymorphisms (rs7748266, rs1360780, rs9296158, rs3800373, rs9470080, and rs9394309) previously associated with psychopathology and/or HPA axis function. Interactions between each SNP and EN emerged such that risk alleles predicted relatively increased dorsal amygdala reactivity in the context of higher EN, even after correcting for multiple testing. Two different haplotype analyses confirmed this relationship as haplotypes with risk alleles also exhibited increased amygdala reactivity in the context of higher EN. Our results suggest that increased threat-related amygdala reactivity may represent a mechanism linking psychopathology to interactions between common genetic variants affecting HPA axis function and childhood trauma. PMID:22979952

  16. Resolving Anomalies in Predicting Electrokinetic Energy Conversion Efficiencies of Nanofluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Sagardip; Dhar, Jayabrata; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-01-01

    We devise a new approach for capturing complex interfacial interactions over reduced length scales, towards predicting electrokinetic energy conversion efficiencies of nanofluidic devices. By embedding several aspects of intermolecular interactions in continuum based formalism, we show that our simple theory becomes capable of representing complex interconnections between electro-mechanics and hydrodynamics over reduced length scales. The predictions from our model are supported by reported experimental data, and are in excellent quantitative agreement with molecular dynamics simulations. The present model, thus, may be employed to rationalize the discrepancies between low energy conversion efficiencies of nanofluidic channels that have been realized from experiments, and the impractically high energy conversion efficiencies that have been routinely predicted by the existing theories. PMID:26437925

  17. Relationship among performance, carcass, and feed efficiency characteristics, and their ability to predict economic value in the feedlot.

    PubMed

    Retallick, K M; Faulkner, D B; Rodriguez-Zas, S L; Nkrumah, J D; Shike, D W

    2013-12-01

    A 4-yr study was conducted using 736 steers of known Angus, Simmental, or Simmental × Angus genetics to determine performance, carcass, and feed efficiency factors that explained variation in economic performance. Steers were pen fed and individual DMI was recorded using a GrowSafe automated feeding system (GrowSafe Systems Ltd., Airdrie, Alberta, Canada). Steers consumed a similar diet and received similar management each year. The objectives of this study were to: 1) determine current economic value of feed efficiency and 2) identify performance, carcass, and feed efficiency characteristics that predict: carcass value, profit, cost of gain, and feed costs. Economic data used were from 2011 values. Feed efficiency values investigated were: feed conversion ratio (FCR; feed to gain), residual feed intake (RFI), residual BW gain (RG), and residual intake and BW gain (RIG). Dependent variables were carcass value ($/steer), profit ($/steer), feed costs ($/steer • d(-1)), and cost of gain ($/kg). Independent variables were year, DMI, ADG, HCW, LM area, marbling, yield grade, dam breed, and sire breed. A 10% improvement in RG (P < 0.05) yielded the lowest cost of gain at $0.09/kg and highest carcass value at $17.92/steer. Carcass value increased (P < 0.05) as feed efficiency improved for FCR, RG, and RIG. Profit increased with a 10% improvement in feed efficiency (P < 0.05) with FCR at $34.65/steer, RG at $31.21/steer, RIG at $21.66/steer, and RFI at $11.47/steer. The carcass value prediction model explained 96% of the variation among carcasses and included HCW, marbling score, and yield grade. Average daily gain, marbling score, yield grade, DMI, HCW, and year born constituted 81% of the variation for prediction of profit. Eighty-five percent of the variation in cost of gain was explained by ADG, DMI, HCW, and year. Prediction equations were developed that excluded ADG and DMI, and included feed efficiency values. Using these equations, cost of gain was explained

  18. Benchmarking Deep Networks for Predicting Residue-Specific Quality of Individual Protein Models in CASP11.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Wang, Yiheng; Eickholt, Jesse; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-14

    Quality assessment of a protein model is to predict the absolute or relative quality of a protein model using computational methods before the native structure is available. Single-model methods only need one model as input and can predict the absolute residue-specific quality of an individual model. Here, we have developed four novel single-model methods (Wang_deep_1, Wang_deep_2, Wang_deep_3, and Wang_SVM) based on stacked denoising autoencoders (SdAs) and support vector machines (SVMs). We evaluated these four methods along with six other methods participating in CASP11 at the global and local levels using Pearson's correlation coefficients and ROC analysis. As for residue-specific quality assessment, our four methods achieved better performance than most of the six other CASP11 methods in distinguishing the reliably modeled residues from the unreliable measured by ROC analysis; and our SdA-based method Wang_deep_1 has achieved the highest accuracy, 0.77, compared to SVM-based methods and our ensemble of an SVM and SdAs. However, we found that Wang_deep_2 and Wang_deep_3, both based on an ensemble of multiple SdAs and an SVM, performed slightly better than Wang_deep_1 in terms of ROC analysis, indicating that integrating an SVM with deep networks works well in terms of certain measurements.

  19. Evidence for predictive validity of blood assays to evaluate individual radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Severin, Erhard . E-mail: severie@uni-muenster.de; Greve, Burkhard; Pascher, Elke; Wedemeyer, Niels; Hacker-Klom, Ursula; Silling, Gerda; Kienast, Joachim; Willich, Normann; Goehde, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: An escalation in standard irradiation dose ensuring improved local tumor control is estimated, but this strategy would require the exclusion of the most sensitive individuals from treatment. Therefore, fast and reliable assays for prediction of the individual radiosensitivity are urgently required. Methods and Materials: Seven parameters in lymphocytes of 40 patients with leukemia were analyzed before, during, and after total body irradiation (TBI) and in vitro X-ray irradiation. These were: cell proliferation, nuclear damage, activation of cytokines, and numbers of total leukocytes of CD34+ hematopoietic blood stem cells and of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. Additionally, antioxidative capacity of blood plasma, uric acid, and hemoglobin levels were measured. Blood samples of 67 healthy donors were used as controls. Results: In vivo and in vitro irradiations showed comparable results. A dose-response relationship was found for most parameters. Three parameters were associated with severe acute oral mucositis (Grade 3 or 4 vs. Grade 0 to 2): leukocytes fewer than 6200/{mu}L after 4 Gy TBI, a rate of >19% lymphocytes with reduced DNA and protein content ('necroses') after 4 Gy in vitro irradiation, and a small antioxidative capacity in blood plasma (<0.68 mMol) after 8 Gy TBI. Conclusion: Three simple blood assays were associated with oral mucositis that are posed here hypothetically as an early symptom of enhanced radiosensitivity in leukemic patients: leukocyte count, damaged lymphocyte score, and the antioxidative capacity after exposure.

  20. Individual differences in social dominance orientation predict support for the use of cognitive ability tests.

    PubMed

    Kim, Anita; Berry, Christopher M

    2015-02-01

    This study investigates the personality processes involved in the debate surrounding the use of cognitive ability tests in college admissions. In Study 1, 108 undergraduates (Mage  = 18.88 years, 60 women, 80 Whites) completed measures of social dominance orientation (SDO), testing self-efficacy, and attitudes regarding the use of cognitive ability tests in college admissions; SAT/ACT scores were collected from the registrar. Sixty-seven undergraduates (Mage  = 19.06 years, 39 women, 49 Whites) completed the same measures in Study 2, along with measures of endorsement of commonly presented arguments about test use. In Study 3, 321 American adults (Mage  = 35.58 years, 180 women, 251 Whites) completed the same measures used in Study 2; half were provided with facts about race and validity issues surrounding cognitive ability tests. Individual differences in SDO significantly predicted support for the use of cognitive ability tests in all samples, after controlling for SAT/ACT scores and test self-efficacy and also among participants who read facts about cognitive ability tests. Moreover, arguments for and against test use mediated this effect. The present study sheds new light on an old debate by demonstrating that individual differences in beliefs about hierarchy play a key role in attitudes toward cognitive ability test use.

  1. PLASMA OXYTOCIN LEVELS PREDICT SOCIAL CUE RECOGNITION IN INDIVIDUALS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Gregory P.; Keller, William R.; Koenig, James I.; Gold, James M.; Frost, Katherine H.; Buchanan, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Lower endogenous levels of the neuropeptide oxytocin may be an important biological predictor of social cognition impairments in schizophrenia (SZ). Prior studies have demonstrated that lower-level social cognitive processes (e.g., facial affect perception) are significantly associated with reduced plasma oxytocin levels in SZ; however, it is unclear whether higher-level social cognition, which requires inferential processes and knowledge not directly presented in the stimulus, is associated with endogenous oxytocin. The current study explored the association between endogenous oxytocin levels and lower- and higher-level social cognition in 40 individuals diagnosed with SZ and 22 demographically matched healthy controls (CN). All participants received the Social Cue Recognition Test (SCRT), which presents participants with videotaped interpersonal vignettes and subsequent true/false questions related to concrete or abstract aspects of social interactions in the vignettes. Results indicated that SZ had significantly higher plasma oxytocin concentrations than CN. SZ and CN did not differ on SCRT hits, but SZ had more false positives and lower sensitivity scores than CN. Higher plasma oxytocin levels were associated with better sensitivity scores for abstract items in CN and fewer false positives for concrete items in individuals with SZ. Findings indicate that endogenous oxytocin levels predict accurate encoding of lower-level socially relevant information in SZ. PMID:25673435

  2. Individualized Early Prediction of Familial Risk of Dyslexia: A Study of Infant Vocabulary Development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ao; Wijnen, Frank; Koster, Charlotte; Schnack, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    We examined early vocabulary development in children at familial risk (FR) of dyslexia and typically developing (TD) children between 17 and 35 months of age. We trained a support vector machine to classify TD and FR using these vocabulary data at the individual level. The Dutch version of the McArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory (Words and Sentences) (N-CDI) was used to measure vocabulary development. We analyzed group-level differences for both total vocabulary as well as lexical classes: common nouns, predicates, and closed class words. The generalizability of the classification model was tested using cross-validation. At the group level, for both total vocabulary and the composites, the difference between TD and FR was most pronounced at 19–20 months, with FRs having lower scores. For the individual prediction, highest cross-validation accuracy (68%) was obtained at 19–20 months, with sensitivity (correctly classified FR) being 70% and specificity (correctly classified TD) being 67%. There is a sensitive window in which the difference between FR and TD is most evident. Machine learning methods are promising techniques for separating FR and TD children at an early age, before they start reading. PMID:28270778

  3. Individualized Prediction and Clinical Staging of Bipolar Disorders using Neuroanatomical Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Mwangi, Benson; Wu, Mon-Ju; Cao, Bo; Passos, Ives C.; Lavagnino, Luca; Keser, Zafer; Zunta-Soares, Giovana B.; Hasan, Khader M.; Kapczinski, Flavio; Soares, Jair C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuroanatomical abnormalities in Bipolar disorder (BD) have previously been reported. However, the utility of these abnormalities in distinguishing individual BD patients from Healthy controls and stratify patients based on overall illness burden has not been investigated in a large cohort. Methods In this study, we examined whether structural neuroimaging scans coupled with a machine learning algorithm are able to distinguish individual BD patients from Healthy controls in a large cohort of 256 subjects. Additionally, we investigated the relationship between machine learning predicted probability scores and subjects’ clinical characteristics such as illness duration and clinical stages. Neuroimaging scans were acquired from 128 BD patients and 128 Healthy controls. Gray and white matter density maps were obtained and used to ‘train’ a relevance vector machine (RVM) learning algorithm which was used to distinguish individual patients from Healthy controls. Results The RVM algorithm distinguished patients from Healthy controls with 70.3 % accuracy (74.2 % specificity, 66.4 % sensitivity, chi-square p<0.005) using white matter density data and 64.9 % accuracy (71.1 % specificity, 58.6 % sensitivity, chi-square p<0.005) with gray matter density. Multiple brain regions – largely covering the fronto – limbic system were identified as ‘most relevant’ in distinguishing both groups. Patients identified by the algorithm with high certainty (a high probability score) – belonged to a subgroup with more than ten total lifetime manic episodes including hospitalizations (late stage). Conclusions These results indicate the presence of widespread structural brain abnormalities in BD which are associated with higher illness burden – which points to neuroprogression. PMID:27047994

  4. High-Throughput Near-Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy for Predicting Quantitative and Qualitative Composition Phenotypes of Individual Maize Kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Near-infrared reflectance (NIR) spectroscopy can be used for fast and reliable prediction of organic compounds in complex biological samples. We used a recently developed NIR spectroscopy instrument to predict starch, protein, oil, and weight of individual maize (Zea mays) seeds. The starch, prote...

  5. Prediction of Biological Motion Perception Performance from Intrinsic Brain Network Regional Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zengjian; Zhang, Delong; Liang, Bishan; Chang, Song; Pan, Jinghua; Huang, Ruiwang; Liu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Biological motion perception (BMP) refers to the ability to perceive the moving form of a human figure from a limited amount of stimuli, such as from a few point lights located on the joints of a moving body. BMP is commonplace and important, but there is great inter-individual variability in this ability. This study used multiple regression model analysis to explore the association between BMP performance and intrinsic brain activity, in order to investigate the neural substrates underlying inter-individual variability of BMP performance. The resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and BMP performance data were collected from 24 healthy participants, for whom intrinsic brain networks were constructed, and a graph-based network efficiency metric was measured. Then, a multiple linear regression model was used to explore the association between network regional efficiency and BMP performance. We found that the local and global network efficiency of many regions was significantly correlated with BMP performance. Further analysis showed that the local efficiency rather than global efficiency could be used to explain most of the BMP inter-individual variability, and the regions involved were predominately located in the Default Mode Network (DMN). Additionally, discrimination analysis showed that the local efficiency of certain regions such as the thalamus could be used to classify BMP performance across participants. Notably, the association pattern between network nodal efficiency and BMP was different from the association pattern of static directional/gender information perception. Overall, these findings show that intrinsic brain network efficiency may be considered a neural factor that explains BMP inter-individual variability. PMID:27853427

  6. The potential of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of milk samples to predict energy intake and efficiency in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    McParland, S; Berry, D P

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of animal-level and herd-level energy intake, energy balance, and feed efficiency affect day-to-day herd management strategies; information on these traits at an individual animal level is also useful in animal breeding programs. A paucity of data (especially at the individual cow level), of feed intake in particular, hinders the inclusion of such attributes in herd management decision-support tools and breeding programs. Dairy producers have access to an individual cow milk sample at least once daily during lactation, and consequently any low-cost phenotyping strategy should consider exploiting measureable properties in this biological sample, reflecting the physiological status and performance of the cow. Infrared spectroscopy is the study of the interaction of an electromagnetic wave with matter and it is used globally to predict milk quality parameters on routinely acquired individual cow milk samples and bulk tank samples. Thus, exploiting infrared spectroscopy in next-generation phenotyping will ensure potentially rapid application globally with a negligible additional implementation cost as the infrastructure already exists. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) analysis is already used to predict milk fat and protein concentrations, the ratio of which has been proposed as an indicator of energy balance. Milk FTIRS is also able to predict the concentration of various fatty acids in milk, the composition of which is known to change when body tissue is mobilized; that is, when the cow is in negative energy balance. Energy balance is mathematically very similar to residual energy intake (REI), a suggested measure of feed efficiency. Therefore, the prediction of energy intake, energy balance, and feed efficiency (i.e., REI) from milk FTIRS seems logical. In fact, the accuracy of predicting (i.e., correlation between predicted and actual values; root mean square error in parentheses) energy intake, energy balance, and REI from milk FTIRS in

  7. An efficient algorithm to integrate network and attribute data for gene function prediction.

    PubMed

    Vembu, Shankar; Morris, Quaid

    2014-01-01

    Label propagation methods are extremely well-suited for a variety of biomedical prediction tasks based on network data. However, these algorithms cannot be used to integrate feature-based data sources with networks. We propose an efficient learning algorithm to integrate these two types of heterogeneous data sources to perform binary prediction tasks on node features (e.g., gene prioritization, disease gene prediction). Our method, LMGraph, consists of two steps. In the first step, we extract a small set of "network features" from the nodes of networks that represent connectivity with labeled nodes in the prediction tasks. In the second step, we apply a simple weighting scheme in conjunction with linear classifiers to combine these network features with other feature data. This two-step procedure allows us to (i) learn highly scalable and computationally efficient linear classifiers, (ii) and seamlessly combine feature-based data sources with networks. Our method is much faster than label propagation which is already known to be computationally efficient on large-scale prediction problems. Experiments on multiple functional interaction networks from three species (mouse, y, C.elegans) with tens of thousands of nodes and hundreds of binary prediction tasks demonstrate the efficacy of our method.

  8. Improving Computational Efficiency of Prediction in Model-Based Prognostics Using the Unscented Transform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew John; Goebel, Kai Frank

    2010-01-01

    Model-based prognostics captures system knowledge in the form of physics-based models of components, and how they fail, in order to obtain accurate predictions of end of life (EOL). EOL is predicted based on the estimated current state distribution of a component and expected profiles of future usage. In general, this requires simulations of the component using the underlying models. In this paper, we develop a simulation-based prediction methodology that achieves computational efficiency by performing only the minimal number of simulations needed in order to accurately approximate the mean and variance of the complete EOL distribution. This is performed through the use of the unscented transform, which predicts the means and covariances of a distribution passed through a nonlinear transformation. In this case, the EOL simulation acts as that nonlinear transformation. In this paper, we review the unscented transform, and describe how this concept is applied to efficient EOL prediction. As a case study, we develop a physics-based model of a solenoid valve, and perform simulation experiments to demonstrate improved computational efficiency without sacrificing prediction accuracy.

  9. Computational Efficient Upscaling Methodology for Predicting Thermal Conductivity of Nuclear Waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-09-28

    This study evaluated different upscaling methods to predict thermal conductivity in loaded nuclear waste form, a heterogeneous material system. The efficiency and accuracy of these methods were compared. Thermal conductivity in loaded nuclear waste form is an important property specific to scientific researchers, in waste form Integrated performance and safety code (IPSC). The effective thermal conductivity obtained from microstructure information and local thermal conductivity of different components is critical in predicting the life and performance of waste form during storage. How the heat generated during storage is directly related to thermal conductivity, which in turn determining the mechanical deformation behavior, corrosion resistance and aging performance. Several methods, including the Taylor model, Sachs model, self-consistent model, and statistical upscaling models were developed and implemented. Due to the absence of experimental data, prediction results from finite element method (FEM) were used as reference to determine the accuracy of different upscaling models. Micrographs from different loading of nuclear waste were used in the prediction of thermal conductivity. Prediction results demonstrated that in term of efficiency, boundary models (Taylor and Sachs model) are better than self consistent model, statistical upscaling method and FEM. Balancing the computation resource and accuracy, statistical upscaling is a computational efficient method in predicting effective thermal conductivity for nuclear waste form.

  10. Individual differences in degree of handedness and somesthetic asymmetry predict individual differences in left-right confusion.

    PubMed

    Vingerhoets, Guy; Sarrechia, Iemke

    2009-12-01

    Confusion or frustration connected with daily demands involving left-right discrimination is a common observation even in neurologically intact adults. We aimed to test the hypothesis that the degree of left-right confusion is associated with bodily asymmetry. Sixty-two female volunteers performed a left-right decision task that required fast responses to visually presented directional words (left, right, up, down) or pictograms (<--, -->, upward arrow, downward arrow). Participants also performed several tests that measured asymmetry of handedness, grip strength, and tactile sensitivity, and completed self-reports on left-right confusion and perceived bodily asymmetry. Results showed significant correlations between left-right confusion and the degree of handedness and asymmetry in tactile sensitivity. These results suggest that individuals who reveal a stronger internal bias between both sides of the body show less left-right confusion than people with less salient bodily asymmetry.

  11. Incremental Efficiency of WISC-III Factor Scores in Predicting Achievement: What Do They Tell Us?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glutting, Joseph J.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Ward, Thomas; Ward, Sandra; Hale, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    The incremental validity of factor scores from the Wechlser Intelligence Scale for Children-III (WISC-III) in predicting scores on the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test (WIAT) was studied in 283 nonreferred children and 636 referred for evaluation. The Full Scale IQ of the WISC-III was the best predictor of WIAT achievement. (SLD)

  12. The Carbon_h-factor: predicting individuals' research impact at early stages of their career.

    PubMed

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2011-01-01

    Assessing an individual's research impact on the basis of a transparent algorithm is an important task for evaluation and comparison purposes. Besides simple but also inaccurate indices such as counting the mere number of publications or the accumulation of overall citations, and highly complex but also overwhelming full-range publication lists in their raw format, Hirsch (2005) introduced a single figure cleverly combining different approaches. The so-called h-index has undoubtedly become the standard in scientometrics of individuals' research impact (note: in the present paper I will always use the term "research impact" to describe the research performance as the logic of the paper is based on the h-index, which quantifies the specific "impact" of, e.g., researchers, but also because the genuine meaning of impact refers to quality as well). As the h-index reflects the number h of papers a researcher has published with at least h citations, the index is inherently positively biased towards senior level researchers. This might sometimes be problematic when predictive tools are needed for assessing young scientists' potential, especially when recruiting early career positions or equipping young scientists' labs. To be compatible with the standard h-index, the proposed index integrates the scientist's research age (Carbon_h-factor) into the h-index, thus reporting the average gain of h-index per year. Comprehensive calculations of the Carbon_h-factor were made for a broad variety of four research-disciplines (economics, neuroscience, physics and psychology) and for researchers performing on three high levels of research impact (substantial, outstanding and epochal) with ten researchers per category. For all research areas and output levels we obtained linear developments of the h-index demonstrating the validity of predicting one's later impact in terms of research impact already at an early stage of their career with the Carbon_h-factor being approx. 0.4, 0.8, and

  13. Emotional traits predict individual differences in amphetamine-induced positive mood in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Matthew G.; Goldenson, Nicholas I.; Kapadia, Nahel; Kahler, Christopher W.; de Wit, Harriet; Swift, Robert M.; McGeary, John E.; Sussman, Steve; Leventhal, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Previous research on emotional correlates of individual differences in subjective responses to d-amphetamine has focused on relatively broad personality traits. Yet, emotional functioning is best characterized by several narrow subcomponents, each of which may contribute uniquely to amphetamine response. Here, we examine several specific subdomains of emotional functioning in relation to acute amphetamine response. METHOD At a baseline session, healthy stimulant-naïve volunteers (N=97) completed measures of several subdomains of baseline trait emotional functioning, and then completed two counterbalanced experimental sessions during which they received a single dose of 20-mg oral d-amphetamine or placebo. Acute subjective drug response measures were completed at repeated intervals before and after drug administration. Data from subjective measures that were significantly modulated by amphetamine were reduced using principal components analysis (amphetamine – placebo) into three higher-order factors of “Positive Mood,” “Arousal,” and “Drug High.” Amphetamine did not significantly alter any “negative” subjective states. Separate multiple regression analyses were conducted regressing these three drug factors on baseline trait emotional functioning scales. RESULTS The combined set of trait emotional functioning indicators accounted for approximately 22% of the variance in acute amphetamine-induced positive mood changes. Greater anticipatory pleasure and greater anxious distress each uniquely predicted greater amphetamine-induced Positive Mood. Trait emotional functioning did not significantly predict amphetamine-induced changes in Arousal or Drug High. DISCUSSION Emotional traits appear to moderate drug-induced positive mood but not other dimensions of amphetamine effects. Different facets of emotional functioning may differentially modulate amphetamine's subjective effect profile. PMID:26429791

  14. Individual variation in avian reproductive physiology does not reliably predict variation in laying date.

    PubMed

    Schaper, Sonja V; Dawson, Alistair; Sharp, Peter J; Caro, Samuel P; Visser, Marcel E

    2012-10-01

    Most animals reproduce seasonally. They time their reproduction in response to environmental cues, like increasing photoperiod and temperature, which are predictive for the time of high food availability. Although individuals of a population use the same cues, they vary in their onset of reproduction, with some animals reproducing consistently early or late. In avian research, timing of reproduction often refers to the laying date of the first egg, which is a key determinant of fitness. Experiments measuring temporal patterns of reproductive hormone concentrations or gonadal size under controlled conditions in response to a cue commonly assume that these proxies are indicative of the timing of egg laying. This assumption often remains untested, with few studies reporting both reproductive development and the onset of laying. We kept in total 144 pairs of great tits (Parus major) in separate climate-controlled aviaries over 4 years to correlate pre-breeding plasma luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL) and gonadal growth with the timing of laying. Individuals varied consistently in hormone concentrations over spring, but this was not directly related to the timing of gonadal growth, nor with the laying date of the first egg. The timing of gonadal development in both sexes was similarly not correlated with the timing of laying. This demonstrates the female's ability to adjust the onset of laying to environmental conditions irrespective of substantial differences in pre-laying development. We conclude that stages of reproductive development are regulated by different cues, and therefore egg laying dates need to be studied to measure the influences of environmental cues on timing of seasonal reproduction.

  15. Neural activity tied to reading predicts individual differences in extended-text comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Mossbridge, Julia A.; Grabowecky, Marcia; Paller, Ken A.; Suzuki, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    Reading comprehension depends on neural processes supporting the access, understanding, and storage of words over time. Examinations of the neural activity correlated with reading have contributed to our understanding of reading comprehension, especially for the comprehension of sentences and short passages. However, the neural activity associated with comprehending an extended text is not well-understood. Here we describe a current-source-density (CSD) index that predicts individual differences in the comprehension of an extended text. The index is the difference in CSD-transformed event-related potentials (ERPs) to a target word between two conditions: a comprehension condition with words from a story presented in their original order, and a scrambled condition with the same words presented in a randomized order. In both conditions participants responded to the target word, and in the comprehension condition they also tried to follow the story in preparation for a comprehension test. We reasoned that the spatiotemporal pattern of difference-CSDs would reflect comprehension-related processes beyond word-level processing. We used a pattern-classification method to identify the component of the difference-CSDs that accurately (88%) discriminated good from poor comprehenders. The critical CSD index was focused at a frontal-midline scalp site, occurred 400–500 ms after target-word onset, and was strongly correlated with comprehension performance. Behavioral data indicated that group differences in effort or motor preparation could not explain these results. Further, our CSD index appears to be distinct from the well-known P300 and N400 components, and CSD transformation seems to be crucial for distinguishing good from poor comprehenders using our experimental paradigm. Once our CSD index is fully characterized, this neural signature of individual differences in extended-text comprehension may aid the diagnosis and remediation of reading comprehension deficits. PMID

  16. [Blood DNA Radiosensitivity May Be Predictive Marker for Efficacy of Radiation Therapy in Glioma Tumorbearing Individuals].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, S D; Korytova, L I; Yamshanov, V A; Zhabina, R M; Semenov, A L; Krasnikova, V G

    2015-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies were conducted to evaluate the association between the blood DNA radiosensitivity, assessed by determining the original S-index ex vivo, and the response of gliomas to irradiation in vivo. Possible modifications of the latter after administration of iron-containing water (ICW) in rats were also explored. The study was performed on the rats with subcutaneously implanted experimental glioma-35. The tumors were locally X-irradiated with a single 15 Gy dose as a radiation therapy (RT). ICW (60-63 mg · Fe 2+/l) was administered as a drinking water for 3 days before treatment. The animals underwent blood sampling for analysis of the DNA concentration and leukocyte count. The DNA index was estimated 24 h after RT. The S-index was evaluated within 4 h before RT. The mean initial S-index in the blood samples of glioma-bearing rats was 0.73 ± 0.05. Addition of ICW ex vivo resulted in a significantly increased S-index in a half of the samples. In general, the irradiated rats, which had been given pretreatment with ICW and demonstrated an ex vivo increase of the S-index to > 1.0, showed the most marked inhibition of tumor progression and the smallest tumor volume 25 days after irradiation. They also exhibited the lowest rate of growth and the longest survival. Determination of the biochemical S-index and evaluation of its changes ex vivo caused by ICW may be predictive of the response of experimental glioma to irradiation with radiomodification. The S-index may serve as a predictive indicator in clinic of the efficient evaluation of RT in patients with glioma.

  17. Within-person Changes in Individual Symptoms of Depression Predict Subsequent Depressive Episodes in Adolescents: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Morris, Matthew C.; Garber, Judy

    2015-01-01

    The current longitudinal study examined which individual symptoms of depression uniquely predicted a subsequent Major Depressive Episode (MDE) in adolescents, and whether these relations differed by sex. Adolescents (N=240) were first interviewed in grade 6 (M=11.86 years old; SD = 0.56; 54% female; 81.5% Caucasian) and then annually through grade 12 regarding their individual symptoms of depression as well as the occurrence of MDEs. Individual symptoms of depression were assessed with the Children’s Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R) and depressive episodes were assessed with the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE). Results showed that within-person changes in sleep problems and low self-esteem/excessive guilt positively predicted an increased likelihood of an MDE for both boys and girls. Significant sex differences also were found. Within-person changes in anhedonia predicted an increased likelihood of a subsequent MDE among boys, whereas irritability predicted a decreased likelihood of a future MDE among boys, and concentration difficulties predicted a decreased likelihood of an MDE in girls. These results identified individual depressive symptoms that predicted subsequent depressive episodes in male and female adolescents, and may be used to guide the early detection, treatment, and prevention of depressive disorders in youth. PMID:26105209

  18. [A gate spring which can torque an individual tooth with high efficiency].

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Guan, Yu; Pan, Lanlan; Zhao, Zhihe

    2012-04-01

    It is to address torquing an individual tooth using a gate spring. The gate spring is made of a rectangular stainless steal wire, in the shape of a gate, which is incorporated to the archwire by spot welding. Torque is generated by the combined effects of the gate spring and the archwire. After 2-3 months, the gate spring can obviously torque individual tooth.

  19. Efficient temporal search range prediction for motion estimation in H.264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Changsung; Kuo, C.-C. Jay

    2005-08-01

    An efficient search range prediction method is proposed to reduce the complexity of motion search in the H.264 video coding standard in this work. The main idea is to predict the temporal search range by modeling the relationship between the rate-distortion (RD) coding gain and the required computational complexity. The proposed algorithm first predicts the temporal search range to maximize the ratio of the expected RD coding gain and the normalized computational cost. Then, fast motion search is performed within the predicted search range with some early termination rule. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can save approximately 63-75% of the encoding complexity in motion estimation of H.264 (JM9.3) with negligible degradation in the RD performance.

  20. HBV-DNA levels predict overall mortality in HIV/HBV coinfected individuals.

    PubMed

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios K; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Psichogiou, Mina; Hatzakis, Angelos

    2016-03-01

    The coinfection of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been associated with increased death rates. However, the relevant research has mostly relied on serologic HBV testing [HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)]. The aim of this work was to explore the relationship of HBV viraemia with overall mortality among HIV/HBV coinfected individuals. The analysis included 1,609 HIV seropositives of a previously described cohort (1984-2003) with limited exposure to tenofovir (12%) and a median follow-up of approximately 5 years. Those with persistent expression of HBsAg were further tested for HBV-DNA. The data were analyzed using Poisson regression models. Totally, 101 participants were chronic carriers of HBsAg (6.28%). Of these, 81 were tested for HBV-DNA. The median HBV-DNA levels were 3.81 log (base-10) International Units (IU)/ml. A third (31%) of those tested for HBV-DNA had received tenofovir. Before developing acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), the adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR) for all-cause mortality of coinfected patients with HBV viraemia above the median value versus the HIV monoinfected group was 3.44 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05-11.27]. Multivariable regressions in the coinfected group only (n = 81) showed that one log-10 increase in HBV-DNA levels was associated with an elevated risk for death (IRR: 1.24, 95%CI: 1.03-1.49). HBV-DNA levels predict overall mortality in the setting of HIV/HBV coinfection, especially during the period before developing AIDS, and could thus help prioritize needs and determine the frequency of medical monitoring.

  1. Neural activity in the hippocampus predicts individual visual short-term memory capacity.

    PubMed

    von Allmen, David Yoh; Wurmitzer, Karoline; Martin, Ernst; Klaver, Peter

    2013-07-01

    Although the hippocampus had been traditionally thought to be exclusively involved in long-term memory, recent studies raised controversial explanations why hippocampal activity emerged during short-term memory tasks. For example, it has been argued that long-term memory processes might contribute to performance within a short-term memory paradigm when memory capacity has been exceeded. It is still unclear, though, whether neural activity in the hippocampus predicts visual short-term memory (VSTM) performance. To investigate this question, we measured BOLD activity in 21 healthy adults (age range 19-27 yr, nine males) while they performed a match-to-sample task requiring processing of object-location associations (delay period  =  900 ms; set size conditions 1, 2, 4, and 6). Based on individual memory capacity (estimated by Cowan's K-formula), two performance groups were formed (high and low performers). Within whole brain analyses, we found a robust main effect of "set size" in the posterior parietal cortex (PPC). In line with a "set size × group" interaction in the hippocampus, a subsequent Finite Impulse Response (FIR) analysis revealed divergent hippocampal activation patterns between performance groups: Low performers (mean capacity  =  3.63) elicited increased neural activity at set size two, followed by a drop in activity at set sizes four and six, whereas high performers (mean capacity  =  5.19) showed an incremental activity increase with larger set size (maximal activation at set size six). Our data demonstrated that performance-related neural activity in the hippocampus emerged below capacity limit. In conclusion, we suggest that hippocampal activity reflected successful processing of object-location associations in VSTM. Neural activity in the PPC might have been involved in attentional updating.

  2. Studying Individual Differences in Predictability with Gamma Regression and Nonlinear Multilevel Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culpepper, Steven Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Statistical prediction remains an important tool for decisions in a variety of disciplines. An equally important issue is identifying factors that contribute to more or less accurate predictions. The time series literature includes well developed methods for studying predictability and volatility over time. This article develops…

  3. Can a Mathematical Model Predict an Individual’s Trait-like Response to Both Total and Partial Sleep Loss?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    CSR ) of 7 days of 3 h nightly time in bed. We then quantified the extent to which models developed using psychomotor vigilance task data under TSD...predicted performance data under CSR , and vice versa. The results showed that the models customized to an individual under one sleep-loss condition...chronic sleep restriction ( CSR ) [seven consec- utive days of 3 h nightly time in bed (TIB)]. In both studies, they quantified individual response to

  4. Predicting the effects of human developments on individual dolphins to understand potential long-term population consequences.

    PubMed

    Pirotta, Enrico; Harwood, John; Thompson, Paul M; New, Leslie; Cheney, Barbara; Arso, Monica; Hammond, Philip S; Donovan, Carl; Lusseau, David

    2015-11-07

    Human activities that impact wildlife do not necessarily remove individuals from populations. They may also change individual behaviour in ways that have sublethal effects. This has driven interest in developing analytical tools that predict the population consequences of short-term behavioural responses. In this study, we incorporate empirical information on the ecology of a population of bottlenose dolphins into an individual-based model that predicts how individuals' behavioural dynamics arise from their underlying motivational states, as well as their interaction with boat traffic and dredging activities. We simulate the potential effects of proposed coastal developments on this population and predict that the operational phase may affect animals' motivational states. For such results to be relevant for management, the effects on individuals' vital rates also need to be quantified. We investigate whether the relationship between an individual's exposure and the survival of its calves can be directly estimated using a Bayesian multi-stage model for calf survival. The results suggest that any effect on calf survival is probably small and that a significant relationship could only be detected in large, closely studied populations. Our work can be used to guide management decisions, accelerate the consenting process for coastal and offshore developments and design targeted monitoring.

  5. Predicting the effects of human developments on individual dolphins to understand potential long-term population consequences

    PubMed Central

    Pirotta, Enrico; Harwood, John; Thompson, Paul M.; New, Leslie; Cheney, Barbara; Arso, Monica; Hammond, Philip S.; Donovan, Carl; Lusseau, David

    2015-01-01

    Human activities that impact wildlife do not necessarily remove individuals from populations. They may also change individual behaviour in ways that have sublethal effects. This has driven interest in developing analytical tools that predict the population consequences of short-term behavioural responses. In this study, we incorporate empirical information on the ecology of a population of bottlenose dolphins into an individual-based model that predicts how individuals' behavioural dynamics arise from their underlying motivational states, as well as their interaction with boat traffic and dredging activities. We simulate the potential effects of proposed coastal developments on this population and predict that the operational phase may affect animals' motivational states. For such results to be relevant for management, the effects on individuals' vital rates also need to be quantified. We investigate whether the relationship between an individual's exposure and the survival of its calves can be directly estimated using a Bayesian multi-stage model for calf survival. The results suggest that any effect on calf survival is probably small and that a significant relationship could only be detected in large, closely studied populations. Our work can be used to guide management decisions, accelerate the consenting process for coastal and offshore developments and design targeted monitoring. PMID:26511044

  6. Prediction of removal efficiency of Lanaset Red G on walnut husk using artificial neural network model.

    PubMed

    Çelekli, Abuzer; Birecikligil, Sevil Sungur; Geyik, Faruk; Bozkurt, Hüseyin

    2012-01-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) model was used to predict removal efficiency of Lanaset Red (LR) G on walnut husk (WH). This adsorbent was characterized by FTIR-ATR. Effects of particle size, adsorbent dose, initial pH value, dye concentration, and contact time were investigated to optimize sorption process. Operating variables were used as the inputs to the constructed neural network to predict the dye uptake at any time as an output. Commonly used pseudo second-order model was fitted to the experimental data to compare with ANN model. According to error analyses and determination of coefficients, ANN was the more appropriate model to describe this sorption process. Results of ANN indicated that pH was the most efficient parameter (43%), followed by initial dye concentration (40%) for sorption of LR G on WH.

  7. Individual variability in finger-to-finger transmission efficiency of Enterococcus faecium clones

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Rosa; Sánchez-Díaz, Ana María; Zamora, Javier; Torres, Carmen; Cintas, Luis María; Franco, Elvira; Cantón, Rafael; Baquero, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    A fingertip-to-fingertip intraindividual transmission experiment was carried out in 30 healthy volunteers, using four MLST-typed Enterococcus faecium clones. Overall results showed an adequate fit goodness to a theoretical exponential model, whereas four volunteers (13%) exhibited a significantly higher finger-to-finger bacterial transmission efficiency. This observation might have deep consequences in nosocomial epidemiology. PMID:24382843

  8. Communication Efficiency in Children: A Function of Individual Skill or Dyadic Interaction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stipek, Deborah; Nelson, Katherine

    Two experiments investigating the efficiency of communication between 5th grade children from differing socioeconomic (SES) backgrounds are described. In each experiment, 40 same-sex pairs, half male and half female, were formed into dyadic groupings by combining lower- and middle-SES children into the four possible speaker-listener combinations.…

  9. A Simple and Efficient Computational Approach to Chafed Cable Time-Domain Reflectometry Signature Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, Marc Edward

    2009-01-01

    A method for the prediction of time-domain signatures of chafed coaxial cables is presented. The method is quasi-static in nature, and is thus efficient enough to be included in inference and inversion routines. Unlike previous models proposed, no restriction on the geometry or size of the chafe is required in the present approach. The model is validated and its speed is illustrated via comparison to simulations from a commercial, three-dimensional electromagnetic simulator.

  10. An Efficient Deterministic Approach to Model-based Prediction Uncertainty Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew J.; Saxena, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Prognostics deals with the prediction of the end of life (EOL) of a system. EOL is a random variable, due to the presence of process noise and uncertainty in the future inputs to the system. Prognostics algorithm must account for this inherent uncertainty. In addition, these algorithms never know exactly the state of the system at the desired time of prediction, or the exact model describing the future evolution of the system, accumulating additional uncertainty into the predicted EOL. Prediction algorithms that do not account for these sources of uncertainty are misrepresenting the EOL and can lead to poor decisions based on their results. In this paper, we explore the impact of uncertainty in the prediction problem. We develop a general model-based prediction algorithm that incorporates these sources of uncertainty, and propose a novel approach to efficiently handle uncertainty in the future input trajectories of a system by using the unscented transformation. Using this approach, we are not only able to reduce the computational load but also estimate the bounds of uncertainty in a deterministic manner, which can be useful to consider during decision-making. Using a lithium-ion battery as a case study, we perform several simulation-based experiments to explore these issues, and validate the overall approach using experimental data from a battery testbed.

  11. Individual differences in children's innovative problem-solving are not predicted by divergent thinking or executive functions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of children's tool innovation have revealed that there is variation in children's success in middle-childhood. In two individual differences studies, we sought to identify personal characteristics that might predict success on an innovation task. In Study 1, we found that although measures of divergent thinking were related to each other they did not predict innovation success. In Study 2, we measured executive functioning including: inhibition, working memory, attentional flexibility and ill-structured problem-solving. None of these measures predicted innovation, but, innovation was predicted by children's performance on a receptive vocabulary scale that may function as a proxy for general intelligence. We did not find evidence that children's innovation was predicted by specific personal characteristics. PMID:26926280

  12. Modeling recombination processes and predicting energy conversion efficiency of dye sensitized solar cells from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wei; Meng, Sheng

    2014-03-01

    We present a set of algorithms based on solo first principles calculations, to accurately calculate key properties of a DSC device including sunlight harvest, electron injection, electron-hole recombination, and open circuit voltages. Two series of D- π-A dyes are adopted as sample dyes. The short circuit current can be predicted by calculating the dyes' photo absorption, and the electron injection and recombination lifetime using real-time time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) simulations. Open circuit voltage can be reproduced by calculating energy difference between the quasi-Fermi level of electrons in the semiconductor and the electrolyte redox potential, considering the influence of electron recombination. Based on timescales obtained from real time TDDFT dynamics for excited states, the estimated power conversion efficiency of DSC fits nicely with the experiment, with deviation below 1-2%. Light harvesting efficiency, incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency and the current-voltage characteristics can also be well reproduced. The predicted efficiency can serve as either an ideal limit for optimizing photovoltaic performance of a given dye, or a virtual device that closely mimicking the performance of a real device under different experimental settings.

  13. Efficient Prediction Structures for H.264 Multi View Coding Using Temporal Scalability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guruvareddiar, Palanivel; Joseph, Biju K.

    2014-03-01

    Prediction structures with "disposable view components based" hierarchical coding have been proven to be efficient for H.264 multi view coding. Though these prediction structures along with the QP cascading schemes provide superior compression efficiency when compared to the traditional IBBP coding scheme, the temporal scalability requirements of the bit stream could not be met to the fullest. On the other hand, a fully scalable bit stream, obtained by "temporal identifier based" hierarchical coding, provides a number of advantages including bit rate adaptations and improved error resilience, but lacks in compression efficiency when compared to the former scheme. In this paper it is proposed to combine the two approaches such that a fully scalable bit stream could be realized with minimal reduction in compression efficiency when compared to state-of-the-art "disposable view components based" hierarchical coding. Simulation results shows that the proposed method enables full temporal scalability with maximum BDPSNR reduction of only 0.34 dB. A novel method also has been proposed for the identification of temporal identifier for the legacy H.264/AVC base layer packets. Simulation results also show that this enables the scenario where the enhancement views could be extracted at a lower frame rate (1/2nd or 1/4th of base view) with average extraction time for a view component of only 0.38 ms.

  14. An approximate solution to improve computational efficiency of impedance-type payload load prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    The computational efficiency of the impedance type loads prediction method was studied. Three goals were addressed: devise a method to make the impedance method operate more efficiently in the computer; assess the accuracy and convenience of the method for determining the effect of design changes; and investigate the use of the method to identify design changes for reduction of payload loads. The method is suitable for calculation of dynamic response in either the frequency or time domain. It is concluded that: the choice of an orthogonal coordinate system will allow the impedance method to operate more efficiently in the computer; the approximate mode impedance technique is adequate for determining the effect of design changes, and is applicable for both statically determinate and statically indeterminate payload attachments; and beneficial design changes to reduce payload loads can be identified by the combined application of impedance techniques and energy distribution review techniques.

  15. Predicting Individual Differences in Attention, Memory, and Planning in First Graders from Experiences at Home, Child Care, and School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Developmental Psychology, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This study adds to the growing literature linking children's experiences in the environment to individual differences in their developing skills in attention, memory, and planning. The authors asked about the extent to which stimulating and sensitive care in the family and in the child-care or school environments would predict these cognitive…

  16. How Does Early Developmental Assessment Predict Academic and Attentional-Behavioural Skills at Group and Individual Levels?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valtonen, Riitta; Ahonen, Timo; Tolvanen, Asko; Lyytinen, Paula

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of the study was to explore the ability of a brief developmental assessment to predict teacher-rated learning and attentional and behavioural skills in the first grade of school at both the group and individual levels. A sample of 394 children (181 males, 213 females) aged 4 years were followed to the age of 6 years, and 283 of the…

  17. The predictive value of arterial stiffness on major adverse cardiovascular events in individuals with mildly impaired renal function

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jie; Wang, Xiaona; Ye, Ping; Cao, Ruihua; Yang, Xu; Xiao, Wenkai; Zhang, Yun; Bai, Yongyi; Wu, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Despite growing evidence that arterial stiffness has important predictive value for cardiovascular disease in patients with advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, the predictive significance of arterial stiffness in individuals with mildly impaired renal function has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of arterial stiffness on cardiovascular disease in this specific population. Materials and methods We analyzed measurements of arterial stiffness (carotid–femoral pulse-wave velocity [cf-PWV]) and the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) in 1,499 subjects from a 4.8-year longitudinal study. Results A multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis showed that in individuals with normal renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m2), the baseline cf-PWV was not associated with occurrence of MACEs (hazard ratio 1.398, 95% confidence interval 0.748–2.613; P=0.293). In individuals with mildly impaired renal function (eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2), a higher baseline cf-PWV level was associated with a higher risk of MACEs (hazard ratio 2.334, 95% confidence interval 1.082–5.036; P=0.031). Conclusion Arterial stiffness is a moderate and independent predictive factor for MACEs in individuals with mildly impaired renal function (eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2). PMID:27621605

  18. Why Harmless Sensations Might Hurt in Individuals with Chronic Pain: About Heightened Prediction and Perception of Pain in the Mind

    PubMed Central

    Hechler, Tanja; Endres, Dominik; Thorwart, Anna

    2016-01-01

    In individuals with chronic pain harmless bodily sensations can elicit anticipatory fear of pain resulting in maladaptive responses such as taking pain medication. Here, we aim to broaden the perspective taking into account recent evidence that suggests that interoceptive perception is largely a construction of beliefs, which are based on past experience and that are kept in check by the actual state of the body. Taking a Bayesian perspective, we propose that individuals with chronic pain display a heightened prediction of pain [prior probability p(pain)], which results in heightened pain perception [posterior probability p(pain|sensation)] due to an assumed link between pain and a harmless bodily sensation [p(sensation|pain)]. This pain perception emerges because their mind infers pain as the most likely cause for the sensation. When confronted with a mismatch between predicted pain and a (harmless bodily) sensation, individuals with chronic pain try to minimize the mismatch most likely by active inference of pain or alternatively by an attentional shift away from the sensation. The active inference results in activities that produce a stronger sensation that will match with the prediction, allowing subsequent perceptual inference of pain. Here, we depict heightened pain perception in individuals with chronic pain by reformulating and extending the assumptions of the interoceptive predictive coding model from a Bayesian perspective. The review concludes with a research agenda and clinical considerations. PMID:27826271

  19. Peer Assessments of Normative and Individual Teacher-Student Support Predict Social Acceptance and Engagement among Low-Achieving Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Jan N.; Zhang, Duan; Hill, Crystal R.

    2006-01-01

    This study used hierarchical linear modeling to predict first grade students' peer acceptance, classroom engagement, and sense of school belonging from measures of normative classroom teacher-student support and individual teacher-student support. Participants were 509 (54.4% male) ethnically diverse, first grade children attending one of three…

  20. Both Nearest Neighbours and Long-term Affiliates Predict Individual Locations During Collective Movement in Wild Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Farine, Damien R.; Strandburg-Peshkin, Ariana; Berger-Wolf, Tanya; Ziebart, Brian; Brugere, Ivan; Li, Jia; Crofoot, Margaret C.

    2016-01-01

    In many animal societies, groups of individuals form stable social units that are shaped by well-delineated dominance hierarchies and a range of affiliative relationships. How do socially complex groups maintain cohesion and achieve collective movement? Using high-resolution GPS tracking of members of a wild baboon troop, we test whether collective movement in stable social groups is governed by interactions among local neighbours (commonly found in groups with largely anonymous memberships), social affiliates, and/or by individuals paying attention to global group structure. We construct candidate movement prediction models and evaluate their ability to predict the future trajectory of focal individuals. We find that baboon movements are best predicted by 4 to 6 neighbours. While these are generally individuals’ nearest neighbours, we find that baboons have distinct preferences for particular neighbours, and that these social affiliates best predict individual location at longer time scales (>10 minutes). Our results support existing theoretical and empirical studies highlighting the importance of local rules in driving collective outcomes, such as collective departures, in primates. We extend previous studies by elucidating the rules that maintain cohesion in baboons ‘on the move’, as well as the different temporal scales of social interactions that are at play. PMID:27292778

  1. What Predicts the Effectiveness of Foreign-Language Pronunciation Instruction? Investigating the Role of Perception and Other Individual Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissling, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated second language (L2) learners' perception of L2 sounds as an individual difference that predicted their improvement in pronunciation after receiving instruction. Learners were given explicit pronunciation instruction in a series of modules added to their Spanish as a foreign language curriculum and were then tested on their…

  2. Developmental Trajectories in Toddlers' Self-Restraint Predict Individual Differences in Executive Functions 14 Years Later: A Behavioral Genetic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Naomi P.; Miyake, Akira; Robinson, JoAnn L.; Hewitt, John K.

    2011-01-01

    We examined whether self-restraint in early childhood predicted individual differences in 3 executive functions (EFs; inhibiting prepotent responses, updating working memory, and shifting task sets) in late adolescence in a sample of approximately 950 twins. At ages 14, 20, 24, and 36 months, the children were shown an attractive toy and told not…

  3. Prediction of individual combined benefit and harm for patients with atrial fibrillation considering warfarin therapy: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guowei; Holbrook, Anne; Delate, Thomas; Witt, Daniel M; Levine, Mitchell AH; Thabane, Lehana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Clinical prediction rules have been validated and widely used in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) to predict stroke and major bleeding. However, these prediction rules were not developed in the same population, and do not provide the key information that patients and prescribers need at the time anticoagulants are being considered—what is the individual patient-specific risk of both benefit (decreased stroke) and harm (increased major bleeding). In this study, our primary objective is to develop and validate a prediction model for patients’ individual combined benefit and harm outcomes (stroke, major bleeding and neither event) with and without warfarin therapy. Our secondary outcome is all-cause mortality. Methods and analysis We will use data from the Kaiser Permanente Colorado (KPCO) anticoagulation management databases and electronic medical records. Patients with a primary or secondary diagnosis during an ambulatory KPCO medical office visit, emergency department visit, or inpatient stay between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2012 with no AF diagnosis in the previous 180 days will be included. Patients’ demographic characteristics, laboratory data, comorbidities, warfarin medication data and concurrent use of medication will be used to construct the prediction model. For primary outcomes (stroke with no major bleeding, and major bleeding with no stroke), we will perform polytomous logistic regression to develop a prediction model for patients’ individual combined benefit and harm outcomes, taking neither event group as the reference group. As regards death, we will use Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to build a prediction model for all-cause mortality. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the KPCO Institutional Review Board and the Hamilton Integrated Research Ethics Board. Results from this study will be published in a peer-reviewed journal electronically and in print. The prediction models may aid

  4. Development and Validation of a Multidisciplinary Tool for Accurate and Efficient Rotorcraft Noise Prediction (MUTE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yi; Anusonti-Inthra, Phuriwat; Diskin, Boris

    2011-01-01

    A physics-based, systematically coupled, multidisciplinary prediction tool (MUTE) for rotorcraft noise was developed and validated with a wide range of flight configurations and conditions. MUTE is an aggregation of multidisciplinary computational tools that accurately and efficiently model the physics of the source of rotorcraft noise, and predict the noise at far-field observer locations. It uses systematic coupling approaches among multiple disciplines including Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD), and high fidelity acoustics. Within MUTE, advanced high-order CFD tools are used around the rotor blade to predict the transonic flow (shock wave) effects, which generate the high-speed impulsive noise. Predictions of the blade-vortex interaction noise in low speed flight are also improved by using the Particle Vortex Transport Method (PVTM), which preserves the wake flow details required for blade/wake and fuselage/wake interactions. The accuracy of the source noise prediction is further improved by utilizing a coupling approach between CFD and CSD, so that the effects of key structural dynamics, elastic blade deformations, and trim solutions are correctly represented in the analysis. The blade loading information and/or the flow field parameters around the rotor blade predicted by the CFD/CSD coupling approach are used to predict the acoustic signatures at far-field observer locations with a high-fidelity noise propagation code (WOPWOP3). The predicted results from the MUTE tool for rotor blade aerodynamic loading and far-field acoustic signatures are compared and validated with a variation of experimental data sets, such as UH60-A data, DNW test data and HART II test data.

  5. Predicting individual change in personality disorder features by simultaneous individual change in personality dimensions linked to neurobehavioral systems: the longitudinal study of personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Lenzenweger, Mark F; Willett, John B

    2007-11-01

    Personality disorders (PDs), long thought to be immutable over time, show considerable evidence of individual change and malleability in modern prospective longitudinal studies. The factors responsible for the evident individual change in PDs over time, however, remain essentially unknown. A neurobehavioral model that posits negative emotion (NEM), nonaffective constraint (CON), communal positive emotion (PEM-C), and agentic positive emotion (PEM-A) as important systems underlying PD provides a theoretical basis for investigating predictors of change in PD features over time. Thus, in this study, the authors investigated how individual change in NEM, CON, PEM-C, and PEM-A over time predicted individual change in PD features over time, using longitudinal data on PD assessed by the International Personality Disorders Examination (A. W. Loranger, 1999), as well as data on normal personality features gathered within a 4-year prospective multiwave longitudinal study (N = 250). The authors used the method of latent growth modeling to conduct their analyses. Lower initial levels of PEM-C predicted initial levels of the growth trajectories for those with elevated Cluster A PD features. Elevated NEM, lower CON, and elevated PEM-A initial levels were found to characterize the initial levels of growth trajectories for those with increased Cluster B PD features. Interestingly, subjects with higher initial levels of PEM-A revealed a more rapid rate of change (declining) in Cluster B PD features over time. Elevated NEM and decreased PEM-C initial levels were found to characterize the growth trajectories for subjects with increased Cluster C PD features. The substantive meaning of these results is discussed, and the methodological advantages offered by this statistical approach are also highlighted.

  6. Deriving the species richness distribution of Geotrupinae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea) in Mexico from the overlap of individual model predictions.

    PubMed

    Trotta-Moreu, Nuria; Lobo, Jorge M

    2010-02-01

    Predictions from individual distribution models for Mexican Geotrupinae species were overlaid to obtain a total species richness map for this group. A database (GEOMEX) that compiles available information from the literature and from several entomological collections was used. A Maximum Entropy method (MaxEnt) was applied to estimate the distribution of each species, taking into account 19 climatic variables as predictors. For each species, suitability values ranging from 0 to 100 were calculated for each grid cell on the map, and 21 different thresholds were used to convert these continuous suitability values into binary ones (presence-absence). By summing all of the individual binary maps, we generated a species richness prediction for each of the considered thresholds. The number of species and faunal composition thus predicted for each Mexican state were subsequently compared with those observed in a preselected set of well-surveyed states. Our results indicate that the sum of individual predictions tends to overestimate species richness but that the selection of an appropriate threshold can reduce this bias. Even under the most optimistic prediction threshold, the mean species richness error is 61% of the observed species richness, with commission errors being significantly more common than omission errors (71 +/- 29 versus 18 +/- 10%). The estimated distribution of Geotrupinae species richness in Mexico in discussed, although our conclusions are preliminary and contingent on the scarce and probably biased available data.

  7. IPR 1.0: an efficient method for calculating solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in sparse heterogeneous woody plant communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Chen, W.; Li, J.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change may alter the spatial distribution, composition, structure, and functions of plant communities. Transitional zones between biomes, or ecotones, are particularly sensitive to climate change. Ecotones are usually heterogeneous with sparse trees. The dynamics of ecotones are mainly determined by the growth and competition of individual plants in the communities. Therefore it is necessary to calculate solar radiation absorbed by individual plants for understanding and predicting their responses to climate change. In this study, we developed an individual plant radiation model, IPR (version 1.0), to calculate solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in sparse heterogeneous woody plant communities. The model is developed based on geometrical optical relationships assuming crowns of woody plants are rectangular boxes with uniform leaf area density. The model calculates the fractions of sunlit and shaded leaf classes and the solar radiation absorbed by each class, including direct radiation from the sun, diffuse radiation from the sky, and scattered radiation from the plant community. The solar radiation received on the ground is also calculated. We tested the model by comparing with the analytical solutions of random distributions of plants. The tests show that the model results are very close to the averages of the random distributions. This model is efficient in computation, and is suitable for ecological models to simulate long-term transient responses of plant communities to climate change.

  8. IPR 1.0: an efficient method for calculating solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in sparse heterogeneous woody plant communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Chen, W.; Li, J.

    2014-07-01

    Climate change may alter the spatial distribution, composition, structure and functions of plant communities. Transitional zones between biomes, or ecotones, are particularly sensitive to climate change. Ecotones are usually heterogeneous with sparse trees. The dynamics of ecotones are mainly determined by the growth and competition of individual plants in the communities. Therefore it is necessary to calculate the solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in order to understand and predict their responses to climate change. In this study, we developed an individual plant radiation model, IPR (version 1.0), to calculate solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in sparse heterogeneous woody plant communities. The model is developed based on geometrical optical relationships assuming that crowns of woody plants are rectangular boxes with uniform leaf area density. The model calculates the fractions of sunlit and shaded leaf classes and the solar radiation absorbed by each class, including direct radiation from the sun, diffuse radiation from the sky, and scattered radiation from the plant community. The solar radiation received on the ground is also calculated. We tested the model by comparing with the results of random distribution of plants. The tests show that the model results are very close to the averages of the random distributions. This model is efficient in computation, and can be included in vegetation models to simulate long-term transient responses of plant communities to climate change. The code and a user's manual are provided as Supplement of the paper.

  9. A Pilot Study of Individual Muscle Force Prediction during Elbow Flexion and Extension in the Neurorehabilitation Field

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jiateng; Sun, Yingfei; Sun, Lixin; Pan, Bingyu; Huang, Zhipei; Wu, Jiankang; Zhang, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a neuromusculoskeletal (NMS) model to predict individual muscle force during elbow flexion and extension. Four male subjects were asked to do voluntary elbow flexion and extension. An inertial sensor and surface electromyography (sEMG) sensors were attached to subject's forearm. Joint angle calculated by fusion of acceleration and angular rate using an extended Kalman filter (EKF) and muscle activations obtained from the sEMG signals were taken as the inputs of the proposed NMS model to determine individual muscle force. The result shows that our NMS model can predict individual muscle force accurately, with the ability to reflect subject-specific joint dynamics and neural control solutions. Our method incorporates sEMG and motion data, making it possible to get a deeper understanding of neurological, physiological, and anatomical characteristics of human dynamic movement. We demonstrate the potential of the proposed NMS model for evaluating the function of upper limb movements in the field of neurorehabilitation. PMID:27916853

  10. Resting EEG in Alpha and Beta Bands Predicts Individual Differences in Attentional Blink Magnitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLean, Mary H.; Arnell, Karen M.; Cote, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Accuracy for a second target (T2) is reduced when it is presented within 500 ms of a first target (T1) in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP)--an attentional blink (AB). There are reliable individual differences in the magnitude of the AB. Recent evidence has shown that the attentional approach that an individual typically adopts during a…

  11. Individual-learning ability predicts social-foraging strategy in house sparrows.

    PubMed

    Katsnelson, Edith; Motro, Uzi; Feldman, Marcus W; Lotem, Arnon

    2011-02-22

    Social foragers can use either a 'producer' strategy, which involves searching for food, or a 'scrounger' strategy, which involves joining others' food discoveries. While producers rely on personal information and past experience, we may ask whether the tendency to forage as a producer is related to being a better learner. To answer this question, we hand-raised house sparrow (Passer domesticus) nestlings that upon independence were given an individual-learning task that required them to associate colour signal and food presence. Following the testing phase, all fledglings were released into a shared aviary, and their social-foraging tendencies were measured. We found a significant positive correlation between individual's performance in the individual-learning task and subsequent tendency to use searching (producing) behaviour. Individual-learning score was negatively correlated with initial fear of the test apparatus and with body weight. However, the correlation between individual learning and searching remained significant after controlling for these variables. Since it was measured before the birds entered a social group, individual-learning ability could not be the outcome of being a producer. However, the two traits may be initially associated, or individual learning could facilitate producing behaviour. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence that associates individual-learning abilities with social-foraging strategies in animal groups.

  12. How Plantar Exteroceptive Efficiency Modulates Postural and Oculomotor Control: Inter-Individual Variability.

    PubMed

    Foisy, Arnaud; Kapoula, Zoï

    2016-01-01

    In a previous experiment, we showed that among young and healthy subjects, thin plantar inserts improve postural control and modify vergence amplitudes. In this experiment, however, significant inter-individual variability was observed. We hypothesize that its origin could be attributed to a different reliance upon feet cutaneous afferents. In order to test this hypothesis, we re-analyzed the data relative to 31 young (age 25.7 ± 3.8) and healthy subjects who participated in the first experiment after having classified them into two groups depending on their Plantar Quotient (PQ = Surface area of CoPfoam/Surface area of CoPfirm ground × 100). Foam decreases the information arising from the feet, normally resulting in a PQ > 100. Hence, the PQ provides information on the weight of plantar cutaneous afferents used in postural control. Twelve people were Plantar-Independent Subjects, as indicated by a PQ < 100. These individuals did not behave like the Normal Plantar Quotient Subjects: they were almost insensitive to the plantar stimulations in terms of postural control and totally insensitive in terms of oculomotor control. We conclude that the inter-individual variability observed in our first experiment is explained by the subjects' degree of plantar reliance. We propose that plantar independence is a dysfunctional situation revealing inefficiency in plantar cutaneous afferents. The latter could be due to a latent somatosensory dysfunction generating a noise which prevents the CNS from correctly processing and using feet somatosensory afferents both for balance and vergence control: Plantar Irritating Stimulus. Considering the non-noxious nature and prevalence of this phenomenon, these results can be of great interest to researchers and clinicians who attempt to trigger postural or oculomotor responses through mechanical stimulation of the foot sole.

  13. Distribution Patterns Predict Individual Specialization in the Diet of Dolphin Gulls

    PubMed Central

    Masello, Juan F.; Wikelski, Martin; Voigt, Christian C.; Quillfeldt, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Many animals show some degree of individual specialization in foraging strategies and diet. This has profound ecological and evolutionary implications. For example, populations containing diverse individual foraging strategies will respond in different ways to changes in the environment, thus affecting the capacity of the populations to adapt to environmental changes and to diversify. However, patterns of individual specialization have been examined in few species. Likewise it is usually unknown whether specialization is maintained over time, because examining the temporal scale at which specialization occurs can prove difficult in the field. In the present study, we analyzed individual specialization in foraging in Dolphin Gulls Leucophaeus scoresbii, a scavenger endemic to the southernmost coasts of South America. We used GPS position logging and stable isotope analyses (SIA) to investigate individual specialization in feeding strategies and their persistence over time. The analysis of GPS data indicated two major foraging strategies in Dolphin Gulls from New I. (Falkland Is./Islas Malvinas). Tagged individuals repeatedly attended either a site with mussel beds or seabird and seal colonies during 5 to 7 days of tracking. Females foraging at mussel beds were heavier than those foraging at seabird colonies. Nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) of Dolphin Gull blood cells clustered in two groups, showing that individuals were consistent in their preferred foraging strategies over a period of at least several weeks. The results of the SIA as well as the foraging patterns recorded revealed a high degree of specialization for particular feeding sites and diets by individual Dolphin Gulls. Individual differences in foraging behavior were not related to sex. Specialization in Dolphin Gulls may be favored by the advantages of learning and memorizing optimal feeding locations and behaviors. Specialized individuals may reduce search and handling time and thus, optimize their

  14. Predicting an Individual’s Physiologic State without a Crystal Ball

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-05

    RT) CGM # of Diabetes Sampling Frequency (min)Device* Subjects Type iSense 9 1 1 DexCom 7 2 5 Guardian RT 18 1 5 Glucose Prediction for Type 1 & 2...40.5 41 Prediction 95% Prediction interval Measurement Time, hh:mm *Data provided by Ken Ward (iSense), Robert Vigersky ( DexCom ), Direcnet (Guardian...Diabetes - three studies using distinct continuous glucose monitoring ( CGM ) devices - Collection Time (days) 5 56 6 Time (min) G l u c o s e ( m g / d

  15. Model-based evaluation of subsurface monitoring networks for improved efficiency and predictive certainty of regional groundwater models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosses, M. J.; Wöhling, Th.; Moore, C. R.; Dann, R.; Scott, D. M.; Close, M.

    2012-04-01

    -specific prediction target under consideration. Therefore, the worth of individual observation locations may differ for different prediction targets. Our evaluation is based on predictions of lowland stream discharge resulting from changes in land use and irrigation in the upper Central Plains catchment. In our analysis, we adopt the model predictive uncertainty analysis method by Moore and Doherty (2005) which accounts for contributions from both measurement errors and uncertain structural heterogeneity. The method is robust and efficient due to a linearity assumption in the governing equations and readily implemented for application in the model-independent parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis toolkit PEST (Doherty, 2010). The proposed methods can be applied not only for the evaluation of monitoring networks, but also for the optimization of networks, to compare alternative monitoring strategies, as well as to identify best cost-benefit monitoring design even prior to any data acquisition.

  16. Competition versus planning in health care: implications for corporate and individual incentives, efficiency & control.

    PubMed

    Lee, K

    1991-01-01

    This paper is about the management of change; and, most especially, about the changing tides of thinking that health planning and, more latterly, competition could bring about desired change in the health industry towards cost containment, efficiency and control. Looking back over the decade of the 1980s, it was characterised, for many countries, as a real questioning of the role of the public sector in people's life, and--in terms of public/private provision--a re-examination of what is public and should be. Coupled with this inquiry was a growing belief that comprehensive health planning was too lofty a goal, and that however elegant in theory, its delivery in practice fell far short of its ideals. Attention has therefore focused on the workings of competitive markets, and the extent to which objectives of cost containment and economic efficiency can be better addressed through competition and internal markets. In reality, the mixed economy is the only policy option available to developed countries today. Public and private monopolies are frowned upon, and the search is on for intermediate possibilities that capture some of the advantages of markets without their disadvantages, and arrangements that motivate consumer choice and simultaneously yield efficiency in the production and distribution of health care. By way of illustration, this paper looks at a number of innovations taking place to address these issues; and, in the context of the UK, at the most recent government proposals in respect of self-governing trusts and GP budget holders, as illustrations of the move towards the internal market, or to managed competition. Not surprisingly, the two areas that feature large on the agenda are hospital (and community) information systems; and, the motivations, rewards and penalties of the provider institutions that deliver services, and the consumers and purchasers who will "buy" them. Whether the mould can and should be broken is left tantalisingly open in the

  17. An efficient artificial bee colony algorithm with application to nonlinear predictive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait Sahed, Oussama; Kara, Kamel; Benyoucef, Abousoufyane; Laid Hadjili, Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a constrained nonlinear predictive control algorithm, that uses the artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm to solve the optimization problem, is proposed. The main objective is to derive a simple and efficient control algorithm that can solve the nonlinear constrained optimization problem with minimal computational time. Indeed, a modified version, enhancing the exploring and the exploitation capabilities, of the ABC algorithm is proposed and used to design a nonlinear constrained predictive controller. This version allows addressing the premature and the slow convergence drawbacks of the standard ABC algorithm, using a modified search equation, a well-known organized distribution mechanism for the initial population and a new equation for the limit parameter. A convergence statistical analysis of the proposed algorithm, using some well-known benchmark functions is presented and compared with several other variants of the ABC algorithm. To demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm in solving engineering problems, the constrained nonlinear predictive control of the model of a Multi-Input Multi-Output industrial boiler is considered. The control performances of the proposed ABC algorithm-based controller are also compared to those obtained using some variants of the ABC algorithms.

  18. Thermal substitution and aerobic efficiency: measuring and predicting effects of heat balance on endotherm diving energetics.

    PubMed

    Lovvorn, J R

    2007-11-29

    For diving endotherms, modelling costs of locomotion as a function of prey dispersion requires estimates of the costs of diving to different depths. One approach is to estimate the physical costs of locomotion (Pmech) with biomechanical models and to convert those estimates to chemical energy needs by an aerobic efficiency (eta=Pmech/Vo2) based on oxygen consumption (Vo2) in captive animals. Variations in eta with temperature depend partly on thermal substitution, whereby heat from the inefficiency of exercising muscles or the heat increment of feeding (HIF) can substitute for thermogenesis. However, measurements of substitution have ranged from lack of detection to nearly complete use of exercise heat or HIF. This inconsistency may reflect (i) problems in methods of calculating substitution, (ii) confounding mechanisms of thermoregulatory control, or (iii) varying conditions that affect heat balance and allow substitution to be expressed. At present, understanding of how heat generation is regulated, and how heat is transported among tissues during exercise, digestion, thermal challenge and breath holding, is inadequate for predicting substitution and aerobic efficiencies without direct measurements for conditions of interest. Confirming that work rates during exercise are generally conserved, and identifying temperatures at those work rates below which shivering begins, may allow better prediction of aerobic efficiencies for ecological models.

  19. High-intensity interval training improves performance in young and older individuals by increasing mechanical efficiency.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Georges; Iancu, Horia-Daniel; Mauriège, Pascale; Joanisse, Denis R; Martin, Luc J

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluated the effects of 6 weeks of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on mechanical efficiency (ME) in young and older groups. Seventeen healthy young adults [26.2(2.4) year], and thirteen healthy older adults [54.5(2.3) year] completed a 6-week HIIT intervention (three sessions per week) on an electromagnetically braked cycle ergometer. Each HIIT session contained six repetitions of supramaximal exercise intervals (6 seconds each) with 2 min of passive recovery between each repetition. ME (%) were computed in net terms across stages corresponding to ventilator thresholds 1 (VT1) and 2 (VT2) and at 100% of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) of an incremental maximal cycling test. After 6 weeks, the ME values did not differ between the two groups and were significantly higher than the ones at baseline (P < 0.01). In this study, the multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated the increases in maximal power (Pmax) contributed significantly to ME increases over 6 weeks at VT1, VT2 and at 100% of VO2max This model accounted respectively for 28, 38, and 42%, of the increases. In older adults, ME determined during incremental maximal cycling test increases at VT1, VT2 and at 100% over 6-week HIIT intervention, and the increment appeared to be related to increases in Pmax. HIIT can be recommended as a strategy aimed at improving muscle efficiency among older adults.

  20. Predicting Performance during Chronic Sleep Loss: Identification of Factors Sensitive to Individual Fatigue Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-18

    that predicted for Trials 2 – 8 and 10 – 20. During each day of the sleep restriction period, the lowest predicted level of performance effectiveness ...the study, masking any fatigue- related effects . Comparing and Contrasting Chronic Sleep Restriction with Total Sleep Deprivation The experiment...sensitive to the performance impairments associated with total sleep deprivation but on which participants actually improved during chronic sleep

  1. Speech acquisition predicts regions of enhanced cortical response to auditory stimulation in autism spectrum individuals.

    PubMed

    Samson, F; Zeffiro, T A; Doyon, J; Benali, H; Mottron, L

    2015-09-01

    A continuum of phenotypes makes up the autism spectrum (AS). In particular, individuals show large differences in language acquisition, ranging from precocious speech to severe speech onset delay. However, the neurological origin of this heterogeneity remains unknown. Here, we sought to determine whether AS individuals differing in speech acquisition show different cortical responses to auditory stimulation and morphometric brain differences. Whole-brain activity following exposure to non-social sounds was investigated. Individuals in the AS were classified according to the presence or absence of Speech Onset Delay (AS-SOD and AS-NoSOD, respectively) and were compared with IQ-matched typically developing individuals (TYP). AS-NoSOD participants displayed greater task-related activity than TYP in the inferior frontal gyrus and peri-auditory middle and superior temporal gyri, which are associated with language processing. Conversely, the AS-SOD group only showed enhanced activity in the vicinity of the auditory cortex. We detected no differences in brain structure between groups. This is the first study to demonstrate the existence of differences in functional brain activity between AS individuals divided according to their pattern of speech development. These findings support the Trigger-threshold-target model and indicate that the occurrence of speech onset delay in AS individuals depends on the location of cortical functional reallocation, which favors perception in AS-SOD and language in AS-NoSOD.

  2. Individual differences in structural and functional connectivity predict speed of emotion discrimination.

    PubMed

    Marstaller, Lars; Burianová, Hana; Reutens, David C

    2016-12-01

    In social interactions, individuals who are slower at differentiating between facial expressions signalling direct and indirect threat might be at a serious disadvantage. However, the neurobiological underpinnings of individual differences in face processing are not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to use multimodal neuroimaging to investigate how the speed of emotion recognition is related to the structural and functional connectivity underlying the differentiation of direct and indirect threat displays. Our results demonstrate that individuals, who are faster at discriminating angry faces, engaged areas of the extended emotional system more strongly than individuals with slower reaction times, showed higher white matter integrity in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), as well as stronger functional connectivity with the right amygdala. In contrast, individuals, who were faster at discriminating fearful faces, engaged visual-attentional regions outside of the face processing network more strongly than individuals with slower reaction times, showed higher white matter integrity in the ILF, as well as reduced functional connectivity with the right amygdala. Our findings suggest that the high survival value of rapid and appropriate responses to threat has defined but separate neurobiological correlates for angry and fearful facial expressions.

  3. Individual differences in mathematical competence predict parietal brain activation during mental calculation.

    PubMed

    Grabner, Roland H; Ansari, Daniel; Reishofer, Gernot; Stern, Elsbeth; Ebner, Franz; Neuper, Christa

    2007-11-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies have revealed that parietal brain circuits subserve arithmetic problem solving and that their recruitment dynamically changes as a function of training and development. The present study investigated whether the brain activation during mental calculation is also modulated by individual differences in mathematical competence. Twenty-five adult students were selected from a larger pool based on their performance on standardized tests of intelligence and arithmetic and divided into groups of individuals with relatively lower and higher mathematical competence. These groups did not differ in their non-numerical intelligence or age. In an fMRI block-design, participants had to verify the correctness of single-digit and multi-digit multiplication problems. Analyses revealed that the individuals with higher mathematical competence displayed stronger activation of the left angular gyrus while solving both types of arithmetic problems. Additional correlational analyses corroborated the association between individual differences in mathematical competence and angular gyrus activation, even when variability in task performance was controlled for. These findings demonstrate that the recruitment of the left angular gyrus during arithmetic problem solving underlies individual differences in mathematical ability and suggests a stronger reliance on automatic, language-mediated processes in more competent individuals.

  4. Individual prediction of chronic motor outcome in the acute post-stroke stage: Behavioral parameters versus functional imaging.

    PubMed

    Rehme, Anne K; Volz, Lukas J; Feis, Delia-Lisa; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fink, Gereon R; Grefkes, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Several neurobiological factors have been found to correlate with functional recovery after brain lesions. However, predicting the individual potential of recovery remains difficult. Here we used multivariate support vector machine (SVM) classification to explore the prognostic value of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to predict individual motor outcome at 4-6 months post-stroke. To this end, 21 first-ever stroke patients with hand motor deficits participated in an fMRI hand motor task in the first few days post-stroke. Motor impairment was quantified assessing grip force and the Action Research Arm Test. Linear SVM classifiers were trained to predict good versus poor motor outcome of unseen new patients. We found that fMRI activity acquired in the first week post-stroke correctly predicted the outcome for 86% of all patients. In contrast, the concurrent assessment of motor function provided 76% accuracy with low sensitivity (<60%). Furthermore, the outcome of patients with initially moderate impairment and high outcome variability could not be predicted based on motor tests. In contrast, fMRI provided 87.5% prediction accuracy in these patients. Classifications were driven by activity in ipsilesional motor areas and contralesional cerebellum. The accuracy of subacute fMRI data (two weeks post-stroke), age, time post-stroke, lesion volume, and location were at 50%-chance-level. In conclusion, multivariate decoding of fMRI data with SVM early after stroke enables a robust prediction of motor recovery. The potential for recovery is influenced by the initial dysfunction of the active motor system, particularly in those patients whose outcome cannot be predicted by behavioral tests.

  5. The effect of breed and individual heterosis on the feed efficiency, performance, and carcass characteristics of feedlot steers.

    PubMed

    Retallick, K M; Faulkner, D B; Rodriguez-Zas, S L; Nkrumah, J D; Shike, D W

    2013-11-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate maternal breed effects, direct breed effects, and individual heterosis on subsequent steer performance, carcass, and feed efficiency traits. This was a consecutive 2-yr trial using 158 steers. The same dam breeds, Angus (AN) and purebred Simmental (SM), were used both years. Also, the same AN and SM sires (n=11) were used both years. Steers were AN, SM, or AN×SM breed composition. Steers were managed similarly before weaning and early weaned at 56±9 d of age. Steers were then randomly allotted to pens and fed a common finishing ration. Contrasts were written to evaluate direct and maternal breed effects and individual heterosis in the PROC MIXED procedure of SAS (SAS Inst. Inc., Cary, NC) using dam breed, sire breed, and year as fixed effects. Simmental direct breed effect resulted in a 26 kg heavier initial BW (P<0.05) and a 46 kg heavier final BW (P<0.05). Simmental maternal breed effect increased initial BW by 43.5 kg (P<0.05). Dry matter intake was not impacted by direct breed effects, maternal breed effects, or individual heterosis. Individual heterosis did improve G:F 3.4% (P<0.05) and residual BW gain 0.048 kg/d (P<0.05). Residual intake and BW gain tended (P=0.07) to improve as a result of individual heterosis. Residual feed intake (RFI) was impacted by direct breed effect with SM cattle having a more desirable RFI (P=0.05). Angus direct breed effect increased backfat (P<0.05) and improved marbling score by 126 units (P<0.05). Simmental direct breed effect increased LM area (P<0.05), had the highest HCW at 410 kg (P<0.05), and had the most desirable yield grade at 2.74 (P<0.05). Individual heterosis improved marbling score (P=0.05). Maternal breed effect increased HCW (P<0.05) as a result of the SM dam. Direct breed effects were present for performance, feed efficiency measures, and carcass traits. Overall, heterosis impacted feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and feed efficiency, which impacts beef

  6. Novelty seeking is related to individual risk preference and brain activation associated with risk prediction during decision making

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Ying; Yang, Lizhuang; Gu, Feng; Li, Xiaoming; Zha, Rujing; Wei, Zhengde; Pei, Yakun; Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Yifeng; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2015-01-01

    Novelty seeking (NS) is a personality trait reflecting excitement in response to novel stimuli. High NS is usually a predictor of risky behaviour such as drug abuse. However, the relationships between NS and risk-related cognitive processes, including individual risk preference and the brain activation associated with risk prediction, remain elusive. In this fMRI study, participants completed the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire to measure NS and performed a probabilistic decision making task. Using a mathematical model, we estimated individual risk preference. Brain regions associated with risk prediction were determined via fMRI. The NS score showed a positive correlation with risk preference and a negative correlation with the activation elicited by risk prediction in the right posterior insula (r-PI), left anterior insula (l-AI), right striatum (r-striatum) and supplementary motor area (SMA). Within these brain regions, only the activation associated with risk prediction in the r-PI showed a correlation with NS after controlling for the effect of risk preference. Resting-state functional connectivity between the r-PI and r-striatum/l-AI was negatively correlated with NS. Our results suggest that high NS may be associated with less aversion to risk and that the r-PI plays an important role in relating risk prediction to NS. PMID:26065910

  7. Can We Predict Individual Combined Benefit and Harm of Therapy? Warfarin Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation as a Test Case

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guowei; Thabane, Lehana; Delate, Thomas; Witt, Daniel M.; Levine, Mitchell A. H.; Cheng, Ji; Holbrook, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To construct and validate a prediction model for individual combined benefit and harm outcomes (stroke with no major bleeding, major bleeding with no stroke, neither event, or both) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) with and without warfarin therapy. Methods Using the Kaiser Permanente Colorado databases, we included patients newly diagnosed with AF between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2012 for model construction and validation. The primary outcome was a prediction model of composite of stroke or major bleeding using polytomous logistic regression (PLR) modelling. The secondary outcome was a prediction model of all-cause mortality using the Cox regression modelling. Results We included 9074 patients with 4537 and 4537 warfarin users and non-users, respectively. In the derivation cohort (n = 4632), there were 136 strokes (2.94%), 280 major bleedings (6.04%) and 1194 deaths (25.78%) occurred. In the prediction models, warfarin use was not significantly associated with risk of stroke, but increased the risk of major bleeding and decreased the risk of death. Both the PLR and Cox models were robust, internally and externally validated, and with acceptable model performances. Conclusions In this study, we introduce a new methodology for predicting individual combined benefit and harm outcomes associated with warfarin therapy for patients with AF. Should this approach be validated in other patient populations, it has potential advantages over existing risk stratification approaches as a patient-physician aid for shared decision-making PMID:27513986

  8. Investigating the importance of various individual, interpersonal, organisational and demographic variables when predicting job burnout in disability support workers.

    PubMed

    Vassos, Maria V; Nankervis, Karen L

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has highlighted that factors such as large workload, role ambiguity, lack of support from colleagues, and challenging behaviour are associated with higher levels of burnout within the disability support worker (DSW) population. The aim of this research was to investigate which factors contribute the most to the prediction of the three facets of burnout--feeling exhausted and overextended by one's work (emotional exhaustion), detached and callous responses towards work (depersonalisation) and a lack of achievement and productivity within one's role (personal accomplishment). The factors chosen for analysis within this research were analysed within four categories linked to theories of burnout development (individual, interpersonal, organisational and demographic). A sample of 108 DSWs completed a questionnaire booklet that contained standardised measures of burnout and job stressors related to disability work. Results highlighted the importance of predictors such as challenging behaviour (interpersonal), workload (individual), supervisor support (individual), work-home conflict (individual), job feedback (individual), role ambiguity (organisational), low job status (organisational), role conflict (organisational), gender (demographic) and work hours (demographic) when predicting one or more of the facets of burnout. In conclusion, disability services and organisations may benefit from focusing on remodelling their staff-related organisational practices in order to prevent the development of burnout in their DSWs (e.g., increase supervision and support practices).

  9. Who is honest and why: baseline activation in anterior insula predicts inter-individual differences in deceptive behavior.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Thomas; Gianotti, Lorena R R; Knoch, Daria

    2013-09-01

    Humans engage in deceptive behavior that negatively affects others. The propensity to deceive is, however, characterized by vast inter-individual heterogeneity that is poorly understood. Attempts to investigate the origins of this heterogeneity have so far mainly relied on subjective measures and have shown little predictive power. Here, we used resting electroencephalography to measure objective and stable individual differences in neural baseline activation in combination with an ecologically valid deception paradigm. Results showed that task-independent baseline activation in the anterior insula, a brain area implicated in mapping internal bodily states and in representing emotional arousal and conscious feelings, predicts individuals' propensity for deceptive behavior. The higher the neural baseline activation in this area is, the lower individuals' propensity to deceive. Moreover, results provide evidence that high baseline activation in the anterior insula is associated with negative affect and dispositional tendencies to avoid aversive emotional situations. These results provide converging neural and psychological evidence that individuals might avoid a deceptive act due to a highly active negative emotional system which would make a deceptive act too stressful and bothersome.

  10. A New Method for Predicting Patient Survivorship Using Efficient Bayesian Network Learning

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xia; Xue, Diyang; Brufsky, Adam; Khan, Seema; Neapolitan, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to develop and evaluate a new Bayesian network (BN)-based patient survivorship prediction method. The central hypothesis is that the method predicts patient survivorship well, while having the capability to handle high-dimensional data and be incorporated into a clinical decision support system (CDSS). We have developed EBMC_Survivorship (EBMC_S), which predicts survivorship for each year individually. EBMC_S is based on the EBMC BN algorithm, which has been shown to handle high-dimensional data. BNs have excellent architecture for decision support systems. In this study, we evaluate EBMC_S using the Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium (METABRIC) dataset, which concerns breast tumors. A 5-fold cross-validation study indicates that EMBC_S performs better than the Cox proportional hazard model and is comparable to the random survival forest method. We show that EBMC_S provides additional information such as sensitivity analyses, which covariates predict each year, and yearly areas under the ROC curve (AUROCs). We conclude that our investigation supports the central hypothesis. PMID:24558297

  11. Efficient Estimation of Mutation Rates during Individual Development by Minimization of Chi-Square.

    PubMed

    Ai, Shi-Meng; Gao, Jian-Jun; Liu, Shu-Qun; Fu, Yun-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Mutation primarily occurs when cells divide and it is highly desirable to have knowledge of the rate of mutations for each of the cell divisions during individual development. Recently, recessive lethal or nearly lethal mutations which were observed in a large mutation accumulation experiment using Drosophila melanogaster suggested that mutation rates vary significantly during the germline development of male Drosophila melanogaster. The analysis of the data was based on a combination of the maximum likelihood framework with numerical assistance from a newly developed coalescent algorithm. Although powerful, the likelihood based framework is computationally highly demanding which limited the scope of the inference. This paper presents a new estimation approach by minimizing chi-square statistics which is asymptotically consistent with the maximum likelihood method. When only at most one mutation in a family is considered the minimization of chi-square is simplified to a constrained weighted minimum least square method which can be solved easily by optimization theory. The new methods effectively eliminates the computational bottleneck of the likelihood. Reanalysis of the published Drosophila melanogaster mutation data results in similar estimates of mutation rates. The new method is also expected to be applicable to the analysis of mutation data generated by next-generation sequencing technology.

  12. Controlled formation of polymer nanocapsules with high diffusion-barrier properties and prediction of encapsulation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Hofmeister, Ines; Landfester, Katharina; Taden, Andreas

    2015-01-02

    Polymer nanocapsules with high diffusion-barrier performance were designed following simple thermodynamic considerations. Hindered diffusion of the enclosed material leads to high encapsulation efficiencies (EEs), which was demonstrated based on the encapsulation of highly volatile compounds of different chemical natures. Low interactions between core and shell materials are key factors to achieve phase separation and a high diffusion barrier of the resulting polymeric shell. These interactions can be characterized and quantified using the Hansen solubility parameters. A systematic study of our copolymer system revealed a linear relationship between the Hansen parameter for hydrogen bonding (δh ) and encapsulation efficiencies which enables the prediction of encapsulated amounts for any material. Furthermore EEs of poorly encapsulated materials can be increased by mixing them with a mediator compound to give lower overall δh values.

  13. An efficient sampling algorithm for uncertain abnormal data detection in biomedical image processing and disease prediction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Zhang, Xi; Jia, Yan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a computer information processing algorithm that can be used for biomedical image processing and disease prediction. A biomedical image is considered a data object in a multi-dimensional space. Each dimension is a feature that can be used for disease diagnosis. We introduce a new concept of the top (k1,k2) outlier. It can be used to detect abnormal data objects in the multi-dimensional space. This technique focuses on uncertain space, where each data object has several possible instances with distinct probabilities. We design an efficient sampling algorithm for the top (k1,k2) outlier in uncertain space. Some improvement techniques are used for acceleration. Experiments show our methods' high accuracy and high efficiency.

  14. Adaptive Measurement of Well-Being: Maximizing Efficiency and Optimizing User Experience during Individual Assessment.

    PubMed

    Kraatz, Miriam; Sears, Lindsay E; Coberley, Carter R; Pope, James E

    2016-08-01

    Well-being is linked to important societal factors such as health care costs and productivity and has experienced a surge in development activity of both theories and measurement. This study builds on validation of the Well-Being 5 survey and for the first time applies Item Response Theory, a modern and flexible measurement paradigm, to form the basis of adaptive population well-being measurement. Adaptive testing allows survey questions to be administered selectively, thereby reducing the number of questions required of the participant. After the graded response model was fit to a sample of size N = 12,035, theta scores were estimated based on both the full-item bank and a simulation of Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT). Comparisons of these 2 sets of score estimates with each other and of their correlations with external outcomes of job performance, absenteeism, and hospital admissions demonstrate that the CAT well-being scores maintain accuracy and validity. The simulation indicates that the average survey taker can expect a reduction in number of items administered during the CAT process of almost 50%. An increase in efficiency of this extent is of considerable value because of the time savings during the administration of the survey and the potential improvement of user experience, which in turn can help secure the success of a total population-based well-being improvement program. (Population Health Management 2016;19:284-290).

  15. Enabling Energy Efficiency and Polarity Control in Germanium Nanowire Transistors by Individually Gated Nanojunctions.

    PubMed

    Trommer, Jens; Heinzig, André; Mühle, Uwe; Löffler, Markus; Winzer, Annett; Jordan, Paul M; Beister, Jürgen; Baldauf, Tim; Geidel, Marion; Adolphi, Barbara; Zschech, Ehrenfried; Mikolajick, Thomas; Weber, Walter M

    2017-02-28

    Germanium is a promising material for future very large scale integration transistors, due to its superior hole mobility. However, germanium-based devices typically suffer from high reverse junction leakage due to the low band-gap energy of 0.66 eV and therefore are characterized by high static power dissipation. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate a solution to suppress the off-state leakage in germanium nanowire Schottky barrier transistors. Thereto, a device layout with two independent gates is used to induce an additional energy barrier to the channel that blocks the undesired carrier type. In addition, the polarity of the same doping-free device can be dynamically switched between p- and n-type. The shown germanium nanowire approach is able to outperform previous polarity-controllable device concepts on other material systems in terms of threshold voltages and normalized on-currents. The dielectric and Schottky barrier interface properties of the device are analyzed in detail. Finite-element drift-diffusion simulations reveal that both leakage current suppression and polarity control can also be achieved at highly scaled geometries, providing solutions for future energy-efficient systems.

  16. Adaptive Measurement of Well-Being: Maximizing Efficiency and Optimizing User Experience during Individual Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Kraatz, Miriam; Coberley, Carter R.; Pope, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Well-being is linked to important societal factors such as health care costs and productivity and has experienced a surge in development activity of both theories and measurement. This study builds on validation of the Well-Being 5 survey and for the first time applies Item Response Theory, a modern and flexible measurement paradigm, to form the basis of adaptive population well-being measurement. Adaptive testing allows survey questions to be administered selectively, thereby reducing the number of questions required of the participant. After the graded response model was fit to a sample of size N = 12,035, theta scores were estimated based on both the full-item bank and a simulation of Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT). Comparisons of these 2 sets of score estimates with each other and of their correlations with external outcomes of job performance, absenteeism, and hospital admissions demonstrate that the CAT well-being scores maintain accuracy and validity. The simulation indicates that the average survey taker can expect a reduction in number of items administered during the CAT process of almost 50%. An increase in efficiency of this extent is of considerable value because of the time savings during the administration of the survey and the potential improvement of user experience, which in turn can help secure the success of a total population-based well-being improvement program. (Population Health Management 2016;19:284–290) PMID:26674396

  17. Digestive efficiency mediated by serum calcium predicts bone mineral density in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Jarcho, Michael R; Power, Michael L; Layne-Colon, Donna G; Tardif, Suzette D

    2013-02-01

    Two health problems have plagued captive common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) colonies for nearly as long as those colonies have existed: marmoset wasting syndrome and metabolic bone disease. While marmoset wasting syndrome is explicitly linked to nutrient malabsorption, we propose metabolic bone disease is also linked to nutrient malabsorption, although indirectly. If animals experience negative nutrient balance chronically, critical nutrients may be taken from mineral stores such as the skeleton, thus leaving those stores depleted. We indirectly tested this prediction through an initial investigation of digestive efficiency, as measured by apparent energy digestibility, and serum parameters known to play a part in metabolic bone mineral density of captive common marmoset monkeys. In our initial study on 12 clinically healthy animals, we found a wide range of digestive efficiencies, and subjects with lower digestive efficiency had lower serum vitamin D despite having higher food intakes. A second experiment on 23 subjects including several with suspected bone disease was undertaken to measure digestive and serum parameters, with the addition of a measure of bone mineral density by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Bone mineral density was positively associated with apparent digestibility of energy, vitamin D, and serum calcium. Further, digestive efficiency was found to predict bone mineral density when mediated by serum calcium. These data indicate that a poor ability to digest and absorb nutrients leads to calcium and vitamin D insufficiency. Vitamin D absorption may be particularly critical for indoor-housed animals, as opposed to animals in a more natural setting, because vitamin D that would otherwise be synthesized via exposure to sunlight must be absorbed from their diet. If malabsorption persists, metabolic bone disease is a possible consequence in common marmosets. These findings support our hypothesis that both wasting syndrome and metabolic bone

  18. Using individual interest and conscientiousness to predict academic effort: Additive, synergistic, or compensatory effects?

    PubMed

    Trautwein, Ulrich; Lüdtke, Oliver; Nagy, Nicole; Lenski, Anna; Niggli, Alois; Schnyder, Inge

    2015-07-01

    Although both conscientiousness and domain-specific interest are believed to be major determinants of academic effort, they have rarely been brought together in empirical studies. In the present research, it was hypothesized that both interest and conscientiousness uniquely predict academic effort and statistically interact with each other to predict academic effort. In 4 studies with 2,557, 415, 1,025, and 1,531 students, respectively, conscientiousness and interest meaningfully and uniquely predicted academic effort. In addition, conscientiousness interacted with interest in a compensatory pattern, indicating that conscientiousness is especially important when a student finds a school subject uninteresting and that domain-specific interest plays a particularly important role for students low in conscientiousness.

  19. Ultralow mode-volume photonic crystal nanobeam cavities for high-efficiency coupling to individual carbon nanotube emitters

    PubMed Central

    Miura, R.; Imamura, S.; Ohta, R.; Ishii, A.; Liu, X.; Shimada, T.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.; Kato, Y. K.

    2014-01-01

    The unique emission properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes are attractive for achieving increased functionality in integrated photonics. In addition to being room-temperature telecom-band emitters that can be directly grown on silicon, they are ideal for coupling to nanoscale photonic structures. Here we report on high-efficiency coupling of individual air-suspended carbon nanotubes to silicon photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. Photoluminescence images of dielectric- and air-mode cavities reflect their distinctly different mode profiles and show that fields in the air are important for coupling. We find that the air-mode cavities couple more efficiently, and estimated spontaneous emission coupling factors reach a value as high as 0.85. Our results demonstrate advantages of ultralow mode-volumes in air-mode cavities for coupling to low-dimensional nanoscale emitters. PMID:25420679

  20. Ultralow mode-volume photonic crystal nanobeam cavities for high-efficiency coupling to individual carbon nanotube emitters.

    PubMed

    Miura, R; Imamura, S; Ohta, R; Ishii, A; Liu, X; Shimada, T; Iwamoto, S; Arakawa, Y; Kato, Y K

    2014-11-25

    The unique emission properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes are attractive for achieving increased functionality in integrated photonics. In addition to being room-temperature telecom-band emitters that can be directly grown on silicon, they are ideal for coupling to nanoscale photonic structures. Here we report on high-efficiency coupling of individual air-suspended carbon nanotubes to silicon photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. Photoluminescence images of dielectric- and air-mode cavities reflect their distinctly different mode profiles and show that fields in the air are important for coupling. We find that the air-mode cavities couple more efficiently, and estimated spontaneous emission coupling factors reach a value as high as 0.85. Our results demonstrate advantages of ultralow mode-volumes in air-mode cavities for coupling to low-dimensional nanoscale emitters.

  1. Emotional Experiences Predict the Conversion of Individuals with Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome to Psychosis: A 6-Month Follow up Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fa Zhan; Wang, Yi; Sun, Xi Rong; Yao, Yu Hong; Zhang, Ning; Qiao, Hui Fen; Zhang, Lan; Li, Zhan Jiang; Lin, Hong; Lu, Zheng; Li, Jing; Chan, Raymond C. K.; Zhao, Xu Dong

    2016-01-01

    The present study explored the conversion rate in individuals with Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome (APS) and potential predictor for transition in mainland China. Sixty-three participants identified as APS were followed up 6 months later. The results showed that 17% of individuals with APS converted to full-blown psychosis. The converters exhibited significantly poorer emotional experience and expression than the non-converters at baseline. A further binary logistic regression analysis showed that emotional experience could predict the transition (Wald = 4.18, p = 0.041, 95% CI = 1.04~6.82). The present study suggests an important role of emotional processing in the prediction of the development of full-blown psychosis. PMID:27313553

  2. Computational Fluency and Strategy Choice Predict Individual and Cross-National Differences in Complex Arithmetic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasilyeva, Marina; Laski, Elida V.; Shen, Chen

    2015-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that children's fluency with basic number facts and knowledge of computational strategies, derived from early arithmetic experience, predicts their performance on complex arithmetic problems. First-grade students from United States and Taiwan (N = 152, mean age: 7.3 years) were presented with problems that…

  3. Predicting Change for Individual Psychotherapy Clients on the Basis of their Nearest Neighbors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Wolfgang; Leach, Chris; Barkham, Michael; Lucock, Mike; Stiles, William B.; Evans, Chris; Noble, Rachael; Iveson, Steve

    2005-01-01

    This study extended client-focused research by using the nearest neighbor (NN) approach, a client-specific sampling and prediction strategy derived from research on alpine avalanches. Psychotherapy clients (N = 203) seen in routine practice settings in the United Kingdom completed a battery of intake measures and then completed symptom intensity…

  4. Bullying and Victimization: Predictive Role of Individual, Parental, and Academic Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atik, Gökhan; Güneri, Oya Yerin

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the roles of individual factors (age, gender, locus of control, self-esteem, and loneliness), parenting style, and academic achievement in discriminating students involved in bullying (as bullies, victims, and bully/victims) from those not involved. Participants comprised 742 middle school students (393 females, 349 males). The…

  5. Severity of Hyperacusis Predicts Individual Differences in Speech Perception in Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsabbagh, M.; Cohen, H.; Cohen, M.; Rosen, S.; Karmiloff-Smith, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Williams Syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder of genetic origin, characterised by relative proficiency in language in the face of serious impairment in several other domains. Individuals with WS display an unusual sensitivity to noise, known as hyperacusis. Methods: In this study, we examined the extent to which hyperacusis…

  6. Individualized Sampling Parameters for Behavioral Observations: Enhancing the Predictive Validity of Competing Stimulus Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLeon, Iser G.; Toole, Lisa M.; Gutshall, Katharine A.; Bowman, Lynn G.

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies have used pretreatment analyses, termed competing stimulus assessments, to identify items that most effectively displace the aberrant behavior of individuals with developmental disabilities. In most studies, there appeared to have been no systematic basis for selecting the sampling period (ranging from 30 s to 10 min) in which items…

  7. Officer Individual Differences: Predicting Long-Term Continuance and Performance in the U.S. Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    200 words): This project investigated individual differences in knowledge, skills, abilities, and personality traits as contributors to long-term...of interest. In addition, these cognitively based selection tools may be supplemented with social, motivational, and personality measures. 15...PAGES 39 21. RESPONSIBLE PERSON 16. REPORT Unclassified 17. ABSTRACT Unclassified 18. THIS PAGE Unclassified (Name and

  8. Structural covariance networks of the dorsal anterior insula predict females' individual differences in empathic responding.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Boris C; Klimecki, Olga M; Leiberg, Susanne; Singer, Tania

    2014-08-01

    Previous functional imaging studies have shown key roles of the dorsal anterior insula (dAI) and anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC) in empathy for the suffering of others. The current study mapped structural covariance networks of these regions and assessed the relationship between networks and individual differences in empathic responding in 94 females. Individual differences in empathy were assessed through average state measures in response to a video task showing others' suffering, and through questionnaire-based trait measures of empathic concern. Overall, covariance patterns indicated that dAI and aMCC are principal hubs within prefrontal, temporolimbic, and midline structural covariance networks. Importantly, participants with high empathy state ratings showed increased covariance of dAI, but not aMCC, to prefrontal and limbic brain regions. This relationship was specific for empathy and could not be explained by individual differences in negative affect ratings. Regarding questionnaire-based empathic trait measures, we observed a similar, albeit weaker modulation of dAI covariance, confirming the robustness of our findings. Our analysis, thus, provides novel evidence for a specific contribution of frontolimbic structural covariance networks to individual differences in social emotions beyond negative affect.

  9. Migratory restlessness in captive individuals predicts actual departure in the wild

    PubMed Central

    Eikenaar, Cas; Klinner, Thomas; Szostek, K. Lesley; Bairlein, Franz

    2014-01-01

    In captivity, migratory birds show increased activity during the time that they would normally migrate. The phenology and intensity of such ‘migratory restlessness’ has been shown to mirror species- and population-specific migration patterns observed in the wild and has consequently been used as a proxy for the motivation to migrate. Many studies doing so, however, were aiming to explain among-individual variation in migratory behaviour or traits, and not species- or population-specific traits. These studies thus assumed that, also at the level of the individual, migratory restlessness is an accurate proxy for the motivation to migrate. We tested this assumption for the first time and found that it holds; individuals showing very little migratory restlessness remained at stopover for longer than one night, whereas most individuals showing more restlessness departed sooner. This finding validates the use of migratory restlessness as a proxy for the motivation to migrate, thereby justifying the conclusions made in a large body of research on avian migration. PMID:24718095

  10. Migratory restlessness in captive individuals predicts actual departure in the wild.

    PubMed

    Eikenaar, Cas; Klinner, Thomas; Szostek, K Lesley; Bairlein, Franz

    2014-01-01

    In captivity, migratory birds show increased activity during the time that they would normally migrate. The phenology and intensity of such 'migratory restlessness' has been shown to mirror species- and population-specific migration patterns observed in the wild and has consequently been used as a proxy for the motivation to migrate. Many studies doing so, however, were aiming to explain among-individual variation in migratory behaviour or traits, and not species- or population-specific traits. These studies thus assumed that, also at the level of the individual, migratory restlessness is an accurate proxy for the motivation to migrate. We tested this assumption for the first time and found that it holds; individuals showing very little migratory restlessness remained at stopover for longer than one night, whereas most individuals showing more restlessness departed sooner. This finding validates the use of migratory restlessness as a proxy for the motivation to migrate, thereby justifying the conclusions made in a large body of research on avian migration.

  11. Individual Differences in Working Memory Capacity Predict Action Monitoring and the Error-Related Negativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, A. Eve; Watson, Jason M.; Strayer, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroscience suggests that the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is responsible for conflict monitoring and the detection of errors in cognitive tasks, thereby contributing to the implementation of attentional control. Though individual differences in frontally mediated goal maintenance have clearly been shown to influence outward behavior in…

  12. Individual Differences in (Non-Visual) Processing Style Predict the Face Inversion Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyer, Natalie A.; Martin, Douglas; Pickup, Tracey; Macrae, C. Neil

    2012-01-01

    Recent research suggests that individuals with relatively weak global precedence (i.e., a smaller propensity to view visual stimuli in a configural manner) show a reduced face inversion effect (FIE). Coupled with such findings, a number of recent studies have demonstrated links between an advantage for feature-based processing and the presentation…

  13. Quantitative Approach to Collaborative Learning: Performance Prediction, Individual Assessment, and Group Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cen, Ling; Ruta, Dymitr; Powell, Leigh; Hirsch, Benjamin; Ng, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of collaborative learning, although widely reported, lack the quantitative rigor and detailed insight into the dynamics of interactions within the group, while individual contributions and their impacts on group members and their collaborative work remain hidden behind joint group assessment. To bridge this gap we intend to address…

  14. Multimedia Learning: Cognitive Individual Differences and Display Design Techniques Predict Transfer Learning with Multimedia Learning Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Katherine A.

    2009-01-01

    In the wake of the information explosion and rapidly progressing technology [Mayer, R. E. (2001). "Multimedia learning". Cambridge: University Press] formulated a theory that focused on human cognition, rather than technology capacity and features. By measuring the effect of cognitive individual differences and display design manipulations on…

  15. Individuation Experience Predicts Other-Race Effects in Holistic Processing for Both Caucasian and Black Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukach, Cindy M.; Cottle, Jasmine; Ubiwa, JoAnna; Miller, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Same-race (SR) faces are recognized better than other-race (OR) faces, and this other-race effect (ORE) is correlated with experience. SR faces are also processed more holistically than OR faces, suggesting one possible mechanism for poorer performance on OR faces. Studies of object expertise have shown that individuating experiences are necessary…

  16. Does individual variation in metabolic phenotype predict fish behaviour and performance?

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, N B; Van Leeuwen, T E; Killen, S S

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing interest in documenting and explaining the existence of marked intraspecific variation in metabolic rate in animals, with fishes providing some of the best-studied examples. After accounting for variation due to other factors, there can typically be a two to three-fold variation among individual fishes for both standard and maximum metabolic rate (SMR and MMR). This variation is reasonably consistent over time (provided that conditions remain stable), and its underlying causes may be influenced by both genes and developmental conditions. In this paper, current knowledge of the extent and causes of individual variation in SMR, MMR and aerobic scope (AS), collectively its metabolic phenotype, is reviewed and potential links among metabolism, behaviour and performance are described. Intraspecific variation in metabolism has been found to be related to other traits: fishes with a relatively high SMR tend to be more dominant and grow faster in high food environments, but may lose their advantage and are more prone to risk-taking when conditions deteriorate. In contrast to the wide body of research examining links between SMR and behavioural traits, very little work has been directed towards understanding the ecological consequences of individual variation in MMR and AS. Although AS can differ among populations of the same species in response to performance demands, virtually nothing is known about the effects of AS on individual behaviours such as those associated with foraging or predator avoidance. Further, while factors such as food availability, temperature, hypoxia and the fish's social environment are known to alter resting and MMRs in fishes, there is a paucity of studies examining how these effects vary among individuals, and how this variation relates to behaviour. Given the observed links between metabolism and measures of performance, understanding the metabolic responses of individuals to changing environments will be a key area for

  17. Individual differences in the multisensory temporal binding window predict susceptibility to audiovisual illusions.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Ryan A; Zemtsov, Raquel K; Wallace, Mark T

    2012-12-01

    Human multisensory systems are known to bind inputs from the different sensory modalities into a unified percept, a process that leads to measurable behavioral benefits. This integrative process can be observed through multisensory illusions, including the McGurk effect and the sound-induced flash illusion, both of which demonstrate the ability of one sensory modality to modulate perception in a second modality. Such multisensory integration is highly dependent upon the temporal relationship of the different sensory inputs, with perceptual binding occurring within a limited range of asynchronies known as the temporal binding window (TBW). Previous studies have shown that this window is highly variable across individuals, but it is unclear how these variations in the TBW relate to an individual's ability to integrate multisensory cues. Here we provide evidence linking individual differences in multisensory temporal processes to differences in the individual's audiovisual integration of illusory stimuli. Our data provide strong evidence that the temporal processing of multiple sensory signals and the merging of multiple signals into a single, unified perception, are highly related. Specifically, the width of right side of an individuals' TBW, where the auditory stimulus follows the visual, is significantly correlated with the strength of illusory percepts, as indexed via both an increase in the strength of binding synchronous sensory signals and in an improvement in correctly dissociating asynchronous signals. These findings are discussed in terms of their possible neurobiological basis, relevance to the development of sensory integration, and possible importance for clinical conditions in which there is growing evidence that multisensory integration is compromised.

  18. A Validated Prediction Model for Overall Survival From Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Toward Survival Prediction for Individual Patients

    PubMed Central

    Oberije, Cary; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Houben, Ruud; van de Heuvel, Michel; Uyterlinde, Wilma; Deasy, Joseph O.; Belderbos, Jose; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.; Rimner, Andreas; Din, Shaun; Lambin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are homogeneous according to the TNM staging system, they form a heterogeneous group, which is reflected in the survival outcome. The increasing amount of information for an individual patient and the growing number of treatment options facilitate personalized treatment, but they also complicate treatment decision making. Decision support systems (DSS), which provide individualized prognostic information, can overcome this but are currently lacking. A DSS for stage III NSCLC requires the development and integration of multiple models. The current study takes the first step in this process by developing and validating a model that can provide physicians with a survival probability for an individual NSCLC patient. Methods and Materials Data from 548 patients with stage III NSCLC were available to enable the development of a prediction model, using stratified Cox regression. Variables were selected by using a bootstrap procedure. Performance of the model was expressed as the c statistic, assessed internally and on 2 external data sets (n=174 and n=130). Results The final multivariate model, stratified for treatment, consisted of age, gender, World Health Organization performance status, overall treatment time, equivalent radiation dose, number of positive lymph node stations, and gross tumor volume. The bootstrapped c statistic was 0.62. The model could identify risk groups in external data sets. Nomograms were constructed to predict an individual patient’s survival probability (www.predictcancer.org). The data set can be downloaded at https://www.cancerdata.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.02.048. Conclusions The prediction model for overall survival of patients with stage III NSCLC highlights the importance of combining patient, clinical, and treatment variables. Nomograms were developed and validated. This tool could be used as a first building block for a decision support system. PMID:25936599

  19. A Validated Prediction Model for Overall Survival From Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Toward Survival Prediction for Individual Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Oberije, Cary; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Houben, Ruud; Heuvel, Michel van de; Uyterlinde, Wilma; Deasy, Joseph O.; Belderbos, Jose; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.; Rimner, Andreas; Din, Shaun; Lambin, Philippe

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Although patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are homogeneous according to the TNM staging system, they form a heterogeneous group, which is reflected in the survival outcome. The increasing amount of information for an individual patient and the growing number of treatment options facilitate personalized treatment, but they also complicate treatment decision making. Decision support systems (DSS), which provide individualized prognostic information, can overcome this but are currently lacking. A DSS for stage III NSCLC requires the development and integration of multiple models. The current study takes the first step in this process by developing and validating a model that can provide physicians with a survival probability for an individual NSCLC patient. Methods and Materials: Data from 548 patients with stage III NSCLC were available to enable the development of a prediction model, using stratified Cox regression. Variables were selected by using a bootstrap procedure. Performance of the model was expressed as the c statistic, assessed internally and on 2 external data sets (n=174 and n=130). Results: The final multivariate model, stratified for treatment, consisted of age, gender, World Health Organization performance status, overall treatment time, equivalent radiation dose, number of positive lymph node stations, and gross tumor volume. The bootstrapped c statistic was 0.62. The model could identify risk groups in external data sets. Nomograms were constructed to predict an individual patient's survival probability ( (www.predictcancer.org)). The data set can be downloaded at (https://www.cancerdata.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.02.048). Conclusions: The prediction model for overall survival of patients with stage III NSCLC highlights the importance of combining patient, clinical, and treatment variables. Nomograms were developed and validated. This tool could be used as a first building block for a decision support system.

  20. Predicting Optimal Outcomes in Cognitive Therapy or Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Individuals Using the Personalized Advantage Index Approach

    PubMed Central

    Huibers, Marcus J. H.; Cohen, Zachary D.; Lemmens, Lotte H. J. M.; Arntz, Arnoud; Peeters, Frenk P. M. L.; Cuijpers, Pim; DeRubeis, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although psychotherapies for depression produce equivalent outcomes, individual patients respond differently to different therapies. Predictors of outcome have been identified in the context of randomized trials, but this information has not been used to predict which treatment works best for the depressed individual. In this paper, we aim to replicate a recently developed treatment selection method, using data from an RCT comparing the effects of cognitive therapy (CT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT). Methods 134 depressed patients completed the pre- and post-treatment BDI-II assessment. First, we identified baseline predictors and moderators. Second, individual treatment recommendations were generated by combining the identified predictors and moderators in an algorithm that produces the Personalized Advantage Index (PAI), a measure of the predicted advantage in one therapy compared to the other, using standard regression analyses and the leave-one-out cross-validation approach. Results We found five predictors (gender, employment status, anxiety, personality disorder and quality of life) and six moderators (somatic complaints, cognitive problems, paranoid symptoms, interpersonal self-sacrificing, attributional style and number of life events) of treatment outcome. The mean average PAI value was 8.9 BDI points, and 63% of the sample was predicted to have a clinically meaningful advantage in one of the therapies. Those who were randomized to their predicted optimal treatment (either CT or IPT) had an observed mean end-BDI of 11.8, while those who received their predicted non-optimal treatment had an end-BDI of 17.8 (effect size for the difference = 0.51). Discussion Depressed patients who were randomized to their predicted optimal treatment fared much better than those randomized to their predicted non-optimal treatment. The PAI provides a great opportunity for formal decision-making to improve individual patient outcomes in depression. Although

  1. Overview of Heat Addition and Efficiency Predictions for an Advanced Stirling Convertor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Reid, Terry V.; Schifer, Nicholas A.; Briggs, Maxwell H.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. This generator would use two high-efficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), developed by Sunpower Inc. and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The ASCs convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. As part of ground testing of these ASCs, different operating conditions are used to simulate expected mission conditions. These conditions require achieving a particular operating frequency, hot end and cold end temperatures, and specified electrical power output for a given net heat input. Microporous bulk insulation is used in the ground support test hardware to minimize the loss of thermal energy from the electric heat source to the environment. The insulation package is characterized before operation to predict how much heat will be absorbed by the convertor and how much will be lost to the environment during operation. In an effort to validate these predictions, numerous tasks have been performed, which provided a more accurate value for net heat input into the ASCs. This test and modeling effort included: (a) making thermophysical property measurements of test setup materials to provide inputs to the numerical models, (b) acquiring additional test data that was collected during convertor tests to provide numerical models with temperature profiles of the test setup via thermocouple and infrared measurements, (c) using multidimensional numerical models (computational fluid dynamics code) to predict net heat input of an operating convertor, and (d) using validation test hardware to provide direct comparison of numerical results and validate the multidimensional numerical models used to predict convertor net heat input. This effort produced high fidelity ASC net heat input predictions, which were successfully validated using

  2. Predicted versus measured photosynthetic water-use efficiency of crop stands under dynamically changing field environments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liu-Kang; Hsiao, Theodore C

    2004-11-01

    Water-use efficiency (WUE) is critical in determining the adaptation and productivity of plants in water-limited areas, either under the present climate or future global change. Data on WUE are often highly variable and a unifying and quantitative approach is needed to analyse and predict WUE for different environments. Hsiao has already proposed a set of paradigm equations based on leaf gas exchange for this purpose, calculating WUE (ratio of assimilation to transpiration) relative to the WUE for a chosen reference situation. This study tests the validity and applicability of these equations to cotton and sweet corn stands with full canopies in the open field. Measured were evapotranspiration and downward flux of atmospheric CO2 into the canopy, soil CO2 efflux, canopy temperature, and CO2 and vapour pressure of the air surrounding the canopy. With the measured mean WUE and conditions at midday serving as the reference, WUE for other times was predicted from the air CO2 and water vapour data, intercellular water vapour pressure calculated from canopy temperature, and an assumed ratio of Ci/Ca based on leaf gas-exchange data. Provided that the stomatal response to humidity as it affected the Ci/Ca ratio was accounted for, the equations predicted the moment-by-moment changes in canopy WUE of cotton over daily cycles reasonably well, and also the variation in midday WUE from day-to-day over a 47 d period. The prediction for sweet corn was fairly good for most parts of the day except the early morning. Measurement uncertainties and possible causes of the differences between predicted and measured WUE are discussed. Overall, the results indicate that the equations may be suitable to simulate changes in WUE without upscaling, and also demonstrate clearly the importance of stomatal response to humidity in determining stand WUE in the field.

  3. Partial solubility parameters and solvatochromic parameters for predicting the solubility of single and multiple drugs in individual solvents.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, P; Martin, A; Gonzalez-Guisandez, M A

    1993-06-01

    A modification of the extended Hansen method is used for estimating the solubility of sulfadiazine and other organic drug molecules in a number of individual solvents ranging from nonpolar to highly polar. The equations obtained for each drug involve the partial solubility parameters of the solvents and allow the prediction of solubility of these drugs in a new solvent. Furthermore, a number of drugs (e.g., sulfadiazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine, naphthalene, and some benzoic acid derivatives) are combined in a single expression including the ideal solubility of the drugs and the partial solubility parameters of the solvents. The equation fits the solubilities of these drugs in a wide variety of solvents and may be used to predict the solubility of other sulfonamides and benzoic acid derivatives in semipolar and highly polar solvents. The solvatochromic parameter approach is also used in models for predicting the solubility of single drugs in individual solvents. It was tested with multiple solutes as was the partial solubility parameter approach. However, the latter approach is superior; the parameters of the solubility parameter method are all statistically significant for drugs tested individually or together in a single equation, a condition that is not obtained with the solvatochromic model.

  4. Maximising the efficiency of clinical screening programmes: balancing predictive genetic testing with a right not to know

    PubMed Central

    Schuurman, Agnes G; van der Kolk, Dorina M; Verkerk, Marian A; Birnie, Erwin; Ranchor, Adelita V; Plantinga, Mirjam; van Langen, Irene M

    2015-01-01

    We explored the dilemma between patients' right not to know their genetic status and the efficient use of health-care resources in the form of clinical cancer screening programmes. Currently, in the Netherlands, 50% risk carriers of heritable cancer syndromes who choose not to know their genetic status have access to the same screening programmes as proven mutation carriers. This implies an inefficient use of health-care resources, because half of this group will not carry the familial mutation. At the moment, only a small number of patients are involved; however, the expanding possibilities for genetic risk profiling means this issue must be addressed because of potentially adverse societal and financial impact. The trade-off between patients' right not to know their genetic status and efficient use of health-care resources was discussed in six focus groups with health-care professionals and patients from three Dutch university hospitals. Professionals prefer patients to undergo a predictive DNA test as a prerequisite for entering cancer screening programmes. Professionals prioritise treating sick patients or proven mutation carriers over screening untested individuals. Participation in cancer screening programmes without prior DNA testing is, however, supported by most professionals, as testing is usually delayed and relatively few patients are involved at present. Reducing the number of 50% risk carriers undergoing screening is expected to be achieved by: offering more psychosocial support, explaining the iatrogenic risks of cancer screening, increasing out-of-pocket costs, and offering a less stringent screening programme for 50% risk carriers. PMID:25564039

  5. Maximising the efficiency of clinical screening programmes: balancing predictive genetic testing with a right not to know.

    PubMed

    Schuurman, Agnes G; van der Kolk, Dorina M; Verkerk, Marian A; Birnie, Erwin; Ranchor, Adelita V; Plantinga, Mirjam; van Langen, Irene M

    2015-09-01

    We explored the dilemma between patients' right not to know their genetic status and the efficient use of health-care resources in the form of clinical cancer screening programmes. Currently, in the Netherlands, 50% risk carriers of heritable cancer syndromes who choose not to know their genetic status have access to the same screening programmes as proven mutation carriers. This implies an inefficient use of health-care resources, because half of this group will not carry the familial mutation. At the moment, only a small number of patients are involved; however, the expanding possibilities for genetic risk profiling means this issue must be addressed because of potentially adverse societal and financial impact. The trade-off between patients' right not to know their genetic status and efficient use of health-care resources was discussed in six focus groups with health-care professionals and patients from three Dutch university hospitals. Professionals prefer patients to undergo a predictive DNA test as a prerequisite for entering cancer screening programmes. Professionals prioritise treating sick patients or proven mutation carriers over screening untested individuals. Participation in cancer screening programmes without prior DNA testing is, however, supported by most professionals, as testing is usually delayed and relatively few patients are involved at present. Reducing the number of 50% risk carriers undergoing screening is expected to be achieved by: offering more psychosocial support, explaining the iatrogenic risks of cancer screening, increasing out-of-pocket costs, and offering a less stringent screening programme for 50% risk carriers.

  6. Using bench press load to predict upper body exercise loads in physically active individuals.

    PubMed

    Wong, Del P; Ngo, Kwan-Lung; Tse, Michael A; Smith, Andrew W

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether loads for assistance exercises of the upper body can be predicted from the loads of the bench press exercise. Twenty-nine physically active collegiate students (age: 22.6 ± 2.5; weight training experience: 2.9 ± 2.1 years; estimated 1RM bench press: 54.31 ± 14.60 kg; 1RM: body weight ratio: 0.80 ± 0.22; BMI: 22.7 ± 2.1 kg·m(-2)) were recruited. The 6RM loads for bench press, barbell bicep curl, overhead dumbbell triceps extension, hammer curl and dumbbell shoulder press were measured. Test-retest reliability for the 5 exercises as determined by Pearson product moment correlation coefficient was very high to nearly perfect (0.82-0.98, p < 0.01). The bench press load was significantly correlated with the loads of the 4 assistance exercises (r ranged from 0.80 to 0.93, p < 0.01). Linear regression revealed that the bench press load was a significant (R(2) range from 0.64 to 0.86, p < 0.01) predictor for the loads of the 4 assistance exercises. The following 6RM prediction equations were determined: (a) Hammer curl = Bench press load (0.28) + 6.30 kg, (b) Barbell biceps curl = Bench press load (0.33) + 6.20 kg, (c) Overhead triceps extension = Bench press load (0.33) - 0.60 kg, and (d) Dumbbell shoulder press = Bench press load (0.42) + 5.84 kg. The difference between the actual load and the predicted load using the four equations ranged between 6.52% and 8.54%, such difference was not significant. Fitness professionals can use the 6RM bench press load as a time effective and accurate method to predict training loads for upper body assistance exercises. Key pointsThe bench press load was significantly correlated with the loads of the 4 assistance exercises.No significant differences were found between the actual load and the predicted load in the four equations.6RM bench press load can be a time effective and accurate method to predict training loads for upper body assistance exercises.

  7. Using Bench Press Load to Predict Upper Body Exercise Loads in Physically Active Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Del P.; Ngo, Kwan-Lung; Tse, Michael A.; Smith, Andrew W.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether loads for assistance exercises of the upper body can be predicted from the loads of the bench press exercise. Twenty-nine physically active collegiate students (age: 22.6 ± 2.5; weight training experience: 2.9 ± 2.1 years; estimated 1RM bench press: 54.31 ± 14.60 kg; 1RM: body weight ratio: 0.80 ± 0.22; BMI: 22.7 ± 2.1 kg·m-2) were recruited. The 6RM loads for bench press, barbell bicep curl, overhead dumbbell triceps extension, hammer curl and dumbbell shoulder press were measured. Test-retest reliability for the 5 exercises as determined by Pearson product moment correlation coefficient was very high to nearly perfect (0.82-0.98, p < 0.01). The bench press load was significantly correlated with the loads of the 4 assistance exercises (r ranged from 0.80 to 0.93, p < 0.01). Linear regression revealed that the bench press load was a significant (R2 range from 0.64 to 0.86, p < 0.01) predictor for the loads of the 4 assistance exercises. The following 6RM prediction equations were determined: (a) Hammer curl = Bench press load (0.28) + 6.30 kg, (b) Barbell biceps curl = Bench press load (0.33) + 6.20 kg, (c) Overhead triceps extension = Bench press load (0.33) - 0.60 kg, and (d) Dumbbell shoulder press = Bench press load (0.42) + 5.84 kg. The difference between the actual load and the predicted load using the four equations ranged between 6.52% and 8.54%, such difference was not significant. Fitness professionals can use the 6RM bench press load as a time effective and accurate method to predict training loads for upper body assistance exercises. Key points The bench press load was significantly correlated with the loads of the 4 assistance exercises. No significant differences were found between the actual load and the predicted load in the four equations. 6RM bench press load can be a time effective and accurate method to predict training loads for upper body assistance exercises. PMID:24149723

  8. A probabilistic and individualized approach for predicting treatment gains: an extension and application to anxiety disordered youth.

    PubMed

    Beidas, Rinad S; Lindhiem, Oliver; Brodman, Douglas M; Swan, Anna; Carper, Matthew; Cummings, Colleen; Kendall, Philip C; Albano, Anne Marie; Rynn, Moira; Piacentini, John; McCracken, James; Compton, Scott N; March, John; Walkup, John; Ginsburg, Golda; Keeton, Courtney P; Birmaher, Boris; Sakolsky, Dara; Sherrill, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to extend the probability of treatment benefit method by adding treatment condition as a stratifying variable, and illustrate this extension of the methodology using the Child and Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study data. The probability of treatment benefit method produces a simple and practical way to predict individualized treatment benefit based on pretreatment patient characteristics. Two pretreatment patient characteristics were selected in the production of the probability of treatment benefit charts: baseline anxiety severity, measured by the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale, and treatment condition (cognitive-behavioral therapy, sertraline, their combination, and placebo). We produced two charts as exemplars which provide individualized and probabilistic information for treatment response and outcome to treatments for child anxiety. We discuss the implications of the use of the probability of treatment benefit method, particularly with regard to patient-centered outcomes and individualized decision-making in psychology and psychiatry.

  9. Individual stress vulnerability is predicted by short-term memory and AMPA receptor subunit ratio in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Mathias V; Trümbach, Dietrich; Weber, Peter; Wagner, Klaus; Scharf, Sebastian H; Liebl, Claudia; Datson, Nicole; Namendorf, Christian; Gerlach, Tamara; Kühne, Claudia; Uhr, Manfred; Deussing, Jan M; Wurst, Wolfgang; Binder, Elisabeth B; Holsboer, Florian; Müller, Marianne B

    2010-12-15

    Increased vulnerability to aversive experiences is one of the main risk factors for stress-related psychiatric disorders as major depression. However, the molecular bases of vulnerability, on the one hand, and stress resilience, on the other hand, are still not understood. Increasing clinical and preclinical evidence suggests a central involvement of the glutamatergic system in the pathogenesis of major depression. Using a mouse paradigm, modeling increased stress vulnerability and depression-like symptoms in a genetically diverse outbred strain, and we tested the hypothesis that differences in AMPA receptor function may be linked to individual variations in stress vulnerability. Vulnerable and resilient animals differed significantly in their dorsal hippocampal AMPA receptor expression and AMPA receptor binding. Treatment with an AMPA receptor potentiator during the stress exposure prevented the lasting effects of chronic social stress exposure on physiological, neuroendocrine, and behavioral parameters. In addition, spatial short-term memory, an AMPA receptor-dependent behavior, was found to be predictive of individual stress vulnerability and response to AMPA potentiator treatment. Finally, we provide evidence that genetic variations in the AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 are linked to the vulnerable phenotype. Therefore, we propose genetic variations in the AMPA receptor system to shape individual stress vulnerability. Those individual differences can be predicted by the assessment of short-term memory, thereby opening up the possibility for a specific treatment by enhancing AMPA receptor function.

  10. Individual Differences in Rhythmic Cortical Entrainment Correlate with Predictive Behavior in Sensorimotor Synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Nozaradan, Sylvie; Peretz, Isabelle; Keller, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    The current study aims at characterizing the mechanisms that allow humans to entrain the mind and body to incoming rhythmic sensory inputs in real time. We addressed this unresolved issue by examining the relationship between covert neural processes and overt behavior in the context of musical rhythm. We measured temporal prediction abilities, sensorimotor synchronization accuracy and neural entrainment to auditory rhythms as captured using an EEG frequency-tagging approach. Importantly, movement synchronization accuracy with a rhythmic beat could be explained by the amplitude of neural activity selectively locked with the beat period when listening to the rhythmic inputs. Furthermore, stronger endogenous neural entrainment at the beat frequency was associated with superior temporal prediction abilities. Together, these results reveal a direct link between cortical and behavioral measures of rhythmic entrainment, thus providing evidence that frequency-tagged brain activity has functional relevance for beat perception and synchronization. PMID:26847160

  11. Brainstem White Matter Predicts Individual Differences in Manual Motor Difficulties and Symptom Severity in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Brittany G.; Bigler, Erin D.; Tromp, Do P. M.; Adluru, Nagesh; Destiche, Dan; Samsin, Danica; Froehlich, Alyson; Prigge, Molly D. B.; Duffield, Tyler; Lange, Nicholas; Alexander, Andrew L.; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that poorer motor skills may be related to more severe autism symptoms. This study investigated if atypical white matter microstructure in the brain mediated the relationship between motor skills and ASD symptom severity. Sixty-seven males with ASD and 42 males with typical development (5-33 years old) completed a diffusion tensor imaging scan and measures of grip strength, finger tapping, and autism symptom severity. Within the ASD group, weaker grip strength predicted more severe autism symptoms. Fractional anisotropy of the brainstem's corticospinal tract predicted both grip strength and autism symptom severity and mediated the relationship between the two. These findings suggest that brainstem white matter may contribute to autism symptoms and grip strength in ASD. PMID:26001365

  12. Partner traits that predict relationship satisfaction for neurotic individuals in premarital relationships.

    PubMed

    Larson, Jeffry H; Blick, Ryan W; Jackson, Jeffrey B; Holman, Thomas B

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (a) to examine the degree of consensus between self-reports of neuroticism and partner reports of neuroticism, (b) to explore how neuroticism is related to relationship satisfaction for both partners, and (c) to identify partner traits and skills that predict relationship satisfaction in committed premarital relationships in which one partner has neurotic traits. The results from 198 single, young adult couples who completed the Relationship Evaluation indicated the length of the relationship and their perceptions of their partners' empathy, flexibility, and clear-speaking skills predicted relationship satisfaction for neurotic women. Predictors of relationship satisfaction for neurotic men included perceptions of their partners' lack of criticism and flooding as well as high levels of kindness and empathy. Implications for couple therapy are discussed.

  13. Inter-individual differences in the experience of negative emotion predict variations in functional brain architecture

    PubMed Central

    Petrican, Raluca; Saverino, Cristina; Rosenbaum, R. Shayna; Grady, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that two spatially distinct neuroanatomical networks, the dorsal attention network (DAN) and the default mode network (DMN), support externally and internally oriented cognition, respectively, and are functionally regulated by a third, frontoparietal control network (FPC). Interactions among these networks contribute to normal variations in cognitive functioning and to the aberrant affective profiles present in certain clinical conditions, such as major depression. Nevertheless, their links to non-clinical variations in affective functioning are still poorly understood. To address this issue, we used fMRI to measure the intrinsic functional interactions among these networks in a sample of predominantly younger women (N = 162) from the Human Connectome Project. Consistent with the previously documented dichotomous motivational orientations (i.e., withdrawal versus approach) associated with sadness versus anger, we hypothesized that greater sadness would predict greater DMN (rather than DAN) functional dominance, whereas greater anger would predict the opposite. Overall, there was evidence of greater DAN (rather than DMN) functional dominance, but this pattern was modulated by current experience of specific negative emotions, as well as subclinical depressive and anxiety symptoms. Thus, greater levels of currently experienced sadness and subclinical depression independently predicted weaker DAN functional dominance (i.e., weaker DAN-FPC functional connectivity), likely reflecting reduced goal-directed attention towards the external perceptual environment. Complementarily, greater levels of currently experienced anger and subclinical anxiety predicted greater DAN functional dominance (i.e., greater DAN-FPC functional connectivity and, for anxiety only, also weaker DMN-FPC coupling). Our findings suggest that distinct affective states and subclinical mood symptoms have dissociable neural signatures, reflective of the symbiotic relationship

  14. Effect of Individual Variability in Body Size on Empirical Model Predictions of Exercise Endurance Times

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    clothing, and exertion, increased body mass index ( BMI ) has recently been shown to increase the likelihood of developing exertional heat illness. USARIEM...addition to weather, clothing, and exertion, increased body mass index ( BMI ) has recently been shown to increase the likelihood of developing exertional...OF ABSTRACT 8. M05-24 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE EFFECT OF INDIVIDUAL VARIABILITY IN BODY SIZE ON EMPIRICAL MODEL

  15. Correlation Equation for Predicting the Single-Collector Contact Efficiency of Colloids in a Horizontal Flow.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Xie, Xiaohu; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2015-07-07

    The single-collector contact efficiency (η0) for physicochemical colloid filtration under horizontal flow in saturated porous media was calculated using trajectory analysis in three dimensions. Past studies have developed correlation equations for colloids with densities close to that of water, such as bacteria and latex particles. A new correlation equation was developed for predicting η0 based on a large number of trajectory simulations to account for higher-density particles representative of metal colloids. The correlation equation was developed by assuming Brownian diffusion, interception, and gravitational sedimentation contributed to η0 in an additive manner. Numerical simulations for colloid trajectory analysis used for calculating η0 were based on horizontal flow around a collector under the action of van der Waals attractive forces, gravity, and hydrodynamic forces as well as Brownian motion. The derived correlation equation shows excellent agreement with existing correlation equations for particles with density close to that of water. However, the correlation equation presented in this study shows that η0 of high-density colloids, such as metal particles, transported under horizontal flow deviates from that predicted by existing correlations for colloids larger than 4 μm and under low approach velocities. Simulations of trajectory paths show that a significantly reduced contact of high-density colloids larger than 4 μm in size with a collector is due to gravity forces causing trajectory paths to deviate away from the underside of collectors. The new correlation equation is suitable for predicting the single collector efficiency of large particles (several hundred nanometers to several micrometers) and with a large amount of density transport in the horizontal flow mode but is unsuitable for particles with a quite small size (several to tens of nanometers) and for the particle with a large amount of density flow in the vertical flow mode. The

  16. Age and Individual Foraging Behavior Predict Tooth Wear in Amboseli Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Galbany, Jordi; Altmann, Jeanne; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro; Alberts, Susan C.

    2010-01-01

    Teeth represent an essential component of the foraging apparatus for any mammal, and tooth wear can have significant implications for survival and reproduction. This study focuses on tooth wear in wild baboons in Amboseli, southern Kenya. We obtained mandibular and maxillary tooth impressions from 95 baboons and analyzed digital images of replicas made from these impressions. We measured tooth wear as the percent dentine exposure (PDE, the percent of the occlusal surface on which dentine was exposed), and we examined the relationship of PDE to age, behavior, and life history variables. We found that PDE increased significantly with age for both sexes in all three molar types. In females, we also tested the hypotheses that long-term patterns of feeding behavior, social dominance rank, and one measure of maternal investment (the cumulative number of months that a female had dependent infants during her lifetime) would predict tooth wear when we controlled for age. The hypothesis that feeding behavior predicted tooth wear was supported. The percent of feeding time spent consuming grass corms predicted PDE when controlling for age. However, PDE was not associated with social dominance rank or maternal investment. Am J Phys Anthropol 000:000–000, 2010. PMID:20721946

  17. Acoustic startle response in rats predicts inter-individual variation in fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Russo, Amanda S; Parsons, Ryan G

    2017-03-01

    Although a large portion of the population is exposed to a traumatic event at some point, only a small percentage of the population develops post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), suggesting the presence of predisposing factors. Abnormal acoustic startle response (ASR) has been shown to be associated with PTSD, implicating it as a potential predictor of the development of PTSD-like behavior. Since poor extinction and retention of extinction learning are characteristic of PTSD patients, it is of interest to determine if abnormal ASR is predictive of development of such deficits. To determine whether baseline ASR has utility in predicting the development of PTSD-like behavior, the relationship between baseline ASR and freezing behavior following Pavlovian fear conditioning was examined in a group of adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats. Baseline acoustic startle response (ASR) was assessed preceding exposure to a Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm where freezing behavior was measured during fear conditioning, extinction training, and extinction testing. Although there was no relationship between baseline ASR and fear memory following conditioning, rats with low baseline ASR had significantly lower magnitude of retention of the extinction memory than rats with high baseline ASR. The results suggest that baseline ASR has value as a predictive index of the development of a PTSD-like phenotype.

  18. Pathogen prevalence predicts human cross-cultural variability in individualism/collectivism.

    PubMed

    Fincher, Corey L; Thornhill, Randy; Murray, Damian R; Schaller, Mark

    2008-06-07

    Pathogenic diseases impose selection pressures on the social behaviour of host populations. In humans (Homo sapiens), many psychological phenomena appear to serve an antipathogen defence function. One broad implication is the existence of cross-cultural differences in human cognition and behaviour contingent upon the relative presence of pathogens in the local ecology. We focus specifically on one fundamental cultural variable: differences in individualistic versus collectivist values. We suggest that specific behavioural manifestations of collectivism (e.g. ethnocentrism, conformity) can inhibit the transmission of pathogens; and so we hypothesize that collectivism (compared with individualism) will more often characterize cultures in regions that have historically had higher prevalence of pathogens. Drawing on epidemiological data and the findings of worldwide cross-national surveys of individualism/collectivism, our results support this hypothesis: the regional prevalence of pathogens has a strong positive correlation with cultural indicators of collectivism and a strong negative correlation with individualism. The correlations remain significant even when controlling for potential confounding variables. These results help to explain the origin of a paradigmatic cross-cultural difference, and reveal previously undocumented consequences of pathogenic diseases on the variable nature of human societies.

  19. Pathogen prevalence predicts human cross-cultural variability in individualism/collectivism

    PubMed Central

    Fincher, Corey L; Thornhill, Randy; Murray, Damian R; Schaller, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic diseases impose selection pressures on the social behaviour of host populations. In humans (Homo sapiens), many psychological phenomena appear to serve an antipathogen defence function. One broad implication is the existence of cross-cultural differences in human cognition and behaviour contingent upon the relative presence of pathogens in the local ecology. We focus specifically on one fundamental cultural variable: differences in individualistic versus collectivist values. We suggest that specific behavioural manifestations of collectivism (e.g. ethnocentrism, conformity) can inhibit the transmission of pathogens; and so we hypothesize that collectivism (compared with individualism) will more often characterize cultures in regions that have historically had higher prevalence of pathogens. Drawing on epidemiological data and the findings of worldwide cross-national surveys of individualism/collectivism, our results support this hypothesis: the regional prevalence of pathogens has a strong positive correlation with cultural indicators of collectivism and a strong negative correlation with individualism. The correlations remain significant even when controlling for potential confounding variables. These results help to explain the origin of a paradigmatic cross-cultural difference, and reveal previously undocumented consequences of pathogenic diseases on the variable nature of human societies. PMID:18302996

  20. Type of High School Predicts Academic Performance at University Better than Individual Differences

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Psychological correlates of academic performance have always been of high relevance to psychological research. The relation between psychometric intelligence and academic performance is one of the most consistent and well-established findings in psychology. It is hypothesized that intelligence puts a limit on what an individual can learn or achieve. Moreover, a growing body of literature indicates a relationship between personality traits and academic performance. This relationship helps us to better understand how an individual will learn or achieve their goals. The aim of this study is to further investigate the relationship between psychological correlates of academic performance by exploring the potentially moderating role of prior education. The participants in this study differed in the type of high school they attended. They went either to gymnasium, a general education type of high school that prepares students specifically for university studies, or to vocational school, which prepares students both for the labour market and for further studies. In this study, we used archival data of psychological testing during career guidance in the final year of high school, and information about the university graduation of those who received guidance. The psychological measures included intelligence, personality and general knowledge. The results show that gymnasium students had greater chances of performing well at university, and that this relationship exceeds the contribution of intelligence and personality traits to university graduation. Moreover, psychological measures did not interact with type of high school, which indicates that students from different school types do not profit from certain individual characteristics. PMID:27695073

  1. Connectivity Strength of Dissociable Striatal Tracts Predict Individual Differences in Temporal Discounting

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Christian A.; Schweitzer, Julie B.

    2014-01-01

    Large individual differences exist in the ability to delay gratification for the sake of satisfying longer-term goals. These individual differences are commonly assayed by studying intertemporal preferences, as revealed by choices between immediate and delayed rewards. In the brain, reward-based and goal-oriented decisions are believed to rely on the striatum and its interactions with other cortical and subcortical networks. However, it remains unknown which specific cortical-striatal tracts are involved in intertemporal decision making. We use connectivity analyses in both structural and functional MRI to further our understanding of the relationship between distinct corticostriatal networks and intertemporal preferences in humans. Our results revealed distinct striatal pathways that are differentially related to delay discounting. Structural and functional connectivity between striatum and lateral prefrontal cortex was associated with increased patience, whereas connectivity between subcortical areas and striatum was associated with increased impulsivity. These findings provide novel insights into how the anatomy and functioning of striatal circuits mediate individual differences in intertemporal choice. PMID:25080591

  2. ENIGMA and the individual: Predicting factors that affect the brain in 35 countries worldwide.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Paul M; Andreassen, Ole A; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Bearden, Carrie E; Boedhoe, Premika S; Brouwer, Rachel M; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Cannon, Dara M; Cohen, Ronald A; Conrod, Patricia J; Dale, Anders M; Deary, Ian J; Dennis, Emily L; de Reus, Marcel A; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Dima, Danai; Donohoe, Gary; Fisher, Simon E; Fouche, Jean-Paul; Francks, Clyde; Frangou, Sophia; Franke, Barbara; Ganjgahi, Habib; Garavan, Hugh; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Guadalupe, Tulio; Gutman, Boris A; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hibar, Derrek P; Holland, Dominic; Hoogman, Martine; Pol, Hilleke E Hulshoff; Hosten, Norbert; Jahanshad, Neda; Kelly, Sinead; Kochunov, Peter; Kremen, William S; Lee, Phil H; Mackey, Scott; Martin, Nicholas G; Mazoyer, Bernard; McDonald, Colm; Medland, Sarah E; Morey, Rajendra A; Nichols, Thomas E; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Schmaal, Lianne; Schumann, Gunter; Shen, Li; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smit, Dirk J A; Smoller, Jordan W; Stein, Dan J; Stein, Jason L; Toro, Roberto; Turner, Jessica A; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; van den Heuvel, Odile L; van Erp, Theo G M; van Rooij, Daan; Veltman, Dick J; Walter, Henrik; Wang, Yalin; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Whelan, Christopher D; Wright, Margaret J; Ye, Jieping

    2017-01-15

    In this review, we discuss recent work by the ENIGMA Consortium (http://enigma.ini.usc.edu) - a global alliance of over 500 scientists spread across 200 institutions in 35 countries collectively analyzing brain imaging, clinical, and genetic data. Initially formed to detect genetic influences on brain measures, ENIGMA has grown to over 30 working groups studying 12 major brain diseases by pooling and comparing brain data. In some of the largest neuroimaging studies to date - of schizophrenia and major depression - ENIGMA has found replicable disease effects on the brain that are consistent worldwide, as well as factors that modulate disease effects. In partnership with other consortia including ADNI, CHARGE, IMAGEN and others(1), ENIGMA's genomic screens - now numbering over 30,000 MRI scans - have revealed at least 8 genetic loci that affect brain volumes. Downstream of gene findings, ENIGMA has revealed how these individual variants - and genetic variants in general - may affect both the brain and risk for a range of diseases. The ENIGMA consortium is discovering factors that consistently affect brain structure and function that will serve as future predictors linking individual brain scans and genomic data. It is generating vast pools of normative data on brain measures - from tens of thousands of people - that may help detect deviations from normal development or aging in specific groups of subjects. We discuss challenges and opportunities in applying these predictors to individual subjects and new cohorts, as well as lessons we have learned in ENIGMA's efforts so far.

  3. A cognitive neuroscience-based computerized battery for efficient measurement of individual differences: standardization and initial construct validation.

    PubMed

    Gur, Ruben C; Richard, Jan; Hughett, Paul; Calkins, Monica E; Macy, Larry; Bilker, Warren B; Brensinger, Colleen; Gur, Raquel E

    2010-03-30

    There is increased need for efficient computerized methods to collect reliable data on a range of cognitive domains that can be linked to specific brain systems. Such need arises in functional neuroimaging studies, where individual differences in cognitive performance are variables of interest or serve as confounds. In genetic studies of complex behavior, which require particularly large samples, such trait measures can serve as endophenotypes. Traditional neuropsychological tests, based on clinical pathological correlations, are protracted, require extensive training in administration and scoring, and leave lengthy paper trails (double-entry for analysis). We present a computerized battery that takes an average of 1h and provides measures of accuracy and speed on 9 neurocognitive domains. They are cognitive neuroscience-based in that they have been linked experimentally to specific brain systems with functional neuroimaging studies. We describe the process of translating tasks used in functional neuroimaging to tests for assessing individual differences. Data are presented on each test with samples ranging from 139 (81 female) to 536 (311 female) of carefully screened healthy individuals ranging in age from 18 to 84. Item consistency was established with acceptable to high Cronbach alpha coefficients. Inter-item correlations were moderate to high within domain and low to nil across domains, indicating construct validity. Initial criterion validity was demonstrated by sensitivity to sex differences and the effects of age, education and parental education. These results encourage the use of this battery in studies needing an efficient assessment of major neurocognitive domains such as multi-site genetic studies and clinical trials.

  4. Individual variability in preference for energy-dense foods fails to predict child BMI percentile.

    PubMed

    Potter, Christina; Griggs, Rebecca L; Ferriday, Danielle; Rogers, Peter J; Brunstrom, Jeffrey M

    2017-04-01

    Many studies show that higher dietary energy density is associated with greater body weight. Here we explored two propositions: i) that child BMI percentile is associated with individual differences in children's relative preference for energy-dense foods, ii) that child BMI percentile is associated with the same individual differences between their parents. Child-parent dyads were recruited from a local interactive science center in Bristol (UK). Using computerized tasks, participants ranked their preference and rated their liking for a range of snack foods that varied in energy density. Children (aged 3-14years, N=110) and parents completed the tasks for themselves. Parents also completed two further tasks in which they ranked the foods in the order that they would prioritize for their child, and again, in the order that they thought their child would choose. Children preferred (t(109)=3.91, p<0.001) and better liked the taste of (t(109)=3.28, p=0.001) higher energy-dense foods, and parents correctly estimated this outcome (t(109)=7.18, p<0.001). Conversely, lower energy-dense foods were preferred (t(109)=-4.63, p<0.001), better liked (t(109)=-2.75, p=0.007) and served (t(109)=-15.06, p<0.001) by parents. However, we found no evidence that child BMI percentile was associated with child or parent preference for, or liking of, energy-dense foods. Therefore, we suggest that the observed relationship between dietary energy density and body weight is not explained by individual differences in preference for energy density.

  5. An Individual-Based Diploid Model Predicts Limited Conditions Under Which Stochastic Gene Expression Becomes Advantageous

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tomotaka; Mineta, Katsuhiko; Osada, Naoki; Araki, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest the existence of a stochasticity in gene expression (SGE) in many organisms, and its non-negligible effect on their phenotype and fitness. To date, however, how SGE affects the key parameters of population genetics are not well understood. SGE can increase the phenotypic variation and act as a load for individuals, if they are at the adaptive optimum in a stable environment. On the other hand, part of the phenotypic variation caused by SGE might become advantageous if individuals at the adaptive optimum become genetically less-adaptive, for example due to an environmental change. Furthermore, SGE of unimportant genes might have little or no fitness consequences. Thus, SGE can be advantageous, disadvantageous, or selectively neutral depending on its context. In addition, there might be a genetic basis that regulates magnitude of SGE, which is often referred to as “modifier genes,” but little is known about the conditions under which such an SGE-modifier gene evolves. In the present study, we conducted individual-based computer simulations to examine these conditions in a diploid model. In the simulations, we considered a single locus that determines organismal fitness for simplicity, and that SGE on the locus creates fitness variation in a stochastic manner. We also considered another locus that modifies the magnitude of SGE. Our results suggested that SGE was always deleterious in stable environments and increased the fixation probability of deleterious mutations in this model. Even under frequently changing environmental conditions, only very strong natural selection made SGE adaptive. These results suggest that the evolution of SGE-modifier genes requires strict balance among the strength of natural selection, magnitude of SGE, and frequency of environmental changes. However, the degree of dominance affected the condition under which SGE becomes advantageous, indicating a better opportunity for the evolution of SGE in different genetic

  6. Child abuse predicts adult PTSD symptoms among individuals diagnosed with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Catani, Claudia; Sossalla, Iris M

    2015-01-01

    Prior research has shown that people with intellectual disabilities (ID) are more likely to experience child abuse as well as other forms of traumatic or negative events later in life compared to the general population. Little is known however, about the association of these experiences with adult mental health in intellectually disabled individuals. The present study aimed to assess whether child abuse in families and institutions as well as other types of adverse life events, were associated with current posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms in individuals with ID. We conducted clinical interviews which included standardized self-report measures for childhood abuse, PTSD, and depression in an unselected sample of 56 persons with a medical diagnosis of ID who were attending a specialized welfare center. The frequency of traumatic experiences was very high, with physical and emotional child abuse being the most common trauma types. 87% of the persons reported at least one aversive experience on the family violence spectrum, and 50% of the sample reported a violent physical attack later in adulthood. 25% were diagnosed with PTSD and almost 27% had a critical score on the depression scale. Physical and emotional child abuse was positively correlated with the amount of institutional violence and the number of general traumatic events, whereas childhood sexual abuse was related to the experience of intimate partner violence in adult life. A linear regression model revealed child abuse in the family to be the only significant independent predictor of PTSD symptom severity. The current findings underscore the central role of child maltreatment in the increased risk of further victimization and in the development of mental health problems in adulthood in intellectually disabled individuals. Our data have important clinical implications and demonstrate the need for targeted prevention and intervention programs that are tailored to the specific needs

  7. Child abuse predicts adult PTSD symptoms among individuals diagnosed with intellectual disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Catani, Claudia; Sossalla, Iris M.

    2015-01-01

    Prior research has shown that people with intellectual disabilities (ID) are more likely to experience child abuse as well as other forms of traumatic or negative events later in life compared to the general population. Little is known however, about the association of these experiences with adult mental health in intellectually disabled individuals. The present study aimed to assess whether child abuse in families and institutions as well as other types of adverse life events, were associated with current posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms in individuals with ID. We conducted clinical interviews which included standardized self-report measures for childhood abuse, PTSD, and depression in an unselected sample of 56 persons with a medical diagnosis of ID who were attending a specialized welfare center. The frequency of traumatic experiences was very high, with physical and emotional child abuse being the most common trauma types. 87% of the persons reported at least one aversive experience on the family violence spectrum, and 50% of the sample reported a violent physical attack later in adulthood. 25% were diagnosed with PTSD and almost 27% had a critical score on the depression scale. Physical and emotional child abuse was positively correlated with the amount of institutional violence and the number of general traumatic events, whereas childhood sexual abuse was related to the experience of intimate partner violence in adult life. A linear regression model revealed child abuse in the family to be the only significant independent predictor of PTSD symptom severity. The current findings underscore the central role of child maltreatment in the increased risk of further victimization and in the development of mental health problems in adulthood in intellectually disabled individuals. Our data have important clinical implications and demonstrate the need for targeted prevention and intervention programs that are tailored to the specific needs

  8. Eye Movements during Auditory Attention Predict Individual Differences in Dorsal Attention Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Rodrigo M.; Fu, Richard Z.; Seemungal, Barry M.; Wise, Richard J. S.; Leech, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The neural mechanisms supporting auditory attention are not fully understood. A dorsal frontoparietal network of brain regions is thought to mediate the spatial orienting of attention across all sensory modalities. Key parts of this network, the frontal eye fields (FEF) and the superior parietal lobes (SPL), contain retinotopic maps and elicit saccades when stimulated. This suggests that their recruitment during auditory attention might reflect crossmodal oculomotor processes; however this has not been confirmed experimentally. Here we investigate whether task-evoked eye movements during an auditory task can predict the magnitude of activity within the dorsal frontoparietal network. A spatial and non-spatial listening task was used with on-line eye-tracking and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). No visual stimuli or cues were used. The auditory task elicited systematic eye movements, with saccade rate and gaze position predicting attentional engagement and the cued sound location, respectively. Activity associated with these separate aspects of evoked eye-movements dissociated between the SPL and FEF. However these observed eye movements could not account for all the activation in the frontoparietal network. Our results suggest that the recruitment of the SPL and FEF during attentive listening reflects, at least partly, overt crossmodal oculomotor processes during non-visual attention. Further work is needed to establish whether the network’s remaining contribution to auditory attention is through covert crossmodal processes, or is directly involved in the manipulation of auditory information. PMID:27242465

  9. Predicting Individual Action Switching in Covert and Continuous Interactive Tasks Using the Fluid Events Model

    PubMed Central

    Radvansky, Gabriel A.; D’Mello, Sidney K.; Abbott, Robert G.; Bixler, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    The Fluid Events Model is aimed at predicting changes in the actions people take on a moment-by-moment basis. In contrast with other research on action selection, this work does not investigate why some course of action was selected, but rather the likelihood of discontinuing the current course of action and selecting another in the near future. This is done using both task-based and experience-based factors. Prior work evaluated this model in the context of trial-by-trial, independent, interactive events, such as choosing how to copy a figure of a line drawing. In this paper, we extend this model to more covert event experiences, such as reading narratives, as well as to continuous interactive events, such as playing a video game. To this end, the model was applied to existing data sets of reading time and event segmentation for written and picture stories. It was also applied to existing data sets of performance in a strategy board game, an aerial combat game, and a first person shooter game in which a participant’s current state was dependent on prior events. The results revealed that the model predicted behavior changes well, taking into account both the theoretically defined structure of the described events, as well as a person’s prior experience. Thus, theories of event cognition can benefit from efforts that take into account not only how events in the world are structured, but also how people experience those events. PMID:26858673

  10. Predicting Individual Action Switching in Covert and Continuous Interactive Tasks Using the Fluid Events Model.

    PubMed

    Radvansky, Gabriel A; D'Mello, Sidney K; Abbott, Robert G; Bixler, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    The Fluid Events Model is aimed at predicting changes in the actions people take on a moment-by-moment basis. In contrast with other research on action selection, this work does not investigate why some course of action was selected, but rather the likelihood of discontinuing the current course of action and selecting another in the near future. This is done using both task-based and experience-based factors. Prior work evaluated this model in the context of trial-by-trial, independent, interactive events, such as choosing how to copy a figure of a line drawing. In this paper, we extend this model to more covert event experiences, such as reading narratives, as well as to continuous interactive events, such as playing a video game. To this end, the model was applied to existing data sets of reading time and event segmentation for written and picture stories. It was also applied to existing data sets of performance in a strategy board game, an aerial combat game, and a first person shooter game in which a participant's current state was dependent on prior events. The results revealed that the model predicted behavior changes well, taking into account both the theoretically defined structure of the described events, as well as a person's prior experience. Thus, theories of event cognition can benefit from efforts that take into account not only how events in the world are structured, but also how people experience those events.

  11. Predicting individual action switching in covert and continuous interactive tasks using the fluid events model

    SciTech Connect

    Radvansky, Gabriel A.; D’Mello, Sidney K.; Abbott, Robert G.; Bixler, Robert E.

    2016-01-27

    The Fluid Events Model is aimed at predicting changes in the actions people take on a moment-by-moment basis. In contrast with other research on action selection, this work does not investigate why some course of action was selected, but rather the likelihood of discontinuing the current course of action and selecting another in the near future. This is done using both task-based and experience-based factors. Prior work evaluated this model in the context of trial-by-trial, independent, interactive events, such as choosing how to copy a figure of a line drawing. In this paper, we extend this model to more covert event experiences, such as reading narratives, as well as to continuous interactive events, such as playing a video game. To this end, the model was applied to existing data sets of reading time and event segmentation for written and picture stories. It was also applied to existing data sets of performance in a strategy board game, an aerial combat game, and a first person shooter game in which a participant’s current state was dependent on prior events. The results revealed that the model predicted behavior changes well, taking into account both the theoretically defined structure of the described events, as well as a person’s prior experience. Hence, theories of event cognition can benefit from efforts that take into account not only how events in the world are structured, but also how people experience those events.

  12. Predicting individual action switching in covert and continuous interactive tasks using the fluid events model

    DOE PAGES

    Radvansky, Gabriel A.; D’Mello, Sidney K.; Abbott, Robert G.; ...

    2016-01-27

    The Fluid Events Model is aimed at predicting changes in the actions people take on a moment-by-moment basis. In contrast with other research on action selection, this work does not investigate why some course of action was selected, but rather the likelihood of discontinuing the current course of action and selecting another in the near future. This is done using both task-based and experience-based factors. Prior work evaluated this model in the context of trial-by-trial, independent, interactive events, such as choosing how to copy a figure of a line drawing. In this paper, we extend this model to more covertmore » event experiences, such as reading narratives, as well as to continuous interactive events, such as playing a video game. To this end, the model was applied to existing data sets of reading time and event segmentation for written and picture stories. It was also applied to existing data sets of performance in a strategy board game, an aerial combat game, and a first person shooter game in which a participant’s current state was dependent on prior events. The results revealed that the model predicted behavior changes well, taking into account both the theoretically defined structure of the described events, as well as a person’s prior experience. Hence, theories of event cognition can benefit from efforts that take into account not only how events in the world are structured, but also how people experience those events.« less

  13. Individual differences in self-reported self-control predict successful emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Paschke, Lena M; Dörfel, Denise; Steimke, Rosa; Trempler, Ima; Magrabi, Amadeus; Ludwig, Vera U; Schubert, Torsten; Stelzel, Christine; Walter, Henrik

    2016-08-01

    Both self-control and emotion regulation enable individuals to adapt to external circumstances and social contexts, and both are assumed to rely on the overlapping neural resources. Here, we tested whether high self-reported self-control is related to successful emotion regulation on the behavioral and neural level. One hundred eight participants completed three self-control questionnaires and regulated their negative emotions during functional magnetic resonance imaging using reappraisal (distancing). Trait self-control correlated positively with successful emotion regulation both subjectively and neurally, as indicated by online ratings of negative emotions and functional connectivity strength between the amygdala and prefrontal areas, respectively. This stronger overall connectivity of the left amygdala was related to more successful subjective emotion regulation. Comparing amygdala activity over time showed that high self-controllers successfully maintained down-regulation of the left amygdala over time, while low self-controllers failed to down-regulate towards the end of the experiment. This indicates that high self-controllers are better at maintaining a motivated state supporting emotion regulation over time. Our results support assumptions concerning a close relation of self-control and emotion regulation as two domains of behavioral control. They further indicate that individual differences in functional connectivity between task-related brain areas directly relate to differences in trait self-control.

  14. Societal individualism predicts prevalence of nonhomosexual orientation in male-to-female transsexualism.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Anne A

    2010-04-01

    There are two distinct subtypes of male-to-female (MtF) transsexuals: homosexual and nonhomosexual. The relative prevalence of these two subtypes varies dramatically between countries, but no explanation of this variability has yet been proposed. This study examined the hypothesis that the prevalence of nonhomosexual MtF transsexualism, relative to homosexual MtF transsexualism, would be higher in individualistic countries than in collectivistic countries. I analyzed data from 22 studies of MtF transsexualism, conducted in 16 countries, examining the association between percentage of nonhomosexual participants and Hofstede's (Culture's consequences: Comparing values, behaviors, institutions, and organizations across nations, 2001) Individualism Index (IDV). IDV accounted for 77% of observed variance in the percentage of nonhomosexual MtF participants (r = 0.88, p < .0001). Controlling for differences in national wealth and in Hofstede's other indices of societal values (Power Distance, Uncertainty Avoidance, and Masculinity) did not significantly change the ability of IDV to account for variance in the percentage of nonhomosexual participants. The factors that contribute to the observed association between societal individualism and the relative prevalence of nonhomosexual MtF transsexualism remain to be determined, but a greater tolerance within individualistic countries for socially disruptive gender transitions by nonhomosexual gender dysphoric men, and the availability within many collectivistic countries of socially approved transgender roles for pervasively feminine homosexual gender dysphoric men, are plausible contributors.

  15. Transcriptome profiling of patient-specific human iPSC-cardiomyocytes predicts individual drug safety and efficacy responses in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Matsa, Elena; Burridge, Paul W.; Yu, Kun-Hsing; Ahrens, John H.; Termglinchan, Vittavat; Wu, Haodi; Liu, Chun; Shukla, Praveen; Sayed, Nazish; Churko, Jared M.; Shao, Ningyi; Woo, Nicole A.; Chao, Alexander S.; Gold, Joseph D.; Karakikes, Ioannis; Snyder, Michael P.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding individual susceptibility to drug-induced cardiotoxicity is key to improving patient safety and preventing drug attrition. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) enable the study of pharmacological and toxicological responses in patient-specific cardiomyocytes (CMs), and may serve as preclinical platforms for precision medicine. Transcriptome profiling in hiPSC-CMs from seven individuals lacking known cardiovascular disease-associated mutations, and in three isogenic human heart tissue and hiPSC-CM pairs, showed greater inter-patient variation than intra-patient variation, verifying that reprogramming and differentiation preserve patient-specific gene expression, particularly in metabolic and stress-response genes. Transcriptome-based toxicology analysis predicted and risk-stratified patient-specific susceptibility to cardiotoxicity, and functional assays in hiPSC-CMs using tacrolimus and rosiglitazone, drugs targeting pathways predicted to produce cardiotoxicity, validated inter-patient differential responses. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated pathway correction prevented drug-induced cardiotoxicity. Our data suggest that hiPSC-CMs can be used in vitro to predict and validate patient-specific drug safety and efficacy, potentially enabling future clinical approaches to precision medicine. PMID:27545504

  16. Do the Big Five personality traits predict individual differences in the left cheek bias for emotion perception?

    PubMed

    Galea, Samantha; Lindell, Annukka K

    2016-01-01

    Like language, emotion is a lateralized function. Because the right hemisphere typically dominates emotion processing, people express stronger emotion on the left side of their face. This prompts a left cheek bias: we offer the left cheek to express emotion and rate left cheek portraits more emotionally expressive than right cheek portraits. Though the majority of the population show this left cheek bias (60-70%), individual differences exist but remain largely unexplained. Given that people with higher self-rated emotional expressivity show a stronger left cheek bias, personality variables associated with increased emotional expressivity and emotional intelligence, such as extraversion and openness, may help account for individual differences. The present study thus examined whether the Big Five traits predict left cheek preferences. Participants (M = 58, F = 116) completed the NEO-Five Factor Personality Inventory (NEO-FFI) [Costa, P. T. J., & McCrae, R. R. (1992). NEO PI-R professional manual. Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources] and viewed pairs of left and right cheek images (half mirror-reversed); participants made forced-choice decisions, indicating which image in each pair looked happier. Hierarchical regression indicated that neither trait extraversion nor openness predicted left cheek selections, with NEO-FFI personality subscales accounting for negligible variance in preferences. As the Big Five traits have been discounted, exploration of other potential contributors to individual differences in the left cheek bias is clearly needed.

  17. Prediction of Functional Outcome in Individuals at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Ricardo E.; McLaughlin, Danielle; Goldberg, Terry E.; Auther, Andrea M.; Olsen, Ruth H.; Olvet, Doreen M.; Correll, Christoph U.; Cornblatt, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    Importance A major public health concern associated with schizophrenia and psychotic disorders is the long-term disability that involves impaired cognition, lack of social support, and an inability to function independently in the community. A critical goal of early detection and intervention studies in psychosis is therefore to understand the factors leading to this often profound impairment. Objective To develop a predictive model of functional (social and role) outcome in a clinical high-risk sample for psychosis. Design Prospective, naturalistic, longitudinal 3- to 5-year follow-up study. Setting The Recognition and Prevention Program in New York, a research clinic located in the Zucker Hillside Hospital in New York. Participants One hundred one treatment-seeking patients at clinical high risk for psychosis. Ninety-two (91%) were followed up prospectively for a mean (SD) of 3 (1.6) years. Intervention Neurocognitive and clinical assessment. Main Outcomes and Measures The primary outcome variables were social and role functioning at the last follow-up visit. Results Poor social outcome was predicted by reduced processing speed (odds ratio [OR], 1.38; 95% CI, 1.050-1.823; P = .02), impaired social functioning at baseline (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.258-2.732; P = .002), and total disorganized symptoms (OR, 5.06; 95% CI, 1.548-16.527; P = .007). Reduced performance on tests for verbal memory (OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.169-2.594; P = .006), role functioning at baseline (OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.053-1.711; P = .02), and motor disturbances (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.060-2.969; P = .03) predicted role outcome. The areas under the curve for the social and role prediction models were 0.824 (95% CI, 0.736-0.913; P < .001) and 0.77 (95% CI, 0.68-0.87; P < .001), respectively, demonstrating a high discriminative ability. In addition, poor functional outcomes were not entirely dependent on the development of psychosis, because 40.3% and 45.5% of nonconverters at clinical high risk had poor social

  18. Predicting individual differences in low-income children's executive control from early to middle childhood.

    PubMed

    Cybele Raver, C; McCoy, Dana Charles; Lowenstein, Amy E; Pess, Rachel

    2013-05-01

    The present longitudinal study tested the roles of early childhood executive control (EC) as well as exposure to poverty-related adversity at family and school levels as key predictors of low-income children's EC in elementary school (n = 391). Findings suggest that children's EC difficulties in preschool and lower family income from early to middle childhood are robust predictors of later EC difficulties as rated by teachers in 2nd and 3rd grades. Findings also suggest enrollment in unsafe elementary schools is significantly predictive of higher levels of teacher-rated EC difficulty, but only for those children who showed initially elevated levels of EC difficulty in early childhood. Implications for scientific models of cognitive development and poverty-related adversity are discussed.

  19. A Bayesian approach to the group versus individual prediction controversy in actuarial risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Scurich, Nicholas; John, Richard S

    2012-06-01

    Recent attempts to indict the use of actuarial risk assessment instruments have relied on confidence intervals to demonstrate that risk estimates derived at the group level do not necessarily apply to any specific individual within that group. This article contends that frequentist confidence intervals are inapposite to the current debate. Instead, Bayesian credible intervals are necessary-in principle-to accomplish what commentators are concerned about: describing the precision of an actuarial risk estimate. After illustrating both the calculation and interpretation of credible intervals, this article shows how such intervals can be used to characterize the precision of actuarial risk estimates. It then explores the legal implications of wide and overlapping intervals. Contrary to what detractors claim, the fact that risk estimate intervals overlap is not a germane to legal (logical) relevance, and therefore actuarial risk estimates cannot be per se "inadmissible" on this basis.

  20. Individual personalities predict social behaviour in wild networks of great tits (Parus major).

    PubMed

    Aplin, L M; Farine, D R; Morand-Ferron, J; Cole, E F; Cockburn, A; Sheldon, B C

    2013-11-01

    Social environments have an important effect on a range of ecological processes, and form a crucial component of selection. However, little is known of the link between personality, social behaviour and population structure. We combine a well-understood personality trait with large-scale social networks in wild songbirds, and show that personality underpins multiple aspects of social organisation. First, we demonstrate a relationship between network centrality and personality with 'proactive' (fast-exploring) individuals associating weakly with greater numbers of conspecifics and moving between flocks. Second, temporal stability of associations relates to personality: 'reactive' (slow-exploring) birds form synergistically stable relationships. Finally, we show that personality influences social structure, with males non-randomly distributed across groups. These results provide strong evidence that songbirds follow alternative social strategies related to personality. This has implications not only for the causes of social network structure but also for the strength and direction of selection on personality in natural populations.

  1. Individual Differences in the Multisensory Temporal Binding Window Predict Susceptibility to Audiovisual Illusions

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Ryan A.; Zemtsov, Raquel K.; Wallace, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Human multisensory systems are known to bind inputs from the different sensory modalities into a unified percept, a process that leads to measurable behavioral benefits. This integrative process can be observed through multisensory illusions, including the McGurk effect and the sound-induced flash illusion, both of which demonstrate the ability of one sensory modality to modulate perception in a second modality. Such multisensory integration is highly dependent upon the temporal relationship of the different sensory inputs, with perceptual binding occurring within a limited range of asynchronies known as the temporal binding window (TBW). Previous studies have shown that this window is highly variable across individuals, but it is unclear how these variations in the TBW relate to an individual’s ability to integrate multisensory cues. Here we provide evidence linking individual differences in multisensory temporal processes to differences in the individual’s audiovisual integration of illusory stimuli. Our data provide strong evidence that the temporal processing of multiple sensory signals and the merging of multiple signals into a single, unified perception, are highly related. Specifically, the width of right side of an individuals’ TBW, where the auditory stimulus follows the visual, is significantly correlated with the strength of illusory percepts, as indexed via both an increase in the strength of binding synchronous sensory signals and in an improvement in correctly dissociating asynchronous signals. These findings are discussed in terms of their possible neurobiological basis, relevance to the development of sensory integration, and possible importance for clinical conditions in which there is growing evidence that multisensory integration is compromised. PMID:22390292

  2. Individual differences in risk preference predict neural responses during financial decision-making.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, Jan B; Tamir, Diana

    2009-09-22

    We investigated the neural correlates of subjective valuations during a task involving risky choices about lotteries. Because expected value was held constant across all lotteries, decisions were influenced by subjective preferences, which manifest behaviorally as risk-seeking or risk-averse attitudes. To isolate structures encoding risk preference during choice, we probed for areas showing increased activation as a function of selected risk-level. Such response patterns were obtained in anterior (ACC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), superior frontal gyrus, caudate nucleus, and substantia nigra. Behavioral results revealed the presence of risk-averse and risk-neutral individuals. In parallel, brain signals revealed modulation of activity by risk attitude during choice. Correlations between risk-seeking attitudes and neural activity during risky choice were obtained in superior and inferior frontal gyri, medial and lateral orbitofrontal cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus, while correlations with risk-averse attitudes were found in the caudate. The dynamics of neural responses relevant to each stage of the task (decision, anticipation, outcome) were investigated via timeseries and conjunction analyses. Though the networks engaged in each of the task stages were mostly distinct, regions within ACC, PCC and caudate were consistently activated during each decision-making phase. These results demonstrate (1) that subjective assessments of risk, as well as individual attitudes toward risk, play a significant role in modulating activity within brain regions recruited during decision-making, and (2) that ACC, PCC and caudate are relevant during each phase of a decision-making task requiring subjective valuations, strengthening the role of these regions in self-referential subjective valuations during choice.

  3. Do Personality Traits Predict Individual Differences in Excitatory and Inhibitory Learning?

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhimin; Cassaday, Helen J.; Bonardi, Charlotte; Bibby, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Conditioned inhibition (CI) is demonstrated in classical conditioning when a stimulus is used to signal the omission of an otherwise expected outcome. This basic learning ability is involved in a wide range of normal behavior – and thus its disruption could produce a correspondingly wide range of behavioral deficits. The present study employed a computer-based task to measure conditioned excitation and inhibition in the same discrimination procedure. CI by summation test was clearly demonstrated. Additionally summary measures of excitatory and inhibitory learning (difference scores) were calculated in order to explore how performance related to individual differences in a large sample of normal participants (n = 176 following exclusion of those not meeting the basic learning criterion). The individual difference measures selected derive from two biologically based personality theories, Gray’s (1982) reinforcement sensitivity theory and Eysenck and Eysenck (1991) psychoticism, extraversion, and neuroticism theory. Following the behavioral tasks, participants completed the behavioral inhibition system/behavioral activation system (BIS/BAS) scales and the Eysenck personality questionnaire revised short scale (EPQ-RS). Analyses of the relationship between scores on each of the scales and summary measures of excitatory and inhibitory learning suggested that those with higher BAS (specifically the drive sub-scale) and higher EPQ-RS neuroticism showed reduced levels of excitatory conditioning. Inhibitory conditioning was similarly attenuated in those with higher EPQ-RS neuroticism, as well as in those with higher BIS scores. Thus the findings are consistent with higher levels of neuroticism being accompanied by generally impaired associative learning, both inhibitory and excitatory. There was also evidence for some dissociation in the effects of behavioral activation and behavioral inhibition on excitatory and inhibitory learning respectively. PMID:23658551

  4. Do personality traits predict individual differences in excitatory and inhibitory learning?

    PubMed

    He, Zhimin; Cassaday, Helen J; Bonardi, Charlotte; Bibby, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Conditioned inhibition (CI) is demonstrated in classical conditioning when a stimulus is used to signal the omission of an otherwise expected outcome. This basic learning ability is involved in a wide range of normal behavior - and thus its disruption could produce a correspondingly wide range of behavioral deficits. The present study employed a computer-based task to measure conditioned excitation and inhibition in the same discrimination procedure. CI by summation test was clearly demonstrated. Additionally summary measures of excitatory and inhibitory learning (difference scores) were calculated in order to explore how performance related to individual differences in a large sample of normal participants (n = 176 following exclusion of those not meeting the basic learning criterion). The individual difference measures selected derive from two biologically based personality theories, Gray's (1982) reinforcement sensitivity theory and Eysenck and Eysenck (1991) psychoticism, extraversion, and neuroticism theory. Following the behavioral tasks, participants completed the behavioral inhibition system/behavioral activation system (BIS/BAS) scales and the Eysenck personality questionnaire revised short scale (EPQ-RS). Analyses of the relationship between scores on each of the scales and summary measures of excitatory and inhibitory learning suggested that those with higher BAS (specifically the drive sub-scale) and higher EPQ-RS neuroticism showed reduced levels of excitatory conditioning. Inhibitory conditioning was similarly attenuated in those with higher EPQ-RS neuroticism, as well as in those with higher BIS scores. Thus the findings are consistent with higher levels of neuroticism being accompanied by generally impaired associative learning, both inhibitory and excitatory. There was also evidence for some dissociation in the effects of behavioral activation and behavioral inhibition on excitatory and inhibitory learning respectively.

  5. Simulation based efficiency prediction of a Brushless DC drive applied in ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Pohlmann, André; Hameyer, Kay

    2012-01-01

    Ventricular Assist Devices (VADs) are mechanical blood pumps that support the human heart in order to maintain a sufficient perfusion of the human body and its organs. During VAD operation blood damage caused by hemolysis, thrombogenecity and denaturation has to be avoided. One key parameter causing the blood's denaturation is its temperature which must not exceed 42 °C. As a temperature rise can be directly linked to the losses occuring in the drive system, this paper introduces an efficiency prediction chain for Brushless DC (BLDC) drives which are applied in various VAD systems. The presented chain is applied to various core materials and operation ranges, providing a general overview on the loss dependencies.

  6. In Search of a Time Efficient Approach to Crack and Delamination Growth Predictions in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Carvalho, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Analysis benchmarking was used to assess the accuracy and time efficiency of algorithms suitable for automated delamination growth analysis. First, the Floating Node Method (FNM) was introduced and its combination with a simple exponential growth law (Paris Law) and Virtual Crack Closure technique (VCCT) was discussed. Implementation of the method into a user element (UEL) in Abaqus/Standard(Registered TradeMark) was also presented. For the assessment of growth prediction capabilities, an existing benchmark case based on the Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen was briefly summarized. Additionally, the development of new benchmark cases based on the Mixed-Mode Bending (MMB) specimen to assess the growth prediction capabilities under mixed-mode I/II conditions was discussed in detail. A comparison was presented, in which the benchmark cases were used to assess the existing low-cycle fatigue analysis tool in Abaqus/Standard(Registered TradeMark) in comparison to the FNM-VCCT fatigue growth analysis implementation. The low-cycle fatigue analysis tool in Abaqus/Standard(Registered TradeMark) was able to yield results that were in good agreement with the DCB benchmark example. Results for the MMB benchmark cases, however, only captured the trend correctly. The user element (FNM-VCCT) always yielded results that were in excellent agreement with all benchmark cases, at a fraction of the analysis time. The ability to assess the implementation of two methods in one finite element code illustrated the value of establishing benchmark solutions.

  7. Prediction of aromatase inhibitory activity using the efficient linear method (ELM)

    PubMed Central

    Shoombuatong, Watshara; Prachayasittikul, Veda; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2015-01-01

    Aromatase inhibition is an effective treatment strategy for breast cancer. Currently, several in silico methods have been developed for the prediction of aromatase inhibitors (AIs) using artificial neural network (ANN) or support vector machine (SVM). In spite of this, there are ample opportunities for further improvements by developing a simple and interpretable quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) method. Herein, an efficient linear method (ELM) is proposed for constructing a highly predictive QSAR model containing a spontaneous feature importance estimator. Briefly, ELM is a linear-based model with optimal parameters derived from genetic algorithm. Results showed that the simple ELM method displayed robust performance with 10-fold cross-validation MCC values of 0.64 and 0.56 for steroidal and non-steroidal AIs, respectively. Comparative analyses with other machine learning methods (i.e. ANN, SVM and decision tree) were also performed. A thorough analysis of informative molecular descriptors for both steroidal and non-steroidal AIs provided insights into the mechanism of action of compounds. Our findings suggest that the shape and polarizability of compounds may govern the inhibitory activity of both steroidal and non-steroidal types whereas the terminal primary C(sp3) functional group and electronegativity may be required for non-steroidal AIs. The R code of the ELM method is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1274030. PMID:26535037

  8. Individual differences in holistic processing predict the own-race advantage in recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Degutis, Joseph; Mercado, Rogelio J; Wilmer, Jeremy; Rosenblatt, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Individuals are consistently better at recognizing own-race faces compared to other-race faces (other-race effect, ORE). One popular hypothesis is that this recognition memory ORE is caused by differential own- and other-race holistic processing, the simultaneous integration of part and configural face information into a coherent whole. Holistic processing may create a more rich, detailed memory representation of own-race faces compared to other-race faces. Despite several studies showing that own-race faces are processed more holistically than other-race faces, studies have yet to link the holistic processing ORE and the recognition memory ORE. In the current study, we sought to use a more valid method of analyzing individual differences in holistic processing by using regression to statistically remove the influence of the control condition (part trials in the part-whole task) from the condition of interest (whole trials in the part-whole task). We also employed regression to separately examine the two components of the ORE: own-race advantage (regressing other-race from own-race performance) and other-race decrement (regressing own-race from other-race performance). First, we demonstrated that own-race faces were processed more holistically than other-race faces, particularly the eye region. Notably, using regression, we showed a significant association between the own-race advantage in recognition memory and the own-race advantage in holistic processing and that these associations were weaker when examining the other-race decrement. We also demonstrated that performance on own- and other-race faces across all of our tasks was highly correlated, suggesting that the differences we found between own- and other-race faces are quantitative rather than qualitative. Together, this suggests that own- and other-race faces recruit largely similar mechanisms, that own-race faces more thoroughly engage holistic processing, and that this greater engagement of holistic

  9. Individual Differences in Holistic Processing Predict the Own-Race Advantage in Recognition Memory

    PubMed Central

    DeGutis, Joseph; Mercado, Rogelio J.; Wilmer, Jeremy; Rosenblatt, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Individuals are consistently better at recognizing own-race faces compared to other-race faces (other-race effect, ORE). One popular hypothesis is that this recognition memory ORE is caused by differential own- and other-race holistic processing, the simultaneous integration of part and configural face information into a coherent whole. Holistic processing may create a more rich, detailed memory representation of own-race faces compared to other-race faces. Despite several studies showing that own-race faces are processed more holistically than other-race faces, studies have yet to link the holistic processing ORE and the recognition memory ORE. In the current study, we sought to use a more valid method of analyzing individual differences in holistic processing by using regression to statistically remove the influence of the control condition (part trials in the part-whole task) from the condition of interest (whole trials in the part-whole task). We also employed regression to separately examine the two components of the ORE: own-race advantage (regressing other-race from own-race performance) and other-race decrement (regressing own-race from other-race performance). First, we demonstrated that own-race faces were processed more holistically than other-race faces, particularly the eye region. Notably, using regression, we showed a significant association between the own-race advantage in recognition memory and the own-race advantage in holistic processing and that these associations were weaker when examining the other-race decrement. We also demonstrated that performance on own- and other-race faces across all of our tasks was highly correlated, suggesting that the differences we found between own- and other-race faces are quantitative rather than qualitative. Together, this suggests that own- and other-race faces recruit largely similar mechanisms, that own-race faces more thoroughly engage holistic processing, and that this greater engagement of holistic

  10. Energy-Efficient Control with Harvesting Predictions for Solar-Powered Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Zou, Tengyue; Lin, Shouying; Feng, Qijie; Chen, Yanlian

    2016-01-04

    Wireless sensor networks equipped with rechargeable batteries are useful for outdoor environmental monitoring. However, the severe energy constraints of the sensor nodes present major challenges for long-term applications. To achieve sustainability, solar cells can be used to acquire energy from the environment. Unfortunately, the energy supplied by the harvesting system is generally intermittent and considerably influenced by the weather. To improve the energy efficiency and extend the lifetime of the networks, we propose algorithms for harvested energy prediction using environmental shadow detection. Thus, the sensor nodes can adjust their scheduling plans accordingly to best suit their energy production and residual battery levels. Furthermore, we introduce clustering and routing selection methods to optimize the data transmission, and a Bayesian network is used for warning notifications of bottlenecks along the path. The entire system is implemented on a real-time Texas Instruments CC2530 embedded platform, and the experimental results indicate that these mechanisms sustain the networks' activities in an uninterrupted and efficient manner.

  11. Energy-Efficient Control with Harvesting Predictions for Solar-Powered Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Tengyue; Lin, Shouying; Feng, Qijie; Chen, Yanlian

    2016-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks equipped with rechargeable batteries are useful for outdoor environmental monitoring. However, the severe energy constraints of the sensor nodes present major challenges for long-term applications. To achieve sustainability, solar cells can be used to acquire energy from the environment. Unfortunately, the energy supplied by the harvesting system is generally intermittent and considerably influenced by the weather. To improve the energy efficiency and extend the lifetime of the networks, we propose algorithms for harvested energy prediction using environmental shadow detection. Thus, the sensor nodes can adjust their scheduling plans accordingly to best suit their energy production and residual battery levels. Furthermore, we introduce clustering and routing selection methods to optimize the data transmission, and a Bayesian network is used for warning notifications of bottlenecks along the path. The entire system is implemented on a real-time Texas Instruments CC2530 embedded platform, and the experimental results indicate that these mechanisms sustain the networks’ activities in an uninterrupted and efficient manner. PMID:26742042

  12. An extended and total flux normalized correlation equation for predicting single-collector efficiency.

    PubMed

    Messina, Francesca; Marchisio, Daniele Luca; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2015-05-15

    In this study a novel total flux normalized correlation equation is proposed for predicting single-collector efficiency under a broad range of parameters. The correlation equation does not exploit the additivity approach introduced by Yao et al. (1971), but includes mixed terms that account for the mutual interaction of concomitant transport mechanisms (i.e., advection, gravity and Brownian motion) and of finite size of the particles (steric effect). The correlation equation is based on a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian simulations performed, under Smoluchowski-Levich conditions, in a geometry which consists of a sphere enveloped by a cylindrical control volume. The normalization of the deposited flux is performed accounting for all of the particles entering into the control volume through all transport mechanisms (not just the upstream convective flux as conventionally done) to provide efficiency values lower than one over a wide range of parameters. In order to guarantee the independence of each term, the correlation equation is derived through a rigorous hierarchical parameter estimation process, accounting for single and mutual interacting transport mechanisms. The correlation equation, valid both for point and finite-size particles, is extended to include porosity dependency and it is compared with previous models. Reduced forms are proposed by elimination of the less relevant terms.

  13. Individual differences in reward-prediction-error: extraversion and feedback-related negativity.

    PubMed

    Smillie, Luke D; Cooper, Andrew J; Pickering, Alan D

    2011-10-01

    Medial frontal scalp-recorded negativity occurring ∼200-300 ms post-stimulus [known as feedback-related negativity (FRN)] is attenuated following unpredicted reward and potentiated following unpredicted non-reward. This encourages the view that FRN may partly reflect dopaminergic 'reward-prediction-error' signalling. We examined the influence of a putatively dopamine-based personality trait, extraversion (N = 30), and a dopamine-related gene polymorphism, DRD2/ANKK1 (N = 24), on FRN during an associative reward-learning paradigm. FRN was most negative following unpredicted non-reward and least-negative following unpredicted reward. A difference wave contrasting these conditions was significantly more pronounced for extraverted participants than for introverts, with a similar but non-significant trend for participants carrying at least one copy of the A1 allele of the DRD2/ANKK1 gene compared with those without the allele. Extraversion was also significantly higher in A1 allele carriers. Results have broad relevance to neuroscience and personality research concerning reward processing and dopamine function.

  14. The Eye is Listening: Music-Induced Arousal and Individual Differences Predict Pupillary Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gingras, Bruno; Marin, Manuela M.; Puig-Waldmüller, Estela; Fitch, W. T.

    2015-01-01

    Pupillary responses are a well-known indicator of emotional arousal but have not yet been systematically investigated in response to music. Here, we measured pupillary dilations evoked by short musical excerpts normalized for intensity and selected for their stylistic uniformity. Thirty participants (15 females) provided subjective ratings of music-induced felt arousal, tension, pleasantness, and familiarity for 80 classical music excerpts. The pupillary responses evoked by these excerpts were measured in another thirty participants (15 females). We probed the role of listener-specific characteristics such as mood, stress reactivity, self-reported role of music in life, liking for the selected excerpts, as well as of subjective responses to music, in pupillary responses. Linear mixed model analyses showed that a greater role of music in life was associated with larger dilations, and that larger dilations were also predicted for excerpts rated as more arousing or tense. However, an interaction between arousal and liking for the excerpts suggested that pupillary responses were modulated less strongly by arousal when the excerpts were particularly liked. An analogous interaction was observed between tension and liking. Additionally, males exhibited larger dilations than females. Overall, these findings suggest a complex interplay between bottom-up and top-down influences on pupillary responses to music. PMID:26617511

  15. Brain activity in valuation regions while thinking about the future predicts individual discount rates.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Nicole; Kable, Joseph W; Kim, B Kyu; Zauberman, Gal

    2013-08-07

    People vary widely in how much they discount delayed rewards, yet little is known about the sources of these differences. Here we demonstrate that neural activity in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) and ventral striatum (VS) when human subjects are asked to merely think about the future--specifically, to judge the subjective length of future time intervals--predicts delay discounting. High discounters showed lower activity for longer time delays, while low discounters showed the opposite pattern. Our results demonstrate that the correlation between VMPFC and VS activity and discounting occurs even in the absence of choices about future rewards, and does not depend on a person explicitly evaluating future outcomes or judging their self-relevance. This suggests a link between discounting and basic processes involved in thinking about the future, such as temporal perception. Our results also suggest that reducing impatience requires not suppression of VMPFC and VS activity altogether, but rather modulation of how these regions respond to the present versus the future.

  16. Measuring spirituality, religiosity, and denial in individuals working in funeral service to predict death anxiety.

    PubMed

    Harrawood, Laura K

    The aim of the present study was to examine predictors of death anxiety in U.S. funeral directors/embalmers who were part of a larger study (n = 234). Backward stepwise multiple regression was conducted to determine whether or not spirituality, intrinsic religiosity, extrinsic religiosity, and denial predicted levels of death anxiety. Results indicated that spirituality along with age of the participants accounted for 19% of the variance of death anxiety, R2 = .190, R2(adj) = .180, F(2, 168) = 19.64, p < .001. Intrinsic religiosity, extrinsic religiosity, and denial were not significant in the regression model. Several items, however, in the model had a significant positive correlation with each other at the .01 alpha level including spirituality with intrinsic religiosity (r = .63) and age (r = .21), and intrinsic religiosity with denial (r = .22) and age (r = .24). Other variables correlated negatively with one another at the .01 alpha level. Namely, death anxiety with spirituality (-.38), intrinsic religiosity (r = -.36), and age (-.28); spirituality with extrinsic religiosity (-.22); intrinsic religiosity with extrinsic religiosity (-.45); and extrinsic religiosity with age (r = -.19). Limitations of the study and implications for practice were discussed.

  17. Improving Computational Efficiency of Model Predictive Control Genetic Algorithms for Real-Time Decision Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsker, B. S.; Zimmer, A. L.; Ostfeld, A.; Schmidt, A.

    2014-12-01

    Enabling real-time decision support, particularly under conditions of uncertainty, requires computationally efficient algorithms that can rapidly generate recommendations. In this paper, a suite of model predictive control (MPC) genetic algorithms are developed and tested offline to explore their value for reducing CSOs during real-time use in a deep-tunnel sewer system. MPC approaches include the micro-GA, the probability-based compact GA, and domain-specific GA methods that reduce the number of decision variable values analyzed within the sewer hydraulic model, thus reducing algorithm search space. Minimum fitness and constraint values achieved by all GA approaches, as well as computational times required to reach the minimum values, are compared to large population sizes with long convergence times. Optimization results for a subset of the Chicago combined sewer system indicate that genetic algorithm variations with coarse decision variable representation, eventually transitioning to the entire range of decision variable values, are most efficient at addressing the CSO control problem. Although diversity-enhancing micro-GAs evaluate a larger search space and exhibit shorter convergence times, these representations do not reach minimum fitness and constraint values. The domain-specific GAs prove to be the most efficient and are used to test CSO sensitivity to energy costs, CSO penalties, and pressurization constraint values. The results show that CSO volumes are highly dependent on the tunnel pressurization constraint, with reductions of 13% to 77% possible with less conservative operational strategies. Because current management practices may not account for varying costs at CSO locations and electricity rate changes in the summer and winter, the sensitivity of the results is evaluated for variable seasonal and diurnal CSO penalty costs and electricity-related system maintenance costs, as well as different sluice gate constraint levels. These findings indicate

  18. Effective amygdala-prefrontal connectivity predicts individual differences in successful emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Morawetz, Carmen; Bode, Stefan; Baudewig, Juergen; Heekeren, Hauke R

    2016-12-20

    The ability to voluntarily regulate our emotional response to threatening and highly arousing stimuli by using cognitive reappraisal strategies is essential for our mental and physical well-being. This might be achieved by prefrontal brain regions (e.g., inferior frontal gyrus, IFG) down-regulating activity in the amygdala. It is unknown, to which degree effective connectivity within the emotion-regulation network is linked to individual differences in reappraisal skills. Using psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analyses of functional magnetic resonance imaging data, we examined changes in inter-regional connectivity between the amygdala and IFG with other brain regions during reappraisal of emotional responses and used emotion regulation success as an explicit regressor. During down-regulation of emotion, reappraisal success correlated with effective connectivity between IFG with dorsolateral, dorsomedial and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (PFC). During up-regulation of emotion, effective coupling between IFG with anterior cingulate cortex, dorsomedial and ventromedial PFC as well as the amygdala correlated with reappraisal success. Activity in the amygdala covaried with activity in lateral and medial prefrontal regions during the up-regulation of emotion and correlated with reappraisal success. These results suggest that successful reappraisal is linked to changes in effective connectivity between two systems, prefrontal cognitive control regions and regions crucially involved in emotional evaluation.

  19. Psychological Profiles in the Prediction of Leukocyte Telomere Length in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Starnino, Louisia; Busque, Lambert; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Background Shorter telomere length (TL) may signal premature cellular aging and increased risk for disease. While depression and psychosocial stress have been associated with shorter telomeres, other psychological risk factors for cardiovascular disease have received less attention. Purpose To evaluate the association between TL and psychological risk factors (symptoms of anxiety and depression, hostility and defensiveness traits) for heart disease, and to examine whether chronological age and sex moderate the associations observed. Methods 132 healthy men and women (Mage = 45.34 years) completed the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory II, The Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Cook-Medley Hostility Scale. Relative TL was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of total genomic DNA samples. A series of hierarchical linear regressions were performed controlling for pertinent covariates. Results Shorter TL was observed among individuals high in defensiveness (β = -.221) and depressive symptoms (β = -.213), as well as in those with less hostility (β =.256) and anxiety (β =.220)(all Ps<.05). Psychological variables explained 19% of the variance over and above that explained by covariates (age, sex, exercise, alcohol consumption, systemic inflammation, and 24-hr mean arterial pressure). Age moderated the relation between TL and defensiveness (β =.179, p =.03). Sex did not influence any of the relations. Conclusions Telomere length is associated with psychological burden though the direction of effect differs depending on the psychological variables under study. Further research is needed to determine the reasons for and implications of these seemingly contradictory findings. PMID:27788238

  20. Predicting Speech Intelligibility Decline in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Based on the Deterioration of Individual Speech Subsystems

    PubMed Central

    Yunusova, Yana; Wang, Jun; Zinman, Lorne; Pattee, Gary L.; Berry, James D.; Perry, Bridget; Green, Jordan R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the mechanisms of speech intelligibility impairment due to neurologic impairments, intelligibility decline was modeled as a function of co-occurring changes in the articulatory, resonatory, phonatory, and respiratory subsystems. Method Sixty-six individuals diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) were studied longitudinally. The disease-related changes in articulatory, resonatory, phonatory, and respiratory subsystems were quantified using multiple instrumental measures, which were subjected to a principal component analysis and mixed effects models to derive a set of speech subsystem predictors. A stepwise approach was used to select the best set of subsystem predictors to model the overall decline in intelligibility. Results Intelligibility was modeled as a function of five predictors that corresponded to velocities of lip and jaw movements (articulatory), number of syllable repetitions in the alternating motion rate task (articulatory), nasal airflow (resonatory), maximum fundamental frequency (phonatory), and speech pauses (respiratory). The model accounted for 95.6% of the variance in intelligibility, among which the articulatory predictors showed the most substantial independent contribution (57.7%). Conclusion Articulatory impairments characterized by reduced velocities of lip and jaw movements and resonatory impairments characterized by increased nasal airflow served as the subsystem predictors of the longitudinal decline of speech intelligibility in ALS. Declines in maximum performance tasks such as the alternating motion rate preceded declines in intelligibility, thus serving as early predictors of bulbar dysfunction. Following the rapid decline in speech intelligibility, a precipitous decline in maximum performance tasks subsequently occurred. PMID:27148967

  1. Improving the efficiency and accuracy of individual tree crown delineation from high-density LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Baoxin; Li, Jili; Jing, Linhai; Judah, Aaron

    2014-02-01

    Canopy height model (CHM) derived from LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) data has been commonly used to generate segments of individual tree crowns for forest inventory and sustainable management. However, branches, tree crowns, and tree clusters usually have similar shapes and overlapping sizes, which cause current individual tree crown delineation methods to work less effectively on closed canopy, deciduous or mixedwood forests. In addition, the potential of 3-dimentional (3-D) LiDAR data is not fully realized by CHM-oriented methods. In this study, a framework was proposed to take advantage of the simplicity of a CHM-oriented method, detailed vertical structures of tree crowns represented in high-density LiDAR data, and any prior knowledge of tree crowns. The efficiency and accuracy of ITC delineation can be improved. This framework consists of five steps: (1) determination of dominant crown sizes; (2) generation of initial tree segments using a multi-scale segmentation method; (3) identification of “problematic” segments; (4) determination of the number of trees based on the 3-D LiDAR points in each of the identified segments; and (5) refinement of the “problematic” segments by splitting and merging operations. The proposed framework was efficient, since the detailed examination of 3-D LiDAR points was not applied to all initial segments, but only to those needed further evaluations based on prior knowledge. It was also demonstrated to be effective based on an experiment on natural forests in Ontario, Canada. The proposed framework and specific methods yielded crown maps having a good consistency with manual and visual interpretation. The automated method correctly delineated about 74% and 72% of the tree crowns in two plots with mixedwood and deciduous trees, respectively.

  2. Polymerization efficiency of curing lamps: a universal energy conversion relationship predictive of conversion of resin-based composite.

    PubMed

    Halvorson, Rolf H; Erickson, Robert L; Davidson, Carel L

    2004-01-01

    A universal energy-conversion relationship (ECRu) predictive of conversion of a resin-based composite (RBC) polymerized with any light source has been described. This relationship was derived from an energy conversion relationship for RBC polymerized with a tungsten-halogen lamp and the lamp's efficiency relative to a hypothetical standard lamp. The ECRu was then used to predict conversion throughout RBC polymerized with an LED lamp using the lamp's relative efficiency compared to the standard lamp. The universal energy scale has also been described as predictive of scrape-back lengths for this RBC family when polymerized with any light source. Despite a 31% greater relative efficiency, scrape-back lengths from RBC polymerized using the LED lamp were predicted to be only 6% greater than those polymerized with the tungsten-halogen lamp when RBC is polymerized on an equal energy basis. This result was experimentally verified.

  3. High-order feature-based mixture models of classification learning predict individual learning curves and enable personalized teaching.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Yarden; Schneidman, Elad

    2013-01-08

    Pattern classification learning tasks are commonly used to explore learning strategies in human subjects. The universal and individual traits of learning such tasks reflect our cognitive abilities and have been of interest both psychophysically and clinically. From a computational perspective, these tasks are hard, because the number of patterns and rules one could consider even in simple cases is exponentially large. Thus, when we learn to classify we must use simplifying assumptions and generalize. Studies of human behavior in probabilistic learning tasks have focused on rules in which pattern cues are independent, and also described individual behavior in terms of simple, single-cue, feature-based models. Here, we conducted psychophysical experiments in which people learned to classify binary sequences according to deterministic rules of different complexity, including high-order, multicue-dependent rules. We show that human performance on such tasks is very diverse, but that a class of reinforcement learning-like models that use a mixture of features captures individual learning behavior surprisingly well. These models reflect the important role of subjects' priors, and their reliance on high-order features even when learning a low-order rule. Further, we show that these models predict future individual answers to a high degree of accuracy. We then use these models to build personally optimized teaching sessions and boost learning.

  4. Modeling dopaminergic and other processes involved in learning from reward prediction error: contributions from an individual differences perspective.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Alan D; Pesola, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Phasic firing changes of midbrain dopamine neurons have been widely characterized as reflecting a reward prediction error (RPE). Major personality traits (e.g., extraversion) have been linked to inter-individual variations in dopaminergic neurotransmission. Consistent with these two claims, recent research (Smillie et al., 2011; Cooper et al., 2014) found that extraverts exhibited larger RPEs than introverts, as reflected in feedback related negativity (FRN) effects in EEG recordings. Using an established, biologically-localized RPE computational model, we successfully simulated dopaminergic cell firing changes which are thought to modulate the FRN. We introduced simulated individual differences into the model: parameters were systematically varied, with stable values for each simulated individual. We explored whether a model parameter might be responsible for the observed covariance between extraversion and the FRN changes in real data, and argued that a parameter is a plausible source of such covariance if parameter variance, across simulated individuals, correlated almost perfectly with the size of the simulated dopaminergic FRN modulation, and created as much variance as possible in this simulated output. Several model parameters met these criteria, while others did not. In particular, variations in the strength of connections carrying excitatory reward drive inputs to midbrain dopaminergic cells were considered plausible candidates, along with variations in a parameter which scales the effects of dopamine cell firing bursts on synaptic modification in ventral striatum. We suggest possible neurotransmitter mechanisms underpinning these model parameters. Finally, the limitations and possible extensions of our general approach are discussed.

  5. High-order feature-based mixture models of classification learning predict individual learning curves and enable personalized teaching

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Yarden; Schneidman, Elad

    2013-01-01

    Pattern classification learning tasks are commonly used to explore learning strategies in human subjects. The universal and individual traits of learning such tasks reflect our cognitive abilities and have been of interest both psychophysically and clinically. From a computational perspective, these tasks are hard, because the number of patterns and rules one could consider even in simple cases is exponentially large. Thus, when we learn to classify we must use simplifying assumptions and generalize. Studies of human behavior in probabilistic learning tasks have focused on rules in which pattern cues are independent, and also described individual behavior in terms of simple, single-cue, feature-based models. Here, we conducted psychophysical experiments in which people learned to classify binary sequences according to deterministic rules of different complexity, including high-order, multicue-dependent rules. We show that human performance on such tasks is very diverse, but that a class of reinforcement learning-like models that use a mixture of features captures individual learning behavior surprisingly well. These models reflect the important role of subjects’ priors, and their reliance on high-order features even when learning a low-order rule. Further, we show that these models predict future individual answers to a high degree of accuracy. We then use these models to build personally optimized teaching sessions and boost learning. PMID:23269833

  6. Individualized Gaussian process-based prediction and detection of local and global gray matter abnormalities in elderly subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, G.; Ridgway, G.R.; Dahnke, R.; Gaser, C.

    2014-01-01

    Structural imaging based on MRI is an integral component of the clinical assessment of patients with potential dementia. We here propose an individualized Gaussian process-based inference scheme for clinical decision support in healthy and pathological aging elderly subjects using MRI. The approach aims at quantitative and transparent support for clinicians who aim to detect structural abnormalities in patients at risk of Alzheimer's disease or other types of dementia. Firstly, we introduce a generative model incorporating our knowledge about normative decline of local and global gray matter volume across the brain in elderly. By supposing smooth structural trajectories the models account for the general course of age-related structural decline as well as late-life accelerated loss. Considering healthy subjects' demography and global brain parameters as informative about normal brain aging variability affords individualized predictions in single cases. Using Gaussian process models as a normative reference, we predict new subjects' brain scans and quantify the local gray matter abnormalities in terms of Normative Probability Maps (NPM) and global z-scores. By integrating the observed expectation error and the predictive uncertainty, the local maps and global scores exploit the advantages of Bayesian inference for clinical decisions and provide a valuable extension of diagnostic information about pathological aging. We validate the approach in simulated data and real MRI data. We train the GP framework using 1238 healthy subjects with ages 18–94 years, and predict in 415 independent test subjects diagnosed as healthy controls, Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24742919

  7. Improved individualized prediction of schizophrenia in subjects at familial high risk, based on neuroanatomical data, schizotypal and neurocognitive features.

    PubMed

    Zarogianni, Eleni; Storkey, Amos J; Johnstone, Eve C; Owens, David G C; Lawrie, Stephen M

    2017-03-01

    To date, there are no reliable markers for predicting onset of schizophrenia in individuals at high risk (HR). Substantial promise is, however, shown by a variety of pattern classification approaches to neuroimaging data. Here, we examined the predictive accuracy of support vector machine (SVM) in later diagnosing schizophrenia, at a single-subject level, using a cohort of HR individuals drawn from multiply affected families and a combination of neuroanatomical, schizotypal and neurocognitive variables. Baseline structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), schizotypal and neurocognitive data from 17 HR subjects, who subsequently developed schizophrenia and a matched group of 17 HR subjects who did not make the transition, yet had psychotic symptoms, were included in the analysis. We employed recursive feature elimination (RFE), in a nested cross-validation scheme to identify the most significant predictors of disease transition and enhance diagnostic performance. Classification accuracy was 94% when a self-completed measure of schizotypy, a declarative memory test and structural MRI data were combined into a single learning algorithm; higher than when either quantitative measure was used alone. The discriminative neuroanatomical pattern involved gray matter volume differences in frontal, orbito-frontal and occipital lobe regions bilaterally as well as parts of the superior, medial temporal lobe and cerebellar regions. Our findings suggest that an early SVM-based prediction of schizophrenia is possible and can be improved by combining schizotypal and neurocognitive features with neuroanatomical variables. However, our predictive model needs to be tested by classifying a new, independent HR cohort in order to estimate its validity.

  8. Individual differences in cortical face selectivity predict behavioral performance in face recognition

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lijie; Song, Yiying; Li, Jingguang; Zhen, Zonglei; Yang, Zetian; Liu, Jia

    2014-01-01

    In functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, object selectivity is defined as a higher neural response to an object category than other object categories. Importantly, object selectivity is widely considered as a neural signature of a functionally-specialized area in processing its preferred object category in the human brain. However, the behavioral significance of the object selectivity remains unclear. In the present study, we used the individual differences approach to correlate participants' face selectivity in the face-selective regions with their behavioral performance in face recognition measured outside the scanner in a large sample of healthy adults. Face selectivity was defined as the z score of activation with the contrast of faces vs. non-face objects, and the face recognition ability was indexed as the normalized residual of the accuracy in recognizing previously-learned faces after regressing out that for non-face objects in an old/new memory task. We found that the participants with higher face selectivity in the fusiform face area (FFA) and the occipital face area (OFA), but not in the posterior part of the superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), possessed higher face recognition ability. Importantly, the association of face selectivity in the FFA and face recognition ability cannot be accounted for by FFA response to objects or behavioral performance in object recognition, suggesting that the association is domain-specific. Finally, the association is reliable, confirmed by the replication from another independent participant group. In sum, our finding provides empirical evidence on the validity of using object selectivity as a neural signature in defining object-selective regions in the human brain. PMID:25071513

  9. Cingulate cortex functional connectivity predicts future relapse in alcohol dependent individuals.

    PubMed

    Zakiniaeiz, Yasmin; Scheinost, Dustin; Seo, Dongju; Sinha, Rajita; Constable, R Todd

    2017-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a chronic relapsing illness. Alcohol and stress cues have consistently been shown to increase craving and relapse risk in recovering alcohol dependent (AUD) patients. However, differences in functional connectivity in response to these cues have not been studied using data-driven approaches. Here, voxel-wise connectivity is used in a whole-brain investigation of functional connectivity differences associated with alcohol and stress cues and to examine whether these differences are related to subsequent relapse. In Study 1, 45, 4- to 8-week abstinent, recovering AUD patients underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during individualized imagery of alcohol, stress, and neutral cues. Relapse measures were collected prospectively for 90 days post-discharge from inpatient treatment. AUD patients showed blunted anterior (ACC), mid (MCC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), voxel-wise connectivity responses to stress compared to neutral cues and blunted PCC response to alcohol compared to neutral cues. Using Cox proportional hazard regression, weaker connectivity in ACC and MCC during neutral exposure was associated with longer time to relapse (better recovery outcome). Similarly, greater connectivity in PCC during alcohol-cue compared to stress cue was associated with longer time to relapse. In Study 2, a sub-group of 30 AUD patients were demographically-matched to 30 healthy control (HC) participants for group comparisons. AUD compared to HC participants showed reduced cingulate connectivity during alcohol and stress cues. Using novel data-driven approaches, the cingulate cortex emerged as a key region in the disruption of functional connectivity during alcohol and stress-cue processing in AUD patients and as a marker of subsequent alcohol relapse.

  10. SNP development from RNA-seq data in a nonmodel fish: how many individuals are needed for accurate allele frequency prediction?

    PubMed

    Schunter, C; Garza, J C; Macpherson, E; Pascual, M

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are rapidly becoming the marker of choice in population genetics due to a variety of advantages relative to other markers, including higher genomic density, data quality, reproducibility and genotyping efficiency, as well as ease of portability between laboratories. Advances in sequencing technology and methodologies to reduce genomic representation have made the isolation of SNPs feasible for nonmodel organisms. RNA-seq is one such technique for the discovery of SNPs and development of markers for large-scale genotyping. Here, we report the development of 192 validated SNP markers for parentage analysis in Tripterygion delaisi (the black-faced blenny), a small rocky-shore fish from the Mediterranean Sea. RNA-seq data for 15 individual samples were used for SNP discovery by applying a series of selection criteria. Genotypes were then collected from 1599 individuals from the same population with the resulting loci. Differences in heterozygosity and allele frequencies were found between the two data sets. Heterozygosity was lower, on average, in the population sample, and the mean difference between the frequencies of particular alleles in the two data sets was 0.135 ± 0.100. We used bootstrap resampling of the sequence data to predict appropriate sample sizes for SNP discovery. As cDNA library production is time-consuming and expensive, we suggest that using seven individuals for RNA sequencing reduces the probability of discarding highly informative SNP loci, due to lack of observed polymorphism, whereas use of more than 12 samples does not considerably improve prediction of true allele frequencies.

  11. Measures to Predict The Individual Variability of Corticospinal Responses Following Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Nuzum, Nathan D.; Hendy, Ashlee M.; Russell, Aaron P.; Teo, Wei-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Individual responses to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are varied and therefore potentially limit its application. There is evidence that this variability is related to the contributions of Indirect waves (I-waves) recruited in the cortex. The latency of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) can be measured through transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), allowing an individual’s responsiveness to tDCS to be determined. However, this single-pulse method requires several different orientations of the TMS coil, potentially affecting its reliability. Instead, we propose a paired-pulse TMS paradigm targeting I-waves as an alternative method. This method uses one orientation that reduces inter- and intra-trial variability. It was hypothesized that the paired-pulse method would correlate more highly to tDCS responses than the single-pulse method. In a randomized, double blinded, cross-over design, 30 healthy participants completed two sessions, receiving 20 min of either anodal (2 mA) or sham tDCS. TMS was used to quantify Short interval intracortical facilitation (SICF) at Inter stimulus intervals (ISIs) of 1.5, 3.5 and 4.5 ms. Latency was determined in the posterior-anterior (PA), anterior-posterior (AP) and latero-medial (LM) coil orientations. The relationship between latency, SICF measures and the change in suprathreshold MEP amplitude size following tDCS were determined with Pearson’s correlations. TMS measures, SICI and SICF were also used to determine responses to Anodal-tDCS (a-tDCS). Neither of the latency differences nor the SICF measures correlated to the change in MEP amplitude from pre-post tDCS (all P > 0.05). Overall, there was no significant response to tDCS in this cohort. This study highlights the need for testing the effects of various tDCS protocols on the different I-waves. Further research into SICF and whether it is a viable measure of I-wave facilitation is warranted. PMID:27766075

  12. Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Chemoradiation Therapy for Lung Cancer: An International Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, David A.; Senan, Suresh; Tsujino, Kayoko; Barriger, Robert B.; Rengan, Ramesh; Moreno, Marta; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Kim, Tae Hyun; Ramella, Sara; Marks, Lawrence B.; De Petris, Luigi; Stitt, Larry; Rodrigues, George

    2013-02-01

    Background: Radiation pneumonitis is a dose-limiting toxicity for patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We performed an individual patient data meta-analysis to determine factors predictive of clinically significant pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: After a systematic review of the literature, data were obtained on 836 patients who underwent CCRT in Europe, North America, and Asia. Patients were randomly divided into training and validation sets (two-thirds vs one-third of patients). Factors predictive of symptomatic pneumonitis (grade {>=}2 by 1 of several scoring systems) or fatal pneumonitis were evaluated using logistic regression. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to define risk groups. Results: The median radiation therapy dose was 60 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 2.3 years. Most patients received concurrent cisplatin/etoposide (38%) or carboplatin/paclitaxel (26%). The overall rate of symptomatic pneumonitis was 29.8% (n=249), with fatal pneumonitis in 1.9% (n=16). In the training set, factors predictive of symptomatic pneumonitis were lung volume receiving {>=}20 Gy (V{sub 20}) (odds ratio [OR] 1.03 per 1% increase, P=.008), and carboplatin/paclitaxel chemotherapy (OR 3.33, P<.001), with a trend for age (OR 1.24 per decade, P=.09); the model remained predictive in the validation set with good discrimination in both datasets (c-statistic >0.65). On RPA, the highest risk of pneumonitis (>50%) was in patients >65 years of age receiving carboplatin/paclitaxel. Predictors of fatal pneumonitis were daily dose >2 Gy, V{sub 20}, and lower-lobe tumor location. Conclusions: Several treatment-related risk factors predict the development of symptomatic pneumonitis, and elderly patients who undergo CCRT with carboplatin-paclitaxel chemotherapy are at highest risk. Fatal pneumonitis, although uncommon, is related to dosimetric factors and tumor location.

  13. Effect of condom-use measures in predicting sexually transmitted diseases: variation by individual and contextual factors of sexual risk.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Li, X; Yang, H; Hong, Y; Fang, X; Wang, B; Stanton, B

    2012-09-01

    Inconsistent findings in the global literature regarding the effectiveness of condom use against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) may result from variations in the measurement of condom use. In this study, we assess the sensitivity and specificity of six condom-use measures in predicting STD infection, and assess the difference in sensitivity and specificity by type of sexual partner (clients versus stable partners), type of STD, ethnicity (Han versus non-Han), years of formal schooling (≤6 versus >6 years) and level of risk of STD exposure (high versus low). Cross-sectional data were obtained from 454 female sex workers (FSWs) in Guangxi, China. Measurements of condom use were created along types of use (any use, consistent use, correct use, or the combination of consistent and correct use) and periods of recall (life time, last month or recent three sexual episodes). Measures of consistent use had higher sensitivity and lower specificity than measures of any use in predicting STDs among FSWs, regardless of the recall period and type of sexual partner. Incorporating correct use improved the measures of consistent use. Measures of consistent use and the combination of consistent and correct use demonstrated high sensitivity in predicting particular STDs. They showed higher sensitivity in predicting STDs among FSWs who reported higher risk for STD exposure than among FSWs who reported lower risk of exposure to STDs. In conclusion, the findings suggest the superiority of consistent use and correct use of condoms in predicting STD infection. The findings also underscore the importance of considering the context of sexual risk such as type of sexual partner and risk of exposure to STD infection when we measure condom use. Future studies of condom effectiveness should collect and quantify these contextual and individual factors among the target population.

  14. Predicting individual differences in decision-making process from signature movement styles: an illustrative study of leaders

    PubMed Central

    Connors, Brenda L.; Rende, Richard; Colton, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    There has been a surge of interest in examining the utility of methods for capturing individual differences in decision-making style. We illustrate the potential offered by Movement Pattern Analysis (MPA), an observational methodology that has been used in business and by the US Department of Defense to record body movements that provide predictive insight into individual differences in decision-making motivations and actions. Twelve military officers participated in an intensive 2-h interview that permitted detailed and fine-grained observation and coding of signature movements by trained practitioners using MPA. Three months later, these subjects completed four hypothetical decision-making tasks in which the amount of information sought out before coming to a decision, as well as the time spent on the tasks, were under the partial control of the subject. A composite MPA indicator of how a person allocates decision-making actions and motivations to balance both Assertion (exertion of tangible movement effort on the environment to make something occur) and Perspective (through movements that support shaping in the body to perceive and create a suitable viewpoint for action) was highly correlated with the total number of information draws and total response time—individuals high on Assertion reached for less information and had faster response times than those high on Perspective. Discussion focuses on the utility of using movement-based observational measures to capture individual differences in decision-making style and the implications for application in applied settings geared toward investigations of experienced leaders and world statesmen where individuality rules the day. PMID:24069012

  15. Identification and individualized prediction of clinical phenotypes in bipolar disorders using neurocognitive data, neuroimaging scans and machine learning.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mon-Ju; Mwangi, Benson; Bauer, Isabelle E; Passos, Ives C; Sanches, Marsal; Zunta-Soares, Giovana B; Meyer, Thomas D; Hasan, Khader M; Soares, Jair C

    2017-01-15

    Diagnosis, clinical management and research of psychiatric disorders remain subjective - largely guided by historically developed categories which may not effectively capture underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of dysfunction. Here, we report a novel approach of identifying and validating distinct and biologically meaningful clinical phenotypes of bipolar disorders using both unsupervised and supervised machine learning techniques. First, neurocognitive data were analyzed using an unsupervised machine learning approach and two distinct clinical phenotypes identified namely; phenotype I and phenotype II. Second, diffusion weighted imaging scans were pre-processed using the tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) method and 'skeletonized' white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) maps extracted. The 'skeletonized' white matter FA and MD maps were entered into the Elastic Net machine learning algorithm to distinguish individual subjects' phenotypic labels (e.g. phenotype I vs. phenotype II). This calculation was performed to ascertain whether the identified clinical phenotypes were biologically distinct. Original neurocognitive measurements distinguished individual subjects' phenotypic labels with 94% accuracy (sensitivity=92%, specificity=97%). TBSS derived FA and MD measurements predicted individual subjects' phenotypic labels with 76% and 65% accuracy respectively. In addition, individual subjects belonging to phenotypes I and II were distinguished from healthy controls with 57% and 92% accuracy respectively. Neurocognitive task variables identified as most relevant in distinguishing phenotypic labels included; Affective Go/No-Go (AGN), Cambridge Gambling Task (CGT) coupled with inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and callosal white matter pathways. These results suggest that there may exist two biologically distinct clinical phenotypes in bipolar disorders which can be identified from healthy controls with high accuracy and at an

  16. Sex Matters: Hippocampal Volume Predicts Individual Differences in Associative Memory in Cognitively Normal Older Women but Not Men.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhiwei; Li, Rui; Xiao, Fengqiu; He, Rongqiao; Zhang, Shouzi; Li, Juan

    2017-01-01

    The hippocampus plays a prominent role in associative memory by supporting relational binding and recollection processes. Structural atrophy in the hippocampus is likely to induce associative memory deficits in older adults. Previous studies have primarily focused on average age-related differences in hippocampal structure and memory performance. To date, however, it remains unclear whether individual differences in hippocampal morphometry underlie differential associative memory performance, and whether there are sex differences in the structural correlates of associative memory in healthy older adults. Here, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to examine the extent to which gray matter volume (GMV) of the hippocampus predicts associative memory performance in cognitively normal older adults. Seventy-one participants completed a cued recall paired-associative learning test (PALT), which consists of novel associations and semantically related associations, and underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We observed worse associative memory performance and larger variability for novel associations than for semantically related associations. The VBM results revealed that higher scores on associative memory for novel associations were related to greater hippocampal GMV across all older adults. When considering men and women separately, the correlation between hippocampal GMV and associative memory performance for novel associations reached significance only in older women. These findings suggest that hippocampal structural volumes may predict individual differences in novel associative memory in older women but not men.

  17. Sex Matters: Hippocampal Volume Predicts Individual Differences in Associative Memory in Cognitively Normal Older Women but Not Men

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhiwei; Li, Rui; Xiao, Fengqiu; He, Rongqiao; Zhang, Shouzi; Li, Juan

    2017-01-01

    The hippocampus plays a prominent role in associative memory by supporting relational binding and recollection processes. Structural atrophy in the hippocampus is likely to induce associative memory deficits in older adults. Previous studies have primarily focused on average age-related differences in hippocampal structure and memory performance. To date, however, it remains unclear whether individual differences in hippocampal morphometry underlie differential associative memory performance, and whether there are sex differences in the structural correlates of associative memory in healthy older adults. Here, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to examine the extent to which gray matter volume (GMV) of the hippocampus predicts associative memory performance in cognitively normal older adults. Seventy-one participants completed a cued recall paired-associative learning test (PALT), which consists of novel associations and semantically related associations, and underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We observed worse associative memory performance and larger variability for novel associations than for semantically related associations. The VBM results revealed that higher scores on associative memory for novel associations were related to greater hippocampal GMV across all older adults. When considering men and women separately, the correlation between hippocampal GMV and associative memory performance for novel associations reached significance only in older women. These findings suggest that hippocampal structural volumes may predict individual differences in novel associative memory in older women but not men. PMID:28321185

  18. Using Tests Designed to Measure Individual Sensorimotor Subsystem Perfomance to Predict Locomotor Adaptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, B. T.; Caldwell, E. E.; Batson, C. D.; Guined, J. R.; DeDios, Y. E.; Stepanyan, V.; Gadd, N. E.; Szecsy, D. L.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor disturbances during the initial exposure to microgravity and during the readapation phase following a return to a gravitational environment. These alterations may lead to disruption in the ability to perform mission critical functions during and after these gravitational transitions. Astronauts show significant inter-subject variation in adaptive capability following gravitational transitions. The way each individual's brain synthesizes the available visual, vestibular and somatosensory information is likely the basis for much of the variation. Identifying the presence of biases in each person's use of information available from these sensorimotor subsystems and relating it to their ability to adapt to a novel locomotor task will allow us to customize a training program designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. Eight tests are being used to measure sensorimotor subsystem performance. Three of these use measures of body sway to characterize balance during varying sensorimotor challenges. The effect of vision is assessed by repeating conditions with eyes open and eyes closed. Standing on foam, or on a support surface that pitches to maintain a constant ankle angle provide somatosensory challenges. Information from the vestibular system is isolated when vision is removed and the support surface is compromised, and it is challenged when the tasks are done while the head is in motion. The integration and dominance of visual information is assessed in three additional tests. The Rod & Frame Test measures the degree to which a subject's perception of the visual vertical is affected by the orientation of a tilted frame in the periphery. Locomotor visual dependence is determined by assessing how much an oscillating virtual visual world affects a treadmill-walking subject. In the third of the visual manipulation tests, subjects walk an obstacle course while wearing up-down reversing prisms. The two remaining tests include direct

  19. Individual variation in baseline and stress-induced corticosterone and prolactin levels predicts parental effort by nesting mourning doves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David A.; Vleck, Carol M.; Otis, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Endocrine systems have an important mechanistic role in structuring life-history trade-offs. During breeding, individual variation in prolactin (PRL) and corticosterone (CORT) levels affects behavioral and physiological processes that drive trade-offs between reproduction and self-maintenance. We examined patterns in baseline (BL) and stress induced (SI; level following a standard capture-restraint protocol) levels of PRL and CORT for breeding mourning doves (Zenaida macroura). We determined whether the relationship of adult condition and parental effort to hormone levels in wild birds was consistent with life-history predictions. Both BL PRL and BL CORT level in adults were positively related to nestling weight at early nestling ages, consistent with the prediction of a positive relationship of hormone levels to current parental effort of adults and associated increased energy demand. Results are consistent with the two hormones acting together at baseline levels to limit negative effects of CORT on reproduction while maintaining beneficial effects such as increased foraging for nestling feeding. Our data did not support predictions that SI responses would vary in response to nestling or adult condition. The magnitude of CORT response in the parents to our capture-restraint protocol was negatively correlated with subsequent parental effort. Average nestling weights for adults with the highest SI CORT response were on average 10–15% lighter than expected for their age in follow-up visits after the stress event. Our results demonstrated a relationship between individual hormone levels and within population variation in parental effort and suggested that hormonal control plays an important role in structuring reproductive decisions for mourning doves.

  20. Individual variation in baseline and stress-induced corticosterone and prolactin levels predicts parental effort by nesting mourning doves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David A.; Vleck, Carol M.; Otis, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Endocrine systems have an important mechanistic role in structuring life-history trade-offs. During breeding, individual variation in prolactin (PRL) and corticosterone (CORT) levels affects behavioral and physiological processes that drive trade-offs between reproduction and self-maintenance. We examined patterns in baseline (BL) and stress induced (SI; level following a standard capture-restraint protocol) levels of PRL and CORT for breeding mourning doves (Zenaida macroura). We determined whether the relationship of adult condition and parental effort to hormone levels in wild birds was consistent with life-history predictions. Both BL PRL and BL CORT level in adults were positively related to nestling weight at early nestling ages, consistent with the prediction of a positive relationship of hormone levels to current parental effort of adults and associated increased energy demand. Results are consistent with the two hormones acting together at baseline levels to limit negative effects of CORT on reproduction while maintaining beneficial effects such as increased foraging for nestling feeding. Our data did not support predictions that SI responses would vary in response to nestling or adult condition. The magnitude of CORT response in the parents to our capture-restraint protocol was negatively correlated with subsequent parental effort. Average nestling weights for adults with the highest SI CORT response were on average 10–15% lighter than expected for their age in follow-up visits after the stress event. Our results demonstrated a relationship between individual hormone levels and within population variation in parental effort and suggested that hormonal control plays an important role in structuring reproductive decisions for mourning doves.

  1. Cell population structure prior to bifurcation predicts efficiency of directed differentiation in human induced pluripotent cells

    PubMed Central

    Bargaje, Rhishikesh; Trachana, Kalliopi; Shelton, Martin N.; McGinnis, Christopher S.; Zhou, Joseph X.; Chadick, Cora; Cook, Savannah; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Huang, Sui; Hood, Leroy

    2017-01-01

    Steering the differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) toward specific cell types is crucial for patient-specific disease modeling and drug testing. This effort requires the capacity to predict and control when and how multipotent progenitor cells commit to the desired cell fate. Cell fate commitment represents a critical state transition or “tipping point” at which complex systems undergo a sudden qualitative shift. To characterize such transitions during iPSC to cardiomyocyte differentiation, we analyzed the gene expression patterns of 96 developmental genes at single-cell resolution. We identified a bifurcation event early in the trajectory when a primitive streak-like cell population segregated into the mesodermal and endodermal lineages. Before this branching point, we could detect the signature of an imminent critical transition: increase in cell heterogeneity and coordination of gene expression. Correlation analysis of gene expression profiles at the tipping point indicates transcription factors that drive the state transition toward each alternative cell fate and their relationships with specific phenotypic readouts. The latter helps us to facilitate small molecule screening for differentiation efficiency. To this end, we set up an analysis of cell population structure at the tipping point after systematic variation of the protocol to bias the differentiation toward mesodermal or endodermal cell lineage. We were able to predict the proportion of cardiomyocytes many days before cells manifest the differentiated phenotype. The analysis of cell populations undergoing a critical state transition thus affords a tool to forecast cell fate outcomes and can be used to optimize differentiation protocols to obtain desired cell populations. PMID:28167799

  2. Functional Connectivity Between Superior Parietal Lobule and Primary Visual Cortex "at Rest" Predicts Visual Search Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Bueichekú, Elisenda; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Palomar-García, María-Ángeles; Miró-Padilla, Anna; Parcet, María-Antonia; Ávila, César

    2015-10-01

    Spatiotemporal activity that emerges spontaneously "at rest" has been proposed to reflect individual a priori biases in cognitive processing. This research focused on testing neurocognitive models of visual attention by studying the functional connectivity (FC) of the superior parietal lobule (SPL), given its central role in establishing priority maps during visual search tasks. Twenty-three human participants completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging session that featured a resting-state scan, followed by a visual search task based on the alphanumeric category effect. As expected, the behavioral results showed longer reaction times and more errors for the within-category (i.e., searching a target letter among letters) than the between-category search (i.e., searching a target letter among numbers). The within-category condition was related to greater activation of the superior and inferior parietal lobules, occipital cortex, inferior frontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and the superior colliculus than the between-category search. The resting-state FC analysis of the SPL revealed a broad network that included connections with the inferotemporal cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and dorsal frontal areas like the supplementary motor area and frontal eye field. Noteworthy, the regression analysis revealed that the more efficient participants in the visual search showed stronger FC between the SPL and areas of primary visual cortex (V1) related to the search task. We shed some light on how the SPL establishes a priority map of the environment during visual attention tasks and how FC is a valuable tool for assessing individual differences while performing cognitive tasks.

  3. Predicting Esophagitis After Chemoradiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, David A.; Senan, Suresh; Oberije, Cary; Belderbos, Jose; Dios, Núria Rodríguez de; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Barriger, R. Bryan; Moreno-Jiménez, Marta; Kim, Tae Hyun; Ramella, Sara; Everitt, Sarah; Rengan, Ramesh; Marks, Lawrence B.; De Ruyck, Kim; and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) improves survival compared with sequential treatment for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, but it increases toxicity, particularly radiation esophagitis (RE). Validated predictors of RE for clinical use are lacking. We performed an individual-patient-data meta-analysis to determine factors predictive of clinically significant RE. Methods and Materials: After a systematic review of the literature, data were obtained on 1082 patients who underwent CCRT, including patients from Europe, North America, Asia, and Australia. Patients were randomly divided into training and validation sets (2/3 vs 1/3 of patients). Factors predictive of RE (grade ≥2 and grade ≥3) were assessed using logistic modeling, with the concordance statistic (c statistic) used to evaluate the performance of each model. Results: The median radiation therapy dose delivered was 65 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 2.1 years. Most patients (91%) received platinum-containing CCRT regimens. The development of RE was common, scored as grade 2 in 348 patients (32.2%), grade 3 in 185 (17.1%), and grade 4 in 10 (0.9%). There were no RE-related deaths. On univariable analysis using the training set, several baseline factors were statistically predictive of RE (P<.05), but only dosimetric factors had good discrimination scores (c > .60). On multivariable analysis, the esophageal volume receiving ≥60 Gy (V60) alone emerged as the best predictor of grade ≥2 and grade ≥3 RE, with good calibration and discrimination. Recursive partitioning identified 3 risk groups: low (V60 <0.07%), intermediate (V60 0.07% to 16.99%), and high (V60 ≥17%). With use of the validation set, the predictive model performed inferiorly for the grade ≥2 endpoint (c = .58) but performed well for the grade ≥3 endpoint (c = .66). Conclusions: Clinically significant RE is common, but life-threatening complications occur in <1% of patients. Although several factors

  4. Individual differences in cognitive functioning predict effectiveness of a heads-up lane departure warning for younger and older drivers.

    PubMed

    Aksan, Nazan; Sager, Lauren; Hacker, Sarah; Lester, Benjamin; Dawson, Jeffrey; Rizzo, Matthew; Ebe, Kazutoshi; Foley, James

    2017-02-01

    The effectiveness of an idealized lane departure warning (LDW) was evaluated in an interactive fixed base driving simulator. Thirty-eight older (mean age=77years) and 40 younger drivers (mean age=35years) took four different drives/routes similar in road culture composition and hazards encountered with and without LDW. The four drives were administered over visits separated approximately by two weeks to examine changes in long-term effectiveness of LDW. Performance metrics were number of LDW activations and average correction time to each LDW. LDW reduced correction time to re-center the vehicle by 1.34s on average (95% CI=1.12-1.57s) but did not reduce the number of times the drivers drifted enough in their lanes to activate the system (LDW activations). The magnitude of reductions in average correction RT was similar for older and younger drivers and did not change with repeated exposures across visits. The contribution of individual differences in basic visual and motor function, as well as cognitive function to safety gains from LDW was also examined. Cognitive speed of processing predicted lane keeping performance for older and younger drivers. Differences in memory, visuospatial construction, and executive function tended to predict performance differences among older but not younger drivers. Cognitive functioning did not predict changes in the magnitude of safety benefits from LDW over time. Implications are discussed with respect to real-world safety systems.

  5. Multivariate meta-analysis of individual participant data helped externally validate the performance and implementation of a prediction model

    PubMed Central

    Snell, Kym I.E.; Hua, Harry; Debray, Thomas P.A.; Ensor, Joie; Look, Maxime P.; Moons, Karel G.M.; Riley, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to improve meta-analysis methods for summarizing a prediction model's performance when individual participant data are available from multiple studies for external validation. Study Design and Setting We suggest multivariate meta-analysis for jointly synthesizing calibration and discrimination performance, while accounting for their correlation. The approach estimates a prediction model's average performance, the heterogeneity in performance across populations, and the probability of “good” performance in new populations. This allows different implementation strategies (e.g., recalibration) to be compared. Application is made to a diagnostic model for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and a prognostic model for breast cancer mortality. Results In both examples, multivariate meta-analysis reveals that calibration performance is excellent on average but highly heterogeneous across populations unless the model's intercept (baseline hazard) is recalibrated. For the cancer model, the probability of “good” performance (defined by C statistic ≥0.7 and calibration slope between 0.9 and 1.1) in a new population was 0.67 with recalibration but 0.22 without recalibration. For the DVT model, even with recalibration, there was only a 0.03 probability of “good” performance. Conclusion Multivariate meta-analysis can be used to externally validate a prediction model's calibration and discrimination performance across multiple populations and to evaluate different implementation strategies. PMID:26142114

  6. Individualized Survival and Treatment Response Predictions in Breast Cancer Patients: Involvements of Phospho-EGFR and Phospho-Her2/neu Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lan; Abraham, Jame; Flynn, Daniel C.; Castranova, Vincent; Shi, Xianglin; Qian, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Our robust prediction system for individual breast cancer patients combines three well-known machine-learning classifiers to provide stable and accurate clinical outcome prediction (N=269). The average performance of the selected classifiers is used as the evaluation criterion in breast cancer outcome predictions. A profile (incorporating histology, lymph node status, tumor grade, tumor stage, ER, PR, Her2/neu, patient’s age and smoking status) generated over 95% accuracy in individualized disease-free survival and treatment response predictions. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrated that the measurement of phospho-EGFR and phospho-Her2/neu is more powerful in breast cancer survival prediction than that of total EGFR and total Her2/neu (p < 0.05). The incorporation of hormone receptor status, Her2/neu, patient’s age and smoking status into the traditional pathologic markers creates a powerful standard to perform individualized survival and treatment outcome predictions for breast cancer patients. PMID:25558292

  7. Fast coding unit selection method for high efficiency video coding intra prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Jian

    2013-07-01

    The high efficiency video coding (HEVC) video coding standard under development can achieve higher compression performance than previous standards, such as MPEG-4, H.263, and H.264/AVC. To improve coding performance, a quad-tree coding structure and a robust rate-distortion (RD) optimization technique is used to select an optimum coding mode. Since the RD costs of all possible coding modes are computed to decide an optimum mode, high computational complexity is induced in the encoder. A fast learning-based coding unit (CU) size selection method is presented for HEVC intra prediction. The proposed algorithm is based on theoretical analysis that shows the non-normalized histogram of oriented gradient (n-HOG) can be used to help select CU size. A codebook is constructed offline by clustering n-HOGs of training sequences for each CU size. The optimum size is determined by comparing the n-HOG of the current CU with the learned codebooks. Experimental results show that the CU size selection scheme speeds up intra coding significantly with negligible loss of peak signal-to-noise ratio.

  8. An efficient numerical method for predicting the performance of valveless micropump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braineard Eladi, Paul; Chatterjee, Dhiman; DasGupta, Amitava

    2012-11-01

    Numerical characterization of valveless micropumps involves fluid-structure interaction (FSI) between a membrane and the working fluid. FSI being computationally difficult, efforts have been mainly restricted to analyzing a given micropump performance. Designing an optimum micropump involves understanding the role of different geometric parameters and this forms the focus of the present work. It is shown that membrane displacement information extracted from a two-way coupled FSI simulation at a given frequency can be reliably used to carry out fluid flow simulations over a wide range of geometrical and operating parameters. The maximum variation between this approach and FSI is within 4% while there is a drastic reduction in computational time and resource. A micropump structure suitable for MEMS technology is considered in this work. An optimum micropump geometry, having a pump chamber height of 50 μm, diffuser length of 280 μm, throat width of 100 μm and separation distance between nozzle and diffuser openings of 2.5 mm, is recommended. The numerical prediction of flowrate at 200 Hz (68 μl min-1) for this pyramidal valveless micropump matches well with the experimental data (60 μl min-1) of the micropump fabricated using MEMS-based silicon micromachining. Thus an efficient numerical method to design valveless micropumps is proposed and validated through rigorous characterization.

  9. Global Image Dissimilarity in Macaque Inferotemporal Cortex Predicts Human Visual Search Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sripati, Arun P.; Olson, Carl R.

    2010-01-01

    Finding a target in a visual scene can be easy or difficult depending on the nature of the distractors. Research in humans has suggested that search is more difficult the more similar the target and distractors are to each other. However, it has not yielded an objective definition of similarity. We hypothesized that visual search performance depends on similarity as determined by the degree to which two images elicit overlapping patterns of neuronal activity in visual cortex. To test this idea, we recorded from neurons in monkey inferotemporal cortex (IT) and assessed visual search performance in humans using pairs of images formed from the same local features in different global arrangements. The ability of IT neurons to discriminate between two images was strongly predictive of the ability of humans to discriminate between them during visual search, accounting overall for 90% of the variance in human performance. A simple physical measure of global similarity – the degree of overlap between the coarse footprints of a pair of images – largely explains both the neuronal and the behavioral results. To explain the relation between population activity and search behavior, we propose a model in which the efficiency of global oddball search depends on contrast-enhancing lateral interactions in high-order visual cortex. PMID:20107054

  10. Nonlinear predictive control for durability enhancement and efficiency improvement in a fuel cell power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Julio; Jemei, Samir; Yousfi-Steiner, Nadia; Husar, Attila; Serra, Maria; Hissel, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) strategy is proposed to improve the efficiency and enhance the durability of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) power system. The PEMFC controller is based on a distributed parameters model that describes the nonlinear dynamics of the system, considering spatial variations along the gas channels. Parasitic power from different system auxiliaries is considered, including the main parasitic losses which are those of the compressor. A nonlinear observer is implemented, based on the discretised model of the PEMFC, to estimate the internal states. This information is included in the cost function of the controller to enhance the durability of the system by means of avoiding local starvation and inappropriate water vapour concentrations. Simulation results are presented to show the performance of the proposed controller over a given case study in an automotive application (New European Driving Cycle). With the aim of representing the most relevant phenomena that affects the PEMFC voltage, the simulation model includes a two-phase water model and the effects of liquid water on the catalyst active area. The control model is a simplified version that does not consider two-phase water dynamics.

  11. Predicting the disinfection efficiency range in chlorine contact tanks through a CFD-based approach.

    PubMed

    Angeloudis, Athanasios; Stoesser, Thorsten; Falconer, Roger A

    2014-09-01

    In this study three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models, incorporating appropriately selected kinetic models, were developed to simulate the processes of chlorine decay, pathogen inactivation and the formation of potentially carcinogenic by-products in disinfection contact tanks (CTs). Currently, the performance of CT facilities largely relies on Hydraulic Efficiency Indicators (HEIs), extracted from experimentally derived Residence Time Distribution (RTD) curves. This approach has more recently been aided with the application of CFD models, which can be calibrated to predict accurately RTDs, enabling the assessment of disinfection facilities prior to their construction. However, as long as it depends on HEIs, the CT design process does not directly take into consideration the disinfection biochemistry which needs to be optimized. The main objective of this study is to address this issue by refining the modelling practices to simulate some reactive processes of interest, while acknowledging the uneven contact time stemming from the RTD curves. Initially, the hydraulic performances of seven CT design variations were reviewed through available experimental and computational data. In turn, the same design configurations were tested using numerical modelling techniques, featuring kinetic models that enable the quantification of disinfection operational parameters. Results highlight that the optimization of the hydrodynamic conditions facilitates a more uniform disinfectant contact time, which correspond to greater levels of pathogen inactivation and a more controlled by-product accumulation.

  12. Early language processing efficiency predicts later receptive vocabulary outcomes in children born preterm.

    PubMed

    Marchman, Virginia A; Adams, Katherine A; Loi, Elizabeth C; Fernald, Anne; Feldman, Heidi M

    2016-01-01

    As rates of prematurity continue to rise, identifying which preterm children are at increased risk for learning disabilities is a public health imperative. Identifying continuities between early and later skills in this vulnerable population can also illuminate fundamental neuropsychological processes that support learning in all children. At 18 months adjusted age, we used socioeconomic status (SES), medical variables, parent-reported vocabulary, scores on the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (third edition) language composite, and children's lexical processing speed in the looking-while-listening (LWL) task as predictor variables in a sample of 30 preterm children. Receptive vocabulary as measured by the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (fourth edition) at 36 months was the outcome. Receptive vocabulary was correlated with SES, but uncorrelated with degree of prematurity or a composite of medical risk. Importantly, lexical processing speed was the strongest predictor of receptive vocabulary (r = -.81), accounting for 30% unique variance. Individual differences in lexical processing efficiency may be able to serve as a marker for information processing skills that are critical for language learning.

  13. Operon mRNAs are organized into ORF-centric structures that predict translation efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, David H; Rouskin, Silvi; Zhang, Yan; Li, Gene-Wei; Weissman, Jonathan S; Gross, Carol A

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial mRNAs are organized into operons consisting of discrete open reading frames (ORFs) in a single polycistronic mRNA. Individual ORFs on the mRNA are differentially translated, with rates varying as much as 100-fold. The signals controlling differential translation are poorly understood. Our genome-wide mRNA secondary structure analysis indicated that operonic mRNAs are comprised of ORF-wide units of secondary structure that vary across ORF boundaries such that adjacent ORFs on the same mRNA molecule are structurally distinct. ORF translation rate is strongly correlated with its mRNA structure in vivo, and correlation persists, albeit in a reduced form, with its structure when translation is inhibited and with that of in vitro refolded mRNA. These data suggest that intrinsic ORF mRNA structure encodes a rough blueprint for translation efficiency. This structure is then amplified by translation, in a self-reinforcing loop, to provide the structure that ultimately specifies the translation of each ORF. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22037.001 PMID:28139975

  14. Predicting growth and curve progression in the individual patient with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: design of a prospective longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Scoliosis is present in 3-5% of the children in the adolescent age group, with a higher incidence in females. Treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is mainly dependent on the progression of the scoliotic curve. There is a close relationship between curve progression and rapid (spinal) growth of the patient during puberty. However, until present time no conclusive method was found for predicting the timing and magnitude of the pubertal growth spurt in total body height, or the curve progression of the idiopathic scoliosis. The goal of this study is to determine the predictive value of several maturity indicators that reflect growth or remaining growth potential, in order to predict timing of the peak growth velocity of total body height in the individual patient with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Furthermore, different parameters are evaluated for their correlation with curve progression in the individual scoliosis patient. Methods/design This prospective, longitudinal cohort study will be incorporated in the usual care of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. All new patients between 8 and 17 years with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (Cobb angle >10 degrees) visiting the outpatient clinic of the University Medical Center Groningen are included in this study. Follow up will take place every 6 months. The present study will use a new ultra-low dose X-ray system which can make total body X-rays. Several maturity indicators are evaluated like different body length dimensions, secondary sexual characteristics, skeletal age in hand and wrist, skeletal age in the elbow, the Risser sign, the status of the triradiate cartilage, and EMG ratios of the paraspinal muscle activity. Correlations of all dimensions will be calculated in relationship to the timing of the pubertal growth spurt, and to the progression of the scoliotic curve. An algorithm will be made for the optimal treatment strategy in the individual patient with adolescent idiopathic

  15. Individual differences in decision making and reward processing predict changes in cannabis use: a prospective functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Cousijn, Janna; Wiers, Reinout W; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; van den Brink, Wim; Veltman, Dick J; Porrino, Linda J; Goudriaan, Anna E

    2013-11-01

    Decision-making deficits are thought to play an important role in the development and persistence of substance use disorders. Individual differences in decision-making abilities and their underlying neurocircuitry may, therefore, constitute an important predictor for the course of substance use and the development of substance use disorders. Here, we investigate the predictive value of decision making and neural mechanisms underlying decision making for future cannabis use and problem severity in a sample of heavy cannabis users. Brain activity during a monetary decision-making task (Iowa gambling task) was compared between 32 heavy cannabis users and 41 matched non-using controls using functional magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, within the group of heavy cannabis users, associations were examined between task-related brain activations, cannabis use and cannabis use-related problems at baseline, and change in cannabis use and problem severity after a 6-month follow-up. Despite normal task performance, heavy cannabis users compared with controls showed higher activation during wins in core areas associated with decision making. Moreover, within the group of heavy cannabis users, win-related activity and activity anticipating loss outcomes in areas generally involved in executive functions predicted change in cannabis use after 6 months. These findings are consistent with previous studies and point to abnormal processing of motivational information in heavy cannabis users. A new finding is that individuals who are biased toward immediate rewards have a higher probability of increasing drug use, highlighting the importance of the relative balance between motivational processes and regulatory executive processes in the development of substance use disorders.

  16. Individual differences in common factors of emotional traits and executive functions predict functional connectivity of the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Rohr, C S; Dreyer, F R; Aderka, I M; Margulies, D S; Frisch, S; Villringer, A; Okon-Singer, H

    2015-10-15

    Evidence suggests that individual differences in emotion control are associated with frontoparietal-limbic networks and linked to emotional traits and executive functions. In a first attempt to directly target the link between emotional traits and executive functions using resting-state fMRI analysis, 43 healthy adults completed a test battery including executive tasks and emotional trait self-assessments that were subjected to a principal component analysis. Of the three factors detected, two explained 40.4% of the variance and were further investigated. Both factors suggest a relation between emotional traits and executive functions. Specifically, the first factor consisted of measures related to inhibitory control and negative affect, and the second factor was related to reward and positive affect. To investigate whether this interplay between emotional traits and executive functions is reflected in neural connectivity, we used resting-state fMRI to explore the functional connectivity of the amygdala as a starting point, and progressed to other seed-based analyses based on the initial findings. We found that the first factor predicted the strength of connectivity between brain regions known to be involved in the cognitive control of emotion, including the amygdala and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, whereas the second factor predicted the strength of connectivity between brain regions known to be involved in reward and attention, including the amygdala, the caudate and the thalamus. These findings suggest that individual differences in the ability to inhibit negative affect are mediated by prefrontal-limbic pathways, while the ability to be positive and use rewarding information is mediated by a network that includes the amygdala and thalamostriatal regions.

  17. A novel total flux normalized correlation equation for predicting single-collector efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, R.; Messina, F.; Marchisio, D.

    2015-12-01

    In this study a novel total flux normalized correlation equation is proposed for predicting single-collector efficiency under a broad range of parameters. The correlation equation does not exploit the additivity approach introduced by Yao et al. (1971), but includes mixed terms that account for the mutual interaction of concomitant transport mechanisms (i.e., advection, gravity and Brownian motion) and of finite size of the particles (steric effect). The correlation equation is based on a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian simulations performed, under Smoluchowski-Levich conditions, in a geometry which consists of a sphere enveloped by a cylindrical control volume. The normalization of the deposited flux is performed accounting for all of the particles entering into the control volume through all transport mechanisms (not just the upstream convective flux as conventionally done) to provide efficiency values lower than one over a wide range of parameters. In order to guarantee the independence of each term, the correlation equation is derived through a rigorous hierarchical parameter estimation process, accounting for single and mutual interacting transport mechanisms. The correlation equation, valid both for point and finite-size particles, is extended to include porosity dependency and it is compared with previous models. Reduced forms are proposed by elimination of the less relevant terms.References:F Messina, DL Marchisio, R Sethi . Journal of colloid and interface science 446, (2015) 185-193 T Tosco, DL Marchisio, F Lince, R Sethi, Transport in porous media 96 (1), (2013) 1-20 A Tiraferri, T Tosco, R Sethi Environmental Earth Sciences 63 (4), (2011) 847-859 K.E. Nelson, T.R. Ginn, T. Kemai, Environ Sci Technol 47 (2013) 8078. G. Boccardo, D.L. Marchisio, R. Sethi, J Colloid Interface Sci 417 (2014) 227. H. Ma, J. Pedel, P. Fife, W.P. Johnson, (2009). N. Tufenkji, M. Elimelech, Environ Sci Technol 38 (2004) 529.K.M. Yao, M.M. Habibian, C.R. O'Melia, Environ

  18. IFIT1 polymorphisms predict interferon-α treatment efficiency for hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Dong-Ying; Wang, Shi-Ming; Yang, Jing-Min; Wang, Liang-Hui; Chen, Hong-Yan; Huai, Cong; Shang, Jia; Mao, Qing; Lei, Chun-Liang; Luo, Guang-Han; Qian, Ji; Lu, Da-Ru

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the association between interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 1 (IFIT1) polymorphisms and interferon-α (IFNα) treatment efficiency among Chinese hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection patients. METHODS Two hundred and twenty five newly diagnosed chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients were enrolled in the study. All of these patients received IFNα treatment for a course of 48 wk, and were followed up for 24 wk after the treatment was end. Clinical information about virological response, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion rate and combined response at the end of the treatment, as well as the sustained response by the time of following up 24 wk after the treatment, was collected. Four tag-single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of IFIT1 were selected and assessed for their association with these clinical outcomes. RESULTS At the end of the treatment, HBeAg seroconversion was observed in 27.1% patients. Thirty-six point nine percent patients achieved virological response, and 15.6% patients exhibited combined response. Sustained response was obtained in 26.2% patients. The main HBV genotype of the study was genotype B. Patients who infected with HBV genotype B or C showed better treatment efficiency, no matter which clinical outcome was considered. Among the four SNPs assessed, rs303218 (A > G) was found to be significantly associated with the end point virological response when assuming additive model [OR = 0.64 (95%CI: 0.42-0.96), P = 0.032]. Patients who carried rs303218 GG genotype had a rather higher rate of achieving virological response (response rate: 52%, OR = 0.40, 95%CI: 0.18-0.91; P = 0.028) when compared to those had AA genotype (response rate: 27%). The most significant interaction was observed in patients who had relative lower baseline aspartate transaminase. No association between SNPs and HBeAg seroconversion, combined response or sustained response was observed. CONCLUSION IFIT1 involves in the regulation of

  19. Individual Differences in Nucleus Accumbens Activity to Food and Sexual Images Predict Weight Gain and Sexual Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Demos, K. E.; Heatherton, T. F.; Kelley, W. M.

    2012-01-01

    Failures of self-regulation are common, leading to many of the most vexing problems facing contemporary society, from overeating and obesity to impulsive sexual behavior and HIV/AIDS. One reason that people may be prone to engaging in unwanted behaviors is because of heightened sensitivity to cues related to those behaviors; people may overeat because of hyper responsiveness to food cues, addicts may relapse following exposure to their drug of choice, and some people might engage in impulsive sexual activity because they are easily aroused by erotic stimuli. An open question is the extent to which individual differences in neural cue reactivity relate to actual behavioral outcomes. Here we show that individual differences in human reward-related brain activity in the nucleus accumbens to food and sexual images predict subsequent weight gain and sexual activity six months later. These findings suggest that heightened reward responsivity in the brain to food and sexual cues is associated with indulgence in overeating and sexual activity, respectively, and provide evidence for a common neural mechanism associated with appetitive behaviors. PMID:22514316

  20. Developmental trajectories in toddlers' self-restraint predict individual differences in executive functions 14 years later: a behavioral genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Naomi P; Miyake, Akira; Robinson, JoAnn L; Hewitt, John K

    2011-09-01

    We examined whether self-restraint in early childhood predicted individual differences in 3 executive functions (EFs; inhibiting prepotent responses, updating working memory, and shifting task sets) in late adolescence in a sample of approximately 950 twins. At ages 14, 20, 24, and 36 months, the children were shown an attractive toy and told not to touch it for 30 s. Latency to touch the toy increased with age, and latent class growth modeling distinguished 2 groups of children that differed in their latencies to touch the toy at all 4 time points. Using confirmatory factor analysis, we decomposed the 3 EFs (measured with latent variables at age 17 years) into a Common EF factor (isomorphic to response inhibition ability) and 2 factors specific to updating and shifting. Less-restrained children had significantly lower scores on the Common EF factor, equivalent scores on the Updating-Specific factor, and higher scores on the Shifting-Specific factor than did the more-restrained children. The less-restrained group also had lower IQ scores, but this effect was entirely mediated by the EF components. Twin models indicated that the associations were primarily genetic in origin for the Common EF variable but split between genetics and nonshared environment for the Shifting-Specific variable. These results suggest a biological relation between individual differences in self-restraint and EFs, one that begins early in life and persists into late adolescence.

  1. Predicting Short Term Runoff Efficiency Using Antecedent Soil Moisture Estimates From Ground Penetrating Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermance, J. F.; Bohidar, R. N.

    2002-05-01

    Hydrologists universally recognize the importance of antecedent soil moisture conditions for predicting the response of catchments to storm events. We describe a pilot study involving a series of repeat geophysical measurements over a 5 month period to determine the water content of the subsurface immediately before a sequence of precipitation events. We correlate the resultant streamflow "response" of the local catchment to each event with the antecedent soil moisture at our reference site using a metric commonly employed by hydrologists: the ratio Qef/W, referred to here as the "short term runoff efficiency", which is simply the time-integrated volume of event flow (Qef) at the catchment's outflow point normalized by the volume of total precipitation (W) over its area. To determine the volumetric water content (Cw) of soils, past studies suggest the effectiveness of pulsed radio frequency methods, such as time domain reflectometry (TDR), or ground-penetrating radar (GPR). To first order, for typical field conditions and procedures, the velocity of a radio pulse in the subsurface is inversely proportional to the square root of the bulk dielectric constant, which in turn is proportional to the soil's water content. For this study, the advantage of GPR over conventional TDR measurements is that the GPR procedure determines average velocities from two-way traveltimes to an interface at depth, resulting in estimates of average physical properties over much larger volumes of the subsurface than would TDR. Our hydrologic data are USGS daily averaged discharges from the Ten Mile River (watershed area = 138 km2; 53.2 mi2) in southern New England. Daily values of precipitation were provided by personnel from the Seekonk Water District Office (MA) adjacent to the field site. Our hydrograph separation was facilitated by the observation that the event flow seems to be adequately represented by a simple composite cascaded linear reservoir model. The GPR data involved a series

  2. Thermodynamic modeling for solubility prediction of indomethacin in self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) and its individual components.

    PubMed

    Shakeel, Faiyaz; Haq, Nazrul; Alanazi, Fars K; Alsarra, Ibrahim A

    2014-09-01

    Abstract For the development of an effective self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) of poorly soluble drugs, the knowledge of the solubility in its oil phase and SNEDDS are one of the most important factors to avoid possibility of drug to get phase separated or precipitated upon dilution with gastrointestinal fluids. With this background, this study was undertaken to determine the equilibrium saturated solubility as well as mole fraction solubility of indomethacin in prepared SNEDDS and its individual components at the temperature range of 295.15 to 320.15 K. The equilibrium solubilities of indomethacin in each sample matrices were determined by an isothermal mechanical shaking method and the resulting data was analyzed by regression analysis. The experimental mole fraction solubility data of indomethacin at various temperatures was well correlated with the modified Apelblat model. The equilibrium saturated solubility as well as mole fraction solubility of indomethacin was found to be increased with increase in temperature in SNEDDS as well as in its individual components. The mole fraction solubility of indomethacin was found to be significantly higher in Tween-80 than SNEDDS, Labrafil-M1944CS and Transcutol-HP. These preliminary studies on solubility could be a useful tool for the development of an efficient and thermodynamically stable SNEDDS formulation of various poorly soluble drugs to enhance their solubility/dissolution and oral bioavailability.

  3. Autonomic dysfunction independently predicts poor cardiovascular outcomes in asymptomatic individuals with type 2 diabetes in the DIAD study

    PubMed Central

    Wackers, Frans JTh; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Jose, Powell; Weiss, Curtis; Davey, Janice A; Heller, Gary V; Iskandrian, Ami E; Young, Lawrence H

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The primary aim of this secondary analysis was to determine whether cardiac autonomic neuropathy independently predicted adverse cardiac outcomes in asymptomatic individuals with type 2 diabetes. Additional aims include the determination of the correlation of standard autonomic testing measures and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability, and the association of diabetes-related and cardiac risk factors with cardiac autonomic neuropathy measures. Methods: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy was assessed at the study entry into the Detection of Ischemia in Asymptomatic Diabetics study, using autonomic heart rate and blood pressure testing, and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability. All participants were prospectively followed for the composite clinical outcome of cardiac death, acute coronary syndromes, heart failure, or coronary revascularization. Results: Over 5 years of follow-up, 94 of 1119 (8.4%) subjects developed symptomatic cardiac disease. In unadjusted bivariate analyses, abnormalities in several cardiac autonomic neuropathy tests, including lower Valsalva and Standing Heart Rate Ratios, higher resting Heart Rate, greater systolic blood pressure decrease on standing, and lower low-frequency power, were predictive of symptomatic disease. Independent predictors of poor cardiac outcome were a lower Valsalva Heart Rate Ratio, non-Black ethnicity, longer diabetes duration, higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), insulin use, reported numbness in the extremities, higher pulse pressure, family history of coronary artery disease, and higher waist-to-hip ratio. Clinical factors independently associated with a lower Valsalva Heart Rate Ratio were insulin use, clinical proteinuria, higher pulse pressure, use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and non-Black ethnicity. Conclusion: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy predicted adverse cardiac outcomes in asymptomatic type 2 diabetes without known cardiac disease. Clinical variables may help to

  4. Stress and success: individual differences in the glucocorticoid stress response predict behavior and reproductive success under high predation risk.

    PubMed

    Vitousek, Maren N; Jenkins, Brittany R; Safran, Rebecca J

    2014-11-01

    A fundamental element of how vertebrates respond to stressors is by rapidly elevating circulating glucocorticoid hormones. Individual variation in the magnitude of the glucocorticoid stress response has been linked with reproductive success and survival. But while the adaptive value of this response is believed to stem in part from changes in the expression of hormone-mediated behaviors, it is not clear how the behavior of stronger and weaker glucocorticoid responders differs during reproduction, or during exposure to ecologically relevant stressors. Here we report that in a population of barn swallows (Hirundo rustica erythrogaster) experiencing high rates of nest predation, circulating levels of corticosterone (the primary avian glucocorticoid) during exposure to a standardized stressor predict aspects of subsequent behavior and fitness. Individuals that mounted a stronger corticosterone stress response during the early reproductive period did not differ in clutch size, but fledged fewer offspring. Parents with higher stress-induced corticosterone during the early reproductive period later provisioned their nestlings at lower rates. Additionally, in the presence of a model predator stress-induced corticosterone was positively associated with the latency to return to the nest, but only among birds that were observed to return. Model comparisons revealed that stress-induced hormones were better predictors of the behavioral and fitness effects of exposure to transient, ecologically relevant stressors than baseline corticosterone. These findings are consistent with functional links between individual variation in the hormonal and behavioral response to stressors. If such links occur, then selection on the heritable components of the corticosterone stress response could promote adaptation to novel environments or predation regimes.

  5. Periventricular [11C]flumazenil binding for predicting postoperative outcome in individual patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis☆

    PubMed Central

    Yankam Njiwa, Josiane; Bouvard, Sandrine; Catenoix, Hélène; Mauguiere, François; Ryvlin, Philippe; Hammers, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    A third of patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis (HS) are not seizure free (NSF) after surgery. Increased periventricular [11C]flumazenil (FMZ) binding, reflecting heterotopic neuron concentration, has been described as one predictor of NSF outcome at the group level. We aimed to replicate this finding in an independent larger cohort and investigated whether NSF outcome can be predicted in individuals. Preoperative [11C]FMZ summed radioactivity images were available for 16 patients with HS and 41 controls. Images were analyzed using SPM8, explicitly including the white matter, and correction for global radioactivity via group-specific ANCOVA. Periventricular increases were assessed with a mask and different cutoffs for distinguishing NSF and seizure free (SF) patients. NSF patients had increased [11C]FMZ binding around the posterior horn of the ventricles ipsilaterally (z = 2.53) and contralaterally (z = 4.44) to the seizure focus compared with SF patients. Compared with controls, SF patients had fewer periventricular increases (two clusters, total volume 0.87 cm3, zmax = 3.8) than NSF patients (two ipsilateral and three contralateral clusters, 6.15 cm3, zmax = 4.8). In individuals and at optimized cutoffs, five (63%) of eight NSF patients and one (13%) of eight SF patients showed periventricular increases compared with controls (accuracy 75%). Only one (2%) of the 41 controls had increases at the same cutoff. The association between periventricular [11C]FMZ increases and NSF outcome after temporal lobe resection for HS has been confirmed in an independent cohort on simple summed activity images. [11C]FMZ-PET may be useful for individual preoperative counseling with clinically relevant accuracy. PMID:24273709

  6. Acoustic Prediction Methodology and Test Validation for an Efficient Low-Noise Hybrid Wing Body Subsonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, Ronald T. (Compiler)

    2011-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to: (1) Develop a hybrid wing body subsonic transport configuration with noise prediction methods to meet the circa 2007 NASA Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) N+2 noise goal of -52 dB cum relative to FAR 36 Stage 3 (-42 dB cum re: Stage 4) while achieving a -25% fuel burned compared to current transports (re :B737/B767); (2) Develop improved noise prediction methods for ANOPP2 for use in predicting FAR 36 noise; (3) Design and fabricate a wind tunnel model for testing in the LaRC 14 x 22 ft low speed wind tunnel to validate noise predictions and determine low speed aero characteristics for an efficient low noise Hybrid Wing Body configuration. A medium wide body cargo freighter was selected to represent a logical need for an initial operational capability in the 2020 time frame. The Efficient Low Noise Hybrid Wing Body (ELNHWB) configuration N2A-EXTE was evolved meeting the circa 2007 NRA N+2 fuel burn and noise goals. The noise estimates were made using improvements in jet noise shielding and noise shielding prediction methods developed by UC Irvine and MIT. From this the Quiet Ultra Integrated Efficient Test Research Aircraft #1 (QUIET-R1) 5.8% wind tunnel model was designed and fabricated.

  7. Modelling impacts of performance on the probability of reproducing, and thereby on productive lifespan, allow prediction of lifetime efficiency in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Phuong, H N; Blavy, P; Martin, O; Schmidely, P; Friggens, N C

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive success is a key component of lifetime efficiency - which is the ratio of energy in milk (MJ) to energy intake (MJ) over the lifespan, of cows. At the animal level, breeding and feeding management can substantially impact milk yield, body condition and energy balance of cows, which are known as major contributors to reproductive failure in dairy cattle. This study extended an existing lifetime performance model to incorporate the impacts that performance changes due to changing breeding and feeding strategies have on the probability of reproducing and thereby on the productive lifespan, and thus allow the prediction of a cow's lifetime efficiency. The model is dynamic and stochastic, with an individual cow being the unit modelled and one day being the unit of time. To evaluate the model, data from a French study including Holstein and Normande cows fed high-concentrate diets and data from a Scottish study including Holstein cows selected for high and average genetic merit for fat plus protein that were fed high- v. low-concentrate diets were used. Generally, the model consistently simulated productive and reproductive performance of various genotypes of cows across feeding systems. In the French data, the model adequately simulated the reproductive performance of Holsteins but significantly under-predicted that of Normande cows. In the Scottish data, conception to first service was comparably simulated, whereas interval traits were slightly under-predicted. Selection for greater milk production impaired the reproductive performance and lifespan but not lifetime efficiency. The definition of lifetime efficiency used in this model did not include associated costs or herd-level effects. Further works should include such economic indicators to allow more accurate simulation of lifetime profitability in different production scenarios.

  8. Molecular value predictions: associations with beef quality, carcass, production, behavior, and efficiency phenotypes in Brahman cattle.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, P L; Cafe, L M; McIntyre, B L; Geesink, G H; Thompson, J M; Polkinghorne, R; Pethick, D W; Robinson, D L

    2013-12-01

    Data from 2 previously published experiments, New South Wales (NSW; n = 161) and Western Australia (WA; n = 135), were used to test molecular value predictions (MVP), generated from commercially available gene markers, on economically important traits of Bos indicus (Brahman) cattle. Favorable tenderness MVP scores were associated with reduced shear force values of strip loin (LM) steaks aged 7 d from Achilles-hung carcasses (P ≤ 0.06), as well as steaks aged 1 (P ≤ 0.08) or 7 d (P ≤ 0.07) from carcasses hung from the pelvis (tenderstretch). Favorable tenderness MVP scores were also associated with improved consumer tenderness ratings for strip loin steaks aged 7 d and either Achilles hung (P ≤ 0.006) or tenderstretched (P ≤ 0.07). Similar results were observed in NSW for rump (top butt; gluteus medius) steaks, with favorable tenderness MVP scores associated with more tender (P = 0.006) and acceptable (P = 0.008) beef. Favorable marbling MVP scores were associated with improved (P ≤ 0.021) marbling scores and intramuscular fat (IMF) content in the NSW experiment, despite low variation in marbling in the Brahman cattle. For the WA experiment, however, there were no (P ≥ 0.71) relationships between marbling MVP and marbling scores or IMF content. Although residual (net) feed intake (RFI) was not associated (P = 0.63) with the RFI (feed efficiency) MVP, the RFI MVP was adversely associated with LM tenderness and acceptability of 7-d-aged Achilles-hung carcasses in NSW (P ≤ 0.031) and WA (P ≤ 0.037). Some other relationships and trends were noted between the MVP and the other traits, but few reached statistical significance, and none were evident in both experiments. Results from this study provide evidence to support the use of the tenderness MVP. The value of the marbling MVP, which was associated with marbling in only 1 herd, warrants further evaluation; however, there appears to be no evidence to support use of the RFI MVP in Brahman cattle.

  9. Fast trabecular bone strength predictions of HR-pQCT and individual trabeculae segmentation-based plate and rod finite element model discriminate postmenopausal vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Liu, X Sherry; Wang, Ji; Zhou, Bin; Stein, Emily; Shi, Xiutao; Adams, Mark; Shane, Elizabeth; Guo, X Edward

    2013-07-01

    Although high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) has advanced clinical assessment of trabecular bone microstructure, nonlinear microstructural finite element (µFE) prediction of yield strength using a HR-pQCT voxel model is impractical for clinical use due to its prohibitively high computational costs. The goal of this study was to develop an efficient HR-pQCT-based plate and rod (PR) modeling technique to fill the unmet clinical need for fast bone strength estimation. By using an individual trabecula segmentation (ITS) technique to segment the trabecular structure into individual plates and rods, a patient-specific PR model was implemented by modeling each trabecular plate with multiple shell elements and each rod with a beam element. To validate this modeling technique, predictions by HR-pQCT PR model were compared with those of the registered high-resolution micro-computed tomography (HR-µCT) voxel model of 19 trabecular subvolumes from human cadaveric tibia samples. Both the Young's modulus and yield strength of HR-pQCT PR models strongly correlated with those of µCT voxel models (r²  = 0.91 and 0.86). Notably, the HR-pQCT PR models achieved major reductions in element number (>40-fold) and computer central processing unit (CPU) time (>1200-fold). Then, we applied PR model µFE analysis to HR-pQCT images of 60 postmenopausal women with (n = 30) and without (n = 30) a history of vertebral fracture. HR-pQCT PR model revealed significantly lower Young's modulus and yield strength at the radius and tibia in fracture subjects compared to controls. Moreover, these mechanical measurements remained significantly lower in fracture subjects at both sites after adjustment for areal bone mineral density (aBMD) T-score at the ultradistal radius or total hip. In conclusion, we validated a novel HR-pQCT PR model of human trabecular bone against µCT voxel models and demonstrated its ability to discriminate vertebral fracture

  10. Chaos in balance: non-linear measures of postural control predict individual variations in visual illusions of motion.

    PubMed

    Apthorp, Deborah; Nagle, Fintan; Palmisano, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Visually-induced illusions of self-motion (vection) can be compelling for some people, but they are subject to large individual variations in strength. Do these variations depend, at least in part, on the extent to which people rely on vision to maintain their postural stability? We investigated by comparing physical posture measures to subjective vection ratings. Using a Bertec balance plate in a brightly-lit room, we measured 13 participants' excursions of the centre of foot pressure (CoP) over a 60-second period with eyes open and with eyes closed during quiet stance. Subsequently, we collected vection strength ratings for large optic flow displays while seated, using both verbal ratings and online throttle measures. We also collected measures of postural sway (changes in anterior-posterior CoP) in response to the same visual motion stimuli while standing on the plate. The magnitude of standing sway in response to expanding optic flow (in comparison to blank fixation periods) was predictive of both verbal and throttle measures for seated vection. In addition, the ratio between eyes-open and eyes-closed CoP excursions during quiet stance (using the area of postural sway) significantly predicted seated vection for both measures. Interestingly, these relationships were weaker for contracting optic flow displays, though these produced both stronger vection and more sway. Next we used a non-linear analysis (recurrence quantification analysis, RQA) of the fluctuations in anterior-posterior position during quiet stance (both with eyes closed and eyes open); this was a much stronger predictor of seated vection for both expanding and contracting stimuli. Given the complex multisensory integration involved in postural control, our study adds to the growing evidence that non-linear measures drawn from complexity theory may provide a more informative measure of postural sway than the conventional linear measures.

  11. Individual prediction of long-term outcome in adolescents at ultra-high risk for psychosis: Applying machine learning techniques to brain imaging data.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Sanne; Ziermans, Tim B; Nieuwenhuis, M; Schothorst, Patricia F; van Engeland, Herman; Kahn, René S; Durston, Sarah; Schnack, Hugo G

    2017-02-01

    An important focus of studies of individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis has been to identify biomarkers to predict which individuals will transition to psychosis. However, the majority of individuals will prove to be resilient and go on to experience remission of their symptoms and function well. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of using structural MRI measures collected in UHR adolescents at baseline to quantitatively predict their long-term clinical outcome and level of functioning. We included 64 UHR individuals and 62 typically developing adolescents (12-18 years old at recruitment). At six-year follow-up, we determined resilience for 43 UHR individuals. Support Vector Regression analyses were performed to predict long-term functional and clinical outcome from baseline MRI measures on a continuous scale, instead of the more typical binary classification. This led to predictive correlations of baseline MR measures with level of functioning, and negative and disorganization symptoms. The highest correlation (r = 0.42) was found between baseline subcortical volumes and long-term level of functioning. In conclusion, our results show that structural MRI data can be used to quantitatively predict long-term functional and clinical outcome in UHR individuals with medium effect size, suggesting that there may be scope for predicting outcome at the individual level. Moreover, we recommend classifying individual outcome on a continuous scale, enabling the assessment of different functional and clinical scales separately without the need to set a threshold. Hum Brain Mapp 38:704-714, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Neural disruption to theory of mind predicts daily social functioning in individuals at familial high-risk for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Dodell-Feder, David; DeLisi, Lynn E; Hooker, Christine I

    2014-12-01

    Theory-of-mind (ToM) ability is foundational for successful social relationships, and dependent on a neurocognitive system, which includes temporoparietal junction and medial prefrontal cortex. Schizophrenia is associated with ToM impairments, and initial studies demonstrate similar, though more subtle deficits, in unaffected first-degree relatives, indicating that ToM deficits are a potential biomarker for the disorder. Importantly, the social consequences of ToM deficits could create an additional vulnerability factor for individuals at familial high risk (FHR). However, behavioral studies of ToM are inconsistent and virtually nothing is known about the neural basis of ToM in FHR or the relationship between ToM and social functioning. Here, FHR and non-FHR control participants underwent functional MRI scanning while reasoning about a story character's thoughts, emotions or physical appearance. Afterwards, participants completed a 28-day online 'daily-diary' questionnaire in which they reported daily social interactions and degree of ToM reasoning. FHR participants demonstrated less neural activity in bilateral temporoparietal junction when reasoning about thoughts and emotions. Moreover, across all participants, the degree of neural activity during ToM reasoning predicted several aspects of daily social behavior. Results suggest that vulnerability for schizophrenia is associated with neurocognitive deficits in ToM and the degree of deficit is related to day-to-day social functioning.

  13. Individual personality differences in goats predict their performance in visual learning and non-associative cognitive tasks.

    PubMed

    Nawroth, Christian; Prentice, Pamela M; McElligott, Alan G

    2017-01-01

    Variation in common personality traits, such as boldness or exploration, is often associated with risk-reward trade-offs and behavioural flexibility. To date, only a few studies have examined the effects of consistent behavioural traits on both learning and cognition. We investigated whether certain personality traits ('exploration' and 'sociability') of individuals were related to cognitive performance, learning flexibility and learning style in a social ungulate species, the goat (Capra hircus). We also investigated whether a preference for feature cues rather than impaired learning abilities can explain performance variation in a visual discrimination task. We found that personality scores were consistent across time and context. Less explorative goats performed better in a non-associative cognitive task, in which subjects had to follow the trajectory of a hidden object (i.e. testing their ability for object permanence). We also found that less sociable subjects performed better compared to more sociable goats in a visual discrimination task. Good visual learning performance was associated with a preference for feature cues, indicating personality-dependent learning strategies in goats. Our results suggest that personality traits predict the outcome in visual discrimination and non-associative cognitive tasks in goats and that impaired performance in a visual discrimination tasks does not necessarily imply impaired learning capacities, but rather can be explained by a varying preference for feature cues.

  14. Inter-individual variation in fronto-temporal connectivity predicts the ability to learn different types of associations.

    PubMed

    Alm, Kylie H; Rolheiser, Tyler; Olson, Ingrid R

    2016-05-15

    The uncinate fasciculus connects portions of the anterior and medial temporal lobes to the lateral orbitofrontal cortex, so it has long been thought that this limbic fiber pathway plays an important role in episodic memory. Some types of episodic memory are impaired after damage to the uncinate, while others remain intact. Because of this, the specific role played by the uncinate fasciculus in episodic memory remains undetermined. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the uncinate fasciculus is involved in episodic memory tasks that have high competition between representations at retrieval. To test this hypothesis, healthy young adults performed three tasks: Experiment 1 in which they learned to associate names with faces through feedback provided at the end of each trial; Experiment 2 in which they learned to associate fractals with cued locations through feedback provided at the end of each trial; and Experiment 3 in which unique faces were remembered in a paradigm with low retrieval competition. Diffusion tensor imaging and deterministic tractography methods were used to extract measures of uncinate fasciculus microstructure. Results revealed that microstructural properties of the uncinate, but not a control tract, the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, significantly predicted individual differences in performance on the face-name and fractal-location tasks. However, no relationship was observed for simple face memory (Experiment 3). These findings suggest that the uncinate fasciculus may be important for adjudicating between competing memory representations at the time of episodic retrieval.

  15. Biomarker Profile Does Not Predict Weight Loss Success in Successful and Unsuccessful Diet-Reduced Obese Individuals: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, Lorraine Garratt; MacLean, Paul Scown; Giles, Erin Danielle; Wyatt, Holly Roxanna

    2013-01-01

    Background. Individuals attempting weight reduction have varying success when participating in the same intervention. Identifying physiological factors associated with greater weight loss could improve outcomes. Methods. Sixty-one adults (BMI 27–30 kg/m2) participated in a 16-week group-based, cognitive-behavioral control weight loss program. Concentrations of 12 fasting hormones and cytokines related to adiposity, satiety/hunger, and inflammation were measured using the Milliplex human metabolic human panel before and after weight loss. Participants were grouped based on ≥8% (successful group, SG) or <8% weight loss (less successful group, LSG). Results. The SG had 46 subjects (75.4%), while the LSG had 15 (24.6%). There were no differences in baseline sex distribution, age, weight, BMI, and body composition between groups. In the SG, baseline to the 16-week levels decreased significantly for c-peptide (1,030 versus 891 pg/mL, P = 0.002), insulin (665 versus 541 pg/mL, P = 0.001), and leptin (0.83 versus 0.58 ng/mL/kg fat, P < 0.001). None of the baseline analytes predicted greater weight loss. Conclusions. Successful weight loss was associated with changes in adiposity (less fat mass) and unfavorable hunger signals. No baseline biomarker profile was associated with weight loss success. Behavioral factors may have outweighed physiological signals for determining successful weight loss. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00429650. PMID:24363955

  16. An accurate and efficient method to predict the electronic excitation energies of BODIPY fluorescent dyes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Nan; Jin, Jun-Ling; Geng, Yun; Sun, Shi-Ling; Xu, Hong-Liang; Lu, Ying-Hua; Su, Zhong-Min

    2013-03-15

    Recently, the extreme learning machine neural network (ELMNN) as a valid computing method has been proposed to predict the nonlinear optical property successfully (Wang et al., J. Comput. Chem. 2012, 33, 231). In this work, first, we follow this line of work to predict the electronic excitation energies using the ELMNN method. Significantly, the root mean square deviation of the predicted electronic excitation energies of 90 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (BODIPY) derivatives between the predicted and experimental values has been reduced to 0.13 eV. Second, four groups of molecule descriptors are considered when building the computing models. The results show that the quantum chemical descriptions have the closest intrinsic relation with the electronic excitation energy values. Finally, a user-friendly web server (EEEBPre: Prediction of electronic excitation energies for BODIPY dyes), which is freely accessible to public at the web site: http://202.198.129.218, has been built for prediction. This web server can return the predicted electronic excitation energy values of BODIPY dyes that are high consistent with the experimental values. We hope that this web server would be helpful to theoretical and experimental chemists in related research.

  17. Improved prediction of accessible surface area results in efficient energy function application.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Sumaiya; Mishra, Avdesh; Hoque, Md Tamjidul

    2015-09-07

    An accurate prediction of real value accessible surface area (ASA) from protein sequence alone has wide application in the field of bioinformatics and computational biology. ASA has been helpful in understanding the 3-dimensional structure and function of a protein, acting as high impact feature in secondary structure prediction, disorder prediction, binding region identification and fold recognition applications. To enhance and support broad applications of ASA, we have made an attempt to improve the prediction accuracy of absolute accessible surface area by developing a new predictor paradigm, namely REGAd(3)p, for real value prediction through classical Exact Regression with Regularization and polynomial kernel of degree 3 which was further optimized using Genetic Algorithm. ASA assisting effective energy function, motivated us to enhance the accuracy of predicted ASA for better energy function application. Our ASA prediction paradigm was trained and tested using a new benchmark dataset, proposed in this work, consisting of 1001 and 298 protein chains, respectively. We achieved maximum Pearson Correlation Coefficient (PCC) of 0.76 and 1.45% improved PCC when compared with existing top performing predictor, SPINE-X, in ASA prediction on independent test set. Furthermore, we modeled the error between actual and predicted ASA in terms of energy and combined this energy linearly with the energy function 3DIGARS which resulted in an effective energy function, namely 3DIGARS2.0, outperforming all the state-of-the-art energy functions. Based on Rosetta and Tasser decoy-sets 3DIGARS2.0 resulted 80.78%, 73.77%, 141.24%, 16.52%, and 32.32% improvement over DFIRE, RWplus, dDFIRE, GOAP and 3DIGARS respectively.

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Defects in Silicon. [to predict energy conversion efficiency of silicon samples for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natesh, R.; Smith, J. M.; Qidwai, H. A.; Bruce, T.

    1979-01-01

    The evaluation and prediction of the conversion efficiency for a variety of silicon samples with differences in structural defects, such as grain boundaries, twin boundaries, precipitate particles, dislocations, etc. are discussed. Quantitative characterization of these structural defects, which were revealed by etching the surface of silicon samples, is performed by using an image analyzer. Due to different crystal growth and fabrication techniques the various types of silicon contain a variety of trace impurity elements and structural defects. The two most important criteria in evaluating the various silicon types for solar cell applications are cost and conversion efficiency.

  19. A method for predicting target drug efficiency in cancer based on the analysis of signaling pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Artemov, Artem; Aliper, Alexander; Korzinkin, Michael; Lezhnina, Ksenia; Jellen, Leslie; Zhukov, Nikolay; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Gaifullin, Nurshat; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Borisov, Nicolas; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-10-06

    A new generation of anticancer therapeutics called target drugs has quickly developed in the 21st century. These drugs are tailored to inhibit cancer cell growth, proliferation, and viability by specific interactions with one or a few target proteins. However, despite formally known molecular targets for every "target" drug, patient response to treatment remains largely individual and unpredictable. Choosing the most effective personalized treatment remains a major challenge in oncology and is still largely trial and error. Here we present a novel approach for predicting target drug efficacy based on the gene expression signature of the individual tumor sample(s). The enclosed bioinformatic algorithm detects activation of intracellular regulatory pathways in the tumor in comparison to the corresponding normal tissues. According to the nature of the molecular targets of a drug, it predicts whether the drug can prevent cancer growth and survival in each individual case by blocking the abnormally activated tumor-promoting pathways or by reinforcing internal tumor suppressor cascades. To validate the method, we compared the distribution of predicted drug efficacy scores for five drugs (Sorafenib, Bevacizumab, Cetuximab, Sorafenib, Imatinib, Sunitinib) and seven cancer types (Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma, Colon cancer, Lung adenocarcinoma, non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Thyroid cancer and Sarcoma) with the available clinical trials data for the respective cancer types and drugs. The percent of responders to a drug treatment correlated significantly (Pearson's correlation 0.77 p = 0.023) with the percent of tumors showing high drug scores calculated with the current algorithm.

  20. More Gamma More Predictions: Gamma-Synchronization as a Key Mechanism for Efficient Integration of Classical Receptive Field Inputs with Surround Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Vinck, Martin; Bosman, Conrado A.

    2016-01-01

    During visual stimulation, neurons in visual cortex often exhibit rhythmic and synchronous firing in the gamma-frequency (30–90 Hz) band. Whether this phenomenon plays a functional role during visual processing is not fully clear and remains heavily debated. In this article, we explore the function of gamma-synchronization in the context of predictive and efficient coding theories. These theories hold that sensory neurons utilize the statistical regularities in the natural world in order to improve the efficiency of the neural code, and to optimize the inference of the stimulus causes of the sensory data. In visual cortex, this relies on the integration of classical receptive field (CRF) data with predictions from the surround. Here we outline two main hypotheses about gamma-synchronization in visual cortex. First, we hypothesize that the precision of gamma-synchronization reflects the extent to which CRF data can be accurately predicted by the surround. Second, we hypothesize that different cortical columns synchronize to the extent that they accurately predict each other’s CRF visual input. We argue that these two hypotheses can account for a large number of empirical observations made on the stimulus dependencies of gamma-synchronization. Furthermore, we show that they are consistent with the known laminar dependencies of gamma-synchronization and the spatial profile of intercolumnar gamma-synchronization, as well as the dependence of gamma-synchronization on experience and development. Based on our two main hypotheses, we outline two additional hypotheses. First, we hypothesize that the precision of gamma-synchronization shows, in general, a negative dependence on RF size. In support, we review evidence showing that gamma-synchronization decreases in strength along the visual hierarchy, and tends to be more prominent in species with small V1 RFs. Second, we hypothesize that gamma-synchronized network dynamics facilitate the emergence of spiking output that

  1. NACE: A web-based tool for prediction of intercompartmental efficiency of human molecular genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Popik, Olga V; Ivanisenko, Timofey V; Saik, Olga V; Petrovskiy, Evgeny D; Lavrik, Inna N; Ivanisenko, Vladimir A

    2016-06-15

    Molecular genetic processes generally involve proteins from distinct intracellular localisations. Reactions that follow the same process are distributed among various compartments within the cell. In this regard, the reaction rate and the efficiency of biological processes can depend on the subcellular localisation of proteins. Previously, the authors proposed a method of evaluating the efficiency of biological processes based on the analysis of the distribution of protein subcellular localisation (Popik et al., 2014). Here, NACE is presented, which is an open access web-oriented program that implements this method and allows the user to evaluate the intercompartmental efficiency of human molecular genetic networks. The method has been extended by a new feature that provides the evaluation of the tissue-specific efficiency of networks for more than 2800 anatomical structures. Such assessments are important in cases when molecular genetic pathways in different tissues proceed with the participation of various proteins with a number of intracellular localisations. For example, an analysis of KEGG pathways, conducted using the developed program, showed that the efficiencies of many KEGG pathways are tissue-specific. Analysis of efficiencies of regulatory pathways in the liver, linking proteins of the hepatitis C virus with human proteins involved in the KEGG apoptosis pathway, showed that intercompartmental efficiency might play an important role in host-pathogen interactions. Thus, the developed tool can be useful in the study of the effectiveness of functioning of various molecular genetic networks, including metabolic, regulatory, host-pathogen interactions and others taking into account tissue-specific gene expression. The tool is available via the following link: http://www-bionet.sscc.ru/nace/.

  2. An efficient seizure prediction method using KNN-based undersampling and linear frequency measures.

    PubMed

    Ghaderyan, Peyvand; Abbasi, Ataollah; Sedaaghi, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-07-30

    Seizure prediction based on analysis of electroencephalogram signals has generated considerable research interests. A reliable seizure prediction algorithm with minimal computational requirements is prominent issue for medical facilities; however, it has not been addressed correctly. In this study, an optimized novel method is proposed in order to remove computational complexity, and predict epileptic seizures clinically. It is based on the univariate linear features in eight frequency sub-bands. It also employs principal component analysis (PCA) for dimension reduction and optimal feature selection. Class unbalanced problem is tackled by K-nearest neighbor (KNN)-based undersampling combined with support vector machine (SVM) classifier. To find out the best results two types of postprocessing methods were studied. The proposed algorithm was evaluated on seizures and 434.9h of interictal data from 18 patients of Freiburg database. It predicted 100% of seizures with average false alarm rate of 0.13 per hour ranging between 0 and 0.39. Furthermore, G-Mean and F-measure were used for validation which were 0.97 and 0.90, respectively. These results confirmed the discriminative ability of the algorithm. In comparison with other studies, the proposed method improves trade-off between sensitivity and false prediction rate with linear features and low computational requirements and it can potentially be employed in implantable devices. Achieving high performance by linear features, PCA, KNN-based undersampling, and SVM demonstrates that this method can potentially be used in implantable devices.

  3. Predictability and Market Efficiency in Agricultural Futures Markets: a Perspective from Price-Volume Correlation Based on Wavelet Coherency Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ling-Yun; Wen, Xing-Chun

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we use a time-frequency domain technique, namely, wavelet squared coherency, to examine the associations between the trading volumes of three agricultural futures and three different forms of these futures' daily closing prices, i.e. prices, returns and volatilities, over the past several years. These agricultural futures markets are selected from China as a typical case of the emerging countries, and from the US as a representative of the developed economies. We investigate correlations and lead-lag relationships between the trading volumes and the prices to detect the predictability and efficiency of these futures markets. The results suggest that the information contained in the trading volumes of the three agricultural futures markets in China can be applied to predict the prices or returns, while that in US has extremely weak predictive power for prices or returns. We also conduct the wavelet analysis on the relationships between the volumes and returns or volatilities to examine the existence of the two "stylized facts" proposed by Karpoff [J. M. Karpoff, The relation between price changes and trading volume: A survey, J. Financ. Quant. Anal.22(1) (1987) 109-126]. Different markets in the two countries perform differently in reproducing the two stylized facts. As the wavelet tools can decode nonlinear regularities and hidden patterns behind price-volume relationship in time-frequency space, different from the conventional econometric framework, this paper offers a new perspective into the market predictability and efficiency.

  4. A cascaded QSAR model for efficient prediction of overall power conversion efficiency of all-organic dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhi; Zhong, Ziyan; Li, Lin; Gao, Rui; Cui, Jingxia; Gao, Ting; Hu, Li Hong; Lu, Yinghua; Su, Zhong-Min; Li, Hui

    2015-05-30

    A cascaded model is proposed to establish the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) between the overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) and quantum chemical molecular descriptors of all-organic dye sensitizers. The cascaded model is a two-level network in which the outputs of the first level (JSC, VOC, and FF) are the inputs of the second level, and the ultimate end-point is the overall PCE of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The model combines quantum chemical methods and machine learning methods, further including quantum chemical calculations, data division, feature selection, regression, and validation steps. To improve the efficiency of the model and reduce the redundancy and noise of the molecular descriptors, six feature selection methods (multiple linear regression, genetic algorithms, mean impact value, forward selection, backward elimination, and +n-m algorithm) are used with the support vector machine. The best established cascaded model predicts the PCE values of DSSCs with a MAE of 0.57 (%), which is about 10% of the mean value PCE (5.62%). The validation parameters according to the OECD principles are R(2) (0.75), Q(2) (0.77), and Qcv2 (0.76), which demonstrate the great goodness-of-fit, predictivity, and robustness of the model. Additionally, the applicability domain of the cascaded QSAR model is defined for further application. This study demonstrates that the established cascaded model is able to effectively predict the PCE for organic dye sensitizers with very low cost and relatively high accuracy, providing a useful tool for the design of dye sensitizers with high PCE.

  5. Background matching and camouflage efficiency predict population density in four-eyed turtle (Sacalia quadriocellata).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fanrong; Yang, Canchao; Shi, Haitao; Wang, Jichao; Sun, Liang; Lin, Liu

    2016-10-01

    Background matching is an important way to camouflage and is widespread among animals. In the field, however, few studies have addressed background matching, and there has been no reported camouflage efficiency in freshwater turtles. Background matching and camouflage efficiency of the four-eyed turtle, Sacalia quadriocellata, among three microhabitat sections of Hezonggou stream were investigated by measuring carapace components of CIE L*a*b* (International Commission on Illumination; lightness, red/green and yellow/blue) color space, and scoring camouflage efficiency through the use of humans as predators. The results showed that the color difference (ΔE), lightness difference (ΔL(*)), and chroma difference (Δa(*)b(*)) between carapace and the substrate background in midstream were significantly lower than that upstream and downstream, indicating that the four-eyed turtle carapace color most closely matched the substrate of midstream. In line with these findings, the camouflage efficiency was the best for the turtles that inhabit midstream. These results suggest that the four-eyed turtles may enhance camouflage efficiency by selecting microhabitat that best match their carapace color. This finding may explain the high population density of the four-eyed turtle in the midstream section of Hezonggou stream. To the best of our knowledge, this study is among the first to quantify camouflage of freshwater turtles in the wild, laying the groundwork to further study the function and mechanisms of turtle camouflage.

  6. The Reliability and Predictive Efficiency of Aptitude Scores Obtained at Grades Three and Five.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Les; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A Group of children were given the Otis Lennon Mental Abilities Tests in grades 3, 5, and 7, to measure the degree of score consistency over time. The test predicted future academic success only moderately well in grade 5 and slightly, if at all, in grade 3. (Author/SJL)

  7. Efficient network disintegration under incomplete information: the comic effect of link prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Suo-Yi; Wu, Jun; Lü, Linyuan; Li, Meng-Jun; Lu, Xin

    2016-03-01

    The study of network disintegration has attracted much attention due to its wide applications, including suppressing the epidemic spreading, destabilizing terrorist network, preventing financial contagion, controlling the rumor diffusion and perturbing cancer networks. The crux of this matter is to find the critical nodes whose removal will lead to network collapse. This paper studies the disintegration of networks with incomplete link information. An effective method is proposed to find the critical nodes by the assistance of link prediction techniques. Extensive experiments in both synthetic and real networks suggest that, by using link prediction method to recover partial missing links in advance, the method can largely improve the network disintegration performance. Besides, to our surprise, we find that when the size of missing information is relatively small, our method even outperforms than the results based on complete information. We refer to this phenomenon as the “comic effect” of link prediction, which means that the network is reshaped through the addition of some links that identified by link prediction algorithms, and the reshaped network is like an exaggerated but characteristic comic of the original one, where the important parts are emphasized.

  8. Efficient network disintegration under incomplete information: the comic effect of link prediction

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Suo-Yi; Wu, Jun; Lü, Linyuan; Li, Meng-Jun; Lu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The study of network disintegration has attracted much attention due to its wide applications, including suppressing the epidemic spreading, destabilizing terrorist network, preventing financial contagion, controlling the rumor diffusion and perturbing cancer networks. The crux of this matter is to find the critical nodes whose removal will lead to network collapse. This paper studies the disintegration of networks with incomplete link information. An effective method is proposed to find the critical nodes by the assistance of link prediction techniques. Extensive experiments in both synthetic and real networks suggest that, by using link prediction method to recover partial missing links in advance, the method can largely improve the network disintegration performance. Besides, to our surprise, we find that when the size of missing information is relatively small, our method even outperforms than the results based on complete information. We refer to this phenomenon as the “comic effect” of link prediction, which means that the network is reshaped through the addition of some links that identified by link prediction algorithms, and the reshaped network is like an exaggerated but characteristic comic of the original one, where the important parts are emphasized. PMID:26960247

  9. Efficient network disintegration under incomplete information: the comic effect of link prediction.

    PubMed

    Tan, Suo-Yi; Wu, Jun; Lü, Linyuan; Li, Meng-Jun; Lu, Xin

    2016-03-10

    The study of network disintegration has attracted much attention due to its wide applications, including suppressing the epidemic spreading, destabilizing terrorist network, preventing financial contagion, controlling the rumor diffusion and perturbing cancer networks. The crux of this matter is to find the critical nodes whose removal will lead to network collapse. This paper studies the disintegration of networks with incomplete link information. An effective method is proposed to find the critical nodes by the assistance of link prediction techniques. Extensive experiments in both synthetic and real networks suggest that, by using link prediction method to recover partial missing links in advance, the method can largely improve the network disintegration performance. Besides, to our surprise, we find that when the size of missing information is relatively small, our method even outperforms than the results based on complete information. We refer to this phenomenon as the "comic effect" of link prediction, which means that the network is reshaped through the addition of some links that identified by link prediction algorithms, and the reshaped network is like an exaggerated but characteristic comic of the original one, where the important parts are emphasized.

  10. Comparison of individual prediction of treatment outcome made by a TMD specialist and a TMD-trained general dental practitioner in patients with temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Sundqvist, Bertil; Wenneberg, Bengt; Magnusson, Tomas

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if a TMD-trained general dental practitioner could individually predict actual treatment outcome in selected patients diagnosed with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) with similar results as a TMD specialist. The patients were examined, individually predicted, treatment planned, treated and had their treatment outcome evaluated by the therapist, respectively. Out of 2618 patients referred to a TMD specialist clinic, 1086 patients started treatment. They were all divided into Muscle or Mainly TMJ symptoms. Prediction of the treatment outcome as Good or Dubious was based on the patient's history, the clinical and, sometimes, radiological findings. The degree of improvement was graded using a Numeric Rating Scale 0-100. A clinical important improvement, defined as an improvement of initial complaints of 50% or more, was judged as a correct prediction of Good treatment outcome. Seven-hundred-sixty-nine patients treated by the TMD specialist (Sample 1) was compared with 164 patients treated by the TMD-trained general dental practitioner (Sample 2). For patients with Muscle symptoms in Sample 1, a 50% improvement or more was reached by 93% of those predicted Good and 57% of those predicted Dubious. The corresponding figures in Sample 2 were 100% and 82%, respectively. In Sample 1, patients with Mainly TMJ symptoms reached a 50% improvement or more in 94% of those with prediction Good and 73% of those predicted Dubious. In Sample 2 the figures were 100% and 87%, respectively. ATMD-trained general dental practitioner could individually predict treatment outcome with similar results as a TMD specialist in selected patients diagnosed with TMD. Whether the method is possible to generalize has to be investigated further.

  11. Factors Predicting Development of Opioid Use Disorders among Individuals who Receive an Initial Opioid Prescription: Mathematical Modeling Using a Database of Commercially-insured Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, Bryan N.; Flentje, Annesa; Heck, Nicholas C.; Van Den Bos, Jill; Perlman, Dan; Torres, Jorge; Valuck, Robert; Carter, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Background Prescription drug abuse in the United States and elsewhere in the world is increasing at an alarming rate with non-medical opioid use, in particular, increasing to epidemic proportions over the past two decades. It is imperative to identify those most likely to develop opioid abuse or dependence to inform large-scale, targeted prevention efforts. Methods The present investigation utilized a large commercial insurance claims database to identify demographic, mental health, physical health, and healthcare service utilization variables that differentiate persons who receive an opioid abuse or dependence diagnosis within two years of filling an opioid prescription (OUDs) from those who do not receive such a diagnosis within the same time frame (non-OUDs). Results When compared to non-OUDs, OUDs were more likely to: 1) be male (59.9% vs. 44.2% for non-OUDs) and younger (M=37.9 vs. 47.7); 2) have a prescription history of more opioids (1.7 vs. 1.2), and more days supply of opioids (M=272.5, vs. M=33.2; 3) have prescriptions filled at more pharmacies (M=3.3 per year vs. M=1.3); 4) have greater rates of psychiatric disorders; 5) utilize more medical and psychiatric services; and 6) be prescribed more concomitant medications. A predictive model incorporating these findings was 79.5% concordant with actual OUDs in the data set. Conclusions Understanding correlates of OUD development can help to predict risk and inform prevention efforts. PMID:24679839

  12. A universal scaling law to predict the efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles as MRI T(2)-contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Quoc L; Berret, Jean-François; Fresnais, Jérôme; Gossuin, Yves; Sandre, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    Magnetic particles are very efficient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. In recent years, chemists have unleashed their imagination to design multi-functional nanoprobes for biomedical applications including MRI contrast enhancement. This study is focused on the direct relationship between the size and magnetization of the particles and their nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation properties, which condition their efficiency. Experimental relaxation results with maghemite particles exhibiting a wide range of sizes and magnetizations are compared to previously published data and to well-established relaxation theories with a good agreement. This allows deriving the experimental master curve of the transverse relaxivity versus particle size and to predict the MRI contrast efficiency of any type of magnetic nanoparticles. This prediction only requires the knowledge of the size of the particles impermeable to water protons and the saturation magnetization of the corresponding volume. To predict the T(2) relaxation efficiency of magnetic single crystals, the crystal size and magnetization - obtained through a single Langevin fit of a magnetization curve - is the only information needed. For contrast agents made of several magnetic cores assembled into various geometries (dilute fractal aggregates, dense spherical clusters, core-shell micelles, hollow vesicles…), one needs to know a third parameter, namely the intra-aggregate volume fraction occupied by the magnetic materials relatively to the whole (hydrodynamic) sphere. Finally a calculation of the maximum achievable relaxation effect - and the size needed to reach this maximum - is performed for different cases: maghemite single crystals and dense clusters, core-shell particles (oxide layer around a metallic core) and zinc-manganese ferrite crystals.

  13. On the efficiency of image completion methods for intra prediction in video coding with large block structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doshkov, Dimitar; Jottrand, Oscar; Wiegand, Thomas; Ndjiki-Nya, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    Intra prediction is a fundamental tool in video coding with hybrid block-based architecture. Recent investigations have shown that one of the most beneficial elements for a higher compression performance in high-resolution videos is the incorporation of larger block structures. Thus in this work, we investigate the performance of novel intra prediction modes based on different image completion techniques in a new video coding scheme with large block structures. Image completion methods exploit the fact that high frequency image regions yield high coding costs when using classical H.264/AVC prediction modes. This problem is tackled by investigating the incorporation of several intra predictors using the concept of Laplace partial differential equation (PDE), Least Square (LS) based linear prediction and the Auto Regressive model. A major aspect of this article is the evaluation of the coding performance in a qualitative (i.e. coding efficiency) manner. Experimental results show significant improvements in compression (up to 7.41 %) by integrating the LS-based linear intra prediction.

  14. Predicting the oral uptake efficiency of chemicals in mammals: Combining the hydrophilic and lipophilic range

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, Isabel A.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; Ragas, Ad M.J.; Hendriks, A. Jan

    2013-01-01

    Environmental risk assessment requires models for estimating the bioaccumulation of untested compounds. So far, bioaccumulation models have focused on lipophilic compounds, and only a few have included hydrophilic compounds. Our aim was to extend an existing bioaccumulation model to estimate the oral uptake efficiency of pollutants in mammals for compounds over a wide K{sub ow} range with an emphasis on hydrophilic compounds, i.e. compounds in the lower K{sub ow} range. Usually, most models use octanol as a single surrogate for the membrane and thus neglect the bilayer structure of the membrane. However, compounds with polar groups can have different affinities for the different membrane regions. Therefore, an existing bioaccumulation model was extended by dividing the diffusion resistance through the membrane into an outer and inner membrane resistance, where the solvents octanol and heptane were used as surrogates for these membrane regions, respectively. The model was calibrated with uptake efficiencies of environmental pollutants measured in different mammals during feeding studies combined with human oral uptake efficiencies of pharmaceuticals. The new model estimated the uptake efficiency of neutral (RMSE = 14.6) and dissociating (RMSE = 19.5) compounds with logK{sub ow} ranging from − 10 to + 8. The inclusion of the K{sub hw} improved uptake estimation for 33% of the hydrophilic compounds (logK{sub ow} < 0) (r{sup 2} = 0.51, RMSE = 22.8) compared with the model based on K{sub ow} only (r{sup 2} = 0.05, RMSE = 34.9), while hydrophobic compounds (logK{sub ow} > 0) were estimated equally by both model versions with RMSE = 15.2 (K{sub ow} and K{sub hw}) and RMSE = 15.7 (K{sub ow} only). The model can be used to estimate the oral uptake efficiency for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds. -- Highlights: ► A mechanistic model was developed to estimate oral uptake efficiency. ► Model covers wide logK{sub ow} range (- 10 to + 8) and several mammalian

  15. New efficient optimizing techniques for Kalman filters and numerical weather prediction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Famelis, Ioannis; Galanis, George; Liakatas, Aristotelis

    2016-06-01

    The need for accurate local environmental predictions and simulations beyond the classical meteorological forecasts are increasing the last years due to the great number of applications that are directly or not affected: renewable energy resource assessment, natural hazards early warning systems, global warming and questions on the climate change can be listed among them. Within this framework the utilization of numerical weather and wave prediction systems in conjunction with advanced statistical techniques that support the elimination of the model bias and the reduction of the error variability may successfully address the above issues. In the present work, new optimization methods are studied and tested in selected areas of Greece where the use of renewable energy sources is of critical. The added value of the proposed work is due to the solid mathematical background adopted making use of Information Geometry and Statistical techniques, new versions of Kalman filters and state of the art numerical analysis tools.

  16. An efficient and robust method for predicting helicopter rotor high-speed impulsive noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.

    1996-01-01

    A new formulation for the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings quadrupole source, which is valid for a far-field in-plane observer, is presented. The far-field approximation is new and unique in that no further approximation of the quadrupole source strength is made and integrands with r(exp -2) and r(exp -3) dependence are retained. This paper focuses on the development of a retarded-time formulation in which time derivatives are analytically taken inside the integrals to avoid unnecessary computational work when the observer moves with the rotor. The new quadrupole formulation is similar to Farassat's thickness and loading formulation 1A. Quadrupole noise prediction is carried out in two parts: a preprocessing stage in which the previously computed flow field is integrated in the direction normal to the rotor disk, and a noise computation stage in which quadrupole surface integrals are evaluated for a particular observer position. Preliminary predictions for hover and forward flight agree well with experimental data. The method is robust and requires computer resources comparable to thickness and loading noise prediction.

  17. Efficient Prediction of Helicopter BVI Noise under Different Conditions of Wake and Blade Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Yoshinobu; Yang, Choongmo; Iwanaga, Noriki; Aoyama, Takashi

    Predictions of helicopter BVI noise using three-dimensional Euler code with a single blade grid are conducted under three different conditions: BVI noise caused by (1) interaction between rotating blades and vortex shed from fixed wing vortex generator, (2) interaction between rotating blades and tip vortices shed from preceding blades, and (3) interaction between rotating blades with elastic deformation and shed tip vortices. In the CFD calculation, the Field Velocity Approach (FVA) and Scully’s vortex model are used to import the wake information into the calculation grid and to determine the induced velocity made by tip vortices, respectively (cases 1 3). Beddoes generalized wake model is used to prescribe the tip vortices position in the wake (cases 2 and 3). Information about blade elastic deformation is imported from HART II project experimental data into the calculation (case 3). Acoustic analyses based on Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings (FW-H) equation are conducted subsequently in each case. The results from the calculations show good agreement with experiments in all three cases, indicating that application of FVA, Scully’s model, and Beddoes generalized wake model is effective for BVI noise prediction in this study, which is intended for low calculation cost using a single blade grid. Also, use of blade elastic deformation data in the calculation shows marked improvement in calculation precision. Consequently, the method used in this study can predict BVI noise under various conditions of wake or blade deformation with acceptable precision and low calculation cost.

  18. Statistical Evaluation of Efficiency and Possibility of Earthquake Predictions with Gravity Field Variation and its Analytic Signal in Western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shi; Jiang, Changsheng; Zhuang, Jiancang

    2016-01-01

    This paper aimed at assessing gravity variations as precursors for earthquake prediction in the Tibet (Xizang)-Qinghai-Xinjiang-Sichuan Region, western China. We here take a statistical approach to evaluate efficiency and possibility of earthquake prediction. We used the most recent spatiotemporal gravity field variation datasets of 2002-2008 for the region that were provided by the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONC). The datasets were space sparse and time discrete. In 2007-2010, 13 earthquakes (> M s 6.0) occurred in the region. The observed gravity variations have a statistical correlation with the occurrence of these earthquakes through the Molchan error diagram tests that lead to alarms over a good fraction of space-time. The results show that the prediction efficiency of amplitude of analytic signal of gravity variations is better than seismicity rate model and THD and absolute value of gravity variation, implying that gravity variations before earthquake may include precursory information of future large earthquakes.

  19. Backbone dependency further improves side chain prediction efficiency in the Energy-based Conformer Library (bEBL).

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sabareesh; Senes, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    Side chain optimization is an integral component of many protein modeling applications. In these applications, the conformational freedom of the side chains is often explored using libraries of discrete, frequently occurring conformations. Because side chain optimization can pose a computationally intensive combinatorial problem, the nature of these conformer libraries is important for ensuring efficiency and accuracy in side chain prediction. We have previously developed an innovative method to create a conformer library with enhanced performance. The Energy-based Library (EBL) was obtained by analyzing the energetic interactions between conformers and a large number of natural protein environments from crystal structures. This process guided the selection of conformers with the highest propensity to fit into spaces that should accommodate a side chain. Because the method requires a large crystallographic data-set, the EBL was created in a backbone-independent fashion. However, it is well established that side chain conformation is strongly dependent on the local backbone geometry, and that backbone-dependent libraries are more efficient in side chain optimization. Here we present the backbone-dependent EBL (bEBL), whose conformers are independently sorted for each populated region of Ramachandran space. The resulting library closely mirrors the local backbone-dependent distribution of side chain conformation. Compared to the EBL, we demonstrate that the bEBL uses fewer conformers to produce similar side chain prediction outcomes, thus further improving performance with respect to the already efficient backbone-independent version of the library.

  20. Using Community-Level Prevalence of Loa loa Infection to Predict the Proportion of Highly-Infected Individuals: Statistical Modelling to Support Lymphatic Filariasis and Onchocerciasis Elimination Programs

    PubMed Central

    Ndeffo-Mbah, Martial L; Takougang, Innocent; Ukety, Tony; Wanji, Samuel; Galvani, Alison P; Diggle, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic Filariasis and Onchocerciasis (river blindness) constitute pressing public health issues in tropical regions. Global elimination programs, involving mass drug administration (MDA), have been launched by the World Health Organisation. Although the drugs used are generally well tolerated, individuals who are highly co-infected with Loa loa are at risk of experiencing serious adverse events. Highly infected individuals are more likely to be found in communities with high prevalence. An understanding of the relationship between individual infection and population-level prevalence can therefore inform decisions on whether MDA can be safely administered in an endemic community. Based on Loa loa infection intensity data from individuals in Cameroon, the Republic of the Congo and the Democratic Republic of the Congo we develop a statistical model for the distribution of infection levels in communities. We then use this model to make predictive inferences regarding the proportion of individuals whose parasite count exceeds policy-relevant levels. In particular we show how to exploit the positive correlation between community-level prevalence and intensity of infection in order to predict the proportion of highly infected individuals in a community given only prevalence data from the community in question. The resulting prediction intervals are not substantially wider, and in some cases narrower, than the corresponding binomial confidence intervals obtained from data that include measurements of individual infection levels. Therefore the model developed here facilitates the estimation of the proportion of individuals highly infected with Loa loa using only estimated community level prevalence. It can be used to assess the risk of rolling out MDA in a specific community, or to guide policy decisions. PMID:27906982

  1. Using Community-Level Prevalence of Loa loa Infection to Predict the Proportion of Highly-Infected Individuals: Statistical Modelling to Support Lymphatic Filariasis and Onchocerciasis Elimination Programs.

    PubMed

    Schlüter, Daniela K; Ndeffo-Mbah, Martial L; Takougang, Innocent; Ukety, Tony; Wanji, Samuel; Galvani, Alison P; Diggle, Peter J

    2016-12-01

    Lymphatic Filariasis and Onchocerciasis (river blindness) constitute pressing public health issues in tropical regions. Global elimination programs, involving mass drug administration (MDA), have been launched by the World Health Organisation. Although the drugs used are generally well tolerated, individuals who are highly co-infected with Loa loa are at risk of experiencing serious adverse events. Highly infected individuals are more likely to be found in communities with high prevalence. An understanding of the relationship between individual infection and population-level prevalence can therefore inform decisions on whether MDA can be safely administered in an endemic community. Based on Loa loa infection intensity data from individuals in Cameroon, the Republic of the Congo and the Democratic Republic of the Congo we develop a statistical model for the distribution of infection levels in communities. We then use this model to make predictive inferences regarding the proportion of individuals whose parasite count exceeds policy-relevant levels. In particular we show how to exploit the positive correlation between community-level prevalence and intensity of infection in order to predict the proportion of highly infected individuals in a community given only prevalence data from the community in question. The resulting prediction intervals are not substantially wider, and in some cases narrower, than the corresponding binomial confidence intervals obtained from data that include measurements of individual infection levels. Therefore the model developed here facilitates the estimation of the proportion of individuals highly infected with Loa loa using only estimated community level prevalence. It can be used to assess the risk of rolling out MDA in a specific community, or to guide policy decisions.

  2. Efficient three-dimensional ray-tracing model for electromagnetic propagation prediction in complex indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z-Y; Guo, L-X; Meng, X

    2013-08-01

    A three-dimensional ray-tracing model for the use of the uniform theory of diffraction and geometrical optics in radio channel characterizations of indoor environments is presented in this paper. Based on the environment information chosen by the proposed modeling approach, the model is effectively applied by utilizing a technique in which multiple reflections, transmissions, and diffractions are considered via the ray-path classification into four different categories. Ray paths belonging to each ray category are determined by using different methods. Our theoretical results are compared with narrowband and wideband measurements. The good agreement with these measurements indicates that our prediction model works well for such indoor communication applications.

  3. Memory efficient solution of the primitive equations for numerical weather prediction on the CYBER 205

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuccillo, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP), for both operational and research purposes, requires only fast computational speed but also large memory. A technique for solving the Primitive Equations for atmospheric motion on the CYBER 205, as implemented in the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation System, which is fully vectorized and requires substantially less memory than other techniques such as the Leapfrog or Adams-Bashforth Schemes is discussed. The technique presented uses the Euler-Backard time marching scheme. Also discussed are several techniques for reducing computational time of the model by replacing slow intrinsic routines by faster algorithms which use only hardware vector instructions.

  4. Towards 12% stabilised efficiency in single junction polymorphous silicon solar cells: experimental developments and model predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolmasov, Sergey; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i.; Chatterjee, Parsathi

    2016-01-01

    We have combined recent experimental developments in our laboratory with modelling to devise ways of maximising the stabilised efficiency of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) PIN solar cells. The cells were fabricated using the conventional plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) technique at various temperatures, pressures and gas flow ratios. A detailed electrical-optical simulator was used to examine the effect of using wide band gap P-and N-doped μc-SiOx:H layers, as well as a MgF2 anti-reflection coating (ARC) on cell performance. We find that with the best quality a-Si:H so far produced in our laboratory and optimised deposition parameters for the corresponding solar cell, we could not attain a 10% stabilised efficiency due to the high stabilised defect density of a-Si:H, although this landmark has been achieved in some laboratories. On the other hand, a close cousin of a-Si:H, hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H), a nano-structured silicon thin film produced by PECVD under conditions close to powder formation, has been developed in our laboratory. This material has been shown to have a lower initial and stabilised defect density as well as higher hole mobility than a-Si:H. Modelling indicates that it is possible to attain stabilised efficiencies of 12% when pm-Si:H is incorporated in a solar cell, deposited in a NIP configuration to reduce the P/I interface defects and combined with P- and N-doped μc-SiOx:H layers and a MgF2 ARC.

  5. An efficient T-cell epitope discovery strategy using in silico prediction and the iTopia assay platform

    PubMed Central

    Fridman, Arthur; Finnefrock, Adam C.; Peruzzi, Daniela; Pak, Irene; La Monica, Nicola; Bagchi, Ansuman; Casimiro, Danilo R.; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Aurisicchio, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Functional T-cell epitope discovery is a key process for the development of novel immunotherapies, particularly for cancer immunology. In silico epitope prediction is a common strategy to try to achieve this objective. However, this approach suffers from a significant rate of false-negative results and epitope ranking lists that often are not validated by practical experience. A high-throughput platform for the identification and prioritization of potential T-cell epitopes is the iTopiaTM Epitope Discovery SystemTM, which allows measuring binding and stability of selected peptides to MHC Class I molecules. So far, the value of iTopia combined with in silico epitope prediction has not been investigated systematically. In this study, we have developed a novel in silico selection strategy based on three criteria: (1) predicted binding to one out of five common MHC Class I alleles; (2) uniqueness to the antigen of interest; and (3) increased likelihood of natural processing. We predicted in silico and characterized by iTopia 225 candidate T-cell epitopes and fixed-anchor analogs from three human tumor-associated antigens: CEA, HER2 and TERT. HLA-A2-restricted fragments were further screened for their ability to induce cell-mediated responses in HLA-A2 transgenic mice. The iTopia binding assay was only marginally informative while the stability assay proved to be a valuable experimental screening method complementary to in silico prediction. Thirteen novel T-cell epitopes and analogs were characterized and additional potential epitopes identified, providing the basis for novel anticancer immunotherapies. In conclusion, we show that combination of in silico prediction and an iTopia-based assay may be an accurate and efficient method for MHC Class I epitope discovery among tumor-associated antigens. PMID:23243589

  6. Neural and Hybrid Modeling: An Alternative Route to Efficiently Predict the Behavior of Biotechnological Processes Aimed at Biofuels Obtainment

    PubMed Central

    Saraceno, Alessandra; Calabrò, Vincenza; Iorio, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    The present paper was aimed at showing that advanced modeling techniques, based either on artificial neural networks or on hybrid systems, might efficiently predict the behavior of two biotechnological processes designed for the obtainment of second-generation biofuels from waste biomasses. In particular, the enzymatic transesterification of waste-oil glycerides, the key step for the obtainment of biodiesel, and the anaerobic digestion of agroindustry wastes to produce biogas were modeled. It was proved that the proposed modeling approaches provided very accurate predictions of systems behavior. Both neural network and hybrid modeling definitely represented a valid alternative to traditional theoretical models, especially when comprehensive knowledge of the metabolic pathways, of the true kinetic mechanisms, and of the transport phenomena involved in biotechnological processes was difficult to be achieved. PMID:24516363

  7. The prediction of filter belt press dewatering efficiency for activated sludge by experimentation on filtration compression cells.

    PubMed

    Olivier, J; Vaxelaire, J

    2004-12-01

    The filter belt press is commonly used to dewater activated sludge. However, little research has been done on this process and the prediction of its efficiency. Experimentation has been carried out in a filtration compression cell (FCC) and in a pilot scale filter belt press. It offers a way of determining filter belt press efficiency thanks to simple laboratory research. The pressure distribution around the pressing roller was measured inside the pilot scale filter belt press. It showed progressive increase (up to a certain maximum value: plateau), which was followed by a rapid decrease. The impact of the progressive increase of applied pressure onto the dry solid sludge content was observed in FCC. Similar dry solid contents were obtained from both the above laboratory devices when the application of the pressure is comparable (in time and increasing rate).

  8. A highly efficient semiphenomenological model of a half-sarcomere for real-time prediction of mechanical behavior.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Yin, Yue Hong

    2014-12-01

    With existent biomechanical models of skeletal muscle, challenges still exist in implementing real-time predictions for contraction statuses that are particularly significant to biomechanical and biomedical engineering. Because of this difficulty, this paper proposed a decoupled scheme of the links involved in the working process of a sarcomere and established a semiphenomenological model integrating both linear and nonlinear frames of no higher than a second-order system. In order to facilitate engineering application and cybernetics, the proposed model contains a reduced number of parameters and no partial differential equation, making it highly concise and computationally efficient. Through the simulations of various contraction modes, including isometric, isotonic, successive stretch and release, and cyclic contractions, the correctness and efficiency of the model, are validated. Although this study targets half-sarcomeres, the proposed model can be easily extended to describe the larger-scale mechanical behavior of a muscle fiber or a whole muscle.

  9. Antigen profiling analysis of vaccinia virus injected canine tumors: oncolytic virus efficiency predicted by boolean models.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Alexander; Gentschev, Ivaylo; Adelfinger, Marion; Nolte, Ingo; Dandekar, Thomas; Szalay, Aladar A

    2014-01-01

    Virotherapy on the basis of oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV) strains is a novel approach for cancer therapy. In this study we describe for the first time the use of dynamic boolean modeling for tumor growth prediction of vaccinia virus GLV-1h68-injected canine tumors including canine mammary adenoma (ZMTH3), canine mammary carcinoma (MTH52c), canine prostate carcinoma (CT1258), and canine soft tissue sarcoma (STSA-1). Additionally, the STSA-1 xenografted mice were injected with either LIVP 1.1.1 or LIVP 5.1.1 vaccinia virus strains.   Antigen profiling data of the four different vaccinia virus-injected canine tumors were obtained, analyzed and used to calculate differences in the tumor growth signaling network by type and tumor type. Our model combines networks for apoptosis, MAPK, p53, WNT, Hedgehog, TK cell, Interferon, and Interleukin signaling networks. The in silico findings conform with in vivo findings of tumor growth. Boolean modeling describes tumor growth and remission semi-quantitatively with a good fit to the data obtained for all cancer type variants. At the same time it monitors all signaling activities as a basis for treatment planning according to antigen levels. Mitigation and elimination of VACV- susceptible tumor types as well as effects on the non-susceptible type CT1258 are predicted correctly. Thus the combination of Antigen profiling and semi-quantitative modeling optimizes the therapy already before its start.

  10. High throughput computing to improve efficiency of predicting protein stability change upon mutation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao-Chin; Lai, Lien-Fu; Gromiha, M Michael; Huang, Liang-Tsung

    2014-01-01

    Predicting protein stability change upon mutation is important for protein design. Although several methods have been proposed to improve prediction accuracy it will be difficult to employ those methods when the required input information is incomplete. In this work, we integrated a fuzzy query model based on the knowledge-based approach to overcome this problem, and then we proposed a high throughput computing method based on parallel technologies in emerging cluster or grid systems to discriminate stability change. To improve the load balance of heterogeneous computing power in cluster and grid nodes, a variety of self-scheduling schemes have been implemented. Further, we have tested the method by performing different analyses and the results showed that the present method can process hundreds of predication queries in more reasonable response time and perform a super linear speedup to a maximum of 86.2 times. We have also established a website tool to implement the proposed method and it is available at http://bioinformatics.myweb.hinet.net/para.htm.

  11. Efficient pairwise RNA structure prediction and alignment using sequence alignment constraints

    PubMed Central

    Dowell, Robin D; Eddy, Sean R

    2006-01-01

    Background We are interested in the problem of predicting secondary structure for small sets of homologous RNAs, by incorporating limited comparative sequence information into an RNA folding model. The Sankoff algorithm for simultaneous RNA folding and alignment is a basis for approaches to this problem. There are two open problems in applying a Sankoff algorithm: development of a good unified scoring system for alignment and folding and development of practical heuristics for dealing with the computational complexity of the algorithm. Results We use probabilistic models (pair stochastic context-free grammars, pairSCFGs) as a unifying framework for scoring pairwise alignment and folding. A constrained version of the pairSCFG structural alignment algorithm was developed which assumes knowledge of a few confidently aligned positions (pins). These pins are selected based on the posterior probabilities of a probabilistic pairwise sequence alignment. Conclusion Pairwise RNA structural alignment improves on structure prediction accuracy relative to single sequence folding. Constraining on alignment is a straightforward method of reducing the runtime and memory requirements of the algorithm. Five practical implementations of the pairwise Sankoff algorithm – this work (Consan), David Mathews' Dynalign, Ian Holmes' Stemloc, Ivo Hofacker's PMcomp, and Jan Gorodkin's FOLDALIGN – have comparable overall performance with different strengths and weaknesses. PMID:16952317

  12. Ligand efficiency-based support vector regression models for predicting bioactivities of ligands to drug target proteins.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Nobuyoshi

    2014-10-27

    The concept of ligand efficiency (LE) indices is widely accepted throughout the drug design community and is frequently used in a retrospective manner in the process of drug development. For example, LE indices are used to investigate LE optimization processes of already-approved drugs and to re-evaluate hit compounds obtained from structure-based virtual screening methods and/or high-throughput experimental assays. However, LE indices could also be applied in a prospective manner to explore drug candidates. Here, we describe the construction of machine learning-based regression models in which LE indices are adopted as an end point and show that LE-based regression models can outperform regression models based on pIC50 values. In addition to pIC50 values traditionally used in machine learning studies based on chemogenomics data, three representative LE indices (ligand lipophilicity efficiency (LLE), binding efficiency index (BEI), and surface efficiency index (SEI)) were adopted, then used to create four types of training data. We constructed regression models by applying a support vector regression (SVR) method to the training data. In cross-validation tests of the SVR models, the LE-based SVR models showed higher correlations between the observed and predicted values than the pIC50-based models. Application tests to new data displayed that, generally, the predictive performance of SVR models follows the order SEI > BEI > LLE > pIC50. Close examination of the distributions of the activity values (pIC50, LLE, BEI, and SEI) in the training and validation data implied that the performance order of the SVR models may be ascribed to the much higher diversity of the LE-based training and validation data. In the application tests, the LE-based SVR models can offer better predictive performance of compound-protein pairs with a wider range of ligand potencies than the pIC50-based models. This finding strongly suggests that LE-based SVR models are better than pIC50-based

  13. Fronto-Parietal gray matter and white matter efficiency differentially predict intelligence in males and females.

    PubMed

    Ryman, Sephira G; Yeo, Ronald A; Witkiewitz, Katie; Vakhtin, Andrei A; van den Heuvel, Martijn; de Reus, Marcel; Flores, Ranee A; Wertz, Christopher R; Jung, Rex E

    2016-11-01

    While there are minimal sex differences in overall intelligence, males, on average, have larger total brain volume and corresponding regional brain volumes compared to females, measures that are consistently related to intelligence. Limited research has examined which other brain characteristics may differentially contribute to intelligence in females to facilitate equal performance on intelligence measures. Recent reports of sex differences in the neural characteristics of the brain further highlight the need to differentiate how the structural neural characteristics relate to intellectual ability in males and females. The current study utilized a graph network approach in conjunction with structural equation modeling to examine potential sex differences in the relationship between white matter efficiency, fronto-parietal gray matter volume, and general cognitive ability (GCA). Participants were healthy adults (n = 244) who completed a battery of cognitive testing and underwent structural neuroimaging. Results indicated that in males, a latent factor of fronto-parietal gray matter was significantly related to GCA when controlling for total gray matter volume. In females, white matter efficiency and total gray matter volume were significantly related to GCA, with no specificity of the fronto-parietal gray matter factor over and above total gray matter volume. This work highlights that different neural characteristics across males and females may contribute to performance on intelligence measures. Hum Brain Mapp 37:4006-4016, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Efficiency of a real time flood forecasting system in the Alps and in the Apennines: deterministic versus ensemble predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, G.

    2009-04-01

    Real time hydrological forecasting is still a challenging task for most of the Italian territory, especially in mountain areas where both the topography and the meteorological forcing are affected by a strong spatial variability. Nevertheless there is an increasing request to provide some clues for the development of efficient real time flood forecasting systems, for warning population as well as for water management purposes. In this perspective the efficiency of a real time forecasting system needs to be investigated, with particular care to the uncertainty of the provided prediction and to how this prediction will be handled by water resources managers and land protection services. To this aim a real time flood forecasting system using both deterministic and ensemble meteorological predictions has been implemented at University of Brescia and applied to an Alpine area (the Toce River - Piemonte Region) and to an Apennine area (the Taro River - Emilia Romagna Region). The Map D- Phase experiment (autumn 2007) was a good test for the implemented system: daily rainfall fields provided by high resolution deterministic limited area meteorological models and esemble rainfall predictions provided by coarser resolution meteorological models could be used to force a hydrological model and produce either a single deterministic or an esemble of flood forecats. Namely only minor flood events occurred in the Alpine area in autumn 2007, while one major flood event affected the Taro river at the end of November 2007. Focusing on this major event the potentials of the forecasting system was tested and evaluated with reference also to the geographical and climatic characteristics of the investigated area.

  15. MEDock: a web server for efficient prediction of ligand binding sites based on a novel optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chang, Darby Tien-Hau; Oyang, Yen-Jen; Lin, Jung-Hsin

    2005-07-01

    The prediction of ligand binding sites is an essential part of the drug discovery process. Knowing the location of binding sites greatly facilitates the search for hits, the lead optimization process, the design of site-directed mutagenesis experiments and the hunt for structural features that influence the selectivity of binding in order to minimize the drug's adverse effects. However, docking is still the rate-limiting step for such predictions; consequently, much more efficient algorithms are required. In this article, the design of the MEDock web server is described. The goal of this sever is to provide an efficient utility for predicting ligand binding sites. The MEDock web server incorporates a global search strategy that exploits the maximum entropy property of the Gaussian probability distribution in the context of information theory. As a result of the global search strategy, the optimization algorithm incorporated in MEDock is significantly superior when dealing with very rugged energy landscapes, which usually have insurmountable barriers. This article describes four different benchmark cases that span a diverse set of different types of ligand binding interactions. These benchmarks were compared with the use of the Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA), which is the major workhorse of the well-known AutoDock program. These results demonstrate that MEDock consistently converged to the correct binding modes with significantly smaller numbers of energy evaluations than the LGA required. When judged by a threshold of the number of energy evaluations consumed in the docking simulation, MEDock also greatly elevates the rate of accurate predictions for all benchmark cases. MEDock is available at http://medock.csie.ntu.edu.tw/ and http://bioinfo.mc.ntu.edu.tw/medock/.

  16. Training based on ligand efficiency improves prediction of bioactivities of ligands and drug target proteins in a machine learning approach.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Nobuyoshi

    2013-10-28

    Machine learning methods based on ligand-protein interaction data in bioactivity databases are one of the current strategies for efficiently finding novel lead compounds as the first step in the drug discovery process. Although previous machine learning studies have succeeded in predicting novel ligand-protein interactions with high performance, all of the previous studies to date have been heavily dependent on the simple use of raw bioactivity data of ligand potencies measured by IC50, EC50, K(i), and K(d) deposited in databases. ChEMBL provides us with a unique opportunity to investigate whether a machine-learning-based classifier created by reflecting ligand efficiency other than the IC50, EC50, K(i), and Kd values can also offer high predictive performance. Here we report that classifiers created from training data based on ligand efficiency show higher performance than those from data based on IC50 or K(i) values. Utilizing GPCRSARfari and KinaseSARfari databases in ChEMBL, we created IC50- or K(i)-based training data and binding efficiency index (BEI) based training data then constructed classifiers using support vector machines (SVMs). The SVM classifiers from the BEI-based training data showed slightly higher area under curve (AUC), accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity in the cross-validation tests. Application of the classifiers to the validation data demonstrated that the AUCs and specificities of the BEI-based classifiers dramatically increased in comparison with the IC50- or K(i)-based classifiers. The improvement of the predictive power by the BEI-based classifiers can be attributed to (i) the more separated distributions of positives and negatives, (ii) the higher diversity of negatives in the BEI-based training data in a feature space of SVMs, and (iii) a more balanced number of positives and negatives in the BEI-based training data. These results strongly suggest that training data based on ligand efficiency as well as data based on classical IC50

  17. Efficient physics-based predictive 3D image modeling and simulation of optical atmospheric refraction phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Colin N.; Hammel, Stephen M.; Tsintikidis, Dimitris

    2016-09-01

    We present some preliminary results and discussion of our ongoing effort to develop a prototype volumetric atmospheric optical refraction simulator which uses 3D nonlinear ray-tracing and state-of-art physics-based rendering techniques. The tool will allow simulation of optical curved-ray propagation through nonlinear refractivity gradient profiles in volumetric atmospheric participating media, and the generation of radiometrically accurate images of the resulting atmospheric refraction phenomena, including inferior and superior mirages, over-the-horizon viewing conditions, looming and sinking, towering and stooping of distant objects. The ability to accurately model and predict atmospheric optical refraction conditions and phenomena is important in both defense and commercial applications. Our nonlinear refractive ray-trace method is currently CPU-parallelized and is well-suited for GPU compute implementation.

  18. An intuitive and efficient method for cell voltage prediction of lithium and sodium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Saubanère, M; Ben Yahia, M; Lebègue, S; Doublet, M-L

    2014-11-24

    The voltage delivered by rechargeable Lithium- and Sodium-ion batteries is a key parameter to qualify the device as promising for future applications. Here we report a new formulation of the cell voltage in terms of chemically intuitive quantities that can be rapidly and quantitatively evaluated from the alkaliated crystal structure with no need of first-principles calculations. The model, which is here validated on a wide series of existing cathode materials, provides new insights into the physical and chemical features of a crystal structure that influence the material potential. In particular, we show that disordered materials with cationic intermixing must exhibit higher potentials than their ordered homologues. The present method is utilizable by any solid-state chemist, is fully predictive and allows rapid assessement of material potentials, thus opening new directions for the challenging project of material design in rechargeable batteries.

  19. Experimental quadrotor flight performance using computationally efficient and recursively feasible linear model predictive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffery, Mujtaba H.; Shead, Leo; Forshaw, Jason L.; Lappas, Vaios J.

    2013-12-01

    A new linear model predictive control (MPC) algorithm in a state-space framework is presented based on the fusion of two past MPC control laws: steady-state optimal MPC (SSOMPC) and Laguerre optimal MPC (LOMPC). The new controller, SSLOMPC, is demonstrated to have improved feasibility, tracking performance and computation time than its predecessors. This is verified in both simulation and practical experimentation on a quadrotor unmanned air vehicle in an indoor motion-capture testbed. The performance of the control law is experimentally compared with proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and linear quadratic regulator (LQR) controllers in an unconstrained square manoeuvre. The use of soft control output and hard control input constraints is also examined in single and dual constrained manoeuvres.

  20. Theta synchronization predicts efficient memory encoding of concrete and abstract nouns.

    PubMed

    Weiss, S; Müller, H M; Rappelsberger, P

    2000-08-03

    Functional and topographical differences between processing of spoken nouns which were remembered or which were forgotten were shown by means of EEG coherence analysis. Later recalled nouns were related with increased neuronal synchronization (= cooperation) between anterior and posterior brain regions regardless of presented word category (either concrete or abstract nouns). However, theta coherence exhibited topographical differences during encoding of concrete and abstract nouns whereby former were related with higher short-range (mainly intrahemispheric), later with higher long-range (mainly interhemispheric) coherence. Thus, theta synchronization possibly is a general phenomenon always occurring if task demand increases and more efficient information processing is required. Measurement of EEG coherence yields new information about the neuronal interaction of involved brain regions during memory encoding of different word classes.

  1. Neuromuscular efficiency of the vastus lateralis and biceps femoris muscles in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament injuries☆

    PubMed Central

    Aragão, Fernando Amâncio; Schäfer, Gabriel Santo; de Albuquerque, Carlos Eduardo; Vituri, Rogério Fonseca; de Azevedo, Fábio Mícolis; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze strength and integrated electromyography (IEMG) data in order to determine the neuromuscular efficiency (NME) of the vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps femoris (BF) muscles in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, during the preoperative and postoperative periods; and to compare the injured limb at these two times, using the non-operated limb as a control. Methods EMG data and BF and VL strength data were collected during three maximum isometric contractions in knee flexion and extension movements. The assessment protocol was applied before the operation and two months after the operation, and the NME of the BF and VL muscles was obtained. Results There was no difference in the NME of the VL muscle from before to after the operation. On the other hand, the NME of the BF in the non-operated limb was found to have increased, two months after the surgery. Conclusions The NME provides a good estimate of muscle function because it is directly related to muscle strength and capacity for activation. However, the results indicated that two months after the ACL reconstruction procedure, at the time when loading in the open kinetic chain within rehabilitation protocols is usually started, the neuromuscular efficiency of the VL and BF had still not been reestablished. PMID:26229914

  2. Complex-to-Predict Generational Shift between Nested and Clustered Organization of Individual Prey Networks in Digger Wasps

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros, Yolanda; Polidori, Carlo; Tormos, José; Baños-Picón, Laura; Asís, Josep Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Although diet has traditionally been considered to be a property of the species or populations as a whole, there is nowadays extensive knowledge that individual specialization is widespread among animal populations. Nevertheless, the factors determining the shape of interactions within food webs remain largely undiscovered, especially in predatory insects. We used an aggregation of the digger wasp Bembix merceti to 1) analyse patterns of individual prey use across three flying seasons in a network–based context; and 2) test the effect of four potential factors that might explain network topologies (wasp mass, nest spatial distribution, simultaneous nest-provisioning, prey availability). Inter-individual diet variation was found in all three years, under different predator-prey network topologies: Individuals arranged in dietary clusters and displayed a checkerboard pattern in 2009, but showed nestedness in 2008 and 2010. Network topologies were not fully explained by the tested factors. Larger females consumed a higher proportion of the total number of prey species captured by the population as a whole, in such a way that nested patterns may arise from mass-dependent prey spectrum width. Conversely, individuals with similar body mass didn’t form clusters. Nested patterns seemed to be associated with a greater availability of the main prey species (a proxy for reduced intra-specific competition). Thus, according with theory, clusters seemed to appear when competition increased. On the other hand, the nests of the individuals belonging to a given cluster were not more closely located, and neither did individuals within a cluster provision their nests simultaneously. Thus, a female-female copying behaviour during foraging was unlikely. In conclusion, wasp populations can maintain a considerable individual variation across years under different food web organizations. The tested factors only partially accounted for the shift in network properties, and new analyses

  3. Industrial Compositional Streamline Simulation for Efficient and Accurate Prediction of Gas Injection and WAG Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Margot Gerritsen

    2008-10-31

    Gas-injection processes are widely and increasingly used for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). In the United States, for example, EOR production by gas injection accounts for approximately 45% of total EOR production and has tripled since 1986. The understanding of the multiphase, multicomponent flow taking place in any displacement process is essential for successful design of gas-injection projects. Due to complex reservoir geometry, reservoir fluid properties and phase behavior, the design of accurate and efficient numerical simulations for the multiphase, multicomponent flow governing these processes is nontrivial. In this work, we developed, implemented and tested a streamline based solver for gas injection processes that is computationally very attractive: as compared to traditional Eulerian solvers in use by industry it computes solutions with a computational speed orders of magnitude higher and a comparable accuracy provided that cross-flow effects do not dominate. We contributed to the development of compositional streamline solvers in three significant ways: improvement of the overall framework allowing improved streamline coverage and partial streamline tracing, amongst others; parallelization of the streamline code, which significantly improves wall clock time; and development of new compositional solvers that can be implemented along streamlines as well as in existing Eulerian codes used by industry. We designed several novel ideas in the streamline framework. First, we developed an adaptive streamline coverage algorithm. Adding streamlines locally can reduce computational costs by concentrating computational efforts where needed, and reduce mapping errors. Adapting streamline coverage effectively controls mass balance errors that mostly result from the mapping from streamlines to pressure grid. We also introduced the concept of partial streamlines: streamlines that do not necessarily start and/or end at wells. This allows more efficient coverage and avoids

  4. Unsteady Fast Random Particle Mesh method for efficient prediction of tonal and broadband noises of a centrifugal fan unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Seung; Cheong, Cheolung; Kim, Taehoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, efficient numerical method is proposed for predicting tonal and broadband noises of a centrifugal fan unit. The proposed method is based on Hybrid Computational Aero-Acoustic (H-CAA) techniques combined with Unsteady Fast Random Particle Mesh (U-FRPM) method. The U-FRPM method is developed by extending the FRPM method proposed by Ewert et al. and is utilized to synthesize turbulence flow field from unsteady RANS solutions. The H-CAA technique combined with U-FRPM method is applied to predict broadband as well as tonal noises of a centrifugal fan unit in a household refrigerator. Firstly, unsteady flow field driven by a rotating fan is computed by solving the RANS equations with Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) techniques. Main source regions around the rotating fan are identified by examining the computed flow fields. Then, turbulence flow fields in the main source regions are synthesized by applying the U-FRPM method. The acoustic analogy is applied to model acoustic sources in the main source regions. Finally, the centrifugal fan noise is predicted by feeding the modeled acoustic sources into an acoustic solver based on the Boundary Element Method (BEM). The sound spectral levels predicted using the current numerical method show good agreements with the measured spectra at the Blade Pass Frequencies (BPFs) as well as in the high frequency range. On the more, the present method enables quantitative assessment of relative contributions of identified source regions to the sound field by comparing predicted sound pressure spectrum due to modeled sources.

  5. A Simpler Energy Transfer Efficiency Model to Predict Relative Biological Effect for Protons and Heavier Ions

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Bleddyn

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to predict relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for protons and clinically relevant heavier ions, by using a simplified semi-empirical process based on rational expectations and published experimental results using different ion species. The model input parameters are: Z (effective nuclear charge) and radiosensitivity parameters αL and βL of the control low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Sequential saturation processes are assumed for: (a) the position of the turnover point (LETU) for the LET–RBE relationship with Z, and (b) the ultimate value of α at this point (αU) being non-linearly related to αL. Using the same procedure for β, on the logical assumption that the changes in β with LET, although smaller than α, are symmetrical with those of α, since there is symmetry of the fall off of LET–RBE curves with increasing dose, which suggests that LETU must be identical for α and β. Then, using iso-effective linear quadratic model equations, the estimated RBE is scaled between αU and αL and between βU and βL from for any input value of Z, αL, βL, and dose. The model described is fitted to the data of Barendsen (alpha particles), Weyrather et al. (carbon ions), and Todd for nine different ions (deuterons to Argon), which include variations in cell surviving fraction and dose. In principle, this new system can be used to complement the more complex methods to predict RBE with LET such as the local effect and MKM models which already have been incorporated into treatment planning systems in various countries. It would be useful to have a secondary check to such systems, especially to alert clinicians of potential risks by relatively easy estimation of relevant RBEs. In clinical practice, LET values smaller than LETU are mostly encountered, but the model extends to higher values beyond LETU for other purposes such as radiation, protection, and astrobiology. Considerable further research is required, perhaps in a

  6. RiboAbacus: a model trained on polyribosome images predicts ribosome density and translational efficiency from mammalian transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Lauria, Fabio; Te