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Sample records for predict suppressed growth

  1. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    GH suppression test; Glucose loading test; Acromegaly - blood test; Gigantism - blood test ... is not changed and stays high during the suppression test, the provider will suspect gigantism or acromegaly. ...

  2. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  3. Rapid Suppression of Growth by Blue Light

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    1981-01-01

    The inhibition of stem elongation in dark-grown seedlings by blue light was studied with marking techniques and with a high-resolution, growth-measuring apparatus. Blue light rapidly suppresses growth in a variety of cultivated species. In some species, the inhibition persists only during the period of irradiation, after which time growth quickly returns to the high dark rate, whereas, in other species, the light response has an additional long-term component which lasts for at least several hours in the dark. The long-term inhibition may be mediated by phytochrome, whereas the rapid, short-term component is specific to a blue-light receptor. The rapid inhibition of growth in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) requires high-energy blue irradiation, which is perceived directly by the growing region of the hypocotyl and inhibits all regions below the hook to the same extent. Detailed investigation of the kinetics of the inhibition in cucumber and in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) shows that, after a short lag period (20 to 30 seconds in cucumber, 60 to 70 seconds in sunflower), the growth rate declines in an exponential fashion to a lower rate, with a half-time of 15 to 25 seconds in cucumber and 90 to 150 seconds in sunflower. Excision of the hypocotyl greatly reduces the sensitivity of the growth rate to blue-light inhibition. Because of the rapid kinetics, the blue-light photoreceptor cannot affect cell enlargement by altering the supply of growth hormone or the sensitivity to hormones but probably operates more directly either on the biochemical process which loosens cell walls or on cell turgor. PMID:16661718

  4. Predicting fire suppression in a simulated engine nacelle.

    SciTech Connect

    Keyser, David R.; Hewson, John C.

    2004-06-01

    The Vulcan fire-field model is employed to simulate the evolution of pool fires and the distribution of fire suppressants in a engine nacelle simulator. The objective is to identify conditions for which suppression will and will not be successful in order to (1) provide input on experimental design and (2) to test the model's predictive capabilities through comparison with future test results. Pool fires, where the fuel pool is on the bottom of the nacelle, have been selected for these tests because they have been identified as among the most challenging to suppress. Modeling of the production HFC-125 fire suppression system predicts that all pool fires are extinguished. Removing nozzles and reducing the rate of suppressant injection eventually lead to a predicted failure to suppress the fires. The stability of the fires, and therefore the difficulty in extinguishing them, depends on a variety of additional factors as discussed in the text.

  5. Duration of growth suppressive effects of regular inhaled corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Doull, I.; Campbell, M.; Holgate, S.

    1998-01-01

    The growth of 50 children receiving regular inhaled corticosteroids was segregated into divisions of six weeks from the start of treatment and compared with their growth when not receiving regular corticosteroids using a random effects regression model. Growth suppression was most marked during the initial six weeks after starting treatment, with most suppression occurring during the initial 18 weeks. Thereafter the children's growth was similar to their growth when not receiving treatment. These findings have important consequences for patterns of treatment of asthma in children.

 PMID:9579164

  6. Burst suppression electroencephalogram pattern in the newborn: predicting the outcome.

    PubMed

    Douglass, Laurie M; Wu, Joyce Y; Rosman, N Paul; Stafstrom, Carl E

    2002-06-01

    A neonatal burst suppression electroencephalogram (EEG) is usually associated with an ominous prognosis. It is controversial whether a reactive burst suppression pattern (ie, a burst suppression pattern that can be interrupted by stimulation) is predictive of a better outcome. We retrospectively studied 22 full-term newborns with burst suppression EEGs to examine their functional outcome. Follow-up (3 to 9 years) was by record review and telephone interview. On the basis of initial EEG pattern and prognosis, three groups were identified post hoc: group 1 (n = 16) had initially nonreactive burst suppression EEGs that remained abnormal; 11 patients died, 4 remained profoundly impaired (nonambulatory, nonverbal), and 1 was moderately impaired (unassisted ambulation, limited speech). Group 2 (n = 3) had initially nonreactive burst suppression EEGs that later improved substantially (within a mean of 7 weeks). At follow-up (3 to 8 1/2 years), each child was waLking (one with braces), talking, and enrolled in special education. Group 3 (n = 3) had reactive burst suppression EEGs initially. At follow-up (ages 3 1/2 to 9 years), each child was walking unassisted and speaking in sentences. Two children in group 3 were of preschool age, and the third was in a special needs program. Although most newborns with nonreactive burst suppression EEGs have a dire neurologic outcome, of those in whom the EEG improves early, the prognosis may be slightly more favorable. Infants with reactive burst suppression EEGs during the acute phase of illness appear to have the best prognosis.

  7. Weight Suppression Predicts Time to Remission from Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Michael R.; Berner, Laura A.; Swanson, Sonja A.; Clark, Vicki L.; Eddy, Kamryn T.; Franko, Debra L.; Shaw, Jena A.; Ross, Stephanie; Herzog, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether, at study entry, (a) weight suppression (WS), the difference between highest past adult weight and current weight, prospectively predicts time to first full remission from bulimia nervosa (BN) over a follow-up period of 8 years, and (b) weight change over time mediates the relationship between WS and time to first…

  8. Penfluridol suppresses pancreatic tumor growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Alok; Srivastava, Sanjay K.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors exhibit enhanced autophagy as compared to any other cancer, making it resistant to chemotherapy. We evaluated the effect of penfluridol against pancreatic cancer. Penfluridol treatment induced apoptosis and inhibited the growth of Panc-1, BxPC-3 and AsPC-1, pancreatic cancer cells with IC50 ranging between 6–7 μM after 24 h of treatment. Significant autophagy was induced by penfluridol treatment in pancreatic cancer cells. Punctate LC3B and autophagosomes staining confirmed autophagy. Inhibiting autophagy by chloroquine, bafilomycin, 3-methyladenine or LC3BsiRNA, significantly blocked penfluridol-induced apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy lead to apoptosis in our model. Penfluridol treatment suppressed the growth of BxPC-3 tumor xenografts by 48% as compared to 17% when treated in combination with chloroquine. Similarly, penfluridol suppressed the growth of AsPC-1 tumors by 40% versus 16% when given in combination with chloroquine. TUNEL staining and caspase-3 cleavage revealed less apoptosis in the tumors from mice treated with penfluridol and chloroquine as compared to penfluridol alone. Penfluridol treatment also suppressed the growth of orthotopically implanted Panc-1 tumors by 80% by inducing autophagy-mediated apoptosis in the tumors. These studies established that penfluridol inhibits pancreatic tumor growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis. Since penfluridol is already in clinic, positive findings from our study will accelerate its clinical development. PMID:27189859

  9. Bone morphogenetic protein signaling and growth suppression in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Stayce E.; Jung, Barbara H.; Fiorino, Antonio; Gomez, Jessica; Del Rosario, Eunice; Cabrera, Betty L.; Huang, Sherry C.; Chow, Jimmy Y. C.; Carethers, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, which utilize BMP receptors and intracellular SMADs to transduce their signals to regulate cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Because mutations in BMP receptor type IA (BMPRIA) and SMAD4 are found in the germline of patients with the colon cancer predisposition syndrome juvenile polyposis, and because the contribution of BMP in colon cancers is largely unknown, we examined colon cancer cells and tissues for evidence of BMP signaling and determined its growth effects. We determined the presence and functionality of BMPR1A by examining BMP-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of SMAD1; transcriptional activity via a BMP-specific luciferase reporter; and growth characteristics by cell cycle analysis, cell growth, and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide metabolic as-says. These assays were also performed after transfection with a dominant negative (DN) BMPR1A construct. In SMAD4-null SW480 cells, we examined BMP effects on cellular wound assays as well as BMP-induced transcription in the presence of transfected SMAD4. We also determined the expression of BMPR1A, BMP ligands, and phospho-SMAD1 in primary human colon cancer specimens. We found intact BMP signaling and modest growth suppression in HCT116 and two derivative cell lines and, surprisingly, growth suppression in SMAD4-null SW480 cells. BMP-induced SMAD signaling and BMPR1A-mediated growth suppression were reversed with DN BMPR1A transfection. BMP2 slowed wound closure, and transfection of SMAD4 into SW480 cells did not change BMP-specific transcriptional activity over controls due to receptor stimulation by endogenously produced ligand. We found no cell cycle alterations with BMP treatment in the HCT116 and derivative cell lines, but there was an increased G1 fraction in SW480 cells that was not due to increased p21 transcription. In human colon cancer

  10. Tumor growth suppression by the combination of nanobubbles and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryo; Oda, Yusuke; Omata, Daiki; Nishiie, Norihito; Koshima, Risa; Shiono, Yasuyuki; Sawaguchi, Yoshikazu; Unga, Johan; Naoi, Tomoyuki; Negishi, Yoichi; Kawakami, Shigeru; Hashida, Mitsuru; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    We previously developed novel liposomal nanobubbles (Bubble liposomes [BL]) that oscillate and collapse in an ultrasound field, generating heat and shock waves. We aimed to investigate the feasibility of cancer therapy using the combination of BL and ultrasound. In addition, we investigated the anti-tumor mechanism of this cancer therapy. Colon-26 cells were inoculated into the flank of BALB/c mice to induce tumors. After 8 days, BL or saline was intratumorally injected, followed by transdermal ultrasound exposure of tumor tissue (1 MHz, 0-4 W/cm2 , 2 min). The anti-tumor effects were evaluated by histology (necrosis) and tumor growth. In vivo cell depletion assays were performed to identify the immune cells responsible for anti-tumor effects. Tumor temperatures were significantly higher when treated with BL + ultrasound than ultrasound alone. Intratumoral BL caused extensive tissue necrosis at 3-4 W/cm2 of ultrasound exposure. In addition, BL + ultrasound significantly suppressed tumor growth at 2-4 W/cm2 . In vivo depletion of CD8+ T cells (not NK or CD4+ T cells) completely blocked the effect of BL + ultrasound on tumor growth. These data suggest that CD8+ T cells play a critical role in tumor growth suppression. Finally, we concluded that BL + ultrasound, which can prime the anti-tumor cellular immune system, may be an effective hyperthermia strategy for cancer treatment.

  11. Predicting Affective Information - An Evaluation of Repetition Suppression Effects.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Sabrina; Kotz, Sonja A

    2016-01-01

    Both theoretical proposals and empirical studies suggest that the brain interprets sensory input based on expectations to mitigate computational burden. However, as social beings, much of sensory input is affectively loaded - e.g., the smile of a partner, the critical voice of a boss, or the welcoming gesture of a friend. Given that affective information is highly complex and often ambiguous, building up expectations of upcoming affective sensory input may greatly contribute to its rapid and efficient processing. This review points to the role of affective information in the context of the 'predictive brain'. It particularly focuses on repetition suppression (RS) effects that have recently been linked to prediction processes. The findings are interpreted as evidence for more pronounced prediction processes with affective material. Importantly, it is argued that bottom-up attention inflates the neural RS effect, and because affective stimuli tend to attract more bottom-up attention, it thereby particularly overshadows the magnitude of RS effects for this information. Finally, anxiety disorders, such as social phobia, are briefly discussed as manifestations of modulations in affective prediction. PMID:27667980

  12. Predicting Affective Information – An Evaluation of Repetition Suppression Effects

    PubMed Central

    Trapp, Sabrina; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2016-01-01

    Both theoretical proposals and empirical studies suggest that the brain interprets sensory input based on expectations to mitigate computational burden. However, as social beings, much of sensory input is affectively loaded – e.g., the smile of a partner, the critical voice of a boss, or the welcoming gesture of a friend. Given that affective information is highly complex and often ambiguous, building up expectations of upcoming affective sensory input may greatly contribute to its rapid and efficient processing. This review points to the role of affective information in the context of the ‘predictive brain’. It particularly focuses on repetition suppression (RS) effects that have recently been linked to prediction processes. The findings are interpreted as evidence for more pronounced prediction processes with affective material. Importantly, it is argued that bottom-up attention inflates the neural RS effect, and because affective stimuli tend to attract more bottom-up attention, it thereby particularly overshadows the magnitude of RS effects for this information. Finally, anxiety disorders, such as social phobia, are briefly discussed as manifestations of modulations in affective prediction.

  13. Predicting Affective Information – An Evaluation of Repetition Suppression Effects

    PubMed Central

    Trapp, Sabrina; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2016-01-01

    Both theoretical proposals and empirical studies suggest that the brain interprets sensory input based on expectations to mitigate computational burden. However, as social beings, much of sensory input is affectively loaded – e.g., the smile of a partner, the critical voice of a boss, or the welcoming gesture of a friend. Given that affective information is highly complex and often ambiguous, building up expectations of upcoming affective sensory input may greatly contribute to its rapid and efficient processing. This review points to the role of affective information in the context of the ‘predictive brain’. It particularly focuses on repetition suppression (RS) effects that have recently been linked to prediction processes. The findings are interpreted as evidence for more pronounced prediction processes with affective material. Importantly, it is argued that bottom-up attention inflates the neural RS effect, and because affective stimuli tend to attract more bottom-up attention, it thereby particularly overshadows the magnitude of RS effects for this information. Finally, anxiety disorders, such as social phobia, are briefly discussed as manifestations of modulations in affective prediction. PMID:27667980

  14. Suppressing The Growth Of Dendrites In Secondary Li Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Evan D.; Perrone, David E.; Shen, David H.

    1996-01-01

    Proposed technique for suppressing growth of lithium dendrites in rechargeable lithium electrochemical power cells involves periodic interruption of steady charging current with short, high-current discharge pulses. Technique applicable to lithium cells of several different types, including Li/TiS(2), Li/NbSe(3), Li/CoO(2), Li/MoS(2), Li/Vo(x), and Li/MnO(2). Cells candidates for use in spacecraft, military, communications, automotive, and other applications in which high-energy-density rechargeable batteries needed.

  15. Evaluating the Predictive Value of Growth Prediction Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Daniel L.; Gaertner, Matthew N.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates four growth prediction models--projection, student growth percentile, trajectory, and transition table--commonly used to forecast (and give schools credit for) middle school students' future proficiency. Analyses focused on vertically scaled summative mathematics assessments, and two performance standards conditions (high…

  16. Inhibiting Delta-6 Desaturase Activity Suppresses Tumor Growth in Mice

    PubMed Central

    He, Chengwei; Qu, Xiying; Wan, Jianbo; Rong, Rong; Huang, Lili; Cai, Chun; Zhou, Keyuan; Gu, Yan; Qian, Steven Y.; Kang, Jing X.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that a tumor-supportive microenvironment is characterized by high levels of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic eicosanoids derived from omega-6 (n−6) arachidonic acid (AA). Although the metabolic pathways (COX, LOX, and P450) that generate these n−6 AA eicosanoids have been targeted, the role of endogenous AA production in tumorigenesis remains unexplored. Delta-6 desaturase (D6D) is the rate-limiting enzyme responsible for the synthesis of n−6 AA and increased D6D activity can lead to enhanced n−6 AA production. Here, we show that D6D activity is upregulated during melanoma and lung tumor growth and that suppressing D6D activity, either by RNAi knockdown or a specific D6D inhibitor, dramatically reduces tumor growth. Accordingly, the content of AA and AA-derived tumor-promoting metabolites is significantly decreased. Angiogenesis and inflammatory status are also reduced. These results identify D6D as a key factor for tumor growth and as a potential target for cancer therapy and prevention. PMID:23112819

  17. Abrogating Cholesterol Esterification Suppresses Growth and Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junjie; Gu, Dongsheng; Lee, Steve Seung-Young; Song, Bing; Bandyopadhyay, Shovik; Chen, Shaoxiong; Konieczny, Stephen F.; Ratliff, Timothy L.; Liu, Xiaoqi; Xie, Jingwu; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells are known to execute reprogramed metabolism of glucose, amino acids, and lipids. Here, we report a significant role of cholesterol metabolism in cancer metastasis. By employing label-free Raman spectromicroscopy, we found an aberrant accumulation of cholesteryl ester in human pancreatic cancer specimens and cell lines, mediated by acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) enzyme. Expression of ACAT-1 showed a correlation with poor patient survival. Abrogation of cholesterol esterification, either by an ACAT-1 inhibitor or by shRNA knockdown, significantly suppressed tumor growth and metastasis in an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Mechanically, ACAT-1 inhibition increased intracellular free cholesterol level, which was associated with elevated endoplasmic reticulum stress and caused apoptosis. Collectively, our results demonstrate a new strategy for treating metastatic pancreatic cancer by inhibiting cholesterol esterification. PMID:27132508

  18. Probiotics modulated gut microbiota suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Sung, Cecilia Ying Ju; Lee, Nikki; Ni, Yueqiong; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Panagiotou, Gianni; El-Nezami, Hani

    2016-03-01

    The beneficial roles of probiotics in lowering the gastrointestinal inflammation and preventing colorectal cancer have been frequently demonstrated, but their immunomodulatory effects and mechanism in suppressing the growth of extraintestinal tumors remain unexplored. Here, we adopted a mouse model and metagenome sequencing to investigate the efficacy of probiotic feeding in controlling s.c. hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the underlying mechanism suppressing the tumor progression. Our result demonstrated that Prohep, a novel probiotic mixture, slows down the tumor growth significantly and reduces the tumor size and weight by 40% compared with the control. From a mechanistic point of view the down-regulated IL-17 cytokine and its major producer Th17 cells, whose levels decreased drastically, played critical roles in tumor reduction upon probiotics feeding. Cell staining illustrated that the reduced Th17 cells in the tumor of the probiotic-treated group is mainly caused by the reduced frequency of migratory Th17 cells from the intestine and peripheral blood. In addition, shotgun-metagenome sequencing revealed the crosstalk between gut microbial metabolites and the HCC development. Probiotics shifted the gut microbial community toward certain beneficial bacteria, including Prevotella and Oscillibacter, that are known producers of antiinflammatory metabolites, which subsequently reduced the Th17 polarization and promoted the differentiation of antiinflammatory Treg/Tr1 cells in the gut. Overall, our study offers novel insights into the mechanism by which probiotic treatment modulates the microbiota and influences the regulation of the T-cell differentiation in the gut, which in turn alters the level of the proinflammatory cytokines in the extraintestinal tumor microenvironment. PMID:26884164

  19. Probiotics modulated gut microbiota suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Sung, Cecilia Ying Ju; Lee, Nikki; Ni, Yueqiong; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Panagiotou, Gianni; El-Nezami, Hani

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial roles of probiotics in lowering the gastrointestinal inflammation and preventing colorectal cancer have been frequently demonstrated, but their immunomodulatory effects and mechanism in suppressing the growth of extraintestinal tumors remain unexplored. Here, we adopted a mouse model and metagenome sequencing to investigate the efficacy of probiotic feeding in controlling s.c. hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the underlying mechanism suppressing the tumor progression. Our result demonstrated that Prohep, a novel probiotic mixture, slows down the tumor growth significantly and reduces the tumor size and weight by 40% compared with the control. From a mechanistic point of view the down-regulated IL-17 cytokine and its major producer Th17 cells, whose levels decreased drastically, played critical roles in tumor reduction upon probiotics feeding. Cell staining illustrated that the reduced Th17 cells in the tumor of the probiotic-treated group is mainly caused by the reduced frequency of migratory Th17 cells from the intestine and peripheral blood. In addition, shotgun-metagenome sequencing revealed the crosstalk between gut microbial metabolites and the HCC development. Probiotics shifted the gut microbial community toward certain beneficial bacteria, including Prevotella and Oscillibacter, that are known producers of antiinflammatory metabolites, which subsequently reduced the Th17 polarization and promoted the differentiation of antiinflammatory Treg/Tr1 cells in the gut. Overall, our study offers novel insights into the mechanism by which probiotic treatment modulates the microbiota and influences the regulation of the T-cell differentiation in the gut, which in turn alters the level of the proinflammatory cytokines in the extraintestinal tumor microenvironment. PMID:26884164

  20. Predictive factors for intrauterine growth restriction

    PubMed Central

    Albu, AR; Anca, AF; Horhoianu, VV; Horhoianu, IA

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Reduced fetal growth is seen in about 10% of the pregnancies but only a minority has a pathological background and is known as intrauterine growth restriction or fetal growth restriction (IUGR / FGR). Increased fetal and neonatal mortality and morbidity as well as adult pathologic conditions are often associated to IUGR. Risk factors for IUGR are easy to assess but have poor predictive value. For the diagnostic purpose, biochemical serum markers, ultrasound and Doppler study of uterine and spiral arteries, placental volume and vascularization, first trimester growth pattern are object of assessment today. Modern evaluations propose combined algorithms using these strategies, all with the goal of a better prediction of risk pregnancies. Abbreviations: SGA = small for gestational age; IUGR = intrauterine growth restriction; FGR = fetal growth restriction; IUFD = intrauterine fetal demise; HIV = human immunodeficiency virus; PAPP-A = pregnancy associated plasmatic protein A; β-hCG = beta human chorionic gonadotropin; MoM = multiple of median; ADAM-12 = A-disintegrin and metalloprotease 12; PP-13 = placental protein 13; VEGF = vascular endothelial growth factor; PlGF = placental growth factor; sFlt-1 = soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1; UAD = uterine arteries Doppler ultrasound; RI = resistence index; PI = pulsatility index; VOCAL = Virtual Organ Computer–Aided Analysis software; VI = vascularization index; FI = flow index; VFI = vascularization flow index; PQ = placental quotient PMID:25408721

  1. Predicting cellular growth from gene expression signatures.

    PubMed

    Airoldi, Edoardo M; Huttenhower, Curtis; Gresham, David; Lu, Charles; Caudy, Amy A; Dunham, Maitreya J; Broach, James R; Botstein, David; Troyanskaya, Olga G

    2009-01-01

    Maintaining balanced growth in a changing environment is a fundamental systems-level challenge for cellular physiology, particularly in microorganisms. While the complete set of regulatory and functional pathways supporting growth and cellular proliferation are not yet known, portions of them are well understood. In particular, cellular proliferation is governed by mechanisms that are highly conserved from unicellular to multicellular organisms, and the disruption of these processes in metazoans is a major factor in the development of cancer. In this paper, we develop statistical methodology to identify quantitative aspects of the regulatory mechanisms underlying cellular proliferation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that the expression levels of a small set of genes can be exploited to predict the instantaneous growth rate of any cellular culture with high accuracy. The predictions obtained in this fashion are robust to changing biological conditions, experimental methods, and technological platforms. The proposed model is also effective in predicting growth rates for the related yeast Saccharomyces bayanus and the highly diverged yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, suggesting that the underlying regulatory signature is conserved across a wide range of unicellular evolution. We investigate the biological significance of the gene expression signature that the predictions are based upon from multiple perspectives: by perturbing the regulatory network through the Ras/PKA pathway, observing strong upregulation of growth rate even in the absence of appropriate nutrients, and discovering putative transcription factor binding sites, observing enrichment in growth-correlated genes. More broadly, the proposed methodology enables biological insights about growth at an instantaneous time scale, inaccessible by direct experimental methods. Data and tools enabling others to apply our methods are available at http://function.princeton.edu/growthrate.

  2. Osteocytic Connexin Hemichannels Suppress Breast Cancer Growth and Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jade Z.; Riquelme, Manuel A.; Gu, Sumin; Kar, Rekha; Gao, Xiaoli; Sun, LuZhe; Jiang, Jean X.

    2016-01-01

    Although the skeleton is one of predominant sites for breast cancer metastasis, why breast cancer cells often become dormant after homing to bone is not well understood. Here, we reported an intrinsic self-defense mechanism of bone cells against breast cancer cells: a critical role of connexin (Cx) 43 hemichannels in osteocytes in the suppression of breast cancer bone metastasis. Cx43 hemichannels allow passage of small molecules between the intracellular and extracellular environments. The treatment of bisphosphonate drugs, either alendronate (ALN) or zoledronic acid (ZOL), opened Cx43 hemichannels in osteocytes. Conditioned media (CM) collected from MLO-Y4 osteocyte cells treated with bisphosphonates inhibited the anchorage-independent growth, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells and Py8119 mouse mammary carcinoma cells and this inhibitory effect was attenuated with Cx43(E2), a specific hemichannel blocking antibody. The opening of osteocytic Cx43 hemichannels by mechanical stimulation had similar inhibitory effects on breast cancer cells and this inhibition was attenuated by Cx43(E2) antibody as well. These inhibitory effects on cancer cells were mediated by ATP released from osteocyte Cx43 hemichannels. Furthermore, both Cx43 osteocyte-specific knockout mice and osteocyte-specific Δ130–136 transgenic mice with impaired Cx43 gap junctions and hemichannels showed significantly increased tumor growth and attenuated the inhibitory effect of ZOL. However, R76W transgenic mice with functional hemichannels but not gap junctions in osteocytes did not display a significant difference. Together, our studies establish the specific inhibitory role of osteocytic Cx43 hemichannels, and exploiting the activity of this channel could serve as a de novo therapeutic strategy. PMID:27041582

  3. Can supplementary dietary fibre suppress breast cancer growth?

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    Case-control studies in diverse populations around the world have reported a lower risk of breast cancer in association with higher intake of dietary fibre and complex carbohydrates. Although this has not been confirmed in prospective studies in the USA, the observations have prompted the hypothesis that prolonged use of dietary fibre supplements might reduce breast cancer risk in high-incidence populations. Several possible mechanisms of action have been suggested, all involving a reduction of bioactive oestrogen levels in the blood. The various mechanisms are not necessarily mutually exclusive. First, a high-fibre diet might reduce circulating oestrogen levels by reducing the enterohepatic recirculation of oestrogen. Second, many plants and vegetables contain isoflavones and lignans capable of conversion in the bowel into weak oestrogens that may compete with oestradiol for target binding-sites. Third, a high-fibre diet is less often associated with obesity, which tends to increase availability of the biologically active 16-alpha metabolites of oestrone. Fourth, a high-fibre diet usually has a lower content of fat and a higher content of antioxidant vitamins, which may protect against breast cancer risk. Finally, diets rich in fibre and complex carbohydrates have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity, with an associated reduction in circulating oestrogen levels. Synergism between these effects offers a possible mechanism by which a high fibre intake might suppress breast cancer growth in women. PMID:8605086

  4. Maturation of cochlear nonlinearity as measured by distortion product otoacoustic emission suppression growth in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdala, Caroline; Chatterjee, Monita

    2003-08-01

    The growth of distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) suppression follows a systematic, frequency-dependent pattern. The pattern is consistent with direct measures of basilar-membrane response growth, psychoacoustic measures of masking growth, and measures of neural rate growth. This pattern has its basis in the recognized nonlinear properties of basilar-membrane motion and, as such, the DPOAE suppression growth paradigm can be applied to human neonates to study the maturation of cochlear nonlinearity. The objective of this experiment was to investigate the maturation of human cochlear nonlinearity and define the time course for this maturational process. Normal-hearing adults, children, term-born neonates, and premature neonates, plus a small number of children with sensorineural hearing loss, were included in this experiment. DPOAE suppression growth was measured at two f2 frequencies (1500 and 6000 Hz) and three primary tone levels (55-45, 65-55, and 75-65 dB SPL). Slope of DPOAE suppression growth, as well as an asymmetry ratio (to compare slope for suppressor tones below and above f2 frequency), were generated. Suppression threshold was also measured in all subjects. Findings indicate that both term-born neonates and premature neonates who have attained term-like age, show non-adult-like DPOAE suppression growth for low-frequency suppressor tones. These age effects are most evident at f2=6000 Hz. In neonates, suppression growth is shallower and suppression thresholds are elevated for suppressor tones lower in frequency than f2. Additionally, the asymmetry ratio is smaller in neonates, indicating that the typical frequency-dependent pattern of suppression growth is not present. These findings suggest that an immaturity of cochlear nonlinearity persists into the first months of postnatal life. DPOAE suppression growth examined for a small group of hearing-impaired children also showed abnormalities.

  5. Water relations, gas exchange and growth of dominant and suppressed shoots of Arbutus unedo L.

    PubMed

    Castell, C; Terradas, J

    1995-06-01

    Basal shoots produced by Arbutus unedo L. after cutting at ground level vary in size and growth rate, and are classified accordingly as dominant or suppressed. The suppressed shoots eventually cease growth and die. In this study, we investigated the role of light and water in the competition among shoots of A. unedo. Dominant and suppressed shoots of A. unedo showed similar leaf water potentials and tissue water relations over the year, suggesting that water status is not responsible for the lack of flushing in suppressed shoots. Although suppressed shoots did not flush under low light, they showed many characteristics of shade-tolerant plants. Leaves of suppressed shoots had lower leaf conductance and light-saturated photosynthetic rate, and higher specific leaf area than leaves of dominant shoots. We conclude that light was the main resource determining competition among shoots and the death of suppressed shoots. PMID:14965950

  6. TatC-dependent translocation of pyoverdine is responsible for the microbial growth suppression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeji; Kim, Yong-Jae; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Yu, Hyung Eun; Lee, Kiho; Jin, Shouguang; Ha, Un-Hwan

    2016-02-01

    Infections are often not caused by a colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa alone but by a consortium of other bacteria. Little is known about the impact of P. aeruginosa on the growth of other bacteria upon coinfection. Here, cell-ree culture supernatants obtained from P. aeruginosa suppressed the growth of a number of bacterial strains such as Corynebacterium glutamicum, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens, but had little effect on the growth of Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium. The growth suppression effect was obvious when P. aeruginosa was cultivated in M9 minimal media, and the suppression was not due to pyocyanin, a well-known antimicrobial toxin secreted by P. aeruginosa. By performing transposon mutagenesis, PA5070 encoding TatC was identified, and the culture supernatant of its mutant did not suppress the growth. HPLC analysis of supernatants showed that pyoverdine was a secondary metabolite present in culture supernatants of the wild-type strain, but not in those of the PA5070 mutant. Supplementation of FeCl2 as a source of iron compromised the growth suppression effect of supernatants and also recovered biofilm formation of S. aureus, indicating that pyoverdine-mediated iron acquisition is responsible for the growth suppression. Thus, this study provides the action of TatC-dependent pyoverdine translocation for the growth suppression of other bacteria, and it might aid understanding of the impact of P. aeruginosa in the complex community of bacterial species upon coinfection. PMID:26832668

  7. Suppression of inhomogeneous segregation in graphene growth on epitaxial metal films.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Shigeo; Nozawa, Katsuya; Toyoda, Kenji; Matsukawa, Nozomu; Odagawa, Akihiro; Tsujimura, Ayumu

    2011-07-13

    Large-scale uniform graphene growth was achieved by suppressing inhomogeneous carbon segregation using a single domain Ru film epitaxially grown on a sapphire substrate. An investigation of how the metal thickness affected growth and a comparative study on metals with different crystal structures have revealed that locally enhanced carbon segregation at stacking domain boundaries of metal is the origin of inhomogeneous graphene growth. Single domain Ru film has no stacking domain boundary, and the graphene growth on it is mainly caused not by segregation but by a surface catalytic reaction. Suppression of local segregation is essential for uniform graphene growth on epitaxial metal films. PMID:21648391

  8. Prediction suppression in monkey inferotemporal cortex depends on the conditional probability between images.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Suchitra; Meyer, Travis; Olson, Carl R

    2016-01-01

    When monkeys view two images in fixed sequence repeatedly over days and weeks, neurons in area TE of the inferotemporal cortex come to exhibit prediction suppression. The trailing image elicits only a weak response when presented following the leading image that preceded it during training. Induction of prediction suppression might depend either on the contiguity of the images, as determined by their co-occurrence and captured in the measure of joint probability P(A,B), or on their contingency, as determined by their correlation and as captured in the measures of conditional probability P(A|B) and P(B|A). To distinguish between these possibilities, we measured prediction suppression after imposing training regimens that held P(A,B) constant but varied P(A|B) and P(B|A). We found that reducing either P(A|B) or P(B|A) during training attenuated prediction suppression as measured during subsequent testing. We conclude that prediction suppression depends on contingency, as embodied in the predictive relations between the images, and not just on contiguity, as embodied in their co-occurrence.

  9. Total triterpenoids from Ganoderma Lucidum suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Xie, Zi-ping; Huang, Zhan-sen; Li, Hao; Wei, An-yang; Di, Jin-ming; Xiao, Heng-jun; Zhang, Zhi-gang; Cai, Liu-hong; Tao, Xin; Qi, Tao; Chen, Di-ling; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, one immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell line (BPH) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, 22Rv1, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with Ganoderma Lucidum triterpenoids (GLT) at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle were analyzed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR and Western blotting. It was found that GLT dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. GLT-induced apoptosis was due to activation of Caspases-9 and -3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. GLT-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and E2F1 expression at the late time. These findings demonstrate that GLT suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which might suggest that GLT or Ganoderma Lucidum could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer. PMID:26489631

  10. Total triterpenoids from Ganoderma Lucidum suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Xie, Zi-ping; Huang, Zhan-sen; Li, Hao; Wei, An-yang; Di, Jin-ming; Xiao, Heng-jun; Zhang, Zhi-gang; Cai, Liu-hong; Tao, Xin; Qi, Tao; Chen, Di-ling; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, one immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell line (BPH) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, 22Rv1, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with Ganoderma Lucidum triterpenoids (GLT) at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle were analyzed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR and Western blotting. It was found that GLT dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. GLT-induced apoptosis was due to activation of Caspases-9 and -3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. GLT-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and E2F1 expression at the late time. These findings demonstrate that GLT suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which might suggest that GLT or Ganoderma Lucidum could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer.

  11. Prediction of delamination growth under cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, R.; Koenig, M.

    1997-12-31

    The growth of delaminations in carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy (CFRE) specimens during R = 0.1 and R = {minus}1 fatigue loading has been studied. Artificial circular and square delaminations as well as ply cuts have been introduced at various interfaces during manufacturing to simulate a pre-damaged structure and to cause delamination growth. Criteria based on fracture mechanics will be used to describe the delamination failure. Predicting delamination growth with this approach requires the distribution of the local energy release rate along the delamination front. For obtaining this energy release rate distribution, the virtual crack closure method was found to be most favorable for three-dimensional finite element analysis as the separation of the total energy release rate into the contributing modes is inherent to the method and only one complete finite element analysis is necessary. Plots of measured delamination progression per load cycle (da/dN-values) versus computed energy release rates have been included in a Paris law diagram as obtained experimentally using double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens to characterize Mode 1 and end-notched flexure (ENF) and transverse crack tension (TCT) specimens to characterize Mode 2 failure, respectively. Computed mixed-mode results lie well within the scatter band of the experimentally determined Paris law for Mode 1 and Mode 2 failure.

  12. Plant growth hormones suppress the development of Harpophora maydis, the cause of late wilt in maize.

    PubMed

    Degani, Ofir; Drori, Ran; Goldblat, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    Late wilt, a severe vascular disease of maize caused by the fungus Harpophora maydis, is characterized by rapid wilting of maize plants before tasseling and until shortly before maturity. The pathogen is currently controlled by resistant maize cultivars, but the disease is constantly spreading to new areas. The plant's late phenological stage at which the disease appears suggests that plant hormones may be involved in the pathogenesis. This work revealed that plant growth hormones, auxin (Indole-3-acetic acid) and cytokinin (kinetin), suppress H. maydis in culture media and in a detached root assay. Kinetin, and even more auxin, caused significant suppression of fungus spore germination. Gibberellic acid did not alter colony growth rate but had a signal suppressive effect on the pathogens' spore germination. In comparison, ethylene and jasmonic acid, plant senescing and defense response regulators, had minor effects on colony growth and spore germination rate. Their associate hormone, salicylic acid, had a moderate suppressive effect on spore germination and colony growth rate, and a strong influence when combined with auxin. Despite the anti-fungal auxin success in vitro, field experiments with dimethylamine salt of  2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (that mimics the influence of auxin) failed to suppress the late wilt. The lines of evidence presented here reveal the suppressive influence of the three growth hormones studied on fungal development and are important to encourage further and more in-depth examinations of this intriguing hormonal complex regulatory and its role in the maize-H. maydis interactions. PMID:25649030

  13. Plant growth hormones suppress the development of Harpophora maydis, the cause of late wilt in maize.

    PubMed

    Degani, Ofir; Drori, Ran; Goldblat, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    Late wilt, a severe vascular disease of maize caused by the fungus Harpophora maydis, is characterized by rapid wilting of maize plants before tasseling and until shortly before maturity. The pathogen is currently controlled by resistant maize cultivars, but the disease is constantly spreading to new areas. The plant's late phenological stage at which the disease appears suggests that plant hormones may be involved in the pathogenesis. This work revealed that plant growth hormones, auxin (Indole-3-acetic acid) and cytokinin (kinetin), suppress H. maydis in culture media and in a detached root assay. Kinetin, and even more auxin, caused significant suppression of fungus spore germination. Gibberellic acid did not alter colony growth rate but had a signal suppressive effect on the pathogens' spore germination. In comparison, ethylene and jasmonic acid, plant senescing and defense response regulators, had minor effects on colony growth and spore germination rate. Their associate hormone, salicylic acid, had a moderate suppressive effect on spore germination and colony growth rate, and a strong influence when combined with auxin. Despite the anti-fungal auxin success in vitro, field experiments with dimethylamine salt of  2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (that mimics the influence of auxin) failed to suppress the late wilt. The lines of evidence presented here reveal the suppressive influence of the three growth hormones studied on fungal development and are important to encourage further and more in-depth examinations of this intriguing hormonal complex regulatory and its role in the maize-H. maydis interactions.

  14. MiR-30a-5p suppresses tumor growth in colon carcinoma by targeting DTL.

    PubMed

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid; Zöllner, Hannah; Munding, Johanna; Klein-Scory, Susanne; Reinacher-Schick, Anke; Schwarte-Waldhoff, Irmgard; Schmiegel, Wolff; Hahn, Stephan A

    2012-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that are involved in different biological processes by suppressing target gene expression. Altered expression of miR-30a-5p has been reported in colon carcinoma. To elucidate its potential biological role in colon cancer, miR-30a-5p was overexpressed via a lentiviral vector system in two different colon cancer cell lines. This induced in both lines miR-30a-5p-mediated growth inhibition, attributable to a cell cycle arrest at the G(1) phase and an induction of apoptosis. Combining global gene expression analyses of miR-30a-5p transgenic line HCT116 with in silico miRNA target prediction, we identified the denticleless protein homolog (DTL) as a potential miRNA-30a-5p target. Subsequent reporter gene assays confirmed the predicted miR-30a-5p binding site in the 3'untranslated region of DTL. Importantly, overexpression of DTL in HCT116 cells partially rescued these cells from miR-30a-5p-mediated growth suppression. In addition, TP53 and CDKN1A expression were increased in miR-30a-5p-overexpressing HCT116 cells, suggesting that miR-30a-5p is able to modulate the cell cycle via a DTL-TP53-CDKN1A regulatory circuit. Finally, 379 colorectal cancer tissues were screened for DTL expression and DTL was found to be overexpressed in 95.8% of human colorectal cancers compared with normal colon mucosa. In conclusion, our data identified miR-30a-5p as a tumor-suppressing miRNA in colon cancer cells exerting its function via modulation of DTL expression, which is frequently overexpressed in colorectal cancer. Thus, our data suggest that restoring miR-30a-5p function may prove useful as therapeutic strategy for tumors with reduced miR-30a-5p expression.

  15. Prediction, Measurement, and Suppression of High Temperature Supersonic Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, John M.; Bhat, T. R. S.; Jansen, Bernard J.

    1999-01-01

    The photograph in figure 1 displays a water cooled round convergent-divergent supersonic nozzle operating slightly overexpanded near 2460 F. The nozzle is designed to produce shock free flow near this temperature at Mach 2. The exit diameter of this nozzle is 3.5 inches. This nozzle is used in the present study to establish properties of the sound field associated with high temperature supersonic jets operating fully pressure balanced (i.e. shock free) and to evaluate capability of the compressible Rayleigh model to account for principle physical features of the observed sound emission. The experiment is conducted statically (i.e. M(sub f) = 0.) in the NASA/LaRC Jet Noise Laboratory. Both aerodynamic and acoustic measurements are obtained in this study along with numerical plume simulation and theoretical prediction of jet noise. Detailed results from this study are reported previously by Seiner, Ponton, Jansen, and Lagen.

  16. Evidence for yellow light suppression of lettuce growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougher, T. A.; Bugbee, B.

    2001-01-01

    Researchers studying plant growth under different lamp types often attribute differences in growth to a blue light response. Lettuce plants were grown in six blue light treatments comprising five blue light fractions (0, 2, 6% from high-pressure sodium [HPS] lamps and 6, 12, 26% from metal halide [MH] lamps). Lettuce chlorophyll concentration, dry mass, leaf area and specific leaf area under the HPS and MH 6% blue were significantly different, suggesting wavelengths other than blue and red affected plant growth. Results were reproducible in two replicate studies at each of two photosynthetic photon fluxes, 200 and 500 mumol m-2 s-1. We graphed the data against absolute blue light, phytochrome photoequilibrium, phototropic blue, UV, red:far red, blue:red, blue: far red and 'yellow' light fraction. Only the 'yellow' wavelength range (580-600 nm) explained the differences between the two lamp types.

  17. The melanoma differentiation associated gene mda-7 suppresses cancer cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, H; Su, Z Z; Lin, J J; Goldstein, N I; Young, C S; Fisher, P B

    1996-01-01

    Cancer is a disease characterized by defects in growth control, and tumor cells often display abnormal patterns of cellular differentiation. The combination of recombinant human fibroblast interferon and the antileukemic agent mezerein corrects these abnormalities in cultured human melanoma cells resulting in irreversible growth arrest and terminal differentiation. Subtraction hybridization identifies a melanoma differentiation associated gene (mda-7) with elevated expression in growth arrested and terminally differentiated human melanoma cells. Colony formation decreases when mda-7 is transfected into human tumor cells of diverse origin and with multiple genetic defects. In contrast, the effects of mda-7 on growth and colony formation in transient transfection assays with normal cells, including human mammary epithelial, human skin fibroblast, and rat embryo fibroblast, is quantitatively less than that found with cancer cells. Tumor cells expressing elevated mda-7 display suppression in monolayer growth and anchorage independence. Infection with a recombinant type 5 adenovirus expressing antisense mda-7 eliminates mda-7 suppression of the in vitro growth and transformed phenotype. The ability of mda-7 to suppress growth in cancer cells not expressing or containing defects in both the retinoblastoma (RB) and p53 genes indicates a lack of involvement of these critical tumor suppressor elements in mediating mda-7-induced growth inhibition. The lack of protein homology of mda-7 with previously described growth suppressing genes and the differential effect of this gene on normal versus cancer cells suggests that mda-7 may represent a new class of cancer growth suppressing genes with antitumor activity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8799171

  18. Rapid Suppression of Growth by Blue Light 1

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.; Green, Paul B.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of the rapid inhibition of hypocotyl elongation by blue light was investigated in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedlings by measuring the changes in turgor during the response. A special device, based on the resonance frequency principle, was built which permitted simultaneous and continuous measurements of both tissue rigidity (turgor) and growth rate on a single intact hypocotyl. The large decrease in growth rate following blue irradiation was consistently accompanied by a small increase in resonance frequency. This result indicates that blue light inhibits growth by decreasing the yielding properties of the cell walls, resulting in a slight rise in turgor because of the coupling between growth rate and turgor. The nature of the blue-light inhibition was further studied by measuring the influence of light dose and temperature on the time course of inhibition (lag-time, half-time of inhibition, and amount of inhibition) with the aid of a microcomputer-based system for measuring growth rate and for controlling light duration and energy. The light dose has no influence on either the lag-time or the half-time of inhibition, but strongly affects the amount of inhibition. In contrast, a 10°C drop in temperature (from 30 to 20°C) lengthened the lag-time of the blue-light response, but did not significantly affect the half-time or the per cent inhibition by blue light. The half-time for changes in hypocotyl length (induced by applying a hydrostatic pressure to the roots or to the cut end of seedlings with roots excised) was found to be the same as the half-time of the blue-light inhibition (15 to 25 seconds in cucumber; 90 to 150 seconds in sunflower). These results support the idea that blue light, after a fixed lag period, induces an immediate decrease in the yielding properties of the cell walls. The growth rate subsequently decreases with a half-time that depends on the time required for cell turgor pressures to

  19. Triparanol suppresses human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Xinyu; Han, Xingpeng; Zhang, Fang; He, Miao; Zhang, Yi; Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Zhao, Hong

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can block proliferation in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can induce apoptosis in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proved Triparanol can inhibit Hedgehog signaling in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrated Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo in mouse xenograft model. -- Abstract: Despite the improved contemporary multidisciplinary regimens treating cancer, majority of cancer patients still suffer from adverse effects and relapse, therefore posing a significant challenge to uncover more efficacious molecular therapeutics targeting signaling pathways central to tumorigenesis. Here, our study have demonstrated that Triparanol, a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor, can block proliferation and induce apoptosis in multiple human cancer cells including lung, breast, liver, pancreatic, prostate cancer and melanoma cells, and growth inhibition can be rescued by exogenous addition of cholesterol. Remarkably, we have proved Triparanol can significantly repress Hedgehog pathway signaling in these human cancer cells. Furthermore, study in a mouse xenograft model of human lung cancer has validated that Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo. We have therefore uncovered Triparanol as potential new cancer therapeutic in treating multiple types of human cancers with deregulated Hedgehog signaling.

  20. Tumor Growth Suppression Induced by Biomimetic Silk Fibroin Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Le-Ping; Silva-Correia, Joana; Ribeiro, Viviana P.; Miranda-Gonçalves, Vera; Correia, Cristina; da Silva Morais, Alain; Sousa, Rui A.; Reis, Rui M.; Oliveira, Ana L.; Oliveira, Joaquim M.; Reis, Rui L.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-based hydrogels with distinct conformations which enable encapsulation or differentiation of cells are of great interest in 3D cancer research models. Conformational changes may cause macroscopic shifts in the hydrogels, allowing for its use as biosensors and drug carriers. In depth knowledge on how 3D conformational changes in proteins may affect cell fate and tumor formation is required. Thus, this study reports an enzymatically crosslinked silk fibroin (SF) hydrogel system that can undergo intrinsic conformation changes from random coil to β-sheet conformation. In random coil status, the SF hydrogels are transparent, elastic, and present ionic strength and pH stimuli-responses. The random coil hydrogels become β-sheet conformation after 10 days in vitro incubation and 14 days in vivo subcutaneous implantation in rat. When encapsulated with ATDC-5 cells, the random coil SF hydrogel promotes cell survival up to 7 days, whereas the subsequent β-sheet transition induces cell apoptosis in vitro. HeLa cells are further incorporated in SF hydrogels and the constructs are investigated in vitro and in an in vivo chick chorioallantoic membrane model for tumor formation. In vivo, Angiogenesis and tumor formation are suppressed in SF hydrogels. Therefore, these hydrogels provide new insights for cancer research and uses of biomaterials. PMID:27485515

  1. Growth suppression by ursodeoxycholic acid involves caveolin-1 enhanced degradation of EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Rebecca; Martinez, Jesse D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been shown to prevent colon tumorigenesis in animal models and in humans. In vitro work indicates that this bile acid can suppress cell growth and mitogenic signaling suggesting that UDCA may be an anti-proliferative agent. However, the mechanism by which UDCA functions is unclear. Previously we showed that bile acids may alter cellular signaling by acting at the plasma membrane. Here we utilized EGFR as a model membrane receptor and examined the effects that UDCA has on its functioning. We found that UDCA promoted an interaction between EGFR and caveolin-1 and this interaction enhanced UDCA-mediated suppression of MAP kinase activity and cell growth . Importantly, UDCA treatment led to recruitment of the ubiquitin ligase, c-Cbl, to the membrane, ubiquitination of EGFR, and increased receptor degradation. Moreover, suppression of c-Cbl activity abrogated UDCA's growth suppression activities suggesting that receptor ubiquitination plays an important role in UDCA's biological activities. Taken together these results suggest that UDCA may act to suppress cell growth by inhibiting the mitogenic activity of receptor tyrosine kinases such as EGFR through increased receptor degradation. PMID:19446582

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Las quorum sensing autoinducer suppresses growth and biofilm production in Legionella species.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Soichiro; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Horikawa, Manabu; Miyairi, Shinichi; Gotoh, Naomasa; Ishiguro, Masaji; Yamaguchi, Keizo

    2009-06-01

    Bacteria commonly communicate with each other by a cell-to-cell signalling mechanism known as quorum sensing (QS). Recent studies have shown that the Las QS autoinducer N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C(12)-HSL) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa performs a variety of functions not only in intraspecies communication, but also in interspecies and interkingdom interactions. In this study, we report the effects of Pseudomonas 3-oxo-C(12)-HSL on the growth and suppression of virulence factors in other bacterial species that frequently co-exist with Ps. aeruginosa in nature. It was found that 3-oxo-C(12)-HSL, but not its analogues, suppressed the growth of Legionella pneumophila in a dose-dependent manner. However, 3-oxo-C(12)-HSL did not exhibit a growth-suppressive effect on Serratia marcescens, Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli, Alcaligenes faecalis and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. A concentration of 50 microM 3-oxo-C(12)-HSL completely inhibited the growth of L. pneumophila. Additionally, a significant suppression of biofilm formation was demonstrated in L. pneumophila exposed to 3-oxo-C(12)-HSL. Our results suggest that the Pseudomonas QS autoinducer 3-oxo-C(12)-HSL exerts both bacteriostatic and virulence factor-suppressive activities on L. pneumophila alone.

  3. Sanguinarine suppresses prostate tumor growth and inhibits survivin expression.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meng; Lou, Wei; Chun, Jae Yeon; Cho, Daniel S; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Evans, Christopher P; Chen, Jun; Yue, Jiao; Zhou, Qinghua; Gao, Allen C

    2010-03-01

    Prostate cancer is a frequently occurring disease and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths of men in the United States. Current treatments have proved inadequate in curing or controlling prostate cancer, and a search for agents for the management of this disease is urgently needed. Survivin plays an important role in both progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer and resistance to chemotherapy. Altered expression of survivin in prostate cancer cells is associated with cancer progression, drug/radiation resistance, poor prognosis, and short patient survival. In the present study, the authors performed a cell-based rapid screen of the Prestwick Chemical Library consisting of 1120 Food and Drug Administration-approved compounds with known safety and bioavailability in humans to identify potential inhibitors of survivin and anticancer agents for prostate cancer. Sanguinarine, a benzophenanthridine alkaloid derived primarily from the bloodroot plant, was identified as a novel inhibitor of survivin that selectively kills prostate cancer cells over "normal" prostate epithelial cells. The authors found that sanguinarine inhibits survivin protein expression through protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Sanguinarine induces apoptosis and inhibits growth of human prostate cancer cells and in vivo tumor formation. Administration of sanguinarine, beginning 3 days after ectopic implantation of DU145 human prostate cancer cells, reduces both tumor weight and volume. In addition, sanguinarine sensitized paclitaxel-mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis, offering a potential therapeutic strategy for overcoming taxol resistance. These results suggest that sanguinarine may be developed as an agent either alone or in combination with taxol for treatment of prostate cancer overexpressing survivin. PMID:21318089

  4. Mechanisms of environmental chemicals that enable the cancer hallmark of evasion of growth suppression

    PubMed Central

    Nahta, Rita; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Andrade-Vieira, Rafaela; Bay, Sarah; G. Brown, Dustin; Calaf, Gloria M.; Castellino, Robert C.; Cohen-Solal, Karine A.; Colacci, Annamaria; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Dent, Paul; Di Fiore, Riccardo; Forte, Stefano; Goldberg, Gary S.; Hamid, Roslida A.; Krishnan, Harini; Laird, Dale W.; Lasfar, Ahmed; Marignani, Paola A.; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Naus, Christian C.; Ponce-Cusi, Richard; Raju, Jayadev; Roy, Debasish; Roy, Rabindra; P. Ryan, Elizabeth; Salem, Hosni K.; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Vento, Renza; Vondráček, Jan; Wade, Mark; Woodrick, Jordan; Bisson, William H.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Halifax Project, this review brings attention to the potential effects of environmental chemicals on important molecular and cellular regulators of the cancer hallmark of evading growth suppression. Specifically, we review the mechanisms by which cancer cells escape the growth-inhibitory signals of p53, retinoblastoma protein, transforming growth factor-beta, gap junctions and contact inhibition. We discuss the effects of selected environmental chemicals on these mechanisms of growth inhibition and cross-reference the effects of these chemicals in other classical cancer hallmarks. PMID:26106139

  5. Mechanisms of environmental chemicals that enable the cancer hallmark of evasion of growth suppression.

    PubMed

    Nahta, Rita; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Andrade-Vieira, Rafaela; Bay, Sarah N; Brown, Dustin G; Calaf, Gloria M; Castellino, Robert C; Cohen-Solal, Karine A; Colacci, Annamaria; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Dent, Paul; Di Fiore, Riccardo; Forte, Stefano; Goldberg, Gary S; Hamid, Roslida A; Krishnan, Harini; Laird, Dale W; Lasfar, Ahmed; Marignani, Paola A; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Naus, Christian C; Ponce-Cusi, Richard; Raju, Jayadev; Roy, Debasish; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Salem, Hosni K; Scovassi, A Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Vento, Renza; Vondráček, Jan; Wade, Mark; Woodrick, Jordan; Bisson, William H

    2015-06-01

    As part of the Halifax Project, this review brings attention to the potential effects of environmental chemicals on important molecular and cellular regulators of the cancer hallmark of evading growth suppression. Specifically, we review the mechanisms by which cancer cells escape the growth-inhibitory signals of p53, retinoblastoma protein, transforming growth factor-beta, gap junctions and contact inhibition. We discuss the effects of selected environmental chemicals on these mechanisms of growth inhibition and cross-reference the effects of these chemicals in other classical cancer hallmarks.

  6. Structural basis for cyclodextrins' suppression of human growth hormone aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Otzen, Daniel Erik; Knudsen, Benjamin Raerup; Aachmann, Finn; Larsen, Kim Lambertsen; Wimmer, Reinhard

    2002-01-01

    Many therapeutic proteins require storage at room temperature for extended periods of time. This can lead to aggregation and loss of function. Cyclodextrins (CDs) have been shown to function as aggregation suppressors for a wide range of proteins. Their potency is often ascribed to their affinity for aromatic amino acids, whose surface exposure would otherwise lead to protein association. However, no detailed structural studies are available. Here we investigate the interactions between human growth hormone (hGH) and different CDs at low pH. Although hGH aggregates readily at pH 2.5 in 1 M NaCl to form amorphous aggregates, the presence of 25 to 50 mM of various β-CD derivatives is sufficient to completely avoid this. α- and γ-CD are considerably less effective. Stopped-flow data on the aggregation reaction in the presence of β-CD are analyzed according to a minimalist association model to yield an apparent hGH-β-CD dissociation constant of ∼6 mM. This value is very similar to that obtained by simple fluorescence-based titration of hGH with β-CD. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies indicate that β-CD leads to a more unfolded conformation of hGH at low pH and predominantly binds to the aromatic side-chains. This indicates that aromatic amino acids are important components of regions of residual structure that may form nuclei for aggregation. PMID:12070330

  7. Human chromosome 3 mediates growth arrest and suppression of apoptosis in microcell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Speevak, M D; Chevrette, M

    1996-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic treatment of tumor cells leads either to tumor cell death (usually by apoptosis) or to the formation of drug-resistant subpopulations. Known mechanisms of cancer cell drug resistance include gene amplification and increased expression of drug transporters. On the other hand, normal cells survive many forms of chemotherapy with minimal damage probably because of their capacity for growth arrest and stringent control of apoptosis. Microcell hybrids between B78 (murine melanoma) and HSF5 (normal human fibroblasts) were analyzed to identify a new human chromosomal region involved in the promotion of drug-induced growth arrest and suppression of apoptosis. In these hybrids, the presence of human chromosome 3 was strongly associated with suppression of apoptosis via G1 and G2 growth arrest during exposure to the antimetabolite N-phosphonoacetyl-L-aspartate (PALA), suggesting that a gene(s) on chromosome 3 serves an antiproliferative role in a drug-responsive growth arrest pathway. PMID:8628288

  8. Cellular basis of growth suppression by submergence in azuki bean epicotyls

    PubMed Central

    Ooume, Kentaro; Inoue, Yuki; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Fujii, Shuhei; Yamamoto, Ryoichi; Hoson, Takayuki

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Complete submergence severely reduces growth rate and productivity of terrestrial plants, but much remains to be elucidated regarding the mechanisms involved. The aim of this study was to clarify the cellular basis of growth suppression by submergence in stems. Methods The effects of submergence on the viscoelastic extensibility of the cell wall and the cellular osmotic concentration were studied in azuki bean epicotyls. Modifications by submergence to chemical properties of the cell wall; levels of osmotic solutes and their translocation from the seed to epicotyls; and apoplastic pH and levels of ATP and ethanol were also examined. These cellular events underwater were compared in etiolated and in light-grown seedlings. Key Results Under submergence, the osmotic concentration of the cell sap was substantially decreased via decreased concentrations of organic compounds including sugars and amino acids. In contrast, the viscoelastic extensibility of the cell wall was kept high. Submergence also decreased ATP and increased the pH of the apoplastic solution. Alcoholic fermentation was stimulated underwater, but the resulting accumulated ethanol was not directly involved in growth suppression. Light partially relieved the inhibitory effects of submergence on growth, osmoregulation and sugar translocation. Conclusions A decrease in the levels of osmotic solutes is a main cause of underwater growth suppression in azuki bean epicotyls. This may be brought about by suppression of solute uptake via breakdown of the H+ gradient across the plasma membrane due to a decrease in ATP. The involvement of cell wall properties in underwater growth suppression remains to be fully elucidated. PMID:18940853

  9. Suppressing weed growth after wheat harvest with underseeded red clover in organic farming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic producers are seeking alternative tactics for weed control so that they can reduce their need for tillage. In this study, we examined cover crop strategies for suppressing weed growth after harvest of wheat. Two cover crop treatments, red clover (mammoth type) or a mixture of oat and dry p...

  10. Predicting lean growth while accounting for correlated traits.

    PubMed

    Bennett, G L

    1992-01-01

    Lean tissue growth rate is usually estimated from indirect measurements including growth rate. A procedure to determine prediction equations for lean tissue growth rate is proposed. The procedure restricts the regression of fat growth rate on predicted lean growth rate to be equal to the regression of fat growth rate on actual lean growth rate. The restriction can be phenotypic or genetic if suitable parameter estimates are available. When applied phenotypically, selection on predicted lean tissue growth rate will result in selection differentials for both fat and lean tissue growth rates that are proportional to those obtained by direct selection for lean tissue growth rate. This restriction is desirable because expected correlated changes in fat are used to justify selection for lean tissue growth. Conventional prediction procedures have ignored correlated changes and obscured the original intent of using lean tissue growth rate as a biological selection criterion. When using conventional procedures to predict a biological selection criterion from indirect measurements, changes in important correlated traits may depend more on the choice of indirect measurements than on the choice of selection criterion.

  11. A chrysin derivative suppresses skin cancer growth by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haidan; Liu, Kangdong; Huang, Zunnan; Park, Chan-Mi; Thimmegowda, N R; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ryoo, In-Ja; He, Long; Kim, Sun-Ok; Oi, Naomi; Lee, Ki Won; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Bode, Ann M; Yang, Yifeng; Zhou, Xinmin; Erikson, Raymond L; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Hwang, Joonsung; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Dong, Zigang; Kim, Bo-Yeon

    2013-09-01

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid widely distributed in plants, reportedly has chemopreventive properties against various cancers. However, the anticancer activity of chrysin observed in in vivo studies has been disappointing. Here, we report that a chrysin derivative, referred to as compound 69407, more strongly inhibited EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P(+) cells compared with chrysin. It attenuated cell cycle progression of EGF-stimulated cells at the G1 phase and inhibited the G1/S transition. It caused loss of retinoblastoma phosphorylation at both Ser-795 and Ser-807/811, the preferred sites phosphorylated by Cdk4/6 and Cdk2, respectively. It also suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Compound 69407 reduced tumor growth in the A431 mouse xenograft model and retinoblastoma phosphorylation at Ser-795 and Ser-807/811. Immunoprecipitation kinase assay results showed that compound 69407 attenuated endogenous Cdk4 and Cdk2 kinase activities in EGF-stimulated JB6 P(+) cells. Pulldown and in vitro kinase assay results indicated that compound 69407 directly binds with Cdk2 and Cdk4 in an ATP-independent manner and inhibited their kinase activities. A binding model between compound 69407 and a crystal structure of Cdk2 predicted that compound 69407 was located inside the Cdk2 allosteric binding site. The binding was further verified by a point mutation binding assay. Overall results indicated that compound 69407 is an ATP-noncompetitive cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with anti-tumor effects, which acts by binding inside the Cdk2 allosteric pocket. This study provides new insights for creating a general pharmacophore model to design and develop novel ATP-noncompetitive agents with chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic potency.

  12. A chrysin derivative suppresses skin cancer growth by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haidan; Liu, Kangdong; Huang, Zunnan; Park, Chan-Mi; Thimmegowda, N R; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ryoo, In-Ja; He, Long; Kim, Sun-Ok; Oi, Naomi; Lee, Ki Won; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Bode, Ann M; Yang, Yifeng; Zhou, Xinmin; Erikson, Raymond L; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Hwang, Joonsung; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Dong, Zigang; Kim, Bo-Yeon

    2013-09-01

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid widely distributed in plants, reportedly has chemopreventive properties against various cancers. However, the anticancer activity of chrysin observed in in vivo studies has been disappointing. Here, we report that a chrysin derivative, referred to as compound 69407, more strongly inhibited EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P(+) cells compared with chrysin. It attenuated cell cycle progression of EGF-stimulated cells at the G1 phase and inhibited the G1/S transition. It caused loss of retinoblastoma phosphorylation at both Ser-795 and Ser-807/811, the preferred sites phosphorylated by Cdk4/6 and Cdk2, respectively. It also suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Compound 69407 reduced tumor growth in the A431 mouse xenograft model and retinoblastoma phosphorylation at Ser-795 and Ser-807/811. Immunoprecipitation kinase assay results showed that compound 69407 attenuated endogenous Cdk4 and Cdk2 kinase activities in EGF-stimulated JB6 P(+) cells. Pulldown and in vitro kinase assay results indicated that compound 69407 directly binds with Cdk2 and Cdk4 in an ATP-independent manner and inhibited their kinase activities. A binding model between compound 69407 and a crystal structure of Cdk2 predicted that compound 69407 was located inside the Cdk2 allosteric binding site. The binding was further verified by a point mutation binding assay. Overall results indicated that compound 69407 is an ATP-noncompetitive cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with anti-tumor effects, which acts by binding inside the Cdk2 allosteric pocket. This study provides new insights for creating a general pharmacophore model to design and develop novel ATP-noncompetitive agents with chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic potency. PMID:23888052

  13. Climate dependency of tree growth suppressed by acid deposition effects on soils in northwest Russia.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Gregory B; Lapenis, Andrei G; Berggren, Dan; Aparin, Boris F; Smith, Kevin T; Shortle, Walter C; Bailey, Scott W; Varlyguin, Dmitry L; Babikov, Boris

    2005-04-01

    Increased tree growth in temperate and boreal forests has been proposed as a direct consequence of a warming climate. Acid deposition effects on nutrient availability may influence the climate dependency of tree growth, however. This study presents an analysis of archived soil samples that has enabled changes in soil chemistry to be tracked with patterns of tree growth through the 20th century. Soil samples collected in 1926, 1964, and 2001, near St. Petersburg, Russia, showed that acid deposition was likely to have decreased root-available concentrations of Ca (an essential element) and increased root-available concentrations of Al (an inhibitor of Ca uptake). These soil changes coincided with decreased diameter growth and a suppression of climate-tree growth relationships in Norway spruce. Expected increases in tree growth from climate warming may be limited by decreased soil fertility in regions of northern and eastern Europe, and eastern North America, where Ca availability has been reduced by acidic deposition.

  14. Substrate Deformation Predicts Neuronal Growth Cone Advance

    PubMed Central

    Athamneh, Ahmad I.M.; Cartagena-Rivera, Alexander X.; Raman, Arvind; Suter, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Although pulling forces have been observed in axonal growth for several decades, their underlying mechanisms, absolute magnitudes, and exact roles are not well understood. In this study, using two different experimental approaches, we quantified retrograde traction force in Aplysia californica neuronal growth cones as they develop over time in response to a new adhesion substrate. In the first approach, we developed a novel method, to our knowledge, for measuring traction forces using an atomic force microscope (AFM) with a cantilever that was modified with an Aplysia cell adhesion molecule (apCAM)-coated microbead. In the second approach, we used force-calibrated glass microneedles coated with apCAM ligands to guide growth cone advance. The traction force exerted by the growth cone was measured by monitoring the microneedle deflection using an optical microscope. Both approaches showed that Aplysia growth cones can develop traction forces in the 100–102 nN range during adhesion-mediated advance. Moreover, our results suggest that the level of traction force is directly correlated to the stiffness of the microneedle, which is consistent with a reinforcement mechanism previously observed in other cell types. Interestingly, the absolute level of traction force did not correlate with growth cone advance toward the adhesion site, but the amount of microneedle deflection did. In cases of adhesion-mediated growth cone advance, the mean needle deflection was 1.05 ± 0.07 μm. By contrast, the mean deflection was significantly lower (0.48 ± 0.06 μm) when the growth cones did not advance. Our data support a hypothesis that adhesion complexes, which can undergo micron-scale elastic deformation, regulate the coupling between the retrogradely flowing actin cytoskeleton and apCAM substrates, stimulating growth cone advance if sufficiently abundant. PMID:26445437

  15. Toxicant-disease-environment interactions associated with suppression of immune system, growth, and reproduction. [PCB

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, W.P.; Hinsdill, R.; Fairbrother, A.; Olson, L.J.; Jaeger, J.; Yuill, T.; Bisgaard, S.; Hunter, W.G.; Nolan, K.

    1984-06-01

    The effects of marginal malnourishment, infections, and environmental chemicals on growth and reproductive success in Swiss-Webster white mice and wild deer mice were studied with fractional factorial designs. Interaction effects were discovered. For example, malnourished mice were more sensitive to virus exposure and environmental chemicals (a plant growth regulator or polychlorinated biphenyls). Since several commercial plant growth regulators also appear to suppress the immune system, these results cast doubt on the adequacy of current toxicity testing procedures in which factors are studied individually and not in combination.

  16. [Application of predictive microbiology in fungi growth and mycotoxin production].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yu, Hongxia; Li, Fengqin

    2009-11-01

    Food spoilage and food poisoning caused by fungi is an important issue in the field of food safety. The linear regression equations and predictive models are developed through the study on the effect of environmental factors on fungi growth and mycotoxin production. This is easier to understand fungi activities. Predictive microbiology plays an important role in evaluation of food spoilage and food poisoning. The application of predictive modelling in fungi growth and mycotoxin production are reviewed.

  17. Intercellular redistribution of cAMP underlies selective suppression of cancer cell growth by connexin26.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Anjana; Kalmykov, Edward A; Polusani, Srikanth R; Mathis, Sandra A; Zucker, Shoshanna N; Nicholson, Bruce J

    2013-01-01

    Connexins (Cx), which constitute gap junction intercellular channels in vertebrates, have been shown to suppress transformed cell growth and tumorigenesis, but the mechanism(s) still remain largely speculative. Here, we define the molecular basis by which Cx26, but less frequently Cx43 or Cx32, selectively confer growth suppression on cancer cells. Functional intercellular coupling is shown to be required, producing partial blocks of the cell cycle due to prolonged activation of several mitogenic kinases. PKA is both necessary and sufficient for the Cx26 induced growth inhibition in low serum and the absence of anchorage. Activation of PKA was not associated with elevated cAMP levels, but appeared to result from a redistribution of cAMP throughout the cell population, eliminating the cell cycle oscillations in cAMP required for efficient cell cycle progression. Cx43 and Cx32 fail to mediate this redistribution as, unlike Cx26, these channels are closed during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle when cAMP levels peak. Comparisons of tumor cell lines indicate that this is a general pattern, with growth suppression by connexins occurring whenever cAMP oscillates with the cell cycle, and the gap junction remain open throughout the cell cycle. Thus, gap junctional coupling, in the absence of any external signals, provides a general means to limit the mitotic rate of cell populations. PMID:24312655

  18. Histone Methylase MLL1 plays critical roles in tumor growth and angiogenesis and its knockdown suppresses tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Khairul I.; Kasiri, Sahba; Mandal, Subhrangsu S.

    2012-01-01

    Mixed lineage leukemias (MLL) are human histone H3 lysine-4 specific methyl transferases that play critical roles in gene expression, epigenetics, and cancer. Herein, we demonstrated that antisense-mediated knockdown of MLL1 induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cultured cells. Intriguingly, application of MLL1-antisense specifically knocked down MLL1 in vivo and suppressed the growth of xenografted cervical tumor implanted in nude mouse. MLL1-knockdown downregulated various growth and angiogenic factors such as HIF1α, VEGF and CD31 in tumor tissue affecting tumor growth. MLL1 is overexpressed along the line of vascular network and localized adjacent to endothelial cell layer expressing CD31, indicating potential roles of MLL1 in vasculogenesis. MLL1 is also overexpressed in the hypoxic regions along with HIF1α. Overall, our studies demonstrated that MLL1 is a key player in hypoxia signaling, vasculogenesis, and tumor growth, and its depletion suppresses tumor growth in vivo, indicating its potential in novel cancer therapy. PMID:22926525

  19. The suppression of fibroblast growth factor 2/fibroblast growth factor 4-dependent tumour angiogenesis and growth by the anti-growth factor activity of dextran derivative (CMDB7).

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri-Yarmand, R.; Kourbali, Y.; Mabilat, C.; Morère, J. F.; Martin, A.; Lu, H.; Soria, C.; Jozefonvicz, J.; Crépin, M.

    1998-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that carboxymethyl benzylamide dextran (CMDB7) blocks basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2)-dependent cell proliferation of a human breast epithelial line (HBL100), suggesting its potential role as a potent antiangiogenic substance. The derived cell line (HH9), which was transformed with the hst/FGF4 gene, has been shown to be highly proliferative in vitro and to induce angiogenic tumours in nude mice. We show here that CMDB7 inhibits the mitogenic activities of the conditioned media from HBL 100 and HH9 cells in a dose-dependent manner. When HH9 cells were injected s.c. into nude mice, CMDB7 treatment (300 mg kg(-1) week(-1)) suppressed the tumour take and the tumour growth by about 50% and 80% respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a highly significant decrease, by more than threefold, in the endothelial density of viable tumour regions, together with a significant increase in the necrosis area. This antiangiogenic activity of CMDB7 was further demonstrated by direct inhibition of calf pulmonary artery (CPAE) and human umbilical vein (HUVEC) endothelial cell proliferation and migration in vitro. In addition, we showed that CMDB7 inhibits specifically the mitogenic effects of the growth factors that bind to heparin such as FGF-2, FGF-4, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor (TGF-beta1), but not those of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1). These results demonstrate that CMDB7 inhibits FGF-2/FGF-4-dependent tumour growth and angiogenesis, most likely by disrupting the autocrine and paracrine effects of growth factors released from the tumour cells. Images Figure 4 PMID:9662260

  20. MicroRNA-124 suppresses growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting STAT3

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yanxin; Yue, Xupeng; Cui, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jufeng; Wang, KeWei

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •miR-124 is down-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. •Over-expression of miR-124 suppresses proliferation and induces apoptosis in HepG2 cells. •miR-124 inhibits xenograft tumor growth in nude mice implanted with HepG2 cells by reducing STAT3 expression. •STATs function as a novel target of miR-124 in HCC HepG2 cells. -- Abstract: The aberrant expression of microRNAs is associated with development and progression of cancers. Down-regulation of miR-124 has been demonstrated in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the underlying mechanism by which miR-124 suppresses tumorigenesis in HCC remains elusive. In this study, we found that miR-124 suppresses the tumor growth of HCC through targeting the signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). Overexpression of miR-124 suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis in HepG-2 cells. Luciferase assay confirmed that miR-124 binding to the 3′-UTR region of STAT3 inhibited the expression of STAT3 and phosphorylated STAT3 proteins in HepG-2 cells. Knockdown of STAT3 by siRNA in HepG-2 cells mimicked the effect induced by miR-124. Overexpression of STAT3 in miR-124-transfected HepG-2 cells effectively rescued the inhibition of cell proliferation caused by miR-124. Furthermore, miR-124 suppressed xenograft tumor growth in nude mice implanted with HepG-2 cells by reducing STAT3 expression. Taken together, our findings show that miR-124 functions as tumor suppressor in HCC by targeting STAT3, and miR-124 may therefore serve as a biomarker for diagnosis and therapeutics in HCC.

  1. Improved NASA-ANOPP Noise Prediction Computer Code for Advanced Subsonic Propulsion Systems. Volume 2; Fan Suppression Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kontos, Karen B.; Kraft, Robert E.; Gliebe, Philip R.

    1996-01-01

    The Aircraft Noise Predication Program (ANOPP) is an industry-wide tool used to predict turbofan engine flyover noise in system noise optimization studies. Its goal is to provide the best currently available methods for source noise prediction. As part of a program to improve the Heidmann fan noise model, models for fan inlet and fan exhaust noise suppression estimation that are based on simple engine and acoustic geometry inputs have been developed. The models can be used to predict sound power level suppression and sound pressure level suppression at a position specified relative to the engine inlet.

  2. Polycomb repressive complex 2 regulates skeletal growth by suppressing Wnt and TGF-β signalling

    PubMed Central

    Mirzamohammadi, Fatemeh; Papaioannou, Garyfallia; Inloes, Jennifer B.; Rankin, Erinn B.; Xie, Huafeng; Schipani, Ernestina; Orkin, Stuart H.; Kobayashi, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) controls maintenance and lineage determination of stem cells by suppressing genes that regulate cellular differentiation and tissue development. However, the role of PRC2 in lineage-committed somatic cells is mostly unknown. Here we show that Eed deficiency in chondrocytes causes severe kyphosis and a growth defect with decreased chondrocyte proliferation, accelerated hypertrophic differentiation and cell death with reduced Hif1a expression. Eed deficiency also causes induction of multiple signalling pathways in chondrocytes. Wnt signalling overactivation is responsible for the accelerated hypertrophic differentiation and kyphosis, whereas the overactivation of TGF-β signalling is responsible for the reduced proliferation and growth defect. Thus, our study demonstrates that PRC2 has an important regulatory role in lineage-committed tissue cells by suppressing overactivation of multiple signalling pathways. PMID:27329220

  3. Complete suppression of in vivo growth of human leukemia cells by specific immunotoxins: nude mouse models

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, H.; Seon, B.K.

    1987-05-01

    In this study, immunotoxins containing monoclonal anti-human T-cell leukemia antibodies are shown to be capable of completely suppressing the tumor growth of human T-cell leukemia cells in vivo without any overt undersirable toxicity. These immunotoxins were prepared by conjugating ricin A chain (RA) with our monoclonal antibodies, SN1 and SN2, directed specifically to the human T-cell leukemia cell surface antigens TALLA and GP37, respectively. The authors have shown that these monoclonal antibodies are highly specific for human T-cell leukemia cells and do not react with various normal cells including normal T and B cells, thymocytes, and bone marrow cells. Ascitic and solid human T-cell leukemia cell tumors were generated in nude mice. The ascitic tumor was generated by transplanting Ichikawa cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell) i.p. into nude mice, whereas the solid tumor was generated by transplanting s.c. MOLT-4 cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell line) and x-irradiated human fibrosarcoma cells into x-irradiated nude mice. To investigate the efficacy of specific immunotoxins in suppression the in vivo growth of the ascitic tumor, they divided 40 nude mice that were injected with Ichikawa cells into four groups. None of the mice in group 4 that were treated with SN1-RA and SN2-RA showed any signs of a tumor or undesirable toxic effects for the 20 weeks that they were followed after the transplantation. Treatment with SN1-RA plus SN2-RA completely suppressed solid tumor growth in 4 of 10 nude mice carrying solid tumors and partially suppressed the tumor growth in the remaining 6 nude mice. These results strongly suggest that SN1-RA and SN2-RA may be useful for clinical treatment.

  4. Neddylation inhibitor MLN4924 suppresses growth and migration of human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Huiyin; Tang, Zaiming; Jin, Hongchuan; Sun, Yi

    2016-01-01

    MLN4924 is a recently discovered small molecule inhibitor of NEDD8-Activating Enzyme (NAE). Because cullin RING ligase (CRL), the largest family of E3 ubiquitin ligase, requires cullin neddylation for its activity, MLN4924, therefore, acts as an indirect inhibitor of CRL by blocking cullin neddylation. Given that CRLs components are up-regulated, whereas neddylation modification is over-activated in a number of human cancers, MLN4924 was found to be effective in growth suppression of cancer cells. Whether MLN4924 is effective against gastric cancer cells, however, remains elusive. Here we showed that in gastric cancer cells, MLN4924 rapidly inhibited cullin 1 neddylation and remarkably suppressed growth and survival as well as migration in a dose-and time-dependent manner. Mechanistic studies in combination with siRNA knockdown-based rescue experiments revealed that MLN4924 induced the accumulation of a number of CRL substrates, including CDT1/ORC1, p21/p27, and PHLPP1 to trigger DNA damage response and induce growth arrest at the G2/M phase, to induce senescence, as well as autophagy, respectively. MLN4924 also significantly suppressed migration by transcriptionally activating E-cadherin and repressing MMP-9. Taken together, our study suggest that neddylation modification and CRL E3 ligase are attractive gastric cancer targets, and MLN4924 might be further developed as a potent therapeutic agent for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:27063292

  5. Integrin α7 Binds Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase 3 to Suppress Growth of Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lang-Zhu; Song, Yang; Nelson, Joel; Yu, Yan P.; Luo, Jian-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Integrin α7 (ITGA7) is a tumor-suppressor gene that is critical for suppressing the growth of malignant tumors; however, the mechanisms allowing ITGA7 to suppress the growth of cancer cells remain unclear. Herein, we show that ITGA7 binds to tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3) in prostate cancer cells. The ITGA7-TIMP3 binding led to a decreased protein level of tumor necrosis factor α, cytoplasmic translocation of NF-κB, and down-regulation of cyclin D1. These changes led to an accumulation of cells in G0/G1 and a dramatic suppression of cell growth. Knocking down TIMP3 or ITGA7/TIMP3 binding interference largely abrogated the signaling changes induced by ITGA7, whereas a mutant ITGA7 lacking TIMP3 binding activity had no tumor-suppressor activity. Interestingly, knocking down ITGA7 ligand laminin β1 enhanced ITGA7-TIMP3 signaling and the downstream tumor-suppressor activity, suggesting the existence of a counterbalancing role between extracellular matrix and integrin signaling. As a result, this report demonstrates a novel and critical signaling mechanism of ITGA7, through the TIMP3/NF-κB/cyclin D1 pathway. PMID:23830872

  6. Oak ellagitannins suppress the phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fridrich, Diana; Glabasnia, Arne; Fritz, Jessica; Esselen, Melanie; Pahlke, Gudrun; Hofmann, Thomas; Marko, Doris

    2008-05-14

    The ellagitannins castalagin and vescalagin, and the C-glycosides grandinin and roburin E as well as ellagic acid were found to potently inhibit the growth of human colon carcinoma cells (HT29) in vitro. In a cell-free system these compounds were identified as potent inhibitors of the protein tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with IC 50 values in the low nanomolar range. To address the question of whether the interference with the activity of the isolated EGFR also plays a role within intact cells, effects on the phosphorylation status of the EGFR, as a measure for its activity, were determined in HT29 cells. As exemplified for castalagin and grandinin, both the nonglycosylated and the glycosylated ellagitannins effectively suppressed EGFR phosphorylation, but only at concentrations > or =10 microM, thus, in a concentration range where growth inhibition was observed. These results indicate that the suppression of EGFR-mediated signaling might contribute to the growth inhibitory effects of these compounds present in oak-matured wines and spirits such as whiskey. In contrast, despite substantial growth inhibitory properties, ellagic acid did not significantly affect EGFR phosphorylation in HT29 cells up to 100 microM. PMID:18419129

  7. Predictive mechanisms of head-eye coordination and vestibulo-ocular reflex suppression in humans.

    PubMed

    Barnes, G R; Grealy, M A

    1992-01-01

    Head and eye movements of human subjects have been recorded during head-free pursuit in the horizontal plane of a target executing sinusoidal motion at a frequency of 0.26 to 0.78 Hz and a peak velocity of +/- 96 degrees/s. The target was not presented continuously but was exposed for brief durations of 120 to 320 ms as it passed through the centre of the visual field at peak velocity. This technique allowed the timing of each response to be assessed in relation to the onset of target appearance. During the first 3 to 4 target presentations, there was a progressive buildup of both head velocity and the smooth component of gaze velocity, while, simultaneously, the responses became more phase-advanced with respect to target onset. In the steady state, similar temporal response trajectories were observed for head and gaze velocity, which were initiated approximately 500 ms prior to target onset, rose to a peak that increased with the duration of target exposure, and then decayed with a time constant of 0.5 to 1 s. Whenever the target failed to appear as expected, the gaze and head velocity trajectories continued to be made, indicating that predictive suppression of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) was taking place in darkness. In a further experiment, subjects attempted to suppress the VOR during whole body oscillation at 0.2 or 0.4 Hz on a turntable by fixating a head-fixed target that appeared for 10 to 160 ms at the time of peak head velocity. Again, VOR suppression was initiated prior to target appearance in the same manner as for natural head movements, and when the target suddenly disappeared but rotation continued, predictive VOR suppression was observed in darkness. The similarity of these predictive effects to those obtained previously for head-fixed pursuit provides further support for the hypothesis that both pursuit and visual suppression of the VOR are controlled primarily by identical visual feedback mechanisms. PMID:1342395

  8. MiR-125a suppresses tumor growth, invasion and metastasis in cervical cancer by targeting STAT3.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhongyi; Cui, Hanzhi; Xu, Xiaojie; Lin, Zhi; Zhang, Xuelin; Kang, Lei; Han, Baiyu; Meng, Jing; Yan, Zhifeng; Yan, Xiang; Jiao, Shunchang

    2015-09-22

    MiR-125a has been characterized as a tumor suppressor in several cancers. However, the role of miR-125a in cervical cancer is unknown. In this study, we found the expression of miR-125a was downregulated in cervical cancer patients, and negatively correlated with the tumor size, FIGO stage, and preoperative metastasis. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that miR-125a expression predicted favorable outcome for cervical cancer patients. Dual luciferase assays identified the STAT3 gene as a novel direct target of miR-125a. Functional studies showed that miR-125a overexpression significantly suppressed the growth, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of cervical cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo via decreasing STAT3 expression. Moreover, miR-125a conferred to G2/M cell cycle arrest, accompanied by inhibition of several G2/M checkpoint proteins. Mechanistically, inactivation of miR-125a during cervical carcinogenesis was caused by HPV suppression of p53 expression. Clinically, STAT3, the expression of which, predicted poorer outcome, was inversely correlated with miR-125a in cervical cancer. These data highlight the importance of miR-125a in the cell proliferation and progression of cervical cancer, and indicate that miR-125a may be a useful therapeutic target for cervical cancer.

  9. Chemical interference with iron transport systems to suppress bacterial growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Bin; Zhang, Liang; Li, Nan; Han, Junlong; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Xuesong; He, Qing-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for the growth of most bacteria. To obtain iron, bacteria have developed specific iron-transport systems located on the membrane surface to uptake iron and iron complexes such as ferrichrome. Interference with the iron-acquisition systems should be therefore an efficient strategy to suppress bacterial growth and infection. Based on the chemical similarity of iron and ruthenium, we used a Ru(II) complex R-825 to compete with ferrichrome for the ferrichrome-transport pathway in Streptococcus pneumoniae. R-825 inhibited the bacterial growth of S. pneumoniae and stimulated the expression of PiuA, the iron-binding protein in the ferrichrome-uptake system on the cell surface. R-825 treatment decreased the cellular content of iron, accompanying with the increase of Ru(II) level in the bacterium. When the piuA gene (SPD_0915) was deleted in the bacterium, the mutant strain became resistant to R-825 treatment, with decreased content of Ru(II). Addition of ferrichrome can rescue the bacterial growth that was suppressed by R-825. Fluorescence spectral quenching showed that R-825 can bind with PiuA in a similar pattern to the ferrichrome-PiuA interaction in vitro. These observations demonstrated that Ru(II) complex R-825 can compete with ferrichrome for the ferrichrome-transport system to enter S. pneumoniae, reduce the cellular iron supply, and thus suppress the bacterial growth. This finding suggests a novel antimicrobial approach by interfering with iron-uptake pathways, which is different from the mechanisms used by current antibiotics.

  10. Chemical Interference with Iron Transport Systems to Suppress Bacterial Growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Li, Nan; Han, Junlong; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Xuesong; He, Qing-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for the growth of most bacteria. To obtain iron, bacteria have developed specific iron-transport systems located on the membrane surface to uptake iron and iron complexes such as ferrichrome. Interference with the iron-acquisition systems should be therefore an efficient strategy to suppress bacterial growth and infection. Based on the chemical similarity of iron and ruthenium, we used a Ru(II) complex R-825 to compete with ferrichrome for the ferrichrome-transport pathway in Streptococcus pneumoniae. R-825 inhibited the bacterial growth of S. pneumoniae and stimulated the expression of PiuA, the iron-binding protein in the ferrichrome-uptake system on the cell surface. R-825 treatment decreased the cellular content of iron, accompanying with the increase of Ru(II) level in the bacterium. When the piuA gene (SPD_0915) was deleted in the bacterium, the mutant strain became resistant to R-825 treatment, with decreased content of Ru(II). Addition of ferrichrome can rescue the bacterial growth that was suppressed by R-825. Fluorescence spectral quenching showed that R-825 can bind with PiuA in a similar pattern to the ferrichrome-PiuA interaction in vitro. These observations demonstrated that Ru(II) complex R-825 can compete with ferrichrome for the ferrichrome-transport system to enter S. pneumoniae, reduce the cellular iron supply, and thus suppress the bacterial growth. This finding suggests a novel antimicrobial approach by interfering with iron-uptake pathways, which is different from the mechanisms used by current antibiotics. PMID:25170896

  11. Salmonella typhimurium Suppresses Tumor Growth via the Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-1β

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Eun; Phan, Thuy Xuan; Nguyen, Vu Hong; Dinh-Vu, Hong-Van; Zheng, Jin Hai; Yun, Misun; Park, Sung-Gyoo; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E.; Szardenings, Michael; Hwang, Won; Park, Jin-A; Park, SunHee; Im, Sin-Hyeog; Min, Jung-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Although strains of attenuated Salmonella typhimurium and wild-type Escherichia coli show similar tumor-targeting capacities, only S. typhimurium significantly suppresses tumor growth in mice. The aim of the present study was to examine bacteria-mediated immune responses by conducting comparative analyses of the cytokine profiles and immune cell populations within tumor tissues colonized by E. coli or attenuated Salmonellae. CT26 tumor-bearing mice were treated with two different bacterial strains: S. typhimurium defective in ppGpp synthesis (ΔppGpp Salmonellae) or wild-type E. coli MG1655. Cytokine profiles and immune cell populations in tumor tissue colonized by these two bacterial strains were examined at two time points based on the pattern of tumor growth after ΔppGpp Salmonellae treatment: 1) when tumor growth was suppressed ('suppression stage') and 2) when they began to re-grow ('re-growing stage'). The levels of IL-1β and TNF-α were markedly increased in tumors colonized by ΔppGpp Salmonellae. This increase was associated with tumor regression; the levels of both IL-1β and TNF-α returned to normal level when the tumors started to re-grow. To identify the immune cells primarily responsible for Salmonellae-mediated tumor suppression, we examined the major cell types that produce IL-1β and TNF-α. We found that macrophages and dendritic cells were the main producers of TNF-α and IL-1β. Inhibiting IL-1β production in Salmonellae-treated mice restored tumor growth, whereas tumor growth was suppressed for longer by local administration of recombinant IL-1β or TNF-α in conjunction with Salmonella therapy. These findings suggested that IL-1β and TNF-α play important roles in Salmonella-mediated cancer therapy. A better understanding of host immune responses in Salmonella therapy may increase the success of a given drug, particularly when various strategies are combined with bacteriotherapy. PMID:26516371

  12. Crack Growth Simulation and Residual Strength Prediction in Airplane Fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuin-Shan; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives were to create a capability to simulate curvilinear crack growth and ductile tearing in aircraft fuselages subjected to widespread fatigue damage and to validate with tests. Analysis methodology and software program (FRANC3D/STAGS) developed herein allows engineers to maintain aging aircraft economically, while insuring continuous airworthiness, and to design more damage-tolerant aircraft for the next generation. Simulations of crack growth in fuselages were described. The crack tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion, obtained from laboratory tests, was used to predict fracture behavior of fuselage panel tests. Geometrically nonlinear, elastic-plastic, thin shell finite element crack growth analyses were conducted. Comparisons of stress distributions, multiple stable crack growth history, and residual strength between measured and predicted results were made to assess the validity of the methodology. Incorporation of residual plastic deformations and tear strap failure was essential for accurate residual strength predictions. Issue related to predicting crack trajectory in fuselages were also discussed. A directional criterion, including T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy, was developed. Curvilinear crack growth was simulated in coupon and fuselage panel tests. Both T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy were essential to predict the observed crack paths. Flapping of fuselages were predicted. Measured and predicted results agreed reasonable well.

  13. Macrophage ABHD5 promotes colorectal cancer growth by suppressing spermidine production by SRM

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Hongming; Ou, Juanjuan; Peng, Yuan; Zhang, Xuan; Chen, Yujuan; Hao, Lijun; Xie, Ganfeng; Wang, Zhe; Pang, Xueli; Ruan, Zhihua; Li, Jianjun; Yu, Liqing; Xue, Bingzhong; Shi, Hang; Shi, Chunmeng; Liang, Houjie

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming in stromal cells plays an essential role in regulating tumour growth. The metabolic activities of tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) in colorectal cancer (CRC) are incompletely characterized. Here, we identify TAM-derived factors and their roles in the development of CRC. We demonstrate that ABHD5, a lipolytic co-activator, is ectopically expressed in CRC-associated macrophages. We demonstrate in vitro and in mouse models that macrophage ABHD5 potentiates growth of CRC cells. Mechanistically, ABHD5 suppresses spermidine synthase (SRM)-dependent spermidine production in macrophages by inhibiting the reactive oxygen species-dependent expression of C/EBPɛ, which activates transcription of the srm gene. Notably, macrophage-specific ABHD5 transgene-induced CRC growth in mice can be prevented by an additional SRM transgene in macrophages. Altogether, our results show that the lipolytic factor ABHD5 suppresses SRM-dependent spermidine production in TAMs and potentiates the growth of CRC. The ABHD5/SRM/spermidine axis in TAMs might represent a potential target for therapy. PMID:27189574

  14. A mutation affecting carbon catabolite repression suppresses growth defects in pyruvate carboxylase mutants from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Blázquez, M A; Gamo, F J; Gancedo, C

    1995-12-18

    Yeasts with disruptions in the genes PYC1 and PYC2 encoding the isoenzymes of pyruvate carboxylase cannot grow in a glucose-ammonium medium (Stucka et al. (1991) Mol. Gen. Genet. 229, 307-315). We have isolated a dominant mutation, BPC1-1, that allows growth in this medium of yeasts with interrupted PYC1 and PYC2 genes. The BPC1-1 mutation abolishes catabolite repression of a series of genes and allows expression of the enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle during growth in glucose. A functional glyoxylate cycle is necessary for suppression as a disruption of gene ICL1 encoding isocitrate lyase abolished the phenotypic effect of BPC1-1 on growth in glucose-ammonium. Concurrent expression from constitutive promoters of genes ICL1 and MLS1 (encoding malate synthase) also suppressed the growth phenotype of pyc1 pyc2 mutants. The mutation BPC1-1 is either allelic or closely linked to the mutation DGT1-1.

  15. Suppression of tumour growth by orally administered osteopontin is accompanied by alterations in tumour blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Rittling, S R; Wejse, P L; Yagiz, K; Warot, G A; Hui, T

    2014-01-01

    Background: The integrin-binding protein osteopontin is strongly associated with tumour development, yet is an abundant dietary component as a constituent of human and bovine milk. Therefore, we tested the effect of orally administered osteopontin (o-OPN) on the development of subcutaneous tumours in mice. Methods: Bovine milk osteopontin was administered in drinking water to tumour-bearing immune-competent mice. Tumour growth, proliferation, necrosis, apoptosis and blood vessel size and number were measured. Expression of the α9 integrin was determined. Results: o-OPN suppressed tumour growth, increased the extent of necrosis, and induced formation of abnormally large blood vessels. Anti-OPN reactivity detected in the plasma of OPN-null mice fed OPN suggested that tumour-blocking peptides were absorbed during digestion, but the o-OPN effect was likely distinct from that of an RGD peptide. Expression of the α9 integrin was detected on both tumour cells and blood vessels. Potential active peptides from the α9 binding site of OPN were identified by mass spectrometry following in vitro digestion, and injection of these peptides suppressed tumour growth. Conclusions: These results suggest that peptides derived from o-OPN are absorbed and interfere with tumour growth and normal vessel development. o-OPN-derived peptides that target the α9 integrin are likely involved. PMID:24473400

  16. Growth characteristics of a weed-suppressive indica x non-suppressive tropical japonica rice mapping population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The indica rice cultivar, PI 312777, can be highly productive as well as suppressive to C4 grass species such as barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli). A recombinant inbred line (RIL) mapping population was developed using single seed descent from a cross between ‘Katy’ (non-weed-suppressive) and ...

  17. Mechanisms of photosynthetic inactivation on growth suppression of Microcystis aeruginosa under UV-C stress.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi; Mao, Xianzhong; Hu, Jiangyong; Mok, H O L; Wang, Lingyun; Au, D W T; Zhu, Jia; Zhang, Xihui

    2013-10-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of UV-C irradiation on photosynthetic processes of Microcystis aeruginosa to unravel the mechanism(s) involved in how and in what ways UV-C mediates growth suppression and cellular recovery. Changes in the concentration of photosynthetic pigments, photochemical efficiency, PS II core protein (D1) content, and the coding genes expressions were measured. The results indicate that UV-C doses at 20-200 mJ cm(-2) lead to rapid reduction in gene expression of both psbA (for D1) and cpc (for phycocyanin), but the suppression was short term and recoverable within 3 d of post-UV incubation. Conversely, UV-C doses at ≥50 mJ cm(-2) could induce marked decline in photochemical efficiency (represented by the optimal PS II quantum yield, FV/FM, and the effective PS II quantum yield, Y) as well as decreases in D1 content and water soluble pigments (phycoerythrins, phycocyanins, allophycocyanins) in M. aeruginosa during the post UV-C incubation period. The results suggest that interruption of both the light energy harvesting apparatus (especially the water soluble pigments) and the photochemical process mainly accounted for the growth suppression effect in UV-C irradiated M. aeruginosa. PMID:23838039

  18. IL-35 over-expression increases apoptosis sensitivity and suppresses cell growth in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Jun; Zhang, Xulong; Wen, Mingjie; Kong, Qingli; Lv, Zhe; An, Yunqing; Wei, Xiao-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-35 is a novel heterodimeric cytokine in the IL-12 family and is composed of two subunits: Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) and IL-12p35. IL-35 is expressed in T regulatory (Treg) cells and contributes to the immune suppression function of these cells. In contrast, we found that both IL-35 subunits were expressed concurrently in most human cancer cell lines compared to normal cell lines. In addition, we found that TNF-α and IFN-γ stimulation led to increased IL-35 expression in human cancer cells. Furthermore, over-expression of IL-35 in human cancer cells suppressed cell growth in vitro, induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, and mediated robust apoptosis induced by serum starvation, TNF-α, and IFN-γ stimulation through the up-regulation of Fas and concurrent down-regulation of cyclinD1, survivin, and Bcl-2 expression. In conclusion, our results reveal a novel functional role for IL-35 in suppressing cancer activity, inhibiting cancer cell growth, and increasing the apoptosis sensitivity of human cancer cells through the regulation of genes related to the cell cycle and apoptosis. Thus, this research provides new insights into IL-35 function and presents a possible target for the development of novel cancer therapies.

  19. Inhibition of BRD4 suppresses tumor growth and enhances iodine uptake in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuemei; Wu, Xinchao; Zhang, Xiao; Hua, Wenjuan; Zhang, Yajing; Maimaiti, Yusufu; Gao, Zairong; Zhang, Yongxue

    2016-01-15

    Thyroid cancer is a common malignancy of the endocrine system. Although radioiodine (131)I treatment on differentiated thyroid cancer is widely used, many patients still fail to benefit from (131)I therapy. Therefore, exploration of novel targeted therapies to suppress tumor growth and improve radioiodine uptake remains necessary. Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) is an important member of the bromodomain and extra terminal domain family that influences transcription of downstream genes by binding to acetylated histones. In the present study, we found that BRD4 was up-regulated in thyroid cancer tissues and cell lines. Inhibition of BRD4 in thyroid cancer cells by JQ1 resulted in cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and enhanced (131)I uptake in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, JQ1 treatment suppressed C-MYC but enhanced NIS expression. We further demonstrated that BRD4 was enriched in the promoter region of C-MYC, which could be markedly blocked by JQ1 treatment. In conclusion, our findings revealed that the aberrant expression of BRD4 in thyroid cancer is possibly involved in tumor progression, and JQ1 is potentially an effective chemotherapeutic agent against human thyroid cancer. PMID:26707881

  20. Predicting the patterns in lamellar growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkaldy, J. S.

    1984-12-01

    The removal of the degeneracy in the steady-state diffusion-capillarity relation for the undercooling of lamellar eutectics as a function of forced growth velocity and spacing requires the statement of a global principle. The consequences of Langer's conjecture that "each lamella must grow in a direction which is perpendicular to the solidification front" have been explored. In the first instance it is demonstrated that the principle is equivalent on the isotherm to a conditional minimum in the frontal-surface free energy. Secondly, it is deduced for forced-velocity eutectics that the stable spacing is 2λm, where λm is given by a minimum in the undercooling. Langer and co-workers have been led to favor the value λm on the basis of an unjustified approximation. In contradistinction to Langer's identification of a "diffusive mode" for relaxation of lamellar spacing, we find that the mechanism of stabilization is best described as a damped oscillation in the spacing. The present stable coordinate is identical with that obtained for isothermal structures via Langer's conjecture and by a number of earlier related perturbation arguments. It corresponds to an isothermal state of the spacing which coincides with a maximum in the entropy-production rate. The thermodynamic validation of this principle is briefly discussed.

  1. Auditory Mismatch Negativity and Repetition Suppression Deficits in Schizophrenia Explained by Irregular Computation of Prediction Error

    PubMed Central

    Rentzsch, Johannes; Shen, Christina; Jockers-Scherübl, Maria C.; Gallinat, Jürgen; Neuhaus, Andres H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The predictive coding model is rapidly gaining attention in schizophrenia research. It posits the neuronal computation of residual variance (‘prediction error’) between sensory information and top-down expectation through multiple hierarchical levels. Event-related potentials (ERP) reflect cortical processing stages that are increasingly interpreted in the light of the predictive coding hypothesis. Both mismatch negativity (MMN) and repetition suppression (RS) measures are considered a prediction error correlates based on error detection and error minimization, respectively. Methods Twenty-five schizophrenia patients and 25 healthy controls completed auditory tasks designed to elicit MMN and RS responses that were investigated using repeated measures models and strong spatio-temporal a priori hypothesis based on previous research. Separate correlations were performed for controls and schizophrenia patients, using age and clinical variables as covariates. Results MMN and RS deficits were largely replicated in our sample of schizophrenia patients. Moreover, MMN and RS measures were strongly correlated in healthy controls, while no correlation was found in schizophrenia patients. Single-trial analyses indicated significantly lower signal-to-noise ratio during prediction error computation in schizophrenia. Conclusions This study provides evidence that auditory ERP components relevant for schizophrenia research can be reconciled in the light of the predictive coding framework. The lack of any correlation between the investigated measures in schizophrenia patients suggests a disruption of predictive coding mechanisms in general. More specifically, these results suggest that schizophrenia is associated with an irregular computation of residual variance between sensory input and top-down models, i.e. prediction error. PMID:25955846

  2. Opioid-dependent growth of glial cultures: Suppression of astrocyte DNA synthesis by met-enkephalin

    SciTech Connect

    Stiene-Martin, A.; Hauser, K.F. )

    1990-01-01

    The action of met-enkephalin on the growth of astrocytes in mixed-glial cultures was examined. Primary, mixed-glial cultures were isolated from 1 day-old mouse cerebral hemispheres and continuously treated with either basal growth media, 1 {mu}M met-enkephalin, 1 {mu}M met-enkephalin plus the opioid antagonist naloxone, or naloxone alone. Absolute numbers of neural cells were counted in unstained preparations, while combined ({sup 3}H)-thymidine autoradiography and glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) immunocytochemistry was performed to identify specific changes in astrocytes. When compared to control and naloxone treated cultures, met-enkephalin caused a significant decrease in both total cell numbers, and in ({sup 3}H)-thymidine incorporation by GFAP-positive cells with flat morphology. These results indicate that met-enkephalin suppresses astrocyte growth in culture.

  3. Development of a Benchmark Example for Delamination Fatigue Growth Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The development of a benchmark example for cyclic delamination growth prediction is presented and demonstrated for a commercial code. The example is based on a finite element model of a Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen, which is independent of the analysis software used and allows the assessment of the delamination growth prediction capabilities in commercial finite element codes. First, the benchmark result was created for the specimen. Second, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to grow under cyclic loading in a finite element model of a commercial code. The number of cycles to delamination onset and the number of cycles during stable delamination growth for each growth increment were obtained from the analysis. In general, good agreement between the results obtained from the growth analysis and the benchmark results could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. Overall, the results are encouraging but further assessment for mixed-mode delamination is required.

  4. Development of a Benchmark Example for Delamination Fatigue Growth Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The development of a benchmark example for cyclic delamination growth prediction is presented and demonstrated for a commercial code. The example is based on a finite element model of a Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimen, which is independent of the analysis software used and allows the assessment of the delamination growth prediction capabilities in commercial finite element codes. First, the benchmark result was created for the specimen. Second, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to grow under cyclic loading in a finite element model of a commercial code. The number of cycles to delamination onset and the number of cycles during stable delamination growth for each growth increment were obtained from the analysis. In general, good agreement between the results obtained from the growth analysis and the benchmark results could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. Overall, the results are encouraging but further assessment for mixed-mode delamination is required

  5. Numerical simulations of multifrequency instability-wave growth and suppression in the Blasius boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, A.; Bower, W. W.; Meyer, G. H.

    1991-02-01

    A mathematical model based on the Orr-Sommerfeld equation is developed to describe the growth and suppression of multifrequency, two-dimensional instability waves in the Blasius boundary layer over a flat place through localized perturbations at the surface caused by time-varying suction/blowing. It is shown for harmonic (single-frequency) perturbations that the instability wave can be decomposed into two components: an idealized Tollmien-Schlichting wave and a second perturbation that approximately cancels the first component upstream of the surface disturbance and becomes small downstream. Because the first component alone fully expresses the instability of the flow, the need to perform numerical Fourier transformation over the wave number is eliminated, permitting easy extension of the analysis to the more general case of arbitrary waveform of the perturbation. Numerical results are presented for examples of instability-wave generation and suppression in the boundary layer.

  6. Platelet-cytokine Complex Suppresses Tumour Growth by Exploiting Intratumoural Thrombin-dependent Platelet Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Tung; Nishikawa, Tomoyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2016-01-01

    Tumours constitute unique microenvironments where various blood cells and factors are exposed as a result of leaky vasculature. In the present study, we report that thrombin enrichment in B16F10 melanoma led to platelet aggregation, and this property was exploited to administer an anticancer cytokine, interferon-gamma induced protein 10 (IP10), through the formation of a platelet-IP10 complex. When intravenously infused, the complex reached platelet microaggregates in the tumour. The responses induced by the complex were solely immune-mediated, and tumour cytotoxicity was not observed. The complex suppressed the growth of mouse melanoma in vivo, while both platelets and the complex suppressed the accumulation of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in the tumour. These results demonstrated that thrombin-dependent platelet aggregation in B16F10 tumours defines platelets as a vector to deliver anticancer cytokines and provide specific treatment benefits. PMID:27117228

  7. A nonlinear competitive model of the prostate tumor growth under intermittent androgen suppression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zhao, Tong-Jun; Yuan, Chang-Qing; Xie, Jing-Hui; Hao, Fang-Fang

    2016-09-01

    Hormone suppression has been the primary modality of treatment for prostate cancer. However long-term androgen deprivation may induce androgen-independent (AI) recurrence. Intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) is a potential way to delay or avoid the AI relapse. Mathematical models of tumor growth and treatment are simple while they are capable of capturing the essence of complicated interactions. Game theory models have analyzed that tumor cells can enhance their fitness by adopting genetically determined survival strategies. In this paper, we consider the survival strategies as the competitive advantage of tumor cells and propose a new model to mimic the prostate tumor growth in IAS therapy. Then we investigate the competition effect in tumor development by numerical simulations. The results indicate that successfully IAS-controlled states can be achieved even though the net growth rate of AI cells is positive for any androgen level. There is crucial difference between the previous models and the new one in the phase diagram of successful and unsuccessful tumor control by IAS administration, which means that the suggestions from the models for medication can be different. Furthermore we introduce quadratic logistic terms to the competition model to simulate the tumor growth in the environment with a finite carrying capacity considering the nutrients or inhibitors. The simulations show that the tumor growth can reach an equilibrium state or an oscillatory state with the net growth rate of AI cells being androgen independent. Our results suggest that the competition and the restraint of a limited environment can enhance the possibility of relapse prevention. PMID:27259386

  8. A nonlinear competitive model of the prostate tumor growth under intermittent androgen suppression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zhao, Tong-Jun; Yuan, Chang-Qing; Xie, Jing-Hui; Hao, Fang-Fang

    2016-09-01

    Hormone suppression has been the primary modality of treatment for prostate cancer. However long-term androgen deprivation may induce androgen-independent (AI) recurrence. Intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) is a potential way to delay or avoid the AI relapse. Mathematical models of tumor growth and treatment are simple while they are capable of capturing the essence of complicated interactions. Game theory models have analyzed that tumor cells can enhance their fitness by adopting genetically determined survival strategies. In this paper, we consider the survival strategies as the competitive advantage of tumor cells and propose a new model to mimic the prostate tumor growth in IAS therapy. Then we investigate the competition effect in tumor development by numerical simulations. The results indicate that successfully IAS-controlled states can be achieved even though the net growth rate of AI cells is positive for any androgen level. There is crucial difference between the previous models and the new one in the phase diagram of successful and unsuccessful tumor control by IAS administration, which means that the suggestions from the models for medication can be different. Furthermore we introduce quadratic logistic terms to the competition model to simulate the tumor growth in the environment with a finite carrying capacity considering the nutrients or inhibitors. The simulations show that the tumor growth can reach an equilibrium state or an oscillatory state with the net growth rate of AI cells being androgen independent. Our results suggest that the competition and the restraint of a limited environment can enhance the possibility of relapse prevention.

  9. MicroRNA-340 suppresses osteosarcoma tumor growth and metastasis by directly targeting ROCK1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xin; Wei, Min; Wang, Wei

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •miR-340 is downregulated in OS cell lines and tissues. •miR-340 suppresses OS cell proliferation, migration and invasion. •miR-340 suppresses tumor growth and metastasis of OS cells in nude mice. •ROCK1 is a target gene of miR-340. •ROCK1 is involved in miR-340-induced suppression of OS cell proliferation, migration and invasion. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in cancer development and progression. In the present study, we investigated the role of miR-340 in the progression and metastasis of osteosarcoma (OS). Our results showed that miR-340 was frequently downregulated in OS tumors and cell lines. Overexpression of miR-340 in OS cell lines significantly inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro, and tumor growth and metastasis in a xenograft mouse model. ROCK1 was identified as a target of miR-340, and ectopic expression of miR-340 downregulated ROCK1 by direct binding to its 3′ untranslated region. siRNA-mediated silencing of ROCK1 phenocopied the effects of miR-340 overexpression, whereas restoration of ROCK1 in miR-340-overexpressing OS cells reversed the suppressive effects of miR-340. Together, these findings indicate that miR-340 acts as a tumor suppressor and its downregulation in tumor tissues may contribute to the progression and metastasis of OS through a mechanism involving ROCK1, suggesting miR-340 as a potential new diagnostic and therapeutic target for the treatment of OS.

  10. Inducible repression of multiple expansin genes leads to growth suppression during leaf development.

    PubMed

    Goh, Hoe-Han; Sloan, Jennifer; Dorca-Fornell, Carmen; Fleming, Andrew

    2012-08-01

    Expansins are cell wall proteins implicated in the control of plant growth via loosening of the extracellular matrix. They are encoded by a large gene family, and data linked to loss of single gene function to support a role of expansins in leaf growth remain limited. Here, we provide a quantitative growth analysis of transgenics containing an inducible artificial microRNA construct designed to down-regulate the expression of a number of expansin genes that an expression analysis indicated are expressed during the development of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf 6. The results support the hypothesis that expansins are required for leaf growth and show that decreased expansin gene expression leads to a more marked repression of growth during the later stage of leaf development. In addition, a histological analysis of leaves in which expansin gene expression was suppressed indicates that, despite smaller leaves, mean cell size was increased. These data provide functional evidence for a role of expansins in leaf growth, indicate the importance of tissue/organ developmental context for the outcome of altered expansin gene expression, and highlight the separation of the outcome of expansin gene expression at the cellular and organ levels.

  11. Climate dependency of tree growth suppressed by acid deposition effects on soils in Northwest Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; Lapenis, A.G.; Berggren, D.; Aparin, B.F.; Smith, K.T.; Shortle, W.C.; Bailey, S.W.; Varlyguin, D.L.; Babikov, B.

    2005-01-01

    Increased tree growth in temperate and boreal forests has been proposed as a direct consequence of a warming climate. Acid deposition effects on nutrient availability may influence the climate dependency of tree growth, however. This study presents an analysis of archived soil samples that has enabled changes in soil chemistry to be tracked with patterns of tree growth through the 20th century. Soil samples collected in 1926, 1964, and 2001, near St. Petersburg, Russia, showed that acid deposition was likely to have decreased root-available concentrations of Ca (an essential element) and increased root-available concentrations of Al (an inhibitor of Ca uptake). These soil changes coincided with decreased diameter growth and a suppression of climate-tree growth relationships in Norway spruce. Expected increases in tree growth from climate warming may be limited by decreased soil fertility in regions of northern and eastern Europe, and eastern North America, where Ca availability has been reduced by acidic deposition. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  12. Application of chemokine receptor antagonist with stents reduces local inflammation and suppresses cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ai-Wu; Jiang, Ting-Hui; Sun, Xian-Jun; Peng, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Severe pain and obstructive jaundice resulting from invasive cholangiocarcinoma or pancreatic carcinoma can be alleviated by implantation of biliary and duodenal stents. However, stents may cause local inflammation to have an adverse effect on the patients' condition and survival. So far, no efficient approaches have been applied to prevent the occurrence of stents-related inflammation. Here, we reported significantly higher levels of serum stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) in the patients that developed stents-associated inflammation. A higher number of inflammatory cells have been detected in the cancer close to stent in the patients with high serum SDF-1. Since chemokine plays a pivotal role in the development of inflammation, we implanted an Alzet osmotic pump with the stents to gradually release AMD3100, a specific inhibitor binding of SDF-1 and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), at the site of stents in mice that had developed pancreatic cancer. We found that AMD3100 significantly reduced local inflammation and significantly inhibited cancer cell growth, resulting in improved survival of the mice that bore cancer. Moreover, the suppression of cancer growth may be conducted through modulation of CyclinD1, p21, and p27 in the cancer cells. Together, these data suggest that inhibition of chemokine signaling at the site of stents may substantially improve survival through suppression of stent-related inflammation and tumor growth.

  13. In vitro suppression of fibroblast growth inhibitory lymphokine production by asbestos.

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, I; Dubois, C

    1983-01-01

    Human peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes (PBML) stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A) or phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) produced a soluble factor which inhibits lung fibroblast DNA synthesis and growth. Lymphocyte enriched preparations produced significant growth inhibitory activity in the presence of PHA whereas media from adherent mononuclear cells incubated in the presence of the mitogen did not contain similar activity. This fibroblast growth inhibitory factor (FGIF) was non-dialysable, heat stable and resistant to pH 5. FGIF was also resistant to treatment with chymotrypsin and phosphodiesterase but partially sensitive to treatment with trypsin. Interestingly, there was significant suppression of FGIF production by PBML cultured with PHA in the presence of low concentrations of chrysotile asbestos (5-25 micrograms/ml). In this regard, asbestos (25 micrograms/ml) was not cytotoxic for lymphocytes but had a damaging effect on monocytes as evidenced by the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) a cytoplasmic enzyme, in their culture media. These findings indicate that stimulated lymphocytes have the ability to inhibit fibroblast proliferation by releasing FGIF and that asbestos interfere with this process. Thus, while FGIF may regulate the extent of connective tissue proliferation during normal repair process, suppression of its production by asbestos may contribute to excessive fibroblast accumulation and fibrosis. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6872328

  14. An adequate Fe nutritional status of maize suppresses infection and biotrophic growth of Colletotrichum graminicola.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fanghua; Albarouki, Emad; Lingam, Brahmasivasenkar; Deising, Holger B; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2014-07-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential element for plant pathogens as well as for their host plants. As Fe plays a central role in pathogen virulence, most plants have evolved Fe-withholding strategies to reduce Fe availability to pathogens. On the other hand, plants need Fe for an oxidative burst in their basal defense response against pathogens. To investigate how the plant Fe nutritional status affects plant tolerance to a hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen, we employed the maize-Colletotrichum graminicola pathosystem. Fungal infection progressed rapidly via biotrophic to necrotrophic growth in Fe-deficient leaves, while an adequate Fe nutritional status suppressed the formation of infection structures of C. graminicola already during the early biotrophic growth phase. As indicated by Prussian blue and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) staining, the retarding effect of an adequate Fe nutritional status on fungal development coincided temporally and spatially with the recruitment of Fe to infection sites and a local production of H2 O2 . A similar coincidence between local Fe and H2 O2 accumulation was found in a parallel approach employing C. graminicola mutants affected in Fe acquisition and differing in virulence. These results indicate that an adequate Fe nutritional status delays and partially suppresses the fungal infection process and the biotrophic growth phase of C. graminicola, most likely via the recruitment of free Fe to the fungal infection site for a timely oxidative burst.

  15. Androgen suppresses testicular cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Hideo; Ueda, Takashi; Ito, Saya; Shiraishi, Takumi; Taniguchi, Hidefumi; Kayukawa, Naruhiro; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Ushijima, So; Kanazawa, Motohiro; Nakamura, Terukazu; Naya, Yoshio; Hongo, Fumiya; Kamoi, Kazumi; Okihara, Koji; Ukimura, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Silencing of androgen receptor (AR)-meditated androgen signaling is thought to be associated with the development of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). However, the role of the androgen/AR signal in TGCT development has not been investigated. In this study, we show that the androgen/AR signal suppressed the cell growth of seminomas (SEs), a type of TGCT, in vitro and in vivo. Growth of SE cells was suppressed by DHT treatment and reduction of androgen levels by surgical castration promoted cancer cell growth in an in vivo xenograft model. Tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), the rate limit enzyme in serotonin synthesis, was one of the genes which expression was reduced in DHT-treated SE cells. TPH1 was highly expressed in SE cancer tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues. Activation of androgen/AR signaling in SE cells reduced the expression of TPH1 in SE cells, followed by the reduction of serotonin secretion in cell culture supernatant. These results suggested that silencing of androgen/AR signaling may cause initiation and progression of SE through increase in TPH1 gene expression level. PMID:27144435

  16. A Predictive Model of High Shear Thrombus Growth.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Marmar; Casa, Lauren D C; Aidun, Cyrus K; Ku, David N

    2016-08-01

    The ability to predict the timescale of thrombotic occlusion in stenotic vessels may improve patient risk assessment for thrombotic events. In blood contacting devices, thrombosis predictions can lead to improved designs to minimize thrombotic risks. We have developed and validated a model of high shear thrombosis based on empirical correlations between thrombus growth and shear rate. A mathematical model was developed to predict the growth of thrombus based on the hemodynamic shear rate. The model predicts thrombus deposition based on initial geometric and fluid mechanic conditions, which are updated throughout the simulation to reflect the changing lumen dimensions. The model was validated by comparing predictions against actual thrombus growth in six separate in vitro experiments: stenotic glass capillary tubes (diameter = 345 µm) at three shear rates, the PFA-100(®) system, two microfluidic channel dimensions (heights = 300 and 82 µm), and a stenotic aortic graft (diameter = 5.5 mm). Comparison of the predicted occlusion times to experimental results shows excellent agreement. The model is also applied to a clinical angiography image to illustrate the time course of thrombosis in a stenotic carotid artery after plaque cap rupture. Our model can accurately predict thrombotic occlusion time over a wide range of hemodynamic conditions.

  17. Moderate swimming suppressed the growth and metastasis of the transplanted liver cancer in mice model: with reference to nervous system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q-B; Zhang, B-H; Zhang, K-Z; Meng, X-T; Jia, Q-A; Zhang, Q-B; Bu, Y; Zhu, X-D; Ma, D-N; Ye, B-G; Zhang, N; Ren, Z-G; Sun, H-C; Tang, Z-Y

    2016-08-01

    Physical activity has been shown to suppress tumor initiation and progression. The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) is closely related to movement and exhibits antitumor properties. However, whether the suppressive effects of physical activity on tumors was mediated by the nervous system via increased DA level remains unknowns. Here we show that regular moderate swimming (8 min/day, 9 weeks) raised DA levels in the prefrontal cortex, serum and tumor tissue, suppressed growth, reduced lung metastasis of transplanted liver cancer, and prolonged survival in a C57BL/6 mouse model, while overload swimming (16 and 32 min/day, 9 weeks) had the opposite effect. In nude mice that were orthotopically implanted with human liver cancer cell lines, DA treatment significantly suppressed growth and lung metastasis by acting on the D2 receptor (DR2). Furthermore, DR2 blockade attenuated the suppressive effect of moderate swimming on liver cancer. Both moderate swimming and DA treatment suppressed the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1)-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of transplanted liver cancer cells. At the molecular level, DR2 signaling inhibited extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation and expression of TGF-β1 in vitro. Together, these findings demonstrated a novel mechanism by which the moderate exercise suppressed liver cancer through boosting DR2 activity, while overload exercise had the opposite effect, highlighting the possible importance of the dopaminergic system in tumor growth and metastasis of liver cancer. PMID:26686088

  18. GALNT2 suppresses malignant phenotypes through IGF-1 receptor and predicts favorable prognosis in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Yung-Ming; Lu, Meng-Yao; Yang, Yung-Li; Jou, Shiann-Tarng; Lin, Dong-Tsamn; Chang, Hsiu-Hao; Lin, Kai-Hsin; Hsu, Wen-Ming; Huang, Min-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant expression of the simple mucin-type carbohydrate antigens such as Tn antigen is associated with malignant transformation and cancer progression. N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 (GALNT2), one of the enzymes that mediate the initial step of mucin-type O-glycosylation, is responsible for forming Tn antigen. GALNT2 is expressed differentially in nervous tissues during mouse embryogenesis; however, the role of GALNT2 in neuroblastoma (NB) remains unclear. Here we showed that increased GALNT2 expression evaluated using immunohistochemistry in NB tumor tissues correlated well with the histological grade of differentiation as well as younger age at diagnosis, early clinical stage, primary tumor originated from the extra-adrenal site, favorable INPC histology, and MYCN non-amplification. Multivariate analysis showed that GALNT2 expression is an independent prognostic factor for better survival for NB patients. GALNT2 overexpression suppressed IGF-1-induced cell growth, migration, and invasion of NB cells, whereas GALNT2 knockdown enhanced these NB phenotypes. Mechanistic investigations demonstrated that GALNT2 overexpression modified O-glycans on IGF-1R, which suppressed IGF-1-triggered IGF-1R dimerization and subsequent downstream signaling events. Conversely, these properties were reversed by GALNT2 knockdown in NB cells. Our findings suggest that GALNT2 regulates malignant phenotypes of NB cells through the IGF-1R signaling pathway, suggesting a critical role for GALNT2 in the pathogenesis of NB. PMID:25362349

  19. Nematode suppression and growth stimulation in corn plants (Zea mays L.) irrigated with domestic effluent.

    PubMed

    Barros, Kenia Kelly; do Nascimento, Clístenes Williams Araújo; Florencio, Lourdinha

    2012-01-01

    Treated wastewater has great potential for agricultural use due to its concentrations of nutrients and organic matter, which are capable of improving soil characteristics. Additionally, effluents can induce suppression of plant diseases caused by soil pathogens. This study evaluates the effect of irrigation with effluent in a UASB reactor on maize (Zea mays L.) development and on suppression of the diseases caused by nematodes of the genus Meloidogyne. Twelve lysimeters of 1 m(3) each were arranged in a completely randomized design, with four treatments and three replicates. The following treatments were used: T1 (W+I), irrigation with water and infestation with nematodes; T2 (W+I+NPK), irrigation with water, infestation with nematodes and fertilization with nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K); T3 (E+I), irrigation with effluent and infestation with nematodes; and T4 (E+I+P), irrigation with effluent, infestation with nematodes and fertilization with phosphorus. The plants irrigated with the effluent plus the phosphorus fertilizer had better growth and productivity and were more resistant to the disease symptoms caused by the nematodes. The suppression levels may have been due to the higher levels of Zn and NO(3)(-) found in the leaf tissue of the plants irrigated with the effluent and phosphorus fertilizer.

  20. Nematode suppression and growth stimulation in corn plants (Zea mays L.) irrigated with domestic effluent.

    PubMed

    Barros, Kenia Kelly; do Nascimento, Clístenes Williams Araújo; Florencio, Lourdinha

    2012-01-01

    Treated wastewater has great potential for agricultural use due to its concentrations of nutrients and organic matter, which are capable of improving soil characteristics. Additionally, effluents can induce suppression of plant diseases caused by soil pathogens. This study evaluates the effect of irrigation with effluent in a UASB reactor on maize (Zea mays L.) development and on suppression of the diseases caused by nematodes of the genus Meloidogyne. Twelve lysimeters of 1 m(3) each were arranged in a completely randomized design, with four treatments and three replicates. The following treatments were used: T1 (W+I), irrigation with water and infestation with nematodes; T2 (W+I+NPK), irrigation with water, infestation with nematodes and fertilization with nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K); T3 (E+I), irrigation with effluent and infestation with nematodes; and T4 (E+I+P), irrigation with effluent, infestation with nematodes and fertilization with phosphorus. The plants irrigated with the effluent plus the phosphorus fertilizer had better growth and productivity and were more resistant to the disease symptoms caused by the nematodes. The suppression levels may have been due to the higher levels of Zn and NO(3)(-) found in the leaf tissue of the plants irrigated with the effluent and phosphorus fertilizer. PMID:22744702

  1. A clinical data validated mathematical model of prostate cancer growth under intermittent androgen suppression therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portz, Travis; Kuang, Yang; Nagy, John D.

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is commonly treated by a form of hormone therapy called androgen suppression. This form of treatment, while successful at reducing the cancer cell population, adversely affects quality of life and typically leads to a recurrence of the cancer in an androgen-independent form. Intermittent androgen suppression aims to alleviate some of these adverse affects by cycling the patient on and off treatment. Clinical studies have suggested that intermittent therapy is capable of maintaining androgen dependence over multiple treatment cycles while increasing quality of life during off-treatment periods. This paper presents a mathematical model of prostate cancer to study the dynamics of androgen suppression therapy and the production of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a clinical marker for prostate cancer. Preliminary models were based on the assumption of an androgen-independent (AI) cell population with constant net growth rate. These models gave poor accuracy when fitting clinical data during simulation. The final model presented hypothesizes an AI population with increased sensitivity to low levels of androgen. It also hypothesizes that PSA production is heavily dependent on androgen. The high level of accuracy in fitting clinical data with this model appears to confirm these hypotheses, which are also consistent with biological evidence.

  2. [Growth and red luminescence suppression of gamma-Cu I single crystal].

    PubMed

    Cai, Zu-Xu; Gu, Mu; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Bo; Huang, Shi-Ming; Ni, Chen

    2013-02-01

    Transparent gamma-Cu I crystal with size about 9 mm x 9 mm x 1 mm was grown by using optimized solvent evaporation method with gamma-Cu I powders as raw material and acetonitrile as solvent. The results of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) showed that the proportions of copper and iodine in as-grown gamma-Cu I crystal were 53.1 and 46.9 mol%, respectively. By iodine doping into growth solution, the proportions of copper and iodine were adjusted to 50.4 and 49.6 mol%, respectively. Photoluminescence (PL) showed that the as-grown gamma-Cu I crystal had an emission at 410 nm and an emission band around 720 nm. After iodine doping, the emission band around 720 nm was suppressed while other two weak emissions at 424 and 474 nm appeared. X-ray excited luminescence (XEL) showed that the as-grown gamma-Cu I crystal had an emission at 435 nm and an emission band around 720 nm. After iodine doping, the emission band around 720 nm was suppressed. Comparing the emission spectra before and after iodine doping, it is clear that red luminescence in gamma-Cu I crystal could be suppressed by iodine doping. The effect originated from the reduction of iodine vacancy in the crystal, but not from the iodine adsorbtion on the surface.

  3. Pharmacological Inhibition of Microsomal Prostaglandin E Synthase-1 Suppresses Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Mediated Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bocci, Elena; Coletta, Isabella; Polenzani, Lorenzo; Mangano, Giorgina; Alisi, Maria Alessandra; Cazzolla, Nicola; Giachetti, Antonio; Ziche, Marina; Donnini, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Background Blockade of Prostaglandin (PG) E2 production via deletion of microsomal Prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) gene reduces tumor cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo on xenograft tumors. So far the therapeutic potential of the pharmacological inhibition of mPGES-1 has not been elucidated. PGE2 promotes epithelial tumor progression via multiple signaling pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we evaluated the antitumor activity of AF3485, a compound of a novel family of human mPGES-1 inhibitors, in vitro and in vivo, in mice bearing human A431 xenografts overexpressing EGFR. Treatment of the human cell line A431 with interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) increased mPGES-1 expression, PGE2 production and induced EGFR phosphorylation, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) expression. AF3485 reduced PGE2 production, both in quiescent and in cells stimulated by IL-1β. AF3485 abolished IL-1β-induced activation of the EGFR, decreasing VEGF and FGF-2 expression, and tumor-mediated endothelial tube formation. In vivo, in A431 xenograft, AF3485, administered sub-chronically, decreased tumor growth, an effect related to inhibition of EGFR signalling, and to tumor microvessel rarefaction. In fact, we observed a decrease of EGFR phosphorylation, and VEGF and FGF-2 expression in tumours explanted from treated mice. Conclusion Our work demonstrates that the pharmacological inhibition of mPGES-1 reduces squamous carcinoma growth by suppressing PGE2 mediated-EGFR signalling and by impairing tumor associated angiogenesis. These results underscore the potential of mPGES-1 inhibitors as agents capable of controlling tumor growth. PMID:22815767

  4. A Transendocytosis model of CTLA-4 function predicts its suppressive behaviour on regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Tie Zheng; Qureshi, Omar S.; Wang, Chun Jing; Baker, Jennifer; Young, Stephen P.; Walker, Lucy S.K.; Sansom, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Manipulation of the CD28/CTLA-4 pathway is at the heart of a number of immunomodulatory approaches used in both autoimmunity and cancer. Whilst it is clear that CTLA-4 is a critical regulator of T cell responses, the immunological contexts in which CTLA-4 controls immune responses are not well defined. Here we show that whilst CD80/CD86-dependent activation of resting human T cells caused extensive T cell proliferation and robust CTLA-4 expression, in this context CTLA-4 blocking antibodies had no impact on the response. In contrast, in settings where CTLA-4+ cells were present as “regulators”, inhibition of resting T cell responses was dependent on CTLA-4 expression and specifically related to the number of antigen presenting cells. At low numbers of APC or low levels of ligand, CTLA-4-dependent suppression was highly effective whereas at higher APC numbers or high levels of ligand, inhibition was lost. Accordingly, the degree of suppression correlated with the level of CD86 expression remaining on the antigen presenting cells. These data reveal clear rules for the inhibitory function of CTLA-4 on Treg which are predicted by its ability to remove ligands from antigen presenting cells. PMID:25632005

  5. SNR Loss: A new objective measure for predicting speech intelligibility of noise-suppressed speech

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianfen; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2010-01-01

    Most of the existing intelligibility measures do not account for the distortions present in processed speech, such as those introduced by speech-enhancement algorithms. In the present study, we propose three new objective measures that can be used for prediction of intelligibility of processed (e.g., via an enhancement algorithm) speech in noisy conditions. All three measures use a critical-band spectral representation of the clean and noise-suppressed signals and are based on the measurement of the SNR loss incurred in each critical band after the corrupted signal goes through a speech enhancement algorithm. The proposed measures are flexible in that they can provide different weights to the two types of spectral distortions introduced by enhancement algorithms, namely spectral attenuation and spectral amplification distortions. The proposed measures were evaluated with intelligibility scores obtained by normal-hearing listeners in 72 noisy conditions involving noise-suppressed speech (consonants and sentences) corrupted by four different maskers (car, babble, train and street interferences). Highest correlation (r=−0.85) with sentence recognition scores was obtained using a variant of the SNR loss measure that only included vowel/consonant transitions and weak consonant information. High correlation was maintained for all noise types, with a maximum correlation (r=−0.88) achieved in street noise conditions. PMID:21503274

  6. Overexpression of GRIM-19, a mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I protein, suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Dexia; Zhao, Lijing; Du, Yanwei; He, Ping; Zou, Yabin; Yang, Luoluo; Sun, Liankun; Wang, Hebin; Xu, Deqi; Meng, Xiangwei; Sun, Xun

    2014-01-01

    GRIM-19 has been demonstrated as an important regulator for the normal tissue development. Recently, more evidences regarded GRIM-19 as the new tumor suppressor. However, the possible mechanisms underlying GRIM-19 suppressing cancer growth are unclear. In the present study, Paired hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and adjacent non-tumor liver tissues were obtained from 54 patients who underwent primary surgical HCC tissue resection. GRIM-19 protein expression in HCC tissues was performed by immunohistochemistry. Cells were transfected by lentiviruses plasmid expressing GRIM-19. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses were performed to confirm the expression of GRIM-19 mRNA or protein. Cell proliferation was assessed by MTT and FCM analyses. Mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis were respectively determined by using fluorescence microscopy and FCM analyses. AKT1, pAKT1, cyclinD1, CDK4, PCNA, Bax, Bcl-2, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3, and cytochrome C were detected by Western blot and immunofluorescence. GRIM-19 protein expression was markedly lower in HCC than in paired adjacent non-tumor liver tissues. GRIM-19 overexpression in HCC cells significantly induced cell cycle arrest and enhanced apoptosis. We also found that AKT1 expression and phosphorylation were regulated by the expression of GRIM-19. Collectively, our study demonstrated that GRIM-19 overexpression suppressed HCC growth and downregulated AKT1 expression, suggesting that GRIM-19 might play a crucial role in hepatocarcinogenesis through negatively regulating the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. PMID:25550785

  7. Growth suppression of Leydig TM3 cells mediated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Iseki, Minoru; Ikuta, Togo; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Kawajiri, Kaname . E-mail: kawajiri@cancer-c.pref.saitama.jp

    2005-06-17

    Exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin induces developmental toxicity in reproductive organs. To elucidate the function of AhR, we generated stable transformants of TM3 cells overexpressing wild-type aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) or its mutants which carried mutations in nuclear localization signal or nuclear export signal. In the presence of 3-methylcholanthrene (MC), proliferation of the cells transfected with wild-type AhR was completely suppressed, whereas cells expressing AhR mutants proliferated in a manner equivalent to control TM3 cells, suggesting AhR-dependent growth inhibition. The suppression was associated with up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21{sup Cip1}, which was abolished by pretreatment with actinomycin D. A p38 MAPK specific inhibitor, SB203580, blocked the increase of p21{sup Cip1} mRNA in response to MC. Treatment with indigo, another AhR ligand, failed to increase of p21{sup Cip1} mRNA, although up-regulation of mRNA for CYP1A1 was observed. These data suggest AhR in Leydig cells mediates growth inhibition by inducing p21{sup Cip1}.

  8. Brain tumor regulates neuromuscular synapse growth and endocytosis in Drosophila by suppressing mad expression.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenwen; Chen, Yan; Gan, Guangming; Wang, Dan; Ren, Jinqi; Wang, Qifu; Xu, Zhiheng; Xie, Wei; Zhang, Yong Q

    2013-07-24

    The precise regulation of synaptic growth is critical for the proper formation and plasticity of functional neural circuits. Identification and characterization of factors that regulate synaptic growth and function have been under intensive investigation. Here we report that brain tumor (brat), which was identified as a translational repressor in multiple biological processes, plays a crucial role at Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) synapses. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that brat mutants exhibited synaptic overgrowth characterized by excess satellite boutons at NMJ terminals, whereas electron microscopy revealed increased synaptic vesicle size but reduced density at active zones compared with wild-types. Spontaneous miniature excitatory junctional potential amplitudes were larger and evoked quantal content was lower at brat mutant NMJs. In agreement with the morphological and physiological phenotypes, loss of Brat resulted in reduced FM1-43 uptake at the NMJ terminals, indicating that brat regulates synaptic endocytosis. Genetic analysis revealed that the actions of Brat at synapses are mediated through mothers against decapentaplegic (Mad), the signal transduction effector of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway. Furthermore, biochemical analyses showed upregulated levels of Mad protein but normal mRNA levels in the larval brains of brat mutants, suggesting that Brat suppresses Mad translation. Consistently, knockdown of brat by RNA interference in Drosophila S2 cells also increased Mad protein level. These results together reveal an important and previously unidentified role for Brat in synaptic development and endocytosis mediated by suppression of BMP signaling. PMID:23884941

  9. Chitosan/short hairpin RNA complexes for vascular endothelial growth factor suppression invasive breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Salva, Emine; Kabasakal, Levent; Eren, Fatih; Cakalağaoğlu, Fulya; Ozkan, Naziye; Akbuğa, Jülide

    2010-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a critical role in angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to use chitosan/short hairpin VEGF (shVEGF) [short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-expressing pDNA targeting VEGF-A] complexes in the treatment of rat breast cancer model. Therefore, chitosan/shVEGF complexes were prepared in (2/1) ratio and injected to the breast-tumor bearing Sprague-Dawley rats. Intratumoral and intraperitoneal injections were applied and compared. Tumor volumes were measured during the 36 days. To investigate the effect of complexes on the VEGF expression, VEGF were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. The mRNA levels of VEGF were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Tumor volume decreased at the end of experiments after shRNA treatment. The highest suppression in the tumor volume was observed after intratumoral complex injection to rats (96%). Compared with intratumoral and intraperitoneal injection, higher tumor inhibition was obtained with intratumoral injection. Free shRNA injection indicated lower tumor suppression. The immunohistochemistry and western blotting results correlated with the real-time polymerase chain reaction and tumor volume measurements. The data suggest that chitosan/shVEGF complexes can be used to inhibit tumor growth in breast carcinoma model of rats.

  10. MiR-214 inhibits cell growth in hepatocellular carcinoma through suppression of {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaojun; Chen, Ji; Li, Feng; Lin, Yanting; Zhang, Xiaoping; Lv, Zhongwei; Jiang, Jiaji

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 is frequently downregulated in human HCC cell lines and tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 overexpression inhibits HCC cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 directly targets {beta}-catenin 3 Prime -UTR in HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 regulates {beta}-catenin downstream signaling molecules. -- Abstract: Mounting evidence has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) are implicated in carcinogenesis and can function as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes in human cancers. Recent profile studies of miRNA expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-214) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, its potential functions and underlying mechanisms in hepatocarcinogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we confirmed that miR-214 is significantly downregulated in HCC cells and specimens. Ectopic overexpression of miR-214 inhibited proliferation of HCC cells in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Further studies revealed that miR-214 could directly target the 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR) of {beta}-catenin mRNA and suppress its protein expression. Similar to the restoring miR-214 expression, {beta}-catenin downregulation inhibited cell growth, whereas restoring the {beta}-catenin expression abolished the function of miR-214. Moreover, miR-214-mediated reduction of {beta}-catenin resulted in suppression of several downstream genes including c-Myc, cyclinD1, TCF-1, and LEF-1. These findings indicate that miR-214 serves as tumor suppressor and plays substantial roles in inhibiting the tumorigenesis of HCC through suppression of {beta}-catenin. Given these, miR-214 may serve as a useful prognostic or therapeutic target for treatment of HCC.

  11. Impaired Genome Maintenance Suppresses the Growth Hormone–Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Axis in Mice with Cockayne Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Renata M. C; Gorgels, Theo G. M. F; Wijnhoven, Susan W; Diderich, Karin E. M; de Wit, Jan; Mitchell, James R; van Oostrom, Conny; Beems, Rudolf; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Velasco, Susana; Friedberg, Errol C; Tanaka, Kiyoji; van Steeg, Harry; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J

    2007-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a photosensitive, DNA repair disorder associated with progeria that is caused by a defect in the transcription-coupled repair subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER). Here, complete inactivation of NER in Csbm/m/Xpa−/− mutants causes a phenotype that reliably mimics the human progeroid CS syndrome. Newborn Csbm/m/Xpa−/− mice display attenuated growth, progressive neurological dysfunction, retinal degeneration, cachexia, kyphosis, and die before weaning. Mouse liver transcriptome analysis and several physiological endpoints revealed systemic suppression of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH/IGF1) somatotroph axis and oxidative metabolism, increased antioxidant responses, and hypoglycemia together with hepatic glycogen and fat accumulation. Broad genome-wide parallels between Csbm/m/Xpa−/− and naturally aged mouse liver transcriptomes suggested that these changes are intrinsic to natural ageing and the DNA repair–deficient mice. Importantly, wild-type mice exposed to a low dose of chronic genotoxic stress recapitulated this response, thereby pointing to a novel link between genome instability and the age-related decline of the somatotroph axis. PMID:17326724

  12. Myristica fragrans Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metabolism by Inhibiting Lactate Dehydrogenase A.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Yeong; Choi, Hee-Jung; Park, Mi-Ju; Jung, Yeon-Seop; Lee, Syng-Ook; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Choi, Jung-Hye; Chung, Tae-Wook; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Most cancer cells predominantly produce ATP by maintaining a high rate of lactate fermentation, rather than by maintaining a comparatively low rate of tricarboxylic acid cycle, i.e., Warburg's effect. In the pathway, the pyruvate produced by glycolysis is converted to lactic acid by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Here, we demonstrated that water extracts from the seeds of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (MF) inhibit the in vitro enzymatic activity of LDH. MF effectively suppressed cell growth and the overall Warburg effect in HT29 human colon cancer cells. Although the expression of LDH-A was not changed by MF, both lactate production and LDH activity were decreased in MF-treated cells under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In addition, intracellular ATP levels were also decreased by MF treatment, and the uptake of glucose was also reduced by MF treatment. Furthermore, the experiment on tumor growth in the in vivo mice model revealed that MF effectively reduced the growth of allotransplanted Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Taken together, these results suggest that MF effectively inhibits cancer growth and metabolism by inhibiting the activity of LDH, a major enzyme responsible for regulating cancer metabolism. These results implicate MF as a potential candidate for development into a novel drug against cancer through inhibition of LDH activity.

  13. SEIZURES IN EARLY-LIFE SUPPRESS HIPPOCAMPAL DENDRITE GROWTH WHILE IMPAIRING SPATIAL LEARNING

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Masataka; Gu, Xue; Swann, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Impaired learning and memory are common in epilepsy syndromes of childhood. Clinical investigations suggest that the developing brain may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of intractable seizure disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have demonstrated reduced volumes in brain regions involved in learning and memory. The earlier the onset of an epilepsy the larger the effects seem to be on both brain anatomy and cognition. Thus, childhood epilepsy has been proposed to interfere in some unknown way with brain development. Experiments reported here explore these ideas by examining the effects of seizures in infant mice on learning and memory and on the growth of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cell dendrites. Fifteen brief seizures were induced by flurothyl between postnatal days 7 and 11 in mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) in hippocampal pyramidal cells. One to 44 days later, dendritic arbors were reconstructed to measure growth. Spatial learning and memory were also assessed in a water maze. Our results show that recurrent seizures produced marked deficits in learning and memory. Seizures also dramatically slowed the growth of basilar dendrites while neurons in litter-mate control mice continued to add new dendritic branches and lengthen existing branches. When experiments were performed in older mice, seizures had no measureable effects on either dendrite arbor complexity or spatial learning and memory. Our results suggest that the recurring seizures of intractable childhood epilepsy contribute to associated learning and memory deficits by suppressing dendrite growth. PMID:21777677

  14. Enhanced mitochondrial glutamine anaplerosis suppresses pancreatic cancer growth through autophagy inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Min; Hwang, Sunsook; Park, Kyungsoo; Yang, Seungyeon; Seong, Rho Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells use precursors derived from tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle to support their unlimited growth. However, continuous export of TCA cycle intermediates results in the defect of mitochondrial integrity. Mitochondria glutamine metabolism plays an essential role for the maintenance of mitochondrial functions and its biosynthetic roles by refilling the mitochondrial carbon pool. Here we report that human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells have a distinct dependence on mitochondrial glutamine metabolism. Whereas glutamine flux into mitochondria contributes to proliferation of most cancer cells, enhanced glutamine anaplerosis results in a pronounced suppression of PDAC growth. A cell membrane permeable α-ketoglutarate analog or overexpression of glutamate dehydrogenase lead to decreased proliferation and increased apoptotic cell death in PDAC cells but not other cancer cells. We found that enhanced glutamine anaplerosis inhibits autophagy, required for tumorigenic growth of PDAC, by activating mammalian TORC1. Together, our results reveal that glutamine anaplerosis is a crucial regulator of growth and survival of PDAC cells, which may provide novel therapeutic approaches to treat these cancers. PMID:27477484

  15. Enhanced mitochondrial glutamine anaplerosis suppresses pancreatic cancer growth through autophagy inhibition.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung Min; Hwang, Sunsook; Park, Kyungsoo; Yang, Seungyeon; Seong, Rho Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells use precursors derived from tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle to support their unlimited growth. However, continuous export of TCA cycle intermediates results in the defect of mitochondrial integrity. Mitochondria glutamine metabolism plays an essential role for the maintenance of mitochondrial functions and its biosynthetic roles by refilling the mitochondrial carbon pool. Here we report that human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells have a distinct dependence on mitochondrial glutamine metabolism. Whereas glutamine flux into mitochondria contributes to proliferation of most cancer cells, enhanced glutamine anaplerosis results in a pronounced suppression of PDAC growth. A cell membrane permeable α-ketoglutarate analog or overexpression of glutamate dehydrogenase lead to decreased proliferation and increased apoptotic cell death in PDAC cells but not other cancer cells. We found that enhanced glutamine anaplerosis inhibits autophagy, required for tumorigenic growth of PDAC, by activating mammalian TORC1. Together, our results reveal that glutamine anaplerosis is a crucial regulator of growth and survival of PDAC cells, which may provide novel therapeutic approaches to treat these cancers. PMID:27477484

  16. Myristica fragrans Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metabolism by Inhibiting Lactate Dehydrogenase A.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Yeong; Choi, Hee-Jung; Park, Mi-Ju; Jung, Yeon-Seop; Lee, Syng-Ook; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Choi, Jung-Hye; Chung, Tae-Wook; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Most cancer cells predominantly produce ATP by maintaining a high rate of lactate fermentation, rather than by maintaining a comparatively low rate of tricarboxylic acid cycle, i.e., Warburg's effect. In the pathway, the pyruvate produced by glycolysis is converted to lactic acid by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Here, we demonstrated that water extracts from the seeds of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (MF) inhibit the in vitro enzymatic activity of LDH. MF effectively suppressed cell growth and the overall Warburg effect in HT29 human colon cancer cells. Although the expression of LDH-A was not changed by MF, both lactate production and LDH activity were decreased in MF-treated cells under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In addition, intracellular ATP levels were also decreased by MF treatment, and the uptake of glucose was also reduced by MF treatment. Furthermore, the experiment on tumor growth in the in vivo mice model revealed that MF effectively reduced the growth of allotransplanted Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Taken together, these results suggest that MF effectively inhibits cancer growth and metabolism by inhibiting the activity of LDH, a major enzyme responsible for regulating cancer metabolism. These results implicate MF as a potential candidate for development into a novel drug against cancer through inhibition of LDH activity. PMID:27430914

  17. Using growth velocity to predict child mortality12

    PubMed Central

    Schwinger, Catherine; Van den Broeck, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Growth assessment based on the WHO child growth velocity standards can potentially be used to predict adverse health outcomes. Nevertheless, there are very few studies on growth velocity to predict mortality. Objectives: We aimed to determine the ability of various growth velocity measures to predict child death within 3 mo and to compare it with those of attained growth measures. Design: Data from 5657 children <5 y old who were enrolled in a cohort study in the Democratic Republic of Congo were used. Children were measured up to 6 times in 3-mo intervals, and 246 (4.3%) children died during the study period. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) models informed the mortality risk within 3 mo for weight and length velocity z scores and 3-mo changes in midupper arm circumference (MUAC). We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to present balance in sensitivity and specificity to predict child death. Results: GEE models showed that children had an exponential increase in the risk of dying with decreasing growth velocity in all 4 indexes (1.2- to 2.4-fold for every unit decrease). A length and weight velocity z score of <−3 was associated with an 11.8- and a 7.9-fold increase, respectively, in the RR of death in the subsequent 3-mo period (95% CIs: 3.9, 35.5, and 3.9, 16.2, respectively). Weight and length velocity z scores had better predictive abilities [area under the ROC curves (AUCs) of 0.67 and 0.69] than did weight-for-age (AUC: 0.57) and length-for-age (AUC: 0.52) z scores. Among wasted children (weight-for-height z score <−2), the AUC of weight velocity z scores was 0.87. Absolute MUAC performed best among the attained indexes (AUC: 0.63), but longitudinal assessment of MUAC-based indexes did not increase the predictive value. Conclusion: Although repeated growth measures are slightly more complex to implement, their superiority in mortality-predictive abilities suggests that these could be used more for identifying children at

  18. Cooperative Bacterial Growth Dynamics Predict the Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemova, Tatiana; Gerardin, Ylaine; Hsin-Jung Li, Sophia; Gore, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    Since the discovery of penicillin, antibiotics have been our primary weapon against bacterial infections. Unfortunately, bacteria can gain resistance to penicillin by acquiring the gene that encodes beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. However, mutations in this gene are necessary to degrade the modern antibiotic cefotaxime. Understanding the conditions that favor the spread of these mutations is a challenge. Here we show that bacterial growth in beta-lactam antibiotics is cooperative and that the nature of this growth determines the conditions in which resistance evolves. Quantitative analysis of the growth dynamics predicts a peak in selection at very low antibiotic concentrations; competition between strains confirms this prediction. We also find significant selection at higher antibiotic concentrations, close to the minimum inhibitory concentrations of the strains. Our results argue that an understanding of the evolutionary forces that lead to antibiotic resistance requires a quantitative understanding of the evolution of cooperation in bacteria.

  19. Suppression in droplet growth kinetics by the addition of organics to sulfate particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Jenny P. S.; Liggio, John; Li, Shao-Meng; Nenes, Athanasios; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.

    2014-11-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions are affected by the rate at which water vapor condenses onto particles during cloud droplet growth. Changes in droplet growth rates can impact cloud droplet number and size distribution. The current study investigated droplet growth kinetics of acidic and neutral sulfate particles which contained various amounts and types of organic compounds, from model compounds (carbonyls) to complex mixtures (α-pinene secondary organic aerosol and diesel engine exhaust). In most cases, the formed droplet size distributions were shifted to smaller sizes relative to control experiments (pure sulfate particles), due to suppression in droplet growth rates in the cloud condensation nuclei counter. The shift to smaller droplets correlated with increasing amounts of organic material, with the largest effect observed for acidic seed particles at low relative humidity. For all organics incorporated onto acidic particles, formation of high molecular weight compounds was observed, probably by acid-catalyzed Aldol condensation reactions in the case of carbonyls. To test the reversibility of this process, carbonyl experiments were conducted with acidic particles exposed to higher relative humidity. High molecular weight compounds were not measured in this case and no shift in droplet sizes was observed, suggesting that high molecular weight compounds are the species affecting the rate of water uptake. While these results provide laboratory evidence that organic compounds can slow droplet growth rates, the modeled mass accommodation coefficient of water on these particles (α > 0.1) indicates that this effect is unlikely to significantly affect cloud properties, consistent with infrequent field observations of slower droplet growth rates.

  20. Suppression of breast cancer cell growth by Her2-reduced AR serine 81 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pao-Hsuan; Wang, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Chen-Chuan; Lee, Yueh-Tsung; Yue, Chia-Herng; Chen, Mei-Chih; Lin, Ho

    2016-08-31

    Breast cancer is a hormone-related carcinoma and the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in women. Although Her-2, estrogen receptor (ER), and progesterone receptor (PR) are the major diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets to breast cancer, searching for additional molecular targets remains an important issue and one of the candidates is androgen receptor (AR). AR has been shown expressed in 70% breast cancer patients and connects to low recurrence and high survival rate. Our previous study demonstrates that Ser81 phosphorylation of AR in prostate cancer cells is critical for its protein stability modulated by human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (Her2). The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of Her2 and AR in proliferation of breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-453. The data show that AR which was activated by synthetic androgen R1881 suppressed the proliferation of MDA-MB-453 cells. Notably, AR activation decreased the protein levels of cell growth-related proteins, including cyclin A, cyclin B, and early growth response protein 1 (Egr1), while cell-cycle inhibitor protein p27 was increased. Besides, Heregulin (HRG)-induced Her2 activation decreased the AR protein levels and its Ser81 phosphorylation. Her2 small molecular inhibitor, Lapatinib, dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation while the levels of phospho-Ser81 AR and p27 protein were increased. Phospho-Ser81 AR was also increased after Her2 knockdown. Specifically, the influence of phospho-Ser81 AR by Lapatinib was primarily found in the nucleus of MDA-MD-453 cells, where the cell proliferation might directly be interfered. In conclusion, our findings indicate that Her2 might negatively regulate AR phosphorylation/activation and contribute to regulate the proliferation of MDA-MB 453 cells.

  1. New approaches to toxicity: a seven-gas predictive model and toxicant suppressants.

    PubMed

    Levin, B C

    1997-11-01

    Two new research approaches in combustion toxicology are: 1. the prediction of smoke toxicity from mathematical equations, which are empirically derived from, experiments on the toxicological interactions of complex fire gas mixtures and 2. the use of toxicant suppressants in materials or products to prevent the formation of toxic combustion products. The predictive approach consists of burning materials using a bench-scale method that simulates realistic fire conditions, measuring the concentrations of the primary fire gases--CO, CO2, low O2, HCN, HCl, HBr, and NO2--and predicting the toxicity of the smoke using either the 6- or 7-gas N-Gas Model. These models are based on the results of toxicological studies of these primary gases as individual gases and as complex mixtures. The predicted toxic potency is checked with a small number of animal (Fischer 344 male rats) tests to assure that an unanticipated toxic gas is not generated or an unexpected synergistic or antagonistic effect has not occurred. The results indicate if the smoke from a material or product is extremely toxic (based on mass consumed at the predicted toxic level) or unusually toxic (based on the gases deemed responsible). The predictions based on bench-scale laboratory tests have been validated with full-scale room burns of a limited number of materials of widely differing characteristics chosen to challenge the system. The advantages of this new approach are 1. the number of test animals is minimized by predicting the toxic potency from the chemical analysis of the smoke, 2. smoke may be produced under conditions that simulate the fire scenario of concern, 3. fewer tests are needed, thereby reducing the overall cost of the testing and 4, information is obtained on both the toxic potency of the smoke and the responsible gases. The N-Gas Models have been developed into the N-Gas Method (described in this paper) and these results have been used in computations of fire hazard. The 6-Gas Model is now

  2. Early growth response-1 suppresses epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated airway hyperresponsiveness and lung remodeling in mice.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Elizabeth L; Mushaben, Elizabeth M; Pastura, Patricia A; Acciani, Thomas H; Deutsch, Gail H; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Hardie, William D; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Le Cras, Timothy D

    2009-10-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha and its receptor, the epidermal growth factor receptor, are induced after lung injury and are associated with remodeling in chronic pulmonary diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis and asthma. Expression of TGF-alpha in the lungs of adult mice causes fibrosis, pleural thickening, and pulmonary hypertension, in addition to increased expression of a transcription factor, early growth response-1 (Egr-1). Egr-1 was increased in airway smooth muscle (ASM) and the vascular adventitia in the lungs of mice conditionally expressing TGF-alpha in airway epithelium (Clara cell secretory protein-rtTA(+/-)/[tetO](7)-TGF-alpha(+/-)). The goal of this study was to determine the role of Egr-1 in TGF-alpha-induced lung disease. To accomplish this, TGF-alpha-transgenic mice were crossed to Egr-1 knockout (Egr-1(ko/ko)) mice. The lack of Egr-1 markedly increased the severity of TGF-alpha-induced pulmonary disease, dramatically enhancing airway muscularization, increasing pulmonary fibrosis, and causing greater airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Smooth muscle hyperplasia, not hypertrophy, caused the ASM thickening in the absence of Egr-1. No detectable increases in pulmonary inflammation were found. In addition to the airway remodeling disease, vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension were also more severe in Egr-1(ko/ko) mice. Thus, Egr-1 acts to suppress epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated airway and vascular muscularization, fibrosis, and airway hyperresponsiveness in the absence of inflammation. This provides a unique model to study the processes causing pulmonary fibrosis and ASM thickening without the complicating effects of inflammation.

  3. Crack Growth Simulation and Residual Strength Prediction in Airplane Fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuin-Shan; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report for the NASA funded project entitled "Crack Growth Prediction Methodology for Multi-Site Damage." The primary objective of the project was to create a capability to simulate curvilinear fatigue crack growth and ductile tearing in aircraft fuselages subjected to widespread fatigue damage. The second objective was to validate the capability by way of comparisons to experimental results. Both objectives have been achieved and the results are detailed herein. In the first part of the report, the crack tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion, obtained and correlated from coupon tests to predict fracture behavior and residual strength of built-up aircraft fuselages, is discussed. Geometrically nonlinear, elastic-plastic, thin shell finite element analyses are used to simulate stable crack growth and to predict residual strength. Both measured and predicted results of laboratory flat panel tests and full-scale fuselage panel tests show substantial reduction of residual strength due to the occurrence of multi-site damage (MSD). Detailed comparisons of n stable crack growth history, and residual strength between the predicted and experimental results are used to assess the validity of the analysis methodology. In the second part of the report, issues related to crack trajectory prediction in thin shells; an evolving methodology uses the crack turning phenomenon to improve the structural integrity of aircraft structures are discussed, A directional criterion is developed based on the maximum tangential stress theory, but taking into account the effect of T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy. Possible extensions of the current crack growth directional criterion to handle geometrically and materially nonlinear problems are discussed. The path independent contour integral method for T-stress evaluation is derived and its accuracy is assessed using a p- and hp-version adaptive finite element method. Curvilinear crack growth is simulated in

  4. Suppression in growth hormone during overeating ameliorates the increase in insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease risk.

    PubMed

    Cornford, Andrea S; Barkan, Ariel L; Hinko, Alexander; Horowitz, Jeffrey F

    2012-11-15

    Previously, we reported that overeating for only a few days markedly suppressed the secretion of growth hormone (GH). The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of this reduction in GH concentration on key metabolic adaptations that occur during 2 wk of overeating. Nine nonobese, healthy adults were admitted to the hospital for 2 wk, during which time they ate ∼4,000 kcal/day (70 kcal·kg fat-free mass(-1)·day(-1); 50% carbohydrate, 35% fat, and 15% protein), and their plasma GH concentration was allowed to decline naturally (control). An additional eight subjects underwent the same overeating intervention and received exogenous GH treatment (GHT) administered in four daily injections to mimic physiological GH secretion throughout the 2-wk overeating period. We measured plasma insulin and glucose concentrations in the fasting and postprandial state as well as fasting lipolytic rate, proteolytic rate, and fractional synthetic rate (FSR) using stable-isotope tracer methods. GHT prevented the fall in plasma GH concentration, maintaining plasma GH concentration at baseline levels (1.2 ± 0.2 ng/ml), which increased fasting and postprandial assessments of insulin resistance (P < 0.05) and increased fasting lipidemia (all P < 0.05 vs. control). In addition, preventing the suppression in GH with overeating also blunted the increase in systemic proteolysis (P < 0.05 GHT vs. control). However, GHT did not alter lipolysis or FSR in response to overeating. In conclusion, our main findings suggest that the suppression in GH secretion that naturally occurs during the early stages of overeating may help attenuate the insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia that typically accompany overeating. PMID:23011065

  5. Volasertib suppresses tumor growth and potentiates the activity of cisplatin in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Feng-Feng; Pan, Shi-Shi; Ou, Rong-Ying; Zheng, Zhen-Zhen; Huang, Xiao-Xiu; Jian, Meng-Ting; Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Yang, Yang; Li, Wen-Feng; Shi, Zhi; Yan, Xiao-Jian

    2015-01-01

    Volasertib (BI 6727), a highly selective and potent inhibitor of PLK1, has shown broad antitumor activities in the preclinical and clinical studies for the treatment of several types of cancers. However, the anticancer effect of volasertib on cervical cancer cells is still unknown. In the present study, we show that volasertib can markedly induce cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and apoptosis with the decreased protein expressions of PLK1 substrates survivin and wee1 in human cervical cancer cells. Furthermore, volasertib also enhances the intracellular reactive oxidative species (ROS) levels, and pretreated with ROS scavenger N-acety-L-cysteine totally blocks ROS generation but partly reverses volasertib-induced apoptosis. In addition, volasertib significantly potentiates the activity of cisplatin to inhibit the growth of cervical cancer in vitro and in vivo. In brief, volasertib suppresses tumor growth and potentiates the activity of cisplatin in cervical cancer, suggesting the combination of volasertib and cisplatin may be a promising strategy for the treatment of patients with cervical cancer. PMID:26885445

  6. Volasertib suppresses tumor growth and potentiates the activity of cisplatin in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Feng-Feng; Pan, Shi-Shi; Ou, Rong-Ying; Zheng, Zhen-Zhen; Huang, Xiao-Xiu; Jian, Meng-Ting; Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Yang, Yang; Li, Wen-Feng; Shi, Zhi; Yan, Xiao-Jian

    2015-01-01

    Volasertib (BI 6727), a highly selective and potent inhibitor of PLK1, has shown broad antitumor activities in the preclinical and clinical studies for the treatment of several types of cancers. However, the anticancer effect of volasertib on cervical cancer cells is still unknown. In the present study, we show that volasertib can markedly induce cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and apoptosis with the decreased protein expressions of PLK1 substrates survivin and wee1 in human cervical cancer cells. Furthermore, volasertib also enhances the intracellular reactive oxidative species (ROS) levels, and pretreated with ROS scavenger N-acety-L-cysteine totally blocks ROS generation but partly reverses volasertib-induced apoptosis. In addition, volasertib significantly potentiates the activity of cisplatin to inhibit the growth of cervical cancer in vitro and in vivo. In brief, volasertib suppresses tumor growth and potentiates the activity of cisplatin in cervical cancer, suggesting the combination of volasertib and cisplatin may be a promising strategy for the treatment of patients with cervical cancer. PMID:26885445

  7. Prediction of fire growth on furniture using CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pehrson, Richard David

    A fire growth calculation method has been developed that couples a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model with bench scale cone calorimeter test data for predicting the rate of flame spread on compartment contents such as furniture. The commercial CFD code TASCflow has been applied to solve time averaged conservation equations using an algebraic multigrid solver with mass weighted skewed upstream differencing for advection. Closure models include k-e for turbulence, eddy breakup for combustion following a single step irreversible reaction with Arrhenius rate constant, finite difference radiation transfer, and conjugate heat transfer. Radiation properties are determined from concentrations of soot, CO2 and H2O using the narrow band model of Grosshandler and exponential wide band curve fit model of Modak. The growth in pyrolyzing area is predicted by treating flame spread as a series of piloted ignitions based on coupled gas-fluid boundary conditions. The mass loss rate from a given surface element follows the bench scale test data for input to the combustion prediction. The fire growth model has been tested against foam-fabric mattresses and chairs burned in the furniture calorimeter. In general, agreement between model and experiment for peak heat release rate (HRR), time to peak HRR, and total energy lost is within +/-20%. Used as a proxy for the flame spread velocity, the slope of the HRR curve predicted by model agreed with experiment within +/-20% for all but one case.

  8. Liposome-Encapsulated Curcumin Suppresses Neuroblastoma Growth Through Nuclear Factor-κB Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Orr, W. Shannon; Denbo, Jason W.; Saab, Karim R.; Myers, Adrianne L.; Ng, Catherine Y.; Zhou, Junfang; Morton, Christopher L.; Pfeffer, Lawrence M.; Davidoff, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) has been implicated in tumor cell proliferation and survival, and tumor angiogenesis. We sought to evaluate the effects of curcumin, an inhibitor of NF-κB, on a xenograft model on disseminated neuroblastoma. Methods For in vitro studies, neuroblastoma cell lines, NB1691, CHLA-20, and SK-N-AS, were treated with varying doses of liposomal curcumin. Disseminated neuroblastoma was established in vivo by tail vein injection of NB1691-luc cells into SCID mice which were then treated with 50mg/kg/day of liposomal curcumin 5 days/week intraperitoneal. Results Curcumin suppressed NF-κB activation and proliferation of all neuroblastoma cell lines in vitro. In vivo, curcumin treatment resulted in a significant decrease in disseminated tumor burden. Curcumin treated tumors had decreased NF-κB activity and an associated significant decrease in tumor cell proliferation and an increase in tumor cell apoptosis, as well as a decrease in tumor VEGF levels and microvessel density. Conclusions Liposomal curcumin suppressed neuroblastoma growth, with treated tumors showing a decrease in NF-kB activity. Our results suggest that liposomal curcumin maybe a viable option for the treatment of neuroblastoma that works via inhibiting the NF-κB pathway. PMID:22284765

  9. Plants Release Precursors of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors to Suppress Growth of Competitors.

    PubMed

    Venturelli, Sascha; Belz, Regina G; Kämper, Andreas; Berger, Alexander; von Horn, Kyra; Wegner, André; Böcker, Alexander; Zabulon, Gérald; Langenecker, Tobias; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Barneche, Fredy; Weigel, Detlef; Lauer, Ulrich M; Bitzer, Michael; Becker, Claude

    2015-11-01

    To secure their access to water, light, and nutrients, many plant species have developed allelopathic strategies to suppress competitors. To this end, they release into the rhizosphere phytotoxic substances that inhibit the germination and growth of neighbors. Despite the importance of allelopathy in shaping natural plant communities and for agricultural production, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we report that allelochemicals derived from the common class of cyclic hydroxamic acid root exudates directly affect the chromatin-modifying machinery in Arabidopsis thaliana. These allelochemicals inhibit histone deacetylases both in vitro and in vivo and exert their activity through locus-specific alterations of histone acetylation and associated gene expression. Our multilevel analysis collectively shows how plant-plant interactions interfere with a fundamental cellular process, histone acetylation, by targeting an evolutionarily highly conserved class of enzymes.

  10. MicroRNA-183 suppresses retinoblastoma cell growth, invasion and migration by targeting LRP6.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianwen; Wang, Xiaochun; Li, Zhongji; Liu, Hongtao; Teng, Yan

    2014-03-01

    Our study demonstrates the downregulation of microRNA-183 (miR-183) in retinoblastoma (RB) tissues and RB cell lines compared with normal retinal tissues. The ectopic expression of miR-183 in the RB cell lines Y79, SO-RB50 and WERI-RB1 suppresses cell viability, migration and invasion. Furthermore, the Wnt co-receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) was identified as a new target of miR-183, and restoration of the expression of LRP6 rescues the effects induced by miR-183 in RB cells. These results indicate that miR-183 targets and downregulates LRP6 in the growth, migration and invasion of RB cells. PMID:24289859

  11. Plants Release Precursors of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors to Suppress Growth of Competitors.

    PubMed

    Venturelli, Sascha; Belz, Regina G; Kämper, Andreas; Berger, Alexander; von Horn, Kyra; Wegner, André; Böcker, Alexander; Zabulon, Gérald; Langenecker, Tobias; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Barneche, Fredy; Weigel, Detlef; Lauer, Ulrich M; Bitzer, Michael; Becker, Claude

    2015-11-01

    To secure their access to water, light, and nutrients, many plant species have developed allelopathic strategies to suppress competitors. To this end, they release into the rhizosphere phytotoxic substances that inhibit the germination and growth of neighbors. Despite the importance of allelopathy in shaping natural plant communities and for agricultural production, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we report that allelochemicals derived from the common class of cyclic hydroxamic acid root exudates directly affect the chromatin-modifying machinery in Arabidopsis thaliana. These allelochemicals inhibit histone deacetylases both in vitro and in vivo and exert their activity through locus-specific alterations of histone acetylation and associated gene expression. Our multilevel analysis collectively shows how plant-plant interactions interfere with a fundamental cellular process, histone acetylation, by targeting an evolutionarily highly conserved class of enzymes. PMID:26530086

  12. Plants Release Precursors of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors to Suppress Growth of Competitors[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Venturelli, Sascha; Belz, Regina G.; Kämper, Andreas; Berger, Alexander; von Horn, Kyra; Wegner, André; Böcker, Alexander; Zabulon, Gérald; Barneche, Fredy; Lauer, Ulrich M.; Bitzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To secure their access to water, light, and nutrients, many plant species have developed allelopathic strategies to suppress competitors. To this end, they release into the rhizosphere phytotoxic substances that inhibit the germination and growth of neighbors. Despite the importance of allelopathy in shaping natural plant communities and for agricultural production, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we report that allelochemicals derived from the common class of cyclic hydroxamic acid root exudates directly affect the chromatin-modifying machinery in Arabidopsis thaliana. These allelochemicals inhibit histone deacetylases both in vitro and in vivo and exert their activity through locus-specific alterations of histone acetylation and associated gene expression. Our multilevel analysis collectively shows how plant-plant interactions interfere with a fundamental cellular process, histone acetylation, by targeting an evolutionarily highly conserved class of enzymes. PMID:26530086

  13. MicroRNA let-7c Is Downregulated in Prostate Cancer and Suppresses Prostate Cancer Growth

    PubMed Central

    Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Tummala, Ramakumar; Lou, Wei; Zhu, Yezi; Shi, Xu-Bao; Zou, June X.; Chen, Hongwu; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Xinbin; Luo, Jun; deVere White, Ralph W.; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Evans, Christopher P.; Gao, Allen C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Prostate cancer (PCa) is characterized by deregulated expression of several tumor suppressor or oncogenic miRNAs. The objective of this study was the identification and characterization of miR-let-7c as a potential tumor suppressor in PCa. Experimental Design Levels of expression of miR-let-7c were examined in human PCa cell lines and tissues using qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization. Let-7c was overexpressed or suppressed to assess the effects on the growth of human PCa cell lines. Lentiviral-mediated re-expression of let-7c was utilized to assess the effects on human PCa xenografts. Results We identified miR-let-7c as a potential tumor suppressor in PCa. Expression of let-7c is downregulated in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells. Overexpression of let-7c decreased while downregulation of let-7c increased cell proliferation, clonogenicity and anchorage-independent growth of PCa cells in vitro. Suppression of let-7c expression enhanced the ability of androgen-sensitive PCa cells to grow in androgen-deprived conditions in vitro. Reconstitution of Let-7c by lentiviral-mediated intratumoral delivery significantly reduced tumor burden in xenografts of human PCa cells. Furthermore, let-7c expression is downregulated in clinical PCa specimens compared to their matched benign tissues, while the expression of Lin28, a master regulator of let-7 miRNA processing, is upregulated in clinical PCa specimens. Conclusions These results demonstrate that microRNA let-7c is downregulated in PCa and functions as a tumor suppressor, and is a potential therapeutic target for PCa. PMID:22479342

  14. Proton irradiation suppresses angiogenic genes and impairs cell invasion and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Girdhani, Swati; Lamont, Clare; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Abdollahi, Amir; Hlatky, Lynn

    2012-07-01

    The energy deposition characteristics of proton radiation have attracted considerable attention in light of its implications for carcinogenesis risk in space travel, as well for application to cancer treatment. In space, it is the principle component of the galactic cosmic radiation to which astronauts will be exposed. For treatment, an increasing number of proton facilities are being established to exploit the physical advantages of this radiation type. However, the possibility that there may also be biologically based advantages to proton exposure has not been considered in either context. We demonstrate here that high-energy proton irradiation can inhibit expression of major pro-angiogenic factors and multiple angiogenesis-associated processes, including invasion and endothelial cell proliferation, which is prominent in cancer progression. Dose-dependent suppression of angiogenic signaling was demonstrated for both cancer and nontransformed cells. Pan-genomic microarray analysis and RT-PCR revealed that post-irradiation (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 Gy), critical pro-angiogenic signaling factors including: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin 6 and 8 (IL-6, IL-8) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1A), were significantly downregulated. Co-culture studies demonstrated that endothelial cell proliferation and invasion were inhibited by culturing with irradiated cancer or fibroblast cells, which suggests that proton irradiation may, in addition to direct action, contribute to angiogenesis suppression through modulation of paracrine signalings from targeted cells. Addition of recombinant IL-8 or VEGF partially restored these functions in vitro, while in vivo, an attenuated tumor growth rate was demonstrated for proton-irradiated human lung cancer cells. Taken together, these findings provide novel pre-clinical evidence that proton irradiation may, in addition to its physical targeting advantages, have important biological ramifications that should be a

  15. Plant Growth Promotion and Suppression of Bacterial Leaf Blight in Rice by Inoculated Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Sumera; Zaka, Abha; Imran, Asma; Zahid, Muhammad Awais; Yousaf, Sumaira; Rasul, Ghulam; Arif, Muhammad; Mirza, Muhammad Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the potential of rice rhizosphere associated antagonistic bacteria for growth promotion and disease suppression of bacterial leaf blight (BLB). A total of 811 rhizospheric bacteria were isolated and screened against 3 prevalent strains of BLB pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) of which five antagonistic bacteria, i.e., Pseudomonas spp. E227, E233, Rh323, Serratia sp. Rh269 and Bacillus sp. Rh219 showed antagonistic potential (zone of inhibition 1-19 mm). Production of siderophores was found to be the common biocontrol determinant and all the strains solubilized inorganic phosphate (82-116 μg mL-1) and produced indole acetic acid (0.48-1.85 mg L-1) in vitro. All antagonistic bacteria were non-pathogenic to rice, and their co-inoculation significantly improved plant health in terms of reduced diseased leaf area (80%), improved shoot length (31%), root length (41%) and plant dry weight (60%) as compared to infected control plants. Furthermore, under pathogen pressure, bacterial inoculation resulted in increased activity of defense related enzymes including phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and polyphenol oxidase, along with 86% increase in peroxidase and 53% increase in catalase enzyme activities in plants inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. Rh323 as well as co-inoculated plants. Bacterial strains showed good colonization potential in the rice rhizosphere up to 21 days after seed inoculation. Application of bacterial consortia in the field resulted in an increase of 31% in grain yield and 10% in straw yield over non-inoculated plots. Although, yield increase was statistically non-significant but was accomplished with overall saving of 20% chemical fertilizers. The study showed that Pseudomonas sp. Rh323 can be used to develop dual-purpose inoculum which can serve not only to suppress BLB but also to promote plant growth in rice. PMID:27532545

  16. Proton irradiation suppresses angiogenic genes and impairs cell invasion and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Girdhani, Swati; Lamont, Clare; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Abdollahi, Amir; Hlatky, Lynn

    2012-07-01

    The energy deposition characteristics of proton radiation have attracted considerable attention in light of its implications for carcinogenesis risk in space travel, as well for application to cancer treatment. In space, it is the principle component of the galactic cosmic radiation to which astronauts will be exposed. For treatment, an increasing number of proton facilities are being established to exploit the physical advantages of this radiation type. However, the possibility that there may also be biologically based advantages to proton exposure has not been considered in either context. We demonstrate here that high-energy proton irradiation can inhibit expression of major pro-angiogenic factors and multiple angiogenesis-associated processes, including invasion and endothelial cell proliferation, which is prominent in cancer progression. Dose-dependent suppression of angiogenic signaling was demonstrated for both cancer and nontransformed cells. Pan-genomic microarray analysis and RT-PCR revealed that post-irradiation (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 Gy), critical pro-angiogenic signaling factors including: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin 6 and 8 (IL-6, IL-8) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1A), were significantly downregulated. Co-culture studies demonstrated that endothelial cell proliferation and invasion were inhibited by culturing with irradiated cancer or fibroblast cells, which suggests that proton irradiation may, in addition to direct action, contribute to angiogenesis suppression through modulation of paracrine signalings from targeted cells. Addition of recombinant IL-8 or VEGF partially restored these functions in vitro, while in vivo, an attenuated tumor growth rate was demonstrated for proton-irradiated human lung cancer cells. Taken together, these findings provide novel pre-clinical evidence that proton irradiation may, in addition to its physical targeting advantages, have important biological ramifications that should be a

  17. Glipizide, an antidiabetic drug, suppresses tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Cuiling; Zhou, Qin; Li, Bin; Yang, Yang; Cao, Liu; Ye, Yuxiang; Li, Jiangchao; Ding, Yi; Wang, Huiping; Wang, Jintao; He, Xiaodong; Zhang, Qianqian; Lan, Tian; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Li, Weidong; Song, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Jia; Yang, Xuesong; Wang, Lijing

    2014-10-30

    Angiogenesis is involved in the development, progression and metastasis of various human cancers. Herein, we report the discovery of glipizide, a widely used drug for type 2 diabetes mellitus, as a promising anticancer agent through the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. By high-throughput screening (HTS) of an FDA approved drug library utilizing our in vivo chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and yolk sac membrane (YSM) models, glipizide has been identified to significantly inhibit blood vessel formation and development. Moreover, glipizide was found to suppress tumor angiogenesis, tumor growth and metastasis using xenograft tumor and MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse models. We further revealed that the anticancer capability of glipizide is not attributed to its antiproliferative effects, which are not significant against various human cancer cell lines. To investigate whether its anticancer efficacy is associated with the glucose level alteration induced by glipizide application, glimepiride, another medium to long-acting sulfonylurea antidiabetic drug in the same class, was employed for the comparison studies in the same fashion. Interestingly, glimepiride has demonstrated no significant impact on the tumor growth and metastasis, indicating that the anticancer effects of glipizide is not ascribed to its antidiabetic properties. Furthermore, glipizide suppresses endothelial cell migration and the formation of tubular structures, thereby inhibiting angiogenesis by up-regulating the expression of natriuretic peptide receptor A. These findings uncover a novel mechanism of glipizide as a potential cancer therapy, and also for the first time, provide direct evidence to support that treatment with glipizide may reduce the cancer risk for diabetic patients. PMID:25294818

  18. Plant Growth Promotion and Suppression of Bacterial Leaf Blight in Rice by Inoculated Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zaka, Abha; Imran, Asma; Zahid, Muhammad Awais; Yousaf, Sumaira; Rasul, Ghulam; Arif, Muhammad; Mirza, Muhammad Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the potential of rice rhizosphere associated antagonistic bacteria for growth promotion and disease suppression of bacterial leaf blight (BLB). A total of 811 rhizospheric bacteria were isolated and screened against 3 prevalent strains of BLB pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) of which five antagonistic bacteria, i.e., Pseudomonas spp. E227, E233, Rh323, Serratia sp. Rh269 and Bacillus sp. Rh219 showed antagonistic potential (zone of inhibition 1–19 mm). Production of siderophores was found to be the common biocontrol determinant and all the strains solubilized inorganic phosphate (82–116 μg mL-1) and produced indole acetic acid (0.48–1.85 mg L-1) in vitro. All antagonistic bacteria were non-pathogenic to rice, and their co-inoculation significantly improved plant health in terms of reduced diseased leaf area (80%), improved shoot length (31%), root length (41%) and plant dry weight (60%) as compared to infected control plants. Furthermore, under pathogen pressure, bacterial inoculation resulted in increased activity of defense related enzymes including phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and polyphenol oxidase, along with 86% increase in peroxidase and 53% increase in catalase enzyme activities in plants inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. Rh323 as well as co-inoculated plants. Bacterial strains showed good colonization potential in the rice rhizosphere up to 21 days after seed inoculation. Application of bacterial consortia in the field resulted in an increase of 31% in grain yield and 10% in straw yield over non-inoculated plots. Although, yield increase was statistically non-significant but was accomplished with overall saving of 20% chemical fertilizers. The study showed that Pseudomonas sp. Rh323 can be used to develop dual-purpose inoculum which can serve not only to suppress BLB but also to promote plant growth in rice. PMID:27532545

  19. Transgene Induced Co-Suppression during Vegetative Growth in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuying; Wang, Ping; Sun, Sheng; Darwiche, Sabrina; Idnurm, Alexander; Heitman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Introduction of DNA sequences into the genome often results in homology-dependent gene silencing in organisms as diverse as plants, fungi, flies, nematodes, and mammals. We previously showed in Cryptococcus neoformans that a repeat transgene array can induce gene silencing at a high frequency during mating (∼50%), but at a much lower frequency during vegetative growth (∼0.2%). Here we report a robust asexual co-suppression phenomenon triggered by the introduction of a cpa1::ADE2 transgene. Multiple copies of the cpa1::ADE2 transgene were ectopically integrated into the genome, leading to silencing of the endogenous CPA1 and CPA2 genes encoding the cyclosporine A target protein cyclophilin A. Given that CPA1-derived antisense siRNAs were detected in the silenced isolates, and that RNAi components (Rdp1, Ago1, and Dcr2) are required for silencing, we hypothesize that an RNAi pathway is involved, in which siRNAs function as trans factors to silence both the CPA1 and the CPA2 genes. The silencing efficiency of the CPA1 and CPA2 genes is correlated with the transgene copy number and reached ∼90% in the presence of >25 copies of the transgene. We term this transgene silencing phenomenon asexual co-suppression to distinguish it from the related sex-induced silencing (SIS) process. We further show that replication protein A (RPA), a single-stranded DNA binding complex, is required for transgene silencing, suggesting that RPA might play a similar role in aberrant RNA production as observed for quelling in Neurospora crassa. Interestingly, we also observed that silencing of the ADE2 gene occurred at a much lower frequency than the CPA1/2 genes even though it is present in the same transgene array, suggesting that factors in addition to copy number influence silencing. Taken together, our results illustrate that a transgene induced co-suppression process operates during C. neoformans vegetative growth that shares mechanistic features with quelling. PMID:22916030

  20. Survivin inhibitor YM155 suppresses gastric cancer xenograft growth in mice without affecting normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Ding, Yan Fei; Zhu, Liming; Ye, Jing; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-01-01

    Survivin overexpression is associated with poor prognosis of human gastric cancer, and is a target for gastric cancer therapy. YM155 is originally identified as a specific inhibitor of survivin. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of YM155 on human gastric cancer. Our results showed that YM155 treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, reduced colony formation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, YM155 treatment significantly decreased survivin expression without affecting XIAP expression and increased the cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins caspase 3, 7, 8, 9. YM155 significantly inhibited sphere formation of gastric cancer cells, suppressed expansion and growth of the formed spheres (cancer stem cell-like cells, CSCs) and downregulated the protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and CD44 in gastric cancer cells. YM155 infusion at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days markedly inhibited growth of gastric cancer xenograft in a nude mouse model. Immunohistochemistry staining and Western Blot showed that YM155 treatment inhibited expression of survivin and CD44, induced apoptosis and reduced CD44+ CSCs in xenograft tumor tissues in vivo. No obvious pathological changes were observed in organs (e.g. heart, liver, lung and kidney) in YM155-treated mice. Our results demonstrated that YM155 inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis, reduces cancer stem cell expansion, and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in gastric cancer cells. Our results elucidate a new mechanism by which YM155 inhibits gastric cancer growth by inhibition of CSCs. YM155 may be a promising agent for gastric cancer treatment. PMID:26771139

  1. Predictive Models for Nanostructure Evolution during Epitaxial Thin Film Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Jim

    2004-03-01

    We describe the development of a realistic atomistic lattice-gas (LG) model for multilayer homoepitaxial growth of metal(100) films at higher deposition temperatures (T). The model is tailored to incorporate the essential physical processes underlying growth, and is thus efficiently simulated using KMC [1]. It is shown to reliably predict film morphologies up to 1000's layers for a broad range of deposition conditions (T, flux), in fact revealing quite unexpected behavior. Specifically, we consider the Ag/Ag(100) system - the perceived prototype for smooth quasi-layer-by-layer growth at higher T. We predict the formation of mounds (multilayer stacks of islands) above 150K due to a small non-uniform step edge barrier. Initial growth at 300K is indeed smooth, but subsequent growth is actually extremely rough, corresponding to prolonged mound steepening. Thin films grow rougher at lower T down to 200K, but thick films grow smoother. Experiments confirm these surprising predictions [1,2]. We also find that long-time mound dynamics is quite distinct from predictions of standard continuum theories. For Ag/Ag(100) growth below 150K in the absence of terrace diffusion, one finds self-affine growth of films containing bulk vacancies [3], the latter feature being confirmed by X-ray scattering studies [4]. This regime can be modeled by accelerated MD [5], generic self-teaching KMC [6], or tailored LG models (distinct from the above model for higher T) [3,7]. Using the latter, we identify the key processes controlling morphology from 0-150K as capture of deposited atoms on the sides of nanoprotrusions, and the activation of low-barrier interlayer thermal diffusion processes. [1] Caspersen et al. PRB 65 (2002) 193407. [2] Elliott et al. PRB 54 (1996) 17938. [3] Stoldt et al. PRL 85 (2000) 800. [4] Botez et al. PRB 66 (2002) 075418. [5] Montalenti et al. PRL 87 (2001) 126101. [6] Henkelman et al. PRL 90 (2003) 116101. [7] Caspersen et al. PRB 64 (2001) 075401.

  2. Predicting the duration of antiviral treatment needed to suppress plasma HIV-1 RNA

    PubMed Central

    Rizzardi, G. Paolo; De Boer, Rob J.; Hoover, Shelley; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Chapuis, Aude; Halkic, Nermin; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Miller, Veronica; Staszewski, Schlomo; Notermans, Daan W.; Perrin, Luc; Fox, Cecil H.; Lange, Joep M.A.; Lazzarin, Adriano; Pantaleo, Giuseppe

    2000-01-01

    Effective therapeutic interventions and clinical care of adults infected with HIV-1 require an understanding of factors that influence time of response to antiretroviral therapy. We have studied a cohort of 118 HIV-1–infected subjects naive to antiretroviral therapy and have correlated the time of response to treatment with a series of virological and immunological measures, including levels of viral load in blood and lymph node, percent of CD4 T cells in lymph nodes, and CD4 T-cell count in blood at study entry. Suppression of viremia below the limit of detection, 50 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL of plasma, served as a benchmark for a successful virological response. We employed these correlations to predict the length of treatment required to attain a virological response in each patient. Baseline plasma viremia emerged as the factor most tightly correlated with the duration of treatment required, allowing us to estimate the required time as a function of this one measure. PMID:10727446

  3. Quantitative and Morphological Measures May Predict Growth and Mortality During Prenatal Growth in Japanese Quails

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Kashmiri L.; Vatsalya, Vatsalya

    2014-01-01

    Growth pattern and mortality rate during the embryonic phase of avian species are difficult to recognize and predict. Determination of such measures and associated events may enhance our understanding of characteristics involved in the growth and hatching process. Furthermore, some quantitative measures could validate morphological determinants during the embryonic phase and predict the course of normal growth and alterations. Our aim was to characterize quantitative growth of embryos and to establish baseline embryonic standards for use in comparative and pathological research during the prenatal life of Japanese quail. Day 10 was a landmark timeline for initiation of extensive anatomical changes in growth and transformation. Wet and dry weights were positively correlated with each other and inversely correlated with water content (p = 0.05). Following d10, the water content decreased progressively, whereas, dry and wet weights increased with increasing age. Velocity of growth in wet and dry weights was evident starting d6, spiked at d11 and d15 and then declined before hatching on d16. Organic and inorganic contents of embryos were positively associated with age. Progressive increase in the organic to inorganic ratio with age was evident after d5, spiked on d9, d13 and d16. Accurate determinations of prenatal growth processes could serve as valuable tools in identifying morphological developments and characterization of prenatal growth and mortality, thus enhancing the reproductive efficiency of the breeding colony and the postnatal robustness of the offspring. PMID:25285101

  4. Toxicology across scales: Cell population growth in vitro predicts reduced fish growth

    PubMed Central

    Stadnicka-Michalak, Julita; Schirmer, Kristin; Ashauer, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Environmental risk assessment of chemicals is essential but often relies on ethically controversial and expensive methods. We show that tests using cell cultures, combined with modeling of toxicological effects, can replace tests with juvenile fish. Hundreds of thousands of fish at this developmental stage are annually used to assess the influence of chemicals on growth. Juveniles are more sensitive than adult fish, and their growth can affect their chances to survive and reproduce. Thus, to reduce the number of fish used for such tests, we propose a method that can quantitatively predict chemical impact on fish growth based on in vitro data. Our model predicts reduced fish growth in two fish species in excellent agreement with measured in vivo data of two pesticides. This promising step toward alternatives to fish toxicity testing is simple, inexpensive, and fast and only requires in vitro data for model calibration. PMID:26601229

  5. Numerical prediction of rail roughness growth on tangent railway tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, J. C. O.

    2003-10-01

    Growth of railhead roughness (irregularities, waviness) is predicted through numerical simulation of dynamic train-track interaction on tangent track. The hypothesis is that wear is caused by longitudinal slip due to driven wheelsets, and that wear is proportional to the longitudinal frictional power in the contact patch. Emanating from an initial roughness spectrum corresponding to a new or a recent ground rail, an initial roughness profile is determined. Wheel-rail contact forces, creepages and wear for one wheelset passage are calculated in relation to location along a discretely supported track model. The calculated wear is scaled by a chosen number of wheelset passages, and is then added to the initial roughness profile. Field observations of rail corrugation on a Dutch track are used to validate the simulation model. Results from the simulations predict a large roughness growth rate for wavelengths around 30-40 mm. The large growth in this wavelength interval is explained by a low track receptance near the sleepers around the pinned-pinned resonance frequency, in combination with a large number of driven passenger wheelset passages at uniform speed. The agreement between simulations and field measurements is good with respect to dominating roughness wavelength and annual wear rate. Remedies for reducing roughness growth are discussed.

  6. Honokiol inhibits bladder tumor growth by suppressing EZH2/miR-143 axis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Zhao, Wei; Ye, Changxiao; Zhuang, Junlong; Chang, Cunjie; Li, Yuying; Huang, Xiaojing; Shen, Lan; Li, Yan; Cui, Yangyan; Song, Jiannan; Shen, Bing; Eliaz, Isaac; Huang, Ruimin; Ying, Hao; Guo, Hongqian; Yan, Jun

    2015-11-10

    The oncoprotein EZH2, as a histone H3K27 methyltransferase, is frequently overexpressed in various cancer types. However, the mechanisms underlying its role in urinary bladder cancer (UBC) cells have not yet fully understood. Herein, we reported that honokiol, a biologically active biphenolic compound isolated from the Magnolia officinalis inhibited human UBC cell proliferation, survival, cancer stemness, migration, and invasion, through downregulation of EZH2 expression level, along with the reductions of MMP9, CD44, Sox2 and the induction of tumor suppressor miR-143. Either EZH2 overexpression or miR-143 inhibition could partially reverse honokiol-induced cell growth arrest and impaired clonogenicity. Importantly, it was first revealed that EZH2 could directly bind to the transcriptional regulatory region of miR-143 and repress its expression. Furthermore, honokiol treatment on T24 tumor xenografts confirmed its anticancer effects in vivo, including suppression tumor growth and tumor stemness, accompanied by the dysregulation of EZH2 and miR-143 expressions. Our data suggest a promising therapeutic option to develop drugs targeting EZH2/miR-143 axis, such as honokiol, for bladder cancer treatment.

  7. Kaempferol suppresses bladder cancer tumor growth by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dang, Qiang; Song, Wenbin; Xu, Defeng; Ma, Yanmin; Li, Feng; Zeng, Jin; Zhu, Guodong; Wang, Xinyang; Chang, Luke S; He, Dalin; Li, Lei

    2015-09-01

    The effects of the flavonoid compound, kaempferol, which is an inhibitor of cancer cell proliferation and an inducer of cell apoptosis have been shown in various cancers, including lung, pancreatic, and ovarian, but its effect has never been studied in bladder cancer. Here, we investigated the effects of kaempferol on bladder cancer using multiple in vitro cell lines and in vivo mice studies. The MTT assay results on various bladder cancer cell lines showed that kaempferol enhanced bladder cancer cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, when analyzed by the flow cytometric analysis, DNA ladder experiment, and TUNEL assay, kaempferol significantly was shown to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. These in vitro results were confirmed in in vivo mice studies using subcutaneous xenografted mouse models. Consistent with the in vitro results, we found that treating mice with kaempferol significant suppression in tumor growth compared to the control group mice. Tumor tissue staining results showed decreased expressions of the growth related markers, yet increased expressions in apoptosis markers in the kaempferol treated group mice tissues compared to the control group mice. In addition, our in vitro and in vivo data showed kaempferol can also inhibit bladder cancer invasion and metastasis. Further mechanism dissection studies showed that significant down-regulation of the c-Met/p38 signaling pathway is responsible for the kaempferol mediated cell proliferation inhibition. All these findings suggest kaempferol might be an effective and novel chemotherapeutic drug to apply for the future therapeutic agent to combat bladder cancer.

  8. Decreased Warburg effect induced by ATP citrate lyase suppression inhibits tumor growth in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Zong, Haifeng; Zhang, Yang; You, Yong; Cai, Tiantian; Wang, Yehuang

    2015-03-01

    ATP citrate lyase (ACLY) is responsible for the conversion of cytosolic citrate into acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetate, and the first rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo lipogenesis. Recent studies have demonstrated that inhibition of elevated ACLY results in growth arrest and apoptosis in a subset of cancers; however, the expression pattern and underlying biological function of ACLY in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains unclear. In the current study, overexpressed ACLY was more commonly observed in PDAC compared to normal pancreatic tissues. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that high expression level of ACLY resulted in a poor prognosis of PDAC patients. Silencing of endogenous ACLY expression by siRNA in PANC-1 cells led to reduced cell viability and increased cell apoptosis. Furthermore, significant decrease in glucose uptake and lactate production was observed after ACLY was knocked down, and this effect was blocked by 2-deoxy-D-glucose, indicating that ACLY functions in the Warburg effect affect PDAC cell growth. Collectively, this study reveals that suppression of ACLY plays an anti-tumor role through decreased Warburg effect, and ACLY-related inhibitors might be potential therapeutic approaches for PDAC. PMID:25701462

  9. Geraniol Suppresses Angiogenesis by Downregulating Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)/VEGFR-2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wittig, Christine; Scheuer, Claudia; Parakenings, Julia; Menger, Michael D.; Laschke, Matthias W.

    2015-01-01

    Geraniol exerts several direct pharmacological effects on tumor cells and, thus, has been suggested as a promising anti-cancer compound. Because vascularization is a major precondition for tumor growth, we analyzed in this study the anti-angiogenic action of geraniol. In vitro, geraniol reduced the migratory activity of endothelial-like eEND2 cells. Western blot analyses further revealed that geraniol downregulates proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and upregulates cleaved caspase-3 (Casp-3) expression in eEND2 cells. Moreover, geraniol blocked vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGFR-2 signal transduction, resulting in a suppression of downstream AKT and ERK signaling pathways. In addition, geraniol significantly reduced vascular sprout formation in a rat aortic ring assay. In vivo, geraniol inhibited the vascularization of CT26 tumors in dorsal skinfold chambers of BALB/c mice, which was associated with a smaller tumor size when compared to vehicle-treated controls. Immunohistochemical analyses confirmed a decreased number of Ki67-positive cells and CD31-positive microvessels with reduced VEGFR-2 expression within geraniol-treated tumors. Taken together, these findings indicate that geraniol targets multiple angiogenic mechanisms and, therefore, is an attractive candidate for the anti-angiogenic treatment of tumors. PMID:26154255

  10. Allicin inhibits lymphangiogenesis through suppressing activation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weicang; Du, Zheyuan; Nimiya, Yoshiki; Sukamtoh, Elvira; Kim, Daeyoung; Zhang, Guodong

    2016-03-01

    Allicin, the most abundant organosulfur compound in freshly crushed garlic tissues, has been shown to have various health-promoting effects, including anticancer actions. A better understanding of the effects and mechanisms of allicin on tumorigenesis could facilitate development of allicin or garlic products for cancer prevention. Here we found that allicin inhibited lymphangiogenesis, which is a critical cellular process implicated in tumor metastasis. In primary human lymphatic endothelial cells, allicin at 10 μM inhibited capillary-like tube formation and cell migration, and it suppressed phosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and focal adhesion kinase. Using a Matrigel plug assay in mice, addition of 10 μg allicin in Matrigel plug inhibited 40-50% of vascular endothelial growth factor-C-induced infiltration of lymphatic endothelial cells and leukocytes. S-Allylmercaptoglutathione, a major cellular metabolite of allicin, had no effect on lymphangiogenic responses in lymphatic endothelial cells. Together, these results demonstrate the antilymphangiogenic effect of allicin in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a novel mechanism for the health-promoting effects of garlic compounds. PMID:26895668

  11. AMPK is a negative regulator of the Warburg Effect and suppresses tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Faubert, Brandon; Boily, Gino; Izreig, Said; Griss, Takla; Samborska, Bozena; Dong, Zhifeng; Dupuy, Fanny; Chambers, Christopher; Fuerth, Benjamin J.; Viollet, Benoit; Mamer, Orval A.; Avizonis, Daina; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Siegel, Peter M.; Jones, Russell G.

    2012-01-01

    Summary AMPK is a metabolic sensor that helps maintain cellular energy homeostasis. Despite evidence linking AMPK with tumor suppressor functions, the role of AMPK in tumorigenesis and tumor metabolism is unknown. Here we show that AMPK negatively regulates aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) in cancer cells, and suppresses tumor growth in vivo. Genetic ablation of the α1 catalytic subunit of AMPK accelerates Myc-induced lymphomagenesis. Inactivation of AMPKα in both transformed and non-transformed cells promotes a metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis, increased allocation of glucose carbon into lipids, and biomass accumulation. These metabolic effects require normoxic stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), as silencing HIF-1α reverses the shift to aerobic glycolysis and the biosynthetic and proliferative advantages conferred by reduced AMPKα signaling. Together our findings suggest that AMPK activity opposes tumor development, and its loss fosters tumor progression in part by regulating cellular metabolic pathways that support cell growth and proliferation. PMID:23274086

  12. Withaferin-A suppress AKT induced tumor growth in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Suman; Das, Trinath P.; Sirimulla, Suman; Alatassi, Houda; Ankem, Murali K.; Damodaran, Chendil

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic activation of AKT gene has emerged as a key determinant of the aggressiveness of colorectal cancer (CRC); hence, research has focused on targeting AKT signaling for the treatment of advanced stages of CRC. In this study, we explored the anti-tumorigenic effects of withaferin A (WA) on CRC cells overexpressing AKT in preclinical (in vitro and in vivo) models. Our results indicated that WA, a natural compound, resulted in significant inhibition of AKT activity and led to the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion by downregulating the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers in CRC cells overexpressing AKT. The oral administration of WA significantly suppressed AKT-induced aggressive tumor growth in a xenograft model. Molecular analysis revealed that the decreased expression of AKT and its downstream pro-survival signaling molecules may be responsible for tumor inhibition. Further, significant inhibition of some important EMT markers, i.e., Snail, Slug, β-catenin and vimentin, was observed in WA-treated human CRC cells overexpressing AKT. Significant inhibition of micro-vessel formation and the length of vessels were evident in WA-treated tumors, which correlated with a low expression of the angiogenic marker RETIC. In conclusion, the present study emphasizes the crucial role of AKT activation in inducing cell proliferation, angiogenesis and EMT in CRC cells and suggests that WA may overcome AKT-induced cell proliferation and tumor growth in CRC. PMID:26883103

  13. Ethanol-induced loss of brain cyclic AMP binding proteins: correlation with growth suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, S.; Kalmus, G.

    1987-05-01

    Brain hypoplasia secondary to maternal ethanol consumption is a common fetal defect observed in all models of fetal alcohol syndrome. The molecular mechanism by which ethanol inhibits growth is unknown but has been hypothesized to involve ethanol-induced changes in the activity of cyclic-AMP stimulated protein kinase. Acute and chronic alcohol exposure elevate cyclic AMP level in many tissues, including brain. This increase in cyclic AMP should increase the phosphorylating activity of kinase by increasing the amount of dissociated (active) kinase catalytic subunit. In 7-day embryonic chick brains, ethanol-induced growth suppression was correlated with increased brain cyclic AMP content but neither basal nor cyclic AMP stimulated kinase catalytic activity was increased. However, the levels of cyclic AMP binding protein (kinase regulatory subunit) were significantly lowered by ethanol exposure. Measured as either /sup 3/H cyclic AMP binding or as 8-azido cyclic AM/sup 32/P labeling, ethanol-exposed brains had significantly less cyclic AMP binding activity (51 +/- 14 versus 29 +/- 10 units/..mu..g protein for 8-azido cyclic AMP binding). These findings suggest that ethanol's effect on kinase activity may involve more than ethanol-induced activation of adenylate cyclase.

  14. Suppression of Radixin and Moesin Alters Growth Cone Morphology, Motility, and Process Formation In Primary Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Paglini, Gabriela; Kunda, Patricia; Quiroga, Santiago; Kosik, Kenneth; Cáceres, Alfredo

    1998-01-01

    In this study we have examined the cellular functions of ERM proteins in developing neurons. The results obtained indicate that there is a high degree of spatial and temporal correlation between the expression and subcellular localization of radixin and moesin with the morphological development of neuritic growth cones. More importantly, we show that double suppression of radixin and moesin, but not of ezrin–radixin or ezrin–moesin, results in reduction of growth cone size, disappearance of radial striations, retraction of the growth cone lamellipodial veil, and disorganization of actin filaments that invade the central region of growth cones where they colocalize with microtubules. Neuritic tips from radixin–moesin suppressed neurons displayed high filopodial protrusive activity; however, its rate of advance is 8–10 times slower than the one of growth cones from control neurons. Radixin–moesin suppressed neurons have short neurites and failed to develop an axon-like neurite, a phenomenon that appears to be directly linked with the alterations in growth cone structure and motility. Taken collectively, our data suggest that by regulating key aspects of growth cone development and maintenance, radixin and moesin modulate neurite formation and the development of neuronal polarity. PMID:9786954

  15. Galectin-9 suppresses the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma via apoptosis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Koji; Iwama, Hisakazu; Sakamoto, Teppei; Okura, Ryoichi; Kobayashi, Kiyoyuki; Takano, Jitsuko; Katsura, Akiko; Tatsuta, Miwa; Maeda, Emiko; Mimura, Shima; Nomura, Takako; Tani, Joji; Miyoshi, Hisaaki; Morishita, Asahiro; Yoneyama, Hirohito; Yamana, Yuka; Himoto, Takashi; Okano, Keiichi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Niki, Toshiro; Hirashima, Mitsuomi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Galectin-9, a soluble β-galactoside-binding animal lectin, evokes apoptosis in various human cancer cell lines. The galectin-9 antitumor effect against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is, however, unknown. We investigated whether galectin-9 suppresses HCC growth in vitro and in vivo. We assessed the antitumor effect of galectin-9 on HCC cells by conducting WST-8 assay in vitro and xenograft model analysis in vivo. Galectin-9-induced apoptosis was evaluated by FACS and ELISA in vitro and by TUNEL stain in vivo. Cell cycle alteration was profiled by FACS. Caspases were profiled by colorimetry. MicroRNAs related to the galectin-9 antitumor effects were determined using microarrays, and their antitumor effect was confirmed in a transfection study in vitro. The expression levels of the target proteins of the miRNAs extracted above were analyzed by western blot analysis. To summarize the results, galectin-9 inhibited the growth of the HCC cell lines HLE and Li-7 in vitro and Li-7 in vivo inducing apoptosis. Cell cycle turnover was not arrested in HLE and Li-7 cells in vitro. miR-1246 was similarly extracted both in vitro and in vivo, which sensitized Li-7 cells to apoptosis when transfected into the cells. DYRK1A, a target protein of miR-1246 was downregulated in Li-7 cells. Caspase-9 was upregulated in Li-7 cells in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, galectin-9 inhibited the growth of HCC cells by apoptosis, but not cell cycle arrest, in vitro and in vivo. miR-1246 mediated signals of galectin-9, possibly through miR-1246-DYRK1A-caspase-9 axis. Galectin-9 might be a candidate agent for HCC chemotherapy. PMID:25823465

  16. Identification of derlin-1 as a novel growth factor-responsive endothelial antigen by suppression subtractive hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Ran Yuliang; Jiang Yangfu; Zhong Xing; Zhou Zhuan; Liu Haiyan; Hu Hai; Lou Jinning; Yang Zhihua . E-mail: yang_zhihua_prof@yahoo.com.cn

    2006-10-06

    Endothelial cells play an important regulatory role in embryonic development, reproductive functions, tumor growth and progression. In the present study, the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method was employed to identify differentially expressed genes between non-stimulated endothelial cells and activated endothelial cells. Following mRNA isolation of non-stimulated and hepatocellular carcinoma homogenate-stimulated cells, cDNAs of both populations were prepared and subtracted by suppressive PCR. Sequencing of the enriched cDNAs identified a couple of genes differentially expressed, including derlin-1. Derlin-1 was significantly up-regulated by tumor homogenates, VEGF, and endothelial growth supplements in a dose-dependent manner. Knock-down of derlin-1 triggered endothelial cell apoptosis, inhibited endothelial cell proliferation, and blocked the formation of a network of tubular-like structures. Our data reveal that derlin-1 is a novel growth factor-responsive endothelial antigen that promotes endothelial cell survival and growth.

  17. Zoledronic acid suppresses transforming growth factor-β-induced fibrogenesis by human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    KOMATSU, YUKO; IBI, MIHO; CHOSA, NAOYUKI; KYAKUMOTO, SEIKO; KAMO, MASAHARU; SHIBATA, TOSHIYUKI; SUGIYAMA, YOSHIKI; ISHISAKI, AKIRA

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are analogues of pyro-phosphate that are known to prevent bone resorption by inhibiting osteoclast activity. Nitrogen-containing BPs, such as zoledronic acid (ZA), are widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis and bone metastasis. However, despite having benefits, ZA has been reported to induce BP-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) in cancer patients. The molecular pathological mechanisms responsible for the development of BRONJ, including necrotic bone exposure after tooth extraction, remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the effects of ZA on the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-induced myofibroblast (MF) differentiation of human gingival fibroblasts (hGFs) and the migratory activity of hGFs, which are important for wound closure by fibrous tissue formation. The ZA maximum concentration in serum (Cmax) was found to be approximately 1.47 µM, which clinically, is found after the intravenous administration of 4 mg ZA, and ZA at this dose is considered appropriate for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis or bone diseases, such as Erdheim-Chester disease. At Cmax, ZA significantly suppressed i) the TGF-β-induced promotion of cell viability, ii) the TGF-β-induced expression of MF markers such as α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and type I collagen, iii) the TGF-β-induced migratory activity of hGFs and iv) the expression level of TGF-β type I receptor on the surfaces of hGFs, as well as the TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of Smad2/3. Thus, ZA suppresses TGF-β-induced fibrous tissue formation by hGFs, possibly through the inhibition of Smad-dependent signal transduction. Our findings partly elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying BRONJ and may prove to be beneficial to the identification of drug targets for the treatment of this symptom at the molecular level. PMID:27176567

  18. Predicting the growth of nanoscale nuclei by histotripsy pulses.

    PubMed

    Bader, Kenneth B; Holland, Christy K

    2016-04-01

    Histotripsy is a focused ultrasound therapy that ablates tissue through the mechanical action of cavitation. Histotripsy-initiated cavitation activity is generated from shocked ultrasound pulses that scatter from incidental nuclei (shock scattering histotripsy), or purely tensile ultrasound pulses (microtripsy). The Yang/Church model was numerically integrated to predict the behavior of the cavitation nuclei exposed to measured shock scattering histotripsy pulses. The bubble motion exhibited expansion only behavior, suggesting that the ablative action of a histotripsy pulse is related to the maximum size of the bubble. The analytic model of Holland and Apfel was extended to predict the maximum size of cavitation nuclei for both shock scattering histotripsy and microtripsy excitations. The predictions of the analytic model and the numerical model agree within 2% for fully developed shock scattering histotripsy pulses (>72 MPa peak positive pressure). For shock scattering histotripsy pulses that are not fully developed (<72 MPa), the analytic model underestimated the maximum size by less than 5%. The analytic model was also used to predict bubble growth nucleated from microtripsy insonations, and was found to be consistent with experimental observations. Based on the extended analytic model, metrics were developed to predict the extent of the treatment zone from histotripsy pulses.

  19. Predicting the growth of nanoscale nuclei by histotripsy pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Kenneth B.; Holland, Christy K.

    2016-04-01

    Histotripsy is a focused ultrasound therapy that ablates tissue through the mechanical action of cavitation. Histotripsy-initiated cavitation activity is generated from shocked ultrasound pulses that scatter from incidental nuclei (shock scattering histotripsy), or purely tensile ultrasound pulses (microtripsy). The Yang/Church model was numerically integrated to predict the behavior of the cavitation nuclei exposed to measured shock scattering histotripsy pulses. The bubble motion exhibited expansion only behavior, suggesting that the ablative action of a histotripsy pulse is related to the maximum size of the bubble. The analytic model of Holland and Apfel was extended to predict the maximum size of cavitation nuclei for both shock scattering histotripsy and microtripsy excitations. The predictions of the analytic model and the numerical model agree within 2% for fully developed shock scattering histotripsy pulses (>72 MPa peak positive pressure). For shock scattering histotripsy pulses that are not fully developed (<72 MPa), the analytic model underestimated the maximum size by less than 5%. The analytic model was also used to predict bubble growth nucleated from microtripsy insonations, and was found to be consistent with experimental observations. Based on the extended analytic model, metrics were developed to predict the extent of the treatment zone from histotripsy pulses.

  20. Predicting the growth of nanoscale nuclei by histotripsy pulses

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Kenneth B; Holland, Christy K

    2016-01-01

    Histotripsy is a focused ultrasound therapy that ablates tissue through the mechanical action of cavitation. Histotripsy-initiated cavitation activity is generated from shocked ultrasound pulses that scatter from incidental nuclei (shock scattering histotripsy), or purely tensile ultrasound pulses (microtripsy). The Yang/Church model was numerically integrated to predict the behavior of the cavitation nuclei exposed to measured shock scattering histotripsy pulses. The bubble motion exhibited expansion only behavior, suggesting that the ablative action of a histotripsy pulse is related to the maximum size of the bubble. The analytic model of Holland and Apfel was extended to predict the maximum size of cavitation nuclei for both shock scattering histotripsy and microtripsy excitations. The predictions of the analytic model and the numerical model agree within 2% for fully developed shock scattering histotripsy pulses (>72 MPa peak positive pressure). For shock scattering histotripsy pulses that are not fully developed (<72 MPa), the analytic model underestimated the maximum size by less than 5%. The analytic model was also used to predict bubble growth nucleated from microtripsy insonations, and was found to be consistent with experimental observations. Based on the extended analytic model, metrics were developed to predict the extent of the treatment zone from histotripsy pulses. PMID:26988374

  1. MT(1) melatonin receptor overexpression enhances the growth suppressive effect of melatonin in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lin; Collins, April R; Dai, Jun; Dubocovich, Margarita L; Hill, Steven M

    2002-06-28

    Melatonin inhibits the proliferation of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha)-positive (MCF-7), but not ERalpha-negative (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells. Here, we assessed the effect of MT(1) melatonin receptor stable overexpression in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells on the growth-suppressive effects of melatonin. Parental and vector-transfected MCF-7 cells demonstrated a modest, but significant, growth-suppressive response to melatonin; however, melatonin treatment of MT(1)-transfected MCF-7 cells resulted in significantly enhanced growth-suppression. This response was blocked by an MT1/MT2 melatonin receptor antagonist. Interestingly, MT(1)-overexpression did not induce a melatonin-sensitive phenotype in melatonin-insensitive MDA-MB-231 cells. Finally, Northern blot analysis demonstrated an enhanced inhibition of ERalpha mRNA expression and an enhanced induction of pancreatic spasmolytic polypeptide (pS2) by melatonin in MT(1)-transfected MCF-7 cells relative to vector-transfected MCF-7 cells. These data suggest the involvement of the MT(1) melatonin receptor in mediation of melatonin effects on growth-suppression and gene-modulation in breast cancer cells.

  2. MELATONIN-INDUCED SUPPRESSION OF PC12 CELL GROWTH IS MEDIATED BY ITS GI COUPLED TRANSMEMBRANE RECEPTORS. (R826248)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of pertussis toxin, an uncoupler of Gi protein from adenylate cyclase, and luzindole, a competitive inhibitor of melatonin receptor binding, were examined for their ability to inhibit melatonin-induced suppression of PC12 cell growth. Both agents inhibited the mela...

  3. Suppression of glypican 3 inhibits growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells through up-regulation of TGF-β2.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chris K; Chua, Mei-Sze; He, Jing; So, Samuel K

    2011-08-01

    Glypican 3 (GPC3) is a valuable diagnostic marker and a potential therapeutic target in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To evaluate the efficacy of targeting GPC3 at the translational level, we used RNA interference to examine the biologic and molecular effects of GPC3 suppression in HCC cells in vitro and in vivo. Transfection of Huh7 and HepG2 cells with GPC3-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibited cell proliferation (P < .001) together with cell cycle arrest at the G(1) phase, down-regulation of antiapoptotic protein (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1), and replicative senescence. Gene expression analysis revealed that GPC3 suppression significantly correlated with transforming growth factor beta receptor (TGFBR) pathway (P = 4.57e-5) and upregulated TGF-β2 at both RNA and protein levels. The effects of GPC3 suppression by siRNA can be recapitulated by addition of human recombinant TGF-β2 to HCC cells in culture, suggesting the possible involvement of TGF-β2 in growth inhibition of HCC cells. Cotransfection of siRNA-GPC3 with siRNA-TGF-β2 partially attenuated the effects of GPC3 suppression on cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and replicative senescence, confirming the involvement of TGF-β2 in siRNA-GPC3-mediated growth suppression. In vivo, GPC3 suppression significantly inhibited the growth of orthotopic xenografts of Huh7 and HepG2 cells (P < .05), accompanied by increased TGF-β2 expression, reduced cell proliferation (observed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen staining), and enhanced apoptosis (by TUNEL staining). In conclusion, molecular targeting of GPC3 at the translational level offers an effective option for the clinical management of GPC3-positive HCC patients.

  4. Mechanistic study on growth suppression and apoptosis induction by targeting hepatoma-derived growth factor in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Tsun Yee; Tang, Wan Yee; Tsang, Wing Pui; Co, Ngai Na; Kong, Siu Kai; Kwok, Tim Tak

    2009-01-01

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) is frequently overexpressed in human cancer. The growth factor was previously demonstrated to be a survival factor as knock-down of HDGF suppresses the growth and induces apoptosis in human cancer cells through the Bad-mediated intrinsic apoptotic pathway. However, inactivation of Bad cannot completely repress the apoptosis induced upon HDGF knock-down, indicating the presence of other unidentified pathways. In the present study, HDGF knock-down was shown to trigger the Fas-mediated extrinsic apoptotic pathway in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells through NF-kappaB signaling pathway. Increases in Fas expression and fas promoter activity were detected upon HDGF knock-down by Western blot analysis and luciferase reporter assay. Knock-down of fas inhibited HDGF knock-down effect on apoptosis induction and growth suppression as revealed by annexin V binding assay and soft agar assay. Down-regulation of IkappaBalpha was also observed upon HDGF knock-down. Overexpression of IkappaBalpha by transient transfection or inhibition of NF-kappaB by BAY11-7082 suppressed HDGF knock-down effect on fas promoter activation, Fas up-regulation, apoptosis induction and growth suppression. Furthermore, the interaction of Fas-mediated extrinsic and Bad-mediated intrinsic apoptotic pathways was demonstrated as a stronger inhibition on apoptosis induction and growth suppression upon HDGF knock-down was observed when both pathways were inactivated. The results therefore suggested that, through both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways, HDGF may function as a survival factor and be a potential target for cancer therapy.

  5. Genetic delivery of the murine equivalent of bevacizumab (avastin), an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody, to suppress growth of human tumors in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masaki; Boyer, Julie L; Hackett, Neil R; Qiu, Jianping; Crystal, Ronald G

    2008-03-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) produced by tumor cells plays a central role in stimulating angiogenesis required for solid tumor growth. VEGF-specific antibodies inhibit tumor cell line growth in animal models and a humanized monoclonal anti-VEGF antibody (bevacizumab [Avastin]) is approved as a treatment for metastatic cancer. We hypothesized that administration of an adenoviral (Ad) vector expressing the murine monoclonal antibody equivalent of bevacizumab would suppress human tumor growth in vivo. The Ad vector (AdalphaVEGF) encodes the light chain and heavy chain cDNAs of monoclonal antibody A.4.6.1, a murine antibody that specifically recognizes human VEGF with the same antigen-binding site as bevacizumab. AdalphaVEGF efficacy in vivo was evaluated with A-673 rhabdomyosarcoma and DU 145 prostate carcinoma cells in human tumor cell xenografts in SCID mice. For both tumor models, AdalphaVEGF directed the expression of high anti-human VEGF IgG antibody titers in vivo, the numbers of mitotic nuclei and blood vessels in the tumor were significantly decreased (p < 0.05), tumor growth was suppressed (p < 0.05), and there was increased survival (p < 0.005). Thus, AdalphaVEGF, encoding a murine monoclonal antibody that is the equivalent of bevacizumab, effectively suppresses the growth of human tumors, suggesting gene therapy as an alternative to bevacizumab monoclonal antibody therapy.

  6. Xenogeneic immunization with human tyrosine hydroxylase DNA vaccines suppresses growth of established neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Huebener, Nicole; Fest, Stefan; Hilt, Kerstin; Schramm, Alexander; Eggert, Angelika; Durmus, Tahir; Woehler, Anja; Stermann, Alexander; Bleeke, Matthias; Baykan, Bianca; Weixler, Silke; Gaedicke, Gerhard; Lode, Holger N

    2009-08-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a challenging malignancy of the sympathetic nervous tissue characterized by a very poor prognosis. One important marker for NB is the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the first-step enzyme of catecholamine biosynthesis. We could show stable and high TH gene expression in 67 NB samples independent of the clinical stage. Based on this observation, we addressed the question of whether xenogeneic TH DNA vaccination is effective in inducing an anti-NB immune response. For this purpose, we generated three DNA vaccines based on pCMV-F3Ub and pBUD-CE4.1 plasmids encoding for human (h)THcDNA (A), hTH minigene (B), and hTHcDNA in combination with the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 12 (C), and tested prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy to suppress primary tumor growth and spontaneous metastasis. Here we report that xenogeneic TH DNA vaccination was effective in eradicating established primary tumors and inhibiting metastasis. Interestingly, this effect could not be enhanced by adding the Th1 cytokine interleukin 12. However, increased IFN-gamma production and NB cytotoxicity of effector cells harvested from vaccinated mice suggested the participation of tumor-specific CTLs in the immune response. The depletion of CD8(+)T cells completely abrogated the hTH vaccine-mediated anti-NB immune response. Furthermore, rechallenging of surviving mice resulted in reduced primary tumor growth, indicating the induction of a memory immune response. In conclusion, xenogeneic immunization with TH-derived DNA vaccines is effective against NB, and may open a new venue for a novel and effective immunotherapeutic strategy against this challenging childhood tumor.

  7. Quantitative digital imaging of banana growth suppression by plant parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Roderick, Hugh; Mbiru, Elvis; Coyne, Danny; Tripathi, Leena; Atkinson, Howard J

    2012-01-01

    A digital camera fitted with a hemispherical lens was used to generate canopy leaf area index (LAI) values for a banana (Musa spp.) field trial with the aim of establishing a method for monitoring stresses on tall crop plants. The trial in Uganda consisted of two cultivars susceptible to nematodes, a plantain, Gonja manjaya and an East African Highland banana, Mbwazirume, plus a nematode resistant dessert banana, Yangambi km5. A comparative approach included adding a mixed population of Radopholus similis, Helicotylenchus multicinctus and Meloidogyne spp. to the soil around half the plants of each cultivar prior to field planting. Measurements of LAI were made fortnightly from 106 days post-planting over two successive cropping cycles. The highest mean LAI during the first cycle for Gonja manjaya was suppressed to 74.8±3.5% by the addition of nematodes, while for Mbwazirume the values were reduced to 71.1±1.9%. During the second cycle these values were 69.2±2.2% and 72.2±2.7%, respectively. Reductions in LAI values were validated as due to the biotic stress by assessing nematode numbers in roots and the necrosis they caused at each of two harvests and the relationship is described. Yield losses, including a component due to toppled plants, were 35.3% and 55.3% for Gonja manjaya and 31.4% and 55.8% for Mbwazirume, at first and second harvests respectively. Yangambi km5 showed no decrease in LAI and yield in the presence of nematodes at both harvests. LAI estimated by hemispherical photography provided a rapid basis for detecting biotic growth checks by nematodes on bananas, and demonstrated the potential of the approach for studies of growth checks to other tall crop plants caused by biotic or abiotic stresses. PMID:23285286

  8. Fucoidan Suppresses the Growth of Human Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Atashrazm, Farzaneh; Lowenthal, Ray M; Woods, Gregory M; Holloway, Adele F; Karpiniec, Samuel S; Dickinson, Joanne L

    2016-03-01

    Fucoidan, a natural component of seaweeds, is reported to have immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects. The mechanisms underpinning these activities remain poorly understood. In this study, the cytotoxicity and anti-tumor activities of fucoidan were investigated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. The human AML cell lines NB4, KG1a, HL60, and K562 were treated with fucoidan and cell cycle, cell proliferation, and expression of apoptotic pathways molecules were analyzed. Fucoidan suppressed the proliferation and induced apoptosis through the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways in the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cell lines NB4 and HL60, but not in KG1a and K562 cells. In NB4 cells, apoptosis was caspase-dependent as it was significantly attenuated by pre-treatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor. P21/WAF1/CIP1 was significantly up-regulated leading to cell cycle arrest. Fucoidan decreased the activation of ERK1/2 and down-regulated the activation of AKT through hypo-phosphorylation of Thr(308) residue but not Ser(473). In vivo, a xenograft model using the NB4 cells was employed. Mice were fed with fucoidan and tumor growth was measured following inoculation with NB4 cells. Subsequently, splenic natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity was also examined. Oral doses of fucoidan significantly delayed tumor growth in the xenograft model and increased cytolytic activity of NK cells. Taken together, these data suggest that the selective inhibitory effect of fucoidan on APL cells and its protective effect against APL development in mice warrant further investigation of fucoidan as a useful agent in treatment of certain types of leukemia.

  9. Nimotuzumab enhances temozolomide-induced growth suppression of glioma cells expressing mutant EGFR in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Yusuke; Shimizu, Saki; Shishido-Hara, Yukiko; Suzuki, Kaori; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Nagane, Motoo

    2016-03-01

    A mutant form of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), EGFRvIII, is common in glioblastoma (GBM) and confers enhanced tumorigenic activity and drug resistance. Nimotuzumab, an anti-EGFR antibody, has shown preclinical and clinical activity to GBM, but its specific activity against EGFRvIII has not been fully investigated. Human glioma U87MG or LNZ308 cells overexpressing either wild-type (wt) EGFR or EGFRvIII were treated with nimotuzumab, temozolomide, or both. Expression and phosphorylation status of molecules were determined by Western blot analysis. Methylation status of promoter region of O(6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) was detected by methylation-specific PCR. Antitumor activity was tested using nude mice bearing either subcutaneous or intracerebral xenografts along with analyses of EGFR phosphorylation status, proliferation, apoptosis, and vessel density. Nimotuzumab treatment resulted in reduction of EGFRvIII tyrosine phosphorylation with a decrease in Akt phosphorylation that was greater than that of wtEGFR. Correspondingly, antitumor effects, growth suppression and survival elongation, were more significant in mice bearing either subcutaneous or intracerebral tumor expressing EGFRvIII than in those expressing wtEGFR. These effects were markedly increased when temozolomide was combined with nimotuzumab. The post-treatment recurrent brain tumors exhibited a decrease in expression of the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, MSH6 and MLH1, but their methylated MGMT status did not changed. Nimotuzumab has in vivo antitumor activity against GBM, especially those expressing EGFRvIII, when combined with temozolomide. This could provide a basis for preselection of patients with GBM by EGFR status who might benefit from the nimotuzumab and temozolomide combination therapy. PMID:26778701

  10. Quantitative digital imaging of banana growth suppression by plant parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Roderick, Hugh; Mbiru, Elvis; Coyne, Danny; Tripathi, Leena; Atkinson, Howard J

    2012-01-01

    A digital camera fitted with a hemispherical lens was used to generate canopy leaf area index (LAI) values for a banana (Musa spp.) field trial with the aim of establishing a method for monitoring stresses on tall crop plants. The trial in Uganda consisted of two cultivars susceptible to nematodes, a plantain, Gonja manjaya and an East African Highland banana, Mbwazirume, plus a nematode resistant dessert banana, Yangambi km5. A comparative approach included adding a mixed population of Radopholus similis, Helicotylenchus multicinctus and Meloidogyne spp. to the soil around half the plants of each cultivar prior to field planting. Measurements of LAI were made fortnightly from 106 days post-planting over two successive cropping cycles. The highest mean LAI during the first cycle for Gonja manjaya was suppressed to 74.8±3.5% by the addition of nematodes, while for Mbwazirume the values were reduced to 71.1±1.9%. During the second cycle these values were 69.2±2.2% and 72.2±2.7%, respectively. Reductions in LAI values were validated as due to the biotic stress by assessing nematode numbers in roots and the necrosis they caused at each of two harvests and the relationship is described. Yield losses, including a component due to toppled plants, were 35.3% and 55.3% for Gonja manjaya and 31.4% and 55.8% for Mbwazirume, at first and second harvests respectively. Yangambi km5 showed no decrease in LAI and yield in the presence of nematodes at both harvests. LAI estimated by hemispherical photography provided a rapid basis for detecting biotic growth checks by nematodes on bananas, and demonstrated the potential of the approach for studies of growth checks to other tall crop plants caused by biotic or abiotic stresses.

  11. Suppression of the emittance growth induced by coherent synchrotron radiation in triple-bend achromats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xi-Yang; Jiao, Yi; Xu, Gang; Cui, Xiao-Hao

    2015-05-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effect in a bending path plays an important role in transverse emittance dilution in high-brightness light sources and linear colliders, where the electron beams are of short bunch length and high peak current. Suppression of the emittance growth induced by CSR is critical to preserve the beam quality and help improve the machine performance. It has been shown that the CSR effect in a double-bend achromat (DBA) can be analyzed with the two-dimensional point-kick analysis method. In this paper, this method is applied to analyze the CSR effect in a triple-bend achromat (TBA) with symmetric layout, which is commonly used in the optics designs of energy recovery linacs (ERLs). A condition of cancelling the CSR linear effect in such a TBA is obtained, and is verified through numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that emittance preservation can be achieved with this condition, and to a large extent, has a high tolerance to the fluctuation of the initial transverse phase space distribution of the beam. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475202, 11405187) and Youth Innovation Promotion Association of Chinese Academy of Sciences (2015009)

  12. Suppression of KSHV-induced angiopoietin-2 inhibits angiogenesis, infiltration of inflammatory cells, and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaolan; Sha, Jingfeng; Xiang, Shao; Qin, Sanhai; Conrad, Patricia; Ghosh, Santosh K; Weinberg, Aaron; Ye, Fengchun

    2016-08-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a highly angiogenic and inflammatory neoplasia. The angiogenic and inflammatory cytokine angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) is strongly expressed in KS due to Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection. In the present study, we determined how Ang-2 contributes to development of KS by using telomerase-immortalized human umbilical vein endothelial cells (TIVE) as a model, which become malignantly transformed and express increased levels of Ang-2 following KSHV infection. Ang-2 released from TIVE-KSHV cells induces tyrosine phosphorylation of Tie-2 receptor from both human and mouse endothelial cells and promotes angiogenesis in nude mice. Functional inhibition or expressional "knock-down" of Ang-2 in these cells blocks angiogenesis and inhibits tumor growth. Ang-2 suppression also reduces the numbers of infiltrating monocytes/macrophages in tumors. In transwell-based cell migration assays, Ang-2 indeed enhances migration of human monocytes in a dose-dependent manner. These results underscore a pivotal role of KSHV-induced Ang-2 in KS tumor development by promoting both angiogenesis and inflammation. Our data also suggest that selective drug targeting of Ang-2 may be used for treatment of KS. PMID:27294705

  13. BCL2-BH4 antagonist BDA-366 suppresses human myeloma growth

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jiusheng; Park, Dongkyoo; Wang, Mengchang; Nooka, Ajay; Deng, Qiaoya; Matulis, Shannon; Kaufman, Jonathan; Lonial, Sagar; Boise, Lawrence H.; Galipeau, Jacques; Deng, Xingming

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a heterogeneous plasma cell malignancy and remains incurable. B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL2) protein correlates with the survival and the drug resistance of myeloma cells. BH3 mimetics have been developed to disrupt the binding between BCL2 and its pro-apoptotic BCL2 family partners for the treatment of MM, but with limited therapeutic efficacy. We recently identified a small molecule BDA-366 as a BCL2 BH4 domain antagonist, converting it from an anti-apoptotic into a pro-apoptotic molecule. In this study, we demonstrated that BDA-366 induces robust apoptosis in MM cell lines and primary MM cells by inducing BCL2 conformational change. Delivery of BDA-366 substantially suppressed the growth of human MM xenografts in NOD-scid/IL2Rγnull mice, without significant cytotoxic effects on normal hematopoietic cells or body weight. Thus, BDA-366 functions as a novel BH4-based BCL2 inhibitor and offers an entirely new tool for MM therapy. PMID:27049723

  14. AP-2{alpha} suppresses skeletal myoblast proliferation and represses fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 promoter activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darrion L.; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-01-15

    Skeletal muscle development is partly characterized by myoblast proliferation and subsequent differentiation into postmitotic muscle fibers. Developmental regulation of expression of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene is required for normal myoblast proliferation and muscle formation. As a result, FGFR1 promoter activity is controlled by multiple transcriptional regulatory proteins during both proliferation and differentiation of myogenic cells. The transcription factor AP-2{alpha} is present in nuclei of skeletal muscle cells and suppresses myoblast proliferation in vitro. Since FGFR1 gene expression is tightly linked to myoblast proliferation versus differentiation, the FGFR1 promoter was examined for candidate AP-2{alpha} binding sites. Mutagenesis studies indicated that a candidate binding site located at - 1035 bp functioned as a repressor cis-regulatory element. Furthermore, mutation of this site alleviated AP-2{alpha}-mediated repression of FGFR1 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that AP-2{alpha} interacted with the FGFR1 promoter in both proliferating myoblasts and differentiated myotubes. In total, these results indicate that AP-2{alpha} is a transcriptional repressor of FGFR1 gene expression during skeletal myogenesis.

  15. Vaginal delivery of paclitaxel via nanoparticles with non-mucoadhesive surfaces suppresses cervical tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming; Yu, Tao; Wang, Ying-Ying; Lai, Samuel K.; Zeng, Qi; Miao, Bolong; Tang, Benjamin C.; Simons, Brian W.; Ensign, Laura; Liu, Guanshu; Chan, Kannie W. Y.; Juang, Chih-Yin; Mert, Olcay; Wood, Joseph; Fu, Jie; McMahon, Michael T.; Wu, T.-C.; Hung, Chien-Fu; Hanes, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Local delivery of chemotherapeutics in the cervicovaginal tract using nanoparticles may reduce adverse side effects associated with systemic chemotherapy, while improving outcomes for early stage cervical cancer. We hypothesize drug-loaded nanoparticles must rapidly penetrate cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) lining the female reproductive tract to effectively deliver their payload to underlying diseased tissues in a uniform and sustained manner. We develop paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles, composed entirely of polymers used in FDA-approved products, which rapidly penetrate human CVM and provide sustained drug release with minimal burst effect. We further employ a mouse model with aggressive cervical tumors established in the cervicovaginal tract to compare paclitaxel-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (conventional particles , or CP) and similar particles coated with Pluronic® F127 (mucus-penetrating particles , or MPP). CP are mucoadhesive and, thus, aggregated in mucus, while MPP achieve more uniform distribution and close proximity to cervical tumors. Paclitaxel-MPP suppress tumor growth more effectively and prolong median survival of mice compared to free paclitaxel or paclitaxel-CP. Histopathological studies demonstrate minimal toxicity to the cervicovaginal epithelia, suggesting paclitaxel-MPP may be safe for intravaginal use. These results demonstrate for the first time the in vivo advantages of polymer-based MPP for treatment of tumors localized to a mucosal surface. PMID:24339398

  16. BMP2-Induced Inflammation Can Be Suppressed by the Osteoinductive Growth Factor NELL-1

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jia; James, Aaron W.; Zara, Janette N.; Asatrian, Greg; Khadarian, Kevork; Zhang, James B.; Ho, Stephanie; Kim, Hyun Ju

    2013-01-01

    Bone-morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) is currently the only Food and Drug Administration-approved osteoinductive growth factor used in clinical settings for bone regeneration and repair. However, the use of BMP2 is encumbered by numerous clinical complications, including postoperative inflammation and life-threatening cervical swelling. Thus, methods to prevent BMP2-induced inflammation would have far-reaching clinical implications toward improving current BMP2-based methods for bone regeneration. For the first time, we investigate the potential role of the growth factor Nel-like molecule-1 (NELL-1) in inhibiting BMP2-induced inflammation. Adult rats underwent a femoral bone onlay procedure, treated with either BMP2 protein (4 mg/mL), NELL-1 protein (4 mg/mL), or both proteins combined. Animals were evaluated at 3, 7, and 14 days postoperatively by histology, histomorphometry, immunohistochemistry, and real-time PCR for markers of inflammation (TNFα, IL6). The relative levels of TNFα and IL6 in serum were also detected by ELISA. The mechanism for NELL-1's anti-inflammatory effect was further assessed through examining inflammatory markers and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH3T3 cells. BMP2 significantly induced local inflammation, including an early and pronounced polymorphonuclear cell infiltration accompanied by increased expression of TNFα and IL6. Treatment with NELL-1 alone elicited no significant inflammatory response. However, NELL-1 significantly attenuated BMP2-induced inflammation by all markers and at all timepoints. These local findings were also confirmed using systemic serum inflammatory biomarkers (TNFα, IL6). In each case, NELL-1 fully reversed BMP2-induced systemic inflammation. Lastly, our findings were recapitulated in vitro, where NELL-1 suppressed BMP2 induced expression of inflammatory markers, as well as NF-κB transcriptional activity and generation of ROS. BMP2-induced inflammation is a

  17. Anti-ERBB2 sh-RNA Suppress Cell Growth in ERBB2-Overexpressing Upper Gastrointestinal Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Arrington, Amanda K.; Davydova, Julia; Vickers, Selwyn M.; Yamamoto, Masato

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION ERBB2 is overexpressed in 15–25% of upper gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas. We use a stable lentiviral shRNA model to demonstrate that ERBB2 suppression in upper gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas with documented ERBB2 amplification effectively decreases ERBB2 protein levels and decreases cell viability. Further, we evaluate tumor growth of cells treated with the ERBB2 shRNA. METHODS Three upper gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma cells lines with varying ERBB2 levels were treated with one of three separate lentiviral GFP-labeled ERBB2 shRNA vectors or a nonsilencing control shRNA vector for 6 hours. Protein levels on Day 6 and cell viability was evaluated on Days 3–10. A xenograft in vivo experiment was performed using OE19 cells pretransduced with ERBB2 shRNA to evaluate tumor growth. RESULTS ERBB2 protein levels decreased by 80%. ERBB2 knockdown significantly decreased cell viability in cell lines with high ERBB2 levels. In vivo tumor growth was suppressed in ERBB2 shRNA treated groups. CONCLUSION ERBB2 suppression based on a stable lentiviral shRNA transfection system effectively decrease cell viability in cell lines with amplification of ERBB2 as compared to cell lines without overexpression. ERBB2 knockdown significantly decreases tumor growth in vivo. ERBB2-directed therapy may be of benefit in the subset of patients with gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas exhibiting overamplification of ERBB2. PMID:19813066

  18. Sunitinib (SUTENT, SU11248) suppresses tumor growth and induces apoptosis in xenograft models of human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Huynh, H; Ngo, V C; Choo, S P; Poon, D; Koong, H N; Thng, C H; Toh, H C; Zheng, L; Ong, L C; Jin, Y; Song, I C; Chang, A P C; Ong, H S; Chung, A Y F; Chow, P K H; Soo, K C

    2009-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common and third deadliest primary neoplasm. Since HCC is a particularly vascular solid tumor, we determined the antitumor and antiangiogenic activities of sunitinib malate, a potent inhibitor of two receptors involved in angiogenesis - vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR). In the present study, we reported that treatment of HepG2 and SK-Hep-1 cells with sunitinib led to growth inhibition and apoptosis in a dose-dependent fashion. Sunitinib inhibited phosphorylation of VEGFR-2 at Tyr951 and PDGFR-beta at Tyr1021 both in vitro and in vivo. Sunitinib also suppressed tumor growth of five patient-derived xenografts. Sunitinib-induced tumor growth inhibition was associated with increased apoptosis, reduced microvessel density and inhibition of cell proliferation. This study provides a strong rationale for further clinical investigation of sunitinib in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

  19. Stability of Magnetically-Suppressed Solutal Convection In Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, F. W.; Ramachandran, N.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of convection during the crystallization of proteins is not very well understood. In a gravitational field, convection is caused by crystal sedimentation and by solutal buoyancy induced flow and these can lead to crystal imperfections. While crystallization in microgravity can approach diffusion limited growth conditions (no convection), terrestrially strong magnetic fields can be used to control fluid flow and sedimentation effects. In this work, a theory is presented on the stability of solutal convection of a magnetized fluid in the presence of a magnetic field. The requirements for stability are developed and compared to experiments performed within the bore of a superconducting magnet. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experiments and show solutal convection can be stabilized if the surrounding fluid has larger magnetic susceptibility and the magnetic field has a specific structure. Discussion on the application of the technique to protein crystallization is also provided.

  20. Growth suppression by an E2F-binding-defective retinoblastoma protein (RB): contribution from the RB C pocket.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, L L; Su, H; Baskaran, R; Knudsen, E S; Wang, J Y

    1998-07-01

    Growth suppression by the retinoblastoma protein (RB) is dependent on its ability to form complexes with transcription regulators. At least three distinct protein-binding activities have been identified in RB: the large A/B pocket binds E2F, the A/B pocket binds the LXCXE peptide motif, and the C pocket binds the nuclear c-Abl tyrosine kinase. Substitution of Trp for Arg 661 in the B region of RB (mutant 661) inactivates both E2F and LXCXE binding. The tumor suppression function of mutant 661 is not abolished, because this allele predisposes its carriers to retinoblastoma development with a low penetrance. In cell-based assays, 661 is shown to inhibit G1/S progression. This low-penetrance mutant also induces terminal growth arrest with reduced but detectable activity. We have constructed mutations that disrupt C pocket activity. When overproduced, the RB C-terminal fragment did not induce terminal growth arrest but could inhibit G1/S progression, and this activity was abolished by the C-pocket mutations. In full-length RB, the C-pocket mutations reduced but did not abolish RB function. Interestingly, combination of the C-pocket and 661 mutations completely abolished RB's ability to cause an increase in the percentage of cells in G1 and to induce terminal growth arrest. These results suggest that the A/B or C region can induce a prolongation of G1 through mechanisms that are independent of each other. In contrast, long-term growth arrest requires combined activities from both regions of RB. In addition, E2F and LXCXE binding are not the only mechanisms through which RB inhibits cell growth. The C pocket also contributes to RB-mediated growth suppression. PMID:9632788

  1. Overexpression of iron regulatory protein 1 suppresses growth of tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guohua; Fillebeen, Carine; Wang, Jian; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2007-04-01

    Iron is essential for proliferation of normal and neoplastic cells. Cellular iron uptake, utilization and storage are regulated by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that the disruption of iron homeostasis may modulate the growth properties of cancer cells. To address this, we employed H1299 lung cancer cells engineered for tetracycline-inducible overexpression of the post-transcriptional regulator iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1). The induction of IRP1 (wild-type or the constitutive IRP1(C437S) mutant) did not affect the proliferation of the cells in culture, and only modestly reduced their efficiency to form colonies in soft agar. However, IRP1 dramatically impaired the capacity of the cells to form solid tumor xenografts in nude mice. Tumors derived from IRP1-transfectants were <20% in size compared to those from parent cells. IRP1 coordinately controls the expression of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and ferritin by binding to iron-responsive elements (IREs) within their mRNAs. Biochemical analysis revealed high expression of epitope-tagged IRP1 in tumor tissue, which was associated with a profound increase in IRE-binding activity. As expected, this response misregulated iron metabolism by increasing TfR1 levels. Surprisingly, IRP1 failed to suppress ferritin expression and did not affect the levels of the iron transporter ferroportin. Our results show that the overexpression of IRP1 is associated with an apparent tumor suppressor phenotype and provide a direct regulatory link between the IRE/IRP system and cancer.

  2. EphrinA5 suppresses colon cancer development by negatively regulating epidermal growth factor receptor stability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong-Hong; Chang, Junn-Liang; Ho, Jar-Yi; Wu, Hsiao-Chun; Chen, Tse-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common human cancers worldwide. Owing to its aggressiveness and lethality, it is necessary to determine the mechanisms regulating the carcinogenesis of colon cancer. EphrinA5 has been reported to act as a putative tumor suppressor in glioma; however, little is known concerning the role of this protein in the context of colon cancer. To elucidate the biological significance of ephrinA5 in colon cancer, we examined ephrinA5 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression profiles in both colon cancer and normal tissues, using immunohistochemistry on a 96-spot tissue microarray. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments were performed on the human colon cancer cell lines SW480 and WiDr to determine the biological effects of ephrinA5 in relation to cell proliferation, survival, and migration. It was found that ephrinA5 mRNA and protein levels were significantly reduced in colon cancer as compared with normal colon tissue specimens. EphrinA5 expression was also negatively associated with tumor differentiation and clinical stage. In colon cancer cell line models, ephrinA5 exerted an inhibitory effect on EGFR by promoting c-Cbl-mediated EGFR ubiquitination and degradation. EphrinA5 did not affect the transcriptional regulation of EGFR mRNA expression in colon cancer cells. Expression of ephrinA5 suppressed colon cancer cell proliferation, migration, and chemotherapeutic resistance. In conclusion, ephrinA5 inhibited colon cancer progression by promoting c-Cbl-mediated EGFR degradation. Our findings identify a novel mechanism that could be utilized to improve the therapeutic efficiency of EGFR-targeting strategies.

  3. Docetaxel-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles suppress breast cancer cells growth with reduced myelosuppression toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qing; Han, Jing; Cong, Wenshu; Ge, Ying; Ma, Dandan; Dai, Zhaoxia; Li, Yaping; Bi, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    Docetaxel is an adjuvant chemotherapy drug widely used to treat multiple solid tumors; however, its toxicity and side effects limit its clinical efficacy. Herein, docetaxel-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (DSNs) were developed to reduce systemic toxicity of docetaxel while still keeping its anticancer activity. To evaluate its anticancer activity and toxicity, and to understand the molecular mechanisms of DSNs, different cellular, molecular, and whole genome transcription analysis approaches were utilized. The DSNs showed lower cytotoxicity compared with the commercial formulation of docetaxel (Taxotere®) and induced more apoptosis at 24 hours after treatment in vitro. DSNs can cause the treated cancer cells to arrest in the G2/M phase in a dose-dependent manner similar to Taxotere. They can also suppress tumor growth very effectively in a mice model with human xenograft breast cancer. Systemic analysis of gene expression profiles by microarray and subsequent verification experiments suggested that both DSNs and Taxotere regulate gene expression and gene function, including DNA replication, DNA damage response, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle regulation. Some of these genes expressed differentially at the protein level although their messenger RNA expression level was similar under Taxotere and DSN treatment. Moreover, DSNs improved the main side effect of Taxotere by greatly lowering myelosuppression toxicity to bone marrow cells from mice. Taken together, these results expound the antitumor efficacy and the potential working mechanisms of DSNs in its anticancer activity and toxicity, which provide a theoretical foundation to develop and apply a more efficient docetaxel formulation to treat cancer patients. PMID:25378924

  4. Cadmium-coordinated supramolecule suppresses tumor growth of T-cell leukemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoping; Koizumi, Yukio; Zhang, Muxin; Natsui, Miyuki; Koyota, Souichi; Yamada, Manabu; Kondo, Yoshihiko; Hamada, Fumio; Sugiyama, Toshihiro

    2015-05-01

    Cadmium is a toxic pollutant with occupational and environmental significance, due to its diverse toxic effects. Supramolecules that conjugate and decontaminate toxic metals have potential for use in treatment of cadmium intoxication. In addition, metal-coordinating ability has been postulated to contribute to the cytotoxic effects of anti-tumor agents such as cisplatin or bleomycin. Thiacalixarenes, cyclic oligomers of p-alkylphenol bridged by sulfur atoms, are supramolecules known to have potent coordinating ability to metal ions. In this study, we show that cadmium-coordinated thiacalix[4]arene tetrasulfate (TC4ATS-Cd) exhibits an anti-proliferative effect against T-cell leukemia cells. Cadmium exhibited cytotoxicity with IC50 values ranging from 36 to 129 μM against epithelia-derived cancer cell lines, while TC4ATS-Cd elicited no significant cytotoxicity (IC50 > 947 μM). However, a number of T-cell leukemia cell lines exhibited marked sensitivity to TC4ATS-Cd. In Jurkat cells, toxicity of TC4ATS-Cd occurred with an IC50 of 6.9 μM, which is comparable to that of 6.5 μM observed for cadmium alone. TC4ATS-Cd induced apoptotic cell death through activation of caspase-3 in Jurkat cells. In a xenograft model, TC4ATS-Cd (13 mg/kg) treatment significantly suppressed the tumor growth of Jurkat cells in mice. In addition, TC4ATS-Cd-treated mice exhibited significantly less cadmium accumulation in liver and kidney compared to equimolar cadmium-treated mice. These results suggest that cadmium-coordinated supramolecules may have therapeutic potential for treatment of T-cell leukemia.

  5. Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Treatment Suppresses Early Brain Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Fujimoto, Masashi; Kawakita, Fumihiro; Nakano, Fumi; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2016-09-01

    The role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in early brain injury (EBI) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of anti-VEGF therapy on EBI after SAH. C57BL/6 male mice underwent sham or filament perforation SAH modeling, and vehicle or two dosages (0.2 and 1 μg) of anti-VEGF antibody were randomly administrated by an intracerebroventricular injection. Neuroscore, brain water content, immunoglobulin G staining, and Western blotting were performed to evaluate EBI at 24-48 h. To confirm the role of VEGF, anti-VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-2 (a major receptor of VEGF) antibody was intracerebroventricularly administered and the effects on EBI were evaluated at 24 h. A higher dose, but not a lower dose, of anti-VEGF antibody significantly ameliorated post-SAH neurological impairments and brain edema at 24-48 h post-SAH. Post-SAH blood-brain barrier disruption was also inhibited by anti-VEGF antibody. The protective effects of anti-VEGF antibody were associated with the inhibition of post-SAH induction of VEGF, VEGFR-2, phosphorylated VEGFR-2, interleukin-1β and a matricellular protein tenascin-C (TNC). Anti-VEGFR-2 antibody also suppressed post-SAH neurological impairments and brain edema associated with VEGFR-2 inactivation and TNC downregulation. These findings demonstrated that VEGF causes post-SAH EBI via VEGFR-2 and TNC and that anti-VEGF therapy is effective for post-SAH EBI.

  6. Cadmium-coordinated supramolecule suppresses tumor growth of T-cell leukemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoping; Koizumi, Yukio; Zhang, Muxin; Natsui, Miyuki; Koyota, Souichi; Yamada, Manabu; Kondo, Yoshihiko; Hamada, Fumio; Sugiyama, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium is a toxic pollutant with occupational and environmental significance, due to its diverse toxic effects. Supramolecules that conjugate and decontaminate toxic metals have potential for use in treatment of cadmium intoxication. In addition, metal-coordinating ability has been postulated to contribute to the cytotoxic effects of anti-tumor agents such as cisplatin or bleomycin. Thiacalixarenes, cyclic oligomers of p-alkylphenol bridged by sulfur atoms, are supramolecules known to have potent coordinating ability to metal ions. In this study, we show that cadmium-coordinated thiacalix[4]arene tetrasulfate (TC4ATS-Cd) exhibits an anti-proliferative effect against T-cell leukemia cells. Cadmium exhibited cytotoxicity with IC50 values ranging from 36 to 129 μM against epithelia-derived cancer cell lines, while TC4ATS-Cd elicited no significant cytotoxicity (IC50 > 947 μM). However, a number of T-cell leukemia cell lines exhibited marked sensitivity to TC4ATS-Cd. In Jurkat cells, toxicity of TC4ATS-Cd occurred with an IC50 of 6.9 μM, which is comparable to that of 6.5 μM observed for cadmium alone. TC4ATS-Cd induced apoptotic cell death through activation of caspase-3 in Jurkat cells. In a xenograft model, TC4ATS-Cd (13 mg/kg) treatment significantly suppressed the tumor growth of Jurkat cells in mice. In addition, TC4ATS-Cd-treated mice exhibited significantly less cadmium accumulation in liver and kidney compared to equimolar cadmium-treated mice. These results suggest that cadmium-coordinated supramolecules may have therapeutic potential for treatment of T-cell leukemia. PMID:25735932

  7. Porcupine inhibitor suppresses paracrine Wnt-driven growth of Rnf43;Znrf3-mutant neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Bon-Kyoung; van Es, Johan H.; van den Born, Maaike; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Rnf43 (RING finger protein 43) and Znrf3 (zinc/RING finger protein 3) (RZ) are two closely related transmembrane E3 ligases, encoded by Wnt target genes, that remove surface Wnt (wingless-int) receptors. The two genes are mutated in various human cancers. Such tumors are predicted to be hypersensitive to, yet still depend on, secreted Wnts. We previously showed that mutation of RZ in the intestine yields rapidly growing adenomas containing LGR5+ (leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5) stem cells and Wnt3-producing Paneth cells. We now show that removal of Paneth cells by Math1 mutation inhibits RZ−/− tumor formation. Similarly, deletion of Wnt3 inhibits tumorigenesis. Treatment of mice carrying RZ−/− intestinal neoplasia with a small molecule Wnt secretion inhibitor (porcupine inhibitor C59) strongly inhibited growth, whereas adjacent normal crypts remained intact. These results establish that paracrine Wnt secretion is an essential driver of RZ−/− tumor growth and imply that a therapeutic window exists for the use of porcupine inhibitors for RZ-mutant cancers. PMID:26023187

  8. Buckwheat protein extract suppression of the growth depression in rats induced by feeding amaranth (Food Red No. 2).

    PubMed

    Kayashita, J; Nagai, H; Kato, N

    1996-09-01

    Dietary fiber has an ameliorative effect on the toxicity of amaranth (Food Red No. 2). To test the possibility that a buckwheat protein extract (BWPE) has dietary fiber-like activity by virtue of its low digestibility, we examined the influence of BWPE on amaranth toxicity in rats. The results show that BWPE-containing diet suppressed the growth depression induced by the dietary addition of 5% amaranth.

  9. Receptor Interacting Protein 3 Suppresses Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Growth by Inhibition of the Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase-Akt Axis*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Li, Geng; Lan, Xiaomei; Zheng, Ming; Chen, Kuang-Hueih; Cao, Chun-Mei; Xiao, Rui-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is a primary mechanism underlying cardiovascular proliferative disorders. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt (or protein kinase B) axis has been assigned at the center of pathways that regulate cell proliferation. Here we demonstrate that enhanced PI3K-Akt signaling by mitogenic stimulation or arterial injury profoundly elevates expression of receptor interacting protein 3 (RIP3) in primary cultured rat VSMCs and in vivo and that the up-regulation of RIP3 leads to VSMC growth arrest and apoptosis via inhibiting the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, thereby alleviating balloon injury-induced neointimal formation. Specifically, mitogenic stimulation with platelet-derived growth factor-BB or angiotensin II leads to a profound increase in RIP3 expression, which is abolished by inhibition of PI3K or Akt, and increased PI3K-Akt signaling by expression of a constitutively active PI3K mutant also elevates RIP3 expression. Importantly, adenoviral overexpression of RIP3 not only triggers apoptosis but also causes cell cycle arrest at G1/G0 phases that is associated with suppressed Akt activation. In sharp contrast, RIP3 gene silencing enhances serum- and platelet-derived growth factor-induced cell proliferation and Akt activation. In vivo adenoviral gene delivery of rat RIP3 (rRIP3) increased apoptosis and reduced VSMC proliferation, thus, effectively alleviating balloon injury-induced neointimal formation. The growth-suppressive and pro-apoptotic effects are independent of rRIP3 Ser/Thr kinase activity, because overexpression of a kinase-inactive mutant of rRIP3, similar to its wild type, is sufficient to induce growth arrest and apoptosis. These findings reveal a novel growth-suppressive action of RIP3, marking RIP3 as an important factor to prevent excessive mitogenic stimulation- or injury-induced vascular smooth muscle cells hyperplasia. PMID:20042608

  10. SIRT6 suppresses glioma cell growth via induction of apoptosis, inhibition of oxidative stress and suppression of JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Yan, Peng-Fei; Zhao, Hong-Yang; Zhang, Fang-Cheng; Zhao, Wo-Hua; Feng, Min

    2016-03-01

    Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) is a member of the mammalian NAD+‑dependent deacetylase sirtuin family that acts to maintain genomic stability and to repress genes. SIRT6 has recently been reported to be a tumor suppressor that controls cancer metabolism, although this effect of SIRT6 is still in dispute. Moreover, the role of SIRT6 in glioma is largely unknown. In the present study, we found that overexpression of SIRT6 using an adenovirus inhibited glioma cell growth and induced marked cell injury in two glioma cell lines (U87‑MG and T98G). Fluorescent terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase (TdT)‑mediated biotin‑16‑dUTP nick‑end labelling (TUNEL) assay showed that SIRT6 overexpression induced obvious apoptosis in the T98G glioma cells. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescent staining demonstrated that SIRT6 overexpression promoted the mitochondrial-to‑nuclear translocation of apoptosis‑inducing factor (AIF), a potent apoptosis inducer. Moreover, we found that SIRT6 overexpression largely reduced oxidative stress and suppressed the activation of the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway in glioma cells. Finally, we showed that SIRT6 mRNA and protein levels in human glioblastoma multiforme tissues were significantly lower than the levels in peritumor tissues. In summary, our data suggest that SIRT6 suppresses glioma cell growth via induction of apoptosis, inhibition of oxidative stress and inhibition of the activation of the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway. These results indicate that SIRT6 may be a promising therapeutic target for glioma treatment. PMID:26648570

  11. Herbal Compound Songyou Yin and Moderate Swimming Suppress Growth and Metastasis of Liver Cancer by Enhancing Immune Function.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan-Bao; Meng, Xiang-Ting; Jia, Qing-An; Bu, Yang; Ren, Zheng-Gang; Zhang, Bo-Heng; Tang, Zhao-You

    2016-09-01

    Objective Both the Chinese herbal compound Songyou Yin (SYY) and swimming exercise have been shown to have protective effects against liver cancer in animal models. In this study, we investigated whether SYY and moderate swimming (MS) have enhanced effect on suppressing progression of liver cancer by immunomodulation. Methods C57BL/6 mice were transplanted with Hepa1-6 murine liver cancer cell lines and received treatment with SYY alone or SYY combined with MS. The green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive metastatic foci in lungs were imaged with a stereoscopic fluorescence microscope. Flow cytometry was used to test the proportion of CD4 +, CD8 + T cells in peripheral blood and the proportions of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + Treg cells in peripheral blood, spleen, and tumor tissues. Cytokine transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 level in serum was detected by ELISA. Results SYY plus MS significantly suppressed the growth and lung metastasis of liver cancer and prolonged survival in tumor-burdened mice. SYY plus MS markedly raised the CD4 to CD8 ratio in peripheral blood and lowered the serum TGF-β1 level and the proportions of Treg cells in peripheral blood, spleen, and tumor tissue. The effects of the combined intervention were significantly superior to SYY or MS alone. Conclusion The combined application of SYY and MS exerted an enhanced effect on suppressing growth and metastasis of liver cancer by strengthening immunity. PMID:26699805

  12. Herbal Compound Songyou Yin and Moderate Swimming Suppress Growth and Metastasis of Liver Cancer by Enhancing Immune Function.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan-Bao; Meng, Xiang-Ting; Jia, Qing-An; Bu, Yang; Ren, Zheng-Gang; Zhang, Bo-Heng; Tang, Zhao-You

    2016-09-01

    Objective Both the Chinese herbal compound Songyou Yin (SYY) and swimming exercise have been shown to have protective effects against liver cancer in animal models. In this study, we investigated whether SYY and moderate swimming (MS) have enhanced effect on suppressing progression of liver cancer by immunomodulation. Methods C57BL/6 mice were transplanted with Hepa1-6 murine liver cancer cell lines and received treatment with SYY alone or SYY combined with MS. The green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive metastatic foci in lungs were imaged with a stereoscopic fluorescence microscope. Flow cytometry was used to test the proportion of CD4 +, CD8 + T cells in peripheral blood and the proportions of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + Treg cells in peripheral blood, spleen, and tumor tissues. Cytokine transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 level in serum was detected by ELISA. Results SYY plus MS significantly suppressed the growth and lung metastasis of liver cancer and prolonged survival in tumor-burdened mice. SYY plus MS markedly raised the CD4 to CD8 ratio in peripheral blood and lowered the serum TGF-β1 level and the proportions of Treg cells in peripheral blood, spleen, and tumor tissue. The effects of the combined intervention were significantly superior to SYY or MS alone. Conclusion The combined application of SYY and MS exerted an enhanced effect on suppressing growth and metastasis of liver cancer by strengthening immunity.

  13. Suppression of polymorphonuclear (PMN) and monocyte-mediated inhibition of Candida albicans growth by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol

    SciTech Connect

    Djeu, J.Y.; Parapanios, A.; Halkias, D.; Friedman, H.

    1986-03-05

    This study was an in vitro attempt to identify the effector cells responsible for growth inhibition of the opportunistic fungus, candida albicans, and to determine if THC or another marijuana derivatives, 11-hydroxyTHC, would adversely affect their function. Using a 24h radiolabel assay, the authors found that growth inhibition of C. albicans was primarily mediated by PMN and monocytes that could be isolated normal human peripheral blood. Both effector cell types caused almost complete inhibition of Candida growth at effector/target ratio of 300/1 and inhibition was often still seen at 30/1-. Incubation of PMN, PBL, or monocytes for 1 hr at 37C with THC or 11-hydroxyTHC caused a marked suppression of function in all 3 cell populations. Maximal suppression was obtained with 7.5-10..mu..g/ml of the drugs in medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) or with 2-4..mu..g/ml in 1% FBS. These drug concentrations did not affect lymphoid cell viability or candida growth in the absence of lymphoid effector cells. Marijuana derivatives, therefore, are doubly dangerous in that opportunistic fungi such as C. albicans can grow in their presence while the effector cells that control fungal growth are readily inactivated.

  14. Drosophila Casein Kinase 2 (CK2) Promotes Warts Protein to Suppress Yorkie Protein Activity for Growth Control*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lianxin; Huang, Hongling; Li, Jinhui; Yin, Meng-Xin; Lu, Yi; Wu, Wenqing; Zeng, Rong; Jiang, Jin; Zhao, Yun; Zhang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila Hippo signaling regulates Wts activity to phosphorylate and inhibit Yki in order to control tissue growth. CK2 is widely expressed and involved in a variety of signaling pathways. In this study we report that Drosophila CK2 promotes Wts activity to phosphorylate and inhibit Yki activity, which is independent of Hpo-induced Wts promotion. In vivo, CK2 overexpression suppresses hpo mutant-induced expanded (Ex) up-regulation and overgrowth phenotype, whereas it cannot affect wts mutant. Consistent with this, knockdown of CK2 up-regulates Hpo pathway target expression. We also found that Drosophila CK2 is essential for tissue growth as a cell death inhibitor as knockdown of CK2 in the developing disc induces severe growth defects as well as caspase3 signals. Taken together, our results uncover a dual role of CK2; although its major role is promoting cell survive, it may potentially be a growth inhibitor as well. PMID:25320084

  15. Suppression of Photosynthetic Gene Expression in Roots Is Required for Sustained Root Growth under Phosphate Deficiency1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jun; Yu, Haopeng; Tian, Caihuan; Zhou, Wenkun; Li, Chuanyou; Jiao, Yuling; Liu, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Plants cope with inorganic phosphate (Pi) deficiencies in their environment by adjusting their developmental programs and metabolic activities. For Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the developmental responses include the inhibition of primary root growth and the enhanced formation of lateral roots and root hairs. Pi deficiency also inhibits photosynthesis by suppressing the expression of photosynthetic genes. Early studies showed that photosynthetic gene expression was also suppressed in Pi-deficient roots, a nonphotosynthetic organ; however, the biological relevance of this phenomenon remains unknown. In this work, we characterized an Arabidopsis mutant, hypersensitive to Pi starvation7 (hps7), that is hypersensitive to Pi deficiency; the hypersensitivity includes an increased inhibition of root growth. HPS7 encodes a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase. Accumulation of HPS7 proteins in root tips is enhanced by Pi deficiency. Comparative RNA sequencing analyses indicated that the expression of many photosynthetic genes is activated in roots of hps7. Under Pi deficiency, the expression of photosynthetic genes in hps7 is further increased, which leads to enhanced accumulation of chlorophyll, starch, and sucrose. Pi-deficient hps7 roots also produce a high level of reactive oxygen species. Previous research showed that the overexpression of GOLDEN-like (GLK) transcription factors in transgenic Arabidopsis activates photosynthesis in roots. The GLK overexpressing (GLK OX) lines also exhibit increased inhibition of root growth under Pi deficiency. The increased inhibition of root growth in hps7 and GLK OX lines by Pi deficiency was completely reversed by growing the plants in the dark. Based on these results, we propose that suppression of photosynthetic gene expression is required for sustained root growth under Pi deficiency. PMID:24868033

  16. An integrated genomic approach identifies persistent tumor suppressive effects of transforming growth factor-β in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-βs) play a dual role in breast cancer, with context-dependent tumor-suppressive or pro-oncogenic effects. TGF-β antagonists are showing promise in early-phase clinical oncology trials to neutralize the pro-oncogenic effects. However, there is currently no way to determine whether the tumor-suppressive effects of TGF-β are still active in human breast tumors at the time of surgery and treatment, a situation that could lead to adverse therapeutic responses. Methods Using a breast cancer progression model that exemplifies the dual role of TGF-β, promoter-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcriptomic approaches were applied to identify a core set of TGF-β-regulated genes that specifically reflect only the tumor-suppressor arm of the pathway. The clinical significance of this signature and the underlying biology were investigated using bioinformatic analyses in clinical breast cancer datasets, and knockdown validation approaches in tumor xenografts. Results TGF-β-driven tumor suppression was highly dependent on Smad3, and Smad3 target genes that were specifically enriched for involvement in tumor suppression were identified. Patterns of Smad3 binding reflected the preexisting active chromatin landscape, and target genes were frequently regulated in opposite directions in vitro and in vivo, highlighting the strong contextuality of TGF-β action. An in vivo-weighted TGF-β/Smad3 tumor-suppressor signature was associated with good outcome in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cohorts. TGF-β/Smad3 effects on cell proliferation, differentiation and ephrin signaling contributed to the observed tumor suppression. Conclusions Tumor-suppressive effects of TGF-β persist in some breast cancer patients at the time of surgery and affect clinical outcome. Carefully tailored in vitro/in vivo genomic approaches can identify such patients for exclusion from treatment with TGF-β antagonists. PMID:24890385

  17. Does Growth in Working Memory Span or Executive Processes Predict Growth in Reading and Math in Children with Reading Disabilities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerman, Olga; Reynolds, Chandra; Swanson, H. Lee

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated whether (a) growth patterns related to cognitive processing (working memory, updating, inhibition) differed in subgroups of children with reading disabilities (RD) and (b) growth in working memory (executive processing) predicted growth in other cognitive areas, such as reading and math. Seventy-three children (ages…

  18. Suppression of lithium dendrite growth using cross-linked polyethylene/poly(ethylene oxide) electrolytes: a new approach for practical lithium-metal polymer batteries.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Rachna; Schaefer, Jennifer L; Archer, Lynden A; Coates, Geoffrey W

    2014-05-21

    Solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) membranes are a critical component of high specific energy rechargeable Li-metal polymer (LMP) batteries. SPEs exhibit low volatility and thus increase the safety of Li-based batteries compared to current state-of-the-art Li-ion batteries that use flammable small-molecule electrolytes. However, most SPEs exhibit low ionic conductivity at room temperature, and often allow the growth of lithium dendrites that short-circuit the batteries. Both of these deficiencies are significant barriers to the commercialization of LMP batteries. Herein we report a cross-linked polyethylene/poly(ethylene oxide) SPE with both high ionic conductivity (>1.0 × 10(-4) S/cm at 25 °C) and excellent resistance to dendrite growth. It has been proposed that SPEs with shear moduli of the same order of magnitude as lithium could be used to suppress dendrite growth, leading to increased lifetime and safety for LMP batteries. In contrast to the theoretical predictions, the low-modulus (G' ≈ 1.0 × 10(5) Pa at 90 °C) cross-linked SPEs reported herein exhibit remarkable dendrite growth resistance. These results suggest that a high-modulus SPE is not a requirement for the control of dendrite proliferation.

  19. MET inhibitor PHA-665752 suppresses the hepatocyte growth factor-induced cell proliferation and radioresistance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tongxin; Li, Qi; Sun, Quanquan; Zhang, Yuqin; Yang, Hua; Wang, Rong; Chen, Longhua; Wang, Wei

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • We demonstrated that irradiation induced MET overexpression and activation. • The aberrant MET signal mediated by HGF induced proliferation and radioresistance of NPC cells. • MET inhibitor PHA-665752 effectively suppressed HGF induced cell proliferation and radioresistance in NPC cells. • PHA-665752 suppressed the three downstream pathway of HGF/MET signal in a dose-dependent manner. - Abstract: Although ionizing radiation (IR) has provided considerable improvements in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), in subsets of patients, radioresistance is still a major problem in the treatment. In this study, we demonstrated that irradiation induced MET overexpression and activation, and the aberrant MET signal mediated by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induced radioresistance. We also found that MET inhibitor PHA-665752 effectively suppressed HGF induced cell proliferation and radioresistance in NPC cells. Further investigation indicated that PHA-665752 suppressed the phosphorylation of the Akt, ERK1/2, and STAT3 proteins in a dose-dependent manner. Our data indicated that the combination of IR with a MET inhibitor, such as PHA-665752, might be a promising therapeutic strategy for NPC.

  20. Suppression of Tumor Growth in Mice by Rationally Designed Pseudopeptide Inhibitors of Fibroblast Activation Protein and Prolyl Oligopeptidase1

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kenneth W.; Christiansen, Victoria J.; Yadav, Vivek R.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Lupu, Florea; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Zhang, Roy R.; McKee, Patrick A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments (TMEs) are composed of cancer cells, fibroblasts, extracellular matrix, microvessels, and endothelial cells. Two prolyl endopeptidases, fibroblast activation protein (FAP) and prolyl oligopeptidase (POP), are commonly overexpressed by epithelial-derived malignancies, with the specificity of FAP expression by cancer stromal fibroblasts suggesting FAP as a possible therapeutic target. Despite overexpression in most cancers and having a role in angiogenesis, inhibition of POP activity has received little attention as an approach to quench tumor growth. We developed two specific and highly effective pseudopeptide inhibitors, M83, which inhibits FAP and POP proteinase activities, and J94, which inhibits only POP. Both suppressed human colon cancer xenograft growth > 90% in mice. By immunohistochemical stains, M83- and J94-treated tumors had fewer microvessels, and apoptotic areas were apparent in both. In response to M83, but not J94, disordered collagen accumulations were observed. Neither M83- nor J94-treated mice manifested changes in behavior, weight, or gastrointestinal function. Tumor growth suppression was more extensive than noted with recently reported efforts by others to inhibit FAP proteinase function or reduce FAP expression. Diminished angiogenesis and the accompanying profound reduction in tumor growth suggest that inhibition of either FAP or POP may offer new therapeutic approaches that directly target TMEs. PMID:25622898

  1. Measles virus C protein suppresses gamma-activated factor formation and virus-induced cell growth arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Shin-ichi; Okabayashi, Tamaki; Fujii, Nobuhiro

    2011-05-25

    Measles virus (MeV) produces two accessory proteins, V and C, from the P gene. These accessory proteins have been reported to contribute to efficient virus proliferation through the modulation of host cell events. Our previous paper described that Vero cell-adapted strains of MeV led host cells to growth arrest through the upregulation of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1), and wild strains did not. In the present study, we found that C protein expression levels varied among MeV strains in infected SiHa cells. C protein levels were inversely correlated with IRF-1 expression levels and with cell growth arrest. Forced expression of C protein released cells from growth arrest. C-deficient recombinant virus efficiently upregulated IRF-1 and caused growth arrest more efficiently than the wild-type virus. C protein preferentially bound to phosphorylated STAT1 and suppressed STAT1 dimer formation. We conclude that MeV C protein suppresses IFN-{gamma} signaling pathway via inhibition of phosphorylated STAT1 dimerization.

  2. The inhibition of Akt-Pdpk1 interaction efficiently suppresses the growth of murine primary liver tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mäemets-Allas, Kristina; Belitškin, Denis; Jaks, Viljar

    2016-05-20

    The lack of primary liver tumor cells has hampered testing of potential chemotherapeutic agents in vitro. To overcome this issue we developed a primary mouse liver tumor cell line K07074. The K07074 cells were immortal, exhibited a biliary phenotype, formed colonies in soft agar and displayed an increase in Hedgehog, Notch and Akt signaling. To study the effect of single and combined inhibition of the liver tumor-related pathways on the growth of K07074 cells we treated these with small-molecule antitumor agents. While the inhibition of Akt and Notch pathways strongly inhibited the growth of K07074 cells the inhibition of Wnt and Hedgehog pathways was less efficient in cell growth suppression. Interestingly, the inhibition of Akt pathway at the level of Akt-Pdpk1 interaction was sufficient to suppress the growth of tumor cells and no significant additive effect could be detected when co-treated with the inhibitors of Wnt, Hedgehog or Notch pathways. Only when suboptimal doses of Akt-Pdpk1 interaction inhibitor NSC156529 were used an additive effect with Notch inhibition was seen. We conclude that the Akt pathway inhibitor NSC156529 is potentially useful as single treatment for liver tumors with hyperactivated Akt signaling. PMID:27103434

  3. Synergistic effect of obesity and lipid ingestion in suppressing the growth hormone response to exercise in children.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Stacy R; Hingorani, Sunita R; Rosa, Jaime S; Zaldivar, Frank P; Galassetti, Pietro R

    2012-07-01

    Diet plays an important role in modulating exercise responses, including activation of the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-1) axis. Obesity and fat ingestion were separately shown to reduce exercise GH responses, but their combined effect, especially important in children, has not been studied. We therefore measured the GH response to exercise [30-min intermittent cycling, ten 2-min bouts at ~80% maximal aerobic capacity (Vo(2max)), separated by 1-min rest], started 45 min after ingestion of a high-fat meal (HFM) in 16 healthy [controls; body mass index percentile (BMI%ile) 51 ± 7], and 19 obese (Ob, BMI%ile 97 ± 0.4) children. Samples were drawn at baseline (premeal), and at start, peak, and 30 min postexercise. In the Ob group, a marked ~75% suppression of the GH response (ng/ml) to exercise was observed (2.4 ± 0.6 vs. 10.6 ± 2.1, P < 0.001). This level of suppression was also significantly greater compared with age-, fitness-, and BMI-matched historical controls that had performed identical exercise in fasting conditions. Our data indicate that the reduction in the GH response to exercise, already present in obese children vs. healthy controls, is considerably amplified by ingestion of fat nutrients shortly before exercise, implying a potentially downstream negative impact on growth factor homeostasis and long-term modulation of physiological growth.

  4. Epicatechins Purified from Green Tea (Camellia sinensis) Differentially Suppress Growth of Gender-Dependent Human Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, Mepur H.; Saravanan, Thiruverkadu S.; Monteclaro, Clarence C.; Presser, Naftali; Ye, Xing; Selvan, Senthamil R.; Brosman, Stanley

    2006-01-01

    The anticancer potential of catechins derived from green tea is not well understood, in part because catechin-related growth suppression and/or apoptosis appears to vary with the type and stage of malignancy as well as with the type of catechin. This in vitro study examined the biological effects of epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC), EC 3-gallate (ECG) and EGC 3-gallate (EGCG) in cell lines from human gender-specific cancers. Cell lines developed from organ-confined (HH870) and metastatic (DU145) prostate cancer, and from moderately (HH450) and poorly differentiated (HH639) epithelial ovarian cancer were grown with or without EC, EGC, ECG or EGCG. When untreated cells reached confluency, viability and doubling time were measured for treated and untreated cells. Whereas EC treatment reduced proliferation of HH639 cells by 50%, EGCG suppressed proliferation of all cell lines by 50%. ECG was even more potent: it inhibited DU145, HH870, HH450 and HH639 cells at concentrations of 24, 27, 29 and 30 µM, whereas EGCG inhibited DU145, HH870, HH450 and HH639 cells at concentrations 89, 45, 62 and 42 µM. When compared with EGCG, ECG more effectively suppresses the growth of prostate cancer and epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines derived from tumors of patients with different stages of disease. PMID:16786054

  5. Theaflavins suppress tumor growth and metastasis via the blockage of the STAT3 pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jianping; Meng, Qingyan; Li, Yongyuan

    2016-01-01

    Theaflavins, the major black tea polyphenols, have been reported to exhibit promising antitumor activities in several human cancers. However, the role of theaflavins in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is still unknown. In this study, we found that theaflavins could significantly inhibit proliferation, migration, and invasion, and induce apoptosis in HCC cells in vitro. Furthermore, we found that theaflavins inhibited the growth and metastasis of HCC in an orthotopic model and a lung metastasis model. Immunohistochemical analyses and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling assays showed that theaflavins could suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in vivo. Theaflavins also suppressed constitutive and inducible signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation. The downstream proteins regulated by STAT3, including the antiapoptotic proteins (Bcl-2 and Survivin) and the invasion-related proteins (MMP-2, MMP-9), were also downregulated after theaflavins treatment. Theaflavins induced apoptosis by activating the caspase pathway. Together, our results suggest that theaflavins suppress the growth and metastasis of human HCC through the blockage of the STAT3 pathway, and thus may act as potential therapeutic agents for HCC. PMID:27478384

  6. Simvastatin Induces Apoptosis and Suppresses Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor in Bile Duct Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin; Hong, Eun Mi; Jang, Ju Ah; Park, Se Woo; Koh, Dong Hee; Choi, Min Ho; Jang, Hyun Joo; Kae, Sea Hyub

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Statins act as antineoplastic agents through the inhibition of cell proliferation. This study sought to demonstrate the effects of statins on extrahepatic bile duct cancer cell apoptosis and to document the changes in protein expression involved in tumor growth and suppression. Methods Human extrahepatic bile duct cancer cells were cultured. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays were performed to determine the effect of statins on cell proliferation. Apoptosis was measured by a cell death detection enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and caspase-3 activity assay, and flow cytometry was used to determine the percentage of cells in each phase of the cell cycle. The protein expression of Bax, Bcl-2, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) receptor, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and Akt was measured by Western blot analysis. Results Simvastatin suppressed cell proliferation by inducing G1 phase cell cycle arrest in bile duct cancer cells. Furthermore, it induced apoptosis via caspase-3 activation, downregulated the expression of the Bcl-2 protein, and enhanced the expression of the Bax protein. Moreover, simvastatin suppressed the expression of the IGF-1 receptor and IGF-1-induced ERK/Akt activation. Conclusions Simvastatin induces apoptosis in bile duct cancer cells, which suggests that it could be an antineoplastic agent for bile duct cancer. PMID:26470769

  7. KEX2 mutations suppress RNA polymerase II mutants and alter the temperature range of yeast cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, C; Young, R A

    1989-01-01

    Suppressors of a temperature-sensitive RNA polymerase II mutation were isolated to identify proteins that interact with RNA polymerase II in yeast cells. Ten independently isolated extragenic mutations that suppressed the temperature-sensitive mutation rpb1-1 and produced a cold-sensitive phenotype were all found to be alleles of a single gene, SRB1. An SRB1 partial deletion mutant was further investigated and found to exhibit several pleiotropic phenotypes. These included suppression of numerous temperature-sensitive RNA polymerase II mutations, alteration of the temperature growth range of cells containing wild-type RNA polymerase, and sterility of cells of alpha mating type. The ability of SRB1 mutations to suppress the temperature-sensitive phenotype of RNA polymerase II mutants did not extend to other temperature-sensitive mutants investigated. Isolation of the SRB1 gene revealed that SRB1 is KEX2. These results indicate that the KEX2 protease, whose only known substrates are hormone precursors, can have an important influence on RNA polymerase II and the temperature-dependent growth properties of yeast cells. Images PMID:2668732

  8. Young Age Predicts Poor Antiretroviral Adherence and Viral Load Suppression Among Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Hadland, Scott E.; Milloy, M.-J.; Kerr, Thomas; Zhang, Ruth; Guillemi, Silvia; Hogg, Robert S.; Montaner, Julio S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV among young injection drug users (IDU) have been limited because financial barriers to care disproportionately affect youth, thus confounding results. This study examines adherence among IDU in a unique setting where all medical care is provided free-of-charge. From May 1996 to April 2008, we followed a prospective cohort of 545 HIV-positive IDU of 18 years of age or older in Vancouver, Canada. Using generalized estimating equations (GEE), we studied the association between age and adherence (obtaining ART≥95% of the prescribed time), controlling for potential confounders. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we also studied the effect of age on time to viral load suppression (<500 copies per milliliter), and examined adherence as a mediating variable. Five hundred forty-five participants were followed for a median of 23.8 months (interquartile range [IQR]=8.5–91.6 months). Odds of adherence were significantly lower among younger IDU (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=0.76 per 10 years younger; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.65–0.89). Younger IDU were also less likely to achieve viral load suppression (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]=0.75 per 10 years younger; 95% CI, 0.64–0.88). Adding adherence to the model eliminated this association with age, supporting the role of adherence as a mediating variable. Despite absence of financial barriers, younger IDU remain less likely to adhere to ART, resulting in inferior viral load suppression. Interventions should carefully address the unique needs of young HIV-positive IDU. PMID:22429003

  9. Prediction and suppression of beam breakup instability in multicell superconducting cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V.

    2009-01-01

    Beam breakup instability in superconducting cavities is a serious problem. In this work, a four-cell LEP cavity installed in the KAERI linear accelerator is considered as an example. Dependence of the breakup instability threshold currents on the characteristics of a dipole mode was determined both analytically and numerically. An efficient technique to suppress breakup instability using rf beam focusing within a cavity is suggested. The technique involves applying TE-type monopole higher-order modes and is useful for multicell superconducting cavities with many trapped high-Q dipole modes.

  10. Green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate suppresses melanoma growth by inhibiting inflammasome and IL-1{beta} secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Lixia Z.; Liu, Weimin; Luo, Yuchun; Okamoto, Miyako; Qu, Dovina; Dunn, Jeffrey H.; Fujita, Mayumi

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG inhibits melanoma cell growth at physiological doses (0.1-1 {mu}M). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG inhibits melanoma cell growth via inflammasomes and IL-1{beta} suppression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inflammasomes and IL-1{beta} could be potential targets for future melanoma therapeutics. -- Abstract: Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenolic component of green tea, has been demonstrated to possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-mutagenic and anti-carcinogenic properties. The anti-melanoma effect of EGCG has been previously suggested, but no clear mechanism of action has been established. In this study, we demonstrated that EGCG inhibits melanoma cell growth at physiological doses (0.1-1 {mu}M). In the search for mechanisms of EGCG-mediated melanoma cell suppression, we found that NF-{kappa}B was inhibited, and that reduced NF-{kappa}B activity was associated with decreased IL-1{beta} secretion from melanoma cells. Since inflammasomes are involved in IL-1{beta} secretion, we investigated whether IL-1{beta} suppression was mediated by inflammasomes, and found that EGCG treatment led to downregulation of the inflammasome component, NLRP1, and reduced caspase-1 activation. Furthermore, silencing the expression of NLRP1 abolished EGCG-induced inhibition of tumor cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a key role of inflammasomes in EGCG efficacy. This paper provides a novel mechanism for EGCG-induced melanoma inhibition: inflammasome downregulation {yields} decreased IL-1{beta} secretion {yields} decreased NF-{kappa}B activities {yields} decreased cell growth. In addition, it suggests inflammasomes and IL-1{beta} could be potential targets for future melanoma therapeutics.

  11. Overexpression of Wnt-1 in thyrocytes enhances cellular growth but suppresses transcription of the thyroperoxidase gene via different signaling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Bae; Lewis, Christopher J; McCall, Kelly D; Malgor, Ramiro; Kohn, Aimee D; Moon, Randall T; Kohn, Leonard D

    2007-04-01

    Wnt binding to cell surface receptors can activate a 'canonical' pathway that increases cellular beta-catenin or a 'noncanonical' Ca(++) pathway which can increase protein kinase C (PKC) activity. Although components of both Wnt/beta-catenin-signaling pathways exist in thyrocytes, their biological role is largely unknown. In evaluating the biological role of Wnt signaling in differentiated FRTL-5 thyroid cells, we showed that TSH increased canonical Wnt-1 but, surprisingly, decreased the active form of beta-catenin. Transient overexpression of Wnt-1 or beta-catenin in FRTL-5 cells increased active beta-catenin (ABC), decreased thyroperoxidase (TPO) mRNA, and suppressed TPO-promoter activity. The target of beta-catenin suppressive action was a consensus T cell factor/lymphoid enhancing factor (TCF/LEF)-binding site 5'-A/T A/T CAAAG-3', -137 to -129 bp on the rat TPO promoter. beta-Catenin overexpression significantly increased complex formation between beta-catenin/TCF-1 and an oligonucleotide containing the TCF/LEF sequence, suggesting that the beta-catenin/TCF-1 complex acts as a transcriptional repressor of the TPO gene. Stable over-expression of Wnt-1 in FRTL-5 cells significantly increased the growth rate without increasing beta-catenin levels. Increased growth was blunted by a PKC inhibitor, staurosporin. Wnt-1 overexpression increased serine phosphorylation, without affecting tyrosine phosphorylation, of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) protein. In addition, these final results suggest that TSH-induced increase in Wnt-1 levels in thyrocytes contributes to enhanced cellular growth via a PKC pathway that increases STAT3 serine phosphorylation and activation, whereas TSH-induced decrease in activation of beta-catenin simultaneously relieves transcriptional suppression of TPO. We hypothesize that Wnt signaling contributes to the ability of TSH to simultaneously increase cell growth and functional, thyroid-specific, gene expression

  12. Suppression of insulin-like growth factor acid-labile subunit expression--a novel mechanism for deoxynivalenol-induced growth retardation.

    PubMed

    Amuzie, Chidozie J; Pestka, James J

    2010-02-01

    Consumption of deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene mycotoxin commonly detected in cereal-based foods, causes impaired growth in many animal species. While growth retardation is used as a basis for regulating DON levels in human food, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Oral exposure of mice to DON rapidly induces multiorgan expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and this is followed by upregulation of several suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS), some of which are capable of impairing growth hormone (GH) signaling. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that impairment of the GH axis precedes DON-induced growth retardation in the mouse. Subchronic dietary exposure of young (4-week old) mice to DON (20 ppm) over a period of 2-8 weeks was found to (1) impair weight gain, (2) result in a steady-state plasma DON concentration (40-60 ng/ml), (3) downregulate hepatic insulin-like growth factor acid-labile subunit (IGFALS) mRNA expression, and (4) reduce circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and IGFALS levels. Acute oral exposure to DON at 0.5-12.5 mg/kg body weight (bw) markedly suppressed hepatic IGFALS mRNA levels within 2 h in a dose-dependent fashion, whereas 0.1 mg/kg bw was without effect. DON-induced IGFALS mRNA upregulation occurred both with and without exogenous GH treatment. These latter effects co-occurred with robust hepatic suppressors of cytokine signaling 3 upregulation. Taken together, these data suggest that oral DON exposure perturbs GH axis by suppressing two clinically relevant growth-related proteins, IGFALS and IGF1. Both have potential to serve as biomarkers of effect in populations exposed to this common foodborne mycotoxin.

  13. Experimental verification of the mechanisms for nonlinear harmonic growth and suppression by harmonic injection in a traveling wave tube.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Wöhlbier, J G; Booske, J H; Scharer, J E

    2004-05-21

    Understanding the generation and growth of nonlinear harmonic (and intermodulation) distortion in microwave amplifiers such as traveling wave tubes (TWTs), free electron lasers (FELs), and klystrons is of current research interest. Similar to FELs, the nonlinear harmonic growth rate scales with the harmonic number in TWTs. In klystrons, the wave number scaling applies to the nonlinear harmonic bunching and associated nonlinear space-charge waves. Using a custom-modified TWT that has sensors along the helix, we provide the first experimental confirmation of the scaling of nonlinear harmonic growth rate and wave number in TWTs. These scalings of a nonlinearly generated harmonic mode versus an injected linear harmonic mode imply that suppression by harmonic injection occurs at a single axial position that can be located as desired by changing the injected amplitude and phase.

  14. Experimental Verification of the Mechanisms for Nonlinear Harmonic Growth and Suppression by Harmonic Injection in a Traveling Wave Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A.; Wöhlbier, J. G.; Booske, J. H.; Scharer, J. E.

    2004-05-01

    Understanding the generation and growth of nonlinear harmonic (and intermodulation) distortion in microwave amplifiers such as traveling wave tubes (TWTs), free electron lasers (FELs), and klystrons is of current research interest. Similar to FELs, the nonlinear harmonic growth rate scales with the harmonic number in TWTs. In klystrons, the wave number scaling applies to the nonlinear harmonic bunching and associated nonlinear space-charge waves. Using a custom-modified TWT that has sensors along the helix, we provide the first experimental confirmation of the scaling of nonlinear harmonic growth rate and wave number in TWTs. These scalings of a nonlinearly generated harmonic mode versus an injected linear harmonic mode imply that suppression by harmonic injection occurs at a single axial position that can be located as desired by changing the injected amplitude and phase.

  15. Growth differentiation factor 8 suppresses cell proliferation by up-regulating CTGF expression in human granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsun-Ming; Pan, Hui-Hui; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Zhu, Yi-Min; Leung, Peter C K

    2016-02-15

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a matricellular protein that plays a critical role in the development of ovarian follicles. Growth differentiation factor 8 (GDF8) is mainly, but not exclusively, expressed in the mammalian musculoskeletal system and is a potent negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GDF8 and CTGF on the regulation of cell proliferation in human granulosa cells and to examine its underlying molecular determinants. Using dual inhibition approaches (inhibitors and small interfering RNAs), we have demonstrated that GDF8 induces the up-regulation of CTGF expression through the activin receptor-like kinase (ALK)4/5-mediated SMAD2/3-dependent signaling pathways. In addition, the increase in CTGF expression contributes to the GDF8-induced suppressive effect on granulosa cell proliferation. Our findings suggest that GDF8 and CTGF may play critical roles in the regulation of proliferative events in human granulosa cells.

  16. Finite element prediction of fatigue damage growth in cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha; Frikha, Sana; Toumi, Hechmi; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic stresses applied to bones generate fatigue damage that affects the bone stiffness and its elastic modulus. This paper proposes a finite element model for the prediction of fatigue damage accumulation and failure in cancellous bone at continuum scale. The model is based on continuum damage mechanics and incorporates crack closure effects in compression. The propagation of the cracks is completely simulated throughout the damaged area. In this case, the stiffness of the broken element is reduced by 98% to ensure no stress-carrying capacities of completely damaged elements. Once a crack is initiated, the propagation direction is simulated by the propagation of the broken elements of the mesh. The proposed model suggests that damage evolves over a real physical time variable (cycles). In order to reduce the computation time, the integration of the damage growth rate is based on the cycle blocks approach. In this approach, the real number of cycles is reduced (divided) into equivalent blocks of cycles. Damage accumulation is computed over the cycle blocks and then extrapolated over the corresponding real cycles. The results show a clear difference between local tensile and compressive stresses on damage accumulation. Incorporating stiffness reduction also produces a redistribution of the peak stresses in the damaged region, which results in a delay in damage fracture.

  17. Dynamic vortex interactions with flexible fibers and edges for prediction of owl noise suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korykora, Sarah; Jaworski, Justin

    2015-11-01

    The compliant trailing-edge fringe of owls and the soft downy material on their upper wing surfaces are thought to enable their silent flight by weakening the interaction of boundary layer turbulence with these flexible structures. Previous analysis of turbulence noise generation by wave-bearing elastic edges have shown that the far-field acoustic power scaling can be weakened by up to the square of the Mach number relative to a rigid edge. However, it is unclear whether or not the wave-bearing feature or simply the flexible nature of the edge scatterer produces this noise suppression. To assess this distinction, a dynamic vortex interaction model is developed whereby the motion of a line vortex round a rigid but elastically-restrained wall-mounted fiber or trailing edge is determined numerically. Special attention is paid to the dynamic interaction between the flexible structure and vortex, which is accomplished via a conformal mapping relationship determined in closed form. Results from this analysis seek to develop a vortex sound model to discern the effect of flexible versus wave-bearing scatterers on turbulence noise suppression and help explain the mechanisms of silent owl flight.

  18. Crack Growth Prediction Methodology for Multi-Site Damage: Layered Analysis and Growth During Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark Anthony

    1999-01-01

    A finite element program has been developed to perform quasi-static, elastic-plastic crack growth simulations. The model provides a general framework for mixed-mode I/II elastic-plastic fracture analysis using small strain assumptions and plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric finite elements. Cracks are modeled explicitly in the mesh. As the cracks propagate, automatic remeshing algorithms delete the mesh local to the crack tip, extend the crack, and build a new mesh around the new tip. State variable mapping algorithms transfer stresses and displacements from the old mesh to the new mesh. The von Mises material model is implemented in the context of a non-linear Newton solution scheme. The fracture criterion is the critical crack tip opening displacement, and crack direction is predicted by the maximum tensile stress criterion at the crack tip. The implementation can accommodate multiple curving and interacting cracks. An additional fracture algorithm based on nodal release can be used to simulate fracture along a horizontal plane of symmetry. A core of plane strain elements can be used with the nodal release algorithm to simulate the triaxial state of stress near the crack tip. Verification and validation studies compare analysis results with experimental data and published three-dimensional analysis results. Fracture predictions using nodal release for compact tension, middle-crack tension, and multi-site damage test specimens produced accurate results for residual strength and link-up loads. Curving crack predictions using remeshing/mapping were compared with experimental data for an Arcan mixed-mode specimen. Loading angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees were analyzed. The maximum tensile stress criterion was able to predict the crack direction and path for all loading angles in which the material failed in tension. Residual strength was also accurately predicted for these cases.

  19. Isolation and Identification of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria from Cucumber Rhizosphere and Their Effect on Plant Growth Promotion and Disease Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Shaikhul; Akanda, Abdul M.; Prova, Ananya; Islam, Md. T.; Hossain, Md. M.

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are the rhizosphere bacteria that may be utilized to augment plant growth and suppress plant diseases. The objectives of this study were to identify and characterize PGPR indigenous to cucumber rhizosphere in Bangladesh, and to evaluate their ability to suppress Phytophthora crown rot in cucumber. A total of 66 isolates were isolated, out of which 10 (PPB1, PPB2, PPB3, PPB4, PPB5, PPB8, PPB9, PPB10, PPB11, and PPB12) were selected based on their in vitro plant growth promoting attributes and antagonism of phytopathogens. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences identified these isolates as new strains of Pseudomonas stutzeri, Bacillus subtilis, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The selected isolates produced high levels (26.78–51.28 μg mL-1) of indole-3-acetic acid, while significant acetylene reduction activities (1.79–4.9 μmole C2H4 mg-1 protein h-1) were observed in eight isolates. Cucumber plants grown from seeds that were treated with these PGPR strains displayed significantly higher levels of germination, seedling vigour, growth, and N content in root and shoot tissue compared to non-treated control plants. All selected isolates were able to successfully colonize the cucumber roots. Moreover, treating cucumber seeds with these isolates significantly suppressed Phytophthora crown rot caused by Phytophthora capsici, and characteristic morphological alterations in P. capsici hyphae that grew toward PGPR colonies were observed. Since these PGPR inoculants exhibited multiple traits beneficial to the host plants, they may be applied in the development of new, safe, and effective seed treatments as an alternative to chemical fungicides. PMID:26869996

  20. Dynamic model for predicting growth of salmonella spp. in ground sterile pork

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Predictive model for Salmonella spp. growth in ground pork was developed and validated using kinetic growth data. Salmonella spp. kinetic growth data in ground pork was collected at several isothermal conditions (between 10 and 45C) and Baranyi model was fitted to describe the growth at each temper...

  1. Lentivirus-mediated PLCγ1 gene short-hairpin RNA suppresses tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingchang; Wang, Fen; Dai, Lianzhi; Cai, Heguo; Zhan, Yanyan; Gang, Song; Hu, Tianhui; Xia, Chun; Zhang, Bing

    2016-02-16

    Targeted molecular therapy has gradually been a potential solution in cancer therapy. Other authors' and our previous studies have demonstrated that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase γ (PLCγ) is involved in regulating tumor growth and metastasis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying PLCγ-dependent tumor growth and metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma and whether PLCγ may be a potential target for tumor therapy in human gastric adenocarcinoma are not yet well determined. Here, we investigated the role of PLCγ inhibition in tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma using BGC-823 cell line and a nude mouse tumor xenograft model. The results manifested that the depletion of PLCγ1 by the transduction with lentivirus-mediated PLCγ1 gene short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) vector led to the decrease of tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the Akt/Bad, Akt/S6, and ERK/Bad signal axes were involved in PLCγ1-mediated tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma. Therefore, the abrogation of PLCγ1 signaling by shRNA could efficaciously suppress human gastric adenocarcinoma tumor growth and metastasis, with important implication for validating PLCγ1 as a potential target for human gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:26811493

  2. Lentivirus-mediated PLCγ1 gene short-hairpin RNA suppresses tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bingchang; Wang, Fen; Dai, Lianzhi; Cai, Heguo; Zhan, Yanyan; Gang, Song; Hu, Tianhui; Xia, Chun; Zhang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Targeted molecular therapy has gradually been a potential solution in cancer therapy. Other authors' and our previous studies have demonstrated that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase γ (PLCγ) is involved in regulating tumor growth and metastasis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying PLCγ-dependent tumor growth and metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma and whether PLCγ may be a potential target for tumor therapy in human gastric adenocarcinoma are not yet well determined. Here, we investigated the role of PLCγ inhibition in tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma using BGC-823 cell line and a nude mouse tumor xenograft model. The results manifested that the depletion of PLCγ1 by the transduction with lentivirus-mediated PLCγ1 gene short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) vector led to the decrease of tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the Akt/Bad, Akt/S6, and ERK/Bad signal axes were involved in PLCγ1-mediated tumor growth and metastasis of human gastric adenocarcinoma. Therefore, the abrogation of PLCγ1 signaling by shRNA could efficaciously suppress human gastric adenocarcinoma tumor growth and metastasis, with important implication for validating PLCγ1 as a potential target for human gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:26811493

  3. Cell growth suppression by thanatos-associated protein 11(THAP11) is mediated by transcriptional downregulation of c-Myc.

    PubMed

    Zhu, C-Y; Li, C-Y; Li, Y; Zhan, Y-Q; Li, Y-H; Xu, C-W; Xu, W-X; Sun, H B; Yang, X-M

    2009-03-01

    Thanatos-associated proteins (THAPs) are zinc-dependent, sequence-specific DNA-binding factors involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, chromatin modification and transcriptional regulation. THAP11 is the most recently described member of this human protein family. In this study, we show that THAP11 is ubiquitously expressed in normal tissues and frequently downregulated in several human tumor tissues. Overexpression of THAP11 markedly inhibits growth of a number of different cells, including cancer cells and non-transformed cells. Silencing of THAP11 by RNA interference in HepG2 cells results in loss of cell growth repression. These results suggest that human THAP11 may be an endogenous physiologic regulator of cell proliferation. We also provide evidence that the function of THAP11 is mediated by its ability to repress transcription of c-Myc. Promoter reporter assays indicate a DNA binding-dependent c-Myc transcriptional repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitations and EMSA assay suggest that THAP11 directly binds to the c-Myc promoter. The findings that expression of c-Myc rescues significantly cells from THAP11-mediated cell growth suppression and that THAP11 expression only slightly inhibits c-Myc null fibroblasts cells growth reveal that THAP11 inhibits cell growth through downregulation of c-Myc expression. Taken together, these suggest that THAP11 functions as a cell growth suppressor by negatively regulating the expression of c-Myc. PMID:19008924

  4. Lattice and beam optics design for suppression of CSR-induced emittance growth at the KEK-ERL test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, M.; Yokoya, K.; Suwada, T.; Enomoto, A.

    2007-06-01

    The lattice and beam optics of the arc section of the KEK-ERL test facility, having an energy of 200 MeV, were optimized to efficiently suppress emittance growth based on a simulation using a particle-tracking method taking coherent synchrotron radiation effects into account. The lattice optimization in the arc section was performed under two conditions: a high-current mode with a bunch charge of 76.9 pC without bunch compression, and a short-bunch mode with bunch compression, producing a final bunch length of around 0.1 ps. The simulation results showed that, in the high-current mode, emittance growth was efficiently suppressed by keeping a root-mean-square (rms) bunch length of 1 ps at a bunch charge of 76.9 pC, and in the short-bunch mode, emittance growth was kept within permissible limits with a maximum allowable bunch charge of 23.1 pC at an rms bunch length of 0.1 ps.

  5. A crack-closure model for predicting fatigue-crack growth under aircraft spectrum loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The development and application of an analytical model of cycle crack growth is presented that includes the effects of crack closure. The model was used to correlate crack growth rates under constant amplitude loading and to predict crack growth under aircraft spectrum loading on 2219-T851 aluminum alloy sheet material. The predicted crack growth lives agreed well with experimental data. The ratio of predicted to experimental lives ranged from 0.66 to 1.48. These predictions were made using data from an ASTM E24.06.01 Round Robin.

  6. Generic conditions for suppressing the coherent synchrotron radiation induced emittance growth in a two-dipole achromat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yi; Cui, Xiaohao; Huang, Xiyang; Xu, Gang

    2014-06-01

    The effect of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) becomes evident, and leads to increased beam energy spread and transverse emittance dilution, as both the emittance and bunch length of the electron beams are continuously pushed down in present and forthcoming high-brightness light sources and linear colliders. Suppressing this effect is important to preserve the expected machine performance. Methods of the R-matrix analysis and the Courant-Snyder formalism analysis have been proposed to evaluate and to suppress the emittance growth due to CSR in achromatic cells. In this paper a few important modifications are made on these two methods, which enable us to prove that these two methods are equivalent to each other. With the modified analysis, we obtain explicit and generic conditions of cancelling the CSR-driven emittance excitation in a single achromat consisting of two dipoles of arbitrary bending angles. In spite of the fact that the analysis constrains itself in a linear regime, based on the assumption that CSR-induced particle energy deviation is proportional to both θ and ρ1/3, with θ being the bending angle and ρ the bending radius, it is demonstrated through ELEGANT simulations that the conditions derived from this analysis are still effective in suppressing the emittance growth when a more detailed one-dimensional CSR model is considered. In addition, it illustrates that the emittance growth can be reduced to a lower level with the proposed conditions than with the other two approaches, such as matching the beam envelope to the CSR kick and setting the cell-to-cell betatron phase advance to an appropriate value.

  7. Genomic structure, chromosomal localization and expression profile of a novel melanoma differentiation associated (mda-7) gene with cancer specific growth suppressing and apoptosis inducing properties.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E. Y.; Madireddi, M. T.; Gopalkrishnan, R. V.; Leszczyniecka, M.; Su, Z. Z.; Lebedeva, I. V.; Kang, D. C.; Jian, H.; Lin, J. J.; Alexandre, D.; Chen, Y.; Vozhilla, N.; Mei, M. X.; Christiansen, K. A.; Sivo, F.; Goldstein, N. I.; Chada, S.; Huberman, E.; Pestka, S.; Fisher, P. B.; Biochip Technology Center; Columbia Univ.; Introgen Therapeutics Inc.; UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

    2001-10-25

    Abnormalities in cellular differentiation are frequent occurrences in human cancers. Treatment of human melanoma cells with recombinant fibroblast interferon (IFN-beta) and the protein kinase C activator mezerein (MEZ) results in an irreversible loss in growth potential, suppression of tumorigenic properties and induction of terminal cell differentiation. Subtraction hybridization identified melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 (mda-7), as a gene induced during these physiological changes in human melanoma cells. Ectopic expression of mda-7 by means of a replication defective adenovirus results in growth suppression and induction of apoptosis in a broad spectrum of additional cancers, including melanoma, glioblastoma multiforme, osteosarcoma and carcinomas of the breast, cervix, colon, lung, nasopharynx and prostate. In contrast, no apparent harmful effects occur when mda-7 is expressed in normal epithelial or fibroblast cells. Human clones of mda-7 were isolated and its organization resolved in terms of intron/exon structure and chromosomal localization. Hu-mda-7 encompasses seven exons and six introns and encodes a protein with a predicted size of 23.8 kDa, consisting of 206 amino acids. Hu-mda-7 mRNA is stably expressed in the thymus, spleen and peripheral blood leukocytes. De novo mda-7 mRNA expression is also detected in human melanocytes and expression is inducible in cells of melanocyte/melanoma lineage and in certain normal and cancer cell types following treatment with a combination of IFN-beta plus MEZ. Mda-7 expression is also induced during megakaryocyte differentiation induced in human hematopoietic cells by treatment with TPA (12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate). In contrast, de novo expression of mda-7 is not detected nor is it inducible by IFN-beta+MEZ in a spectrum of additional normal and cancer cells. No correlation was observed between induction of mda-7 mRNA expression and growth suppression following treatment with IFN-beta+MEZ and

  8. A Multilevel Latent Growth Curve Approach to Predicting Student Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Kilchan; Goldschmidt, Pete

    2012-01-01

    Value-added models and growth-based accountability aim to evaluate school's performance based on student growth in learning. The current focus is on linking the results from value-added models to the ones from growth-based accountability systems including Adequate Yearly Progress decisions mandated by No Child Left Behind. We present a new…

  9. A chemical pollen suppressant inhibits auxin-induced growth in maize coleoptile sections

    SciTech Connect

    Vesper, M.J. ); Cross, J.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Chemical inhibitors of pollen development having a phenylcinnoline carboxylate structure were found to inhibit IAA- and 1-NAA-induced growth in maize coleoptile sections. The inhibitor (100 {mu}M) used in these experiments caused approx. 35% reduction in auxin-induced growth over the auxin concentration range of 0.3 to 100 {mu}M. Growth inhibition was noted as a lengthening of the latent period and a decrease in the rate of an auxin-induced growth response. An acid growth response to pH 5 buffer in abraded sections was not impaired. The velocity of basipetal transport of ({sup 3}H)IAA through the coleoptile sections also was not inhibited by the compound, nor was uptake of ({sup 3}H)IAA. Similarly, the inhibitor does not appear to alter auxin-induced H{sup +} secretion. We suggest that the agent targets some other process necessary for auxin-dependent growth.

  10. Dynamic Modeling of Aerobic Growth of Shewanella oneidensis. Predicting Triauxic Growth, Flux Distributions and Energy Requirement for Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2013-01-01

    A model-based analysis is conducted to investigate metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 strain in aerobic batch culture, which exhibits an intriguing growth pattern by sequentially consuming substrate (i.e., lactate) and by-products (i.e., pyruvate and acetate). A general protocol is presented for developing a detailed network-based dynamic model for S. oneidensis based on the Lumped Hybrid Cybernetic Model (LHCM) framework. The L-HCM, although developed from only limited data, is shown to accurately reproduce exacting dynamic metabolic shifts, and provide reasonable estimates of energy requirement for growth. Flux distributions in S. oneidensis predicted by the L-HCM compare very favorably with 13C-metabolic flux analysis results reported in the literature. Predictive accuracy is enhanced by incorporating measurements of only a few intracellular fluxes, in addition to extracellular metabolites. The L-HCM developed here for S. oneidensis is consequently a promising tool for the analysis of intracellular flux distribution and metabolic engineering.

  11. miR-17 inhibitor suppressed osteosarcoma tumor growth and metastasis via increasing PTEN expression

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yong; Luo, Ling-hui; Li, Shuai; Yang, Cao

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • miR-17 was increased in OS tissues and cell lines. • Inhibition of miR-17 suppressed OS cell proliferation. • Inhibition of miR-17 suppressed OS cell migration and invasion. • PTEN was a target of miR-17. • miR-17 was negatively correlated with PTEN in OS tissues. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play essential roles in cancer development and progression. Here, we investigated the role of miR-17 in the progression and metastasis of osteosarcoma (OS). miR-17 was frequently increased in OS tissues and cell lines. Inhibition of miR-17 in OS cell lines substantially suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) was identified as a target of miR-17, and ectopic expression of miR-17 inhibited PTEN by direct binding to its 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR). Expression of miR-17 was negatively correlated with PTEN in OS tissues. Together, these findings indicate that miR-17 acts as an oncogenic miRNA and may contribute to the progression and metastasis of OS, suggesting miR-17 as a potential novel diagnostic and therapeutic target of OS.

  12. Pharmaceuticals suppress algal growth and microbial respiration and alter bacterial communities in stream biofilms.

    PubMed

    Rosi-Marshall, Emma J; Kincaid, Dustin W; Bechtold, Heather A; Royer, Todd V; Rojas, Miguel; Kelly, John J

    2013-04-01

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products are ubiquitous in surface waters but their effects on aquatic biofilms and associated ecosystem properties are not well understood. We measured in situ responses of stream biofilms to six common pharmaceutical compounds (caffeine, cimetidine, ciprofloxacin, diphenhydramine, metformin, ranitidine, and a mixture of each) by deploying pharmaceutical-diffusing substrates in streams in Indiana, Maryland, and New York. Results were consistent across seasons and geographic locations. On average, algal biomass was suppressed by 22%, 4%, 22%, and 18% relative to controls by caffeine, ciprofloxacin, diphenhydramine, and the mixed treatment, respectively. Biofilm respiration was significantly suppressed by caffeine (53%), cimetidine (51%), ciprofloxacin (91%), diphenhydramine (63%), and the mixed treatment (40%). In autumn in New York, photosynthesis was also significantly suppressed by diphenhydramine (99%) and the mixed treatment (88%). Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes was used to examine the effects of caffeine and diphenhydramine on biofilm bacterial community composition at the three sites. Relative to the controls, diphenhydramine exposure significantly altered bacterial community composition and resulted in significant relative increases in Pseudomonas sp. and decreases in Flavobacterium sp. in all three streams. These ubiquitous pharmaceuticals, alone or in combination, influenced stream biofilms, which could have consequences for higher trophic levels and important ecosystem processes.

  13. MicroRNA-144 suppresses osteosarcoma growth and metastasis by targeting ROCK1 and ROCK2

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Min

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary tumor of bone. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenously expressed small non-coding RNAs that are strongly implicated in cancerous processes. However, our current understanding of the biological role of miRNAs in OS remains incomplete. In the present study, miR-144 was markedly downregulated in OS cell lines and clinical specimens. Low-level expression of miR-144 was significantly associated with distant metastasis and poor prognosis. Functional studies demonstrated that ectopic expression of miR-144 suppresses tumor cell proliferation and metastasis in vitro as well as in vivo. Furthermore, we identified Rho-associated kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1 and ROCK2) as direct targets for miR-144 binding, resulting in suppression of their expression. Exogenous expression of ROCK1 or ROCK2 in 143B-miR-144 cells partially restored miR-144-inhibited cell proliferation and invasion. In clinical OS specimens, ROCK1 and ROCK2 levels were elevated, relative to that in paired normal bone tissues, and inversely correlated with miR-144 expression. Taken together, miR-144 suppresses OS progression by directly downregulating ROCK1 and ROCK2 expression, and may be a promising therapeutic target for OS. PMID:25912304

  14. Hydrogen sulfide suppresses transforming growth factor-β1-induced differentiation of human cardiac fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, YouEn; Wang, JiaNing; Li, Hua; Yuan, LiangJun; Wang, Lei; Wu, Bing; Ge, JunBo

    2015-11-01

    In heart disease, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) converts fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, which synthesize and secrete fibrillar type I and III collagens. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how hydrogen sulfide (H2S) suppresses TGF-β1-induced differentiation of human cardiac fibroblasts to myofibroblasts. Human cardiac fibroblasts were serum-starved in fibroblast medium for 16 h before exposure to TGF-β1 (10 ng mL(-1)) for 24 h with or without sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, 100 µmol L(-1), 30 min pretreatment) treatment. NaHS, an exogenous H2S donor, potently inhibited the proliferation and migration of TGF-β1-induced human cardiac fibroblasts and regulated their cell cycle progression. Furthermore, NaHS treatment led to suppression of fibroblast differentiation into myofibroblasts, and reduced the levels of collagen, TGF-β1, and activated Smad3 in TGF-β1-induced human cardiac fibroblasts in vitro. We therefore conclude that H2S suppresses TGF-β1-stimulated conversion of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts by inhibiting the TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling pathway, as well as by inhibiting the proliferation, migration, and cell cycle progression of human cardiac myofibroblasts. These effects of H2S may play significant roles in cardiac remodeling associated with heart failure.

  15. Transforming growth factor-alpha abrogates glucocorticoid-stimulated tight junction formation and growth suppression in rat mammary epithelial tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Buse, P; Woo, P L; Alexander, D B; Cha, H H; Reza, A; Sirota, N D; Firestone, G L

    1995-03-24

    The glucocorticoid and transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) regulation of growth and cell-cell contact was investigated in the Con8 mammary epithelial tumor cell line derived from a 7,12-dimethylbenz(alpha)anthracene-induced rat mammary adenocarcinoma. In Con8 cell monolayers cultured on permeable filter supports, the synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, coordinately suppressed [3H]thymidine incorporation, stimulated monolayer transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), and decreased the paracellular leakage of [3H]inulin or [14C]mannitol across the monolayer. These processes dose dependently correlated with glucocorticoid receptor occupancy and function. Constitutive production of TGF-alpha in transfected cells or exogenous treatment with TGF-alpha prevented the glucocorticoid growth suppression response and disrupted tight junction formation without affecting glucocorticoid responsiveness. Treatment with hydroxyurea or araC demonstrated that de novo DNA synthesis is not a requirement for the growth factor disruption of tight junctions. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the ZO-1 tight junction protein is localized exclusively at the cell periphery in dexamethasone-treated cells and that TGF-alpha caused-ZO-1 to relocalize from the cell periphery back to a cytoplasmic compartment. Taken together, our results demonstrate that glucocorticoids can coordinately regulate growth inhibition and cell-cell contact of mammary tumor cells and that TGF-alpha, can override both effects of glucocorticoids. These results have uncovered a novel functional "cross-talk" between glucocorticoids and TGF-alpha which potentially regulates the proliferation and differentiation of mammary epithelial cells.

  16. Leucine-rich α-2-glycoprotein promotes TGFβ1-mediated growth suppression in the Lewis lung carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Norihiko; Serada, Satoshi; Fujimoto, Minoru; Honda, Hiromi; Ohkawara, Tomoharu; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Nomura, Shintaro; Inohara, Hidenori; Naka, Tetsuji

    2015-05-10

    Leucine-rich α2-glycoprotein (LRG) is an approximately 50-kDa glycoprotein that has been found to be elevated in the sera of patients with several types of cancer. LRG directly binds to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) and modulates TGFβ1 signaling in endothelial cells; however, the precise function of LRG in cancer remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the role of LRG in cancer. Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells hardly expressed LRG. The growth of LLC tumors allografted in the LRG knockout (KO) mice was significantly increased compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Conversely, overexpression of LRG significantly inhibited the growth of LLC tumors in WT mice. In the presence of LRG, TGFβ1 significantly inhibited the proliferation of LLC cells and human hepatocellular carcinoma Hep3B cells in vitro by inducing apoptosis via the potent activation of smad2 and its downstream signaling pathway. Furthermore, administration of a TGFβR1 inhibitor (SB431542) significantly enhanced the growth of LLC tumors in WT mice compared with LRG KO mice via inhibition of apoptosis. We propose that LRG potentiates the effect of TGFβ1 in cancer cells whose growth is suppressed in the presence of TGFβ1.

  17. Suppressing the dendritic growth of zinc in an ionic liquid containing cationic and anionic zinc complexes for battery applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Pulletikurthi, Giridhar; Lahiri, Abhishek; Cui, Tong; Endres, Frank

    2016-05-10

    Metallic zinc is a promising negative electrode for high energy rechargeable batteries due to its abundance, low-cost and non-toxic nature. However, the formation of dendritic zinc and low Columbic efficiency in aqueous alkaline solutions during charge/discharge processes remain a great challenge. Here we demonstrate that the dendritic growth of zinc can be effectively suppressed in an ionic liquid electrolyte containing highly concentrated cationic and anionic zinc complexes obtained by dissolving zinc oxide and zinc trifluoromethylsulfonate in a protic ionic liquid, 1-ethylimidazolium trifluoromethylsulfonate. The presence of both cationic and anionic zinc complexes alters the interfacial structure at the electrode/electrolyte interface and influences the nucleation and growth of zinc, leading to compact, homogeneous and dendrite-free zinc coatings. This study also provides insights into the development of highly concentrated metal salts in ionic liquids as electrolytes to deposit dendrite-free zinc as an anode material for energy storage applications. PMID:27080261

  18. Definition of a novel growth factor-dependent signal cascade for the suppression of bile acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Holt, Jason A; Luo, Guizhen; Billin, Andrew N; Bisi, John; McNeill, Y Yvette; Kozarsky, Karen F; Donahee, Mary; Wang, Da Yuan; Mansfield, Traci A; Kliewer, Steven A; Goodwin, Bryan; Jones, Stacey A

    2003-07-01

    The nuclear bile acid receptor FXR has been proposed to play a central role in the feedback repression of the gene encoding cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of bile acids. We demonstrate that FXR directly regulates expression of fibroblast growth factor-19 (FGF-19), a secreted growth factor that signals through the FGFR4 cell-surface receptor tyrosine kinase. In turn, FGF-19 strongly suppresses expression of CYP7A1 in primary cultures of human hepatocytes and mouse liver through a c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-dependent pathway. This signaling cascade defines a novel mechanism for feedback repression of bile acid biosynthesis and underscores the vital role of FXR in the regulation of multiple pathways of cholesterol catabolism in the liver.

  19. Berberine suppresses Id-1 expression and inhibits the growth and development of lung metastases in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Chi Man; Cheung, Kenneth Chat Pan; Cheung, Yuk Chun; Man, Kwan; Lui, Vivian Wai-Yan; Tsao, Sai Wah; Feng, Yibin

    2015-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an invasive cancer with a high rate of recurrence and metastasis. Agents with anti-proliferative as well as anti-metastatic activity will be ideal for effective treatment. Here, we demonstrated that berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, harbored potent anti-metastatic and anti-proliferative activities in vivo. Using an orthotopic model of HCC (MHCC-97L), which spontaneously develops lung metastases (one of the most common sites of HCC metastasis), we found that berberine treatment (10mg/kg/2days) significantly reduced lung metastasis from the liver tumors by ~85% (quantitated by bioluminescence emitted from lung metastases). Histological examination also confirmed the reduced incidence and number of lung metastases in berberine-treated mice. Furthermore, berberine effectively suppressed extra-tumor invasion of the primary HCC implant into the surrounding normal liver tissue, illustrating its potent anti-metastatic action in vivo. Consistent with previous reports in other cancer, berberine's anti-tumor activity was accompanied by suppression of cellular proliferation, invasiveness and HIF-1α/VEGF signaling. Strikingly, further mechanistic investigation revealed that berberine exerted profound inhibitory effect on the expression of Id-1, which is a key regulator for HCC development and metastasis. Berberine could suppress the transcription level of Id-1 through inhibiting its promotor activity. Specific downregulation of Id-1 by knocking down its RNA transcripts in HCC cells inhibited cellular growth, invasion and VEGF secretion, demonstrating the functional relevance of Id-1 downregulation induced by berberine. Lastly, berberine's anti-proliferative and anti-invasive activities could be partially rescued by Id-1 overexpression in HCC models, revealing a novel anti-cancer/anti-invasive mechanism of berberine via Id-1 suppression.

  20. Down-regulation by resveratrol of basic fibroblast growth factor-stimulated osteoprotegerin synthesis through suppression of Akt in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kuroyanagi, Gen; Otsuka, Takanobu; Yamamoto, Naohiro; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Nakakami, Akira; Mizutani, Jun; Kozawa, Osamu; Tokuda, Haruhiko

    2014-10-06

    It is firmly established that resveratrol, a natural food compound abundantly found in grape skins and red wine, has beneficial properties for human health. In the present study, we investigated the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) on osteoprotegerin (OPG) synthesis in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells and whether resveratrol affects the OPG synthesis. FGF-2 stimulated both the OPG release and the expression of OPG mRNA. Resveratrol significantly suppressed the FGF-2-stimulated OPG release and the mRNA levels of OPG. SRT1720, an activator of SIRT1, reduced the FGF-2-induced OPG release and the OPG mRNA expression. PD98059, an inhibitor of upstream kinase activating p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, had little effect on the FGF-2-stimulated OPG release. On the other hand, SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase, SP600125, an inhibitor of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK), and Akt inhibitor suppressed the OPG release induced by FGF-2. Resveratrol failed to affect the FGF-2-induced phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAP kinase, p38 MAP kinase or SAPK/JNK. The phosphorylation of Akt induced by FGF-2 was significantly suppressed by resveratrol or SRT1720. These findings strongly suggest that resveratrol down-regulates FGF-2-stimulated OPG synthesis through the suppression of the Akt pathway in osteoblasts and that the inhibitory effect of resveratrol is mediated at least in part by SIRT1 activation.

  1. Combination therapy with zoledronic acid and cetuximab effectively suppresses growth of colorectal cancer cells regardless of KRAS status

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Junko; Kanematsu, Masako; Gaowa, Siqin; Mori, Ryutaro; Tanahashi, Toshiyuki; Matsuhashi, Nobuhisa; Yoshida, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Targeted molecular therapy is an effective anticancer strategy. Anti‐EGFR monoclonal antibodies such as cetuximab (CTX) have been approved for the treatment of various malignancies, including colorectal cancer (CRC) with wild‐type KRAS. However, their efficacy in patients with KRAS mutations has not been established. Therefore, we investigated whether CTX treatment was effective as a single agent or in combination with zoledronic acid (ZOL) in human CRC cell lines with different KRAS status. CRC cell lines SW48 (wild‐type KRAS) and LS174T (mutant KRAS) were treated with ZOL, CTX and a combination of both drugs. Cytotoxicity was measured using the MTT assay. Changes in the levels of intracellular signaling proteins were evaluated using western blot analysis. Finally, we evaluated the efficacy of the combination treatment in an in vivo xenograft model. We observed that ZOL apparently inhibited growth in both cell lines, whereas CTX showed little effect. ZOL also increased the levels of unprenylated RAS. Combined ZOL and CTX treatment was synergistic in both cell lines and was associated with inhibition of the RAS‐MAPK and AKT‐mTOR signaling pathways. Furthermore, the combination treatment was more effective in suppressing the growth of xenografts derived from both SW48 and LS174T cells; this effect was associated with increased apoptosis. These results demonstrate that ZOL inhibits the growth of colon cancer cells regardless of KRAS status, and combination therapy using ZOL and CTX enhances this growth suppression. These findings suggest a novel strategy for the treatment of CRC independent of KRAS mutational status. PMID:26437179

  2. Effusanin E suppresses nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell growth by inhibiting NF-κB and COX-2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Mingzhu; Zhao, Mouming; Qiu, Huijuan; Shi, Dingbo; Wang, Jingshu; Tian, Yun; Lin, Lianzhu; Deng, Wuguo

    2014-01-01

    Rabdosia serra is well known for its antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities, but no information has been available for the active compounds derived from this plant in inhibiting human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell growth. In this study, we isolated and purified a natural diterpenoid from Rabdosia serra and identified its chemical structure as effusanin E and elucidated its underlying mechanism of action in inhibiting NPC cell growth. Effusanin E significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in NPC cells. Effusanin E also induced the cleavage of PARP, caspase-3 and -9 proteins and inhibited the nuclear translocation of p65 NF-κB proteins. Moreover, effusanin E abrogated the binding of NF-κB to the COX-2 promoter, thereby inhibiting the expression and promoter activity of COX-2. Pretreatment with a COX-2 or NF-κB-selective inhibitor (celecoxib or ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate) had an additive effect on the effusanin E-mediated inhibition of proliferation, while pretreatment with an activator of NF-κB/COX-2 (lipopolysaccharides) abrogated the effusanin E-mediated inhibition of proliferation. Effusanin E also significantly suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model without obvious toxicity, furthermore, the expression of p50 NF-κB and COX-2 were down-regulated in the tumors of nude mice. These data suggest that effusanin E suppresses p50/p65 proteins to down-regulate COX-2 expression, thereby inhibiting NPC cell growth. Our findings provide new insights into exploring effusanin E as a potential therapeutic compound for the treatment of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:25333664

  3. Effusanin E Suppresses Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cell Growth by Inhibiting NF-κB and COX-2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Mingzhu; Zhao, Mouming; Qiu, Huijuan; Shi, Dingbo; Wang, Jingshu; Tian, Yun; Lin, Lianzhu; Deng, Wuguo

    2014-01-01

    Rabdosia serra is well known for its antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities, but no information has been available for the active compounds derived from this plant in inhibiting human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell growth. In this study, we isolated and purified a natural diterpenoid from Rabdosia serra and identified its chemical structure as effusanin E and elucidated its underlying mechanism of action in inhibiting NPC cell growth. Effusanin E significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in NPC cells. Effusanin E also induced the cleavage of PARP, caspase-3 and -9 proteins and inhibited the nuclear translocation of p65 NF-κB proteins. Moreover, effusanin E abrogated the binding of NF-κB to the COX-2 promoter, thereby inhibiting the expression and promoter activity of COX-2. Pretreatment with a COX-2 or NF-κB-selective inhibitor (celecoxib or ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate) had an additive effect on the effusanin E-mediated inhibition of proliferation, while pretreatment with an activator of NF-κB/COX-2 (lipopolysaccharides) abrogated the effusanin E-mediated inhibition of proliferation. Effusanin E also significantly suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model without obvious toxicity, furthermore, the expression of p50 NF-κB and COX-2 were down-regulated in the tumors of nude mice. These data suggest that effusanin E suppresses p50/p65 proteins to down-regulate COX-2 expression, thereby inhibiting NPC cell growth. Our findings provide new insights into exploring effusanin E as a potential therapeutic compound for the treatment of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:25333664

  4. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Growth Suppression of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) mediates the developmental, physiologic, and pathologic effects of androgens including 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). However, the mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells are not well understood, though they are central to prostate development, homeostasis, and neoplasia. Here, we identify androgen-responsive genes that restrain cell cycle progression and proliferation of human prostate epithelial cell lines (HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR), and we investigate the mechanisms through which AR regulates their expression. DHT inhibited proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, and cell cycle analysis revealed a prolonged G1 interval. In the cell cycle, the G1/S-phase transition is initiated by the activity of cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complexes, which relieve growth suppression. In HPr-1AR, cyclin D1/2 and CDK4/6 mRNAs were androgen-repressed, whereas CDK inhibitor, CDKN1A, mRNA was androgen-induced. The regulation of these transcripts was AR-dependent, and involved multiple mechanisms. Similar AR-mediated down-regulation of CDK4/6 mRNAs and up-regulation of CDKN1A mRNA occurred in PC3-Lenti-AR. Further, CDK4/6 overexpression suppressed DHT-inhibited cell cycle progression and proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, whereas CDKN1A overexpression induced cell cycle arrest. We therefore propose that AR-mediated growth suppression of HPr-1AR involves cyclin D1 mRNA decay, transcriptional repression of cyclin D2 and CDK4/6, and transcriptional activation of CDKN1A, which serve to decrease CDK4/6 activity. AR-mediated inhibition of PC3-Lenti-AR proliferation occurs through a similar mechanism, albeit without down-regulation of cyclin D. Our findings provide insight into AR-mediated regulation of prostate epithelial cell proliferation. PMID:26372468

  5. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Growth Suppression of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Chae; Chen, Congcong; Bolton, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) mediates the developmental, physiologic, and pathologic effects of androgens including 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). However, the mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells are not well understood, though they are central to prostate development, homeostasis, and neoplasia. Here, we identify androgen-responsive genes that restrain cell cycle progression and proliferation of human prostate epithelial cell lines (HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR), and we investigate the mechanisms through which AR regulates their expression. DHT inhibited proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, and cell cycle analysis revealed a prolonged G1 interval. In the cell cycle, the G1/S-phase transition is initiated by the activity of cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complexes, which relieve growth suppression. In HPr-1AR, cyclin D1/2 and CDK4/6 mRNAs were androgen-repressed, whereas CDK inhibitor, CDKN1A, mRNA was androgen-induced. The regulation of these transcripts was AR-dependent, and involved multiple mechanisms. Similar AR-mediated down-regulation of CDK4/6 mRNAs and up-regulation of CDKN1A mRNA occurred in PC3-Lenti-AR. Further, CDK4/6 overexpression suppressed DHT-inhibited cell cycle progression and proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, whereas CDKN1A overexpression induced cell cycle arrest. We therefore propose that AR-mediated growth suppression of HPr-1AR involves cyclin D1 mRNA decay, transcriptional repression of cyclin D2 and CDK4/6, and transcriptional activation of CDKN1A, which serve to decrease CDK4/6 activity. AR-mediated inhibition of PC3-Lenti-AR proliferation occurs through a similar mechanism, albeit without down-regulation of cyclin D. Our findings provide insight into AR-mediated regulation of prostate epithelial cell proliferation.

  6. Eudaimonic Growth: Narrative Growth Goals Predict Increases in Ego Development and Subjective Well-Being 3 Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Jack J.; McAdams, Dan P.

    2010-01-01

    We examine (a) the normative course of eudaimonic well-being in emerging adulthood and (b) whether people's narratives of major life goals might prospectively predict eudaimonic growth 3 years later. We define eudaimonic growth as longitudinal increases in eudaimonic well-being, which we define as the combination of psychosocial maturity and…

  7. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated quercetin suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in both transgenic zebrafish and mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qinjie; Deng, Senyi; Li, Ling; Sun, Lu; Yang, Xi; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Lei; Qian, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2013-11-01

    Quercetin (Que) loaded polymeric micelles were prepared to obtain an aqueous formulation of Que with enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activities. A simple solid dispersion method was used, and the obtained Que micelles had a small particle size (about 31 nm), high drug loading, and high encapsulation efficiency. Que micelles showed improved cellular uptake, an enhanced apoptosis induction effect, and stronger inhibitory effects on proliferation, migration, and invasion of 4T1 cells than free Que. The enhanced in vitro antiangiogenesis effects of Que micelles were proved by the results that Que micelles significantly suppressed proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Subsequently, transgenic zebrafish models were employed to investigate anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effects of Que micelles, in which stronger inhibitory effects of Que micelles were observed on embryonic angiogenesis, tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor growth, and tumor metastasis. Furthermore, in a subcutaneous 4T1 tumor model, Que micelles were more effective in suppressing tumor growth and spontaneous pulmonary metastasis, and prolonging the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Besides, immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent assays suggested that tumors in the Que micelle-treated group showed more apoptosis, fewer microvessels, and fewer proliferation-positive cells. In conclusion, Que micelles, which are synthesized as an aqueous formulation of Que, possess enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity, which can serve as potential candidates for cancer therapy.

  8. Pokemon siRNA Delivery Mediated by RGD-Modified HBV Core Protein Suppressed the Growth of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jing; Liu, Xiaoping; Jia, Jianbo; Wu, Jinsheng; Wu, Ning; Chen, Jun; Fang, Fang

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a deadly human malignant tumor that is among the most common cancers in the world, especially in Asia. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been well established as a high risk factor for hepatic malignance. Studies have shown that Pokemon is a master oncogene for HCC growth, suggesting it as an ideal therapeutic target. However, efficient delivery system is still lacking for Pokemon targeting treatment. In this study, we used core proteins of HBV, which is modified with RGD peptides, to construct a biomimetic vector for the delivery of Pokemon siRNAs (namely, RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA). Quantitative PCR and Western blot assays revealed that RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA possessed the highest efficiency of Pokemon suppression in HCC cells. In vitro experiments further indicated that RGD-HBc-Pokemon-siRNA exerted a higher tumor suppressor activity on HCC cell lines, evidenced by reduced proliferation and attenuated invasiveness, than Pokemon-siRNA or RGD-HBc alone. Finally, animal studies demonstrated that RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA suppressed the growth of HCC xenografts in mice by a greater extent than Pokemon-siRNA or RGD-HBc alone. Based on the above results, Pokemon siRNA delivery mediated by RGD-modified HBV core protein was shown to be an effective strategy of HCC gene therapy. PMID:26356810

  9. MicroRNA-338-3p suppresses tumor growth of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinyu; Li, Zhihong; Yang, Guiyun; Pan, Zhenxiang

    2015-09-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) are aberrantly expressed in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and are crucial in tumorigenesis, among which miR‑338‑3p has been examined to be downregulated in patients with ESCC. However, the role of miR‑338‑3p in ESCC remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the role of miR‑338‑3p on the growth and survival of an ESCC cell line was determined with several in vitro approaches and in nude mouse models. It was determined that miR‑338‑3p expression was frequently downregulated in ESCC tissue compared with corresponding adjacent non‑tumor tissue, and that its expression was significantly correlated with tumor stage and metastasis. Overexpression of miR‑338‑3p in ESCC cells suppressed cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion, and induced cell arrest at the G0/G1 stage and cell apoptosis in vitro. In addition, it was demonstrated that overexpression of miR‑338‑3p significantly suppresses tumor growth of xenograft tumors in mice (P<0.05). These findings revealed that miR‑338‑3p may act as a tumor suppressor in ESCC, and its dysregulation may be involved in the initiation and development of human ESCC. In addition, it was suggested that miR‑338‑3p may be a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of ESCC.

  10. Pokemon siRNA Delivery Mediated by RGD-Modified HBV Core Protein Suppressed the Growth of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jing; Liu, Xiaoping; Jia, Jianbo; Wu, Jinsheng; Wu, Ning; Chen, Jun; Fang, Fang

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a deadly human malignant tumor that is among the most common cancers in the world, especially in Asia. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been well established as a high risk factor for hepatic malignance. Studies have shown that Pokemon is a master oncogene for HCC growth, suggesting it as an ideal therapeutic target. However, efficient delivery system is still lacking for Pokemon targeting treatment. In this study, we used core proteins of HBV, which is modified with RGD peptides, to construct a biomimetic vector for the delivery of Pokemon siRNAs (namely, RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA). Quantitative PCR and Western blot assays revealed that RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA possessed the highest efficiency of Pokemon suppression in HCC cells. In vitro experiments further indicated that RGD-HBc-Pokemon-siRNA exerted a higher tumor suppressor activity on HCC cell lines, evidenced by reduced proliferation and attenuated invasiveness, than Pokemon-siRNA or RGD-HBc alone. Finally, animal studies demonstrated that RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA suppressed the growth of HCC xenografts in mice by a greater extent than Pokemon-siRNA or RGD-HBc alone. Based on the above results, Pokemon siRNA delivery mediated by RGD-modified HBV core protein was shown to be an effective strategy of HCC gene therapy.

  11. MECP2 promotes the growth of gastric cancer cells by suppressing miR-338-mediated antiproliferative effect

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Dongdong; Zhao, Lingyu; He, Kang; Sun, Hongfei; Cai, Donghui; Ni, Lei; Sun, Ruifang; Chang, Su'e; Song, Tusheng; Huang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2), a transcriptional suppressor, is involved in gene regulation by binding to methylated promoters. We found that MECP2 is overexpressed in gastric cancer (GC), and that Mecp2 knockdown affects the growth of GC cells both in vitro and in vivo. MECP2 can directly bind to the methylated-CpG island of miR-338 promoter and suppress the expression of two mature microRNAs, namely, miR-338-3p and miR-338-5p. Furthermore, miR-338-5p can suppress GC cell growth by targeting BMI1 (B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 homolog). We additionally found that decreased miR-338-5p expression in GC tissues, relative to normal tissues, was significantly negatively correlated with increased BMI1 expression. Silencing MECP2 can indirectly lead to reduced expression of P-REX2, which has been identified as the miR-338-3p target, as well as BMI1 and increasing expression of P16 or P21 both in vitro and in vivo. Altogether, our results indicate that MECP2 promote the proliferation of GC cells via miR-338 (miR-338-3p and miR-338-5p)-mediated antitumor and gene regulatory effect. PMID:27166996

  12. Aurantiamide acetate suppresses the growth of malignant gliomas in vitro and in vivo by inhibiting autophagic flux

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Zhang, Li-hui; Yang, Bing-xian; Tian, Jin-kui; Zhang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    We aim to investigate the effect of aurantiamide acetate isolated from the aerial parts of Clematis terniflora DC against gliomas. Human malignant glioma U87 and U251 cells were incubated with different concentrations (0–100 μM) of aurantiamide acetate. Aurantiamide acetate greatly decreased the cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It induced moderate mitochondrial fragmentation and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. No significant difference was found in the alternation of other intracellular organelles, although F-actin structure was slightly disturbed. Apparent ultrastructure alternation with increased autophagosome and autolysosome accumulation was observed in aurantiamide acetate-treated cells. The expression of LC3-II was greatly up-regulated in cells exposed to aurantiamide acetate (P < 0.05 compared with control). The cytoplasmic accumulation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes induced by aurantiamide acetate treatment was confirmed by fluorescent reporter protein labelling. Administration of chloroquine (CQ), which inhibits the fusion step of autophagosomes, further increased the accumulation of autophagosomes in the cytoplasm of U87 cells. Autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine, Bafilomycin A1 or CQ had no influence on aurantiamide acetate-induced cytotoxicity, whereas autophagy stimulator rapamycin significantly suppressed aurantiamide acetate-induced cell death. The anti-tumour effects of aurantiamide acetate were further evaluated in tumour-bearing nude mice. Intratumoural injection of aurantiamide acetate obviously suppressed tumour growth, and increased number of autophagic vacuoles was observed in tumour tissues of animals receiving aurantiamide acetate. Our findings suggest that aurantiamide acetate may suppress the growth of malignant gliomas by blocking autophagic flux. PMID:25704599

  13. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NJN-6-enriched bio-organic fertilizer suppressed Fusarium wilt and promoted the growth of banana plants.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jun; Ruan, Yunze; Wang, Beibei; Zhang, Jian; Waseem, Raza; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2013-04-24

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain NJN-6 is an important plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) which can produce secondary metabolites antagonistic to several soil-borne pathogens. In this study, the ability of a bio-organic fertilizer (BIO) containing NJN-6 strain to promote the growth and suppress Fusarium wilt of banana plants was evaluated in a pot experiment. The results showed that the application of BIO significantly decreased the incidence of Fusarium wilt and promoted the growth of banana plants compared to that for the organic fertilizer (OF). To determine the beneficial mechanism of the strain, the colonization of NJN-6 strain on banana roots was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The plant growth-promoting hormones indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and gibberellin A3 (GA3), along with antifungal lipopeptides iturin A, were detected when the NJN-6 strain was incubated in both Landy medium with additional l-tryptophan and in root exudates of banana plants. In addition, some antifungal volatile organic compounds and iturin A were also detected in BIO. In summary, strain NJN-6 could colonize the roots of banana plants after the application of BIO and produced active compounds which were beneficial for the growth of banana plants. PMID:23541032

  14. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria strain Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NJN-6-enriched bio-organic fertilizer suppressed Fusarium wilt and promoted the growth of banana plants.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jun; Ruan, Yunze; Wang, Beibei; Zhang, Jian; Waseem, Raza; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2013-04-24

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain NJN-6 is an important plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) which can produce secondary metabolites antagonistic to several soil-borne pathogens. In this study, the ability of a bio-organic fertilizer (BIO) containing NJN-6 strain to promote the growth and suppress Fusarium wilt of banana plants was evaluated in a pot experiment. The results showed that the application of BIO significantly decreased the incidence of Fusarium wilt and promoted the growth of banana plants compared to that for the organic fertilizer (OF). To determine the beneficial mechanism of the strain, the colonization of NJN-6 strain on banana roots was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The plant growth-promoting hormones indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and gibberellin A3 (GA3), along with antifungal lipopeptides iturin A, were detected when the NJN-6 strain was incubated in both Landy medium with additional l-tryptophan and in root exudates of banana plants. In addition, some antifungal volatile organic compounds and iturin A were also detected in BIO. In summary, strain NJN-6 could colonize the roots of banana plants after the application of BIO and produced active compounds which were beneficial for the growth of banana plants.

  15. Inhibition of histamine receptor 3 suppresses glioblastoma tumor growth, invasion, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wen-Ke; Yang, Yong-Xiang; Sun, Chao; Zhang, Zhuo; Xu, Yu-Qiao; Chang, Ting; Li, Zhu-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Histamine receptor 3 (H3R) is expressed in various tumors and correlated with malignancy and tumor proliferation. However, the role of H3R in tumor invasion and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) remains unknown. Here, we explored the H3R in the highly invasive glioblastoma (GBM) and U87MG cells. We found that H3R mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated in the GBM and glioma cell lines compared to normal brain tissue and astrocytes. In U87MG cell line, inhibition of H3R by siRNA or the antagonist ciproxifan (CPX) suppressed proliferation, invasiveness, and the expression of EMT activators (Snail, Slug and Twist). In addition, expression of epithelial markers (E-cadherin and ZO-1) was up-regulated and expression of mesenchymal markers (vimentin and N-cadherin) was down-regulated in vitro and in vivo in a xenograft model. In addition, we also showed that inhibition of H3R by siRNA or CPX inactivated the PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK signaling pathways, while inhibition of Akt or ERK activity with antagonists or siRNAs suppressed H3R agonist (R)-(α)-(−)- methylhistamine dihydrobromide (RAMH) mediated invasion and reorganization of cadherin-household. In conclusion, overexpression of H3R is associated with glioma progression. Inhibition of H3R leads to suppressed invasion and EMT of GBM by inactivating the PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK pathways in gliomas. PMID:25940798

  16. Overexpressed CacyBP/SIP leads to the suppression of growth in renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Shiren; Ning, Xiaoxuan; Liu, Jie; Liu, Lili; Chen, Yu; Han, Shuang; Zhang, Yanqi; Liang, Jie; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming . E-mail: fandaim@fmmu.edu.cn

    2007-05-18

    Calcyclin-binding protein/Siah-1-interacting protein (CacyBP/SIP), a target protein of S100, has been identified as a component of a novel ubiquitinylation complex leading to {beta}-catenin degradation, which was found to be related to the malignant phenotypes of gastric cancer. However, the roles of CacyBP/SIP in renal cell carcinoma still remain unclear. In the present study, we had analyzed the expression of the CacyBP/SIP protein in human renal cancer cells and clinical tissue samples. The possible roles of CacyBP/SIP in regulating the malignant phenotype of renal cancer cells were also investigated. The results demonstrated that the expression of CacyBP/SIP was markedly down-regulated in renal cell carcinoma tissues and cell lines. Ectopic overexpression of CacyBP/SIP in A498 cells inhibited the proliferation of this cell and delayed cell cycle progression significantly, which might be related to the down-regulation of Cyclin D1 through reducing {beta}-catenin protein. CacyBP/SIP also suppressed colony formation in soft agar and its tumorigenicity in nude mice. Taken together, our work showed that CacyBP/SIP, as a novel down-regulated gene in renal cell carcinoma, suppressed proliferation and tumorigenesis of renal cancer cells.

  17. JQ1 suppresses tumor growth through downregulating LDHA in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Haifeng; Jackson, Amanda L; Kilgore, Joshua E; Zhong, Yan; Chan, Leo Li-Ying; Gehrig, Paola A; Zhou, Chunxiao; Bae-Jump, Victoria L

    2015-03-30

    Amplification and overexpression of c-Myc is commonly seen in human ovarian cancers, and this could be a potentially novel therapeutic target for this disease. JQ1, a selective small-molecule BET bromodomain (BRDs) inhibitor, has been found to suppress tumor progression in several cancer cell types. Using ovarian cancer cell lines, a transgenic mouse model, and primary cell cultures from human ovarian cancer tissues, we demonstrated that JQ1 significantly suppressed cellular proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells and mouse model via targeting c-Myc. In addition, JQ1 had multiple influences on cancer metabolism, particularly in the aerobic glycolysis pathway. JQ1 reduced both the activity and phosphorylation of LDHA, inhibited lactate production, and decreased the energy supply to ovarian cancer cell lines and tumors. Taken together, our findings suggest that JQ1 is an efficacious anti-tumor agent in ovarian cancer that is associated with cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis and alterations of metabolism.

  18. SOX2 suppresses CDKN1A to sustain growth of lung squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fukazawa, Takuya; Guo, Minzhe; Ishida, Naomasa; Yamatsuji, Tomoki; Takaoka, Munenori; Yokota, Etsuko; Haisa, Minoru; Miyake, Noriko; Ikeda, Tomoko; Okui, Tatsuo; Takigawa, Nagio; Maeda, Yutaka; Naomoto, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Since the SOX2 amplification was identified in lung squamous cell carcinoma (lung SCC), SOX2 transcriptional downstream targets have been actively investigated; however, such targets are often cell line specific. Here, in order to identify highly consensus SOX2 downstream genes in lung SCC cells, we used RNA-seq data from 178 lung SCC specimens (containing tumor and tumor-associated cells) and analyzed the correlation between SOX2 and previously-reported SOX2-controlled genes in lung SCC. In addition, we used another RNA-seq dataset from 105 non-small cell lung cancer cell lines (NSCLC; including 4 lung SCC cell lines) and again analyzed the correlation between SOX2 and the reported SOX2-controlled genes in the NSCLC cell lines (no tumor-associated cells). We combined the two analyses and identified genes commonly correlated with SOX2 in both datasets. Among the 99 genes reported as SOX2 downstream and/or correlated genes, we found 4 negatively-correlated (e.g., CDKN1A) and 11 positively-correlated genes with SOX2. We used biological studies to demonstrate that CDKN1A was suppressed by SOX2 in lung SCC cells. G1 cell cycle arrest induced by SOX2 siRNA was rescued by CDKN1A siRNA. These results indicate that the tumorigenic effect of SOX2 in lung SCC cells is mediated in part by suppression of CDKN1A. PMID:26846300

  19. EF24 inhibits tumor growth and metastasis via suppressing NF-kappaB dependent pathways in human cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Da-long; Liang, Ying-jian; Zheng, Tong-sen; Song, Rui-peng; Wang, Jia-bei; Sun, Bo-shi; Pan, Shang-ha; Qu, Lian-dong; Liu, Jia-ren; Jiang, Hong-chi; Liu, Lian-xin

    2016-01-01

    A synthetic monoketone analog of curcumin, termed 3, 5-bis (2-flurobenzylidene) piperidin-4-one (EF24), has been reported to inhibit the growth of a variety of cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. However, whether EF24 has anticancer effects on cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) cells and the mechanisms remain to be investigated. The aim of our study was to evaluate the molecular mechanisms underlying the anticancer effects of EF24 on CCA tumor growth and metastasis. Cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion, tumorigenesis and metastasis were examined. EF24 exhibited time- and dose-dependent inhibitory effects on HuCCT-1, TFK-1 and HuH28 human CCA cell lines. EF24 inhibited CCA cell proliferation, migration, and induced G2/M phase arrest. EF24 induced cell apoptosis along with negative regulation of NF-κB- X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) signaling pathway. XIAP inhibition by lentivirus mediated RNA interference enhanced EF24-induced apoptosis, while XIAP overexpression reduced it in CCA cells. In vivo, EF24 significantly suppressed the growth of CCA tumor xenografts and tumor metastasis while displaying low toxicity levels. Our findings indicate that EF24 is a potent antitumor agent that inhibits tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting NF-κB dependent signaling pathways. EF24 may represent a novel approach for CCA treatment. PMID:27571770

  20. EF24 inhibits tumor growth and metastasis via suppressing NF-kappaB dependent pathways in human cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yin, Da-Long; Liang, Ying-Jian; Zheng, Tong-Sen; Song, Rui-Peng; Wang, Jia-Bei; Sun, Bo-Shi; Pan, Shang-Ha; Qu, Lian-Dong; Liu, Jia-Ren; Jiang, Hong-Chi; Liu, Lian-Xin

    2016-01-01

    A synthetic monoketone analog of curcumin, termed 3, 5-bis (2-flurobenzylidene) piperidin-4-one (EF24), has been reported to inhibit the growth of a variety of cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. However, whether EF24 has anticancer effects on cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) cells and the mechanisms remain to be investigated. The aim of our study was to evaluate the molecular mechanisms underlying the anticancer effects of EF24 on CCA tumor growth and metastasis. Cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion, tumorigenesis and metastasis were examined. EF24 exhibited time- and dose-dependent inhibitory effects on HuCCT-1, TFK-1 and HuH28 human CCA cell lines. EF24 inhibited CCA cell proliferation, migration, and induced G2/M phase arrest. EF24 induced cell apoptosis along with negative regulation of NF-κB- X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) signaling pathway. XIAP inhibition by lentivirus mediated RNA interference enhanced EF24-induced apoptosis, while XIAP overexpression reduced it in CCA cells. In vivo, EF24 significantly suppressed the growth of CCA tumor xenografts and tumor metastasis while displaying low toxicity levels. Our findings indicate that EF24 is a potent antitumor agent that inhibits tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting NF-κB dependent signaling pathways. EF24 may represent a novel approach for CCA treatment. PMID:27571770

  1. IMP1 suppresses breast tumor growth and metastasis through the regulation of its target mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Huang, Wenhe; Chen, Shaoying; Zhou, Yanchun; Li, Deling; Singer, Robert H.; Gu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported the ability of IMP1 in inhibiting proliferation and invasiveness of breast carcinoma cells in vitro. In the current study, we utilized a mouse xenograft model to further investigate the function of IMP1 in breast tumor progression and its underlying mechanism. We demonstrated that IMP1 expression significantly suppressed the growth of MDA231 cell-derived xenograft tumors and subsequent lung metastasis. Microarray analyses and differential gene expression identified handful mRNAs, many of which were involved in breast tumor-growth and metastasis. Further studies revealed that these mRNAs were directly interacted with the KH34 domain of IMP1 and this interaction post-transcriptionally regulated their corresponding protein expression. Either deletion of the KH34 domain of IMP1 or alteration of the expression of IMP1-bound mRNAs affected cell proliferation and tumor growth, producing the same phenotypes as IMP1 knockdown. Correlation of increased IMP1 expression with the reduced levels of its bound mRNAs, such as PTGS2, GDF15 and IGF-2 transcripts, was also observed in human breast tumors. Our studies provide insights into a molecular mechanism that the positive function of IMP1 to inhibit breast tumor growth and metastasis could be through the regulation of its target mRNAs. PMID:26910917

  2. Eudaimonic growth: Narrative growth goals predict increases in ego development and subjective well-being 3 years later.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jack J; McAdams, Dan P

    2010-07-01

    We examine (a) the normative course of eudaimonic well-being in emerging adulthood and (b) whether people's narratives of major life goals might prospectively predict eudaimonic growth 3 years later. We define eudaimonic growth as longitudinal increases in eudaimonic well-being, which we define as the combination of psychosocial maturity and subjective well-being (SWB). College freshmen and seniors took measures of ego development (ED; to assess maturity; Loevinger, 1976) and SWB at Time 1 (T1) and again 3 years later (Time 2). ED levels increased longitudinally across that time for men and T1 freshmen, but SWB levels did not change. Participants also wrote narratives of 2 major life goals at T1 that were coded for an explicit emphasis on specific kinds of personal growth. Participants' intellectual-growth goals (especially agentic ones) predicted increases in ED 3 years later, whereas participants' socioemotional-growth goals (especially communal ones) predicted increases in SWB 3 years later. These findings were independent of the effects of Big Five personality traits-notably conscientiousness, which on its own predicted increases in SWB. We discuss (a) emerging adulthood as the last stop for normative eudaimonic growth in modern society and (b) empirical and theoretical issues surrounding the relations among narrative identity, life planning, dispositional traits, eudaimonia, and 2 paths of personal growth.

  3. p21Cip1 Protection against Hyperoxia Requires Bcl-XL and Is Uncoupled from Its Ability to Suppress Growth

    PubMed Central

    Vitiello, Peter F.; Staversky, Rhonda J.; Gehen, Sean C.; Johnston, Carl J.; Finkelstein, Jacob N.; Wright, Terry W.; O’Reilly, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Cip1/Waf1/Sdi1 protects the lung against hyperoxia, but the mechanism of protection remains unclear because loss of p21 does not lead to aberrant cell proliferation. Because some members of the Bcl-2 gene family have been implicated in hyperoxia-induced cell death, the current study investigated their expression as well as p21-dependent growth suppression and cytoprotection. Conditional overexpression of full-length p21, its amino-terminal cyclin-binding (p211–82NLS) domain or its carboxy-terminal PCNA-binding (p2176–164) domain inhibited growth of human lung adenocarcinoma H1299 cells, but only the full-length protein was cytoprotective. Low levels of p21 inhibited cell proliferation, whereas higher levels were required for protection. Expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL declined during hyperoxia but was maintained in cells expressing p21. RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown of Bcl-XL enhanced hyperoxic death of cells expressing p21, whereas overexpression of Bcl-XL increased cell survival. Consistent with growth suppression and cytoprotection requiring different levels of p21, hyperoxia inhibited PCNA expression in p21+/+ and p21+/− mice but not in p21−/− mice. In contrast, p21 was haplo-insufficient for maintaining expression of Bcl-XL and protection against hyperoxia. Taken together, these data show that p21-mediated cytoprotection against hyperoxia involves regulation of Bcl-XL and is uncoupled from its ability to inhibit proliferation. PMID:16723699

  4. Cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO 48-8071 suppresses growth of hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yayun; Mafuvadze, Benford; Aebi, Johannes D; Hyder, Salman M

    2016-01-01

    Standard treatment for primary prostate cancer includes systemic exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs that target androgen receptor or antihormone therapy (chemical castration); however, drug-resistant cancer cells generally emerge during treatment, limiting the continued use of systemic chemotherapy. Patients are then treated with more toxic standard therapies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for novel and more effective treatments for prostate cancer. The cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is an attractive therapeutic target for treating endocrine-dependent cancers because cholesterol is an essential structural and functional component of cell membranes as well as the metabolic precursor of endogenous steroid hormones. In this study, we have examined the effects of RO 48-8071 (4′-[6-(allylmethylamino)hexyloxy]-4-bromo-2′-fluorobenzophenone fumarate; Roche Pharmaceuticals internal reference: RO0488071) (RO), which is an inhibitor of 2, 3-oxidosqualene cyclase (a key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway), on prostate cancer cells. Exposure of both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant human prostate cancer cells to RO reduced prostate cancer cell viability and induced apoptosis in vitro. RO treatment reduced androgen receptor protein expression in hormone-dependent prostate cancer cells and increased estrogen receptor β (ERβ) protein expression in both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell lines. Combining RO with an ERβ agonist increased its ability to reduce castration-resistant prostate cancer cell viability. In addition, RO effectively suppressed the growth of aggressive castration-resistant human prostate cancer cell xenografts in vivo without any signs of toxicity to experimental animals. Importantly, RO did not reduce the viability of normal prostate cells in vitro. Our study is the first to demonstrate that the cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO effectively suppresses growth of human prostate cancer cells

  5. Cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO 48-8071 suppresses growth of hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yayun; Mafuvadze, Benford; Aebi, Johannes D; Hyder, Salman M

    2016-01-01

    Standard treatment for primary prostate cancer includes systemic exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs that target androgen receptor or antihormone therapy (chemical castration); however, drug-resistant cancer cells generally emerge during treatment, limiting the continued use of systemic chemotherapy. Patients are then treated with more toxic standard therapies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for novel and more effective treatments for prostate cancer. The cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is an attractive therapeutic target for treating endocrine-dependent cancers because cholesterol is an essential structural and functional component of cell membranes as well as the metabolic precursor of endogenous steroid hormones. In this study, we have examined the effects of RO 48-8071 (4'-[6-(allylmethylamino)hexyloxy]-4-bromo-2'-fluorobenzophenone fumarate; Roche Pharmaceuticals internal reference: RO0488071) (RO), which is an inhibitor of 2, 3-oxidosqualene cyclase (a key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway), on prostate cancer cells. Exposure of both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant human prostate cancer cells to RO reduced prostate cancer cell viability and induced apoptosis in vitro. RO treatment reduced androgen receptor protein expression in hormone-dependent prostate cancer cells and increased estrogen receptor β (ERβ) protein expression in both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell lines. Combining RO with an ERβ agonist increased its ability to reduce castration-resistant prostate cancer cell viability. In addition, RO effectively suppressed the growth of aggressive castration-resistant human prostate cancer cell xenografts in vivo without any signs of toxicity to experimental animals. Importantly, RO did not reduce the viability of normal prostate cells in vitro. Our study is the first to demonstrate that the cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO effectively suppresses growth of human prostate cancer cells. Our

  6. Ack promotes tissue growth via phosphorylation and suppression of the Hippo pathway component Expanded

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lianxin; Xu, Jiajun; Yin, Meng-Xin; Zhang, Liguo; Lu, Yi; Wu, Wenqing; Xue, Zhaoyu; Ho, Margaret S; Gao, Guanjun; Zhao, Yun; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Non-receptor tyrosine kinase activated cdc42 kinase was reported to participate in several types of cancers in mammals. It is also believed to have an anti-apoptotic function in Drosophila. Here, we report the identification of Drosophila activated cdc42 kinase as a growth promoter and a novel Hippo signaling pathway regulator. We find that activated cdc42 kinase promotes tissue growth through modulating Yorkie activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activated cdc42 kinase interacts with Expanded and induces tyrosine phosphorylation of Expanded on multiple sites. We propose a model that activated cdc42 kinase negatively regulates Expanded by changing its phosphorylation status to promote tissue growth. Moreover, we show that ack genetically interacts with merlin and expanded. Thus, we identify Drosophila activated cdc42 kinase as a Hippo pathway regulator. PMID:27462444

  7. Protein Thermodynamics Can Be Predicted Directly from Biological Growth Rates

    PubMed Central

    Corkrey, Ross; McMeekin, Tom A.; Bowman, John P.; Ratkowsky, David A.; Olley, June; Ross, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Life on Earth is capable of growing from temperatures well below freezing to above the boiling point of water, with some organisms preferring cooler and others hotter conditions. The growth rate of each organism ultimately depends on its intracellular chemical reactions. Here we show that a thermodynamic model based on a single, rate-limiting, enzyme-catalysed reaction accurately describes population growth rates in 230 diverse strains of unicellular and multicellular organisms. Collectively these represent all three domains of life, ranging from psychrophilic to hyperthermophilic, and including the highest temperature so far observed for growth (122°C). The results provide credible estimates of thermodynamic properties of proteins and obtain, purely from organism intrinsic growth rate data, relationships between parameters previously identified experimentally, thus bridging a gap between biochemistry and whole organism biology. We find that growth rates of both unicellular and multicellular life forms can be described by the same temperature dependence model. The model results provide strong support for a single highly-conserved reaction present in the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). This is remarkable in that it means that the growth rate dependence on temperature of unicellular and multicellular life forms that evolved over geological time spans can be explained by the same model. PMID:24787650

  8. Direct inhibition of Retinoblastoma phosphorylation by Nimbolide causes cell cycle arrest and suppresses glioblastoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jane; Liu, Xiaona; Henry, Heather; Gasilina, Anjelika; Nassar, Nicholas; Ghosh, Jayeeta; Clark, Jason P; Kumar, Ashish; Pauletti, Giovanni M.; Ghosh, Pradip K; Dasgupta, Biplab

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Classical pharmacology allows the use and development of conventional phytomedicine faster and more economically than conventional drugs. This approach should be tested for their efficacy in terms of complementarity and disease control. The purpose of this study was to determine the molecular mechanisms by which nimbolide, a triterpenoid found in the well-known medicinal plant Azadirachta indica controls glioblastoma (GBM) growth. Experimental Design Using in vitro signaling, anchorage-independent growth, kinase assays, and xenograft models, we investigated the mechanisms of its growth inhibition in glioblastoma. Results We show that nimbolide or an ethanol soluble fraction of A. indica leaves (Azt) that contains nimbolide as the principal cytotoxic agent is highly cytotoxic against GBM in vitro and in vivo. Azt caused cell cycle arrest, most prominently at the G1-S stage in GBM cells expressing EGFRvIII, an oncogene present in about 20-25% of GBMs. Azt/nimbolide directly inhibited CDK4/CDK6 kinase activity leading to hypophosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein, cell cycle arrest at G1-S and cell death. Independent of RB hypophosphorylation, Azt also significantly reduced proliferative and survival advantage of GBM cells in vitro and in tumor xenografts by downregulating Bcl2 and blocking growth factor induced phosphorylation of Akt, Erk1/2 and STAT3. These effects were specific since Azt did not affect mTOR or other cell cycle regulators. In vivo, Azt completely prevented initiation and inhibited progression of GBM growth. Conclusions Our preclinical findings demonstrate Nimbolide as a potent anti-glioma agent that blocks cell cycle and inhibits glioma growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24170547

  9. Suppressing tin whisker growth in lead-free solders and platings

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Elizabeth N; Lam, Poh-Sang

    2014-04-29

    A process of irradiation Sn containing Pb-free solder to mitigate whisker formation and growth thereon is provided. The use of gamma radiation such as cobalt-60 has been applied to a substrate of Sn on copper has been found to change the morphology of the crystalline whisker growth to a more truncated hillock pattern. The change in morphology greatly reduces the tendency of whiskers to contribute to electrical short-circuits being used as a Pb-free solder system on a copper substrate.

  10. Predictability of a Coupled Model of ENSO Using Singular Vector Analysis: Optimal Growth and Forecast Skill.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yan

    The optimal growth and its relationship with the forecast skill of the Zebiak and Cane model are studied using a simple statistical model best fit to the original nonlinear model and local linear tangent models about idealized climatic states (the mean background and ENSO cycles in a long model run), and the actual forecast states, including two sets of runs using two different initialization procedures. The seasonally varying Markov model best fit to a suite of 3-year forecasts in a reduced EOF space (18 EOFs) fits the original nonlinear model reasonably well and has comparable or better forecast skill. The initial error growth in a linear evolution operator A is governed by the eigenvalues of A^{T}A, and the square roots of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of A^{T}A are named singular values and singular vectors. One dominant growing singular vector is found, and the optimal 6 month growth rate is largest for a (boreal) spring start and smallest for a fall start. Most of the variation in the optimal growth rate of the two forecasts is seasonal, attributable to the seasonal variations in the mean background, except that in the cold events it is substantially suppressed. It is found that the mean background (zero anomaly) is the most unstable state, and the "forecast IC states" are more unstable than the "coupled model states". One dominant growing singular vector is found, characterized by north-south and east -west dipoles, convergent winds on the equator in the eastern Pacific and a deepened thermocline in the whole equatorial belt. This singular vector is insensitive to initial time and optimization time, but its final pattern is a strong function of initial states. The ENSO system is inherently unpredictable for the dominant singular vector can amplify 5-fold to 24-fold in 6 months and evolve into the large scales characteristic of ENSO. However, the inherent ENSO predictability is only a secondary factor, while the mismatches between the model and data is a

  11. Brg1 Enables Rapid Growth of the Early Embryo by Suppressing Genes That Regulate Apoptosis and Cell Growth Arrest.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajeet P; Foley, Julie F; Rubino, Mark; Boyle, Michael C; Tandon, Arpit; Shah, Ruchir; Archer, Trevor K

    2016-08-01

    SWI/SNF (switching/sucrose nonfermenting)-dependent chromatin remodeling establishes coordinated gene expression programs during development, yet important functional details remain to be elucidated. We show that the Brg1 (Brahma-related gene 1; Smarca4) ATPase is globally expressed at high levels during postimplantation development and its conditional ablation, beginning at gastrulation, results in increased apoptosis, growth retardation, and, ultimately, embryonic death. Global gene expression analysis revealed that genes upregulated in Rosa26CreERT2; Brg1(flox/flox) embryos (here referred to as Brg1(d/d) embryos to describe embryos with deletion of the Brg1(flox/flox) alleles) negatively regulate cell cycle progression and cell growth. In addition, the p53 (Trp53) protein, which is virtually undetectable in early wild-type embryos, accumulated in the Brg1(d/d) embryos and activated the p53-dependent pathways. Using P19 cells, we show that Brg1 and CHD4 (chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 4) coordinate to control target gene expression. Both proteins physically interact and show a substantial overlap of binding sites at chromatin-accessible regions adjacent to genes differentially expressed in the Brg1(d/d) embryos. Specifically, Brg1 deficiency results in reduced levels of the repressive histone H3 lysine K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) histone mark and an increase in the amount of open chromatin at the regulatory region of the p53 and p21 (Cdkn1a) genes. These results provide insights into the mechanisms by which Brg1 functions, which is in part via the p53 program, to constrain gene expression and facilitate rapid embryonic growth. PMID:27185875

  12. Mathematical modeling of herpes simplex virus-2 suppression with pritelivir predicts trial outcomes.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Joshua T; Swan, David A; Magaret, Amalia; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna; Ossig, Joachim; Ruebsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Stoelben, Susanne; Timmler, Burkhard; Zimmermann, Holger; Melhem, Murad R; Van Wart, Scott A; Rubino, Christopher M; Birkmann, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models estimate the potency of antiviral agents but do not capture viral and immunologic factors that drive the natural dynamics of infection. We designed a mathematical model that synthesizes pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and viral pathogenesis concepts to simulate the activity of pritelivir, a DNA helicase-primase inhibitor that targets herpes simplex virus. Our simulations recapitulate detailed viral kinetic shedding features in five dosage arms of a phase 2 clinical trial. We identify that in vitro estimates of median effective concentration (EC50) are lower than in vivo values for the drug. Nevertheless, pritelivir potently decreases shedding at appropriate doses based on its mode of action and long half-life. Although pritelivir directly inhibits replication in epithelial cells, our model indicates that pritelivir also indirectly limits downstream viral spread from neurons to genital keratinocytes, within genital ulcers, and from ulcer to new mucosal sites of infection. We validate our model based on its ability to predict outcomes in a subsequent trial with a higher dose. The model can therefore be used to optimize dose selection in clinical practice.

  13. Mathematical modeling of herpes simplex virus-2 suppression with pritelivir predicts trial outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Schiffer, Joshua T.; Swan, David A.; Magaret, Amalia; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna; Ossig, Joachim; Ruebsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Stoelben, Susanne; Timmler, Burkhard; Zimmermann, Holger; Melhem, Murad R.; Van Wart, Scott A.; Rubino, Christopher M.; Birkmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models estimate the potency of antiviral agents but do not capture viral and immunologic factors that drive the natural dynamics of infection. We designed a mathematical model that synthesizes pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and viral pathogenesis concepts to simulate the activity of pritelivir, a DNA helicase-primase inhibitor that targets herpes simplex virus. Our simulations recapitulate detailed viral kinetic shedding features in five dosage arms of a phase 2 clinical trial. We identify that in vitro estimates of EC50 are lower than in vivo values for the drug. Nevertheless, pritelivir potently decreases shedding at appropriate doses based on its mode of action and long half-life. While pritelivir directly inhibits replication in epithelial cells, our model indicates that pritelivir also indirectly limits downstream viral spread from neurons to genital keratinocytes, within genital ulcers, and from ulcer to new mucosal sites of infection. We validate our model based on its ability to predict outcomes in a subsequent trial with a higher dose. The model can therefore be employed to optimize dose selection in clinical practice. PMID:26843190

  14. Comparison of Primary Models to Predict Microbial Growth by the Plate Count and Absorbance Methods.

    PubMed

    Pla, María-Leonor; Oltra, Sandra; Esteban, María-Dolores; Andreu, Santiago; Palop, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The selection of a primary model to describe microbial growth in predictive food microbiology often appears to be subjective. The objective of this research was to check the performance of different mathematical models in predicting growth parameters, both by absorbance and plate count methods. For this purpose, growth curves of three different microorganisms (Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli) grown under the same conditions, but with different initial concentrations each, were analysed. When measuring the microbial growth of each microorganism by optical density, almost all models provided quite high goodness of fit (r(2) > 0.93) for all growth curves. The growth rate remained approximately constant for all growth curves of each microorganism, when considering one growth model, but differences were found among models. Three-phase linear model provided the lowest variation for growth rate values for all three microorganisms. Baranyi model gave a variation marginally higher, despite a much better overall fitting. When measuring the microbial growth by plate count, similar results were obtained. These results provide insight into predictive microbiology and will help food microbiologists and researchers to choose the proper primary growth predictive model. PMID:26539483

  15. Comparison of Primary Models to Predict Microbial Growth by the Plate Count and Absorbance Methods

    PubMed Central

    Pla, María-Leonor; Oltra, Sandra; Esteban, María-Dolores; Andreu, Santiago; Palop, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The selection of a primary model to describe microbial growth in predictive food microbiology often appears to be subjective. The objective of this research was to check the performance of different mathematical models in predicting growth parameters, both by absorbance and plate count methods. For this purpose, growth curves of three different microorganisms (Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli) grown under the same conditions, but with different initial concentrations each, were analysed. When measuring the microbial growth of each microorganism by optical density, almost all models provided quite high goodness of fit (r2 > 0.93) for all growth curves. The growth rate remained approximately constant for all growth curves of each microorganism, when considering one growth model, but differences were found among models. Three-phase linear model provided the lowest variation for growth rate values for all three microorganisms. Baranyi model gave a variation marginally higher, despite a much better overall fitting. When measuring the microbial growth by plate count, similar results were obtained. These results provide insight into predictive microbiology and will help food microbiologists and researchers to choose the proper primary growth predictive model. PMID:26539483

  16. Comparison of Primary Models to Predict Microbial Growth by the Plate Count and Absorbance Methods.

    PubMed

    Pla, María-Leonor; Oltra, Sandra; Esteban, María-Dolores; Andreu, Santiago; Palop, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The selection of a primary model to describe microbial growth in predictive food microbiology often appears to be subjective. The objective of this research was to check the performance of different mathematical models in predicting growth parameters, both by absorbance and plate count methods. For this purpose, growth curves of three different microorganisms (Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli) grown under the same conditions, but with different initial concentrations each, were analysed. When measuring the microbial growth of each microorganism by optical density, almost all models provided quite high goodness of fit (r(2) > 0.93) for all growth curves. The growth rate remained approximately constant for all growth curves of each microorganism, when considering one growth model, but differences were found among models. Three-phase linear model provided the lowest variation for growth rate values for all three microorganisms. Baranyi model gave a variation marginally higher, despite a much better overall fitting. When measuring the microbial growth by plate count, similar results were obtained. These results provide insight into predictive microbiology and will help food microbiologists and researchers to choose the proper primary growth predictive model.

  17. Walker 256 Tumor Growth Suppression by Crotoxin Involves Formyl Peptide Receptors and Lipoxin A4

    PubMed Central

    Brigatte, Patrícia; Faiad, Odair Jorge; Ferreira Nocelli, Roberta Cornélio; Landgraf, Richardt G.; Palma, Mario Sergio; Cury, Yara; Curi, Rui; Sampaio, Sandra Coccuzzo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Crotoxin (CTX), the main toxin of South American rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) venom, on Walker 256 tumor growth, the pain symptoms associated (hyperalgesia and allodynia), and participation of endogenous lipoxin A4. Treatment with CTX (s.c.), daily, for 5 days reduced tumor growth at the 5th day after injection of Walker 256 carcinoma cells into the plantar surface of adult rat hind paw. This observation was associated with inhibition of new blood vessel formation and decrease in blood vessel diameter. The treatment with CTX raised plasma concentrations of lipoxin A4 and its natural analogue 15-epi-LXA4, an effect mediated by formyl peptide receptors (FPRs). In fact, the treatment with Boc-2, an inhibitor of FPRs, abolished the increase in plasma levels of these mediators triggered by CTX. The blockage of these receptors also abolished the inhibitory action of CTX on tumor growth and blood vessel formation and the decrease in blood vessel diameter. Together, the results herein presented demonstrate that CTX increases plasma concentrations of lipoxin A4 and 15-epi-LXA4, which might inhibit both tumor growth and formation of new vessels via FPRs. PMID:27190493

  18. THE RED-TIDE DINOFLAGELLATE, ALEXANDRIUM MONILATUM, SUPPRESSES GROWTH OF MIXED NATURAL PHYTOPLANKTON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alexandrium monilatum is a large, chain-forming, autotrophic dinoflagellate associated with red-tides and fish kills along the US Gulf of Mexico coast. When cultured inocula of A. monilatum were added to nutrient-amended seawater samples, growth rates and biomass yields of the na...

  19. Rhizoctonia wilt suppression of brinjal (Solanum melongena L) and plant growth activity by Bacillus BS2.

    PubMed

    Boruah, H P Deka; Kumar, B S Dileep

    2003-06-01

    An antibiotic-producing and hydrogen-cyanide-producing rhizobacteria strain Bacillus BS2 showed a wide range of antifungal activity against many Fusarium sp. and brinjal wilt disease pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. Seed bacterization with the strain BS2 promoted seed germination and plant growth in leguminous plants Phaseolus vulgaris and non-leguminous plants Solanum melongena L, Brassica oleracea var. capitata, B. oleraceae var. gongylodes and Lycopersicon esculentum Mill in terms of relative growth rate, shoot height, root length, total biomass production and total chlorophyll content of leaves. Yield of bacterized plants were increased by 10 to 49% compared to uninoculated control plants. Brinjal sapling raised through seed bacterization by the strain BS2 showed a significantly reduced wilt syndrome of brinjal caused by Rhizoctonia solani. Control of wilt disease by the bacterium was clue to the production of antibiotic-like substances, whereas plant growth-promotion was due to the activity of hydrogen cyanide. Root colonization study confirmed that the introduced bacteria colonized the roots and occupied 23-25% of total aerobic bacteria, which was confirmed using dual antibiotic (nalidixic acid and streptomycin sulphate) resistant mutant strain. The results obtained through this investigation suggested the potentiality of the strain BS2 to be used as a plant growth promoter and suppressor of wilt pathogen.

  20. Does Prolonged Therapy with a Long-Acting Stimulant Suppress Growth in Children with ADHD?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Thomas J.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Biederman, Joseph; Lerner, Marc; Cooper, Kimberly M.; Zimmerman, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether prolonged therapy with a long-acting stimulant affects growth in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: One hundred seventy-eight children ages 6 to 13 years received OROS methylphenidate (OROS MPH, CONCERTA) for at least 21 months. Height and weight were measured monthly during the…

  1. Insulin-like growth factor-1 suppresses the Myostatin signaling pathway during myogenic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Retamales, A.; Zuloaga, R.; Valenzuela, C.A.; Gallardo-Escarate, C.; Molina, A.; Valdés, J.A.

    2015-08-21

    Myogenic differentiation is a complex and well-coordinated process for generating mature skeletal muscle fibers. This event is autocrine/paracrine regulated by growth factors, principally Myostatin (MSTN) and Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1). Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth in vertebrates that exerts its inhibitory function by activating Smad transcription factors. In contrast, IGF-1 promotes the differentiation of skeletal myoblasts by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. This study reports on a novel functional crosstalk between the IGF-1 and MSTN signaling pathways, as mediated through interaction between PI3K/Akt and Smad3. Stimulation of skeletal myoblasts with MSTN resulted in a transient increase in the pSmad3:Smad3 ratio and Smad-dependent transcription. Moreover, MSTN inhibited myod gene expression and myoblast fusion in an Activin receptor-like kinase/Smad3-dependent manner. Preincubation of skeletal myoblasts with IGF-1 blocked MSTN-induced Smad3 activation, promoting myod expression and myoblast differentiation. This inhibitory effect of IGF-1 on the MSTN signaling pathway was dependent on IGF-1 receptor, PI3K, and Akt activities. Finally, immunoprecipitation assay analysis determined that IGF-1 pretreatment increased Akt and Smad3 interaction. These results demonstrate that the IGF-1/PI3K/Akt pathway may inhibit MSTN signaling during myoblast differentiation, providing new insight to existing knowledge on the complex crosstalk between both growth factors. - Highlights: • IGF-1 inhibits Myostatin canonical signaling pathway through IGF-1R/PI3K/Akt pathway. • IGF-1 promotes myoblast differentiation through a direct blocking of Myostatin signaling pathway. • IGF-1 induces the interaction of Akt with Smad3 in skeletal myoblast.

  2. miR-143 suppresses the proliferation of NSCLC cells by inhibiting the epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong-Bo; Sun, Li-Chao; Ling, Lan; Cong, Lu-Hong; Lian, Rui

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) regulate the proliferation and metastasis of numerous cancer cell types. It was previously reported that miR-143 levels were downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues and cell lines, and that the migration and invasion of NSCLC cells was inhibited upon suppression of cell proliferation and colony formation by the upregulation of miR-143. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is a vital factor in the promotion of cancer cell proliferation and has been investigated as a potential focus in cancer therapy, has been reported to be a possible target of miR-143. The present study aimed to investigate the role of miR-143 in NSCLC using NSCLC cell lines and primary cells from NSCLC patients. NSCLC cells were co-transfected with EGFR and miR-143, and the mRNA and protein expression of EGFR were analyzed. Furthermore, the activity of the transfected cancer cells with regard to colony formation, migration, invasion and apoptosis were evaluated. The levels of miR-143 were decreased in the NSCLC cell lines and primary cells from patients with NSCLC compared with the controls. Following transfection with miR-143, the ability of NSCLC cells to proliferate, form colonies, migrate and invade was inhibited. Similarly, knockdown of EGFR led to the suppression of NSCLC cell proliferation. The mRNA and protein expression levels of EGFR were significantly reduced following miR-143 overexpression, and the level of miR-143 was inversely correlated with that of EGFR in NSCLC cells. The results of the present study demonstrated that miR-143 was able to suppress NSCLC cell proliferation and invasion by inhibiting the effects of EGFR, suggesting that EGFR may be considered a potential target for NSCLC therapy. PMID:27602093

  3. miR-143 suppresses the proliferation of NSCLC cells by inhibiting the epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong-Bo; Sun, Li-Chao; Ling, Lan; Cong, Lu-Hong; Lian, Rui

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) regulate the proliferation and metastasis of numerous cancer cell types. It was previously reported that miR-143 levels were downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues and cell lines, and that the migration and invasion of NSCLC cells was inhibited upon suppression of cell proliferation and colony formation by the upregulation of miR-143. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is a vital factor in the promotion of cancer cell proliferation and has been investigated as a potential focus in cancer therapy, has been reported to be a possible target of miR-143. The present study aimed to investigate the role of miR-143 in NSCLC using NSCLC cell lines and primary cells from NSCLC patients. NSCLC cells were co-transfected with EGFR and miR-143, and the mRNA and protein expression of EGFR were analyzed. Furthermore, the activity of the transfected cancer cells with regard to colony formation, migration, invasion and apoptosis were evaluated. The levels of miR-143 were decreased in the NSCLC cell lines and primary cells from patients with NSCLC compared with the controls. Following transfection with miR-143, the ability of NSCLC cells to proliferate, form colonies, migrate and invade was inhibited. Similarly, knockdown of EGFR led to the suppression of NSCLC cell proliferation. The mRNA and protein expression levels of EGFR were significantly reduced following miR-143 overexpression, and the level of miR-143 was inversely correlated with that of EGFR in NSCLC cells. The results of the present study demonstrated that miR-143 was able to suppress NSCLC cell proliferation and invasion by inhibiting the effects of EGFR, suggesting that EGFR may be considered a potential target for NSCLC therapy.

  4. Sensation Seeking Predicting Growth in Adolescent Problem Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Byck, Gayle R.; Swann, Greg; Schalet, Benjamin; Bolland, John; Mustanski, Brian

    2014-01-01

    There is limited literature on the relationship between sensation seeking and adolescent risk behaviors, particularly among African Americans. We tested the association between psychometrically-derived subscales of the Zuckerman Sensation Seeking Scale and the intercepts and slopes of individual growth curves of conduct problems, sexual risk taking, and substance use from ages 13-18 years by sex. Boys and girls had different associations between sensation seeking and baseline levels and growth of risk behaviors. The Pleasure Seeking scale was associated with baseline levels of conduct problems in boys and girls, baseline substance use in boys, and growth in sexual risk taking and substance use by girls. Girls had the same pattern of associations with the Danger/Novelty scale as the Pleasure Seeking scale. Knowledge about the relationships between adolescent risk taking and sensation seeking can help in the targeted design of prevention and intervention programs for the understudied population of very low-income, African American adolescents. PMID:25112599

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells with Sirt1 overexpression suppress breast tumor growth via chemokine-dependent natural killer cells recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Liu, Yan; Zong, Chen; Yu, Qingbo; Yang, Xue; Liang, Lei; Ye, Fei; Nong, Li; Jia, Yuxian; Lu, Yongkui; Han, Zhipeng

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are generally used in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and therapy for immune disorder diseases. However, due to the immunosuppressive function of MSCs, the application of MSCs in breast cancer therapy remains limited. Sirt1 is the closest mammalian homologue of the yeast enzyme Sir2 which has an established capacity to influence yeast replicative lifespan. In this study, we demonstrated the effect of MSCs with Sirt1 overexpression (MSCs-Sirt1) in mice bearing 4T1 breast cancer and investigated the underlying mechanism. Firstly, we found that MSCs could accelerate breast tumor growth with promoted proliferation and inhibited apoptosis, whereas MSCs-Sirt1 significantly suppressed tumor growth with proliferation inhibition and apoptosis promotion. Moreover, we detected that NK cells were the prominent antitumor effectors for the MSCs-Sirt1-induced antitumor activity. Besides that, CXCL10 and IFN-γ showed the high level expression in MSCs-Sirt1 treatment group. The impulsive effect of MSCs-Sirt1 on 4T1 cells in vivo could be reversed by inhibition of CXCL10 and IFN-γ. Overall, our results suggest that MSCs-Sirt1 can effectively inhibit breast tumor growth via the recruitment of NK cells in tumor inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:27782173

  6. Humanized anti-hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) antibody suppresses innate irinotecan (CPT-11) resistance induced by fibroblast-derived HGF

    PubMed Central

    Kim, BoRa; Park, Byung Hee; Shin, Kum-Joo; Song, Seong-Won; Kim, Jung Ju; Kim, Hwan-Mook; Lee, Sang-Jin; Oh, Seung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The growth factors derived from the microenvironment create an environment conducive to tumor growth and survival. HGF deprivation using neutralizing antibody enhanced chemosensitivity in colorectal cancer cells (CRC). We determined secreted HGF in fibroblast conditioned medium (CM). Combination treatment of anti-HGF antibody and irinotecan (CPT-11) directly enhanced CPT-11 sensitivity in CRC. We generated xenograft in NOD/SCID mice inoculating HCT-116 human colorectal cancer cells subcutaneously with or without fibroblast. We found that the combination of CPT-11 and anti-HGF antibody induced marked suppression of tumor development. These results suggest that HGF produced by fibroblast induce CPT-11 resistance, and that anti-HGF antibody abrogate such resistance in vivo. fibroblast-derived HGF is important determinant of chemoresistance. Anti-HGF monoclonal antibody treatment confirmed the importance of this growth factor for chemoresistance in CRC. These results present new options toward the early diagnosis of chemoresistance and suggest novel combinations of chemotherapy and anti-HGF agents to prevent or significantly delay the onset of therapy resistance. PMID:26090722

  7. Beneficial effects of fluorescent pseudomonads on seed germination, growth promotion, and suppression of charcoal rot in groundnut (Arachis hypogea L.).

    PubMed

    Shweta, Bhatia; Maheshwari, Dinesh Kumar; Dubey, Ramesh Chand; Arora, Daljit Singh; Bajpai, Vivek K; Kang, Sun Chul

    2008-09-01

    Rhizobacteria are used as inoculants to enhance crop yield and for biological control of fungal pathogens. Fluorescent pseudomonads isolated from the rhizosphere of groundnut showed suppression of the phytopathogen Macrophomina phaseolina that causes charcoal rot of groundnut, an economically important agroproduct. Two strains of fluorescent pseudomonads, designated as PS1 and PS2, were selected as a result of in vitro antifungal activity. After 5 days of incubation at 28+/-1 degrees , both PS1 and PS2 caused clear inhibition zones in dual cultures, restricting the growth of M. phaseolina by 71% and 74%, respectively. Both the strains were capable of producing siderophores, indole acetic acid, and hydrocyanic acid, and causing phosphate solubilization under normal growth conditions. These strains, when used as inoculants in groundnut, enhanced germination up to 15% and 30% with subsequent increase in grain yield by 66% and 77%, respectively. Conversely, when the pathogen alone was testeds 57% decrease in yield was recorded. Thus the studies revealed the potential of the two pseudomonads not only as biocontrol agents against M. phaseolina, but also as a good growth promoter for groundnut. PMID:18852515

  8. Bacteria on housefly eggs, Musca domestica, suppress fungal growth in chicken manure through nutrient depletion or antifungal metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Kevin; Thu, Kelsie; Tsang, Michelle; Moore, Margo; Gries, Gerhard

    2009-09-01

    Female houseflies, Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae), lay their eggs in ephemeral resources such as animal manure. Hatching larvae compete for essential nutrients with fungi that also colonize such resources. Both the well-known antagonistic relationship between bacteria and fungi and the consistent presence of the bacterium Klebsiella oxytoca on housefly eggs led us to hypothesize (1) that K. oxytoca, and possibly other bacteria on housefly eggs, help curtail the growth of fungal resource competitors and (2) that such fungi indeed adversely affect the development of housefly larvae. Bacteria washed from housefly eggs significantly reduced the growth of fungi in chicken manure. Nineteen bacterial strains and ten fungal strains were isolated from housefly eggs or chicken manure, respectively. Co-culturing each of all the possible bacterium-fungus pairs revealed that the bacteria as a group, but no single bacterium, significantly suppressed the growth of all fungal strains tested. The bacteria's adverse effect on fungi is due to resource nutrient depletion and/or the release of antifungal chemicals. Well-established fungi in resources significantly reduced the number of larval offspring that completed development to adult flies.

  9. Humanized anti-hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) antibody suppresses innate irinotecan (CPT-11) resistance induced by fibroblast-derived HGF.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jong Kyu; Kang, Ju-Hee; Kim, BoRa; Park, Byung Hee; Shin, Kum-Joo; Song, Seong-Won; Kim, Jung Ju; Kim, Hwan-Mook; Lee, Sang-Jin; Oh, Seung Hyun

    2015-09-15

    The growth factors derived from the microenvironment create an environment conducive to tumor growth and survival. HGF deprivation using neutralizing antibody enhanced chemosensitivity in colorectal cancer cells (CRC). We determined secreted HGF in fibroblast conditioned medium (CM). Combination treatment of anti-HGF antibody and irinotecan (CPT-11) directly enhanced CPT-11 sensitivity in CRC. We generated xenograft in NOD/SCID mice inoculating HCT-116 human colorectal cancer cells subcutaneously with or without fibroblast. We found that the combination of CPT-11 and anti-HGF antibody induced marked suppression of tumor development. These results suggest that HGF produced by fibroblast induce CPT-11 resistance, and that anti-HGF antibody abrogate such resistance in vivo. fibroblast-derived HGF is important determinant of chemoresistance. Anti-HGF monoclonal antibody treatment confirmed the importance of this growth factor for chemoresistance in CRC. These results present new options toward the early diagnosis of chemoresistance and suggest novel combinations of chemotherapy and anti-HGF agents to prevent or significantly delay the onset of therapy resistance.

  10. Silencing of E2F3 suppresses tumor growth of Her2+ breast cancer cells by restricting mitosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Miyoung; Oprea-Ilies, Gabriela; Saavedra, Harold I

    2015-11-10

    The E2F transcriptional activators E2F1, E2F2 and E2F3a regulate many important cellular processes, including DNA replication, apoptosis and centrosome duplication. Previously, we demonstrated that silencing E2F1 or E2F3 suppresses centrosome amplification (CA) and chromosome instability (CIN) in Her2+ breast cancer cells without markedly altering proliferation. However, it is unknown whether and how silencing a single E2F activator, E2F3, affects malignancy of human breast cancer cells. Thus, we injected HCC1954 Her2+ breast cancer cells silenced for E2F3 into mammary fat pads of immunodeficient mice and demonstrated that loss of E2F3 retards tumor growth. Surprisingly, silencing of E2F3 led to significant reductions in mitotic indices relative to vector controls, while the percentage of cells undergoing S phase were not affected. Nek2 is a mitotic kinase commonly upregulated in breast cancers and a critical regulator of Cdk4- or E2F-mediated CA. In this report, we found that Nek2 overexpression rescued back the CA caused by silencing of shE2F3. However, the effects of Nek2 overexpression in affecting tumor growth rates of shE2F3 and shE2F3; GFP cells were inconclusive. Taken together, our results indicate that E2F3 silencing decreases mammary tumor growth by reducing percentage of cells undergoing mitosis.

  11. Epidermal growth factor suppresses insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 levels in human papillomavirus type 16-immortalized cervical epithelial cells and thereby potentiates the effects of insulin-like growth factor 1.

    PubMed

    Hembree, J R; Agarwal, C; Eckert, R L

    1994-06-15

    Human ectocervical epithelial cells are a primary target for infection by oncogenic papillomaviruses, which are strongly implicated as causative agents in the genesis of cervical cancer. Growth factors have been implicated as agents that stimulate proliferation and enhance the possibility of malignant transformation. In the present study we utilize several human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16-immortalized ectocervical epithelial cell lines to investigate the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) on cell proliferation and the production of IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). ECE16-1 cells, an HPV16-immortalized/nontumorigenic cell line, maintained in defined medium, produce and release high levels of IGFBP-3 (38/42 kDa) as well as smaller amounts of a 24-kDa IGFBP. Supplementation of defined medium with EGF causes a dose-dependent increase in cell growth and a concomitant decrease in the levels of IGFBP-3 released into the culture medium. EGF suppression of IGFBP-3 is maintained even when EGF-stimulated cell growth is suppressed 67% due to the simultaneous presence of 3 ng/ml of TGF beta 1, indicating that EGF suppression of IGFBP-3 levels is independent of EGF effects on cell growth. EGF suppression of IGFBP-3 production is correlated with a reduction in IGFBP-3 mRNA level. In the presence of EGF, the growth response of the cells to ng amounts of IGF-I is significantly enhanced. Moreover, the simultaneous presence of both EGF and IGF-I reduces the level of IGFBP-3 more efficiently than EGF alone. We also observe that the IGFBP-3 level is decreased and the 24-kDa IGFBP level is increased in HPV16-positive tumorigenic versus nontumorigenic cell lines. This is the first report of EGF acting as a positive regulator of IGF-I action via the IGFBPs. On the basis of these findings, we propose that EGF stimulates ECE16-1 cell growth via a dual-action mechanism by (a) stimulating growth directly via the EGF mitogenic pathway and (b

  12. Insulin-like growth factor-1 endues monocytes with immune suppressive ability to inhibit inflammation in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Ge, Rong-Ti; Mo, Li-Hua; Wu, Ruijin; Liu, Jiang-Qi; Zhang, Huan-Ping; Liu, Zhigang; Liu, Zhanju; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2015-01-15

    The pathogenesis of some chronic inflammation such as inflammatory bowel disease is unclear. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) has active immune regulatory capability. This study aims to investigate into the mechanism by which IGF1 modulates the monocyte (Mo) properties to inhibit immune inflammation in the intestine. In this study, the production of IGF1 by intestinal epithelial cells was evaluated by real time RT-PCR and Western blotting. Mos were analyzed by flow cytometry. A mouse colitis model was created with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. The results showed that mouse IECs produced IGF1, which could be up regulated by exposure to CpG-ODN (CpG-oligodeoxynueleotides) in the culture. Culture the CpG-ODN-primed IEC cells and Mos or exposure of Mos to IGF1 in the culture induced the Mos to express IL-10. The IGF1-primed Mos showed the immune suppressive effect on inhibiting the immune inflammation in the mouse colon. In conclusion, the IGF1-primed Mos are capable of suppressing immune inflammation in the intestine.

  13. MeCP2 suppresses nuclear microRNA processing and dendritic growth by regulating the DGCR8/Drosha complex.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tian-Lin; Wang, Zhizhi; Liao, Qiuming; Zhu, Ying; Zhou, Wen-Hao; Xu, Wenqing; Qiu, Zilong

    2014-03-10

    Loss- and gain-of-function mutations of the X-linked gene MECP2 (methyl-CpG binding protein 2) lead to severe neurodevelopmental disorders in humans, such as Rett syndrome (RTT) and autism. MeCP2 is previously known as a transcriptional repressor by binding to methylated DNA and recruiting histone deacetylase complex (HDAC). Here, we report that MeCP2 regulates gene expression posttranscriptionally by suppressing nuclear microRNA processing. We found that MeCP2 binds directly to DiGeorge syndrome critical region 8 (DGCR8), a critical component of the nuclear microRNA-processing machinery, and interferes with the assembly of Drosha and DGCR8 complex. Protein targets of MeCP2-suppressed microRNAs include CREB, LIMK1, and Pumilio2, which play critical roles in neural development. Gain of function of MeCP2 strongly inhibits dendritic and spine growth, which depends on the interaction of MeCP2 and DGCR8. Thus, control of microRNA processing via direct interaction with DGCR8 represents a mechanism for MeCP2 regulation of gene expression and neural development.

  14. miR-144 suppresses the growth and metastasis of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma by targeting IRS1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xin; Cui, Chang-Lei; Chen, Wei-Lun; Fu, Zhong-Ying; Cui, Xiang-Yan; Gong, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has been suggested that microRNA-144 (miR-144) involved in tumor initiation, development and metastasis in various cancers. However, the biological roles and potential mechanisms of miR-144 in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) remain unclear. In the present study, we discovered that miR-144 expression levels in LSCC tissues were significantly lower than those of adjacent normal tissues. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-144 in LSCC cells inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion in vitro. Consistently, stable overexpression of miR-144 suppressed the growth of LSCC cell xenografts in vivo. Bioinformatic algorithms and luciferase reporter assays confirmed that insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) is a direct target of miR-144. Overexpreesion of miR-144 obviously decreased IRS1 expression thereby suppressing phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway activation. Further functional studies suggested that downregulation of IRS1 had similar effects as that of miR-144 overexpression, and upregulation of IRS1 partially reversed the inhibitory effects of miR-144. These findings suggested that miR-144 functioned as a tumor suppressor in LSCC by targeting IRS1, and that miR-144 might serve as a potential target for LSCC treatment. PMID:27069535

  15. Ponicidin suppresses HT29 cell growth via the induction of G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Du, Jie; Chen, Chunyou; Sun, Yiqun; Zheng, Lin; Wang, Wanchen

    2015-10-01

    Ponicidin is a diterpenoid extracted from the Chinese herb Isodon adenolomus, which has been reported as a therapeutic cytotoxic drug that may be used to treat various types of human cancer. The present study aimed to determine the antitumor effects of ponicidin, and to investigate its underlying mechanisms in colorectal cancer. The HT29 colorectal cancer cell line was used to detect the cytotoxicity of various doses of ponicidin. Cell proliferation was measured using a Cell Counting kit‑8 assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis analyses were performed using flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Western blot analysis was used to measure the expression levels of apoptosis‑associated proteins following treatment with ponicidin. Treatment with ponicidin significantly suppressed HT29 cell growth by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The AKT and MEK signaling pathways were also suppressed by ponicidin; however, the p38 signaling pathway was significantly activated. The expression levels of caspase 3 and Bax protein were markedly upregulated following treatment with ponicidin. These results suggest that ponicidin exerts significant antitumor effects via the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in colorectal cells. In conclusion, ponicidin acted as an inducer of apoptosis, and may be used as a therapeutic cytotoxic drug to treat human cancer, including colorectal cancer. PMID:26239027

  16. Ponicidin suppresses HT29 cell growth via the induction of G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    DU, JIE; CHEN, CHUNYOU; SUN, YIQUN; ZHENG, LIN; WANG, WANCHEN

    2015-01-01

    Ponicidin is a diterpenoid extracted from the Chinese herb Isodon adenolomus, which has been reported as a therapeutic cytotoxic drug that may be used to treat various types of human cancer. The present study aimed to determine the antitumor effects of ponicidin, and to investigate its underlying mechanisms in colorectal cancer. The HT29 colorectal cancer cell line was used to detect the cytotoxicity of various doses of ponicidin. Cell proliferation was measured using a Cell Counting kit-8 assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis analyses were performed using flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Western blot analysis was used to measure the expression levels of apoptosis-associated proteins following treatment with ponicidin. Treatment with ponicidin significantly suppressed HT29 cell growth by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The AKT and MEK signaling pathways were also suppressed by ponicidin; however, the p38 signaling pathway was significantly activated. The expression levels of caspase 3 and Bax protein were markedly upregulated following treatment with ponicidin. These results suggest that ponicidin exerts significant antitumor effects via the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in colorectal cells. In conclusion, ponicidin acted as an inducer of apoptosis, and may be used as a therapeutic cytotoxic drug to treat human cancer, including colorectal cancer. PMID:26239027

  17. Althaea rosea Cavanil and Plantago major L. suppress neoplastic cell transformation through the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor kinase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Sun; Cho, Sung-Dae; Shin, Ji-Ae; Kwon, Ki Han; Cho, Nam-Pyo; Shim, Jung-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    For thousands of years in Asia, Althaea rosea Cavanil (ARC) and Plantago major L. (PML) have been used as powerful non-toxic therapeutic agents that inhibit inflammation. However, the anticancer mechanisms and molecular targets of ARC and PML are poorly understood, particularly in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced neoplastic cell transformation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemopreventive effects and mechanisms of the methanol extracts from ARC (MARC) and PML (MPML) in EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation of JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells using an MTS assay, anchorage-independent cell transformation assay and western blotting. Our results showed that MARC and MPML significantly suppressed neoplastic cell transformation by inhibiting the kinase activity of the EGF receptor (EGFR). The activation of EGFR by EGF was suppressed by MARC and MPML treatment in EGFR(+/+) cells, but not in EGFR(-/-) cells. In addition, MARC and MPML inhibited EGF-induced cell proliferation in EGFR-expressing murine embryonic fibroblasts (EGFR(+/+)). These results strongly indicate that EGFR targeting by MARC and MPML may be a good strategy for chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic applications. PMID:22767187

  18. Brief Communication: Copper suppression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 is involved in the regression of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Li, Rui; Lin, Chen; Sun, Miao; Kang, Y James

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies revealed that copper (Cu)-induced regression of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is associated with enhanced activity in the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) signaling pathway. The mechanism by which Cu enhances the activity of VEGFR-1 pathway remains to be defined. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that Cu enhances the VEGFR-1 signaling pathway via suppression of the VEGFR-2 signaling pathway. Primary cultures of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to phenylephrine (PE) at a final concentration of 100 µM in cultures for 48 h to induce cell hypertrophy. The hypertrophic cardiomyocytes were exposed to copper sulfate at a final concentration of 5 µM Cu in cultures for 24 h. Western blot analysis showed that PE increased the protein levels of both VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2. Cu supplementation significantly reduced the increase in VEGFR-2, but had no effect on the elevation of VEGFR-1. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis found no difference in the mRNA levels between the VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 under the conditions defined above. This study thus demonstrated that Cu selectively suppressed PE-elevated VEGFR-2 levels likely via post-translational regulation, leading to the VEGFR-1 signaling pathway becoming dominant and thereby regressing cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. PMID:24903162

  19. RNA-binding motif protein 47 inhibits Nrf2 activity to suppress tumor growth in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, T; Isogaya, K; Sakai, S; Morikawa, M; Morishita, Y; Ehata, S; Miyazono, K; Koinuma, D

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins provide a new layer of posttranscriptional regulation of RNA during cancer progression. We identified RNA-binding motif protein 47 (RBM47) as a target gene of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in mammary gland epithelial cells (NMuMG cells) that have undergone the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. TGF-β repressed RBM47 expression in NMuMG cells and lung cancer cell lines. Expression of RBM47 correlated with good prognosis in patients with lung, breast and gastric cancer. RBM47 suppressed the expression of cell metabolism-related genes, which were the direct targets of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2; also known as NFE2L2). RBM47 bound to KEAP1 and Cullin 3 mRNAs, and knockdown of RBM47 inhibited their protein expression, which led to enhanced binding of Nrf2 to target genomic regions. Knockdown of RBM47 also enhanced the expression of some Nrf2 activators, p21/CDKN1A and MafK induced by TGF-β. Both mitochondrial respiration rates and the side population cells in lung cancer cells increased in the absence of RBM47. Our findings, together with the enhanced tumor formation and metastasis of xenografted mice by knockdown of the RBM47 expression, suggested tumor-suppressive roles for RBM47 through the inhibition of Nrf2 activity. PMID:26923328

  20. Althaea rosea Cavanil and Plantago major L. suppress neoplastic cell transformation through the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor kinase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Sun; Cho, Sung-Dae; Shin, Ji-Ae; Kwon, Ki Han; Cho, Nam-Pyo; Shim, Jung-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    For thousands of years in Asia, Althaea rosea Cavanil (ARC) and Plantago major L. (PML) have been used as powerful non-toxic therapeutic agents that inhibit inflammation. However, the anticancer mechanisms and molecular targets of ARC and PML are poorly understood, particularly in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced neoplastic cell transformation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemopreventive effects and mechanisms of the methanol extracts from ARC (MARC) and PML (MPML) in EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation of JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells using an MTS assay, anchorage-independent cell transformation assay and western blotting. Our results showed that MARC and MPML significantly suppressed neoplastic cell transformation by inhibiting the kinase activity of the EGF receptor (EGFR). The activation of EGFR by EGF was suppressed by MARC and MPML treatment in EGFR(+/+) cells, but not in EGFR(-/-) cells. In addition, MARC and MPML inhibited EGF-induced cell proliferation in EGFR-expressing murine embryonic fibroblasts (EGFR(+/+)). These results strongly indicate that EGFR targeting by MARC and MPML may be a good strategy for chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic applications.

  1. A novel mouse monoclonal antibody targeting ErbB2 suppresses breast cancer growth

    SciTech Connect

    Kawa, Seiji; Matsushita, Hirohisa; Ohbayashi, Hirokazu; Semba, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2009-07-03

    Overexpression of ErbB2 in breast cancer is associated with increased recurrence and worse prognosis. Accumulating evidences suggest that molecular targeted therapy is a promising anticancer strategy. In this study, we produced a novel anti-ErbB2 monoclonal antibody, 6G10, that recognized an epitope distinct from the trastuzumab binding site. 6G10 induced aggregation of BT474 breast cancer cells and inhibited proliferation of various breast cancer cell lines including BT474. A growth inhibition assay showed that 6G10 had EC{sub 50} values comparable to trastuzumab, indicating that the drugs have a similar level of potency. Furthermore, intraperitoneal administration of 6G10 completely inhibited the growth of xenografted tumors derived from BT474 and SK-BR-3 cells. These data suggested that 6G10 has great therapeutic potential and could be administered to patients alternatively, or synergistically, with trastuzumab.

  2. Suppression of Grain Growth by Additive in Nanostructured P-type Bismuth Antimony Tellurides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Qinyong; Chen, S.; Liu, W S; Lukas, K; Yan, X; Wang, H; Wang, D.; Opeil, C; Chen, Gang; Ren, Z. F.

    2011-01-01

    Grain growth is a major issue in the preparation of nanostructured bismuth-antimony-tellurides during hot pressing the nanopowders into dense bulk samples. To prevent grain agglomeration during ball milling and growth during hot pressing, organic agent (Oleic Acid, OA) as additive was added into the materials at the beginning of the ball milling process. With different concentrations of OA (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 wt%), grains with different sizes are obtained. Structural analysis clearly shows that it is the particle size of the nanopowders that determines the final grain size in the densely compacted bulk samples. A combination of small grains ~200–500 nm and nanopores leads to effective phonon scattering, which results in the decrease of lattice thermal conductivity, and ZT of ~1.3 at 373 K for the sample with 2.0 wt% OA.

  3. 1′-Acetoxychavicol acetate suppresses angiogenesis-mediated human prostate tumor growth by targeting VEGF-mediated Src-FAK-Rho GTPase-signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Li; Lai, Li; Chen, Jing; Wu, Yuanyuan; Yi, Zhengfang; Zhang, Jian; Qu, Weijing; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Liu, Mingyao

    2011-01-01

    Cancer therapeutic agents that are safe, effective and affordable are urgently needed. We describe that 1′-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), a component of Siamese ginger (Languas galanga), can suppress prostate tumor growth by largely abrogating angiogenesis. ACA suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced proliferation, migration, adhesion and tubulogenesis of primary cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. ACA also inhibited VEGF-induced microvessel sprouting from aortic rings ex vivo and suppressed new vasculature formation in Matrigel plugs in vivo. We further demonstrated that the mechanisms of this chavicol were to block the activation of VEGF-mediated Src kinase, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rho family of small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) (Rac1 and Cdc42 but not RhoA) in HUVECs. Furthermore, treatment of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) with ACA resulted in decreased cell viability and suppression of angiogenic factor production by interference with dual Src/FAK kinases. After subcutaneous administration to mice bearing human prostate cancer PC-3 xenografts, ACA (6 mg/kg/day) remarkably inhibited tumor volume and tumor weight and decreased levels of Src, CD31, VEGF and Ki-67. As indicated by immunohistochemistry and TUNEL analysis, microvessel density and cell proliferation were also dramatically suppressed in tumors from ACA-treated mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that ACA targets the Src-FAK-Rho GTPase pathway, leading to the suppression of prostate tumor angiogenesis and growth. PMID:21427164

  4. 1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate suppresses angiogenesis-mediated human prostate tumor growth by targeting VEGF-mediated Src-FAK-Rho GTPase-signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Li; Lai, Li; Chen, Jing; Wu, Yuanyuan; Yi, Zhengfang; Zhang, Jian; Qu, Weijing; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Liu, Mingyao

    2011-06-01

    Cancer therapeutic agents that are safe, effective and affordable are urgently needed. We describe that 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), a component of Siamese ginger (Languas galanga), can suppress prostate tumor growth by largely abrogating angiogenesis. ACA suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced proliferation, migration, adhesion and tubulogenesis of primary cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. ACA also inhibited VEGF-induced microvessel sprouting from aortic rings ex vivo and suppressed new vasculature formation in Matrigel plugs in vivo. We further demonstrated that the mechanisms of this chavicol were to block the activation of VEGF-mediated Src kinase, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rho family of small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) (Rac1 and Cdc42 but not RhoA) in HUVECs. Furthermore, treatment of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) with ACA resulted in decreased cell viability and suppression of angiogenic factor production by interference with dual Src/FAK kinases. After subcutaneous administration to mice bearing human prostate cancer PC-3 xenografts, ACA (6 mg/kg/day) remarkably inhibited tumor volume and tumor weight and decreased levels of Src, CD31, VEGF and Ki-67. As indicated by immunohistochemistry and TUNEL analysis, microvessel density and cell proliferation were also dramatically suppressed in tumors from ACA-treated mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that ACA targets the Src-FAK-Rho GTPase pathway, leading to the suppression of prostate tumor angiogenesis and growth.

  5. Disrupting Hypoxia-Induced Bicarbonate Transport Acidifies Tumor Cells and Suppresses Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Alan; Hulikova, Alzbeta; Ledaki, Ioanna; Snell, Cameron; Singleton, Dean; Steers, Graham; Seden, Peter; Jones, Dylan; Bridges, Esther; Wigfield, Simon; Li, Ji-Liang; Russell, Angela; Swietach, Pawel; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-07-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated clinically with therapeutic resistance and poor patient outcomes. One feature of tumor hypoxia is activated expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9), a regulator of pH and tumor growth. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that impeding the reuptake of bicarbonate produced extracellularly by CA9 could exacerbate the intracellular acidity produced by hypoxic conditions, perhaps compromising cell growth and viability as a result. In 8 of 10 cancer cell lines, we found that hypoxia induced the expression of at least one bicarbonate transporter. The most robust and frequent inductions were of the sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters SLC4A4 and SLC4A9, which rely upon both HIF1α and HIF2α activity for their expression. In cancer cell spheroids, SLC4A4 or SLC4A9 disruption by either genetic or pharmaceutical approaches acidified intracellular pH and reduced cell growth. Furthermore, treatment of spheroids with S0859, a small-molecule inhibitor of sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters, increased apoptosis in the cell lines tested. Finally, RNAi-mediated attenuation of SLC4A9 increased apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer spheroids and dramatically reduced growth of MDA-MB-231 breast tumors or U87 gliomas in murine xenografts. Our findings suggest that disrupting pH homeostasis by blocking bicarbonate import might broadly relieve the common resistance of hypoxic tumors to anticancer therapy. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3744-55. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197160

  6. A recombinant antibody-interleukin 2 fusion protein suppresses growth of hepatic human neuroblastoma metastases in severe combined immunodeficiency mice.

    PubMed

    Sabzevari, H; Gillies, S D; Mueller, B M; Pancook, J D; Reisfeld, R A

    1994-09-27

    A genetically engineered fusion protein consisting of a human/mouse chimeric anti-ganglioside GD2 antibody (ch14.18) and recombinant human interleukin 2 (rhIL-2) was tested for its ability to target rhIL-2 to tumor sites and stimulate immune effector cells sufficiently to achieve effective tumor cell lysis in vivo. The ch14.18-IL-2 fusion protein proved more effective than equivalent doses of rhIL-2 in suppressing dissemination and growth of human neuroblastoma in an experimental hepatic metastases model of scid (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice reconstituted with human lymphokine-activated killer cells. The ch14.18-IL-2 fusion protein was also more proficient than equivalent doses of rhIL-2 in prolonging the life-span of these animals. This recombinant antibody-cytokine fusion protein may prove useful for future treatment of GD2-expressing human tumors in an adjuvant setting.

  7. HRD1 suppresses the growth and metastasis of breast cancer cells by promoting IGF-1R degradation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yue-Mei; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Chen, Fang; Guo, Wan-Hua; Wang, Yan-Yang; Li, Hang-Yu; Tang, Jin-Hai; Ding, Ying; Shen, Ya-Chen; Li, Min; Xuan, Wen-Ying; Liu, Lin-Hui; Wang, Jia; Wang, Xue-Rong; Gao, Ze-Jun; Liang, Xiu-Bin; Su, Dong-Ming

    2015-12-15

    HRD1 (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl reductase degradation) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase. We found that HRD1 was significantly downregulated in 170 breast cancer tissues. Low tumoral HRD1 expression was correlated with clinicopathological characteristics and a shorter survival in breast cancer patients. P65 specifically bound to the HRD1 promoter and inhibited HRD1 expression. Suppression of NF-κB activity reversed IL-6-induced downregulation of HRD1 expression. HRD1 interacted with IGF-1R and promoted its ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome. Overexpression of HRD1 resulted in the inhibition of growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, HRD1 attenuated IL-6-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in MCF10A cells. These findings uncover a novel role for HRD1 in breast cancer.

  8. HRD1 suppresses the growth and metastasis of breast cancer cells by promoting IGF-1R degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ying; Shen, Ya-Chen; Li, Min; Xuan, Wen-Ying; Liu, Lin-Hui; Wang, Jia; Wang, Xue-Rong; Gao, Ze-Jun; Liang, Xiu-Bin; Su, Dong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    HRD1 (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl reductase degradation) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase. We found that HRD1 was significantly downregulated in 170 breast cancer tissues. Low tumoral HRD1 expression was correlated with clinicopathological characteristics and a shorter survival in breast cancer patients. P65 specifically bound to the HRD1 promoter and inhibited HRD1 expression. Suppression of NF-κB activity reversed IL-6-induced downregulation of HRD1 expression. HRD1 interacted with IGF-1R and promoted its ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome. Overexpression of HRD1 resulted in the inhibition of growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, HRD1 attenuated IL-6-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in MCF10A cells. These findings uncover a novel role for HRD1 in breast cancer. PMID:26536657

  9. Competition induces allelopathy but suppresses growth and anti-herbivore defence in a chemically rich seaweed

    PubMed Central

    Rasher, Douglas B.; Hay, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Many seaweeds and terrestrial plants induce chemical defences in response to herbivory, but whether they induce chemical defences against competitors (allelopathy) remains poorly understood. We evaluated whether two tropical seaweeds induce allelopathy in response to competition with a reef-building coral. We also assessed the effects of competition on seaweed growth and seaweed chemical defence against herbivores. Following 8 days of competition with the coral Porites cylindrica, the chemically rich seaweed Galaxaura filamentosa induced increased allelochemicals and became nearly twice as damaging to the coral. However, it also experienced significantly reduced growth and increased palatability to herbivores (because of reduced chemical defences). Under the same conditions, the seaweed Sargassum polycystum did not induce allelopathy and did not experience a change in growth or palatability. This is the first demonstration of induced allelopathy in a seaweed, or of competitors reducing seaweed chemical defences against herbivores. Our results suggest that the chemical ecology of coral–seaweed–herbivore interactions can be complex and nuanced, highlighting the need to incorporate greater ecological complexity into the study of chemical defence. PMID:24403332

  10. Challenge to the suppression of tumor growth by the β4-galactosyltransferase genes

    PubMed Central

    FURUKAWA, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    It has been well established that structural changes in glycans attached to proteins and lipids are associated with malignant transformation of cells. We focused on galactose residues among the sugars since they are involved in the galectin-mediated biology, and many carbohydrate antigens are frequently expressed on this sugar. We found changes in the expression of the β4-galactosyltransferase (β4GalT) 2 and 5 genes in cancer cells: decreased expression of the β4GalT2 gene and increased expression of the β4GalT5 gene. The growth of mouse melanoma cells showing enhanced expression of the β4GalT2 gene or reduced expression of the β4GalT5 gene is inhibited remarkably in syngeneic mice. Tumor growth inhibition is probably caused by the induction of apoptosis, inhibition of angiogenesis, and/or reduced MAPK signals. Direct transduction of human β4GalT2 cDNA together with the adenovirus vector into human hepatocellular carcinoma cells grown in SCID mice results in marked growth retardation of the tumors. β4GalT gene-transfer appears to be a potential tool for cancer therapy. PMID:25743061

  11. Dual mTOR inhibitor MLN0128 suppresses Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) xenograft tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Aarthi; Lin, Zhenyu; Shao, Qiang; Zhao, Stephanie; Fang, Bin; Moreno, Mauricio A; Vural, Emre; Stack, Brendan C; Suen, James Y; Kannan, Krishnaswamy; Gao, Ling

    2016-02-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer. Pathologic activation of PI3K/mTOR pathway and elevated expression of c-Myc are frequently detected in MCC. Yet, there is no targeted therapy presently available for this lethal disease. Recently, MLN0128, a second-generation dual TORC1/2 inhibitor is shown to have therapeutic efficacy in preclinical studies. MLN0128 is currently in clinical trials as a potential therapy for advanced cancers. Here we characterize the therapeutic efficacy of MLN0128 in the preclinical setting of MCC and delineate downstream targets of mTORC1/2 in MCC cellular systems. MLN0128 significantly attenuates xenograft MCC tumor growth independent of Merkel cell polyomavirus. Moreover, MLN0128 markedly diminishes MCC cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. Further investigations indicate that senescence does not contribute to MLN0128-mediated repression of xenograft MCC tumor growth. Finally, we also observe robust antitumor effects of MLN0128 when administered as a dual therapy with JQ1, a bromodomain protein BRD4 inhibitor. These results suggest dual blockade of PI3K/mTOR pathway and c-Myc axis is effective in the control of MCC tumor growth. Our results demonstrate that MLN0128 is potent as monotherapy or as a member of combination therapy with JQ1 for advanced MCC. PMID:26536665

  12. Competition induces allelopathy but suppresses growth and anti-herbivore defence in a chemically rich seaweed.

    PubMed

    Rasher, Douglas B; Hay, Mark E

    2014-02-22

    Many seaweeds and terrestrial plants induce chemical defences in response to herbivory, but whether they induce chemical defences against competitors (allelopathy) remains poorly understood. We evaluated whether two tropical seaweeds induce allelopathy in response to competition with a reef-building coral. We also assessed the effects of competition on seaweed growth and seaweed chemical defence against herbivores. Following 8 days of competition with the coral Porites cylindrica, the chemically rich seaweed Galaxaura filamentosa induced increased allelochemicals and became nearly twice as damaging to the coral. However, it also experienced significantly reduced growth and increased palatability to herbivores (because of reduced chemical defences). Under the same conditions, the seaweed Sargassum polycystum did not induce allelopathy and did not experience a change in growth or palatability. This is the first demonstration of induced allelopathy in a seaweed, or of competitors reducing seaweed chemical defences against herbivores. Our results suggest that the chemical ecology of coral-seaweed-herbivore interactions can be complex and nuanced, highlighting the need to incorporate greater ecological complexity into the study of chemical defence. PMID:24403332

  13. The Slit/Robo System Suppresses Hepatocyte Growth Factor-dependent Invasion and Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Comoglio, Paolo M.

    2009-01-01

    The Slit protein acts through the Roundabout receptor as a paracrine chemorepellent in axon guidance and as an inhibitor in leukocyte chemotaxis, but its role in epithelial cell motility and morphogenesis remains largely unexplored. We report that nontransformed epithelial cells and cancerous cells empower the Slit-2/Robo1 signaling system to limit outward migration in response to motogenic attractants and to remain positionally confined within their primitive location. Short hairpin RNA-mediated depletion of SLIT-2 or ectopic expression of a soluble decoy Robo enhance hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-induced migration, matrix invasion, and tubulogenesis, concomitantly with the up-regulation of Cdc-42 and the down-modulation of Rac-1 activities. Accordingly, autocrine overexpression or exogenous administration of Slit-2 prevent HGF-triggered motile responses, reduce Cdc-42 activation, and stimulate Rac-1. This antimigratory activity of Slit-2 derives from the inhibition of actin-based protrusive forces and from an increased adhesive strength of cadherin-mediated intercellular contacts. These results disclose a novel function for Slit and Robo in the inhibition of growth factor-mediated epithelial cell motility and morphogenesis, invoking a critical role for both molecules as natural antagonists of neoplastic invasive growth. PMID:19005219

  14. Suppression of Glioblastoma Angiogenicity and Tumorigenicity by Inhibition of Endogenous Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Huang, H.-J. Su; Nagane, Motoo; Ji, Xiang-Dong; Wang, Degui; Shih, Charles C.-Y.; Arap, Wadih; Huang, Chun-Ming; Cavenee, Webster K.

    1996-08-01

    The development of new capillary networks from the normal microvasculature of the host appears to be required for growth of solid tumors. Tumor cells influence this process by producing both inhibitors and positive effectors of angiogenesis. Among the latter, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has assumed prime candidacy as a major positive physiological effector. Here, we have directly tested this hypothesis in the brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme, one of the most highly vascularized human cancers. We introduced an antisense VEGF expression construct into glioblastoma cells and found that (i) VEGF mRNA and protein levels were markedly reduced, (ii) the modified cells did not secrete sufficient factors so as to be chemoattractive for primary human microvascular endothelial cells, (iii) the modified cells were not able to sustain tumor growth in immunodeficient animals, and (iv) the density of in vivo blood vessel formation was reduced in direct relation to the reduction of VEGF secretion and tumor formation. Moreover, revertant cells that recovered the ability to secrete VEGF regained each of these tumorigenic properties. These results suggest that VEGF plays a major angiogenic role in glioblastoma.

  15. Inhibitor of growth 4 suppresses colorectal cancer growth and invasion by inducing G1 arrest, inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and reversing epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Qu, Hui; Yin, Hong; Yan, Su; Tao, Min; Xie, Yufeng; Chen, Weichang

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have found that inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4), a tumor suppressor, is reduced in human colorectal cancer (CRC), and is inversely correlated with clinical Dukes' stage, histological grade, lymph node metastasis and microvessel density (MVD). However, its underlying mechanism remains undetermined. In the present study, we analyzed ING4 expression in a panel of human CRC cells using low (LS174T and SW480) and high (LoVo and SW620) metastatic cell lines. We demonstrated that both the low and high metastatic CRC cells exhibited a lower level of ING4 compared to the level in normal human colorectal mucous epithelial FHC cells. Furthermore, ING4 expression in high metastatic CRC cells was less than that in low metastatic CRC cells. We then generated a lentivirus construct expressing ING4 and green fluorescent protein (GFP), established a ING4-stably transgenic LoVo CRC cell line, and investigated the effect of lentiviral-mediated ING4 expression on high metastatic LoVo CRC cells. Gain-of-function studies revealed that ING4 significantly inhibited LoVo CRC cell growth and invasion in vitro and induced cell cycle G1 phase arrest. Moreover, ING4 obviously suppressed LoVo CRC subcutaneously xenografted tumor growth and reduced tumor MVD in vivo in athymic BALB/c nude mice. Mechanistically, ING4 markedly upregulated P21 and E-cadherin but downregulated cyclin E, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Snail1, N-cadherin and vimentin in the LoVo CRC cells. Our data provide compelling evidence that i) ING4 suppresses CRC growth possibly via induction of G1 phase arrest through upregulation of P21 cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor and downregulation of cyclin E as well as inhibition of tumor angiogenesis through reduction of IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF proangiogenic factors; ii) ING4 inhibits CRC invasion and metastasis probably via a switch from mesenchymal marker N-cadherin to epithelial marker E-cadherin through downregulation of

  16. Analysis and prediction of Multiple-Site Damage (MSD) fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A technique was developed to calculate the stress intensity factor for multiple interacting cracks. The analysis was verified through comparison with accepted methods of calculating stress intensity factors. The technique was incorporated into a fatigue crack growth prediction model and used to predict the fatigue crack growth life for multiple-site damage (MSD). The analysis was verified through comparison with experiments conducted on uniaxially loaded flat panels with multiple cracks. Configuration with nearly equal and unequal crack distribution were examined. The fatigue crack growth predictions agreed within 20 percent of the experimental lives for all crack configurations considered.

  17. Predicting Change in Postpartum Depression: An Individual Growth Curve Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Trey

    Recently, methodologists interested in examining problems associated with measuring change have suggested that developmental researchers should focus upon assessing change at both intra-individual and inter-individual levels. This study used an application of individual growth curve analysis to the problem of maternal postpartum depression.…

  18. Modified low density lipoproteins suppress production of a platelet-derived growth factor-like protein by cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, P L; DiCorleto, P E

    1986-01-01

    Cultured endothelial cells (EC) produce a platelet-derived growth factor-like protein (PDGF-c) that stimulates the growth of cultured cells of mesenchymal origin. We have examined the effect of native plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) and chemically modified LDL on production of PDGF-c by EC. Acetyl-LDL, but not native LDL, suppressed the production of PDGF-c by bovine aortic EC. Half-maximal inhibition was observed at a concentration of 25-75 micrograms of cholesterol per ml, and maximal inhibition (0-25% of control) at 150 micrograms of cholesterol per ml. EC treated with acetyl-LDL showed no morphological damage, there was no change in cell number, and the effect on production of PDGF-c was substantially reversed upon removal of the acetyl-LDL. The observed inhibition of PDGF-c production was specific, since total cellular and secreted protein synthesis were unaffected by acetyl-LDL. Acetyl-LDL suppressed PDGF-c production in both bovine aortic and human umbilical vein EC, but not in rat heart EC. This cell specificity correlated with the presence of scavenger receptors as measured by degradation of 125I-labeled acetyl-LDL and uptake of fluorescently labeled acetyl-LDL. Dimethylpropanediamine-LDL, a cationic modified lipoprotein, also inhibited PDGF-c production. The inhibition by both types of modified LDL was accompanied by significant intracellular cholesterol accumulation, suggesting a role for EC lipid composition in the regulation of production of PDGF-c. PMID:3460071

  19. miR-218 suppresses tumor growth and enhances the chemosensitivity of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hang; Hou, Lei; Xiong, Yu-Mei; Huang, Jun-Xiang; She, Ying-Jun; Bi, Xiao-Bao; Song, Xing-Rong

    2015-02-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that microRNA-218 (miR-218) acts as a tumor suppressor and is involved in tumor progression, development and metastasis and confers sensitivity to certain chemotherapeutic drugs in several types of cancer. However, our knowledge concerning the exact roles played by miR-218 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain relatively unclear. Thus, the aims of this study were to detect the expression of miR-218 in human ESCC tissues and explore its effects on the biological features and chemosensitivity to cisplatin (CDDP) in an ESCC cell line (Eca109), so as to provide new insights for ESCC treatment. Here, we found increased expression of miR-218 in the ESCC tissues compared with that in the matched non-tumor tissues, and its expression level was correlated with key pathological characteristics including clinical stage, tumor depth and metastasis. We also found that enforced expression of miR-218 significantly decreased cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion, induced cell apoptosis and arrested the cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase, as well as suppressed tumor growth in a nude mouse model. In addition, our results showed that miR-218 mimics increased the sensitivity to the antitumor effect of CDDP in the human Eca109 cells. Importantly, this study also showed that miR-218 regulated the expression of phosphorylated PI3K, AKT and mTOR, which may contribute to suppressed tumor growth of ESCC and enhanced sensitivity of ESCC cells. These findings suggest that miR-218 is a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of ESCC.

  20. Inhibition of MUC1-C Suppresses MYC Expression and Attenuates Malignant Growth in KRAS Mutant Lung Adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Bouillez, Audrey; Rajabi, Hasan; Pitroda, Sean; Jin, Caining; Alam, Maroof; Kharbanda, Akriti; Tagde, Ashujit; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Kufe, Donald

    2016-03-15

    Dysregulation of MYC expression is a hallmark of cancer, but the development of agents that target MYC has remained challenging. The oncogenic MUC1-C transmembrane protein is, like MYC, aberrantly expressed in diverse human cancers. The present studies demonstrate that MUC1-C induces MYC expression in KRAS mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, an effect that can be suppressed by targeting MUC1-C via shRNA silencing, CRISPR editing, or pharmacologic inhibition with GO-203. MUC1-C activated the WNT/β-catenin (CTNNB1) pathway and promoted occupancy of MUC1-C/β-catenin/TCF4 complexes on the MYC promoter. MUC1-C also promoted the recruitment of the p300 histone acetylase (EP300) and, in turn, induced histone H3 acetylation and activation of MYC gene transcription. We also show that targeting MUC1-C decreased the expression of key MYC target genes essential for the growth and survival of NSCLC cells, such as TERT and CDK4. Based on these results, we found that the combination of GO-203 and the BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ1, which targets MYC transcription, synergistically suppressed MYC expression and cell survival in vitro as well as tumor xenograft growth. Furthermore, MUC1 expression significantly correlated with that of MYC and its target genes in human KRAS mutant NSCLC tumors. Taken together, these findings suggest a therapeutic approach for targeting MYC-dependent cancers and provide the framework for the ongoing clinical studies addressing the efficacy of MUC1-C inhibition in solid tumors. PMID:26833129

  1. Dexamethasone suppresses the growth of human non-small cell lung cancer via inducing estrogen sulfotransferase and inactivating estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-jie; Li, Jian; Hao, Fang-ran; Yuan, Yin; Li, Jing-yun; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tian-yan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Dexamethasone (DEX) is a widely used synthetic glucocorticoid, which has shown anti-cancer efficacy and anti-estrogenic activity. In this study we explored the possibility that DEX might be used as an endocrine therapeutic agent to treat human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: The viability and proliferation of human NSCLC cell lines A549 and H1299 were assessed in vitro. Anti-tumor action was also evaluated in A549 xenograft nude mice treated with DEX (2 or 4 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) or the positive control tamoxifen (50 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 32 d. The expression of estrogen sulfotransferase (EST) in tumor cells and tissues was examined. The intratumoral estrogen levels and uterine estrogen responses were measured. Results: DEX displayed mild cytotoxicity to the NSCLC cells (IC50 >500 μmol/L) compared to tamoxifen (IC50 <50 μmol/L), but it was able to inhibit the cell proliferation at low micromolar ranges. Furthermore, DEX (0.1–10 μmol/L) dose-dependently up-regulated EST expression in the cells, and inhibited the cell migration in vitro. Triclosan, a sulfation inhibitor, was able to diminish DEX-caused inhibition on the cell viability. In A549 xenograft nude mice, DEX or tamoxifen administration remarkably suppressed the tumor growth. Moreover, DEX administration dose-dependently increased EST expression in tumor tissues, and reduced intratumoral estrogen levels as well as the volumes and weights of uterine. Conclusion: DEX suppresses the growth of A549 xenograft tumors via inducing EST and decreasing estradiol levels in tumor tissues, suggesting that DEX may be used as anti-estrogenic agent for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:27133297

  2. Adeno-associated virus-mediated expression of apolipoprotein (a) kringles suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyuhyun; Yun, Sung-Tae; Kim, Young-Gun; Yoon, Yeup; Jo, Eui-Cheol

    2006-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) constitutes more than 90% of all primary liver cancers. HCC is a hypervascular tumor that develops from dedifferentiation of small avascular HCC and is therefore a good target for anti-angiogenic gene therapy. Recent studies have identified apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] kringles LK68 and LK8 (LKs) as having a potential antiangiogenic and anti-tumor activity, and the current study evaluates the therapeutic potential of gene therapy with recombinant adeno-associated virus carrying genes encoding LKs (rAAV-LK) in the treatment of hypervascular HCC. We generated rAAV-LK to obtain persistent transgene expression in vivo, which is essential for anti-angiogenic therapy. The rAAV-produced LKs substantially inhibited proliferation and migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro, validating their anti-angiogenic potential. Intramuscular administration of rAAV-LK gave 60% to 84% suppression (P < .05) of tumor growth in mice bearing subcutaneously transplanted HCC derived from Huh-7 and Hep3B cells, respectively. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses of HCC tumor sections showed that a single administration of rAAV-LK gave rise to persistent expression of LKs that inhibited tumor angiogenesis and triggered tumor apoptosis, and, thus, significantly suppressed tumor growth. The administration of rAAV-LK provided a significant survival benefit (P < .05), and 3 of 10 rAAV-LK-treated mice were still alive without visible tumors and without clinical symptoms 188 days after treatment. In conclusion, rAAV-LK is a potential candidate for anti-angiogenic gene therapy in the treatment of HCC.

  3. Expression of the Elm1 Gene, a Novel Gene of the CCN (Connective Tissue Growth Factor, Cyr61/Cef10, and Neuroblastoma Overexpressed Gene) Family, Suppresses In Vivo Tumor Growth and Metastasis of K-1735 Murine Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Yasunobu; Shindo-Okada, Nobuko; Tani, Masachika; Nagamachi, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Kaori; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Toma, Hiroshi; Yokota, Jun

    1998-01-01

    We previously isolated a partial cDNA fragment of a novel gene, Elm1 (expressed in low-metastatic cells), that is expressed in low-metastatic but not in high-metastatic K-1735 mouse melanoma cells. Here we determined the full-length cDNA structure of Elm1 and investigated the effect of Elm1 expression on growth and metastatic potential of K-1735 cells. The Elm1 gene encodes a predicted protein of 367 amino acids showing ∼40% amino acid identity with the CCN (connective tissue growth factor [CTGF], Cyr61/Cef10, neuroblastoma overexpressed gene [Nov]) family proteins, which consist of secreted cysteine-rich proteins with growth regulatory functions. Elm1 is also a cysteine-rich protein and contains a signal peptide and four domains conserved in the CCN family proteins. Elm1 was highly conserved, expressed ubiquitously in diverse organs, and mapped to mouse chromosome 15. High-metastatic K-1735 M-2 cells, which did not express Elm1, were transfected with an Elm1 expression vector, and several stable clones with Elm1 expression were established. The in vivo growth rates of cells expressing a high level of Elm1 were remarkably slower than those of cells expressing a low level of Elm1. Metastatic potential of transfectants was reduced in proportion to the level of Elm1 expression. Thus, Elm1 is a novel gene of CCN family that can suppress the in vivo growth and metastatic potential of K-1735 mouse melanoma cells. PMID:9449709

  4. Herbal Extract SH003 Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metastasis of MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells by Inhibiting STAT3-IL-6 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sang-Mi; Park, Sunju; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Cancer inflammation promotes cancer progression, resulting in a high risk of cancer. Here, we demonstrate that our new herbal extract, SH003, suppresses both tumor growth and metastasis of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells via inhibiting STAT3-IL-6 signaling path. Our new herbal formula, SH003, mixed extract from Astragalus membranaceus, Angelica gigas, and Trichosanthes kirilowii Maximowicz, suppressed MDA-MB-231 tumor growth and lung metastasis in vivo and reduced the viability and metastatic abilities of MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro. Furthermore, SH003 inhibited STAT3 activation, which resulted in a reduction of IL-6 production. Therefore, we conclude that SH003 suppresses highly metastatic breast cancer growth and metastasis by inhibiting STAT3-IL-6 signaling path. PMID:24976685

  5. Transforming growth factor-beta suppresses tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression in monocytes.

    PubMed

    Vaday, G G; Schor, H; Rahat, M A; Lahat, N; Lider, O

    2001-04-01

    The inflammatory response is marked by the release of several cytokines with multiple roles in regulating leukocyte activities, including the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Although the effects of individual cytokines on monocyte MMP expression have been studied extensively, few studies have examined the influence of combinations of cytokines, which are likely present at inflammatory sites. Herein, we report our investigation of the combinatorial effects of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta on MMP-9 synthesis. We found that TGF-beta suppressed TNF-alpha-induced MMP-9 secretion by MonoMac-6 monocytic cells in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximal effect of TGF-beta observed at 1 ng/ml. Such suppression was likely regulated at the pretranslational level, because steady-state mRNA levels of TNF-alpha-induced MMP-9 were reduced by TGF-beta, and pulse-chase radiolabeling also showed a decrease in new MMP-9 protein synthesis. The suppressive effects of TGF-beta were time dependent, because short exposures to TNF-alpha before TGF-beta or simultaneous exposure to both cytokines efficiently reduced MMP-9 secretion. Expression of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 and TNF-alpha receptors was unaffected by either cytokine individually or in combination. Affinity binding with radiolabeled TGF-beta demonstrated that levels of TGF-beta receptors were not increased after preincubation with TGF-beta. Suppression of TNFalpha-induced MMP-9 secretion by TGF-beta correlated with a reduction in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) secretion. Furthermore, the effect of TGF-beta or indomethacin on blockage of TNF-alpha-stimulated MMP-9 production was reversed by the addition of either exogenous PGE2 or the cyclic AMP (cAMP) analogue Bt2cAMP. Thus, we concluded that TGF-beta acts as a potent suppressor of TNF-alpha-induced monocyte MMP-9 synthesis via a PGE2- and cAMP-dependent mechanism. These results suggest that various

  6. Predicting the Future: Studies on the Growth of the Intellect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ.

    This illustrated booklet describes research procedures in the Infant Laboratory of the Educational Testing Service to investigate measurable factors in infant behavior which can predict intellectual potential. The research is currently focusing on attending, the manner in which infants respond to various stimuli presented to them during their…

  7. The Pace of Vocabulary Growth Helps Predict Later Vocabulary Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Meredith L.; Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Children vary widely in the rate at which they acquire words--some start slow and speed up, others start fast and continue at a steady pace. Do early developmental variations of this sort help predict vocabulary skill just prior to kindergarten entry? This longitudinal study starts by examining important predictors (socioeconomic status [SES],…

  8. Suppression of maize root diseases caused by Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium moniliforme and Fusarium graminearum by plant growth promoting rhizobacteria.

    PubMed

    Pal, K K; Tilak, K V; Saxena, A K; Dey, R; Singh, C S

    2001-01-01

    A plant growth-promoting isolate of a fluorescent Pseudomonas sp. EM85 and two bacilli isolates MR-11(2) and MRF, isolated from maize rhizosphere, were found strongly antagonistic to Fusarium moniliforme, Fusarium graminearum and Macrophomina phaseolina, causal agents of foot rots and wilting, collar rots/stalk rots and root rots and wilting, and charcoal rots of maize, respectively. Pseudomonas sp. EM85 produced antifungal antibiotics (Afa+), siderophore (Sid+), HCN (HCN+) and fluorescent pigments (Flu+) besides exhibiting plant growth promoting traits like nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, and production of organic acids and IAA. While MR-11(2) produced siderophore (Sid+), antibiotics (Afa+) and antifungal volatiles (Afv+), MRF exhibited the production of antifungal antibiotics (Afa+) and siderophores (Sid+). Bacillus spp. MRF was also found to produce organic acids and IAA, solubilized tri-calcium phosphate and fixed nitrogen from the atmosphere. All three isolates suppressed the diseases caused by Fusarium moniliforme, Fusarium graminearum and Macrophomina phaseolina in vitro. A Tn5:: lacZ induced isogenic mutant of the fluorescent Pseudomonas EM85, M23, along with the two bacilli were evaluated for in situ disease suppression of maize. Results indicated that combined application of the two bacilli significantly (P = 0.05) reduced the Macrophomina-induced charcoal rots of maize by 56.04%. Treatments with the MRF isolate of Bacillus spp. and Tn5:: lacZ mutant (M23) of fluorescent Pseudomonas sp. EM85 significantly reduced collar rots, root and foot rots, and wilting of maize caused by Fusarium moniliforme and F. graminearum (P = 0.05) compared to all other treatments. All these isolates were found very efficient in colonizing the rhizotic zones of maize after inoculation. Evaluation of the population dynamics of the fluorescent Pseudomonas sp. EM85 using the Tn5:: lacZ marker and of the Bacillus spp. MRF and MR-11(2) using an antibiotic resistance

  9. The CREB binding protein inhibitor ICG-001 suppresses pancreatic cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Arensman, Michael D.; Telesca, Donatello; Lay, Anna R.; Kershaw, Kathleen M.; Wu, Nanping; Donahue, Timothy R.; Dawson, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly lethal cancer due in part to a lack of highly robust cytotoxic or molecular-based therapies. Recent studies investigating ligand-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling have highlighted its importance in pancreatic cancer initiation and progression, as well as its potential as a therapeutic target in PDAC. The small molecule ICG-001 binds CREB-binding protein (CBP) to disrupt its interaction with β-catenin and inhibit CBP function as a co-activator of Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription. Given its ability to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription in vitro and in vivo, as well as its efficacy in preclinical models of colorectal cancer and other Wnt-driven diseases, we examined ICG-001 and its potential role as a therapeutic in PDAC. ICG-001 alone significantly inhibited anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of multiple PDAC lines, and augmented in vitro growth inhibition when used in combination with gemcitabine. ICG-001 had only variable modest effects on PDAC apoptosis and instead mediated PDAC growth inhibition primarily through robust induction of G1 cell cycle arrest. These effects, however, appeared decoupled from its inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription. DNA microarrays performed on PDAC cells in the context of ICG-001 treatment revealed ICG-001 altered the expression of several genes with well-established roles in DNA replication and cell cycle progression, including direct actions on SKP2 and CDKN1A. ICG-001 also significantly prolonged survival in an in vivo orthotopic xenograft model of PDAC, indicating ICG-001 or derived compounds that disrupt CBP activity are potentially useful small molecule therapeutics for pancreatic cancer. PMID:25082960

  10. Frondoside A Suppressive Effects on Lung Cancer Survival, Tumor Growth, Angiogenesis, Invasion, and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Attoub, Samir; Arafat, Kholoud; Gélaude, An; Al Sultan, Mahmood Ahmed; Bracke, Marc; Collin, Peter; Takahashi, Takashi; Adrian, Thomas E.; De Wever, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge for oncologists and pharmacologists is to develop less toxic drugs that will improve the survival of lung cancer patients. Frondoside A is a triterpenoid glycoside isolated from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa and was shown to be a highly safe compound. We investigated the impact of Frondoside A on survival, migration and invasion in vitro, and on tumor growth, metastasis and angiogenesis in vivo alone and in combination with cisplatin. Frondoside A caused concentration-dependent reduction in viability of LNM35, A549, NCI-H460-Luc2, MDA-MB-435, MCF-7, and HepG2 over 24 hours through a caspase 3/7-dependent cell death pathway. The IC50 concentrations (producing half-maximal inhibition) at 24 h were between 1.7 and 2.5 µM of Frondoside A. In addition, Frondoside A induced a time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis in vitro. Frondoside A (0.01 and 1 mg/kg/day i.p. for 25 days) significantly decreased the growth, the angiogenesis and lymph node metastasis of LNM35 tumor xenografts in athymic mice, without obvious toxic side-effects. Frondoside A (0.1–0.5 µM) also significantly prevented basal and bFGF induced angiogenesis in the CAM angiogenesis assay. Moreover, Frondoside A enhanced the inhibition of lung tumor growth induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin. These findings identify Frondoside A as a promising novel therapeutic agent for lung cancer. PMID:23308143

  11. Lianas suppress seedling growth and survival of 14 tree species in a Panamanian tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Izquierdo, Laura; García, María M; Powers, Jennifer S; Schnitzer, Stefan A

    2016-01-01

    Lianas are a common plant growth form in tropical forests, where they compete intensely with trees, decreasing tree recruitment, growth, and survival. If the detrimental effects of lianas vary significantly with tree species identity, as is often assumed, then lianas may influence tree species diversity and community composition. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that liana abundance and biomass are increasing relative to trees in neotropical forests, which will likely magnify the detrimental effects of lianas and may ultimately alter tree species diversity, relative abundances, and community composition. Few studies, however, have tested the responses of multiple tree species to the presence of lianas in robust, well-replicated experiments. We tested the hypotheses that lianas reduce tree seedling growth and survival, and that the effect of lianas varies with tree species identity. We used a large-scale liana removal experiment in Central Panama in which we planted 14 replicate seedlings of 14 different tree species that varied in shade tolerance in each of 16 80 x 80 m plots (eight liana-removal and eight unmanipulated controls; 3136 total seedlings). Over a nearly two-yr period, we found that tree seedlings survived 75% more, grew 300% taller, and had twice the aboveground biomass in liana-removal plots than seedlings in control plots, consistent with strong competition between lianas and tree seedlings. There were no significant differences in the response of tree species to liana competition (i.e., there was no species by treatment interaction), indicating that lianas had a similar negative effect on all 14 tree species. Furthermore, the effect of lianas did not vary with tree species shade tolerance classification, suggesting that the liana effect was not solely based on light. Based on these findings, recently observed increases in liana abundance in neotropical forests will substantially reduce tree regeneration, but will not significantly alter

  12. Knockdown of PKM2 Suppresses Tumor Growth and Invasion in Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong; Zhu, Anyou; Zhang, Lunjun; Zhang, Jie; Zhong, Zhengrong; Wang, Fengchao

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that activity of the pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) isoform is closely related to tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigated the relationship between PKM2 expression, tumor invasion, and the prognosis of patients with lung adenocarcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed 65 cases of patients with lung adenocarcinoma who were divided into low and a high expression groups based on PKM2 immunohistochemical staining. High PKM2 expression was significantly associated with reduced patient survival. We used small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology to investigate the effect of targeted PKM2-knockout on tumor growth at the cellular level. In vitro, siRNA-mediated PKM2-knockdown significantly inhibited the proliferation, glucose uptake (25%), ATP generation (20%) and fatty acid synthesis of A549 cells, while the mitochondrial respiratory capacity of the cells increased (13%).Western blotting analysis showed that PKM2-knockout significantly inhibited the expression of the glucose transporter GLUT1 and ATP citrate lyase, which is critical for fatty acid synthesis. Further Western blotting analysis showed that PKM2-knockdown inhibited the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which are important in degradation of the extracellular matrix and angiogenesis, respectively. These observations show that PKM2 activates both glycolysis and lipid synthesis, thereby regulating cell proliferation and invasion. This information is important in elucidating the mechanisms by which PKM2 influences the growth and metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma at the cellular and molecular level, thereby providing the basic data required for the development of PKM2-targeted gene therapy.

  13. Lianas suppress seedling growth and survival of 14 tree species in a Panamanian tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Izquierdo, Laura; García, María M; Powers, Jennifer S; Schnitzer, Stefan A

    2016-01-01

    Lianas are a common plant growth form in tropical forests, where they compete intensely with trees, decreasing tree recruitment, growth, and survival. If the detrimental effects of lianas vary significantly with tree species identity, as is often assumed, then lianas may influence tree species diversity and community composition. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that liana abundance and biomass are increasing relative to trees in neotropical forests, which will likely magnify the detrimental effects of lianas and may ultimately alter tree species diversity, relative abundances, and community composition. Few studies, however, have tested the responses of multiple tree species to the presence of lianas in robust, well-replicated experiments. We tested the hypotheses that lianas reduce tree seedling growth and survival, and that the effect of lianas varies with tree species identity. We used a large-scale liana removal experiment in Central Panama in which we planted 14 replicate seedlings of 14 different tree species that varied in shade tolerance in each of 16 80 x 80 m plots (eight liana-removal and eight unmanipulated controls; 3136 total seedlings). Over a nearly two-yr period, we found that tree seedlings survived 75% more, grew 300% taller, and had twice the aboveground biomass in liana-removal plots than seedlings in control plots, consistent with strong competition between lianas and tree seedlings. There were no significant differences in the response of tree species to liana competition (i.e., there was no species by treatment interaction), indicating that lianas had a similar negative effect on all 14 tree species. Furthermore, the effect of lianas did not vary with tree species shade tolerance classification, suggesting that the liana effect was not solely based on light. Based on these findings, recently observed increases in liana abundance in neotropical forests will substantially reduce tree regeneration, but will not significantly alter

  14. Modeling pollen tube growth: feeling the pressure to deliver testifiable predictions.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Jens; Geitmann, Anja

    2011-11-01

    The frequency and amplitude of oscillatory pollen tube growth can be altered by changing the osmotic value of the surrounding medium. This has motivated the proposition that the periodic change in growth velocity is caused by changes in turgor pressure. Using mathematical modeling we recently demonstrated that the oscillatory pollen tube growth does not require turgor to change but that this behavior can be explained with a mechanism that relies on changes in the mechanical properties of the cell wall which in turn are caused by temporal variations in the secretion of cell wall precursors. The model also explains why turgor and growth rate are correlated for oscillatory growth with long growth cycles while they seem uncorrelated for oscillatory growth with short growth cycles. The predictions made by the model are testifiable by experimental data and therefore represent an important step towards understanding the dynamics of the growth behavior in walled cells.

  15. Estimated winter wheat yield from crop growth predicted by LANDSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanemasu, E. T.

    1977-01-01

    An evapotranspiration and growth model for winter wheat is reported. The inputs are daily solar radiation, maximum temperature, minimum temperature, precipitation/irrigation and leaf area index. The meteorological data were obtained from National Weather Service while LAI was obtained from LANDSAT multispectral scanner. The output provides daily estimates of potential evapotranspiration, transpiration, evaporation, soil moisture (50 cm depth), percentage depletion, net photosynthesis and dry matter production. Winter wheat yields are correlated with transpiration and dry matter accumulation.

  16. Overexpression of Brassica rapa SHI-RELATED SEQUENCE genes suppresses growth and development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hong, Joon Ki; Kim, Jin A; Kim, Jung Sun; Lee, Soo In; Koo, Bon Sung; Lee, Yeon-Hee

    2012-08-01

    S HI-R ELATED SEQUENCE (SRS) genes are plant-specific transcription factors containing a zinc-binding RING finger motif, which play a critical role in plant growth and development. We have characterized six SRS genes in Brassica rapa. Overexpression of the SRSs BrSTY1, BrSRS7, and BrLRP1 induced dwarf and compact plants, and significantly decreased primary root elongation and lateral root formation. Additionally, the transgenic plants had upward-curled leaves of narrow widths and with short petioles, and had shorter siliques and low fertility. In stems, hypocotyls, and styles, epidermal cell lengths were also significantly reduced in transgenic plants. RT-PCR analysis of transgenic plants revealed that BrSTY1, BrSRS7, and BrLRP1 regulate expression of several gibberellin (GA)- and auxin-related genes involved in morphogenesis in shoot apical regions. We conclude that BrSTY1, BrSRS7, and BrLRP1 regulate plant growth and development by regulating expression of GA- and auxin-related genes.

  17. Wwox suppresses breast cancer cell growth through modulation of the hedgehog–GLI1 signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Anwen; Wei, Li; Ying, Mingzhen; Wu, Hongmei; Hua, Jin; Wang, Yajie

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • We investigated Gli1 as a novel partner of Wwox. • We observed a physical association between Wwox and the Gli1. • Wwox–Gli1 interaction affects Gli1 intracellular localization. • Gli1 Blocks Wwox-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in T47D cells. - Abstract: Wwox is a tumor suppressor that is frequently deleted or altered in several cancer types, including breast cancer. Previous studies have shown that ectopic expression of Wwox inhibits proliferation of breast cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of Wwox function, we investigated novel partners of this protein. Utilizing the coimmunoprecipitation assay, we observed a physical association between Wwox and the Gli1 zinc-finger transcription factor involved in the hedgehog pathway. Our results further demonstrated that Wwox expression triggered redistribution of nuclear Gli1 to the cytoplasm. Additionally, ectopic expression of Wwox reduced Gli1 expression in vitro. Furthermore, Gli1 Blocks Wwox-induced breast cancer cell growth inhibition. These findings suggest a functional crosstalk between Wwox and hedgehog–GLI1 signaling pathway in tumorigenesis.

  18. Epigenetic re-expression of HIF-2α suppresses soft tissue sarcoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Nakazawa, Michael S.; Eisinger-Mathason, T. S. Karin; Sadri, Navid; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Gade, Terence P. F.; Amin, Ruchi K.; Simon, M. Celeste

    2016-01-01

    In soft tissue sarcomas (STS), low intratumoural O2 (hypoxia) is a poor prognostic indicator. HIF-1α mediates key transcriptional responses to hypoxia, and promotes STS metastasis; however, the role of the related HIF-2α protein is unknown. Surprisingly, here we show that HIF-2α inhibits high-grade STS cell growth in vivo, as loss of HIF-2α promotes sarcoma proliferation and increases calcium and mTORC1 signalling in undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma and dedifferentiated liposarcoma. We find that most human STS have lower levels of EPAS1 (the gene encoding HIF-2α) expression relative to normal tissue. Many cancers, including STS, contain altered epigenetics, and our findings define an epigenetic mechanism whereby EPAS1 is silenced during sarcoma progression. The clinically approved HDAC inhibitor Vorinostat specifically increases HIF-2α, but not HIF-1α, accumulation in multiple STS subtypes. Vorinostat inhibits STS tumour growth, an effect ameliorated by HIF-2α deletion, implicating HIF-2α as a biomarker for Vorinostat efficacy in STS. PMID:26837714

  19. Creep crack growth predictions in INCO 718 using a continuum damage model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, K. P.; Wilson, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Creep crack growth tests have been carried out in compact type specimens of INCO 718 at 1200 F (649 C). Theoretical creep crack growth predictions have been carried out by incorporating a unified viscoplastic constitutive model and a continuum damage model into the ARAQUS nonlinear finite element program. Material constants for both the viscoplastic model and the creep continuum damage model were determined from tests carried out on uniaxial bar specimens of INCO 718 at 1200 F (649 C). A comparison of the theoretical creep crack growth rates obtained from the finite element predictions with the experimentally observed creep crack growth rates indicates that the viscoplastic/continuum damage model can be used to successfully predict creep crack growth in compact type specimens using material constants obtained from uniaxial bar specimens of INCO 718 at 1200 F (649 C).

  20. Intracoronary photodynamic therapy reduces neointimal growth without suppressing re‐endothelialisation in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Waksman, R; Leitch, I M; Roessler, J; Yazdi, H; Seabron, R; Tio, F; Scott, R W; Grove, R I; Rychnovsky, S; Robinson, B; Pakala, R; Cheneau, E

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of intracoronary PhotoPoint photodynamic therapy (PDT) with a new photosensitiser, MV0611, in the overstretch balloon and stent porcine models of restenosis. Methods 28 pigs were injected with 3 mg/kg of MV0611 systemically 4 h before the procedure. Animals were divided into either the balloon overstretch injury (BI) group (n  =  19) or the stented group (n  =  9). After BI, a centred delivery catheter was positioned in the artery to cover the injured area, and light (532 nm, 125 J/cm2) was applied to activate the drug (n  =  10). Control arteries (n  =  9) were not activated by light. In the stented group, the drug was light activated before stent deployment. Serial sections of vessels were processed 14 days after treatment in the BI group and 30 days after treatment in the stented group for histomorphometric or immunohistochemical analysis. Results Intracoronary PDT significantly reduced intimal thickness in both BI and stented arteries (about 65%: 0.22 (SEM 0.05) mm v 0.62 (0.05) mm, p < 0.01; and about 26%: 0.40 (0.04) mm v 0.54 (0.04) mm, p < 0.01, respectively). PDT increased luminal area by ⩽ 60% and 50% within BI and stented arteries (3.43 (0.27) mm2v 5.51 (0.52) mm2, p < 0.05; 4.0 (0.02) mm2v 6.0 (0.16) mm2, p < 0.01), respectively. Complete re‐endothelialisation was observed by immunohistochemical and gross histological analyses in all PDT and control arteries. There were no cases of aneurysm formation or thrombosis. Conclusion Intracoronary PhotoPoint PDT with MV0611 reduces intimal proliferation without suppressing re‐endothelialisation in a porcine model of restenosis. PMID:16399853

  1. PGPIPN, a Therapeutic Hexapeptide, Suppressed Human Ovarian Cancer Growth by Targeting BCL2

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Cai; Tang, Yigui; Zheng, Xin; Ren, Mingqiang; Qin, Yide

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive peptides, either derived from nature resources or synthesized by rational design, have been demonstrated potential for therapeutic agents against numerous human diseases, including cancer. However, the mechanism of therapeutic peptides against cancer has not been well elucidated. Here we show that PGPIPN, a hexapeptide derived from bovine β-casein, inhibited the proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells line SKOV3 as well as the primary ovarian cancer cells in vitro. Consistently, PGPIPIN also decreased tumor growth rate in xenograft ovarian cancer model mice in a dose-dependent manner. Further study demonstrated that the anti-tumor effect of PGPIPN is partially through promoting cell apoptosis by inhibiting BCL2 pathway. Thus, our study suggests that PGPIPN is a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of ovarian cancer or other types of cancer. PMID:23593287

  2. Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng. seed extract suppresses breast cancer growth by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei; Zhang, Yanmin; Liu, Yanping; Yang, Xiaoyan Ou; Zhan, Yingzhuan

    2015-10-01

    The herb Momordica cochinchinensis has been used for a variety of purposes, and been shown to have anti‑cancer properties. The present study assessed the potency and the underlying mechanisms of action of the ethyl acetate extract of seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis (ESMC2) on breast cancer cells. Therefore, the effects of ESMC2 on the cell viability, cell cycle and apoptosis of MDA‑MB‑231 cells were investigated. The results showed that ESMC2 exerted a marked growth inhibitory effect on the cells. Cell cycle arrest in G2 phase following treatment with ESMC2 was associated with a marked increase in the protein levels of cyclin B1, cyclin E and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and a decrease in cyclin D1 expression. In addition, ESMC2 dose‑dependently induced cell apoptosis, which was mediated via upregulation of the apoptosis-associated proteins p53, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2)‑associated X protein, Bcl-2 homologous antagonist killer and Bcl-2-associated death promoter expression, as well as downregulation of nuclear factor kappa B, Bcl‑2 and myeloid cell leukemia‑1. Furthermore, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Akt phosphorylation were decreased by ESMC2 in a dose‑dependent manner, indicating that ESMC2 exerted its effects via the mitogen-activated protein kinase/JNK pathway. Furthermore, nude mouse xenotransplant models were used to evaluate the tumor growth inhibitory effects of ESMC2. The possible chemical components of ESMC2 were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and 12 compounds were detected from the major peaks based on the similarity index with entries of a compound database. The results of the present study may aid in the development of novel therapies for breast cancer. PMID:26252798

  3. Sustained-release genistein from nanostructured lipid carrier suppresses human lens epithelial cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Lu; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Li, Xue-Dong; Yang, Na; Pan, Wei-San; Kong, Jun; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    AIM To design and investigate the efficacy of a modified nanostructured lipid carrier loaded with genistein (Gen-NLC) to inhibit human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) proliferation. METHODS Gen-NLC was made by melt emulsification method. The morphology, particle size (PS), zeta potentials (ZP), encapsulation efficiency (EE) and in vitro release were characterized. The inhibition effect of nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC), genistein (Gen) and Gen-NLC on HLECs proliferation was evaluated by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, gene and protein expression of the proliferation marker Ki67 were evaluated with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and immunofluorescence analyses. RESULTS The mean PS of Gen-NLC was 80.12±1.55 nm with a mean polydispersity index of 0.11±0.02. The mean ZP was -7.14±0.38 mV and the EE of Gen in the nanoparticles was 92.3%±0.73%. Transmission electron microscopy showed that Gen-NLC displayed spherical-shaped particles covered by an outer-layer structure. In vitro release experiments demonstrated a prolonged drug release for 72h. The CCK-8 assay results showed the NLC had no inhibitory effect on HLECs and Gen-NLC displayed a much more prominent inhibitory effect on cellular growth compared to Gen of the same concentration. The mRNA and protein expression of Ki67 in LECs decreased significantly in Gen-NLC group. CONCLUSION Sustained drug release by Gen-NLCs may impede HLEC growth. PMID:27275415

  4. Epirubicin-gold nanoparticles suppress hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft growth in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Meng, William C. S.; Pan, Yunlong; Zhao, Xiaoxu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We sought to investigate the effects of epirubicin-nanogold compounds (EPI-AuNP) on hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft growth in nude mice. EPI-AuNP was prepared and hepatoma xenograft model was established in nude mice. The mice were then randomly divided into four groups: the control group with injection of saline, the AuNP treatment group, the EPI treatment group and the EPI-AuNP treatment group. After two weeks, the hepatoma weight and volume of the xenografts were assessed. Our transmission electron microscopy revealed that epirubicin-gold nanoparticles caused significantly more structural changes of hepatocellular carcinoma cells HepG2. The tumor weight in the Epi-AuNP treatment group (0.80±0.11 g) was significantly lower than that of the control group (2.48±0.15 g), the AuNP treatment group (1.67±0.17 g), and the EPI treatment group (1.39±0.10 g) (P<0.01). Furthermore, the tumor volume of mice in the EPI-AuNP treatment group (0.27±0.06 cm3) was significantly smaller than that of the control group (2.23±0.34 cm3), the AuNP treatment group (1.21±0.25 cm3) and the EPI treatment group (0.81±0.11 cm3) (P<0.01). In conclusion, epirubicin-nanogold compounds (EPI-AuNP) have significant inhibitory effects on the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vivo. PMID:26423611

  5. AT9283, a novel aurora kinase inhibitor, suppresses tumor growth in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenqing; Liu, Xiaobing; Cooke, Laurence S; Persky, Daniel O; Miller, Thomas P; Squires, Matthew; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2012-06-15

    Aurora kinases are oncogenic serine/threonine kinases that play key roles in regulating the mitotic phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Auroras are overexpressed in numerous tumors including B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and are validated oncology targets. AT9283, a pan-aurora inhibitor inhibited growth and survival of multiple solid tumors in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that AT9283 had potent activity against Aurora B in a variety of aggressive B-(non-Hodgkin lymphoma) B-NHL cell lines. Cells treated with AT9283 exhibited endoreduplication confirming the mechanism of action of an Aurora B inhibitor. Also, treatment of B-NHL cell lines with AT9283 induced apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner and inhibited cell proliferation with an IC(50) < 1 μM. It is well known that inhibition of auroras (A or B) synergistically enhances the effects of microtubule targeting agents such as taxanes and vinca alkaloids to induce antiproliferation and apoptosis. We evaluated whether AT9283 in combination with docetaxel is more efficient in inducing apoptosis than AT9283 or docetaxel alone. At very low doses (5 nM) apoptosis was doubled in the combination (23%) compared to AT9283 or docetaxel alone (10%). A mouse xenograft model of mantle cell lymphoma demonstrated that AT9283 at 15 mg/kg and docetaxel (10 mg/kg) alone had modest anti-tumor activity. However, AT9283 at 20 mg/kg and AT9283 (15 or 20 mg/kg) plus docetaxel (10 mg/kg) demonstrated a statistically significant tumor growth inhibition and enhanced survival. Together, our results suggest that AT9283 plus docetaxel may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in B-cell NHL and warrant early phase clinical trial evaluation. PMID:21796626

  6. Tetrandrine inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling and suppresses tumor growth of human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Bai-Cheng; Gao, Jian-Li; Zhang, Bing-Qiang; Luo, Qing; Shi, Qiong; Kim, Stephanie H; Huang, Enyi; Gao, Yanhong; Yang, Ke; Wagner, Eric R; Wang, Linyuan; Tang, Ni; Luo, Jinyong; Liu, Xing; Li, Mi; Bi, Yang; Shen, Jikun; Luther, Gaurav; Hu, Ning; Zhou, Qixin; Luu, Hue H; Haydon, Rex C; Zhao, Yingming; He, Tong-Chuan

    2011-02-01

    As one of the most common malignancies, colon cancer is initiated by abnormal activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Although the treatment options have increased for some patients, overall progress has been modest. Thus, there is a great need to develop new treatments. We have found that bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid tetrandrine (TET) exhibits anticancer activity. TET is used as a calcium channel blocker to treat hypertensive and arrhythmic conditions in Chinese medicine. Here, we investigate the molecular basis underlying TET's anticancer activity. We compare TET with six chemotherapy drugs in eight cancer lines and find that TET exhibits comparable anticancer activities with camptothecin, vincristine, paclitaxel, and doxorubicin, and better than that of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and carboplatin. TET IC₅₀ is ≤5 μM in most of the tested cancer lines. TET exhibits synergistic anticancer activity with 5-FU and reduces migration and invasion capabilities of HCT116 cells. Furthermore, TET induces apoptosis and inhibits xenograft tumor growth of colon cancer. TET treatment leads to a decrease in β-catenin protein level in xenograft tumors, which is confirmed by T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancer factor and c-Myc reporter assays. It is noteworthy that HCT116 cells with allelic oncogenic β-catenin deleted are less sensitive to TET-mediated inhibition of proliferation, viability, and xenograft tumor growth. Thus, our findings strongly suggest that the anticancer effect of TET in colon cancer may be at least in part mediated by targeting β-catenin activity. Therefore, TET may be used alone or in combination as an effective anticancer agent. PMID:20978119

  7. Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng. seed extract suppresses breast cancer growth by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei; Zhang, Yanmin; Liu, Yanping; Yang, Xiaoyan Ou; Zhan, Yingzhuan

    2015-10-01

    The herb Momordica cochinchinensis has been used for a variety of purposes, and been shown to have anti‑cancer properties. The present study assessed the potency and the underlying mechanisms of action of the ethyl acetate extract of seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis (ESMC2) on breast cancer cells. Therefore, the effects of ESMC2 on the cell viability, cell cycle and apoptosis of MDA‑MB‑231 cells were investigated. The results showed that ESMC2 exerted a marked growth inhibitory effect on the cells. Cell cycle arrest in G2 phase following treatment with ESMC2 was associated with a marked increase in the protein levels of cyclin B1, cyclin E and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and a decrease in cyclin D1 expression. In addition, ESMC2 dose‑dependently induced cell apoptosis, which was mediated via upregulation of the apoptosis-associated proteins p53, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2)‑associated X protein, Bcl-2 homologous antagonist killer and Bcl-2-associated death promoter expression, as well as downregulation of nuclear factor kappa B, Bcl‑2 and myeloid cell leukemia‑1. Furthermore, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Akt phosphorylation were decreased by ESMC2 in a dose‑dependent manner, indicating that ESMC2 exerted its effects via the mitogen-activated protein kinase/JNK pathway. Furthermore, nude mouse xenotransplant models were used to evaluate the tumor growth inhibitory effects of ESMC2. The possible chemical components of ESMC2 were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and 12 compounds were detected from the major peaks based on the similarity index with entries of a compound database. The results of the present study may aid in the development of novel therapies for breast cancer.

  8. PLACENTAL GROWTH FACTOR ATTENUATES SUPPRESSION OF ERYTHROID COLONY FORMATION BY INTERFERON

    PubMed Central

    Dallalio, Gail; Means, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Placental growth factor (PlGF) is a member of the vascular endothelial growth factor family and is associated with inflammation and with pathologic angiogenesis. PlGF is released from marrow erythroid cells and serum PlGF concentrations have been reported to distinguish sickle cell patients from healthy controls. We observed that CFU-E from homozygous sickle cell (SS) patients are less sensitive to inhibition by recombinant human (rh) γ interferon (IFN) than those from healthy controls, and the contribution of PlGF to this process was evaluated. At concentrations 10 – 1000 pg/mL, PlGF neither inhibits nor enhances CFU-E colony formation, and there were no differences between the responses of SS patients or healthy controls. rhPlGF 100 pg/mL reversed the inhibitory effects of rhγIFN on CFU-E colony formation. rhPlGF significantly attenuated rhγIFN induction of Fas ligandin an erythroid cell line (HCD57). Both HCD57 cells and CD36+ human marrow cells express Flt-1, a receptor for PlGF. Neutralizing antibody against Flt-1 partially attenuated the IFN-protective effect of rhPlGF, although this effect was not statistically significant. In conclusion, increased PlGF concentrations in the marrow of SS patients may protect erythroid progenitors from cytokine-induced inhibition of colony formation, and may be a mechanism by which erythropoiesis in sickle cell disease is preserved despite concurrent inflammation. PMID:19010294

  9. Mechanism of gemcitabine-induced suppression of human cholangiocellular carcinoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Yuka; Iwama, Hisakazu; Kato, Kiyohito; Tani, Joji; Katsura, Akiko; Miyata, Miwa; Fujiwara, Shintaro; Fujita, Koji; Sakamoto, Teppei; Fujimori, Takayuki; Okura, Ryoichi; Kobayashi, Kiyoyuki; Tadokoro, Tomoko; Mimura, Shima; Nomura, Takako; Miyoshi, Hisaaki; Morishita, Asahiro; Kamada, Hideki; Yoneyama, Hirohito; Okano, Keiichi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2015-10-01

    Although gemcitabine (2',2'-difluorocytidine monohydrochloride) is a common anticancer agent of cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC), its growth inhibitory effects and gemcitabine resistance in CCC cells are poorly understood. Our aims were to uncover the mechanism underlying the antitumor effect of gemcitabine and to analyze the mechanism regulating in vitro CCC cell gemcitabine resistance. In addition, we sought to identify miRNAs associated with the antitumor effects of gemcitabine in CCCs. Using a cell proliferation assay and flow cytometry, we examined the ability of gemcitabine to inhibit cell proliferation in three types of human CCC cell lines (HuCCT-1, Huh28, TKKK). We also employed western blotting to investigate the effects of gemcitabine on cell cycle-related molecules in CCC cells. In addition, we used array chips to assess gemcitabine-mediated changes in angiogenic molecules and activated tyrosine kinase receptors in CCC cells. We used miRNA array chips to comprehensively analyze gemcitabine-induced miRNAs and examined clusters of differentially expressed miRNAs in cells with and without gemcitabine treatment. Gemcitabine inhibited cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner in HuCCT-1 cells, whereas cell proliferation was unchanged in Huh28 and TKKK cells. Gemcitabine inhibited cell cycle progression in HuCCT-1 cells from G0/G1 to S phase, resulting in G1 cell cycle arrest due to the reduction of cyclin D1 expression. In addition, gemcitabine upregulated the angiogenic molecules IL-6, IL-8, ENA-78 and MCP-1. In TKKK cells, by contrast, gemcitabine did not arrest the cell cycle or modify angiogenic molecules. Furthermore, in gemcitabine-sensitive HuCCT-1 cells, gemcitabine markedly altered miRNA expression. The miRNAs and angiogenic molecules altered by gemcitabine contribute to the inhibition of tumor growth in vitro.

  10. AT9283, a novel aurora kinase inhibitor, suppresses tumor growth in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenqing; Liu, Xiaobing; Cooke, Laurence S; Persky, Daniel O; Miller, Thomas P; Squires, Matthew; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2012-06-15

    Aurora kinases are oncogenic serine/threonine kinases that play key roles in regulating the mitotic phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Auroras are overexpressed in numerous tumors including B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and are validated oncology targets. AT9283, a pan-aurora inhibitor inhibited growth and survival of multiple solid tumors in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that AT9283 had potent activity against Aurora B in a variety of aggressive B-(non-Hodgkin lymphoma) B-NHL cell lines. Cells treated with AT9283 exhibited endoreduplication confirming the mechanism of action of an Aurora B inhibitor. Also, treatment of B-NHL cell lines with AT9283 induced apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner and inhibited cell proliferation with an IC(50) < 1 μM. It is well known that inhibition of auroras (A or B) synergistically enhances the effects of microtubule targeting agents such as taxanes and vinca alkaloids to induce antiproliferation and apoptosis. We evaluated whether AT9283 in combination with docetaxel is more efficient in inducing apoptosis than AT9283 or docetaxel alone. At very low doses (5 nM) apoptosis was doubled in the combination (23%) compared to AT9283 or docetaxel alone (10%). A mouse xenograft model of mantle cell lymphoma demonstrated that AT9283 at 15 mg/kg and docetaxel (10 mg/kg) alone had modest anti-tumor activity. However, AT9283 at 20 mg/kg and AT9283 (15 or 20 mg/kg) plus docetaxel (10 mg/kg) demonstrated a statistically significant tumor growth inhibition and enhanced survival. Together, our results suggest that AT9283 plus docetaxel may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in B-cell NHL and warrant early phase clinical trial evaluation.

  11. Cisplatin suppresses the growth and proliferation of breast and cervical cancer cell lines by inhibiting integrin β5-mediated glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaojia; Xie, Jie; Li, Jiajia; Liu, Fei; Wu, Xiaohua; Wang, Ziliang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells harbor lower energy consumption after rounds of anticancer drugs, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we investigated metabolic alterations in cancer cells exposed to cisplatin. The present study exhibited cisplatin, known as a chemotherapeutic agent interacting with DNA, also acted as an anti-metabolic agent. We found that glycolysis levels of breast and cervical cancer cells were reduced after cisplatin treatment, resulting in cells growth and proliferation inhibition. We demonstrated that cisplatin suppressed glycolysis-related proteins expression, including glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB), through down-regulating integrin β5 (ITGB5)/focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway. ITGB5 overexpression rescued cisplatin-induced inhibition of cancer cell glycolysis, growth and proliferation. Conclusively, we reveal a novel insight into cisplatin-induced anticancer mechanism, suggesting alternative strategies to the current therapeutic approaches of targeting ITGB5, as well as of a combination of cisplatin with glucose up-regulation chemotherapeutic agents to enhance anticancer effect. PMID:27294003

  12. Halofuginone inhibits colorectal cancer growth through suppression of Akt/mTORC1 signaling and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guo-Qing; Tang, Cheng-Fang; Shi, Xiao-Ke; Lin, Cheng-Yuan; Fatima, Sarwat; Pan, Xiao-Hua; Yang, Da-Jian; Zhang, Ge; Lu, Ai-Ping; Lin, Shu-Hai; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2015-09-15

    The Akt/mTORC1 pathway plays a central role in the activation of Warburg effect in cancer. Here, we present for the first time that halofuginone (HF) treatment inhibits colorectal cancer (CRC) growth both in vitro and in vivo through regulation of Akt/mTORC1 signaling pathway. Halofuginone treatment of human CRC cells inhibited cell proliferation, induced the generation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis. As expected, reduced level of NADPH was also observed, at least in part due to inactivation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in pentose phosphate pathway upon HF treatment. Given these findings, we further investigated metabolic regulation of HF through Akt/mTORC1-mediated aerobic glycolysis and found that HF downregulated Akt/mTORC1 signaling pathway. Moreover, metabolomics delineated the slower rates in both glycolytic flux and glucose-derived tricarboxylic acid cycle flux. Meanwhile, both glucose transporter GLUT1 and hexokinase-2 in glycolysis were suppressed in CRC cells upon HF treatment, to support our notion that HF regulates Akt/mTORC1 signaling pathway to dampen glucose uptake and glycolysis in CRC cells. Furthermore, HF retarded tumor growth in nude mice inoculated with HCT116 cells, showing the anticancer activity of HF through metabolic regulation of Akt/mTORC1 in CRC. PMID:26160839

  13. Xanthohumol inhibits STAT3 activation pathway leading to growth suppression and apoptosis induction in human cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dokduang, Hasaya; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Namwat, Nisana; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Sangkhamanon, Sakkarn; Yageta, Mika Sakurai; Murakami, Yoshinori; Loilome, Watcharin

    2016-04-01

    STAT3 plays a significant role in the development of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) associated with the liver fluke (Opisthorchis viverrini; Ov). Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated flavonoid extracted from hops, has known anticancer activity and could potentially target STAT3. The present study determined the effect of XN on STAT3, as well as ascertained its usefulness against CCA. The CCA cell proliferation at 20 µM and 50 µM of XN was shown to inhibited, while 20 µM partially inhibited IL-6-induced STAT3 activation. At 50 µM, the inhibition was complete. The reduction in STAT3 activity at 20 and 50 µM was associated with a significant reduction of CCA cell growth and apoptosis. We also found that the administration of 50 µM XN orally in drinking water to nude mice inoculated with CCA led to a reduction in tumor growth in comparison with controls. In addition, apoptosis of cancer cells increased although there was no visible toxicity. The present study shows that XN can inhibit STAT3 activation both in vivo and in vitro due to suppression of the Akt-NFκB signaling pathway. XN should be considered as a possible therapeutic agent against CCA. PMID:26794001

  14. Suppression of grain growth in nanocrystalline Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} through oxide particle dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Humphry-Baker, Samuel A.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2014-11-07

    The strategy of suppressing grain growth by dispersing nanoscale particles that pin the grain boundaries is demonstrated in a nanocrystalline thermoelectric compound. Yttria nanoparticles that were incorporated by mechanical alloying enabled nanocrystalline (i.e., d < 100 nm) Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} to be retained up to a homologous temperature of 0.94 T{sub m} for durations over which the grain size of the unreinforced compound grew to several microns. The nanostructure appeared to saturate at a grain size that depended on volume fraction (f) according to an f {sup −1/3} relationship, in accordance with theoretical models in the limit of high volume fractions of particles. Interestingly, at low temperatures, the particles stimulate enhanced grain growth over the unreinforced compound, due to particle-stimulated nucleation of recrystallization. To help prevent this effect, in-situ composites formed by internal oxidation of yttrium are compared with those made ex-situ by incorporation of yttria nanoparticles, with the result that the in-situ dispersion eliminates recrystallization at low temperatures and therefore improves nanostructure stabilization. These developments offer a pathway to thermally stabilized bulk nanocrystalline thermoelectrics processed via a powder route.

  15. Silencing of CDC20 suppresses metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer growth and enhances chemosensitivity to docetaxel.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Mao, Yunhua; Lu, Li; Hu, Cheng; Wang, Dejuan; Si-Tu, Jie; Lu, Minhua; Peng, Shubin; Qiu, Jianguang; Gao, Xin

    2016-10-01

    The role of cell division cycle 20 (CDC20) was investigated in chemoresistance to decetaxel and the underlying mechanisms in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). MTT assays were performed to determine effects of siRNA-mediated CDC20 knockdown on cell proliferation and anticancer activity of docetaxel. Western blot analyses were conducted to detect changes of Akt and Wnt signaling. Furthermore, in vivo growth of PCa was examined in nude mice treated with siCDC20 or docetaxel alone or in combination. CDC20 was overexpressed in mCRPC cells. Knockdown of CDC20 suppressed cell proliferation and enhanced anticancer effect of docetaxel with IC50 reducing from 0.358 to 0.188 µg/ml in PC3 cells and 0.307 to 0.162 µg/ml in DU145 cells (P<0.01). While no change of Akt signaling was observed, inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling was detected upon CDC20 silencing. Xenograft tumor growth was significantly reduced in nude mice by CDC20 inhibition. The additional treatment of siCDC20 achieved better anticancer effects than that of docetaxel alone. Silencing of CDC20 may be a new strategy to improve chemosensitization to docetaxel in mCRPC. PMID:27633058

  16. Knockdown of asparagine synthetase by RNAi suppresses cell growth in human melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhou, Fusheng; Du, Wenhui; Dou, Jinfa; Xu, Yu; Gao, Wanwan; Chen, Gang; Zuo, Xianbo; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Xuejun; Yang, Sen

    2016-05-01

    Melanoma, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, causes more than 40,000 deaths each year worldwide. And epidermoid carcinoma is another major form of skin cancer, which could be studied together with melanoma in several aspects. Asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the glutamine- and ATP-dependent conversion of aspartic acid to asparagine, and its expression is associated with the chemotherapy resistance and prognosis in several human cancers. The present study aims to explore the potential role of ASNS in melanoma cells A375 and human epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431. We applied a lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) system to study its function in cell growth of both cells. The results revealed that inhibition of ASNS expression by RNAi significantly suppressed the growth of melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells, and induced a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in melanoma cells. Knockdown of ASNS in A375 cells remarkably downregulated the expression levels of CDK4, CDK6, and Cyclin D1, and upregulated the expression of p21. Therefore, our study provides evidence that ASNS may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma.

  17. Cisplatin suppresses the growth and proliferation of breast and cervical cancer cell lines by inhibiting integrin β5-mediated glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaojia; Xie, Jie; Li, Jiajia; Liu, Fei; Wu, Xiaohua; Wang, Ziliang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells harbor lower energy consumption after rounds of anticancer drugs, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we investigated metabolic alterations in cancer cells exposed to cisplatin. The present study exhibited cisplatin, known as a chemotherapeutic agent interacting with DNA, also acted as an anti-metabolic agent. We found that glycolysis levels of breast and cervical cancer cells were reduced after cisplatin treatment, resulting in cells growth and proliferation inhibition. We demonstrated that cisplatin suppressed glycolysis-related proteins expression, including glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB), through down-regulating integrin β5 (ITGB5)/focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway. ITGB5 overexpression rescued cisplatin-induced inhibition of cancer cell glycolysis, growth and proliferation. Conclusively, we reveal a novel insight into cisplatin-induced anticancer mechanism, suggesting alternative strategies to the current therapeutic approaches of targeting ITGB5, as well as of a combination of cisplatin with glucose up-regulation chemotherapeutic agents to enhance anticancer effect. PMID:27294003

  18. Knockdown of asparagine synthetase by RNAi suppresses cell growth in human melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhou, Fusheng; Du, Wenhui; Dou, Jinfa; Xu, Yu; Gao, Wanwan; Chen, Gang; Zuo, Xianbo; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Xuejun; Yang, Sen

    2016-05-01

    Melanoma, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, causes more than 40,000 deaths each year worldwide. And epidermoid carcinoma is another major form of skin cancer, which could be studied together with melanoma in several aspects. Asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the glutamine- and ATP-dependent conversion of aspartic acid to asparagine, and its expression is associated with the chemotherapy resistance and prognosis in several human cancers. The present study aims to explore the potential role of ASNS in melanoma cells A375 and human epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431. We applied a lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) system to study its function in cell growth of both cells. The results revealed that inhibition of ASNS expression by RNAi significantly suppressed the growth of melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells, and induced a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in melanoma cells. Knockdown of ASNS in A375 cells remarkably downregulated the expression levels of CDK4, CDK6, and Cyclin D1, and upregulated the expression of p21. Therefore, our study provides evidence that ASNS may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:25858017

  19. Bed rest suppresses bioassayable growth hormone release in response to muscle activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, G. E.; Goulet, C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Hodgson, J. A.; Bigbee, A. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    Hormonal responses to muscle activity were studied in eight men before (-13 or -12 and -8 or -7 days), during (2 or 3, 8 or 9, and 13 or 14 days) and after (+2 or +3 and +10 or +11 days) 17 days of bed rest. Muscle activity consisted of a series of unilateral isometric plantar flexions, including 4 maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), 48 contractions at 30% MVC, and 12 contractions at 80% MVC, all performed at a 4:1-s work-to-rest ratio. Blood was collected before and immediately after muscle activity to measure plasma growth hormone by radioimmunoassay (IGH) and by bioassay (BGH) of tibia epiphyseal cartilage growth in hypophysectomized rats. Plasma IGH was unchanged by muscle activity before, during, or after bed rest. Before bed rest, muscle activity increased (P < 0.05) BGH by 66% at -13 or -12 days (2,146 +/- 192 to 3,565 +/- 197 microg/l) and by 92% at -8 or -7 days (2,162 +/- 159 to 4,161 +/- 204 microg/l). After 2 or 3 days of bed rest, there was no response of BGH to the muscle activity, a pattern that persisted through 8 or 9 days of bed rest. However, after 13 or 14 days of bed rest, plasma concentration of BGH was significantly lower after than before muscle activity (2,594 +/- 211 to 2,085 +/- 109 microg/l). After completion of bed rest, muscle activity increased BGH by 31% at 2 or 3 days (1,807 +/- 117 to 2,379 +/- 473 microg/l; P < 0.05), and by 10 or 11 days the BGH response was similar to that before bed rest (1,881 +/- 75 to 4,160 +/- 315 microg/l; P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that the ambulatory state of an individual can have a major impact on the release of BGH, but not IGH, in response to a single bout of muscle activity.

  20. A Novel Modelling Approach for Predicting Forest Growth and Yield under Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, M Irfan; Meng, Fan-Rui; Bourque, Charles P-A; MacLean, David A

    2015-01-01

    Global climate is changing due to increasing anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Forest managers need growth and yield models that can be used to predict future forest dynamics during the transition period of present-day forests under a changing climatic regime. In this study, we developed a forest growth and yield model that can be used to predict individual-tree growth under current and projected future climatic conditions. The model was constructed by integrating historical tree growth records with predictions from an ecological process-based model using neural networks. The new model predicts basal area (BA) and volume growth for individual trees in pure or mixed species forests. For model development, tree-growth data under current climatic conditions were obtained using over 3000 permanent sample plots from the Province of Nova Scotia, Canada. Data to reflect tree growth under a changing climatic regime were projected with JABOWA-3 (an ecological process-based model). Model validation with designated data produced model efficiencies of 0.82 and 0.89 in predicting individual-tree BA and volume growth. Model efficiency is a relative index of model performance, where 1 indicates an ideal fit, while values lower than zero means the predictions are no better than the average of the observations. Overall mean prediction error (BIAS) of basal area and volume growth predictions was nominal (i.e., for BA: -0.0177 cm(2) 5-year(-1) and volume: 0.0008 m(3) 5-year(-1)). Model variability described by root mean squared error (RMSE) in basal area prediction was 40.53 cm(2) 5-year(-1) and 0.0393 m(3) 5-year(-1) in volume prediction. The new modelling approach has potential to reduce uncertainties in growth and yield predictions under different climate change scenarios. This novel approach provides an avenue for forest managers to generate required information for the management of forests in transitional periods of climate change. Artificial intelligence technology

  1. A Novel Modelling Approach for Predicting Forest Growth and Yield under Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, M Irfan; Meng, Fan-Rui; Bourque, Charles P-A; MacLean, David A

    2015-01-01

    Global climate is changing due to increasing anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Forest managers need growth and yield models that can be used to predict future forest dynamics during the transition period of present-day forests under a changing climatic regime. In this study, we developed a forest growth and yield model that can be used to predict individual-tree growth under current and projected future climatic conditions. The model was constructed by integrating historical tree growth records with predictions from an ecological process-based model using neural networks. The new model predicts basal area (BA) and volume growth for individual trees in pure or mixed species forests. For model development, tree-growth data under current climatic conditions were obtained using over 3000 permanent sample plots from the Province of Nova Scotia, Canada. Data to reflect tree growth under a changing climatic regime were projected with JABOWA-3 (an ecological process-based model). Model validation with designated data produced model efficiencies of 0.82 and 0.89 in predicting individual-tree BA and volume growth. Model efficiency is a relative index of model performance, where 1 indicates an ideal fit, while values lower than zero means the predictions are no better than the average of the observations. Overall mean prediction error (BIAS) of basal area and volume growth predictions was nominal (i.e., for BA: -0.0177 cm(2) 5-year(-1) and volume: 0.0008 m(3) 5-year(-1)). Model variability described by root mean squared error (RMSE) in basal area prediction was 40.53 cm(2) 5-year(-1) and 0.0393 m(3) 5-year(-1) in volume prediction. The new modelling approach has potential to reduce uncertainties in growth and yield predictions under different climate change scenarios. This novel approach provides an avenue for forest managers to generate required information for the management of forests in transitional periods of climate change. Artificial intelligence technology

  2. A Novel Modelling Approach for Predicting Forest Growth and Yield under Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, M. Irfan; Meng, Fan-Rui; Bourque, Charles P.-A.; MacLean, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Global climate is changing due to increasing anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Forest managers need growth and yield models that can be used to predict future forest dynamics during the transition period of present-day forests under a changing climatic regime. In this study, we developed a forest growth and yield model that can be used to predict individual-tree growth under current and projected future climatic conditions. The model was constructed by integrating historical tree growth records with predictions from an ecological process-based model using neural networks. The new model predicts basal area (BA) and volume growth for individual trees in pure or mixed species forests. For model development, tree-growth data under current climatic conditions were obtained using over 3000 permanent sample plots from the Province of Nova Scotia, Canada. Data to reflect tree growth under a changing climatic regime were projected with JABOWA-3 (an ecological process-based model). Model validation with designated data produced model efficiencies of 0.82 and 0.89 in predicting individual-tree BA and volume growth. Model efficiency is a relative index of model performance, where 1 indicates an ideal fit, while values lower than zero means the predictions are no better than the average of the observations. Overall mean prediction error (BIAS) of basal area and volume growth predictions was nominal (i.e., for BA: -0.0177 cm2 5-year-1 and volume: 0.0008 m3 5-year-1). Model variability described by root mean squared error (RMSE) in basal area prediction was 40.53 cm2 5-year-1 and 0.0393 m3 5-year-1 in volume prediction. The new modelling approach has potential to reduce uncertainties in growth and yield predictions under different climate change scenarios. This novel approach provides an avenue for forest managers to generate required information for the management of forests in transitional periods of climate change. Artificial intelligence technology has substantial

  3. The RCAN1 inhibits NF-κB and suppresses lymphoma growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C; Zheng, L; Wang, H; Ran, X; Liu, H; Sun, X

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) has a vital role in cell survival. Inhibition of NF-κB has been proven to be an efficient therapeutic pathway for various cancers. Activation of NF-κB is mainly through serine residues' phosphorylation of inhibitor of κBα (IκBα) by IKK complex. Phosphorylation at tyrosine 42 is an alternative pathway in regulation of IκBα and NF-κB signaling, though little is known about the underlying mechanism. Here we identified regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1) as a novel endogenous inhibitor of NF-κB signaling pathway. RCAN1 can interact with IκBα and affect the phosphorylation of IκBα at tyrosine 42. Overexpression of RCAN1 by adenovirus reduced cell viability in lymphoma Raji cells and restrained the growth of lymphoma transplants in mice. We further found that N terminus 1–103aa of RCAN1 is sufficient to inhibit NF-κB and reduce cell viability of lymphoma cells. Our study implicated a novel therapeutic approach for lymphoma by RCAN1 through inhibition of NF-κB signaling. PMID:26492364

  4. WT1 suppresses synthesis of the epidermal growth factor receptor and induces apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Englert, C; Hou, X; Maheswaran, S; Bennett, P; Ngwu, C; Re, G G; Garvin, A J; Rosner, M R; Haber, D A

    1995-01-01

    The Wilms tumor suppressor gene WT1 encodes a developmentally regulated transcription factor that is mutated in a subset of embryonal tumors. To test its functional properties, we developed osteosarcoma cell lines expressing WT1 under an inducible tetracycline-regulated promoter. Induction of WT1 resulted in programmed cell death. This effect, which was differentially mediated by the alternative splicing variants of WT1, was independent of p53. WT1-mediated apoptosis was associated with reduced synthesis of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), but not of other postulated WT1-target genes, and it was abrogated by constitutive expression of EGFR. WT1 repressed transcription from the EGFR promoter, binding to two TC-rich repeat sequences. In the developing kidney, EGFR expression in renal precursor cells declined with the onset of WT1 expression. Repression of EGFR and induction of apoptosis by mechanism that may contribute to its critical role in normal kidney development and to the immortalization of tumor cells with inactivated WT1 alleles. Images PMID:7588596

  5. Growth suppression of MCF-7 cancer cell-derived xenografts in nude mice by caveolin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Ping; Wang Xiaohui; Li Fei; Qi Baoju; Zhu Hua; Liu Shuang; Cui Yeqing; Chen Jianwen

    2008-11-07

    Caveolin-1 is an essential structural constituent of caveolae membrane domains that has been implicated in mitogenic signaling and oncogenesis. However, the exact functional role of caveolin-1 still remains controversial. In this report, utilizing MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells stably transfected with caveolin-1 (MCF-7/cav-1 cells), we demonstrate that caveolin-1 expression dramatically inhibits invasion and migration of these cells. Importantly, in vivo experiments employing xenograft tumor models demonstrated that expression of caveolin-1 results in significant growth inhibition of breast tumors. Moreover, a dramatic delay in tumor progression was observed in MCF-7/cav-1 cells as compared with MCF-7 cells. Histological analysis of tumor sections demonstrated a marked decrease in the percentage of proliferating tumor cells (Ki-67 assay) along with an increase in apoptotic tumor cells (TUNEL assay) in MCF-7/cav-1-treated animals. Our current findings provide for the first time in vivo evidence that caveolin-1 can indeed function as a tumor suppressor in human breast adenocarcinoma derived from MCF-7 cells rather than as a tumor promoter.

  6. Knockdown of TRAF4 expression suppresses osteosarcoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yao, Weitao; Wang, Xin; Cai, Qiqing; Gao, Songtao; Wang, Jiaqiang; Zhang, Peng

    2014-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 4 (TRAF4) is an adapter molecule that is overexpressed in certain cancers. TRAF4 is overexpressed in osteosarcoma tissues and osteosarcoma cells. Using the technique of RNA interference, the expression of TRAF4 in the human osteosarcoma Saos-2 cell line was shown to be downregulated. The proliferation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis ability of Saos‑2 cells were examined, as was tumor development in a xenograft mouse model. The results showed that the TRAF4 knockdown exerts inhibitory effects on the proliferation ability of Saos-2 cells and tumor development in a xenograft mouse model. Simultaneously, it was found that TRAF4 knockdown led to cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase and promoted Saos-2 cell apoptosis. Following TNF-α treatment, the expression of nuclear factor κB was significantly reduced in the TRAF4‑small interfering RNA group. These results indicate that TRAF4 regulated osteosarcoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo, and offers a candidate molecular target for osteosarcoma prevention and therapy. PMID:25270078

  7. Yeasts isolated from industrial maltings can suppress Fusarium growth and formation of gushing factors.

    PubMed

    Laitila, Arja; Sarlin, Tuija; Kotaviita, Erja; Huttunen, Timo; Home, Silja; Wilhelmson, Annika

    2007-11-01

    Fusarium infection of barley and malt can cause severe problems in the malting and brewing industry. In addition to being potential mycotoxin producers, Fusarium fungi are known to cause beer gushing (spontaneous overfoaming of beer). Cereal-derived bacteria and yeasts are potential biocontrol agents. In this study, the antifungal potential of selected yeasts (12 strains) derived from the industrial malting ecosystem was studied in vitro with a plate-screening assay. Several ascomycetous yeast strains showed antagonistic activity against field and storage moulds, Pichia anomala being the most effective strain. The effects of P. anomala VTT C-04565 (C565) were examined in laboratory scale malting with naturally contaminated barley exhibiting gushing potential. P. anomala C565 restricted Fusarium growth and hydrophobin production during malting and prevented beer gushing. Grain germination was not disturbed by the presence of yeast. Addition of P. anomala C565 into the steeping seemed to retard wort filtration, but the filtration performance was recovered when yeast culture was combined with Lactobacillus plantarum VTT E-78076. Well-characterized microbial cultures could be used as food-grade biocontrol agents and they offer a natural tool for tailoring of malt properties. PMID:17680285

  8. Yeasts isolated from industrial maltings can suppress Fusarium growth and formation of gushing factors.

    PubMed

    Laitila, Arja; Sarlin, Tuija; Kotaviita, Erja; Huttunen, Timo; Home, Silja; Wilhelmson, Annika

    2007-11-01

    Fusarium infection of barley and malt can cause severe problems in the malting and brewing industry. In addition to being potential mycotoxin producers, Fusarium fungi are known to cause beer gushing (spontaneous overfoaming of beer). Cereal-derived bacteria and yeasts are potential biocontrol agents. In this study, the antifungal potential of selected yeasts (12 strains) derived from the industrial malting ecosystem was studied in vitro with a plate-screening assay. Several ascomycetous yeast strains showed antagonistic activity against field and storage moulds, Pichia anomala being the most effective strain. The effects of P. anomala VTT C-04565 (C565) were examined in laboratory scale malting with naturally contaminated barley exhibiting gushing potential. P. anomala C565 restricted Fusarium growth and hydrophobin production during malting and prevented beer gushing. Grain germination was not disturbed by the presence of yeast. Addition of P. anomala C565 into the steeping seemed to retard wort filtration, but the filtration performance was recovered when yeast culture was combined with Lactobacillus plantarum VTT E-78076. Well-characterized microbial cultures could be used as food-grade biocontrol agents and they offer a natural tool for tailoring of malt properties.

  9. microRNA 21-mediated suppression of Sprouty1 by Pokemon affects liver cancer cell growth and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiu-Li; Sun, Qin-Sheng; Liu, Feng; Yang, Hong-Wei; Liu, Min; Liu, Hong-Xia; Xu, Wei; Jiang, Yu-Yang

    2013-07-01

    Transcriptional repressor Pokemon is a critical factor in embryogenesis, development, cell proliferation, differentiation, and oncogenesis, thus behaving as an oncogene. Oncomine database suggests a potential correlation between the expressions of Pokemon and Sprouty1. This study investigated the regulatory role of Pokemon in Sprouty1 expression and the effect on liver cancer cell growth and proliferation, revealing a novel miR-21-mediated regulatory circuit. In normal (HL-7702) and cancer (QGY-7703) liver cell lines, Sprouty1 expression is inversely correlated with Pokemon levels. Targeted expression or siRNA-mediated silencing showed that Pokemon is a repressor of Sprouty1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels, but Pokemon cannot affect the promoter activity of Sprouty1. Sprouty1 is a target of miR-21 and interestingly, we found that miR-21 is up-regulated by Pokemon in liver cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Pokemon up-regulated miR-21 transcription in a dose-dependent manner, and ChIP assay exhibited a direct binding of Pokemon to the miR-21 promoter at -747 to -399 bp. Site-directed mutagenesis of the GC boxes at -684 to -679 bp and -652 to -647 bp of miR-21 promoter abolished the regulatory activity by Pokemon. Furthermore, we found that the modulation of Pokemon and miR-21 expression affected the growth and proliferation of liver cancer cells QGY-7703. In summary, our findings demonstrate that Pokemon suppresses Sprouty1 expression through a miR-21-mediated mechanism, affecting the growth and proliferation of liver cancer cells. This study recognized miR-21 and Sprouty1 as novel targets of the Pokemon regulatory network. PMID:23355454

  10. Suppression of SOX18 by siRNA inhibits cell growth and invasion of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianxiang; Ma, Yanmei; Wang, Shoujun; Chen, Fu; Gu, Yuanting

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women around the world, and its incidence and mortality rates are still rising. An increasing number of studies have reported that SOX18 plays an important role in various cancers. However, the role of SOX18 in breast cancer remains poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the biological role and potential molecular mechanism of SOX18 in breast cancer. We found that the mRNA and protein expression levels of SOX18 were prevalently and significantly overexpressed in human breast cancer cell lines. Next, we performed loss-of-function experiments by transfection of two breast cancer cell lines, BT-474 and MCF-7, with SOX18 small interfering RNAs (siRNA). Results showed that SOX18 siRNA transfection significantly suppressed mRNA and protein expression of SOX18 in breast cancer cells. Furthermore, knockdown of SOX18 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and invasion, but promoted apoptosis in breast cancer cells. Importantly, several oncogenic proteins, including the Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA), platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGFB), Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R), and matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7), were markedly decreased by SOX18 siRNA. Taken together, the results of our study suggest that knockdown of SOX18 inhibits breast cancer cell growth and invasion, possibly by downregulating downstream oncogenic proteins, providing novel insights into the development of breast cancer therapy through targeting of SOX18. PMID:27108946

  11. microRNA 21-mediated suppression of Sprouty1 by Pokemon affects liver cancer cell growth and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiu-Li; Sun, Qin-Sheng; Liu, Feng; Yang, Hong-Wei; Liu, Min; Liu, Hong-Xia; Xu, Wei; Jiang, Yu-Yang

    2013-07-01

    Transcriptional repressor Pokemon is a critical factor in embryogenesis, development, cell proliferation, differentiation, and oncogenesis, thus behaving as an oncogene. Oncomine database suggests a potential correlation between the expressions of Pokemon and Sprouty1. This study investigated the regulatory role of Pokemon in Sprouty1 expression and the effect on liver cancer cell growth and proliferation, revealing a novel miR-21-mediated regulatory circuit. In normal (HL-7702) and cancer (QGY-7703) liver cell lines, Sprouty1 expression is inversely correlated with Pokemon levels. Targeted expression or siRNA-mediated silencing showed that Pokemon is a repressor of Sprouty1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels, but Pokemon cannot affect the promoter activity of Sprouty1. Sprouty1 is a target of miR-21 and interestingly, we found that miR-21 is up-regulated by Pokemon in liver cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Pokemon up-regulated miR-21 transcription in a dose-dependent manner, and ChIP assay exhibited a direct binding of Pokemon to the miR-21 promoter at -747 to -399 bp. Site-directed mutagenesis of the GC boxes at -684 to -679 bp and -652 to -647 bp of miR-21 promoter abolished the regulatory activity by Pokemon. Furthermore, we found that the modulation of Pokemon and miR-21 expression affected the growth and proliferation of liver cancer cells QGY-7703. In summary, our findings demonstrate that Pokemon suppresses Sprouty1 expression through a miR-21-mediated mechanism, affecting the growth and proliferation of liver cancer cells. This study recognized miR-21 and Sprouty1 as novel targets of the Pokemon regulatory network.

  12. Genetic delivery of bevacizumab to suppress vascular endothelial growth factor-induced high-permeability pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masaki; Boyer, Julie L; Crystal, Ronald G

    2009-06-01

    High-permeability pulmonary edema causing acute respiratory distress syndrome is associated with high mortality. Using a model of intratracheal adenovirus (Ad)-mediated overexpression of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A(165) in mouse lung to induce alveolar permeability and consequent pulmonary edema, we hypothesized that systemic administration of a second adenoviral vector expressing an anti-VEGF antibody (AdalphaVEGFAb) would protect the lung from pulmonary edema. Pulmonary edema was induced in mice by intratracheal administration of AdVEGFA165. To evaluate anti-VEGF antibody therapy, the mice were treated intravenously with AdalphaVEGFAb, an adenoviral vector encoding the light and heavy chains of an anti-human VEGF antibody with the bevacizumab (Avastin) antigen-binding site. Lung VEGF-A(165) and phosphorylated VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-2 levels, histology, lung wet-to-dry weight ratios, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) levels of total protein were assessed. Administration of AdalphaVEGFAb to mice decreased AdVEGFA165-induced levels of human VEGF-A(165) and phosphorylated VEGFR-2 in the lung. Histological analysis of AdalphaVEGFAb-treated mice demonstrated a reduction of edema fluid in the lung tissue that correlated with a reduction of lung wet-to-dry ratios and BALF total protein levels. Importantly, administration of AdalphaVEGFAb 48 hr after induction of pulmonary edema with AdVEGFA165 was effective in suppressing pulmonary edema. Administration of an adenoviral vector encoding an anti-VEGF antibody that is the equivalent of bevacizumab effectively suppresses VEGF-A(165)-induced high-permeability pulmonary edema, suggesting that anti-VEGF antibody therapy may represent a novel therapy for high-permeability pulmonary edema.

  13. The Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Vaproic Acid Induces Cell Growth Arrest in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells via Suppressing Notch Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guangchun; Mackey, Lily V.; Coy, David H.; Yu, Cui-Yun; Sun, Lichun

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a type of malignant cancer. Notch signaling is aberrantly expressed in HCC tissues with more evidence showing that this signaling plays a critical role in HCCs. In the present study, we investigate the effects of the anti-convulsant drug valproic acid (VPA) in HCC cells and its involvement in modulating Notch signaling. We found that VPA, acting as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, induced a decrease in HDAC4 and an increase in acetylated histone 4 (AcH4) and suppressed HCC cell growth. VPA also induced down-regulation of Notch signaling via suppressing the expression of Notch1 and its target gene HES1, with an increase of tumor suppressor p21 and p63. Furthermore, Notch1 activation via overexpressing Notch1 active form ICN1 induced HCC cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis, indicating Notch signaling played an oncogenic role in HCC cells. Meanwhile, VPA could reverse Notch1-induced increase of cell proliferation. Interestingly, VPA was also observed to stimulate the expression of G protein-coupled somatostatin receptor type 2 (SSTR2) that has been used in receptor-targeting therapies. This discovery supports a combination therapy of VPA with the SSTR2-targeting agents. Our in vitro assay did show that the combination of VPA and the peptide-drug conjugate camptothecin-somatostatin (CPT-SST) displayed more potent anti-proliferative effects on HCC cells than did each alone. VPA may be a potential drug candidate in the development of anti-HCC drugs via targeting Notch signaling, especially in combination with receptor-targeting cytotoxic agents. PMID:26366213

  14. Biodegradable polymeric micelles encapsulated JK184 suppress tumor growth through inhibiting Hedgehog signaling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nannan; Liu, Shichang; Wang, Ning; Deng, Senyi; Song, Linjiang; Wu, Qinjie; Liu, Lei; Su, Weijun; Wei, Yuquan; Xie, Yongmei; Gong, Changyang

    2015-01-01

    JK184 can specially inhibit Gli in the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which showed great promise for cancer therapeutics. For developing aqueous formulation and improving anti-tumor activity of JK184, we prepared JK184 encapsulated MPEG-PCL micelles by the solid dispersion method without using surfactants or toxic organic solvents. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of JK184 micelles were both increased compared with the free drug. JK184 micelles induced more apoptosis and blocked proliferation of Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor cells. In addition, JK184 micelles exerted a sustained in vitro release behavior and had a stronger inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration and invasion of HUVECs than free JK184. Furthermore, JK184 micelles had stronger tumor growth inhibiting effects in subcutaneous Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor models. Histological analysis showed that JK184 micelles improved anti-tumor activity by inducing more apoptosis, decreasing microvessel density and reducing expression of CD31, Ki67, and VEGF in tumor tissues. JK184 micelles showed a stronger inhibition of Gli expression in Hh signaling, which played an important role in pancreatic carcinoma. Furthermore, circulation time of JK184 in blood was prolonged after entrapment in polymeric micelles. Our results suggested that JK184 micelles are a promising drug candidate for treating pancreatic tumors with a highly inhibitory effect on Hh activity.JK184 can specially inhibit Gli in the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which showed great promise for cancer therapeutics. For developing aqueous formulation and improving anti-tumor activity of JK184, we prepared JK184 encapsulated MPEG-PCL micelles by the solid dispersion method without using surfactants or toxic organic solvents. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of JK184 micelles were both increased compared with the free drug. JK184 micelles induced more apoptosis and blocked proliferation of Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor cells. In addition, JK184 micelles exerted a sustained in

  15. Novel STAT3 phosphorylation inhibitors exhibit potent growth suppressive activity in pancreatic and breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li; Hutzen, Brian; Zuo, Mingxin; Ball, Sarah; Deangelis, Stephanie; Foust, Elizabeth; Pandit, Bulbul; Ihnat, Michael A.; Shenoy, Satyendra S.; Kulp, Samuel; Li, Pui-Kai; Li, Chenglong; Fuchs, James; Lin, Jiayuh

    2010-01-01

    The constitutive activation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is frequently detected in most types of human cancer where it plays important roles in survival, drug-resistance, angiogenesis, and other functions. Targeting constitutive STAT3 signaling is thus an attractive therapeutic approach for these cancers. We have recently developed novel small molecule STAT3 inhibitors known as FLLL31 and FLLL32, which are derived from curcumin (the primary bioactive compound of turmeric). These compounds are designed to bind selectively to Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2) and the STAT3 SH2 domain, which serves crucial roles in STAT3 dimerization and signal transduction. Here we show that FLLL31 and FLLL32 are effective inhibitors of STAT3 phosphorylation, DNA binding activity, and transactivation in vitro, leading to the impediment of multiple oncogenic processes and the induction of apoptosis in pancreatic and breast cancer cell lines. FLLL31 and FLLL32 also inhibit colony formation in soft agar, cell invasion, and exhibit synergy with the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin against breast cancer cells. In addition, we show that FLLL32 can inhibit the induction of STAT3 phosphorylation by Interferon-α (IFNα) and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) in breast cancer cells. We also demonstrate that administration of FLLL32 can inhibit tumor growth and vascularity in chicken embryo xenografts as well as substantially reduce tumor volumes in mouse xenografts. Our findings highlight the potential of these new compounds and their efficacy in targeting pancreatic and breast cancers that exhibit constitutive STAT3 signaling. PMID:20215512

  16. Sirt2 suppresses glioma cell growth through targeting NF-κB–miR-21 axis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ya’nan; Dai, Dongwei; Lu, Qiong; Fei, Mingyu; Li, Mengmeng; Wu, Xi

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression is down-regulated in human glioma tissues and cell lines. •Sirt2 regresses glioma cell growth and colony formation via inducing apoptosis. •miR-21 is essential for the functions of Sirt2 in glioma cells. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 to decrease miR-21 expression. -- Abstract: Sirtuins are NAD{sup +}-dependent deacetylases that regulate numerous cellular processes including aging, DNA repair, cell cycle, metabolism, and survival under stress conditions. The roles of sirtuin family members are widely studied in carcinogenesis. However, their roles in glioma remain unclear. Here we report that Sir2 was under expressed in human glioma tissues and cell lines. We found that Sirt2 overexpression decreased cell proliferation and colony formation capacity. In addition, Sirt2 overexpression induced cellular apoptosis via up-regulating cleaved caspase 3 and Bax, and down-regulating anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Sirt2 knockdown obtained opposing results. We showed that Sirt2 overexpression inhibited miR-21 expression, and Sirt2 was not sufficient to reduce cell proliferation and colony formation as well as to induce apoptosis when miR-21 was knocked down in glioma cells. Mechanically, we demonstrated that Sirt2 deacetylated p65 at K310 and blocked p65 binding to the promoter region of miR-21, thus regressing the transcription of miR-21. In summary, Sirt2 is critical in human glioma via NF-κB–miR-21 pathway and Sirt2 activator may serve as candidate drug for glioma therapy.

  17. In Hyperthermia Increased ERK and WNT Signaling Suppress Colorectal Cancer Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bordonaro, Michael; Shirasawa, Senji; Lazarova, Darina L.

    2016-01-01

    Although neoplastic cells exhibit relatively higher sensitivity to hyperthermia than normal cells, hyperthermia has had variable success as an anti-cancer therapy. This variable outcome might be due to the fact that cancer cells themselves have differential degrees of sensitivity to high temperature. We hypothesized that the varying sensitivity of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells to hyperthermia depends upon the differential induction of survival pathways. Screening of such pathways revealed that Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) signaling is augmented by hyperthermia, and the extent of this modulation correlates with the mutation status of V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS). Through clonal growth assays, apoptotic analyses and transcription reporter assays of CRC cells that differ only in KRAS mutation status we established that mutant KRAS cells are more sensitive to hyperthermia, as they exhibit sustained ERK signaling hyperactivation and increased Wingless/Integrated (WNT)/beta-catenin signaling. We propose that whereas increased levels of WNT and ERK signaling and a positive feedback between the two pathways is a major obstacle in anti-cancer therapy today, under hyperthermia the hyperinduction of the pathways and their positive crosstalk contribute to CRC cell death. Ascertaining the causative association between types of mutations and hyperthermia sensitivity may allow for a mutation profile-guided application of hyperthermia as an anti-cancer therapy. Since KRAS and WNT signaling mutations are prevalent in CRC, our results suggest that hyperthermia-based therapy might benefit a significant number, but not all, CRC patients. PMID:27187477

  18. N-terminus-modified Hec1 suppresses tumour growth by interfering with kinetochore-microtubule dynamics.

    PubMed

    Orticello, M; Fiore, M; Totta, P; Desideri, M; Barisic, M; Passeri, D; Lenzi, J; Rosa, A; Orlandi, A; Maiato, H; Del Bufalo, D; Degrassi, F

    2015-06-01

    Mitotic proteins are attractive targets to develop molecular cancer therapeutics due to the intimate interdependence between cell proliferation and mitosis. In this work, we have explored the therapeutic potential of the kinetochore (KT) protein Hec1 (Highly Expressed in Cancer protein 1) as a molecular target to produce massive chromosome missegregation and cell death in cancer cells. Hec1 is a constituent of the Ndc80 complex, which mediates KT-microtubule (MT) attachments at mitosis and is upregulated in various cancer types. We expressed Hec1 fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) at its N-terminus MT-interaction domain in HeLa cells and showed that expression of this modified Hec1, which localized at KTs, blocked cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis in tumour cells. EGFP-Hec1 was extremely potent in tumour cell killing and more efficient than siRNA-induced Hec1 depletion. In striking contrast, normal cells showed no apparent cell proliferation defects or cell death following EGFP-Hec1 expression. Live-cell imaging demonstrated that cancer cell death was associated with massive chromosome missegregation within multipolar spindles after a prolonged mitotic arrest. Moreover, EGFP-Hec1 expression was found to increase KT-MT attachment stability, providing a molecular explanation for the abnormal spindle architecture and the cytotoxic activity of this modified protein. Consistent with cell culture data, EGFP-Hec1 expression was found to strongly inhibit tumour growth in a mouse xenograft model by disrupting mitosis and inducing multipolar spindles. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that stimulation of massive chromosome segregation defects can be used as an anti-cancer strategy through the activation of mitotic catastrophe after a multipolar mitosis. Importantly, this study represents a clear proof of concept that targeting KT proteins required for proper KT-MT attachment dynamics constitutes a powerful approach in cancer therapy.

  19. Co-targeting AR and HSP90 suppresses prostate cancer cell growth and prevents resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Centenera, Margaret M; Carter, Sarah L; Gillis, Joanna L; Marrocco-Tallarigo, Deborah L; Grose, Randall H; Tilley, Wayne D; Butler, Lisa M

    2015-10-01

    Persistent androgen receptor (AR) signaling in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) underpins the urgent need for therapeutic strategies that better target this pathway. Combining classes of agents that target different components of AR signaling has the potential to delay resistance and improve patient outcomes. Many oncoproteins, including the AR, rely on the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) for functional maturation and stability. In this study, enhanced anti-proliferative activity of the Hsp90 inhibitors 17-allylamino-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) and AUY922 in androgen-sensitive and CRPC cells was achieved when the agents were used in combination with AR antagonists bicalutamide or enzalutamide. Moreover, significant caspase-dependent cell death was achieved using sub-optimal agent doses that individually have no effect. Expression profiling demonstrated regulation of a broadened set of AR target genes with combined 17-AAG and bicalutamide compared with the respective single agent treatments. This enhanced inhibition of AR signaling was accompanied by impaired chromatin binding and nuclear localization of the AR. Importantly, expression of the AR variant AR-V7 that is implicated in resistance to AR antagonists was not induced by combination treatment. Likewise, the heat shock response that is typically elicited with therapeutic doses of Hsp90 inhibitors, and is a potential mediator of resistance to these agents, was significantly reduced by combination treatment. In summary, the co-targeting strategy in this study more effectively inhibits AR signaling than targeting AR or HSP90 alone and prevents induction of key resistance mechanisms in prostate cancer cells. These findings merit further evaluation of this therapeutic strategy to prevent CRPC growth.

  20. A low carbohydrate, high protein diet suppresses intratumoral androgen synthesis and slows castration-resistant prostate tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Fokidis, H Bobby; Yieng Chin, Mei; Ho, Victor W; Adomat, Hans H; Soma, Kiran K; Fazli, Ladan; Nip, Ka Mun; Cox, Michael; Krystal, Gerald; Zoubeidi, Amina; Tomlinson Guns, Emma S

    2015-06-01

    likely to be mechanistic drivers behind the observed tumor growth suppression. PMID:25797030

  1. A low carbohydrate, high protein diet suppresses intratumoral androgen synthesis and slows castration-resistant prostate tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Fokidis, H Bobby; Yieng Chin, Mei; Ho, Victor W; Adomat, Hans H; Soma, Kiran K; Fazli, Ladan; Nip, Ka Mun; Cox, Michael; Krystal, Gerald; Zoubeidi, Amina; Tomlinson Guns, Emma S

    2015-06-01

    likely to be mechanistic drivers behind the observed tumor growth suppression.

  2. Predicting growth of graphene nanostructures using high-fidelity atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, Keven F.; Zhou, Xiaowang; Ward, Donald K.; Schultz, Peter A.; Foster, Michael E.; Bartelt, Norman Charles

    2015-09-01

    In this project we developed t he atomistic models needed to predict how graphene grows when carbon is deposited on metal and semiconductor surfaces. We first calculated energies of many carbon configurations using first principles electronic structure calculations and then used these energies to construct an empirical bond order potentials that enable s comprehensive molecular dynamics simulation of growth. We validated our approach by comparing our predictions to experiments of graphene growth on Ir, Cu and Ge. The robustness of ou r understanding of graphene growth will enable high quality graphene to be grown on novel substrates which will expand the number of potential types of graphene electronic devices.

  3. Suppression of Soft Tissue Sarcoma Growth by a Host Defense-Like Lytic Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Hauk, Jennifer; Schubert, Cornelius; Al-Benna, Sammy; Stricker, Ingo; Hatt, Hanns; Shai, Yechiel; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Jacobsen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Background Soft tissue sarcoma (STS) is an anatomically and histologically heterogeneous neoplasia that shares a putative mesenchymal cell origin. The treatment with common chemotherapeutics is still unsatisfying because of association with poor response rates. Although evidence is accumulating for potent oncolytic activity of host defense peptides (HDPs), their potential therapeutic use is often limited by poor bioavailability and inactivation in serum. Therefore, we tested the designer host defense-like lytic D,L-amino acid peptide [D]-K3H3L9 on two STS cell lines in vitro and also in an athymic and syngeneic mouse model. In recent studies the peptide could show selectivity against prostate carcinoma cells and also an active state in serum. Methods In vitro the human synovial sarcoma cell line SW982, the murine fibrosarcoma cell line BFS-1 and primary human fibroblasts as a control were exposed to [D]-K3H3L9, a 15mer D,L-amino acid designer HDP. Cell vitality in physiological and acidic conditions (MTT-assay), cell growth (BrdU) and DNA-fragmentation (TUNEL) were investigated. Membrane damage at different time points could be analyzed with LDH assay. An antibody against the tested peptide and recordings using scanning electron microscopy could give an inside in the mode of action. In vivo [D]-K3H3L9 was administered intratumorally in an athymic and syngeneic (immunocompetent) mouse model with SW982 and BFS-1 cells, respectively. After three weeks tumor sections were histologically analyzed. Results The peptide exerts rapid and high significant cytotoxicity and antiproliferating activity against the malignant cell lines, apparently via a membrane disrupting mode of action. The local intratumoral administration of [D]-K3H3L9 in the athymic and syngeneic mice models significantly inhibited tumor progression. The histological analyses of the tumor sections revealed a significant antiproliferative, antiangiogenic activity of the treatment group. Conclusion These

  4. Essays on the predictability of oil shocks and yield curves for real-time output growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlton, Amelie B.

    This dissertation is a collection of three essays that revisits the long-standing puzzle of the apparently disproportionate effect of oil prices in the economy by examining output growth predictability with real-time data. Each study of the predictive content of oil shocks is from a different perspective by using newly developed real-time datasets, which allows for replicating the economic environment faced by policymakers in real time. The first study extends the conventional set of models of output growth determination by investigating predictability of models that incorporate various functional forms of oil prices and real-time data. The results are supportive of the relationship of GDP and oil in the context of Granger causality with real-time data. In the second essay, I use oil shocks to predict the economy is changing direction earlier than would be predicted by solely using initial GDP releases. The model provides compelling evidence of negative GDP growth predictability in response to oil price shocks, which could shorten the "recognition lag" for successful implementation of discretionary counter-cyclical policies. In the third essay, I evaluate short-horizon output growth predictability using real-time data for different sample periods. I find strong evidence of predictability at the one-quarter and four-quarter horizon for the United States. The major result of the paper is that we reject the null hypothesis of no predictability against an alternative hypothesis of predictability with oil shocks that include yield curves in the forecasting regression. This relationship suggests the combination of monetary policy and oil shocks are important for subsequent GDP growth.

  5. Prediction of competitive microbial growth in mixed culture at dynamic temperature patterns.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Sakha, Mohammad Z

    2014-01-01

    A novel competition model developed with the new logistic model and the Lotka-Volterra model successfully predicted the growth of bacteria in mixed culture using the mesophiles Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella at a constant temperature in our previous studies. In this study, we further studied the prediction of the growth of those bacteria in mixed culture at dynamic temperatures with various initial populations with the competition model. First, we studied the growth kinetics of the species in a monoculture at various constant temperatures ranging from 16℃ to 32℃. With the analyzed data in the monoculture, we then examined the prediction of bacterial growth in mixed culture with two and three species. The growth of the bacteria in the mixed culture at dynamic temperatures was successfully predicted with the model. The residuals between the observed and predicted populations at the data points were <0.5 log at most points, being 83.3% and 84.2% for the two-species mixture and the three-species mixture, respectively. The present study showed that the model could be applied to the competitive growth in mixed culture at dynamic temperature patterns. PMID:25252643

  6. Prediction of Toxigenic Fungal Growth in Buildings by Using a Novel Modelling System

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Neil J.; Johnstone, Cameron M.; McLean, R. Craig; Anderson, John G.; Clarke, Joe A.

    1999-01-01

    There is growing concern about the adverse effects of fungal bioaerosols on the occupants of damp dwellings. Based on an extensive analysis of previously published data and on experiments carried out within this study, critical limits for the growth of the indoor fungi Eurotium herbariorum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Stachybotrys chartarum were mathematically described in terms of growth limit curves (isopleths) which define the minimum combination of temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) at which growth will occur. Each growth limit curve was generated from a series of data points on a T-RH plot and mathematically fitted by using a third-order polynomial equation of the form RH = a3T3 + a2T2 + a1T + a0. This fungal growth prediction model was incorporated within the ESP-r (Environmental Systems Performance [r stands for “research”]) computer-based program for transient simulation of the energy and environmental performance of buildings. For any specified location, the ESP-r system is able to predict the time series evolution of local surface temperature and relative humidity, taking explicit account of constructional moisture flow, moisture generation sources, and air movement. This allows the predicted local conditions to be superimposed directly onto fungal growth curves. The concentration of plotted points relative to the curves allows an assessment of the risk of fungal growth. The system’s predictive capability was tested via laboratory experiments and by comparison with monitored data from a fungus-contaminated house. PMID:10543791

  7. Predicting the outcome of the growth of binary solids far from equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannige, Ranjan V.; Whitelam, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    The growth of multicomponent structures in simulations and experiments often results in kinetically trapped, nonequilibrium objects. In such cases we have no general theoretical framework for predicting the outcome of the growth process. Here we use computer simulations to study the growth of two-component structures within a simple lattice model. We show that kinetic trapping happens for many choices of growth rate and intercomponent interaction energies, and that qualitatively distinct kinds of kinetic trapping are found in different regions of parameter space. In a region in which the low-energy structure is an "antiferromagnet" or "checkerboard," we show that the grown nonequilibrium structure displays a component-type stoichiometry that is different from the equilibrium one but is insensitive to growth rate and solution conditions. This robust nonequilibrium stoichiometry can be predicted via a mapping to the jammed random tiling of dimers studied by Flory, a finding that suggests a way of making defined nonequilibrium structures in experiment.

  8. Predicting the outcome of the growth of binary solids far from equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Mannige, Ranjan V; Whitelam, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    The growth of multicomponent structures in simulations and experiments often results in kinetically trapped, nonequilibrium objects. In such cases we have no general theoretical framework for predicting the outcome of the growth process. Here we use computer simulations to study the growth of two-component structures within a simple lattice model. We show that kinetic trapping happens for many choices of growth rate and intercomponent interaction energies, and that qualitatively distinct kinds of kinetic trapping are found in different regions of parameter space. In a region in which the low-energy structure is an "antiferromagnet" or "checkerboard," we show that the grown nonequilibrium structure displays a component-type stoichiometry that is different from the equilibrium one but is insensitive to growth rate and solution conditions. This robust nonequilibrium stoichiometry can be predicted via a mapping to the jammed random tiling of dimers studied by Flory, a finding that suggests a way of making defined nonequilibrium structures in experiment. PMID:27176283

  9. Growth-suppressive effect of the α-amylase inhibitor of Triticum aestivum on stored-product mites varies by the species and type of diet.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Jan; Nesvorna, Marta; Erban, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    A naturally occurring α-amylase inhibitor (α-AI) of Triticum aestivum protects wheat grain from gramnivorous arthropod pests. The α-AI (Type-I) was incorporated into carbohydrate and protein diets to test its inhibitory activity on the stored-product mites Acarus siro, Lepidoglyphus destructor and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Acari: Astigmata). Growth tests of mites fed the various diets were used to compare the suppressive effects. The final population size of mites attained from an initial population of 50 specimens maintained under controlled conditions (85 % relative humidity and 25 °C) was compared after 21 days of cultivation. The results showed that α-AI in the concentration in the range of 0.01-1 mg g(-1) did not suppress the growth of the tested stored-product mites. α-AI at a concentration of 10 mg g(-1) exerted a growth-suppressive effect that depended on the diet and species of the mites. The growth rate of A. siro was affected by the type of diet and was higher on carbohydrate diet than on the protein diet, the suppressive effect of α-AI was on the both diets. The growth-suppressive effect of α-AI on L. destructor and T. putrescentiae was significant when they were fed the protein diet but not when they were fed the carbohydrate diet. The higher resistance of tested mites to α-AI (proteinaceous) compared to non-proteinaceous acarbose corresponds to a powerful proteotolytic system in the mite gut. The results are discussed in terms of the adaptability of mites to utilize the starch from food sources.

  10. Suppression of Erk activation and in vivo growth in esophageal cancer cells by the dominant negative Ras mutant, N116Y.

    PubMed

    Senmaru, N; Shichinohe, T; Takeuchi, M; Miyamoto, M; Sazawa, A; Ogiso, Y; Takahashi, T; Okushiba, S; Takimoto, M; Kato, H; Kuzumaki, N

    1998-10-29

    Our previous studies demonstrated that introduction of a dominant negative H-ras mutant, N116Y, inhibits the growth of various types of cancer cells in vitro. In this study, we tested the efficacy of N116Y in blocking the growth of esophageal cancer cells using an adenoviral vector. Infection with N116Y adenovirus, (AdCMV-N116Y), in which N116Y expression is driven by the cytomegalovirus promoter, significantly reduced the in vitro growth of all esophageal cancer cell lines studied. Esophageal cancer cells that contained wild-type K-ras and H-ras (TE8, SGF3, SGF7) were more sensitive to AdCMV-N116Y than HEC46 cells that expressed mutant K-ras protein. Most importantly, direct injection of AdCMV-N116Y into TE8- or SGF3-induced tumors in nude mice suppressed their growth significantly. To examine the suppressive mechanism of N116Y, cell cycle profile and the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (Erk2) were examined by flow cytometry and Western blot analysis, respectively. In TE8 cells, progression into S phase was clearly blocked after infection with AdCMV-N116Y. Infection with AdCMV-N116Y did not strongly suppress the activation of Erk2 after EGF stimulation in serum-starved HEC46 cells, whereas it completely suppressed activation in TE8, SGF3 and SGF7 cells. Our observations suggest that N116Y reduces growth of human esophageal cancer cells and suppresses the activation of Erk2; they also indicate that N116Y is a potential candidate gene for human esophageal cancer gene therapy.

  11. First principles prediction of the gas-phase precursors for AlN sublimation growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanxin; Brenner, Donald W

    2004-02-20

    Using a new, parameter-free first principles strategy for modeling sublimation growth, we show that while Al and N2 dominate gas concentrations in AlN sublimation growth chambers under typical growth conditions, N2 is undersaturated with respect to the crystal and therefore cannot be a growth precursor. Instead, our calculations predict that the nitrogen-containing precursors are Al(n)N (n=2,3,4), in stark contrast to assumptions used in all previous modeling studies of this system.

  12. First Principles Prediction of the Gas-Phase Precursors for AlN Sublimation Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanxin; Brenner, Donald W.

    2004-02-01

    Using a new, parameter-free first principles strategy for modeling sublimation growth, we show that while Al and N2 dominate gas concentrations in AlN sublimation growth chambers under typical growth conditions, N2 is undersaturated with respect to the crystal and therefore cannot be a growth precursor. Instead, our calculations predict that the nitrogen-containing precursors are AlnN (n=2,3,4), in stark contrast to assumptions used in all previous modeling studies of this system.

  13. Loss of protein tyrosine phosphatase N2 potentiates epidermal growth factor suppression of intestinal epithelial chloride secretion.

    PubMed

    Scharl, Michael; Rudenko, Ivan; McCole, Declan F

    2010-10-01

    The Crohn's disease candidate gene, protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 2 (PTPN2), has been shown to regulate epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation in fibroblasts. In intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), EGF-induced EGF receptor (EGFR) activation and recruitment of PI3K play a key role in regulating many cellular functions including Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion. Moreover, EGFR also serves as a conduit for signaling by other non-growth factor receptor ligands such as the proinflammatory cytokine, IFN-γ. Here we investigated a possible role for PTPN2 in the regulation of EGFR signaling and Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion in IECs. PTPN2 knockdown enhanced EGF-induced EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation in T(84) cells. In particular, PTPN2 knockdown promoted EGF-induced phosphorylation of EGFR residues Tyr-992 and Tyr-1068 and led subsequently to increased association of the catalytic PI3K subunit, p110, with EGFR and elevated phosphorylation of the downstream marker, Akt. As a functional consequence, loss of PTPN2 potentiated EGF-induced inhibition of carbachol-stimulated Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion. In contrast, PTPN2 knockdown affected neither IFN-γ-induced EGFR transactivation nor EGF- or IFN-γ-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2. In summary, our data establish a role for PTPN2 in the regulation of EGFR signaling in IECs in response to EGF but not IFN-γ. Knockdown of PTPN2 directs EGFR signaling toward increased PI3K activation and increased suppression of epithelial chloride secretory responses. Moreover, our findings suggest that PTPN2 dysfunction in IECs leads to altered control of intestinal epithelial functions regulated by EGFR. PMID:20689057

  14. The Growth of SGC-7901 Tumor Xenografts Was Suppressed by Chinese Bayberry Anthocyanin Extract through Upregulating KLF6 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Zhang, Xia-nan; Xie, Wen-hua; Zheng, Yi-xiong; Cao, Jin-ping; Cao, Pei-rang; Chen, Qing-jun; Li, Xian; Sun, Chong-de

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the antitumor effect of anthocyanins extracted from Chinese bayberry fruit (Myrica rubra Sieb. et Zucc.), a nude mouse tumor xenograft model was established. Treatments with C3G (cyanidin-3-glucoside, an anthocyanin) significantly suppressed the growth of SGC-7901 tumor xenografts in a dose-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical staining showed a significant increase in p21 expression, indicating that the cell cycle of tumor xenografts was inhibited. qPCR screening showed that C3G treatment up-regulated the expression of the KLF6 gene, which is an important tumor suppressor gene inactivated in many human cancers. Western blot showed that C3G treatments markedly increased KLF6 and p21 protein levels, inhibited CDK4 and Cyclin D1 expression, but did not notably change the expression of p53. These results indicated that KLF6 up-regulates p21 in a p53-independent manner and significantly reduces tumor proliferation. This study provides important information for the possible mechanism of C3G-induced antitumor activity against gastric adenocarcinoma in vivo. PMID:27690088

  15. Transforming growth factor β-mediated suppression of antitumor T cells requires FoxP1 transcription factor expression.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Tom L; Rutkowski, Melanie R; Allegrezza, Michael J; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Tesone, Amelia J; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Nguyen, Jenny M; Sarmin, Fahmida; Borowsky, Mark E; Tchou, Julia; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R

    2014-09-18

    Tumor-reactive T cells become unresponsive in advanced tumors. Here we have characterized a common mechanism of T cell unresponsiveness in cancer driven by the upregulation of the transcription factor Forkhead box protein P1 (Foxp1), which prevents CD8⁺ T cells from proliferating and upregulating Granzyme-B and interferon-γ in response to tumor antigens. Accordingly, Foxp1-deficient lymphocytes induced rejection of incurable tumors and promoted protection against tumor rechallenge. Mechanistically, Foxp1 interacted with the transcription factors Smad2 and Smad3 in preactivated CD8⁺ T cells in response to microenvironmental transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and was essential for its suppressive activity. Therefore, Smad2 and Smad3-mediated c-Myc repression requires Foxp1 expression in T cells. Furthermore, Foxp1 directly mediated TGF-β-induced c-Jun transcriptional repression, which abrogated T cell activity. Our results unveil a fundamental mechanism of T cell unresponsiveness different from anergy or exhaustion, driven by TGF-β signaling on tumor-associated lymphocytes undergoing Foxp1-dependent transcriptional regulation.

  16. Chemical inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase suppresses self-renewal growth of cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Gumuzio, Juan; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Leis, Olatz; Martin, Ángel G.; Menendez, Javier A.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) may take advantage of the Warburg effect-induced siphoning of metabolic intermediates into de novo fatty acid biosynthesis to increase self-renewal growth. We examined the anti-CSC effects of the antifungal polyketide soraphen A, a specific inhibitor of the first committed step of lipid biosynthesis catalyzed by acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACACA). The mammosphere formation capability of MCF-7 cells was reduced following treatment with soraphen A in a dose-dependent manner. MCF-7 cells engineered to overexpress the oncogene HER2 (MCF-7/HER2 cells) were 5-fold more sensitive than MCF-7 parental cells to soraphen A-induced reductions in mammosphere-forming efficiency. Soraphen A treatment notably decreased aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)-positive CSC-like cells and impeded the HER2's ability to increase the ALDH+-stem cell population. The following results confirmed that soraphen A-induced suppression of CSC populations occurred through ACACA-driven lipogenesis: a.) exogenous supplementation with supraphysiological concentrations of oleic acid fully rescued mammosphere formation in the presence of soraphen A and b.) mammosphere cultures of MCF-7 cells with stably silenced expression of the cytosolic isoform ACACA1, which specifically participates in de novo lipogenesis, were mostly refractory to soraphen A treatment. Our findings reveal for the first time that ACACA may constitute a previously unrecognized target for novel anti-breast CSC therapies. PMID:25246709

  17. Nutritional and supranutritional levels of selenate differentially suppress prostate tumor growth in adult but not young nude mice.

    PubMed

    Holmstrom, Alexandra; Wu, Ryan T Y; Zeng, Huawei; Lei, K Y; Cheng, Wen-Hsing

    2012-09-01

    The inhibitory effect of oral methylseleninic acid or methylselenocysteine administration on cancer cell xenograft development in nude mice is well characterized; however, less is known about the efficacy of selenate and age on selenium chemoprevention. In this study, we tested whether selenate and duration on diets would regulate prostate cancer xenograft in nude mice. Thirty-nine homozygous NU/J nude mice were fed a selenium-deficient, Torula yeast basal diet alone (Se-) or supplemented with 0.15 (Se) or 1.0 (Se+) mg selenium/kg (as Na₂SeO₄) for 6 months in Experiment 1 and for 4 weeks in Experiment 2, followed by a 47-day PC-3 prostate cancer cell xenograft on the designated diet. In Experiment 1, the Se- diet enhanced the initial tumor development on days 11-17, whereas the Se+ diet suppressed tumor growth on days 35-47 in adult nude mice. Tumors grown in Se- mice were loosely packed and showed increased necrosis and inflammation as compared to those in Se and Se+ mice. In Experiment 2, dietary selenium did not affect tumor development or histopathology throughout the time course. In both experiments, postmortem plasma selenium concentrations in Se and Se+ mice were comparable and were twofold greater than those in Se- mice. Taken together, dietary selenate at nutritional and supranutritional levels differentially inhibit tumor development in adult, but not young, nude mice engrafted with PC-3 prostate cancer cells.

  18. Disialoganglioside GD2 on human neuroblastoma cells: target antigen for monoclonal antibody-mediated cytolysis and suppression of tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Mujoo, K; Cheresh, D A; Yang, H M; Reisfeld, R A

    1987-02-15

    A murine monoclonal antibody 14.18 specifically recognizes disialoganglioside GD2, the major ganglioside expressed on the surface of human neuroblastoma cells. This monoclonal antibody (Mab) is of immunoglobulin G3 isotype, has an affinity constant (KA) of 3.5 X 10(8) M-1, and reacts preferentially with tumor cells and fresh frozen tumor tissues of neuroectodermal origin in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoperoxidase assays, respectively. Mab 14.18 effectively lyses a number of human neuroblastoma cell lines by two distinct mechanisms, i.e., antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. There is a good correlation between the average number of antibody-binding sites per neuroblastoma cell and the amount of cell lysis observed in complement-dependent cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In addition, Mab 14.18 suppresses establishment as well as growth of progressively growing, established human neuroblastoma tumors in nude mice when injected 24 h and 9 days, respectively, after the initial s.c. inoculation of tumor cells. These data suggest that Mab 14.18 can mediate tumor cell killing in vivo and in vitro and may thereby prove useful for immunotherapy of human neuroblastoma.

  19. Tumor growth suppression by gadolinium-neutron capture therapy using gadolinium-entrapped liposome as gadolinium delivery agent.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Novriana; Yanagie, Hironobu; Zhu, Haito; Demachi, Kazuyuki; Shinohara, Atsuko; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Sekino, Masaki; Sakurai, Yuriko; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Iyomoto, Naoko; Nagasaki, Takeshi; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Nagasaki, Yukio; Nakajima, Jun; Ono, Minoru; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    Neutron capture therapy (NCT) is a promising non-invasive cancer therapy approach and some recent NCT research has focused on using compounds containing gadolinium as an alternative to currently used boron-10 considering several advantages that gadolinium offers compared to those of boron. In this study, we evaluated gadolinium-entrapped liposome compound as neutron capture therapy agent by in vivo experiment on colon-26 tumor-bearing mice. Gadolinium compound were injected intravenously via tail vein and allowed to accumulate into tumor site. Tumor samples were taken for quantitative analysis by ICP-MS at 2, 12, and 24 h after gadolinium compound injection. Highest gadolinium concentration was observed at about 2 h after gadolinium compound injection with an average of 40.3 μg/g of wet tumor tissue. We performed neutron irradiation at JRR-4 reactor facility of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in Tokaimura with average neutron fluence of 2×10¹² n/cm². The experimental results showed that the tumor growth suppression of gadolinium-injected irradiated group was revealed until about four times higher compared to the control group, and no significant weight loss were observed after treatment suggesting low systemic toxicity of this compound. The gadolinium-entrapped liposome will become one of the candidates for Gd delivery system on NCT.

  20. Antroquinonol Targets FAK-Signaling Pathway Suppressed Cell Migration, Invasion, and Tumor Growth of C6 Glioma.

    PubMed

    Thiyagarajan, Varadharajan; Tsai, May-Jywan; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor protein tyrosine that is overexpressed in many types of tumors and plays a pivotal role in multiple cell signaling pathways involved in cell survival, migration, and proliferation. This study attempts to determine the effect of synthesized antroquinonol on the modulation of FAK signaling pathways and explore their underlying mechanisms. Antroquinonol significantly inhibits cell viability with an MTT assay in both N18 neuroblastoma and C6 glioma cell lines, which exhibits sub G1 phase cell cycle, and further induction of apoptosis is confirmed by a TUNEL assay. Antroquinonol decreases anti-apoptotic proteins, whereas it increases p53 and pro-apoptotic proteins. Alterations of cell morphology are observed after treatment by atomic force microscopy. Molecular docking results reveal that antroquinonol has an H-bond with the Arg 86 residue of FAK. The protein levels of Src, pSrc, FAK, pFAK, Rac1, and cdc42 are decreased after antroquinonol treatment. Additionally, antroquinonol also regulates the expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) proteins. Furthermore, antroquinonol suppresses the C6 glioma growth in xenograft studies. Together, these results suggest that antroquinonol is a potential anti-tumorigenesis and anti-metastasis inhibitor of FAK. PMID:26517117

  1. TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-BETA MEDIATED SUPPRESSION OF ANTI-TUMOR T CELLS REQUIRES FOXP1 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, Tom L.; Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Allegrezza, Michael J.; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Tesone, Amelia J.; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Nguyen, Jenny M.; Sarmin, Fahmida; Borowsky, Mark E.; Tchou, Julia; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Tumor-reactive T cells become unresponsive in advanced tumors. Here we have characterized a common mechanism of T cell unresponsiveness in cancer driven by the up-regulation of the transcription factor Forkhead box protein P1 (Foxp1), which prevents CD8+ T cells from proliferating and up-regulating Granzyme-B and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in response to tumor antigens. Accordingly, Foxp1-deficient lymphocytes induced rejection of incurable tumors, and promoted protection against tumor re-challenge. Mechanistically, Foxp1 interacted with the transcription factors Smad2 and Smad3 in pre-activated CD8+ T cells in response to microenvironmental transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and was essential for its suppressive activity. Therefore, Smad2 and Smad3-mediated c-Myc repression requires Foxp1 expression in T cells. Furthermore, Foxp1 directly mediated TGF-β-induced c-Jun transcriptional repression, which abrogated T cell activity. Our results unveil a fundamental mechanism of T cell unresponsiveness different from anergy or exhaustion, driven by TGF-β signaling on tumor-associated lymphocytes undergoing Foxp1-dependent transcriptional regulation. PMID:25238097

  2. T-cell-mediated suppression of anti-tumor immunity. An explanation for progressive growth of an immunogenic tumor

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The results of this paper are consistent with the hypothesis that progressive growth of the Meth A fibrosarcoma evokes the generation of a T-cell-mediated mechanism of immunosuppression that prevents this highly immunogenic tumor from being rejected by its immunocompetent host. It was shown that it is possible to cause the regression of large, established Meth A tumors by intravenous infusion of tumor- sensitized T cells from immune donors, but only if the tumors are growing in T-cell-deficient recipients. It was also shown that the adoptive T-cell-mediated regression of tumors in such recipients can be prevented by prior infusion of splenic T cells from T-cell-intact, tumor-bearing donors. The results leave little doubt that the presence of suppressor T cells in T-cell-intact, tumor-bearing mice is responsible for the loss of an earlier generated state of concomitant immunity, and for the inability of intravenously infused, sensitized T cells to cause tumor regression. Because the presence of suppressor T cells generated in response to the Meth A did not suppress the capacity of Meth A-bearing mice to generate and express immunity against a tumor allograft, it is obvious that they were not in a state of generalized immunosuppression. PMID:6444236

  3. Predicting growth-no growth of Listeria monocytogenes on vacuum-packaged ready-to-eat meats.

    PubMed

    Ingham, Steven C; Borneman, Darand L; Ané, Cécile; Ingham, Barbara H

    2010-04-01

    Compliance with U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) composition-based labeling standards often has been regarded as evidence of the shelf stability of ready-to-eat (RTE) meats. However, the USDA now requires further proof of shelf stability. Our previous work included development of equations for predicting the probability of Staphylococcus aureus growth based on the pH and a(w) of an RTE product. In the present study, we evaluated the growth-no-growth during 21 degrees C storage of Listeria monocytogenes on 39 vacuum-packaged commercial RTE meat products with a wide range of pH (4.6 to 6.5), a(w) (0.47 to 0.98), and percent water-phase salt (%WPS; 2.9 to 34.0). Pieces of each product were inoculated with a five-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes and vacuum packaged, and L. monocytogenes levels were determined immediately after inoculation and after storage at 21 degrees C for up to 5 weeks. L. monocytogenes grew on 13 of 14 products labeled "keep refrigerated" but not on any of the 25 products sold as shelf stable. Using bias reduction logistic regression data analysis, the probability of L. monocytogenes growth (Pr) could be predicted as a function of pH and a(w): Pr = exp[-59.58 + (4.67 x pH) + (35.05 x a(w))]/{1 + exp[-59.58 + (4.67 x pH) + (35.05 x a(w))]}. Pr also could be predicted as a function of pH and %WPS: Pr = exp[-20.52 + (4.10 x pH) - (0.51 x %WPS)]/{1 + exp[-20.52 + (4.10 x pH) - (0.51 x %WPS)]}. The equations accurately predicted L. monocytogenes growth (Pr values of 0.68 to 0.99) or no growth (Pr values of <0.01 to 0.26) and with our equations for predicting S. aureus growth will be useful for evaluating RTE meat shelf stability.

  4. Phosphorylation and interaction of Myopodin by Integrin-Link Kinase Lead to Suppression of Cell Growth and Motility in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan-Ping; Luo, Jian-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Myopodin is a tumor suppressor gene that suppresses growth of prostate and urothelial carcinomas. However, the mechanism of myopodin tumor suppressor activity or signaling that leads to activation of myopodin remains unclear. In this report, we showed that the N-terminus of myopodin binds integrin-linked kinase (ILK) both in vivo and in vitro. An ILK interaction motif of 78 amino acids (amino acids 82–157) was identified in the N-terminus region of myopodin. Induction of ILK dependent kinase activity by integrin α7 led to phosphorylation of myopodin both in vivo and in vitro. Knocking down ILK dramatically reduced the inhibition of cell growth and motility mediated by myopodin. A mutant of myopodin lacking the ILK interaction motif is inactive in suppressing the growth and motility of PC3 cells. As a result, this study showed a novel and critical signaling pathway that leads to activation of myopodin. PMID:21643011

  5. Tumor-suppressive microRNA-145 induces growth arrest by targeting SENP1 in human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunyang; Tao, Weiyang; Ni, Shaobin; Chen, Qiyin; Zhao, Zhongshan; Ma, Li; Fu, Yiming; Jiao, Zhixing

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) prevails as the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in men and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in developed countries. One of the distinct characteristics of prostate cancer is overexpression of the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-specific protease 1 (SENP1), and the upregulation of SENP1 contributes to the malignant progression and cell proliferation of PCa. Previous studies have shown that the expression of microRNA-145 (miRNA-145) was extensively deregulated in PCa cell lines and primary clinical prostate cancer samples. Independent target prediction methods have indicated that the 3′-untranslated region of SENP1 mRNA is a potential target of miR-145. Here we found that low expression of miR-145 was correlated with high expression of SENP1 in PCa cell line PC-3. The transient introduction of miR-145 caused cell cycle arrest in PC-3 cells, and the opposite effect was observed when miR-145 inhibitor was transfected. Further studies revealed that the SENP1 3′-untranslated region was a regulative target of miR-145 in vitro. MicroRNA-145 also suppressed tumor formation in vivo in nude mice. Taken together, miR-145 plays an important role in tumorigenesis of PCa through interfering SENP1. PMID:25645686

  6. Suppression of β-catenin/TCF transcriptional activity and colon tumor cell growth by dual inhibition of PDE5 and 10

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Bing; Ramírez-Alcántara, Verónica; Canzoneri, Joshua C.; Lee, Kevin; Sigler, Sara; Gary, Bernard; Li, Yonghe; Zhang, Wei; Moyer, Mary P.; Salter, E. Alan; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Keeton, Adam B.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies suggest the anti-inflammatory drug, sulindac inhibits tumorigenesis by a COX independent mechanism involving cGMP PDE inhibition. Here we report that the cGMP PDE isozymes, PDE5 and 10, are elevated in colon tumor cells compared with normal colonocytes, and that inhibitors and siRNAs can selectively suppress colon tumor cell growth. Combined treatment with inhibitors or dual knockdown suppresses tumor cell growth to a greater extent than inhibition from either isozyme alone. A novel sulindac derivative, ADT-094 was designed to lack COX-1/-2 inhibitory activity but have improved potency to inhibit PDE5 and 10. ADT-094 displayed >500 fold higher potency to inhibit colon tumor cell growth compared with sulindac by activating cGMP/PKG signaling to suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis. Combined inhibition of PDE5 and 10 by treatment with ADT-094, PDE isozyme-selective inhibitors, or by siRNA knockdown also suppresses β-catenin, TCF transcriptional activity, and the levels of downstream targets, cyclin D1 and survivin. These results suggest that dual inhibition of PDE5 and 10 represents novel strategy for developing potent and selective anticancer drugs. PMID:26299804

  7. ψ-Bufarenogin, a novel anti-tumor compound, suppresses liver cancer growth by inhibiting receptor tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jin; Wen, Wen; Xiang, Daimin; Yin, Peipei; Liu, Yanfang; Liu, Chang; He, Guoping; Cheng, Zhuo; Yin, Jianpeng; Sheng, Chunquan; Zhang, Wen; Nan, Fajun; Ye, Wencai; Zhang, Xiuli; Wang, Hongyang

    2015-05-10

    Resistance of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to existing chemotherapeutic agents largely contributes to the poor prognosis of patients, and discovery of novel anti-HCC drug is in an urgent need. Herein we report ψ-Bufarenogin, a novel active compound that we isolated from the extract of toad skin, exhibited potent therapeutic effect in xenografted human hepatoma without notable side effects. In vitro, ψ-Bufarenogin suppressed HCC cells proliferation through impeding cell cycle progression, and it facilitated cell apoptosis by downregulating Mcl-1 expression. Moreover, ψ-Bufarenogin decreased the number of hepatoma stem cells through Sox2 depression and exhibited synergistic effect with conventional chemotherapeutics. Mechanistic study revealed that ψ-Bufarenogin impaired the activation of MEK/ERK pathway, which is essential in the proliferation of hepatoma cells. ψ-Bufarenogin notably suppressed PI3-K/Akt cascade, which was required in ψ-Bufarenogin-mediated reduction of Mcl-1 and Sox2. ψ-Bufarenogin inhibited the auto-phosphorylation and activation of epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) and hepatocyte growth factor receptor (c-Met), thereafter suppressed their primary downstream cascades Raf/MEK/ERK and PI3-K/Akt signaling. Taken together, ψ-Bufarenogin suppressed HCC growth via inhibiting, at least partially, receptor tyrosine kinases-regulated signaling, suggesting that ψ-Bufarenogin could be a novel lead compound for anti-HCC drug.

  8. Isolation, characterization, and evaluation of multi-trait plant growth promoting rhizobacteria for their growth promoting and disease suppressing effects on ginger.

    PubMed

    Dinesh, Raghavan; Anandaraj, Muthuswamy; Kumar, Aundy; Bini, Yogiyar Kundil; Subila, Kizhakke Purayil; Aravind, Ravindran

    2015-04-01

    In this study, 100 PGPR strains isolated from different varieties of ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) were first characterized for their morphological, biochemical, and nutrient mobilization traits in vitro. The PGPR were also screened in vitro for inhibition of Pythium myriotylum causing soft rot in ginger. Results revealed that only five PGPR showed >70% suppression of P. myriotylum. These 5 PGPR viz., GRB (Ginger rhizobacteria) 25--Burkholderia cepacia, GRB35--Bacillus amyloliquefaciens; GRB58--Serratia marcescens; GRB68--S. marcescens; GRB91--Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used for further growth promotion and biocontrol studies in the green house and field. The green house study revealed that GRB35 (B. amyloliquefaciens) and GRB68 (S. marcescens) registered markedly higher sprouting (96.3%) and lower disease incidence (48.1%) and greater rhizome yield (365.6 g pot(-1) and 384.4 g pot(-1), respectively), while control registered the lowest sprouting (66%), maximum soft rot incidence (100%) and lowest rhizome yield (134.4 g pot(-1)). In the field experiments also, GRB68 (S. marcescens) and GRB35 (B. amyloliquefaciens) registered the greatest sprouting (80% each), markedly lower soft rot incidence (5.2% and 7.3%, respectively) and higher yield (5.0 and 4.3 kg(3)m(-2), respectively) compared to chemicals like Streptomycin sulphate (73.0%, 18.5% and 2.3 kg(3)m(-2), respectively), Metalaxyl-Mancozeb (73.0%, 14.0% and 3.8 kg(3)m(-2), respectively) and control (73.0%, 25.1% and 2.2 kg 3m(-2), respectively). Overall, the results suggested that for growth promotion and management of soft rot disease in ginger, GRB35 B. amyloliquefaciens and GRB68 S. marcescens could be good alternatives to chemical measures. Since, the latter has been reported to be an opportunistic human pathogen, we recommend the use of B. amyloliquefaciens for integration into nutrient and disease management schedules for ginger cultivation.

  9. Latino Adolescents' Ethnic Identity: Is There a Developmental Progression and Does Growth in Ethnic Identity Predict Growth in Self-Esteem?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.; Gonzales-Backen, Melinda A.; Guimond, Amy B.

    2009-01-01

    The current longitudinal study of 323 Latino adolescents (50.5% male; M age = 15.31 years) examined whether ethnic identity exploration, resolution, and affirmation demonstrated significant growth over a 4-year period and whether growth in ethnic identity predicted growth in self-esteem. Findings from multiple-group latent growth curve models…

  10. Hinokitiol inhibits cell growth through induction of S-phase arrest and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells and suppresses tumor growth in a mouse xenograft experiment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youn-Sun; Choi, Kyeong-Mi; Kim, Wonkyun; Jeon, Young-Soo; Lee, Yong-Moon; Hong, Jin-Tae; Yun, Yeo-Pyo; Yoo, Hwan-Soo

    2013-12-27

    Hinokitiol (1), a tropolone-related natural compound, induces apoptosis and has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antitumor activities. In this study, the inhibitory effects of 1 were investigated on human colon cancer cell growth and tumor formation of xenograft mice. HCT-116 and SW-620 cells derived from human colon cancers were found to be similarly susceptible to 1, with IC50 values of 4.5 and 4.4 μM, respectively. Compound 1 induced S-phase arrest in the cell cycle progression and decreased the expression levels of cyclin A, cyclin E, and Cdk2. Conversely, 1 increased the expression of p21, a Cdk inhibitor. Compound 1 decreased Bcl-2 expression and increased the expression of Bax, and cleaved caspase-9 and -3. The effect of 1 on tumor formation when administered orally was evaluated in male BALB/c-nude mice implanted intradermally separately with HCT-116 and SW-620 cells. Tumor volumes and tumor weights in the mice treated with 1 (100 mg/kg) were decreased in both cases. These results suggest that the suppression of tumor formation by compound 1 in human colon cancer may occur through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  11. Study on the correlation between copper oxide nanoparticles induced growth suppression and enhanced lignification in Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.).

    PubMed

    Nair, Prakash M Gopalakrishnan; Chung, Ill Min

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the morphological, physiological and molecular level effects of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuONPs) were studied in an economically important oil seed crop Brassica juncea L. The possible involvement of lignification on shoot-root growth retardation was also studied. The seedlings were exposed to 0, 20, 50, 100, 200, 400 and 500mg/L of CuONPs in semi-solid half strength Murashige and Skoog medium under controlled growth chamber conditions for 14 days. Exposure to CuONPs resulted in suppression of shoot-growth, reduction in total chlorophyll and carotenoids contents as well modification of root system architecture such as shortening of primary and lateral roots. Significant increases in hydrogen peroxide formation, peroxidase enzyme activity and lignification of shoots and roots were observed. The lipid peroxidation levels increased significantly in shoots and roots of B. juncea seedlings. Phloroglucinol-HCl staining revealed enhanced lignification of shoot and roots. Gene expression studies revealed significant activation of CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) in roots at all concentrations of CuONPs exposure. In shoots significant up-regulation of CuZnSOD gene was observed upon exposure to 100, 200 and 400 mg/L of CuONPs exposure. However no change in the expression levels of MnSOD gene was observed in both stem and roots. The expression of catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) genes were also not changed in shoots. However, significant inhibition of CAT and APX genes were observed in roots of B. juncea plants under exposure to 100, 200, 400 and 500 mg/L of CuONPs exposure. The SOD enzyme activity significantly increased in roots under exposure to 50-500 mg/L of CuONPs and in shoots as a result of exposure to 100-500 mg/L of CuONPs. The APX activity significantly decreased in roots upon exposure to 50-500 mg/L of CuONPs. In shoots, the APX activity significantly decreased upon exposure to 200-500 mg/L of CuONPs. PMID:25528486

  12. Study on the correlation between copper oxide nanoparticles induced growth suppression and enhanced lignification in Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.).

    PubMed

    Nair, Prakash M Gopalakrishnan; Chung, Ill Min

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the morphological, physiological and molecular level effects of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuONPs) were studied in an economically important oil seed crop Brassica juncea L. The possible involvement of lignification on shoot-root growth retardation was also studied. The seedlings were exposed to 0, 20, 50, 100, 200, 400 and 500mg/L of CuONPs in semi-solid half strength Murashige and Skoog medium under controlled growth chamber conditions for 14 days. Exposure to CuONPs resulted in suppression of shoot-growth, reduction in total chlorophyll and carotenoids contents as well modification of root system architecture such as shortening of primary and lateral roots. Significant increases in hydrogen peroxide formation, peroxidase enzyme activity and lignification of shoots and roots were observed. The lipid peroxidation levels increased significantly in shoots and roots of B. juncea seedlings. Phloroglucinol-HCl staining revealed enhanced lignification of shoot and roots. Gene expression studies revealed significant activation of CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) in roots at all concentrations of CuONPs exposure. In shoots significant up-regulation of CuZnSOD gene was observed upon exposure to 100, 200 and 400 mg/L of CuONPs exposure. However no change in the expression levels of MnSOD gene was observed in both stem and roots. The expression of catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) genes were also not changed in shoots. However, significant inhibition of CAT and APX genes were observed in roots of B. juncea plants under exposure to 100, 200, 400 and 500 mg/L of CuONPs exposure. The SOD enzyme activity significantly increased in roots under exposure to 50-500 mg/L of CuONPs and in shoots as a result of exposure to 100-500 mg/L of CuONPs. The APX activity significantly decreased in roots upon exposure to 50-500 mg/L of CuONPs. In shoots, the APX activity significantly decreased upon exposure to 200-500 mg/L of CuONPs.

  13. Morin, a flavonoid from Moraceae, suppresses growth and invasion of the highly metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB‑231 partly through suppression of the Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hana; Lee, Won Sup; Eun, So Young; Jung, Ji Hyun; Park, Hyeon-Soo; Kim, Gonsup; Choi, Yung Hyun; Ryu, Chung Ho; Jung, Jin Myung; Hong, Soon Chan; Shin, Sung Chul; Kim, Hye Jung

    2014-10-01

    Morin, a flavonoid found in figs and other Moraceae, displays a variety of biological actions, such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic. However, the anticancer effects of morin and in particular its anti-metastatic effects are not well known. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the anticancer effects of morin on highly metastatic human breast cancer cells. Our results showed that morin significantly inhibited the colony forming ability of highly metastatic MDA-MB‑231 breast cancer cells from low doses (50 µM) without cytotoxicity. In addition, morin changed MDA-MB‑231 cell morphology from mesenchymal shape to epithelial shape and inhibited the invasion of MDA-MB‑231 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Morin decreased matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) secretion and expression of the mesenchymal marker N-cadherin of MDA-MB‑231 cells, suggesting that morin might suppress the EMT process. Furthermore, morin significantly decreased the phosphorylation of Akt, and inhibition of the Akt pathway significantly reduced MDA-MB‑231 invasion. In an in vivo xenograft mouse model, morin suppressed MDA-MB‑231 cancer cell progression. Taken together, our findings suggest that morin exhibits an inhibitory effect on the cancer progression and EMT process of highly metastatic breast cancer cells at least in part through inhibiting Akt activation. This study provides evidence that morin may have anticancer effects against metastatic breast cancer.

  14. Discrete Spring Model for Predicting Delamination Growth in Z-Fiber Reinforced DCB Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; O'Brien, T. Kevin

    2004-01-01

    Beam theory analysis was applied to predict delamination growth in DCB specimens reinforced in the thickness direction with pultruded pins, known as Z-fibers. The specimen arms were modeled as cantilever beams supported by discrete springs, which were included to represent the pins. A bi-linear, irreversible damage law was used to represent Z-fiber damage, the parameters of which were obtained from previous experiments. Closed-form solutions were developed for specimen compliance and displacements corresponding to Z-fiber row locations. A solution strategy was formulated to predict delamination growth, in which the parent laminate mode I fracture toughness was used as the criterion for delamination growth. The solution procedure was coded into FORTRAN 90, giving a dedicated software tool for performing the delamination prediction. Comparison of analysis results with previous analysis and experiment showed good agreement, yielding an initial verification for the analytical procedure.

  15. Discrete Spring Model for Predicting Delamination Growth in Z-Fiber Reinforced DCB Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; OBrien, T. Kevin

    2004-01-01

    Beam theory analysis was applied to predict delamination growth in Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimens reinforced in the thickness direction with pultruded pins, known as Z-fibers. The specimen arms were modeled as cantilever beams supported by discrete springs, which were included to represent the pins. A bi-linear, irreversible damage law was used to represent Z-fiber damage, the parameters of which were obtained from previous experiments. Closed-form solutions were developed for specimen compliance and displacements corresponding to Z-fiber row locations. A solution strategy was formulated to predict delamination growth, in which the parent laminate mode I critical strain energy release rate was used as the criterion for delamination growth. The solution procedure was coded into FORTRAN 90, giving a dedicated software tool for performing the delamination prediction. Comparison of analysis results with previous analysis and experiment showed good agreement, yielding an initial verification for the analytical procedure.

  16. Prediction of microbial growth in mixed culture with a competition model.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Sakha, Mohammad Z

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of microbial growth in mixed culture was studied with a competition model that we had developed recently. The model, which is composed of the new logistic model and the Lotka-Volterra model, is shown to successfully describe the microbial growth of two species in mixed culture using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. With the parameter values of the model obtained from the experimental data on monoculture and mixed culture with two species, it then succeeded in predicting the simultaneous growth of the three species in mixed culture inoculated with various cell concentrations. To our knowledge, it is the first time for a prediction model for multiple (three) microbial species to be reported. The model, which is not built on any premise for specific microorganisms, may become a basic competition model for microorganisms in food and food materials. PMID:24975413

  17. Modelling and predicting growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in milk and cottage cheese.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rios, Veronica; Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Gkogka, Elissavet; Rosshaug, Per Sand; Dalgaard, Paw

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models were developed and evaluated for growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in chilled milk and in cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. The mathematical models include the effect of temperature, pH, NaCl, lactic acid and sorbic acid. A simplified cardinal parameter growth rate model was developed based on growth in broth. Subsequently, the reference growth rate parameter μref25°C-broth of 1.031/h was calibrated by fitting the model to a total of 35 growth rates from cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. This resulted in a μref25°C-cottage cheese value of 0.621/h. Predictions from both growth rate models were evaluated by comparison with literature and experimental data. Growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in heat-treated milk (n=33) resulted in a bias factor (Bf) of 1.08 and an accuracy factor (Af) of 1.32 (μref25°C-broth), whereas growth in cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing and in non-heated milk (n=26) resulted in Bf of 1.08 and Af of 1.43 (μref25°C-cottage cheese). Lag phase models were developed by using relative lag times and data from both the present study and from literature. The acceptable simulation zone method showed the developed models to successfully predict growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in milk and cottage cheese at both constant and dynamic temperature storage conditions. The developed models can be used to predict growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads and shelf life of chilled cottage cheese and milk at constant and dynamic storage temperatures. The applied methodology and the developed models seem likely to be applicable for shelf life assessment of other types of products where psychrotolerant pseudomonads are important for spoilage.

  18. Prediction of microbial growth rate versus biomass yield by a metabolic network with kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Adadi, Roi; Volkmer, Benjamin; Milo, Ron; Heinemann, Matthias; Shlomi, Tomer

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the factors that determine microbial growth rate under various environmental and genetic conditions is a major challenge of systems biology. While current genome-scale metabolic modeling approaches enable us to successfully predict a variety of metabolic phenotypes, including maximal biomass yield, the prediction of actual growth rate is a long standing goal. This gap stems from strictly relying on data regarding reaction stoichiometry and directionality, without accounting for enzyme kinetic considerations. Here we present a novel metabolic network-based approach, MetabOlic Modeling with ENzyme kineTics (MOMENT), which predicts metabolic flux rate and growth rate by utilizing prior data on enzyme turnover rates and enzyme molecular weights, without requiring measurements of nutrient uptake rates. The method is based on an identified design principle of metabolism in which enzymes catalyzing high flux reactions across different media tend to be more efficient in terms of having higher turnover numbers. Extending upon previous attempts to utilize kinetic data in genome-scale metabolic modeling, our approach takes into account the requirement for specific enzyme concentrations for catalyzing predicted metabolic flux rates, considering isozymes, protein complexes, and multi-functional enzymes. MOMENT is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy of various metabolic phenotypes in E. coli, including intracellular flux rates and changes in gene expression levels under different growth rates. Most importantly, MOMENT is shown to predict growth rates of E. coli under a diverse set of media that are correlated with experimental measurements, markedly improving upon existing state-of-the art stoichiometric modeling approaches. These results support the view that a physiological bound on cellular enzyme concentrations is a key factor that determines microbial growth rate. PMID:22792053

  19. Prediction of microbial growth rate versus biomass yield by a metabolic network with kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Adadi, Roi; Volkmer, Benjamin; Milo, Ron; Heinemann, Matthias; Shlomi, Tomer

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the factors that determine microbial growth rate under various environmental and genetic conditions is a major challenge of systems biology. While current genome-scale metabolic modeling approaches enable us to successfully predict a variety of metabolic phenotypes, including maximal biomass yield, the prediction of actual growth rate is a long standing goal. This gap stems from strictly relying on data regarding reaction stoichiometry and directionality, without accounting for enzyme kinetic considerations. Here we present a novel metabolic network-based approach, MetabOlic Modeling with ENzyme kineTics (MOMENT), which predicts metabolic flux rate and growth rate by utilizing prior data on enzyme turnover rates and enzyme molecular weights, without requiring measurements of nutrient uptake rates. The method is based on an identified design principle of metabolism in which enzymes catalyzing high flux reactions across different media tend to be more efficient in terms of having higher turnover numbers. Extending upon previous attempts to utilize kinetic data in genome-scale metabolic modeling, our approach takes into account the requirement for specific enzyme concentrations for catalyzing predicted metabolic flux rates, considering isozymes, protein complexes, and multi-functional enzymes. MOMENT is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy of various metabolic phenotypes in E. coli, including intracellular flux rates and changes in gene expression levels under different growth rates. Most importantly, MOMENT is shown to predict growth rates of E. coli under a diverse set of media that are correlated with experimental measurements, markedly improving upon existing state-of-the art stoichiometric modeling approaches. These results support the view that a physiological bound on cellular enzyme concentrations is a key factor that determines microbial growth rate.

  20. Predictive knowledge of stimulus relevance does not influence top-down suppression of irrelevant information in older adults.

    PubMed

    Zanto, Theodore P; Hennigan, Kelly; Ostberg, Mattias; Clapp, Wesley C; Gazzaley, Adam

    2010-04-01

    Our ability to focus attention on task-relevant stimuli and ignore irrelevant distractions is reflected by differential enhancement and suppression of neural activity in sensory cortices. Previous research has shown that older adults exhibit a deficit in suppressing task-irrelevant information, the magnitude of which is associated with a decline in working memory performance. However, it remains unclear if a failure to suppress is a reflection of an inability of older adults to rapidly assess the relevance of information upon stimulus presentation when they are not aware of the relevance beforehand. To address this, we recorded the electroencephalogram (EEG) in healthy older participants (aged 60-80 years) while they performed two different versions of a selective face/scene working memory task, both with and without prior knowledge as to when relevant and irrelevant stimuli would appear. Each trial contained two faces and two scenes presented sequentially followed by a 9 sec delay and a probe stimulus. Participants were given the following instructions: remember faces (ignore scenes), remember scenes (ignore faces), remember the xth and yth stimuli (where x and y could be 1st, 2nd, 3rd or 4th), or passively view all stimuli. Working memory performance remained consistent regardless of task instructions. Enhanced neural activity was observed at posterior electrodes to attended stimuli, while neural responses that reflected the suppression of irrelevant stimuli was absent for both tasks. The lack of significant suppression at early stages of visual processing was revealed by P1 amplitude and N1 latency modulation indices. These results reveal that prior knowledge of stimulus relevance does not modify early neural processing during stimulus encoding and does not improve working memory performance in older adults. These results suggest that the inability to suppress irrelevant information early in the visual processing stream by older adults is related to mechanisms

  1. Development and application of Geobacillus stearothermophilus growth model for predicting spoilage of evaporated milk.

    PubMed

    Kakagianni, Myrsini; Gougouli, Maria; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2016-08-01

    The presence of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores in evaporated milk constitutes an important quality problem for the milk industry. This study was undertaken to provide an approach in modelling the effect of temperature on G. stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 growth and in predicting spoilage of evaporated milk. The growth of G. stearothermophilus was monitored in tryptone soy broth at isothermal conditions (35-67 °C). The data derived were used to model the effect of temperature on G. stearothermophilus growth with a cardinal type model. The cardinal values of the model for the maximum specific growth rate were Tmin = 33.76 °C, Tmax = 68.14 °C, Topt = 61.82 °C and μopt = 2.068/h. The growth of G. stearothermophilus was assessed in evaporated milk at Topt in order to adjust the model to milk. The efficiency of the model in predicting G. stearothermophilus growth at non-isothermal conditions was evaluated by comparing predictions with observed growth under dynamic conditions and the results showed a good performance of the model. The model was further used to predict the time-to-spoilage (tts) of evaporated milk. The spoilage of this product caused by acid coagulation when the pH approached a level around 5.2, eight generations after G. stearothermophilus reached the maximum population density (Nmax). Based on the above, the tts was predicted from the growth model as the sum of the time required for the microorganism to multiply from the initial to the maximum level ( [Formula: see text] ), plus the time required after the [Formula: see text] to complete eight generations. The observed tts was very close to the predicted one indicating that the model is able to describe satisfactorily the growth of G. stearothermophilus and to provide realistic predictions for evaporated milk spoilage.

  2. Development and application of Geobacillus stearothermophilus growth model for predicting spoilage of evaporated milk.

    PubMed

    Kakagianni, Myrsini; Gougouli, Maria; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2016-08-01

    The presence of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores in evaporated milk constitutes an important quality problem for the milk industry. This study was undertaken to provide an approach in modelling the effect of temperature on G. stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 growth and in predicting spoilage of evaporated milk. The growth of G. stearothermophilus was monitored in tryptone soy broth at isothermal conditions (35-67 °C). The data derived were used to model the effect of temperature on G. stearothermophilus growth with a cardinal type model. The cardinal values of the model for the maximum specific growth rate were Tmin = 33.76 °C, Tmax = 68.14 °C, Topt = 61.82 °C and μopt = 2.068/h. The growth of G. stearothermophilus was assessed in evaporated milk at Topt in order to adjust the model to milk. The efficiency of the model in predicting G. stearothermophilus growth at non-isothermal conditions was evaluated by comparing predictions with observed growth under dynamic conditions and the results showed a good performance of the model. The model was further used to predict the time-to-spoilage (tts) of evaporated milk. The spoilage of this product caused by acid coagulation when the pH approached a level around 5.2, eight generations after G. stearothermophilus reached the maximum population density (Nmax). Based on the above, the tts was predicted from the growth model as the sum of the time required for the microorganism to multiply from the initial to the maximum level ( [Formula: see text] ), plus the time required after the [Formula: see text] to complete eight generations. The observed tts was very close to the predicted one indicating that the model is able to describe satisfactorily the growth of G. stearothermophilus and to provide realistic predictions for evaporated milk spoilage. PMID:27052699

  3. A root-mean-square approach for predicting fatigue crack growth under random loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    A method for predicting fatigue crack growth under random loading which employs the concept of Barsom (1976) is presented. In accordance with this method, the loading history for each specimen is analyzed to determine the root-mean-square maximum and minimum stresses, and the predictions are made by assuming the tests have been conducted under constant-amplitude loading at the root-mean-square maximum and minimum levels. The procedure requires a simple computer program and a desk-top computer. For the eleven predictions made, the ratios of the predicted lives to the test lives ranged from 2.13 to 0.82, which is a good result, considering that the normal scatter in the fatigue-crack-growth rates may range from a factor of two to four under identical loading conditions.

  4. Water temperature and fish growth: otoliths predict growth patterns of a marine fish in a changing climate.

    PubMed

    Rountrey, Adam N; Coulson, Peter G; Meeuwig, Jessica J; Meekan, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Ecological modeling shows that even small, gradual changes in body size in a fish population can have large effects on natural mortality, biomass, and catch. However, efforts to model the impact of climate change on fish growth have been hampered by a lack of long-term (multidecadal) data needed to understand the effects of temperature on growth rates in natural environments. We used a combination of dendrochronology techniques and additive mixed-effects modeling to examine the sensitivity of growth in a long-lived (up to 70 years), endemic marine fish, the western blue groper (Achoerodus gouldii), to changes in water temperature. A multi-decadal biochronology (1952-2003) of growth was constructed from the otoliths of 56 fish collected off the southwestern coast of Western Australia, and we tested for correlations between the mean index chronology and a range of potential environmental drivers. The chronology was significantly correlated with sea surface temperature in the region, but common variance among individuals was low. This suggests that this species has been relatively insensitive to past variations in climate. Growth increment and age data were also used in an additive mixed model to predict otolith growth and body size later this century. Although growth was relatively insensitive to changes in temperature, the model results suggested that a fish aged 20 in 2099 would have an otolith about 10% larger and a body size about 5% larger than a fish aged 20 in 1977. Our study shows that species or populations regarded as relatively insensitive to climate change could still undergo significant changes in growth rate and body size that are likely to have important effects on the productivity and yield of fisheries.

  5. Water temperature and fish growth: otoliths predict growth patterns of a marine fish in a changing climate.

    PubMed

    Rountrey, Adam N; Coulson, Peter G; Meeuwig, Jessica J; Meekan, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Ecological modeling shows that even small, gradual changes in body size in a fish population can have large effects on natural mortality, biomass, and catch. However, efforts to model the impact of climate change on fish growth have been hampered by a lack of long-term (multidecadal) data needed to understand the effects of temperature on growth rates in natural environments. We used a combination of dendrochronology techniques and additive mixed-effects modeling to examine the sensitivity of growth in a long-lived (up to 70 years), endemic marine fish, the western blue groper (Achoerodus gouldii), to changes in water temperature. A multi-decadal biochronology (1952-2003) of growth was constructed from the otoliths of 56 fish collected off the southwestern coast of Western Australia, and we tested for correlations between the mean index chronology and a range of potential environmental drivers. The chronology was significantly correlated with sea surface temperature in the region, but common variance among individuals was low. This suggests that this species has been relatively insensitive to past variations in climate. Growth increment and age data were also used in an additive mixed model to predict otolith growth and body size later this century. Although growth was relatively insensitive to changes in temperature, the model results suggested that a fish aged 20 in 2099 would have an otolith about 10% larger and a body size about 5% larger than a fish aged 20 in 1977. Our study shows that species or populations regarded as relatively insensitive to climate change could still undergo significant changes in growth rate and body size that are likely to have important effects on the productivity and yield of fisheries. PMID:24862838

  6. Peripheral Opioid Antagonist Enhances the Effect of Anti-Tumor Drug by Blocking a Cell Growth-Suppressive Pathway In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Yumi; Ashikawa, Maho; Aoyagi, Kazuhiko; Fujita, Takeshi; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Komatsu, Masayuki; Narita, Minoru; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nagase, Hiroshi; Kushima, Ryoji; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Fukagawa, Takeo; Katai, Hitoshi; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Uezono, Yasuhito; Sasaki, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    The dormancy of tumor cells is a major problem in chemotherapy, since it limits the therapeutic efficacy of anti-tumor drugs that only target dividing cells. One potential way to overcome chemo-resistance is to “wake up” these dormant cells. Here we show that the opioid antagonist methylnaltrexone (MNTX) enhances the effect of docetaxel (Doc) by blocking a cell growth-suppressive pathway. We found that PENK, which encodes opioid growth factor (OGF) and suppresses cell growth, is predominantly expressed in diffuse-type gastric cancers (GCs). The blockade of OGF signaling by MNTX releases cells from their arrest and boosts the effect of Doc. In comparison with the use of Doc alone, the combined use of Doc and MNTX significantly prolongs survival, alleviates abdominal pain, and diminishes Doc-resistant spheroids on the peritoneal membrane in model mice. These results suggest that blockade of the pathways that suppress cell growth may enhance the effects of anti-tumor drugs. PMID:25853862

  7. 3D choroid neovascularization growth prediction based on reaction-diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shuxia; Chen, Xinjian; Shi, Fei; Xiang, Dehui; Zhu, Weifang; Chen, Haoyu

    2016-03-01

    Choroid neovascularization (CNV) is a kind of pathology from the choroid and CNV-related disease is one important cause of vision loss. It is desirable to predict the CNV growth rate so that appropriate treatment can be planned. In this paper, we seek to find a method to predict the growth of CNV based on 3D longitudinal Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) images. A reaction-diffusion model is proposed for prediction. The method consists of four phases: pre-processing, meshing, CNV growth modeling and prediction. We not only apply the reaction-diffusion model to the disease region, but also take the surrounding tissues into consideration including outer retinal layer, inner retinal layer and choroid layer. The diffusion in these tissues is considered as isotropic. The finite-element-method (FEM) is used to solve the partial differential equations (PDE) in the diffusion model. The curve of CNV growth with treatment are fitted and then we can predict the CNV status in a future time point. The preliminary results demonstrated that our proposed method is accurate and the validity and feasibility of our model is obvious.

  8. ASC-J9 Suppresses Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Growth through Degradation of Full-length and Splice Variant Androgen Receptors12

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Shinichi; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Chuang, Kun-Lung; Xu, Defeng; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Tochigi, Tatsuo; Pang, See-Tong; Li, Lei; Arai, Yoichi; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2012-01-01

    Early studies suggested androgen receptor (AR) splice variants might contribute to the progression of prostate cancer (PCa) into castration resistance. However, the therapeutic strategy to target these AR splice variants still remains unresolved. Through tissue survey of tumors from the same patients before and after castration resistance, we found that the expression of AR3, a major AR splice variant that lacks the AR ligand-binding domain, was substantially increased after castration resistance development. The currently used antiandrogen, Casodex, showed little growth suppression in CWR22Rv1 cells. Importantly, we found that AR degradation enhancer ASC-J9 could degrade both full-length (fAR) and AR3 in CWR22Rv1 cells as well as in C4-2 and C81 cells with addition of AR3. The consequences of such degradation of both fAR and AR3 might then result in the inhibition of AR transcriptional activity and cell growth in vitro. More importantly, suppression of AR3 specifically by short-hairpin AR3 or degradation of AR3 by ASC-J9 resulted in suppression of AR transcriptional activity and cell growth in CWR22Rv1-fARKD (fAR knockdown) cells in which DHT failed to induce, suggesting the importance of targeting AR3. Finally, we demonstrated the in vivo therapeutic effects of ASC-J9 by showing the inhibition of PCa growth using the xenografted model of CWR22Rv1 cells orthotopically implanted into castrated nude mice with undetectable serum testosterone. These results suggested that targeting both fAR- and AR3-mediated PCa growth by ASC-J9 may represent the novel therapeutic approach to suppress castration-resistant PCa. Successful clinical trials targeting both fAR and AR3 may help us to battle castration-resistant PCa in the future. PMID:22355276

  9. CDK2 and mTOR are direct molecular targets of isoangustone A in the suppression of human prostate cancer cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eunjung; Son, Joe Eun; Byun, Sanguine; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Yeong A; Liu, Kangdong; Kim, Jiyoung; Lim, Soon Sung; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Dong, Zigang; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2013-10-01

    Licorice extract which is used as a natural sweetener has been shown to possess inhibitory effects against prostate cancer, but the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. Here, we report a compound, isoangustone A (IAA) in licorice that potently suppresses the growth of aggressive prostate cancer and sought to clarify its mechanism of action. We analyzed its inhibitory effects on the growth of PTEN-deleted human prostate cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. Administration of IAA significantly attenuated the growth of prostate cancer cell cultures and xenograft tumors. These effects were found to be attributable to inhibition of the G1/S phase cell cycle transition and the accumulation of p27{sup kip1}. The elevated p27{sup kip1} expression levels were concurrent with the decrease of its phosphorylation at threonine 187 through suppression of CDK2 kinase activity and the reduced phosphorylation of Akt at Serine 473 by diminishing the kinase activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Further analysis using recombinant proteins and immunoprecipitated cell lysates determined that IAA exerts suppressive effects against CDK2 and mTOR kinase activity by direct binding with both proteins. These findings suggested that the licorice compound IAA is a potent molecular inhibitor of CDK2 and mTOR, with strong implications for the treatment of prostate cancer. Thus, licorice-derived extracts with high IAA content warrant further clinical investigation for nutritional sources for prostate cancer patients. - Highlights: • Isoangustone A suppresses growth of PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. • Administration of isoangustone A inhibits tumor growth in mice. • Treatment of isoangustone A induces cell cycle arrest and accumulation of p27{sup kip1}. • Isoangustone A inhibits CDK2 and mTOR activity. • Isoangustone A directly binds with CDK2 and mTOR complex in prostate cancer cells.

  10. Growth characteristics of pearl gray guinea fowl as predicted by the Richards, Gompertz, and logistic models.

    PubMed

    Nahashon, S N; Aggrey, S E; Adefope, N A; Amenyenu, A; Wright, D

    2006-02-01

    This study was undertaken to describe the growth pattern of the pearl gray Guinea fowl. Using BW data from hatch to 22 wk, 3 nonlinear mathematical functions (Richards, Gompertz, and logistic) were used to estimate growth patterns of the pearl gray guinea fowl. The logistic and Gompertz models are a special case of the Richards model, which has a variable point of inflection defined by the shape or growth trajectory parameter, m. The shape parameter m was 1.08 and 0.98 in males and females, respectively, suggesting that the growth pattern of the pearl gray female guinea fowl is Gompertz. The pearl gray guinea fowl exhibited sexual dimorphism for their growth characteristics. From the Gompertz model, the asymptotic BW, growth rate, and age at maximum growth were 1.62 kg, 0.22 kg/wk, and 6.65 wk in males, respectively, and 1.70 kg, 0.19 kg/wk, and 6.70 wk in females, respectively. The ages at maximum growth were 6.65, 6.47, and 8.12 wk for the Richards, Gompertz, and logistic models, respectively. The pearl gray guinea fowl females have a higher asymptotic BW compared with the males. The average asymptotic BW of about 1.57 kg for both sexes predicted by the logistic model was below the average predicted BW from the Richards (1.66 kg) and Gompertz (1.67 kg) models, respectively, at 22 wk of age. The inverse relationship between the asymptotic weight and both relative growth and age at maximum growth of the pearl gray guinea fowl is similar to that of chickens, quail, and ducks. Success in studying the growth characteristics of guinea fowl will contribute to the efforts of genetically improving this least-studied avian species.

  11. Ursolic acid inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer and enhances the antitumor potential of gemcitabine in an orthotopic mouse model through suppression of the inflammatory microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R; Sung, Bokyung; Gupta, Subash C; Tyagi, Amit K; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2016-03-15

    The development of chemoresistance in human pancreatic cancer is one reason for the poor survival rate for patients with this cancer. Because multiple gene products are linked with chemoresistance, we investigated the ability of ursolic acid (UA) to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine, a standard drug used for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. These investigations were done in AsPC-1, MIA PaCa-2, and Panc-28 cells and in nude mice orthotopically implanted with Panc-28 cells. In vitro, UA inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, suppressed NF-κB activation and its regulated proliferative, metastatic, and angiogenic proteins. UA (20 μM) also enhanced gemcitabine (200 nM)-induced apoptosis and suppressed the expression of NF-κB-regulated proteins. In the nude mouse model, oral administration of UA (250 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth and enhanced the effect of gemcitabine (25 mg/kg). Furthermore, the combination of UA and gemcitabine suppressed the metastasis of cancer cells to distant organs such as liver and spleen. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that biomarkers of proliferation (Ki-67) and microvessel density (CD31) were suppressed by the combination of UA and gemcitabine. UA inhibited the activation of NF-κB and STAT3 and the expression of tumorigenic proteins regulated by these inflammatory transcription factors in tumor tissue. Furthermore, the combination of two agents decreased the expression of miR-29a, closely linked with tumorigenesis, in the tumor tissue. UA was found to be bioavailable in animal serum and tumor tissue. These results suggest that UA can inhibit the growth of human pancreatic tumors and sensitize them to gemcitabine by suppressing inflammatory biomarkers linked to proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis.

  12. Ursolic acid inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer and enhances the antitumor potential of gemcitabine in an orthotopic mouse model through suppression of the inflammatory microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R.; Sung, Bokyung; Gupta, Subash C.; Tyagi, Amit K.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    The development of chemoresistance in human pancreatic cancer is one reason for the poor survival rate for patients with this cancer. Because multiple gene products are linked with chemoresistance, we investigated the ability of ursolic acid (UA) to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine, a standard drug used for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. These investigations were done in AsPC-1, MIA PaCa-2, and Panc-28 cells and in nude mice orthotopically implanted with Panc-28 cells. In vitro, UA inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, suppressed NF-κB activation and its regulated proliferative, metastatic, and angiogenic proteins. UA (20 μM) also enhanced gemcitabine (200 nM)-induced apoptosis and suppressed the expression of NF-κB-regulated proteins. In the nude mouse model, oral administration of UA (250 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth and enhanced the effect of gemcitabine (25 mg/kg). Furthermore, the combination of UA and gemcitabine suppressed the metastasis of cancer cells to distant organs such as liver and spleen. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that biomarkers of proliferation (Ki-67) and microvessel density (CD31) were suppressed by the combination of UA and gemcitabine. UA inhibited the activation of NF-κB and STAT3 and the expression of tumorigenic proteins regulated by these inflammatory transcription factors in tumor tissue. Furthermore, the combination of two agents decreased the expression of miR-29a, closely linked with tumorigenesis, in the tumor tissue. UA was found to be bioavailable in animal serum and tumor tissue. These results suggest that UA can inhibit the growth of human pancreatic tumors and sensitize them to gemcitabine by suppressing inflammatory biomarkers linked to proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. PMID:26909608

  13. Prediction and suppression of HIFU-induced vessel rupture using passive cavitation detection in an ex vivo model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    emission amplitude. Time to rupture was compared between these feedback-controlled trials and paired controller-inactive trials using a paired Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results Subharmonic emissions were found to be the most predictive of vessel rupture (areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) = 0.757, p < 10-16) compared to low-frequency (AUROC = 0.657, p < 10-11) and broadband (AUROC = 0.729, p < 10-16) emissions. An independent-sample t test comparing pre-rupture to intact-vessel emissions revealed a statistically significant difference between the two groups for broadband and subharmonic emissions (p < 10-3), but not for low-frequency emissions (p = 0.058). In a one-sided paired Wilcoxon signed-rank test, activation of the control module was shown to increase the time to vessel rupture (T- = 8, p = 0.0244, N = 10). In one-sided paired t tests, activation of the control module was shown to cause no significant difference in time-averaged focal intensity (t = 0.362, p = 0.363, N = 10), but was shown to cause delivery of significantly greater total acoustic energy (t = 2.037, p = 0.0361, N = 10). Conclusions These results suggest that acoustic cavitation plays an important role in HIFU-induced vessel rupture. In HIFU treatments for vessel occlusion, passive monitoring of acoustic emissions may be useful in avoiding hemorrhage due to vessel rupture, as shown in the rupture suppression experiments. PMID:25232483

  14. Targeting NF-kappaB signaling pathway suppresses tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis of human esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Li, Yuk Yin; Tsao, Sai Wah; Cheung, Annie L M

    2009-09-01

    Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common malignancy, and one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The overall 5-year survival rate of patients with esophageal cancer remains low at 10% to 40% due to late diagnosis, metastasis, and resistance of the tumor to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. NF-kappaB is involved in the regulation of cell growth, survival, and motility, but little is known about the role of this signaling pathway in the tumorigenesis of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), the most common form of esophageal cancer. This study aims to explore the functions of NF-kappaB in human ESCC progression and to determine whether targeting the NF-kappaB signaling pathway might be of therapeutic value against ESCC. Our results from human ESCC cell lines and ESCC tissue indicated that NF-kappaB is constitutively active in ESCC. Exposure of ESCC cells to two NF-kappaB inhibitors, Bay11-7082 and sulfasalazine, not only reduced cancer cell proliferation, but also induced apoptosis and enhanced sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs, 5-fluorouracil, and cisplatin. In addition, Bay11-7082 and sulfasalazine suppressed the migration and invasive potential of ESCC cells. More importantly, the results from tumor xenograft and experimental metastasis models showed that Bay11-7082 had significant antitumor effects on ESCC xenografts in nude mice by promoting apoptosis, and inhibiting proliferation and angiogenesis, as well as reduced the metastasis of ESCC cells to the lungs without significant toxic effects. In summary, our data suggest that NF-kappaB inhibitors may be potentially useful as therapeutic agents for patients with esophageal cancer.

  15. Enhanced suppression of tumor growth by concomitant treatment of human lung cancer cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and arsenic trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Chia-Wen; Yao, Ju-Hsien; Chang, Shih-Yu; Lee, Pei-Chih; Lee, Te-Chang

    2011-11-15

    The efficacy of arsenic trioxide (ATO) against acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and relapsed APL has been well documented. ATO may cause DNA damage by generating reactive oxygen intermediates. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, modulates gene and protein expression via histone-dependent or -independent pathways that may result in chromatin decondensation, cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis. We investigated whether ATO and SAHA act synergistically to enhance the death of cancer cells. Our current findings showed that combined treatment with ATO and SAHA resulted in enhanced suppression of non-small-cell lung carcinoma in vitro in H1299 cells and in vivo in a xenograft mouse model. Flow cytometric analysis of annexin V+ cells showed that apoptotic cell death was significantly enhanced after combined treatment with ATO and SAHA. At the doses used, ATO did not interfere with cell cycle progression, but SAHA induced p21 expression and led to G1 arrest. A Comet assay demonstrated that ATO, but not SAHA, induced DNA strand breaks in H1299 cells; however, co-treatment with SAHA significantly increased ATO-induced DNA damage. Moreover, SAHA enhanced acetylation of histone H3 and sensitized genomic DNA to DNase I digestion. Our results suggest that SAHA may cause chromatin relaxation and increase cellular susceptibility to ATO-induced DNA damage. Combined administration of SAHA and ATO may be an effective approach to the treatment of lung cancer. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO and SAHA are therapeutic agents with different action modes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination of ATO and SAHA synergistically inhibits tumor cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SAHA loosens chromatin structure resulting in increased sensitivity to DNase I. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO-induced DNA damage and apoptosis are enhanced by co-treatment with SAHA.

  16. Tunicamycin-induced cell death in the trigeminal ganglion is suppressed by nerve growth factor in the mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Hiroyuki; Zhao, Bing-Ran; Kano, Mitsuhiro; Shimizu, Yoshinaka; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Terayama, Ruji; Matsuo, Saburo; Sugimoto, Tomosada

    2010-04-01

    The effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) on tunicamycin (Tm)-treated neurons in the trigeminal ganglion was investigated by use of caspase-3 immunohistochemistry. In intact embryos at embryonic day 16.5, only a few caspase-3-immunoreactivity were detected in the ganglion neurons. Mean +/- SE of the density of the immunoreactivity was 0.22 +/- 0.03%. In contrast, the number of the immunoreactive neurons was increased at 24 h after injection of 0.5 microg Tm in 1 microl of 0.05 N NaOH solution into mouse embryos at embryonic day 15.5. The density of immunoreactivity was also increased (mean +/- SE = 1.44 +/- 0.11%) compared to intact and 0.05 N NaOH-treated embryos (mean +/- SE = 0.35 +/- 0.03%). The Tm treatment caused increase of the number of trigeminal neurons representing apoptotic profiles (intact, mean +/- SE = 79.3 +/- 8.5; 0.05 N NaOH, mean +/- SE = 132 +/- 11.5; 0.5 microg Tm, mean +/- SE = 370.2 +/- 64.8). In addition, NGF significantly prevented the increase of density of the immunoreactivity (mean +/- SE = 0.54 +/- 0.16%) and the number of apoptotic cells (mean +/- SE = 146.2 +/- 11.3). Saline application (without NGF) had no effect on Tm-induced increase of the immunoreactivity (mean +/- SE = 1.78 +/- 0.23%) or the apoptotic profiles (mean +/- SE = 431.9 +/- 80.5). These results indicate that Tm-induced cell death in the trigeminal ganglion is suppressed by NGF in the mouse embryo.

  17. NFIL3 suppresses hypoxia-induced apoptotic cell death by targeting the insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuan-Ho; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Pai, Peiying; Chen, Wei-Kung; Pan, Lung-Fa; Wang, Chien-Cheng; Padma, V Vijaya; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-06-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-II/mannose 6-phosphate receptor (IGF2R) over-expression correlates with heart disease progression. The IGF2R is not only an IGF2 clearance receptor, but it also triggers signal transduction, resulting in cardiac hypertrophy, apoptosis and fibrosis. The present study investigated the nuclear factor IL-3 (NFIL3), a transcription factor of the basic leucine zipper superfamily, and its potential pro-survival effects in cardiomyocytes. NFIL3 might play a key role in heart development and act as a survival factor in the heart, but the regulatory mechanisms are still unclear. IGF2 and IGF2R protein expression were highly increased in rat hearts subjected to hemorrhagic shock. IGF2R protein expression was also up-regulated in H9c2 cells exposed to hypoxia. Over-expression of NFIL3 in H9c2 cardiomyoblast cells inhibited the induction of hypoxia-induced apoptosis and down-regulated IGF2R expression levels. Gel shift assay, double-stranded DNA pull-down assay and chromatin immune-precipitation analyses indicated that NFIL3 binds directly to the IGF2R promoter region. Using a luciferase assay, we further observed NFIL3 repress IGF2R gene promoter activity. Our results demonstrate that NFIL3 is an important negative transcription factor, which through binding to the promoter of IGF2R, suppresses the apoptosis induced by IGF2R signaling in H9c2 cardiomyoblast cells under hypoxic conditions. PMID:25536374

  18. Mechanisms of immune suppression by interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β: the role of T regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alison; Verhagen, Johan; Blaser, Kurt; Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2006-01-01

    Specific immune suppression and induction of tolerance are essential processes in the regulation and circumvention of immune defence. The balance between allergen-specific type 1 regulatory (Tr1) cells and T helper (Th) 2 cells appears to be decisive in the development of allergy. Tr1 cells consistently represent the dominant subset specific for common environmental allergens in healthy individuals. In contrast, there is a high frequency of allergen-specific interleukin-4 (IL-4)-secreting T cells in allergic individuals. Allergen-specific immunotherapy can induce specific Tr1 cells that abolish allergen-induced proliferation of Th1 and Th2 cells, as well as their cytokine production. Tr1 cells utilize multiple suppressor mechanisms, such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) as secreted cytokines and various surface molecules, such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and programmed death-1. IL-10 only inhibits T cells stimulated by low numbers of triggered T-cell receptors, which depend on CD28 costimulation. IL-10 inhibits CD28 tyrosine phosphorylation, preventing the binding of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase p85 and consequently inhibiting the CD28 signalling pathway. In addition, IL-10 and TGF-β secreted by Tr1 cells skew the antibody production from immunoglobulin E (IgE) towards the non-inflammatory isotypes IgG4 and IgA, respectively. Induction of antigen-specific Tr1 cells can thus re-direct an inappropriate immune response against allergens or auto-antigens using a broad range of suppressor mechanisms. PMID:16556256

  19. Abrogation of Gli3 expression suppresses the growth of colon cancer cells via activation of p53

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Han Na; Oh, Sang Cheul; Kim, Jun Suk

    2012-03-10

    p53, the major human tumor suppressor, appears to be related to sonic hedgehog (Shh)-Gli-mediated tumorigenesis. However, the role of p53 in tumor progression by the Shh-Gli signaling pathway is poorly understood. Herein we investigated the critical regulation of Gli3-p53 in tumorigenesis of colon cancer cells and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the mRNA level of Shh and Gli3 in colon tumor tissues was significantly higher than corresponding normal tissues (P < 0.001). The inhibition of Gli3 by treatment with Gli3 siRNA resulted in a clear decrease in cell proliferation and enhanced the level of expression of p53 proteins compared to treatment with control siRNA. The half-life of p53 was dramatically increased by treatment with Gli3 siRNA. In addition, treatment with MG132 blocked MDM2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation, and led to accumulation of p53 in Gli3 siRNA-overexpressing cells. Importantly, ectopic expression of p53 siRNA reduced the ability of Gli3 siRNA to suppress proliferation of those cells compared with the cells treated with Gli3 siRNA alone. Moreover, Gli3 siRNA sensitized colon cancer cells to treatment with anti-cancer agents (5-FU and bevacizumab). Taken together, our studies demonstrate that loss of Gli3 signaling leads to disruption of the MDM2-p53 interaction and strongly potentiate p53-dependent cell growth inhibition in colon cancer cells, indicating a basis for the rational use of Gli3 antagonists as a novel treatment option for colon cancer.

  20. Endophytic Association of Trichoderma asperellum within Theobroma cacao Suppresses Vascular Streak Dieback Incidence and Promotes Side Graft Growth

    PubMed Central

    Nasaruddin, Nasaruddin; Hendarto, Hendarto; Hakkar, Andi Akbar; Agriansyah, Nursalim

    2016-01-01

    Trichoderma species are able to persist on living sapwood and leaves of cacao (Theobroma cacao) in an endophytic relationship. In this research, we evaluated the ability of Trichodema asperellum introduced at the incision site in the bark for side grafting with the concentration of 4 g/10 mL, 4 g/100 mL, and 4 g/1,000 mL (suspended in water) in suppressing vascular streak dieback (VSD) incidence and promoting growth of side grafts in the field. The incidence of VSD in two local clones of cacao, MCC1 and M04, without application of T. asperellum was 71.2% and 70.1% at 21 wk after grafting, respectively. However, when the two clones were treated with a concentration of 4 g/10 mL T. asperellum, the incidence was 20.6% and 21.7%, respectively, compared to 29.1% and 20.9% at 4 g/100 mL and 18.2% and 15.6% at 4 g/1,000 mL. By comparing to the control, the treatment with the same concentrations of T. asperellum listed above, the total number of stomata in MCC1 decreased by 41.9%, 30.2%, and 14.0% and in M04 by 30.5%, 21.9%, and -2.5% (exception), respectively. Otherwise, the total area of stomata opening increased by 91.4%, 99.7%, and 28.6% in MCC1 and by 203.8%, 253.5%, and 35.9% in M04, respectively. Furthermore, the number of buds and branches treated with a mixture concentration on the the two clones increased by 90.7% and 21.7%, respectively. These data showed that the application of T. asperellum to cacao scions while grafting can decrease VSD incidence in side grafts and increase growth of grafts in addition to decreasing total number of stomata, increasing total area of opened stomata, and increasing number of buds and branches. PMID:27790069

  1. Identification of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genes associated with growth suppression in stationary-phase nutrient broth cultures and in the chicken intestine.

    PubMed

    Rychlik, Ivan; Martin, Gerald; Methner, Ulrich; Lovell, Margaret; Cardova, Lenka; Sebkova, Alena; Sevcik, Mojmor; Damborsky, Jiri; Barrow, Paul A

    2002-12-01

    Over 2,800 Tn 5 insertion mutants of Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium were screened for the loss of ability to suppress the multiplication of a spectinomycin-resistant (Spc(r)) but otherwise isogenic S. enterica sv. Typhimurium strain, when the Spc(r) mutant was added to 24-h LB broth cultures of the mutants. Selected "growth non-suppressive" (GNS) mutants were defective in respiration (insertions in arcA and fnr), amino acid biosynthesis (aroA and aroD), nutrient uptake and its regulation (tdcC and crp), and chemotaxis (fliD). In the last GNS mutant, the transposon inactivated yhjH, an ORF with unknown function which shows sequence similarity to di-guanylate cyclase and to novel two-component signal transduction proteins. In newly hatched chickens, all of the mutants, with the exception of the fliDmutant, were also unable to suppress colonization of the alimentary tract by the parent strain inoculated 1 day later. Defined mutations in luxS or sdiA,genes which contribute to quorum sensing in S. enterica sv. Typhimurium, had no effect on the stationary-phase growth suppression. Analysis of a transcriptional fusion construct indicated that yhjH was moderately expressed in the exponential phase of growth and up-regulated upon entry into stationary phase. Expression of yhjH was also considerably suppressed by the addition of supernatant from a 24-h stationary-phase S. enterica sv. Typhimurium culture, suggesting that the gene belongs to a new sensing and signaling regulatory pathway in S. enterica sv. Typhimurium.

  2. Molecular concentration of deoxyHb in human prefrontal cortex predicts the emergence and suppression of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Leon-Dominguez, Umberto; Izzetoglu, Meltem; Leon-Carrion, Jose; Solís-Marcos, Ignacio; Garcia-Torrado, Francisco Jose; Forastero-Rodríguez, Ana; Mellado-Miras, Patricia; Villegas-Duque, Diego; Lopez-Romero, Juan Luis; Onaral, Banu; Izzetoglu, Kurtulus

    2014-01-15

    This is the first study to use fNIRS to explore anaesthetic depth and awakening during surgery with general anaesthesia. A 16 channel continuous wave (CW) functional near-infrared system (fNIRS) was used to monitor PFC activity. These outcomes were compared to BIS measures. The results indicate that deoxyHb concentration in the PFC varies during the suppression and emergence of consciousness. During suppression, deoxyHb levels increase, signalling the deactivation of the PFC, while during emergence, deoxyHb concentration drops, initiating PFC activation and the recovery of consciousness. Furthermore, BIS and deoxyHb concentrations in the PFC display a high negative correlation throughout the different anaesthetic phases. These findings suggest that deoxyHb could be a reliable marker for monitoring anaesthetic depth, and that the PFC intervenes in the suppression and emergence of consciousness.

  3. Interleukin-10 inhibits burst-forming unit-erythroid growth by suppression of endogenous granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor production from T cells.

    PubMed

    Oehler, L; Kollars, M; Bohle, B; Berer, A; Reiter, E; Lechner, K; Geissler, K

    1999-02-01

    Numerous cytokines released from accessory cells have been shown to exert either stimulatory or inhibitory growth signals on burst-forming unit-erythroid (BFU-E) growth. Because of its cytokine synthesis-inhibiting effects on T cells and monocytes, interleukin-10 (IL-10) may be a potential candidate for indirectly affecting erythropoiesis. We investigated the effects of IL-10 on BFU-E growth from normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) using a clonogenic progenitor cell assay. The addition of recombinant human IL-10 to cultures containing recombinant human erythropoietin suppressed BFU-E growth in a dose-dependent manner (by 55.2%, range 47.3-63.3%, p < 0.01, at 10 ng/mL). In contrast, no inhibitory effect of IL-10 was seen when cultivating highly enriched CD34+ cells. BFU-E growth from PBMC also was markedly suppressed in the presence of a neutralizing anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) antibody (by 48.7%, range 32.9-61.2% inhibition,p < 0.01), but not by neutralizing antibodies against granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-3. This suggests a stimulatory role of endogenously released GM-CSF on BFU-E formation. Also, the addition of exogenous GM-CSF completely restored IL-10-induced suppression of BFU-E growth. To determine the cellular source of GM-CSF production, we analyzed GM-CSF levels in suspension cultures containing PBMC that were either depleted of monocytes or T cells. Monocyte-depleted PBMC showed spontaneous production of increasing amounts of GM-CSF on days 3, 5, and 7, respectively, which could be suppressed by IL-10, whereas GM-CSF levels did not increase in cultures containing T-cell-depleted PBMC. Our data indicate that IL-10 inhibits the growth of erythroid progenitor cells in vitro, most likely by suppression of endogenous GM-CSF production from T cells.

  4. Temporal consistency of spatial pattern in growth of the mussel, Mytilus edulis: Implications for predictive modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, Per; Lindegarth, Susanne; Lindegarth, Mats

    2013-10-01

    Human pressures on coastal seas are increasing and methods for sustainable management, including spatial planning and mitigative actions, are therefore needed. In coastal areas worldwide, the development of mussel farming as an economically and ecologically sustainable industry requires geographic information on the growth and potential production capacity. In practice this means that coherent maps of temporally stable spatial patterns of growth need to be available in the planning process and that maps need to be based on mechanistic or empirical models. Therefore, as a first step towards development of models of growth, we assessed empirically the fundamental requirement that there are temporally consistent spatial patterns of growth in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. Using a pilot study we designed and dimensioned a transplant experiment, where the spatial consistency in the growth of mussels was evaluated at two resolutions. We found strong temporal and scale-dependent spatial variability in growth but patterns suggested that spatial patterns were uncoupled between growth of shell and that of soft tissue. Spatial patterns of shell growth were complex and largely inconsistent among years. Importantly, however, the growth of soft tissue was qualitatively consistent among years at the scale of km. The results suggest that processes affecting the whole coastal area cause substantial differences in growth of soft tissue among years but that factors varying at the scale of km create strong and persistent spatial patterns of growth, with a potential doubling of productivity by identifying the most suitable locations. We conclude that the observed spatial consistency provides a basis for further development of predictive modelling and mapping of soft tissue growth in these coastal areas. Potential causes of observed patterns, consequences for mussel-farming as a tool for mitigating eutrophication, aspects of precision of modelling and sampling of mussel growth as well

  5. Tree growth inference and prediction from diameter censuses and ring widths.

    PubMed

    Clark, James S; Wolosin, Michael; Dietze, Michael; Ibáñez, Inés; LaDeau, Shannon; Welsh, Miranda; Kloeppel, Brian

    2007-10-01

    Estimation of tree growth is based on sparse observations of tree diameter, ring widths, or increments read from a dendrometer. From annual measurements on a few trees (e.g., increment cores) or sporadic measurements from many trees (e.g., diameter censuses on mapped plots), relationships with resources, tree size, and climate are extrapolated to whole stands. There has been no way to formally integrate different types of data and problems of estimation that result from (1) multiple sources of observation error, which frequently result in impossible estimates of negative growth, (2) the fact that data are typically sparse (a few trees or a few years), whereas inference is needed broadly (many trees over many years), (3) the fact that some unknown fraction of the variance is shared across the population, and (4) the fact that growth rates of trees within competing stands are not independent. We develop a hierarchical Bayes state space model for tree growth that addresses all of these challenges, allowing for formal inference that is consistent with the available data and the assumption that growth is nonnegative. Prediction follows directly, incorporating the full uncertainty from inference with scenarios for "filling the gaps" for past growth rates and for future conditions affecting growth. An example involving multiple species and multiple stands with tree-ring data and up to 14 years of tree census data illustrates how different levels of information at the tree and stand level contribute to inference and prediction. PMID:17974333

  6. Tree growth inference and prediction from diameter censuses and ring widths.

    PubMed

    Clark, James S; Wolosin, Michael; Dietze, Michael; Ibáñez, Inés; LaDeau, Shannon; Welsh, Miranda; Kloeppel, Brian

    2007-10-01

    Estimation of tree growth is based on sparse observations of tree diameter, ring widths, or increments read from a dendrometer. From annual measurements on a few trees (e.g., increment cores) or sporadic measurements from many trees (e.g., diameter censuses on mapped plots), relationships with resources, tree size, and climate are extrapolated to whole stands. There has been no way to formally integrate different types of data and problems of estimation that result from (1) multiple sources of observation error, which frequently result in impossible estimates of negative growth, (2) the fact that data are typically sparse (a few trees or a few years), whereas inference is needed broadly (many trees over many years), (3) the fact that some unknown fraction of the variance is shared across the population, and (4) the fact that growth rates of trees within competing stands are not independent. We develop a hierarchical Bayes state space model for tree growth that addresses all of these challenges, allowing for formal inference that is consistent with the available data and the assumption that growth is nonnegative. Prediction follows directly, incorporating the full uncertainty from inference with scenarios for "filling the gaps" for past growth rates and for future conditions affecting growth. An example involving multiple species and multiple stands with tree-ring data and up to 14 years of tree census data illustrates how different levels of information at the tree and stand level contribute to inference and prediction.

  7. A computational model that predicts reverse growth in response to mechanical unloading

    PubMed Central

    Genet, M.; Acevedo-Bolton, G.; Ordovas, K.; Guccione, J. M.; Kuhl, E.

    2014-01-01

    Ventricular growth is widely considered to be an important feature in the adverse progression of heart diseases, whereas reverse ventricular growth (or reverse remodeling) is often considered to be a favorable response to clinical intervention. In recent years, a number of theoretical models have been proposed to model the process of ventricular growth while little has been done to model its reverse. Based on the framework of volumetric strain-driven finite growth with a homeostatic equilibrium range for the elastic myofiber stretch, we propose here a reversible growth model capable of describing both ventricular growth and its reversal. We used this model to construct a semi-analytical solution based on an idealized cylindrical tube model, as well as numerical solutions based on a truncated ellipsoidal model and a human left ventricular model that was reconstructed from magnetic resonance images. We show that our model is able to predict key features in the end-diastolic pressure–volume relationship that were observed experimentally and clinically during ventricular growth and reverse growth. We also show that the residual stress fields generated as a result of differential growth in the cylindrical tube model are similar to those in other nonidentical models utilizing the same geometry. PMID:24888270

  8. Predicting the Probability of Abnormal Stimulated Growth Hormone Response in Children After Radiotherapy for Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hua Chiaho; Wu Shengjie; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Lukose, Renin C.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a mathematical model utilizing more readily available measures than stimulation tests that identifies brain tumor survivors with high likelihood of abnormal growth hormone secretion after radiotherapy (RT), to avoid late recognition and a consequent delay in growth hormone replacement therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 191 prospectively collected post-RT evaluations of peak growth hormone level (arginine tolerance/levodopa stimulation test), serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, height, weight, growth velocity, and body mass index in 106 children and adolescents treated for ependymoma (n = 72), low-grade glioma (n = 28) or craniopharyngioma (n = 6), who had normal growth hormone levels before RT. Normal level in this study was defined as the peak growth hormone response to the stimulation test {>=}7 ng/mL. Results: Independent predictor variables identified by multivariate logistic regression with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001) included IGF-1 z score, weight z score, and hypothalamic dose. The developed predictive model demonstrated a strong discriminatory power with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.883. At a potential cutoff point of probability of 0.3 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 78%. Conclusions: Without unpleasant and expensive frequent stimulation tests, our model provides a quantitative approach to closely follow the growth hormone secretory capacity of brain tumor survivors. It allows identification of high-risk children for subsequent confirmatory tests and in-depth workup for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency.

  9. Monoclonal Antibody and an Antibody-Toxin Conjugate to a Cell Surface Proteoglycan of Melanoma Cells Suppress in vivo Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumol, T. F.; Wang, Q. C.; Reisfeld, R. A.; Kaplan, N. O.

    1983-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody directed against a cell surface chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan of human melanoma cells, 9.2.27, and its diphtheria toxin A chain (DTA) conjugate were investigated for their effects on in vitro protein synthesis and in vivo tumor growth of human melanoma cells. The 9.2.27 IgG and its DTA conjugate display similar serological activities against melanoma target cells but only the conjugate can induce consistent in vitro inhibition of protein synthesis and toxicity in M21 melanoma cells. However, both 9.2.27 IgG and its DTA conjugate effect significant suppression of M21 tumor growth in vivo in an immunotherapy model of a rapidly growing tumor in athymic nu/nu mice, suggesting that other host mechanisms may mediate monoclonal antibody-induced tumor suppression.

  10. Isolation, characterization, and evaluation of multi-trait plant growth promoting rhizobacteria for their growth promoting and disease suppressing effects on ginger.

    PubMed

    Dinesh, Raghavan; Anandaraj, Muthuswamy; Kumar, Aundy; Bini, Yogiyar Kundil; Subila, Kizhakke Purayil; Aravind, Ravindran

    2015-04-01

    In this study, 100 PGPR strains isolated from different varieties of ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) were first characterized for their morphological, biochemical, and nutrient mobilization traits in vitro. The PGPR were also screened in vitro for inhibition of Pythium myriotylum causing soft rot in ginger. Results revealed that only five PGPR showed >70% suppression of P. myriotylum. These 5 PGPR viz., GRB (Ginger rhizobacteria) 25--Burkholderia cepacia, GRB35--Bacillus amyloliquefaciens; GRB58--Serratia marcescens; GRB68--S. marcescens; GRB91--Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used for further growth promotion and biocontrol studies in the green house and field. The green house study revealed that GRB35 (B. amyloliquefaciens) and GRB68 (S. marcescens) registered markedly higher sprouting (96.3%) and lower disease incidence (48.1%) and greater rhizome yield (365.6 g pot(-1) and 384.4 g pot(-1), respectively), while control registered the lowest sprouting (66%), maximum soft rot incidence (100%) and lowest rhizome yield (134.4 g pot(-1)). In the field experiments also, GRB68 (S. marcescens) and GRB35 (B. amyloliquefaciens) registered the greatest sprouting (80% each), markedly lower soft rot incidence (5.2% and 7.3%, respectively) and higher yield (5.0 and 4.3 kg(3)m(-2), respectively) compared to chemicals like Streptomycin sulphate (73.0%, 18.5% and 2.3 kg(3)m(-2), respectively), Metalaxyl-Mancozeb (73.0%, 14.0% and 3.8 kg(3)m(-2), respectively) and control (73.0%, 25.1% and 2.2 kg 3m(-2), respectively). Overall, the results suggested that for growth promotion and management of soft rot disease in ginger, GRB35 B. amyloliquefaciens and GRB68 S. marcescens could be good alternatives to chemical measures. Since, the latter has been reported to be an opportunistic human pathogen, we recommend the use of B. amyloliquefaciens for integration into nutrient and disease management schedules for ginger cultivation. PMID:25801969

  11. Therapeutic targeting of CBP/β-catenin signaling reduces cancer stem-like population and synergistically suppresses growth of EBV-positive nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells with cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Chan, King Chi; Chan, Lai Sheung; Ip, Joseph Chok Yan; Lo, Carman; Yip, Timothy Tak Chun; Ngan, Roger Kai Cheong; Wong, Ricky Ngok Shun; Lo, Kwok Wai; Ng, Wai Tong; Lee, Anne Wing Mui; Tsao, George Sai Wah; Kahn, Michael; Lung, Maria Li; Mak, Nai Ki

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is an EBV-associated epithelial malignancy prevalent in southern China. Presence of treatment-resistant cancer stem cells (CSC) may associate with tumor relapse and metastasis in NPC. ICG-001 is a specific CBP/β-catenin antagonist that can block CBP/β-catenin-mediated transcription of stem cell associated genes and enhance p300/β-catenin-mediated transcription, thereby reducing the CSC-like population via forced differentiation. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of ICG-001 on the CSC-like population, and the combination effect of ICG-001 with cisplatin in the C666-1 EBV-positive NPC cells. Results showed that ICG-001 inhibited C666-1 cell growth and reduced expression of CSC-associated proteins with altered expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers. ICG-001 also inhibited C666-1 tumor sphere formation, accompanied with reduced SOX2hi/CD44hi CSC-like population. ICG-001 was also found to restore the expression of a tumor suppressive microRNA-145 (miR-145). Ectopic expression of miR-145 effectively repressed SOX2 protein expression and inhibited tumor sphere formation. Combination of ICG-001 with cisplatin synergistically suppressed in vitro growth of C666-1 cells and significantly suppressed growth of NPC xenografts. These results suggested that therapeutically targeting of the CBP/β-catenin signaling pathway with ICG-001 can effectively reduce the CSC-like population and combination with cisplatin can effectively suppress the growth of NPC. PMID:25897700

  12. Dynamic Models of Learning That Characterize Parent-Child Exchanges Predict Vocabulary Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ober, David R.; Beekman, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Cumulative vocabulary models for infants and toddlers were developed from models of learning that predict trajectories associated with low, average, and high vocabulary growth rates (14 to 46 months). It was hypothesized that models derived from rates of learning mirror the type of exchanges provided to infants and toddlers by parents and…

  13. Predicting Reading Growth with Event-Related Potentials: Thinking Differently about Indexing "Responsiveness"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemons, Christopher J.; Key, Alexandra P. F.; Fuchs, Douglas; Yoder, Paul J.; Fuchs, Lynn S.; Compton, Donald L.; Williams, Susan M.; Bouton, Bobette

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if event-related potential (ERP) data collected during three reading-related tasks (Letter Sound Matching, Nonword Rhyming, and Nonword Reading) could be used to predict short-term reading growth on a curriculum-based measure of word identification fluency over 19 weeks in a sample of 29 first-grade…

  14. Predicting Lexical Density Growth Rate in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Paul J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this longitudinal correlational study was to test whether an environmental variable and 4 child variables predicted growth rate of number of different nonimitative words used (i.e., lexical density). Method: Thirty-five young (age range = 21-54 months) children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) who were initially…

  15. Monoculture parameters successfully predict coculture growth kinetics of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and two Bifidobacterium strains.

    PubMed

    Van Wey, A S; Cookson, A L; Roy, N C; McNabb, W C; Soboleva, T K; Shorten, P R

    2014-11-17

    Microorganisms rarely live in isolation but are most often found in a consortium. This provides the potential for cross-feeding and nutrient competition among the microbial species, which make it challenging to predict the growth kinetics in coculture. In this paper we developed a mathematical model to describe substrate consumption and subsequent microbial growth and metabolite production for bacteria grown in monoculture. The model characterized substrate utilization kinetics of 18 Bifidobacterium strains. Some bifidobacterial strains demonstrated preferential degradation of oligofructose in that sugars with low degree of polymerization (DP) (DP≤3 or 4) were metabolized before sugars of higher DP, or vice versa. Thus, we expanded the model to describe the preferential degradation of oligofructose. In addition, we adapted the model to describe the competition between human colonic bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262 and Bifidobacterium longum LMG 11047 or Bifidobacterium breve Yakult for inulin as well as cross-feeding of breakdown products from the extracellular hydrolysis of inulin by B. thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262. We found that the coculture growth kinetics could be predicted based on the respective monoculture growth kinetics. Using growth kinetics from monoculture experiments to predict coculture dynamics will reduce the number of in vitro experiments required to parameterize multi-culture models.

  16. Suppression of growth factor-mediated MAP kinase activation by v-raf in macrophages: a putative role for the MKP-1 phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Krautwald, S; Büscher, D; Dent, P; Ruthenberg, K; Baccarini, M

    1995-03-16

    Many tyrosine kinase growth factor receptors activate the MAP Kinase (MAPK) pathway by stimulating the activity of the RAF kinase. In some, but not all cell types, the expression of activated RAF is sufficient to induce constitutive MAPK activation. In BAC-1.2F5 macrophages the expression of virally activated RAF does not correlate with constitutive MAPK activation; on the contrary, growth factor-mediated stimulation of MAPK activity is suppressed in these cells. Suppression correlates with v-RAF expression, as MAPK activation is normal in a revertant cell line that stopped expressing v-RAF. Inhibition of MAPK activation is associated with lack of ERK-2 tyrosine phosphorylation, and is not due to the suppression of CSF-1-mediated MEK activation. Pretreatment with vanadate restores growth factor-stimulated activation and tyrosine phosphorylation of MAPK in v-RAF-expressing macrophages, indicating the involvement of a tyrosine phosphatase. Interestingly, v-RAF-expressing macrophages contain low constitutive levels of MKP-1 mRNA, an immediate early gene that encodes a MAPK-specific phosphatase and is induced in the parental cell line by CSF-1 treatment. The restoration of MAPK activation by vanadate pretreatment and the presence of MKP-1 mRNA in v-RAF-expressing macrophages raise the intriguing possibility that in macrophages RAF may be feeding back on the MAPK pathway by participating in the control of MKP-1 expression. PMID:7700643

  17. Inhibition of Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel ANO1/TMEM16A Suppresses Tumor Growth and Invasion in Human Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jia, Linghan; Liu, Wen; Guan, Lizhao; Lu, Min; Wang, KeWei

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer or pulmonary carcinoma is primarily derived from epithelial cells that are thin and line on the alveolar surfaces of the lung for gas exchange. ANO1/TMEM16A, initially identified from airway epithelial cells, is a member of Ca2+-activated Cl- channels (CaCCs) that function to regulate epithelial secretion and cell volume for maintenance of ion and tissue homeostasis. ANO1/TMEM16A has recently been shown to be highly expressed in several epithelium originated carcinomas. However, the role of ANO1 in lung cancer remains unknown. In this study, we show that inhibition of calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1/TMEM16A suppresses tumor growth and invasion in human lung cancer. ANO1 is upregulated in different human lung cancer cell lines. Knocking-down ANO1 by small hairpin RNAs inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of GLC82 and NCI-H520 cancel cells evaluated by CCK-8, would-healing, transwell and 3D soft agar assays. ANO1 protein is overexpressed in 77.3% cases of human lung adenocarcinoma tissues detected by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the tumor growth in nude mice implanted with GLC82 cells was significantly suppressed by ANO1 silencing. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that ANO1 overexpression contributes to tumor growth and invasion of lung cancer; and suppressing ANO1 overexpression may have therapeutic potential in lung cancer therapy.

  18. Model Predictions of Chemically Controlled Slow Crack Growth with Application to Mechanical Effects in Geothermal Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, B E

    2001-04-11

    Representative, simplified geothermal rock-fluid systems are investigated with a modeling approach to estimate how rock water interactions affect coupled properties related to mechanical stability and permeability improvement through fracturing. First, geochemical modeling is used to determine the evolution of fluid chemistry at temperatures up to 300 C when fluids are in contact with representative rocks of continental origin. Then, a kinetic crack growth model for quartz is used to predict growth rate for subcritical cracks in acidic and basic environments. The predicted growth rate is highly sensitive to temperature and pH in the ranges tested. At present, the model is limited to situations in which quartz controls the mechanical process of interest, such as well bore stability in silica cemented rocks and the opening of quartz filled veins to enhance permeability.

  19. Pathological Signaling via Platelet-Derived Growth Factor Receptor α Involves Chronic Activation of Akt and Suppression of p53 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hetian; Velez, Gisela; Kazlauskas, Andrius

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to direct activation of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor α (PDGFRα) via PDGF, indirect activation via growth factors outside the PDGF family failed to induce dimerization, internalization, and degradation of PDGFRα. Chronically activated, monomeric PDGFRα induced prolonged activation of Akt and suppressed the level of p53. These events were sufficient to promote both cellular responses (proliferation, survival, and contraction) that are intrinsic to proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and induce the disease itself. This signature signaling pathway appeared to extend beyond PVR since deregulating PDGFRα in ways that promote solid tumors also resulted in chronic activation of Akt and a decline in the level of p53. PMID:21357737

  20. The traditional Chinese medicinal formula BDL301 suppresses tumor growth by inhibiting STAT3 pathway and inducing apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Li; Zhao, Huaxin; Fang, Juemin; Li, Chunyan; Liu, Zhuqing; Cui, Ran; Hu, Fei; Zhang, Xi; Chen, Yijing; Han, Hui; Cao, Chuanhai; Xu, Qing

    2015-03-01

    The traditional Chinese medicinal formula BDL301 has been used to inhibit inflammation for hundreds of years. The development of colorectal cancer and chronic inflammation are closely related. In this study, we investigated whether BDL301 could inhibit tumor growth. We found that angiogenesis and tumor growth were both inhibited in vivo. In addition, apoptosis was induced and the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) pathway were suppressed in the colorectal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by BDL301. This study demonstrates that BDL301 exerted significant anticancer activity by inhibiting the STAT3 pathways and inducing apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells.

  1. PIK3R1 targeting by miR-21 suppresses tumor cell migration and invasion by reducing PI3K/AKT signaling and reversing EMT, and predicts clinical outcome of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li-Xu; Liu, Yan-Hui; Xiang, Jian-Wen; Wu, Qi-Nian; Xu, Lei-Bo; Luo, Xin-Lan; Zhu, Xiao-Lan; Liu, Chao; Xu, Fang-Ping; Luo, Dong-Lan; Mei, Ping; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Ke-Ping; Chen, Jie

    2016-02-01

    We have previously shown that dysregulation of miR-21 functioned as an oncomiR in breast cancer. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms by which miR-21 regulate breast tumor migration and invasion. We applied pathway analysis on genome microarray data and target-predicting algorithms for miR-21 target screening, and used luciferase reporting as