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Sample records for predict suppressed growth

  1. Predictive factors for the suppression of fusarium wilt of tomato in plant growth media.

    PubMed

    Borrero, Celia; Trillas, M Isabel; Ordovás, José; Tello, Julio C; Avilés, Manuel

    2004-10-01

    ABSTRACT Fusarium wilts are economically important diseases for which there are no effective chemical control measures. However, biological control and fertility management are becoming efficient alternatives for controlling this disease. Growth media formulated with composts that are able to suppress Fusarium wilt of tomato provide a control system that integrates both strategies. The aim of this study was to predict Fusarium wilt suppression of growth media using abiotic and biotic variables. Grape marc compost was the most effective medium used to suppress Fusarium wilt. Cork compost was intermediate, and light peat and expanded vermiculite were the most conducive growth media. The growth media evaluated were in a pH range of 6.26 to 7.97. Both composts had high beta-glucosidase activity. When pH and beta-glucosidase activity were taken into account as predictive variables, more than 91% of the variation in severity of Fusarium wilt was explained. This relationship illustrates the effect of nutrient availability and the degree of microbiostasis, two key factors in this pathosystem. Microbial populations involved in suppressiveness were cellulolytic and oligotrophic actinomycetes, fungi, and the ratios cellulolytic actinomycetes/cellulolytic bacteria, oligotrophic bacteria/copiotrophic bacteria, and oligotrophic actinomycetes/oligotrophic bacteria. Based on community level physiological profiles, different community structures were evident among growth media evaluated.

  2. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    GH suppression test; Glucose loading test; Acromegaly - blood test; Gigantism - blood test ... At least 3 blood samples are taken. The test is done in the following way: The first blood sample is collected between 6 ...

  3. Growth suppression caused by corticosteroid eye drops.

    PubMed

    Wolthers, Ole D

    2011-01-01

    Scarce data on systemic activity of corticosteroid eye drops are available in children. Two weeks treatment with fluorometholone eye drops in a case series of five children caused growth suppression detected by knemometry. The suppression had no impact on height growth during the following year.

  4. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  5. Silencing of Profilin-1 suppresses cell adhesion and tumor growth via predicted alterations in integrin and Ca2+ signaling in T24M-based bladder cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Frantzi, Maria; Klimou, Zoi; Makridakis, Manousos; Zoidakis, Jerome; Latosinska, Agnieszka; Borràs, Daniel M.; Janssen, Bart; Giannopoulou, Ioanna; Lygirou, Vasiliki; Lazaris, Andreas C.; Anagnou, Nicholas P.; Mischak, Harald; Roubelakis, Maria G.; Vlahou, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is the second most common malignancy of the genitourinary system, characterized by the highest recurrence rate of all cancers. Treatment options are limited; thus a thorough understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms is needed to guide the discovery of novel therapeutic targets. Profilins are actin binding proteins with attributed pleiotropic functions to cytoskeletal remodeling, cell adhesion, motility, even transcriptional regulation, not fully characterized yet. Earlier studies from our laboratory revealed that decreased tissue levels of Profilin-1 (PFN1) are correlated with BC progression to muscle invasive disease. Herein, we describe a comprehensive analysis of PFN1 silencing via shRNA, in vitro (by employing T24M cells) and in vivo [(with T24M xenografts in non-obese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient mice (NOD/SCID) mice]. A combination of phenotypic and molecular assays, including migration, proliferation, adhesion assays, flow cytometry and total mRNA sequencing, as well as immunohistochemistry for investigation of selected findings in human specimens were applied. A decrease in BC cell adhesion and tumor growth in vivo following PFN downregulation are observed, likely associated with the concomitant downregulation of Fibronectin receptor, Endothelin-1, and Actin polymerization. A decrease in the levels of multiple key members of the non-canonical Wnt/Ca2+ signaling pathway is also detected following PFN1 suppression, providing the groundwork for future studies, addressing the specific role of PFN1 in Ca2+ signaling, particularly in the muscle invasive disease. PMID:27683119

  6. Growth suppression in the Trichuris dysentery syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cooper, E S; Bundy, D A; MacDonald, T T; Golden, M H

    1990-04-01

    The Trichuris Dysentery Syndrome (Ramsey, 1962) is an insidious, chronic condition which has clinical features similar to Crohn's ileocolitis and ulcerative colitis, diseases similarly associated with growth retardation. The attained heights and weights of 19 children at the time of diagnosis of intens, -2.4 Standard Deviation (Z) scores from the Tanner-Whitehouse median with weight, adjusted for height-age, -1.3 Z. We present data on the growth velocities of 11 of the children in the half-year following worm expulsion by mebendazole. These children returned to their home environments without food supplementation or close follow-up, but showed an average height velocity of +5.5 Z and weight velocity (for height-age) of +2.4 Z. Of 8 children with unequivocal height spurts only 3 had any weight spurt. We suggest that the pattern of catch-up growth points to the existence of some specific link between allergy or inflammation in the lower intestinal tract and suppression of linear growth, rather than to stunting due to general deprivation and undernutrition.

  7. Prediction of Competitive Microbial Growth.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

     Prediction of competitive microbial growth is becoming important for microbial food safety. There would be two approaches to predict competitive microbial growth with mathematical models. The first approach is the development of a growth model for competitive microbes. Among several candidates for the competition model considered, the combination of the primary growth model of the new logistic (NL) model and the competition model of the Lotka-Vorttera (LV) model showed the best performance in predicting microbial competitive growth in the mixed culture of two species. This system further successfully predicted the growth of three competitive species in mixed culture. The second approach is the application of the secondary model especially for the parameter of the maximum cell population in the primary growth model. The combination of the NL model and a polynomial model for the maximum population successfully predicted Salmonella growth in raw ground beef. This system further successfully predicted Salmonella growth in beef at various initial concentrations and temperatures. The first approach requires microbial growth data in monoculture for analysis. The second approach to the prediction of competitive growth from the viewpoint of microbial food safety would be more suitable for practical application.

  8. Optimal Tuning for Disturbance Suppression Mechanism for Model Predictive Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tange, Yoshio; Nakazawa, Chikashi

    Disturbance suppression is one of most required performances in process control. We recently proposed a new disturbance suppression mechanism applicable for model predictive control in order to enhance disturbance suppression performance for ramp-like disturbances. The proposed method utilized the prediction error of controlled values and generates a disturbance compensation signal by a constant gain feedback. In this paper, we propose an improved version of the disturbance suppression mechanism by applying a low-pass filter and parameter tuning methods by which we can make the mechanism more tolerant to various disturbances such as ramp, step, and other supposable ones. We also show numerical simulation results with an oil distillation tower plant.

  9. Perceptual suppression of predicted natural images

    PubMed Central

    Denison, Rachel N.; Sheynin, Jacob; Silver, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Perception is shaped not only by current sensory inputs but also by expectations generated from past sensory experience. Humans viewing ambiguous stimuli in a stable visual environment are generally more likely to see the perceptual interpretation that matches their expectations, but it is less clear how expectations affect perception when the environment is changing predictably. We used statistical learning to teach observers arbitrary sequences of natural images and employed binocular rivalry to measure perceptual selection as a function of predictive context. In contrast to previous demonstrations of preferential selection of predicted images for conscious awareness, we found that recently acquired sequence predictions biased perceptual selection toward unexpected natural images and image categories. These perceptual biases were not associated with explicit recall of the learned image sequences. Our results show that exposure to arbitrary sequential structure in the environment impacts subsequent visual perceptual selection and awareness. Specifically, for natural image sequences, the visual system prioritizes what is surprising, or statistically informative, over what is expected, or statistically likely. PMID:27802512

  10. Endogenous GABAA receptor activity suppresses glioma growth.

    PubMed

    Blanchart, A; Fernando, R; Häring, M; Assaife-Lopes, N; Romanov, R A; Andäng, M; Harkany, T; Ernfors, P

    2017-02-09

    Although genome alterations driving glioma by fueling cell malignancy have largely been resolved, less is known of the impact of tumor environment on disease progression. Here, we demonstrate functional GABAA receptor-activated currents in human glioblastoma cells and show the existence of a continuous GABA signaling within the tumor cell mass that significantly affects tumor growth and survival expectancy in mouse models. Endogenous GABA released by tumor cells, attenuates proliferation of the glioma cells with enriched expression of stem/progenitor markers and with competence to seed growth of new tumors. Our results suggest that GABA levels rapidly increase in tumors impeding further growth. Thus, shunting chloride ions by a maintained local GABAA receptor activity within glioma cells has a significant impact on tumor development by attenuating proliferation, reducing tumor growth and prolonging survival, a mechanism that may have important impact on therapy resistance and recurrence following tumor resection.

  11. Weight Suppression Predicts Time to Remission from Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Michael R.; Berner, Laura A.; Swanson, Sonja A.; Clark, Vicki L.; Eddy, Kamryn T.; Franko, Debra L.; Shaw, Jena A.; Ross, Stephanie; Herzog, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether, at study entry, (a) weight suppression (WS), the difference between highest past adult weight and current weight, prospectively predicts time to first full remission from bulimia nervosa (BN) over a follow-up period of 8 years, and (b) weight change over time mediates the relationship between WS and time to first…

  12. To dissociate or suppress? Predicting automatic vs. conscious cognitive avoidance.

    PubMed

    Hetzel-Riggin, Melanie D; Wilber, Emily L

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive avoidance is a common response to sexual assault and reminders of trauma, but there is a paucity of research regarding predictors of automatic and conscious cognitive avoidance in response to trauma-related stimuli. The present study examined whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms, physiological responses, and subjective emotional responses predicted peritraumatic dissociation and thought suppression in a sample of 86 female sexual assault victims. Participants provided information about their current symptoms of PTSD and depression as well as their emotional reactions and physiological responses to hearing a personalized sexual assault narrative. PTSD and self-reported anger predicted thought suppression; peritraumatic dissociation was predicted by PTSD symptoms, changes in skin conductance, and self-reported arousal. Heart rate failed to predict either cognitive avoidance response. The results suggest that peritraumatic dissociation and thought suppression are associated with different physiological and emotional responses to trauma cues, perhaps because they tap different memory systems. Limitations and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  13. Penfluridol suppresses pancreatic tumor growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Alok; Srivastava, Sanjay K.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors exhibit enhanced autophagy as compared to any other cancer, making it resistant to chemotherapy. We evaluated the effect of penfluridol against pancreatic cancer. Penfluridol treatment induced apoptosis and inhibited the growth of Panc-1, BxPC-3 and AsPC-1, pancreatic cancer cells with IC50 ranging between 6–7 μM after 24 h of treatment. Significant autophagy was induced by penfluridol treatment in pancreatic cancer cells. Punctate LC3B and autophagosomes staining confirmed autophagy. Inhibiting autophagy by chloroquine, bafilomycin, 3-methyladenine or LC3BsiRNA, significantly blocked penfluridol-induced apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy lead to apoptosis in our model. Penfluridol treatment suppressed the growth of BxPC-3 tumor xenografts by 48% as compared to 17% when treated in combination with chloroquine. Similarly, penfluridol suppressed the growth of AsPC-1 tumors by 40% versus 16% when given in combination with chloroquine. TUNEL staining and caspase-3 cleavage revealed less apoptosis in the tumors from mice treated with penfluridol and chloroquine as compared to penfluridol alone. Penfluridol treatment also suppressed the growth of orthotopically implanted Panc-1 tumors by 80% by inducing autophagy-mediated apoptosis in the tumors. These studies established that penfluridol inhibits pancreatic tumor growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis. Since penfluridol is already in clinic, positive findings from our study will accelerate its clinical development. PMID:27189859

  14. Quercetin suppresses lung cancer growth by targeting Aurora B kinase.

    PubMed

    Xingyu, Zhu; Peijie, Ma; Dan, Peng; Youg, Wang; Daojun, Wang; Xinzheng, Chen; Xijun, Zhang; Yangrong, Song

    2016-11-01

    aurora B kinase is highly expressed in several cancer cells and promotes tumorigenesis and progression, and therefore, it is an important target for drug to treat tumors. Quercetin was identified to be an antitumor agent. Herein, we report for the first time that quercetin inhibited aurora B activities by directly binding with aurora B in vitro and in vivo. Ex vivo studies showed that quercetin inhibited aurora B activities in JB6 Cl41 cells and A549 lung cancer cells. Moreover, knockdown of aurora B in A549 cells decreased their sensitivities to quercetin. In vivo study demonstrated that injection of quercetin in A549 tumor-bearing mice effectively suppressed cancer growth. The phosphorylation of histone 3 in tumor tissues was also decreased after quercetin treatment. In short, quercetin can suppress growth of lung cancer cells as an aurora B inhibitor both in vitro and in vivo.

  15. DST non-suppression predicts suicide after attempted suicide.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, Jussi; Carlborg, Andreas; Mårtensson, Björn; Forslund, Kaj; Nordström, Anna-Lena; Nordström, Peter

    2007-04-15

    Most prospective studies of HPA axis have found that non-suppressors in the dexamethasone suppression test (DST) are more likely to commit suicide during the follow-up. Attempted suicide is a strong clinical predictor of suicide. The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of DST for suicide in a group of depressed inpatients with and without an index suicide attempt. Historical cohort of 382 psychiatric inpatients with mood disorder admitted to the department of Psychiatry at the Karolinska University Hospital between 1980 and 2000 were submitted to the DST and followed up for causes of death. During the follow-up (mean 18 years), 36 suicides (9.4%) occurred, 20 of these were non-suppressors and 16 were suppressors. There was no statistically significant difference in suicide risk between the suppressors and non-suppressors for the sample as a whole. An index suicide attempt predicted suicide. In suicide attempters with mood disorder, the non-suppressor status was significantly associated with suicide indicating that HPA axis hyperactivity is a risk factor for suicide in this group. The dexamethasone suppression test may be a useful predictor within this population.

  16. Predicting Affective Information – An Evaluation of Repetition Suppression Effects

    PubMed Central

    Trapp, Sabrina; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2016-01-01

    Both theoretical proposals and empirical studies suggest that the brain interprets sensory input based on expectations to mitigate computational burden. However, as social beings, much of sensory input is affectively loaded – e.g., the smile of a partner, the critical voice of a boss, or the welcoming gesture of a friend. Given that affective information is highly complex and often ambiguous, building up expectations of upcoming affective sensory input may greatly contribute to its rapid and efficient processing. This review points to the role of affective information in the context of the ‘predictive brain’. It particularly focuses on repetition suppression (RS) effects that have recently been linked to prediction processes. The findings are interpreted as evidence for more pronounced prediction processes with affective material. Importantly, it is argued that bottom-up attention inflates the neural RS effect, and because affective stimuli tend to attract more bottom-up attention, it thereby particularly overshadows the magnitude of RS effects for this information. Finally, anxiety disorders, such as social phobia, are briefly discussed as manifestations of modulations in affective prediction. PMID:27667980

  17. Suppression of vacancy cluster growth in concentrated solid solution alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Shijun; Velisa, Gihan; Xue, Haizhou; Bei, Hongbin; Weber, William J.; Zhang, Yanwen

    2016-12-13

    Large vacancy clusters, such as stacking-fault tetrahedra, are detrimental vacancy-type defects in ion-irradiated structural alloys. Suppression of vacancy cluster formation and growth is highly desirable to improve the irradiation tolerance of these materials. In this paper, we demonstrate that vacancy cluster growth can be inhibited in concentrated solid solution alloys by modifying cluster migration pathways and diffusion kinetics. The alloying effects of Fe and Cr on the migration of vacancy clusters in Ni concentrated alloys are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations and ion irradiation experiment. While the diffusion coefficients of small vacancy clusters in Ni-based binary and ternary solid solution alloys are higher than in pure Ni, they become lower for large clusters. This observation suggests that large clusters can easily migrate and grow to very large sizes in pure Ni. In contrast, cluster growth is suppressed in solid solution alloys owing to the limited mobility of large vacancy clusters. Finally, the differences in cluster sizes and mobilities in Ni and in solid solution alloys are consistent with the results from ion irradiation experiments.

  18. Suppression of vacancy cluster growth in concentrated solid solution alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Shijun; Velisa, Gihan; Xue, Haizhou; ...

    2016-12-13

    Large vacancy clusters, such as stacking-fault tetrahedra, are detrimental vacancy-type defects in ion-irradiated structural alloys. Suppression of vacancy cluster formation and growth is highly desirable to improve the irradiation tolerance of these materials. In this paper, we demonstrate that vacancy cluster growth can be inhibited in concentrated solid solution alloys by modifying cluster migration pathways and diffusion kinetics. The alloying effects of Fe and Cr on the migration of vacancy clusters in Ni concentrated alloys are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations and ion irradiation experiment. While the diffusion coefficients of small vacancy clusters in Ni-based binary and ternary solid solutionmore » alloys are higher than in pure Ni, they become lower for large clusters. This observation suggests that large clusters can easily migrate and grow to very large sizes in pure Ni. In contrast, cluster growth is suppressed in solid solution alloys owing to the limited mobility of large vacancy clusters. Finally, the differences in cluster sizes and mobilities in Ni and in solid solution alloys are consistent with the results from ion irradiation experiments.« less

  19. Stromal heparan sulfate differentiates neuroblasts to suppress neuroblastoma growth.

    PubMed

    Knelson, Erik H; Gaviglio, Angela L; Nee, Jasmine C; Starr, Mark D; Nixon, Andrew B; Marcus, Stephen G; Blobe, Gerard C

    2014-07-01

    Neuroblastoma prognosis is dependent on both the differentiation state and stromal content of the tumor. Neuroblastoma tumor stroma is thought to suppress neuroblast growth via release of soluble differentiating factors. Here, we identified critical growth-limiting components of the differentiating stroma secretome and designed a potential therapeutic strategy based on their central mechanism of action. We demonstrated that expression of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), including TβRIII, GPC1, GPC3, SDC3, and SDC4, is low in neuroblasts and high in the Schwannian stroma. Evaluation of neuroblastoma patient microarray data revealed an association between TGFBR3, GPC1, and SDC3 expression and improved prognosis. Treatment of neuroblastoma cell lines with soluble HSPGs promoted neuroblast differentiation via FGFR1 and ERK phosphorylation, leading to upregulation of the transcription factor inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (ID1). HSPGs also enhanced FGF2-dependent differentiation, and the anticoagulant heparin had a similar effect, leading to decreased neuroblast proliferation. Dissection of individual sulfation sites identified 2-O, 3-O-desulfated heparin (ODSH) as a differentiating agent, and treatment of orthotopic xenograft models with ODSH suppressed tumor growth and metastasis without anticoagulation. These studies support heparan sulfate signaling intermediates as prognostic and therapeutic neuroblastoma biomarkers and demonstrate that tumor stroma biology can inform the design of targeted molecular therapeutics.

  20. Suppressing The Growth Of Dendrites In Secondary Li Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Evan D.; Perrone, David E.; Shen, David H.

    1996-01-01

    Proposed technique for suppressing growth of lithium dendrites in rechargeable lithium electrochemical power cells involves periodic interruption of steady charging current with short, high-current discharge pulses. Technique applicable to lithium cells of several different types, including Li/TiS(2), Li/NbSe(3), Li/CoO(2), Li/MoS(2), Li/Vo(x), and Li/MnO(2). Cells candidates for use in spacecraft, military, communications, automotive, and other applications in which high-energy-density rechargeable batteries needed.

  1. Embelin suppresses pancreatic cancer growth by modulating tumor immune microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Justine L; Jackman, Chris P; Tang, Su-Ni; Shankar, Sharmila; Srivastava, Rakesh K

    2014-01-01

    Since pancreatic carcinoma is largely refractory to conventional therapies, development of novel agents is required for the effective treatment of pancreatic cancer. The objective of this paper was to examine the molecular mechanisms by which embelin inhibited human pancreatic cancer growth in mice by modulating tumor immune microenvironment. Embelin inhibited PANC-1 tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis which were associated with suppression of Akt and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathways. Embelin inhibited the expression of Bcl-2, cyclin D1, CDK2 and CDK6, IL-6 and IL-8, and induced the expression of Bax in tumor tissues. Embelin also reversed epithelial-mesenchymal transition by up-regulating E-cadherin and inhibiting the expression of Snail, Slug and Zeb1. Embelin inhibited pancreatic cancer growth in Kras(G12D) mice by modulating tumor immune microenvironment where CTL, NKT, γδT, NK, and IFNγ (Th1 type) cells were up-regulated, and Th17, PMN-MDSC, IL-6 and IL-8 (Th2 type) immune cells were inhibited. These data suggest that embelin can inhibit pancreatic cancer growth by modulating tumor immune microenvironment and Akt and Shh pathways, and inhibiting inflammation. Embelin may offer therapeutic benefits for the treatment and/or prevention of pancreatic cancer.

  2. Evaluating the Predictive Value of Growth Prediction Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Daniel L.; Gaertner, Matthew N.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates four growth prediction models--projection, student growth percentile, trajectory, and transition table--commonly used to forecast (and give schools credit for) middle school students' future proficiency. Analyses focused on vertically scaled summative mathematics assessments, and two performance standards conditions (high…

  3. Abrogating cholesterol esterification suppresses growth and metastasis of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, J; Gu, D; Lee, S S-Y; Song, B; Bandyopadhyay, S; Chen, S; Konieczny, S F; Ratliff, T L; Liu, X; Xie, J; Cheng, J-X

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells are known to execute reprogramed metabolism of glucose, amino acids and lipids. Here, we report a significant role of cholesterol metabolism in cancer metastasis. By using label-free Raman spectromicroscopy, we found an aberrant accumulation of cholesteryl ester in human pancreatic cancer specimens and cell lines, mediated by acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) enzyme. Expression of ACAT-1 showed a correlation with poor patient survival. Abrogation of cholesterol esterification, either by an ACAT-1 inhibitor or by shRNA knockdown, significantly suppressed tumor growth and metastasis in an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Mechanically, ACAT-1 inhibition increased intracellular free cholesterol level, which was associated with elevated endoplasmic reticulum stress and caused apoptosis. Collectively, our results demonstrate a new strategy for treating metastatic pancreatic cancer by inhibiting cholesterol esterification. PMID:27132508

  4. Targeting Gli Transcription Activation by Small Molecule Suppresses Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bosco-Clément, Geneviève; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Zhao; Zhou, Hai-Meng; Li, Hui; Mikami, Iwao; Hirata, Tomomi; Yagui-Beltran, Adam; Lui, Natalie; Do, Hanh T.; Cheng, Tiffany; Tseng, Hsin-Hui; Choi, Helen; Fang, Li-Tai; Kim, Il-Jin; Yue, Dongsheng; Wang, Changli; Zheng, Qingfeng; Fujii, Naoaki; Mann, Michael; Jablons, David M.; He, Biao

    2014-01-01

    Targeted inhibition of Hedgehog signaling at the cell membrane has been associated with anti-cancer activity in preclinical and early clinical studies. Hedgehog signaling involves activation of Gli transcription factors that can also be induced by alternative pathways. In this study we identified an interaction between Gli proteins and a transcription co-activator TAF9, and validated its functional relevance in regulating Gli transactivation. We also describe a novel, synthetic small molecule, FN1-8, that efficiently interferes with Gli/TAF9 interaction and down-regulate Gli/TAF9 dependent transcriptional activity. More importantly, FN1-8 suppresses cancer cell proliferation in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Our results suggest that blocking Gli transactivation, a key control point of multiple oncogenic pathways, may be an effective anti-cancer strategy. PMID:23686308

  5. Probiotics modulated gut microbiota suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Sung, Cecilia Ying Ju; Lee, Nikki; Ni, Yueqiong; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Panagiotou, Gianni; El-Nezami, Hani

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial roles of probiotics in lowering the gastrointestinal inflammation and preventing colorectal cancer have been frequently demonstrated, but their immunomodulatory effects and mechanism in suppressing the growth of extraintestinal tumors remain unexplored. Here, we adopted a mouse model and metagenome sequencing to investigate the efficacy of probiotic feeding in controlling s.c. hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the underlying mechanism suppressing the tumor progression. Our result demonstrated that Prohep, a novel probiotic mixture, slows down the tumor growth significantly and reduces the tumor size and weight by 40% compared with the control. From a mechanistic point of view the down-regulated IL-17 cytokine and its major producer Th17 cells, whose levels decreased drastically, played critical roles in tumor reduction upon probiotics feeding. Cell staining illustrated that the reduced Th17 cells in the tumor of the probiotic-treated group is mainly caused by the reduced frequency of migratory Th17 cells from the intestine and peripheral blood. In addition, shotgun-metagenome sequencing revealed the crosstalk between gut microbial metabolites and the HCC development. Probiotics shifted the gut microbial community toward certain beneficial bacteria, including Prevotella and Oscillibacter, that are known producers of antiinflammatory metabolites, which subsequently reduced the Th17 polarization and promoted the differentiation of antiinflammatory Treg/Tr1 cells in the gut. Overall, our study offers novel insights into the mechanism by which probiotic treatment modulates the microbiota and influences the regulation of the T-cell differentiation in the gut, which in turn alters the level of the proinflammatory cytokines in the extraintestinal tumor microenvironment. PMID:26884164

  6. Probiotics modulated gut microbiota suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Sung, Cecilia Ying Ju; Lee, Nikki; Ni, Yueqiong; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Panagiotou, Gianni; El-Nezami, Hani

    2016-03-01

    The beneficial roles of probiotics in lowering the gastrointestinal inflammation and preventing colorectal cancer have been frequently demonstrated, but their immunomodulatory effects and mechanism in suppressing the growth of extraintestinal tumors remain unexplored. Here, we adopted a mouse model and metagenome sequencing to investigate the efficacy of probiotic feeding in controlling s.c. hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the underlying mechanism suppressing the tumor progression. Our result demonstrated that Prohep, a novel probiotic mixture, slows down the tumor growth significantly and reduces the tumor size and weight by 40% compared with the control. From a mechanistic point of view the down-regulated IL-17 cytokine and its major producer Th17 cells, whose levels decreased drastically, played critical roles in tumor reduction upon probiotics feeding. Cell staining illustrated that the reduced Th17 cells in the tumor of the probiotic-treated group is mainly caused by the reduced frequency of migratory Th17 cells from the intestine and peripheral blood. In addition, shotgun-metagenome sequencing revealed the crosstalk between gut microbial metabolites and the HCC development. Probiotics shifted the gut microbial community toward certain beneficial bacteria, including Prevotella and Oscillibacter, that are known producers of antiinflammatory metabolites, which subsequently reduced the Th17 polarization and promoted the differentiation of antiinflammatory Treg/Tr1 cells in the gut. Overall, our study offers novel insights into the mechanism by which probiotic treatment modulates the microbiota and influences the regulation of the T-cell differentiation in the gut, which in turn alters the level of the proinflammatory cytokines in the extraintestinal tumor microenvironment.

  7. Glutamine suppresses PGE2 synthesis and breast cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Klimberg, V S; Kornbluth, J; Cao, Y; Dang, A; Blossom, S; Schaeffer, R F

    1996-06-01

    Reduced natural killer (NK) activity found in tumor-bearing hosts has been associated with high levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) produced by monocytes in vitro. We have previously demonstrated a dependence of NK cell activity on glutamine (GLN) levels in vitro and in vivo. Further, glutathione (GSH) is antagonistic to PGE2 synthesis. We hypothesized that GLN, through increased GSH production, leads to decreased PGE2 synthesis and upregulation of NK cytotoxic activity. To test this, we examined the effects of oral GLN on GSH and PGE2 concentrations, NK activity and tumor growth in a rat breast cancer model. Starting on the day of MTF-7 tumor implantation 18 Fisher 344 rats were pair-fed chow and gavaged with 1 g/kg/day GLN (n = 9) or an isonitrogenous amount of Freamine (FA) (n = 9). Seven weeks after tumor implantation rats were sacrificed. Tumors were measured, weighed, and processed for tumor morphometrics. Spleens were removed, lymphocytes isolated and assayed for NK activity. Blood GLN, GSH, and PGE2 concentrations were measured. Over the 7-week study period tumor growth was decreased by approximately 40% in the GLN-supplemented group. This decrease in growth was associated with a 2.5 fold greater NK activity in the GLN-fed rats vs FA-fed rats. This correlated with a 25% rise in GSH concentration and a proportional decrease in PGE2 synthesis. Decreased tumor volume in rats fed GLN was not associated with changes in morphometrics. Oral GLN supplementation enhances NK activity resulting in decreased tumor growth. The enhanced NK activity seen with oral GLN supplementation in the tumor-bearing host is associated with GSH mediated suppression of PGE2 synthesis.

  8. Parthenolide suppresses pancreatic cell growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weifeng; Wang, Xinshuai; Sun, Junjun; Yang, Yanhui; Li, Wensheng; Song, Junxin

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy and is unresponsive to conventional chemotherapies. Parthenolide, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from feverfew, has exhibited potent anticancer effects against various cancers. The purpose of this report was to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of parthenolide in human pancreatic cancer Panc-1 and BxPC3 cells. The results demonstrated that parthenolide suppressed the growth and induced apoptosis of Panc-1 and BxPC3 pancreatic cancer cells with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) ranging between 7 and 9 μM after 24 h of treatment. Significant autophagy was induced by parthenolide treatment in pancreatic cancer cells. Parthenolide treatment concentration-dependently increased the percentage of autophagic cells and significantly increased the expression levels of p62/SQSTM1, Beclin 1, and LC3II in Panc-1 cells. Punctate LC3II staining confirmed autophagy. Furthermore, inhibiting autophagy by chloroquine, 3-methyladenine, or LC3II siRNA significantly blocked parthenolide-induced apoptosis, suggesting that parthenolide induced apoptosis through autophagy in this study. In conclusion, these studies established that parthenolide inhibits pancreatic cell growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis. Data of the present study suggest that parthenolide can serve as a potential chemotherapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer. PMID:28176967

  9. Targeting glutamine transport to suppress melanoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Beaumont, Kimberley A; Otte, Nicholas J; Font, Josep; Bailey, Charles G; van Geldermalsen, Michelle; Sharp, Danae M; Tiffen, Jessamy C; Ryan, Renae M; Jormakka, Mika; Haass, Nikolas K; Rasko, John E J; Holst, Jeff

    2014-09-01

    Amino acids, especially leucine and glutamine, are important for tumor cell growth, survival and metabolism. A range of different transporters deliver each specific amino acid into cells, some of which are increased in cancer. These amino acids consequently activate the mTORC1 pathway and drive cell cycle progression. The leucine transporter LAT1/4F2hc heterodimer assembles as part of a large complex with the glutamine transporter ASCT2 to transport amino acids. In this study, we show that the expression of LAT1 and ASCT2 is significantly increased in human melanoma samples and is present in both BRAF(WT) (C8161 and WM852) and BRAF(V600E) mutant (1205Lu and 451Lu) melanoma cell lines. While inhibition of LAT1 by BCH did not suppress melanoma cell growth, the ASCT2 inhibitor BenSer significantly reduced both leucine and glutamine transport in melanoma cells, leading to inhibition of mTORC1 signaling. Cell proliferation and cell cycle progression were significantly reduced in the presence of BenSer in melanoma cells in 2D and 3D cell culture. This included reduced expression of the cell cycle regulators CDK1 and UBE2C. The importance of ASCT2 expression in melanoma was confirmed by shRNA knockdown, which inhibited glutamine uptake, mTORC1 signaling and cell proliferation. Taken together, our study demonstrates that ASCT2-mediated glutamine transport is a potential therapeutic target for both BRAF(WT) and BRAF(V600E) melanoma.

  10. Osteocytic Connexin Hemichannels Suppress Breast Cancer Growth and Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jade Z.; Riquelme, Manuel A.; Gu, Sumin; Kar, Rekha; Gao, Xiaoli; Sun, LuZhe; Jiang, Jean X.

    2016-01-01

    Although the skeleton is one of predominant sites for breast cancer metastasis, why breast cancer cells often become dormant after homing to bone is not well understood. Here, we reported an intrinsic self-defense mechanism of bone cells against breast cancer cells: a critical role of connexin (Cx) 43 hemichannels in osteocytes in the suppression of breast cancer bone metastasis. Cx43 hemichannels allow passage of small molecules between the intracellular and extracellular environments. The treatment of bisphosphonate drugs, either alendronate (ALN) or zoledronic acid (ZOL), opened Cx43 hemichannels in osteocytes. Conditioned media (CM) collected from MLO-Y4 osteocyte cells treated with bisphosphonates inhibited the anchorage-independent growth, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells and Py8119 mouse mammary carcinoma cells and this inhibitory effect was attenuated with Cx43(E2), a specific hemichannel blocking antibody. The opening of osteocytic Cx43 hemichannels by mechanical stimulation had similar inhibitory effects on breast cancer cells and this inhibition was attenuated by Cx43(E2) antibody as well. These inhibitory effects on cancer cells were mediated by ATP released from osteocyte Cx43 hemichannels. Furthermore, both Cx43 osteocyte-specific knockout mice and osteocyte-specific Δ130–136 transgenic mice with impaired Cx43 gap junctions and hemichannels showed significantly increased tumor growth and attenuated the inhibitory effect of ZOL. However, R76W transgenic mice with functional hemichannels but not gap junctions in osteocytes did not display a significant difference. Together, our studies establish the specific inhibitory role of osteocytic Cx43 hemichannels, and exploiting the activity of this channel could serve as a de novo therapeutic strategy. PMID:27041582

  11. Fatigue life and crack growth prediction methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Phillips, E. P.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The capabilities of a plasticity-induced crack-closure model and life-prediction code to predict fatigue crack growth and fatigue lives of metallic materials are reviewed. Crack-tip constraint factors, to account for three-dimensional effects, were selected to correlate large-crack growth rate data as a function of the effective-stress-intensity factor range (delta(K(sub eff))) under constant-amplitude loading. Some modifications to the delta(K(sub eff))-rate relations were needed in the near threshold regime to fit small-crack growth rate behavior and endurance limits. The model was then used to calculate small- and large-crack growth rates, and in some cases total fatigue lives, for several aluminum and titanium alloys under constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude, and spectrum loading. Fatigue lives were calculated using the crack growth relations and microstructural features like those that initiated cracks. Results from the tests and analyses agreed well.

  12. A Novel Repressor of Estrogen-Regulated Genes for Breast Cancer Growth Suppression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-08-01

    Genes for Breast Cancer Growth Suppression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David J. Shapiro, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Illinois Champaign...Cancer Growth DAMD17-97-1-7241 Suppression 6. AUTHOR(S) David J. Shapiro, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING...part hypothesis. First, that the estrogen-independent growth of breast cancer cells involves the estrogen-independent expression of genes which are

  13. Suppression of inhomogeneous segregation in graphene growth on epitaxial metal films.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Shigeo; Nozawa, Katsuya; Toyoda, Kenji; Matsukawa, Nozomu; Odagawa, Akihiro; Tsujimura, Ayumu

    2011-07-13

    Large-scale uniform graphene growth was achieved by suppressing inhomogeneous carbon segregation using a single domain Ru film epitaxially grown on a sapphire substrate. An investigation of how the metal thickness affected growth and a comparative study on metals with different crystal structures have revealed that locally enhanced carbon segregation at stacking domain boundaries of metal is the origin of inhomogeneous graphene growth. Single domain Ru film has no stacking domain boundary, and the graphene growth on it is mainly caused not by segregation but by a surface catalytic reaction. Suppression of local segregation is essential for uniform graphene growth on epitaxial metal films.

  14. Suppression of Elongation and Growth of Tomato Seedlings by Auxin Biosynthesis Inhibitors and Modeling of the Growth and Environmental Response

    PubMed Central

    Higashide, Tadahisa; Narukawa, Megumi; Shimada, Yukihisa; Soeno, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    To develop a growth inhibitor, the effects of auxin inhibitors were investigated. Application of 30 μM L-α-aminooxy-β-phenylpropionic acid (AOPP) or (S)-methyl 2-((1,3-dioxoisoindolin-2-yl)oxy)-3-phenylpropanoate (KOK1101), decreased the endogenous IAA levels in tomato seedlings at 8 days after sowing. Then, 10–1200 μM AOPP or KOK1101 were sprayed on the leaves and stem of 2–3 leaf stage tomato plants grown under a range of environmental conditions. We predicted plant growth and environmental response using a model based on the observed suppression of leaf enlargement. Spraying AOPP or KOK1101 decreased stem length and leaf area. Concentration-dependent inhibitions and dose response curves were observed. Although the effects of the inhibitors on dry weight varied according to the environmental conditions, the net assimilation rate was not influenced by the inhibitors. Accordingly, the observed decrease in dry weight caused by the inhibitors may result from decreased leaf area. Validation of the model based on observed data independent of the dataset showed good correlations between the observed and predicted values of dry weight and leaf area index. PMID:24690949

  15. Total triterpenoids from Ganoderma Lucidum suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Xie, Zi-ping; Huang, Zhan-sen; Li, Hao; Wei, An-yang; Di, Jin-ming; Xiao, Heng-jun; Zhang, Zhi-gang; Cai, Liu-hong; Tao, Xin; Qi, Tao; Chen, Di-ling; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, one immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell line (BPH) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, 22Rv1, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with Ganoderma Lucidum triterpenoids (GLT) at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle were analyzed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR and Western blotting. It was found that GLT dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. GLT-induced apoptosis was due to activation of Caspases-9 and -3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. GLT-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and E2F1 expression at the late time. These findings demonstrate that GLT suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which might suggest that GLT or Ganoderma Lucidum could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer.

  16. Prediction suppression in monkey inferotemporal cortex depends on the conditional probability between images.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Suchitra; Meyer, Travis; Olson, Carl R

    2016-01-01

    When monkeys view two images in fixed sequence repeatedly over days and weeks, neurons in area TE of the inferotemporal cortex come to exhibit prediction suppression. The trailing image elicits only a weak response when presented following the leading image that preceded it during training. Induction of prediction suppression might depend either on the contiguity of the images, as determined by their co-occurrence and captured in the measure of joint probability P(A,B), or on their contingency, as determined by their correlation and as captured in the measures of conditional probability P(A|B) and P(B|A). To distinguish between these possibilities, we measured prediction suppression after imposing training regimens that held P(A,B) constant but varied P(A|B) and P(B|A). We found that reducing either P(A|B) or P(B|A) during training attenuated prediction suppression as measured during subsequent testing. We conclude that prediction suppression depends on contingency, as embodied in the predictive relations between the images, and not just on contiguity, as embodied in their co-occurrence.

  17. Growth Suppression and Therapy Sensitization of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    Laboratories Inc.), which incorporates an internal ribosome binding site (IRES) and generates a bicistronic message in which the subcloned gene of interest...suppression and apoptosis." Presented at the AACR Special Conference on DNA repair Defects, San Diego CA, January 14- 18, 2000. 12 PROPRIETARY...alter p53 in breast cancer: mutation and nuclear exclusion. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA 89:7262-7266. 5. Hendersin, I.C., Harris, J.R., Kinne, D.W

  18. Hypoxic induction of UCP3 in the growth plate: UCP3 suppresses chondrocyte autophagy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hitoshi; Bohensky, Jolene; Freeman, Theresa; Srinivas, Vickram; Shapiro, Irving M

    2008-08-01

    The overall goal of the investigation was to examine the role of uncoupling proteins (UCPs) in regulating late stage events in the chondrocyte maturation pathway. We showed for the first time that epiphyseal chondrocytes expressed UCP3. In hypoxia, UCP3 mediated regulation of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)) was dependent on HIF-1alpha. We also showed for the first time that UCP3 regulated the induction of autophagy. Thus, suppression of UCP3 enhanced the expression of the autophagic phenotype, even in serum-replete media. Predictably, the mature autophagic chondrocytes were susceptible to an apoptogen challenge. Susceptibility was probably associated with a lowered expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl2 and BCL(xL) and a raised baseline expression of cytochrome c in the cytosol. These changes would serve to promote sensitivity to apoptogens. We conclude that in concert with HIF-1alpha, UCP3 regulates the activity of the mitochondrion by modulating the transmembrane potential. In addition, it inhibits induction of the autophagic response. When this occurs, it suppresses sensitivity to agents that promote chondrocyte deletion from the growth plate.

  19. Growth curve prediction from optical density data.

    PubMed

    Mytilinaios, I; Salih, M; Schofield, H K; Lambert, R J W

    2012-03-15

    A fundamental aspect of predictive microbiology is the shape of the microbial growth curve and many models are used to fit microbial count data, the modified Gompertz and Baranyi equation being two of the most widely used. Rapid, automated methods such as turbidimetry have been widely used to obtain growth parameters, but do not directly give the microbial growth curve. Optical density (OD) data can be used to obtain the specific growth rate and if used in conjunction with the known initial inocula, the maximum population data and knowledge of the microbial number at a predefined OD at a known time then all the information required for the reconstruction of a standard growth curve can be obtained. Using multiple initial inocula the times to detection (TTD) at a given standard OD were obtained from which the specific growth rate was calculated. The modified logistic, modified Gompertz, 3-phase linear, Baranyi and the classical logistic model (with or without lag) were fitted to the TTD data. In all cases the modified logistic and modified Gompertz failed to reproduce the observed linear plots of the log initial inocula against TTD using the known parameters (initial inoculum, MPD and growth rate). The 3 phase linear model (3PLM), Baranyi and classical logistic models fitted the observed data and were able to reproduce elements of the OD incubation-time curves. Using a calibration curve relating OD and microbial numbers, the Baranyi equation was able to reproduce OD data obtained for Listeria monocytogenes at 37 and 30°C as well as data on the effect of pH (range 7.05 to 3.46) at 30°C. The Baranyi model was found to be the most capable primary model of those examined (in the absence of lag it defaults to the classic logistic model). The results suggested that the modified logistic and the modified Gompertz models should not be used as Primary models for TTD data as they cannot reproduce the observed data.

  20. Prediction, Measurement, and Suppression of High Temperature Supersonic Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, John M.; Bhat, T. R. S.; Jansen, Bernard J.

    1999-01-01

    The photograph in figure 1 displays a water cooled round convergent-divergent supersonic nozzle operating slightly overexpanded near 2460 F. The nozzle is designed to produce shock free flow near this temperature at Mach 2. The exit diameter of this nozzle is 3.5 inches. This nozzle is used in the present study to establish properties of the sound field associated with high temperature supersonic jets operating fully pressure balanced (i.e. shock free) and to evaluate capability of the compressible Rayleigh model to account for principle physical features of the observed sound emission. The experiment is conducted statically (i.e. M(sub f) = 0.) in the NASA/LaRC Jet Noise Laboratory. Both aerodynamic and acoustic measurements are obtained in this study along with numerical plume simulation and theoretical prediction of jet noise. Detailed results from this study are reported previously by Seiner, Ponton, Jansen, and Lagen.

  1. Methoxyacetic acid suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Keshab R; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Patel, Neil K; Lu, Hua; Zeng, Shelya X; Wang, Guangdi; Zhang, Changde; You, Zongbing

    2014-01-01

    Methoxyacetic acid (MAA) is a primary metabolite of ester phthalates that are used in production of consumer products and pharmaceutical products. MAA causes embryo malformation and spermatocyte death through inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Little is known about MAA’s effects on cancer cells. In this study, two immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell lines (RWPE-1 and pRNS-1-1) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, C4-2B, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with MAA at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle analysis were performed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR, Western blot, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses. We found that MAA dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. MAA-induced apoptosis was due to down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic gene baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis protein repeat containing 2 (BIRC2, also named cIAP1), leading to activation of caspases 7 and 3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. MAA-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and CDK2 expression at the late time. MAA up-regulated p21 expression through inhibition of HDAC activities, independently of p53/p63/p73. These findings demonstrate that MAA suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which suggests that MAA could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer. PMID:25606576

  2. Evidence for yellow light suppression of lettuce growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougher, T. A.; Bugbee, B.

    2001-01-01

    Researchers studying plant growth under different lamp types often attribute differences in growth to a blue light response. Lettuce plants were grown in six blue light treatments comprising five blue light fractions (0, 2, 6% from high-pressure sodium [HPS] lamps and 6, 12, 26% from metal halide [MH] lamps). Lettuce chlorophyll concentration, dry mass, leaf area and specific leaf area under the HPS and MH 6% blue were significantly different, suggesting wavelengths other than blue and red affected plant growth. Results were reproducible in two replicate studies at each of two photosynthetic photon fluxes, 200 and 500 mumol m-2 s-1. We graphed the data against absolute blue light, phytochrome photoequilibrium, phototropic blue, UV, red:far red, blue:red, blue: far red and 'yellow' light fraction. Only the 'yellow' wavelength range (580-600 nm) explained the differences between the two lamp types.

  3. Competitive suppression of Quercus douglasii (Fagaceae) seedling emergence and growth.

    PubMed

    Gordon, D R; Rice, K J

    2000-07-01

    Reduced recruitment of blue oak (Quercus douglasii) seedlings in California grasslands and woodlands may result from shifts in seasonal soil water availability coincident with replacement of the native perennial herbaceous community by Mediterranean annuals. We used a combination of container and field experiments to examine the interrelationships between soil water potential, herbaceous neighborhood composition, and blue oak seedling shoot emergence and growth. Neighborhoods of exotic annuals depleted soil moisture more rapidly than neighborhoods of a perennial grass or "no-neighbor" controls. Although effects of neighborhood composition on oak seedling root elongation were not statistically significant, seedling shoot emergence was significantly inhibited in the annual neighborhoods where soil water was rapidly depleted. Seedling water status directly reflected soil water potential, which also determined the extent and duration of oak seedling growth during the first year. End-of-season seedling height significantly influenced survival and growth in subsequent years. While growth and survival of blue oak seedlings may be initially constrained by competition with herbaceous species, subsequent competition with adult blue oak trees may further contribute to reduced sapling recruitment.

  4. Rapid Suppression of Growth by Blue Light 1

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.; Green, Paul B.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of the rapid inhibition of hypocotyl elongation by blue light was investigated in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedlings by measuring the changes in turgor during the response. A special device, based on the resonance frequency principle, was built which permitted simultaneous and continuous measurements of both tissue rigidity (turgor) and growth rate on a single intact hypocotyl. The large decrease in growth rate following blue irradiation was consistently accompanied by a small increase in resonance frequency. This result indicates that blue light inhibits growth by decreasing the yielding properties of the cell walls, resulting in a slight rise in turgor because of the coupling between growth rate and turgor. The nature of the blue-light inhibition was further studied by measuring the influence of light dose and temperature on the time course of inhibition (lag-time, half-time of inhibition, and amount of inhibition) with the aid of a microcomputer-based system for measuring growth rate and for controlling light duration and energy. The light dose has no influence on either the lag-time or the half-time of inhibition, but strongly affects the amount of inhibition. In contrast, a 10°C drop in temperature (from 30 to 20°C) lengthened the lag-time of the blue-light response, but did not significantly affect the half-time or the per cent inhibition by blue light. The half-time for changes in hypocotyl length (induced by applying a hydrostatic pressure to the roots or to the cut end of seedlings with roots excised) was found to be the same as the half-time of the blue-light inhibition (15 to 25 seconds in cucumber; 90 to 150 seconds in sunflower). These results support the idea that blue light, after a fixed lag period, induces an immediate decrease in the yielding properties of the cell walls. The growth rate subsequently decreases with a half-time that depends on the time required for cell turgor pressures to

  5. Triparanol suppresses human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Xinyu; Han, Xingpeng; Zhang, Fang; He, Miao; Zhang, Yi; Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Zhao, Hong

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can block proliferation in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can induce apoptosis in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proved Triparanol can inhibit Hedgehog signaling in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrated Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo in mouse xenograft model. -- Abstract: Despite the improved contemporary multidisciplinary regimens treating cancer, majority of cancer patients still suffer from adverse effects and relapse, therefore posing a significant challenge to uncover more efficacious molecular therapeutics targeting signaling pathways central to tumorigenesis. Here, our study have demonstrated that Triparanol, a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor, can block proliferation and induce apoptosis in multiple human cancer cells including lung, breast, liver, pancreatic, prostate cancer and melanoma cells, and growth inhibition can be rescued by exogenous addition of cholesterol. Remarkably, we have proved Triparanol can significantly repress Hedgehog pathway signaling in these human cancer cells. Furthermore, study in a mouse xenograft model of human lung cancer has validated that Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo. We have therefore uncovered Triparanol as potential new cancer therapeutic in treating multiple types of human cancers with deregulated Hedgehog signaling.

  6. Tumor Growth Suppression Induced by Biomimetic Silk Fibroin Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Le-Ping; Silva-Correia, Joana; Ribeiro, Viviana P.; Miranda-Gonçalves, Vera; Correia, Cristina; da Silva Morais, Alain; Sousa, Rui A.; Reis, Rui M.; Oliveira, Ana L.; Oliveira, Joaquim M.; Reis, Rui L.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-based hydrogels with distinct conformations which enable encapsulation or differentiation of cells are of great interest in 3D cancer research models. Conformational changes may cause macroscopic shifts in the hydrogels, allowing for its use as biosensors and drug carriers. In depth knowledge on how 3D conformational changes in proteins may affect cell fate and tumor formation is required. Thus, this study reports an enzymatically crosslinked silk fibroin (SF) hydrogel system that can undergo intrinsic conformation changes from random coil to β-sheet conformation. In random coil status, the SF hydrogels are transparent, elastic, and present ionic strength and pH stimuli-responses. The random coil hydrogels become β-sheet conformation after 10 days in vitro incubation and 14 days in vivo subcutaneous implantation in rat. When encapsulated with ATDC-5 cells, the random coil SF hydrogel promotes cell survival up to 7 days, whereas the subsequent β-sheet transition induces cell apoptosis in vitro. HeLa cells are further incorporated in SF hydrogels and the constructs are investigated in vitro and in an in vivo chick chorioallantoic membrane model for tumor formation. In vivo, Angiogenesis and tumor formation are suppressed in SF hydrogels. Therefore, these hydrogels provide new insights for cancer research and uses of biomaterials. PMID:27485515

  7. Tumor Growth Suppression Induced by Biomimetic Silk Fibroin Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Le-Ping; Silva-Correia, Joana; Ribeiro, Viviana P.; Miranda-Gonçalves, Vera; Correia, Cristina; da Silva Morais, Alain; Sousa, Rui A.; Reis, Rui M.; Oliveira, Ana L.; Oliveira, Joaquim M.; Reis, Rui L.

    2016-08-01

    Protein-based hydrogels with distinct conformations which enable encapsulation or differentiation of cells are of great interest in 3D cancer research models. Conformational changes may cause macroscopic shifts in the hydrogels, allowing for its use as biosensors and drug carriers. In depth knowledge on how 3D conformational changes in proteins may affect cell fate and tumor formation is required. Thus, this study reports an enzymatically crosslinked silk fibroin (SF) hydrogel system that can undergo intrinsic conformation changes from random coil to β-sheet conformation. In random coil status, the SF hydrogels are transparent, elastic, and present ionic strength and pH stimuli-responses. The random coil hydrogels become β-sheet conformation after 10 days in vitro incubation and 14 days in vivo subcutaneous implantation in rat. When encapsulated with ATDC-5 cells, the random coil SF hydrogel promotes cell survival up to 7 days, whereas the subsequent β-sheet transition induces cell apoptosis in vitro. HeLa cells are further incorporated in SF hydrogels and the constructs are investigated in vitro and in an in vivo chick chorioallantoic membrane model for tumor formation. In vivo, Angiogenesis and tumor formation are suppressed in SF hydrogels. Therefore, these hydrogels provide new insights for cancer research and uses of biomaterials.

  8. Growth suppression by ursodeoxycholic acid involves caveolin-1 enhanced degradation of EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Rebecca; Martinez, Jesse D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been shown to prevent colon tumorigenesis in animal models and in humans. In vitro work indicates that this bile acid can suppress cell growth and mitogenic signaling suggesting that UDCA may be an anti-proliferative agent. However, the mechanism by which UDCA functions is unclear. Previously we showed that bile acids may alter cellular signaling by acting at the plasma membrane. Here we utilized EGFR as a model membrane receptor and examined the effects that UDCA has on its functioning. We found that UDCA promoted an interaction between EGFR and caveolin-1 and this interaction enhanced UDCA-mediated suppression of MAP kinase activity and cell growth . Importantly, UDCA treatment led to recruitment of the ubiquitin ligase, c-Cbl, to the membrane, ubiquitination of EGFR, and increased receptor degradation. Moreover, suppression of c-Cbl activity abrogated UDCA's growth suppression activities suggesting that receptor ubiquitination plays an important role in UDCA's biological activities. Taken together these results suggest that UDCA may act to suppress cell growth by inhibiting the mitogenic activity of receptor tyrosine kinases such as EGFR through increased receptor degradation. PMID:19446582

  9. Novel features of early burst suppression predict outcome after birth asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Kartik K; Roberts, James A; Metsäranta, Marjo; Finnigan, Simon; Breakspear, Michael; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2014-01-01

    Burst suppression patterns in the electroencephalogram are a reliable marker of recent severe brain insult. Here we analyze statistical properties of bursts occurring in 20 electroencephalographic recordings acquired from hypothermic asphyxic newborns in the hours immediately following birth. We show that the distributions of burst area and duration in these acute data predict later clinical outcome in both structural neuroimaging and neurodevelopment. Our findings indicate the first early electroencephalographic metrics that offer outcome prediction in asphyxic neonates undergoing hypothermia treatment. PMID:25356399

  10. Procyanidins Mitigate Osteoarthritis Pathogenesis by, at Least in Part, Suppressing Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Angela; Leong, Daniel J.; He, Zhiyong; Xu, Lin; Liu, Lidi; Kim, Sun Jin; Hirsh, David M.; Hardin, John A.; Cobelli, Neil J.; Sun, Hui B.

    2016-01-01

    Procyanidins are a family of plant metabolites that have been suggested to mitigate osteoarthritis pathogenesis in mice. However, the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. This study aimed to determine whether procyanidins mitigate traumatic injury-induced osteoarthritis (OA) disease progression, and whether procyanidins exert a chondroprotective effect by, at least in part, suppressing vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. Procyanidins (extracts from pine bark), orally administered to mice subjected to surgery for destabilization of the medial meniscus, significantly slowed OA disease progression. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that procyanidin treatment reduced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and effectors in OA pathogenesis that are regulated by vascular endothelial growth factor. Procyanidin-suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor expression was correlated with reduced phosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 in human OA primary chondrocytes. Moreover, components of procyanidins, procyanidin B2 and procyanidin B3 exerted effects similar to those of total procyanidins in mitigating the OA-related gene expression profile in the primary culture of human OA chondrocytes in the presence of vascular endothelial growth factor. Together, these findings suggest procyanidins mitigate OA pathogenesis, which is mediated, at least in part, by suppressing vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. PMID:27941690

  11. Mechanisms of environmental chemicals that enable the cancer hallmark of evasion of growth suppression

    PubMed Central

    Nahta, Rita; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Andrade-Vieira, Rafaela; Bay, Sarah; G. Brown, Dustin; Calaf, Gloria M.; Castellino, Robert C.; Cohen-Solal, Karine A.; Colacci, Annamaria; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Dent, Paul; Di Fiore, Riccardo; Forte, Stefano; Goldberg, Gary S.; Hamid, Roslida A.; Krishnan, Harini; Laird, Dale W.; Lasfar, Ahmed; Marignani, Paola A.; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Naus, Christian C.; Ponce-Cusi, Richard; Raju, Jayadev; Roy, Debasish; Roy, Rabindra; P. Ryan, Elizabeth; Salem, Hosni K.; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Vento, Renza; Vondráček, Jan; Wade, Mark; Woodrick, Jordan; Bisson, William H.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Halifax Project, this review brings attention to the potential effects of environmental chemicals on important molecular and cellular regulators of the cancer hallmark of evading growth suppression. Specifically, we review the mechanisms by which cancer cells escape the growth-inhibitory signals of p53, retinoblastoma protein, transforming growth factor-beta, gap junctions and contact inhibition. We discuss the effects of selected environmental chemicals on these mechanisms of growth inhibition and cross-reference the effects of these chemicals in other classical cancer hallmarks. PMID:26106139

  12. DDA suppresses angiogenesis and tumor growth of colorectal cancer in vivo through decreasing VEGFR2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shiu-Wen; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Huang, Tur-Fu

    2016-01-01

    As angiogenesis is required for tumor growth and metastasis, suppressing angiogenesis is a promising strategy in limiting tumor progression. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, a critical pro-angiogenic factor, has thus become an attractive target for therapeutic interventions in cancer. In this study, we explored the underlying mechanisms of a novel anthraquinone derivative DDA in suppressing angiogenesis. DDA inhibited VEGF-A-induced proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). DDA also reduced VEGF-A-induced microvessel sprouting from aortic rings ex vivo and suppressed neovascularization in vivo. VEGF-A-induced VEGFR1, VEGFR2, FAK, Akt, ERK1/2 or STAT3 phosphorylation was reduced in the presence of DDA. In addition, NRP-1 siRNA reduced VEGF-A's enhancing effects in VEGFR2, FAK and Akt phosphorylation and cell proliferation in HUVECs. DDA disrupted VEGF-A-induced complex formation between NRP-1 and VEGFR2. Furthermore, systemic administration of DDA was shown to suppress tumor angiogenesis and growth in in vivo mouse xenograft models. Taken together, we demonstrated in this study that DDA exhibits anti-angiogenic properties through suppressing VEGF-A signaling. These observations also suggest that DDA might be a potential drug candidate for developing anti-angiogenic agent in the field of cancer and angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:27517319

  13. Active suppression of a leaf meristem orchestrates determinate leaf growth

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, John Paul; Furumizu, Chihiro; Efroni, Idan; Eshed, Yuval; Bowman, John L

    2016-01-01

    Leaves are flat determinate organs derived from indeterminate shoot apical meristems. The presence of a specific leaf meristem is debated, as anatomical features typical of meristems are not present in leaves. Here we demonstrate that multiple NGATHA (NGA) and CINCINNATA-class-TCP (CIN-TCP) transcription factors act redundantly, shortly after leaf initiation, to gradually restrict the activity of a leaf meristem in Arabidopsis thaliana to marginal and basal domains, and that their absence confers persistent marginal growth to leaves, cotyledons and floral organs. Following primordia initiation, the restriction of the broadly acting leaf meristem to the margins is mediated by the juxtaposition of adaxial and abaxial domains and maintained by WOX homeobox transcription factors, whereas other marginal elaboration genes are dispensable for its maintenance. This genetic framework parallels the morphogenetic program of shoot apical meristems and may represent a relic of an ancestral shoot system from which seed plant leaves evolved. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15023.001 PMID:27710768

  14. Suppressing weed growth after wheat harvest with underseeded red clover in organic farming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic producers are seeking alternative tactics for weed control so that they can reduce their need for tillage. In this study, we examined cover crop strategies for suppressing weed growth after harvest of wheat. Two cover crop treatments, red clover (mammoth type) or a mixture of oat and dry p...

  15. Individual Differences in Spontaneous Expressive Suppression Predict Amygdala Responses to Fearful Stimuli: The Role of Suppression Priming

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shengdong; Deng, Zhongyan; Xu, Yin; Long, Quanshan; Yang, Jiemin; Yuan, Jiajin

    2017-01-01

    Though the spontaneous emotion regulation has received long discussions, few studies have explored the regulatory effects of spontaneous expressive suppression in neural activations, especially in collectivistic cultural context. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study aimed to examine whether individual differences in the tendency to use suppression are correlated with amygdala responses to negative situations when individuals are unconsciously primed with expressive suppression. Twenty-three healthy Chinese undergraduates completed an fMRI paradigm involving fear processing, and a synonym matching task was added to prime participants with the unconscious (automatic) expressive suppression goal. Participants completed measures of typical emotion regulation use (reappraisal and suppression), trait anxiety, and neuroticism. Results indicated that only in emotion suppression prime condition, greater use of suppression in everyday life was related to decreased amygdala activity. These associations were not attributable to variation in trait anxiety, neuroticism, or the habitual use of reappraisal. These findings suggest that in collectivistic cultural settings, individual differences in expressive suppression do not alter fear-related neural activation during suppression-irrelevant context. However, unconscious suppression priming facilitates the manifestation of individual differences in the neural consequence of expressive suppression, as reflected by the priming-specific decrease of emotional subcortical activations with more use of expressive suppression. PMID:28197108

  16. A Chrysin Derivative Suppresses Skin Cancer Growth by Inhibiting Cyclin-dependent Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haidan; Liu, Kangdong; Huang, Zunnan; Park, Chan-Mi; Thimmegowda, N. R.; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ryoo, In-Ja; He, Long; Kim, Sun-Ok; Oi, Naomi; Lee, Ki Won; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Bode, Ann M.; Yang, Yifeng; Zhou, Xinmin; Erikson, Raymond L.; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Hwang, Joonsung; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Dong, Zigang; Kim, Bo-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid widely distributed in plants, reportedly has chemopreventive properties against various cancers. However, the anticancer activity of chrysin observed in in vivo studies has been disappointing. Here, we report that a chrysin derivative, referred to as compound 69407, more strongly inhibited EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P+ cells compared with chrysin. It attenuated cell cycle progression of EGF-stimulated cells at the G1 phase and inhibited the G1/S transition. It caused loss of retinoblastoma phosphorylation at both Ser-795 and Ser-807/811, the preferred sites phosphorylated by Cdk4/6 and Cdk2, respectively. It also suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Compound 69407 reduced tumor growth in the A431 mouse xenograft model and retinoblastoma phosphorylation at Ser-795 and Ser-807/811. Immunoprecipitation kinase assay results showed that compound 69407 attenuated endogenous Cdk4 and Cdk2 kinase activities in EGF-stimulated JB6 P+ cells. Pulldown and in vitro kinase assay results indicated that compound 69407 directly binds with Cdk2 and Cdk4 in an ATP-independent manner and inhibited their kinase activities. A binding model between compound 69407 and a crystal structure of Cdk2 predicted that compound 69407 was located inside the Cdk2 allosteric binding site. The binding was further verified by a point mutation binding assay. Overall results indicated that compound 69407 is an ATP-noncompetitive cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with anti-tumor effects, which acts by binding inside the Cdk2 allosteric pocket. This study provides new insights for creating a general pharmacophore model to design and develop novel ATP-noncompetitive agents with chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic potency. PMID:23888052

  17. A chrysin derivative suppresses skin cancer growth by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haidan; Liu, Kangdong; Huang, Zunnan; Park, Chan-Mi; Thimmegowda, N R; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ryoo, In-Ja; He, Long; Kim, Sun-Ok; Oi, Naomi; Lee, Ki Won; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Bode, Ann M; Yang, Yifeng; Zhou, Xinmin; Erikson, Raymond L; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Hwang, Joonsung; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Dong, Zigang; Kim, Bo-Yeon

    2013-09-06

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid widely distributed in plants, reportedly has chemopreventive properties against various cancers. However, the anticancer activity of chrysin observed in in vivo studies has been disappointing. Here, we report that a chrysin derivative, referred to as compound 69407, more strongly inhibited EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P(+) cells compared with chrysin. It attenuated cell cycle progression of EGF-stimulated cells at the G1 phase and inhibited the G1/S transition. It caused loss of retinoblastoma phosphorylation at both Ser-795 and Ser-807/811, the preferred sites phosphorylated by Cdk4/6 and Cdk2, respectively. It also suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Compound 69407 reduced tumor growth in the A431 mouse xenograft model and retinoblastoma phosphorylation at Ser-795 and Ser-807/811. Immunoprecipitation kinase assay results showed that compound 69407 attenuated endogenous Cdk4 and Cdk2 kinase activities in EGF-stimulated JB6 P(+) cells. Pulldown and in vitro kinase assay results indicated that compound 69407 directly binds with Cdk2 and Cdk4 in an ATP-independent manner and inhibited their kinase activities. A binding model between compound 69407 and a crystal structure of Cdk2 predicted that compound 69407 was located inside the Cdk2 allosteric binding site. The binding was further verified by a point mutation binding assay. Overall results indicated that compound 69407 is an ATP-noncompetitive cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with anti-tumor effects, which acts by binding inside the Cdk2 allosteric pocket. This study provides new insights for creating a general pharmacophore model to design and develop novel ATP-noncompetitive agents with chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic potency.

  18. Thyroid hormone suppresses expression of stathmin and associated tumor growth in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yi-Hsin; Huang, Ya-Hui; Lin, Tzu-Kang; Wu, Sheng-Ming; Chi, Hsiang-Cheng; Tsai, Chung-Ying; Tsai, Ming-Ming; Lin, Yang-Hsiang; Chang, Wei-Chun; Chang, Ya-Ting; Chen, Wei-Jan; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Stathmin (STMN1), a recognized oncoprotein upregulated in various solid tumors, promotes microtubule disassembly and modulates tumor growth and migration activity. However, the mechanisms underlying the genetic regulation of STMN1 have yet to be elucidated. In the current study, we report that thyroid hormone receptor (THR) expression is negatively correlated with STMN1 expression in a subset of clinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) specimens. We further identified the STMN1 gene as a target of thyroid hormone (T3) in the HepG2 hepatoma cell line. An analysis of STMN1 expression profile and mechanism of transcriptional regulation revealed that T3 significantly suppressed STMN1 mRNA and protein expression, and further showed that THR directly targeted the STMN1 upstream element to regulate STMN1 transcriptional activity. Specific knockdown of STMN1 suppressed cell proliferation and xenograft tumor growth in mice. In addition, T3 regulation of cell growth arrest and cell cycle distribution were attenuated by overexpression of STMN1. Our results suggest that the oncogene STMN1 is transcriptionally downregulated by T3 in the liver. This T3-mediated suppression of STMN1 supports the theory that T3 plays an inhibitory role in HCC tumor growth, and suggests that the lack of normal THR function leads to elevated STMN1 expression and malignant growth. PMID:27934948

  19. Growth hormone suppression of apoptosis in preovulatory rat follicles and partial neutralization by insulin-like growth factor binding protein.

    PubMed

    Eisenhauer, K M; Chun, S Y; Billig, H; Hsueh, A J

    1995-07-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that growth hormone (GH) plays a role in regulating ovarian function by augmenting gonadotropin stimulation of granulosa cell differentiation and folliculogenesis. The majority of follicles in the mammalian ovary do not ovulate, but instead undergo a degenerative process (atresia) involving apoptotic cell death. The objective of the present study was to investigate the role of GH in regulating follicle apoptosis and to determine whether or not insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) mediates GH action in this process. Preovulatory follicles obtained from eCG-primed rats were cultured for 24 h in serum-free conditions with or without hormone treatments. After culture, follicular apoptotic DNA fragmentation was analyzed by autoradiography of size-fractionated DNA labeled at 3' ends with [32P]dideoxy-ATP. Culture of preovulatory follicles resulted in a spontaneous onset of apoptotic DNA fragmentation that was suppressed by ovine GH (oGH) in a dose-dependent manner, reaching a maximum of 65% suppression. To rule out the effect of residual gonadotropin in the oGH preparation, follicles were also cultured with recombinant bovine growth hormone (rbGH). Like oGH, rbGH suppressed apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Our earlier study indicated that hCG and FSH treatment also suppress apoptosis in the present model system, but no additive effect of GH and either hCG or FSH on the suppression of apoptosis was observed. To determine whether the observed effect of GH action on follicle apoptosis is mediated by IGF-I, three types of studies were carried out.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Curcumin suppresses growth of mesothelioma cells in vitro and in vivo, in part, by stimulating apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Rishi, Arun K; Wu, Wenjuan; Polin, Lisa; Sharma, Sunita; Levi, Edi; Albelda, Steven; Pass, Harvey I; Wali, Anil

    2011-11-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive, asbestos-related malignancy of the thoracic pleura. Although, platinum-based agents are the first line of therapy, there is an urgent need for second-line therapies to treat the drug-resistant MPM. Cell cycle as well as apoptosis pathways are frequently altered in MPM and thus remain attractive targets for intervention strategies. Curcumin, the major component in the spice turmeric, alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutics has been under investigation for a number of cancers. In this study, we investigated the biological and molecular responses of MPM cells to curcumin treatments and the mechanisms involved. Flow-cytometric analyses coupled with western immunoblotting and gene-array analyses were conducted to determine mechanisms of curcumin-dependent growth suppression of human (H2373, H2452, H2461, and H226) and murine (AB12) MPM cells. Curcumin inhibited MPM cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner while pretreatment of MPM cells with curcumin enhanced cisplatin efficacy. Curcumin activated the stress-activated p38 kinase, caspases 9 and 3, caused elevated levels of proapoptotic proteins Bax, stimulated PARP cleavage, and apoptosis. In addition, curcumin treatments stimulated expression of novel transducers of cell growth suppression such as CARP-1, XAF1, and SULF1 proteins. Oral administration of curcumin inhibited growth of murine MPM cell-derived tumors in vivo in part by stimulating apoptosis. Thus, curcumin targets cell cycle and promotes apoptosis to suppress MPM growth in vitro and in vivo. Our studies provide a proof-of-principle rationale for further in-depth analysis of MPM growth suppression mechanisms and their future exploitation in effective management of resistant MPM.

  1. Harmonic suppression and delay compensation for inverters via variable horizon nonlinear model predictive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaeva, G.; Goodwin, G. C.

    2015-07-01

    Inverters play a central role in modern society including renewable energy integration and motor drives. Due to the inherent switched nature of the inverter waveforms harmonic distortion is an issue. Additionally, the switching patterns are perturbed by unavoidable switching delays. Amongst those, nonlinear and load-dependent switching delays (known as inverter 'dead-time delays') are the most difficult to compensate. In this paper, we propose a new approach to delay compensation and harmonic suppression in inverter voltage. The proposed approach is based on variable prediction horizon nonlinear model predictive control.

  2. MicroRNA-124 suppresses growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting STAT3

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yanxin; Yue, Xupeng; Cui, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jufeng; Wang, KeWei

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •miR-124 is down-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. •Over-expression of miR-124 suppresses proliferation and induces apoptosis in HepG2 cells. •miR-124 inhibits xenograft tumor growth in nude mice implanted with HepG2 cells by reducing STAT3 expression. •STATs function as a novel target of miR-124 in HCC HepG2 cells. -- Abstract: The aberrant expression of microRNAs is associated with development and progression of cancers. Down-regulation of miR-124 has been demonstrated in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the underlying mechanism by which miR-124 suppresses tumorigenesis in HCC remains elusive. In this study, we found that miR-124 suppresses the tumor growth of HCC through targeting the signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). Overexpression of miR-124 suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis in HepG-2 cells. Luciferase assay confirmed that miR-124 binding to the 3′-UTR region of STAT3 inhibited the expression of STAT3 and phosphorylated STAT3 proteins in HepG-2 cells. Knockdown of STAT3 by siRNA in HepG-2 cells mimicked the effect induced by miR-124. Overexpression of STAT3 in miR-124-transfected HepG-2 cells effectively rescued the inhibition of cell proliferation caused by miR-124. Furthermore, miR-124 suppressed xenograft tumor growth in nude mice implanted with HepG-2 cells by reducing STAT3 expression. Taken together, our findings show that miR-124 functions as tumor suppressor in HCC by targeting STAT3, and miR-124 may therefore serve as a biomarker for diagnosis and therapeutics in HCC.

  3. Polycomb repressive complex 2 regulates skeletal growth by suppressing Wnt and TGF-β signalling

    PubMed Central

    Mirzamohammadi, Fatemeh; Papaioannou, Garyfallia; Inloes, Jennifer B.; Rankin, Erinn B.; Xie, Huafeng; Schipani, Ernestina; Orkin, Stuart H.; Kobayashi, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) controls maintenance and lineage determination of stem cells by suppressing genes that regulate cellular differentiation and tissue development. However, the role of PRC2 in lineage-committed somatic cells is mostly unknown. Here we show that Eed deficiency in chondrocytes causes severe kyphosis and a growth defect with decreased chondrocyte proliferation, accelerated hypertrophic differentiation and cell death with reduced Hif1a expression. Eed deficiency also causes induction of multiple signalling pathways in chondrocytes. Wnt signalling overactivation is responsible for the accelerated hypertrophic differentiation and kyphosis, whereas the overactivation of TGF-β signalling is responsible for the reduced proliferation and growth defect. Thus, our study demonstrates that PRC2 has an important regulatory role in lineage-committed tissue cells by suppressing overactivation of multiple signalling pathways. PMID:27329220

  4. Improved NASA-ANOPP Noise Prediction Computer Code for Advanced Subsonic Propulsion Systems. Volume 2; Fan Suppression Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kontos, Karen B.; Kraft, Robert E.; Gliebe, Philip R.

    1996-01-01

    The Aircraft Noise Predication Program (ANOPP) is an industry-wide tool used to predict turbofan engine flyover noise in system noise optimization studies. Its goal is to provide the best currently available methods for source noise prediction. As part of a program to improve the Heidmann fan noise model, models for fan inlet and fan exhaust noise suppression estimation that are based on simple engine and acoustic geometry inputs have been developed. The models can be used to predict sound power level suppression and sound pressure level suppression at a position specified relative to the engine inlet.

  5. Complete suppression of in vivo growth of human leukemia cells by specific immunotoxins: nude mouse models

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, H.; Seon, B.K.

    1987-05-01

    In this study, immunotoxins containing monoclonal anti-human T-cell leukemia antibodies are shown to be capable of completely suppressing the tumor growth of human T-cell leukemia cells in vivo without any overt undersirable toxicity. These immunotoxins were prepared by conjugating ricin A chain (RA) with our monoclonal antibodies, SN1 and SN2, directed specifically to the human T-cell leukemia cell surface antigens TALLA and GP37, respectively. The authors have shown that these monoclonal antibodies are highly specific for human T-cell leukemia cells and do not react with various normal cells including normal T and B cells, thymocytes, and bone marrow cells. Ascitic and solid human T-cell leukemia cell tumors were generated in nude mice. The ascitic tumor was generated by transplanting Ichikawa cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell) i.p. into nude mice, whereas the solid tumor was generated by transplanting s.c. MOLT-4 cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell line) and x-irradiated human fibrosarcoma cells into x-irradiated nude mice. To investigate the efficacy of specific immunotoxins in suppression the in vivo growth of the ascitic tumor, they divided 40 nude mice that were injected with Ichikawa cells into four groups. None of the mice in group 4 that were treated with SN1-RA and SN2-RA showed any signs of a tumor or undesirable toxic effects for the 20 weeks that they were followed after the transplantation. Treatment with SN1-RA plus SN2-RA completely suppressed solid tumor growth in 4 of 10 nude mice carrying solid tumors and partially suppressed the tumor growth in the remaining 6 nude mice. These results strongly suggest that SN1-RA and SN2-RA may be useful for clinical treatment.

  6. Neddylation inhibitor MLN4924 suppresses growth and migration of human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lan, Huiyin; Tang, Zaiming; Jin, Hongchuan; Sun, Yi

    2016-04-11

    MLN4924 is a recently discovered small molecule inhibitor of NEDD8-Activating Enzyme (NAE). Because cullin RING ligase (CRL), the largest family of E3 ubiquitin ligase, requires cullin neddylation for its activity, MLN4924, therefore, acts as an indirect inhibitor of CRL by blocking cullin neddylation. Given that CRLs components are up-regulated, whereas neddylation modification is over-activated in a number of human cancers, MLN4924 was found to be effective in growth suppression of cancer cells. Whether MLN4924 is effective against gastric cancer cells, however, remains elusive. Here we showed that in gastric cancer cells, MLN4924 rapidly inhibited cullin 1 neddylation and remarkably suppressed growth and survival as well as migration in a dose-and time-dependent manner. Mechanistic studies in combination with siRNA knockdown-based rescue experiments revealed that MLN4924 induced the accumulation of a number of CRL substrates, including CDT1/ORC1, p21/p27, and PHLPP1 to trigger DNA damage response and induce growth arrest at the G2/M phase, to induce senescence, as well as autophagy, respectively. MLN4924 also significantly suppressed migration by transcriptionally activating E-cadherin and repressing MMP-9. Taken together, our study suggest that neddylation modification and CRL E3 ligase are attractive gastric cancer targets, and MLN4924 might be further developed as a potent therapeutic agent for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  7. Semaphorin3A regulates neuronal polarization by suppressing axon formation and promoting dendrite growth.

    PubMed

    Shelly, Maya; Cancedda, Laura; Lim, Byung Kook; Popescu, Andrei T; Cheng, Pei-lin; Gao, Hongfeng; Poo, Mu-ming

    2011-08-11

    Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is a secreted factor known to guide axon/dendrite growth and neuronal migration. We found that it also acts as a polarizing factor for axon/dendrite development in cultured hippocampal neurons. Exposure of the undifferentiated neurite to localized Sema3A suppressed its differentiation into axon and promoted dendrite formation, resulting in axon formation away from the Sema3A source, and bath application of Sema3A to polarized neurons promoted dendrite growth but suppressed axon growth. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging showed that Sema3A elevated the cGMP but reduced cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA) activity, and its axon suppression is attributed to the downregulation of PKA-dependent phosphorylation of axon determinants LKB1 and GSK-3β. Downregulating Sema3A signaling in rat embryonic cortical progenitors via in utero electroporation of siRNAs against the Sema3A receptor neuropilin-1 also resulted in polarization defects in vivo. Thus, Sema3A regulates the earliest step of neuronal morphogenesis by polarizing axon/dendrite formation.

  8. Oak ellagitannins suppress the phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fridrich, Diana; Glabasnia, Arne; Fritz, Jessica; Esselen, Melanie; Pahlke, Gudrun; Hofmann, Thomas; Marko, Doris

    2008-05-14

    The ellagitannins castalagin and vescalagin, and the C-glycosides grandinin and roburin E as well as ellagic acid were found to potently inhibit the growth of human colon carcinoma cells (HT29) in vitro. In a cell-free system these compounds were identified as potent inhibitors of the protein tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with IC 50 values in the low nanomolar range. To address the question of whether the interference with the activity of the isolated EGFR also plays a role within intact cells, effects on the phosphorylation status of the EGFR, as a measure for its activity, were determined in HT29 cells. As exemplified for castalagin and grandinin, both the nonglycosylated and the glycosylated ellagitannins effectively suppressed EGFR phosphorylation, but only at concentrations > or =10 microM, thus, in a concentration range where growth inhibition was observed. These results indicate that the suppression of EGFR-mediated signaling might contribute to the growth inhibitory effects of these compounds present in oak-matured wines and spirits such as whiskey. In contrast, despite substantial growth inhibitory properties, ellagic acid did not significantly affect EGFR phosphorylation in HT29 cells up to 100 microM.

  9. Inhibiting histone deacetylases suppresses glucose metabolism and hepatocellular carcinoma growth by restoring FBP1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Jin, Xin; Yan, Yuqian; Shao, Yingjie; Pan, Yunqian; Roberts, Lewis R.; Zhang, Jun; Huang, Haojie; Jiang, Jingting

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in the world. Elevated glucose metabolism in the availability of oxygen, a phenomenon called the Warburg effect, is important for cancer cell growth. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP1) is a rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis and is frequently lost in various types of cancer. Here, we demonstrated that expression of FBP1 was downregulated in HCC patient specimens and decreased expression of FBP1 associated with poor prognosis. Low expression of FBP1 correlated with high levels of histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC2 proteins in HCC patient tissues. Treatment of HCC cells with HDAC inhibitors or knockdown of HDAC1 and/or HDAC2 restored FBP1 expression and inhibited HCC cell growth. HDAC-mediated suppression of FBP1 expression correlated with decreased histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation (H3K27Ac) in the FBP1 enhancer. Restored expression of FBP1 decreased glucose reduction and lactate secretion and inhibited HCC cell growth in vitro and tumor growth in mice. Our data reveal that loss of FBP1 due to histone deacetylation associates with poor prognosis of HCC and restored FBP1 expression by HDAC inhibitors suppresses HCC growth. Our findings suggest that repression of FBP1 by HDACs has important implications for HCC prognosis and treatment. PMID:28262837

  10. Endothelial Robo4 suppresses breast cancer growth and metastasis through regulation of tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Helong; Ahirwar, Dinesh K; Oghumu, Steve; Wilkie, Tasha; Powell, Catherine A; Nasser, Mohd W; Satoskar, Abhay R; Li, Dean Y; Ganju, Ramesh K

    2016-02-01

    Targeting tumor angiogenesis is a promising alternative strategy for improvement of breast cancer therapy. Robo4 (roundabout homolog 4) signaling has been shown to protect endothelial integrity during sepsis shock and arthritis, and inhibit Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) signaling during pathological angiogenesis of retinopathy, which indicates that Robo4 might be a potential target for angiogenesis in breast cancer. In this study, we used immune competent Robo4 knockout mouse model to show that endothelial Robo4 is important for suppressing breast cancer growth and metastasis. And this effect does not involve the function of Robo4 on hematopoietic stem cells. Robo4 inhibits breast cancer growth and metastasis by regulating tumor angiogenesis, endothelial leakage and tight junction protein zonula occludens protein-1 (ZO-1) downregulation. Treatment with SecinH3, a small molecule drug which deactivates ARF6 downstream of Robo4, can enhance Robo4 signaling and thus inhibit breast cancer growth and metastasis. SecinH3 mediated its effect by reducing tumor angiogenesis rather than directly affecting cancer cell proliferation. In conclusion, endothelial Robo4 signaling is important for suppressing breast cancer growth and metastasis, and it can be targeted (enhanced) by administrating a small molecular drug.

  11. Plasma metabolite levels predict bird growth rates: A field test of model predictive ability.

    PubMed

    Albano, Noelia; Masero, José A; Villegas, Auxiliadora; Abad-Gómez, José María; Sánchez-Guzmán, Juan M

    2011-09-01

    Bird growth rates are usually derived from nonlinear relationships between age and some morphological structure, but this procedure may be limited by several factors. To date, nothing is known about the capacity of plasma metabolite profiling to predict chick growth rates. Based on laboratory-trials, we here develop predictive logistic models of body mass, and tarsus and wing length growth rates in Gull-billed Tern Gelochelidon nilotica chicks from measurements of plasma metabolite levels at different developmental stages. The predictive model obtained during the fastest growth period (at the age of 12 days) explained 65-68% of the chicks' growth rates, with fasting triglyceride level explaining most of the variation in growth rate. At the end of pre-fledging period, β-hydroxybutyrate level was also a good predictor of growth rates. Finally, we carried out a field test to check the predictive capacity of the models in two colonies of wild Gull-billed Tern, comparing field-measured and model-predicted growth rates between groups. Both, measured and predicted growth rates, matched statistically. Plasma metabolite levels can thus be applied in comparative studies of chick growth rates when semi-precocial birds can be captured only once.

  12. Salmonella typhimurium Suppresses Tumor Growth via the Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-1β.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Eun; Phan, Thuy Xuan; Nguyen, Vu Hong; Dinh-Vu, Hong-Van; Zheng, Jin Hai; Yun, Misun; Park, Sung-Gyoo; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E; Szardenings, Michael; Hwang, Won; Park, Jin-A; Park, SunHee; Im, Sin-Hyeog; Min, Jung-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Although strains of attenuated Salmonella typhimurium and wild-type Escherichia coli show similar tumor-targeting capacities, only S. typhimurium significantly suppresses tumor growth in mice. The aim of the present study was to examine bacteria-mediated immune responses by conducting comparative analyses of the cytokine profiles and immune cell populations within tumor tissues colonized by E. coli or attenuated Salmonellae. CT26 tumor-bearing mice were treated with two different bacterial strains: S. typhimurium defective in ppGpp synthesis (ΔppGpp Salmonellae) or wild-type E. coli MG1655. Cytokine profiles and immune cell populations in tumor tissue colonized by these two bacterial strains were examined at two time points based on the pattern of tumor growth after ΔppGpp Salmonellae treatment: 1) when tumor growth was suppressed ('suppression stage') and 2) when they began to re-grow ('re-growing stage'). The levels of IL-1β and TNF-α were markedly increased in tumors colonized by ΔppGpp Salmonellae. This increase was associated with tumor regression; the levels of both IL-1β and TNF-α returned to normal level when the tumors started to re-grow. To identify the immune cells primarily responsible for Salmonellae-mediated tumor suppression, we examined the major cell types that produce IL-1β and TNF-α. We found that macrophages and dendritic cells were the main producers of TNF-α and IL-1β. Inhibiting IL-1β production in Salmonellae-treated mice restored tumor growth, whereas tumor growth was suppressed for longer by local administration of recombinant IL-1β or TNF-α in conjunction with Salmonella therapy. These findings suggested that IL-1β and TNF-α play important roles in Salmonella-mediated cancer therapy. A better understanding of host immune responses in Salmonella therapy may increase the success of a given drug, particularly when various strategies are combined with bacteriotherapy.

  13. Salmonella typhimurium Suppresses Tumor Growth via the Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-1β

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Eun; Phan, Thuy Xuan; Nguyen, Vu Hong; Dinh-Vu, Hong-Van; Zheng, Jin Hai; Yun, Misun; Park, Sung-Gyoo; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E.; Szardenings, Michael; Hwang, Won; Park, Jin-A; Park, SunHee; Im, Sin-Hyeog; Min, Jung-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Although strains of attenuated Salmonella typhimurium and wild-type Escherichia coli show similar tumor-targeting capacities, only S. typhimurium significantly suppresses tumor growth in mice. The aim of the present study was to examine bacteria-mediated immune responses by conducting comparative analyses of the cytokine profiles and immune cell populations within tumor tissues colonized by E. coli or attenuated Salmonellae. CT26 tumor-bearing mice were treated with two different bacterial strains: S. typhimurium defective in ppGpp synthesis (ΔppGpp Salmonellae) or wild-type E. coli MG1655. Cytokine profiles and immune cell populations in tumor tissue colonized by these two bacterial strains were examined at two time points based on the pattern of tumor growth after ΔppGpp Salmonellae treatment: 1) when tumor growth was suppressed ('suppression stage') and 2) when they began to re-grow ('re-growing stage'). The levels of IL-1β and TNF-α were markedly increased in tumors colonized by ΔppGpp Salmonellae. This increase was associated with tumor regression; the levels of both IL-1β and TNF-α returned to normal level when the tumors started to re-grow. To identify the immune cells primarily responsible for Salmonellae-mediated tumor suppression, we examined the major cell types that produce IL-1β and TNF-α. We found that macrophages and dendritic cells were the main producers of TNF-α and IL-1β. Inhibiting IL-1β production in Salmonellae-treated mice restored tumor growth, whereas tumor growth was suppressed for longer by local administration of recombinant IL-1β or TNF-α in conjunction with Salmonella therapy. These findings suggested that IL-1β and TNF-α play important roles in Salmonella-mediated cancer therapy. A better understanding of host immune responses in Salmonella therapy may increase the success of a given drug, particularly when various strategies are combined with bacteriotherapy. PMID:26516371

  14. Crack Growth Simulation and Residual Strength Prediction in Airplane Fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuin-Shan; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives were to create a capability to simulate curvilinear crack growth and ductile tearing in aircraft fuselages subjected to widespread fatigue damage and to validate with tests. Analysis methodology and software program (FRANC3D/STAGS) developed herein allows engineers to maintain aging aircraft economically, while insuring continuous airworthiness, and to design more damage-tolerant aircraft for the next generation. Simulations of crack growth in fuselages were described. The crack tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion, obtained from laboratory tests, was used to predict fracture behavior of fuselage panel tests. Geometrically nonlinear, elastic-plastic, thin shell finite element crack growth analyses were conducted. Comparisons of stress distributions, multiple stable crack growth history, and residual strength between measured and predicted results were made to assess the validity of the methodology. Incorporation of residual plastic deformations and tear strap failure was essential for accurate residual strength predictions. Issue related to predicting crack trajectory in fuselages were also discussed. A directional criterion, including T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy, was developed. Curvilinear crack growth was simulated in coupon and fuselage panel tests. Both T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy were essential to predict the observed crack paths. Flapping of fuselages were predicted. Measured and predicted results agreed reasonable well.

  15. Crop Growth Modeling in the Wind Erosion Prediction System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On land used for the production of food and fiber, the amount of growing crop and crop residue remaining on the field during no growth periods often determine whether the field is susceptible to the erosion of the soil by wind. The crop growth sub-model component of the Wind Erosion Prediction Syste...

  16. MicroRNA-137 inhibits growth of glioblastoma through EGFR suppression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenxing; Song, Xiaofeng; Tian, He; Miao, Ye; Feng, Xu; Li, Yang; Wang, Honglei

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant expression of certain microRNAs (miRNAs) has been shown to contribute to the development of Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, the involvement of miR-137 in the carcinogenesis of GBM has not been reported. Here, we showed that miR-137 levels in GBM tissues were significantly lower than the paired normal brain tissue in patients’ specimens. Moreover, low miR-137 levels in GBM tissue were associated with poor prognosis. In vitro, overexpression of miR-137 decreased GBM cell growth and increased cell apoptosis, while depletion of miR-137 enhanced cell growth and decreased cell apoptosis. Combined bioinformatics analysis and dual luciferase reporter assay showed that miR-137 may target the 3’-UTR of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to reduce its protein translation, resulting in suppression of EGFR signaling in GBM cells. Together, our data suggest that reduction in miR-137 levels in GBM tissues may increase cell growth and decrease cell apoptosis, possibly through suppression of EGFR. PMID:28386374

  17. Growth characteristics of a weed-suppressive indica x non-suppressive tropical japonica rice mapping population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The indica rice cultivar, PI 312777, can be highly productive as well as suppressive to C4 grass species such as barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli). A recombinant inbred line (RIL) mapping population was developed using single seed descent from a cross between ‘Katy’ (non-weed-suppressive) and ...

  18. Glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose simultaneously targets cancer and endothelial cells to suppress neuroblastoma growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao-Cheng; Wang, Shuo-Yu; Lin, Li-Ling; Wang, Pei-Wen; Chen, Ting-Ya; Hsu, Wen-Ming; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chuang, Jiin-Haur

    2015-10-01

    Neuroblastoma is characterized by a wide range of clinical manifestations and associated with poor prognosis when there is amplification of MYCN oncogene or high expression of Myc oncoproteins. In a previous in vitro study, we found that the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) could suppress the growth of neuroblastoma cells, particularly in those with MYCN amplification. In this study, we established a mouse model of neuroblastoma xenografts with SK-N-DZ and SK-N-AS cells treated with 2DG by intraperitoneal injection twice a week for 3 weeks at 100 or 500 mg/kg body weight. We found that 2DG was effective in suppressing the growth of both MYCN-amplified SK-N-DZ and MYCN-non-amplified SK-N-AS neuroblastoma xenografts, which was associated with downregulation of HIF-1α, PDK1 and c-Myc, and a reduction in the number of tumor blood vessels. In vitro study showed that 2DG can suppress proliferation, cause apoptosis and reduce migration of murine endothelial cells, with inhibition of the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia and disorganization of F-actin filaments. The results suggest that 2DG might simultaneously target cancer cells and endothelial cells in the neuroblastoma xenografts in mice regardless of the status of MYCN amplification, providing a potential therapeutic opportunity to use 2DG or other glycolytic inhibitors for the treatment of patients with refractory neuroblastoma.

  19. Hair Concentrations of Antiretrovirals Predict Viral Suppression in HIV-Infected Pregnant and Breastfeeding Ugandan Women

    PubMed Central

    KOSS, Catherine A.; NATUREEBA, Paul; MWESIGWA, Julia; COHAN, Deborah; NZARUBARA, Bridget; BACCHETTI, Peter; HORNG, Howard; CLARK, Tamara D.; PLENTY, Albert; RUEL, Theodore D.; ACHAN, Jane; CHARLEBOIS, Edwin D.; KAMYA, Moses R.; HAVLIR, Diane V.; GANDHI, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hair concentrations are a non-invasive measure of cumulative antiretroviral (ARV) exposure and the strongest predictor of viral suppression in large cohorts of non-pregnant patients. We examined hair concentrations of ARVs in relation to virologic outcomes in pregnant and breastfeeding women for the first time. Design/Methods The PROMOTE trial (NCT00993031) enrolled HIV-infected pregnant Ugandan women at 12–28 weeks gestation who were randomized to lopinavir or efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy (ART). Small hair samples were collected at 30–34 weeks gestation and 10–25 weeks postpartum. Efavirenz and lopinavir hair concentrations were measured via liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Multivariate logistic regression models examined predictors of viral suppression (HIV-1 RNA ≤400 copies/ml) at delivery and 24 weeks postpartum. Results Among 325 women, median CD4 cell count was 366 cells/mm3 (IQR 270–488) at ART initiation. Mean self-reported 3-day adherence was >97% in each arm. Viral suppression was achieved by 98.0% (efavirenz) and 87.4% (lopinavir) at delivery. At 24 weeks postpartum, 92.5% (efavirenz) and 90.6% (lopinavir) achieved viral suppression; 88% of women were breastfeeding. In multivariate models including self-reported adherence and pretreatment HIV-1 RNA, ARV hair concentrations were the strongest predictors of viral suppression at delivery (efavirenz: aOR 1.86 per doubling in concentration, 95% CI 1.14–3.1, P=0.013; lopinavir: aOR 1.90, 95% CI 1.33–2.7, P=0.0004) and 24 weeks postpartum (efavirenz: aOR 1.81, 95% CI 1.22–2.7, P=0.003; lopinavir: aOR 1.53, 95% CI: 1.05–2.2, P=0.026). Conclusions ARV hair concentrations represent an innovative tool that strongly predicts viral suppression among HIV-infected childbearing women during the critical periods of delivery and breastfeeding. PMID:25985404

  20. Voluntary Running Suppresses Tumor Growth through Epinephrine- and IL-6-Dependent NK Cell Mobilization and Redistribution.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Line; Idorn, Manja; Olofsson, Gitte H; Lauenborg, Britt; Nookaew, Intawat; Hansen, Rasmus Hvass; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Becker, Jürgen C; Pedersen, Katrine S; Dethlefsen, Christine; Nielsen, Jens; Gehl, Julie; Pedersen, Bente K; Thor Straten, Per; Hojman, Pernille

    2016-03-08

    Regular exercise reduces the risk of cancer and disease recurrence. Yet the mechanisms behind this protection remain to be elucidated. In this study, tumor-bearing mice randomized to voluntary wheel running showed over 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across five different tumor models. Microarray analysis revealed training-induced upregulation of pathways associated with immune function. NK cell infiltration was significantly increased in tumors from running mice, whereas depletion of NK cells enhanced tumor growth and blunted the beneficial effects of exercise. Mechanistic analyses showed that NK cells were mobilized by epinephrine, and blockade of β-adrenergic signaling blunted training-dependent tumor inhibition. Moreover, epinephrine induced a selective mobilization of IL-6-sensitive NK cells, and IL-6-blocking antibodies blunted training-induced tumor suppression, intratumoral NK cell infiltration, and NK cell activation. Together, these results link exercise, epinephrine, and IL-6 to NK cell mobilization and redistribution, and ultimately to control of tumor growth.

  1. Opioid-dependent growth of glial cultures: Suppression of astrocyte DNA synthesis by met-enkephalin

    SciTech Connect

    Stiene-Martin, A.; Hauser, K.F. )

    1990-01-01

    The action of met-enkephalin on the growth of astrocytes in mixed-glial cultures was examined. Primary, mixed-glial cultures were isolated from 1 day-old mouse cerebral hemispheres and continuously treated with either basal growth media, 1 {mu}M met-enkephalin, 1 {mu}M met-enkephalin plus the opioid antagonist naloxone, or naloxone alone. Absolute numbers of neural cells were counted in unstained preparations, while combined ({sup 3}H)-thymidine autoradiography and glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) immunocytochemistry was performed to identify specific changes in astrocytes. When compared to control and naloxone treated cultures, met-enkephalin caused a significant decrease in both total cell numbers, and in ({sup 3}H)-thymidine incorporation by GFAP-positive cells with flat morphology. These results indicate that met-enkephalin suppresses astrocyte growth in culture.

  2. Platelet-cytokine Complex Suppresses Tumour Growth by Exploiting Intratumoural Thrombin-dependent Platelet Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Tung; Nishikawa, Tomoyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2016-01-01

    Tumours constitute unique microenvironments where various blood cells and factors are exposed as a result of leaky vasculature. In the present study, we report that thrombin enrichment in B16F10 melanoma led to platelet aggregation, and this property was exploited to administer an anticancer cytokine, interferon-gamma induced protein 10 (IP10), through the formation of a platelet-IP10 complex. When intravenously infused, the complex reached platelet microaggregates in the tumour. The responses induced by the complex were solely immune-mediated, and tumour cytotoxicity was not observed. The complex suppressed the growth of mouse melanoma in vivo, while both platelets and the complex suppressed the accumulation of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in the tumour. These results demonstrated that thrombin-dependent platelet aggregation in B16F10 tumours defines platelets as a vector to deliver anticancer cytokines and provide specific treatment benefits. PMID:27117228

  3. The pace of vocabulary growth helps predict later vocabulary skill

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Meredith L.; Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Children vary widely in the rate at which they acquire words—some start slow and speed up, others start fast and continue at a steady pace. Do early developmental variations of this sort help predict vocabulary skill just prior to kindergarten entry? This longitudinal study starts by examining important predictors (SES, parent input, child gesture) of vocabulary growth between 14 and 46 months (n=62), and then uses growth estimates to predict children's vocabulary at 54 months. Velocity and acceleration in vocabulary development at 30 months predicted later vocabulary, particularly for children from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Understanding the pace of early vocabulary growth thus improves our ability to predict school readiness, and may help identify children at risk for starting behind. PMID:22235920

  4. The pace of vocabulary growth helps predict later vocabulary skill.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Meredith L; Raudenbush, Stephen W; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Children vary widely in the rate at which they acquire words--some start slow and speed up, others start fast and continue at a steady pace. Do early developmental variations of this sort help predict vocabulary skill just prior to kindergarten entry? This longitudinal study starts by examining important predictors (socioeconomic status [SES], parent input, child gesture) of vocabulary growth between 14 and 46 months (n = 62) and then uses growth estimates to predict children's vocabulary at 54 months. Velocity and acceleration in vocabulary development at 30 months predicted later vocabulary, particularly for children from low-SES backgrounds. Understanding the pace of early vocabulary growth thus improves our ability to predict school readiness and may help identify children at risk for starting behind.

  5. Estradiol suppresses tissue androgens and prostate cancer growth in castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Estrogens suppress tumor growth in prostate cancer which progresses despite anorchid serum androgen levels, termed castration resistant prostate cancers (CRPC), although the mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that estrogen inhibits CRPC in anorchid animals by suppressing tumoral androgens, an effect independent of the estrogen receptor. Methods The human CRPC xenograft LuCaP 35V was implanted into orchiectomized male SCID mice and established tumors were treated with placebo, 17β-estradiol or 17β-estradiol and estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780. Effects of 17β-estradiol on tumor growth were evaluated and tissue testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) evaluated by mass spectrometry. Results Treatment of LuCaP 35V with 17β-estradiol slowed tumor growth compared to controls (tumor volume at day 21: 785 ± 81 mm3 vs. 1195 ± 84 mm3, p = 0.002). Survival was also significantly improved in animals treated with 17β-estradiol (p = 0.03). The addition of the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 did not significantly change survival or growth. 17β-estradiol in the presence and absence of ICI 182,780 suppressed tumor testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) as assayed by mass spectrometry. Tissue androgens in placebo treated LuCaP 35V xenografts were; T = 0.71 ± 0.28 pg/mg and DHT = 1.73 ± 0.36 pg/mg. In 17β-estradiol treated LuCaP35V xenografts the tissue androgens were, T = 0.20 ± 0.10 pg/mg and DHT = 0.15 ± 0.15 pg/mg, (p < 0.001 vs. controls). Levels of T and DHT in control liver tissue were < 0.2 pg/mg. Conclusions CRPC in anorchid animals maintains tumoral androgen levels despite castration. 17β-estradiol significantly suppressed tumor T and DHT and inhibits growth of CRPC in an estrogen receptor independent manner. The ability to manipulate tumoral androgens will be critical in the development and testing of agents targeting CRPC through tissue steroidogenesis. PMID:20509933

  6. MicroRNA-340 suppresses osteosarcoma tumor growth and metastasis by directly targeting ROCK1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xin; Wei, Min; Wang, Wei

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •miR-340 is downregulated in OS cell lines and tissues. •miR-340 suppresses OS cell proliferation, migration and invasion. •miR-340 suppresses tumor growth and metastasis of OS cells in nude mice. •ROCK1 is a target gene of miR-340. •ROCK1 is involved in miR-340-induced suppression of OS cell proliferation, migration and invasion. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in cancer development and progression. In the present study, we investigated the role of miR-340 in the progression and metastasis of osteosarcoma (OS). Our results showed that miR-340 was frequently downregulated in OS tumors and cell lines. Overexpression of miR-340 in OS cell lines significantly inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro, and tumor growth and metastasis in a xenograft mouse model. ROCK1 was identified as a target of miR-340, and ectopic expression of miR-340 downregulated ROCK1 by direct binding to its 3′ untranslated region. siRNA-mediated silencing of ROCK1 phenocopied the effects of miR-340 overexpression, whereas restoration of ROCK1 in miR-340-overexpressing OS cells reversed the suppressive effects of miR-340. Together, these findings indicate that miR-340 acts as a tumor suppressor and its downregulation in tumor tissues may contribute to the progression and metastasis of OS through a mechanism involving ROCK1, suggesting miR-340 as a potential new diagnostic and therapeutic target for the treatment of OS.

  7. Suppressive effect of sinomenine combined with 5-fluorouracil on colon carcinoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Xiang; Yang, Zi-Rong; Wu, Dan-Dan; Song, Jia; Guo, Xu-Feng; Wang, Jing; Dong, Wei-Guo

    2014-01-01

    It is reported that sinomenine (SIN) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) both are effective for colon cancer, but their cooperative suppressive effects and toxicity remain to be clarified in detail. This study aimed to determine suppressive effects and toxicity of sinomenine (SIN) plus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on LoVo colon carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. CCK-8, Hoechst 33258 staining and an annexin V-FITC/PI apoptosis kit were used to detect suppressive effects. Western blotting was applied to investigate the essential mechanism underlying SIN and 5-FU-induced apoptosis. SIN or 5-FU or both were injected into nude mice, and then suppressive effects and side effects were observed. SIN plus 5-FU apparently inhibited the proliferation of LoVo cells and induced apoptosis. Moreover the united effects were stronger than individually (p<0.05). The results of annexin V-FITC /PI staining and Hoechst 33258 staining showed that the percentage of apoptotic cells induced by SIN and 5-FU combined or alone was significantly higher than the control group (p<0.05). Expression of Bax and Bcl-2 was up-regulated and down-regulated respectively. SIN or 5-FU significantly inhibited effects on the volume of tumour xenografts and their combined suppressive effects were stronger (p<0.05). No obvious side effects were observed. It was apparent that the united effects of SIN and 5-FU on the growth of colorectal carcinoma LoVo cells in vitro and in vivo were superior to those using them individually, and it did not markedly increase the side effects of chemotherapy.

  8. Development of a Benchmark Example for Delamination Fatigue Growth Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The development of a benchmark example for cyclic delamination growth prediction is presented and demonstrated for a commercial code. The example is based on a finite element model of a Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen, which is independent of the analysis software used and allows the assessment of the delamination growth prediction capabilities in commercial finite element codes. First, the benchmark result was created for the specimen. Second, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to grow under cyclic loading in a finite element model of a commercial code. The number of cycles to delamination onset and the number of cycles during stable delamination growth for each growth increment were obtained from the analysis. In general, good agreement between the results obtained from the growth analysis and the benchmark results could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. Overall, the results are encouraging but further assessment for mixed-mode delamination is required

  9. Development of a Benchmark Example for Delamination Fatigue Growth Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The development of a benchmark example for cyclic delamination growth prediction is presented and demonstrated for a commercial code. The example is based on a finite element model of a Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen, which is independent of the analysis software used and allows the assessment of the delamination growth prediction capabilities in commercial finite element codes. First, the benchmark result was created for the specimen. Second, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to grow under cyclic loading in a finite element model of a commercial code. The number of cycles to delamination onset and the number of cycles during stable delamination growth for each growth increment were obtained from the analysis. In general, good agreement between the results obtained from the growth analysis and the benchmark results could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. Overall, the results are encouraging but further assessment for mixed-mode delamination is required.

  10. Climate dependency of tree growth suppressed by acid deposition effects on soils in Northwest Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; Lapenis, A.G.; Berggren, D.; Aparin, B.F.; Smith, K.T.; Shortle, W.C.; Bailey, S.W.; Varlyguin, D.L.; Babikov, B.

    2005-01-01

    Increased tree growth in temperate and boreal forests has been proposed as a direct consequence of a warming climate. Acid deposition effects on nutrient availability may influence the climate dependency of tree growth, however. This study presents an analysis of archived soil samples that has enabled changes in soil chemistry to be tracked with patterns of tree growth through the 20th century. Soil samples collected in 1926, 1964, and 2001, near St. Petersburg, Russia, showed that acid deposition was likely to have decreased root-available concentrations of Ca (an essential element) and increased root-available concentrations of Al (an inhibitor of Ca uptake). These soil changes coincided with decreased diameter growth and a suppression of climate-tree growth relationships in Norway spruce. Expected increases in tree growth from climate warming may be limited by decreased soil fertility in regions of northern and eastern Europe, and eastern North America, where Ca availability has been reduced by acidic deposition. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  11. Androgen suppresses testicular cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Hideo; Ueda, Takashi; Ito, Saya; Shiraishi, Takumi; Taniguchi, Hidefumi; Kayukawa, Naruhiro; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Ushijima, So; Kanazawa, Motohiro; Nakamura, Terukazu; Naya, Yoshio; Hongo, Fumiya; Kamoi, Kazumi; Okihara, Koji; Ukimura, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Silencing of androgen receptor (AR)-meditated androgen signaling is thought to be associated with the development of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). However, the role of the androgen/AR signal in TGCT development has not been investigated. In this study, we show that the androgen/AR signal suppressed the cell growth of seminomas (SEs), a type of TGCT, in vitro and in vivo. Growth of SE cells was suppressed by DHT treatment and reduction of androgen levels by surgical castration promoted cancer cell growth in an in vivo xenograft model. Tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), the rate limit enzyme in serotonin synthesis, was one of the genes which expression was reduced in DHT-treated SE cells. TPH1 was highly expressed in SE cancer tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues. Activation of androgen/AR signaling in SE cells reduced the expression of TPH1 in SE cells, followed by the reduction of serotonin secretion in cell culture supernatant. These results suggested that silencing of androgen/AR signaling may cause initiation and progression of SE through increase in TPH1 gene expression level. PMID:27144435

  12. Combination therapy with bioengineered miR-34a prodrug and doxorubicin synergistically suppresses osteosarcoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yong; Tu, Mei-Juan; Yu, Yi-Feng; Wang, Wei-Peng; Chen, Qiu-Xia; Qiu, Jing-Xin; Yu, Ai-Xi; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common form of primary malignant bone tumor and prevalent among children and young adults. Recently we have established a novel approach to bioengineering large quantity of microRNA-34a (miR-34a) prodrug for miRNA replacement therapy. This study is to evaluate combination treatment with miR-34a prodrug and doxorubicin, which may synergistically suppress human OS cell growth via RNA interference and DNA intercalation. Synergistic effects were indeed obvious between miR-34a prodrug and doxorubicin for the suppression of OS cell proliferation, as defined by Chou-Talalay method. The strongest antiproliferative synergism was achieved when both agents were administered simultaneously to the cells at early stage, which was associated with much greater degrees of late apoptosis, necrosis, and G2 cell cycle arrest. Alteration of OS cellular processes and invasion capacity was linked to the reduction of protein levels of miR-34a targeted (proto-)oncogenes including SIRT1, c-MET, and CDK6. Moreover, orthotopic OS xenograft tumor growth was repressed to a significantly greater degree in mouse models when miR-34a prodrug and doxorubicin were co-administered intravenously. In addition, multiple doses of miR-34a prodrug and doxorubicin had no or minimal effects on mouse blood chemistry profiles. The results demonstrate that combination of doxorubicin chemotherapy and miR-34a replacement therapy produces synergistic antiproliferative effects and it is more effective than monotherapy in suppressing OS xenograft tumor growth. These findings support the development of mechanism-based combination therapy to combat OS and bioengineered miR-34a prodrug represents a new natural miRNA agent. PMID:26518752

  13. Combination therapy with bioengineered miR-34a prodrug and doxorubicin synergistically suppresses osteosarcoma growth.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Tu, Mei-Juan; Yu, Yi-Feng; Wang, Wei-Peng; Chen, Qiu-Xia; Qiu, Jing-Xin; Yu, Ai-Xi; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2015-12-15

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common form of primary malignant bone tumor and prevalent among children and young adults. Recently we have established a novel approach to bioengineering large quantity of microRNA-34a (miR-34a) prodrug for miRNA replacement therapy. This study is to evaluate combination treatment with miR-34a prodrug and doxorubicin, which may synergistically suppress human OS cell growth via RNA interference and DNA intercalation. Synergistic effects were indeed obvious between miR-34a prodrug and doxorubicin for the suppression of OS cell proliferation, as defined by Chou-Talalay method. The strongest antiproliferative synergism was achieved when both agents were administered simultaneously to the cells at early stage, which was associated with much greater degrees of late apoptosis, necrosis, and G2 cell cycle arrest. Alteration of OS cellular processes and invasion capacity was linked to the reduction of protein levels of miR-34a targeted (proto-)oncogenes including SIRT1, c-MET, and CDK6. Moreover, orthotopic OS xenograft tumor growth was repressed to a significantly greater degree in mouse models when miR-34a prodrug and doxorubicin were co-administered intravenously. In addition, multiple doses of miR-34a prodrug and doxorubicin had no or minimal effects on mouse blood chemistry profiles. The results demonstrate that combination of doxorubicin chemotherapy and miR-34a replacement therapy produces synergistic antiproliferative effects and it is more effective than monotherapy in suppressing OS xenograft tumor growth. These findings support the development of mechanism-based combination therapy to combat OS and bioengineered miR-34a prodrug represents a new natural miRNA agent.

  14. Combining fisetin and ionizing radiation suppresses the growth of mammalian colorectal cancers in xenograft tumor models.

    PubMed

    Leu, Jyh-Der; Wang, Bo-Shen; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Chang, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Chih; Chen, Fu-Du; Avirmed, Shiirevnyamba; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2016-12-01

    Fisetin (3,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone), which belongs to the flavonoid group of polyphenols and is found in a wide range of plants, has been reported to exhibit a number of biological activities in human cancer cells, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, anti-invasive and antiproliferative effects. Although previous in vitro studies have shown that fisetin treatment increases the apoptotic rate and enhances the radiosensitivity of human colorectal cancer cells, the in vivo effects of fisetin on tumor growth remain unclear. In the present study a murine xenograft tumor model was employed to investigate the therapeutic effects of fisetin in combination with radiation on CT-26 colon cancer cells and human HCT116 colorectal cancer cells. This revealed that intratumoral injection of fisetin significantly suppressed the growth of CT-26 tumors compared with the untreated control group, but had little effect on the growth of HCT116 tumors. However, fisetin in combination with 2-Gy radiation enhanced tumor suppressor activity in murine colon and human colorectal xenograft tumors, as compared with 2-Gy fractionated radiation administered alone for 5 days and fisetin alone. Interestingly, fisetin downregulated the expression of the oncoprotein securin in a p53-independent manner. However, securin-null HCT116 tumors showed only moderate sensitivity to fisetin treatment, and the combination of fisetin and radiation did not significantly suppress securin-null HCT116 tumor growth compared with normal HCT116 tumors. Therefore, the role of securin in mediating the effect of fisetin on colorectal cancer growth warrants further investigation. In conclusion, the results of the current study provide important preclinical data for evaluating the efficacy of fisetin and radiation combination treatment as an adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for human colorectal cancers.

  15. Combining fisetin and ionizing radiation suppresses the growth of mammalian colorectal cancers in xenograft tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Leu, Jyh-Der; Wang, Bo-Shen; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Chang, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Chih; Chen, Fu-Du; Avirmed, Shiirevnyamba; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2016-01-01

    Fisetin (3,7,3′,4′-tetrahydroxyflavone), which belongs to the flavonoid group of polyphenols and is found in a wide range of plants, has been reported to exhibit a number of biological activities in human cancer cells, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, anti-invasive and antiproliferative effects. Although previous in vitro studies have shown that fisetin treatment increases the apoptotic rate and enhances the radiosensitivity of human colorectal cancer cells, the in vivo effects of fisetin on tumor growth remain unclear. In the present study a murine xenograft tumor model was employed to investigate the therapeutic effects of fisetin in combination with radiation on CT-26 colon cancer cells and human HCT116 colorectal cancer cells. This revealed that intratumoral injection of fisetin significantly suppressed the growth of CT-26 tumors compared with the untreated control group, but had little effect on the growth of HCT116 tumors. However, fisetin in combination with 2-Gy radiation enhanced tumor suppressor activity in murine colon and human colorectal xenograft tumors, as compared with 2-Gy fractionated radiation administered alone for 5 days and fisetin alone. Interestingly, fisetin downregulated the expression of the oncoprotein securin in a p53-independent manner. However, securin-null HCT116 tumors showed only moderate sensitivity to fisetin treatment, and the combination of fisetin and radiation did not significantly suppress securin-null HCT116 tumor growth compared with normal HCT116 tumors. Therefore, the role of securin in mediating the effect of fisetin on colorectal cancer growth warrants further investigation. In conclusion, the results of the current study provide important preclinical data for evaluating the efficacy of fisetin and radiation combination treatment as an adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for human colorectal cancers. PMID:28105204

  16. Invasive Plant Suppresses the Growth of Native Tree Seedlings by Disrupting Belowground Mutualisms

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, Kristina A; Campbell, Stuart A; Powell, Jeff R; Wolfe, Benjamin E; Callaway, Ragan M; Thelen, Giles C; Hallett, Steven G; Prati, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    The impact of exotic species on native organisms is widely acknowledged, but poorly understood. Very few studies have empirically investigated how invading plants may alter delicate ecological interactions among resident species in the invaded range. We present novel evidence that antifungal phytochemistry of the invasive plant, Alliaria petiolata, a European invader of North American forests, suppresses native plant growth by disrupting mutualistic associations between native canopy tree seedlings and belowground arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Our results elucidate an indirect mechanism by which invasive plants can impact native flora, and may help explain how this plant successfully invades relatively undisturbed forest habitat. PMID:16623597

  17. Nematode suppression and growth stimulation in corn plants (Zea mays L.) irrigated with domestic effluent.

    PubMed

    Barros, Kenia Kelly; do Nascimento, Clístenes Williams Araújo; Florencio, Lourdinha

    2012-01-01

    Treated wastewater has great potential for agricultural use due to its concentrations of nutrients and organic matter, which are capable of improving soil characteristics. Additionally, effluents can induce suppression of plant diseases caused by soil pathogens. This study evaluates the effect of irrigation with effluent in a UASB reactor on maize (Zea mays L.) development and on suppression of the diseases caused by nematodes of the genus Meloidogyne. Twelve lysimeters of 1 m(3) each were arranged in a completely randomized design, with four treatments and three replicates. The following treatments were used: T1 (W+I), irrigation with water and infestation with nematodes; T2 (W+I+NPK), irrigation with water, infestation with nematodes and fertilization with nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K); T3 (E+I), irrigation with effluent and infestation with nematodes; and T4 (E+I+P), irrigation with effluent, infestation with nematodes and fertilization with phosphorus. The plants irrigated with the effluent plus the phosphorus fertilizer had better growth and productivity and were more resistant to the disease symptoms caused by the nematodes. The suppression levels may have been due to the higher levels of Zn and NO(3)(-) found in the leaf tissue of the plants irrigated with the effluent and phosphorus fertilizer.

  18. A dominant negative mutation suppresses the function of normal epidermal growth factor receptors by heterodimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Kashles, O; Yarden, Y; Fischer, R; Ullrich, A; Schlessinger, J

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies provide evidence that defective receptors can function as a dominant negative mutation suppressing the action of wild-type receptors. This causes various diminished responses in cell culture and developmental disorders in murine embryogenesis. Here, we describe a model system and a potential mechanism underlying the dominant suppressing response caused by defective epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors. We used cultured 3T3 cells coexpressing human wild-type receptors and an inactive deletion mutant lacking most of the cytoplasmic domain. When expressed alone, EGF was able to stimulate the dimerization of either wild-type or mutant receptors in living cells as revealed by chemical covalent cross-linking experiments. In response to EGF, heterodimers and homodimers of wild-type and mutant receptors were observed in cells coexpressing both receptor species. However, only homodimers of wild-type EGF receptors underwent EGF-induced tyrosine autophosphorylation in living cells. These results indicate that the integrity of both receptor moieties within receptor dimers is essential for kinase activation and autophosphorylation. Moreover, the presence of mutant receptors in cells expressing wild-type receptors diminished the number of high-affinity binding sites for EGF, reduced the rate of receptor endocytosis and degradation, and diminished biological signalling via EGF receptors. We propose that heterodimerization with defective EGF receptors functions as a dominant negative mutation suppressing the activation and response of normal receptors by formation of unproductive heterodimers. Images PMID:1705006

  19. A clinical data validated mathematical model of prostate cancer growth under intermittent androgen suppression therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portz, Travis; Kuang, Yang; Nagy, John D.

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is commonly treated by a form of hormone therapy called androgen suppression. This form of treatment, while successful at reducing the cancer cell population, adversely affects quality of life and typically leads to a recurrence of the cancer in an androgen-independent form. Intermittent androgen suppression aims to alleviate some of these adverse affects by cycling the patient on and off treatment. Clinical studies have suggested that intermittent therapy is capable of maintaining androgen dependence over multiple treatment cycles while increasing quality of life during off-treatment periods. This paper presents a mathematical model of prostate cancer to study the dynamics of androgen suppression therapy and the production of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a clinical marker for prostate cancer. Preliminary models were based on the assumption of an androgen-independent (AI) cell population with constant net growth rate. These models gave poor accuracy when fitting clinical data during simulation. The final model presented hypothesizes an AI population with increased sensitivity to low levels of androgen. It also hypothesizes that PSA production is heavily dependent on androgen. The high level of accuracy in fitting clinical data with this model appears to confirm these hypotheses, which are also consistent with biological evidence.

  20. Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone suppress in vivo tumor growth and gene expression in triple negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Perez, Roberto; Schally, Andrew V; Vidaurre, Irving; Rincon, Ricardo; Block, Norman L; Rick, Ferenc G

    2012-09-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a modern antagonistic analog of GHRH on tumor growth and on expression of inflammatory cytokine genes in two models of human triple negative breast cancers (TNBC). The TNBC subtype is refractory to the treatment options available for other hormone-independent breast cancers. Inflammatory cytokines play a major role in the cellular signaling associated with breast cancer pathogenesis and enhance epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT), drug resistance, and metastatic potential. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide which regulates the synthesis and release of growth hormone by the pituitary and is an autocrine/paracrine growth factor for multiple human cancers. The effects of analogs of GHRH on tumoral cytokine expression have not been previously investigated. Animals bearing xenografts of the human TNBC cell lines, HCC1806 and MX-1, were treated with MIA-602, an antagonistic analog of GHRH. Treatment with MIA-602 significantly reduced tumor growth. We quantified transcript levels of the genes for several inflammatory cytokines. Expression of INFγ, IL-1α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNFα, was significantly reduced by treatment with MIA-602. We conclude that treatment of TNBC with GHRH antagonists reduces tumor growth through an action mediated by tumoral GHRH receptors and produces a suppression of inflammatory cytokine signaling. Silencing of GHRH receptors in vitro with siRNA inhibited the expression of GHRH-R genes and inflammatory cytokine genes in HCC1806 and MX-1 cells. Further studies on GHRH antagonists may facilitate the development of new strategies for the treatment of resistant cancers.

  1. Suppression of Emittance Growth Using a Shaped Cold Atom Electron and Ion Source.

    PubMed

    Thompson, D J; Murphy, D; Speirs, R W; van Bijnen, R M W; McCulloch, A J; Scholten, R E; Sparkes, B M

    2016-11-04

    We demonstrate precise control of charged particle bunch shape with a cold atom electron and ion source to create bunches with linear and, therefore, reversible Coulomb expansion. Using ultracold charged particles enables detailed observation of space-charge effects without loss of information from thermal diffusion, unambiguously demonstrating that shaping in three dimensions can result in a marked reduction of Coulomb-driven emittance growth. We show that the emittance growth suppression is accompanied by an increase in bunch focusability and brightness, improvements necessary for the development of sources capable of coherent single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction of noncrystalline objects, with applications ranging from femtosecond chemistry to materials science and rational drug design.

  2. Inhibition of glutaminase selectively suppresses the growth of primary acute myeloid leukemia cells with IDH mutations.

    PubMed

    Emadi, Ashkan; Jun, Sung Ah; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Fathi, Amir T; Minden, Mark D; Dang, Chi V

    2014-04-01

    The incidence of mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) in de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is approximately 20%. These mutations result in distinct metabolic characteristics including dependency of cancer cells on glutamine as the main source for α-ketoglutarate, which is consumed by leukemia cells to produce a cancer-derived metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate. We sought to exploit this glutamine addiction therapeutically in mutant IDH primary AML cells from patients by measuring cell growth after exposure to a small molecule glutaminase inhibitor, BPTES. We found that BPTES only suppressed the growth of AML cells expressing mutant IDH compared with those expressing wild type IDH. This study lays the groundwork for strategies to target a specific subtype of AML metabolically with IDH mutations with a unique reprogramming of intermediary metabolism that culminates in glutamine dependency of cancer cells for survival.

  3. Suppression of Emittance Growth Using a Shaped Cold Atom Electron and Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Murphy, D.; Speirs, R. W.; van Bijnen, R. M. W.; McCulloch, A. J.; Scholten, R. E.; Sparkes, B. M.

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate precise control of charged particle bunch shape with a cold atom electron and ion source to create bunches with linear and, therefore, reversible Coulomb expansion. Using ultracold charged particles enables detailed observation of space-charge effects without loss of information from thermal diffusion, unambiguously demonstrating that shaping in three dimensions can result in a marked reduction of Coulomb-driven emittance growth. We show that the emittance growth suppression is accompanied by an increase in bunch focusability and brightness, improvements necessary for the development of sources capable of coherent single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction of noncrystalline objects, with applications ranging from femtosecond chemistry to materials science and rational drug design.

  4. Dichloroacetate and metformin synergistically suppress the growth of ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Zhenhong; Zhang, Yan; Zeng, Yijun; Yan, Xiaohuan; Huang, Yan; He, Jintao; Lyu, Xilin; Wu, Yaran; Wang, Yuting; Zheng, Yingru; He, Fengtian

    2016-01-01

    Both dichloroacetate (DCA) and metformin (Met) have shown promising antitumor efficacy by regulating cancer cell metabolism. However, the DCA-mediated protective autophagy and Met-induced lactate accumulation limit their tumor-killing potential respectively. So overcoming the corresponding shortages will improve their therapeutic effects. In the present study, we found that DCA and Met synergistically inhibited the growth and enhanced the apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells. Interestingly, we for the first time revealed that Met sensitized DCA via dramatically attenuating DCA-induced Mcl-1 protein and protective autophagy, while DCA sensitized Met through markedly alleviating Met-induced excessive lactate accumulation and glucose consumption. The in vivo experiments in nude mice also showed that DCA and Met synergistically suppressed the growth of xenograft ovarian tumors. These results may pave a way for developing novel strategies for the treatment of ovarian cancer based on the combined use of DCA and Met. PMID:27449090

  5. Therapeutic potential of tetracycline derivatives to suppress the growth of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R W; Liao, S; Curci, J A

    1998-11-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) represent a potentially lethal disorder associated with aging and atherosclerosis. Although current management of AAA is predicted on early detection and elective surgical repair, routine screening for AAA is infrequent, because most AAA are too small to warrant repair when first detected and because there are no therapeutic approaches proven to suppress aneurysm expansion. Basic research on this problem suggests that chronic inflammation and increased local production of elastin-degrading proteinases play prominent roles in the process of aneurysmal degeneration. Members of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) family appear to be the most prominent elastases produced in human AAA, suggesting that unique therapeutic targets might exist for aneurysm disease. Studies using a representative animal model for AAA support this view, providing a means for further development of pharmacological approaches to suppress aneurysm expansion. Indeed, recent work indicates that tetracycline derivatives have the potential to interrupt the progressive connective tissue destruction that occurs in AAA, by virtue of their non-antimicrobial properties as MMP inhibitors, and they do so at clinically achievable dose schedules. These findings support the view that MMPs are potentially important pharmacotherapeutic targets in AAA and, moreover, that tetracyclines might be useful in suppressing aneurysm expansion in vivo. Because tetracycline derivatives offer a number of distinct advantages as MMP inhibitors for patients with small AAA, prospective clinical trials of this novel therapeutic strategy can be anticipated in the near future.

  6. Extract of Cordyceps militaris inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth of human malignant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ruma, I Made Winarsa; Putranto, Endy Widya; Kondo, Eisaku; Watanabe, Risayo; Saito, Ken; Inoue, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Ken-Ichi; Nakata, Susumu; Kaihata, Masaji; Murata, Hitoshi; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo

    2014-07-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor development and metastasis. Among several angiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF) is important for tumor-derived angiogenesis and commonly overexpressed in solid tumors. Thus, many antitumor strategies targeting VEGF have been developed to inhibit cancer angiogenesis, offering insights into the successful treatment of solid cancers. However, there are a number of issues such as harmful effects on normal vascularity in clinical trials. Taking this into consideration, we employed Cordyceps militaris as an antitumor approach due to its biological safety in vivo. The herbal medicinal mushroom Cordyceps militaris has been reported to show potential anticancer properties including anti-angiogenic capacity; however, its concrete properties have yet to be fully demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the biological role of Cordyceps militaris extract in tumor cells, especially in regulating angiogenesis and tumor growth of a human malignant melanoma cell line. We demonstrated that Cordyceps militaris extract remarkably suppressed tumor growth via induction of apoptotic cell death in culture that links to the abrogation of VEGF production in melanoma cells. This was followed by mitigation of Akt1 and GSK-3β activation, while p38α phosphorylation levels were increased. Extract treatment in mouse model xenografted with human melanoma cells resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect with down-regulation of VEGF expression. The results suggest that suppression of tumor growth by Cordyceps militaris extract is, at least, mediated by its anti-angiogenicity and apoptosis induction capacities. Cordyceps militaris extract may be a potent antitumor herbal drug for solid tumors.

  7. 1. Appetite suppressant activity of supplemental dietary amino acids and subsequent compensatory growth of broilers.

    PubMed

    Acar, N; Patterson, P H; Barbato, G F

    2001-08-01

    This study was conducted to take advantage of the appetite-suppressant effect of excessive dietary amino acids in reducing feed intake and, in turn, restricting the early rapid growth of broilers to minimize metabolic disorders. Dietary amino acids were supplemented to a basal diet to yield a total of 1.57, 2.57, and 3.57% His; 2.7, 4.3, and 5.9% Lys; 1.36, 2.16, and 2.96% Met; 2.8, 3.8, and 4.8% Thr; and 1.27, 2.27, and 3.27% Trp and were fed to 408 chicks from 4 to 11 d of age. Fifteen dietary treatments of His, Lys, Met, Thr, and Trp were compared to the basal diet. Feed consumption was measured daily. Body weight measurements were taken at 0, 4, 7, 11, 14, and 21 d. At 21 d, pectoralis major and minor muscles, liver, and abdominal fat pad were weighed. High levels of Met and His caused the greatest depression in appetite from 4 to 11 d, and Thr, Trp, and Lys were found to be less potent. The exponential growth rate (EGR) of birds from 4 to 11 d of age was significantly reduced by the intermediate and high levels of the amino acid supplementation. From 11 to 14 d, EGR was greatest with high levels of Met or Trp, indicating more potential compensatory growth realized with these treatments. The high level of His decreased the percentage of pectoralis minor muscle yield, whereas the high level of Lys and Met increased the percentage of liver compared to those fed the basal diet. These results indicate that it is possible to use excessive individual amino acids in diets to suppress the appetite and early rapid growth to alleviate or minimize metabolic disorders.

  8. Disulfiram Suppresses Growth of the Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Cells in Part by Inducing Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Muthu, Magesh; Jamal, Shazia; Chen, Di; Yang, Huanjie; Polin, Lisa A.; Tarca, Adi L.; Pass, Harvey I.; Dou, Q. Ping; Sharma, Sunita; Wali, Anil; Rishi, Arun K.

    2014-01-01

    Dithiocarbamate compound Disulfiram (DSF) that binds with copper and functions as an inhibitor of aldehyde dehydrogenase is a Food and Drug Administration approved agent for treatment of alcoholism. Copper complexed DSF (DSF-Cu) also possesses anti-tumor and chemosensitizing properties; however, its molecular mechanisms of action remain unclear. Here we investigated malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) suppressive effects of DSF-Cu and the molecular mechanisms involved. DSF-Cu inhibited growth of the murine as well as human MPM cells in part by increasing levels of ubiquitinated proteins. DSF-Cu exposure stimulated apoptosis in MPM cells that involved activation of stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs) p38 and JNK1/2, caspase-3, and cleavage of poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase, as well as increased expression of sulfatase 1 and apoptosis transducing CARP-1/CCAR1 protein. Gene-array based analyses revealed that DSF-Cu suppressed cell growth and metastasis-promoting genes including matrix metallopeptidase 3 and 10. DSF inhibited MPM cell growth and survival by upregulating cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1, IGFBP7, and inhibitors of NF-κB such as ABIN 1 and 2 and Inhibitory κB (IκB)α and β proteins. DSF-Cu promoted cleavage of vimentin, as well as serine-phosphorylation and lysine-63 linked ubiquitination of podoplanin. Administration of 50 mg/kg DSF-Cu by daily i.p injections inhibited growth of murine MPM cell-derived tumors in vivo. Although podoplanin expression often correlates with metastatic disease and poor prognosis, phosphorylation of serines in cytoplasmic domain of podoplanin has recently been shown to interfere with cellular motility and migration signaling. Post-translational modification of podoplanin and cleavage of vimentin by DSF-Cu underscore a metastasis inhibitory property of this agent and together with our in vivo studies underscore its potential as an anti-MPM agent. PMID:24690739

  9. Growth suppression of Leydig TM3 cells mediated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Iseki, Minoru; Ikuta, Togo; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Kawajiri, Kaname . E-mail: kawajiri@cancer-c.pref.saitama.jp

    2005-06-17

    Exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin induces developmental toxicity in reproductive organs. To elucidate the function of AhR, we generated stable transformants of TM3 cells overexpressing wild-type aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) or its mutants which carried mutations in nuclear localization signal or nuclear export signal. In the presence of 3-methylcholanthrene (MC), proliferation of the cells transfected with wild-type AhR was completely suppressed, whereas cells expressing AhR mutants proliferated in a manner equivalent to control TM3 cells, suggesting AhR-dependent growth inhibition. The suppression was associated with up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21{sup Cip1}, which was abolished by pretreatment with actinomycin D. A p38 MAPK specific inhibitor, SB203580, blocked the increase of p21{sup Cip1} mRNA in response to MC. Treatment with indigo, another AhR ligand, failed to increase of p21{sup Cip1} mRNA, although up-regulation of mRNA for CYP1A1 was observed. These data suggest AhR in Leydig cells mediates growth inhibition by inducing p21{sup Cip1}.

  10. Cimetidine suppresses lung tumor growth in mice through proapoptosis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yisheng; Xu, Meng; Li, Xiao; Jia, Jinpeng; Fan, Kexing; Lai, Guoxiang

    2013-05-01

    Cimetidine, a histamine type-2 receptor antagonist, is known to inhibit the growth of several tumors in human and animals, however the mechanism of action underlying this effect remains largely unknown. Here, in the mice model of 3LL lung tumor, cimetidine showed significant inhibition of tumor growth. However, an in vitro study demonstrated that cimetidine showed no effect on proliferation, survival, migration and invasion of 3LL cells. We found that cimetidine reduced CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid derived-suppressive cell (MDSC) accumulation in spleen, blood and tumor tissue of tumor-bearing mice. In vitro coculture assay showed that cimetidine reversed MDSC-mediated T-cell suppression, and improved IFN-γ production. Further investigation demonstrated that the NO production and arginase I expression of MDSCs were reduced, and MDSCs prone to apoptosis by cimetidine treatment. However, MDSC differentiation was not affect by cimetidine. Importantly, although histamine H2 receptor was expressed in MDSC surface, histamine could not reverse the proapoptosis of cimetidine. Moreover, famotidine also did not have this capacity. We found that cimetidine could induce Fas and FasL expression in MDSC surface, and sequentially regulate caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway. Thus, these findings revealed a novel mechanism for cimetidine to inhibit tumor via modulation of MDSC apoptosis.

  11. MiR-214 inhibits cell growth in hepatocellular carcinoma through suppression of {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaojun; Chen, Ji; Li, Feng; Lin, Yanting; Zhang, Xiaoping; Lv, Zhongwei; Jiang, Jiaji

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 is frequently downregulated in human HCC cell lines and tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 overexpression inhibits HCC cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 directly targets {beta}-catenin 3 Prime -UTR in HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 regulates {beta}-catenin downstream signaling molecules. -- Abstract: Mounting evidence has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) are implicated in carcinogenesis and can function as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes in human cancers. Recent profile studies of miRNA expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-214) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, its potential functions and underlying mechanisms in hepatocarcinogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we confirmed that miR-214 is significantly downregulated in HCC cells and specimens. Ectopic overexpression of miR-214 inhibited proliferation of HCC cells in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Further studies revealed that miR-214 could directly target the 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR) of {beta}-catenin mRNA and suppress its protein expression. Similar to the restoring miR-214 expression, {beta}-catenin downregulation inhibited cell growth, whereas restoring the {beta}-catenin expression abolished the function of miR-214. Moreover, miR-214-mediated reduction of {beta}-catenin resulted in suppression of several downstream genes including c-Myc, cyclinD1, TCF-1, and LEF-1. These findings indicate that miR-214 serves as tumor suppressor and plays substantial roles in inhibiting the tumorigenesis of HCC through suppression of {beta}-catenin. Given these, miR-214 may serve as a useful prognostic or therapeutic target for treatment of HCC.

  12. SNR Loss: A new objective measure for predicting speech intelligibility of noise-suppressed speech

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianfen; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2010-01-01

    Most of the existing intelligibility measures do not account for the distortions present in processed speech, such as those introduced by speech-enhancement algorithms. In the present study, we propose three new objective measures that can be used for prediction of intelligibility of processed (e.g., via an enhancement algorithm) speech in noisy conditions. All three measures use a critical-band spectral representation of the clean and noise-suppressed signals and are based on the measurement of the SNR loss incurred in each critical band after the corrupted signal goes through a speech enhancement algorithm. The proposed measures are flexible in that they can provide different weights to the two types of spectral distortions introduced by enhancement algorithms, namely spectral attenuation and spectral amplification distortions. The proposed measures were evaluated with intelligibility scores obtained by normal-hearing listeners in 72 noisy conditions involving noise-suppressed speech (consonants and sentences) corrupted by four different maskers (car, babble, train and street interferences). Highest correlation (r=−0.85) with sentence recognition scores was obtained using a variant of the SNR loss measure that only included vowel/consonant transitions and weak consonant information. High correlation was maintained for all noise types, with a maximum correlation (r=−0.88) achieved in street noise conditions. PMID:21503274

  13. A major factor in gravitropism in radish hypocotyls is the suppression of growth on the upper side of hypocotyls.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Hikari; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Kosumi; Shigemori, Hideyuki; Hasegawa, Koji

    2006-12-01

    The changes in length on the two opposite sides of etiolated radish (Raphanus sativus) hypocotyls prior to, and following gravitropic stimulation, were measured using an infrared-imaging system. It was observed that the growth suppression on the upper side began first at least 10 min after the onset of gravitropic stimulation, and after 30 min the acceleration in growth on the lower side started. The gravitropic curvature was steadily induced from 10 min. When radish hypocotyls were switched from a vertical to horizontal position for different durations and then replaced to the vertical position, the growth suppression on the gravity-stimulated (upper) side was observed in all cases, but the acceleration in growth on the opposite (lower) side appeared only in continuously gravity-stimulated seedlings, although it occurred later than the growth suppression on the upper side. These results suggest that the suppression in growth on the upper side of the hypocotyls is a direct effect of gravitropic stimulation, but not the acceleration on the lower side. When 4-methylthio-3-butenyl isothiocyanate (4-MTBI), which has an inhibitory activity against radish hypocotyl growth, was applied on the one side of radish hypocotyls and then the 4-MTBI-applied side or opposite side was placed in a horizontal position, the former showed greater bending than the control, suggesting that the growth suppression on the upper side is enhanced and maintained with MTBI application there. In the latter case, the seedlings showed less bending than the control, suggesting a decrease in growth on the lower side with MTBI application. All the results suggest that gravitropism of radish hypocotyls may be caused by an increase in growth-inhibiting substance(s) induced with gravitropic stimulation in the upper side, inducing growth inhibition there.

  14. Enhanced mitochondrial glutamine anaplerosis suppresses pancreatic cancer growth through autophagy inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Min; Hwang, Sunsook; Park, Kyungsoo; Yang, Seungyeon; Seong, Rho Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells use precursors derived from tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle to support their unlimited growth. However, continuous export of TCA cycle intermediates results in the defect of mitochondrial integrity. Mitochondria glutamine metabolism plays an essential role for the maintenance of mitochondrial functions and its biosynthetic roles by refilling the mitochondrial carbon pool. Here we report that human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells have a distinct dependence on mitochondrial glutamine metabolism. Whereas glutamine flux into mitochondria contributes to proliferation of most cancer cells, enhanced glutamine anaplerosis results in a pronounced suppression of PDAC growth. A cell membrane permeable α-ketoglutarate analog or overexpression of glutamate dehydrogenase lead to decreased proliferation and increased apoptotic cell death in PDAC cells but not other cancer cells. We found that enhanced glutamine anaplerosis inhibits autophagy, required for tumorigenic growth of PDAC, by activating mammalian TORC1. Together, our results reveal that glutamine anaplerosis is a crucial regulator of growth and survival of PDAC cells, which may provide novel therapeutic approaches to treat these cancers. PMID:27477484

  15. Seizures in early life suppress hippocampal dendrite growth while impairing spatial learning.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Masataka; Gu, Xue; Swann, John W

    2011-11-01

    Impaired learning and memory are common in epilepsy syndromes of childhood. Clinical investigations suggest that the developing brain may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of intractable seizure disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have demonstrated reduced volumes in brain regions involved in learning and memory. The earlier the onset of an epilepsy the larger the effects seem to be on both brain anatomy and cognition. Thus, childhood epilepsy has been proposed to interfere in some unknown way with brain development. Experiments reported here explore these ideas by examining the effects of seizures in infant mice on learning and memory and on the growth of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cell dendrites. Fifteen brief seizures were induced by flurothyl between postnatal days 7 and 11 in mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) in hippocampal pyramidal cells. One to 44days later, dendritic arbors were reconstructed to measure growth. Spatial learning and memory were also assessed in a water maze. Our results show that recurrent seizures produced marked deficits in learning and memory. Seizures also dramatically slowed the growth of basilar dendrites while neurons in littermate control mice continued to add new dendritic branches and lengthen existing branches. When experiments were performed in older mice, seizures had no measureable effects on either dendrite arbor complexity or spatial learning and memory. Our results suggest that the recurring seizures of intractable childhood epilepsy contribute to associated learning and memory deficits by suppressing dendrite growth.

  16. Myristica fragrans Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metabolism by Inhibiting Lactate Dehydrogenase A.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Yeong; Choi, Hee-Jung; Park, Mi-Ju; Jung, Yeon-Seop; Lee, Syng-Ook; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Choi, Jung-Hye; Chung, Tae-Wook; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Most cancer cells predominantly produce ATP by maintaining a high rate of lactate fermentation, rather than by maintaining a comparatively low rate of tricarboxylic acid cycle, i.e., Warburg's effect. In the pathway, the pyruvate produced by glycolysis is converted to lactic acid by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Here, we demonstrated that water extracts from the seeds of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (MF) inhibit the in vitro enzymatic activity of LDH. MF effectively suppressed cell growth and the overall Warburg effect in HT29 human colon cancer cells. Although the expression of LDH-A was not changed by MF, both lactate production and LDH activity were decreased in MF-treated cells under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In addition, intracellular ATP levels were also decreased by MF treatment, and the uptake of glucose was also reduced by MF treatment. Furthermore, the experiment on tumor growth in the in vivo mice model revealed that MF effectively reduced the growth of allotransplanted Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Taken together, these results suggest that MF effectively inhibits cancer growth and metabolism by inhibiting the activity of LDH, a major enzyme responsible for regulating cancer metabolism. These results implicate MF as a potential candidate for development into a novel drug against cancer through inhibition of LDH activity.

  17. Radiofrequency ablation suppresses distant tumour growth in a novel rat model of multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Erös de Bethlenfalva-Hora, Caroline; Mertens, Joachim C; Piguet, Anne-Christine; Kettenbach, Joachim; Schmitt, Johannes; Terracciano, Luigi; Weimann, Rosemarie; Dufour, Jean-François; Geier, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    RFA (radiofrequency ablation) is an established therapy for HCC (hepatocellular carcinoma). The multikinase inhibitor sorafenib prolongs survival in advanced HCC. We examined the effects of RFA alone and in combination with sorafenib on a bystanding tumour in a two-tumour rat model of HCC. A total of 80 rats were implanted with two liver tumours and randomized to four treatment groups: vehicle and sham operation (control), sorafenib and sham operation (Sora/Sham), vehicle and RFA (Vh/RFA), and sorafenib and RFA (Sora/RFA) (n=10/group per time point). RFA or sham-operation was performed on the left lobe tumour on day 15. Animals were killed at day 18 and day 30. Non-RFA-targeted right lobe tumours were analysed for angiogenesis, growth factors [HGF (hepatocyte growth factor), EGF (epidermal growth factor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor)] and infiltrating immune cells (CD3 and CD68). At day 30, the non-RFA-targeted tumours were significantly smaller in all three treatment groups compared with control (Sora/Sham P≤0.0001, Vh/RFA P=0.005 and Sora/RFA P≤0.0001). The smallest tumours were observed in animals treated with a combination of sorafenib and RFA, whereas the size reduction seen in the RFA-only group indicated an RFA-mediated distant suppression of tumour growth. Growth factor measurement revealed transiently decreased EGF levels after RFA (P=0.008), whereas sorafenib treatment decreased HGF levels (P=0.001). MVD (microvessel density) was reduced by sorafenib (P=0.002) despite increased VEGF levels (P≤0.0001). The immune parameters revealed augmented T-cells and IL-10 (interleukin 10) levels in all three treatment groups; sorafenib additionally increased macrophage numbers (P≤0.0001). RFA and sorafenib alone resulted in significant volume reduction of the non-RFA-targeted tumour; this effect was enhanced when both modalities were combined.

  18. The activation of OR51E1 causes growth suppression of human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Maßberg, Désirée; Jovancevic, Nikolina; Offermann, Anne; Simon, Annika; Baniahmad, Aria; Perner, Sven; Pungsrinont, Thanakorn; Luko, Katarina; Philippou, Stathis; Ubrig, Burkhard; Heiland, Markus; Weber, Lea; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Gisselmann, Günter; Gelis, Lian; Hatt, Hanns

    2016-07-26

    The development of prostate cancer (PCa) is regulated by the androgen-dependent activity of the androgen receptor (AR). Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) is therefore the gold standard treatment to suppress malignant progression of PCa. Nevertheless, due to the development of castration resistance, recurrence of disease after initial response to ADT is a major obstacle to successful treatment. As G-protein coupled receptors play a fundamental role in PCa physiology, they might represent promising alternative or combinatorial targets for advanced diseases. Here, we verified gene expression of the olfactory receptors (ORs) OR51E1 [prostate-specific G-protein coupled receptor 2 (PSGR2)] and OR51E2 (PSGR) in human PCa tissue by RNA-Seq analysis and RT-PCR and elucidated the subcellular localization of both receptor proteins in human prostate tissue. The OR51E1 agonist nonanoic acid (NA) leads to the phosphorylation of various protein kinases and growth suppression of the PCa cell line LNCaP. Furthermore, treatment with NA causes reduction of androgen-mediated AR target gene expression. Interestingly, NA induces cellular senescence, which coincides with reduced E2F1 mRNA levels. In contrast, treatment with the structurally related compound 1-nonanol or the OR2AG1 agonist amyl butyrate, neither of which activates OR51E1, did not lead to reduced cell growth or an induction of cellular senescence. However, decanoic acid, another OR51E1 agonist, also induces cellular senescence. Thus, our results suggest the involvement of OR51E1 in growth processes of PCa cells and its impact on AR-mediated signaling. These findings provide novel evidences to support the functional importance of ORs in PCa pathogenesis.

  19. Endostatin inhibits androgen-independent prostate cancer growth by suppressing nuclear receptor-mediated oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Hyoung; Kang, Minsung; Wang, Hong; Naik, Gurudatta; Mobley, James A; Sonpavde, Guru; Garvey, W Timothy; Darley-Usmar, Victor M; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2017-04-01

    Androgen-deprivation therapy has been identified to induce oxidative stress in prostate cancer (PCa), leading to reactivation of androgen receptor (AR) signaling in a hormone-refractory manner. Thus, antioxidant therapies have gained attention as adjuvants for castration-resistant PCa. Here, we report for the first time that human endostatin (ES) prevents androgen-independent growth phenotype in PCa cells through its molecular targeting of AR and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and downstream pro-oxidant signaling. This reversal after ES treatment significantly decreased PCa cell proliferation through down-regulation of GR and up-regulation of manganese superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione levels. Proteome and biochemical analyses of ES-treated PCa cells further indicated a significant up-regulation of enzymes in the major reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging machinery, including catalase, glutathione synthetase, glutathione reductase, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, biliverdin reductase, and thioredoxin reductase, resulting in a concomitant reduction of intracellular ROS. ES further augmented the antioxidant system through up-regulation of glucose influx, the pentose phosphate pathway, and NAD salvaging pathways. This shift in cancer cell redox homeostasis by ES significantly decreased the effect of protumorigenic oxidative machinery on androgen-independent PCa growth, suggesting that ES can suppress GR-induced resistant phenotype upon AR antagonism and that the dual targeting action of ES on AR and GR can be further translated to PCa therapy.-Lee, J. H., Kang, M., Wang, H., Naik, G., Mobley, J. A., Sonpavde, G., Garvey, W. T., Darley-Usmar, V. M., Ponnazhagan, S. Endostatin inhibits androgen-independent prostate cancer growth by suppressing nuclear receptor-mediated oxidative stress.

  20. Suppression of breast cancer cell growth by Her2-reduced AR serine 81 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pao-Hsuan; Wang, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Chen-Chuan; Lee, Yueh-Tsung; Yue, Chia-Herng; Chen, Mei-Chih; Lin, Ho

    2016-08-31

    Breast cancer is a hormone-related carcinoma and the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in women. Although Her-2, estrogen receptor (ER), and progesterone receptor (PR) are the major diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets to breast cancer, searching for additional molecular targets remains an important issue and one of the candidates is androgen receptor (AR). AR has been shown expressed in 70% breast cancer patients and connects to low recurrence and high survival rate. Our previous study demonstrates that Ser81 phosphorylation of AR in prostate cancer cells is critical for its protein stability modulated by human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (Her2). The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of Her2 and AR in proliferation of breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-453. The data show that AR which was activated by synthetic androgen R1881 suppressed the proliferation of MDA-MB-453 cells. Notably, AR activation decreased the protein levels of cell growth-related proteins, including cyclin A, cyclin B, and early growth response protein 1 (Egr1), while cell-cycle inhibitor protein p27 was increased. Besides, Heregulin (HRG)-induced Her2 activation decreased the AR protein levels and its Ser81 phosphorylation. Her2 small molecular inhibitor, Lapatinib, dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation while the levels of phospho-Ser81 AR and p27 protein were increased. Phospho-Ser81 AR was also increased after Her2 knockdown. Specifically, the influence of phospho-Ser81 AR by Lapatinib was primarily found in the nucleus of MDA-MD-453 cells, where the cell proliferation might directly be interfered. In conclusion, our findings indicate that Her2 might negatively regulate AR phosphorylation/activation and contribute to regulate the proliferation of MDA-MB 453 cells.

  1. Cooperative Bacterial Growth Dynamics Predict the Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemova, Tatiana; Gerardin, Ylaine; Hsin-Jung Li, Sophia; Gore, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    Since the discovery of penicillin, antibiotics have been our primary weapon against bacterial infections. Unfortunately, bacteria can gain resistance to penicillin by acquiring the gene that encodes beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. However, mutations in this gene are necessary to degrade the modern antibiotic cefotaxime. Understanding the conditions that favor the spread of these mutations is a challenge. Here we show that bacterial growth in beta-lactam antibiotics is cooperative and that the nature of this growth determines the conditions in which resistance evolves. Quantitative analysis of the growth dynamics predicts a peak in selection at very low antibiotic concentrations; competition between strains confirms this prediction. We also find significant selection at higher antibiotic concentrations, close to the minimum inhibitory concentrations of the strains. Our results argue that an understanding of the evolutionary forces that lead to antibiotic resistance requires a quantitative understanding of the evolution of cooperation in bacteria.

  2. Predicting the peak growth velocity in the individual child: validation of a new growth model.

    PubMed

    Busscher, Iris; Kingma, Idsart; de Bruin, Rob; Wapstra, Frits Hein; Verkerke, Gijsvertus J; Veldhuizen, Albert G

    2012-01-01

    Predicting the peak growth velocity in an individual patient with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is essential or determining the prognosis of the disorder and timing of the (surgical) treatment. Until the present time, no accurate method has been found to predict the timing and magnitude of the pubertal growth spurt in the individual child. A mathematical model was developed in which the partial individual growth velocity curve was linked to the generic growth velocity curve. The generic curve was shifted and stretched or shrunk, both along the age axis and the height velocity axis. The individual age and magnitude of the PGV were obtained from the new predicted complete growth velocity curve. Predictions were made using 2, 1.5, 1 and 0.5 years of the available longitudinal data of the individual child, starting at different ages. The predicted values of 210 boys and 162 girls were compared to the child's own original values of the PGV. The individual differences were compared to differences obtained when using the generic growth velocity curve as a standard. Using 2 years of data as input for the model, all predictions of the age of the PGV in boys and girls were significantly better in comparison to using the generic values. Using only 0.5 years of data as input, the predictions with a starting age from 13 to 15.5 years in boys and from 9.5 to 14.5 years in girls were significantly better. Similar results were found for the predictions of the magnitude of the PGV. This model showed highly accurate results in predicting the individual age and magnitude of the PGV, which can be used in the treatment of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

  3. MiRNA-34a overexpression inhibits multiple myeloma cancer stem cell growth in mice by suppressing TGIF2

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Songyan; He, Xiangfeng; Li, Miao; Shi, Fangfang; Wu, Di; Pan, Meng; Guo, Mei; Zhang, Rong; Luo, Shouhua; Gu, Ning; Dou, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Hematological malignancy originated from B-cell line, multiple myeloma (MM), is a kind of plasma cells in bone marrow hyperplasia and cause of osteoclast-mediated skeletal destruction disease. MiR-34a plays an important epigenetic regulating role in malignant tumors and presents a therapeutic potential. In this study, we investigated the effects of overexpression of miR-34a in MM cancer stem cells (CSCs) on tumor growth and bone lesions. Here we showed that miR-34a overexpression inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, and increased CSC apoptosis in vitro. The apparent epigenetic modulation induced by miR-34a overexpression was found no only in MM RPMI8226 cells but also in CSC xenograft MM. Both bioinformatics prediction and dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that transforming growth interaction factor 2 (TGIF2) was sufficient to confer miR-34a regulation. The results of qRT-PCR and Western blot assays demonstrated that the expression of TGIF2 was significant decreased in tumor tissues from NOD/SCID mice injected with miR-34a-MM CSCs. We conclude that miR-34a overexpression in MM CSCs significantly suppressed the tumorigenicity and lytic bone lesions in mouse model by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting TGIF2 expression. PMID:28078014

  4. New approaches to toxicity: a seven-gas predictive model and toxicant suppressants.

    PubMed

    Levin, B C

    1997-11-01

    Two new research approaches in combustion toxicology are: 1. the prediction of smoke toxicity from mathematical equations, which are empirically derived from, experiments on the toxicological interactions of complex fire gas mixtures and 2. the use of toxicant suppressants in materials or products to prevent the formation of toxic combustion products. The predictive approach consists of burning materials using a bench-scale method that simulates realistic fire conditions, measuring the concentrations of the primary fire gases--CO, CO2, low O2, HCN, HCl, HBr, and NO2--and predicting the toxicity of the smoke using either the 6- or 7-gas N-Gas Model. These models are based on the results of toxicological studies of these primary gases as individual gases and as complex mixtures. The predicted toxic potency is checked with a small number of animal (Fischer 344 male rats) tests to assure that an unanticipated toxic gas is not generated or an unexpected synergistic or antagonistic effect has not occurred. The results indicate if the smoke from a material or product is extremely toxic (based on mass consumed at the predicted toxic level) or unusually toxic (based on the gases deemed responsible). The predictions based on bench-scale laboratory tests have been validated with full-scale room burns of a limited number of materials of widely differing characteristics chosen to challenge the system. The advantages of this new approach are 1. the number of test animals is minimized by predicting the toxic potency from the chemical analysis of the smoke, 2. smoke may be produced under conditions that simulate the fire scenario of concern, 3. fewer tests are needed, thereby reducing the overall cost of the testing and 4, information is obtained on both the toxic potency of the smoke and the responsible gases. The N-Gas Models have been developed into the N-Gas Method (described in this paper) and these results have been used in computations of fire hazard. The 6-Gas Model is now

  5. Genistein suppresses prostate cancer growth through inhibition of oncogenic microRNA-151.

    PubMed

    Chiyomaru, Takeshi; Yamamura, Soichiro; Zaman, Mohd Saif; Majid, Shahana; Deng, Guoren; Shahryari, Varahram; Saini, Sharanjot; Hirata, Hiroshi; Ueno, Koji; Chang, Inik; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Enokida, Hideki; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2012-01-01

    Genistein has been shown to suppress the growth of several cancers through modulation of various pathways. However, the effects of genistein on the regulation of oncogenic microRNA-151 (miR-151) have not been reported. In this study, we investigated whether genistein could alter the expression of oncogenic miR-151 and its target genes that are involved in the progression and metastasis of prostate cancer (PCa). Real-time RT-PCR showed that the expression of miR-151 was higher in PC3 and DU145 cells compared with RWPE-1 cells. Treatment of PC3 and DU145 cells with 25 µM genistein down-regulated the expression of miR-151 compared with vehicle control. Inhibition of miR-151 in PCa cells by genistein significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion. In-silico analysis showed that several genes (CASZ1, IL1RAPL1, SOX17, N4BP1 and ARHGDIA) suggested to have tumor suppressive functions were target genes of miR-151. Luciferase reporter assays indicated that miR-151 directly binds to specific sites on the 3'UTR of target genes. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the mRNA expression levels of the five target genes in PC3 and DU145 were markedly changed with miR-151 mimics and inhibitor. Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests revealed that high expression levels of miR-151 had an adverse effect on survival rate. This study suggests that genistein mediated suppression of oncogenic miRNAs can be an important dietary therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PCa.

  6. Genistein Suppresses Prostate Cancer Growth through Inhibition of Oncogenic MicroRNA-151

    PubMed Central

    Chiyomaru, Takeshi; Yamamura, Soichiro; Zaman, Mohd Saif; Majid, Shahana; Deng, Guoren; Shahryari, Varahram; Saini, Sharanjot; Hirata, Hiroshi; Ueno, Koji; Chang, Inik; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Tabatabai, Z. Laura; Enokida, Hideki; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2012-01-01

    Genistein has been shown to suppress the growth of several cancers through modulation of various pathways. However, the effects of genistein on the regulation of oncogenic microRNA-151 (miR-151) have not been reported. In this study, we investigated whether genistein could alter the expression of oncogenic miR-151 and its target genes that are involved in the progression and metastasis of prostate cancer (PCa). Real-time RT-PCR showed that the expression of miR-151 was higher in PC3 and DU145 cells compared with RWPE-1 cells. Treatment of PC3 and DU145 cells with 25 µM genistein down-regulated the expression of miR-151 compared with vehicle control. Inhibition of miR-151 in PCa cells by genistein significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion. In-silico analysis showed that several genes (CASZ1, IL1RAPL1, SOX17, N4BP1 and ARHGDIA) suggested to have tumor suppressive functions were target genes of miR-151. Luciferase reporter assays indicated that miR-151 directly binds to specific sites on the 3′UTR of target genes. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the mRNA expression levels of the five target genes in PC3 and DU145 were markedly changed with miR-151 mimics and inhibitor. Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests revealed that high expression levels of miR-151 had an adverse effect on survival rate. This study suggests that genistein mediated suppression of oncogenic miRNAs can be an important dietary therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PCa. PMID:22928040

  7. Suppression in growth hormone during overeating ameliorates the increase in insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Cornford, Andrea S.; Barkan, Ariel L.; Hinko, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we reported that overeating for only a few days markedly suppressed the secretion of growth hormone (GH). The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of this reduction in GH concentration on key metabolic adaptations that occur during 2 wk of overeating. Nine nonobese, healthy adults were admitted to the hospital for 2 wk, during which time they ate ∼4,000 kcal/day (70 kcal·kg fat-free mass−1·day−1; 50% carbohydrate, 35% fat, and 15% protein), and their plasma GH concentration was allowed to decline naturally (control). An additional eight subjects underwent the same overeating intervention and received exogenous GH treatment (GHT) administered in four daily injections to mimic physiological GH secretion throughout the 2-wk overeating period. We measured plasma insulin and glucose concentrations in the fasting and postprandial state as well as fasting lipolytic rate, proteolytic rate, and fractional synthetic rate (FSR) using stable-isotope tracer methods. GHT prevented the fall in plasma GH concentration, maintaining plasma GH concentration at baseline levels (1.2 ± 0.2 ng/ml), which increased fasting and postprandial assessments of insulin resistance (P < 0.05) and increased fasting lipidemia (all P < 0.05 vs. control). In addition, preventing the suppression in GH with overeating also blunted the increase in systemic proteolysis (P < 0.05 GHT vs. control). However, GHT did not alter lipolysis or FSR in response to overeating. In conclusion, our main findings suggest that the suppression in GH secretion that naturally occurs during the early stages of overeating may help attenuate the insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia that typically accompany overeating. PMID:23011065

  8. Crack Growth Simulation and Residual Strength Prediction in Airplane Fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuin-Shan; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report for the NASA funded project entitled "Crack Growth Prediction Methodology for Multi-Site Damage." The primary objective of the project was to create a capability to simulate curvilinear fatigue crack growth and ductile tearing in aircraft fuselages subjected to widespread fatigue damage. The second objective was to validate the capability by way of comparisons to experimental results. Both objectives have been achieved and the results are detailed herein. In the first part of the report, the crack tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion, obtained and correlated from coupon tests to predict fracture behavior and residual strength of built-up aircraft fuselages, is discussed. Geometrically nonlinear, elastic-plastic, thin shell finite element analyses are used to simulate stable crack growth and to predict residual strength. Both measured and predicted results of laboratory flat panel tests and full-scale fuselage panel tests show substantial reduction of residual strength due to the occurrence of multi-site damage (MSD). Detailed comparisons of n stable crack growth history, and residual strength between the predicted and experimental results are used to assess the validity of the analysis methodology. In the second part of the report, issues related to crack trajectory prediction in thin shells; an evolving methodology uses the crack turning phenomenon to improve the structural integrity of aircraft structures are discussed, A directional criterion is developed based on the maximum tangential stress theory, but taking into account the effect of T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy. Possible extensions of the current crack growth directional criterion to handle geometrically and materially nonlinear problems are discussed. The path independent contour integral method for T-stress evaluation is derived and its accuracy is assessed using a p- and hp-version adaptive finite element method. Curvilinear crack growth is simulated in

  9. SIRT6 Depletion Suppresses Tumor Growth by Promoting Cellular Senescence Induced by DNA Damage in HCC

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Namgyu; Ryu, Hye Guk; Kwon, Jung-Hee; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Kim, Sae Rom; Wang, Hee Jung; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Choi, Kwan Yong

    2016-01-01

    The role of Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in liver cancer remains controversial. Thus, we identified the specific role of SIRT6 in the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). SIRT6 expression was significantly higher in HCC cell lines and HCC tissues from 138 patients than in an immortalized hepatocyte cell line, THLE-2 and non-tumor tissues, respectively. SIRT6 knockdown by shRNA suppressed the growth of HCC cells and inhibited HCC tumor growth in vivo. In addition, SIRT6 silencing significantly prevented the growth of HCC cell lines by inducing cellular senescence in the p16/Rb- and p53/p21-pathway independent manners. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression of genes involved in nucleosome assembly was apparently altered in SIRT6-depleted Hep3B cells. SIRT6 knockdown promoted G2/M phase arrest and downregulation of genes encoding histone variants associated with nucleosome assembly, which could be attributed to DNA damage. Taken together, our findings suggest that SIRT6 acts as a tumor promoter by preventing DNA damage and cellular senescence, indicating that SIRT6 represents a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of HCC. PMID:27824900

  10. An uncleavable form of pro–scatter factor suppresses tumor growth and dissemination in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mazzone, Massimiliano; Basilico, Cristina; Cavassa, Silvia; Pennacchietti, Selma; Risio, Mauro; Naldini, Luigi; Comoglio, Paolo M.; Michieli, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    Scatter factor (SF), also known as hepatocyte growth factor, is ubiquitously present in the extracellular matrix of tissues in the form of an inactive precursor (pro-SF). In order to acquire biological activity, pro-SF must be cleaved by specific proteases present on the cell surface. The mature form of SF controls invasive cues in both physiological and pathological processes through activation of its receptor, the Met tyrosine kinase. By substituting a single amino acid in the proteolytic site, we engineered an unprocessable form of pro-SF (uncleavable SF). Using lentivirus vector technology, we achieved local or systemic delivery of uncleavable SF in mice. We provide evidence that (a) uncleavable SF inhibits both protease-mediated pro-SF conversion and active SF–induced Met activation; (b) local expression of uncleavable SF in tumors suppresses tumor growth, impairs tumor angiogenesis, and prevents metastatic dissemination; and (c) systemic expression of uncleavable SF dramatically inhibits the growth of transplanted tumors and abolishes the formation of spontaneous metastases without perturbing vital physiological functions. These data show that proteolytic activation of pro-SF is a limiting step in tumor progression, thus suggesting a new strategy for the treatment or prevention of the malignant conversion of neoplastic lesions. PMID:15545993

  11. An uncleavable form of pro-scatter factor suppresses tumor growth and dissemination in mice.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Massimiliano; Basilico, Cristina; Cavassa, Silvia; Pennacchietti, Selma; Risio, Mauro; Naldini, Luigi; Comoglio, Paolo M; Michieli, Paolo

    2004-11-01

    Scatter factor (SF), also known as hepatocyte growth factor, is ubiquitously present in the extracellular matrix of tissues in the form of an inactive precursor (pro-SF). In order to acquire biological activity, pro-SF must be cleaved by specific proteases present on the cell surface. The mature form of SF controls invasive cues in both physiological and pathological processes through activation of its receptor, the Met tyrosine kinase. By substituting a single amino acid in the proteolytic site, we engineered an unprocessable form of pro-SF (uncleavable SF). Using lentivirus vector technology, we achieved local or systemic delivery of uncleavable SF in mice. We provide evidence that (a) uncleavable SF inhibits both protease-mediated pro-SF conversion and active SF-induced Met activation; (b) local expression of uncleavable SF in tumors suppresses tumor growth, impairs tumor angiogenesis, and prevents metastatic dissemination; and (c) systemic expression of uncleavable SF dramatically inhibits the growth of transplanted tumors and abolishes the formation of spontaneous metastases without perturbing vital physiological functions. These data show that proteolytic activation of pro-SF is a limiting step in tumor progression, thus suggesting a new strategy for the treatment or prevention of the malignant conversion of neoplastic lesions.

  12. Salinomycin inhibits the tumor growth of glioma stem cells by selectively suppressing glioma-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tunan; Yi, Liang; Li, Fei; Hu, Rong; Hu, Shengli; Yin, Yi; Lan, Chuan; Li, Zhao; Fu, Chuhua; Cao, Liu; Chen, Zhi; Xian, Jishu; Feng, Hua

    2015-04-01

    Glioma‑initiating cells are a small population of cells that have the ability to undergo self‑renewal and initiate tumorigenesis. In the present study, the potential role of salinomycin, a polyether antibiotic, on the suppression of glioma cell growth was investigated. GL261 glioma cells were maintained in a stem‑cell‑like status [GL261 neurospheres (GL261‑NS)] or induced for differentiation [GL261 adherent cells (GL261‑AC)]. It was demonstrated that salinomycin significantly reduced the cell viability of GL261‑NS and GL261‑AC cells in a dose‑dependent manner, with a more substantial inhibition of GL261‑NS proliferation (P<0.05). The inhibitory effect of salinomycin on cell growth was more effective than that of 1‑(4‑amino‑2‑methyl‑5‑pyrimid l)‑methyl‑3‑(2‑chloroethyl)‑3‑nitrosourea hydrochloride and vincristine (P<0.05). Salinomycin depleted GL261‑NS from tumorspheres and induced cell apoptosis. In addition, salinomycin prolonged the median survival time of glioma‑bearing mice (P<0.05). Therefore, the present study indicated that salinomycin may preferentially inhibit glioma‑initiated cell growth by inducing apoptosis, suggesting that salinomycin may provide a valuable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  13. Patrinia scabiosaefolia inhibits colorectal cancer growth through suppression of tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liwu; Liu, Liya; Ye, Ling; Shen, Aling; Chen, Youqin; Sferra, Thomas J; Peng, Jun

    2013-09-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process for tumor development and metastasis, therefore inhibition of tumor angiogenesis has become a promising strategy for anticancer treatments. Patrinia scabiosaefolia, a well-known Oriental folk medicine, has been shown to be effective in the clinical treatment of gastrointestinal cancers. However, the precise mechanism of its tumoricidal activity remains largely unknown. Using a colorectal cancer (CRC) mouse xenograft model, the human colon carcinoma cell line HT-29 and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), in the present study we evaluated the effects of an ethanol extract of Patrinia scabiosaefolia (EEPS) on tumor angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro, and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that EEPS treatment significantly reduced the tumor volume in CRC mice and decreased the intratumoral microvessel density in tumor tissues. In addition, EEPS inhibited several key processes of angiogenesis, including the proliferation, migration and tube formation of HUVECs. Moreover, EEPS treatment suppressed the expression of VEGF-A in CRC tumors and HT-29 cells. Collectively, our data suggest that Patrinia scabiosaefolia inhibits CRC growth likely via suppression of tumor angiogenesis.

  14. Increased hepatic glucose production in fetal sheep with intrauterine growth restriction is not suppressed by insulin.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Stephanie R; Brown, Laura D; Rozance, Paul J; Hay, William W; Friedman, Jacob E

    2013-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) increases the risk for metabolic disease and diabetes, although the developmental origins of this remain unclear. We measured glucose metabolism during basal and insulin clamp periods in a fetal sheep model of placental insufficiency and IUGR. Compared with control fetuses (CON), fetuses with IUGR had increased basal glucose production rates and hepatic PEPCK and glucose-6-phosphatase expression, which were not suppressed by insulin. In contrast, insulin significantly increased peripheral glucose utilization rates in CON and IUGR fetuses. Insulin robustly activated AKT, GSK3β, and forkhead box class O (FOXO)1 in CON and IUGR fetal livers. IUGR livers, however, had increased basal FOXO1 phosphorylation, nuclear FOXO1 expression, and Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase activation during hyperinsulinemia. Expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α and hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α were increased in IUGR livers during basal and insulin periods. Cortisol and norepinephrine concentrations were positively correlated with glucose production rates. Isolated IUGR hepatocytes maintained increased glucose production in culture. In summary, fetal sheep with IUGR have increased hepatic glucose production, which is not suppressed by insulin despite insulin sensitivity for peripheral glucose utilization. These data are consistent with a novel mechanism involving persistent transcriptional activation in the liver that seems to be unique in the fetus with IUGR.

  15. Transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 transcriptionally suppresses hepatitis B virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jinke; Zhang, Geng; Lin, Yong; Xie, Zhanglian; Liu, Hongyan; Tang, Libo; Lu, Mengji; Yan, Ran; Guo, Haitao; Sun, Jian; Hou, Jinlin; Zhang, Xiaoyong

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) replication in hepatocytes is restricted by the host innate immune system and related intracellular signaling pathways. Transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is a key mediator of toll-like receptors and pro-inflammatory cytokine signaling pathways. Here, we report that silencing or inhibition of endogenous TAK1 in hepatoma cell lines leads to an upregulation of HBV replication, transcription, and antigen expression. In contrast, overexpression of TAK1 significantly suppresses HBV replication, while an enzymatically inactive form of TAK1 exerts no effect. By screening TAK1-associated signaling pathways with inhibitors and siRNAs, we found that the MAPK-JNK pathway was involved in TAK1-mediated HBV suppression. Moreover, TAK1 knockdown or JNK pathway inhibition induced the expression of farnesoid X receptor α, a transcription factor that upregulates HBV transcription. Finally, ectopic expression of TAK1 in a HBV hydrodynamic injection mouse model resulted in lower levels of HBV DNA and antigens in both liver and serum. In conclusion, our data suggest that TAK1 inhibits HBV primarily at viral transcription level through activation of MAPK-JNK pathway, thus TAK1 represents an intrinsic host restriction factor for HBV replication in hepatocytes. PMID:28045080

  16. PKK suppresses tumor growth and is decreased in squamous cell carcinoma of the skin.

    PubMed

    Poligone, Brian; Gilmore, Elaine S; Alexander, Carolina V; Oleksyn, David; Gillespie, Kathleen; Zhao, Jiyong; Ibrahim, Sherrif F; Pentland, Alice P; Brown, Marc D; Chen, Luojing

    2015-03-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer represents the most common cancer in the United States. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin is a subtype of NMSC that shows a greater potential for invasion and metastasis. The current study identifies the protein kinase C-associated kinase (PKK), which is also known as the receptor-interacting protein kinase 4, as a suppressor of tumor growth in SCC of the skin. We show that expression of PKK is decreased in human SCC of the skin compared with normal skin. Further, suppression of PKK in human keratinocytes leads to increased cell proliferation. The use of RNA interference to reduce PKK expression in keratinocytes leads to an increase in S phase and in proteins that promote cell cycle progression. Consistent with the results obtained from cell culture, there is a marked increased tumorigenesis after PKK knockdown in a xenotransplant model and in soft agar assays. The loss of tumor suppression involves the NF-κB and p63 pathways. NF-κB is inhibited through inhibition of inhibitor of NF-κB kinase function and there is increased nuclear TP63 activity after PKK knockdown. This study opens new avenues both in the discovery of disease pathogenesis and for potential treatments.

  17. PKK Suppresses Tumor Growth and is Decreased in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Poligone, Brian; Gilmore, Elaine S.; Alexander, Carolina; Oleksyn, David; Gillespie, Kathleen; Zhao, Jiyong; Ibrahim, Sherrif; Pentland, Alice P.; Brown, Marc; Chen, Luojing

    2014-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) represents the most common cancer in the United States. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin is a sub-type of NMSC that shows a greater potential for invasion and metastasis. The current study identifies the Protein Kinase C-associated Kinase (PKK), which is also known as the Receptor-Interacting Protein Kinase 4 (RIPK4), as a suppressor of tumor growth in SCC of the skin. We show that expression of PKK is decreased in human SCC of the skin compared to normal skin. Further, suppression of PKK in human keratinocytes leads to increased cell proliferation. Use of RNA interference to reduce PKK expression in keratinocytes leads to an increase in S phase and in proteins that promote cell cycle progression. Consistent with the results obtained from cell culture, there is a dramatic increased tumorigenesis after PKK knockdown in a xenotransplant model and in soft agar assays. The loss of tumor suppression involves the NF-κB and p63 pathways. NF-κB is inhibited through inhibition of IKK function and there is increased nuclear TP63 activity after PKK knockdown. This study opens new avenues both in the discovery of disease pathogenesis and for potential treatments. PMID:25285922

  18. Plants Release Precursors of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors to Suppress Growth of Competitors[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Venturelli, Sascha; Belz, Regina G.; Kämper, Andreas; Berger, Alexander; von Horn, Kyra; Wegner, André; Böcker, Alexander; Zabulon, Gérald; Barneche, Fredy; Lauer, Ulrich M.; Bitzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To secure their access to water, light, and nutrients, many plant species have developed allelopathic strategies to suppress competitors. To this end, they release into the rhizosphere phytotoxic substances that inhibit the germination and growth of neighbors. Despite the importance of allelopathy in shaping natural plant communities and for agricultural production, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we report that allelochemicals derived from the common class of cyclic hydroxamic acid root exudates directly affect the chromatin-modifying machinery in Arabidopsis thaliana. These allelochemicals inhibit histone deacetylases both in vitro and in vivo and exert their activity through locus-specific alterations of histone acetylation and associated gene expression. Our multilevel analysis collectively shows how plant-plant interactions interfere with a fundamental cellular process, histone acetylation, by targeting an evolutionarily highly conserved class of enzymes. PMID:26530086

  19. DAC can restore expression of NALP1 to suppress tumor growth in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, C; Wang, B; Sun, J; Na, H; Chen, Z; Zhu, Z; Yan, L; Ren, S; Zuo, Y

    2015-01-22

    Despite recent progress in the identification of genetic and molecular alternations in colorectal carcinoma, the precise molecular pathogenesis remains unclear. NALP1 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family, pyrin domain-containing 1) is a member of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family of proteins that are key organization proteins in the inflammasome. It is reported that NALP1 plays a central role in cell apoptosis, pyroptosis, inflammatory reactions and autoimmune diseases. DAC (5-aza-2-deoxycytidine) is an antitumor drug useful to lung cancer, myelodysplastic disorders, myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia. In this study, we examined the expression of NALP1 in human normal and cancerous colon tissues using tissue microarray, western blot and quantitative real-time PCR and we measured the expression of NALP1 in three kinds of colon cancer cell lines and animal models before and after treatment with DAC. Furthermore, we examined the treatment effects of DAC on colon cancer in our animal model. Our data indicate that NALP1 is expressed low in human colorectal tumoral tissues relative to paratumoral tissues and was associated with the survival and tumor metastasis of patients. The expression of NALP1 increased after treatment with DAC both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, DAC suppressed the growth of colon cancer and increased lifespan in mouse model. Therefore, we conclude that NALP1 is expressed low in colon cancer and associated with the survival and tumor metastasis of patients, and treatment with DAC can restore NALP1 levels to suppress the growth of colon cancer.

  20. Plant Growth Promotion and Suppression of Bacterial Leaf Blight in Rice by Inoculated Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Sumera; Zaka, Abha; Imran, Asma; Zahid, Muhammad Awais; Yousaf, Sumaira; Rasul, Ghulam; Arif, Muhammad; Mirza, Muhammad Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the potential of rice rhizosphere associated antagonistic bacteria for growth promotion and disease suppression of bacterial leaf blight (BLB). A total of 811 rhizospheric bacteria were isolated and screened against 3 prevalent strains of BLB pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) of which five antagonistic bacteria, i.e., Pseudomonas spp. E227, E233, Rh323, Serratia sp. Rh269 and Bacillus sp. Rh219 showed antagonistic potential (zone of inhibition 1-19 mm). Production of siderophores was found to be the common biocontrol determinant and all the strains solubilized inorganic phosphate (82-116 μg mL-1) and produced indole acetic acid (0.48-1.85 mg L-1) in vitro. All antagonistic bacteria were non-pathogenic to rice, and their co-inoculation significantly improved plant health in terms of reduced diseased leaf area (80%), improved shoot length (31%), root length (41%) and plant dry weight (60%) as compared to infected control plants. Furthermore, under pathogen pressure, bacterial inoculation resulted in increased activity of defense related enzymes including phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and polyphenol oxidase, along with 86% increase in peroxidase and 53% increase in catalase enzyme activities in plants inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. Rh323 as well as co-inoculated plants. Bacterial strains showed good colonization potential in the rice rhizosphere up to 21 days after seed inoculation. Application of bacterial consortia in the field resulted in an increase of 31% in grain yield and 10% in straw yield over non-inoculated plots. Although, yield increase was statistically non-significant but was accomplished with overall saving of 20% chemical fertilizers. The study showed that Pseudomonas sp. Rh323 can be used to develop dual-purpose inoculum which can serve not only to suppress BLB but also to promote plant growth in rice.

  1. Plant Growth Promotion and Suppression of Bacterial Leaf Blight in Rice by Inoculated Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zaka, Abha; Imran, Asma; Zahid, Muhammad Awais; Yousaf, Sumaira; Rasul, Ghulam; Arif, Muhammad; Mirza, Muhammad Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the potential of rice rhizosphere associated antagonistic bacteria for growth promotion and disease suppression of bacterial leaf blight (BLB). A total of 811 rhizospheric bacteria were isolated and screened against 3 prevalent strains of BLB pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) of which five antagonistic bacteria, i.e., Pseudomonas spp. E227, E233, Rh323, Serratia sp. Rh269 and Bacillus sp. Rh219 showed antagonistic potential (zone of inhibition 1–19 mm). Production of siderophores was found to be the common biocontrol determinant and all the strains solubilized inorganic phosphate (82–116 μg mL-1) and produced indole acetic acid (0.48–1.85 mg L-1) in vitro. All antagonistic bacteria were non-pathogenic to rice, and their co-inoculation significantly improved plant health in terms of reduced diseased leaf area (80%), improved shoot length (31%), root length (41%) and plant dry weight (60%) as compared to infected control plants. Furthermore, under pathogen pressure, bacterial inoculation resulted in increased activity of defense related enzymes including phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and polyphenol oxidase, along with 86% increase in peroxidase and 53% increase in catalase enzyme activities in plants inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. Rh323 as well as co-inoculated plants. Bacterial strains showed good colonization potential in the rice rhizosphere up to 21 days after seed inoculation. Application of bacterial consortia in the field resulted in an increase of 31% in grain yield and 10% in straw yield over non-inoculated plots. Although, yield increase was statistically non-significant but was accomplished with overall saving of 20% chemical fertilizers. The study showed that Pseudomonas sp. Rh323 can be used to develop dual-purpose inoculum which can serve not only to suppress BLB but also to promote plant growth in rice. PMID:27532545

  2. Effect of growth plate geometry and growth direction on prediction of proximal femoral morphology.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Priti; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M

    2016-06-14

    Mechanical stimuli play a significant role in the process of endochondral growth. Thus far, approaches to understand the endochondral mechanical growth rate have been limited to the use of approximated location and geometry of the growth plate. Furthermore, growth has been simulated based on the average deflection of the growth plate or of the femoral neck. It has also been reported in the literature that the growth plate lies parallel to one of the principal stresses acting on it, to reduce the shear between epiphysis and diaphysis. Hence the current study objectives were (1) to evaluate the significance of a subject-specific finite element model of the femur and growth plate compared to a simplified growth plate model and (2) to explore the different growth direction models to better understand proximal femoral growth mechanisms. A subject-specific finite element model of an able-bodied 7-year old child was developed. The muscle forces and hip contact force were computed for one gait cycle and applied to a finite element model to determine the specific growth rate. Proximal femoral growth was simulated for two different growth direction models: femoral neck deflection direction and principal stress direction. The principal stress direction model captured the expected tendency for decreasing the neck shaft angle and femoral anteversion for both growth plate models. The results of this study suggest that the subject-specific geometry and consideration of the principal stress direction as growth direction may be a more realistic approach for correct prediction of proximal femoral growth morphology.

  3. Transgene Induced Co-Suppression during Vegetative Growth in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuying; Wang, Ping; Sun, Sheng; Darwiche, Sabrina; Idnurm, Alexander; Heitman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Introduction of DNA sequences into the genome often results in homology-dependent gene silencing in organisms as diverse as plants, fungi, flies, nematodes, and mammals. We previously showed in Cryptococcus neoformans that a repeat transgene array can induce gene silencing at a high frequency during mating (∼50%), but at a much lower frequency during vegetative growth (∼0.2%). Here we report a robust asexual co-suppression phenomenon triggered by the introduction of a cpa1::ADE2 transgene. Multiple copies of the cpa1::ADE2 transgene were ectopically integrated into the genome, leading to silencing of the endogenous CPA1 and CPA2 genes encoding the cyclosporine A target protein cyclophilin A. Given that CPA1-derived antisense siRNAs were detected in the silenced isolates, and that RNAi components (Rdp1, Ago1, and Dcr2) are required for silencing, we hypothesize that an RNAi pathway is involved, in which siRNAs function as trans factors to silence both the CPA1 and the CPA2 genes. The silencing efficiency of the CPA1 and CPA2 genes is correlated with the transgene copy number and reached ∼90% in the presence of >25 copies of the transgene. We term this transgene silencing phenomenon asexual co-suppression to distinguish it from the related sex-induced silencing (SIS) process. We further show that replication protein A (RPA), a single-stranded DNA binding complex, is required for transgene silencing, suggesting that RPA might play a similar role in aberrant RNA production as observed for quelling in Neurospora crassa. Interestingly, we also observed that silencing of the ADE2 gene occurred at a much lower frequency than the CPA1/2 genes even though it is present in the same transgene array, suggesting that factors in addition to copy number influence silencing. Taken together, our results illustrate that a transgene induced co-suppression process operates during C. neoformans vegetative growth that shares mechanistic features with quelling. PMID:22916030

  4. Survivin inhibitor YM155 suppresses gastric cancer xenograft growth in mice without affecting normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Ding, Yan Fei; Zhu, Liming; Ye, Jing; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-02-09

    Survivin overexpression is associated with poor prognosis of human gastric cancer, and is a target for gastric cancer therapy. YM155 is originally identified as a specific inhibitor of survivin. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of YM155 on human gastric cancer. Our results showed that YM155 treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, reduced colony formation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, YM155 treatment significantly decreased survivin expression without affecting XIAP expression and increased the cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins caspase 3, 7, 8, 9. YM155 significantly inhibited sphere formation of gastric cancer cells, suppressed expansion and growth of the formed spheres (cancer stem cell-like cells, CSCs) and downregulated the protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and CD44 in gastric cancer cells. YM155 infusion at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days markedly inhibited growth of gastric cancer xenograft in a nude mouse model. Immunohistochemistry staining and Western Blot showed that YM155 treatment inhibited expression of survivin and CD44, induced apoptosis and reduced CD44+ CSCs in xenograft tumor tissues in vivo. No obvious pathological changes were observed in organs (e.g. heart, liver, lung and kidney) in YM155-treated mice. Our results demonstrated that YM155 inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis, reduces cancer stem cell expansion, and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in gastric cancer cells. Our results elucidate a new mechanism by which YM155 inhibits gastric cancer growth by inhibition of CSCs. YM155 may be a promising agent for gastric cancer treatment.

  5. miR-29a suppresses MCF-7 cell growth by downregulating tumor necrosis factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yiling; Yang, Fenghua; Li, Wenyuan; Xu, Chunyan; Li, Li; Chen, Lifei; Liu, Yancui; Sun, Ping

    2017-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 is the main receptor mediating many tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced cellular events. Some studies have shown that tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 promotes tumorigenesis by activating nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway, while other studies have confirmed that tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 plays an inhibitory role in tumors growth by inducing apoptosis in breast cancer. Therefore, the function of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in breast cancer requires clarification. In this study, we first found that tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 was significantly increased in human breast cancer tissues and cell lines, and knockdown of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 by small interfering RNA inhibited cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis. In addition, miR-29a was predicted as a regulator of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 by TargetScan and was shown to be inversely correlated with tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression in human breast cancer tissues and cell lines. Luciferase reporter assay further confirmed that miR-29a negatively regulated tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression by binding to the 3' untranslated region. In our functional study, miR-29a overexpression remarkably suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation, arrested the cell cycle, and induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cell. Furthermore, in combination with tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 transfection, miR-29a significantly reversed the oncogenic role caused by tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in MCF-7 cell. In addition, we demonstrated that miR-29a suppressed MCF-7 cell growth by inactivating the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway and by decreasing cyclinD1 and Bcl-2/Bax protein levels. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-29a is an important regulator of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 expression in breast cancer and functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 to

  6. Increasing the indium incorporation efficiency during InGaN layer growth by suppressing the dissociation of NH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Zhao, D. G.; Jiang, D. S.; Chen, P.; Zhu, J. J.; Liu, Z. S.; Liu, W.; Liang, F.; Li, X.; Liu, S. T.; Zhang, L. Q.; Yang, H.

    2017-02-01

    Three series of InGaN samples with different growth pressures are grown in a vertical metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system and the indium incorporation efficiency during InGaN layer growth is investigated. It is found that the indium content in InGaN layer decreases when the NH3 flow rate increases at a higher growth pressure and it increases with the NH3 flow rate at a lower growth pressure, This may be attributed to the higher dissociation rate of NH3 into N2 and H2 at a higher growth pressure, leading to a higher H2 concentration in reactor during InGaN growth. Therefore, changing growth conditions to suppress the dissociation of NH3 into N2 and H2 can increase the indium incorporation efficiency during InGaN film growth.

  7. IPA-3 Inhibits the Growth of Liver Cancer Cells By Suppressing PAK1 and NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Leo Lap-Yan; Lam, Ian Pak-Yan; Wong, Tracy Yuk-Nar; Lai, Wai-Lung; Liu, Heong-Fai; Yeung, Lam-Lung; Ching, Yick-Pang

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major malignancies worldwide and is associated with poor prognosis due to the high incidences of metastasis and tumor recurrence. Our previous study showed that overexpression of p21-activated protein kinase 1 (PAK1) is frequently observed in HCC and is associated with a more aggressive tumor behavior, suggesting that PAK1 is a potential therapeutic target in HCC. In the current study, an allosteric small molecule PAK1 inhibitor, IPA-3, was evaluated for the potential in suppressing hepatocarcinogenesis. Consistent with other reports, inhibition of PAK1 activity was observed in several human HCC cell lines treated with various dosages of IPA-3. Using cell proliferation, colony formation and BrdU incorporation assays, we demonstrated that IPA-3 treatment significantly inhibited the growth of HCC cells. The mechanisms through which IPA-3 treatment suppresses HCC cell growth are enhancement of apoptosis and blockage of activation of NF-κB. Furthermore, our data suggested that IPA-3 not only inhibits the HCC cell growth, but also suppresses the metastatic potential of HCC cells. Nude mouse xenograft assay demonstrated that IPA-3 treatment significantly reduced the tumor growth rate and decreased tumor volume, indicating that IPA-3 can suppress the in vivo tumor growth of HCC cells. Taken together, our demonstration of the potential preclinical efficacy of IPA-3 in HCC provides the rationale for cancer therapy. PMID:23894351

  8. Quantitative and Morphological Measures May Predict Growth and Mortality During Prenatal Growth in Japanese Quails

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Kashmiri L.; Vatsalya, Vatsalya

    2014-01-01

    Growth pattern and mortality rate during the embryonic phase of avian species are difficult to recognize and predict. Determination of such measures and associated events may enhance our understanding of characteristics involved in the growth and hatching process. Furthermore, some quantitative measures could validate morphological determinants during the embryonic phase and predict the course of normal growth and alterations. Our aim was to characterize quantitative growth of embryos and to establish baseline embryonic standards for use in comparative and pathological research during the prenatal life of Japanese quail. Day 10 was a landmark timeline for initiation of extensive anatomical changes in growth and transformation. Wet and dry weights were positively correlated with each other and inversely correlated with water content (p = 0.05). Following d10, the water content decreased progressively, whereas, dry and wet weights increased with increasing age. Velocity of growth in wet and dry weights was evident starting d6, spiked at d11 and d15 and then declined before hatching on d16. Organic and inorganic contents of embryos were positively associated with age. Progressive increase in the organic to inorganic ratio with age was evident after d5, spiked on d9, d13 and d16. Accurate determinations of prenatal growth processes could serve as valuable tools in identifying morphological developments and characterization of prenatal growth and mortality, thus enhancing the reproductive efficiency of the breeding colony and the postnatal robustness of the offspring. PMID:25285101

  9. Mechanisms of plant growth promotion and disease suppression by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain 2apa.

    PubMed

    Hariprasad, P; Chandrashekar, S; Singh, S Brijesh; Niranjana, S R

    2014-08-01

    A new Pseudomonas strain, designated as 2apa was isolated from tomato rhizosphere and identified as a member of species Pseudomonas aeruginosa based on its morphology, conventional, biochemical, cell wall fatty acid methyl ester analysis, and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The strain 2apa was positive for root colonization, indole acetic acid (IAA), salicylic acid and siderophore production and inhibited the growth of wide range of microorganisms. Antimicrobial substances produced by this strain with further purification and structure elucidation proved to be phenazine. Under laboratory and greenhouse conditions the strain promoted plant growth and suppressed a wide range of foliar and root pathogens in tomato. The protection offered by strain 2apa to foliar pathogens is considered as induced systemic resistance and was further confirmed by enhanced accumulation of phenolics, elicitation of lipoxygenas activity, and jasmonic acid levels. The broad-spectrum antimicrobial and induced systemic resistance exhibiting strain P. aeruginosa 2apa can be used as an effective biological control candidate against devastating fungal and bacterial pathogens, which attack both root and foliar portions of tomato plant. Production of other functional traits such as IAA and siderophore may enhance its potential as biofertilizer.

  10. Geraniol Suppresses Angiogenesis by Downregulating Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)/VEGFR-2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wittig, Christine; Scheuer, Claudia; Parakenings, Julia; Menger, Michael D.; Laschke, Matthias W.

    2015-01-01

    Geraniol exerts several direct pharmacological effects on tumor cells and, thus, has been suggested as a promising anti-cancer compound. Because vascularization is a major precondition for tumor growth, we analyzed in this study the anti-angiogenic action of geraniol. In vitro, geraniol reduced the migratory activity of endothelial-like eEND2 cells. Western blot analyses further revealed that geraniol downregulates proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and upregulates cleaved caspase-3 (Casp-3) expression in eEND2 cells. Moreover, geraniol blocked vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGFR-2 signal transduction, resulting in a suppression of downstream AKT and ERK signaling pathways. In addition, geraniol significantly reduced vascular sprout formation in a rat aortic ring assay. In vivo, geraniol inhibited the vascularization of CT26 tumors in dorsal skinfold chambers of BALB/c mice, which was associated with a smaller tumor size when compared to vehicle-treated controls. Immunohistochemical analyses confirmed a decreased number of Ki67-positive cells and CD31-positive microvessels with reduced VEGFR-2 expression within geraniol-treated tumors. Taken together, these findings indicate that geraniol targets multiple angiogenic mechanisms and, therefore, is an attractive candidate for the anti-angiogenic treatment of tumors. PMID:26154255

  11. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate(EGCG) suppresses melanoma cell growth and metastasis by targeting TRAF6 activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Youyou; Luo, Zhongling; Zeng, Weiqi; Su, Juan; Peng, Cong; Chen, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    TRAF6 (TNF Receptor-Associated Factor 6) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that contains a Ring domain, induces K63-linked polyubiquitination, and plays a critical role in signaling transduction. Our previous results demonstrated that TRAF6 is overexpressed in melanoma and that TRAF6 knockdown dramatically attenuates tumor cell growth and metastasis. In this study, we found that EGCG can directly bind to TRAF6, and a computational model of the interaction between EGCG and TRAF6 revealed that EGCG probably interacts with TRAF6 at the residues of Gln54, Gly55, Asp57 ILe72, Cys73 and Lys96. Among these amino acids, mutation of Gln54, Asp57, ILe72 in TRAF6 could destroy EGCG bound to TRAF6, furthermore, our results demonstrated that EGCG significantly attenuates interaction between TRAF6 and UBC13(E2) and suppresses TRAF6 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, the phosphorylation of IκBα, p-TAK1 expression are decreased and the nuclear translocation of p65 and p50 is blocked by treatment with EGCG, leading to inactivation of the NF-κB pathway. Moreover, EGCG significantly inhibits cell growth as well as the migration and invasion of melanoma cells. Taken together, these findings show that EGCG is a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase inhibitor that could be used to target TRAF6 for chemotherapy or the prevention of melanoma. PMID:27791197

  12. ELL targets c-Myc for proteasomal degradation and suppresses tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Chi; Ji, Wei; Mei, Zhichao; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Dawei; Wang, Jing; Liu, Xing; Ouyang, Gang; Zhou, Jiangang; Xiao, Wuhan

    2016-03-24

    Increasing evidence supports that ELL (eleven-nineteen lysine-rich leukaemia) is a key regulator of transcriptional elongation, but the physiological function of Ell in mammals remains elusive. Here we show that ELL functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase and targets c-Myc for proteasomal degradation. In addition, we identify that UbcH8 serves as a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme in this pathway. Cysteine 595 of ELL is an active site of the enzyme; its mutation to alanine (C595A) renders the protein unable to promote the ubiquitination and degradation of c-Myc. ELL-mediated c-Myc degradation inhibits c-Myc-dependent transcriptional activity and cell proliferation, and also suppresses c-Myc-dependent xenograft tumour growth. In contrast, the ELL(C595A) mutant not only loses the ability to inhibit cell proliferation and xenograft tumour growth, but also promotes tumour metastasis. Thus, our work reveals a previously unrecognized function for ELL as an E3 ubiquitin ligase for c-Myc and a potential tumour suppressor.

  13. Ethanol-induced loss of brain cyclic AMP binding proteins: correlation with growth suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, S.; Kalmus, G.

    1987-05-01

    Brain hypoplasia secondary to maternal ethanol consumption is a common fetal defect observed in all models of fetal alcohol syndrome. The molecular mechanism by which ethanol inhibits growth is unknown but has been hypothesized to involve ethanol-induced changes in the activity of cyclic-AMP stimulated protein kinase. Acute and chronic alcohol exposure elevate cyclic AMP level in many tissues, including brain. This increase in cyclic AMP should increase the phosphorylating activity of kinase by increasing the amount of dissociated (active) kinase catalytic subunit. In 7-day embryonic chick brains, ethanol-induced growth suppression was correlated with increased brain cyclic AMP content but neither basal nor cyclic AMP stimulated kinase catalytic activity was increased. However, the levels of cyclic AMP binding protein (kinase regulatory subunit) were significantly lowered by ethanol exposure. Measured as either /sup 3/H cyclic AMP binding or as 8-azido cyclic AM/sup 32/P labeling, ethanol-exposed brains had significantly less cyclic AMP binding activity (51 +/- 14 versus 29 +/- 10 units/..mu..g protein for 8-azido cyclic AMP binding). These findings suggest that ethanol's effect on kinase activity may involve more than ethanol-induced activation of adenylate cyclase.

  14. Suppression of grain growth in nanocrystalline Bi2Te3 through oxide particle dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphry-Baker, Samuel A.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2014-11-01

    The strategy of suppressing grain growth by dispersing nanoscale particles that pin the grain boundaries is demonstrated in a nanocrystalline thermoelectric compound. Yttria nanoparticles that were incorporated by mechanical alloying enabled nanocrystalline (i.e., d < 100 nm) Bi2Te3 to be retained up to a homologous temperature of 0.94 Tm for durations over which the grain size of the unreinforced compound grew to several microns. The nanostructure appeared to saturate at a grain size that depended on volume fraction (f) according to an f -1/3 relationship, in accordance with theoretical models in the limit of high volume fractions of particles. Interestingly, at low temperatures, the particles stimulate enhanced grain growth over the unreinforced compound, due to particle-stimulated nucleation of recrystallization. To help prevent this effect, in-situ composites formed by internal oxidation of yttrium are compared with those made ex-situ by incorporation of yttria nanoparticles, with the result that the in-situ dispersion eliminates recrystallization at low temperatures and therefore improves nanostructure stabilization. These developments offer a pathway to thermally stabilized bulk nanocrystalline thermoelectrics processed via a powder route.

  15. CD147 silencing inhibits tumor growth by suppressing glucose transport in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Su, Juan; Gao, Tianyuan; Jiang, Minghao; Wu, Lisha; Zeng, Weiqi; Zhao, Shuang; Peng, Cong; Chen, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a very malignant disease and there are still no effective treatments. CD147 participates in the carcinogenesis of multiple human cancers and GLUT-1, as a glucose transporter, is associated with tumor growth. However, the function of CD147 and GLUT-1 in melanoma have not been completely understood. Thus, in this study we investigated the expression of CD147 and GLUT-1 in melanoma tissue, which were overexpressed compared with that in nevus tissue. In addition, CD147 and GLUT-1 were co-localized in the cytoplasm of human melanoma A375 cells. Immunoprecipitation proved that CD147 interacted with GLUT-1 at D105-199. Silencing CD147 by specific siRNA could downregulate GLUT-1 level via inhibiting PI3K/Akt signaling and decrease glucose uptake in A375 cells. In vivo experiments also supported that CD147 knockdown suppressed the tumor growth in melanoma subcutaneous mice model, observed by micro PET/CT. Our results could help validate CD147 as a new therapeutic target for treating melanoma. PMID:27556188

  16. Kaempferol suppresses bladder cancer tumor growth by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dang, Qiang; Song, Wenbin; Xu, Defeng; Ma, Yanmin; Li, Feng; Zeng, Jin; Zhu, Guodong; Wang, Xinyang; Chang, Luke S; He, Dalin; Li, Lei

    2015-09-01

    The effects of the flavonoid compound, kaempferol, which is an inhibitor of cancer cell proliferation and an inducer of cell apoptosis have been shown in various cancers, including lung, pancreatic, and ovarian, but its effect has never been studied in bladder cancer. Here, we investigated the effects of kaempferol on bladder cancer using multiple in vitro cell lines and in vivo mice studies. The MTT assay results on various bladder cancer cell lines showed that kaempferol enhanced bladder cancer cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, when analyzed by the flow cytometric analysis, DNA ladder experiment, and TUNEL assay, kaempferol significantly was shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. These in vitro results were confirmed in in vivo mice studies using subcutaneous xenografted mouse models. Consistent with the in vitro results, we found that treating mice with kaempferol significant suppression in tumor growth compared to the control group mice. Tumor tissue staining results showed decreased expressions of the growth related markers, yet increased expressions in apoptosis markers in the kaempferol treated group mice tissues compared to the control group mice. In addition, our in vitro and in vivo data showed kaempferol can also inhibit bladder cancer invasion and metastasis. Further mechanism dissection studies showed that significant down-regulation of the c-Met/p38 signaling pathway is responsible for the kaempferol mediated cell proliferation inhibition. All these findings suggest kaempferol might be an effective and novel chemotherapeutic drug to apply for the future therapeutic agent to combat bladder cancer.

  17. Knockdown of Mediator Complex Subunit 19 Suppresses the Growth and Invasion of Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongwei; Lv, Wei; Chen, Jian; Wan, Fengchun; Liu, Dongfu; Gao, Zhenli; Wu, Jitao

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common cancers in elderly men. Mediator Complex Subunit 19 (Med19) is overexpressed and plays promotional roles in many cancers. However, the roles of Med19 in PCa are still obscure. In this study, by using immunohistochemical staining, we found higher expression level of Med19 in PCa tissues than in adjacent benign prostate tissues. We then knocked down the Med19 expression in PCa cell lines LNCaP and PC3 by using lentivirus siRNA. Cell proliferation, anchor-independent growth, migration, and invasion were suppressed in Med19 knockdown PCa cells. In nude mice xenograft model, we found that Med19 knockdown PCa cells formed smaller tumors with lower proliferation index than did control cells. In the mechanism study, we found that Med19 could regulate genes involved in cell proliferation, cell cycle, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, including P27, pAKT, pPI3K, IGF1R, E-Cadherin, N-Cadherin, Vimentin, ZEB2, Snail-1 and Snail-2. Targeting Med19 in PCa cells could inhibit the PCa growth and metastasis, and might be a therapeutic option for PCa in the future. PMID:28125713

  18. Numerical prediction of rail roughness growth on tangent railway tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, J. C. O.

    2003-10-01

    Growth of railhead roughness (irregularities, waviness) is predicted through numerical simulation of dynamic train-track interaction on tangent track. The hypothesis is that wear is caused by longitudinal slip due to driven wheelsets, and that wear is proportional to the longitudinal frictional power in the contact patch. Emanating from an initial roughness spectrum corresponding to a new or a recent ground rail, an initial roughness profile is determined. Wheel-rail contact forces, creepages and wear for one wheelset passage are calculated in relation to location along a discretely supported track model. The calculated wear is scaled by a chosen number of wheelset passages, and is then added to the initial roughness profile. Field observations of rail corrugation on a Dutch track are used to validate the simulation model. Results from the simulations predict a large roughness growth rate for wavelengths around 30-40 mm. The large growth in this wavelength interval is explained by a low track receptance near the sleepers around the pinned-pinned resonance frequency, in combination with a large number of driven passenger wheelset passages at uniform speed. The agreement between simulations and field measurements is good with respect to dominating roughness wavelength and annual wear rate. Remedies for reducing roughness growth are discussed.

  19. Crystal methamphetamine injection predicts slower HIV RNA suppression among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Fairbairn, Nadia; Kerr, Thomas; Milloy, M-J; Zhang, Ruth; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan

    2011-07-01

    We examined the impact of crystal methamphetamine injection on HIV RNA suppression among a prospective cohort of HIV-positive injection drug users initiating antiretroviral therapy. A multivariate Cox regression analysis found crystal methamphetamine injection to be negatively associated with viral load suppression (RH=0.63 [95% CI: 0.40-0.98]; p=0.039). This study is the first to our knowledge to demonstrate an association between crystal methamphetamine use and HIV RNA suppression.

  20. WNT10B functional dualism: beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent growth promotion or independent suppression with deregulated expression in cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Hirohide; Matsubara, Kenichi; Zhou, Xiaoling; Okamura, Shu; Kubo, Takahiko; Murase, Yaeko; Shikauchi, Yuko; Esteller, Manel; Herman, James G; Wei Wang, Xin; Harris, Curtis C

    2007-11-01

    We found aberrant DNA methylation of the WNT10B promoter region in 46% of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 15% of colon cancer samples. Three of 10 HCC and one of two colon cancer cell lines demonstrated low or no expression, and 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine reactivated WNT10B expression with the induction of demethylation, indicating that WNT10B is silenced by DNA methylation in some cancers, whereas WNT10B expression is up-regulated in seven of the 10 HCC cell lines and a colon cancer cell line. These results indicate that WNT10B can be deregulated by either overexpression or silencing in cancer. We found that WNT10B up-regulated beta-catenin/Tcf activity. However, WNT10B-overexpressing cells demonstrated a reduced growth rate and anchorage-independent growth that is independent of the beta-catenin/Tcf activation, because mutant beta-catenin-transduced cells did not suppress growth, and dominant-negative hTcf-4 failed to alleviate the growth suppression by WNT10B. Although WNT10B expression alone inhibits cell growth, it acts synergistically with the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) to stimulate cell growth. WNT10B is bifunctional, one function of which is involved in beta-catenin/Tcf activation, and the other function is related to the down-regulation of cell growth through a different mechanism. We suggest that FGF switches WNT10B from a negative to a positive cell growth regulator.

  1. Bacillus megaterium A6 suppresses Sclerotinia sclerotiorum on oilseed rape in the field and promotes oilseed rape growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum causes serious yield losses in crops in The People’s Republic of China and other regions of the world. Two formulations of oilseed rape seed containing the plant-growth promoting bacterium Bacillus megaterium A6 were evaluated for suppression of this pathogen on oilseed rap...

  2. MELATONIN-INDUCED SUPPRESSION OF PC12 CELL GROWTH IS MEDIATED BY ITS GI COUPLED TRANSMEMBRANE RECEPTORS. (R826248)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of pertussis toxin, an uncoupler of Gi protein from adenylate cyclase, and luzindole, a competitive inhibitor of melatonin receptor binding, were examined for their ability to inhibit melatonin-induced suppression of PC12 cell growth. Both agents inhibited the mela...

  3. Predicting the growth of nanoscale nuclei by histotripsy pulses

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Kenneth B; Holland, Christy K

    2016-01-01

    Histotripsy is a focused ultrasound therapy that ablates tissue through the mechanical action of cavitation. Histotripsy-initiated cavitation activity is generated from shocked ultrasound pulses that scatter from incidental nuclei (shock scattering histotripsy), or purely tensile ultrasound pulses (microtripsy). The Yang/Church model was numerically integrated to predict the behavior of the cavitation nuclei exposed to measured shock scattering histotripsy pulses. The bubble motion exhibited expansion only behavior, suggesting that the ablative action of a histotripsy pulse is related to the maximum size of the bubble. The analytic model of Holland and Apfel was extended to predict the maximum size of cavitation nuclei for both shock scattering histotripsy and microtripsy excitations. The predictions of the analytic model and the numerical model agree within 2% for fully developed shock scattering histotripsy pulses (>72 MPa peak positive pressure). For shock scattering histotripsy pulses that are not fully developed (<72 MPa), the analytic model underestimated the maximum size by less than 5%. The analytic model was also used to predict bubble growth nucleated from microtripsy insonations, and was found to be consistent with experimental observations. Based on the extended analytic model, metrics were developed to predict the extent of the treatment zone from histotripsy pulses. PMID:26988374

  4. Protein kinase C activators suppress stimulation of capillary endothelial cell growth by angiogenic endothelial mitogens

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    The intracellular events regulating endothelial cell proliferation and organization into formalized capillaries are not known. We report that the protein kinase C activator beta-phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) suppresses bovine capillary endothelial (BCE) cell proliferation (K50 = 6 +/- 4 nM) and DNA synthesis in response to human hepatoma-derived growth factor, an angiogenic endothelial mitogen. In contrast, PDBu has no effect on the proliferation of bovine aortic endothelial cells and is mitogenic for bovine aortic smooth muscle and BALB/c 3T3 cells. Several observations indicate that the inhibition of human hepatoma- derived growth factor-stimulated BCE cell growth by PDBu is mediated through protein kinase C. Different phorbol compounds inhibit BCE cell growth according to their potencies as protein kinase C activators (12- O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate greater than PDBu much greater than beta-phorbol 12,13-diacetate much much greater than beta-phorbol; alpha- phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate; alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate). PDBu binds to a single class of specific, saturable sites on the BCE cell with an apparent Kd of 8 nM, in agreement with reported affinities of PDBu for protein kinase C in other systems. Specific binding of PDBu to BCE cells is displaced by sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol, a protein kinase C activator and an analog of the putative second messenger activating this kinase in vivo. The weak protein kinase C activator, sn-1,2- dibutyrylglycerol, does not affect PDBu binding. A cytosolic extract from BCE cells contains a calcium/phosphatidylserine-dependent protein kinase that is activated by sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol and PDBu, but not by beta-phorbol. These findings indicate that protein kinase C activation can cause capillary endothelial cells to become desensitized to angiogenic endothelial mitogens. This intracellular regulatory mechanism might be invoked during certain phases of angiogenesis, for example when proliferating endothelial cells become

  5. Met tyrosine kinase inhibitor, PF-2341066, suppresses growth and invasion of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jing; Tian, Ying; Xue, Cong; Hu, Zhihuang; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We explored the effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/Met signaling pathway on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells in vitro and in vivo, and investigated the ability of Met tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) to block HGF-induced biological signaling. Experimental design Met TKI inhibitor PF-2341066 alone, or in combination with cisplatin, was investigated for its ability to block HGF-induced signaling and biological effects in vitro and in vivo. HGF/Met expression and activation of signaling in NPC cells were detected by using Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Biological evaluation, including wound healing, cell proliferation, and invasion of NPC cells, was also examined, and the correlation between HGF/Met expression of primary and metastatic tumor in NPC patients and clinical prognosis were also analyzed. Results Met TKI inhibitor, PF-2341066, inhibited growth of NPC cells in vivo with half maximal inhibitory concentration of 0.79±0.21 μmol/L, and suppressed invasion and migration of NPC cells; also, the inhibition of PF-2341066 was synergized with cisplatin treatment. Compared with the control group, Met TKI inhibited metastasis of transplanted NPC in nude mice (the number of live metastases [mean ± SD]: 5.8±2.2 versus 11.8±2.2, P=0.03; the number of lung metastases: 2.3±1.5 versus 5.3±0.9, P=0.06). HGF was widely expressed in both primary and metastatic lesions while Met expression of metastatic lesions was higher than that of primary lesions (primary lesions: 24.7%; liver metastases: 40%; lung metastases: 29%; lymph node metastases: 29%, P<0.05), and overall survival of NPC patients with higher expression of Met was shorter (P=0.13). Conclusion Our results demonstrated that HGF/Met signaling promoted NPC growth, further resulting in metastasis and poor prognosis. Met TKI, PF-2341066, showed potent antitumor activity in vivo and in vitro which was enhanced by combination with cisplatin. Our study implied that HGF/Met signaling was the

  6. Nimotuzumab enhances temozolomide-induced growth suppression of glioma cells expressing mutant EGFR in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Yusuke; Shimizu, Saki; Shishido-Hara, Yukiko; Suzuki, Kaori; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Nagane, Motoo

    2016-03-01

    A mutant form of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), EGFRvIII, is common in glioblastoma (GBM) and confers enhanced tumorigenic activity and drug resistance. Nimotuzumab, an anti-EGFR antibody, has shown preclinical and clinical activity to GBM, but its specific activity against EGFRvIII has not been fully investigated. Human glioma U87MG or LNZ308 cells overexpressing either wild-type (wt) EGFR or EGFRvIII were treated with nimotuzumab, temozolomide, or both. Expression and phosphorylation status of molecules were determined by Western blot analysis. Methylation status of promoter region of O(6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) was detected by methylation-specific PCR. Antitumor activity was tested using nude mice bearing either subcutaneous or intracerebral xenografts along with analyses of EGFR phosphorylation status, proliferation, apoptosis, and vessel density. Nimotuzumab treatment resulted in reduction of EGFRvIII tyrosine phosphorylation with a decrease in Akt phosphorylation that was greater than that of wtEGFR. Correspondingly, antitumor effects, growth suppression and survival elongation, were more significant in mice bearing either subcutaneous or intracerebral tumor expressing EGFRvIII than in those expressing wtEGFR. These effects were markedly increased when temozolomide was combined with nimotuzumab. The post-treatment recurrent brain tumors exhibited a decrease in expression of the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, MSH6 and MLH1, but their methylated MGMT status did not changed. Nimotuzumab has in vivo antitumor activity against GBM, especially those expressing EGFRvIII, when combined with temozolomide. This could provide a basis for preselection of patients with GBM by EGFR status who might benefit from the nimotuzumab and temozolomide combination therapy.

  7. Quantitative digital imaging of banana growth suppression by plant parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Roderick, Hugh; Mbiru, Elvis; Coyne, Danny; Tripathi, Leena; Atkinson, Howard J

    2012-01-01

    A digital camera fitted with a hemispherical lens was used to generate canopy leaf area index (LAI) values for a banana (Musa spp.) field trial with the aim of establishing a method for monitoring stresses on tall crop plants. The trial in Uganda consisted of two cultivars susceptible to nematodes, a plantain, Gonja manjaya and an East African Highland banana, Mbwazirume, plus a nematode resistant dessert banana, Yangambi km5. A comparative approach included adding a mixed population of Radopholus similis, Helicotylenchus multicinctus and Meloidogyne spp. to the soil around half the plants of each cultivar prior to field planting. Measurements of LAI were made fortnightly from 106 days post-planting over two successive cropping cycles. The highest mean LAI during the first cycle for Gonja manjaya was suppressed to 74.8±3.5% by the addition of nematodes, while for Mbwazirume the values were reduced to 71.1±1.9%. During the second cycle these values were 69.2±2.2% and 72.2±2.7%, respectively. Reductions in LAI values were validated as due to the biotic stress by assessing nematode numbers in roots and the necrosis they caused at each of two harvests and the relationship is described. Yield losses, including a component due to toppled plants, were 35.3% and 55.3% for Gonja manjaya and 31.4% and 55.8% for Mbwazirume, at first and second harvests respectively. Yangambi km5 showed no decrease in LAI and yield in the presence of nematodes at both harvests. LAI estimated by hemispherical photography provided a rapid basis for detecting biotic growth checks by nematodes on bananas, and demonstrated the potential of the approach for studies of growth checks to other tall crop plants caused by biotic or abiotic stresses.

  8. Scutellaria Barbata D Don Inhibits Colorectal Cancer Growth via Suppression of Multiple Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiumao; Chen, Youqin; Cai, Qiaoyan; Wei, Lihui; Zhan, Youzhi; Shen, Aling; Sferra, Thomas J; Peng, Jun

    2014-05-01

    The pathogenic mechanisms underlying cancer development are complex and heterogeneous, involving multiple cellular signaling transduction pathways that usually function redundantly. In addition, crosstalk between these pathways generates a complicated and robust signaling network that is regulated by compensatory mechanisms. Given the complexity of cancer pathogenesis and progression, many of the currently used antitumor agents, which typically target a single intracellular pathway, might not always be effective on complex tumor systems. Moreover, long-term use of these agents often generates drug resistance and toxicity against normal cells. Therefore, the development of novel anticancer chemotherapies is urgently needed.Scutellaria barbataD Don (SB) is a medicinal herb that has long been used in China to treat various types of cancer. We previously reported that the ethanol extract of SB (EESB) is able to induce colon cancer cell apoptosis, inhibit cell proliferation and tumor angiogenesis via modulation of several pathways, including Hedgehog, Akt, and p53. To further elucidate the precise mechanisms of SB's antitumor activity, using a colorectal cancer (CRC) mouse xenograft model in the present study, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy and molecular mechanisms of EESB against tumor growth. We found that EESB reduced tumor volume and tumor weight but had no effect on body weight gain in CRC mice, demonstrating that EESB could inhibit colon cancer growth in vivo without apparent adverse effect. In addition, EESB treatment could significantly suppress the activation of several CRC-related pathways, including STAT3, Erk, and p38 signalings in tumor tissues, and alter the expression of multiple critical target genes such as Bcl-2, Bax, Cyclin D1, CDK4, and p21. These molecular effects lead to the induction of cancer cell apoptosis and inhibition of cell proliferation. Our findings demonstrate that SB possesses a broad range of antitumor activities because of its

  9. Inhibition of TMEM16A Expression Suppresses Growth and Invasion in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Yujie; Sun, Meiyan; Wu, Fei; Yang, Longfei; Di, Weihua; Zhang, Guizhen; Zhong, Lili; Ma, Zhiming; Zheng, Jinhao; Fang, Xuedong; Ma, Tonghui

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis leads to poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients, and there is a growing need for new therapeutic targets. TMEM16A (ANO1, DOG1 or TAOS2) has recently been identified as a calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) and is reported to be overexpressed in several malignancies; however, its expression and function in colorectal cancer (CRC) remains unclear. In this study, we found expression of TMEM16A mRNA and protein in high-metastatic-potential SW620, HCT116 and LS174T cells, but not in primary HCT8 and SW480 cells, using RT-PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence labeling. Patch-clamp recordings detected CaCC currents regulated by intracellular Ca2+ and voltage in SW620 cells. Knockdown of TMEM16A by short hairpin RNAs (shRNA) resulted in the suppression of growth, migration and invasion of SW620 cells as detected by MTT, wound-healing and transwell assays. Mechanistically, TMEM16A depletion was accompanied by the dysregulation of phospho-MEK, phospho-ERK1/2 and cyclin D1 expression. Flow cytometry analysis showed that SW620 cells were inhibited from the G1 to S phase of the cell cycle in the TMEM16A shRNA group compared with the control group. In conclusion, our results indicate that TMEM16A CaCC is involved in growth, migration and invasion of metastatic CRC cells and provide evidence for TMEM16A as a potential drug target for treating metastatic colorectal carcinoma. PMID:25541940

  10. Fucoidan Suppresses the Growth of Human Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Atashrazm, Farzaneh; Lowenthal, Ray M; Woods, Gregory M; Holloway, Adele F; Karpiniec, Samuel S; Dickinson, Joanne L

    2016-03-01

    Fucoidan, a natural component of seaweeds, is reported to have immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects. The mechanisms underpinning these activities remain poorly understood. In this study, the cytotoxicity and anti-tumor activities of fucoidan were investigated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. The human AML cell lines NB4, KG1a, HL60, and K562 were treated with fucoidan and cell cycle, cell proliferation, and expression of apoptotic pathways molecules were analyzed. Fucoidan suppressed the proliferation and induced apoptosis through the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways in the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cell lines NB4 and HL60, but not in KG1a and K562 cells. In NB4 cells, apoptosis was caspase-dependent as it was significantly attenuated by pre-treatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor. P21/WAF1/CIP1 was significantly up-regulated leading to cell cycle arrest. Fucoidan decreased the activation of ERK1/2 and down-regulated the activation of AKT through hypo-phosphorylation of Thr(308) residue but not Ser(473). In vivo, a xenograft model using the NB4 cells was employed. Mice were fed with fucoidan and tumor growth was measured following inoculation with NB4 cells. Subsequently, splenic natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity was also examined. Oral doses of fucoidan significantly delayed tumor growth in the xenograft model and increased cytolytic activity of NK cells. Taken together, these data suggest that the selective inhibitory effect of fucoidan on APL cells and its protective effect against APL development in mice warrant further investigation of fucoidan as a useful agent in treatment of certain types of leukemia.

  11. Quantitative Digital Imaging of Banana Growth Suppression by Plant Parasitic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Roderick, Hugh; Mbiru, Elvis; Coyne, Danny; Tripathi, Leena; Atkinson, Howard J.

    2012-01-01

    A digital camera fitted with a hemispherical lens was used to generate canopy leaf area index (LAI) values for a banana (Musa spp.) field trial with the aim of establishing a method for monitoring stresses on tall crop plants. The trial in Uganda consisted of two cultivars susceptible to nematodes, a plantain, Gonja manjaya and an East African Highland banana, Mbwazirume, plus a nematode resistant dessert banana, Yangambi km5. A comparative approach included adding a mixed population of Radopholus similis, Helicotylenchus multicinctus and Meloidogyne spp. to the soil around half the plants of each cultivar prior to field planting. Measurements of LAI were made fortnightly from 106 days post-planting over two successive cropping cycles. The highest mean LAI during the first cycle for Gonja manjaya was suppressed to 74.8±3.5% by the addition of nematodes, while for Mbwazirume the values were reduced to 71.1±1.9%. During the second cycle these values were 69.2±2.2% and 72.2±2.7%, respectively. Reductions in LAI values were validated as due to the biotic stress by assessing nematode numbers in roots and the necrosis they caused at each of two harvests and the relationship is described. Yield losses, including a component due to toppled plants, were 35.3% and 55.3% for Gonja manjaya and 31.4% and 55.8% for Mbwazirume, at first and second harvests respectively. Yangambi km5 showed no decrease in LAI and yield in the presence of nematodes at both harvests. LAI estimated by hemispherical photography provided a rapid basis for detecting biotic growth checks by nematodes on bananas, and demonstrated the potential of the approach for studies of growth checks to other tall crop plants caused by biotic or abiotic stresses. PMID:23285286

  12. Growth suppressive efficacy of human lak cells against human lung-cancer implanted into scid mice.

    PubMed

    Teraoka, S; Kyoizumi, S; Suzuki, T; Yamakido, M; Akiyama, M

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the efficacy of immunotherapy using human lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells against a human-lung squamous-cell carcinoma cell line (RERF-LC-AI) implanted into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. A statistically significant growth suppressive effect on RERF-LC-AI implanted into SCID mice was observed when human LAK cells were administered into the caudal vein of the mice treated with a continuous supply (initiated prior to LAK cells injection) of rIL-2. The human LAK cells stained with PKH 2, a fluorescent dye, for later detection using flow cytometry were administered into the caudal vein of RERF-LC-AI bearing SCID mice; the cells persisted for 7 days in the implanted lung cancer tissue and in the mouse peripheral blood, but for 5 days in the mouse spleen. The number of infiltrated human LAK cells in each tissue increased dose-dependently with the number of injected cells. The results indicate that the antitumor effect most likely occurred during the early implantation period of the human LAK cells. These results demonstrate the applicability of this model to the in vivo study of human lung cancer therapy.

  13. AP-2{alpha} suppresses skeletal myoblast proliferation and represses fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 promoter activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darrion L.; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-01-15

    Skeletal muscle development is partly characterized by myoblast proliferation and subsequent differentiation into postmitotic muscle fibers. Developmental regulation of expression of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene is required for normal myoblast proliferation and muscle formation. As a result, FGFR1 promoter activity is controlled by multiple transcriptional regulatory proteins during both proliferation and differentiation of myogenic cells. The transcription factor AP-2{alpha} is present in nuclei of skeletal muscle cells and suppresses myoblast proliferation in vitro. Since FGFR1 gene expression is tightly linked to myoblast proliferation versus differentiation, the FGFR1 promoter was examined for candidate AP-2{alpha} binding sites. Mutagenesis studies indicated that a candidate binding site located at - 1035 bp functioned as a repressor cis-regulatory element. Furthermore, mutation of this site alleviated AP-2{alpha}-mediated repression of FGFR1 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that AP-2{alpha} interacted with the FGFR1 promoter in both proliferating myoblasts and differentiated myotubes. In total, these results indicate that AP-2{alpha} is a transcriptional repressor of FGFR1 gene expression during skeletal myogenesis.

  14. Vaginal delivery of paclitaxel via nanoparticles with non-mucoadhesive surfaces suppresses cervical tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming; Yu, Tao; Wang, Ying-Ying; Lai, Samuel K.; Zeng, Qi; Miao, Bolong; Tang, Benjamin C.; Simons, Brian W.; Ensign, Laura; Liu, Guanshu; Chan, Kannie W. Y.; Juang, Chih-Yin; Mert, Olcay; Wood, Joseph; Fu, Jie; McMahon, Michael T.; Wu, T.-C.; Hung, Chien-Fu; Hanes, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Local delivery of chemotherapeutics in the cervicovaginal tract using nanoparticles may reduce adverse side effects associated with systemic chemotherapy, while improving outcomes for early stage cervical cancer. We hypothesize drug-loaded nanoparticles must rapidly penetrate cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) lining the female reproductive tract to effectively deliver their payload to underlying diseased tissues in a uniform and sustained manner. We develop paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles, composed entirely of polymers used in FDA-approved products, which rapidly penetrate human CVM and provide sustained drug release with minimal burst effect. We further employ a mouse model with aggressive cervical tumors established in the cervicovaginal tract to compare paclitaxel-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (conventional particles , or CP) and similar particles coated with Pluronic® F127 (mucus-penetrating particles , or MPP). CP are mucoadhesive and, thus, aggregated in mucus, while MPP achieve more uniform distribution and close proximity to cervical tumors. Paclitaxel-MPP suppress tumor growth more effectively and prolong median survival of mice compared to free paclitaxel or paclitaxel-CP. Histopathological studies demonstrate minimal toxicity to the cervicovaginal epithelia, suggesting paclitaxel-MPP may be safe for intravaginal use. These results demonstrate for the first time the in vivo advantages of polymer-based MPP for treatment of tumors localized to a mucosal surface. PMID:24339398

  15. A 3D-printed local drug delivery patch for pancreatic cancer growth suppression.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hee-Gyeong; Choi, Yeong-Jin; Kang, Kyung Shin; Hong, Jung Min; Pati, Ruby Gupta; Park, Moon Nyeo; Shim, In Kyong; Lee, Chan Mi; Kim, Song Cheol; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-09-28

    Since recurrence and metastasis of pancreatic cancer has a worse prognosis, chemotherapy has been typically performed to attack the remained malignant cells after resection. However, it is difficult to achieve the therapeutic concentration at the tumor site with systemic chemotherapy. Numerous local drug delivery systems have been studied to overcome the shortcomings of systemic delivery. However, because most systems involve dissolution of the drug within the carrier, the concentration of the drug is limited to the saturation solubility, and consequently cannot reach the sufficient drug dose. Therefore, we hypothesized that 3D printing of a biodegradable patch incorporated with a high drug concentration would provide a versatile shape to be administered at the exact tumor site as well as an appropriate therapeutic drug concentration with a controlled release. Here, we introduce the 3D-printed patches composed of a blend of poly(lactide-co-glycolide), polycaprolactone, and 5-fluorouracil for delivering the anti-cancer drug in a prolonged controlled manner and therapeutic dose. 3D printing technology can manipulate the geometry of the patch and the drug release kinetics. The patches were flexible, and released the drug over four weeks, and thereby suppressed growth of the subcutaneous pancreatic cancer xenografts in mice with minimized side effects. Our approach reveals that 3D printing of bioabsorbable implants containing anti-cancer drugs could be a powerful method for an effective local delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to treatment of cancers.

  16. Suppression of the emittance growth induced by coherent synchrotron radiation in triple-bend achromats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xi-Yang; Jiao, Yi; Xu, Gang; Cui, Xiao-Hao

    2015-05-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effect in a bending path plays an important role in transverse emittance dilution in high-brightness light sources and linear colliders, where the electron beams are of short bunch length and high peak current. Suppression of the emittance growth induced by CSR is critical to preserve the beam quality and help improve the machine performance. It has been shown that the CSR effect in a double-bend achromat (DBA) can be analyzed with the two-dimensional point-kick analysis method. In this paper, this method is applied to analyze the CSR effect in a triple-bend achromat (TBA) with symmetric layout, which is commonly used in the optics designs of energy recovery linacs (ERLs). A condition of cancelling the CSR linear effect in such a TBA is obtained, and is verified through numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that emittance preservation can be achieved with this condition, and to a large extent, has a high tolerance to the fluctuation of the initial transverse phase space distribution of the beam. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475202, 11405187) and Youth Innovation Promotion Association of Chinese Academy of Sciences (2015009)

  17. BCL2-BH4 antagonist BDA-366 suppresses human myeloma growth

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jiusheng; Park, Dongkyoo; Wang, Mengchang; Nooka, Ajay; Deng, Qiaoya; Matulis, Shannon; Kaufman, Jonathan; Lonial, Sagar; Boise, Lawrence H.; Galipeau, Jacques; Deng, Xingming

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a heterogeneous plasma cell malignancy and remains incurable. B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL2) protein correlates with the survival and the drug resistance of myeloma cells. BH3 mimetics have been developed to disrupt the binding between BCL2 and its pro-apoptotic BCL2 family partners for the treatment of MM, but with limited therapeutic efficacy. We recently identified a small molecule BDA-366 as a BCL2 BH4 domain antagonist, converting it from an anti-apoptotic into a pro-apoptotic molecule. In this study, we demonstrated that BDA-366 induces robust apoptosis in MM cell lines and primary MM cells by inducing BCL2 conformational change. Delivery of BDA-366 substantially suppressed the growth of human MM xenografts in NOD-scid/IL2Rγnull mice, without significant cytotoxic effects on normal hematopoietic cells or body weight. Thus, BDA-366 functions as a novel BH4-based BCL2 inhibitor and offers an entirely new tool for MM therapy. PMID:27049723

  18. Cardamonin Regulates miR-21 Expression and Suppresses Angiogenesis Induced by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fu-Sheng; Tian, Sha-Sha; Lu, Jin-Jian; Ding, Xing-Hong; Qian, Chao-Dong; Ding, Bin; Ding, Zhi-Shan; Jin, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Cardamonin has promising potential in cancer prevention and therapy by interacting with proteins and modifying the expressions and activities, including factors of cell survival, proliferation, and angiogenesis. In our precious study, we have demonstrated that cardamonin suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor- (VEGF-) induced angiogenesis as evaluated in the mouse aortic ring assay. It is also known that microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in angiogenesis. Herein, we hypothesized whether antiangiogenesis effect of cardamonin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) triggered by VEGF was associated with miRNAs. We found that cardamonin reduced the miR-21 expression induced by VEGF in HUVECs. Treatment with miR-21 mimics abolished the effects of cardamonin on VEGF-induced cell proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis in HUVECs. However, treatment with miR-21 inhibitors presented the opposite effects, indicating the vital role of miR-21 in this process. Our study provides a new insight of the preliminary mechanism of anti-VEGF-induced angiogenesis by cardamonin in HUVECs. PMID:26266258

  19. Iloprost suppresses connective tissue growth factor production in fibroblasts and in the skin of scleroderma patients

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Richard; Shiwen, Xu; Martini, Giorgia; Holmes, Alan; Leask, Andrew; Haberberger, Thomas; Martin, George R.; Black, Carol M.; Abraham, David

    2001-01-01

    Patients with scleroderma receiving Iloprost as a treatment for severe Raynaud’s phenomenon report a reduction in skin tightness, suggesting that this drug inhibits skin fibrosis. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a recently described profibrotic cytokine, acts downstream and in concert with TGF-β to stimulate the fibrotic process and is involved in the fibrosis seen in scleroderma. Here we show that Iloprost, acting by elevation of cAMP, blocks the induction of CTGF and the increase in collagen synthesis in fibroblasts exposed to TGF-β. The potency of Iloprost with respect to suppression of CTGF far exceeds that of other prostanoid receptor agonists, suggesting that its effect is mediated by the prostacyclin receptor IP. By sampling dermal interstitial fluid using a suction blister device, we show that CTGF levels are greatly elevated in the dermis of scleroderma patients compared with healthy controls and that Iloprost infusion causes a marked decrease in dermal CTGF levels. These studies suggest that Iloprost could be reducing the level of a key profibrotic cytokine in scleroderma patients and that endogenous production of eicosanoids may limit the fibrotic response to TGF-β. PMID:11457877

  20. Mononuclear cell modulation of connective tissue function: suppression of fibroblast growth by stimulation of endogenous prostaglandin production.

    PubMed Central

    Korn, J H; Halushka, P V; LeRoy, E C

    1980-01-01

    The role of immune cell products in modulating connective tissue metabolism was investigated. Supernates of both unstimulated and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human mononuclear cell cultures suppressed fibroblast proliferation (up to 90%) and concomintantly stimulated fibroblast prostaglandin E(PGE) synthesis (20- to 70-fold). The growth suppression was, at least in part, a secondary result of the increased fibroblast PGE synthesis; growth suppression (a) paralled the increased fibroblast PGE synthesis, (b) was reversed by addition of inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis (indomethacin, meclofenamate, and eicostaetraynoic acid), and (c) was reproduced by addition of exogenous PGE2 to fibroblast cultures. The prostaglandin-stimulatory, growth-suppressive activity was a product of non-T-lymphocyte, adherent cells and was present within 6 h of mononuclear cell culture. The activity was heat (56 degrees C) and trypsin sensitive, nondialyzable, and appeared in the 12,000-20,000 mol wt fractions by Sephadex G-100 chromatography. The activity in supernates of mononuclear cell cultures was removed by incubation with fibroblasts but not by similar incubation with peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Mononuclear cells release a factor(s) which modulates fibroblast proliferation by altering prostaglandin metabolism. PMID:7356693

  1. Linking the Belowground Microbial Composition, Diversity and Activity to Soilborne Disease Suppression and Growth Promotion of Tomato Amended with Biochar

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Amit K.; Elad, Yigal; Paudel, Indira; Graber, Ellen R.; Cytryn, Eddie; Frenkel, Omer

    2017-01-01

    Biochar, in addition to sequestering carbon, ameliorating soil, and improving plant performance, can impact foliar and soilborne plant diseases. Nevertheless, the mechanisms associated with suppression of soilborne diseases and improved plant performances are not well understood. This study is designed to establish the relationships between biochar-induced changes in rhizosphere microbial community structure, taxonomic and functional diversity, and activity with soilborne disease suppression and enhanced plant performance in a comprehensive fashion. Biochar suppressed Fusarium crown and root-rot of tomato and simultaneously improved tomato plant growth and physiological parameters. Furthermore, biochar reduced Fusarium root colonization and survival in soil, and increased the culturable counts of several biocontrol and plant growth promoting microorganisms. Illumina sequencing analyses of 16S rRNA gene revealed substantial differences in rhizosphere bacterial taxonomical composition between biochar-amended and non-amended treatments. Moreover, biochar amendment caused a significant increase in microbial taxonomic and functional diversity, microbial activities and an overall shift in carbon-source utilization. High microbial taxonomic and functional diversity and activity in the rhizosphere has been previously associated with suppression of diseases caused by soilborne pathogens and with plant growth promotion, and may collectively explain the significant reduction of disease and improvement in plant performance observed in the presence of biochar. PMID:28287177

  2. Linking the Belowground Microbial Composition, Diversity and Activity to Soilborne Disease Suppression and Growth Promotion of Tomato Amended with Biochar.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Amit K; Elad, Yigal; Paudel, Indira; Graber, Ellen R; Cytryn, Eddie; Frenkel, Omer

    2017-03-13

    Biochar, in addition to sequestering carbon, ameliorating soil, and improving plant performance, can impact foliar and soilborne plant diseases. Nevertheless, the mechanisms associated with suppression of soilborne diseases and improved plant performances are not well understood. This study is designed to establish the relationships between biochar-induced changes in rhizosphere microbial community structure, taxonomic and functional diversity, and activity with soilborne disease suppression and enhanced plant performance in a comprehensive fashion. Biochar suppressed Fusarium crown and root-rot of tomato and simultaneously improved tomato plant growth and physiological parameters. Furthermore, biochar reduced Fusarium root colonization and survival in soil, and increased the culturable counts of several biocontrol and plant growth promoting microorganisms. Illumina sequencing analyses of 16S rRNA gene revealed substantial differences in rhizosphere bacterial taxonomical composition between biochar-amended and non-amended treatments. Moreover, biochar amendment caused a significant increase in microbial taxonomic and functional diversity, microbial activities and an overall shift in carbon-source utilization. High microbial taxonomic and functional diversity and activity in the rhizosphere has been previously associated with suppression of diseases caused by soilborne pathogens and with plant growth promotion, and may collectively explain the significant reduction of disease and improvement in plant performance observed in the presence of biochar.

  3. Dark-ages Reionization & Galaxy Formation Simulation VIII. Suppressed growth of dark matter halos during the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yuxiang; Duffy, Alan R.; Mutch, Simon J.; Poole, Gregory B.; Geil, Paul M.; Angel, Paul W.; Mesinger, Andrei; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate how the hydrostatic suppression of baryonic accretion affects the growth rate of dark matter halos during the Epoch of Reionization. By comparing halo properties in a simplistic hydrodynamic simulation in which gas only cools adiabatically, with its collisionless equivalent, we find that halo growth is slowed as hydrostatic forces prevent gas from collapsing. In our simulations, at the high redshifts relevant for reionization (between ˜6 and ˜11), halos that host dwarf galaxies (≲ 109M⊙) can be reduced by up to a factor of 2 in mass due to the hydrostatic pressure of baryons. Consequently, the inclusion of baryonic effects reduces the amplitude of the low mass tail of the halo mass function by factors of 2 to 4. In addition, we find that the fraction of baryons in dark matter halos hosting dwarf galaxies at high redshift never exceeds ˜90% of the cosmic baryon fraction. When implementing baryonic processes, including cooling, star formation, supernova feedback and reionization, the suppression effects become more significant with further reductions of ˜30% to 60%. Although convergence tests suggest that the suppression may become weaker in higher resolution simulations, this suppressed growth will be important for semi-analytic models of galaxy formation, in which the halo mass inherited from an underlying N-body simulation directly determines galaxy properties. Based on the adiabatic simulation, we provide tables to account for these effects in N-body simulations, and present a modification of the halo mass function along with explanatory analytic calculations.

  4. BMP2-induced inflammation can be suppressed by the osteoinductive growth factor NELL-1.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jia; James, Aaron W; Zara, Janette N; Asatrian, Greg; Khadarian, Kevork; Zhang, James B; Ho, Stephanie; Kim, Hyun Ju; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2013-11-01

    Bone-morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) is currently the only Food and Drug Administration-approved osteoinductive growth factor used in clinical settings for bone regeneration and repair. However, the use of BMP2 is encumbered by numerous clinical complications, including postoperative inflammation and life-threatening cervical swelling. Thus, methods to prevent BMP2-induced inflammation would have far-reaching clinical implications toward improving current BMP2-based methods for bone regeneration. For the first time, we investigate the potential role of the growth factor Nel-like molecule-1 (NELL-1) in inhibiting BMP2-induced inflammation. Adult rats underwent a femoral bone onlay procedure, treated with either BMP2 protein (4 mg/mL), NELL-1 protein (4 mg/mL), or both proteins combined. Animals were evaluated at 3, 7, and 14 days postoperatively by histology, histomorphometry, immunohistochemistry, and real-time PCR for markers of inflammation (TNFα, IL6). The relative levels of TNFα and IL6 in serum were also detected by ELISA. The mechanism for NELL-1's anti-inflammatory effect was further assessed through examining inflammatory markers and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH3T3 cells. BMP2 significantly induced local inflammation, including an early and pronounced polymorphonuclear cell infiltration accompanied by increased expression of TNFα and IL6. Treatment with NELL-1 alone elicited no significant inflammatory response. However, NELL-1 significantly attenuated BMP2-induced inflammation by all markers and at all timepoints. These local findings were also confirmed using systemic serum inflammatory biomarkers (TNFα, IL6). In each case, NELL-1 fully reversed BMP2-induced systemic inflammation. Lastly, our findings were recapitulated in vitro, where NELL-1 suppressed BMP2 induced expression of inflammatory markers, as well as NF-κB transcriptional activity and generation of ROS. BMP2-induced inflammation is a

  5. GM3 suppresses anchorage-independent growth via Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor beta in melanoma B16 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; Xu, Su; Wang, Yinan; Wu, Peixing; Zhang, Jinghai; Sato, Toshinori; Yamagata, Sadako; Yamagata, Tatsuya

    2011-08-01

    Ly-GDI, Rho GTPase dissociation inhibitor beta, was found to be expressed parallel to the GM3 level in mouse B16 cells whose GM3 contents were modified by B4galt6 sense, B4galt6 antisense cDNA, or St3galt5 siRNA transfection. Ly-GDI expression was increased on GM3 addition to these cells and decreased with D-PDMP treatment, a glucosylceramide synthesis inhibitor. Suppression of GM3 or Ly-GDI by RNAi was concomitantly associated with an increase in anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. These results clearly indicate that GM3 suppresses anchorage-independent growth through Ly-GDI. GM3 signals regulating Ly-GDI expression was inhibited by LY294002, siRNA against Akt1 and Akt2 and rapamycin, showing that GM3 signals are transduced via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Either siRNA towards Rictor or Raptor suppressed Ly-GDI expression. The Raptor siRNA suppressed the effects of GM3 on Ly-GDI expression and Akt phosphorylation at Thr(308) , suggesting GM3 signals to be transduced to mTOR-Raptor and Akt-Thr(308) , leading to Ly-GDI stimulation. siRNA targeting Pdpk1 reduced Akt phosphorylation at Thr(308) and rendered the cells insensitive to GM3 stimulation, indicating that Akt-Thr(308) plays a critical role in the pathway. The components aligned in this pathway showed similar effects on anchorage-independent growth as GM3 and Ly-GDI. Taken together, GM3 signals are transduced in B16 cells through PI3K, Pdpk1, Akt(Thr308) and the mTOR/Raptor pathway, leading to enhanced expression of Ly-GDI mRNA, which in turn suppresses anchorage-independent growth in melanoma B16 cells.

  6. Thought suppression predicts task switching deficits in patients with frontal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Amara; Ahmad, Hira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between task switching and thought suppression in connection with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE). Methods: This experimental study included 30 patients with FLE admitted to the Services and Jinnah Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan between February and November 2013, and 30 healthy individuals from the local community. Participants performed a task switching experiment where they switched between emotion and age categorizations among faces. In addition, they completed a thought suppression questionnaire. Results: There were 3 important results: (i) Patients with FLE showed weaker task switching abilities than healthy individuals. This result is attributed toward executive dysfunctions in patients with FLE. (ii) Contrary to the control group, patients with FLE showed larger switch cost for the age than the emotion categorization. This result can be seen in the context of social cognition deficits and poor inhibitory control in patients with FLE. In addition, larger switch costs reflected a binding effect with facial emotion as compared to age. The integration might represent emotion as an intrusive facial dimension that interrupted task switching performance. (iii) Patients with FLE had more recurrent suppression of thoughts than controls. Thought suppression was a significant predictor for switch costs. High scores on thought suppression were correlated with task switching deficits. Conclusion: The results suggest that thought suppression causes significant cognitive decline. PMID:25864068

  7. NLRP1 promotes tumor growth by enhancing inflammasome activation and suppressing apoptosis in metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Z; Liu, W; Kaur, M; Luo, Y; Domenico, J; Samson, J M; Shellman, Y G; Norris, D A; Dinarello, C A; Spritz, R A; Fujita, M

    2017-03-06

    and apoptosis via interaction with caspase-2 and -9. In summary, we showed that NLRP1 promotes melanoma growth by enhancing inflammasome activation and suppressing apoptotic pathways. Our study demonstrates a tumor-promoting role of NLRP1 in cancer cells.Oncogene advance online publication, 6 March 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.26.

  8. Excess TSH causes abnormal skeletal development in young mice with hypothyroidism via suppressive effects on the growth plate.

    PubMed

    Endo, Toyoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2013-09-01

    Hypothyroidism in the young leads to irreversible growth failure. hyt/hyt Mice have a nonfunctional TSH receptor (TSHR) and are severely hypothyroid, but growth retardation was not observed in adult mice. We found that epiphysial cartilage as well as cultured chondrocytes expressed functional TSHR at levels comparable to that seen in the thyroid, and that addition of TSH to cultured chondrocytes suppressed expression of chondrocyte differentiation marker genes such as Sox-9 and type IIa collagen. Next, we compared the long bone phenotypes of two distinct mouse models of hypothyroidism: thyroidectomized (THYx) mice and hyt/hyt mice. Although both THYx and hyt/hyt mice were severely hypothyroid and had similar serum Ca(2+) and growth hormone levels, the tibia was shorter and the proliferating and hypertrophic zones in the growth plate was significantly narrower in THYx mice than in hyt/hyt mice. Supplementation of hyt/hyt mice thyroid hormone resulted in a wider growth plate compared with that of wild-type mice. Expressions of chondrocyte differentiation marker genes Sox-9 and type IIa collagen in growth plate from THYx mice were 52 and 60% lower than those of hyt/hyt mice, respectively. High serum TSH causes abnormal skeletal development in young mice with hypothyroidism via suppressive effects on the growth plate.

  9. miR-96 promotes the growth of prostate carcinoma cells by suppressing MTSS1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Libo; Zhong, Jiateng; Guo, Baofeng; Zhu, Qi; Liang, Hang; Wen, Naiyan; Yun, Wenjing; Zhang, Ling

    2016-09-01

    Prostate carcinoma (PC) is one of the most common cancers for males. However, the molecular mechanisms of PC progression are still to be uncovered. MicroRNA (miRNA) has been shown to be associated with the initiation and progression of prostate cancer. Among the identified tumor-promoting miRNAs, miR-96 has been well established to contribute to PC by reducing FOXO1 expression. This study is aimed to study if miR-96 can promote the progression of PC through other pathways. Our data reinforced the finding that the level of miR-96 was higher in PC samples and cell lines than in non-cancerous tissues and normal prostate epithelial cells. In addition, serum miR-96 abundance was also found to be elevated in PC patients. Decreasing miR-96 expression was able to suppress the proliferation, clonogenicity, and invasion of PC cells. Overexpressing miR-96 led to increased proliferation and colony formation of normal prostate epithelial cells. miR-96 level was found to be inversely associated with the abundance of metastasis suppressor protein 1 (MTSS1) messenger RNA (mRNA), which has been proved to be a tumor suppressor for PC. Predictive analysis indicated that there was a potential miRNA response elements (MREs) located within 3'UTR of MTSS1 mRNA. The changes in miR-96 expression can affect the levels of MTSS1 both at mRNA and protein levels. miR-96 also suppressed the activity of luciferase reporter under the regulation of 3'UTR of MTSS1. Further studies showed that MTSS1 restoration accounted for the effect of miR-96 reduction on PC cells. The overexpression of a recombinant MTSS1 resistant against miRNA regulation was also demonstrated to abolish the transforming effect of miR-96 on prostate epithelial cells. Taken together, we found that miR-96 has a higher abundance in serum samples of PC patients than healthy controls, implying that it may be used as a prognostic marker. MTSS1 is a new authentic target of miR-96 in PC. The above findings suggested that targeting mi

  10. The quantitative prediction of bitterness-suppressing effect of sweeteners on the bitterness of famotidine by sweetness-responsive sensor.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yoshimi; Matsunaga, Chiharu; Tokuyama, Emi; Tsuji, Eriko; Uchida, Takahiro; Okada, Hiroaki

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was the quantitative prediction of the bitterness-suppressing effect of sweeteners (sucrose or sugar alcohols) on the bitterness of famotidine (or quinine sulfate as control) solutions using an artificial taste sensor. Firstly, we examined the response characteristics of the sensor response to sweetness. The sensor membrane is charged negatively in the presence of sweeteners, which tend to receive protons from one of the components of the sensor membrane. The magnitude of the sensor response was shown to increase in direct proportion to the concentration of the sweetener. Secondly, we used direct or indirect methods to evaluate and predict the bitterness-suppressing effect of sweeteners on 1 mg/ml famotidine and 81.4 microM quinine sulfate solutions. In direct method, a regression between the sensor output of the sweetness-responsive sensor and the bitterness intensity obtained in human gustatory tests of famotidine solutions containing sweeteners at various concentrations, was performed. As a result, we were able to predict directly the bitterness intensity of the mixed solution. Finally, we also evaluated the bitterness intensity of the dissolution media of commercially available, orally disintegrating tablets containing famotidine by the combined usage of bitterness- and sweetness-responsive sensor. We found that the sugar alcohols in the tablet seem to be effective in the bitterness-suppression of famotidine from these tablets, especially in the initial phase (within 30 s) of the disintegration process.

  11. Predicted growth of world urban food waste and methane production.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Bijaya K; Barrington, Suzelle; Martinez, José

    2006-10-01

    Landfill gas emissions are one of the largest anthropogenic sources of methane especially because of food waste (FW). To prevent these emissions growing with world population, future FW best management practices need to be evaluated. The objective of this paper was therefore to predict FW production for 2025 if present management practices are maintained, and then, to compare the impact of scenario 1: encouraging people to stay in rural areas and composting 75% of their FW, and; of scenario 2, where in addition to scenario 1, composting or anaerobically digesting 75% of urban FW (UFW). A relationship was established between per capita gross domestic product (GDP) and the population percentage living in urban areas (%UP), as well as production of municipal solid waste (MSW) and UFW. With estimated GDP and population growth per country, %UP and production of MSW and UFW could be predicted for 2025. A relatively accurate (R(2) > 0.85) correlation was found between GDP and %UP, and between GDP and mass of MSW and FW produced. On a global scale, MSW and UFW productions were predicted to increase by 51 and 44%, respectively, from 2005 to 2025. During the same period, and because of its expected economic development, Asia was predicted to experience the largest increase in UFW production, of 278 to 416 Gkg. If present MSW management trends are maintained, landfilled UFW was predicted to increase world CH4 emissions from 34 to 48 Gkg and the landfill share of global anthropogenic emissions from 8 to 10%. In comparison with maintaining present FW management practices, scenario 1 can lower UFW production by 30% and maintain the landfill share of the global anthropogenic emissions at 8%. With scenario 2, the landfill share of global anthropogenic emissions could be further reduced from 8 to 6% and leachate production could be reduced by 40%.

  12. NEU3 inhibitory effect of naringin suppresses cancer cell growth by attenuation of EGFR signaling through GM3 ganglioside accumulation.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Ayana; Kajiya, Natsuki; Oishi, Kazuki; Kamada, Yuko; Ikeda, Asami; Chigwechokha, Petros Kingstone; Kibe, Toshiro; Kishida, Michiko; Kishida, Shosei; Komatsu, Masaharu; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2016-07-05

    Naringin, which is one of the flavonoids contained in citrus fruits, is well known to possess various healthy functions to humans. It has been reported that naringin suppresses cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo, although the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, the roles of glycoconjugates, such as gangliosides, in cancer cells have been focused because of their regulatory effects of malignant phenotypes. Here, to clarify the roles of naringin in the negative-regulation of cancer cell growth, the alteration of glycoconjugates induced by naringin exposure and its significance on cell signaling were investigated. Human cancer cells, HeLa and A549, were exposed to various concentrations of naringin. Naringin treatment induced the suppression of cell growth toward HeLa and A549 cells accompanied with an increase of apoptotic cells. In naringin-exposed cells, GM3 ganglioside was drastically increased compared to the GM3 content prior to the treatment. Furthermore, naringin inhibited NEU3 sialidase, a GM3 degrading glycosidase. Similarly, NEU3 inhibition activities were also detected by other flavanone, such as hesperidin and neohesperidin dihydrocalcone, but their aglycones showed less inhibitions. Naringin-treated cancer cells showed suppressed EGFR and ERK phosphorylation levels. These results suggest a novel mechanism of naringin in the suppression of cancer cell growth through the alteration of glycolipids. NEU3 inhibitory effect of naringin induced GM3 accumulation in HeLa and A549 cells, leading the attenuation of EGFR/ERK signaling accompanied with a decrease in cell growth.

  13. Stability of Magnetically-Suppressed Solutal Convection In Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, F. W.; Ramachandran, N.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of convection during the crystallization of proteins is not very well understood. In a gravitational field, convection is caused by crystal sedimentation and by solutal buoyancy induced flow and these can lead to crystal imperfections. While crystallization in microgravity can approach diffusion limited growth conditions (no convection), terrestrially strong magnetic fields can be used to control fluid flow and sedimentation effects. In this work, a theory is presented on the stability of solutal convection of a magnetized fluid in the presence of a magnetic field. The requirements for stability are developed and compared to experiments performed within the bore of a superconducting magnet. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experiments and show solutal convection can be stabilized if the surrounding fluid has larger magnetic susceptibility and the magnetic field has a specific structure. Discussion on the application of the technique to protein crystallization is also provided.

  14. Predicting the Multisensory Consequences of One’s Own Action: BOLD Suppression in Auditory and Visual Cortices

    PubMed Central

    van Kemenade, Bianca M.; Arikan, B. Ezgi; Fiehler, Katja; Leube, Dirk T.; Harris, Laurence R.; Kircher, Tilo

    2017-01-01

    Predictive mechanisms are essential to successfully interact with the environment and to compensate for delays in the transmission of neural signals. However, whether and how we predict multisensory action outcomes remains largely unknown. Here we investigated the existence of multisensory predictive mechanisms in a context where actions have outcomes in different modalities. During fMRI data acquisition auditory, visual and auditory-visual stimuli were presented in active and passive conditions. In the active condition, a self-initiated button press elicited the stimuli with variable short delays (0-417ms) between action and outcome, and participants had to detect the presence of a delay for auditory or visual outcome (task modality). In the passive condition, stimuli appeared automatically, and participants had to detect the number of stimulus modalities (unimodal/bimodal). For action consequences compared to identical but unpredictable control stimuli we observed suppression of the blood oxygen level depended (BOLD) response in a broad network including bilateral auditory and visual cortices. This effect was independent of task modality or stimulus modality and strongest for trials where no delay was detected (undetectedpredictive mechanisms lead to BOLD suppression in multiple sensory brain regions. These findings support the hypothesis of multisensory predictive mechanisms, which are probably conducted in the left cerebellum. PMID:28060861

  15. Growth suppression by an E2F-binding-defective retinoblastoma protein (RB): contribution from the RB C pocket.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, L L; Su, H; Baskaran, R; Knudsen, E S; Wang, J Y

    1998-07-01

    Growth suppression by the retinoblastoma protein (RB) is dependent on its ability to form complexes with transcription regulators. At least three distinct protein-binding activities have been identified in RB: the large A/B pocket binds E2F, the A/B pocket binds the LXCXE peptide motif, and the C pocket binds the nuclear c-Abl tyrosine kinase. Substitution of Trp for Arg 661 in the B region of RB (mutant 661) inactivates both E2F and LXCXE binding. The tumor suppression function of mutant 661 is not abolished, because this allele predisposes its carriers to retinoblastoma development with a low penetrance. In cell-based assays, 661 is shown to inhibit G1/S progression. This low-penetrance mutant also induces terminal growth arrest with reduced but detectable activity. We have constructed mutations that disrupt C pocket activity. When overproduced, the RB C-terminal fragment did not induce terminal growth arrest but could inhibit G1/S progression, and this activity was abolished by the C-pocket mutations. In full-length RB, the C-pocket mutations reduced but did not abolish RB function. Interestingly, combination of the C-pocket and 661 mutations completely abolished RB's ability to cause an increase in the percentage of cells in G1 and to induce terminal growth arrest. These results suggest that the A/B or C region can induce a prolongation of G1 through mechanisms that are independent of each other. In contrast, long-term growth arrest requires combined activities from both regions of RB. In addition, E2F and LXCXE binding are not the only mechanisms through which RB inhibits cell growth. The C pocket also contributes to RB-mediated growth suppression.

  16. Inability to suppress salient distractors predicts low visual working memory capacity.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, John M; Christie, Gregory J; Prime, David J; Jolicœur, Pierre; McDonald, John J

    2016-03-29

    According to contemporary accounts of visual working memory (vWM), the ability to efficiently filter relevant from irrelevant information contributes to an individual's overall vWM capacity. Although there is mounting evidence for this hypothesis, very little is known about the precise filtering mechanism responsible for controlling access to vWM and for differentiating low- and high-capacity individuals. Theoretically, the inefficient filtering observed in low-capacity individuals might be specifically linked to problems enhancing relevant items, suppressing irrelevant items, or both. To find out, we recorded neurophysiological activity associated with attentional selection and active suppression during a competitive visual search task. We show that high-capacity individuals actively suppress salient distractors, whereas low-capacity individuals are unable to suppress salient distractors in time to prevent those items from capturing attention. These results demonstrate that individual differences in vWM capacity are associated with the timing of a specific attentional control operation that suppresses processing of salient but irrelevant visual objects and restricts their access to higher stages of visual processing.

  17. Hyaluronan suppresses prostate tumor cell proliferation through diminished expression of N-cadherin and aberrant growth factor receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Bharadwaj, Alamelu G.; Goodrich, Nathaniel P.; McAtee, Caitlin O.; Haferbier, Katie; Oakley, Gregory G.; Wahl, James K.; Simpson, Melanie A.

    2011-05-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) production has been functionally implicated in prostate tumorigenesis and metastasis. We previously used prostate tumor cells overexpressing the HA synthesizing enzyme HAS3 or the clinically relevant hyaluronidase Hyal1 to show that excess HA production suppresses tumor growth, while HA turnover accelerates spontaneous metastasis from the prostate. Here, we examined pathways responsible for effects of HAS3 and Hyal1 on tumor cell phenotype. Detailed characterization of cell cycle progression revealed that expression of Hyal1 accelerated cell cycle re-entry following synchronization, whereas HAS3 alone delayed entry. Hyal1 expressing cells exhibited a significant reduction in their ability to sustain ERK phosphorylation upon stimulation by growth factors, and in their expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. In contrast, HAS3 expressing cells showed prolonged ERK phosphorylation and increased expression of both p21 and p27, in asynchronous and synchronized cultures. Changes in cell cycle regulatory proteins were accompanied by HA-induced suppression of N-cadherin, while E-cadherin expression and {beta}-catenin expression and distribution remained unchanged. Our results are consistent with a model in which excess HA synthesis suppresses cell proliferation by promoting homotypic E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion, consequently signaling to elevate cell cycle inhibitor expression and suppress G1- to S-phase transition.

  18. Buckwheat protein extract suppression of the growth depression in rats induced by feeding amaranth (Food Red No. 2).

    PubMed

    Kayashita, J; Nagai, H; Kato, N

    1996-09-01

    Dietary fiber has an ameliorative effect on the toxicity of amaranth (Food Red No. 2). To test the possibility that a buckwheat protein extract (BWPE) has dietary fiber-like activity by virtue of its low digestibility, we examined the influence of BWPE on amaranth toxicity in rats. The results show that BWPE-containing diet suppressed the growth depression induced by the dietary addition of 5% amaranth.

  19. Repetition Suppression in the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus Predicts Tone Learning Performance.

    PubMed

    Asaridou, Salomi S; Takashima, Atsuko; Dediu, Dan; Hagoort, Peter; McQueen, James M

    2016-06-01

    Do individuals differ in how efficiently they process non-native sounds? To what extent do these differences relate to individual variability in sound-learning aptitude? We addressed these questions by assessing the sound-learning abilities of Dutch native speakers as they were trained on non-native tone contrasts. We used fMRI repetition suppression to the non-native tones to measure participants' neuronal processing efficiency before and after training. Although all participants improved in tone identification with training, there was large individual variability in learning performance. A repetition suppression effect to tone was found in the bilateral inferior frontal gyri (IFGs) before training. No whole-brain effect was found after training; a region-of-interest analysis, however, showed that, after training, repetition suppression to tone in the left IFG correlated positively with learning. That is, individuals who were better in learning the non-native tones showed larger repetition suppression in this area. Crucially, this was true even before training. These findings add to existing evidence that the left IFG plays an important role in sound learning and indicate that individual differences in learning aptitude stem from differences in the neuronal efficiency with which non-native sounds are processed.

  20. Suppressed Alpha Oscillations Predict Intelligibility of Speech and its Acoustic Details

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Modulations of human alpha oscillations (8–13 Hz) accompany many cognitive processes, but their functional role in auditory perception has proven elusive: Do oscillatory dynamics of alpha reflect acoustic details of the speech signal and are they indicative of comprehension success? Acoustically presented words were degraded in acoustic envelope and spectrum in an orthogonal design, and electroencephalogram responses in the frequency domain were analyzed in 24 participants, who rated word comprehensibility after each trial. First, the alpha power suppression during and after a degraded word depended monotonically on spectral and, to a lesser extent, envelope detail. The magnitude of this alpha suppression exhibited an additional and independent influence on later comprehension ratings. Second, source localization of alpha suppression yielded superior parietal, prefrontal, as well as anterior temporal brain areas. Third, multivariate classification of the time–frequency pattern across participants showed that patterns of late posterior alpha power allowed best for above-chance classification of word intelligibility. Results suggest that both magnitude and topography of late alpha suppression in response to single words can indicate a listener's sensitivity to acoustic features and the ability to comprehend speech under adverse listening conditions. PMID:22100354

  1. Zyflamend Suppresses Growth and Sensitizes Human Pancreatic Tumors to Gemcitabine in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Through Modulation of Multiple Targets

    PubMed Central

    Kunnumakkara, Ajaikumar B.; Sung, Bokyung; Ravindran, Jayaraj; Diagaradjane, Parmeswaran; Deorukhkar, Amit; Dey, Sanjit; Koca, Cemile; Tong, Zhimin; Gelovani, Juri G.; Guha, Sushovan; Krishnan, Sunil; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2011-01-01

    Agents that can potentiate the efficacy of standard chemotherapy against pancreatic cancer are of great interest. Because of their low cost and safety, patients commonly use a variety of dietary supplements, although evidence of their efficacy is often lacking. One such commonly used food supplement, Zyflamend, is a polyherbal preparation with potent anti-inflammatory activities, and preclinical efficacy against prostate and oral cancer. Whether Zyflamend has any efficacy against human pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with gemcitibine, a commonly used agent, was examined in cell cultures and in an orthotopic mouse model. In vitro, Zyflamend inhibited the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell lines regardless of p53 status and also enhanced gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. This finding correlated with inhibition of NF-κB activation by Zyflamend and suppression of cyclin D1, c-myc, COX-2, Bcl-2, IAP, survivin, VEGF, ICAM-1, and CXCR4. In nude mice, oral administration of Zyflamend alone significantly inhibited the growth of orthotopically transplanted human pancreatic tumors, and when combined with gemcitabine, further enhanced the antitumor effects. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses of tumor tissue showed that the suppression of pancreatic cancer growth correlated with inhibition of proliferation index marker (Ki-67), COX-2, MMP-9, NF-κB, and VEGF. Overall, these results suggest that the concentrated multiherb product Zyflamend alone can inhibit the growth of human pancreatic tumors and, in addition, can sensitize pancreatic cancers to gemcitabine through the suppression of multiple targets linked to tumorigenesis. PMID:21935918

  2. PIAS4 is an activator of hypoxia signalling via VHL suppression during growth of pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chien, W; Lee, K L; Ding, L W; Wuensche, P; Kato, H; Doan, N B; Poellinger, L; Said, J W; Koeffler, H P

    2013-01-01

    Background: The PIAS4 protein belongs to the family of protein inhibitors of activated STAT, but has since been implicated in various biological activities including the post-translational modification known as sumoylation. In this study, we explored the roles of PIAS4 in pancreatic tumourigenesis. Methods: The expression levels of PIAS4 in pancreatic cancer cells were examined. Cell proliferation and invasion was studied after overexpression and gene silencing of PIAS4. The effect of PIAS4 on hypoxia signalling was investigated. Results: The protein was overexpressed in pancreatic cancer cells compared with the normal pancreas. Gene silencing by PIAS4 small interfering RNA (siRNA) suppressed pancreatic cancer cell growth and overexpression of PIAS4 induced expression of genes related to cell growth. The overexpression of PIAS4 is essential for the regulation of the hypoxia signalling pathway. PIAS4 interacts with the tumour suppressor von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) and leads to VHL sumoylation, oligomerization, and impaired function. Pancreatic cancer cells (Panc0327, MiaPaCa2) treated with PIAS4 siRNA suppressed expression of the hypoxia-inducible factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and its target genes JMJD1A, VEGF, and STAT3. Conclusion: Our study elucidates the role of PIAS4 in the regulation of pancreatic cancer cell growth, where the suppression of its activity represents a novel therapeutic target for pancreatic cancers. PMID:24002598

  3. Growth Differentiation Factor 15 Predicts Chronic Liver Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eaum Seok; Kim, Seok Hyun; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Kyung Hee; Lee, Byung Seok; Ku, Bon Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) belongs to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily. GDF-15 is emerging as a biomarker for several diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical performances of GDF-15 for the prediction of liver fibrosis and severity in chronic liver disease. Methods The serum GDF-15 levels were examined via enzyme immunoassay in 145 patients with chronic liver disease and 101 healthy individuals. The patients with chronic liver disease consisted of 54 patients with chronic hepatitis, 44 patients with compensated liver cirrhosis, and 47 patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis. Results Of the patients with chronic liver diseases, the decompensated liver cirrhosis patients had an increased serum GDF-15 (3,483 ng/L) level compared with the patients with compensated liver cirrhosis (1,861 ng/L) and chronic hepatitis (1,232 ng/L). The overall diagnostic accuracies of GDF-15, as determined by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves, were as follows: chronic hepatitis=0.656 (>574 ng/L, sensitivity, 53.7%; specificity, 79.2%), compensated liver cirrhosis=0.886 (>760 ng/L, sensitivity, 75.6%; specificity, 92.1%), and decompensated liver cirrhosis=0.984 (>869 ng/L, sensitivity, 97.9%; specificity, 94.1%). Conclusions This investigation represents the first study to demonstrate the availability of GDF-15 in chronic liver disease. GDF-15 comprised a useful biomarker for the prediction of liver fibrosis and severity in chronic liver disease. PMID:27728964

  4. PRG4 expression in myxoid liposarcoma maintains tumor cell growth through suppression of an antitumor cytokine IL-24.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Kosuke; Mizusaki, Anna; Takanashi, Masakatsu; Ozaki, Takashi; Sato, Fuyuki; Kuroda, Masahiko; Muragaki, Yasuteru

    2017-02-10

    PRG4 is one of the downstream molecules of the myxoid liposarcoma (MLS)-specific fusion oncoproteins TLS-CHOP and EWS-CHOP. Exogenous PRG4 expression increases the tumorigenicity of cells injected in nude mice. The molecular functions of PRG4 in tumorigenesis and/or tumor progression of MLS cells, however, still remain unclear. In this report, we demonstrated that siRNA-mediated knockdown of PRG4 suppressed the growth of the MLS-derived cell lines 1955/91 and 2645/94. In addition, PRG4 knockdown promoted adipocytic differentiation in 1955/91 cells. Thus, PRG4 may play essential roles in MLS cell growth and have potential as a therapeutic target. On the other hand, our previous study has revealed that TLS-CHOP suppresses expression of an anti-tumor cytokine IL-24, contributing to tumor cell survival. In this study, we found that double knockdown of PRG4 and IL-24 did not inhibit MLS cell growth, and single knockdown of PRG4 remarkably increased IL-24 expression. These results suggest that the growth inhibitory effect of PRG4 knockdown is caused by induction of IL-24 expression, and PRG4 may contribute to maintain MLS cell growth through repression of IL-24 expression.

  5. Suppression of polymorphonuclear (PMN) and monocyte-mediated inhibition of Candida albicans growth by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol

    SciTech Connect

    Djeu, J.Y.; Parapanios, A.; Halkias, D.; Friedman, H.

    1986-03-05

    This study was an in vitro attempt to identify the effector cells responsible for growth inhibition of the opportunistic fungus, candida albicans, and to determine if THC or another marijuana derivatives, 11-hydroxyTHC, would adversely affect their function. Using a 24h radiolabel assay, the authors found that growth inhibition of C. albicans was primarily mediated by PMN and monocytes that could be isolated normal human peripheral blood. Both effector cell types caused almost complete inhibition of Candida growth at effector/target ratio of 300/1 and inhibition was often still seen at 30/1-. Incubation of PMN, PBL, or monocytes for 1 hr at 37C with THC or 11-hydroxyTHC caused a marked suppression of function in all 3 cell populations. Maximal suppression was obtained with 7.5-10..mu..g/ml of the drugs in medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) or with 2-4..mu..g/ml in 1% FBS. These drug concentrations did not affect lymphoid cell viability or candida growth in the absence of lymphoid effector cells. Marijuana derivatives, therefore, are doubly dangerous in that opportunistic fungi such as C. albicans can grow in their presence while the effector cells that control fungal growth are readily inactivated.

  6. Predictive growth model of LID: light intensification model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, ChingSeong; Patel, D.; Wang, X.; Schlitz, D.; Dehkordi, P. S.; Menoni, C. S.; Chong, E. K. P.

    2013-11-01

    General precursors and growth model of Laser Induced Damage (LID) have been the focus of research in fused silica material, such as polishing residues, fractures, and contaminations. Assuming the absorption due to trapped material and mechanical strength is the same across the surfaces, various studies have shown that the LID could be minimized by reducing the light field intensification of the layers upon the laser strikes. By revisiting the definition of non-ionising radiation damage, this paper presents the modelling work and simulation of light intensification of laser induced damage condition. Our contribution is to predict the LID growth that take into various factors, specifically on the light intensification problem. The light intensification problem is a function of the inter-layer or intra-layer micro-optical properties, such as transmittance and absorption coefficient of the material at micro- or sub-micro-meter range. The proposed model will first estimate the light propagation that convoluted with the multiply scattering light and subsequently the field intensification within the nodule dimension. This will allow us to evaluate the geometrical factor of the nodule effect over the intensification. The result show that the light intensification is higher whenever the backscattering and multiple scattering components are higher due to its interference with the incoming wave within its coherency.

  7. The isoflavone metabolite 6-methoxyequol inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased consumption of plant-based diets has been linked to the presence of certain phytochemicals, including polyphenols such as flavonoids. Several of these compounds exert their protective effect via inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Identification of additional phytochemicals with potential antiangiogenic activity is important not only for understanding the mechanism of the preventive effect, but also for developing novel therapeutic interventions. Results In an attempt to identify phytochemicals contributing to the well-documented preventive effect of plant-based diets on cancer incidence and mortality, we have screened a set of hitherto untested phytoestrogen metabolites concerning their anti-angiogenic effect, using endothelial cell proliferation as an end point. Here, we show that a novel phytoestrogen, 6-methoxyequol (6-ME), inhibited VEGF-induced proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVE) cells, whereas VEGF-induced migration and survival of HUVE cells remained unaffected. In addition, 6-ME inhibited FGF-2-induced proliferation of bovine brain capillary endothelial (BBCE) cells. In line with its role in cell proliferation, 6-ME inhibited VEGF-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 MAPK, the key cascade responsible for VEGF-induced proliferation of endothelial cells. In this context, 6-ME inhibited in a dose dependent manner the phosphorylation of MEK1/2, the only known upstream activator of ERK1/2. 6-ME did not alter VEGF-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK or AKT, compatible with the lack of effect on VEGF-induced migration and survival of endothelial cells. Peri-tumor injection of 6-ME in A-431 xenograft tumors resulted in reduced tumor growth with suppressed neovasularization compared to vehicle controls (P < 0.01). Conclusions 6-ME inhibits VEGF- and FGF2-induced proliferation of ECs by targeting the phosphorylation of MEK1/2 and it downstream substrate ERK1/2, both key components of the mitogenic MAPK pathway

  8. AZD1480 delays tumor growth in a melanoma model while enhancing the suppressive activity of myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Maenhout, Sarah K.; Four, Stephanie Du; Corthals, Jurgen; Neyns, Bart; Thielemans, Kris; Aerts, Joeri L.

    2014-01-01

    AZD1480 is a potent, competitive small-molecule inhibitor of JAK1/2 kinase which inhibits STAT3 phosphorylation and tumor growth. Here we investigated the effects of AZD1480 on the function of different immune cell populations in a melanoma model. When MO4 tumor-bearing mice were treated with AZD1480 we observed a strong inhibition of tumor growth as well as a prolonged survival. Moreover, a significant decrease in the percentage of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) was observed after treatment with AZD1480. However, AZD1480 enhanced the suppressive capacity of murine MDSCs while at the same time impairing the proliferative as well as the IFN-γ secretion capacity of murine T cells. The addition of AZD1480 to co-cultures of human MDSCs and T cells does not affect the suppressive activity of MDSCs but it does reduce the IFN-γ secretion and the proliferative capacity of T cells. We showed that although AZD1480 has the ability to delay the tumor growth of MO4 tumor-bearing mice, this drug has detrimental effects on several aspects of the immune system. These data indicate that systemic targeting of the JAK/STAT pathway by JAK1/2 inhibition can have divergent effects on tumor growth and anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:25149535

  9. Synergistic effect of obesity and lipid ingestion in suppressing the growth hormone response to exercise in children

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Stacy R.; Hingorani, Sunita R.; Rosa, Jaime S.; Zaldivar, Frank P.

    2012-01-01

    Diet plays an important role in modulating exercise responses, including activation of the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-1) axis. Obesity and fat ingestion were separately shown to reduce exercise GH responses, but their combined effect, especially important in children, has not been studied. We therefore measured the GH response to exercise [30-min intermittent cycling, ten 2-min bouts at ∼80% maximal aerobic capacity (V̇o2max), separated by 1-min rest], started 45 min after ingestion of a high-fat meal (HFM) in 16 healthy [controls; body mass index percentile (BMI%ile) 51 ± 7], and 19 obese (Ob, BMI%ile 97 ± 0.4) children. Samples were drawn at baseline (premeal), and at start, peak, and 30 min postexercise. In the Ob group, a marked ∼75% suppression of the GH response (ng/ml) to exercise was observed (2.4 ± 0.6 vs. 10.6 ± 2.1, P < 0.001). This level of suppression was also significantly greater compared with age-, fitness-, and BMI-matched historical controls that had performed identical exercise in fasting conditions. Our data indicate that the reduction in the GH response to exercise, already present in obese children vs. healthy controls, is considerably amplified by ingestion of fat nutrients shortly before exercise, implying a potentially downstream negative impact on growth factor homeostasis and long-term modulation of physiological growth. PMID:22518832

  10. FERM Domain Phosphoinositide Binding Targets Merlin to the Membrane and Is Essential for Its Growth-Suppressive Function ▿

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Timmy; Hennigan, Robert F.; Foster, Lauren A.; Conrady, Deborah G.; Herr, Andrew B.; Ip, Wallace

    2011-01-01

    The neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor suppressor protein, merlin, is related to the ERM (ezrin, radixin, and moesin) family of plasma membrane-actin cytoskeleton linkers. For ezrin, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) binding to the amino-terminal FERM domain is required for its conformational activation, proper subcellular localization, and function, but less is known about the role of phosphoinositide binding for merlin. Current evidence indicates that association with the membrane is important for merlin to function as a growth regulator; however, the mechanisms by which merlin localizes to the membrane are less clear. Here, we report that merlin binds phosphoinositides, including PIP2, via a conserved binding motif in its FERM domain. Abolition of FERM domain-mediated phosphoinositide binding of merlin displaces merlin from the membrane and releases it into the cytosol without altering the folding of merlin. Importantly, a merlin protein whose FERM domain cannot bind phosphoinositide is defective in growth suppression. Retargeting the mutant merlin into the membrane using a dual-acylated amino-terminal decapeptide from Fyn is sufficient to restore the growth-suppressive properties to the mutant merlin. Thus, FERM domain-mediated phosphoinositide binding and membrane association are critical for the growth-regulatory function of merlin. PMID:21402777

  11. Measles virus C protein suppresses gamma-activated factor formation and virus-induced cell growth arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Shin-ichi; Okabayashi, Tamaki; Fujii, Nobuhiro

    2011-05-25

    Measles virus (MeV) produces two accessory proteins, V and C, from the P gene. These accessory proteins have been reported to contribute to efficient virus proliferation through the modulation of host cell events. Our previous paper described that Vero cell-adapted strains of MeV led host cells to growth arrest through the upregulation of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1), and wild strains did not. In the present study, we found that C protein expression levels varied among MeV strains in infected SiHa cells. C protein levels were inversely correlated with IRF-1 expression levels and with cell growth arrest. Forced expression of C protein released cells from growth arrest. C-deficient recombinant virus efficiently upregulated IRF-1 and caused growth arrest more efficiently than the wild-type virus. C protein preferentially bound to phosphorylated STAT1 and suppressed STAT1 dimer formation. We conclude that MeV C protein suppresses IFN-{gamma} signaling pathway via inhibition of phosphorylated STAT1 dimerization.

  12. MET inhibitor PHA-665752 suppresses the hepatocyte growth factor-induced cell proliferation and radioresistance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tongxin; Li, Qi; Sun, Quanquan; Zhang, Yuqin; Yang, Hua; Wang, Rong; Chen, Longhua; Wang, Wei

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • We demonstrated that irradiation induced MET overexpression and activation. • The aberrant MET signal mediated by HGF induced proliferation and radioresistance of NPC cells. • MET inhibitor PHA-665752 effectively suppressed HGF induced cell proliferation and radioresistance in NPC cells. • PHA-665752 suppressed the three downstream pathway of HGF/MET signal in a dose-dependent manner. - Abstract: Although ionizing radiation (IR) has provided considerable improvements in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), in subsets of patients, radioresistance is still a major problem in the treatment. In this study, we demonstrated that irradiation induced MET overexpression and activation, and the aberrant MET signal mediated by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induced radioresistance. We also found that MET inhibitor PHA-665752 effectively suppressed HGF induced cell proliferation and radioresistance in NPC cells. Further investigation indicated that PHA-665752 suppressed the phosphorylation of the Akt, ERK1/2, and STAT3 proteins in a dose-dependent manner. Our data indicated that the combination of IR with a MET inhibitor, such as PHA-665752, might be a promising therapeutic strategy for NPC.

  13. Theaflavins suppress tumor growth and metastasis via the blockage of the STAT3 pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jianping; Meng, Qingyan; Li, Yongyuan

    2016-01-01

    Theaflavins, the major black tea polyphenols, have been reported to exhibit promising antitumor activities in several human cancers. However, the role of theaflavins in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is still unknown. In this study, we found that theaflavins could significantly inhibit proliferation, migration, and invasion, and induce apoptosis in HCC cells in vitro. Furthermore, we found that theaflavins inhibited the growth and metastasis of HCC in an orthotopic model and a lung metastasis model. Immunohistochemical analyses and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling assays showed that theaflavins could suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in vivo. Theaflavins also suppressed constitutive and inducible signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation. The downstream proteins regulated by STAT3, including the antiapoptotic proteins (Bcl-2 and Survivin) and the invasion-related proteins (MMP-2, MMP-9), were also downregulated after theaflavins treatment. Theaflavins induced apoptosis by activating the caspase pathway. Together, our results suggest that theaflavins suppress the growth and metastasis of human HCC through the blockage of the STAT3 pathway, and thus may act as potential therapeutic agents for HCC. PMID:27478384

  14. Cells transformed by murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) release compounds with transforming and transformed phenotype suppressing activity resembling growth factors.

    PubMed

    Šupolíková, M; Staňová, A Vojs; Kúdelová, M; Marák, J; Zelník, V; Golais, F

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the medium of three cell lines transformed with murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) in vitro and in vivo, 68/HDF, 68/NIH3T3, and S11E, for the presence of compounds resembling growth factors of some herpesviruses which have displayed transforming and transformed phenotype suppressing activity in normal and tumor cells. When any of spent medium was added to cell culture we observed the onset of transformed phenotype in baby hamster kidney cells (BHK-21) cells and transformed phenotype suppressing activity in tumor human epithelial cells (HeLa). In media tested, we have identified the presence of putative growth factor related to MHV-68 (MHGF-68). Its bivalent properties have been blocked entirely by antisera against MHV-68 and two monoclonal antibodies against glycoprotein B (gB) of MHV-68 suggesting viral origin of MHGF-68. The results of initial efforts to separate MHGF-68 on FPLC Sephadex G15 column in the absence of salts revealed the loss of its transforming activity but transformed phenotype suppressing activity retained. On the other hand, the use of methanol-water mobile phase on RP-HPLC C18 column allowed separation of MHGF-68 to two compounds. Both separated fractions, had only the transforming activity to normal cells. Further experiments exploring the nature and the structure of hitherto unknown MHGF-68 are now in the progress to characterize its molecular and biological properties.

  15. KEX2 mutations suppress RNA polymerase II mutants and alter the temperature range of yeast cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, C; Young, R A

    1989-01-01

    Suppressors of a temperature-sensitive RNA polymerase II mutation were isolated to identify proteins that interact with RNA polymerase II in yeast cells. Ten independently isolated extragenic mutations that suppressed the temperature-sensitive mutation rpb1-1 and produced a cold-sensitive phenotype were all found to be alleles of a single gene, SRB1. An SRB1 partial deletion mutant was further investigated and found to exhibit several pleiotropic phenotypes. These included suppression of numerous temperature-sensitive RNA polymerase II mutations, alteration of the temperature growth range of cells containing wild-type RNA polymerase, and sterility of cells of alpha mating type. The ability of SRB1 mutations to suppress the temperature-sensitive phenotype of RNA polymerase II mutants did not extend to other temperature-sensitive mutants investigated. Isolation of the SRB1 gene revealed that SRB1 is KEX2. These results indicate that the KEX2 protease, whose only known substrates are hormone precursors, can have an important influence on RNA polymerase II and the temperature-dependent growth properties of yeast cells. Images PMID:2668732

  16. Green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate suppresses melanoma growth by inhibiting inflammasome and IL-1{beta} secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Lixia Z.; Liu, Weimin; Luo, Yuchun; Okamoto, Miyako; Qu, Dovina; Dunn, Jeffrey H.; Fujita, Mayumi

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG inhibits melanoma cell growth at physiological doses (0.1-1 {mu}M). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG inhibits melanoma cell growth via inflammasomes and IL-1{beta} suppression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inflammasomes and IL-1{beta} could be potential targets for future melanoma therapeutics. -- Abstract: Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenolic component of green tea, has been demonstrated to possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-mutagenic and anti-carcinogenic properties. The anti-melanoma effect of EGCG has been previously suggested, but no clear mechanism of action has been established. In this study, we demonstrated that EGCG inhibits melanoma cell growth at physiological doses (0.1-1 {mu}M). In the search for mechanisms of EGCG-mediated melanoma cell suppression, we found that NF-{kappa}B was inhibited, and that reduced NF-{kappa}B activity was associated with decreased IL-1{beta} secretion from melanoma cells. Since inflammasomes are involved in IL-1{beta} secretion, we investigated whether IL-1{beta} suppression was mediated by inflammasomes, and found that EGCG treatment led to downregulation of the inflammasome component, NLRP1, and reduced caspase-1 activation. Furthermore, silencing the expression of NLRP1 abolished EGCG-induced inhibition of tumor cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a key role of inflammasomes in EGCG efficacy. This paper provides a novel mechanism for EGCG-induced melanoma inhibition: inflammasome downregulation {yields} decreased IL-1{beta} secretion {yields} decreased NF-{kappa}B activities {yields} decreased cell growth. In addition, it suggests inflammasomes and IL-1{beta} could be potential targets for future melanoma therapeutics.

  17. Growth differentiation factor 8 suppresses cell proliferation by up-regulating CTGF expression in human granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsun-Ming; Pan, Hui-Hui; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Zhu, Yi-Min; Leung, Peter C K

    2016-02-15

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a matricellular protein that plays a critical role in the development of ovarian follicles. Growth differentiation factor 8 (GDF8) is mainly, but not exclusively, expressed in the mammalian musculoskeletal system and is a potent negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GDF8 and CTGF on the regulation of cell proliferation in human granulosa cells and to examine its underlying molecular determinants. Using dual inhibition approaches (inhibitors and small interfering RNAs), we have demonstrated that GDF8 induces the up-regulation of CTGF expression through the activin receptor-like kinase (ALK)4/5-mediated SMAD2/3-dependent signaling pathways. In addition, the increase in CTGF expression contributes to the GDF8-induced suppressive effect on granulosa cell proliferation. Our findings suggest that GDF8 and CTGF may play critical roles in the regulation of proliferative events in human granulosa cells.

  18. Suppression of gain-of-function mutant p53 with metabolic inhibitors reduces tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Chae Lim; Mun, Hyemin; Jo, Se-Young; Oh, Ju-Hee; Lee, ChuHee; Choi, Eun-Kyung; Jang, Se Jin; Suh, Young-Ah

    2016-01-01

    Mutation of p53 occasionally results in a gain of function, which promotes tumor growth. We asked whether destabilizing the gain-of-function protein would kill tumor cells. Downregulation of the gene reduced cell proliferation in p53-mutant cells, but not in p53-null cells, indicating that the former depended on the mutant protein for survival. Moreover, phenformin and 2-deoxyglucose suppressed cell growth and simultaneously destabilized mutant p53. The AMPK pathway, MAPK pathway, chaperone proteins and ubiquitination all contributed to this process. Interestingly, phenformin and 2-deoxyglucose also reduced tumor growth in syngeneic mice harboring the p53 mutation. Thus, destabilizing mutant p53 protein in order to kill cells exhibiting “oncogene addiction” could be a promising strategy for combatting p53 mutant tumors. PMID:27765910

  19. Young Age Predicts Poor Antiretroviral Adherence and Viral Load Suppression Among Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Hadland, Scott E.; Milloy, M.-J.; Kerr, Thomas; Zhang, Ruth; Guillemi, Silvia; Hogg, Robert S.; Montaner, Julio S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV among young injection drug users (IDU) have been limited because financial barriers to care disproportionately affect youth, thus confounding results. This study examines adherence among IDU in a unique setting where all medical care is provided free-of-charge. From May 1996 to April 2008, we followed a prospective cohort of 545 HIV-positive IDU of 18 years of age or older in Vancouver, Canada. Using generalized estimating equations (GEE), we studied the association between age and adherence (obtaining ART≥95% of the prescribed time), controlling for potential confounders. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we also studied the effect of age on time to viral load suppression (<500 copies per milliliter), and examined adherence as a mediating variable. Five hundred forty-five participants were followed for a median of 23.8 months (interquartile range [IQR]=8.5–91.6 months). Odds of adherence were significantly lower among younger IDU (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=0.76 per 10 years younger; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.65–0.89). Younger IDU were also less likely to achieve viral load suppression (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]=0.75 per 10 years younger; 95% CI, 0.64–0.88). Adding adherence to the model eliminated this association with age, supporting the role of adherence as a mediating variable. Despite absence of financial barriers, younger IDU remain less likely to adhere to ART, resulting in inferior viral load suppression. Interventions should carefully address the unique needs of young HIV-positive IDU. PMID:22429003

  20. Isolation and Identification of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria from Cucumber Rhizosphere and Their Effect on Plant Growth Promotion and Disease Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Shaikhul; Akanda, Abdul M.; Prova, Ananya; Islam, Md. T.; Hossain, Md. M.

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are the rhizosphere bacteria that may be utilized to augment plant growth and suppress plant diseases. The objectives of this study were to identify and characterize PGPR indigenous to cucumber rhizosphere in Bangladesh, and to evaluate their ability to suppress Phytophthora crown rot in cucumber. A total of 66 isolates were isolated, out of which 10 (PPB1, PPB2, PPB3, PPB4, PPB5, PPB8, PPB9, PPB10, PPB11, and PPB12) were selected based on their in vitro plant growth promoting attributes and antagonism of phytopathogens. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences identified these isolates as new strains of Pseudomonas stutzeri, Bacillus subtilis, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The selected isolates produced high levels (26.78–51.28 μg mL-1) of indole-3-acetic acid, while significant acetylene reduction activities (1.79–4.9 μmole C2H4 mg-1 protein h-1) were observed in eight isolates. Cucumber plants grown from seeds that were treated with these PGPR strains displayed significantly higher levels of germination, seedling vigour, growth, and N content in root and shoot tissue compared to non-treated control plants. All selected isolates were able to successfully colonize the cucumber roots. Moreover, treating cucumber seeds with these isolates significantly suppressed Phytophthora crown rot caused by Phytophthora capsici, and characteristic morphological alterations in P. capsici hyphae that grew toward PGPR colonies were observed. Since these PGPR inoculants exhibited multiple traits beneficial to the host plants, they may be applied in the development of new, safe, and effective seed treatments as an alternative to chemical fungicides. PMID:26869996

  1. Isolation and Identification of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria from Cucumber Rhizosphere and Their Effect on Plant Growth Promotion and Disease Suppression.

    PubMed

    Islam, Shaikhul; Akanda, Abdul M; Prova, Ananya; Islam, Md T; Hossain, Md M

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are the rhizosphere bacteria that may be utilized to augment plant growth and suppress plant diseases. The objectives of this study were to identify and characterize PGPR indigenous to cucumber rhizosphere in Bangladesh, and to evaluate their ability to suppress Phytophthora crown rot in cucumber. A total of 66 isolates were isolated, out of which 10 (PPB1, PPB2, PPB3, PPB4, PPB5, PPB8, PPB9, PPB10, PPB11, and PPB12) were selected based on their in vitro plant growth promoting attributes and antagonism of phytopathogens. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences identified these isolates as new strains of Pseudomonas stutzeri, Bacillus subtilis, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The selected isolates produced high levels (26.78-51.28 μg mL(-1)) of indole-3-acetic acid, while significant acetylene reduction activities (1.79-4.9 μmole C2H4 mg(-1) protein h(-1)) were observed in eight isolates. Cucumber plants grown from seeds that were treated with these PGPR strains displayed significantly higher levels of germination, seedling vigour, growth, and N content in root and shoot tissue compared to non-treated control plants. All selected isolates were able to successfully colonize the cucumber roots. Moreover, treating cucumber seeds with these isolates significantly suppressed Phytophthora crown rot caused by Phytophthora capsici, and characteristic morphological alterations in P. capsici hyphae that grew toward PGPR colonies were observed. Since these PGPR inoculants exhibited multiple traits beneficial to the host plants, they may be applied in the development of new, safe, and effective seed treatments as an alternative to chemical fungicides.

  2. Celecoxib and 2,5-dimethylcelecoxib inhibit intestinal cancer growth by suppressing the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Egashira, Issei; Takahashi-Yanaga, Fumi; Nishida, Risa; Arioka, Masaki; Igawa, Kazunobu; Tomooka, Katsuhiko; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Kitazono, Takanari; Sasaguri, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    We previously reported that celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, strongly inhibited human colon cancer cell proliferation by suppressing the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. 2,5-Dimethylcelecoxib (DM-celecoxib), a celecoxib analog that does not inhibit COX-2, has also been reported to have an antitumor effect. In the present study, we elucidated whether DM-celecoxib inhibits intestinal cancer growth, and its underlying mechanism of action. First, we compared the effect of DM-celecoxib with that of celecoxib on the human colon cancer cell lines HCT-116 and DLD-1. 2,5-Dimethylcelecoxib suppressed cell proliferation and inhibited T-cell factor 7-like 2 expression with almost the same strength as celecoxib. 2,5-Dimethylcelecoxib also inhibited the T-cell factor-dependent transcription activity and suppressed the expression of Wnt/β-catenin target gene products cyclin D1 and survivin. Subsequently, we compared the in vivo effects of celecoxib and DM-celecoxib using the Mutyh(-/-) mouse model, in which oxidative stress induces multiple intestinal carcinomas. Serum concentrations of orally administered celecoxib and DM-celecoxib elevated to the levels enough to suppress cancer cell proliferation. Repeated treatment with celecoxib and DM-celecoxib markedly reduced the number and size of the carcinomas without showing toxicity. These results suggest that the central mechanism for the anticancer effect of celecoxib derivatives is the suppression of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway but not the inhibition of COX-2, and that DM-celecoxib might be a better lead compound candidate than celecoxib for the development of novel anticancer drugs.

  3. Finite element prediction of fatigue damage growth in cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha; Frikha, Sana; Toumi, Hechmi; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic stresses applied to bones generate fatigue damage that affects the bone stiffness and its elastic modulus. This paper proposes a finite element model for the prediction of fatigue damage accumulation and failure in cancellous bone at continuum scale. The model is based on continuum damage mechanics and incorporates crack closure effects in compression. The propagation of the cracks is completely simulated throughout the damaged area. In this case, the stiffness of the broken element is reduced by 98% to ensure no stress-carrying capacities of completely damaged elements. Once a crack is initiated, the propagation direction is simulated by the propagation of the broken elements of the mesh. The proposed model suggests that damage evolves over a real physical time variable (cycles). In order to reduce the computation time, the integration of the damage growth rate is based on the cycle blocks approach. In this approach, the real number of cycles is reduced (divided) into equivalent blocks of cycles. Damage accumulation is computed over the cycle blocks and then extrapolated over the corresponding real cycles. The results show a clear difference between local tensile and compressive stresses on damage accumulation. Incorporating stiffness reduction also produces a redistribution of the peak stresses in the damaged region, which results in a delay in damage fracture.

  4. Dynamic vortex interactions with flexible fibers and edges for prediction of owl noise suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korykora, Sarah; Jaworski, Justin

    2015-11-01

    The compliant trailing-edge fringe of owls and the soft downy material on their upper wing surfaces are thought to enable their silent flight by weakening the interaction of boundary layer turbulence with these flexible structures. Previous analysis of turbulence noise generation by wave-bearing elastic edges have shown that the far-field acoustic power scaling can be weakened by up to the square of the Mach number relative to a rigid edge. However, it is unclear whether or not the wave-bearing feature or simply the flexible nature of the edge scatterer produces this noise suppression. To assess this distinction, a dynamic vortex interaction model is developed whereby the motion of a line vortex round a rigid but elastically-restrained wall-mounted fiber or trailing edge is determined numerically. Special attention is paid to the dynamic interaction between the flexible structure and vortex, which is accomplished via a conformal mapping relationship determined in closed form. Results from this analysis seek to develop a vortex sound model to discern the effect of flexible versus wave-bearing scatterers on turbulence noise suppression and help explain the mechanisms of silent owl flight.

  5. Crack Growth Prediction Methodology for Multi-Site Damage: Layered Analysis and Growth During Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark Anthony

    1999-01-01

    A finite element program has been developed to perform quasi-static, elastic-plastic crack growth simulations. The model provides a general framework for mixed-mode I/II elastic-plastic fracture analysis using small strain assumptions and plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric finite elements. Cracks are modeled explicitly in the mesh. As the cracks propagate, automatic remeshing algorithms delete the mesh local to the crack tip, extend the crack, and build a new mesh around the new tip. State variable mapping algorithms transfer stresses and displacements from the old mesh to the new mesh. The von Mises material model is implemented in the context of a non-linear Newton solution scheme. The fracture criterion is the critical crack tip opening displacement, and crack direction is predicted by the maximum tensile stress criterion at the crack tip. The implementation can accommodate multiple curving and interacting cracks. An additional fracture algorithm based on nodal release can be used to simulate fracture along a horizontal plane of symmetry. A core of plane strain elements can be used with the nodal release algorithm to simulate the triaxial state of stress near the crack tip. Verification and validation studies compare analysis results with experimental data and published three-dimensional analysis results. Fracture predictions using nodal release for compact tension, middle-crack tension, and multi-site damage test specimens produced accurate results for residual strength and link-up loads. Curving crack predictions using remeshing/mapping were compared with experimental data for an Arcan mixed-mode specimen. Loading angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees were analyzed. The maximum tensile stress criterion was able to predict the crack direction and path for all loading angles in which the material failed in tension. Residual strength was also accurately predicted for these cases.

  6. Dynamic model for predicting growth of salmonella spp. in ground sterile pork

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Predictive model for Salmonella spp. growth in ground pork was developed and validated using kinetic growth data. Salmonella spp. kinetic growth data in ground pork was collected at several isothermal conditions (between 10 and 45C) and Baranyi model was fitted to describe the growth at each temper...

  7. Oncogenic roles of TOPK and MELK, and effective growth suppression by small molecular inhibitors in kidney cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kato, Taigo; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Imoto, Seiya; Tamada, Yoshinori; Miyamoto, Takashi; Matsuo, Yo; Nakamura, Yusuke; Park, Jae-Hyun

    2016-04-05

    T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) and maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) have been reported to play critical roles in cancer cell proliferation and maintenance of stemness. In this study, we investigated possible roles of TOPK and MELK in kidney cancer cells and found their growth promotive effect as well as some feedback mechanism between these two molecules. Interestingly, the blockade of either of these two kinases effectively caused downregulation of forkhead box protein M1 (FOXM1) activity which is known as an oncogenic transcriptional factor in various types of cancer cells. Small molecular compound inhibitors against TOPK (OTS514) and MELK (OTS167) effectively suppressed the kidney cancer cell growth, and the combination of these two compounds additively worked and showed the very strong growth suppressive effect on kidney cancer cells. Collectively, our results suggest that both TOPK and MELK are promising molecular targets for kidney cancer treatment and that dual blockade of OTS514 and OTS167 may bring additive anti-tumor effects with low risk of side effects.

  8. Suppression of growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo of human carcinoma cell lines by transfected p16INK4.

    PubMed

    Spillare, E A; Okamoto, A; Hagiwara, K; Demetrick, D J; Serrano, M; Beach, D; Harris, C C

    1996-05-01

    The function of p16INK4 as a putative tumor suppressor gene was examined by investigating its ability to inhibit the growth of cancer cell lines in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. A p16INK4 cDNA expression vector was transfected into five human cancer cell lines that varied in their p16INK4 and retinoblastoma (Rb) status. Suppression of colony-forming efficiency was seen in four cell lines. Of two cell lines wild type for p16INK4 but null for Rb protein expression, one (Hep 3B) showed inhibition of colony formation, whereas the other (Saos-2) did not. This observation may demonstrate involvement of p16INK4 independent of Rb. The transfected p16INK4 gene was frequently selected against and lost during continued growth in vitro. When compared to the colon carcinoma cell line (DLD-1),p16INK4-transfected DLD-1 clone 1 cells were less tumorigenic in athymic nude mice. Tumors arising from p16INK4-transfected DLD-1 clones, which were growth suppressed in vitro, either lost the integrated exogenous p16INK4 or expressed reduced amounts of p16INK4 protein. Therefore, p16INK4 was also selected against during tumor formation in vivo. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that p16INK4 is a tumor suppressor gene.

  9. Generic conditions for suppressing the coherent synchrotron radiation induced emittance growth in a two-dipole achromat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yi; Cui, Xiaohao; Huang, Xiyang; Xu, Gang

    2014-06-01

    The effect of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) becomes evident, and leads to increased beam energy spread and transverse emittance dilution, as both the emittance and bunch length of the electron beams are continuously pushed down in present and forthcoming high-brightness light sources and linear colliders. Suppressing this effect is important to preserve the expected machine performance. Methods of the R-matrix analysis and the Courant-Snyder formalism analysis have been proposed to evaluate and to suppress the emittance growth due to CSR in achromatic cells. In this paper a few important modifications are made on these two methods, which enable us to prove that these two methods are equivalent to each other. With the modified analysis, we obtain explicit and generic conditions of cancelling the CSR-driven emittance excitation in a single achromat consisting of two dipoles of arbitrary bending angles. In spite of the fact that the analysis constrains itself in a linear regime, based on the assumption that CSR-induced particle energy deviation is proportional to both θ and ρ1/3, with θ being the bending angle and ρ the bending radius, it is demonstrated through ELEGANT simulations that the conditions derived from this analysis are still effective in suppressing the emittance growth when a more detailed one-dimensional CSR model is considered. In addition, it illustrates that the emittance growth can be reduced to a lower level with the proposed conditions than with the other two approaches, such as matching the beam envelope to the CSR kick and setting the cell-to-cell betatron phase advance to an appropriate value.

  10. Development of a predictive program for Vibrio parahaemolyticus growth under various environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Kimura, Bon; Fujii, Tateo

    2009-09-01

    In this study, we developed a predictive program for Vibrio parahaemolyticus growth under various environmental conditions. Raw growth data was obtained with a V. parahaemolyticus O3:K6 strain cultured at a variety of broth temperatures, pH, and salt concentrations. Data were analyzed with our logistic model and the parameter values of the model were analyzed with polynomial equations. A prediction program consisting of the growth model and the polynomial equations was then developed. After the range of the growth environments was modified, the program successfully predicted the growth for all environments tested. The program could be a useful tool to ensure the bacteriological safety of seafood.

  11. A chemical pollen suppressant inhibits auxin-induced growth in maize coleoptile sections

    SciTech Connect

    Vesper, M.J. ); Cross, J.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Chemical inhibitors of pollen development having a phenylcinnoline carboxylate structure were found to inhibit IAA- and 1-NAA-induced growth in maize coleoptile sections. The inhibitor (100 {mu}M) used in these experiments caused approx. 35% reduction in auxin-induced growth over the auxin concentration range of 0.3 to 100 {mu}M. Growth inhibition was noted as a lengthening of the latent period and a decrease in the rate of an auxin-induced growth response. An acid growth response to pH 5 buffer in abraded sections was not impaired. The velocity of basipetal transport of ({sup 3}H)IAA through the coleoptile sections also was not inhibited by the compound, nor was uptake of ({sup 3}H)IAA. Similarly, the inhibitor does not appear to alter auxin-induced H{sup +} secretion. We suggest that the agent targets some other process necessary for auxin-dependent growth.

  12. ABA Suppresses Root Hair Growth via the OBP4 Transcriptional Regulator1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Ayako; Schäfer, Sabine; Breuer, Christian; Shibata, Michitaro; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Matsui, Minami

    2017-01-01

    Plants modify organ growth and tune morphogenesis in response to various endogenous and environmental cues. At the cellular level, organ growth is often adjusted by alterations in cell growth, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this control remain poorly understood. In this study, we identify the DNA BINDING WITH ONE FINGER (DOF)-type transcription regulator OBF BINDING PROTEIN4 (OBP4) as a repressor of cell growth. Ectopic expression of OBP4 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) inhibits cell growth, resulting in severe dwarfism and the repression of genes involved in the regulation of water transport, root hair development, and stress responses. Among the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors known to control root hair growth, OBP4 binds the ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE6-LIKE2 (RSL2) promoter to repress its expression. The accumulation of OBP4 proteins is detected in expanding root epidermal cells, and its expression level is increased by the application of abscisic acid (ABA) at concentrations sufficient to inhibit root hair growth. ABA-dependent induction of OBP4 is associated with the reduced expression of RSL2. Furthermore, ectopic expression of OBP4 or loss of RSL2 function results in ABA-insensitive root hair growth. Taken together, our results suggest that OBP4-mediated transcriptional repression of RSL2 contributes to the ABA-dependent inhibition of root hair growth in Arabidopsis. PMID:28167701

  13. A Multilevel Latent Growth Curve Approach to Predicting Student Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Kilchan; Goldschmidt, Pete

    2012-01-01

    Value-added models and growth-based accountability aim to evaluate school's performance based on student growth in learning. The current focus is on linking the results from value-added models to the ones from growth-based accountability systems including Adequate Yearly Progress decisions mandated by No Child Left Behind. We present a new…

  14. Pharmaceuticals suppress algal growth and microbial respiration and alter bacterial communities in stream biofilms.

    PubMed

    Rosi-Marshall, Emma J; Kincaid, Dustin W; Bechtold, Heather A; Royer, Todd V; Rojas, Miguel; Kelly, John J

    2013-04-01

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products are ubiquitous in surface waters but their effects on aquatic biofilms and associated ecosystem properties are not well understood. We measured in situ responses of stream biofilms to six common pharmaceutical compounds (caffeine, cimetidine, ciprofloxacin, diphenhydramine, metformin, ranitidine, and a mixture of each) by deploying pharmaceutical-diffusing substrates in streams in Indiana, Maryland, and New York. Results were consistent across seasons and geographic locations. On average, algal biomass was suppressed by 22%, 4%, 22%, and 18% relative to controls by caffeine, ciprofloxacin, diphenhydramine, and the mixed treatment, respectively. Biofilm respiration was significantly suppressed by caffeine (53%), cimetidine (51%), ciprofloxacin (91%), diphenhydramine (63%), and the mixed treatment (40%). In autumn in New York, photosynthesis was also significantly suppressed by diphenhydramine (99%) and the mixed treatment (88%). Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes was used to examine the effects of caffeine and diphenhydramine on biofilm bacterial community composition at the three sites. Relative to the controls, diphenhydramine exposure significantly altered bacterial community composition and resulted in significant relative increases in Pseudomonas sp. and decreases in Flavobacterium sp. in all three streams. These ubiquitous pharmaceuticals, alone or in combination, influenced stream biofilms, which could have consequences for higher trophic levels and important ecosystem processes.

  15. miR-17 inhibitor suppressed osteosarcoma tumor growth and metastasis via increasing PTEN expression

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yong; Luo, Ling-hui; Li, Shuai; Yang, Cao

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • miR-17 was increased in OS tissues and cell lines. • Inhibition of miR-17 suppressed OS cell proliferation. • Inhibition of miR-17 suppressed OS cell migration and invasion. • PTEN was a target of miR-17. • miR-17 was negatively correlated with PTEN in OS tissues. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play essential roles in cancer development and progression. Here, we investigated the role of miR-17 in the progression and metastasis of osteosarcoma (OS). miR-17 was frequently increased in OS tissues and cell lines. Inhibition of miR-17 in OS cell lines substantially suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) was identified as a target of miR-17, and ectopic expression of miR-17 inhibited PTEN by direct binding to its 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR). Expression of miR-17 was negatively correlated with PTEN in OS tissues. Together, these findings indicate that miR-17 acts as an oncogenic miRNA and may contribute to the progression and metastasis of OS, suggesting miR-17 as a potential novel diagnostic and therapeutic target of OS.

  16. Dynamic Modeling of Aerobic Growth of Shewanella oneidensis. Predicting Triauxic Growth, Flux Distributions and Energy Requirement for Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2013-01-01

    A model-based analysis is conducted to investigate metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 strain in aerobic batch culture, which exhibits an intriguing growth pattern by sequentially consuming substrate (i.e., lactate) and by-products (i.e., pyruvate and acetate). A general protocol is presented for developing a detailed network-based dynamic model for S. oneidensis based on the Lumped Hybrid Cybernetic Model (LHCM) framework. The L-HCM, although developed from only limited data, is shown to accurately reproduce exacting dynamic metabolic shifts, and provide reasonable estimates of energy requirement for growth. Flux distributions in S. oneidensis predicted by the L-HCM compare very favorably with 13C-metabolic flux analysis results reported in the literature. Predictive accuracy is enhanced by incorporating measurements of only a few intracellular fluxes, in addition to extracellular metabolites. The L-HCM developed here for S. oneidensis is consequently a promising tool for the analysis of intracellular flux distribution and metabolic engineering.

  17. Hydrogen sulfide suppresses transforming growth factor-β1-induced differentiation of human cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, YouEn; Wang, JiaNing; Li, Hua; Yuan, LiangJun; Wang, Lei; Wu, Bing; Ge, JunBo

    2015-11-01

    In heart disease, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) converts fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, which synthesize and secrete fibrillar type I and III collagens. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how hydrogen sulfide (H2S) suppresses TGF-β1-induced differentiation of human cardiac fibroblasts to myofibroblasts. Human cardiac fibroblasts were serum-starved in fibroblast medium for 16 h before exposure to TGF-β1 (10 ng mL(-1)) for 24 h with or without sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, 100 µmol L(-1), 30 min pretreatment) treatment. NaHS, an exogenous H2S donor, potently inhibited the proliferation and migration of TGF-β1-induced human cardiac fibroblasts and regulated their cell cycle progression. Furthermore, NaHS treatment led to suppression of fibroblast differentiation into myofibroblasts, and reduced the levels of collagen, TGF-β1, and activated Smad3 in TGF-β1-induced human cardiac fibroblasts in vitro. We therefore conclude that H2S suppresses TGF-β1-stimulated conversion of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts by inhibiting the TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling pathway, as well as by inhibiting the proliferation, migration, and cell cycle progression of human cardiac myofibroblasts. These effects of H2S may play significant roles in cardiac remodeling associated with heart failure.

  18. Targeting the neddylation pathway to suppress the growth of prostate cancer cells: therapeutic implication for the men's cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofang; Li, Lihui; Liang, Yupei; Li, Chunjie; Zhao, Hu; Ye, Dingwei; Sun, Menghong; Jeong, Lak Shin; Feng, Yan; Fu, Shen; Jia, Lijun; Guo, Xiaomao

    2014-01-01

    The neddylation pathway has been recognized as an attractive anticancer target in several malignancies, and its selective inhibitor, MLN4924, has recently advanced to clinical development. However, the anticancer effect of this compound against prostate cancer has not been well investigated. In this study, we demonstrated that the neddylation pathway was functional and targetable in prostate cancer cells. Specific inhibition of this pathway with MLN4924 suppressed the proliferation and clonogenic survival of prostate cancer cells. Mechanistically, MLN4924 treatment inhibited cullin neddylation, inactivated Cullin-RING E3 ligases (CRLs), and led to accumulation of tumor-suppressive CRLs substrates, including cell cycle inhibitors (p21, p27, and WEE1), NF-κB signaling inhibitor IκBα, and DNA replication licensing proteins (CDT1 and ORC1). As a result, MLN4924 triggered DNA damage, G2 phase cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Taken together, our results demonstrate the effectiveness of targeting the neddylation pathway with MLN4924 in suppressing the growth of prostate cancer cells, implicating a potentially new therapeutic approach for the men's cancer.

  19. Antrodia camphorata Grown on Germinated Brown Rice Suppresses Melanoma Cell Proliferation by Inducing Apoptosis and Cell Differentiation and Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Song, Minjung; Park, Dong Ki; Park, Hye-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Antrodia camphorata grown on germinated brown rice (CBR) was prepared to suppress melanoma development. CBR extracts were divided into hexane, EtOAc, BuOH, and water fractions. Among all the fractions, EtOAc fraction showed the best suppressive effect on B16F10 melanoma cell proliferation by CCK-8 assay. It also showed the increased cell death and the changed cellular morphology after CBR treatment. Annexin V-FITC/PI, flow cytometry, and western blotting were performed to elucidate anticancer activity of CBR. The results showed that CBR induced p53-mediated apoptotic cell death of B16F10. CBR EtOAc treatment increased melanin content and melanogenesis-related proteins of MITF and TRP-1 expressions, which supports its anticancer activity. Its potential as an anticancer agent was further investigated in tumor-xenografted mouse model. In melanoma-xenografted mouse model, melanoma tumor growth was significantly suppressed under CBR EtOAc fraction treatment. HPLC analysis of CBR extract showed peak of adenosine. In conclusion, CBR extracts notably inhibited B16F10 melanoma cell proliferation through the p53-mediated apoptosis induction and increased melanogenesis. These findings suggest that CBR EtOAc fraction can act as an effective anticancer agent to treat melanoma. PMID:23533475

  20. Smad3-related miRNAs regulated oncogenic TRIB2 promoter activity to effectively suppress lung adenocarcinoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan-Xia; Yan, Yun-Fei; Liu, Yue-Mei; Li, You-Jie; Zhang, Han-Han; Pang, Min; Hu, Jin-Xia; Zhao, Wei; Xie, Ning; Zhou, Ling; Wang, Ping-Yu; Xie, Shu-Yang

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and Smad3, as key transcription factors in transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) signaling, help regulate various physiological and pathological processes. We investigated the roles of Smad3-regulated miRNAs with respect to lung adenocarcinoma cell apoptosis, proliferation, and metastasis. We observed that Smad3 and phospho-SMAD3 (p-Smad3) were decreased in miR-206- (or miR-140)-treated cells and there might be a feedback loop between miR-206 (or miR-140) and TGF-β1 expression. Smad3-related miRNAs affected tribbles homolog 2 (TRIB2) expression by regulating trib2 promoter activity through the CAGACA box. MiR-206 and miR-140 inhibited lung adenocarcinoma cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo by suppressing p-Smad3/Smad3 and TRIB2. Moreover, lung adenocarcinoma data supported a suppressive role for miR-206/miR-140 and an oncogenic role for TRIB2—patients with higher TRIB2 levels had poorer survival. In summary, miR-206 and miR-140, as tumor suppressors, induced lung adenocarcinoma cell death and inhibited cell proliferation by modifying oncogenic TRIB2 promoter activity through p-Smad3. MiR-206 and miR-140 also suppressed lung adenocarcinoma cell metastasis in vitro and in vivo by regulating EMT-related factors. PMID:28005074

  1. Depletion of CD8+ T cells suppresses growth of Trypanosoma brucei brucei and interferon-gamma) production in infected rats.

    PubMed Central

    Bakhiet, M; Olsson, T; van der Meide, P; Kristensson, K

    1990-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats infected with Trypanosoma brucei brucei showed a strong and rapid induction of splenocyte IFN-gamma (within 12 h post-infection) as measured by a single cell assay for IFN-gamma secretion. Depletion of CD8+ cells in infected rats abrogated the IFN-gamma production, suppressed parasite growth and increased survival of the animals. Induction of MHC class I antigens in the paraventricular and supra-optic hypothalamic nuclei caused by the trypanosome infection was also inhibited by the CD8+ cell depletion. It is suggested that the CD8+ cells are involved directly or indirectly in growth regulation of the parasite and that IFN-gamma induced by the parasite may be one of the factors that trigger MHC expression and immunosuppression. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:2143706

  2. Histone deacetylase inhibitors promote eNOS expression in vascular smooth muscle cells and suppress hypoxia-induced cell growth.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaoling; Feng, Lan; Huang, Xiaoyong; Yang, Yidong; Yang, Chengzhong; Gao, Yuqi

    2017-03-07

    Hypoxia stimulates excessive growth of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contributing to vascular remodelling. Recent studies have shown that histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) suppress VSMC proliferation and activate eNOS expression. However, the effects of HDI on hypoxia-induced VSMC growth and the role of activated eNOS in VSMCs are unclear. Using an EdU incorporation assay and flow cytometry analysis, we found that the HDIs, butyrate (Bur) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) significantly suppressed the proliferation of hypoxic VSMC lines and induced apoptosis. Remarkable induction of cleaved caspase 3, p21 expression and reduction of PCNA expression were also observed. Increased eNOS expression and enhanced NO secretion by hypoxic VSMC lines were detected using Bur or SAHA treatment. Knockdown of eNOS by siRNA transfection or exposure of hypoxic VSMCs to NO scavengers weakened the effects of Bur and SAHA on the growth of hypoxic VSMCs. In animal experiments, administration of Bur to Wistar rats exposed to hypobaric hypoxia for 28 days ameliorated the thickness and collagen deposition in pulmonary artery walls. Although the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) was not obviously decreased with Bur in hypoxic rats, right ventricle hypertrophy index (RVHI) was decreased and the oxygen partial pressure of arterial blood was elevated. Furthermore, cell viability was decreased and eNOS and cleaved caspase 3 were induced in HDI-treated rat pulmonary arterial SMCs. These findings imply that HDIs prevent hypoxia-induced VSMC growth, in correlation with activated eNOS expression and activity in hypoxic VSMCs.

  3. Down-Regulation by Resveratrol of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor-Stimulated Osteoprotegerin Synthesis through Suppression of Akt in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kuroyanagi, Gen; Otsuka, Takanobu; Yamamoto, Naohiro; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Nakakami, Akira; Mizutani, Jun; Kozawa, Osamu; Tokuda, Haruhiko

    2014-01-01

    It is firmly established that resveratrol, a natural food compound abundantly found in grape skins and red wine, has beneficial properties for human health. In the present study, we investigated the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) on osteoprotegerin (OPG) synthesis in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells and whether resveratrol affects the OPG synthesis. FGF-2 stimulated both the OPG release and the expression of OPG mRNA. Resveratrol significantly suppressed the FGF-2-stimulated OPG release and the mRNA levels of OPG. SRT1720, an activator of SIRT1, reduced the FGF-2-induced OPG release and the OPG mRNA expression. PD98059, an inhibitor of upstream kinase activating p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, had little effect on the FGF-2-stimulated OPG release. On the other hand, SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase, SP600125, an inhibitor of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK), and Akt inhibitor suppressed the OPG release induced by FGF-2. Resveratrol failed to affect the FGF-2-induced phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAP kinase, p38 MAP kinase or SAPK/JNK. The phosphorylation of Akt induced by FGF-2 was significantly suppressed by resveratrol or SRT1720. These findings strongly suggest that resveratrol down-regulates FGF-2-stimulated OPG synthesis through the suppression of the Akt pathway in osteoblasts and that the inhibitory effect of resveratrol is mediated at least in part by SIRT1 activation. PMID:25290095

  4. Berberine suppresses Id-1 expression and inhibits the growth and development of lung metastases in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Chi Man; Cheung, Kenneth Chat Pan; Cheung, Yuk Chun; Man, Kwan; Lui, Vivian Wai-Yan; Tsao, Sai Wah; Feng, Yibin

    2015-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an invasive cancer with a high rate of recurrence and metastasis. Agents with anti-proliferative as well as anti-metastatic activity will be ideal for effective treatment. Here, we demonstrated that berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, harbored potent anti-metastatic and anti-proliferative activities in vivo. Using an orthotopic model of HCC (MHCC-97L), which spontaneously develops lung metastases (one of the most common sites of HCC metastasis), we found that berberine treatment (10mg/kg/2days) significantly reduced lung metastasis from the liver tumors by ~85% (quantitated by bioluminescence emitted from lung metastases). Histological examination also confirmed the reduced incidence and number of lung metastases in berberine-treated mice. Furthermore, berberine effectively suppressed extra-tumor invasion of the primary HCC implant into the surrounding normal liver tissue, illustrating its potent anti-metastatic action in vivo. Consistent with previous reports in other cancer, berberine's anti-tumor activity was accompanied by suppression of cellular proliferation, invasiveness and HIF-1α/VEGF signaling. Strikingly, further mechanistic investigation revealed that berberine exerted profound inhibitory effect on the expression of Id-1, which is a key regulator for HCC development and metastasis. Berberine could suppress the transcription level of Id-1 through inhibiting its promotor activity. Specific downregulation of Id-1 by knocking down its RNA transcripts in HCC cells inhibited cellular growth, invasion and VEGF secretion, demonstrating the functional relevance of Id-1 downregulation induced by berberine. Lastly, berberine's anti-proliferative and anti-invasive activities could be partially rescued by Id-1 overexpression in HCC models, revealing a novel anti-cancer/anti-invasive mechanism of berberine via Id-1 suppression.

  5. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Growth Suppression of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) mediates the developmental, physiologic, and pathologic effects of androgens including 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). However, the mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells are not well understood, though they are central to prostate development, homeostasis, and neoplasia. Here, we identify androgen-responsive genes that restrain cell cycle progression and proliferation of human prostate epithelial cell lines (HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR), and we investigate the mechanisms through which AR regulates their expression. DHT inhibited proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, and cell cycle analysis revealed a prolonged G1 interval. In the cell cycle, the G1/S-phase transition is initiated by the activity of cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complexes, which relieve growth suppression. In HPr-1AR, cyclin D1/2 and CDK4/6 mRNAs were androgen-repressed, whereas CDK inhibitor, CDKN1A, mRNA was androgen-induced. The regulation of these transcripts was AR-dependent, and involved multiple mechanisms. Similar AR-mediated down-regulation of CDK4/6 mRNAs and up-regulation of CDKN1A mRNA occurred in PC3-Lenti-AR. Further, CDK4/6 overexpression suppressed DHT-inhibited cell cycle progression and proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, whereas CDKN1A overexpression induced cell cycle arrest. We therefore propose that AR-mediated growth suppression of HPr-1AR involves cyclin D1 mRNA decay, transcriptional repression of cyclin D2 and CDK4/6, and transcriptional activation of CDKN1A, which serve to decrease CDK4/6 activity. AR-mediated inhibition of PC3-Lenti-AR proliferation occurs through a similar mechanism, albeit without down-regulation of cyclin D. Our findings provide insight into AR-mediated regulation of prostate epithelial cell proliferation. PMID:26372468

  6. A specific aptamer-cell penetrating peptides complex delivered siRNA efficiently and suppressed prostate tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Yanjun; Liu, Jiayun; Ma, Yueyun; Su, Mingquan; Zhang, Hongyi; Hao, Xiaoke

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Specific and efficient delivery of siRNA into intended tumor cells remains as a challenge, even though RNAi has been exploited as a new strategy for prostate cancer therapy. This work aims to address both specificity and efficiency of SURVIVIN-siRNA delivery by constructing a therapeutic complex using combinatorial strategies. A fusion protein STD was first expressed to serve as a backbone, consisting of streptavidin, a cell-penetrating peptide called Trans-Activator of Transcription (TAT) and a double-stranded RNA binding domain. A biotinylated Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) specific aptamer A10 and SURVIVIN-siRNA were then linked to STD protein to form the therapeutic complex. This complex could specifically targeted PSMA+ tumor cells. Compared to lipofectamine and A10-siRNA chimera, it demonstrated higher efficiency in delivering siRNA into target cells by 19.2% and 59.9%, and increased apoptosis by 16.8% and 26.1% respectively. Upon systemic administration, this complex also showed significant efficacy in suppressing tumor growth in athymic mice (p <0.001). We conclude that this therapeutic complex could specifically and efficiently deliver SURVIVIN-siRNA to target cells and suppressed tumor growth in vivo, which indicates its potential to be used as a new strategy in prostate cancer therapy PMID:26954374

  7. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated quercetin suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in both transgenic zebrafish and mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinjie; Deng, Senyi; Li, Ling; Sun, Lu; Yang, Xi; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Lei; Qian, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2013-11-01

    Quercetin (Que) loaded polymeric micelles were prepared to obtain an aqueous formulation of Que with enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activities. A simple solid dispersion method was used, and the obtained Que micelles had a small particle size (about 31 nm), high drug loading, and high encapsulation efficiency. Que micelles showed improved cellular uptake, an enhanced apoptosis induction effect, and stronger inhibitory effects on proliferation, migration, and invasion of 4T1 cells than free Que. The enhanced in vitro antiangiogenesis effects of Que micelles were proved by the results that Que micelles significantly suppressed proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Subsequently, transgenic zebrafish models were employed to investigate anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effects of Que micelles, in which stronger inhibitory effects of Que micelles were observed on embryonic angiogenesis, tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor growth, and tumor metastasis. Furthermore, in a subcutaneous 4T1 tumor model, Que micelles were more effective in suppressing tumor growth and spontaneous pulmonary metastasis, and prolonging the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Besides, immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent assays suggested that tumors in the Que micelle-treated group showed more apoptosis, fewer microvessels, and fewer proliferation-positive cells. In conclusion, Que micelles, which are synthesized as an aqueous formulation of Que, possess enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity, which can serve as potential candidates for cancer therapy.

  8. Minocycline treatment suppresses juvenile development and growth by attenuating insulin/TOR signaling in Drosophila animal model

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hyun Myoung; Noh, Sujin; Hyun, Seogang

    2017-01-01

    Minocycline is a broad spectrum, semi-synthetic tetracycline analog that is used to treat bacterial infection. Recently, this drug has been receiving increasing attention for its non-antibiotic properties, including anti-inflammatory, tumor suppressive, and neuroprotective effects. Drosophila is a useful model organism for studying human metabolism and disease. In this study, we investigated the effects of minocycline on juvenile development and growth in Drosophila. Feeding minocycline to Drosophila larvae suppresses larval body growth and delays the timing of pupation in a dose-dependent manner. We found that the drug treatment decreased the activated form of Akt and S6K in peripheral tissues, which suggested that the insulin/target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling had been attenuated. Specifically enhancing TOR activity in the prothoracic gland (PG), the ecdysone-generating organ, attenuated the drug-induced developmental delay, which is consistent with the critical role of PG’s TOR signaling in determining pupation time. Our results reveal previously unrecognized effects of minocycline and offer a new potential therapeutic opportunity for various pathological conditions associated with insulin/TOR signaling. PMID:28317899

  9. Focal Adhesion Kinase-mediated Phosphorylation of Beclin1 Protein Suppresses Cardiomyocyte Autophagy and Initiates Hypertrophic Growth*♦

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhaokang; Zhu, Qiang; Dee, Rachel; Opheim, Zachary; Mack, Christopher P.; Cyr, Douglas M.; Taylor, Joan M.

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved intracellular degradation/recycling system that is essential for cellular homeostasis but is dysregulated in a number of diseases, including myocardial hypertrophy. Although it is clear that limiting or accelerating autophagic flux can result in pathological cardiac remodeling, the physiological signaling pathways that fine-tune cardiac autophagy are poorly understood. Herein, we demonstrated that stimulation of cardiomyocytes with phenylephrine (PE), a well known hypertrophic agonist, suppresses autophagy and that activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is necessary for PE-stimulated autophagy suppression and subsequent initiation of hypertrophic growth. Mechanistically, we showed that FAK phosphorylates Beclin1, a core autophagy protein, on Tyr-233 and that this post-translational modification limits Beclin1 association with Atg14L and reduces Beclin1-dependent autophagosome formation. Remarkably, although ectopic expression of wild-type Beclin1 promoted cardiomyocyte atrophy, expression of a Y233E phosphomimetic variant of Beclin1 failed to affect cardiomyocyte size. Moreover, genetic depletion of Beclin1 attenuated PE-mediated/FAK-dependent initiation of myocyte hypertrophy in vivo. Collectively, these findings identify FAK as a novel negative regulator of Beclin1-mediated autophagy and indicate that this pathway can facilitate the promotion of compensatory hypertrophic growth. This novel mechanism to limit Beclin1 activity has important implications for treating a variety of pathologies associated with altered autophagic flux. PMID:27994061

  10. Characterization of Critical Domains within the Tumor Suppressor CASZ1 Required for Transcriptional Regulation and Growth Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Virden, Ryan A.

    2012-01-01

    CASZ1 is a zinc finger (ZF) transcription factor that is critical for controlling the normal differentiation of subtypes of neural and cardiac muscle cells. In neuroblastoma tumors, loss of CASZ1 is associated with poor prognosis and restoration of CASZ1 function suppresses neuroblastoma tumorigenicity. However, the key domains by which CASZ1 transcription controls developmental processes and neuroblastoma tumorigenicity have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we show that loss of any one of ZF1 to ZF4 resulted in a 58 to 79% loss in transcriptional activity, as measured by induction of tyrosine hydroxylase promoter-luciferase activity, compared to that of wild-type (WT) CASZ1b. Mutation of ZF5 or deletion of the C-terminal sequence of amino acids (aa) 728 to 1166 (a truncation of 38% of the protein) does not significantly alter transcriptional function. A series of N-terminal truncations reveals a critical transcriptional activation domain at aa 31 to 185 and a nuclear localization signal at aa 23 to 29. Soft agar colony formation assays and xenograft studies show that WT CASZ1b is more active in suppressing neuroblastoma growth than CASZ1b with a ZF4 mutation or a deletion of aa 31 to 185. This study identifies key domains needed for CASZ1b to regulate gene transcription. Furthermore, we establish a link between loss of CASZ1b transcriptional activity and attenuation of CASZ1b-mediated inhibition of neuroblastoma growth and tumorigenicity. PMID:22331471

  11. MECP2 promotes the growth of gastric cancer cells by suppressing miR-338-mediated antiproliferative effect

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Dongdong; Zhao, Lingyu; He, Kang; Sun, Hongfei; Cai, Donghui; Ni, Lei; Sun, Ruifang; Chang, Su'e; Song, Tusheng; Huang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2), a transcriptional suppressor, is involved in gene regulation by binding to methylated promoters. We found that MECP2 is overexpressed in gastric cancer (GC), and that Mecp2 knockdown affects the growth of GC cells both in vitro and in vivo. MECP2 can directly bind to the methylated-CpG island of miR-338 promoter and suppress the expression of two mature microRNAs, namely, miR-338-3p and miR-338-5p. Furthermore, miR-338-5p can suppress GC cell growth by targeting BMI1 (B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 homolog). We additionally found that decreased miR-338-5p expression in GC tissues, relative to normal tissues, was significantly negatively correlated with increased BMI1 expression. Silencing MECP2 can indirectly lead to reduced expression of P-REX2, which has been identified as the miR-338-3p target, as well as BMI1 and increasing expression of P16 or P21 both in vitro and in vivo. Altogether, our results indicate that MECP2 promote the proliferation of GC cells via miR-338 (miR-338-3p and miR-338-5p)-mediated antitumor and gene regulatory effect. PMID:27166996

  12. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NJN-6-enriched bio-organic fertilizer suppressed Fusarium wilt and promoted the growth of banana plants.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jun; Ruan, Yunze; Wang, Beibei; Zhang, Jian; Waseem, Raza; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2013-04-24

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain NJN-6 is an important plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) which can produce secondary metabolites antagonistic to several soil-borne pathogens. In this study, the ability of a bio-organic fertilizer (BIO) containing NJN-6 strain to promote the growth and suppress Fusarium wilt of banana plants was evaluated in a pot experiment. The results showed that the application of BIO significantly decreased the incidence of Fusarium wilt and promoted the growth of banana plants compared to that for the organic fertilizer (OF). To determine the beneficial mechanism of the strain, the colonization of NJN-6 strain on banana roots was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The plant growth-promoting hormones indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and gibberellin A3 (GA3), along with antifungal lipopeptides iturin A, were detected when the NJN-6 strain was incubated in both Landy medium with additional l-tryptophan and in root exudates of banana plants. In addition, some antifungal volatile organic compounds and iturin A were also detected in BIO. In summary, strain NJN-6 could colonize the roots of banana plants after the application of BIO and produced active compounds which were beneficial for the growth of banana plants.

  13. Induction of p21-dependent senescence by an NAE inhibitor, MLN4924, as a mechanism of growth suppression.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lijun; Li, Hua; Sun, Yi

    2011-06-01

    Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase (CRL), with its founding member of SKP1-Cullins-F-box proteins (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase, is the largest family of E3 ligases, which requires cullin neddylation for its activation. Recently, an inhibitor of NEDD8 activating enzyme (NAE), MLN4924, was reported to block cullin neddylation and inactivate CRL/SCF E3, resulting in apoptosis induction and tumor suppression both in vitro and in vivo. We report here that apoptosis is not the sole mechanism by which MLN4924 suppresses tumor cell growth because apoptosis is moderately induced by the drug in some cancer cell lines and drug-induced growth suppression is only partially blocked by a pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD. MLN4924 treatment induces the characteristics of senescence phenotypes as evidenced by enlarged and flattened cellular morphology and positive staining of senescence-associated β-Gal. MLN4924-induced senescence is associated with cellular response to DNA damage, triggered by accumulation of DNA-licensing proteins CDT1 and ORC1, as a result of inactivation of CRL/SCF E3s. The senescence occurs in the manner independent of pRB/p16 and p53, but dependent on p21, a known substrate of CRL/SCF E3s and a mediator of senescence, which accumulates on CRL/SCF inactivation by MLN4924. Furthermore, MLN4924-induced senescence is irreversible and coupled with persistent accumulation of p21 and sustained activation of DNA damage response. Our study reveals a novel mechanism of MLN4924 action and showed that MLN4924 could be further developed as an effective anticancer agent by inducing apoptosis and irreversible senescence.

  14. Plane strain crack growth models for fatigue crack growth life predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, J.M.; Daniewicz, S.R.; Hechmer, J.L.

    1996-02-01

    Experimental data and analytical models have shown that a growing fatigue crack produces a plastic wake. This, in turn, leads to residual compressive stresses acting over the crack faces during the unloading portion of the fatigue cycle. This crack closure effect results in an applied stress intensity factor during unloading which is greater than that associated with the K{sub min}, thus producing a crack-driving force which is less than {Delta}K = K{sub max} {minus} K{sub min}. Life predictions which do not account for this crack closure effect give inaccurate life estimates, especially for fully reversed loadings. This paper discusses the development of a crack closure expression for the 4-point bend specimen using numerical results obtained from a modified strip-yield model. Data from tests of eight 4-point bend specimens were used to estimate the specimen constraint factor (stress triaxiality effect). The constraint factor was then used in the estimation of the crack opening stresses for each of the bend tests. The numerically estimated crack opening stresses were used to develop an effective stress intensity factor range, {Delta}K{sub eff}. The resulting crack growth rate data when plotted versus {Delta}K{sub eff} resulted in a material fatigue crack growth rate property curve independent of test specimen type, stress level, and R-ratio. Fatigue crack growth rate data from center-cracked panels using Newman`s crack closure model, from compact specimens using Eason`s R-ratio expression, and from bend specimens using the model discussed in this paper are all shown to fall along the same straight line (on log-log paper) when plotted versus {Delta}K{sub eff}, even though crack closure differs for each specimen type.

  15. Inhibition of histamine receptor 3 suppresses glioblastoma tumor growth, invasion, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wen-Ke; Yang, Yong-Xiang; Sun, Chao; Zhang, Zhuo; Xu, Yu-Qiao; Chang, Ting; Li, Zhu-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Histamine receptor 3 (H3R) is expressed in various tumors and correlated with malignancy and tumor proliferation. However, the role of H3R in tumor invasion and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) remains unknown. Here, we explored the H3R in the highly invasive glioblastoma (GBM) and U87MG cells. We found that H3R mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated in the GBM and glioma cell lines compared to normal brain tissue and astrocytes. In U87MG cell line, inhibition of H3R by siRNA or the antagonist ciproxifan (CPX) suppressed proliferation, invasiveness, and the expression of EMT activators (Snail, Slug and Twist). In addition, expression of epithelial markers (E-cadherin and ZO-1) was up-regulated and expression of mesenchymal markers (vimentin and N-cadherin) was down-regulated in vitro and in vivo in a xenograft model. In addition, we also showed that inhibition of H3R by siRNA or CPX inactivated the PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK signaling pathways, while inhibition of Akt or ERK activity with antagonists or siRNAs suppressed H3R agonist (R)-(α)-(−)- methylhistamine dihydrobromide (RAMH) mediated invasion and reorganization of cadherin-household. In conclusion, overexpression of H3R is associated with glioma progression. Inhibition of H3R leads to suppressed invasion and EMT of GBM by inactivating the PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK pathways in gliomas. PMID:25940798

  16. Interactions between "what" and "when" in the auditory system: temporal predictability enhances repetition suppression.

    PubMed

    Costa-Faidella, Jordi; Baldeweg, Torsten; Grimm, Sabine; Escera, Carles

    2011-12-14

    Neural activity in the auditory system decreases with repeated stimulation, matching stimulus probability in multiple timescales. This phenomenon, known as stimulus-specific adaptation, is interpreted as a neural mechanism of regularity encoding aiding auditory object formation. However, despite the overwhelming literature covering recordings from single-cell to scalp auditory-evoked potential (AEP), stimulation timing has received little interest. Here we investigated whether timing predictability enhances the experience-dependent modulation of neural activity associated with stimulus probability encoding. We used human electrophysiological recordings in healthy participants who were exposed to passive listening of sound sequences. Pure tones of different frequencies were delivered in successive trains of a variable number of repetitions, enabling the study of sequential repetition effects in the AEP. In the predictable timing condition, tones were delivered with isochronous interstimulus intervals; in the unpredictable timing condition, interstimulus intervals varied randomly. Our results show that unpredictable stimulus timing abolishes the early part of the repetition positivity, an AEP indexing auditory sensory memory trace formation, while leaving the later part (≈ >200 ms) unaffected. This suggests that timing predictability aids the propagation of repetition effects upstream the auditory pathway, most likely from association auditory cortex (including the planum temporale) toward primary auditory cortex (Heschl's gyrus) and beyond, as judged by the timing of AEP latencies. This outcome calls for attention to stimulation timing in future experiments regarding sensory memory trace formation in AEP measures and stimulus probability encoding in animal models.

  17. Eudaimonic Growth: Narrative Growth Goals Predict Increases in Ego Development and Subjective Well-Being 3 Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Jack J.; McAdams, Dan P.

    2010-01-01

    We examine (a) the normative course of eudaimonic well-being in emerging adulthood and (b) whether people's narratives of major life goals might prospectively predict eudaimonic growth 3 years later. We define eudaimonic growth as longitudinal increases in eudaimonic well-being, which we define as the combination of psychosocial maturity and…

  18. Nuclear transcription factor Nrf2 suppresses prostate cancer cells growth and migration through upregulating ferroportin.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dong; Zhou, Cuixing; Shi, Yunbo; Lu, Hao; Xu, Renfang; He, Xiaozhou

    2016-11-29

    VTo investigate the effect of nuclear transcription factor Nrf2 on the transcription of Ferroportin (FPN) in prostate cancer cells, and the regulation mechanisms of FPN on cell viability, migration and apoptosis of prostate cancer cells.Empty vectors, pEGFPC1-Nrf2, pEGFPC1-FPN, Si-FPN and Si-Nrf2 were transfected into prostate cancer cell line PC3. The expression of mRNA and protein were measured by real time-PCR (RT-PCR) and western blot. Cell viability, migration, cycle and apoptosis were tested by CCK-8 assay, wound healing and flow cytometry, respectively. The interaction between FPN and Nrf2 was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) assay.The viability, migration and mitosis of PC3 cells could be repressed by over-expressed FPN, with decreased intracellular ferritin. The CHIP assay demonstrated that Nrf2 is one transcription factor of FPN and promotes its transcription. With the increase of Nrf2 in PC3 cells, the viability, migration ability and concentration of ferritin were suppressed, while the apoptosis rate was increased. The above effects were counteracted by down-regulating FPN.FPN could inhibit the prostate cancer cell viability, migration and mitosis, which is also related to a decrease of intracellular ferritin content. In conclusion, Nrf2 suppresses prostate cancer cells viability, migration, and mitosis through upregulating FPN.

  19. Nuclear transcription factor Nrf2 suppresses prostate cancer cells growth and migration through upregulating ferroportin

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Dong; Zhou, Cuixing; Shi, Yunbo; Lu, Hao; Xu, Renfang; He, Xiaozhou

    2016-01-01

    VTo investigate the effect of nuclear transcription factor Nrf2 on the transcription of Ferroportin (FPN) in prostate cancer cells, and the regulation mechanisms of FPN on cell viability, migration and apoptosis of prostate cancer cells. Empty vectors, pEGFPC1-Nrf2, pEGFPC1-FPN, Si-FPN and Si-Nrf2 were transfected into prostate cancer cell line PC3. The expression of mRNA and protein were measured by real time-PCR (RT-PCR) and western blot. Cell viability, migration, cycle and apoptosis were tested by CCK-8 assay, wound healing and flow cytometry, respectively. The interaction between FPN and Nrf2 was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) assay. The viability, migration and mitosis of PC3 cells could be repressed by over-expressed FPN, with decreased intracellular ferritin. The CHIP assay demonstrated that Nrf2 is one transcription factor of FPN and promotes its transcription. With the increase of Nrf2 in PC3 cells, the viability, migration ability and concentration of ferritin were suppressed, while the apoptosis rate was increased. The above effects were counteracted by down-regulating FPN. FPN could inhibit the prostate cancer cell viability, migration and mitosis, which is also related to a decrease of intracellular ferritin content. In conclusion, Nrf2 suppresses prostate cancer cells viability, migration, and mitosis through upregulating FPN. PMID:27788496

  20. Overexpressed CacyBP/SIP leads to the suppression of growth in renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Shiren; Ning, Xiaoxuan; Liu, Jie; Liu, Lili; Chen, Yu; Han, Shuang; Zhang, Yanqi; Liang, Jie; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming . E-mail: fandaim@fmmu.edu.cn

    2007-05-18

    Calcyclin-binding protein/Siah-1-interacting protein (CacyBP/SIP), a target protein of S100, has been identified as a component of a novel ubiquitinylation complex leading to {beta}-catenin degradation, which was found to be related to the malignant phenotypes of gastric cancer. However, the roles of CacyBP/SIP in renal cell carcinoma still remain unclear. In the present study, we had analyzed the expression of the CacyBP/SIP protein in human renal cancer cells and clinical tissue samples. The possible roles of CacyBP/SIP in regulating the malignant phenotype of renal cancer cells were also investigated. The results demonstrated that the expression of CacyBP/SIP was markedly down-regulated in renal cell carcinoma tissues and cell lines. Ectopic overexpression of CacyBP/SIP in A498 cells inhibited the proliferation of this cell and delayed cell cycle progression significantly, which might be related to the down-regulation of Cyclin D1 through reducing {beta}-catenin protein. CacyBP/SIP also suppressed colony formation in soft agar and its tumorigenicity in nude mice. Taken together, our work showed that CacyBP/SIP, as a novel down-regulated gene in renal cell carcinoma, suppressed proliferation and tumorigenesis of renal cancer cells.

  1. Overexpressed CacyBP/SIP leads to the suppression of growth in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiren; Ning, Xiaoxuan; Liu, Jie; Liu, Lili; Chen, Yu; Han, Shuang; Zhang, Yanqi; Liang, Jie; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming

    2007-05-18

    Calcyclin-binding protein/Siah-1-interacting protein (CacyBP/SIP), a target protein of S100, has been identified as a component of a novel ubiquitinylation complex leading to beta-catenin degradation, which was found to be related to the malignant phenotypes of gastric cancer. However, the roles of CacyBP/SIP in renal cell carcinoma still remain unclear. In the present study, we had analyzed the expression of the CacyBP/SIP protein in human renal cancer cells and clinical tissue samples. The possible roles of CacyBP/SIP in regulating the malignant phenotype of renal cancer cells were also investigated. The results demonstrated that the expression of CacyBP/SIP was markedly down-regulated in renal cell carcinoma tissues and cell lines. Ectopic overexpression of CacyBP/SIP in A498 cells inhibited the proliferation of this cell and delayed cell cycle progression significantly, which might be related to the down-regulation of Cyclin D1 through reducing beta-catenin protein. CacyBP/SIP also suppressed colony formation in soft agar and its tumorigenicity in nude mice. Taken together, our work showed that CacyBP/SIP, as a novel down-regulated gene in renal cell carcinoma, suppressed proliferation and tumorigenesis of renal cancer cells.

  2. Isorhamnetin suppresses colon cancer cell growth through the PI3K‑Akt‑mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Yang, Xi; Chen, Cheng; Cai, Shaoxin; Hu, Junbo

    2014-03-01

    Isorhamnetin, a flavonoid isolated from the fruits of herbal medicinal plants, such as Hippophae rhamnoides L., exerts anticancer effects similar to other flavonoids. However, the effect of isorhamnetin on colorectal cancer (CRC) and the underlying molecular mechanism are unclear. This study aimed to determine the effect of isorhamnetin on the proliferation of cells from the human CRC cell lines, HT‑29, HCT116 and SW480. It was demonstrated that isorhamnetin suppressed the proliferation of cells from all three cell lines, induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and suppressed cell proliferation by inhibiting the PI3K‑Akt‑mTOR pathway. Isorhamnetin also reduced the phosphorylation levels of Akt (ser473), phosph‑p70S6 kinase and phosph‑4E‑BP1 (t37/46) protein, and enhanced the expression of Cyclin B1 protein. Therefore, this compound was revealed to be a selective PI3K‑Akt‑mTOR pathway inhibitor, and may be a potent anticancer agent for the treatment of CRC, as it restrains the proliferation of CRC cells.

  3. A natural small molecule harmine inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumour growth through activation of p53 in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Fujun; Chen, Yihua; Song, Yajuan; Huang, Li; Zhai, Dong; Dong, Yanmin; Lai, Li; Zhang, Tao; Li, Dali; Pang, Xiufeng; Liu, Mingyao; Yi, Zhengfang

    2012-01-01

    Activation of p53 effectively inhibits tumor angiogenesis that is necessary for tumor growth and metastasis. Reactivation of the p53 by small molecules has emerged as a promising new strategy for cancer therapy. Several classes of small-molecules that activate the p53 pathway have been discovered using various approaches. Here, we identified harmine (β-carboline alkaloid) as a novel activator of p53 signaling involved in inhibition of angiogenesis and tumor growth. Harmine induced p53 phosphorylation and disrupted the p53-MDM2 interaction. Harmine also prevented p53 degradation in the presence of cycloheximide and activated nuclear accumulation of p53 followed by increasing its transcriptional activity in endothelial cells. Moreover, harmine not only induced endothelial cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, but also suppressed endothelial cell migration and tube formation as well as induction of neovascularity in a mouse corneal micropocket assay. Finally, harmine inhibited tumor growth by reducing tumor angiogenesis, as demonstrated by a xenograft tumor model. Our results suggested a novel mechanism and bioactivity of harmine, which inhibited tumor growth by activating the p53 signaling pathway and blocking angiogenesis in endothelial cells.

  4. EF24 inhibits tumor growth and metastasis via suppressing NF-kappaB dependent pathways in human cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Da-long; Liang, Ying-jian; Zheng, Tong-sen; Song, Rui-peng; Wang, Jia-bei; Sun, Bo-shi; Pan, Shang-ha; Qu, Lian-dong; Liu, Jia-ren; Jiang, Hong-chi; Liu, Lian-xin

    2016-01-01

    A synthetic monoketone analog of curcumin, termed 3, 5-bis (2-flurobenzylidene) piperidin-4-one (EF24), has been reported to inhibit the growth of a variety of cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. However, whether EF24 has anticancer effects on cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) cells and the mechanisms remain to be investigated. The aim of our study was to evaluate the molecular mechanisms underlying the anticancer effects of EF24 on CCA tumor growth and metastasis. Cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion, tumorigenesis and metastasis were examined. EF24 exhibited time- and dose-dependent inhibitory effects on HuCCT-1, TFK-1 and HuH28 human CCA cell lines. EF24 inhibited CCA cell proliferation, migration, and induced G2/M phase arrest. EF24 induced cell apoptosis along with negative regulation of NF-κB- X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) signaling pathway. XIAP inhibition by lentivirus mediated RNA interference enhanced EF24-induced apoptosis, while XIAP overexpression reduced it in CCA cells. In vivo, EF24 significantly suppressed the growth of CCA tumor xenografts and tumor metastasis while displaying low toxicity levels. Our findings indicate that EF24 is a potent antitumor agent that inhibits tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting NF-κB dependent signaling pathways. EF24 may represent a novel approach for CCA treatment. PMID:27571770

  5. Sorafenib suppresses growth and survival of hepatoma cells by accelerating degradation of enhancer of zeste homolog 2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanshan; Zhu, Yu; He, Hongyong; Liu, Jing; Xu, Le; Zhang, Heng; Liu, Haiou; Liu, Weisi; Liu, Yidong; Pan, Deng; Chen, Lin; Wu, Qian; Xu, Jiejie; Gu, Jianxin

    2013-06-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is a mammalian histone methyltransferase that contributes to the epigenetic silencing of target genes that regulate cancer cell growth and survival. It is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with a clinical significance that remains obscure. Sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor, has been used as a first-line therapeutic drug and shown clinical efficiency for advanced-stage HCC patients. In the present study, we found that sorafenib lowered the protein level of EZH2 through accelerating proteasome-mediated EZH2 degradation in hepatoma cells. Overexpression of EZH2 reversed sorafenib-induced cell growth arrest, cell cycle arrest, and cell apoptosis dependent on histone methyltransferase activity in hepatoma cells. More importantly, shRNA-mediated EZH2 knockdown or EZH2 inhibition with 3-deazaneplanocin A treatment promoted sorafenib-induced hepatoma cell growth arrest and apoptosis. Sorafenib altered the hepatoma epigenome by reducing EZH2 and H3K27 trimethylation. These results revealed a novel therapeutic mechanism underlying sorafenib treatment in suppressing hepatoma growth and survival by accelerating EZH2 degradation. Genetic deletion or pharmacological ablation of EZH2 made hepatoma cells more sensitive to sorafenib, which helps provide a strong framework for exploring innovative combined therapies for advanced-stage HCC patients.

  6. A low dose euglycemic infusion of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I rapidly suppresses fasting-enhanced pulsatile growth hormone secretion in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, M L; Clayton, P E; Johnson, M L; Celniker, A; Perlman, A J; Alberti, K G; Thorner, M O

    1993-01-01

    To determine if insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) inhibits pulsatile growth hormone (GH) secretion in man, recombinant human IGF-I (rhIGF-I) was infused for 6 h at 10 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 during a euglycemic clamp in 10 normal men who were fasted for 32 h to enhance GH secretion. Saline alone was infused during an otherwise identical second admission as a control. As a result of rhIGF-I infusion, total and free IGF-I concentrations increased three- and fourfold, respectively. Mean GH concentrations fell from 6.3 +/- 1.6 to 0.59 +/- 0.07 micrograms/liter after 120 min. GH secretion rates, calculated by a deconvolution algorithm, decreased with a t 1/2 of 16.6 min and remained suppressed thereafter. Suppression of GH secretion rates occurred within 60 min when total and free IGF-I concentrations were 1.6-fold and 2-fold above baseline levels, respectively, and while glucose infusion rates were < 1 mumol.kg-1.min-1. During saline infusion, GH secretion rates remained elevated. Infusion of rhIGF-I decreased the mass of GH secreted per pulse by 84% (P < 0.01) and the number of detectable GH secretory pulses by 32% (P < 0.05). Plasma insulin and glucagon decreased to nearly undetectable levels after 60 min of rhIGF-I. Serum free fatty acids, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and acetoacetate were unaffected during the first 3 h of rhIGF-I but decreased thereafter to 52, 32, and 50% of levels observed during saline. We conclude that fasting-enhanced GH secretion is rapidly suppressed by a low-dose euglycemic infusion of rhIGF-I. This effect of rhIGF-I is likely mediated through IGF-I receptors independently of its insulin-like metabolic actions. PMID:8514857

  7. Development of a predictive program for Salmonella enteritidis growth in ground chicken and liquid egg products.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Sakha, Mohammad Zaher

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we developed a predictive program for Salmonella Enteritidis growth in ground chicken and liquid egg products at various temperature patterns. The ground chicken samples were sterilized chicken and raw chicken containing high and low levels of natural microflora, and the liquid egg products were pasteurized or unpasteurized. Microbial growth data published in our previous papers were used for prediction with our new logistic model. The program for the bacterial growth in those food materials was developed on a commercially available spread-sheet program. Users can instantly predict the Salmonella growth in those chicken and egg yolk products by inputting their temperature histories. The growth of natural microflora in the chicken products can also be predicted with the program. This program could be a useful tool to ensure the microbial safety of those materials with regards to Salmonella Enteritidis growth.

  8. Activin Type 2 Receptor Restoration in MSI-H Colon Cancer Suppresses Growth and Enhances Migration With Activin

    PubMed Central

    JUNG, BARBARA H.; BECK, STAYCE E.; CABRAL, JENNIFER; CHAU, EDDY; CABRERA, BETTY L.; FIORINO, ANTONIO; SMITH, E. JULIETA; BOCANEGRA, MELANIE; CARETHERS, JOHN M.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Colon cancers with high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H) develop frameshift mutations in tumor suppressors as part of their pathogenesis. ACVR2 is mutated at its exon 10 polyadenine tract in >80% of MSI-H colon cancers, coinciding with loss of protein. ACVR2 transmits the growth effects of activin via phosphorylation of SMAD proteins to affect gene transcription. The functional effect of activin in colon cancers has not been studied. We developed and characterized a cell model in which we studied how activin signaling affects growth. Methods hMLH1 and ACVR2 mutant HCT116 cells were previously stably transferred with chromosome 2 (HCT116+chr2), restoring a single regulated copy of wild-type ACVR2 but not hMLH1. Both HCT116+chr2 and parental HCT116 cells (as well as HEC59 and ACVR2 and hMSH2 complemented HEC59+chr2 cells) were assessed for genetic complementation and biologic function. Results HCT116+chr2 cells and HEC59+chr2 cells, but not ACVR2-mutant HCT116 or HEC59 cells, acquired wild-type ACVR2 as well as expression of ACVR2 wild-type messenger RNA. Complemented ACVR2 protein complexed with ACVR1 with activin treatment, generating nuclear phosphoSMAD2 and activin-specific gene transcription. ACVR2-restored cells showed decreased growth and reduced S phase but increased cellular migration following activin treatment. ACVR2 small interfering RNA reversed these effects in complemented cells. Conclusions ACVR2-complemented MSI-H colon cancers restore activin-SMAD signaling, decrease growth, and slow their cell cycle following ligand stimulation but show increased cellular migration. Activin is growth suppressive and enhances migration similar to transforming growth factor β in colon cancer, indicating that abrogation of the effects of activin contribute to the pathogenesis of MSI-H colon cancers. PMID:17258738

  9. Suppression of Helicobacter pylori protease activity towards growth factors by sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, J; Slomiany, A; Slomiany, B L

    1997-09-01

    Infection with H. pylori is now recognized as a major factor in the pathogenesis of gastric disease. Here, we examined the susceptibility of epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) to degradation by H. pylori protease, and assessed the effect of a cytoprotective agent, sulglycotide, on this process. The 125I-labeled EGF, bFGF, TGF beta and PDGF were incubatet with H. pylori protease, obtained from the filtrates of saline washes of the bacterium culture, in the presence of 0-100 micrograms sulglycotide. The results showed that, under the assay conditions, H. pylori protease caused only 5% degradation of EGF and 7% degradation of bFGF. However, the protease evoked a 61.7% degradation of PDGF and a 62.3% degradation of TGF beta. Introduction of sulglycotide to the reaction assay system caused a dose-dependent inhibition in PDGF and TGF beta proteolysis by the H. pylori enzyme. The maximal inhibitory effect was obtained with sulglycotide at 100 micrograms/ml, at which dose an 84.4% decrease in PDGF and 88.3% decrease in TGF beta degradation was achieved. The results provide a strong evidence for the effectiveness of sulglycotide in the protection of gastric mucosal growth factors against degradation by H. pylori.

  10. Suppression of glucan, water dikinase in the endosperm alters wheat grain properties, germination and coleoptile growth.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, Andrew F; Newberry, Marcus; Dielen, Anne-Sophie; Whan, Alex; Larroque, Oscar; Pritchard, Jenifer; Gubler, Frank; Howitt, Crispin A; Pogson, Barry J; Morell, Matthew K; Ral, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Starch phosphate ester content is known to alter the physicochemical properties of starch, including its susceptibility to degradation. Previous work producing wheat (Triticum aestivum) with down-regulated glucan, water dikinase, the primary gene responsible for addition of phosphate groups to starch, in a grain-specific manner found unexpected phenotypic alteration in grain and growth. Here, we report on further characterization of these lines focussing on mature grain and early growth. We find that coleoptile length has been increased in these transgenic lines independently of grain size increases. No changes in starch degradation rates during germination could be identified, or any major alteration in soluble sugar levels that may explain the coleoptile growth modification. We identify some alteration in hormones in the tissues in question. Mature grain size is examined, as is Hardness Index and starch conformation. We find no evidence that the increased growth of coleoptiles in these lines is connected to starch conformation or degradation or soluble sugar content and suggest these findings provide a novel means of increasing coleoptile growth and early seedling establishment in cereal crop species.

  11. Cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO 48-8071 suppresses growth of hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yayun; Mafuvadze, Benford; Aebi, Johannes D; Hyder, Salman M

    2016-01-01

    Standard treatment for primary prostate cancer includes systemic exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs that target androgen receptor or antihormone therapy (chemical castration); however, drug-resistant cancer cells generally emerge during treatment, limiting the continued use of systemic chemotherapy. Patients are then treated with more toxic standard therapies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for novel and more effective treatments for prostate cancer. The cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is an attractive therapeutic target for treating endocrine-dependent cancers because cholesterol is an essential structural and functional component of cell membranes as well as the metabolic precursor of endogenous steroid hormones. In this study, we have examined the effects of RO 48-8071 (4′-[6-(allylmethylamino)hexyloxy]-4-bromo-2′-fluorobenzophenone fumarate; Roche Pharmaceuticals internal reference: RO0488071) (RO), which is an inhibitor of 2, 3-oxidosqualene cyclase (a key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway), on prostate cancer cells. Exposure of both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant human prostate cancer cells to RO reduced prostate cancer cell viability and induced apoptosis in vitro. RO treatment reduced androgen receptor protein expression in hormone-dependent prostate cancer cells and increased estrogen receptor β (ERβ) protein expression in both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell lines. Combining RO with an ERβ agonist increased its ability to reduce castration-resistant prostate cancer cell viability. In addition, RO effectively suppressed the growth of aggressive castration-resistant human prostate cancer cell xenografts in vivo without any signs of toxicity to experimental animals. Importantly, RO did not reduce the viability of normal prostate cells in vitro. Our study is the first to demonstrate that the cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO effectively suppresses growth of human prostate cancer cells

  12. JQ1 suppresses tumor growth via PTEN/PI3K/AKT pathway in endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Haifeng; Li, Jing; Clark, Leslie H.; Jackson, Amanda L.; Zhang, Lu; Guo, Hui; Kilgore, Joshua E.; Gehrig, Paola A.; Zhou, Chunxiao; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of c-Myc is associated with worse outcomes in endometrial cancer, indicating that c-Myc may be a promising target for endometrial cancer therapy. A novel small molecule, JQ1, has been shown to block BRD4 resulting in inhibition of c-Myc expression and tumor growth. Thus, we investigated whether JQ1 can inhibit endometrial cancer growth in cell culture and xenograft models. In PTEN-positive endometrial cancer cells, JQ1 significantly suppressed cell proliferation via induction of G1 phase arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied by a sharp decline in cyclin D1 and CDK4 protein expression. However, PTEN-negative endometrial cancer cells exhibited intrinsic resistance to JQ1, despite significant c-Myc inhibition. Moreover, we found that PTEN and its downstream PI3K/AKT signaling targets were modulated by JQ1, as evidenced by microarray analysis. Silencing of PTEN in PTEN-positive endometrial cancer cells resulted in resistance to JQ1, while upregulation of PTEN in PTEN-negative endometrial cancer cells increased sensitivity to JQ1. In xenografts models of PTEN-positive and PTEN-knock-in endometrial cancer, JQ1 significantly upregulated the expression of PTEN, blocked the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway and suppressed tumor growth. These effects were attenuated in PTEN-negative and PTEN-knockdown xenograft models. Thus, JQ1 resistance appears to be highly associated with the status of PTEN expression in endometrial cancer. Our findings suggest that targeting BRD4 using JQ1 might serve as a novel therapeutic strategy in PTEN-positive endometrial cancers. PMID:27572308

  13. Eudaimonic growth: Narrative growth goals predict increases in ego development and subjective well-being 3 years later.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jack J; McAdams, Dan P

    2010-07-01

    We examine (a) the normative course of eudaimonic well-being in emerging adulthood and (b) whether people's narratives of major life goals might prospectively predict eudaimonic growth 3 years later. We define eudaimonic growth as longitudinal increases in eudaimonic well-being, which we define as the combination of psychosocial maturity and subjective well-being (SWB). College freshmen and seniors took measures of ego development (ED; to assess maturity; Loevinger, 1976) and SWB at Time 1 (T1) and again 3 years later (Time 2). ED levels increased longitudinally across that time for men and T1 freshmen, but SWB levels did not change. Participants also wrote narratives of 2 major life goals at T1 that were coded for an explicit emphasis on specific kinds of personal growth. Participants' intellectual-growth goals (especially agentic ones) predicted increases in ED 3 years later, whereas participants' socioemotional-growth goals (especially communal ones) predicted increases in SWB 3 years later. These findings were independent of the effects of Big Five personality traits-notably conscientiousness, which on its own predicted increases in SWB. We discuss (a) emerging adulthood as the last stop for normative eudaimonic growth in modern society and (b) empirical and theoretical issues surrounding the relations among narrative identity, life planning, dispositional traits, eudaimonia, and 2 paths of personal growth.

  14. The aqueous extract of Brucea javanica suppresses cell growth and alleviates tumorigenesis of human lung cancer cells by targeting mutated epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Hun; Liu, Chun-Yen; Fan, Po-Wei; Hsieh, Chang-Heng; Lin, Hsuan-Yuan; Lee, Ming-Chung; Fang, Kang

    2016-01-01

    As a practical and safe herbal medicine, the seeds of Brucea javanica (L.) Merr., were used to cure patients suffering from infectious diseases such as malaria. Recent advances revealed that the herb could also be a useful cancer therapy agent. The study demonstrated that aqueous B. javanica (BJ) extract attenuated the growth of human non-small-lung cancer cells bearing mutant L858R/T790M epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The reduced cell viability in H1975 cells was attributed to apoptosis. Transfection of EGFR small hairpin RNA reverted the sensitivities. When nude mice were fed BJ extract, the growth of xenograft tumors, as established by H1975 cells, was suppressed. Additional histological examination and fluorescence analysis of the resected tissues proved that the induced apoptosis mitigated tumor growth. The work proved that the BJ extract exerted its effectiveness by targeting lung cancer cells carrying mutated EGFR while alleviating tumorigenesis. Aqueous BJ extract is a good candidate to overcome drug resistance in patients undergoing target therapy. PMID:27843300

  15. Suppressing tin whisker growth in lead-free solders and platings

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Elizabeth N; Lam, Poh-Sang

    2014-04-29

    A process of irradiation Sn containing Pb-free solder to mitigate whisker formation and growth thereon is provided. The use of gamma radiation such as cobalt-60 has been applied to a substrate of Sn on copper has been found to change the morphology of the crystalline whisker growth to a more truncated hillock pattern. The change in morphology greatly reduces the tendency of whiskers to contribute to electrical short-circuits being used as a Pb-free solder system on a copper substrate.

  16. Brg1 Enables Rapid Growth of the Early Embryo by Suppressing Genes That Regulate Apoptosis and Cell Growth Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajeet P.; Foley, Julie F.; Rubino, Mark; Boyle, Michael C.; Tandon, Arpit; Shah, Ruchir

    2016-01-01

    SWI/SNF (switching/sucrose nonfermenting)-dependent chromatin remodeling establishes coordinated gene expression programs during development, yet important functional details remain to be elucidated. We show that the Brg1 (Brahma-related gene 1; Smarca4) ATPase is globally expressed at high levels during postimplantation development and its conditional ablation, beginning at gastrulation, results in increased apoptosis, growth retardation, and, ultimately, embryonic death. Global gene expression analysis revealed that genes upregulated in Rosa26CreERT2; Brg1flox/flox embryos (here referred to as Brg1d/d embryos to describe embryos with deletion of the Brg1flox/flox alleles) negatively regulate cell cycle progression and cell growth. In addition, the p53 (Trp53) protein, which is virtually undetectable in early wild-type embryos, accumulated in the Brg1d/d embryos and activated the p53-dependent pathways. Using P19 cells, we show that Brg1 and CHD4 (chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 4) coordinate to control target gene expression. Both proteins physically interact and show a substantial overlap of binding sites at chromatin-accessible regions adjacent to genes differentially expressed in the Brg1d/d embryos. Specifically, Brg1 deficiency results in reduced levels of the repressive histone H3 lysine K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) histone mark and an increase in the amount of open chromatin at the regulatory region of the p53 and p21 (Cdkn1a) genes. These results provide insights into the mechanisms by which Brg1 functions, which is in part via the p53 program, to constrain gene expression and facilitate rapid embryonic growth. PMID:27185875

  17. THE RED-TIDE DINOFLAGELLATE, ALEXANDRIUM MONILATUM, SUPPRESSES GROWTH OF MIXED NATURAL PHYTOPLANKTON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alexandrium monilatum is a large, chain-forming, autotrophic dinoflagellate associated with red-tides and fish kills along the US Gulf of Mexico coast. When cultured inocula of A. monilatum were added to nutrient-amended seawater samples, growth rates and biomass yields of the na...

  18. Does Prolonged Therapy with a Long-Acting Stimulant Suppress Growth in Children with ADHD?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Thomas J.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Biederman, Joseph; Lerner, Marc; Cooper, Kimberly M.; Zimmerman, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether prolonged therapy with a long-acting stimulant affects growth in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: One hundred seventy-eight children ages 6 to 13 years received OROS methylphenidate (OROS MPH, CONCERTA) for at least 21 months. Height and weight were measured monthly during the…

  19. Sulfur amino acid deficiency upregulates intestinal methionine cycle activity and suppresses epithelial growth in neonatal pigs.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We recently showed that the developing gut is a significant site of methionine transmethylation to homocysteine and transsulfuration to cysteine. We hypothesized that sulfur amino acid (SAA) deficiency would preferentially reduce mucosal growth and antioxidant function in neonatal pigs. Neonatal pi...

  20. Walker 256 Tumor Growth Suppression by Crotoxin Involves Formyl Peptide Receptors and Lipoxin A4

    PubMed Central

    Brigatte, Patrícia; Faiad, Odair Jorge; Ferreira Nocelli, Roberta Cornélio; Landgraf, Richardt G.; Palma, Mario Sergio; Cury, Yara; Curi, Rui; Sampaio, Sandra Coccuzzo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Crotoxin (CTX), the main toxin of South American rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) venom, on Walker 256 tumor growth, the pain symptoms associated (hyperalgesia and allodynia), and participation of endogenous lipoxin A4. Treatment with CTX (s.c.), daily, for 5 days reduced tumor growth at the 5th day after injection of Walker 256 carcinoma cells into the plantar surface of adult rat hind paw. This observation was associated with inhibition of new blood vessel formation and decrease in blood vessel diameter. The treatment with CTX raised plasma concentrations of lipoxin A4 and its natural analogue 15-epi-LXA4, an effect mediated by formyl peptide receptors (FPRs). In fact, the treatment with Boc-2, an inhibitor of FPRs, abolished the increase in plasma levels of these mediators triggered by CTX. The blockage of these receptors also abolished the inhibitory action of CTX on tumor growth and blood vessel formation and the decrease in blood vessel diameter. Together, the results herein presented demonstrate that CTX increases plasma concentrations of lipoxin A4 and 15-epi-LXA4, which might inhibit both tumor growth and formation of new vessels via FPRs. PMID:27190493

  1. The C-terminus of IGFBP-5 suppresses tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Ryoung; Cho, Young-Jae; Lee, Yoonna; Park, Youngmee; Han, Hee Dong; Ahn, Hyung Jun; Lee, Je-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Won

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5 (IGFBP-5) plays a role in cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this study, we found that IGFBP5 was markedly downregulated in ovarian cancer tissue. We investigated the functional significance of IGFBP-5 as a tumor suppressor. To determine functional regions of IGFBP-5, truncation mutants were prepared and were studied the effect on tumor growth. Expression of C-terminal region of IGFBP-5 significantly decreased tumor growth in an ovarian cancer xenograft. A peptide derived from the C-terminus of IGFBP-5 (BP5-C) was synthesized to evaluate the minimal amino acid motif that retained anti-tumorigenic activity and its effect on angiogenesis was studied. BP5-C peptide decreased the expression of VEGF-A and MMP-9, phosphorylation of Akt and ERK, and NF-kB activity, and inhibited angiogenesis in in vitro and ex vivo systems. Furthermore, BP5-C peptide significantly decreased tumor weight and angiogenesis in both ovarian cancer orthotopic xenograft and patient-derived xenograft mice. These results suggest that the C-terminus of IGFBP-5 exerts anti-cancer activity by inhibiting angiogenesis via regulation of the Akt/ERK and NF-kB–VEGF/MMP-9 signaling pathway, and might be considered as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:28008951

  2. Insulin-like growth factor-1 suppresses the Myostatin signaling pathway during myogenic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Retamales, A.; Zuloaga, R.; Valenzuela, C.A.; Gallardo-Escarate, C.; Molina, A.; Valdés, J.A.

    2015-08-21

    Myogenic differentiation is a complex and well-coordinated process for generating mature skeletal muscle fibers. This event is autocrine/paracrine regulated by growth factors, principally Myostatin (MSTN) and Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1). Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth in vertebrates that exerts its inhibitory function by activating Smad transcription factors. In contrast, IGF-1 promotes the differentiation of skeletal myoblasts by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. This study reports on a novel functional crosstalk between the IGF-1 and MSTN signaling pathways, as mediated through interaction between PI3K/Akt and Smad3. Stimulation of skeletal myoblasts with MSTN resulted in a transient increase in the pSmad3:Smad3 ratio and Smad-dependent transcription. Moreover, MSTN inhibited myod gene expression and myoblast fusion in an Activin receptor-like kinase/Smad3-dependent manner. Preincubation of skeletal myoblasts with IGF-1 blocked MSTN-induced Smad3 activation, promoting myod expression and myoblast differentiation. This inhibitory effect of IGF-1 on the MSTN signaling pathway was dependent on IGF-1 receptor, PI3K, and Akt activities. Finally, immunoprecipitation assay analysis determined that IGF-1 pretreatment increased Akt and Smad3 interaction. These results demonstrate that the IGF-1/PI3K/Akt pathway may inhibit MSTN signaling during myoblast differentiation, providing new insight to existing knowledge on the complex crosstalk between both growth factors. - Highlights: • IGF-1 inhibits Myostatin canonical signaling pathway through IGF-1R/PI3K/Akt pathway. • IGF-1 promotes myoblast differentiation through a direct blocking of Myostatin signaling pathway. • IGF-1 induces the interaction of Akt with Smad3 in skeletal myoblast.

  3. Protein Thermodynamics Can Be Predicted Directly from Biological Growth Rates

    PubMed Central

    Corkrey, Ross; McMeekin, Tom A.; Bowman, John P.; Ratkowsky, David A.; Olley, June; Ross, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Life on Earth is capable of growing from temperatures well below freezing to above the boiling point of water, with some organisms preferring cooler and others hotter conditions. The growth rate of each organism ultimately depends on its intracellular chemical reactions. Here we show that a thermodynamic model based on a single, rate-limiting, enzyme-catalysed reaction accurately describes population growth rates in 230 diverse strains of unicellular and multicellular organisms. Collectively these represent all three domains of life, ranging from psychrophilic to hyperthermophilic, and including the highest temperature so far observed for growth (122°C). The results provide credible estimates of thermodynamic properties of proteins and obtain, purely from organism intrinsic growth rate data, relationships between parameters previously identified experimentally, thus bridging a gap between biochemistry and whole organism biology. We find that growth rates of both unicellular and multicellular life forms can be described by the same temperature dependence model. The model results provide strong support for a single highly-conserved reaction present in the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). This is remarkable in that it means that the growth rate dependence on temperature of unicellular and multicellular life forms that evolved over geological time spans can be explained by the same model. PMID:24787650

  4. Protein thermodynamics can be predicted directly from biological growth rates.

    PubMed

    Corkrey, Ross; McMeekin, Tom A; Bowman, John P; Ratkowsky, David A; Olley, June; Ross, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Life on Earth is capable of growing from temperatures well below freezing to above the boiling point of water, with some organisms preferring cooler and others hotter conditions. The growth rate of each organism ultimately depends on its intracellular chemical reactions. Here we show that a thermodynamic model based on a single, rate-limiting, enzyme-catalysed reaction accurately describes population growth rates in 230 diverse strains of unicellular and multicellular organisms. Collectively these represent all three domains of life, ranging from psychrophilic to hyperthermophilic, and including the highest temperature so far observed for growth (122 °C). The results provide credible estimates of thermodynamic properties of proteins and obtain, purely from organism intrinsic growth rate data, relationships between parameters previously identified experimentally, thus bridging a gap between biochemistry and whole organism biology. We find that growth rates of both unicellular and multicellular life forms can be described by the same temperature dependence model. The model results provide strong support for a single highly-conserved reaction present in the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). This is remarkable in that it means that the growth rate dependence on temperature of unicellular and multicellular life forms that evolved over geological time spans can be explained by the same model.

  5. Comparison of Primary Models to Predict Microbial Growth by the Plate Count and Absorbance Methods.

    PubMed

    Pla, María-Leonor; Oltra, Sandra; Esteban, María-Dolores; Andreu, Santiago; Palop, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The selection of a primary model to describe microbial growth in predictive food microbiology often appears to be subjective. The objective of this research was to check the performance of different mathematical models in predicting growth parameters, both by absorbance and plate count methods. For this purpose, growth curves of three different microorganisms (Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli) grown under the same conditions, but with different initial concentrations each, were analysed. When measuring the microbial growth of each microorganism by optical density, almost all models provided quite high goodness of fit (r(2) > 0.93) for all growth curves. The growth rate remained approximately constant for all growth curves of each microorganism, when considering one growth model, but differences were found among models. Three-phase linear model provided the lowest variation for growth rate values for all three microorganisms. Baranyi model gave a variation marginally higher, despite a much better overall fitting. When measuring the microbial growth by plate count, similar results were obtained. These results provide insight into predictive microbiology and will help food microbiologists and researchers to choose the proper primary growth predictive model.

  6. Comparison of Primary Models to Predict Microbial Growth by the Plate Count and Absorbance Methods

    PubMed Central

    Pla, María-Leonor; Oltra, Sandra; Esteban, María-Dolores; Andreu, Santiago; Palop, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The selection of a primary model to describe microbial growth in predictive food microbiology often appears to be subjective. The objective of this research was to check the performance of different mathematical models in predicting growth parameters, both by absorbance and plate count methods. For this purpose, growth curves of three different microorganisms (Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli) grown under the same conditions, but with different initial concentrations each, were analysed. When measuring the microbial growth of each microorganism by optical density, almost all models provided quite high goodness of fit (r2 > 0.93) for all growth curves. The growth rate remained approximately constant for all growth curves of each microorganism, when considering one growth model, but differences were found among models. Three-phase linear model provided the lowest variation for growth rate values for all three microorganisms. Baranyi model gave a variation marginally higher, despite a much better overall fitting. When measuring the microbial growth by plate count, similar results were obtained. These results provide insight into predictive microbiology and will help food microbiologists and researchers to choose the proper primary growth predictive model. PMID:26539483

  7. A family of ROP proteins that suppresses actin dynamics, and is essential for polarized growth and cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Burkart, Graham M; Baskin, Tobias I; Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2015-07-15

    In plants, the ROP family of small GTPases has been implicated in the polarized growth of tip-growing cells, such as root hairs and pollen tubes; however, most of the data derive from overexpressing ROP genes or constitutively active and dominant-negative isoforms, whereas confirmation by using loss-of-function studies has generally been lacking. Here, in the model moss Physcomitrella patens, we study ROP signaling during tip growth by using a loss-of-function approach based on RNA interference (RNAi) to silence the entire moss ROP family. We find that plants with reduced expression of ROP genes, in addition to failing to initiate tip growth, have perturbed cell wall staining, reduced cell adhesion and have increased actin-filament dynamics. Although plants subjected to RNAi against the ROP family also have reduced microtubule dynamics, this reduction is not specific to loss of ROP genes, as it occurs when actin function is compromised chemically or genetically. Our data suggest that ROP proteins polarize the actin cytoskeleton by suppressing actin-filament dynamics, leading to an increase in actin filaments at the site of polarized secretion.

  8. Bacteria on housefly eggs, Musca domestica, suppress fungal growth in chicken manure through nutrient depletion or antifungal metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Kevin; Thu, Kelsie; Tsang, Michelle; Moore, Margo; Gries, Gerhard

    2009-09-01

    Female houseflies, Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae), lay their eggs in ephemeral resources such as animal manure. Hatching larvae compete for essential nutrients with fungi that also colonize such resources. Both the well-known antagonistic relationship between bacteria and fungi and the consistent presence of the bacterium Klebsiella oxytoca on housefly eggs led us to hypothesize (1) that K. oxytoca, and possibly other bacteria on housefly eggs, help curtail the growth of fungal resource competitors and (2) that such fungi indeed adversely affect the development of housefly larvae. Bacteria washed from housefly eggs significantly reduced the growth of fungi in chicken manure. Nineteen bacterial strains and ten fungal strains were isolated from housefly eggs or chicken manure, respectively. Co-culturing each of all the possible bacterium-fungus pairs revealed that the bacteria as a group, but no single bacterium, significantly suppressed the growth of all fungal strains tested. The bacteria's adverse effect on fungi is due to resource nutrient depletion and/or the release of antifungal chemicals. Well-established fungi in resources significantly reduced the number of larval offspring that completed development to adult flies.

  9. Humanized anti-hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) antibody suppresses innate irinotecan (CPT-11) resistance induced by fibroblast-derived HGF

    PubMed Central

    Kim, BoRa; Park, Byung Hee; Shin, Kum-Joo; Song, Seong-Won; Kim, Jung Ju; Kim, Hwan-Mook; Lee, Sang-Jin; Oh, Seung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The growth factors derived from the microenvironment create an environment conducive to tumor growth and survival. HGF deprivation using neutralizing antibody enhanced chemosensitivity in colorectal cancer cells (CRC). We determined secreted HGF in fibroblast conditioned medium (CM). Combination treatment of anti-HGF antibody and irinotecan (CPT-11) directly enhanced CPT-11 sensitivity in CRC. We generated xenograft in NOD/SCID mice inoculating HCT-116 human colorectal cancer cells subcutaneously with or without fibroblast. We found that the combination of CPT-11 and anti-HGF antibody induced marked suppression of tumor development. These results suggest that HGF produced by fibroblast induce CPT-11 resistance, and that anti-HGF antibody abrogate such resistance in vivo. fibroblast-derived HGF is important determinant of chemoresistance. Anti-HGF monoclonal antibody treatment confirmed the importance of this growth factor for chemoresistance in CRC. These results present new options toward the early diagnosis of chemoresistance and suggest novel combinations of chemotherapy and anti-HGF agents to prevent or significantly delay the onset of therapy resistance. PMID:26090722

  10. Humanized anti-hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) antibody suppresses innate irinotecan (CPT-11) resistance induced by fibroblast-derived HGF.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jong Kyu; Kang, Ju-Hee; Kim, BoRa; Park, Byung Hee; Shin, Kum-Joo; Song, Seong-Won; Kim, Jung Ju; Kim, Hwan-Mook; Lee, Sang-Jin; Oh, Seung Hyun

    2015-09-15

    The growth factors derived from the microenvironment create an environment conducive to tumor growth and survival. HGF deprivation using neutralizing antibody enhanced chemosensitivity in colorectal cancer cells (CRC). We determined secreted HGF in fibroblast conditioned medium (CM). Combination treatment of anti-HGF antibody and irinotecan (CPT-11) directly enhanced CPT-11 sensitivity in CRC. We generated xenograft in NOD/SCID mice inoculating HCT-116 human colorectal cancer cells subcutaneously with or without fibroblast. We found that the combination of CPT-11 and anti-HGF antibody induced marked suppression of tumor development. These results suggest that HGF produced by fibroblast induce CPT-11 resistance, and that anti-HGF antibody abrogate such resistance in vivo. fibroblast-derived HGF is important determinant of chemoresistance. Anti-HGF monoclonal antibody treatment confirmed the importance of this growth factor for chemoresistance in CRC. These results present new options toward the early diagnosis of chemoresistance and suggest novel combinations of chemotherapy and anti-HGF agents to prevent or significantly delay the onset of therapy resistance.

  11. Suppression of breast tumor growth by DNA vaccination against phosphatase of regenerating liver 3.

    PubMed

    Lv, J; Liu, C; Huang, H; Meng, L; Jiang, B; Cao, Y; Zhou, Z; She, T; Qu, L; Wei Song, S; Shou, C

    2013-08-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL)-3 is highly expressed in multiple cancers and has important roles in cancer development. Some small-molecule inhibitors and antibodies targeting PRL-3 have been recently reported to inhibit tumor growth effectively. To determine whether PRL-3-targeted DNA vaccination can induce immune response to prevent or inhibit the tumor growth, we established mouse D2F2 breast cancer cells expressing PRL-3 (D2F2/PRL-3) and control cells (D2F2/NC) with lentivirus, and constructed pVAX1-Igκ-PRL-3 plasmid (named as K-P3) as DNA vaccine to immunize BALB/c mice. We found that the K-P3 vaccine delivered by gene gun significantly prevented the growth of D2F2/PRL-3 compared with pVAX1-vector (P<0.01), but not of D2F2/NC, and improved the survival of D2F2/PRL-3-innoculated mice. Both PRL-3-targeted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and T-helper type 1 cell immune response (production of high levels of interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α) were found to be involved in the preventive effect. Furthermore, PRL-3-targeted DNA immunization inhibited tumor growth of D2F2/PRL-3 cells in mice. We also evaluated the potential of immunization with PRL-3 protein, but no significant therapeutic or preventive effect was obtained on tumor growth. To enhance the immunity of PRL-3, we incorporated different molecular adjuvants, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis heat-shock protein, CTL antigen 4 and M. tuberculosis T-cell stimulatory epitope (MT), into K-P3 vaccine for expressing the fusion proteins. We found that these adjuvant molecules did not significantly improve the antitumor activity of PRL-3 vaccine, but enhanced the production of PRL-3 antibodies in immunized mice. Summarily, our findings demonstrate that PRL-3-targeted DNA vaccine can generate significantly preventive and therapeutic effects on the growth of breast cancer expressing PRL-3 through the induction of cellular immune responses to PRL-3.

  12. [Development of a predictive program for microbial growth under various temperature conditions].

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Yano, Kazuyoshi; Morozumi, Satoshi; Kimura, Bon; Fujii, Tateo

    2006-12-01

    A predictive program for microbial growth under various temperature conditions was developed with a mathematical model. The model was a new logistic model recently developed by us. The program predicts Escherichia coli growth in broth, Staphylococcus aureus growth and its enterotoxin production in milk, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus growth in broth at various temperature patterns. The program, which was built with Microsoft Excel (Visual Basic Application), is user-friendly; users can easily input the temperature history of a test food and obtain the prediction instantly on the computer screen. The predicted growth and toxin production can be important indices to determine whether a food is microbiologically safe or not. This program should be a useful tool to confirm the microbial safety of commercial foods.

  13. Insulin-like growth factor-1 endues monocytes with immune suppressive ability to inhibit inflammation in the intestine

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Rong-Ti; Mo, Li-Hua; Wu, Ruijin; Liu, Jiang-Qi; Zhang, Huan-Ping; Liu, Zhigang; Liu, Zhanju; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of some chronic inflammation such as inflammatory bowel disease is unclear. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) has active immune regulatory capability. This study aims to investigate into the mechanism by which IGF1 modulates the monocyte (Mo) properties to inhibit immune inflammation in the intestine. In this study, the production of IGF1 by intestinal epithelial cells was evaluated by real time RT-PCR and Western blotting. Mos were analyzed by flow cytometry. A mouse colitis model was created with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. The results showed that mouse IECs produced IGF1, which could be up regulated by exposure to CpG-ODN (CpG-oligodeoxynueleotides) in the culture. Culture the CpG-ODN-primed IEC cells and Mos or exposure of Mos to IGF1 in the culture induced the Mos to express IL-10. The IGF1-primed Mos showed the immune suppressive effect on inhibiting the immune inflammation in the mouse colon. In conclusion, the IGF1-primed Mos are capable of suppressing immune inflammation in the intestine. PMID:25588622

  14. Basic fibroblast growth factor suppresses radiation-induced apoptosis and TP53 pathway in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Matsuu-Matsuyama, Mutsumi; Nakashima, Masahiro; Shichijo, Kazuko; Okaichi, Kumio; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Sekine, Ichiro

    2010-07-01

    The effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was studied in radiation-induced apoptosis in rat jejunal crypt cells. Six-week-old male Wistar rats were administered 4 mg/kg bFGF intraperitoneally 25 h before receiving 8 Gy whole-body X rays. The jejunum was removed for analysis from time 0 to 120 h after irradiation. Villus length in control rats declined steadily until 72 h, while in bFGF-treated rats the villi were longer than in the controls until 48 h. Crypt lengths were similar to villi. bFGF treatment increased Ki-67-positive cells in the jejunal crypt at 0, 24 and 48 h. The treatment with bFGF reduced the number of apoptotic cells per jejunal crypt to 23% and 10% of the control values at 3 and 6 h, respectively, and increased numbers of mitotic cells significantly at 48 and 72 h. bFGF decreased the levels of TP53, CDKN1A, Puma and Cleaved caspase 3 at 3 h as detected by Western blot analyses. Our results suggest that bFGF protected against acute radiation-induced injury by suppressing the crypt apoptotic cells including the stem cells and promoted crypt cell proliferation. The inhibition of apoptosis thus might be related to suppression of the TP53 pathway.

  15. The value of an acute octreotide suppression test in predicting short-term efficacy of somatostatin analogues in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Shen, Ming; He, Wenqiang; Yang, Yeping; Liu, Wenjuan; Lu, Yun; Ma, Zengyi; Ye, Zhao; Zhang, Yichao; Zhao, Xiaolong; Lu, Bin; Hu, Ji; Huang, Yun; Shou, Xuefei; Wang, Yongfei; Ye, Hongying; Li, Yiming; Li, Shiqi; Zhao, Yao; Zhang, Zhaoyun

    2016-09-30

    Predicting the efficacy of long-acting somatostatin analogues (SSA) remains a challenge. We aim to quantitatively evaluate the predictive value of the octreotide suppression test (OST) in short-term efficacy of SSA in active acromegaly. Sixty-seven newly diagnosed acromegaly patients were assessed with OST. Subsequently, all patients were treated with long-acting SSA for 3 months, followed by reassessment. Nine parameters were tested, including GHn (the nadir GH during OST), ΔGH1 (= [GH0h-GHn]/GH0h, GH0h was the baseline GH during OST), ΔGH2 (= [GHm-GHn]/GHm, GHm was the mean GH on day curve), AUC(0-6h) (the GH area under the curve during OST) , ΔAUC1 (= [GH0h-AUC(0-6h)]/GH0h), ΔAUC2 (=[GHm-AUC(0-6h)]/GHm), AUC(m-6h) (the GH AUC during OST where GHm was used instead of GH0h), ΔAUC1' (=[GH0h-AUC(m-6h)]/GH0h) and ΔAUC2' (=[GHm-AUC(m-6h)]/GHm). The Youden indices were calculated to determine the optimal cutoffs to predict the short-term efficacy of SSA. ΔGH2 more than 86.83%, ΔAUC2 more than -57.48% and ΔAUC2' more than -57.98% provided the best predictors of a good GH response (sensitivity 93.8%, specificity 85.7%). ΔGH2 more than 90.51% provided the best predictor of a good tumor size response (sensitivity 84.8%, specificity 87.5%). The percentage fall of GHn (ΔGH) was a better predictive parameter than GHn. OST showed higher efficiency in predicting the efficacy of octreotide LAR than lanreotide SR. In conclusion, OST is a valid tool to predict both GH and tumor size response to short-term efficacy of SSA in acromegaly, especially for octreotide LAR. GHm is better to be used as basal GH than GH0 during OST.

  16. A novel mouse monoclonal antibody targeting ErbB2 suppresses breast cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Kawa, Seiji; Matsushita, Hirohisa; Ohbayashi, Hirokazu; Semba, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2009-07-03

    Overexpression of ErbB2 in breast cancer is associated with increased recurrence and worse prognosis. Accumulating evidences suggest that molecular targeted therapy is a promising anticancer strategy. In this study, we produced a novel anti-ErbB2 monoclonal antibody, 6G10, that recognized an epitope distinct from the trastuzumab binding site. 6G10 induced aggregation of BT474 breast cancer cells and inhibited proliferation of various breast cancer cell lines including BT474. A growth inhibition assay showed that 6G10 had EC(50) values comparable to trastuzumab, indicating that the drugs have a similar level of potency. Furthermore, intraperitoneal administration of 6G10 completely inhibited the growth of xenografted tumors derived from BT474 and SK-BR-3 cells. These data suggested that 6G10 has great therapeutic potential and could be administered to patients alternatively, or synergistically, with trastuzumab.

  17. Suppression of Grain Growth by Additive in Nanostructured P-type Bismuth Antimony Tellurides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Qinyong; Chen, S.; Liu, W S; Lukas, K; Yan, X; Wang, H; Wang, D.; Opeil, C; Chen, Gang; Ren, Z. F.

    2011-01-01

    Grain growth is a major issue in the preparation of nanostructured bismuth-antimony-tellurides during hot pressing the nanopowders into dense bulk samples. To prevent grain agglomeration during ball milling and growth during hot pressing, organic agent (Oleic Acid, OA) as additive was added into the materials at the beginning of the ball milling process. With different concentrations of OA (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 wt%), grains with different sizes are obtained. Structural analysis clearly shows that it is the particle size of the nanopowders that determines the final grain size in the densely compacted bulk samples. A combination of small grains ~200–500 nm and nanopores leads to effective phonon scattering, which results in the decrease of lattice thermal conductivity, and ZT of ~1.3 at 373 K for the sample with 2.0 wt% OA.

  18. The annual cycle in ENSO growth rate as a cause of the spring predictability barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Aaron F. Z.; McPhaden, Michael J.

    2015-06-01

    The spring predictability barrier increases the uncertainty in ENSO forecasts starting before and during the boreal spring. Recent work has shown that the annual cycle of ENSO growth rate is responsible for phase locking of peak ENSO development to the boreal winter, suggesting that this annual cycle may play a role in the spring predictability barrier. To test this hypothesis, the annual cycle of ENSO growth rate is added to a damped, noise-driven conceptual recharge oscillator model. When the annual cycle of ENSO growth rate is included, a spring predictability barrier develops, whereas without it ENSO predictability is independent of the forecast start date. When state-dependent noise is included in the simulations in addition to the annual cycle of the growth rate, the spring predictability barrier is enhanced and more realistic.

  19. Akt- or MEK-mediated mTOR inhibition suppresses Nf1 optic glioma growth

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Aparna; Toonen, Joseph A.; Cimino, Patrick J.; Gianino, Scott M.; Gutmann, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) develop optic pathway gliomas, which result from impaired NF1 protein regulation of Ras activity. One obstacle to the implementation of biologically targeted therapies is an incomplete understanding of the individual contributions of the downstream Ras effectors (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase [MEK], Akt) to optic glioma maintenance. This study was designed to address the importance of MEK and Akt signaling to Nf1 optic glioma growth. Methods Primary neonatal mouse astrocyte cultures were employed to determine the consequence of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt and MEK inhibition on Nf1-deficient astrocyte growth. Nf1 optic glioma–bearing mice were used to assess the effect of Akt and MEK inhibition on tumor volume, proliferation, and retinal ganglion cell dysfunction. Results Both MEK and Akt were hyperactivated in Nf1-deficient astrocytes in vitro and in Nf1 murine optic gliomas in vivo. Pharmacologic PI3K or Akt inhibition reduced Nf1-deficient astrocyte proliferation to wild-type levels, while PI3K inhibition decreased Nf1 optic glioma volume and proliferation. Akt inhibition of Nf1-deficient astrocyte and optic glioma growth reflected Akt-dependent activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Sustained MEK pharmacologic blockade also attenuated Nf1-deficient astrocytes as well as Nf1 optic glioma volume and proliferation. Importantly, these MEK inhibitory effects resulted from p90RSK-mediated, Akt-independent mTOR activation. Finally, both PI3K and MEK inhibition reduced optic glioma–associated retinal ganglion cell loss and nerve fiber layer thinning. Conclusion These findings establish that the convergence of 2 distinct Ras effector pathways on mTOR signaling maintains Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth, supporting the evaluation of pharmacologic inhibitors that target mTOR function in future human NF1–optic pathway glioma clinical trials. PMID:25534823

  20. Disrupting Hypoxia-Induced Bicarbonate Transport Acidifies Tumor Cells and Suppresses Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Alan; Hulikova, Alzbeta; Ledaki, Ioanna; Snell, Cameron; Singleton, Dean; Steers, Graham; Seden, Peter; Jones, Dylan; Bridges, Esther; Wigfield, Simon; Li, Ji-Liang; Russell, Angela; Swietach, Pawel; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-07-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated clinically with therapeutic resistance and poor patient outcomes. One feature of tumor hypoxia is activated expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9), a regulator of pH and tumor growth. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that impeding the reuptake of bicarbonate produced extracellularly by CA9 could exacerbate the intracellular acidity produced by hypoxic conditions, perhaps compromising cell growth and viability as a result. In 8 of 10 cancer cell lines, we found that hypoxia induced the expression of at least one bicarbonate transporter. The most robust and frequent inductions were of the sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters SLC4A4 and SLC4A9, which rely upon both HIF1α and HIF2α activity for their expression. In cancer cell spheroids, SLC4A4 or SLC4A9 disruption by either genetic or pharmaceutical approaches acidified intracellular pH and reduced cell growth. Furthermore, treatment of spheroids with S0859, a small-molecule inhibitor of sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters, increased apoptosis in the cell lines tested. Finally, RNAi-mediated attenuation of SLC4A9 increased apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer spheroids and dramatically reduced growth of MDA-MB-231 breast tumors or U87 gliomas in murine xenografts. Our findings suggest that disrupting pH homeostasis by blocking bicarbonate import might broadly relieve the common resistance of hypoxic tumors to anticancer therapy. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3744-55. ©2016 AACR.

  1. Competition induces allelopathy but suppresses growth and anti-herbivore defence in a chemically rich seaweed.

    PubMed

    Rasher, Douglas B; Hay, Mark E

    2014-02-22

    Many seaweeds and terrestrial plants induce chemical defences in response to herbivory, but whether they induce chemical defences against competitors (allelopathy) remains poorly understood. We evaluated whether two tropical seaweeds induce allelopathy in response to competition with a reef-building coral. We also assessed the effects of competition on seaweed growth and seaweed chemical defence against herbivores. Following 8 days of competition with the coral Porites cylindrica, the chemically rich seaweed Galaxaura filamentosa induced increased allelochemicals and became nearly twice as damaging to the coral. However, it also experienced significantly reduced growth and increased palatability to herbivores (because of reduced chemical defences). Under the same conditions, the seaweed Sargassum polycystum did not induce allelopathy and did not experience a change in growth or palatability. This is the first demonstration of induced allelopathy in a seaweed, or of competitors reducing seaweed chemical defences against herbivores. Our results suggest that the chemical ecology of coral-seaweed-herbivore interactions can be complex and nuanced, highlighting the need to incorporate greater ecological complexity into the study of chemical defence.

  2. Inhibition of Stromal PlGF Suppresses the Growth of Prostate Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Zins, Karin; Thomas, Anita; Lucas, Trevor; Sioud, Mouldy; Aharinejad, Seyedhossein; Abraham, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    The growth and vascularization of prostate cancer is dependent on interactions between cancer cells and supporting stromal cells. The primary stromal cell type found in prostate tumors is the carcinoma-associated fibroblast, which produces placental growth factor (PlGF). PlGF is a member of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family of angiogenic molecules and PlGF mRNA levels increase after androgen deprivation therapy in prostate cancer. In this study, we show that PlGF has a direct dose-dependent proliferative effect on human PC-3 prostate cancer cells in vitro and fibroblast-derived PlGF increases PC-3 proliferation in co-culture. In xenograft tumor models, intratumoral administration of murine PlGF siRNA reduced stromal-derived PlGF expression, reduced tumor burden and decreased the number of Ki-67 positive proliferating cells associated with reduced vascular density. These data show that targeting stromal PlGF expression may represent a therapeutic target for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:24005860

  3. Nitric Oxide Overproduction in Tomato shr Mutant Shifts Metabolic Profiles and Suppresses Fruit Growth and Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Bodanapu, Reddaiah; Gupta, Suresh K.; Basha, Pinjari O.; Sakthivel, Kannabiran; Sadhana; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a pivotal role in growth and disease resistance in plants. It also acts as a secondary messenger in signaling pathways for several plant hormones. Despite its clear role in regulating plant development, its role in fruit development is not known. In an earlier study, we described a short root (shr) mutant of tomato, whose phenotype results from hyperaccumulation of NO. The molecular mapping localized shr locus in 2.5 Mb region of chromosome 9. The shr mutant showed sluggish growth, with smaller leaves, flowers and was less fertile than wild type. The shr mutant also showed reduced fruit size and slower ripening of the fruits post-mature green stage to the red ripe stage. Comparison of the metabolite profiles of shr fruits with wild-type fruits during ripening revealed a significant shift in the patterns. In shr fruits intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were differentially regulated than WT indicating NO affected the regulation of TCA cycle. The accumulation of several amino acids, particularly tyrosine, was higher, whereas most fatty acids were downregulated in shr fruits. Among the plant hormones at one or more stages of ripening, ethylene, Indole-3-acetic acid and Indole-3-butyric acid increased in shr, whereas abscisic acid declined. Our analyses indicate that the retardation of fruit growth and ripening in shr mutant likely results from the influence of NO on central carbon metabolism and endogenous phytohormones levels. PMID:27965677

  4. Growth suppression by MYC inhibition in small cell lung cancer cells with TP53 and RB1 inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentino, Francesco Paolo; Tokgün, Elvan; Solé-Sánchez, Sònia; Giampaolo, Sabrina; Tokgün, Onur; Jauset, Toni; Kohno, Takashi; Perucho, Manuel; Soucek, Laura; Yokota, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is the most aggressive type of lung cancer with high mortality. One of the MYC family genes, MYC, MYCL or MYCN, is amplified in ~20% of the SCLCs; therefore, MYC proteins are potential therapeutic targets in SCLC patients. We investigated the therapeutic impact of Omomyc, a MYC dominant negative, in a panel of SCLC cell lines. Strikingly, Omomyc suppressed the growth of all tested cell lines by inducing cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis. Induction of G1 arrest by Omomyc was found to be dependent on the activation of CDKN1A, in part, through the TP73 pathway. Our results strongly indicate that SCLC cells carrying amplification of MYC, MYCL or MYCN are addicted to MYC function, suggesting that MYC targeting would be an efficient therapeutic option for SCLC patients. PMID:27105536

  5. Dexamethasone suppresses the growth of human non-small cell lung cancer via inducing estrogen sulfotransferase and inactivating estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-jie; Li, Jian; Hao, Fang-ran; Yuan, Yin; Li, Jing-yun; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tian-yan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Dexamethasone (DEX) is a widely used synthetic glucocorticoid, which has shown anti-cancer efficacy and anti-estrogenic activity. In this study we explored the possibility that DEX might be used as an endocrine therapeutic agent to treat human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: The viability and proliferation of human NSCLC cell lines A549 and H1299 were assessed in vitro. Anti-tumor action was also evaluated in A549 xenograft nude mice treated with DEX (2 or 4 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) or the positive control tamoxifen (50 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 32 d. The expression of estrogen sulfotransferase (EST) in tumor cells and tissues was examined. The intratumoral estrogen levels and uterine estrogen responses were measured. Results: DEX displayed mild cytotoxicity to the NSCLC cells (IC50 >500 μmol/L) compared to tamoxifen (IC50 <50 μmol/L), but it was able to inhibit the cell proliferation at low micromolar ranges. Furthermore, DEX (0.1–10 μmol/L) dose-dependently up-regulated EST expression in the cells, and inhibited the cell migration in vitro. Triclosan, a sulfation inhibitor, was able to diminish DEX-caused inhibition on the cell viability. In A549 xenograft nude mice, DEX or tamoxifen administration remarkably suppressed the tumor growth. Moreover, DEX administration dose-dependently increased EST expression in tumor tissues, and reduced intratumoral estrogen levels as well as the volumes and weights of uterine. Conclusion: DEX suppresses the growth of A549 xenograft tumors via inducing EST and decreasing estradiol levels in tumor tissues, suggesting that DEX may be used as anti-estrogenic agent for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:27133297

  6. Development of a model to predict growth of Clostridium perfringens in cooked beef during cooling.

    PubMed

    Smith-Simpson, Sarah; Schaffner, Donald W

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a new model to predict the growth of Clostridium perfringens in cooked meat during cooling. All data were collected under changing temperature conditions. Individual growth curves were fit using DMFit. Germination outgrowth and lag (GOL) time was modeled versus temperature at the end of GOL using conservative assumptions. Each growth curve was used to estimate a series of exponential growth rates at a series of temperatures. The squareroot model was used to describe the relationship between the square root of the average exponential growth rate and effective temperature. Predictions from the new model were in close agreement with the data used to create the model. When predictions from the model were compared with new observations, fail-dangerous predictions were made a majority of the time. When GOL time was predicted exactly, many fail-dangerous predictions shifted toward the fail-safe direction. Two important facts regarding C. perfringens should impact future modeling research with this organism and may have broader food safety policy implications: (i) the normal variability in the response of the organism from replicate to replicate may be quite large (1 log CFU) and may exceed the current U.S. Food Safety Inspection Service performance standard, and (ii) the accuracy of the GOL time model has a profound influence upon the overall prediction, with small differences in GOL time prediction (approximately 1 h) having a very large effect on the predicted final concentration of C. perfringens.

  7. Inhibition of prostate cancer growth by solanine requires the suppression of cell cycle proteins and the activation of ROS/P38 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bin; Zhong, Weifeng; Deng, Zhihai; Lai, Caiyong; Chu, Jing; Jiao, Genlong; Liu, Junfeng; Zhou, Qizhao

    2016-11-01

    Solanine, a naturally steroidal glycoalkaloid in nightshade (Solanum nigrum Linn.), can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of tumor cells. However, the mechanism of solanine-suppressing prostate cancer cell growth remains to be elucidated. This study investigates the inhibition mechanism of solanine on cancer development in vivo and in cultured human prostate cancer cell DU145 in vitro. Results show that solanine injection significantly suppresses the tumor cell growth in xenograft athymic nude mice. Solanine regulates the protein levels of cell cycle proteins, including Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, and P21 in vivo and in vitro. Also, in cultured DU145 cell, solanine significantly inhibits cell growth. Moreover, the administration of NAC, an active oxygen scavenger, markedly reduces solanine-induced cell death. Blockade of P38 MAPK kinase cannot suppress reactive oxygen species (ROS), but can suppress solanine-induced cell apoptosis. Also, inhibition of ROS by NAC inactivates P38 pathway. Taken together, the data suggest that inhibition of prostate cancer growth by solanine may be through blocking the expression of cell cycle proteins and inducing apoptosis via ROS and activation of P38 pathway. These findings indicate an attractive therapeutic potential of solanine for suppression of prostate cancer.

  8. Knockdown of PKM2 Suppresses Tumor Growth and Invasion in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Zhu, Anyou; Zhang, Lunjun; Zhang, Jie; Zhong, Zhengrong; Wang, Fengchao

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that activity of the pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) isoform is closely related to tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigated the relationship betweenPKM2 expression, tumor invasion, and the prognosis of patients with lung adenocarcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed 65 cases of patients with lung adenocarcinoma who were divided into low and a high expression groups based on PKM2immunohistochemical staining. High PKM2 expression was significantly associated with reduced patient survival. We used small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology to investigate the effect of targeted PKM2-knockout on tumor growth at the cellular level. In vitro, siRNA-mediated PKM2-knockdown significantly inhibited the proliferation, glucose uptake (25%), ATP generation (20%) and fatty acid synthesis of A549 cells, while the mitochondrial respiratory capacity of the cells increased (13%).Western blotting analysis showed that PKM2-knockout significantly inhibited the expression of the glucose transporter GLUT1 and ATP citrate lyase, which is critical for fatty acid synthesis. Further Western blotting analysis showed that PKM2-knockdown inhibited the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which are important in degradation of the extracellular matrix and angiogenesis, respectively. These observations show that PKM2 activates both glycolysis and lipid synthesis, thereby regulating cell proliferation and invasion. This information is important in elucidating the mechanisms by which PKM2 influences the growth and metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma at the cellular and molecular level, thereby providing the basic data required for the development of PKM2-targeted gene therapy. PMID:26501265

  9. Collagen IV and CXC chemokine derived anti-angiogenic peptides suppress glioma xenograft growth

    PubMed Central

    Rosca, Elena V.; Lal, Bachchu; Koskimaki, Jacob E.; Popel, Aleksander S.; Laterra, John

    2012-01-01

    Peptides are receiving increased attention as therapeutic agents, due to their high binding specificity and versatility to be modified as targeting or carrier molecules. Particularly, peptides with anti-angiogenic activity are of high interest due to their applicability to a wide range of cancers. In this study we investigate the biological activity of two novel antiangiogenic peptides in pre-clinical glioma models. One peptide SP2000 is derived from collagen IV and the other peptide SP3019 belongs to the CXC family. We previously characterized the capacity of SP2000 and SP3019 to inhibit multiple biological endpoints linked to angiogenesis in human endothelial cells in several assays. Here we report additional studies using endothelial cells and focus on the activity of these peptides against human glioma cell growth, migration and adhesion in vitro and growth as tumor xenografts in vivo. We found that SP2000 completely inhibits migration of the glioma cells at 50 μM and SP3019 produced 50% inhibition at 100 μM. Their relative anti-adhesion activities were similar with SP2000 and SP3019 generating 50% adhesion inhibition at 4.9 ± 0.82 μM and 21.3 ± 5.92 μM respectively. In vivo glioma growth inhibition was 63 % for SP2000 and 76% for SP3019 after 2 weeks of administration at daily doses of 10mg/kg and 20 mg/kg, respectively. The direct activity of these peptides against glioma cells in conjunction with their anti-angiogenic activities warrants their further development as either stand-alone agents or in combination with standard cytotoxic or emerging targeted therapies in malignant brain tumors. PMID:22495619

  10. Lianas suppress seedling growth and survival of 14 tree species in a Panamanian tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Izquierdo, Laura; García, María M; Powers, Jennifer S; Schnitzer, Stefan A

    2016-01-01

    Lianas are a common plant growth form in tropical forests, where they compete intensely with trees, decreasing tree recruitment, growth, and survival. If the detrimental effects of lianas vary significantly with tree species identity, as is often assumed, then lianas may influence tree species diversity and community composition. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that liana abundance and biomass are increasing relative to trees in neotropical forests, which will likely magnify the detrimental effects of lianas and may ultimately alter tree species diversity, relative abundances, and community composition. Few studies, however, have tested the responses of multiple tree species to the presence of lianas in robust, well-replicated experiments. We tested the hypotheses that lianas reduce tree seedling growth and survival, and that the effect of lianas varies with tree species identity. We used a large-scale liana removal experiment in Central Panama in which we planted 14 replicate seedlings of 14 different tree species that varied in shade tolerance in each of 16 80 x 80 m plots (eight liana-removal and eight unmanipulated controls; 3136 total seedlings). Over a nearly two-yr period, we found that tree seedlings survived 75% more, grew 300% taller, and had twice the aboveground biomass in liana-removal plots than seedlings in control plots, consistent with strong competition between lianas and tree seedlings. There were no significant differences in the response of tree species to liana competition (i.e., there was no species by treatment interaction), indicating that lianas had a similar negative effect on all 14 tree species. Furthermore, the effect of lianas did not vary with tree species shade tolerance classification, suggesting that the liana effect was not solely based on light. Based on these findings, recently observed increases in liana abundance in neotropical forests will substantially reduce tree regeneration, but will not significantly alter

  11. A Vector-Based Short Hairpin RNA Targeting Aurora B Suppresses Human Prostatic Carcinoma Growth.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mei; Qi, Panpan; Chen, Chong; Song, Liju; Wang, Xuege; Li, Ningzhe; Wu, Daoyan; Hu, Guoku; Zhao, Jian

    2017-02-01

    Aurora kinase B, playing a vital, important role in mitosis, is frequently detected to be overexpressed in many cancer cell lines and various tumor tissues, including prostatic carcinoma. Given the essential function of Aurora kinase B in mitosis and its association with tumorigenesis, it might be a drug target for prostatic carcinoma treatment. In our study, short hairpin RNA targeting Aurora kinase B was cloned into a pGPU6 plasmid vector and then transfected into human prostatic carcinoma cells. The expression level of Aurora kinase B was verified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. At the same time, cell apoptosis was detected by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide, fluorescent staining, and flow cytometric analysis. Furthermore, prostate carcinoma cells were injected into mice to establish a tumor xenograft model. Previous studies have shown the effect of pGPU6-shAURKB plasmid on tumor growth in a prostate carcinoma xenogenic implantation model. From the study, we knew that the Aurora kinase B was significantly downregulated in prostate carcinoma cells, and cell apoptosis was also detected higher in treated groups than that in control groups. Moreover, in the prostate carcinoma xenogenic implantation model, compared with the control groups, the tumor growth was inhibited about 78.7% in the pGPU6-shAURKB plasmid-treated group, and cell apoptosis in the experimental group was notably higher than that in control groups. The average duration of tumor-bearing mice was prolonged to about 35 days. The results of experiment indicated that specific knockdown of Aurora kinase B led to prostate carcinoma cells apoptosis and inhibited tumor growth. Our data clearly confirmed that specific knockdown of Aurora kinase B expression by vector-based short hairpin RNA/liposome may be a potential new approach to treat human prostatic carcinoma.

  12. The CREB binding protein inhibitor ICG-001 suppresses pancreatic cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Arensman, Michael D.; Telesca, Donatello; Lay, Anna R.; Kershaw, Kathleen M.; Wu, Nanping; Donahue, Timothy R.; Dawson, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly lethal cancer due in part to a lack of highly robust cytotoxic or molecular-based therapies. Recent studies investigating ligand-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling have highlighted its importance in pancreatic cancer initiation and progression, as well as its potential as a therapeutic target in PDAC. The small molecule ICG-001 binds CREB-binding protein (CBP) to disrupt its interaction with β-catenin and inhibit CBP function as a co-activator of Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription. Given its ability to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription in vitro and in vivo, as well as its efficacy in preclinical models of colorectal cancer and other Wnt-driven diseases, we examined ICG-001 and its potential role as a therapeutic in PDAC. ICG-001 alone significantly inhibited anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of multiple PDAC lines, and augmented in vitro growth inhibition when used in combination with gemcitabine. ICG-001 had only variable modest effects on PDAC apoptosis and instead mediated PDAC growth inhibition primarily through robust induction of G1 cell cycle arrest. These effects, however, appeared decoupled from its inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription. DNA microarrays performed on PDAC cells in the context of ICG-001 treatment revealed ICG-001 altered the expression of several genes with well-established roles in DNA replication and cell cycle progression, including direct actions on SKP2 and CDKN1A. ICG-001 also significantly prolonged survival in an in vivo orthotopic xenograft model of PDAC, indicating ICG-001 or derived compounds that disrupt CBP activity are potentially useful small molecule therapeutics for pancreatic cancer. PMID:25082960

  13. Frondoside A Suppressive Effects on Lung Cancer Survival, Tumor Growth, Angiogenesis, Invasion, and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Attoub, Samir; Arafat, Kholoud; Gélaude, An; Al Sultan, Mahmood Ahmed; Bracke, Marc; Collin, Peter; Takahashi, Takashi; Adrian, Thomas E.; De Wever, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge for oncologists and pharmacologists is to develop less toxic drugs that will improve the survival of lung cancer patients. Frondoside A is a triterpenoid glycoside isolated from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa and was shown to be a highly safe compound. We investigated the impact of Frondoside A on survival, migration and invasion in vitro, and on tumor growth, metastasis and angiogenesis in vivo alone and in combination with cisplatin. Frondoside A caused concentration-dependent reduction in viability of LNM35, A549, NCI-H460-Luc2, MDA-MB-435, MCF-7, and HepG2 over 24 hours through a caspase 3/7-dependent cell death pathway. The IC50 concentrations (producing half-maximal inhibition) at 24 h were between 1.7 and 2.5 µM of Frondoside A. In addition, Frondoside A induced a time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis in vitro. Frondoside A (0.01 and 1 mg/kg/day i.p. for 25 days) significantly decreased the growth, the angiogenesis and lymph node metastasis of LNM35 tumor xenografts in athymic mice, without obvious toxic side-effects. Frondoside A (0.1–0.5 µM) also significantly prevented basal and bFGF induced angiogenesis in the CAM angiogenesis assay. Moreover, Frondoside A enhanced the inhibition of lung tumor growth induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin. These findings identify Frondoside A as a promising novel therapeutic agent for lung cancer. PMID:23308143

  14. Predicting Change in Postpartum Depression: An Individual Growth Curve Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Trey

    Recently, methodologists interested in examining problems associated with measuring change have suggested that developmental researchers should focus upon assessing change at both intra-individual and inter-individual levels. This study used an application of individual growth curve analysis to the problem of maternal postpartum depression.…

  15. Glucocorticoids Hijack Runx2 to Stimulate Wif1 for Suppression of Osteoblast Growth and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Eri; Li, Meng; Khalid, Aysha B; Krum, Susan A; Chimge, Nyam-Osor; Frenkel, Baruch

    2017-01-01

    Inhibition of Runx2 is one of many mechanisms that suppress bone formation in glucocorticoid (GC)-induced osteoporosis (GIO). We profiled mRNA expression in ST2/Rx2(dox) cells after treatment with doxycycline (dox; to induce Runx2) and/or the synthetic GC dexamethasone (dex). As expected, dex typically antagonized Runx2-driven transcription. Select genes, however, were synergistic stimulated and this was confirmed by RT-qPCR. Among the genes synergistically stimulated by GCs and Runx2 was Wnt inhibitory Factor 1 (Wif1), and Wif1 protein was readily detectable in medium conditioned by cultures co-treated with dox and dex, but neither alone. Cooperation between Runx2 and GCs in stimulating Wif1 was also observed in primary preosteoblast cultures. GCs strongly inhibited dox-driven alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in control ST2/Rx2(dox) cells, but not in cells in which Wif1 was silenced. Unlike its anti-mitogenic activity in committed osteoblasts, induction of Runx2 transiently increased the percentage of cells in S-phase and accelerated proliferation in the ST2 mesenchymal pluripotent cell culture model. Furthermore, like the inhibition of Runx2-driven ALP activity, dex antagonized the transient mitogenic effect of Runx2 in ST2/Rx2(dox) cultures, and this inhibition eased upon Wif1 silencing. Plausibly, homeostatic feedback loops that rely on Runx2 activation to compensate for bone loss in GIO are thwarted, exacerbating disease progression through stimulation of Wif1. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 145-153, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. ß-adrenoceptor blockers increase cardiac sympathetic innervation by inhibiting autoreceptor suppression of axon growth.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Gwenaëlle L; Bhattacherjee, Aritra; Tague, Sarah E; Hasan, Wohaib; Smith, Peter G

    2010-09-15

    β-Adrenoceptor antagonists are used widely to reduce cardiovascular sympathetic tone, but withdrawal is accompanied by sympathetic hyperactivity. Receptor supersensitivity accounts for some but not all aspects of this withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, we investigated effects of β-blockers on sympathetic innervation. Rats received infusions of adrenergic receptor blockers or saline for 1 week. The nonselective β-blocker propranolol and the β(1)-antagonist metoprolol both increased myocardial sympathetic axon density. At 2 d after propranolol discontinuation, β-receptor sensitivity and responsiveness to isoproterenol were similar to controls. However, tyramine-induced mobilization of norepinephrine stores produced elevated ventricular contractility consistent with enhanced sympathetic neuroeffector properties. In addition, rats undergoing discontinuation showed exaggerated increases in mean arterial pressure in response to air puff or noise startle. In sympathetic neuronal cell cultures, both propranolol and metoprolol increased axon outgrowth but the β(2)-blocker ICI 118551 did not. Norepinephrine synthesis suppression by α-methyl-p-tyrosine also increased sprouting and concurrent dobutamine administration reduced it, confirming that locally synthesized norepinephrine inhibits outgrowth via β(1)-adrenoceptors. Immunohistochemistry revealed β(1)-adrenoceptor protein on sympathetic axon terminations. In rats with coronary artery ligation, propranolol reversed heart failure-induced ventricular myocardial sympathetic axon depletion, but did not affect infarct-associated sympathetic hyperinnervation. We conclude that sympathetic neurons possess β(1)-autoreceptors that negatively regulate axon outgrowth. Chronic β-adrenoceptor blockade disrupts this feedback system, leading to ventricular sympathetic axon proliferation and increased neuroeffector gain, which are likely to contribute to β-blocker withdrawal syndrome.

  17. Suppression of human prostate cancer cell growth by alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists doxazosin and terazosin via induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kyprianou, N; Benning, C M

    2000-08-15

    Recent evidence from our laboratory has demonstrated that alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists doxazosin and terazosin induced apoptosis in prostate epithelial and smooth muscle cells in patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH; J. Urol., 159: 1810-1815, 1998; J. Urol., 161: 2002-2007, 1999). In this study, we investigated the biological action of three alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists, doxazosin, terazosin, and tamsulosin, against prostate cancer cell growth. The antigrowth effect of the three alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists was examined in two human prostate cancer cell lines, PC-3 and DU-145, and a prostate smooth muscle cell primary culture, SMC-1, on the basis of: (a) cell viability assay; (b) rate of DNA synthesis; and (c) induction of apoptosis. Our results indicate that treatment of prostate cancer cells with doxazosin or terazosin results in a significant loss of cell viability, via induction of apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, whereas tamsulosin had no effect on prostate cell growth. Neither doxazosin nor terazosin exerted a significant effect on the rate of cell proliferation in prostate cancer cells. Exposure to phenoxybenzamine, an irreversible inhibitor of alpha1-adrenoceptors, does not abrogate the apoptotic effect of doxazosin or terazosin against human prostate cancer or smooth muscle cells. This suggests that the apoptotic activity of doxazosin and terazosin against prostate cells is independent of their capacity to antagonize alpha1-adrenoceptors. Furthermore, an in vivo efficacy trial demonstrated that doxazosin administration (at tolerated pharmacologically relevant doses) in SCID mice bearing PC-3 prostate cancer xenografts resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor growth. These findings demonstrate the ability of doxazosin and terazosin (but not tamsulosin) to suppress prostate cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo by inducing apoptosis without affecting cell proliferation. This evidence provides the rationale for targeting both

  18. ‘Obligate’ anaerobic Salmonella strain YB1 suppresses liver tumor growth and metastasis in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chang-Xian; Yu, Bin; Shi, Lei; Geng, Wei; Lin, Qiu-Bin; Ling, Chang-Chun; Yang, Mei; Ng, Kevin T. P.; Huang, Jian-Dong; Man, Kwan

    2017-01-01

    The antitumor properties of bacteria have been demonstrated over the past decades. However, the efficacy is limited and unclear. Furthermore, systemic infection remains a serious concern in bacteria treatment. In this study, the effect of YB1, a rationally designed ‘obligate’ anaerobic Salmonella typhimurium strain, on liver tumor growth and metastasis in a nude mouse orthotopic liver tumor model was investigated. The orthotopic liver tumor model was established in nude mice using the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line MHCC-97L. Two weeks after orthotopic liver tumor implantation, YB1, SL7207 and saline were respectively administered through the tail vein of the mice. Longitudinal monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis was performed using Xenogen IVIS, and direct measurements of tumor volume were taken 3 weeks after treatment. In vitro, MHCC-97L and PLC cells were incubated with YB1 or SL7207 under anaerobic conditions. YB1 was observed to invade tumor cells and induce tumor cell apoptosis and death. The results revealed that all mice in the YB1 group were alive 3 weeks after YB1 injection while all mice in the SL7207 group died within 11 days of the SL7207 injection. The body weight decreased by ~9% on day 1 after YB1 injection and but subsequently recovered. Liver tumor growth and metastases were significantly inhibited following YB1 treatment. By contrast to the control group, a large number of Gr1-positive cells were detected on days 1 to 21 following YB1 treatment. Furthermore, YB1 also effectively invaded tumor cells and induced tumor cell apoptosis and death. In conclusion, YB1 suppressed liver tumor growth and metastasis in a nude mice liver tumor model. The potential mechanism may be through enhancing innate immune response and inducing tumor cell apoptosis and cell death. PMID:28123538

  19. Wwox suppresses breast cancer cell growth through modulation of the hedgehog–GLI1 signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Anwen; Wei, Li; Ying, Mingzhen; Wu, Hongmei; Hua, Jin; Wang, Yajie

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • We investigated Gli1 as a novel partner of Wwox. • We observed a physical association between Wwox and the Gli1. • Wwox–Gli1 interaction affects Gli1 intracellular localization. • Gli1 Blocks Wwox-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in T47D cells. - Abstract: Wwox is a tumor suppressor that is frequently deleted or altered in several cancer types, including breast cancer. Previous studies have shown that ectopic expression of Wwox inhibits proliferation of breast cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of Wwox function, we investigated novel partners of this protein. Utilizing the coimmunoprecipitation assay, we observed a physical association between Wwox and the Gli1 zinc-finger transcription factor involved in the hedgehog pathway. Our results further demonstrated that Wwox expression triggered redistribution of nuclear Gli1 to the cytoplasm. Additionally, ectopic expression of Wwox reduced Gli1 expression in vitro. Furthermore, Gli1 Blocks Wwox-induced breast cancer cell growth inhibition. These findings suggest a functional crosstalk between Wwox and hedgehog–GLI1 signaling pathway in tumorigenesis.

  20. Epigenetic re-expression of HIF-2α suppresses soft tissue sarcoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Nakazawa, Michael S.; Eisinger-Mathason, T. S. Karin; Sadri, Navid; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Gade, Terence P. F.; Amin, Ruchi K.; Simon, M. Celeste

    2016-01-01

    In soft tissue sarcomas (STS), low intratumoural O2 (hypoxia) is a poor prognostic indicator. HIF-1α mediates key transcriptional responses to hypoxia, and promotes STS metastasis; however, the role of the related HIF-2α protein is unknown. Surprisingly, here we show that HIF-2α inhibits high-grade STS cell growth in vivo, as loss of HIF-2α promotes sarcoma proliferation and increases calcium and mTORC1 signalling in undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma and dedifferentiated liposarcoma. We find that most human STS have lower levels of EPAS1 (the gene encoding HIF-2α) expression relative to normal tissue. Many cancers, including STS, contain altered epigenetics, and our findings define an epigenetic mechanism whereby EPAS1 is silenced during sarcoma progression. The clinically approved HDAC inhibitor Vorinostat specifically increases HIF-2α, but not HIF-1α, accumulation in multiple STS subtypes. Vorinostat inhibits STS tumour growth, an effect ameliorated by HIF-2α deletion, implicating HIF-2α as a biomarker for Vorinostat efficacy in STS. PMID:26837714

  1. Growth signals employ CGGBP1 to suppress transcription of Alu-SINEs

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Prasoon; Enroth, Stefan; Teichmann, Martin; Jernberg Wiklund, Helena; Smit, Arian; Westermark, Bengt; Singh, Umashankar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT CGGBP1 (CGG triplet repeat-binding protein 1) regulates cell proliferation, stress response, cytokinesis, telomeric integrity and transcription. It could affect these processes by modulating target gene expression under different conditions. Identification of CGGBP1-target genes and their regulation could reveal how a transcription regulator affects such diverse cellular processes. Here we describe the mechanisms of differential gene expression regulation by CGGBP1 in quiescent or growing cells. By studying global gene expression patterns and genome-wide DNA-binding patterns of CGGBP1, we show that a possible mechanism through which it affects the expression of RNA Pol II-transcribed genes in trans depends on Alu RNA. We also show that it regulates Alu transcription in cis by binding to Alu promoter. Our results also indicate that potential phosphorylation of CGGBP1 upon growth stimulation facilitates its nuclear retention, Alu-binding and dislodging of RNA Pol III therefrom. These findings provide insights into how Alu transcription is regulated in response to growth signals. PMID:25483050

  2. Tropomyosin Controls Sarcomere-like Contractions for Rigidity Sensing and Suppressing Growth on Soft Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Wolfenson, Haguy; Meacci, Giovanni; Liu, Shuaimin; Stachowiak, Matthew R.; Iskratsch, Thomas; Ghassemi, Saba; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; O’Shaughnessy, Ben; Hone, James; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Cells test the rigidity of the extracellular matrix by applying forces to it through integrin adhesions. Recent measurements show that these forces are applied via local micrometre-scale contractions, but how contraction force is regulated by rigidity is unknown. Here we performed high temporal- and spatial-resolution tracking of contractile forces by plating cells on sub-micron elastomeric pillars. We found that actomyosin-based sarcomere-like contractile units (CUs) simultaneously moved opposing pillars in net steps of ~2.5 nm, independent of rigidity. What correlated with rigidity was the number of steps taken to reach a force level that activated recruitment of α-actinin to the CUs. When we removed actomyosin restriction by depleting tropomyosin 2.1, we observed larger steps and higher forces that resulted in aberrant rigidity sensing and growth of non-transformed cells on soft matrices. Thus, we conclude that tropomyosin 2.1 acts as a suppressor of growth on soft matrices by supporting proper rigidity sensing. PMID:26619148

  3. MiR-590-3p suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma growth by targeting TEAD1.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xin; Gong, Liansheng

    2017-03-01

    MicroRNA signature is altered in different disease states including cancer, and some microRNAs act as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. MiR-590-3p has been shown to be involved in human cancer progression. However, its role in hepatocellular carcinoma remains unknown. In this study, miR-590-3p level was measured, and clinicopathological features were determined in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues. The function of miR-590-3p was examined in vitro and in vivo. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated downregulation of miR-590-3p in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues, and its downregulation was associated with a poor overall survival of hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Ectopic expression of miR-590-3p promoted growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells, whereas its depletion inhibited cell growth. Transcriptional enhancer activator domain 1 was identified as a validated miR-590-3p target. Upregulation of transcriptional enhancer activator domain 1 was found in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues and inversely correlated with miR-590-3p. Our results indicate a tumor suppressor role of miR-590-3p in hepatocellular carcinoma through targeting transcriptional enhancer activator domain 1 and suggest its use in the diagnosis and prognosis of liver cancer.

  4. HAI-2 suppresses the invasive growth and metastasis of prostate cancer through regulation of matriptase.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C-H; Teng, C-H; Tu, Y-T; Cheng, T-S; Wu, S-R; Ko, C-J; Shyu, H-Y; Lan, S-W; Huang, H-P; Tzeng, S-F; Johnson, M D; Lin, C-Y; Hsiao, P-W; Lee, M-S

    2014-09-18

    Dysregulation of cell surface proteolysis has been strongly implicated in tumorigenicity and metastasis. In this study, we delineated the role of hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor-2 (HAI-2) in prostate cancer (PCa) cell migration, invasion, tumorigenicity and metastasis using a human PCa progression model (103E, N1, and N2 cells) and xenograft models. N1 and N2 cells were established through serial intraprostatic propagation of 103E human PCa cells and isolation of the metastatic cells from nearby lymph nodes. The invasion capability of these cells was revealed to gradually increase throughout the serial isolations (103Egrowth in mice, which was consistent with the immunohistochemical profiles of matriptase and HAI-2 in archival PCa specimens. Knockdown of matriptase reduced the PCa cell invasion induced by HAI-2 knockdown. HAI-2 overexpression or matriptase silencing in N2 cells downregulated matriptase activity and significantly decreased tumorigenicity and metastatic capability in orthotopically xenografted mice. These results suggest that during the progression of human PCa, matriptase activity is primarily controlled by HAI-2 expression. The imbalance between HAI-2 and matriptase expression led to matriptase activation, thereby increasing cell migration, invasion, tumorigenicity and metastasis.

  5. The Pace of Vocabulary Growth Helps Predict Later Vocabulary Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Meredith L.; Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Children vary widely in the rate at which they acquire words--some start slow and speed up, others start fast and continue at a steady pace. Do early developmental variations of this sort help predict vocabulary skill just prior to kindergarten entry? This longitudinal study starts by examining important predictors (socioeconomic status [SES],…

  6. Predicting the Future: Studies on the Growth of the Intellect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ.

    This illustrated booklet describes research procedures in the Infant Laboratory of the Educational Testing Service to investigate measurable factors in infant behavior which can predict intellectual potential. The research is currently focusing on attending, the manner in which infants respond to various stimuli presented to them during their…

  7. Estimated winter wheat yield from crop growth predicted by LANDSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanemasu, E. T.

    1977-01-01

    An evapotranspiration and growth model for winter wheat is reported. The inputs are daily solar radiation, maximum temperature, minimum temperature, precipitation/irrigation and leaf area index. The meteorological data were obtained from National Weather Service while LAI was obtained from LANDSAT multispectral scanner. The output provides daily estimates of potential evapotranspiration, transpiration, evaporation, soil moisture (50 cm depth), percentage depletion, net photosynthesis and dry matter production. Winter wheat yields are correlated with transpiration and dry matter accumulation.

  8. Wwox suppresses breast cancer cell growth through modulation of the hedgehog-GLI1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Anwen; Wei, Li; Ying, Mingzhen; Wu, Hongmei; Hua, Jin; Wang, Yajie

    2014-01-24

    Wwox is a tumor suppressor that is frequently deleted or altered in several cancer types, including breast cancer. Previous studies have shown that ectopic expression of Wwox inhibits proliferation of breast cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of Wwox function, we investigated novel partners of this protein. Utilizing the coimmunoprecipitation assay, we observed a physical association between Wwox and the Gli1 zinc-finger transcription factor involved in the hedgehog pathway. Our results further demonstrated that Wwox expression triggered redistribution of nuclear Gli1 to the cytoplasm. Additionally, ectopic expression of Wwox reduced Gli1 expression in vitro. Furthermore, Gli1 Blocks Wwox-induced breast cancer cell growth inhibition. These findings suggest a functional crosstalk between Wwox and hedgehog-GLI1 signaling pathway in tumorigenesis.

  9. Ultrasmall nanoparticles induce ferroptosis in nutrient-deprived cancer cells and suppress tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Eun; Zhang, Li; Ma, Kai; Riegman, Michelle; Chen, Feng; Ingold, Irina; Conrad, Marcus; Turker, Melik Ziya; Gao, Minghui; Jiang, Xuejun; Monette, Sebastien; Pauliah, Mohan; Gonen, Mithat; Zanzonico, Pat; Quinn, Thomas; Wiesner, Ulrich; Bradbury, Michelle S.; Overholtzer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The design of cancer-targeting particles with precisely-tuned physiocochemical properties may enhance delivery of therapeutics and access to pharmacological targets. However, molecular level understanding of the interactions driving the fate of nanomedicine in biological systems remains elusive. Here, we show that ultrasmall (< 10 nm in diameter) poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-coated silica nanoparticles, functionalized with melanoma-targeting peptides, can induce a form of programmed cell death known as ferroptosis in starved cancer cells and cancer-bearing mice. Tumor xenografts in mice intravenously injected with nanoparticles using a high-dose multiple injection scheme exhibit reduced growth or regression, in a manner that is reversed by the pharmacological inhibitor of ferroptosis, liproxstatin-1. These data demonstrate that ferroptosis can be targeted by ultrasmall silica nanoparticles and may have therapeutic potential. PMID:27668796

  10. Ultrasmall nanoparticles induce ferroptosis in nutrient-deprived cancer cells and suppress tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Eun; Zhang, Li; Ma, Kai; Riegman, Michelle; Chen, Feng; Ingold, Irina; Conrad, Marcus; Turker, Melik Ziya; Gao, Minghui; Jiang, Xuejun; Monette, Sebastien; Pauliah, Mohan; Gonen, Mithat; Zanzonico, Pat; Quinn, Thomas; Wiesner, Ulrich; Bradbury, Michelle S; Overholtzer, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The design of cancer-targeting particles with precisely tuned physicochemical properties may enhance the delivery of therapeutics and access to pharmacological targets. However, a molecular-level understanding of the interactions driving the fate of nanomedicine in biological systems remains elusive. Here, we show that ultrasmall (<10 nm in diameter) poly(ethylene glycol)-coated silica nanoparticles, functionalized with melanoma-targeting peptides, can induce a form of programmed cell death known as ferroptosis in starved cancer cells and cancer-bearing mice. Tumour xenografts in mice intravenously injected with nanoparticles using a high-dose multiple injection scheme exhibit reduced growth or regression, in a manner that is reversed by the pharmacological inhibitor of ferroptosis, liproxstatin-1. These data demonstrate that ferroptosis can be targeted by ultrasmall silica nanoparticles and may have therapeutic potential.

  11. Ultrasmall nanoparticles induce ferroptosis in nutrient-deprived cancer cells and suppress tumour growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Eun; Zhang, Li; Ma, Kai; Riegman, Michelle; Chen, Feng; Ingold, Irina; Conrad, Marcus; Turker, Melik Ziya; Gao, Minghui; Jiang, Xuejun; Monette, Sebastien; Pauliah, Mohan; Gonen, Mithat; Zanzonico, Pat; Quinn, Thomas; Wiesner, Ulrich; Bradbury, Michelle S.; Overholtzer, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The design of cancer-targeting particles with precisely tuned physicochemical properties may enhance the delivery of therapeutics and access to pharmacological targets. However, a molecular-level understanding of the interactions driving the fate of nanomedicine in biological systems remains elusive. Here, we show that ultrasmall (<10 nm in diameter) poly(ethylene glycol)-coated silica nanoparticles, functionalized with melanoma-targeting peptides, can induce a form of programmed cell death known as ferroptosis in starved cancer cells and cancer-bearing mice. Tumour xenografts in mice intravenously injected with nanoparticles using a high-dose multiple injection scheme exhibit reduced growth or regression, in a manner that is reversed by the pharmacological inhibitor of ferroptosis, liproxstatin-1. These data demonstrate that ferroptosis can be targeted by ultrasmall silica nanoparticles and may have therapeutic potential.

  12. MT-4 Suppresses Resistant Ovarian Cancer Growth through Targeting Tubulin and HSP27

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Hui Chen; Kumar, Sunil; Shen, Chien-Chang; Liou, Jing Ping; Pan, Shiow Lin; Teng, Che Ming

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this study, the anticancer mechanisms of MT-4 were examined in A2780 and multidrug-resistant NCI-ADR/res human ovarian cancer cell lines. Methods To evaluate the activity of MT-4, we performed in vitro cell viability and cell cycle assays and in vivo xenograft assays. Immunoblotting analysis was carried out to evaluate the effect of MT-4 on ovarian cancer. Tubulin polymerization was determined using a tubulin binding assay. Results MT-4 (2-Methoxy-5-[2-(3,4,5-trimethoxy-phenyl)-ethyl]-phenol), a derivative of moscatilin, can inhibit both sensitive A2780 and multidrug-resistant NCI-ADR/res cell growth and viability. MT-4 inhibited tubulin polymerization to induce G2/M arrest followed by caspase-mediated apoptosis. Further studies indicated that MT-4 is not a substrate of P-glycoprotein (p-gp). MT-4 also caused G2/M cell cycle arrest, accompanied by the upregulation of cyclin B, p-Thr161 Cdc2/p34, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), Aurora kinase B, and phospho-Ser10-histone H3 protein levels. In addition, we found that p38 MAPK pathway activation was involved in MT-4-induced apoptosis. Most importantly, MT-4 also decreased heat shock protein 27 expression and reduced its interaction with caspase-3, which inured cancer cells to chemotherapy resistance. Treatment of cells with SB203580 or overexpression of dominant negative (DN)-p38 or wild-type HSP27 reduced PARP cleavage caused by MT-4. MT-4 induced apoptosis through regulation of p38 and HSP27. Our xenograft models also show the in vivo efficacy of MT-4. MT-4 inhibited both A2780 and NCI-ADR/res cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion These findings indicate that MT-4 could be a potential lead compound for the treatment of multidrug-resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:25874627

  13. Mechanism of gemcitabine-induced suppression of human cholangiocellular carcinoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Yuka; Iwama, Hisakazu; Kato, Kiyohito; Tani, Joji; Katsura, Akiko; Miyata, Miwa; Fujiwara, Shintaro; Fujita, Koji; Sakamoto, Teppei; Fujimori, Takayuki; Okura, Ryoichi; Kobayashi, Kiyoyuki; Tadokoro, Tomoko; Mimura, Shima; Nomura, Takako; Miyoshi, Hisaaki; Morishita, Asahiro; Kamada, Hideki; Yoneyama, Hirohito; Okano, Keiichi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2015-10-01

    Although gemcitabine (2',2'-difluorocytidine monohydrochloride) is a common anticancer agent of cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC), its growth inhibitory effects and gemcitabine resistance in CCC cells are poorly understood. Our aims were to uncover the mechanism underlying the antitumor effect of gemcitabine and to analyze the mechanism regulating in vitro CCC cell gemcitabine resistance. In addition, we sought to identify miRNAs associated with the antitumor effects of gemcitabine in CCCs. Using a cell proliferation assay and flow cytometry, we examined the ability of gemcitabine to inhibit cell proliferation in three types of human CCC cell lines (HuCCT-1, Huh28, TKKK). We also employed western blotting to investigate the effects of gemcitabine on cell cycle-related molecules in CCC cells. In addition, we used array chips to assess gemcitabine-mediated changes in angiogenic molecules and activated tyrosine kinase receptors in CCC cells. We used miRNA array chips to comprehensively analyze gemcitabine-induced miRNAs and examined clusters of differentially expressed miRNAs in cells with and without gemcitabine treatment. Gemcitabine inhibited cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner in HuCCT-1 cells, whereas cell proliferation was unchanged in Huh28 and TKKK cells. Gemcitabine inhibited cell cycle progression in HuCCT-1 cells from G0/G1 to S phase, resulting in G1 cell cycle arrest due to the reduction of cyclin D1 expression. In addition, gemcitabine upregulated the angiogenic molecules IL-6, IL-8, ENA-78 and MCP-1. In TKKK cells, by contrast, gemcitabine did not arrest the cell cycle or modify angiogenic molecules. Furthermore, in gemcitabine-sensitive HuCCT-1 cells, gemcitabine markedly altered miRNA expression. The miRNAs and angiogenic molecules altered by gemcitabine contribute to the inhibition of tumor growth in vitro.

  14. Sustained-release genistein from nanostructured lipid carrier suppresses human lens epithelial cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Lu; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Li, Xue-Dong; Yang, Na; Pan, Wei-San; Kong, Jun; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    AIM To design and investigate the efficacy of a modified nanostructured lipid carrier loaded with genistein (Gen-NLC) to inhibit human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) proliferation. METHODS Gen-NLC was made by melt emulsification method. The morphology, particle size (PS), zeta potentials (ZP), encapsulation efficiency (EE) and in vitro release were characterized. The inhibition effect of nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC), genistein (Gen) and Gen-NLC on HLECs proliferation was evaluated by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, gene and protein expression of the proliferation marker Ki67 were evaluated with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and immunofluorescence analyses. RESULTS The mean PS of Gen-NLC was 80.12±1.55 nm with a mean polydispersity index of 0.11±0.02. The mean ZP was -7.14±0.38 mV and the EE of Gen in the nanoparticles was 92.3%±0.73%. Transmission electron microscopy showed that Gen-NLC displayed spherical-shaped particles covered by an outer-layer structure. In vitro release experiments demonstrated a prolonged drug release for 72h. The CCK-8 assay results showed the NLC had no inhibitory effect on HLECs and Gen-NLC displayed a much more prominent inhibitory effect on cellular growth compared to Gen of the same concentration. The mRNA and protein expression of Ki67 in LECs decreased significantly in Gen-NLC group. CONCLUSION Sustained drug release by Gen-NLCs may impede HLEC growth. PMID:27275415

  15. AT9283, a novel aurora kinase inhibitor, suppresses tumor growth in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenqing; Liu, Xiaobing; Cooke, Laurence S; Persky, Daniel O; Miller, Thomas P; Squires, Matthew; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2012-06-15

    Aurora kinases are oncogenic serine/threonine kinases that play key roles in regulating the mitotic phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Auroras are overexpressed in numerous tumors including B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and are validated oncology targets. AT9283, a pan-aurora inhibitor inhibited growth and survival of multiple solid tumors in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that AT9283 had potent activity against Aurora B in a variety of aggressive B-(non-Hodgkin lymphoma) B-NHL cell lines. Cells treated with AT9283 exhibited endoreduplication confirming the mechanism of action of an Aurora B inhibitor. Also, treatment of B-NHL cell lines with AT9283 induced apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner and inhibited cell proliferation with an IC(50) < 1 μM. It is well known that inhibition of auroras (A or B) synergistically enhances the effects of microtubule targeting agents such as taxanes and vinca alkaloids to induce antiproliferation and apoptosis. We evaluated whether AT9283 in combination with docetaxel is more efficient in inducing apoptosis than AT9283 or docetaxel alone. At very low doses (5 nM) apoptosis was doubled in the combination (23%) compared to AT9283 or docetaxel alone (10%). A mouse xenograft model of mantle cell lymphoma demonstrated that AT9283 at 15 mg/kg and docetaxel (10 mg/kg) alone had modest anti-tumor activity. However, AT9283 at 20 mg/kg and AT9283 (15 or 20 mg/kg) plus docetaxel (10 mg/kg) demonstrated a statistically significant tumor growth inhibition and enhanced survival. Together, our results suggest that AT9283 plus docetaxel may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in B-cell NHL and warrant early phase clinical trial evaluation.

  16. Lanatoside C suppressed colorectal cancer cell growth by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and increased radiation sensitivity by impairing DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mi Ae; Kim, Mi-Sook; Kim, Wonwoo; Um, Jee-Hyun; Shin, Young-Joo; Song, Jie-Young; Jeong, Jae-Hoon

    2016-02-02

    Cardiac glycosides are clinically used for cardiac arrhythmias. In this study, we investigated the mechanism responsible for anti-cancer and radiosensitizing effects of lanatoside C in colorectal cancer cells. Lanatoside C-treated cells showed classic patterns of autophagy, which may have been caused by lanatoside C-induced mitochondrial aggregation or degeneration. This mitochondrial dysfunction was due to disruption of K+ homeostasis, possibly through inhibition of Na+/K+-ATPase activity. In addition, lanatoside C sensitized HCT116 cells (but not HT-29 cells) to radiation in vitro. γ-H2AX, a representative marker of DNA damage, were sustained longer after combination of irradiation with lanatoside C, suggesting lanatoside C impaired DNA damage repair processes. Recruitment of 53BP1 to damaged DNA, a critical initiation step for DNA damage repair signaling, was significantly suppressed in lanatoside C-treated HCT116 cells. This may have been due to defects in the RNF8- and RNF168-dependent degradation of KDM4A/JMJD2A that increases 53BP1 recruitment to DNA damage sites. Although lanatoside C alone reduced tumor growth in the mouse xenograft tumor model, combination of lanatoside C and radiation inhibited tumor growth more than single treatments. Thus, lanatoside C could be a potential molecule for anti-cancer drugs and radiosensitizing agents.

  17. Lanatoside C suppressed colorectal cancer cell growth by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and increased radiation sensitivity by impairing DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mi Ae; Kim, Mi-Sook; Kim, Wonwoo; Um, Jee-Hyun; Shin, Young-Joo; Song, Jie-Young; Jeong, Jae-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides are clinically used for cardiac arrhythmias. In this study, we investigated the mechanism responsible for anti-cancer and radiosensitizing effects of lanatoside C in colorectal cancer cells. Lanatoside C-treated cells showed classic patterns of autophagy, which may have been caused by lanatoside C-induced mitochondrial aggregation or degeneration. This mitochondrial dysfunction was due to disruption of K+ homeostasis, possibly through inhibition of Na+/K+-ATPase activity. In addition, lanatoside C sensitized HCT116 cells (but not HT-29 cells) to radiation in vitro. γ-H2AX, a representative marker of DNA damage, were sustained longer after combination of irradiation with lanatoside C, suggesting lanatoside C impaired DNA damage repair processes. Recruitment of 53BP1 to damaged DNA, a critical initiation step for DNA damage repair signaling, was significantly suppressed in lanatoside C-treated HCT116 cells. This may have been due to defects in the RNF8- and RNF168-dependent degradation of KDM4A/JMJD2A that increases 53BP1 recruitment to DNA damage sites. Although lanatoside C alone reduced tumor growth in the mouse xenograft tumor model, combination of lanatoside C and radiation inhibited tumor growth more than single treatments. Thus, lanatoside C could be a potential molecule for anti-cancer drugs and radiosensitizing agents. PMID:26756216

  18. Simvastatin suppresses the DNA replication licensing factor MCM7 and inhibits the growth of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zheyong; Li, Wenjie; Liu, Jie; Li, Juan; He, Fang; Jiang, Yina; Yang, Lu; Li, Pingping; Wang, Bo; Wang, Yaochun; Ren, Yu; Yang, Jin; Luo, Zhijun; Vaziri, Cyrus; Liu, Peijun

    2017-01-01

    Acquired tamoxifen resistance (TamR) remains a major challenge in breast cancer endocrine therapy. The mechanism of acquiring tamoxifen resistance remains elusive, and no effective drugs are available. In this investigation, we determined that the expression of the DNA damage marker γH2AX is upregulated under minichromosome maintenance protein 7 (MCM7) knockdown in phospho Ser807/811-retinoblastoma protein (p-Rb) defect cells. In addition, the expression of p-Rb was lower in TamR cells than in parental cells, and the expression of γH2AX was significantly upregulated when MCM7 was knocked down in TamR cells. Simvastatin, an agent for hypercholesterolemia treatment, activated the MCM7/p-RB/γH2AX axis and induced DNA damage in TamR cells, especially when combined with tamoxifen. Finally, in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that simvastatin combined with tamoxifen increased TamR cell apoptosis and inhibited xenograft growth. In conclusion, simvastatin may suppress TamR cell growth by inhibiting MCM7 and Rb and subsequently inducing DNA damage. PMID:28150753

  19. Xanthohumol inhibits STAT3 activation pathway leading to growth suppression and apoptosis induction in human cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dokduang, Hasaya; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Namwat, Nisana; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Sangkhamanon, Sakkarn; Yageta, Mika Sakurai; Murakami, Yoshinori; Loilome, Watcharin

    2016-04-01

    STAT3 plays a significant role in the development of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) associated with the liver fluke (Opisthorchis viverrini; Ov). Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated flavonoid extracted from hops, has known anticancer activity and could potentially target STAT3. The present study determined the effect of XN on STAT3, as well as ascertained its usefulness against CCA. The CCA cell proliferation at 20 µM and 50 µM of XN was shown to inhibited, while 20 µM partially inhibited IL-6-induced STAT3 activation. At 50 µM, the inhibition was complete. The reduction in STAT3 activity at 20 and 50 µM was associated with a significant reduction of CCA cell growth and apoptosis. We also found that the administration of 50 µM XN orally in drinking water to nude mice inoculated with CCA led to a reduction in tumor growth in comparison with controls. In addition, apoptosis of cancer cells increased although there was no visible toxicity. The present study shows that XN can inhibit STAT3 activation both in vivo and in vitro due to suppression of the Akt-NFκB signaling pathway. XN should be considered as a possible therapeutic agent against CCA.

  20. Cisplatin suppresses the growth and proliferation of breast and cervical cancer cell lines by inhibiting integrin β5-mediated glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaojia; Xie, Jie; Li, Jiajia; Liu, Fei; Wu, Xiaohua; Wang, Ziliang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells harbor lower energy consumption after rounds of anticancer drugs, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we investigated metabolic alterations in cancer cells exposed to cisplatin. The present study exhibited cisplatin, known as a chemotherapeutic agent interacting with DNA, also acted as an anti-metabolic agent. We found that glycolysis levels of breast and cervical cancer cells were reduced after cisplatin treatment, resulting in cells growth and proliferation inhibition. We demonstrated that cisplatin suppressed glycolysis-related proteins expression, including glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB), through down-regulating integrin β5 (ITGB5)/focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway. ITGB5 overexpression rescued cisplatin-induced inhibition of cancer cell glycolysis, growth and proliferation. Conclusively, we reveal a novel insight into cisplatin-induced anticancer mechanism, suggesting alternative strategies to the current therapeutic approaches of targeting ITGB5, as well as of a combination of cisplatin with glucose up-regulation chemotherapeutic agents to enhance anticancer effect. PMID:27294003

  1. Manipulating Crystallographic Texture of Sn Coatings by Optimization of Electrodeposition Process Conditions to Suppress Growth of Whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagtap, Piyush; Kumar, Praveen

    2015-04-01

    The effects of two major electrodeposition process conditions, electrolyte bath temperature and current density, on the microstructure and crystallographic texture of pure tin coatings on brass and, ultimately, on the extent of whisker formation have been examined. The grain size of the deposited coatings increased with increasing electrolyte bath temperature and current density, which significantly affected the dominant texture: (211) or (420) was the dominant texture at low current densities whereas, depending on deposition temperature, (200) or (220) became the dominant texture at high current densities. After deposition, coatings were subjected to different environmental conditions, for example isothermal aging (room temperature, 50°C, or 150°C) for up to 90 days and thermal cycling between -25°C and 85°C for 100 cycles, and whisker growth was studied. The Sn coatings with low Miller index planes, for example (200) and (220), and with moderate aging temperature were more prone to whiskering than coating with high Miller index planes, for example (420), and high aging temperature. A processing route involving the optimum combination of current density and deposition temperature is proposed for suppressing whisker growth.

  2. Knockdown of asparagine synthetase by RNAi suppresses cell growth in human melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhou, Fusheng; Du, Wenhui; Dou, Jinfa; Xu, Yu; Gao, Wanwan; Chen, Gang; Zuo, Xianbo; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Xuejun; Yang, Sen

    2016-05-01

    Melanoma, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, causes more than 40,000 deaths each year worldwide. And epidermoid carcinoma is another major form of skin cancer, which could be studied together with melanoma in several aspects. Asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the glutamine- and ATP-dependent conversion of aspartic acid to asparagine, and its expression is associated with the chemotherapy resistance and prognosis in several human cancers. The present study aims to explore the potential role of ASNS in melanoma cells A375 and human epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431. We applied a lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) system to study its function in cell growth of both cells. The results revealed that inhibition of ASNS expression by RNAi significantly suppressed the growth of melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells, and induced a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in melanoma cells. Knockdown of ASNS in A375 cells remarkably downregulated the expression levels of CDK4, CDK6, and Cyclin D1, and upregulated the expression of p21. Therefore, our study provides evidence that ASNS may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma.

  3. Suppression of grain growth in nanocrystalline Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} through oxide particle dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Humphry-Baker, Samuel A.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2014-11-07

    The strategy of suppressing grain growth by dispersing nanoscale particles that pin the grain boundaries is demonstrated in a nanocrystalline thermoelectric compound. Yttria nanoparticles that were incorporated by mechanical alloying enabled nanocrystalline (i.e., d < 100 nm) Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} to be retained up to a homologous temperature of 0.94 T{sub m} for durations over which the grain size of the unreinforced compound grew to several microns. The nanostructure appeared to saturate at a grain size that depended on volume fraction (f) according to an f {sup −1/3} relationship, in accordance with theoretical models in the limit of high volume fractions of particles. Interestingly, at low temperatures, the particles stimulate enhanced grain growth over the unreinforced compound, due to particle-stimulated nucleation of recrystallization. To help prevent this effect, in-situ composites formed by internal oxidation of yttrium are compared with those made ex-situ by incorporation of yttria nanoparticles, with the result that the in-situ dispersion eliminates recrystallization at low temperatures and therefore improves nanostructure stabilization. These developments offer a pathway to thermally stabilized bulk nanocrystalline thermoelectrics processed via a powder route.

  4. Prediction of fatigue-crack growth under variableamplitude and spectrum loading using a closure model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An existing analytical crack closure model was used to study crack growth under various load histories. The model was based on a concept like the Dugdale model, but modified to leave plastically deformed material in the wake of the advancing crack tip. The model was used to correlate crack growth rates under constant amplitude loading, and to predict crack growth under variable amplitude and aircraft spectrum loading on 2219-T851 aluminum alloy sheet material. The predicted crack growth lives agreed well with experimental data. For 80 crack growth tests subjected to various load histories, the ratio of predicted-to-experimental lives (N(P)/n(T)) ranged from 0.5 to 1.8. The mean value of N(P)/N(T) was 0.97 and the standard deviation was 0.27.

  5. Creep crack growth predictions in INCO 718 using a continuum damage model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, K. P.; Wilson, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Creep crack growth tests have been carried out in compact type specimens of INCO 718 at 1200 F (649 C). Theoretical creep crack growth predictions have been carried out by incorporating a unified viscoplastic constitutive model and a continuum damage model into the ARAQUS nonlinear finite element program. Material constants for both the viscoplastic model and the creep continuum damage model were determined from tests carried out on uniaxial bar specimens of INCO 718 at 1200 F (649 C). A comparison of the theoretical creep crack growth rates obtained from the finite element predictions with the experimentally observed creep crack growth rates indicates that the viscoplastic/continuum damage model can be used to successfully predict creep crack growth in compact type specimens using material constants obtained from uniaxial bar specimens of INCO 718 at 1200 F (649 C).

  6. Predictive model for growth of Clostridium perfringens during cooling of cooked uncured beef.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Vijay K; Marks, Harry; Thippareddi, Harshavardhan

    2008-02-01

    This paper considers growth models including one based on Baranyi's equations for growth and the other based on the logistic function. Using a common approach for constructing dynamic models for predicting Clostridium perfringens growth in ready-to-eat uncured beef during cooling, there was no appreciable difference between the models' predictions when the population of cells was within the lag or exponential phases of growth. The developed models can be used for designing safe cooling processes; however, the discrepancies between predicted and observed growths obtained in this study, together with discrepancies reported in other papers using the same, or similar methodology as used in this paper, point to a possible inadequacy of the derived models. In particular, the appropriateness of the methodology depends on the appropriateness of using estimated growth kinetics obtained from experiments conducted in isothermal environments for determining coefficients of differential equations that are used for predicting growth in constantly changing (dynamic) environments. The coefficients are interpreted as instantaneous specific rates of change that are independent of prior history. However, there is no known scientific reason that would imply the truth of this assumption. Incorporating a different, less restrictive assumption, allowing for a dependency on the prior history of cells for these kinetic parameters, might lead to models that provide more accurate estimates of growth. For example, a cooling scenario of 54.4-27 degrees C in 1.5h, the average predicted and observed log(10) relative growths were 1.1log(10) and 0.66log(10), respectively, a difference of 0.44log(10,) whereas, when assuming a particular dependency of history, the predicted value was 0.8log(10). More research is needed to characterize the behavior of growth kinetic parameters relative to prior history in dynamic environments.

  7. Predicting pathogen growth during short-term temperature abuse of raw sausage.

    PubMed

    Ingham, Steven C; Ingham, Barbara H; Borneman, Darand; Jaussaud, Emilie; Schoeller, Erica L; Hoftiezer, Nathan; Schwartzburg, Lauren; Burnham, Greg M; Norback, John P

    2009-01-01

    Lag-phase duration (LPD) and growth rate (GR) values were calculated from experimental data obtained using a previously described protocol (S. C. Ingham, M. A. Fanslau, G. M. Burnham, B. H. Ingham, J. P. Norback, and D. W. Schaffner, J. Food Prot. 70:1445-1456, 2007). These values were used to develop an interval accumulation-based tool designated THERM (temperature history evaluation for raw meats) for predicting growth or no growth of Salmonella serovars, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Staphylococcus aureus in temperature-abused raw sausage. Data (time-temperature and pathogen log CFU per gram) were obtained from six inoculation experiments with Salmonella, E. coli O157:H7, and S. aureus in three raw pork sausage products stored under different temperature abuse conditions. The time-temperature history from each experiment was entered into THERM to predict pathogen growth. Predicted and experimental results were described as growth (> 0.3 log increase in CFU) or no growth (< or = 0.3 log increase in CFU) and compared. The THERM tool accurately predicted growth or no growth for all 18 pathogen-experiment combinations. When compared with the observed changes in log CFU values for the nine pathogen-experiment combinations in which pathogens grew, the predicted changes in log CFU values were within 0.3 log CFU for three combinations, exceeded observed values by 0.4 to 1.5 log CFU in four combinations, and were 1.2 to 1.4 log CFU lower in two combinations. The THERM tool approach appears to be useful for predicting pathogen growth versus no growth in raw sausage during temperature abuse, although further development and testing are warranted.

  8. YMO1 suppresses invasion and metastasis by inhibiting RhoC signaling and predicts favorable prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Rui-Min; Pei, Lei; Fang, Feng; Xu, Jiang-Feng; Yang, Hao; Zuo, Chao-Hui; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Luo, Geng-Qiu; Yang, Lian-Yue

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that 4.1 proteins, which are deregulated in many cancers, contribute to cell adhesion and motility. Yurt/Mosaic eyes-like 1 (YMO1) is a member of 4.1 protein family but it is unclear whether YMO1 plays a role in tumor invasion. This study aimed to investigate the effects of YMO1 on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and attempted to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. YMO1 expression in HCC tissues and its correlation with clinicopathological features and postoperative prognosis was analyzed. The results showed that YMO1 was down-regulated in the highly metastatic HCC cell line and in human tumor tissues. Underexpression of YMO1 indicated poor prognosis of HCC patients. Restoration of YMO1 expression caused a significant decrease in cell migration and invasiveness in vitro. In vivo study showed that YMO1 reduced liver tumor invasion and metastasis in xenograft mice. YMO1 directly inhibited RhoC activation. YMO1 expression in HCC was regulated by PAX5. Analysis of YMO1 expression levels in human HCC patients revealed a significant correlation of YMO1 expression with PAX5 and RhoC. Our findings revealed that YMO1 predicts favorable prognosis and the data suggest that YMO1 suppresses tumor invasion and metastasis by inhibiting RhoC activity. PMID:27487132

  9. Prediction of jet mean flow structure in support of HSCT noise suppression concepts. [High Speed Civilian Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, N.; Dash, S. M.; York, B. J.; Lee, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes the application of techniques based on computational fluid dynamics to the simulation of jet flowfields. A solution code for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is supplemented by conventional two-equation turbulence models based on the Boussinesq approximation. The axisymmetric SCIPVIS code is enhanced with the PARCH and CRAFT codes to examine plug-jet flowfields and imperfectly expanded axisymmetric free round jets. The sensitivity of shock/boundary layer interactions is observed in simulations of the plug case, and the adaptive gridding in the disk region and turbulence levels generated at the triple point are identified as areas in the Mach case that require improvement. Jet-wave structure in the region beyond the first several shock cells can be predicted, and turbulence modeling can be undertaken with respect to improving compressibility, length scale, vorticity, and energy budget. The mean flow structure of imperfectly expanded jets can be studied to develop related noise suppression concepts for the High-Speed Civilian Transport (HSCT).

  10. Tubulin binding cofactor C (TBCC) suppresses tumor growth and enhances chemosensitivity in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microtubules are considered major therapeutic targets in patients with breast cancer. In spite of their essential role in biological functions including cell motility, cell division and intracellular transport, microtubules have not yet been considered as critical actors influencing tumor cell aggressivity. To evaluate the impact of microtubule mass and dynamics on the phenotype and sensitivity of breast cancer cells, we have targeted tubulin binding cofactor C (TBCC), a crucial protein for the proper folding of α and β tubulins into polymerization-competent tubulin heterodimers. Methods We developed variants of human breast cancer cells with increased content of TBCC. Analysis of proliferation, cell cycle distribution and mitotic durations were assayed to investigate the influence of TBCC on the cell phenotype. In vivo growth of tumors was monitored in mice xenografted with breast cancer cells. The microtubule dynamics and the different fractions of tubulins were studied by time-lapse microscopy and lysate fractionation, respectively. In vitro sensitivity to antimicrotubule agents was studied by flow cytometry. In vivo chemosensitivity was assayed by treatment of mice implanted with tumor cells. Results TBCC overexpression influenced tubulin fraction distribution, with higher content of nonpolymerizable tubulins and lower content of polymerizable dimers and microtubules. Microtubule dynamicity was reduced in cells overexpressing TBCC. Cell cycle distribution was altered in cells containing larger amounts of TBCC with higher percentage of cells in G2-M phase and lower percentage in S-phase, along with slower passage into mitosis. While increased content of TBCC had little effect on cell proliferation in vitro, we observed a significant delay in tumor growth with respect to controls when TBCC overexpressing cells were implanted as xenografts in vivo. TBCC overexpressing variants displayed enhanced sensitivity to antimicrotubule agents both in vitro and

  11. Bed rest suppresses bioassayable growth hormone release in response to muscle activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, G. E.; Goulet, C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Hodgson, J. A.; Bigbee, A. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    Hormonal responses to muscle activity were studied in eight men before (-13 or -12 and -8 or -7 days), during (2 or 3, 8 or 9, and 13 or 14 days) and after (+2 or +3 and +10 or +11 days) 17 days of bed rest. Muscle activity consisted of a series of unilateral isometric plantar flexions, including 4 maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), 48 contractions at 30% MVC, and 12 contractions at 80% MVC, all performed at a 4:1-s work-to-rest ratio. Blood was collected before and immediately after muscle activity to measure plasma growth hormone by radioimmunoassay (IGH) and by bioassay (BGH) of tibia epiphyseal cartilage growth in hypophysectomized rats. Plasma IGH was unchanged by muscle activity before, during, or after bed rest. Before bed rest, muscle activity increased (P < 0.05) BGH by 66% at -13 or -12 days (2,146 +/- 192 to 3,565 +/- 197 microg/l) and by 92% at -8 or -7 days (2,162 +/- 159 to 4,161 +/- 204 microg/l). After 2 or 3 days of bed rest, there was no response of BGH to the muscle activity, a pattern that persisted through 8 or 9 days of bed rest. However, after 13 or 14 days of bed rest, plasma concentration of BGH was significantly lower after than before muscle activity (2,594 +/- 211 to 2,085 +/- 109 microg/l). After completion of bed rest, muscle activity increased BGH by 31% at 2 or 3 days (1,807 +/- 117 to 2,379 +/- 473 microg/l; P < 0.05), and by 10 or 11 days the BGH response was similar to that before bed rest (1,881 +/- 75 to 4,160 +/- 315 microg/l; P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that the ambulatory state of an individual can have a major impact on the release of BGH, but not IGH, in response to a single bout of muscle activity.

  12. The RCAN1 inhibits NF-κB and suppresses lymphoma growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C; Zheng, L; Wang, H; Ran, X; Liu, H; Sun, X

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) has a vital role in cell survival. Inhibition of NF-κB has been proven to be an efficient therapeutic pathway for various cancers. Activation of NF-κB is mainly through serine residues' phosphorylation of inhibitor of κBα (IκBα) by IKK complex. Phosphorylation at tyrosine 42 is an alternative pathway in regulation of IκBα and NF-κB signaling, though little is known about the underlying mechanism. Here we identified regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1) as a novel endogenous inhibitor of NF-κB signaling pathway. RCAN1 can interact with IκBα and affect the phosphorylation of IκBα at tyrosine 42. Overexpression of RCAN1 by adenovirus reduced cell viability in lymphoma Raji cells and restrained the growth of lymphoma transplants in mice. We further found that N terminus 1–103aa of RCAN1 is sufficient to inhibit NF-κB and reduce cell viability of lymphoma cells. Our study implicated a novel therapeutic approach for lymphoma by RCAN1 through inhibition of NF-κB signaling. PMID:26492364

  13. Knockdown of ELMO3 Suppresses Growth, Invasion and Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hui-Yun; Yu, Qiong-Fang; Shen, Wei; Guo, Cheng-Ming; Li, Zhen; Zhou, Xiao-Yan; Zhou, Nan-Jin; Min, Wei-Ping; Gao, Dian

    2016-01-01

    The engulfment and cell motility (ELMOs) family of proteins plays a crucial role in tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the function of ELMO3 is poorly defined. To elucidate its role in the development and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC), we examined the expression of ELMO3 in 45 cases of paired CRC tumor tissues and adjacent normal tissues. Furthermore, we assessed the effect of the knockdown of ELMO3 on cell proliferation, cell cycle, migration, invasion and F-actin polymerization in HCT116 cells. The result shows that the expression of ELMO3 in CRC tissues was significantly increased in comparison to the adjacent normal colorectal tissues. Moreover, this overexpression was associated with tumor size (p = 0.007), tumor differentiation (p = 0.001), depth of invasion (p = 0.009), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.003), distant metastasis (p = 0.013) and tumor, node, metastasis (TNM)-based classification (p = 0.000). In in vitro experiments, the silencing of ELMO3 inhibited cell proliferation, invasion, metastasis, and F-actin polymerization, and induced Gap 1 (G1) phase cell cycle arrest. Our study demonstrates that ELMO3 is involved in the processes of growth, invasion and metastasis of CRC, and could be used a potential molecular diagnostic tool or therapy target of CRC. PMID:27999268

  14. Vascular normalization induced by sinomenine hydrochloride results in suppressed mammary tumor growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huimin; Ren, Yu; Tang, Xiaojiang; Wang, Ke; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Li; Li, Xiao; Liu, Peijun; Zhao, Changqi; He, Jianjun

    2015-03-09

    Solid tumor vasculature is characterized by structural and functional abnormality and results in a hostile tumor microenvironment that mediates several deleterious aspects of tumor behavior. Sinomenine is an alkaloid extracted from the Chinese medicinal plant, Sinomenium acutum, which has been utilized to treat rheumatism in China for over 2000 years. Though sinomenine has been demonstrated to mediate a wide range of pharmacological actions, few studies have focused on its effect on tumor vasculature. We showed here that intraperitoneally administration of 100 mg/kg sinomenine hydrochloride (SH, the hydrochloride chemical form of sinomenine) in two orthotopic mouse breast cancer models for 14 days, delayed mammary tumor growth and decreased metastasis by inducing vascular maturity and enhancing tumor perfusion, while improving chemotherapy and tumor immunity. The effects of SH on tumor vessels were caused in part by its capability to restore the balance between pro-angiogenic factor (bFGF) and anti-angiogenic factor (PF4). However 200 mg/kg SH didn't exhibit the similar inhibitory effect on tumor progression due to the immunosuppressive microenvironment caused by excessive vessel pruning, G-CSF upregulation, and GM-CSF downregulation. Altogether, our findings suggest that SH induced vasculature normalization contributes to its anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effect on breast cancer at certain dosage.

  15. Vascular Normalization Induced by Sinomenine Hydrochloride Results in Suppressed Mammary Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huimin; Ren, Yu; Tang, Xiaojiang; Wang, Ke; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Li; Li, Xiao; Liu, Peijun; Zhao, Changqi; He, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Solid tumor vasculature is characterized by structural and functional abnormality and results in a hostile tumor microenvironment that mediates several deleterious aspects of tumor behavior. Sinomenine is an alkaloid extracted from the Chinese medicinal plant, Sinomenium acutum, which has been utilized to treat rheumatism in China for over 2000 years. Though sinomenine has been demonstrated to mediate a wide range of pharmacological actions, few studies have focused on its effect on tumor vasculature. We showed here that intraperitoneally administration of 100 mg/kg sinomenine hydrochloride (SH, the hydrochloride chemical form of sinomenine) in two orthotopic mouse breast cancer models for 14 days, delayed mammary tumor growth and decreased metastasis by inducing vascular maturity and enhancing tumor perfusion, while improving chemotherapy and tumor immunity. The effects of SH on tumor vessels were caused in part by its capability to restore the balance between pro-angiogenic factor (bFGF) and anti-angiogenic factor (PF4). However 200 mg/kg SH didn't exhibit the similar inhibitory effect on tumor progression due to the immunosuppressive microenvironment caused by excessive vessel pruning, G-CSF upregulation, and GM-CSF downregulation. Altogether, our findings suggest that SH induced vasculature normalization contributes to its anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effect on breast cancer at certain dosage. PMID:25749075

  16. The Host Defense Peptide Cathelicidin Is Required for NK Cell-Mediated Suppression of Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Büchau, Amanda S.; Morizane, Shin; Trowbridge, Janet; Schauber, Jürgen; Kotol, Paul; Bui, Jack D.; Gallo, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor surveillance requires the interaction of multiple molecules and cells that participate in innate and the adaptive immunity. Cathelicidin was initially identified as an antimicrobial peptide, although it is now clear that it fulfills a variety of immune functions beyond microbial killing. Recent data have suggested contrasting roles for cathelicidin in tumor development. Because its role in tumor surveillance is not well understood, we investigated the requirement of cathelicidin in controlling transplantable tumors in mice. Cathelicidin was observed to be abundant in tumor-infiltrating NK1.1+ cells in mice. The importance of this finding was demonstrated by the fact that cathelicidin knockout mice (Camp−/−) permitted faster tumor growth than wild type controls in two different xenograft tumor mouse models (B16.F10 and RMA-S). Functional in vitro analyses found that NK cells derived from Camp−/− versus wild type mice showed impaired cytotoxic activity toward tumor targets. These findings could not be solely attributed to an observed perforin deficiency in freshly isolated Camp−/− NK cells, because this deficiency could be partially restored by IL-2 treatment, whereas cytotoxic activity was still defective in IL-2-activated Camp−/− NK cells. Thus, we demonstrate a previously unrecognized role of cathelicidin in NK cell antitumor function. PMID:19949065

  17. A low molecular weight polysaccharide isolated from Agaricus blazei suppresses tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Niu, Y C; Liu, J C; Zhao, X M; Wu, X X

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that the low molecular weight polysaccharide extracts from Agaricus blazei are potential antitumor agents or adjuvant in tumor treatment. In this study, we investigated the antitumor activity of LMPAB, a low molecular weight polysaccharide isolated from Agaricus blazei, and the molecular mechanisms of its antitumor activity. The antitumor effect of LMPAB was examined using mouse sarcoma 180 (S180) xenograft models. Antiangiogenic effect of LMPAB was determined by chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) angiogenesis and Matrigel-induced neovascularization in vivo models. The mRNA and protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were assessed using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Tumor inhibitory rates in the S180 xenograft models were 9.7, 23.9, and 33.0%, respectively, after administration of LMPAB at dose of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks. LMPAB also inhibited angiogenesis in the CAM model and Matrigel-induced neovascularization in C57BL/6 mice. The mRNA and protein levels of VEGF in tumor tissues were significantly down-regulated in the BALB/c mice received LMPAB treatment. Furthermore, significant down-regulation of serum VEGF levels was also observed in the mice. Our data suggest that LMPAB might be a promising agent for tumor therapy, and the antitumor and antiangiogenic effects of LMPAB may be related with down-regulation of VEGF.

  18. Andrographolide suppress tumor growth by inhibiting TLR4/NF-κB signaling activation in insulinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Ding, Yi; Lei, Yan; Qi, Cui-Ling; He, Xiao-Dong; Lan, Tian; Li, Jiang-Chao; Gong, Ping; Yang, Xuesong; Geng, Jian-Guo; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Insulinomas are rare tumors, and approximately 10% of insulinomas are malignant. Accumulating evidence has implicated that we still lack effective therapy to treat the patients who are diagnosed with rare malignant insulinoma. Previous studies have reported that Andrographolide (Andro) could inhibit cell cycle progression, reduce cell invasion and induce cell apoptosis in many common cancer cells. However, the effects of andro are cell type-dependent. So we emplored the β-TC-6 cells and the RIP1-Tag2 transgenic mouse model of endogenously growing insulinoma model to elucidate the possible anti-cancer effect of Andro on insulinoma, an uncommon type of malignant cancers in this study. Our experiments revealed that Andro significantly inhibited tumor growth at both the early-stage and the advanced-stage of insulinoma through targeting the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. This work initially provides the evidence that the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway might be vital as a potential therapeutic target, and also indispensable in Andro-mediated anti-cancer effect in insulinoma.

  19. A morel improved growth and suppressed Fusarium infection in sweet corn.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan; Bu, Fangfang; Hou, Jiaojiao; Kang, Yongxiang; Yu, Zhongdong

    2016-12-01

    A post-fire morel collected from Populus simonii stands in Mt. Qingling was identified as Morchella crassipes Mes-20 by using nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer phylogeny. It was inoculated into sweet corn to observe colonized roots in purified culture and in greenhouse experiments. The elongation and maturation zones of sweet corn were remarkably colonized at the cortex intercellular and intracellular cells, vessel cells, and around the Casparian strip, forming ectendomycorrhiza-like structures. Colonization was also observed in the zone of cell division proximal to the root cap. Greenhouse assays with sweet corn showed that this morel stimulated the development of the root system and significantly increased the dry root biomass. M. crassipes also significantly reduced the incidence of Fusarium verticillioides in the kernels of mature ears when inoculated into young ears before Fusarium inoculation and prevented Fusarium infection in corn ears compared with that of the control in the greenhouse. When grown under axenic conditions, M. crassipes produced the phytohormones abscisic acid, indole-3-acetic acid, and salicylic acid. The benefits to plants elicited by M. crassipes may result from these phytohormones which may improve the drought resistance, biomass growth and resistance to Fusarium.

  20. Growth suppression of MCF-7 cancer cell-derived xenografts in nude mice by caveolin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Ping; Wang Xiaohui; Li Fei; Qi Baoju; Zhu Hua; Liu Shuang; Cui Yeqing; Chen Jianwen

    2008-11-07

    Caveolin-1 is an essential structural constituent of caveolae membrane domains that has been implicated in mitogenic signaling and oncogenesis. However, the exact functional role of caveolin-1 still remains controversial. In this report, utilizing MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells stably transfected with caveolin-1 (MCF-7/cav-1 cells), we demonstrate that caveolin-1 expression dramatically inhibits invasion and migration of these cells. Importantly, in vivo experiments employing xenograft tumor models demonstrated that expression of caveolin-1 results in significant growth inhibition of breast tumors. Moreover, a dramatic delay in tumor progression was observed in MCF-7/cav-1 cells as compared with MCF-7 cells. Histological analysis of tumor sections demonstrated a marked decrease in the percentage of proliferating tumor cells (Ki-67 assay) along with an increase in apoptotic tumor cells (TUNEL assay) in MCF-7/cav-1-treated animals. Our current findings provide for the first time in vivo evidence that caveolin-1 can indeed function as a tumor suppressor in human breast adenocarcinoma derived from MCF-7 cells rather than as a tumor promoter.

  1. A DNA vaccine targeting angiomotin inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmgren, Lars; Ambrosino, Elena; Birot, Olivier; Tullus, Carl; Veitonmäki, Niina; Levchenko, Tetyana; Carlson, Lena-Maria; Musiani, Piero; Iezzi, Manuela; Curcio, Claudia; Forni, Guido; Cavallo, Federica; Kiessling, Rolf

    2006-06-01

    Endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors have shown promise in preclinical trials, but clinical use has been hindered by low half-life in circulation and high production costs. Here, we describe a strategy that targets the angiostatin receptor angiomotin (Amot) by DNA vaccination. The vaccination procedure generated antibodies that detected Amot on the endothelial cell surface. Purified Ig bound to the endothelial cell membrane and inhibited endothelial cell migration. In vivo, DNA vaccination blocked angiogenesis in the matrigel plug assay and prevented growth of transplanted tumors for up to 150 days. We further demonstrate that a combination of DNA vaccines encoding Amot and the extracellular and transmembrane domains of the human EGF receptor 2 (Her-2)/neu oncogene inhibited breast cancer progression and impaired tumor vascularization in Her-2/neu transgenic mice. No toxicity or impairment of normal blood vessels could be detected. This work shows that DNA vaccination targeting Amot may be used to mimic the effect of angiostatin. cancer vaccines | neoplasia | neovascularization | breast cancer | angiostatin

  2. Yeasts isolated from industrial maltings can suppress Fusarium growth and formation of gushing factors.

    PubMed

    Laitila, Arja; Sarlin, Tuija; Kotaviita, Erja; Huttunen, Timo; Home, Silja; Wilhelmson, Annika

    2007-11-01

    Fusarium infection of barley and malt can cause severe problems in the malting and brewing industry. In addition to being potential mycotoxin producers, Fusarium fungi are known to cause beer gushing (spontaneous overfoaming of beer). Cereal-derived bacteria and yeasts are potential biocontrol agents. In this study, the antifungal potential of selected yeasts (12 strains) derived from the industrial malting ecosystem was studied in vitro with a plate-screening assay. Several ascomycetous yeast strains showed antagonistic activity against field and storage moulds, Pichia anomala being the most effective strain. The effects of P. anomala VTT C-04565 (C565) were examined in laboratory scale malting with naturally contaminated barley exhibiting gushing potential. P. anomala C565 restricted Fusarium growth and hydrophobin production during malting and prevented beer gushing. Grain germination was not disturbed by the presence of yeast. Addition of P. anomala C565 into the steeping seemed to retard wort filtration, but the filtration performance was recovered when yeast culture was combined with Lactobacillus plantarum VTT E-78076. Well-characterized microbial cultures could be used as food-grade biocontrol agents and they offer a natural tool for tailoring of malt properties.

  3. PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR GROWTH OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS DURING COOLING OF COOKED GROUND CHICKEN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional methodologies for development of microbial growth models under dynamic temperature conditions do not take adequate account for the organism’s history. Such models were shown to be inadequate in predicting growth of the organisms under dynamic conditions commonly encountered in the food i...

  4. Predictive model for growth of Clostridium perfringens during cooling of cooked ground chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional methodologies for development of microbial growth models under dynamic temperature conditions do not take into account the organism’s prior history. Such models were shown to be inadequate in predicting growth of the organisms under dynamic conditions commonly encountered in the food ind...

  5. A Novel Modelling Approach for Predicting Forest Growth and Yield under Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, M Irfan; Meng, Fan-Rui; Bourque, Charles P-A; MacLean, David A

    2015-01-01

    Global climate is changing due to increasing anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Forest managers need growth and yield models that can be used to predict future forest dynamics during the transition period of present-day forests under a changing climatic regime. In this study, we developed a forest growth and yield model that can be used to predict individual-tree growth under current and projected future climatic conditions. The model was constructed by integrating historical tree growth records with predictions from an ecological process-based model using neural networks. The new model predicts basal area (BA) and volume growth for individual trees in pure or mixed species forests. For model development, tree-growth data under current climatic conditions were obtained using over 3000 permanent sample plots from the Province of Nova Scotia, Canada. Data to reflect tree growth under a changing climatic regime were projected with JABOWA-3 (an ecological process-based model). Model validation with designated data produced model efficiencies of 0.82 and 0.89 in predicting individual-tree BA and volume growth. Model efficiency is a relative index of model performance, where 1 indicates an ideal fit, while values lower than zero means the predictions are no better than the average of the observations. Overall mean prediction error (BIAS) of basal area and volume growth predictions was nominal (i.e., for BA: -0.0177 cm(2) 5-year(-1) and volume: 0.0008 m(3) 5-year(-1)). Model variability described by root mean squared error (RMSE) in basal area prediction was 40.53 cm(2) 5-year(-1) and 0.0393 m(3) 5-year(-1) in volume prediction. The new modelling approach has potential to reduce uncertainties in growth and yield predictions under different climate change scenarios. This novel approach provides an avenue for forest managers to generate required information for the management of forests in transitional periods of climate change. Artificial intelligence technology

  6. A Novel Modelling Approach for Predicting Forest Growth and Yield under Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, M. Irfan; Meng, Fan-Rui; Bourque, Charles P.-A.; MacLean, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Global climate is changing due to increasing anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Forest managers need growth and yield models that can be used to predict future forest dynamics during the transition period of present-day forests under a changing climatic regime. In this study, we developed a forest growth and yield model that can be used to predict individual-tree growth under current and projected future climatic conditions. The model was constructed by integrating historical tree growth records with predictions from an ecological process-based model using neural networks. The new model predicts basal area (BA) and volume growth for individual trees in pure or mixed species forests. For model development, tree-growth data under current climatic conditions were obtained using over 3000 permanent sample plots from the Province of Nova Scotia, Canada. Data to reflect tree growth under a changing climatic regime were projected with JABOWA-3 (an ecological process-based model). Model validation with designated data produced model efficiencies of 0.82 and 0.89 in predicting individual-tree BA and volume growth. Model efficiency is a relative index of model performance, where 1 indicates an ideal fit, while values lower than zero means the predictions are no better than the average of the observations. Overall mean prediction error (BIAS) of basal area and volume growth predictions was nominal (i.e., for BA: -0.0177 cm2 5-year-1 and volume: 0.0008 m3 5-year-1). Model variability described by root mean squared error (RMSE) in basal area prediction was 40.53 cm2 5-year-1 and 0.0393 m3 5-year-1 in volume prediction. The new modelling approach has potential to reduce uncertainties in growth and yield predictions under different climate change scenarios. This novel approach provides an avenue for forest managers to generate required information for the management of forests in transitional periods of climate change. Artificial intelligence technology has substantial

  7. An Intracellular Iron Chelator Pleiotropically Suppresses Enzymatic and Growth Defects of Superoxide Dismutase-Deficient Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Maringanti, Sujatha; Imlay, James A.

    1999-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli that lack cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase (SOD) exhibit auxotrophies for sulfur-containing, branched-chain, and aromatic amino acids and cannot catabolize nonfermentable carbon sources. A secondary-site mutation substantially relieved all of these growth defects. The requirement for fermentable carbon and the branched-chain auxotrophy occur because superoxide (O2−) leaches iron from the [4Fe-4S] clusters of a family of dehydratases, thereby inactivating them; the suppression of these phenotypes was mediated by the restoration of activity to these dehydratases, evidently without changing the intracellular concentration of O2−. Cloning, complementation, and sequence analysis identified the suppressor mutation to be in dapD, which encodes tetrahydrodipicolinate succinylase, an enzyme involved in diaminopimelate and lysine biosynthesis. A block in dapB, which encodes dihydrodipicolinate reductase in the same pathway, conferred similar protection. Genetic analysis indicated that the protection stems from the intracellular accumulation of tetrahydro- or dihydrodipicolinate. Heterologous expression in the SOD mutants of the dipicolinate synthase of Bacillus subtilis generated dipicolinate and similarly protected them. Dipicolinates are excellent iron chelators, and their accumulation in the cell triggered derepression of the Fur regulon and a large increase in the intracellular pool of free iron, presumably as a dipicolinate chelate. A fur mutation only partially relieved the auxotrophies, indicating that Fur derepression assists but is not sufficient for suppression. It seems plausible that the abundant internal iron permits efficient reactivation of superoxide-damaged iron-sulfur clusters. This result provides circumstantial evidence that the sulfur and aromatic auxotrophies of SOD mutants are also directly or indirectly linked to iron metabolism. PMID:10368155

  8. The Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Vaproic Acid Induces Cell Growth Arrest in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells via Suppressing Notch Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guangchun; Mackey, Lily V.; Coy, David H.; Yu, Cui-Yun; Sun, Lichun

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a type of malignant cancer. Notch signaling is aberrantly expressed in HCC tissues with more evidence showing that this signaling plays a critical role in HCCs. In the present study, we investigate the effects of the anti-convulsant drug valproic acid (VPA) in HCC cells and its involvement in modulating Notch signaling. We found that VPA, acting as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, induced a decrease in HDAC4 and an increase in acetylated histone 4 (AcH4) and suppressed HCC cell growth. VPA also induced down-regulation of Notch signaling via suppressing the expression of Notch1 and its target gene HES1, with an increase of tumor suppressor p21 and p63. Furthermore, Notch1 activation via overexpressing Notch1 active form ICN1 induced HCC cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis, indicating Notch signaling played an oncogenic role in HCC cells. Meanwhile, VPA could reverse Notch1-induced increase of cell proliferation. Interestingly, VPA was also observed to stimulate the expression of G protein-coupled somatostatin receptor type 2 (SSTR2) that has been used in receptor-targeting therapies. This discovery supports a combination therapy of VPA with the SSTR2-targeting agents. Our in vitro assay did show that the combination of VPA and the peptide-drug conjugate camptothecin-somatostatin (CPT-SST) displayed more potent anti-proliferative effects on HCC cells than did each alone. VPA may be a potential drug candidate in the development of anti-HCC drugs via targeting Notch signaling, especially in combination with receptor-targeting cytotoxic agents. PMID:26366213

  9. Biodegradable polymeric micelles encapsulated JK184 suppress tumor growth through inhibiting Hedgehog signaling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nannan; Liu, Shichang; Wang, Ning; Deng, Senyi; Song, Linjiang; Wu, Qinjie; Liu, Lei; Su, Weijun; Wei, Yuquan; Xie, Yongmei; Gong, Changyang

    2015-01-01

    JK184 can specially inhibit Gli in the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which showed great promise for cancer therapeutics. For developing aqueous formulation and improving anti-tumor activity of JK184, we prepared JK184 encapsulated MPEG-PCL micelles by the solid dispersion method without using surfactants or toxic organic solvents. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of JK184 micelles were both increased compared with the free drug. JK184 micelles induced more apoptosis and blocked proliferation of Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor cells. In addition, JK184 micelles exerted a sustained in vitro release behavior and had a stronger inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration and invasion of HUVECs than free JK184. Furthermore, JK184 micelles had stronger tumor growth inhibiting effects in subcutaneous Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor models. Histological analysis showed that JK184 micelles improved anti-tumor activity by inducing more apoptosis, decreasing microvessel density and reducing expression of CD31, Ki67, and VEGF in tumor tissues. JK184 micelles showed a stronger inhibition of Gli expression in Hh signaling, which played an important role in pancreatic carcinoma. Furthermore, circulation time of JK184 in blood was prolonged after entrapment in polymeric micelles. Our results suggested that JK184 micelles are a promising drug candidate for treating pancreatic tumors with a highly inhibitory effect on Hh activity.JK184 can specially inhibit Gli in the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which showed great promise for cancer therapeutics. For developing aqueous formulation and improving anti-tumor activity of JK184, we prepared JK184 encapsulated MPEG-PCL micelles by the solid dispersion method without using surfactants or toxic organic solvents. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of JK184 micelles were both increased compared with the free drug. JK184 micelles induced more apoptosis and blocked proliferation of Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor cells. In addition, JK184 micelles exerted a sustained in

  10. A low carbohydrate, high protein diet suppresses intratumoral androgen synthesis and slows castration-resistant prostate tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Fokidis, H Bobby; Yieng Chin, Mei; Ho, Victor W; Adomat, Hans H; Soma, Kiran K; Fazli, Ladan; Nip, Ka Mun; Cox, Michael; Krystal, Gerald; Zoubeidi, Amina; Tomlinson Guns, Emma S

    2015-06-01

    likely to be mechanistic drivers behind the observed tumor growth suppression.

  11. Co-targeting AR and HSP90 suppresses prostate cancer cell growth and prevents resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Centenera, Margaret M; Carter, Sarah L; Gillis, Joanna L; Marrocco-Tallarigo, Deborah L; Grose, Randall H; Tilley, Wayne D; Butler, Lisa M

    2015-10-01

    Persistent androgen receptor (AR) signaling in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) underpins the urgent need for therapeutic strategies that better target this pathway. Combining classes of agents that target different components of AR signaling has the potential to delay resistance and improve patient outcomes. Many oncoproteins, including the AR, rely on the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) for functional maturation and stability. In this study, enhanced anti-proliferative activity of the Hsp90 inhibitors 17-allylamino-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) and AUY922 in androgen-sensitive and CRPC cells was achieved when the agents were used in combination with AR antagonists bicalutamide or enzalutamide. Moreover, significant caspase-dependent cell death was achieved using sub-optimal agent doses that individually have no effect. Expression profiling demonstrated regulation of a broadened set of AR target genes with combined 17-AAG and bicalutamide compared with the respective single agent treatments. This enhanced inhibition of AR signaling was accompanied by impaired chromatin binding and nuclear localization of the AR. Importantly, expression of the AR variant AR-V7 that is implicated in resistance to AR antagonists was not induced by combination treatment. Likewise, the heat shock response that is typically elicited with therapeutic doses of Hsp90 inhibitors, and is a potential mediator of resistance to these agents, was significantly reduced by combination treatment. In summary, the co-targeting strategy in this study more effectively inhibits AR signaling than targeting AR or HSP90 alone and prevents induction of key resistance mechanisms in prostate cancer cells. These findings merit further evaluation of this therapeutic strategy to prevent CRPC growth.

  12. Targeted endostatin-cytosine deaminase fusion gene therapy plus 5-fluorocytosine suppresses ovarian tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sher, Y-P; Chang, C-M; Juo, C-G; Chen, C-T; Hsu, J L; Lin, C-Y; Han, Z; Shiah, S-G; Hung, M-C

    2013-02-28

    There are currently no effective therapies for cancer patients with advanced ovarian cancer, therefore developing an efficient and safe strategy is urgent. To ensure cancer-specific targeting, efficient delivery, and efficacy, we developed an ovarian cancer-specific construct (Survivin-VISA-hEndoyCD) composed of the cancer specific promoter survivin in a transgene amplification vector (VISA; VP16-GAL4-WPRE integrated systemic amplifier) to express a secreted human endostatin-yeast cytosine deaminase fusion protein (hEndoyCD) for advanced ovarian cancer treatment. hEndoyCD contains an endostatin domain that has tumor-targeting ability for anti-angiogenesis and a cytosine deaminase domain that converts the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the chemotherapeutic drug, 5-fluorouracil. Survivin-VISA-hEndoyCD was found to be highly specific, selectively express secreted hEndoyCD from ovarian cancer cells, and induce cancer-cell killing in vitro and in vivo in the presence of 5-FC without affecting normal cells. In addition, Survivin-VISA-hEndoyCD plus 5-FC showed strong synergistic effects in combination with cisplatin in ovarian cancer cell lines. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment with Survivin-VISA-hEndoyCD coupled with liposome attenuated tumor growth and prolonged survival in mice bearing advanced ovarian tumors. Importantly, there was virtually no severe toxicity when hEndoyCD is expressed by Survivin-VISA plus 5-FC compared with CMV plus 5-FC. Thus, the current study demonstrates an effective cancer-targeted gene therapy that is worthy of development in clinical trials for treating advanced ovarian cancer.

  13. Sirt2 suppresses glioma cell growth through targeting NF-κB–miR-21 axis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ya’nan; Dai, Dongwei; Lu, Qiong; Fei, Mingyu; Li, Mengmeng; Wu, Xi

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression is down-regulated in human glioma tissues and cell lines. •Sirt2 regresses glioma cell growth and colony formation via inducing apoptosis. •miR-21 is essential for the functions of Sirt2 in glioma cells. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 to decrease miR-21 expression. -- Abstract: Sirtuins are NAD{sup +}-dependent deacetylases that regulate numerous cellular processes including aging, DNA repair, cell cycle, metabolism, and survival under stress conditions. The roles of sirtuin family members are widely studied in carcinogenesis. However, their roles in glioma remain unclear. Here we report that Sir2 was under expressed in human glioma tissues and cell lines. We found that Sirt2 overexpression decreased cell proliferation and colony formation capacity. In addition, Sirt2 overexpression induced cellular apoptosis via up-regulating cleaved caspase 3 and Bax, and down-regulating anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Sirt2 knockdown obtained opposing results. We showed that Sirt2 overexpression inhibited miR-21 expression, and Sirt2 was not sufficient to reduce cell proliferation and colony formation as well as to induce apoptosis when miR-21 was knocked down in glioma cells. Mechanically, we demonstrated that Sirt2 deacetylated p65 at K310 and blocked p65 binding to the promoter region of miR-21, thus regressing the transcription of miR-21. In summary, Sirt2 is critical in human glioma via NF-κB–miR-21 pathway and Sirt2 activator may serve as candidate drug for glioma therapy.

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Baker's Yeast, suppresses the growth of Ehrlich carcinoma-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Ghoneum, Mamdooh; Badr El-Din, Nariman K; Noaman, Eman; Tolentino, Lucilene

    2008-04-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness and mechanisms of anti-tumor activity of Baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in immunocompetent mice. Swiss albino mice were inoculated intramuscularly in the right thigh with Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma (EAC) cells. At day 8, mice bearing Solid Ehrlich Carcinoma tumor (SEC) were intratumorally (IT) injected with killed S. cerevisiae (10 x 10(6) and 20 x 10(6) cells) for 35 days. Histopathology of yeast-treated mice showed extensive tumor degeneration, apoptosis, and ischemic (coagulative) and liquefactive necrosis. These changes are associated with a tumor growth curve that demonstrates a significant antitumor response that peaked at 35 days. Yeast treatment (20 x 10(6) cells) three times a week resulted in a significant decrease in tumor volume (TV) (67.1%, P < 0.01) as compared to PBS-treated mice. The effect was determined to be dependent on dose and frequency. Yeast administered three and two times per week induced significant decrease in TV as early as 9 and 25 days post-treatment, respectively. Administration of yeast significantly enhanced the recruitment of leukocytes, including macrophages, into the tumors and triggered apoptosis in SEC cells as determined by flow cytometry (78.6%, P < 0.01) at 20 x 10(6) cells, as compared to PBS-treated mice (42.6%). In addition, yeast treatment elevated TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma plasma levels and lowered the elevated IL-10 levels. No adverse side effects from the yeast treatment were observed, including feeding/drinking cycle and life activity patterns. Indeed, yeast-treated mice showed significant final body weight gain (+21.5%, P < 0.01) at day 35. These data may have clinical implications for the treatment of solid cancer with yeast, which is known to be safe for human consumption.

  15. Flood Plain Aggradation Rates Based on Tree-Ring Growth-Suppression Dates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, J. M.

    2003-12-01

    When woody riparian plants are partially buried subsequent tree rings of the buried stems resemble those of roots. Annual rings in a buried stem are narrower and have larger vessels then those in unburied sections of the same stem. We have used this phenomenon to date flood plain sediments exposed in trenches, along two ephemeral streams in New Mexico (Rio Puerco and Chaco Wash) where the sediments are predominantly silt and very fine sand and the plants are predominantly tamarisk and willow. Cross dating down the stem allows dating of the first growth-season following burial by thick beds, and constrains the age of all stratigraphic units deposited since germination of the tree. We observed that the anatomical reaction to burial increases with bed thickness and cumulative deposition. Beds that are thicker than 30 cm can be dated to the year of the deposition event. Beds 10 to 30 cm thick can usually be dated to within several years. The period of deposition of multiple very thin beds can be constrained to the decade. Results can be improved by analyzing multiple stems from one tree and multiple trees linked together by the stratigraphy. Along our study streams, sites far from the channel tend to have moderate and relatively steady point-aggradation rates. Levees next to the channel tend to have the thickest deposits per flood and variable long-term rates, which can differ from the whole flood plain aggradation rates by several fold. Cross-sectionally averaged flood plain aggradation has been as large as a meter per decade along our study streams.

  16. Predictive spatial modeling of narcotic crop growth patterns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waltz, Frederick A.; Moore, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    Spatial models for predicting the geographic distribution of marijuana crops have been developed and are being evaluated for use in law enforcement programs. The models are based on growing condition preferences and on psychological inferences regarding grower behavior. Experiences of local law officials were used to derive the initial model, which was updated and improved as data from crop finds were archived and statistically analyzed. The predictive models are changed as crop locations are moved in response to the pressures of law enforcement. The models use spatial data in a raster geographic information system. The spatial data are derived from the U.S. Geological Survey's US GeoData, standard 7.5-minute topographic quadrangle maps, interpretations of aerial photographs, and thematic maps. Updating of cultural patterns, canopy closure, and other dynamic features is conducted through interpretation of aerial photographs registered to the 7.5-minute quadrangle base. The model is used to numerically weight various data layers that have been processed using spread functions, edge definition, and categorization. The building of the spatial data base, model development, model application, product generation, and use are collectively referred to as the Area Reduction Program (ARP). The goal of ARP is to provide law enforcement officials with tactical maps that show the most likely locations for narcotic crops.

  17. Growth suppression of human hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts by a monoclonal antibody CH12 directed to epidermal growth factor receptor variant III.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hua; Wang, Huamao; Tan, Zhonghua; Hu, Suwen; Wang, Hai; Shi, Bizhi; Yang, Lin; Li, Peiyong; Gu, Jianren; Wang, Hongyang; Li, Zonghai

    2011-02-18

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered difficult to cure because it is resistant to radio- and chemotherapy and has a high recurrence rate after curative liver resection. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) has been reported to express in HCC tissues and cell lines. This article describes the efficacy of an anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody (mAb CH12) in the treatment of HCC xenografts with EGFRvIII expression and the underlying mechanism of EGFRvIII as an oncogene in HCC. The results demonstrated that CH12 bound preferentially to EGFRvIII with a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 1.346 nm/liter. In addition, CH12 induces strong antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity in Huh7-EGFRvIII (with exogenous expression of EGFRvIII) and SMMC-7721 (with endogenous expression of EGFRvIII) cells. Notably, CH12 significantly inhibited the growth of Huh7-EGFRvIII and SMMC-7721 xenografts in vivo with a growth inhibition ratio much higher than C225, a U. S. Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-EGFR antibody. Treatment of the two HCC xenografts with CH12 significantly suppressed tumor proliferation and angiogenesis. Mechanistically, in vivo treatment with CH12 reduced the phosphorylation of constitutively active EGFRvIII, Akt, and ERK. Down-regulation of the apoptotic protectors Bcl-x(L), Bcl-2, and the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, as well as up-regulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p27, were also observed after in vivo CH12 treatment. Collectively, these results indicate that the monoclonal antibody CH12 is a promising therapeutic agent for HCC with EGFRvIII expression.

  18. Growth Suppression of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Xenografts by a Monoclonal Antibody CH12 Directed to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Variant III*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hua; Wang, Huamao; Tan, Zhonghua; Hu, Suwen; Wang, Hai; Shi, Bizhi; Yang, Lin; Li, Peiyong; Gu, Jianren; Wang, Hongyang; Li, Zonghai

    2011-01-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered difficult to cure because it is resistant to radio- and chemotherapy and has a high recurrence rate after curative liver resection. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) has been reported to express in HCC tissues and cell lines. This article describes the efficacy of an anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody (mAb CH12) in the treatment of HCC xenografts with EGFRvIII expression and the underlying mechanism of EGFRvIII as an oncogene in HCC. The results demonstrated that CH12 bound preferentially to EGFRvIII with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.346 nm/liter. In addition, CH12 induces strong antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity in Huh7-EGFRvIII (with exogenous expression of EGFRvIII) and SMMC-7721 (with endogenous expression of EGFRvIII) cells. Notably, CH12 significantly inhibited the growth of Huh7-EGFRvIII and SMMC-7721 xenografts in vivo with a growth inhibition ratio much higher than C225, a U. S. Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-EGFR antibody. Treatment of the two HCC xenografts with CH12 significantly suppressed tumor proliferation and angiogenesis. Mechanistically, in vivo treatment with CH12 reduced the phosphorylation of constitutively active EGFRvIII, Akt, and ERK. Down-regulation of the apoptotic protectors Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, and the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, as well as up-regulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p27, were also observed after in vivo CH12 treatment. Collectively, these results indicate that the monoclonal antibody CH12 is a promising therapeutic agent for HCC with EGFRvIII expression. PMID:21163950

  19. A model for predicting crack growth rate for mixed mode fracture under biaxial loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shliannikov, V. N.; Braude, N. Z.

    1992-09-01

    A model for predicting the crack growth rate of an initially angled crack under biaxial loads of arbitrary direction is suggested. The model is based on a combination of both the Manson-Coffin equation for low cycle fatigue and the Paris equation for fatigue crack propagation. The model takes into consideration the change in material plastic properties in the region around the crack tip due to the stress state, together with the initial orientation of the crack and also its trajectory of growth. Predictions of crack growth rate for any mixed mode fracture is based on the results of uniaxial tension experiments.

  20. Predicting growth of graphene nanostructures using high-fidelity atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Keven F.; Zhou, Xiaowang; Ward, Donald K.; Schultz, Peter A.; Foster, Michael E.; Bartelt, Norman Charles

    2015-09-01

    In this project we developed t he atomistic models needed to predict how graphene grows when carbon is deposited on metal and semiconductor surfaces. We first calculated energies of many carbon configurations using first principles electronic structure calculations and then used these energies to construct an empirical bond order potentials that enable s comprehensive molecular dynamics simulation of growth. We validated our approach by comparing our predictions to experiments of graphene growth on Ir, Cu and Ge. The robustness of ou r understanding of graphene growth will enable high quality graphene to be grown on novel substrates which will expand the number of potential types of graphene electronic devices.

  1. Essays on the predictability of oil shocks and yield curves for real-time output growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlton, Amelie B.

    This dissertation is a collection of three essays that revisits the long-standing puzzle of the apparently disproportionate effect of oil prices in the economy by examining output growth predictability with real-time data. Each study of the predictive content of oil shocks is from a different perspective by using newly developed real-time datasets, which allows for replicating the economic environment faced by policymakers in real time. The first study extends the conventional set of models of output growth determination by investigating predictability of models that incorporate various functional forms of oil prices and real-time data. The results are supportive of the relationship of GDP and oil in the context of Granger causality with real-time data. In the second essay, I use oil shocks to predict the economy is changing direction earlier than would be predicted by solely using initial GDP releases. The model provides compelling evidence of negative GDP growth predictability in response to oil price shocks, which could shorten the "recognition lag" for successful implementation of discretionary counter-cyclical policies. In the third essay, I evaluate short-horizon output growth predictability using real-time data for different sample periods. I find strong evidence of predictability at the one-quarter and four-quarter horizon for the United States. The major result of the paper is that we reject the null hypothesis of no predictability against an alternative hypothesis of predictability with oil shocks that include yield curves in the forecasting regression. This relationship suggests the combination of monetary policy and oil shocks are important for subsequent GDP growth.

  2. Long-term prediction of fish growth under varying ambient temperature using a multiscale dynamic model

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Feed composition has a large impact on the growth of animals, particularly marine fish. We have developed a quantitative dynamic model that can predict the growth and body composition of marine fish for a given feed composition over a timespan of several months. The model takes into consideration the effects of environmental factors, particularly temperature, on growth, and it incorporates detailed kinetics describing the main metabolic processes (protein, lipid, and central metabolism) known to play major roles in growth and body composition. Results For validation, we compared our model's predictions with the results of several experimental studies. We showed that the model gives reliable predictions of growth, nutrient utilization (including amino acid retention), and body composition over a timespan of several months, longer than most of the previously developed predictive models. Conclusion We demonstrate that, despite the difficulties involved, multiscale models in biology can yield reasonable and useful results. The model predictions are reliable over several timescales and in the presence of strong temperature fluctuations, which are crucial factors for modeling marine organism growth. The model provides important improvements over existing models. PMID:19903354

  3. Prediction of competitive microbial growth in mixed culture at dynamic temperature patterns.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Sakha, Mohammad Z

    2014-01-01

    A novel competition model developed with the new logistic model and the Lotka-Volterra model successfully predicted the growth of bacteria in mixed culture using the mesophiles Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella at a constant temperature in our previous studies. In this study, we further studied the prediction of the growth of those bacteria in mixed culture at dynamic temperatures with various initial populations with the competition model. First, we studied the growth kinetics of the species in a monoculture at various constant temperatures ranging from 16℃ to 32℃. With the analyzed data in the monoculture, we then examined the prediction of bacterial growth in mixed culture with two and three species. The growth of the bacteria in the mixed culture at dynamic temperatures was successfully predicted with the model. The residuals between the observed and predicted populations at the data points were <0.5 log at most points, being 83.3% and 84.2% for the two-species mixture and the three-species mixture, respectively. The present study showed that the model could be applied to the competitive growth in mixed culture at dynamic temperature patterns.

  4. A statistical mechanics model to predict electromigration induced damage and void growth in solder interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuexing; Yao, Yao; Keer, Leon M.

    2017-02-01

    Electromigration is an irreversible mass diffusion process with damage accumulation in microelectronic materials and components under high current density. Based on experimental observations, cotton type voids dominate the electromigration damage accumulation prior to cracking in the solder interconnect. To clarify the damage evolution process corresponding to cotton type void growth, a statistical model is proposed to predict the stochastic characteristic of void growth under high current density. An analytical solution of the cotton type void volume growth over time is obtained. The synchronous electromigration induced damage accumulation is predicted by combining the statistical void growth and the entropy increment. The electromigration induced damage evolution in solder joints is developed and applied to verify the tensile strength deterioration of solder joints due to electromigration. The predictions agree well with the experimental results.

  5. Prediction of Toxigenic Fungal Growth in Buildings by Using a Novel Modelling System

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Neil J.; Johnstone, Cameron M.; McLean, R. Craig; Anderson, John G.; Clarke, Joe A.

    1999-01-01

    There is growing concern about the adverse effects of fungal bioaerosols on the occupants of damp dwellings. Based on an extensive analysis of previously published data and on experiments carried out within this study, critical limits for the growth of the indoor fungi Eurotium herbariorum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Stachybotrys chartarum were mathematically described in terms of growth limit curves (isopleths) which define the minimum combination of temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) at which growth will occur. Each growth limit curve was generated from a series of data points on a T-RH plot and mathematically fitted by using a third-order polynomial equation of the form RH = a3T3 + a2T2 + a1T + a0. This fungal growth prediction model was incorporated within the ESP-r (Environmental Systems Performance [r stands for “research”]) computer-based program for transient simulation of the energy and environmental performance of buildings. For any specified location, the ESP-r system is able to predict the time series evolution of local surface temperature and relative humidity, taking explicit account of constructional moisture flow, moisture generation sources, and air movement. This allows the predicted local conditions to be superimposed directly onto fungal growth curves. The concentration of plotted points relative to the curves allows an assessment of the risk of fungal growth. The system’s predictive capability was tested via laboratory experiments and by comparison with monitored data from a fungus-contaminated house. PMID:10543791

  6. Prediction of toxigenic fungal growth in buildings by using a novel modelling system.

    PubMed

    Rowan, N J; Johnstone, C M; McLean, R C; Anderson, J G; Clarke, J A

    1999-11-01

    There is growing concern about the adverse effects of fungal bioaerosols on the occupants of damp dwellings. Based on an extensive analysis of previously published data and on experiments carried out within this study, critical limits for the growth of the indoor fungi Eurotium herbariorum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Stachybotrys chartarum were mathematically described in terms of growth limit curves (isopleths) which define the minimum combination of temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) at which growth will occur. Each growth limit curve was generated from a series of data points on a T-RH plot and mathematically fitted by using a third-order polynomial equation of the form RH = a(3)T(3) + a(2)T(2) + a(1)T + a(0). This fungal growth prediction model was incorporated within the ESP-r (Environmental Systems Performance [r stands for "research"]) computer-based program for transient simulation of the energy and environmental performance of buildings. For any specified location, the ESP-r system is able to predict the time series evolution of local surface temperature and relative humidity, taking explicit account of constructional moisture flow, moisture generation sources, and air movement. This allows the predicted local conditions to be superimposed directly onto fungal growth curves. The concentration of plotted points relative to the curves allows an assessment of the risk of fungal growth. The system's predictive capability was tested via laboratory experiments and by comparison with monitored data from a fungus-contaminated house.

  7. Growth-suppressive effect of the α-amylase inhibitor of Triticum aestivum on stored-product mites varies by the species and type of diet.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Jan; Nesvorna, Marta; Erban, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    A naturally occurring α-amylase inhibitor (α-AI) of Triticum aestivum protects wheat grain from gramnivorous arthropod pests. The α-AI (Type-I) was incorporated into carbohydrate and protein diets to test its inhibitory activity on the stored-product mites Acarus siro, Lepidoglyphus destructor and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Acari: Astigmata). Growth tests of mites fed the various diets were used to compare the suppressive effects. The final population size of mites attained from an initial population of 50 specimens maintained under controlled conditions (85 % relative humidity and 25 °C) was compared after 21 days of cultivation. The results showed that α-AI in the concentration in the range of 0.01-1 mg g(-1) did not suppress the growth of the tested stored-product mites. α-AI at a concentration of 10 mg g(-1) exerted a growth-suppressive effect that depended on the diet and species of the mites. The growth rate of A. siro was affected by the type of diet and was higher on carbohydrate diet than on the protein diet, the suppressive effect of α-AI was on the both diets. The growth-suppressive effect of α-AI on L. destructor and T. putrescentiae was significant when they were fed the protein diet but not when they were fed the carbohydrate diet. The higher resistance of tested mites to α-AI (proteinaceous) compared to non-proteinaceous acarbose corresponds to a powerful proteotolytic system in the mite gut. The results are discussed in terms of the adaptability of mites to utilize the starch from food sources.

  8. Listeria monocytogenes growth dynamics on produce: a review of the available data for predictive modeling.

    PubMed

    Hoelzer, Karin; Pouillot, Régis; Dennis, Sherri

    2012-07-01

    Several listeriosis outbreaks have been linked to the consumption of fresh or processed produce in recent years. One major determinant of the listeriosis risk is the ability of a food to support growth of Listeria monocytogenes during storage. However, data regarding the ability to support growth of L. monocytogenes are scarce or nonexisting for many produce commodities. Here we synthesize the available data regarding growth behavior of L. monocytogenes on produce, compare the growth data with listeriosis outbreak data, and evaluate the adequacy of the data for predictive modeling. Growth rates and maximum L. monocytogenes population densities differed markedly among produce commodities, and post-harvest processing had a considerable effect on growth dynamics for certain commodities such as tomatoes. However, data scarcity prevented reliable estimation of growth rates for many commodities. Produce outbreaks seemed frequently associated with processed produce and often involved storage under suboptimal conditions (e.g., at room temperature for several hours or for several months in the refrigerator) or environmental cross-contamination after processing. However, no clear associations between high growth rates of L. monocytogenes on fresh produce and outbreaks were detected. In conclusion, produce commodities differ in the supported growth rate of L. monocytogenes, the maximum attainable L. monocytogenes population density, and possibly in the impact of post-harvest processing, but data are currently insufficient to predict growth behavior, and the listeriosis risk appears to be also governed by additional factors.

  9. Application of the new logistic model to microbial growth prediction in food.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi

    2011-06-01

    Recently a microbial growth model, the new logistic model, which could precisely describe and predict microbial growth at various patterns of temperature, was developed by the author (Biocontrol Science, 15, 75-80, 2010). The author shows several software programs developed with the model in this review. First, a program that analyzes microbial growth data and generates growth curves fitted to the model was developed. Second, a growth prediction program for Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Vibrio paraheamolyticus [corrected] exposed at various patterns of temperature was made based on experimental data. For V. paraheamolyticus [corrected] a program for bacterial growth under environmental conditions including temperature, salt concentration, and pH was developed. These programs are available free at the Japan Food Industry Center. Furthermore, a method to estimate the temperature at various points on or inside a food exposed to a given temperature was developed by using the measured temperatures of two points on the surface of the food and the heat conduction law. Combining this method with the growth model, a system that predicts microbial growth in a food exposed to various temperature patterns was made. This system could be a prototype of an alert system for microbial food safety.

  10. Expression pattern of immune suppressive cytokines and growth factors in oesophageal adenocarcinoma reveal a tumour immune escape-promoting microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Milano, F; Jorritsma, T; Rygiel, A M; Bergman, J J; Sondermeijer, C; Ten Brinke, A; vanHam, S M; Krishnadath, K K

    2008-12-01

    Immunotherapy for solid cancers, such as oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC), is generally hampered by an unfavourable immunological tumour microenvironment. This prompted us to investigate the nature of the OAC environment. Biopsies of tumour and normal control tissues were collected from 17 OAC patients, and investigated using fluorescent immunohistochemistry (IHC) for the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor-beta, indoleamine 2-3 dioxygenase, CXCL3 and CXCR1, and for measuring a panel of cytokines by cytometric bead array (CBA), and for Granzyme B (GrB), Perforin and PI9 detection by semi-quantitative PCR (QPCR). IHC showed that expression of all the above-mentioned factors is upregulated in 80-93% of the tumours. By QPCR, the cytokine interleukin (IL)-8 was significantly upregulated in tumour samples (P < 0.05). IL-6, IL-10, GrB and Perforin did not show any significant difference between normal and tumour samples, whereas PI9 levels were significantly higher in normal when compared with the tumour samples. CBA confirmed upregulation of IL-8 and show upregulation of IL-1beta in the tumours (P < 0.05). Regarding IL-6 and interferon (IFN)-gamma, no significant differences were observed between normal and tumour tissues. The OAC microenvironment is characterized by a lack of cytokines and factors that normally would enhance anti-cancer responses, such as IFN-gamma and GrB, and by a high expression of several immuno-suppressive factors, such as COX-2, VEGF and IL-8. For future improvement of treatment efficacy of OAC patients, it will be of importance to combine immunotherapy with immune-modulating agents.

  11. Protein tyrosine phosphatase Meg2 dephosphorylates signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and suppresses tumor growth in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is over-activated or phosphorylated in breast cancers. The hyper-phosphorylation of STAT3 was attributed to either up-regulated phosphorylation by several tyrosine-kinases or down-regulated activity of phosphatases. Although several factors have been identified to phosphorylate STAT3, it remains unclear how STAT3 is dephosphorylated by PTPMeg2. The aim of this study was to determine the role of PTPMeg2 as a phosphatase in regulation of the activity of STAT3 in breast cancers. Methods Immunoprecipitation assays were used to study the interaction of STAT3 with PTPMeg2. A series of biochemistry experiments were performed to evaluate the role of PTPMeg2 in the dephosphorylation of STAT3. Two breast cancer cell lines MCF7 (PTPMeg2 was depleted as it was endogenously high) and MDA-MB-231 (PTPMeg2 was overexpressed as it was endogenously low) were used to compare the level of phosphorylated STAT3 and the tumor growth ability in vitro and in vivo. Samples from breast carcinoma (n = 73) were subjected to a pair-wise Pearson correlation analysis for the correlation of levels of PTPMeg2 and phosphorylated STAT3. Results PTPMeg2 directly interacts with STAT3 and mediates its dephosphorylation in the cytoplasm. Over-expression of PTPMeg2 decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 while depletion of PTPMeg2 increased its phosphorylation. The decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 is coupled with suppression of STAT3 transcriptional activity and reduced tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Levels of PTPMeg2 and phosphorylated STAT3 were inversely correlated in breast cancer tissues (P = 0.004). Conclusions PTPMeg2 is an important phosphatase for the dephosphorylation of STAT3 and plays a critical role in breast cancer development. PMID:22394684

  12. Growth of Murine Splenic Tissue Is Suppressed by Lymphotoxin β-Receptor Signaling (LTβR) Originating from Splenic and Non-Splenic Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Friederike; Schmidt, Hendrik; Ringer, Cornelia; Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Milićević, Živana; Westermann, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Development and maintenance of secondary lymphoid organs such as lymph nodes and spleen essentially depend on lymphotoxin β-receptor (LTβR) signaling. It is unclear, however, by which molecular mechanism their size is limited. Here, we investigate whether the LTβR pathway is also growth suppressing. By using splenic tissue transplantation it is possible to analyze a potential contribution of LTβR signaling inside and outside of the implanted tissue. We show that LTβR signaling within the endogenous spleen and within non-splenic tissues both significantly suppressed the regeneration of implanted splenic tissue. The suppressive activity positively correlated with the total number of LTβR expressing cells in the animal (regenerate weights of 115 ± 8 mg in LTβR deficient recipients and of 12 ± 9 mg in wild-type recipients), affected also developed splenic tissue, and was induced but not executed via LTβR signaling. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and subsequent mass spectrometry of stromal splenic tissue was applied to screen for potential factors mediating the LTβR dependent suppressive activity. Thus, LTβR dependent growth suppression is involved in regulating the size of secondary lymphoid organs, and might be therapeutically used to eradicate tertiary lymphoid tissues during autoimmune diseases. PMID:27936003

  13. Docosapentaenoic acid (22:5, n-3) suppressed tube-forming activity in endothelial cells induced by vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Masako; Murota, Se-itsu; Morita, Ikuo

    2003-05-01

    It is generally accepted that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have beneficial effects on vascular homeostasis. Among the several functions of endothelial cells, angiogenesis contributes to tumor growth, inflammation, and microangiopathy. We have already demonstrated that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5, n-3) suppressed angiogenesis. In this paper, we examined the effect of docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5, n-3), an elongated metabolite of EPA, on tube-forming activity in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAE cells) incubated between type I collagen gels. The pretreatment of BAE cells with DPA suppressed tube-forming activity induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The effect of DPA was stronger than those of EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6, n-3). The migrating activity of endothelial cells stimulated with VEGF was also suppressed by DPA pretreatment. The treatment of BAE cells with DPA caused the suppression of VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2, the kinase insert domain-containing receptor, KDR) expression in both plastic dish and collagen gel cultures. These data indicate that DPA has a potent inhibitory effect on angiogenesis through the suppression of VEGFR-2 expression.

  14. Development of novel FePt/nanodiamond hybrid nanostructures: L10 phase size-growth suppression and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douvalis, A. P.; Bourlinos, A. B.; Tucek, J.; Čépe, K.; Bakas, T.; Zboril, R.

    2016-05-01

    A new type of hybrid nanomaterial composed of magnetic FePt nanoparticles grown on the surface of nanodiamond nanotemplate assemblies is described for the first time. Post annealing in vacuum of the as-made nanomaterial bearing cubic A1 soft magnetic FePt nanoparticles leads to the development of FePt nanoparticles with tetragonal L10 hard, magnetic-phase characteristics, leaving untouched the nanodiamond nanotemplate assemblies. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy including chemical mapping (HRTEM/HAADF), magnetization measurements, and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy data show that the magnetic FePt nanoparticles, with average sizes of 3 and 8 nm in the as-made and annealed hybrids, respectively, are homogenously distributed within the nanodiamond template in both nanomaterials. As a consequence, their structural, morphological, and magnetic properties differ significantly from the corresponding properties of the nonsupported (free) as-made and annealed FePt nanoparticles with average sizes of 6 and 32 nm, respectively, developed by the same methods. This spatial isolation suppresses the size-growth of the FePt nanoparticles during the post-annealing procedure, triggering superparamagnetic relaxation phenomena, which are exposed as a combination of hard and soft magnetic-phase characteristics.

  15. Human serum albumin-mediated apoptin delivery suppresses breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fang; Liu, Yizhi; Li, Jian; Hou, Lei; Lei, Fuxi; Huang, Shangke; Feng, Lu; Zhao, Xinhan

    2017-01-01

    Gene therapy is one of the most promising potential therapeutic strategies for many types of cancer. Cell apoptosis is an active, programmed physiological process of the body, and its disruption has been closely associated with the occurrence of tumor development. Apoptin is known to induce tumor cell apoptosis. In the present study, the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line was transfected with a human serum albumin (HSA) and apoptin expressing plasmid [HSA-polyethylenimine (PEI)-pcDNA-Apoptin]. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were performed to detect the expression of apoptin in the transfected MCF-7 cells, while MTT assays and flow cytometry were conducted to detect cell viability and apoptosis. Furthermore, hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to observe the morphology of xenografts from mice injected with MCF-7 cells. It was demonstrated that the HSA-PEI-pcDNA-Apoptin expression plasmid resulted in the upregulation of apoptin in MCF-7 cells, and efficiently suppressed breast tumor growth in vivo. These findings indicated that the use of HSA as an apoptin expression vector has potential therapeutic benefits for cancer and confirms the requirement for the further evaluation of apoptin in clinical trials.

  16. miR-1207-5p suppresses lung cancer growth and metastasis by targeting CSF1

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Songqing; Wen, Qiuyuan; Lu, Yuanjun; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Xuemei; Wei, Lingyu; He, Wei; Ye, Qiurong; Yan, Qun; Li, Guiyuan; Ma, Jian

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that miR-1207-5p can inhibit epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induced by growth factors such as EGF and TGF-β, but the exact mechanism is unclear. Here we identified that Colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) is a target gene of miR-1207-5p. CSF1 controls the production, differentiation and function of macrophage and promotes the release of proinflammatory chemokines. We showed that miR-1207-5p inhibited lung cancer cell A549 proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro, and suppressed the STAT3 and AKT signalings. miR-1207-5p overexpression can increase HUVEC angiogenesis, and can modulate the M2 phenotype of macrophage. miR-1207-5p also significantly inhibited A549 cells metastasis in a nude mouse xenograft model. miR-1207-5p and CSF1 expression levels and their relationship with lung cancer survival and metastasis status were assayed by means of a lung cancer tissue microarray. Macrophage is an essential part of the tumor microenvironment, thus the miR-1207-5p-CSF1 axis maybe a new regulator of lung cancer development through modulating the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27107415

  17. Andrographolide inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor-1 through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT pathway and suppresses breast cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Hongchuan; Cheng, Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a master regulator of the transcriptional response to hypoxia. HIF-1α is one of the most compelling anticancer targets. Andrographolide (Andro) was newly identified to inhibit HIF-1 in T47D cells (a half maximal effective concentration [EC50] of 1.03×10−7 mol/L), by a dual-luciferase reporter assay. It suppressed HIF-1α protein and gene accumulation, which was dependent on the inhibition of upstream phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway. It also abrogated the expression of HIF-1 target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene and protein. Further, Andro inhibited T47D and MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation and colony formation. In addition, it exhibited significant in vivo efficacy and antitumor potential against the MDA-MB-231 xenograft in nude mice. In conclusion, these results highlighted the potential effects of Andro, which inhibits HIF-1, and hence may be developed as an antitumor agent for breast cancer therapy in future. PMID:25709476

  18. Tumor growth suppression by gadolinium-neutron capture therapy using gadolinium-entrapped liposome as gadolinium delivery agent.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Novriana; Yanagie, Hironobu; Zhu, Haito; Demachi, Kazuyuki; Shinohara, Atsuko; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Sekino, Masaki; Sakurai, Yuriko; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Iyomoto, Naoko; Nagasaki, Takeshi; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Nagasaki, Yukio; Nakajima, Jun; Ono, Minoru; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    Neutron capture therapy (NCT) is a promising non-invasive cancer therapy approach and some recent NCT research has focused on using compounds containing gadolinium as an alternative to currently used boron-10 considering several advantages that gadolinium offers compared to those of boron. In this study, we evaluated gadolinium-entrapped liposome compound as neutron capture therapy agent by in vivo experiment on colon-26 tumor-bearing mice. Gadolinium compound were injected intravenously via tail vein and allowed to accumulate into tumor site. Tumor samples were taken for quantitative analysis by ICP-MS at 2, 12, and 24 h after gadolinium compound injection. Highest gadolinium concentration was observed at about 2 h after gadolinium compound injection with an average of 40.3 μg/g of wet tumor tissue. We performed neutron irradiation at JRR-4 reactor facility of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in Tokaimura with average neutron fluence of 2×10¹² n/cm². The experimental results showed that the tumor growth suppression of gadolinium-injected irradiated group was revealed until about four times higher compared to the control group, and no significant weight loss were observed after treatment suggesting low systemic toxicity of this compound. The gadolinium-entrapped liposome will become one of the candidates for Gd delivery system on NCT.

  19. Curcumin Inhibits Gastric Carcinoma Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis by Suppressing the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ruzhen; Deng, Qinghua; Liu, Yuehua; Zhao, Pengjun

    2017-01-01

    Background Curcumin has well-known, explicit biological anti-tumor properties. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays a central role in tumor cell proliferation and curcumin can regulate the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway of several carcinomas. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of curcumin on the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in human gastric cancer cells. Material/Methods We used 3 gastric cancer cell lines: SNU-1, SNU-5, and AGS. Research methods used were MTT assay, flow cytometry, clonogenic assay, annexin V/PI method, Western blotting analysis, tumor formation assay, and in vivo in the TUNEL assay. Results Curcumin markedly impaired tumor cell viability and induced apoptosis in vitro. Curcumin significantly suppressed the levels of Wnt3a, LRP6, phospho-LRP6, β-catenin, phospho-β-catenin, C-myc, and survivin. Xenograft growth in vivo was inhibited and the target genes of Wnt/β-catenin signaling were also reduced by curcumin treatment. Conclusions Curcumin exerts anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effect in gastric cancer cells and in a xenograft model. Inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and the subsequently reduced expression of Wnt target genes show potential as a newly-identified molecular mechanism of curcumin treatment. PMID:28077837

  20. Antroquinonol Targets FAK-Signaling Pathway Suppressed Cell Migration, Invasion, and Tumor Growth of C6 Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Thiyagarajan, Varadharajan; Tsai, May-Jywan; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor protein tyrosine that is overexpressed in many types of tumors and plays a pivotal role in multiple cell signaling pathways involved in cell survival, migration, and proliferation. This study attempts to determine the effect of synthesized antroquinonol on the modulation of FAK signaling pathways and explore their underlying mechanisms. Antroquinonol significantly inhibits cell viability with an MTT assay in both N18 neuroblastoma and C6 glioma cell lines, which exhibits sub G1 phase cell cycle, and further induction of apoptosis is confirmed by a TUNEL assay. Antroquinonol decreases anti-apoptotic proteins, whereas it increases p53 and pro-apoptotic proteins. Alterations of cell morphology are observed after treatment by atomic force microscopy. Molecular docking results reveal that antroquinonol has an H-bond with the Arg 86 residue of FAK. The protein levels of Src, pSrc, FAK, pFAK, Rac1, and cdc42 are decreased after antroquinonol treatment. Additionally, antroquinonol also regulates the expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) proteins. Furthermore, antroquinonol suppresses the C6 glioma growth in xenograft studies. Together, these results suggest that antroquinonol is a potential anti-tumorigenesis and anti-metastasis inhibitor of FAK. PMID:26517117

  1. A polysaccharide from Lentinus edodes inhibits human colon cancer cell proliferation and suppresses tumor growth in athymic nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinglin; Li, Weiyong; Huang, Xiao; Liu, Ying; Li, Qiang; Zheng, Ziming; Wang, Kaiping

    2017-01-01

    The antitumor effect of Lentinan is thought rely on the activation of immune responses; however, little is known about whether Lentinan also directly attacks cancer cells. We therefore investigated the direct antitumor activity of SLNT (a water-extracted polysaccharide from Lentinus edodes) and its probable mechanism. We showed that SLNT significantly inhibited proliferation of HT-29 colon cancer cells and suppressed tumor growth in nude mice. Annxein V-FITC/PI, DAPI, AO/EB and H&E staining assays all showed that SLNT induced cell apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. SLNT induced apoptosis by activating Caspase-3 via both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, which presented as the activation of Caspases-9 and -8, upregulation of cytochrome c and the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, downregulation of NF-κB, and overproduction of ROS and TNF-α in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment with the caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO or antioxidant NAC blocked SLNT-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that SLNT exerts direct antitumor effects by inducing cell apoptosis via ROS-mediated intrinsic and TNF-α-mediated extrinsic pathways. SLNT may thus represent a useful candidate for colon cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:27888812

  2. Gallotannin imposes S phase arrest in breast cancer cells and suppresses the growth of triple-negative tumors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tiejun; Sun, Qiang; del Rincon, Sonia V; Lovato, Amanda; Marques, Maud; Witcher, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers are associated with poor clinical outcomes and new therapeutic strategies are clearly needed. Gallotannin (Gltn) has been previously demonstrated to have potent anti-tumor properties against cholangiocarcinoma in mice, but little is known regarding its capacity to suppress tumor outgrowth in breast cancer models. We tested Gltn for potential growth inhibitory properties against a variety of breast cancer cell lines in vitro. In particular, triple-negative breast cancer cells display higher levels of sensitivity to Gltn. The loss of proliferative capacity in Gltn exposed cells is associated with slowed cell cycle progression and S phase arrest, dependent on Chk2 phosphorylation and further characterized by changes to proliferation related genes, such as cyclin D1 (CcnD1) as determined by Nanostring technology. Importantly, Gltn administered orally or via intraperitoneal (IP) injections greatly reduced tumor outgrowth of triple-negative breast cells from mammary fat pads without signs of toxicity. In conclusion, these data strongly suggest that Gltn represents a novel approach to treat triple-negative breast carcinomas.

  3. Nutritional and supranutritional levels of selenate differentially suppress prostate tumor growth in adult but not young nude mice.

    PubMed

    Holmstrom, Alexandra; Wu, Ryan T Y; Zeng, Huawei; Lei, K Y; Cheng, Wen-Hsing

    2012-09-01

    The inhibitory effect of oral methylseleninic acid or methylselenocysteine administration on cancer cell xenograft development in nude mice is well characterized; however, less is known about the efficacy of selenate and age on selenium chemoprevention. In this study, we tested whether selenate and duration on diets would regulate prostate cancer xenograft in nude mice. Thirty-nine homozygous NU/J nude mice were fed a selenium-deficient, Torula yeast basal diet alone (Se-) or supplemented with 0.15 (Se) or 1.0 (Se+) mg selenium/kg (as Na₂SeO₄) for 6 months in Experiment 1 and for 4 weeks in Experiment 2, followed by a 47-day PC-3 prostate cancer cell xenograft on the designated diet. In Experiment 1, the Se- diet enhanced the initial tumor development on days 11-17, whereas the Se+ diet suppressed tumor growth on days 35-47 in adult nude mice. Tumors grown in Se- mice were loosely packed and showed increased necrosis and inflammation as compared to those in Se and Se+ mice. In Experiment 2, dietary selenium did not affect tumor development or histopathology throughout the time course. In both experiments, postmortem plasma selenium concentrations in Se and Se+ mice were comparable and were twofold greater than those in Se- mice. Taken together, dietary selenate at nutritional and supranutritional levels differentially inhibit tumor development in adult, but not young, nude mice engrafted with PC-3 prostate cancer cells.

  4. The Growth of SGC-7901 Tumor Xenografts Was Suppressed by Chinese Bayberry Anthocyanin Extract through Upregulating KLF6 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Zhang, Xia-nan; Xie, Wen-hua; Zheng, Yi-xiong; Cao, Jin-ping; Cao, Pei-rang; Chen, Qing-jun; Li, Xian; Sun, Chong-de

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the antitumor effect of anthocyanins extracted from Chinese bayberry fruit (Myrica rubra Sieb. et Zucc.), a nude mouse tumor xenograft model was established. Treatments with C3G (cyanidin-3-glucoside, an anthocyanin) significantly suppressed the growth of SGC-7901 tumor xenografts in a dose-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical staining showed a significant increase in p21 expression, indicating that the cell cycle of tumor xenografts was inhibited. qPCR screening showed that C3G treatment up-regulated the expression of the KLF6 gene, which is an important tumor suppressor gene inactivated in many human cancers. Western blot showed that C3G treatments markedly increased KLF6 and p21 protein levels, inhibited CDK4 and Cyclin D1 expression, but did not notably change the expression of p53. These results indicated that KLF6 up-regulates p21 in a p53-independent manner and significantly reduces tumor proliferation. This study provides important information for the possible mechanism of C3G-induced antitumor activity against gastric adenocarcinoma in vivo. PMID:27690088

  5. Coptisine from Rhizoma Coptidis Suppresses HCT-116 Cells-related Tumor Growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Xiao, Yubo; Yi, Lin; Li, Ling; Wang, Meimei; Tian, Cheng; Ma, Hang; He, Kai; Wang, Yue; Han, Bing; Ye, Xiaoli; Li, Xuegang

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death in humans. Coptisine (COP) is a natural alkaloid from Coptidis Rhizoma with unclear antitumor mechanism. Human colon cancer cells (HCT-116) and xenograft mice were used to systematically explore the anti-tumor activity of COP in this study. The results indicated that COP exhibited remarkably cytotoxic activities against the HCT-116 cells by inducing G1-phase cell cycle arrest and increasing apoptosis, and preferentially inhibited the survival pathway and induced the activation of caspase proteases family of HCT-116 cells. Experimental results on male BALB/c nude mice confirmed that orally administration of COP at high-dose (150 mg/kg) could suppress tumor growth, and may reduce cancer metastasis risk by inhibiting the RAS-ERK pathway in vivo. Taken together, the results suggested that COP may be potential as a novel anti-tumor candidate in the HCT-116 cells-related colon cancer, further studies are still needed to suggest COP for the further use. PMID:28165459

  6. Systemic Cytokine Levels Do Not Predict CD4+ T-Cell Recovery After Suppressive Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Philip J.; Zhang, Jinbing; Worlock, Andrew; Nair, Sangeetha V.; Anastos, Kathryn; Minkoff, Howard L.; Villacres, Maria C.; Young, Mary; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Desai, Seema; Landay, Alan L.; Gange, Stephen J.; Nugent, C. Thomas; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Keating, Sheila M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Subjects on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) who do not achieve robust reconstitution of CD4+ T cells face higher risk of complications and death. We studied participants in the Women's Interagency HIV Study with good (immunological responder [IR]) or poor (immunological nonresponder [INR]) CD4+ T-cell recovery after suppressive cART (n = 50 per group) to determine whether cytokine levels or low-level viral load correlated with INR status. Methods. A baseline sample prior to viral control and 2 subsequent samples 1 and 2 years after viral control were tested. Serum levels of 30 cytokines were measured at each time point, and low-level human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral load and anti-HIV antibody levels were measured 2 years after viral suppression. Results. There were minimal differences in cytokine levels between IR and INR subjects. At baseline, macrophage inflammatory protein-3β levels were higher in IR subjects; after 1 year of suppressive cART, soluble vascular endothelial growth factor-R3 levels were higher in IR subjects; and after 2 years of suppressive cART, interferon gamma-induced protein 10 levels were higher in INR subjects. Very low-level HIV viral load and anti-HIV antibody levels did not differ between IR and INR subjects. Conclusions. These results imply that targeting residual viral replication might not be the optimum therapeutic approach for INR subjects. PMID:26966697

  7. Suppression of β-catenin/TCF transcriptional activity and colon tumor cell growth by dual inhibition of PDE5 and 10.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Bing; Ramírez-Alcántara, Verónica; Canzoneri, Joshua C; Lee, Kevin; Sigler, Sara; Gary, Bernard; Li, Yonghe; Zhang, Wei; Moyer, Mary P; Salter, E Alan; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Keeton, Adam B; Piazza, Gary A

    2015-09-29

    Previous studies suggest the anti-inflammatory drug, sulindac inhibits tumorigenesis by a COX independent mechanism involving cGMP PDE inhibition. Here we report that the cGMP PDE isozymes, PDE5 and 10, are elevated in colon tumor cells compared with normal colonocytes, and that inhibitors and siRNAs can selectively suppress colon tumor cell growth. Combined treatment with inhibitors or dual knockdown suppresses tumor cell growth to a greater extent than inhibition from either isozyme alone. A novel sulindac derivative, ADT-094 was designed to lack COX-1/-2 inhibitory activity but have improved potency to inhibit PDE5 and 10. ADT-094 displayed >500 fold higher potency to inhibit colon tumor cell growth compared with sulindac by activating cGMP/PKG signaling to suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis. Combined inhibition of PDE5 and 10 by treatment with ADT-094, PDE isozyme-selective inhibitors, or by siRNA knockdown also suppresses β-catenin, TCF transcriptional activity, and the levels of downstream targets, cyclin D1 and survivin. These results suggest that dual inhibition of PDE5 and 10 represents novel strategy for developing potent and selective anticancer drugs.

  8. Suppression of β-catenin/TCF transcriptional activity and colon tumor cell growth by dual inhibition of PDE5 and 10

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Bing; Ramírez-Alcántara, Verónica; Canzoneri, Joshua C.; Lee, Kevin; Sigler, Sara; Gary, Bernard; Li, Yonghe; Zhang, Wei; Moyer, Mary P.; Salter, E. Alan; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Keeton, Adam B.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies suggest the anti-inflammatory drug, sulindac inhibits tumorigenesis by a COX independent mechanism involving cGMP PDE inhibition. Here we report that the cGMP PDE isozymes, PDE5 and 10, are elevated in colon tumor cells compared with normal colonocytes, and that inhibitors and siRNAs can selectively suppress colon tumor cell growth. Combined treatment with inhibitors or dual knockdown suppresses tumor cell growth to a greater extent than inhibition from either isozyme alone. A novel sulindac derivative, ADT-094 was designed to lack COX-1/-2 inhibitory activity but have improved potency to inhibit PDE5 and 10. ADT-094 displayed >500 fold higher potency to inhibit colon tumor cell growth compared with sulindac by activating cGMP/PKG signaling to suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis. Combined inhibition of PDE5 and 10 by treatment with ADT-094, PDE isozyme-selective inhibitors, or by siRNA knockdown also suppresses β-catenin, TCF transcriptional activity, and the levels of downstream targets, cyclin D1 and survivin. These results suggest that dual inhibition of PDE5 and 10 represents novel strategy for developing potent and selective anticancer drugs. PMID:26299804

  9. ψ-Bufarenogin, a novel anti-tumor compound, suppresses liver cancer growth by inhibiting receptor tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Peipei; Liu, Yanfang; Liu, Chang; He, Guoping; Cheng, Zhuo; Yin, Jianpeng; Sheng, Chunquan; Zhang, Wen; Nan, Fajun; Ye, Wencai; Zhang, Xiuli; Wang, Hongyang

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to existing chemotherapeutic agents largely contributes to the poor prognosis of patients, and discovery of novel anti-HCC drug is in an urgent need. Herein we report ψ-Bufarenogin, a novel active compound that we isolated from the extract of toad skin, exhibited potent therapeutic effect in xenografted human hepatoma without notable side effects. In vitro, ψ-Bufarenogin suppressed HCC cells proliferation through impeding cell cycle progression, and it facilitated cell apoptosis by downregulating Mcl-1 expression. Moreover, ψ-Bufarenogin decreased the number of hepatoma stem cells through Sox2 depression and exhibited synergistic effect with conventional chemotherapeutics. Mechanistic study revealed that ψ-Bufarenogin impaired the activation of MEK/ERK pathway, which is essential in the proliferation of hepatoma cells. ψ-Bufarenogin notably suppressed PI3-K/Akt cascade, which was required in ψ-Bufarenogin-mediated reduction of Mcl-1 and Sox2. ψ-Bufarenogin inhibited the auto-phosphorylation and activation of epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) and hepatocyte growth factor receptor (c-Met), thereafter suppressed their primary downstream cascades Raf/MEK/ERK and PI3-K/Akt signaling. Taken together, ψ-Bufarenogin suppressed HCC growth via inhibiting, at least partially, receptor tyrosine kinases-regulated signaling, suggesting that ψ-Bufarenogin could be a novel lead compound for anti-HCC drug. PMID:25890498

  10. Isolation, characterization, and evaluation of multi-trait plant growth promoting rhizobacteria for their growth promoting and disease suppressing effects on ginger.

    PubMed

    Dinesh, Raghavan; Anandaraj, Muthuswamy; Kumar, Aundy; Bini, Yogiyar Kundil; Subila, Kizhakke Purayil; Aravind, Ravindran

    2015-04-01

    In this study, 100 PGPR strains isolated from different varieties of ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) were first characterized for their morphological, biochemical, and nutrient mobilization traits in vitro. The PGPR were also screened in vitro for inhibition of Pythium myriotylum causing soft rot in ginger. Results revealed that only five PGPR showed >70% suppression of P. myriotylum. These 5 PGPR viz., GRB (Ginger rhizobacteria) 25--Burkholderia cepacia, GRB35--Bacillus amyloliquefaciens; GRB58--Serratia marcescens; GRB68--S. marcescens; GRB91--Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used for further growth promotion and biocontrol studies in the green house and field. The green house study revealed that GRB35 (B. amyloliquefaciens) and GRB68 (S. marcescens) registered markedly higher sprouting (96.3%) and lower disease incidence (48.1%) and greater rhizome yield (365.6 g pot(-1) and 384.4 g pot(-1), respectively), while control registered the lowest sprouting (66%), maximum soft rot incidence (100%) and lowest rhizome yield (134.4 g pot(-1)). In the field experiments also, GRB68 (S. marcescens) and GRB35 (B. amyloliquefaciens) registered the greatest sprouting (80% each), markedly lower soft rot incidence (5.2% and 7.3%, respectively) and higher yield (5.0 and 4.3 kg(3)m(-2), respectively) compared to chemicals like Streptomycin sulphate (73.0%, 18.5% and 2.3 kg(3)m(-2), respectively), Metalaxyl-Mancozeb (73.0%, 14.0% and 3.8 kg(3)m(-2), respectively) and control (73.0%, 25.1% and 2.2 kg 3m(-2), respectively). Overall, the results suggested that for growth promotion and management of soft rot disease in ginger, GRB35 B. amyloliquefaciens and GRB68 S. marcescens could be good alternatives to chemical measures. Since, the latter has been reported to be an opportunistic human pathogen, we recommend the use of B. amyloliquefaciens for integration into nutrient and disease management schedules for ginger cultivation.

  11. Hinokitiol inhibits cell growth through induction of S-phase arrest and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells and suppresses tumor growth in a mouse xenograft experiment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youn-Sun; Choi, Kyeong-Mi; Kim, Wonkyun; Jeon, Young-Soo; Lee, Yong-Moon; Hong, Jin-Tae; Yun, Yeo-Pyo; Yoo, Hwan-Soo

    2013-12-27

    Hinokitiol (1), a tropolone-related natural compound, induces apoptosis and has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antitumor activities. In this study, the inhibitory effects of 1 were investigated on human colon cancer cell growth and tumor formation of xenograft mice. HCT-116 and SW-620 cells derived from human colon cancers were found to be similarly susceptible to 1, with IC50 values of 4.5 and 4.4 μM, respectively. Compound 1 induced S-phase arrest in the cell cycle progression and decreased the expression levels of cyclin A, cyclin E, and Cdk2. Conversely, 1 increased the expression of p21, a Cdk inhibitor. Compound 1 decreased Bcl-2 expression and increased the expression of Bax, and cleaved caspase-9 and -3. The effect of 1 on tumor formation when administered orally was evaluated in male BALB/c-nude mice implanted intradermally separately with HCT-116 and SW-620 cells. Tumor volumes and tumor weights in the mice treated with 1 (100 mg/kg) were decreased in both cases. These results suggest that the suppression of tumor formation by compound 1 in human colon cancer may occur through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  12. Suppression subtractive hybridization profiles of radial growth phase and metastatic melanoma cell lines reveal novel potential targets

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Josane F; Espreafico, Enilza M

    2008-01-01

    Background Melanoma progression occurs through three major stages: radial growth phase (RGP), confined to the epidermis; vertical growth phase (VGP), when the tumor has invaded into the dermis; and metastasis. In this work, we used suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to investigate the molecular signature of melanoma progression, by comparing a group of metastatic cell lines with an RGP-like cell line showing characteristics of early neoplastic lesions including expression of the metastasis suppressor KISS1, lack of αvβ3-integrin and low levels of RHOC. Methods Two subtracted cDNA collections were obtained, one (RGP library) by subtracting the RGP cell line (WM1552C) cDNA from a cDNA pool from four metastatic cell lines (WM9, WM852, 1205Lu and WM1617), and the other (Met library) by the reverse subtraction. Clones were sequenced and annotated, and expression validation was done by Northern blot and RT-PCR. Gene Ontology annotation and searches in large-scale melanoma expression studies were done for the genes identified. Results We identified 367 clones from the RGP library and 386 from the Met library, of which 351 and 368, respectively, match human mRNA sequences, representing 288 and 217 annotated genes. We confirmed the differential expression of all genes selected for validation. In the Met library, we found an enrichment of genes in the growth factors/receptor, adhesion and motility categories whereas in the RGP library, enriched categories were nucleotide biosynthesis, DNA packing/repair, and macromolecular/vesicular trafficking. Interestingly, 19% of the genes from the RGP library map to chromosome 1 against 4% of the ones from Met library. Conclusion This study identifies two populations of genes differentially expressed between melanoma cell lines from two tumor stages and suggests that these sets of genes represent profiles of less aggressive versus metastatic melanomas. A search for expression profiles of melanoma in available expression study

  13. A hyperspectral image can predict tropical tree growth rates in single-species stands.

    PubMed

    Caughlin, T Trevor; Graves, Sarah J; Asner, Gregory P; van Breugel, Michiel; Hall, Jefferson S; Martin, Roberta E; Ashton, Mark S; Bohlman, Stephanie A

    2016-12-01

    Remote sensing is increasingly needed to meet the critical demand for estimates of forest structure and composition at landscape to continental scales. Hyperspectral images can detect tree canopy properties, including species identity, leaf chemistry and disease. Tree growth rates are related to these measurable canopy properties but whether growth can be directly predicted from hyperspectral data remains unknown. We used a single hyperspectral image and light detection and ranging-derived elevation to predict growth rates for 20 tropical tree species planted in experimental plots. We asked whether a consistent relationship between spectral data and growth rates exists across all species and which spectral regions, associated with different canopy chemical and structural properties, are important for predicting growth rates. We found that a linear combination of narrowband indices and elevation is correlated with standardized growth rates across all 20 tree species (R(2)  = 53.70%). Although wavelengths from the entire visible-to-shortwave infrared spectrum were involved in our analysis, results point to relatively greater importance of visible and near-infrared regions for relating canopy reflectance to tree growth data. Overall, we demonstrate the potential for hyperspectral data to quantify tree demography over a much larger area than possible with field-based methods in forest inventory plots.

  14. Crack Growth Modeling and Life Prediction of Pipeline Steels Exposed to Near-Neutral pH Environments: Stage II Crack Growth and Overall Life Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiaxi; Chen, Weixing; Yu, Mengshan; Chevil, Karina; Eadie, Reg; Been, Jenny; Van Boven, Greg; Kania, Richard; Keane, Sean

    2017-04-01

    This investigation was initiated to provide governing equations for crack initiation, crack growth, and service life prediction of pipeline steels in near-neutral pH (NNpH) environments. This investigation develops a predictive model considering loading interactions occurring during oil and gas pipeline operation with underload-type variable pressure fluctuations. This method has predicted lifetimes comparable to the actual service lives found in the field. This is in sharp contrast with the predictions made by existing methods that are either conservative or inconsistent with the field observations. It has been demonstrated that large slash loads ( R-ratio is 0.05), often seen during gas pipeline operation, are a major life-limiting factor and should be avoided where possible. Oil pipelines have shorter lifetime because of their more frequent pressure fluctuations and larger amplitude load cycles. The accuracy of prediction can be improved if pressure data with appropriate sampling intervals are used. The sampling interval error is much larger in the prediction of oil pipelines than gas pipelines because of their different compressibility but is minimized if the pressure sampling rate for the data is at or less than one minute.

  15. Crack Growth Modeling and Life Prediction of Pipeline Steels Exposed to Near-Neutral pH Environments: Stage II Crack Growth and Overall Life Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiaxi; Chen, Weixing; Yu, Mengshan; Chevil, Karina; Eadie, Reg; Been, Jenny; Van Boven, Greg; Kania, Richard; Keane, Sean

    2017-01-01

    This investigation was initiated to provide governing equations for crack initiation, crack growth, and service life prediction of pipeline steels in near-neutral pH (NNpH) environments. This investigation develops a predictive model considering loading interactions occurring during oil and gas pipeline operation with underload-type variable pressure fluctuations. This method has predicted lifetimes comparable to the actual service lives found in the field. This is in sharp contrast with the predictions made by existing methods that are either conservative or inconsistent with the field observations. It has been demonstrated that large slash loads (R-ratio is 0.05), often seen during gas pipeline operation, are a major life-limiting factor and should be avoided where possible. Oil pipelines have shorter lifetime because of their more frequent pressure fluctuations and larger amplitude load cycles. The accuracy of prediction can be improved if pressure data with appropriate sampling intervals are used. The sampling interval error is much larger in the prediction of oil pipelines than gas pipelines because of their different compressibility but is minimized if the pressure sampling rate for the data is at or less than one minute.

  16. Finite element models for predicting crack growth characteristics in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buczek, M. B.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1982-01-01

    Two dimensional and quasi-three dimensional, linear elastic finite element models for the prediction of crack growth characteristics, including crack growth direction, in laminated composite materials are presented. Mixed mode crack growth in isotropic materials, unidirectional and laminated composites is considered. The modified crack closure method is used to predict the applied load level for crack extension and two failure theories, modifications of the point stress and the Hashin failure criteria, are proposed to predict the direction of crack extension in composites. Comparisons are made with the Tsai-Wu failure criterion and the Sih strain energy density criterion as well as with experimental results. It is shown that the modified versions of point stress and Hashin criteria compare well with experiment.

  17. Discrete Spring Model for Predicting Delamination Growth in Z-Fiber Reinforced DCB Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; OBrien, T. Kevin

    2004-01-01

    Beam theory analysis was applied to predict delamination growth in Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimens reinforced in the thickness direction with pultruded pins, known as Z-fibers. The specimen arms were modeled as cantilever beams supported by discrete springs, which were included to represent the pins. A bi-linear, irreversible damage law was used to represent Z-fiber damage, the parameters of which were obtained from previous experiments. Closed-form solutions were developed for specimen compliance and displacements corresponding to Z-fiber row locations. A solution strategy was formulated to predict delamination growth, in which the parent laminate mode I critical strain energy release rate was used as the criterion for delamination growth. The solution procedure was coded into FORTRAN 90, giving a dedicated software tool for performing the delamination prediction. Comparison of analysis results with previous analysis and experiment showed good agreement, yielding an initial verification for the analytical procedure.

  18. Discrete Spring Model for Predicting Delamination Growth in Z-Fiber Reinforced DCB Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; O'Brien, T. Kevin

    2004-01-01

    Beam theory analysis was applied to predict delamination growth in DCB specimens reinforced in the thickness direction with pultruded pins, known as Z-fibers. The specimen arms were modeled as cantilever beams supported by discrete springs, which were included to represent the pins. A bi-linear, irreversible damage law was used to represent Z-fiber damage, the parameters of which were obtained from previous experiments. Closed-form solutions were developed for specimen compliance and displacements corresponding to Z-fiber row locations. A solution strategy was formulated to predict delamination growth, in which the parent laminate mode I fracture toughness was used as the criterion for delamination growth. The solution procedure was coded into FORTRAN 90, giving a dedicated software tool for performing the delamination prediction. Comparison of analysis results with previous analysis and experiment showed good agreement, yielding an initial verification for the analytical procedure.

  19. Prediction of microbial growth in mixed culture with a competition model.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Sakha, Mohammad Z

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of microbial growth in mixed culture was studied with a competition model that we had developed recently. The model, which is composed of the new logistic model and the Lotka-Volterra model, is shown to successfully describe the microbial growth of two species in mixed culture using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. With the parameter values of the model obtained from the experimental data on monoculture and mixed culture with two species, it then succeeded in predicting the simultaneous growth of the three species in mixed culture inoculated with various cell concentrations. To our knowledge, it is the first time for a prediction model for multiple (three) microbial species to be reported. The model, which is not built on any premise for specific microorganisms, may become a basic competition model for microorganisms in food and food materials.

  20. Modelling and predicting growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in milk and cottage cheese.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rios, Veronica; Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Gkogka, Elissavet; Rosshaug, Per Sand; Dalgaard, Paw

    2016-01-04

    Mathematical models were developed and evaluated for growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in chilled milk and in cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. The mathematical models include the effect of temperature, pH, NaCl, lactic acid and sorbic acid. A simplified cardinal parameter growth rate model was developed based on growth in broth. Subsequently, the reference growth rate parameter μref25°C-broth of 1.031/h was calibrated by fitting the model to a total of 35 growth rates from cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. This resulted in a μref25°C-cottage cheese value of 0.621/h. Predictions from both growth rate models were evaluated by comparison with literature and experimental data. Growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in heat-treated milk (n=33) resulted in a bias factor (Bf) of 1.08 and an accuracy factor (Af) of 1.32 (μref25°C-broth), whereas growth in cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing and in non-heated milk (n=26) resulted in Bf of 1.08 and Af of 1.43 (μref25°C-cottage cheese). Lag phase models were developed by using relative lag times and data from both the present study and from literature. The acceptable simulation zone method showed the developed models to successfully predict growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in milk and cottage cheese at both constant and dynamic temperature storage conditions. The developed models can be used to predict growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads and shelf life of chilled cottage cheese and milk at constant and dynamic storage temperatures. The applied methodology and the developed models seem likely to be applicable for shelf life assessment of other types of products where psychrotolerant pseudomonads are important for spoilage.

  1. RNAi-mediated gene silencing of vascular endothelial growth factor C suppresses growth and induces apoptosis in mouse breast cancer in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong-Chao; Ma, Wen-Hui; Ge, Yin-Lin; Xue, Mei-Lan; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Jin-Yu; Hou, Lin; Mu, Run-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF)-C promotes tumorigenesis by allowing lymph node metastasis and lymphangiogenesis, among other actions. RNA interference (RNAi) is a novel technique for suppressing target gene expression and may increase the effectiveness of cancer treatments. The present study assessed the influence of VEGF-C RNAi on the apoptosis and proliferation of mouse breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. A total of three pairs of small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting mouse VEGF-C were designed and synthesized prior to transfection into 4T1 cells via a liposomal approach. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis, a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometry were performed in vitro to analyze VEGF-C expression, cleaved caspase-3 protein expression and 4T1 cell proliferation and apoptosis. Experiments were also conducted in vivo on BALB/c mice with breast cancer. Tumor weight and volume were measured and the number of apoptotic cells in tumor tissues was assessed by a TUNEL assay. Immunohistochemical assays and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used to measure the expression of VEGF-C in tumor tissues. The results demonstrated that the three pairs of siRNA, particularly siV2, significantly reduced VEGF-C mRNA and protein levels in 4T1 cells. siV2 was deemed to be the most efficient siRNA and therefore was selected to be used in subsequent experiments. Furthermore, in vitro studies indicated that VEGF-C RNAi significantly decreased cell growth, induced apoptosis and upregulated the expression of cleaved caspase-3 protein. Tumor weight and volume in breast cancer in vivo models was reduced by the intratumoral injection of siV2. Antitumor efficacy was associated with decreased VEGF-C expression and increased induction of apoptosis. The present study therefore indicated that VEGF-C RNAi inhibited mouse breast cancer growth in vitro and in

  2. Dynamical predictability in a simple general circulation model - Average error growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Siegfried D.; Suarez, Max

    1989-01-01

    Average predictability and error growth in a simple realistic two-level general circulation model (GCM) were investigated using a series of Monte Carlo experiments for fixed external forcing (perpetual winter in the Northern Hemisphere). It was found that, for realistic initial errors, the dependence of the limit of dynamic predictability on total wavenumber was similar to that found for the ECMWF model for the 1980/1981 winter conditions, with the lowest wavenumbers showing significant skill for forecast ranges of more than 1 month. On the other hand, for very small amplitude errors distributed according to the climate spectrum, the total error growth was superexponential, reaching a maximum growth rate (2-day doubling time) in about 1 week. A simple empirical model of error variance, which involved two broad wavenumber bands and incorporating a 3/2 power saturation term, was found to provide an excellent fit to the GCM error growth behavior.

  3. Prediction of Growth Factor-Dependent Cleft Formation During Branching Morphogenesis Using A Dynamic Graph-Based Growth Model.

    PubMed

    Dhulekar, Nimit; Ray, Shayoni; Yuan, Daniel; Baskaran, Abhirami; Oztan, Basak; Larsen, Melinda; Yener, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    This study considers the problem of describing and predicting cleft formation during the early stages of branching morphogenesis in mouse submandibular salivary glands (SMG) under the influence of varied concentrations of epidermal growth factors (EGF). Given a time-lapse video of a growing SMG, first we build a descriptive model that captures the underlying biological process and quantifies the ground truth. Tissue-scale (global) and morphological features related to regions of interest (local features) are used to characterize the biological ground truth. Second, we devise a predictive growth model that simulates EGF-modulated branching morphogenesis using a dynamic graph algorithm, which is driven by biological parameters such as EGF concentration, mitosis rate, and cleft progression rate. Given the initial configuration of the SMG, the evolution of the dynamic graph predicts the cleft formation, while maintaining the local structural characteristics of the SMG. We determined that higher EGF concentrations cause the formation of higher number of buds and comparatively shallow cleft depths. Third, we compared the prediction accuracy of our model to the Glazier-Graner-Hogeweg (GGH) model, an on-lattice Monte-Carlo simulation model, under a specific energy function parameter set that allows new rounds of de novo cleft formation. The results demonstrate that the dynamic graph model yields comparable simulations of gland growth to that of the GGH model with a significantly lower computational complexity. Fourth, we enhanced this model to predict the SMG morphology for an EGF concentration without the assistance of a ground truth time-lapse biological video data; this is a substantial benefit of our model over other similar models that are guided and terminated by information regarding the final SMG morphology. Hence, our model is suitable for testing the impact of different biological parameters involved with the process of branching morphogenesis in silico, while

  4. Prediction of Growth Factor Dependent Cleft Formation During Branching Morphogenesis Using A Dynamic Graph-Based Growth Model

    PubMed Central

    Dhulekar, Nimit; Ray, Shayoni; Yuan, Daniel; Baskaran, Abhirami; Oztan, Basak; Larsen, Melinda; Yener, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    This study considers the problem of describing and predicting cleft formation during the early stages of branching morphogenesis in mouse submandibular salivary glands (SMG) under the influence of varied concentrations of epidermal growth factors (EGF). Given a time-lapse video of a growing SMG, first we build a descriptive model that captures the underlying biological process and quantifies the ground truth. Tissue-scale (global) and morphological features related to regions of interest (local features) are used to characterize the biological ground truth. Second, we devise a predictive growth model that simulates EGF-modulated branching morphogenesis using a dynamic graph algorithm, which is driven by biological parameters such as EGF concentration, mitosis rate, and cleft progression rate. Given the initial configuration of the SMG, the evolution of the dynamic graph predicts the cleft formation, while maintaining the local structural characteristics of the SMG. We determined that higher EGF concentrations cause the formation of higher number of buds and comparatively shallow cleft depths. Third, we compared the prediction accuracy of our model to the Glazier-Graner-Hogeweg (GGH) model, an on-lattice Monte-Carlo simulation model, under a specific energy function parameter set that allows new rounds of de novo cleft formation. The results demonstrate that the dynamic graph model yields comparable simulations of gland growth to that of the GGH model with a significantly lower computational complexity. Fourth, we enhanced this model to predict the SMG morphology for an EGF concentration without the assistance of a ground truth time-lapse biological video data; this is a substantial benefit of our model over other similar models that are guided and terminated by information regarding the final SMG morphology. Hence, our model is suitable for testing the impact of different biological parameters involved with the process of branching morphogenesis in silico, while

  5. Prediction of microbial growth rate versus biomass yield by a metabolic network with kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Adadi, Roi; Volkmer, Benjamin; Milo, Ron; Heinemann, Matthias; Shlomi, Tomer

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the factors that determine microbial growth rate under various environmental and genetic conditions is a major challenge of systems biology. While current genome-scale metabolic modeling approaches enable us to successfully predict a variety of metabolic phenotypes, including maximal biomass yield, the prediction of actual growth rate is a long standing goal. This gap stems from strictly relying on data regarding reaction stoichiometry and directionality, without accounting for enzyme kinetic considerations. Here we present a novel metabolic network-based approach, MetabOlic Modeling with ENzyme kineTics (MOMENT), which predicts metabolic flux rate and growth rate by utilizing prior data on enzyme turnover rates and enzyme molecular weights, without requiring measurements of nutrient uptake rates. The method is based on an identified design principle of metabolism in which enzymes catalyzing high flux reactions across different media tend to be more efficient in terms of having higher turnover numbers. Extending upon previous attempts to utilize kinetic data in genome-scale metabolic modeling, our approach takes into account the requirement for specific enzyme concentrations for catalyzing predicted metabolic flux rates, considering isozymes, protein complexes, and multi-functional enzymes. MOMENT is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy of various metabolic phenotypes in E. coli, including intracellular flux rates and changes in gene expression levels under different growth rates. Most importantly, MOMENT is shown to predict growth rates of E. coli under a diverse set of media that are correlated with experimental measurements, markedly improving upon existing state-of-the art stoichiometric modeling approaches. These results support the view that a physiological bound on cellular enzyme concentrations is a key factor that determines microbial growth rate.

  6. CDK2 and mTOR are direct molecular targets of isoangustone A in the suppression of human prostate cancer cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eunjung; Son, Joe Eun; Byun, Sanguine; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Yeong A; Liu, Kangdong; Kim, Jiyoung; Lim, Soon Sung; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Dong, Zigang; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2013-10-01

    Licorice extract which is used as a natural sweetener has been shown to possess inhibitory effects against prostate cancer, but the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. Here, we report a compound, isoangustone A (IAA) in licorice that potently suppresses the growth of aggressive prostate cancer and sought to clarify its mechanism of action. We analyzed its inhibitory effects on the growth of PTEN-deleted human prostate cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. Administration of IAA significantly attenuated the growth of prostate cancer cell cultures and xenograft tumors. These effects were found to be attributable to inhibition of the G1/S phase cell cycle transition and the accumulation of p27{sup kip1}. The elevated p27{sup kip1} expression levels were concurrent with the decrease of its phosphorylation at threonine 187 through suppression of CDK2 kinase activity and the reduced phosphorylation of Akt at Serine 473 by diminishing the kinase activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Further analysis using recombinant proteins and immunoprecipitated cell lysates determined that IAA exerts suppressive effects against CDK2 and mTOR kinase activity by direct binding with both proteins. These findings suggested that the licorice compound IAA is a potent molecular inhibitor of CDK2 and mTOR, with strong implications for the treatment of prostate cancer. Thus, licorice-derived extracts with high IAA content warrant further clinical investigation for nutritional sources for prostate cancer patients. - Highlights: • Isoangustone A suppresses growth of PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. • Administration of isoangustone A inhibits tumor growth in mice. • Treatment of isoangustone A induces cell cycle arrest and accumulation of p27{sup kip1}. • Isoangustone A inhibits CDK2 and mTOR activity. • Isoangustone A directly binds with CDK2 and mTOR complex in prostate cancer cells.

  7. Dynamic predictive model for growth of Salmonella enteritidis in egg yolk.

    PubMed

    Gumudavelli, V; Subbiah, J; Thippareddi, H; Velugoti, P R; Froning, G

    2007-09-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) contamination of poultry eggs is a major human health concern worldwide. The risk of SE from shell eggs can be significantly reduced through rapid cooling of eggs after they are laid and their storage under safe temperature conditions. Predictive models for the growth of SE in egg yolk under varying ambient temperature conditions (dynamic) were developed. The growth of SE in egg yolk under several isothermal conditions (10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 37, 39, 41, and 43 degrees C) was determined. The Baranyi model, a primary model, was fitted with growth data for each temperature and corresponding maximum specific growth rates were estimated. Root mean squared error (RMSE) values were less than 0.44 log10 CFU/g and pseudo-R2 values were greater than 0.98 for the primary model fitting. For developing the secondary model, the estimated maximum specific growth rates were then modeled as a function of temperature using the modified Ratkowsky's equation. The RMSE and pseudo-R2 were 0.05/h and 0.99, respectively. A dynamic model was developed by integrating the primary and secondary models and solving it numerically using the 4th-order Runge-Kutta method to predict the growth of SE in egg yolk under varying temperature conditions. The integrated dynamic model was then validated with 4 temperature profiles (varying) such as linear heating, exponential heating, exponential cooling, and sinusoidal temperatures. The predicted values agreed well with the observed growth data with RMSE values less than 0.29 log10 CFU/g. The developed dynamic model can predict the growth SE in egg yolk under varying temperature profiles.

  8. Development and application of Geobacillus stearothermophilus growth model for predicting spoilage of evaporated milk.

    PubMed

    Kakagianni, Myrsini; Gougouli, Maria; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2016-08-01

    The presence of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores in evaporated milk constitutes an important quality problem for the milk industry. This study was undertaken to provide an approach in modelling the effect of temperature on G. stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 growth and in predicting spoilage of evaporated milk. The growth of G. stearothermophilus was monitored in tryptone soy broth at isothermal conditions (35-67 °C). The data derived were used to model the effect of temperature on G. stearothermophilus growth with a cardinal type model. The cardinal values of the model for the maximum specific growth rate were Tmin = 33.76 °C, Tmax = 68.14 °C, Topt = 61.82 °C and μopt = 2.068/h. The growth of G. stearothermophilus was assessed in evaporated milk at Topt in order to adjust the model to milk. The efficiency of the model in predicting G. stearothermophilus growth at non-isothermal conditions was evaluated by comparing predictions with observed growth under dynamic conditions and the results showed a good performance of the model. The model was further used to predict the time-to-spoilage (tts) of evaporated milk. The spoilage of this product caused by acid coagulation when the pH approached a level around 5.2, eight generations after G. stearothermophilus reached the maximum population density (Nmax). Based on the above, the tts was predicted from the growth model as the sum of the time required for the microorganism to multiply from the initial to the maximum level ( [Formula: see text] ), plus the time required after the [Formula: see text] to complete eight generations. The observed tts was very close to the predicted one indicating that the model is able to describe satisfactorily the growth of G. stearothermophilus and to provide realistic predictions for evaporated milk spoilage.

  9. Water temperature and fish growth: otoliths predict growth patterns of a marine fish in a changing climate.

    PubMed

    Rountrey, Adam N; Coulson, Peter G; Meeuwig, Jessica J; Meekan, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Ecological modeling shows that even small, gradual changes in body size in a fish population can have large effects on natural mortality, biomass, and catch. However, efforts to model the impact of climate change on fish growth have been hampered by a lack of long-term (multidecadal) data needed to understand the effects of temperature on growth rates in natural environments. We used a combination of dendrochronology techniques and additive mixed-effects modeling to examine the sensitivity of growth in a long-lived (up to 70 years), endemic marine fish, the western blue groper (Achoerodus gouldii), to changes in water temperature. A multi-decadal biochronology (1952-2003) of growth was constructed from the otoliths of 56 fish collected off the southwestern coast of Western Australia, and we tested for correlations between the mean index chronology and a range of potential environmental drivers. The chronology was significantly correlated with sea surface temperature in the region, but common variance among individuals was low. This suggests that this species has been relatively insensitive to past variations in climate. Growth increment and age data were also used in an additive mixed model to predict otolith growth and body size later this century. Although growth was relatively insensitive to changes in temperature, the model results suggested that a fish aged 20 in 2099 would have an otolith about 10% larger and a body size about 5% larger than a fish aged 20 in 1977. Our study shows that species or populations regarded as relatively insensitive to climate change could still undergo significant changes in growth rate and body size that are likely to have important effects on the productivity and yield of fisheries.

  10. Tumor Growth Prediction with Reaction-Diffusion and Hyperelastic Biomechanical Model by Physiological Data Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ken C. L.; Summers, Ronald M.; Kebebew, Electron; Yao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    The goal of tumor growth prediction is to model the tumor growth process, which can be achieved by physiological modeling and model personalization from clinical measurements. Although image-driven frameworks have been proposed with promising results, several issues such as infinitesimal strain assumptions, complicated personalization procedures, and the lack of functional information, may limit their prediction accuracy. In view of these issues, we propose a framework for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor growth prediction, which comprises a FEM-based tumor growth model with coupled reaction-diffusion equation and nonlinear biomechanics. Physiological data fusion of structural and functional images is used to improve the subject-specificity of model personalization, and a derivative-free global optimization algorithm is adopted to facilitate the complicated model and accommodate flexible choices of objective functions. With this flexibility, we propose an objective function accounting for both the tumor volume difference and the root-mean-squared error of intracellular volume fractions. Experiments were performed on synthetic and clinical data to verify the parameter estimation capability and the prediction performance. Comparisons of using different biomechanical models and objective functions were also performed. From the experimental results of eight patient data sets, the average recall, precision, Dice coefficient, and relative volume difference between predicted and measured tumor volumes were 84.5±6.9%, 85.8±8.2%, 84.6±1.7%, and 14.2±8.4%, respectively. PMID:25962846

  11. 3D choroid neovascularization growth prediction based on reaction-diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shuxia; Chen, Xinjian; Shi, Fei; Xiang, Dehui; Zhu, Weifang; Chen, Haoyu

    2016-03-01

    Choroid neovascularization (CNV) is a kind of pathology from the choroid and CNV-related disease is one important cause of vision loss. It is desirable to predict the CNV growth rate so that appropriate treatment can be planned. In this paper, we seek to find a method to predict the growth of CNV based on 3D longitudinal Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) images. A reaction-diffusion model is proposed for prediction. The method consists of four phases: pre-processing, meshing, CNV growth modeling and prediction. We not only apply the reaction-diffusion model to the disease region, but also take the surrounding tissues into consideration including outer retinal layer, inner retinal layer and choroid layer. The diffusion in these tissues is considered as isotropic. The finite-element-method (FEM) is used to solve the partial differential equations (PDE) in the diffusion model. The curve of CNV growth with treatment are fitted and then we can predict the CNV status in a future time point. The preliminary results demonstrated that our proposed method is accurate and the validity and feasibility of our model is obvious.

  12. Ursolic acid inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer and enhances the antitumor potential of gemcitabine in an orthotopic mouse model through suppression of the inflammatory microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R.; Sung, Bokyung; Gupta, Subash C.; Tyagi, Amit K.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    The development of chemoresistance in human pancreatic cancer is one reason for the poor survival rate for patients with this cancer. Because multiple gene products are linked with chemoresistance, we investigated the ability of ursolic acid (UA) to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine, a standard drug used for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. These investigations were done in AsPC-1, MIA PaCa-2, and Panc-28 cells and in nude mice orthotopically implanted with Panc-28 cells. In vitro, UA inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, suppressed NF-κB activation and its regulated proliferative, metastatic, and angiogenic proteins. UA (20 μM) also enhanced gemcitabine (200 nM)-induced apoptosis and suppressed the expression of NF-κB-regulated proteins. In the nude mouse model, oral administration of UA (250 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth and enhanced the effect of gemcitabine (25 mg/kg). Furthermore, the combination of UA and gemcitabine suppressed the metastasis of cancer cells to distant organs such as liver and spleen. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that biomarkers of proliferation (Ki-67) and microvessel density (CD31) were suppressed by the combination of UA and gemcitabine. UA inhibited the activation of NF-κB and STAT3 and the expression of tumorigenic proteins regulated by these inflammatory transcription factors in tumor tissue. Furthermore, the combination of two agents decreased the expression of miR-29a, closely linked with tumorigenesis, in the tumor tissue. UA was found to be bioavailable in animal serum and tumor tissue. These results suggest that UA can inhibit the growth of human pancreatic tumors and sensitize them to gemcitabine by suppressing inflammatory biomarkers linked to proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. PMID:26909608

  13. LKB1 Haploinsufficiency Cooperates With Kras to Promote Pancreatic Cancer Through Suppression of p21-Dependent Growth Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Jennifer P.; Jamieson, Nigel B.; Karim, Saadia A.; Athineos, Dimitris; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Nixon, Colin; McKay, Colin J.; Carter, Ross; Brunton, Valerie G.; Frame, Margaret C.; Ashworth, Alan; Oien, Karin A.; Evans, T.R. Jeffry; Sansom, Owen J.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Patients carrying germline mutations of LKB1 have an increased risk of pancreatic cancer; however, it is unclear whether down-regulation of LKB1 is an important event in sporadic pancreatic cancer. In this study, we aimed to investigate the impact of LKB1 down-regulation for pancreatic cancer in mouse and human and to elucidate the mechanism by which Lkb1 deregulation contributes to this disease. Methods We first investigated the consequences of Lkb1 deficiency in a genetically modified mouse model of pancreatic cancer, both in terms of disease progression and at the molecular level. To test the relevance of our findings to human pancreatic cancer, we investigated levels of LKB1 and its potential targets in human pancreatic cancer. Results We definitively show that Lkb1 haploinsufficiency can cooperate with oncogenic KrasG12D to cause pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in the mouse. Mechanistically, this was associated with decreased p53/p21-dependent growth arrest. Haploinsufficiency for p21 (Cdkn1a) also synergizes with KrasG12D to drive PDAC in the mouse. We also found that levels of LKB1 expression were decreased in around 20% of human PDAC and significantly correlated with low levels of p21 and a poor prognosis. Remarkably, all tumors that had low levels of LKB1 had low levels of p21, and these tumors did not express mutant p53. Conclusions We have identified a novel LKB1-p21 axis that suppresses PDAC following Kras mutation in vivo. Down-regulation of LKB1 may therefore serve as an alternative to p53 mutation to drive pancreatic cancer in vivo. PMID:20452353

  14. MiR-206 Suppresses the Progression of Coronary Artery Disease by Modulating Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Maojing; Ji, Yang; Cai, Shanglang; Ding, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background We investigated whether microRNA-206 (miR-206) is abnormally expressed in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). The potential mechanism by which miR-206 may regulate CAD progression was also studied. Material/Methods A total of 78 CAD patients in the case group and 65 subjects in the control group were enrolled in this study so that the correlation between miR-206 and CAD could be accurately determined. Serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides were detected using a biochemistry analyzer. MiR-206 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression levels were tested using either reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction or western blot. Associations between miR-206 expression and different clinicopathological features of CAD patients were also analyzed. CAD cells were transfected with miR-206 mimic (miR-206), its negative control (miR-NC), miR-206 inhibitor (anti-miR-206), and its negative control (anti-miR-NC), respectively. Flow cytometry was conducted to explore the function of miR-206 in CAD cell apoptosis after transfection. Moreover, transwell assay was carried out to study the migratory ability of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in CAD patients. Results MiR-206 expression was enriched in both diseased EPCs and plasma of CAD patients. No significant correlation was found between decrease in miR-206 expression and different clinicopathological features. In addition, miR-206 significantly suppressed the viability and invasion of EPCs in CAD patients, and it promoted the apoptosis of their EPCs. Moreover, we found that miR-206 is able to inhibit VEGF expression. Conclusions As suggested by our study, MiR-206 can be a novel benign biomarker for CAD because it may regulate VEGF expression. PMID:27994218

  15. The Nedd8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 induces autophagy and apoptosis to suppress liver cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhongguang; Yu, Guangyang; Lee, Hyuk Woo; Li, Lihui; Wang, Lingyan; Yang, Dongqin; Pan, Yongfu; Ding, Chan; Qian, Jing; Wu, Lijun; Chu, Yiwei; Yi, Jing; Wang, Xiangdong; Sun, Yi; Jeong, Lak Shin; Liu, Jie; Jia, Lijun

    2012-07-01

    Posttranslational neddylation of cullins in the Cullin-Ring E3 ligase (CRL) complexes is needed for proteolytic degradation of CRL substrates, whose accumulation induces cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis, and senescence. The Nedd8-activating enzyme (NAE) is critical for neddylation of CRL complexes and their growth-promoting function. Recently, the anticancer small molecule MLN4924 currently in phase I trials was determined to be an inhibitor of NAE that blocks cullin neddylation and inactivates CRL, triggering an accumulation of CRL substrates that trigger cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis, and senescence in cancer cells. Here, we report that MLN4924 also triggers autophagy in response to CRL inactivation and that this effect is important for the ability of MLN4924 to suppress the outgrowth of liver cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. MLN4924-induced autophagy was attributed partially to inhibition of mTOR activity, due to accumulation of the mTOR inhibitory protein Deptor, as well as to induction of reactive oxygen species stress. Inhibiting autophagy enhanced MLN4924-induced apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy is a survival signal triggered in response to CRL inactivation. In a xenograft model of human liver cancer, MLN4924 was well-tolerated and displayed a significant antitumor effect characterized by CRL inactivation and induction of autophagy and apoptosis in liver cancer cells. Together, our findings support the clinical investigation of MLN4924 for liver cancer treatment and provide a preclinical proof-of-concept for combination therapy with an autophagy inhibitor to enhance therapeutic efficacy.

  16. Enhanced suppression of tumor growth by concomitant treatment of human lung cancer cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and arsenic trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Chia-Wen; Yao, Ju-Hsien; Chang, Shih-Yu; Lee, Pei-Chih; Lee, Te-Chang

    2011-11-15

    The efficacy of arsenic trioxide (ATO) against acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and relapsed APL has been well documented. ATO may cause DNA damage by generating reactive oxygen intermediates. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, modulates gene and protein expression via histone-dependent or -independent pathways that may result in chromatin decondensation, cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis. We investigated whether ATO and SAHA act synergistically to enhance the death of cancer cells. Our current findings showed that combined treatment with ATO and SAHA resulted in enhanced suppression of non-small-cell lung carcinoma in vitro in H1299 cells and in vivo in a xenograft mouse model. Flow cytometric analysis of annexin V+ cells showed that apoptotic cell death was significantly enhanced after combined treatment with ATO and SAHA. At the doses used, ATO did not interfere with cell cycle progression, but SAHA induced p21 expression and led to G1 arrest. A Comet assay demonstrated that ATO, but not SAHA, induced DNA strand breaks in H1299 cells; however, co-treatment with SAHA significantly increased ATO-induced DNA damage. Moreover, SAHA enhanced acetylation of histone H3 and sensitized genomic DNA to DNase I digestion. Our results suggest that SAHA may cause chromatin relaxation and increase cellular susceptibility to ATO-induced DNA damage. Combined administration of SAHA and ATO may be an effective approach to the treatment of lung cancer. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO and SAHA are therapeutic agents with different action modes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination of ATO and SAHA synergistically inhibits tumor cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SAHA loosens chromatin structure resulting in increased sensitivity to DNase I. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO-induced DNA damage and apoptosis are enhanced by co-treatment with SAHA.

  17. Growth characteristics of pearl gray guinea fowl as predicted by the Richards, Gompertz, and logistic models.

    PubMed

    Nahashon, S N; Aggrey, S E; Adefope, N A; Amenyenu, A; Wright, D

    2006-02-01

    This study was undertaken to describe the growth pattern of the pearl gray Guinea fowl. Using BW data from hatch to 22 wk, 3 nonlinear mathematical functions (Richards, Gompertz, and logistic) were used to estimate growth patterns of the pearl gray guinea fowl. The logistic and Gompertz models are a special case of the Richards model, which has a variable point of inflection defined by the shape or growth trajectory parameter, m. The shape parameter m was 1.08 and 0.98 in males and females, respectively, suggesting that the growth pattern of the pearl gray female guinea fowl is Gompertz. The pearl gray guinea fowl exhibited sexual dimorphism for their growth characteristics. From the Gompertz model, the asymptotic BW, growth rate, and age at maximum growth were 1.62 kg, 0.22 kg/wk, and 6.65 wk in males, respectively, and 1.70 kg, 0.19 kg/wk, and 6.70 wk in females, respectively. The ages at maximum growth were 6.65, 6.47, and 8.12 wk for the Richards, Gompertz, and logistic models, respectively. The pearl gray guinea fowl females have a higher asymptotic BW compared with the males. The average asymptotic BW of about 1.57 kg for both sexes predicted by the logistic model was below the average predicted BW from the Richards (1.66 kg) and Gompertz (1.67 kg) models, respectively, at 22 wk of age. The inverse relationship between the asymptotic weight and both relative growth and age at maximum growth of the pearl gray guinea fowl is similar to that of chickens, quail, and ducks. Success in studying the growth characteristics of guinea fowl will contribute to the efforts of genetically improving this least-studied avian species.

  18. Endophytic Association of Trichoderma asperellum within Theobroma cacao Suppresses Vascular Streak Dieback Incidence and Promotes Side Graft Growth

    PubMed Central

    Nasaruddin, Nasaruddin; Hendarto, Hendarto; Hakkar, Andi Akbar; Agriansyah, Nursalim

    2016-01-01

    Trichoderma species are able to persist on living sapwood and leaves of cacao (Theobroma cacao) in an endophytic relationship. In this research, we evaluated the ability of Trichodema asperellum introduced at the incision site in the bark for side grafting with the concentration of 4 g/10 mL, 4 g/100 mL, and 4 g/1,000 mL (suspended in water) in suppressing vascular streak dieback (VSD) incidence and promoting growth of side grafts in the field. The incidence of VSD in two local clones of cacao, MCC1 and M04, without application of T. asperellum was 71.2% and 70.1% at 21 wk after grafting, respectively. However, when the two clones were treated with a concentration of 4 g/10 mL T. asperellum, the incidence was 20.6% and 21.7%, respectively, compared to 29.1% and 20.9% at 4 g/100 mL and 18.2% and 15.6% at 4 g/1,000 mL. By comparing to the control, the treatment with the same concentrations of T. asperellum listed above, the total number of stomata in MCC1 decreased by 41.9%, 30.2%, and 14.0% and in M04 by 30.5%, 21.9%, and -2.5% (exception), respectively. Otherwise, the total area of stomata opening increased by 91.4%, 99.7%, and 28.6% in MCC1 and by 203.8%, 253.5%, and 35.9% in M04, respectively. Furthermore, the number of buds and branches treated with a mixture concentration on the the two clones increased by 90.7% and 21.7%, respectively. These data showed that the application of T. asperellum to cacao scions while grafting can decrease VSD incidence in side grafts and increase growth of grafts in addition to decreasing total number of stomata, increasing total area of opened stomata, and increasing number of buds and branches. PMID:27790069

  19. The bioflavonoid galangin suppresses the growth of ehrlich ascites carcinoma in Swiss Albino mice: a molecular insight.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Jai V; Wadegaonkar, Prasad A; Hajare, Sunil W

    2012-07-01

    Bioflavonoids are plant compounds touted for their potential to treat or prevent several diseases including cancer caused by various stress conditions. Galangin (4H-1-Benzopyran-4-one, 3, 5, 7-trihydroxy-2-phenyl-), a flavonoid, is a polyphenolic compound found primarily in medicinal herb, Alpinia galanga. This study aims to demonstrate the galangin as a pharmacological lead compound using in vitro, in vivo, and in silico model targeting specific cancer condition and proteins. The proliferation of MCF-7 and Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells was significantly inhibited with an IC₅₀ of 34.11 and 22.29 μg/ml, respectively. In an animal model system, galangin has inhibited the tumor growth by 73.51% ± 4.742 in EAC-induced Swiss Albino mice with no evidences of mortality as compared to standard drug, 5-fluorouracil. The effectiveness of galangin is proven in an animal system suggesting its pharmacokinetics behavior in an animal model which is also complemented by outcome of in silico analysis with more than 88 % of human intestinal absorption and significant Caco-2 cell, MDCK cell, and skin permeability as predicted by in silico methods. Galangin was docked against 19 different proteins involved in tumorogenesis and apoptosis; the energetic analysis indicates that it exhibits higher predicted binding free energy of -12.7 kcal/mol with Bcl-xL protein.

  20. Prediction and suppression of HIFU-induced vessel rupture using passive cavitation detection in an ex vivo model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    emission amplitude. Time to rupture was compared between these feedback-controlled trials and paired controller-inactive trials using a paired Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results Subharmonic emissions were found to be the most predictive of vessel rupture (areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) = 0.757, p < 10-16) compared to low-frequency (AUROC = 0.657, p < 10-11) and broadband (AUROC = 0.729, p < 10-16) emissions. An independent-sample t test comparing pre-rupture to intact-vessel emissions revealed a statistically significant difference between the two groups for broadband and subharmonic emissions (p < 10-3), but not for low-frequency emissions (p = 0.058). In a one-sided paired Wilcoxon signed-rank test, activation of the control module was shown to increase the time to vessel rupture (T- = 8, p = 0.0244, N = 10). In one-sided paired t tests, activation of the control module was shown to cause no significant difference in time-averaged focal intensity (t = 0.362, p = 0.363, N = 10), but was shown to cause delivery of significantly greater total acoustic energy (t = 2.037, p = 0.0361, N = 10). Conclusions These results suggest that acoustic cavitation plays an important role in HIFU-induced vessel rupture. In HIFU treatments for vessel occlusion, passive monitoring of acoustic emissions may be useful in avoiding hemorrhage due to vessel rupture, as shown in the rupture suppression experiments. PMID:25232483

  1. Growth Arrest-Specific 6 Enhances the Suppressive Function of CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells Mainly through Axl Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guang-ju; Zheng, Jia-yi; Bian, Jia-lan; Chen, Long-wang; Dong, Ning; Yu, Yan; Hong, Guang-liang; Chandoo, Arvine

    2017-01-01

    Background. Growth arrest-specific (Gas) 6 is one of the endogenous ligands of TAM receptors (Tyro3, Axl, and Mertk), and its role as an immune modulator has been recently emphasized. Naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for the active suppression of autoimmunity. The present study was designed to investigate whether Tregs express TAM receptors and the potential role of Gas6-TAM signal in regulating the suppressive function of Tregs. Methods. The protein and mRNA levels of TAM receptors were determined by using Western blot, immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and RT-PCR. Then, TAM receptors were silenced using targeted siRNA or blocked with specific antibody. The suppressive function of Tregs was assessed by using a CFSE-based T cell proliferation assay. Flow cytometry was used to determine the expression of Foxp3 and CTLA4 whereas cytokines secretion levels were measured by ELISA assay. Results. Tregs express both Axl and Mertk receptors. Gas6 increases the suppressive function of Tregs in vitro and in mice. Both Foxp3 and CTLA-4 expression on Tregs are enhanced after Gas6 stimulation. Gas6 enhances the suppressive activity of Tregs mainly through Axl receptor. Conclusion. Gas6 has a direct effect on the functions of CD4+CD25+Tregs mainly through its interaction with Axl receptor. PMID:28270700

  2. Temporal consistency of spatial pattern in growth of the mussel, Mytilus edulis: Implications for predictive modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, Per; Lindegarth, Susanne; Lindegarth, Mats

    2013-10-01

    Human pressures on coastal seas are increasing and methods for sustainable management, including spatial planning and mitigative actions, are therefore needed. In coastal areas worldwide, the development of mussel farming as an economically and ecologically sustainable industry requires geographic information on the growth and potential production capacity. In practice this means that coherent maps of temporally stable spatial patterns of growth need to be available in the planning process and that maps need to be based on mechanistic or empirical models. Therefore, as a first step towards development of models of growth, we assessed empirically the fundamental requirement that there are temporally consistent spatial patterns of growth in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. Using a pilot study we designed and dimensioned a transplant experiment, where the spatial consistency in the growth of mussels was evaluated at two resolutions. We found strong temporal and scale-dependent spatial variability in growth but patterns suggested that spatial patterns were uncoupled between growth of shell and that of soft tissue. Spatial patterns of shell growth were complex and largely inconsistent among years. Importantly, however, the growth of soft tissue was qualitatively consistent among years at the scale of km. The results suggest that processes affecting the whole coastal area cause substantial differences in growth of soft tissue among years but that factors varying at the scale of km create strong and persistent spatial patterns of growth, with a potential doubling of productivity by identifying the most suitable locations. We conclude that the observed spatial consistency provides a basis for further development of predictive modelling and mapping of soft tissue growth in these coastal areas. Potential causes of observed patterns, consequences for mussel-farming as a tool for mitigating eutrophication, aspects of precision of modelling and sampling of mussel growth as well

  3. The suppression of prostate LNCaP cancer cells growth by Selenium nanoparticles through Akt/Mdm2/AR controlled apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ling; Yuan, Qing; Zhu, Huarui; Li, Ying; Guo, Quanyi; Wang, Qin; Bi, Xiaolin; Gao, Xueyun

    2011-09-01

    The trace element Selenium is suggested having cancer prevention activity and used as food supplement. Previous results had shown Selenium nanoparticles are safer compared with other Selenium compounds like selenomethionine, sodium selenite and monomethylated Selenium, however, its anticancer activity and intrinsic mechanisms are still elusive. Here, we prepared Selenium nanoparticles and investigated its inherent anticancer mechanisms. We found Selenium nanoparticles inhibit growth of prostate LNCaP cancer cells partially through caspases mediated apoptosis. Selenium nanoparticles suppress transcriptional activity of androgen receptor via down-regulating its mRNA and protein expression. Moreover, Selenium nanoparticles activate Akt kinase by increasing its phosphorylation, promote Akt-dependent androgen receptor phosphorylation and Mdm2 regulated degradation through proteasome pathway. We suggest Selenium nanoparticles suppress prostate cancer cells growth by disrupting androgen receptor, implicating a potential application in cancer treatment.

  4. Molecular concentration of deoxyHb in human prefrontal cortex predicts the emergence and suppression of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Leon-Dominguez, Umberto; Izzetoglu, Meltem; Leon-Carrion, Jose; Solís-Marcos, Ignacio; Garcia-Torrado, Francisco Jose; Forastero-Rodríguez, Ana; Mellado-Miras, Patricia; Villegas-Duque, Diego; Lopez-Romero, Juan Luis; Onaral, Banu; Izzetoglu, Kurtulus

    2014-01-15

    This is the first study to use fNIRS to explore anaesthetic depth and awakening during surgery with general anaesthesia. A 16 channel continuous wave (CW) functional near-infrared system (fNIRS) was used to monitor PFC activity. These outcomes were compared to BIS measures. The results indicate that deoxyHb concentration in the PFC varies during the suppression and emergence of consciousness. During suppression, deoxyHb levels increase, signalling the deactivation of the PFC, while during emergence, deoxyHb concentration drops, initiating PFC activation and the recovery of consciousness. Furthermore, BIS and deoxyHb concentrations in the PFC display a high negative correlation throughout the different anaesthetic phases. These findings suggest that deoxyHb could be a reliable marker for monitoring anaesthetic depth, and that the PFC intervenes in the suppression and emergence of consciousness.

  5. Predicting the Probability of Abnormal Stimulated Growth Hormone Response in Children After Radiotherapy for Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hua Chiaho; Wu Shengjie; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Lukose, Renin C.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a mathematical model utilizing more readily available measures than stimulation tests that identifies brain tumor survivors with high likelihood of abnormal growth hormone secretion after radiotherapy (RT), to avoid late recognition and a consequent delay in growth hormone replacement therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 191 prospectively collected post-RT evaluations of peak growth hormone level (arginine tolerance/levodopa stimulation test), serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, height, weight, growth velocity, and body mass index in 106 children and adolescents treated for ependymoma (n = 72), low-grade glioma (n = 28) or craniopharyngioma (n = 6), who had normal growth hormone levels before RT. Normal level in this study was defined as the peak growth hormone response to the stimulation test {>=}7 ng/mL. Results: Independent predictor variables identified by multivariate logistic regression with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001) included IGF-1 z score, weight z score, and hypothalamic dose. The developed predictive model demonstrated a strong discriminatory power with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.883. At a potential cutoff point of probability of 0.3 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 78%. Conclusions: Without unpleasant and expensive frequent stimulation tests, our model provides a quantitative approach to closely follow the growth hormone secretory capacity of brain tumor survivors. It allows identification of high-risk children for subsequent confirmatory tests and in-depth workup for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency.

  6. 3-Bromopyruvate and sodium citrate target glycolysis, suppress survivin, and induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in gastric cancer cells and inhibit gastric orthotopic transplantation tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    WANG, TING-AN; ZHANG, XIAO-DONG; GUO, XING-YU; XIAN, SHU-LIN; LU, YUN-FEI

    2016-01-01

    Glycolysis is the primary method utilized by cancer cells to produce the energy (adenosine triphosphate, ATP) required for cell proliferation. Therefore, inhibition of glycolysis may inhibit tumor growth. We previously found that both 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) and sodium citrate (SCT) can inhibit glycolysis in vitro; however, the underlying inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we used a human gastric cancer cell line (SGC-7901) and an orthotopic transplantation tumor model in nude mice to explore the specific mechanisms of 3-BrPA and SCT. We found that both 3-BrPA and SCT effectively suppressed cancer cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle, induced apoptosis, and decreased the production of lactate and ATP. 3-BrPA significantly reduced the glycolytic enzyme hexokinase activity, while SCT selectively inhibited phosphofructokinase-1 activity. Furthermore, 3-BrPA and SCT upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, cytochrome c, and cleaved caspase-3) and downregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2 and survivin). Finally, our animal model of gastric cancer indicated that intraperitoneal injection of 3-BrPA and SCT suppressed orthotopic transplantation tumor growth and induced tumor apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that 3-BrPA and SCT selectively suppress glycolytic enzymes, decrease ATP production, induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis, downregulate survivin, and inhibit tumor growth. Moreover, an intraperitoneal injection is an effective form of administration of 3-BrPA and SCT. PMID:26708213

  7. 3-bromopyruvate and sodium citrate target glycolysis, suppress survivin, and induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in gastric cancer cells and inhibit gastric orthotopic transplantation tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting-An; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Xing-Yu; Xian, Shu-Lin; Lu, Yun-Fei

    2016-03-01

    Glycolysis is the primary method utilized by cancer cells to produce the energy (adenosine triphosphate, ATP) required for cell proliferation. Therefore, inhibition of glycolysis may inhibit tumor growth. We previously found that both 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) and sodium citrate (SCT) can inhibit glycolysis in vitro; however, the underlying inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we used a human gastric cancer cell line (SGC-7901) and an orthotopic transplantation tumor model in nude mice to explore the specific mechanisms of 3-BrPA and SCT. We found that both 3-BrPA and SCT effectively suppressed cancer cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle, induced apoptosis, and decreased the production of lactate and ATP. 3-BrPA significantly reduced the glycolytic enzyme hexokinase activity, while SCT selectively inhibited phosphofructokinase-1 activity. Furthermore, 3-BrPA and SCT upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, cytochrome c, and cleaved caspase-3) and downregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2 and survivin). Finally, our animal model of gastric cancer indicated that intraperitoneal injection of 3-BrPA and SCT suppressed orthotopic transplantation tumor growth and induced tumor apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that 3-BrPA and SCT selectively suppress glycolytic enzymes, decrease ATP production, induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis, downregulate survivin, and inhibit tumor growth. Moreover, an intraperitoneal injection is an effective form of administration of 3-BrPA and SCT.

  8. Growth responses of young Douglas-fir and tanoak 11 years after various levels of hardwood removal and understory suppression in southwestern Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrington, T.B.; Tappeiner, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    At two sites in southwestern Oregon, height, diameter, and crown width of young Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and sprout-origin tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflorus) were measured 1a??11 years after reducing the density of a 2-year-old tanoak stand to 0%, 25%, 50%, and 100% of its initial cover. Some plots also included suppression of understory vegetation. Tanoak cover developed linearly with time, with steepness of the growth trajectory increasing at a diminishing rate with increasing percentage of initial tanoak cover. Fifth-year cover of understory vegetation declined linearly with increasing percentage of initial tanoak cover (R2 = 0.29). Survival of Douglas-fir (96a??100%) differed little among initial abundances of tanoak, while growth trajectories for its size became increasingly exponential with decreasing percentage of initial tanoak cover. Eleventh-year heights of Douglas-fir were similar for 0%, 25%, and 50% of initial tanoak cov