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Sample records for predicting b-dna structure

  1. Structural correlations and melting of B-DNA fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Wildes, Andrew; Theodorakopoulos, Nikos; Valle-Orero, Jessica; Cuesta-Lopez, Santiago; Peyrard, Michel; Garden, Jean-Luc

    2011-06-15

    Despite numerous attempts, understanding the thermal denaturation of DNA is still a challenge due to the lack of structural data on the transition since standard experimental approaches to DNA melting are made in solution and do not provide spatial information. We report a measurement using neutron scattering from oriented DNA fibers to determine the size of the regions that stay in the double-helix conformation as the melting temperature is approached from below. A Bragg peak from the B form of DNA is observed as a function of temperature and its width and integrated intensity are measured. These results, complemented by a differential calorimetry study of the melting of B-DNA fibers as well as electrophoresis and optical observation data, are analyzed in terms of a one-dimensional mesoscopic model of DNA.

  2. Models for chromosomal replication-independent non-B DNA structure-induced genetic instability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guliang; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2009-01-01

    Regions of genomic DNA containing repetitive nucleotide sequences can adopt a number of different structures in addition to the canonical B-DNA form: many of these non-B DNA structures are causative factors in genetic instability and human disease. Although chromosomal DNA replication through such repetitive sequences has been considered a major cause of non-B form DNA structure-induced genetic instability, it is also observed in non-proliferative tissues. In this review, we discuss putative mechanisms responsible for the mutagenesis induced by non-B DNA structures in the absence of chromosomal DNA replication. PMID:19123200

  3. Non-B DNA Secondary Structures and Their Resolution by RecQ Helicases

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sudha

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the canonical B-form structure first described by Watson and Crick, DNA can adopt a number of alternative structures. These non-B-form DNA secondary structures form spontaneously on tracts of repeat sequences that are abundant in genomes. In addition, structured forms of DNA with intrastrand pairing may arise on single-stranded DNA produced transiently during various cellular processes. Such secondary structures have a range of biological functions but also induce genetic instability. Increasing evidence suggests that genomic instabilities induced by non-B DNA secondary structures result in predisposition to diseases. Secondary DNA structures also represent a new class of molecular targets for DNA-interactive compounds that might be useful for targeting telomeres and transcriptional control. The equilibrium between the duplex DNA and formation of multistranded non-B-form structures is partly dependent upon the helicases that unwind (resolve) these alternate DNA structures. With special focus on tetraplex, triplex, and cruciform, this paper summarizes the incidence of non-B DNA structures and their association with genomic instability and emphasizes the roles of RecQ-like DNA helicases in genome maintenance by resolution of DNA secondary structures. In future, RecQ helicases are anticipated to be additional molecular targets for cancer chemotherapeutics. PMID:21977309

  4. B-DNA structure is intrinsically polymorphic: even at the level of base pair positions

    SciTech Connect

    Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Hsiao, Chiaolong; Woods, Kristen Kruger; Moulaei, Tinoush; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2012-10-23

    Increasingly exact measurement of single crystal X-ray diffraction data offers detailed characterization of DNA conformation, hydration and electrostatics. However, instead of providing a more clear and unambiguous image of DNA, highly accurate diffraction data reveal polymorphism of the DNA atomic positions and conformation and hydration. Here we describe an accurate X-ray structure of B-DNA, painstakingly fit to a multistate model that contains multiple competing positions of most of the backbone and of entire base pairs. Two of ten base-pairs of CCAGGCCTGG are in multiple states distinguished primarily by differences in slide. Similarly, all the surrounding ions are seen to fractionally occupy discrete competing and overlapping sites. And finally, the vast majority of water molecules show strong evidence of multiple competing sites. Conventional resolution appears to give a false sense of homogeneity in conformation and interactions of DNA. In addition, conventional resolution yields an average structure that is not accurate, in that it is different from any of the multiple discrete structures observed at high resolution. Because base pair positional heterogeneity has not always been incorporated into model-building, even some high and ultrahigh-resolution structures of DNA do not indicate the full extent of conformational polymorphism.

  5. The N(2)-Furfuryl-deoxyguanosine Adduct Does Not Alter the Structure of B-DNA.

    PubMed

    Ghodke, Pratibha P; Gore, Kiran R; Harikrishna, S; Samanta, Biswajit; Kottur, Jithesh; Nair, Deepak T; Pradeepkumar, P I

    2016-01-15

    N(2)-Furfuryl-deoxyguanosine (fdG) is carcinogenic DNA adduct that originates from furfuryl alcohol. It is also a stable structural mimic of the damage induced by the nitrofurazone family of antibiotics. For the structural and functional studies of this model N(2)-dG adduct, reliable and rapid access to fdG-modified DNAs are warranted. Toward this end, here we report the synthesis of fdG-modified DNAs using phosphoramidite chemistry involving only three steps. The functional integrity of the modified DNA has been verified by primer extension studies with DNA polymerases I and IV from E. coli. Introduction of fdG into a DNA duplex decreases the Tm by ∼1.6 °C/modification. Molecular dynamics simulations of a DNA duplex bearing the fdG adduct revealed that though the overall B-DNA structure is maintained, this lesion can disrupt W-C H-bonding, stacking interactions, and minor groove hydrations to some extent at the modified site, and these effects lead to slight variations in the local base pair parameters. Overall, our studies show that fdG is tolerated at the minor groove of the DNA to a better extent compared with other bulky DNA damages, and this property will make it difficult for the DNA repair pathways to detect this adduct. PMID:26650891

  6. Electronic structure, stacking energy, partial charge, and hydrogen bonding in four periodic B-DNA models.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Lokendra; Rulis, Paul; Liang, Lei; Ching, W Y

    2014-08-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structure of four periodic B-DNA models labeled (AT)(10), (GC)(10), (AT)(5)(GC)(5), and (AT-GC)(5) where A denotes adenine, T denotes thymine, G denotes guanine, and C denotes cytosine. Each model has ten base pairs with Na counterions to neutralize the negative phosphate group in the backbone. The (AT)(5)(GC)(5) and (AT-GC)(5) models contain two and five AT-GC bilayers, respectively. When compared against the average of the two pure models, we estimate the AT-GC bilayer interaction energy to be 19.015 Kcal/mol, which is comparable to the hydrogen bonding energy between base pairs obtained from the literature. Our investigation shows that the stacking of base pairs plays a vital role in the electronic structure, relative stability, bonding, and distribution of partial charges in the DNA models. All four models show a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) to lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gap ranging from 2.14 to 3.12 eV with HOMO states residing on the PO(4) + Na functional group and LUMO states originating from the bases. Our calculation implies that the electrical conductance of a DNA molecule should increase with increased base-pair mixing. Interatomic bonding effects in these models are investigated in detail by analyzing the distributions of the calculated bond order values for every pair of atoms in the four models including hydrogen bonding. The counterions significantly affect the gap width, the conductivity, and the distribution of partial charge on the DNA backbone. We also evaluate quantitatively the surface partial charge density on each functional group of the DNA models.

  7. Singlet Oxygen Attack on Guanine: Reactivity and Structural Signature within the B-DNA Helix.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Elise; Grüber, Raymond; Bignon, Emmanuelle; Morell, Christophe; Aranda, Juan; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2016-08-22

    Oxidatively generated DNA lesions are numerous and versatile, and have been the subject of intensive research since the discovery of 8-oxoguanine in 1984. Even for this prototypical lesion, the precise mechanism of formation remains elusive due to the inherent difficulties in characterizing high-energy intermediates. We have probed the stability of the guanine endoperoxide in B-DNA as a key intermediate and determined a unique activation free energy of around 6 kcal mol(-1) for the formation of the first C-O covalent bond upon the attack of singlet molecular oxygen ((1) O2 ) on the central guanine of a solvated 13 base-pair poly(dG-dC), described by means of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations. The B-helix remains stable upon oxidation in spite of the bulky character of the guanine endoperoxide. Our modeling study has revealed the nature of the versatile (1) O2 attack in terms of free energy and shows a sensitivity to electrostatics and solvation as it involves a charge-separated intermediate. PMID:27440482

  8. Structure and mechanism of the UvrA-UvrB DNA damage sensor.

    PubMed

    Pakotiprapha, Danaya; Samuels, Martin; Shen, Koning; Hu, Johnny H; Jeruzalmi, David

    2012-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is used by all organisms to eliminate DNA lesions. We determined the structure of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus UvrA-UvrB complex, the damage-sensor in bacterial NER and a new structure of UvrA. We observe that the DNA binding surface of UvrA, previously found in an open shape that binds damaged DNA, also exists in a closed groove shape compatible with native DNA only. The sensor contains two UvrB molecules that flank the UvrA dimer along the predicted path for DNA, ~80 Å from the lesion. We show that the conserved signature domain II of UvrA mediates a nexus of contacts among UvrA, UvrB and DNA. Further, in our new structure of UvrA, this domain adopts an altered conformation while an adjacent nucleotide binding site is vacant. Our findings raise unanticipated questions about NER and also suggest a revised picture of its early stages. PMID:22307053

  9. Structure and mechanism of the UvrA-UvrB DNA damage sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Pakotiprapha, Danaya; Samuels, Martin; Shen, Koning; Hu, Johnny H; Jeruzalmi, David

    2012-04-17

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is used by all organisms to eliminate DNA lesions. We determined the structure of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus UvrA-UvrB complex, the damage-sensor in bacterial NER and a new structure of UvrA. We observe that the DNA binding surface of UvrA, previously found in an open shape that binds damaged DNA, also exists in a closed groove shape compatible with native DNA only. The sensor contains two UvrB molecules that flank the UvrA dimer along the predicted path for DNA, ~80 Å from the lesion. We show that the conserved signature domain II of UvrA mediates a nexus of contacts among UvrA, UvrB and DNA. Further, in our new structure of UvrA, this domain adopts an altered conformation while an adjacent nucleotide binding site is vacant. Our findings raise unanticipated questions about NER and also suggest a revised picture of its early stages.

  10. Solution structure of the dodecamer d-(CATGGGCC-CATG)2 is B-DNA. Experimental and molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Dornberger, U; Spackovj, N; Walter, A; Gollmick, F A; Sponer, J; Fritzsche, H

    2001-08-01

    The DNA duplex d-(CATGGGCCCATG)2 has been studied in solution by FTIR, NMR and CD. The experimental approaches have been complemented by series of large-scale unrestrained molecular dynamics simulation with explicit inclusion of solvent and counterions. Typical proton-proton distances extracted from the NMR spectra and the CD spectra are completely in agreement with slightly modified B-DNA. By molecular dynamics simulation, starting from A-type sugar pucker, a spontaneous repuckering to B-type sugar pucker was observed. Both experimental and theoretical approaches suggest for the dodecamer d-(CATGGGCCCATG)2 under solution conditions puckering of all 2'-deoxyribose residues in the south conformation (mostly C2'-endo) and can exclude significant population of sugars in the north conformation (C3'-endo). NMR, FTIR and CD data are in agreement with a B-form of the dodecamer in solution. Furthermore, the duplex shows a cooperative B-A transition in solution induced by addition of trifluorethanol. This contrasts a recently published crystal structure of the same oligonucleotide found as an intermediate between B- and A-DNA where 23 out of 24 sugar residues were reported to adopt the north (N-type) conformation (C3'-endo) like in A-DNA (Ng, H. L., Kopka, M. L. and Dickerson, R. E., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U S A 97, 2035-2039 (2000)). The simulated structures resemble standard B-DNA. They nevertheless show a moderate shift towards A-type stacking similar to that seen in the crystal, despite the striking difference in sugar puckers between the MD and X-ray structures. This is in agreement with preceding MD reports noticing special stacking features of G-tracts exhibiting a tendency towards the A-type stacking supported by the CD spectra also reflecting the G-tract stacking. MD simulations reveal several noticeable local conformational variations, such as redistribution of helical twist and base pair roll between the central GpC steps and the adjacent G-tract segments, as

  11. The non-B-DNA structure of d(CA/TG)n does not differ from that of Z-DNA.

    PubMed

    Ho, P S

    1994-09-27

    A number of recent studies have shown that simple repetitive d(CA/TG) dinucleotide sequences adopt a left-handed non-B-DNA structure under negative superhelical stress. The pattern of chemical reactivities and the helical parameters observed for these sequences differ significantly from those of standard Z-DNA. In this study, the data for two naturally occurring d(CA/TG)n sequences are reevaluated by a statistical mechanics treatment of the B- to Z-DNA transition. The behavior of these sequences under negative superhelical stress is accurately simulated by this model, including the multiple and discrete transitions observed for the rat prolactin promoter. Furthermore, the average helical twist for the left-handed structure of d(CA/TG)n deviates < 2% from that expected for standard Z-DNA. Finally, the predicted distribution of the junctions between B- and Z-DNA are shown to account for differences observed in the patterns of chemical reactivity of d(CA/TG)n and d(CG)n. Thus, no new left-handed structure that differs from Z-DNA is needed to describe the supercoil-induced conformation in d(CA/TG)n sequences.

  12. The DnaB.DnaC complex: a structure based on dimers assembled around an occluded channel.

    PubMed

    Bárcena, M; Ruiz, T; Donate, L E; Brown, S E; Dixon, N E; Radermacher, M; Carazo, J M

    2001-03-15

    Replicative helicases are motor proteins that unwind DNA at replication forks. Escherichia coli DnaB is the best characterized member of this family of enzymes. We present the 26 A resolution three-dimensional structure of the DnaB hexamer in complex with its loading partner, DnaC, obtained from cryo-electron microscopy. Analysis of the volume brings insight into the elaborate way the two proteins interact, and provides a structural basis for control of the symmetry state and inactivation of the helicase by DnaC. The complex is arranged on the basis of interactions among DnaC and DnaB dimers. DnaC monomers are observed for the first time to arrange as three dumb-bell-shaped dimers that interlock into one of the faces of the helicase. This could be responsible for the freezing of DnaB in a C(3) architecture by its loading partner. The central channel of the helicase is almost occluded near the end opposite to DnaC, such that even single-stranded DNA could not pass through. We propose that the DnaB N-terminal domain is located at this face.

  13. B-DNA to Z-DNA structural transitions in the SV40 enhancer: stabilization of Z-DNA in negatively supercoiled DNA minicircles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruskin, E. A.; Rich, A.

    1993-01-01

    During replication and transcription, the SV40 control region is subjected to significant levels of DNA unwinding. There are three, alternating purine-pyrimidine tracts within this region that can adopt the Z-DNA conformation in response to negative superhelix density: a single copy of ACACACAT and two copies of ATGCATGC. Since the control region is essential for both efficient transcription and replication, B-DNA to Z-DNA transitions in these vital sequence tracts may have significant biological consequences. We have synthesized DNA minicircles to detect B-DNA to Z-DNA transitions in the SV40 enhancer, and to determine the negative superhelix density required to stabilize the Z-DNA. A variety of DNA sequences, including the entire SV40 enhancer and the two segments of the enhancer with alternating purine-pyrimidine tracts, were incorporated into topologically relaxed minicircles. Negative supercoils were generated, and the resulting topoisomers were resolved by electrophoresis. Using an anti-Z-DNA Fab and an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, Z-DNA was detected in the enhancer-containing minicircles at a superhelix density of -0.05. Fab saturation binding experiments demonstrated that three, independent Z-DNA tracts were stabilized in the supercoiled minicircles. Two other minicircles, each with one of the two alternating purine-pyrimidine tracts, also contained single Z-DNA sites. These results confirm the identities of the Z-DNA-forming sequences within the control region. Moreover, the B-DNA to Z-DNA transitions were detected at superhelix densities observed during normal replication and transcription processes in the SV40 life cycle.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation algorithm for B-DNA.

    PubMed

    Howell, Steven C; Qiu, Xiangyun; Curtis, Joseph E

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the structure-function relationship of biomolecules containing DNA has motivated experiments aimed at determining molecular structure using methods such as small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS). SAXS and SANS are useful for determining macromolecular shape in solution, a process which benefits by using atomistic models that reproduce the scattering data. The variety of algorithms available for creating and modifying model DNA structures lack the ability to rapidly modify all-atom models to generate structure ensembles. This article describes a Monte Carlo algorithm for simulating DNA, not with the goal of predicting an equilibrium structure, but rather to generate an ensemble of plausible structures which can be filtered using experimental results to identify a sub-ensemble of conformations that reproduce the solution scattering of DNA macromolecules. The algorithm generates an ensemble of atomic structures through an iterative cycle in which B-DNA is represented using a wormlike bead-rod model, new configurations are generated by sampling bend and twist moves, then atomic detail is recovered by back mapping from the final coarse-grained configuration. Using this algorithm on commodity computing hardware, one can rapidly generate an ensemble of atomic level models, each model representing a physically realistic configuration that could be further studied using molecular dynamics. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27671358

  15. Molecular stripping in the NF-κB/IκB/DNA genetic regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    Potoyan, Davit A.; Zheng, Weihua; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic switches based on the NF-κB/IκB/DNA system are master regulators of an array of cellular responses. Recent kinetic experiments have shown that IκB can actively remove NF-κB bound to its genetic sites via a process called “molecular stripping.” This allows the NF-κB/IκB/DNA switch to function under kinetic control rather than the thermodynamic control contemplated in the traditional models of gene switches. Using molecular dynamics simulations of coarse-grained predictive energy landscape models for the constituent proteins by themselves and interacting with the DNA we explore the functional motions of the transcription factor NF-κB and its various binary and ternary complexes with DNA and the inhibitor IκB. These studies show that the function of the NF-κB/IκB/DNA genetic switch is realized via an allosteric mechanism. Molecular stripping occurs through the activation of a domain twist mode by the binding of IκB that occurs through conformational selection. Free energy calculations for DNA binding show that the binding of IκB not only results in a significant decrease of the affinity of the transcription factor for the DNA but also kinetically speeds DNA release. Projections of the free energy onto various reaction coordinates reveal the structural details of the stripping pathways. PMID:26699500

  16. Structure of the complex of [Ru(tpm)(dppz)py](2+) with a B-DNA oligonucleotide - a single-substituent binding switch for a metallo-intercalator.

    PubMed

    Waywell, Philip; Gonzalez, Veronica; Gill, Martin R; Adams, Harry; Meijer, Anthony J H M; Williamson, Mike P; Thomas, James A

    2010-02-22

    We report the synthesis of three new complexes related to the achiral [Ru(tpm)(dppz)py](2+) cation (tpm=tripyridazole methane, dppz=dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine, py=pyridine) that contain an additional single functional group on the monodentate ancillary pyridyl ligand. Computational calculations indicate that the coordinated pyridyl rings are in a fixed orientation parallel to the dppz axis, and that the electrostatic properties of the complexes are very similar. DNA binding studies on the new complexes reveal that the nature and positioning of the functional group has a profound effect on the binding mode and affinity of these complexes. To explore the molecular and structural basis of these effects, circular dichroism and NMR studies on [Ru(tpm)(dppz)py]Cl(2) with the octanucleotides d(AGAGCTCT)(2) and d(CGAGCTCG)(2), were carried out. These studies demonstrate that the dppz ligand intercalates into the G(2)-A(3) step, with {Ru(tpm)py} in the minor groove. They also reveal that the complex intercalates into the binding site in two possible orientations with the pyridyl ligand of the major conformer making close contact with terminal base pairs. We conclude that substitution at the 2- or 3-position of the pyridine ring has little effect on binding, but that substitution at the 4-position drastically disrupts intercalative binding, particularly with a 4-amino substituent, because of steric and electronic interactions with the DNA. These results indicate that complexes derived from these systems have the potential to function as sequence-specific light-switch systems.

  17. Structure of the complex of [Ru(tpm)(dppz)py](2+) with a B-DNA oligonucleotide - a single-substituent binding switch for a metallo-intercalator.

    PubMed

    Waywell, Philip; Gonzalez, Veronica; Gill, Martin R; Adams, Harry; Meijer, Anthony J H M; Williamson, Mike P; Thomas, James A

    2010-02-22

    We report the synthesis of three new complexes related to the achiral [Ru(tpm)(dppz)py](2+) cation (tpm=tripyridazole methane, dppz=dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine, py=pyridine) that contain an additional single functional group on the monodentate ancillary pyridyl ligand. Computational calculations indicate that the coordinated pyridyl rings are in a fixed orientation parallel to the dppz axis, and that the electrostatic properties of the complexes are very similar. DNA binding studies on the new complexes reveal that the nature and positioning of the functional group has a profound effect on the binding mode and affinity of these complexes. To explore the molecular and structural basis of these effects, circular dichroism and NMR studies on [Ru(tpm)(dppz)py]Cl(2) with the octanucleotides d(AGAGCTCT)(2) and d(CGAGCTCG)(2), were carried out. These studies demonstrate that the dppz ligand intercalates into the G(2)-A(3) step, with {Ru(tpm)py} in the minor groove. They also reveal that the complex intercalates into the binding site in two possible orientations with the pyridyl ligand of the major conformer making close contact with terminal base pairs. We conclude that substitution at the 2- or 3-position of the pyridine ring has little effect on binding, but that substitution at the 4-position drastically disrupts intercalative binding, particularly with a 4-amino substituent, because of steric and electronic interactions with the DNA. These results indicate that complexes derived from these systems have the potential to function as sequence-specific light-switch systems. PMID:20108276

  18. De Novo Protein Structure Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Ling-Hong; Ngan, Shing-Chung; Samudrala, Ram

    An unparalleled amount of sequence data is being made available from large-scale genome sequencing efforts. The data provide a shortcut to the determination of the function of a gene of interest, as long as there is an existing sequenced gene with similar sequence and of known function. This has spurred structural genomic initiatives with the goal of determining as many protein folds as possible (Brenner and Levitt, 2000; Burley, 2000; Brenner, 2001; Heinemann et al., 2001). The purpose of this is twofold: First, the structure of a gene product can often lead to direct inference of its function. Second, since the function of a protein is dependent on its structure, direct comparison of the structures of gene products can be more sensitive than the comparison of sequences of genes for detecting homology. Presently, structural determination by crystallography and NMR techniques is still slow and expensive in terms of manpower and resources, despite attempts to automate the processes. Computer structure prediction algorithms, while not providing the accuracy of the traditional techniques, are extremely quick and inexpensive and can provide useful low-resolution data for structure comparisons (Bonneau and Baker, 2001). Given the immense number of structures which the structural genomic projects are attempting to solve, there would be a considerable gain even if the computer structure prediction approach were applicable to a subset of proteins.

  19. Non-B DNA-forming Sequences and WRN Deficiency Independently Increase the Frequency of Base Substitution in Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Bacolla, Albino; Wang, Guliang; Jain, Aklank; Chuzhanova, Nadia A.; Cer, Regina Z.; Collins, Jack R.; Cooper, David N.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2011-01-01

    Although alternative DNA secondary structures (non-B DNA) can induce genomic rearrangements, their associated mutational spectra remain largely unknown. The helicase activity of WRN, which is absent in the human progeroid Werner syndrome, is thought to counteract this genomic instability. We determined non-B DNA-induced mutation frequencies and spectra in human U2OS osteosarcoma cells and assessed the role of WRN in isogenic knockdown (WRN-KD) cells using a supF gene mutation reporter system flanked by triplex- or Z-DNA-forming sequences. Although both non-B DNA and WRN-KD served to increase the mutation frequency, the increase afforded by WRN-KD was independent of DNA structure despite the fact that purified WRN helicase was found to resolve these structures in vitro. In U2OS cells, ∼70% of mutations comprised single-base substitutions, mostly at G·C base-pairs, with the remaining ∼30% being microdeletions. The number of mutations at G·C base-pairs in the context of NGNN/NNCN sequences correlated well with predicted free energies of base stacking and ionization potentials, suggesting a possible origin via oxidation reactions involving electron loss and subsequent electron transfer (hole migration) between neighboring bases. A set of ∼40,000 somatic mutations at G·C base pairs identified in a lung cancer genome exhibited similar correlations, implying that hole migration may also be involved. We conclude that alternative DNA conformations, WRN deficiency and lung tumorigenesis may all serve to increase the mutation rate by promoting, through diverse pathways, oxidation reactions that perturb the electron orbitals of neighboring bases. It follows that such “hole migration” is likely to play a much more widespread role in mutagenesis than previously anticipated. PMID:21285356

  20. De novo design of protein mimics of B-DNA.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Deniz; Bianco, Piero R; Kumar, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Structural mimicry of DNA is utilized in nature as a strategy to evade molecular defences mounted by host organisms. One such example is the protein Ocr - the first translation product to be expressed as the bacteriophage T7 infects E. coli. The structure of Ocr reveals an intricate and deliberate arrangement of negative charges that endows it with the ability to mimic ∼24 base pair stretches of B-DNA. This uncanny resemblance to DNA enables Ocr to compete in binding the type I restriction modification (R/M) system, and neutralizes the threat of hydrolytic cleavage of viral genomic material. Here, we report the de novo design and biophysical characterization of DNA mimicking peptides, and describe the inhibitory action of the designed helical bundles on a type I R/M enzyme, EcoR124I. This work validates the use of charge patterning as a design principle for creation of protein mimics of DNA, and serves as a starting point for development of therapeutic peptide inhibitors against human pathogens that employ molecular camouflage as part of their invasion stratagem. PMID:26568416

  1. De novo design of protein mimics of B-DNA.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Deniz; Bianco, Piero R; Kumar, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Structural mimicry of DNA is utilized in nature as a strategy to evade molecular defences mounted by host organisms. One such example is the protein Ocr - the first translation product to be expressed as the bacteriophage T7 infects E. coli. The structure of Ocr reveals an intricate and deliberate arrangement of negative charges that endows it with the ability to mimic ∼24 base pair stretches of B-DNA. This uncanny resemblance to DNA enables Ocr to compete in binding the type I restriction modification (R/M) system, and neutralizes the threat of hydrolytic cleavage of viral genomic material. Here, we report the de novo design and biophysical characterization of DNA mimicking peptides, and describe the inhibitory action of the designed helical bundles on a type I R/M enzyme, EcoR124I. This work validates the use of charge patterning as a design principle for creation of protein mimics of DNA, and serves as a starting point for development of therapeutic peptide inhibitors against human pathogens that employ molecular camouflage as part of their invasion stratagem.

  2. Theoretical prediction of crystal structures of rubrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shigeaki; Miura, Toshiaki; Shimoi, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically predict crystal structures and molecular arrangements for rubrene molecule using CONFLEX program and compare them with the experimental ones. The most, second-most, and fourth-most stable predicted crystal structures show good agreement with the triclinic, orthorhombic, and monoclinic polymorphs of rubrene, respectively. The change in molecular conformation is also predicted between crystalline and gas phases: the tetracene backbone takes flat conformation in crystalline phase as in the observed structure. Meanwhile, it is twisted in gas phase. The theoretical prediction method used in this work provides the successful results on the determination of the three kinds of crystal structures and molecular arrangements for rubrene molecule.

  3. Improving RNA secondary structure prediction with structure mapping data.

    PubMed

    Sloma, Michael F; Mathews, David H

    2015-01-01

    Methods to probe RNA secondary structure, such as small molecule modifying agents, secondary structure-specific nucleases, inline probing, and SHAPE chemistry, are widely used to study the structure of functional RNA. Computational secondary structure prediction programs can incorporate probing data to predict structure with high accuracy. In this chapter, an overview of current methods for probing RNA secondary structure is provided, including modern high-throughput methods. Methods for guiding secondary structure prediction algorithms using these data are explained, and best practices for using these data are provided. This chapter concludes by listing a number of open questions about how to best use probing data, and what these data can provide.

  4. Protein structure prediction using hybrid AI methods

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, X.; Mural, R.J.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1993-11-01

    This paper describes a new approach for predicting protein structures based on Artificial Intelligence methods and genetic algorithms. We combine nearest neighbor searching algorithms, neural networks, heuristic rules and genetic algorithms to form an integrated system to predict protein structures from their primary amino acid sequences. First we describe our methods and how they are integrated, and then apply our methods to several protein sequences. The results are very close to the real structures obtained by crystallography. Parallel genetic algorithms are also implemented.

  5. Transmembrane beta-barrel protein structure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Arlo; Baldi, Pierre

    Transmembrane β-barrel (TMB) proteins are embedded in the outer membranes of mitochondria, Gram-negative bacteria, and chloroplasts. These proteins perform critical functions, including active ion-transport and passive nutrient intake. Therefore, there is a need for accurate prediction of secondary and tertiary structures of TMB proteins. A variety of methods have been developed for predicting the secondary structure and these predictions are very useful for constructing a coarse topology of TMB structure; however, they do not provide enough information to construct a low-resolution tertiary structure for a TMB protein. In addition, while the overall structural architecture is well conserved among TMB proteins, the amino acid sequences are highly divergent. Thus, traditional homology modeling methods cannot be applied to many putative TMB proteins. Here, we describe the TMBpro: a pipeline of methods for predicting TMB secondary structure, β-residue contacts, and finally tertiary structure. The tertiary prediction method relies on the specific construction rules that TMB proteins adhere to and on the predicted β-residue contacts to dramatically reduce the search space for the model building procedure.

  6. The MULTICOM protein tertiary structure prediction system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jilong; Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Cao, Renzhi; Adhikari, Badri; Deng, Xin; Eickholt, Jesse; Cheng, Jianlin

    2014-01-01

    With the expansion of genomics and proteomics data aided by the rapid progress of next-generation sequencing technologies, computational prediction of protein three-dimensional structure is an essential part of modern structural genomics initiatives. Prediction of protein structure through understanding of the theories behind protein sequence-structure relationship, however, remains one of the most challenging problems in contemporary life sciences. Here, we describe MULTICOM, a multi-level combination technique, intended to predict moderate- to high-resolution structure of a protein through a novel approach of combining multiple sources of complementary information derived from the experimentally solved protein structures in the Protein Data Bank. The MULTICOM web server is freely available at http://sysbio.rnet.missouri.edu/multicom_toolbox/.

  7. Molecular stripping in the NFκB / IκB / DNA genetic regulatory network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potoyan, Davit; Wolynes, Peter

    Genetic switches based on the NFκB / IκB / DNA system are master regulators of an array of cellular responses. Recent kinetic experiments have shown that IκB can actively remove NF κB bound to its genetic sites via a process called ''molecular stripping''. This allows the NFκB / IκB / DNA switch to function under kinetic control rather than the thermodynamic control contemplated in the traditional models of gene switches. Using molecular dynamics simulations of coarse grained predictive energy landscape models for the constituent proteins by themselves and interacting with the DNA we explore the functional motions of the transcription factor NFκB and its various binary and ternary complexes with DNA and the inhibitor I κB. These studies show that the function of the NFκB / IκB / DNA genetic switch is realized via an allosteric mechanism. Molecular stripping occurs through the activation of a domain twist mode by the binding of IκB which occurs through conformational selection. Free energy calculations for DNA binding show that the binding of IκB not only results in a significant decrease of the affinity of the transcription factor for the DNA but also kinetically speeds DNA release. Projections of the

  8. Interface Structure Prediction from First-Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Shu, Qiang; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Wang, Yangang; Ji, Min; Xiang, Hongjun; Ho, Kai-Ming; Gong, Xingao; Wang, Cai-Zhuang

    2014-05-08

    Information about the atomic structures at solid–solid interfaces is crucial for understanding and predicting the performance of materials. Due to the complexity of the interfaces, it is very challenging to resolve their atomic structures using either experimental techniques or computer simulations. In this paper, we present an efficient first-principles computational method for interface structure prediction based on an adaptive genetic algorithm. This approach significantly reduces the computational cost, while retaining the accuracy of first-principles prediction. The method is applied to the investigation of both stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric SrTiO3 Σ3(112)[1¯10] grain boundaries with unit cell containing up to 200 atoms. Several novel low-energy structures are discovered, which provide fresh insights into the structure and stability of the grain boundaries.

  9. Interval prediction in structural dynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselman, Timothy K.; Chrostowski, Jon D.; Ross, Timothy J.

    1992-01-01

    Methods for assessing the predictive accuracy of structural dynamic models are examined with attention given to the effects of modal mass, stiffness, and damping uncertainties. The methods are based on a nondeterministic analysis called 'interval prediction' in which interval variables are used to describe parameters and responses that are unknown. Statistical databases for generic modeling uncertainties are derived from experimental data and incorporated analytically to evaluate responses. Covariance matrices of modal mass, stiffness, and damping parameters are propagated numerically in models of large space structures by means of three methods. The test data tend to fall within the predicted intervals of uncertainty determined by the statistical databases. The present findings demonstrate the suitability of using data from previously analyzed and tested space structures for assessing the predictive accuracy of an analytical model.

  10. Predicting the Fatigue life of Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Besuner, P. M.; Harris, D. O.; Thomas, J. M.; Allison, D. E.; Bannantine, J. M.; Brown, S. B.; Davis, C. S.; Derbalian, G. A.; Eischen, J. W.; Fowler, G. F.; Osteraas, J. D.; Robinson, J. N.; Sire, R. A.; Vroman, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    Report reviews fracture-mechanics technology for predicting life expectancy of structural components subjected to cyclic loads. Report covers analytical tools for modeling and forecasting subcritical fatigue-crack growth in structures. It emphasizes use of tools in practical, day-to-day problems of engineering design, development, and decisionmaking.

  11. Characteristics and Prediction of RNA Structure

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Daming; Zhang, Caiming; Han, Huijian; Crandall, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots are often predicted by minimizing free energy, which is NP-hard. Most RNAs fold during transcription from DNA into RNA through a hierarchical pathway wherein secondary structures form prior to tertiary structures. Real RNA secondary structures often have local instead of global optimization because of kinetic reasons. The performance of RNA structure prediction may be improved by considering dynamic and hierarchical folding mechanisms. This study is a novel report on RNA folding that accords with the golden mean characteristic based on the statistical analysis of the real RNA secondary structures of all 480 sequences from RNA STRAND, which are validated by NMR or X-ray. The length ratios of domains in these sequences are approximately 0.382L, 0.5L, 0.618L, and L, where L is the sequence length. These points are just the important golden sections of sequence. With this characteristic, an algorithm is designed to predict RNA hierarchical structures and simulate RNA folding by dynamically folding RNA structures according to the above golden section points. The sensitivity and number of predicted pseudoknots of our algorithm are better than those of the Mfold, HotKnots, McQfold, ProbKnot, and Lhw-Zhu algorithms. Experimental results reflect the folding rules of RNA from a new angle that is close to natural folding. PMID:25110687

  12. Triple recognition of B-DNA by a neomycin-Hoechst 33258-pyrene conjugate.

    PubMed

    Willis, Bert; Arya, Dev P

    2010-01-26

    Recent developments have indicated that aminoglycoside binding is not limited to RNA, but to nucleic acids that, like RNA, adopt conformations similar to its A-form. We further sought to expand the utility of aminoglycoside binding to B-DNA structures by conjugating neomycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic, with the B-DNA minor groove binding ligand Hoechst 33258. Envisioning a dual groove binding mode, we have extended the potential recognition process to include a third, intercalative moiety. Similar conjugates, which vary in the number of binding moieties but maintain identical linkages to allow direct comparisons to be made, have also been prepared. We report herein novel neomycin- and Hoechst 33258-based conjugates developed in our laboratories for exploring the recognition potential with B-DNA. Spectroscopic studies such as UV melting, differential scanning calorimetry, isothermal fluorescence titrations, and circular dichroism together illustrate the triple recognition of the novel conjugate containing neomycin, Hoechst 33258, and pyrene. This study represents the first example of DNA molecular recognition capable of minor versus major groove recognition in conjunction with intercalation.

  13. Predicting protein dynamics from structural ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copperman, J.; Guenza, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    The biological properties of proteins are uniquely determined by their structure and dynamics. A protein in solution populates a structural ensemble of metastable configurations around the global fold. From overall rotation to local fluctuations, the dynamics of proteins can cover several orders of magnitude in time scales. We propose a simulation-free coarse-grained approach which utilizes knowledge of the important metastable folded states of the protein to predict the protein dynamics. This approach is based upon the Langevin Equation for Protein Dynamics (LE4PD), a Langevin formalism in the coordinates of the protein backbone. The linear modes of this Langevin formalism organize the fluctuations of the protein, so that more extended dynamical cooperativity relates to increasing energy barriers to mode diffusion. The accuracy of the LE4PD is verified by analyzing the predicted dynamics across a set of seven different proteins for which both relaxation data and NMR solution structures are available. Using experimental NMR conformers as the input structural ensembles, LE4PD predicts quantitatively accurate results, with correlation coefficient ρ = 0.93 to NMR backbone relaxation measurements for the seven proteins. The NMR solution structure derived ensemble and predicted dynamical relaxation is compared with molecular dynamics simulation-derived structural ensembles and LE4PD predictions and is consistent in the time scale of the simulations. The use of the experimental NMR conformers frees the approach from computationally demanding simulations.

  14. Predicting structure in nonsymmetric sparse matrix factorizations

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, J.R.; Ng, E.G.

    1992-10-01

    Many computations on sparse matrices have a phase that predicts the nonzero structure of the output, followed by a phase that actually performs the numerical computation. We study structure prediction for computations that involve nonsymmetric row and column permutations and nonsymmetric or non-square matrices. Our tools are bipartite graphs, matchings, and alternating paths. Our main new result concerns LU factorization with partial pivoting. We show that if a square matrix A has the strong Hall property (i.e., is fully indecomposable) then an upper bound due to George and Ng on the nonzero structure of L + U is as tight as possible. To show this, we prove a crucial result about alternating paths in strong Hall graphs. The alternating-paths theorem seems to be of independent interest: it can also be used to prove related results about structure prediction for QR factorization that are due to Coleman, Edenbrandt, Gilbert, Hare, Johnson, Olesky, Pothen, and van den Driessche.

  15. Predicting polymeric crystal structures by evolutionary algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiang; Sharma, Vinit; Oganov, Artem R.; Ramprasad, Ramamurthy

    2014-10-01

    The recently developed evolutionary algorithm USPEX proved to be a tool that enables accurate and reliable prediction of structures. Here we extend this method to predict the crystal structure of polymers by constrained evolutionary search, where each monomeric unit is treated as a building block with fixed connectivity. This greatly reduces the search space and allows the initial structure generation with different sequences and packings of these blocks. The new constrained evolutionary algorithm is successfully tested and validated on a diverse range of experimentally known polymers, namely, polyethylene, polyacetylene, poly(glycolic acid), poly(vinyl chloride), poly(oxymethylene), poly(phenylene oxide), and poly (p-phenylene sulfide). By fixing the orientation of polymeric chains, this method can be further extended to predict the structures of complex linear polymers, such as all polymorphs of poly(vinylidene fluoride), nylon-6 and cellulose. The excellent agreement between predicted crystal structures and experimentally known structures assures a major role of this approach in the efficient design of the future polymeric materials.

  16. Protein Structure Prediction with Evolutionary Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, W.E.; Krasnogor, N.; Pelta, D.A.; Smith, J.

    1999-02-08

    Evolutionary algorithms have been successfully applied to a variety of molecular structure prediction problems. In this paper we reconsider the design of genetic algorithms that have been applied to a simple protein structure prediction problem. Our analysis considers the impact of several algorithmic factors for this problem: the confirmational representation, the energy formulation and the way in which infeasible conformations are penalized, Further we empirically evaluated the impact of these factors on a small set of polymer sequences. Our analysis leads to specific recommendations for both GAs as well as other heuristic methods for solving PSP on the HP model.

  17. Ko Displacement Theory for Structural Shape Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    2010-01-01

    The development of the Ko displacement theory for predictions of structure deformed shapes was motivated in 2003 by the Helios flying wing, which had a 247-ft (75-m) wing span with wingtip deflections reaching 40 ft (12 m). The Helios flying wing failed in midair in June 2003, creating the need to develop new technology to predict in-flight deformed shapes of unmanned aircraft wings for visual display before the ground-based pilots. Any types of strain sensors installed on a structure can only sense the surface strains, but are incapable to sense the overall deformed shapes of structures. After the invention of the Ko displacement theory, predictions of structure deformed shapes could be achieved by feeding the measured surface strains into the Ko displacement transfer functions for the calculations of out-of-plane deflections and cross sectional rotations at multiple locations for mapping out overall deformed shapes of the structures. The new Ko displacement theory combined with a strain-sensing system thus created a revolutionary new structure- shape-sensing technology.

  18. Structure-Based Predictions of Activity Cliffs

    PubMed Central

    Husby, Jarmila; Bottegoni, Giovanni; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Cavalli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In drug discovery, it is generally accepted that neighboring molecules in a given descriptors' space display similar activities. However, even in regions that provide strong predictability, structurally similar molecules can occasionally display large differences in potency. In QSAR jargon, these discontinuities in the activity landscape are known as ‘activity cliffs’. In this study, we assessed the reliability of ligand docking and virtual ligand screening schemes in predicting activity cliffs. We performed our calculations on a diverse, independently collected database of cliff-forming co-crystals. Starting from ideal situations, which allowed us to establish our baseline, we progressively moved toward simulating more realistic scenarios. Ensemble- and template-docking achieved a significant level of accuracy, suggesting that, despite the well-known limitations of empirical scoring schemes, activity cliffs can be accurately predicted by advanced structure-based methods. PMID:25918827

  19. RNA secondary structure prediction using soft computing.

    PubMed

    Ray, Shubhra Sankar; Pal, Sankar K

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of RNA structure is invaluable in creating new drugs and understanding genetic diseases. Several deterministic algorithms and soft computing-based techniques have been developed for more than a decade to determine the structure from a known RNA sequence. Soft computing gained importance with the need to get approximate solutions for RNA sequences by considering the issues related with kinetic effects, cotranscriptional folding, and estimation of certain energy parameters. A brief description of some of the soft computing-based techniques, developed for RNA secondary structure prediction, is presented along with their relevance. The basic concepts of RNA and its different structural elements like helix, bulge, hairpin loop, internal loop, and multiloop are described. These are followed by different methodologies, employing genetic algorithms, artificial neural networks, and fuzzy logic. The role of various metaheuristics, like simulated annealing, particle swarm optimization, ant colony optimization, and tabu search is also discussed. A relative comparison among different techniques, in predicting 12 known RNA secondary structures, is presented, as an example. Future challenging issues are then mentioned. PMID:23702539

  20. Secondary Structure Prediction of Single Sequences Using RNAstructure.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Mathews, David H

    2016-01-01

    RNA secondary structure is often predicted using folding thermodynamics. RNAstructure is a software package that includes structure prediction by free energy minimization, prediction of base pairing probabilities, prediction of structures composed of highly probably base pairs, and prediction of structures with pseudoknots. A user-friendly graphical user interface is provided, and this interface works on Windows, Apple OS X, and Linux. This chapter provides protocols for using RNAstructure for structure prediction. PMID:27665590

  1. Predicting structured metadata from unstructured metadata

    PubMed Central

    Posch, Lisa; Panahiazar, Maryam; Dumontier, Michel; Gevaert, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Enormous amounts of biomedical data have been and are being produced by investigators all over the world. However, one crucial and limiting factor in data reuse is accurate, structured and complete description of the data or data about the data—defined as metadata. We propose a framework to predict structured metadata terms from unstructured metadata for improving quality and quantity of metadata, using the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) microarray database. Our framework consists of classifiers trained using term frequency-inverse document frequency (TF-IDF) features and a second approach based on topics modeled using a Latent Dirichlet Allocation model (LDA) to reduce the dimensionality of the unstructured data. Our results on the GEO database show that structured metadata terms can be the most accurately predicted using the TF-IDF approach followed by LDA both outperforming the majority vote baseline. While some accuracy is lost by the dimensionality reduction of LDA, the difference is small for elements with few possible values, and there is a large improvement over the majority classifier baseline. Overall this is a promising approach for metadata prediction that is likely to be applicable to other datasets and has implications for researchers interested in biomedical metadata curation and metadata prediction. Database URL: http://www.yeastgenome.org/

  2. Prediction of packing of secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Nagano, K; Ponnuswamy, P K

    1984-01-01

    An improved method of picking up candidates for predicting the packing arrangement of beta-strands and alpha-helices of the alpha/beta type domains is described here. The method of judging whether the region of the protein would fold into the alpha/beta type or not is also described. The folding constraints of globular proteins are analysed and presented in this article for application to the prediction of packing of secondary structure. The analysis of the residue-fluctuations is also applicable for the purpose.

  3. Prediction of RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bon, M.; Orland, H.

    2010-08-01

    We present a new algorithm to predict RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots. The method is based on a classification of RNA structures according to their topological genus. The algorithm utilizes a simplified parametrization of the free energies for pair stacking, loop penalties, etc. and in addition a free energy penalty proportional to the topological genus of the pairing graph. Our method can take into account all pseudoknot topologies and achieves high success rates compared to state-of-the-art methods. This shows that the genus is a promising concept to classify pseudoknots.

  4. Excluded volume and ion-ion correlation effects on the ionic atmosphere around B-DNA: Theory, simulations, and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovanesyan, Zaven; Medasani, Bharat; Fenley, Marcia O.; Guerrero-García, Guillermo Iván; Olvera de la Cruz, Mónica; Marucho, Marcelo

    2014-12-01

    The ionic atmosphere around a nucleic acid regulates its stability in aqueous salt solutions. One major source of complexity in biological activities involving nucleic acids arises from the strong influence of the surrounding ions and water molecules on their structural and thermodynamic properties. Here, we implement a classical density functional theory for cylindrical polyelectrolytes embedded in aqueous electrolytes containing explicit (neutral hard sphere) water molecules at experimental solvent concentrations. Our approach allows us to include ion correlations as well as solvent and ion excluded volume effects for studying the structural and thermodynamic properties of highly charged cylindrical polyelectrolytes. Several models of size and charge asymmetric mixtures of aqueous electrolytes at physiological concentrations are studied. Our results are in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Our numerical calculations display significant differences in the ion density profiles for the different aqueous electrolyte models studied. However, similar results regarding the excess number of ions adsorbed to the B-DNA molecule are predicted by our theoretical approach for different aqueous electrolyte models. These findings suggest that ion counting experimental data should not be used alone to validate the performance of aqueous DNA-electrolyte models.

  5. Excluded volume and ion-ion correlation effects on the ionic atmosphere around B-DNA: Theory, simulations, and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ovanesyan, Zaven; Marucho, Marcelo; Medasani, Bharat; Fenley, Marcia O.; Guerrero-García, Guillermo Iván; Olvera de la Cruz, Mónica

    2014-12-14

    The ionic atmosphere around a nucleic acid regulates its stability in aqueous salt solutions. One major source of complexity in biological activities involving nucleic acids arises from the strong influence of the surrounding ions and water molecules on their structural and thermodynamic properties. Here, we implement a classical density functional theory for cylindrical polyelectrolytes embedded in aqueous electrolytes containing explicit (neutral hard sphere) water molecules at experimental solvent concentrations. Our approach allows us to include ion correlations as well as solvent and ion excluded volume effects for studying the structural and thermodynamic properties of highly charged cylindrical polyelectrolytes. Several models of size and charge asymmetric mixtures of aqueous electrolytes at physiological concentrations are studied. Our results are in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Our numerical calculations display significant differences in the ion density profiles for the different aqueous electrolyte models studied. However, similar results regarding the excess number of ions adsorbed to the B-DNA molecule are predicted by our theoretical approach for different aqueous electrolyte models. These findings suggest that ion counting experimental data should not be used alone to validate the performance of aqueous DNA-electrolyte models.

  6. Excluded volume and ion-ion correlation effects on the ionic atmosphere around B-DNA: theory, simulations, and experiments.

    PubMed

    Ovanesyan, Zaven; Medasani, Bharat; Fenley, Marcia O; Guerrero-García, Guillermo Iván; de la Cruz, Mónica Olvera; Marucho, Marcelo

    2014-12-14

    The ionic atmosphere around a nucleic acid regulates its stability in aqueous salt solutions. One major source of complexity in biological activities involving nucleic acids arises from the strong influence of the surrounding ions and water molecules on their structural and thermodynamic properties. Here, we implement a classical density functional theory for cylindrical polyelectrolytes embedded in aqueous electrolytes containing explicit (neutral hard sphere) water molecules at experimental solvent concentrations. Our approach allows us to include ion correlations as well as solvent and ion excluded volume effects for studying the structural and thermodynamic properties of highly charged cylindrical polyelectrolytes. Several models of size and charge asymmetric mixtures of aqueous electrolytes at physiological concentrations are studied. Our results are in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Our numerical calculations display significant differences in the ion density profiles for the different aqueous electrolyte models studied. However, similar results regarding the excess number of ions adsorbed to the B-DNA molecule are predicted by our theoretical approach for different aqueous electrolyte models. These findings suggest that ion counting experimental data should not be used alone to validate the performance of aqueous DNA-electrolyte models. PMID:25494770

  7. Theory for the hydrodynamic and electrophoretic stretch of tethered B-DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Stigter, D; Bustamante, C

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a theory for the extension and force of B-DNA tethered at a fixed point in a uniform hydrodynamic flow or in a uniform applied electric field. The chain tethered in an electric field is considered to be subject to free electrophoresis compensated by free sedimentation in the opposite direction. This allows the use of results of free electrophoresis for including the effects of small ions. The force on the chain is derived for a sequence of ellipsoidal segments, each twice the persistence length of the wormlike chain. Hydrodynamic interaction between these segments is based on the long-range limit of flow around the prolate ellipsoids, as derived from equivalent Stokes spheres. The chain extension is derived by applying the entropic elasticity relation of Marko and Siggia (1995 Macromolecules. 28:8759-8770) to each segment for polymer chains under constant tension. We justify this procedure by comparing with extension results based on the Boltzmann averaged orientation of straight, freely jointed segments. Predicted results agree well with recent extension-flow experiments by Perkins et al., 1995. Science. 258:83-87, and with electrophoretic stretch experiments by Smith and Bendich (1990 Biopolymers. 29:1167-1173) on fluorescently stained B-DNA. We find that the equivalence of hydrodynamic and electrophoretic stretch, proposed by Long et al. (1996 Phys. Rev. Lett. 76:3858-3861; 1996 Biopolymers 39:755-759), is valid only for very small chain deformations, but not in general. PMID:9726922

  8. The intrinsic mechanics of B-DNA in solution characterized by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Imeddourene, Akli Ben; Xu, Xiaoqian; Zargarian, Loussiné; Oguey, Christophe; Foloppe, Nicolas; Mauffret, Olivier; Hartmann, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Experimental characterization of the structural couplings in free B-DNA in solution has been elusive, because of subtle effects that are challenging to tackle. Here, the exploitation of the NMR measurements collected on four dodecamers containing a substantial set of dinucleotide sequences provides new, consistent correlations revealing the DNA intrinsic mechanics. The difference between two successive residual dipolar couplings (ΔRDCs) involving C6/8-H6/8, C3′-H3′ and C4′-H4′ vectors are correlated to the 31P chemical shifts (δP), which reflect the populations of the BI and BII backbone states. The δPs are also correlated to the internucleotide distances (Dinter) involving H6/8, H2′ and H2″ protons. Calculations of NMR quantities on high resolution X-ray structures and controlled models of DNA enable to interpret these couplings: the studied ΔRDCs depend mostly on roll, while Dinter are mainly sensitive to twist or slide. Overall, these relations demonstrate how δP measurements inform on key inter base parameters, in addition to probe the BI↔BII backbone equilibrium, and shed new light into coordinated motions of phosphate groups and bases in free B-DNA in solution. Inspection of the 5′ and 3′ ends of the dodecamers also supplies new information on the fraying events, otherwise neglected. PMID:26883628

  9. Evolutionary Structure Prediction of Stoichiometric Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiang; Oganov, Artem

    2014-03-01

    In general, for a given ionic compound AmBn\\ at ambient pressure condition, its stoichiometry reflects the valence state ratio between per chemical specie (i.e., the charges for each anion and cation). However, compounds under high pressure exhibit significantly behavior, compared to those analogs at ambient condition. Here we developed a method to solve the crystal structure prediction problem based on the evolutionary algorithms, which can predict both the stable compounds and their crystal structures at arbitrary P,T-conditions, given just the set of chemical elements. By applying this method to a wide range of binary ionic systems (Na-Cl, Mg-O, Xe-O, Cs-F, etc), we discovered a lot of compounds with brand new stoichimetries which can become thermodynamically stable. Further electronic structure analysis on these novel compounds indicates that several factors can contribute to this extraordinary phenomenon: (1) polyatomic anions; (2) free electron localization; (3) emergence of new valence states; (4) metallization. In particular, part of the results have been confirmed by experiment, which warrants that this approach can play a crucial role in new materials design under extreme pressure conditions. This work is funded by DARPA (Grants No. W31P4Q1210008 and W31P4Q1310005), NSF (EAR-1114313 and DMR-1231586).

  10. Service life prediction of reinforced concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, M.T.; Wang, K.L.; Liang, C.H.

    1999-09-01

    This paper is focused on the estimation of durability and service life of reinforced concrete structures. Assuming that the chloride ion in concrete can be absorbed on tricalcium aluminate, calcium silicate hydrate, and by other constituents of hardened cement paste, hydrated or not, the exact analytical solution of the governing partial differential equation together with its boundary and initial conditions can be obtained through nondimensional parameters and Laplace's transform. When the results of an exact analytical solution using suitable parameters were compared with the results of previous experimental work, the differences were found to be very small. This suggests that the absorption model is of considerable value. The exact analytical solution with the saturation parameter and time and diffusion coefficients under different effective electrical potential could be used to predict both the experimental results and the service life of reinforced concrete structures.

  11. Phylogenetic approaches to natural product structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Ziemert, Nadine; Jensen, Paul R

    2012-01-01

    Phylogenetics is the study of the evolutionary relatedness among groups of organisms. Molecular phylogenetics uses sequence data to infer these relationships for both organisms and the genes they maintain. With the large amount of publicly available sequence data, phylogenetic inference has become increasingly important in all fields of biology. In the case of natural product research, phylogenetic relationships are proving to be highly informative in terms of delineating the architecture and function of the genes involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases provide model examples in which individual domain phylogenies display different predictive capacities, resolving features ranging from substrate specificity to structural motifs associated with the final metabolic product. This chapter provides examples in which phylogeny has proven effective in terms of predicting functional or structural aspects of secondary metabolism. The basics of how to build a reliable phylogenetic tree are explained along with information about programs and tools that can be used for this purpose. Furthermore, it introduces the Natural Product Domain Seeker, a recently developed Web tool that employs phylogenetic logic to classify ketosynthase and condensation domains based on established enzyme architecture and biochemical function.

  12. Structure prediction of magnetosome-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Nudelman, Hila; Zarivach, Raz

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are Gram-negative bacteria that can navigate along geomagnetic fields. This ability is a result of a unique intracellular organelle, the magnetosome. These organelles are composed of membrane-enclosed magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) crystals ordered into chains along the cell. Magnetosome formation, assembly, and magnetic nano-crystal biomineralization are controlled by magnetosome-associated proteins (MAPs). Most MAP-encoding genes are located in a conserved genomic region - the magnetosome island (MAI). The MAI appears to be conserved in all MTB that were analyzed so far, although the MAI size and organization differs between species. It was shown that MAI deletion leads to a non-magnetic phenotype, further highlighting its important role in magnetosome formation. Today, about 28 proteins are known to be involved in magnetosome formation, but the structures and functions of most MAPs are unknown. To reveal the structure-function relationship of MAPs we used bioinformatics tools in order to build homology models as a way to understand their possible role in magnetosome formation. Here we present a predicted 3D structural models' overview for all known Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 MAPs.

  13. Structure Prediction for Multicomponent Materials Using Biminima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schebarchov, D.; Wales, D. J.

    2014-10-01

    The potential energy surface of a heteroparticle system will contain points that are local minima in both coordinate space and permutation space for the different species. We introduce the term biminima to describe these special points, and we formulate a deterministic scheme for finding them. Our search algorithm generates a converging sequence of particle-identity swaps, each accompanied by a number of local geometry relaxations. For selected binary atomic clusters of size N=NA+NB≤98, convergence to a biminimum on average takes 3NANB relaxations, and the number of biminima grows with the preference for mixing. The new framework unifies continuous and combinatorial optimization, providing a powerful tool for structure prediction and rational design of multicomponent materials.

  14. Prediction of Secondary Structures Conserved in Multiple RNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Mathews, David H

    2016-01-01

    RNA structure is conserved by evolution to a greater extent than sequence. Predicting the conserved structure for multiple homologous sequences can be much more accurate than predicting the structure for a single sequence. RNAstructure is a software package that includes the programs Dynalign, Multilign, TurboFold, and PARTS for predicting conserved RNA secondary structure. This chapter provides protocols for using these programs. PMID:27665591

  15. Using the RNAstructure Software Package to Predict Conserved RNA Structures.

    PubMed

    Mathews, David H

    2014-01-01

    The structures of many non-coding RNA (ncRNA) are conserved by evolution to a greater extent than their sequences. By predicting the conserved structure of two or more homologous sequences, the accuracy of secondary structure prediction can be improved as compared to structure prediction for a single sequence. This unit provides protocols for the use of four programs in the RNAstructure suite for prediction of conserved structures, Multilign, TurboFold, Dynalign, and PARTS. These programs can be run via Web servers, on the command line, or with graphical interfaces.

  16. Studies of the B-Z transition of DNA: The temperature dependence of the free-energy difference, the composition of the counterion sheath in mixed salt, and the preparation of a sample of the 5'-d[T-(m(5) C-G)12 -T] duplex in pure B-DNA or Z-DNA form.

    PubMed

    Guéron, Maurice; Plateau, Pierre; Filoche, Marcel

    2016-07-01

    It is often envisioned that cations might coordinate at specific sites of nucleic acids and play an important structural role, for instance in the transition between B-DNA and Z-DNA. However, nucleic acid models explicitly devoid of specific sites may also exhibit features previously considered as evidence for specific binding. Such is the case of the "composite cylinder" (or CC) model which spreads out localized features of DNA structure and charge by cylindrical averaging, while sustaining the main difference between the B and Z structures, namely the better immersion of the B-DNA phosphodiester charges in the solution. Here, we analyze the non-electrostatic component of the free-energy difference between B-DNA and Z-DNA. We also compute the composition of the counterion sheath in a wide range of mixed-salt solutions and of temperatures: in contrast with the large difference of composition between the B-DNA and Z-DNA forms, the temperature dependence of sheath composition, previously unknown, is very weak. In order to validate the model, the mixed-salt predictions should be compared to experiment. We design a procedure for future measurements of the sheath composition based on Anomalous Small-Angle X-ray Scattering and complemented by (31) P NMR. With due consideration for the kinetics of the B-Z transition and for the capacity of generating at will the B or Z form in a single sample, the 5'-d[T-(m(5) C-G)12 -T] 26-mer emerges as a most suitable oligonucleotide for this study. Finally, the application of the finite element method to the resolution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation is described in detail. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 369-384, 2016. PMID:26900058

  17. Experiment-Assisted Secondary Structure Prediction with RNAstructure.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Mathews, David H

    2016-01-01

    Experimental probing data can be used to improve the accuracy of RNA secondary structure prediction. The software package RNAstructure can take advantage of enzymatic cleavage data, FMN cleavage data, traditional chemical modification reactivity data, and SHAPE reactivity data for secondary structure modeling. This chapter provides protocols for using experimental probing data with RNAstructure to restrain or constrain RNA secondary structure prediction. PMID:27665598

  18. RNA-SSPT: RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Tools.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Freed; Mahboob, Shahid; Gulzar, Tahsin; Din, Salah U; Hanif, Tanzeela; Ahmad, Hifza; Afzal, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of RNA structure is useful for understanding evolution for both in silico and in vitro studies. Physical methods like NMR studies to predict RNA secondary structure are expensive and difficult. Computational RNA secondary structure prediction is easier. Comparative sequence analysis provides the best solution. But secondary structure prediction of a single RNA sequence is challenging. RNA-SSPT is a tool that computationally predicts secondary structure of a single RNA sequence. Most of the RNA secondary structure prediction tools do not allow pseudoknots in the structure or are unable to locate them. Nussinov dynamic programming algorithm has been implemented in RNA-SSPT. The current studies shows only energetically most favorable secondary structure is required and the algorithm modification is also available that produces base pairs to lower the total free energy of the secondary structure. For visualization of RNA secondary structure, NAVIEW in C language is used and modified in C# for tool requirement. RNA-SSPT is built in C# using Dot Net 2.0 in Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Professional edition. The accuracy of RNA-SSPT is tested in terms of Sensitivity and Positive Predicted Value. It is a tool which serves both secondary structure prediction and secondary structure visualization purposes. PMID:24250115

  19. Statistical energy analysis response prediction methods for structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The results of an effort to document methods for accomplishing response predictions for commonly encountered aerospace structural configurations is presented. Application of these methods to specified aerospace structure to provide sample analyses is included. An applications manual, with the structural analyses appended as example problems is given. Comparisons of the response predictions with measured data are provided for three of the example problems.

  20. RNAComposer and RNA 3D structure prediction for nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Biesiada, Marcin; Pachulska-Wieczorek, Katarzyna; Adamiak, Ryszard W; Purzycka, Katarzyna J

    2016-07-01

    RNAs adopt specific, stable tertiary architectures to perform their activities. Knowledge of RNA tertiary structure is fundamental to understand RNA functions beginning with transcription and ending with turnover. Contrary to advanced RNA secondary structure prediction algorithms, which allow good accuracy when experimental data are integrated into the prediction, tertiary structure prediction of large RNAs still remains a significant challenge. However, the field of RNA tertiary structure prediction is rapidly developing and new computational methods based on different strategies are emerging. RNAComposer is a user-friendly and freely available server for 3D structure prediction of RNA up to 500 nucleotide residues. RNAComposer employs fully automated fragment assembly based on RNA secondary structure specified by the user. Importantly, this method allows incorporation of distance restraints derived from the experimental data to strengthen the 3D predictions. The potential and limitations of RNAComposer are discussed and an application to RNA design for nanotechnology is presented.

  1. Molecular dynamics of a κB DNA element: base flipping via cross-strand intercalative stacking in a microsecond-scale simulation

    PubMed Central

    Mura, Cameron; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The sequence-dependent structural variability and conformational dynamics of DNA play pivotal roles in many biological milieus, such as in the site-specific binding of transcription factors to target regulatory elements. To better understand DNA structure, function, and dynamics in general, and protein···DNA recognition in the ‘κB’ family of genetic regulatory elements in particular, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of a 20-bp DNA encompassing a cognate κB site recognized by the proto-oncogenic ‘c-Rel’ subfamily of NF-κB transcription factors. Simulations of the κB DNA in explicit water were extended to microsecond duration, providing a broad, atomically detailed glimpse into the structural and dynamical behavior of double helical DNA over many timescales. Of particular note, novel (and structurally plausible) conformations of DNA developed only at the long times sampled in this simulation—including a peculiar state arising at ≈0.7 μs and characterized by cross-strand intercalative stacking of nucleotides within a longitudinally sheared base pair, followed (at ≈1 μs) by spontaneous base flipping of a neighboring thymine within the A-rich duplex. Results and predictions from the microsecond-scale simulation include implications for a dynamical NF-κB recognition motif, and are amenable to testing and further exploration via specific experimental approaches that are suggested herein. PMID:18653524

  2. Predicting meningococcal disease outbreaks in structured populations.

    PubMed

    Ranta, J; Mäkelä, P H; Arjas, E

    2004-03-30

    Rational decision making on whether some form of intervention would be necessary to control the spread of a meningococcal epidemic is based on predictions concerning its potential natural progression. Unfortunately, reliable predictions are difficult to make during the early stages of an outbreak. A stochastic discrete time epidemic model was applied to adaptively predict the development of outbreaks of meningococcal disease in 'closed' populations such as military garrisons or boarding schools, which are further divided into subgroups called 'units'. The performance of the adaptive method was assessed by using 3 simulated epidemics representing substantially different realizations in a 'garrison' of 20 units, with 68 men in each. Predictions of the weekly number of disease cases, of the number of carriers, and of the number of new infections were computed. Simulations suggest that predictions based only on the observed numbers of disease cases are generally inaccurate. These predictions can be improved if temporal observations on asymptomatic carriers in different units are utilized together with observed time series of the disease. A sample of 15 per cent from all units can be sufficient for a major improvement if the alternative is to obtain a full sample of only some units. Exploiting fully such information requires computer intensive Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. PMID:15027081

  3. Predicting crystal structure by merging data mining with quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Christopher C; Tibbetts, Kevin J; Morgan, Dane; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2006-08-01

    Modern methods of quantum mechanics have proved to be effective tools to understand and even predict materials properties. An essential element of the materials design process, relevant to both new materials and the optimization of existing ones, is knowing which crystal structures will form in an alloy system. Crystal structure can only be predicted effectively with quantum mechanics if an algorithm to direct the search through the large space of possible structures is found. We present a new approach to the prediction of structure that rigorously mines correlations embodied within experimental data and uses them to direct quantum mechanical techniques efficiently towards the stable crystal structure of materials.

  4. Structural coding versus free-energy predictive coding.

    PubMed

    van der Helm, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    Focusing on visual perceptual organization, this article contrasts the free-energy (FE) version of predictive coding (a recent Bayesian approach) to structural coding (a long-standing representational approach). Both use free-energy minimization as metaphor for processing in the brain, but their formal elaborations of this metaphor are fundamentally different. FE predictive coding formalizes it by minimization of prediction errors, whereas structural coding formalizes it by minimization of the descriptive complexity of predictions. Here, both sides are evaluated. A conclusion regarding competence is that FE predictive coding uses a powerful modeling technique, but that structural coding has more explanatory power. A conclusion regarding performance is that FE predictive coding-though more detailed in its account of neurophysiological data-provides a less compelling cognitive architecture than that of structural coding, which, for instance, supplies formal support for the computationally powerful role it attributes to neuronal synchronization.

  5. SAM-T08, HMM-based protein structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Karplus, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The SAM-T08 web server is a protein structure prediction server that provides several useful intermediate results in addition to the final predicted 3D structure: three multiple sequence alignments of putative homologs using different iterated search procedures, prediction of local structure features including various backbone and burial properties, calibrated E-values for the significance of template searches of PDB and residue–residue contact predictions. The server has been validated as part of the CASP8 assessment of structure prediction as having good performance across all classes of predictions. The SAM-T08 server is available at http://compbio.soe.ucsc.edu/SAM_T08/T08-query.html PMID:19483096

  6. Predicting Career Advancement with Structural Equation Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimler, Ronald; Rosenberg, Stuart; Morote, Elsa-Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to use the authors' prior findings concerning basic employability skills in order to determine which skills best predict career advancement potential. Design/methodology/approach: Utilizing survey responses of human resource managers, the employability skills showing the largest relationships to career…

  7. Prediction of binary hard-sphere crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Filion, Laura; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2009-04-01

    We present a method based on a combination of a genetic algorithm and Monte Carlo simulations to predict close-packed crystal structures in hard-core systems. We employ this method to predict the binary crystal structures in a mixture of large and small hard spheres with various stoichiometries and diameter ratios between 0.4 and 0.84. In addition to known binary hard-sphere crystal structures similar to NaCl and AlB2, we predict additional crystal structures with the symmetry of CrB, gammaCuTi, alphaIrV, HgBr2, AuTe2, Ag2Se, and various structures for which an atomic analog was not found. In order to determine the crystal structures at infinite pressures, we calculate the maximum packing density as a function of size ratio for the crystal structures predicted by our GA using a simulated annealing approach. PMID:19518387

  8. Defining and predicting structurally conserved regions in protein superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ivan K.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: The structures of homologous proteins are generally better conserved than their sequences. This phenomenon is demonstrated by the prevalence of structurally conserved regions (SCRs) even in highly divergent protein families. Defining SCRs requires the comparison of two or more homologous structures and is affected by their availability and divergence, and our ability to deduce structurally equivalent positions among them. In the absence of multiple homologous structures, it is necessary to predict SCRs of a protein using information from only a set of homologous sequences and (if available) a single structure. Accurate SCR predictions can benefit homology modelling and sequence alignment. Results: Using pairwise DaliLite alignments among a set of homologous structures, we devised a simple measure of structural conservation, termed structural conservation index (SCI). SCI was used to distinguish SCRs from non-SCRs. A database of SCRs was compiled from 386 SCOP superfamilies containing 6489 protein domains. Artificial neural networks were then trained to predict SCRs with various features deduced from a single structure and homologous sequences. Assessment of the predictions via a 5-fold cross-validation method revealed that predictions based on features derived from a single structure perform similarly to ones based on homologous sequences, while combining sequence and structural features was optimal in terms of accuracy (0.755) and Matthews correlation coefficient (0.476). These results suggest that even without information from multiple structures, it is still possible to effectively predict SCRs for a protein. Finally, inspection of the structures with the worst predictions pinpoints difficulties in SCR definitions. Availability: The SCR database and the prediction server can be found at http://prodata.swmed.edu/SCR. Contact: 91huangi@gmail.com or grishin@chop.swmed.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics

  9. Prediction of Protein Structure Using Surface Accessibility Data

    PubMed Central

    Hartlmüller, Christoph; Göbl, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An approach to the de novo structure prediction of proteins is described that relies on surface accessibility data from NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancements by a soluble paramagnetic compound (sPRE). This method exploits the distance‐to‐surface information encoded in the sPRE data in the chemical shift‐based CS‐Rosetta de novo structure prediction framework to generate reliable structural models. For several proteins, it is demonstrated that surface accessibility data is an excellent measure of the correct protein fold in the early stages of the computational folding algorithm and significantly improves accuracy and convergence of the standard Rosetta structure prediction approach. PMID:27560616

  10. Prediction of Protein Structure Using Surface Accessibility Data.

    PubMed

    Hartlmüller, Christoph; Göbl, Christoph; Madl, Tobias

    2016-09-19

    An approach to the de novo structure prediction of proteins is described that relies on surface accessibility data from NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancements by a soluble paramagnetic compound (sPRE). This method exploits the distance-to-surface information encoded in the sPRE data in the chemical shift-based CS-Rosetta de novo structure prediction framework to generate reliable structural models. For several proteins, it is demonstrated that surface accessibility data is an excellent measure of the correct protein fold in the early stages of the computational folding algorithm and significantly improves accuracy and convergence of the standard Rosetta structure prediction approach.

  11. Prediction of Protein Structure Using Surface Accessibility Data.

    PubMed

    Hartlmüller, Christoph; Göbl, Christoph; Madl, Tobias

    2016-09-19

    An approach to the de novo structure prediction of proteins is described that relies on surface accessibility data from NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancements by a soluble paramagnetic compound (sPRE). This method exploits the distance-to-surface information encoded in the sPRE data in the chemical shift-based CS-Rosetta de novo structure prediction framework to generate reliable structural models. For several proteins, it is demonstrated that surface accessibility data is an excellent measure of the correct protein fold in the early stages of the computational folding algorithm and significantly improves accuracy and convergence of the standard Rosetta structure prediction approach. PMID:27560616

  12. Genome-wide Membrane Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Stefano; Suku, Eda; Garonzi, Marianna; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Transmembrane proteins allow cells to extensively communicate with the external world in a very accurate and specific way. They form principal nodes in several signaling pathways and attract large interest in therapeutic intervention, as the majority pharmaceutical compounds target membrane proteins. Thus, according to the current genome annotation methods, a detailed structural/functional characterization at the protein level of each of the elements codified in the genome is also required. The extreme difficulty in obtaining high-resolution three-dimensional structures, calls for computational approaches. Here we review to which extent the efforts made in the last few years, combining the structural characterization of membrane proteins with protein bioinformatics techniques, could help describing membrane proteins at a genome-wide scale. In particular we analyze the use of comparative modeling techniques as a way of overcoming the lack of high-resolution three-dimensional structures in the human membrane proteome. PMID:24403851

  13. Neural network definitions of highly predictable protein secondary structure classes

    SciTech Connect

    Lapedes, A. |; Steeg, E.; Farber, R.

    1994-02-01

    We use two co-evolving neural networks to determine new classes of protein secondary structure which are significantly more predictable from local amino sequence than the conventional secondary structure classification. Accurate prediction of the conventional secondary structure classes: alpha helix, beta strand, and coil, from primary sequence has long been an important problem in computational molecular biology. Neural networks have been a popular method to attempt to predict these conventional secondary structure classes. Accuracy has been disappointingly low. The algorithm presented here uses neural networks to similtaneously examine both sequence and structure data, and to evolve new classes of secondary structure that can be predicted from sequence with significantly higher accuracy than the conventional classes. These new classes have both similarities to, and differences with the conventional alpha helix, beta strand and coil.

  14. Novel and efficient RNA secondary structure prediction using hierarchical folding.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Hosna; Condon, Anne; Zhao, Shelly

    2008-03-01

    Algorithms for prediction of RNA secondary structure-the set of base pairs that form when an RNA molecule folds-are valuable to biologists who aim to understand RNA structure and function. Improving the accuracy and efficiency of prediction methods is an ongoing challenge, particularly for pseudoknotted secondary structures, in which base pairs overlap. This challenge is biologically important, since pseudoknotted structures play essential roles in functions of many RNA molecules, such as splicing and ribosomal frameshifting. State-of-the-art methods, which are based on free energy minimization, have high run-time complexity (typically Theta(n(5)) or worse), and can handle (minimize over) only limited types of pseudoknotted structures. We propose a new approach for prediction of pseudoknotted structures, motivated by the hypothesis that RNA structures fold hierarchically, with pseudoknot-free (non-overlapping) base pairs forming first, and pseudoknots forming later so as to minimize energy relative to the folded pseudoknot-free structure. Our HFold algorithm uses two-phase energy minimization to predict hierarchically formed secondary structures in O(n(3)) time, matching the complexity of the best algorithms for pseudoknot-free secondary structure prediction via energy minimization. Our algorithm can handle a wide range of biological structures, including kissing hairpins and nested kissing hairpins, which have previously required Theta(n(6)) time.

  15. Characterization and Prediction of Protein Flexibility Based on Structural Alphabets

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Motivation. To assist efforts in determining and exploring the functional properties of proteins, it is desirable to characterize and predict protein flexibilities. Results. In this study, the conformational entropy is used as an indicator of the protein flexibility. We first explore whether the conformational change can capture the protein flexibility. The well-defined decoy structures are converted into one-dimensional series of letters from a structural alphabet. Four different structure alphabets, including the secondary structure in 3-class and 8-class, the PB structure alphabet (16-letter), and the DW structure alphabet (28-letter), are investigated. The conformational entropy is then calculated from the structure alphabet letters. Some of the proteins show high correlation between the conformation entropy and the protein flexibility. We then predict the protein flexibility from basic amino acid sequence. The local structures are predicted by the dual-layer model and the conformational entropy of the predicted class distribution is then calculated. The results show that the conformational entropy is a good indicator of the protein flexibility, but false positives remain a problem. The DW structure alphabet performs the best, which means that more subtle local structures can be captured by large number of structure alphabet letters. Overall this study provides a simple and efficient method for the characterization and prediction of the protein flexibility. PMID:27660756

  16. Characterization and Prediction of Protein Flexibility Based on Structural Alphabets

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Motivation. To assist efforts in determining and exploring the functional properties of proteins, it is desirable to characterize and predict protein flexibilities. Results. In this study, the conformational entropy is used as an indicator of the protein flexibility. We first explore whether the conformational change can capture the protein flexibility. The well-defined decoy structures are converted into one-dimensional series of letters from a structural alphabet. Four different structure alphabets, including the secondary structure in 3-class and 8-class, the PB structure alphabet (16-letter), and the DW structure alphabet (28-letter), are investigated. The conformational entropy is then calculated from the structure alphabet letters. Some of the proteins show high correlation between the conformation entropy and the protein flexibility. We then predict the protein flexibility from basic amino acid sequence. The local structures are predicted by the dual-layer model and the conformational entropy of the predicted class distribution is then calculated. The results show that the conformational entropy is a good indicator of the protein flexibility, but false positives remain a problem. The DW structure alphabet performs the best, which means that more subtle local structures can be captured by large number of structure alphabet letters. Overall this study provides a simple and efficient method for the characterization and prediction of the protein flexibility.

  17. Structural prediction for scandium carbide monolayer sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hong-Man; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Hui-Yan; Zhang, Dong-Bo; Liu, Ying

    2016-09-01

    A two-dimensional tetragonal scandium carbide monolayer sheet has been constructed and studied using density functional theory. The results show that the scandium carbide sheet is stable and exhibits a novel tetracoordinated quasiplanar structure, as favored by the hybridization between Sc-3d orbitals and C-2p orbitals. Calculations of the phonon dispersion as well as molecular dynamics simulations also demonstrate the structural stability of this scandium carbide monolayer sheet. Electronic properties show that the scandium carbide monolayer sheet is metallic and non-magnetic.

  18. Protein Structure and Function Prediction Using I-TASSER.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianyi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    I-TASSER is a hierarchical protocol for automated protein structure prediction and structure-based function annotation. Starting from the amino acid sequence of target proteins, I-TASSER first generates full-length atomic structural models from multiple threading alignments and iterative structural assembly simulations followed by atomic-level structure refinement. The biological functions of the protein, including ligand-binding sites, enzyme commission number, and gene ontology terms, are then inferred from known protein function databases based on sequence and structure profile comparisons. I-TASSER is freely available as both an on-line server and a stand-alone package. This unit describes how to use the I-TASSER protocol to generate structure and function prediction and how to interpret the prediction results, as well as alternative approaches for further improving the I-TASSER modeling quality for distant-homologous and multi-domain protein targets.

  19. Automated RNA 3D Structure Prediction with RNAComposer.

    PubMed

    Biesiada, Marcin; Purzycka, Katarzyna J; Szachniuk, Marta; Blazewicz, Jacek; Adamiak, Ryszard W

    2016-01-01

    RNAs adopt specific structures to perform their activities and these are critical to virtually all RNA-mediated processes. Because of difficulties in experimentally assessing structures of large RNAs using NMR, X-ray crystallography, or cryo-microscopy, there is currently great demand for new high-resolution 3D structure prediction methods. Recently we reported on RNAComposer, a knowledge-based method for the fully automated RNA 3D structure prediction from a user-defined secondary structure. RNAComposer method is especially suited for structural biology users. Since our initial report in 2012, both servers, freely available at http://rnacomposer.ibch.poznan.pl and http://rnacomposer.cs.put.poznan.pl have been often visited. Therefore this chapter provides guidance for using RNAComposer and discusses points that should be considered when predicting 3D RNA structure. An application example presents current scope and limitations of RNAComposer. PMID:27665601

  20. Bimetric structure formation: Non-Gaussian predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Magueijo, Joao; Noller, Johannes; Piazza, Federico

    2010-08-15

    The minimal bimetric theory employing a disformal transformation between matter and gravity metrics is known to produce exactly scale-invariant fluctuations. It has a purely equilateral non-Gaussian signal, with an amplitude smaller than that of Dirac Born Infeld inflation (with opposite sign) but larger than standard inflation. We consider nonminimal bimetric models, where the coupling B appearing in the disformal transformation g-circumflex{sub {mu}{nu}}=g{sub {mu}{nu}}-B{partial_derivative}{sub {mu}{phi}{partial_derivative}{nu}{phi}} can run with {phi}. For power-law B({phi}) these models predict tilted spectra. For each value of the spectral index, a distinctive distortion to the equilateral property can be found. The constraint between this distortion and the spectral index can be seen as a 'consistency relation' for nonminimal bimetric models.

  1. Bimetric structure formation: Non-Gaussian predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magueijo, João; Noller, Johannes; Piazza, Federico

    2010-08-01

    The minimal bimetric theory employing a disformal transformation between matter and gravity metrics is known to produce exactly scale-invariant fluctuations. It has a purely equilateral non-Gaussian signal, with an amplitude smaller than that of Dirac Born Infeld inflation (with opposite sign) but larger than standard inflation. We consider nonminimal bimetric models, where the coupling B appearing in the disformal transformation g^μν=gμν-B∂μϕ∂νϕ can run with ϕ. For power-law B(ϕ) these models predict tilted spectra. For each value of the spectral index, a distinctive distortion to the equilateral property can be found. The constraint between this distortion and the spectral index can be seen as a “consistency relation” for nonminimal bimetric models.

  2. Structure Prediction and Analysis of Neuraminidase Sequence Variants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer, Kelly M.

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing protein structure has become an integral aspect of understanding systems of biochemical import. The laboratory experiment endeavors to introduce protein folding to ascertain structures of proteins for which the structure is unavailable, as well as to critically evaluate the quality of the prediction obtained. The model system used is the…

  3. Computational methods in sequence and structure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Caiyi

    This dissertation is organized into two parts. In the first part, we will discuss three computational methods for cis-regulatory element recognition in three different gene regulatory networks as the following: (a) Using a comprehensive "Phylogenetic Footprinting Comparison" method, we will investigate the promoter sequence structures of three enzymes (PAL, CHS and DFR) that catalyze sequential steps in the pathway from phenylalanine to anthocyanins in plants. Our result shows there exists a putative cis-regulatory element "AC(C/G)TAC(C)" in the upstream of these enzyme genes. We propose this cis-regulatory element to be responsible for the genetic regulation of these three enzymes and this element, might also be the binding site for MYB class transcription factor PAP1. (b) We will investigate the role of the Arabidopsis gene glutamate receptor 1.1 (AtGLR1.1) in C and N metabolism by utilizing the microarray data we obtained from AtGLR1.1 deficient lines (antiAtGLR1.1). We focus our investigation on the putatively co-regulated transcript profile of 876 genes we have collected in antiAtGLR1.1 lines. By (a) scanning the occurrence of several groups of known abscisic acid (ABA) related cisregulatory elements in the upstream regions of 876 Arabidopsis genes; and (b) exhaustive scanning of all possible 6-10 bps motif occurrence in the upstream regions of the same set of genes, we are able to make a quantative estimation on the enrichment level of each of the cis-regulatory element candidates. We finally conclude that one specific cis-regulatory element group, called "ABRE" elements, are statistically highly enriched within the 876-gene group as compared to their occurrence within the genome. (c) We will introduce a new general purpose algorithm, called "fuzzy REDUCE1", which we have developed recently for automated cis-regulatory element identification. In the second part, we will discuss our newly devised protein design framework. With this framework we have developed

  4. Structure of orbitofrontal cortex predicts social influence

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Meiklejohn, Daniel K.; Kanai, Ryota; Bahrami, Bahador; Bach, Dominik R.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Roepstorff, Andreas; Frith, Chris D.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Some people conform more than others. Across different contexts, this tendency is a fairly stable trait [1]. This stability suggests that the tendency to conform might have an anatomical correlate [2]. Values that one associates with available options, from foods to political candidates, help to guide choices and behaviour. These values can often be updated by the expressed preferences of other people as much as by independent experience. In this correspondence, we report a linear relationship between grey matter volume (GM) in a region of lateral orbitofrontal cortex (lOFCGM) and the tendency to shift reported desire for objects toward values expressed by other people. This effect was found in precisely the same region in each brain hemisphere. lOFCGM also predicted the functional hemodynamic response in the middle frontal gyrus to discovering that someone else's values contrast with one's own. These findings indicate that the tendency to conform one's values to those expressed by other people has an anatomical correlate in the human brain. PMID:22361146

  5. Comparative melting and healing of B-DNA and Z-DNA by an infrared laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Man, Viet Hoang; Pan, Feng; Sagui, Celeste; Roland, Christopher

    2016-04-14

    We explore the use of a fast laser melting simulation approach combined with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in order to determine the melting and healing responses of B-DNA and Z-DNA dodecamers with the same d(5'-CGCGCGCGCGCG-3')2 sequence. The frequency of the laser pulse is specifically tuned to disrupt Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds, thus inducing melting of the DNA duplexes. Subsequently, the structures relax and partially refold, depending on the field strength. In addition to the inherent interest of the nonequilibrium melting process, we propose that fast melting by an infrared laser pulse could be used as a technique for a fast comparison of relative stabilities of same-sequence oligonucleotides with different secondary structures with full atomistic detail of the structures and solvent. This could be particularly useful for nonstandard secondary structures involving non-canonical base pairs, mismatches, etc.

  6. WeFold: A Coopetition for Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, George A.; Liwo, Adam; Khatib, Firas; Zhou, Hongyi; Chopra, Gaurav; Bacardit, Jaume; Bortot, Leandro O.; Faccioli, Rodrigo A.; Deng, Xin; He, Yi; Krupa, Pawel; Li, Jilong; Mozolewska, Magdalena A.; Sieradzan, Adam K.; Smadbeck, James; Wirecki, Tomasz; Cooper, Seth; Flatten, Jeff; Xu, Kefan; Baker, David; Cheng, Jianlin; Delbem, Alexandre C. B.; Floudas, Christodoulos A.; Keasar, Chen; Levitt, Michael; Popović, Zoran; Scheraga, Harold A.; Skolnick, Jeffrey; Crivelli, Silvia N.; Players, Foldit

    2014-01-01

    The protein structure prediction problem continues to elude scientists. Despite the introduction of many methods, only modest gains were made over the last decade for certain classes of prediction targets. To address this challenge, a social-media based worldwide collaborative effort, named WeFold, was undertaken by thirteen labs. During the collaboration, the labs were simultaneously competing with each other. Here, we present the first attempt at “coopetition” in scientific research applied to the protein structure prediction and refinement problems. The coopetition was possible by allowing the participating labs to contribute different components of their protein structure prediction pipelines and create new hybrid pipelines that they tested during CASP10. This manuscript describes both successes and areas needing improvement as identified throughout the first WeFold experiment and discusses the efforts that are underway to advance this initiative. A footprint of all contributions and structures are publicly accessible at http://www.wefold.org. PMID:24677212

  7. Status of research aimed at predicting structural integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Reuter, W.G.

    1997-12-31

    Considerable research has been performed throughout the world on measuring the fracture toughness of metals. The existing capability fills the need encountered when selecting materials, thermal-mechanical treatments, welding procedures, etc., but cannot predict the fracture process of structural components containing cracks. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have been collaborating for a number of years on developing capabilities for using fracture toughness results to predict structural integrity. Because of the high cost of fabricating and testing structural components, these studies have been limited to predicting the fracture process in specimens containing surface cracks. This paper summarizes the present status of the experimental studies of using fracture toughness data to predict crack growth initiation in specimens (structural components) containing surface cracks. These results are limited to homogeneous base materials.

  8. JPred4: a protein secondary structure prediction server.

    PubMed

    Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Cole, Christian; Procter, James; Barton, Geoffrey J

    2015-07-01

    JPred4 (http://www.compbio.dundee.ac.uk/jpred4) is the latest version of the popular JPred protein secondary structure prediction server which provides predictions by the JNet algorithm, one of the most accurate methods for secondary structure prediction. In addition to protein secondary structure, JPred also makes predictions of solvent accessibility and coiled-coil regions. The JPred service runs up to 94 000 jobs per month and has carried out over 1.5 million predictions in total for users in 179 countries. The JPred4 web server has been re-implemented in the Bootstrap framework and JavaScript to improve its design, usability and accessibility from mobile devices. JPred4 features higher accuracy, with a blind three-state (α-helix, β-strand and coil) secondary structure prediction accuracy of 82.0% while solvent accessibility prediction accuracy has been raised to 90% for residues <5% accessible. Reporting of results is enhanced both on the website and through the optional email summaries and batch submission results. Predictions are now presented in SVG format with options to view full multiple sequence alignments with and without gaps and insertions. Finally, the help-pages have been updated and tool-tips added as well as step-by-step tutorials. PMID:25883141

  9. JPred4: a protein secondary structure prediction server

    PubMed Central

    Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Cole, Christian; Procter, James; Barton, Geoffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    JPred4 (http://www.compbio.dundee.ac.uk/jpred4) is the latest version of the popular JPred protein secondary structure prediction server which provides predictions by the JNet algorithm, one of the most accurate methods for secondary structure prediction. In addition to protein secondary structure, JPred also makes predictions of solvent accessibility and coiled-coil regions. The JPred service runs up to 94 000 jobs per month and has carried out over 1.5 million predictions in total for users in 179 countries. The JPred4 web server has been re-implemented in the Bootstrap framework and JavaScript to improve its design, usability and accessibility from mobile devices. JPred4 features higher accuracy, with a blind three-state (α-helix, β-strand and coil) secondary structure prediction accuracy of 82.0% while solvent accessibility prediction accuracy has been raised to 90% for residues <5% accessible. Reporting of results is enhanced both on the website and through the optional email summaries and batch submission results. Predictions are now presented in SVG format with options to view full multiple sequence alignments with and without gaps and insertions. Finally, the help-pages have been updated and tool-tips added as well as step-by-step tutorials. PMID:25883141

  10. Gogny HFB prediction of nuclear structure properties

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.; Hilaire, S.; Girod, M.

    2011-10-28

    Large scale mean field calculations from proton to neutron drip lines have been performed using the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method based on the Gogny nucleon-nucleon effective interaction. This extensive study has shown the ability of the method to reproduce bulk nuclear structure data available experimentally. This includes nuclear masses, radii, matter densities, deformations, moment of inertia as well as collective mode (low energy and giant resonances). In particular, the first mass table based on a Gogny-Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov calculation including an explicit and coherent account of all the quadrupole correlation energies is presented. The rms deviation with respect to essentially all the available mass data is 798 keV. Nearly 8000 nuclei have been studied under the axial symmetry hypothesis and going beyond the mean-field approach.

  11. A predictive structural model for bulk metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Laws, K. J.; Miracle, D. B.; Ferry, M.

    2015-01-01

    Great progress has been made in understanding the atomic structure of metallic glasses, but there is still no clear connection between atomic structure and glass-forming ability. Here we give new insights into perhaps the most important question in the field of amorphous metals: how can glass-forming ability be predicted from atomic structure? We give a new approach to modelling metallic glass atomic structures by solving three long-standing problems: we discover a new family of structural defects that discourage glass formation; we impose efficient local packing around all atoms simultaneously; and we enforce structural self-consistency. Fewer than a dozen binary structures satisfy these constraints, but extra degrees of freedom in structures with three or more different atom sizes significantly expand the number of relatively stable, ‘bulk' metallic glasses. The present work gives a new approach towards achieving the long-sought goal of a predictive capability for bulk metallic glasses. PMID:26370667

  12. OPTIMIZATION BIAS IN ENERGY-BASED STRUCTURE PREDICTION

    PubMed Central

    Petrella, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Physics-based computational approaches to predicting the structure of macromolecules such as proteins are gaining increased use, but there are remaining challenges. In the current work, it is demonstrated that in energy-based prediction methods, the degree of optimization of the sampled structures can influence the prediction results. In particular, discrepancies in the degree of local sampling can bias the predictions in favor of the oversampled structures by shifting the local probability distributions of the minimum sampled energies. In simple systems, it is shown that the magnitude of the errors can be calculated from the energy surface, and for certain model systems, derived analytically. Further, it is shown that for energy wells whose forms differ only by a randomly assigned energy shift, the optimal accuracy of prediction is achieved when the sampling around each structure is equal. Energy correction terms can be used in cases of unequal sampling to reproduce the total probabilities that would occur under equal sampling, but optimal corrections only partially restore the prediction accuracy lost to unequal sampling. For multiwell systems, the determination of the correction terms is a multibody problem; it is shown that the involved cross-correlation multiple integrals can be reduced to simpler integrals. The possible implications of the current analysis for macromolecular structure prediction are discussed. PMID:25552783

  13. Predicting RNA secondary structures from sequence and probing data.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Ronny; Wolfinger, Michael T; Tanzer, Andrea; Hofacker, Ivo L

    2016-07-01

    RNA secondary structures have proven essential for understanding the regulatory functions performed by RNA such as microRNAs, bacterial small RNAs, or riboswitches. This success is in part due to the availability of efficient computational methods for predicting RNA secondary structures. Recent advances focus on dealing with the inherent uncertainty of prediction by considering the ensemble of possible structures rather than the single most stable one. Moreover, the advent of high-throughput structural probing has spurred the development of computational methods that incorporate such experimental data as auxiliary information.

  14. Improving structure-based function prediction using molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Dariya S.; Radmer, Randall J.; Altman, Russ B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The number of molecules with solved three-dimensional structure but unknown function is increasing rapidly. Particularly problematic are novel folds with little detectable similarity to molecules of known function. Experimental assays can determine the functions of such molecules, but are time-consuming and expensive. Computational approaches can identify potential functional sites; however, these approaches generally rely on single static structures and do not use information about dynamics. In fact, structural dynamics can enhance function prediction: we coupled molecular dynamics simulations with structure-based function prediction algorithms that identify Ca2+ binding sites. When applied to 11 challenging proteins, both methods showed substantial improvement in performance, revealing 22 more sites in one case and 12 more in the other, with a modest increase in apparent false positives. Thus, we show that treating molecules as dynamic entities improves the performance of structure-based function prediction methods. PMID:19604472

  15. Methods for evaluating the predictive accuracy of structural dynamic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselman, Timothy K.; Chrostowski, Jon D.

    1991-01-01

    Modeling uncertainty is defined in terms of the difference between predicted and measured eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Data compiled from 22 sets of analysis/test results was used to create statistical databases for large truss-type space structures and both pretest and posttest models of conventional satellite-type space structures. Modeling uncertainty is propagated through the model to produce intervals of uncertainty on frequency response functions, both amplitude and phase. This methodology was used successfully to evaluate the predictive accuracy of several structures, including the NASA CSI Evolutionary Structure tested at Langley Research Center. Test measurements for this structure were within + one-sigma intervals of predicted accuracy for the most part, demonstrating the validity of the methodology and computer code.

  16. SAbPred: a structure-based antibody prediction server

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, James; Krawczyk, Konrad; Leem, Jinwoo; Marks, Claire; Nowak, Jaroslaw; Regep, Cristian; Georges, Guy; Kelm, Sebastian; Popovic, Bojana; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2016-01-01

    SAbPred is a server that makes predictions of the properties of antibodies focusing on their structures. Antibody informatics tools can help improve our understanding of immune responses to disease and aid in the design and engineering of therapeutic molecules. SAbPred is a single platform containing multiple applications which can: number and align sequences; automatically generate antibody variable fragment homology models; annotate such models with estimated accuracy alongside sequence and structural properties including potential developability issues; predict paratope residues; and predict epitope patches on protein antigens. The server is available at http://opig.stats.ox.ac.uk/webapps/sabpred. PMID:27131379

  17. GSAFold: a new application of GSA to protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Melo, Marcelo C R; Bernardi, Rafael C; Fernandes, Tácio V A; Pascutti, Pedro G

    2012-08-01

    The folding process defines three-dimensional protein structures from their amino acid chains. A protein's structure determines its activity and properties; thus knowing such conformation on an atomic level is essential for both basic and applied studies of protein function and dynamics. However, the acquisition of such structures by experimental methods is slow and expensive, and current computational methods mostly depend on previously known structures to determine new ones. Here we present a new software called GSAFold that applies the generalized simulated annealing (GSA) algorithm on ab initio protein structure prediction. The GSA is a stochastic search algorithm employed in energy minimization and used in global optimization problems, especially those that depend on long-range interactions, such as gravity models and conformation optimization of small molecules. This new implementation applies, for the first time in ab initio protein structure prediction, an analytical inverse for the Visitation function of GSA. It also employs the broadly used NAMD Molecular Dynamics package to carry out energy calculations, allowing the user to select different force fields and parameterizations. Moreover, the software also allows the execution of several simulations simultaneously. Applications that depend on protein structures include rational drug design and structure-based protein function prediction. Applying GSAFold in a test peptide, it was possible to predict the structure of mastoparan-X to a root mean square deviation of 3.00 Å. PMID:22622959

  18. Evolving networks-Using past structure to predict the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ke-ke; Yan, Wei-sheng; Small, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Many previous studies on link prediction have focused on using common neighbors to predict the existence of links between pairs of nodes. More broadly, research into the structural properties of evolving temporal networks and temporal link prediction methods have recently attracted increasing attention. In this study, for the first time, we examine the use of links between a pair of nodes to predict their common neighbors and analyze the relationship between the weight and the structure in static networks, evolving networks, and in the corresponding randomized networks. We propose both new unweighted and weighted prediction methods and use six kinds of real networks to test our algorithms. In unweighted networks, we find that if a pair of nodes connect to each other in the current network, they will have a higher probability to connect common nodes both in the current and the future networks-and the probability will decrease with the increase of the number of neighbors. Furthermore, we find that the original networks have their particular structure and statistical characteristics which benefit link prediction. In weighted networks, the prediction algorithm performance of networks which are dominated by human factors decrease with the decrease of weight and are in general better in static networks. Furthermore, we find that geographical position and link weight both have significant influence on the transport network. Moreover, the evolving financial network has the lowest predictability. In addition, we find that the structure of non-social networks has more robustness than social networks. The structure of engineering networks has both best predictability and also robustness.

  19. Data-directed RNA secondary structure prediction using probabilistic modeling.

    PubMed

    Deng, Fei; Ledda, Mirko; Vaziri, Sana; Aviran, Sharon

    2016-08-01

    Structure dictates the function of many RNAs, but secondary RNA structure analysis is either labor intensive and costly or relies on computational predictions that are often inaccurate. These limitations are alleviated by integration of structure probing data into prediction algorithms. However, existing algorithms are optimized for a specific type of probing data. Recently, new chemistries combined with advances in sequencing have facilitated structure probing at unprecedented scale and sensitivity. These novel technologies and anticipated wealth of data highlight a need for algorithms that readily accommodate more complex and diverse input sources. We implemented and investigated a recently outlined probabilistic framework for RNA secondary structure prediction and extended it to accommodate further refinement of structural information. This framework utilizes direct likelihood-based calculations of pseudo-energy terms per considered structural context and can readily accommodate diverse data types and complex data dependencies. We use real data in conjunction with simulations to evaluate performances of several implementations and to show that proper integration of structural contexts can lead to improvements. Our tests also reveal discrepancies between real data and simulations, which we show can be alleviated by refined modeling. We then propose statistical preprocessing approaches to standardize data interpretation and integration into such a generic framework. We further systematically quantify the information content of data subsets, demonstrating that high reactivities are major drivers of SHAPE-directed predictions and that better understanding of less informative reactivities is key to further improvements. Finally, we provide evidence for the adaptive capability of our framework using mock probe simulations.

  20. Structure Prediction of RNA Loops with a Probabilistic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Li, Wenfei; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of the tertiary structure of RNA loops is important for understanding their functions. In this work we develop an efficient approach named RNApps, specifically designed for predicting the tertiary structure of RNA loops, including hairpin loops, internal loops, and multi-way junction loops. It includes a probabilistic coarse-grained RNA model, an all-atom statistical energy function, a sequential Monte Carlo growth algorithm, and a simulated annealing procedure. The approach is tested with a dataset including nine RNA loops, a 23S ribosomal RNA, and a large dataset containing 876 RNAs. The performance is evaluated and compared with a homology modeling based predictor and an ab initio predictor. It is found that RNApps has comparable performance with the former one and outdoes the latter in terms of structure predictions. The approach holds great promise for accurate and efficient RNA tertiary structure prediction. PMID:27494763

  1. Text Prediction on Structured Data Entry in Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Hua, L.; Wang, S.; Gong, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Structured data entry pervades computerized patient safety event reporting systems and serves as a key component in collecting patient-related information in electronic health records. Clinicians would spend more time being with patients and arrive at a high probability of proper diagnosis and treatment, if data entry can be completed efficiently and effectively. Historically it has been proven text prediction holds potential for human performance regarding data entry in a variety of research areas. Objective This study aimed at examining a function of text prediction proposed for increasing efficiency and data quality in structured data entry. Methods We employed a two-group randomized design with fifty-two nurses in this usability study. Each participant was assigned the task of reporting patient falls by answering multiple choice questions either with or without the text prediction function. t-test statistics and linear regression model were applied to analyzing the results of the two groups. Results While both groups of participants exhibited a good capacity of accomplishing the assigned task, the results were an overall 13.0% time reduction and 3.9% increase of response accuracy for the group utilizing the prediction function. Conclusion As a primary attempt investigating the effectiveness of text prediction in healthcare, study findings validated the necessity of text prediction to structured date entry, and laid the ground for further research improving the effectiveness of text prediction in clinical settings. PMID:24734137

  2. Coarse-Grained Prediction of RNA Loop Structures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liang; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2012-01-01

    One of the key issues in the theoretical prediction of RNA folding is the prediction of loop structure from the sequence. RNA loop free energies are dependent on the loop sequence content. However, most current models account only for the loop length-dependence. The previously developed “Vfold” model (a coarse-grained RNA folding model) provides an effective method to generate the complete ensemble of coarse-grained RNA loop and junction conformations. However, due to the lack of sequence-dependent scoring parameters, the method is unable to identify the native and near-native structures from the sequence. In this study, using a previously developed iterative method for extracting the knowledge-based potential parameters from the known structures, we derive a set of dinucleotide-based statistical potentials for RNA loops and junctions. A unique advantage of the approach is its ability to go beyond the the (known) native structures by accounting for the full free energy landscape, including all the nonnative folds. The benchmark tests indicate that for given loop/junction sequences, the statistical potentials enable successful predictions for the coarse-grained 3D structures from the complete conformational ensemble generated by the Vfold model. The predicted coarse-grained structures can provide useful initial folds for further detailed structural refinement. PMID:23144887

  3. Protein structure prediction enhanced with evolutionary diversity : SPEED.

    SciTech Connect

    DeBartolo, J.; Hocky, G.; Wilde, M.; Xu, J.; Freed, K. F.; Sosnick, T. R.; Univ. of Chicago; Toyota Technological Inst. at Chicago

    2010-03-01

    For naturally occurring proteins, similar sequence implies similar structure. Consequently, multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) often are used in template-based modeling of protein structure and have been incorporated into fragment-based assembly methods. Our previous homology-free structure prediction study introduced an algorithm that mimics the folding pathway by coupling the formation of secondary and tertiary structure. Moves in the Monte Carlo procedure involve only a change in a single pair of {phi},{psi} backbone dihedral angles that are obtained from a Protein Data Bank-based distribution appropriate for each amino acid, conditional on the type and conformation of the flanking residues. We improve this method by using MSAs to enrich the sampling distribution, but in a manner that does not require structural knowledge of any protein sequence (i.e., not homologous fragment insertion). In combination with other tools, including clustering and refinement, the accuracies of the predicted secondary and tertiary structures are substantially improved and a global and position-resolved measure of confidence is introduced for the accuracy of the predictions. Performance of the method in the Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP8) is discussed.

  4. 3D protein structure prediction using Imperialist Competitive algorithm and half sphere exposure prediction.

    PubMed

    Khaji, Erfan; Karami, Masoumeh; Garkani-Nejad, Zahra

    2016-02-21

    Predicting the native structure of proteins based on half-sphere exposure and contact numbers has been studied deeply within recent years. Online predictors of these vectors and secondary structures of amino acids sequences have made it possible to design a function for the folding process. By choosing variant structures and directs for each secondary structure, a random conformation can be generated, and a potential function can then be assigned. Minimizing the potential function utilizing meta-heuristic algorithms is the final step of finding the native structure of a given amino acid sequence. In this work, Imperialist Competitive algorithm was used in order to accelerate the process of minimization. Moreover, we applied an adaptive procedure to apply revolutionary changes. Finally, we considered a more accurate tool for prediction of secondary structure. The results of the computational experiments on standard benchmark show the superiority of the new algorithm over the previous methods with similar potential function. PMID:26718864

  5. 3D protein structure prediction using Imperialist Competitive algorithm and half sphere exposure prediction.

    PubMed

    Khaji, Erfan; Karami, Masoumeh; Garkani-Nejad, Zahra

    2016-02-21

    Predicting the native structure of proteins based on half-sphere exposure and contact numbers has been studied deeply within recent years. Online predictors of these vectors and secondary structures of amino acids sequences have made it possible to design a function for the folding process. By choosing variant structures and directs for each secondary structure, a random conformation can be generated, and a potential function can then be assigned. Minimizing the potential function utilizing meta-heuristic algorithms is the final step of finding the native structure of a given amino acid sequence. In this work, Imperialist Competitive algorithm was used in order to accelerate the process of minimization. Moreover, we applied an adaptive procedure to apply revolutionary changes. Finally, we considered a more accurate tool for prediction of secondary structure. The results of the computational experiments on standard benchmark show the superiority of the new algorithm over the previous methods with similar potential function.

  6. Predicting the protein-protein interactions using primary structures with predicted protein surface

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many biological functions involve various protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Elucidating such interactions is crucial for understanding general principles of cellular systems. Previous studies have shown the potential of predicting PPIs based on only sequence information. Compared to approaches that require other auxiliary information, these sequence-based approaches can be applied to a broader range of applications. Results This study presents a novel sequence-based method based on the assumption that protein-protein interactions are more related to amino acids at the surface than those at the core. The present method considers surface information and maintains the advantage of relying on only sequence data by including an accessible surface area (ASA) predictor recently proposed by the authors. This study also reports the experiments conducted to evaluate a) the performance of PPI prediction achieved by including the predicted surface and b) the quality of the predicted surface in comparison with the surface obtained from structures. The experimental results show that surface information helps to predict interacting protein pairs. Furthermore, the prediction performance achieved by using the surface estimated with the ASA predictor is close to that using the surface obtained from protein structures. Conclusion This work presents a sequence-based method that takes into account surface information for predicting PPIs. The proposed procedure of surface identification improves the prediction performance with an F-measure of 5.1%. The extracted surfaces are also valuable in other biomedical applications that require similar information. PMID:20122202

  7. MUFOLD: A new solution for protein 3D structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingfen; Wang, Qingguo; Barz, Bogdan; He, Zhiquan; Kosztin, Ioan; Shang, Yi; Xu, Dong

    2010-01-01

    There have been steady improvements in protein structure prediction during the past 2 decades. However, current methods are still far from consistently predicting structural models accurately with computing power accessible to common users. Toward achieving more accurate and efficient structure prediction, we developed a number of novel methods and integrated them into a software package, MUFOLD. First, a systematic protocol was developed to identify useful templates and fragments from Protein Data Bank for a given target protein. Then, an efficient process was applied for iterative coarse-grain model generation and evaluation at the Cα or backbone level. In this process, we construct models using interresidue spatial restraints derived from alignments by multidimensional scaling, evaluate and select models through clustering and static scoring functions, and iteratively improve the selected models by integrating spatial restraints and previous models. Finally, the full-atom models were evaluated using molecular dynamics simulations based on structural changes under simulated heating. We have continuously improved the performance of MUFOLD by using a benchmark of 200 proteins from the Astral database, where no template with >25% sequence identity to any target protein is included. The average root-mean-square deviation of the best models from the native structures is 4.28 Å, which shows significant and systematic improvement over our previous methods. The computing time of MUFOLD is much shorter than many other tools, such as Rosetta. MUFOLD demonstrated some success in the 2008 community-wide experiment for protein structure prediction CASP8. PMID:19927325

  8. A life prediction model for laminated composite structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David H.

    1990-01-01

    A life prediction methodology for laminated continuous fiber composites subjected to fatigue loading conditions was developed. A summary is presented of research completed. A phenomenological damage evolution law was formulated for matrix cracking which is independent of stacking sequence. Mechanistic and physical support was developed for the phenomenological evolution law proposed above. The damage evolution law proposed above was implemented to a finite element computer program. And preliminary predictions were obtained for a structural component undergoing fatigue loading induced damage.

  9. A new protein structure representation for efficient protein function prediction.

    PubMed

    Maghawry, Huda A; Mostafa, Mostafa G M; Gharib, Tarek F

    2014-12-01

    One of the challenging problems in bioinformatics is the prediction of protein function. Protein function is the main key that can be used to classify different proteins. Protein function can be inferred experimentally with very small throughput or computationally with very high throughput. Computational methods are sequence based or structure based. Structure-based methods produce more accurate protein function prediction. In this article, we propose a new protein structure representation for efficient protein function prediction. The representation is based on three-dimensional patterns of protein residues. In the analysis, we used protein function based on enzyme activity through six mechanistically diverse enzyme superfamilies: amidohydrolase, crotonase, haloacid dehalogenase, isoprenoid synthase type I, and vicinal oxygen chelate. We applied three different classification methods, naïve Bayes, k-nearest neighbors, and random forest, to predict the enzyme superfamily of a given protein. The prediction accuracy using the proposed representation outperforms a recently introduced representation method that is based only on the distance patterns. The results show that the proposed representation achieved prediction accuracy up to 98%, with improvement of about 10% on average.

  10. Cloud Prediction of Protein Structure and Function with PredictProtein for Debian

    PubMed Central

    Kaján, László; Yachdav, Guy; Vicedo, Esmeralda; Steinegger, Martin; Mirdita, Milot; Angermüller, Christof; Böhm, Ariane; Domke, Simon; Ertl, Julia; Mertes, Christian; Reisinger, Eva; Rost, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    We report the release of PredictProtein for the Debian operating system and derivatives, such as Ubuntu, Bio-Linux, and Cloud BioLinux. The PredictProtein suite is available as a standard set of open source Debian packages. The release covers the most popular prediction methods from the Rost Lab, including methods for the prediction of secondary structure and solvent accessibility (profphd), nuclear localization signals (predictnls), and intrinsically disordered regions (norsnet). We also present two case studies that successfully utilize PredictProtein packages for high performance computing in the cloud: the first analyzes protein disorder for whole organisms, and the second analyzes the effect of all possible single sequence variants in protein coding regions of the human genome. PMID:23971032

  11. Cloud prediction of protein structure and function with PredictProtein for Debian.

    PubMed

    Kaján, László; Yachdav, Guy; Vicedo, Esmeralda; Steinegger, Martin; Mirdita, Milot; Angermüller, Christof; Böhm, Ariane; Domke, Simon; Ertl, Julia; Mertes, Christian; Reisinger, Eva; Staniewski, Cedric; Rost, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    We report the release of PredictProtein for the Debian operating system and derivatives, such as Ubuntu, Bio-Linux, and Cloud BioLinux. The PredictProtein suite is available as a standard set of open source Debian packages. The release covers the most popular prediction methods from the Rost Lab, including methods for the prediction of secondary structure and solvent accessibility (profphd), nuclear localization signals (predictnls), and intrinsically disordered regions (norsnet). We also present two case studies that successfully utilize PredictProtein packages for high performance computing in the cloud: the first analyzes protein disorder for whole organisms, and the second analyzes the effect of all possible single sequence variants in protein coding regions of the human genome.

  12. A-DNA and B-DNA: Comparing Their Historical X-Ray Fiber Diffraction Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Amand A.

    2008-01-01

    A-DNA and B-DNA are two secondary molecular conformations (among other allomorphs) that double-stranded DNA drawn into a fiber can assume, depending on the relative water content and other chemical parameters of the fiber. They were the first two forms to be observed by X-ray fiber diffraction in the early 1950s, respectively by Wilkins and…

  13. PredictProtein—an open resource for online prediction of protein structural and functional features

    PubMed Central

    Yachdav, Guy; Kloppmann, Edda; Kajan, Laszlo; Hecht, Maximilian; Goldberg, Tatyana; Hamp, Tobias; Hönigschmid, Peter; Schafferhans, Andrea; Roos, Manfred; Bernhofer, Michael; Richter, Lothar; Ashkenazy, Haim; Punta, Marco; Schlessinger, Avner; Bromberg, Yana; Schneider, Reinhard; Vriend, Gerrit; Sander, Chris; Ben-Tal, Nir; Rost, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    PredictProtein is a meta-service for sequence analysis that has been predicting structural and functional features of proteins since 1992. Queried with a protein sequence it returns: multiple sequence alignments, predicted aspects of structure (secondary structure, solvent accessibility, transmembrane helices (TMSEG) and strands, coiled-coil regions, disulfide bonds and disordered regions) and function. The service incorporates analysis methods for the identification of functional regions (ConSurf), homology-based inference of Gene Ontology terms (metastudent), comprehensive subcellular localization prediction (LocTree3), protein–protein binding sites (ISIS2), protein–polynucleotide binding sites (SomeNA) and predictions of the effect of point mutations (non-synonymous SNPs) on protein function (SNAP2). Our goal has always been to develop a system optimized to meet the demands of experimentalists not highly experienced in bioinformatics. To this end, the PredictProtein results are presented as both text and a series of intuitive, interactive and visually appealing figures. The web server and sources are available at http://ppopen.rostlab.org. PMID:24799431

  14. Using theoretical descriptors in structure activity relationships: Validating toxicity predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Famini, G.R.; Wilson, L.Y.; Chester, N.A.; Sterling, P.A.

    1995-12-01

    Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSAR) and Linear Free Energy Relationships (LFER) are very useful for correlating toxicological data, and in characterizating trends in terms of structural and electronic effects. Several years ago, we developed a series of equations correlating a number of toxicity tests with theoretically determined descriptors. One of these tests was the Microtox test, using the degradation in light from Photobacteriurn phosphoreum. Recently, several new compounds have been tested in our laboratory using the Microtox test, and compared against the predicted values. The agreement between experimental and theoretical results will be discussed, as will reasons for {open_quotes}good{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}poor{close_quotes} predictions.

  15. Adaptive modelling of structured molecular representations for toxicity prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertinetto, Carlo; Duce, Celia; Micheli, Alessio; Solaro, Roberto; Tiné, Maria Rosaria

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the possibility of modelling structure-toxicity relationships by direct treatment of the molecular structure (without using descriptors) through an adaptive model able to retain the appropriate structural information. With respect to traditional descriptor-based approaches, this provides a more general and flexible way to tackle prediction problems that is particularly suitable when little or no background knowledge is available. Our method employs a tree-structured molecular representation, which is processed by a recursive neural network (RNN). To explore the realization of RNN modelling in toxicological problems, we employed a data set containing growth impairment concentrations (IGC50) for Tetrahymena pyriformis.

  16. PROTEUS2: a web server for comprehensive protein structure prediction and structure-based annotation.

    PubMed

    Montgomerie, Scott; Cruz, Joseph A; Shrivastava, Savita; Arndt, David; Berjanskii, Mark; Wishart, David S

    2008-07-01

    PROTEUS2 is a web server designed to support comprehensive protein structure prediction and structure-based annotation. PROTEUS2 accepts either single sequences (for directed studies) or multiple sequences (for whole proteome annotation) and predicts the secondary and, if possible, tertiary structure of the query protein(s). Unlike most other tools or servers, PROTEUS2 bundles signal peptide identification, transmembrane helix prediction, transmembrane beta-strand prediction, secondary structure prediction (for soluble proteins) and homology modeling (i.e. 3D structure generation) into a single prediction pipeline. Using a combination of progressive multi-sequence alignment, structure-based mapping, hidden Markov models, multi-component neural nets and up-to-date databases of known secondary structure assignments, PROTEUS is able to achieve among the highest reported levels of predictive accuracy for signal peptides (Q2 = 94%), membrane spanning helices (Q2 = 87%) and secondary structure (Q3 score of 81.3%). PROTEUS2's homology modeling services also provide high quality 3D models that compare favorably with those generated by SWISS-MODEL and 3D JigSaw (within 0.2 A RMSD). The average PROTEUS2 prediction takes approximately 3 min per query sequence. The PROTEUS2 server along with source code for many of its modules is accessible a http://wishart.biology.ualberta.ca/proteus2.

  17. An atomistic geometrical model of the B-DNA configuration for DNA-radiation interaction simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, M. A.; Sikansi, D.; Cavalcante, F.; Incerti, S.; Champion, C.; Ivanchenko, V.; Francis, Z.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, an atomistic geometrical model for the B-DNA configuration is explained. This model accounts for five organization levels of the DNA, up to the 30 nm chromatin fiber. However, fragments of this fiber can be used to construct the whole genome. The algorithm developed in this work is capable to determine which is the closest atom with respect to an arbitrary point in space. It can be used in any application in which a DNA geometrical model is needed, for instance, in investigations related to the effects of ionizing radiations on the human genetic material. Successful consistency checks were carried out to test the proposed model. Catalogue identifier: AEPZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEPZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1245 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6574 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN. Computer: Any. Operating system: Multi-platform. RAM: 2 Gb Classification: 3. Nature of problem: The Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the interaction of ionizing radiation with the human genetic material in order to determine DNA damage yields per unit absorbed dose. To accomplish this task, an algorithm to determine if a given energy deposition lies within a given target is needed. This target can be an atom or any other structure of the genetic material. Solution method: This is a stand-alone subroutine describing an atomic-resolution geometrical model of the B-DNA configuration. It is able to determine the closest atom to an arbitrary point in space. This model accounts for five organization levels of the human genetic material, from the nucleotide pair up to the 30 nm chromatin fiber. This subroutine carries out a series of coordinate transformations

  18. (PS)2: protein structure prediction server version 3.0.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tsun-Tsao; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Chen, Chu-Huang; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Lee, Chi-Wen; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2015-07-01

    Protein complexes are involved in many biological processes. Examining coupling between subunits of a complex would be useful to understand the molecular basis of protein function. Here, our updated (PS)(2) web server predicts the three-dimensional structures of protein complexes based on comparative modeling; furthermore, this server examines the coupling between subunits of the predicted complex by combining structural and evolutionary considerations. The predicted complex structure could be indicated and visualized by Java-based 3D graphics viewers and the structural and evolutionary profiles are shown and compared chain-by-chain. For each subunit, considerations with or without the packing contribution of other subunits cause the differences in similarities between structural and evolutionary profiles, and these differences imply which form, complex or monomeric, is preferred in the biological condition for the subunit. We believe that the (PS)(2) server would be a useful tool for biologists who are interested not only in the structures of protein complexes but also in the coupling between subunits of the complexes. The (PS)(2) is freely available at http://ps2v3.life.nctu.edu.tw/. PMID:25943546

  19. (PS)2: protein structure prediction server version 3.0.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tsun-Tsao; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Chen, Chu-Huang; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Lee, Chi-Wen; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2015-07-01

    Protein complexes are involved in many biological processes. Examining coupling between subunits of a complex would be useful to understand the molecular basis of protein function. Here, our updated (PS)(2) web server predicts the three-dimensional structures of protein complexes based on comparative modeling; furthermore, this server examines the coupling between subunits of the predicted complex by combining structural and evolutionary considerations. The predicted complex structure could be indicated and visualized by Java-based 3D graphics viewers and the structural and evolutionary profiles are shown and compared chain-by-chain. For each subunit, considerations with or without the packing contribution of other subunits cause the differences in similarities between structural and evolutionary profiles, and these differences imply which form, complex or monomeric, is preferred in the biological condition for the subunit. We believe that the (PS)(2) server would be a useful tool for biologists who are interested not only in the structures of protein complexes but also in the coupling between subunits of the complexes. The (PS)(2) is freely available at http://ps2v3.life.nctu.edu.tw/.

  20. Interaction of Iron II Complexes with B-DNA. Insights from Molecular Modeling, Spectroscopy and Cellular Biology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattuso, Hugo; Duchanois, Thibaut; Besancenot, Vanessa; Barbieux, Claire; Assfeld, Xavier; Becuwe, Philippe; Gros, Philippe; Grandemange, Stephanie; Monari, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    We report the characterization of the interaction between B-DNA and three terpyridin iron II complexes. Relatively long time-scale molecular dynamics is used in order to characterize the stable interaction modes. By means of molecular modeling and UV-vis spectroscopy, we prove that they may lead to stable interactions with the DNA duplex. Furthermore, the presence of larger π-conjugated moieties also leads to the appearance of intercalation binding mode. Non-covalent stabilizing interactions between the iron complexes and the DNA are also characterized and evidenced by the analysis of the gradient of the electronic density. Finally, the structural deformations induced on the DNA in the different binding modes are also evidenced. The synthesis and chemical characterization of the three complexes is reported, as well as their absorption spectra in presence of DNA duplexes to prove the interaction with DNA. Finally, their effects on human cell cultures have also been evidenced to further enlighten their biological effects.

  1. Process for predicting structural performance of mechanical systems

    DOEpatents

    Gardner, David R.; Hendrickson, Bruce A.; Plimpton, Steven J.; Attaway, Stephen W.; Heinstein, Martin W.; Vaughan, Courtenay T.

    1998-01-01

    A process for predicting the structural performance of a mechanical system represents the mechanical system by a plurality of surface elements. The surface elements are grouped according to their location in the volume occupied by the mechanical system so that contacts between surface elements can be efficiently located. The process is well suited for efficient practice on multiprocessor computers.

  2. Process for predicting structural performance of mechanical systems

    DOEpatents

    Gardner, D.R.; Hendrickson, B.A.; Plimpton, S.J.; Attaway, S.W.; Heinstein, M.W.; Vaughan, C.T.

    1998-05-19

    A process for predicting the structural performance of a mechanical system represents the mechanical system by a plurality of surface elements. The surface elements are grouped according to their location in the volume occupied by the mechanical system so that contacts between surface elements can be efficiently located. The process is well suited for efficient practice on multiprocessor computers. 12 figs.

  3. Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impact: Consulting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A portion of the contract NAS8-38856, 'Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impacts,' from NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), included consulting which was to be documented in the final report. This attachment to the final report contains memos produced as part of that consulting.

  4. Predictive modeling of neuroanatomic structures for brain atrophy detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xintao; Guo, Lei; Nie, Jingxin; Li, Kaiming; Liu, Tianming

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we present an approach of predictive modeling of neuroanatomic structures for the detection of brain atrophy based on cross-sectional MRI image. The underlying premise of applying predictive modeling for atrophy detection is that brain atrophy is defined as significant deviation of part of the anatomy from what the remaining normal anatomy predicts for that part. The steps of predictive modeling are as follows. The central cortical surface under consideration is reconstructed from brain tissue map and Regions of Interests (ROI) on it are predicted from other reliable anatomies. The vertex pair-wise distance between the predicted vertex and the true one within the abnormal region is expected to be larger than that of the vertex in normal brain region. Change of white matter/gray matter ratio within a spherical region is used to identify the direction of vertex displacement. In this way, the severity of brain atrophy can be defined quantitatively by the displacements of those vertices. The proposed predictive modeling method has been evaluated by using both simulated atrophies and MRI images of Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Automatic prediction of facial trait judgments: appearance vs. structural models.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Mario; Masip, David; Todorov, Alexander; Vitria, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating other individuals with respect to personality characteristics plays a crucial role in human relations and it is the focus of attention for research in diverse fields such as psychology and interactive computer systems. In psychology, face perception has been recognized as a key component of this evaluation system. Multiple studies suggest that observers use face information to infer personality characteristics. Interactive computer systems are trying to take advantage of these findings and apply them to increase the natural aspect of interaction and to improve the performance of interactive computer systems. Here, we experimentally test whether the automatic prediction of facial trait judgments (e.g. dominance) can be made by using the full appearance information of the face and whether a reduced representation of its structure is sufficient. We evaluate two separate approaches: a holistic representation model using the facial appearance information and a structural model constructed from the relations among facial salient points. State of the art machine learning methods are applied to a) derive a facial trait judgment model from training data and b) predict a facial trait value for any face. Furthermore, we address the issue of whether there are specific structural relations among facial points that predict perception of facial traits. Experimental results over a set of labeled data (9 different trait evaluations) and classification rules (4 rules) suggest that a) prediction of perception of facial traits is learnable by both holistic and structural approaches; b) the most reliable prediction of facial trait judgments is obtained by certain type of holistic descriptions of the face appearance; and c) for some traits such as attractiveness and extroversion, there are relationships between specific structural features and social perceptions.

  6. Structural prediction of peptides bound to MHC class I.

    PubMed

    Fagerberg, Theres; Cerottini, Jean-Charles; Michielin, Olivier

    2006-02-17

    An ab initio structure prediction approach adapted to the peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I system is presented. Based on structure comparisons of a large set of peptide-MHC class I complexes, a molecular dynamics protocol is proposed using simulated annealing (SA) cycles to sample the conformational space of the peptide in its fixed MHC environment. A set of 14 peptide-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) A0201 and 27 peptide-non-HLA A0201 complexes for which X-ray structures are available is used to test the accuracy of the prediction method. For each complex, 1000 peptide conformers are obtained from the SA sampling. A graph theory clustering algorithm based on heavy atom root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) values is applied to the sampled conformers. The clusters are ranked using cluster size, mean effective or conformational free energies, with solvation free energies computed using Generalized Born MV 2 (GB-MV2) and Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) continuum models. The final conformation is chosen as the center of the best-ranked cluster. With conformational free energies, the overall prediction success is 83% using a 1.00 Angstroms crystal RMSD criterion for main-chain atoms, and 76% using a 1.50 Angstroms RMSD criterion for heavy atoms. The prediction success is even higher for the set of 14 peptide-HLA A0201 complexes: 100% of the peptides have main-chain RMSD values < or =1.00 Angstroms and 93% of the peptides have heavy atom RMSD values < or =1.50 Angstroms. This structure prediction method can be applied to complexes of natural or modified antigenic peptides in their MHC environment with the aim to perform rational structure-based optimizations of tumor vaccines.

  7. Behavior predicts genes structure in a wild primate group.

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, J; Alberts, S C; Haines, S A; Dubach, J; Muruthi, P; Coote, T; Geffen, E; Cheesman, D J; Mututua, R S; Saiyalel, S N; Wayne, R K; Lacy, R C; Bruford, M W

    1996-01-01

    The predictability of genetic structure from social structure and differential mating success was tested in wild baboons. Baboon populations are subdivided into cohesive social groups that include multiple adults of both sexes. As in many mammals, males are the dispersing sex. Social structure and behavior successfully predicted molecular genetic measures of relatedness and variance in reproductive success. In the first quantitative test of the priority-of-access model among wild primates, the reproductive priority of dominant males was confirmed by molecular genetic analysis. However, the resultant high short-term variance in reproductive success did not translate into equally high long-term variance because male dominance status was unstable. An important consequence of high but unstable short-term variance is that age cohorts will tend to be paternal sibships and social groups will be genetically substructured by age. PMID:8650172

  8. A dynamic programming algorithm for RNA structure prediction including pseudoknots.

    PubMed

    Rivas, E; Eddy, S R

    1999-02-01

    We describe a dynamic programming algorithm for predicting optimal RNA secondary structure, including pseudoknots. The algorithm has a worst case complexity of O(N6) in time and O(N4) in storage. The description of the algorithm is complex, which led us to adopt a useful graphical representation (Feynman diagrams) borrowed from quantum field theory. We present an implementation of the algorithm that generates the optimal minimum energy structure for a single RNA sequence, using standard RNA folding thermodynamic parameters augmented by a few parameters describing the thermodynamic stability of pseudoknots. We demonstrate the properties of the algorithm by using it to predict structures for several small pseudoknotted and non-pseudoknotted RNAs. Although the time and memory demands of the algorithm are steep, we believe this is the first algorithm to be able to fold optimal (minimum energy) pseudoknotted RNAs with the accepted RNA thermodynamic model.

  9. Structure prediction and targeted synthesis: a new Na(n)N2 diazenide crystalline structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuwen; Zunger, Alex; Trimarchi, Giancarlo

    2010-11-21

    Significant progress in theoretical and computational techniques for predicting stable crystal structures has recently begun to stimulate targeted synthesis of such predicted structures. Using a global space-group optimization (GSGO) approach that locates ground-state structures and stable stoichiometries from first-principles energy functionals by objectively starting from randomly selected lattice vectors and random atomic positions, we predict the first alkali diazenide compound Na(n)N(2), manifesting homopolar N-N bonds. The previously predicted Na(3)N structure manifests only heteropolar Na-N bonds and has positive formation enthalpy. It was calculated based on local Hartree-Fock relaxation of a fixed-structure type (Li(3)P-type) found by searching an electrostatic point-ion model. Synthesis attempts of this positive ΔH compound using activated nitrogen yielded another structure (anti-ReO(3)-type). The currently predicted (negative formation enthalpy) diazenide Na(2)N(2) completes the series of previously known BaN(2) and SrN(2) diazenides where the metal sublattice transfers charge into the empty N(2) Π(g) orbital. This points to a new class of alkali nitrides with fundamentally different bonding, i.e., homopolar rather than heteropolar bonds and, at the same time, illustrates some of the crucial subtleties and pitfalls involved in structure predictions versus planned synthesis. Attempts at synthesis of the stable Na(2)N(2) predicted here will be interesting.

  10. Predicting inclusion behaviour and framework structures in organic crystals.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J; Day, Graeme M; Jones, William

    2009-12-01

    We have used well-established computational methods to generate and explore the crystal structure landscapes of four organic molecules of well-known inclusion behaviour. Using these methods, we are able to generate both close-packed crystal structures and high-energy open frameworks containing voids of molecular dimensions. Some of these high-energy open frameworks correspond to real structures observed experimentally when the appropriate guest molecules are present during crystallisation. We propose a combination of crystal structure prediction methodologies with structure rankings based on relative lattice energy and solvent-accessible volume as a way of selecting likely inclusion frameworks completely ab initio. This methodology can be used as part of a rational strategy in the design of inclusion compounds, and also for the anticipation of inclusion behaviour in organic molecules. PMID:19876969

  11. Ionic distribution around simple B-DNA models II. Deviations from cylindrical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoro, Juan Carlos Gil; Abascal, José L. F.

    1998-10-01

    The structure of the ions around two B-DNA models with added monovalent salt at the continuum solvent level is investigated by computer simulation. The salt concentrations cover a wide range, from 0.05 to 4.5 M. The simplicity of the so-called grooved primitive model (unit electron charges at the phosphate positions of canonical DNA and the grooves shape approximated by means of simple geometric elements) enables a detailed study of the counterion and coion distributions with a very small statistical noise. The inhomogeneity of the ionic distributions is noticeable along the axial direction up to distances of about 20 Å from the DNA axis. The counterions deeply penetrate into the DNA grooves even at very low added salt concentrations. In the minor groove, the counterions are preferentially located in its center whereas they lie at the sides of the major groove, close to the phosphate positions. The coions also enter within the major groove, especially in the systems at high added salt concentrations for which regions of absolute negative charge can be found within the groove. This can be explained in terms of an arrangement of ions with alternating charges. The grooved primitive model has also been solved in the context of the finite difference Poisson-Boltzmann theory. The theory accurately describes the ionic structure around DNA at low salt concentrations but the results deteriorate with increasing salt missing important qualitative features at or above molar concentrations. The other model investigated differs from the more detailed one in that the shape of DNA is not taken into account; a soft cylinder is used instead. The counterions accumulate in this model in front of the phosphates and the axial inhomogeneity of the distribution quickly vanishes. These results together with those of previous investigations lead to the conclusion that the coupling of the discrete description of the DNA charge with the steric effects due to the presence of the grooves is

  12. Predicting protein structures with a multiplayer online game.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Seth; Khatib, Firas; Treuille, Adrien; Barbero, Janos; Lee, Jeehyung; Beenen, Michael; Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Baker, David; Popović, Zoran; Players, Foldit

    2010-08-01

    People exert large amounts of problem-solving effort playing computer games. Simple image- and text-recognition tasks have been successfully 'crowd-sourced' through games, but it is not clear if more complex scientific problems can be solved with human-directed computing. Protein structure prediction is one such problem: locating the biologically relevant native conformation of a protein is a formidable computational challenge given the very large size of the search space. Here we describe Foldit, a multiplayer online game that engages non-scientists in solving hard prediction problems. Foldit players interact with protein structures using direct manipulation tools and user-friendly versions of algorithms from the Rosetta structure prediction methodology, while they compete and collaborate to optimize the computed energy. We show that top-ranked Foldit players excel at solving challenging structure refinement problems in which substantial backbone rearrangements are necessary to achieve the burial of hydrophobic residues. Players working collaboratively develop a rich assortment of new strategies and algorithms; unlike computational approaches, they explore not only the conformational space but also the space of possible search strategies. The integration of human visual problem-solving and strategy development capabilities with traditional computational algorithms through interactive multiplayer games is a powerful new approach to solving computationally-limited scientific problems.

  13. Protein Secondary Structure Prediction Using Deep Convolutional Neural Fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Peng, Jian; Ma, Jianzhu; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-01-01

    Protein secondary structure (SS) prediction is important for studying protein structure and function. When only the sequence (profile) information is used as input feature, currently the best predictors can obtain ~80% Q3 accuracy, which has not been improved in the past decade. Here we present DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) for protein SS prediction. DeepCNF is a Deep Learning extension of Conditional Neural Fields (CNF), which is an integration of Conditional Random Fields (CRF) and shallow neural networks. DeepCNF can model not only complex sequence-structure relationship by a deep hierarchical architecture, but also interdependency between adjacent SS labels, so it is much more powerful than CNF. Experimental results show that DeepCNF can obtain ~84% Q3 accuracy, ~85% SOV score, and ~72% Q8 accuracy, respectively, on the CASP and CAMEO test proteins, greatly outperforming currently popular predictors. As a general framework, DeepCNF can be used to predict other protein structure properties such as contact number, disorder regions, and solvent accessibility. PMID:26752681

  14. Protein Secondary Structure Prediction Using Deep Convolutional Neural Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng; Peng, Jian; Ma, Jianzhu; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-01-01

    Protein secondary structure (SS) prediction is important for studying protein structure and function. When only the sequence (profile) information is used as input feature, currently the best predictors can obtain ~80% Q3 accuracy, which has not been improved in the past decade. Here we present DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) for protein SS prediction. DeepCNF is a Deep Learning extension of Conditional Neural Fields (CNF), which is an integration of Conditional Random Fields (CRF) and shallow neural networks. DeepCNF can model not only complex sequence-structure relationship by a deep hierarchical architecture, but also interdependency between adjacent SS labels, so it is much more powerful than CNF. Experimental results show that DeepCNF can obtain ~84% Q3 accuracy, ~85% SOV score, and ~72% Q8 accuracy, respectively, on the CASP and CAMEO test proteins, greatly outperforming currently popular predictors. As a general framework, DeepCNF can be used to predict other protein structure properties such as contact number, disorder regions, and solvent accessibility.

  15. Benchmark data sets for structure-based computational target prediction.

    PubMed

    Schomburg, Karen T; Rarey, Matthias

    2014-08-25

    Structure-based computational target prediction methods identify potential targets for a bioactive compound. Methods based on protein-ligand docking so far face many challenges, where the greatest probably is the ranking of true targets in a large data set of protein structures. Currently, no standard data sets for evaluation exist, rendering comparison and demonstration of improvements of methods cumbersome. Therefore, we propose two data sets and evaluation strategies for a meaningful evaluation of new target prediction methods, i.e., a small data set consisting of three target classes for detailed proof-of-concept and selectivity studies and a large data set consisting of 7992 protein structures and 72 drug-like ligands allowing statistical evaluation with performance metrics on a drug-like chemical space. Both data sets are built from openly available resources, and any information needed to perform the described experiments is reported. We describe the composition of the data sets, the setup of screening experiments, and the evaluation strategy. Performance metrics capable to measure the early recognition of enrichments like AUC, BEDROC, and NSLR are proposed. We apply a sequence-based target prediction method to the large data set to analyze its content of nontrivial evaluation cases. The proposed data sets are used for method evaluation of our new inverse screening method iRAISE. The small data set reveals the method's capability and limitations to selectively distinguish between rather similar protein structures. The large data set simulates real target identification scenarios. iRAISE achieves in 55% excellent or good enrichment a median AUC of 0.67 and RMSDs below 2.0 Å for 74% and was able to predict the first true target in 59 out of 72 cases in the top 2% of the protein data set of about 8000 structures.

  16. 3D-Fun: predicting enzyme function from structure.

    PubMed

    von Grotthuss, Marcin; Plewczynski, Dariusz; Vriend, Gert; Rychlewski, Leszek

    2008-07-01

    The 'omics' revolution is causing a flurry of data that all needs to be annotated for it to become useful. Sequences of proteins of unknown function can be annotated with a putative function by comparing them with proteins of known function. This form of annotation is typically performed with BLAST or similar software. Structural genomics is nowadays also bringing us three dimensional structures of proteins with unknown function. We present here software that can be used when sequence comparisons fail to determine the function of a protein with known structure but unknown function. The software, called 3D-Fun, is implemented as a server that runs at several European institutes and is freely available for everybody at all these sites. The 3D-Fun servers accept protein coordinates in the standard PDB format and compare them with all known protein structures by 3D structural superposition using the 3D-Hit software. If structural hits are found with proteins with known function, these are listed together with their function and some vital comparison statistics. This is conceptually very similar in 3D to what BLAST does in 1D. Additionally, the superposition results are displayed using interactive graphics facilities. Currently, the 3D-Fun system only predicts enzyme function but an expanded version with Gene Ontology predictions will be available soon. The server can be accessed at http://3dfun.bioinfo.pl/ or at http://3dfun.cmbi.ru.nl/.

  17. Virality Prediction and Community Structure in Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Lilian; Menczer, Filippo; Ahn, Yong-Yeol

    2013-01-01

    How does network structure affect diffusion? Recent studies suggest that the answer depends on the type of contagion. Complex contagions, unlike infectious diseases (simple contagions), are affected by social reinforcement and homophily. Hence, the spread within highly clustered communities is enhanced, while diffusion across communities is hampered. A common hypothesis is that memes and behaviors are complex contagions. We show that, while most memes indeed spread like complex contagions, a few viral memes spread across many communities, like diseases. We demonstrate that the future popularity of a meme can be predicted by quantifying its early spreading pattern in terms of community concentration. The more communities a meme permeates, the more viral it is. We present a practical method to translate data about community structure into predictive knowledge about what information will spread widely. This connection contributes to our understanding in computational social science, social media analytics, and marketing applications. PMID:23982106

  18. Virality Prediction and Community Structure in Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Lilian; Menczer, Filippo; Ahn, Yong-Yeol

    2013-08-01

    How does network structure affect diffusion? Recent studies suggest that the answer depends on the type of contagion. Complex contagions, unlike infectious diseases (simple contagions), are affected by social reinforcement and homophily. Hence, the spread within highly clustered communities is enhanced, while diffusion across communities is hampered. A common hypothesis is that memes and behaviors are complex contagions. We show that, while most memes indeed spread like complex contagions, a few viral memes spread across many communities, like diseases. We demonstrate that the future popularity of a meme can be predicted by quantifying its early spreading pattern in terms of community concentration. The more communities a meme permeates, the more viral it is. We present a practical method to translate data about community structure into predictive knowledge about what information will spread widely. This connection contributes to our understanding in computational social science, social media analytics, and marketing applications.

  19. Structure-Based Prediction of Protein-Folding Transition Paths.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, William M; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2016-09-01

    We propose a general theory to describe the distribution of protein-folding transition paths. We show that transition paths follow a predictable sequence of high-free-energy transient states that are separated by free-energy barriers. Each transient state corresponds to the assembly of one or more discrete, cooperative units, which are determined directly from the native structure. We show that the transition state on a folding pathway is reached when a small number of critical contacts are formed between a specific set of substructures, after which folding proceeds downhill in free energy. This approach suggests a natural resolution for distinguishing parallel folding pathways and provides a simple means to predict the rate-limiting step in a folding reaction. Our theory identifies a common folding mechanism for proteins with diverse native structures and establishes general principles for the self-assembly of polymers with specific interactions. PMID:27602721

  20. Structure-Based Prediction of Protein-Folding Transition Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, William M.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a general theory to describe the distribution of protein-folding transition paths. We show that transition paths follow a predictable sequence of high-free-energy transient states that are separated by free-energy barriers. Each transient state corresponds to the assembly of one or more discrete, cooperative units, which are determined directly from the native structure. We show that the transition state on a folding pathway is reached when a small number of critical contacts are formed between a specific set of substructures, after which folding proceeds downhill in free energy. This approach suggests a natural resolution for distinguishing parallel folding pathways and provides a simple means to predict the rate-limiting step in a folding reaction. Our theory identifies a common folding mechanism for proteins with diverse native structures and establishes general principles for the self-assembly of polymers with specific interactions.

  1. One Single Static Measurement Predicts Wave Localization in Complex Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Gondel, Alexane; Dubois, Marc; Atlan, Michael; Feppon, Florian; Labbé, Aimé; Gillot, Camille; Garelli, Alix; Ernoult, Maxence; Mayboroda, Svitlana; Filoche, Marcel; Sebbah, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    A recent theoretical breakthrough has brought a new tool, called the localization landscape, for predicting the localization regions of vibration modes in complex or disordered systems. Here, we report on the first experiment which measures the localization landscape and demonstrates its predictive power. Holographic measurement of the static deformation under uniform load of a thin plate with complex geometry provides direct access to the landscape function. When put in vibration, this system shows modes precisely confined within the subregions delineated by the landscape function. Also the maxima of this function match the measured eigenfrequencies, while the minima of the valley network gives the frequencies at which modes become extended. This approach fully characterizes the low frequency spectrum of a complex structure from a single static measurement. It paves the way for controlling and engineering eigenmodes in any vibratory system, especially where a structural or microscopic description is not accessible.

  2. Virality prediction and community structure in social networks.

    PubMed

    Weng, Lilian; Menczer, Filippo; Ahn, Yong-Yeol

    2013-01-01

    How does network structure affect diffusion? Recent studies suggest that the answer depends on the type of contagion. Complex contagions, unlike infectious diseases (simple contagions), are affected by social reinforcement and homophily. Hence, the spread within highly clustered communities is enhanced, while diffusion across communities is hampered. A common hypothesis is that memes and behaviors are complex contagions. We show that, while most memes indeed spread like complex contagions, a few viral memes spread across many communities, like diseases. We demonstrate that the future popularity of a meme can be predicted by quantifying its early spreading pattern in terms of community concentration. The more communities a meme permeates, the more viral it is. We present a practical method to translate data about community structure into predictive knowledge about what information will spread widely. This connection contributes to our understanding in computational social science, social media analytics, and marketing applications. PMID:23982106

  3. Virality prediction and community structure in social networks.

    PubMed

    Weng, Lilian; Menczer, Filippo; Ahn, Yong-Yeol

    2013-01-01

    How does network structure affect diffusion? Recent studies suggest that the answer depends on the type of contagion. Complex contagions, unlike infectious diseases (simple contagions), are affected by social reinforcement and homophily. Hence, the spread within highly clustered communities is enhanced, while diffusion across communities is hampered. A common hypothesis is that memes and behaviors are complex contagions. We show that, while most memes indeed spread like complex contagions, a few viral memes spread across many communities, like diseases. We demonstrate that the future popularity of a meme can be predicted by quantifying its early spreading pattern in terms of community concentration. The more communities a meme permeates, the more viral it is. We present a practical method to translate data about community structure into predictive knowledge about what information will spread widely. This connection contributes to our understanding in computational social science, social media analytics, and marketing applications.

  4. One Single Static Measurement Predicts Wave Localization in Complex Structures.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Gondel, Alexane; Dubois, Marc; Atlan, Michael; Feppon, Florian; Labbé, Aimé; Gillot, Camille; Garelli, Alix; Ernoult, Maxence; Mayboroda, Svitlana; Filoche, Marcel; Sebbah, Patrick

    2016-08-12

    A recent theoretical breakthrough has brought a new tool, called the localization landscape, for predicting the localization regions of vibration modes in complex or disordered systems. Here, we report on the first experiment which measures the localization landscape and demonstrates its predictive power. Holographic measurement of the static deformation under uniform load of a thin plate with complex geometry provides direct access to the landscape function. When put in vibration, this system shows modes precisely confined within the subregions delineated by the landscape function. Also the maxima of this function match the measured eigenfrequencies, while the minima of the valley network gives the frequencies at which modes become extended. This approach fully characterizes the low frequency spectrum of a complex structure from a single static measurement. It paves the way for controlling and engineering eigenmodes in any vibratory system, especially where a structural or microscopic description is not accessible. PMID:27563967

  5. Effects of scale in predicting global structural response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deo, R. B.; Kan, H. P.

    1991-01-01

    Analytical techniques for scale-up effects were reviewed. The advantages and limitations of applying the principles of similitude to composite structures is summarized and illustrated by simple examples. An analytical procedure was formulated to design scale models of an axially compressed composite cylinder. A building-block approach was outlined where each structural detail is analyzed independently and the probable failure sequence of a selected component is predicted, taking into account load redistribution subsequent to first element failure. Details of this building-block approach are under development.

  6. Protein secondary structure prediction using logic-based machine learning.

    PubMed

    Muggleton, S; King, R D; Sternberg, M J

    1992-10-01

    Many attempts have been made to solve the problem of predicting protein secondary structure from the primary sequence but the best performance results are still disappointing. In this paper, the use of a machine learning algorithm which allows relational descriptions is shown to lead to improved performance. The Inductive Logic Programming computer program, Golem, was applied to learning secondary structure prediction rules for alpha/alpha domain type proteins. The input to the program consisted of 12 non-homologous proteins (1612 residues) of known structure, together with a background knowledge describing the chemical and physical properties of the residues. Golem learned a small set of rules that predict which residues are part of the alpha-helices--based on their positional relationships and chemical and physical properties. The rules were tested on four independent non-homologous proteins (416 residues) giving an accuracy of 81% (+/- 2%). This is an improvement, on identical data, over the previously reported result of 73% by King and Sternberg (1990, J. Mol. Biol., 216, 441-457) using the machine learning program PROMIS, and of 72% using the standard Garnier-Osguthorpe-Robson method. The best previously reported result in the literature for the alpha/alpha domain type is 76%, achieved using a neural net approach. Machine learning also has the advantage over neural network and statistical methods in producing more understandable results. PMID:1480619

  7. Improved hybrid optimization algorithm for 3D protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changjun; Hou, Caixia; Wei, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-07-01

    A new improved hybrid optimization algorithm - PGATS algorithm, which is based on toy off-lattice model, is presented for dealing with three-dimensional protein structure prediction problems. The algorithm combines the particle swarm optimization (PSO), genetic algorithm (GA), and tabu search (TS) algorithms. Otherwise, we also take some different improved strategies. The factor of stochastic disturbance is joined in the particle swarm optimization to improve the search ability; the operations of crossover and mutation that are in the genetic algorithm are changed to a kind of random liner method; at last tabu search algorithm is improved by appending a mutation operator. Through the combination of a variety of strategies and algorithms, the protein structure prediction (PSP) in a 3D off-lattice model is achieved. The PSP problem is an NP-hard problem, but the problem can be attributed to a global optimization problem of multi-extremum and multi-parameters. This is the theoretical principle of the hybrid optimization algorithm that is proposed in this paper. The algorithm combines local search and global search, which overcomes the shortcoming of a single algorithm, giving full play to the advantage of each algorithm. In the current universal standard sequences, Fibonacci sequences and real protein sequences are certified. Experiments show that the proposed new method outperforms single algorithms on the accuracy of calculating the protein sequence energy value, which is proved to be an effective way to predict the structure of proteins. PMID:25069136

  8. Improving protein structure prediction using multiple sequence-based contact predictions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sitao; Szilagyi, Andras; Zhang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Summary Although residue-residue contact maps dictate the topology of proteins, sequence-based ab initio contact predictions have been found little use in actual structure prediction due to the low accuracy. We developed a composite set of nine SVM-based contact predictors which are used in I-TASSER simulation in combination with sparse template contact restraints. When testing the strategy on 273 non-homologous targets, remarkable improvements of I-TASSER models were observed for both easy and hard targets, with P-value by student s t-test below 0.00001 and 0.001, respectively. In several cases, TM-score increases by >30%, which essentially converts “non-foldable” targets into “foldable” ones. In CASP9, I-TASSER employed ab initio contact predictions, and generated models for 26 FM targets with a GDT-score 16% and 44% higher than the second and third best servers from other groups, respectively. These findings demonstrate a new avenue to improve the accuracy of protein structure prediction especially for free-modeling targets. PMID:21827953

  9. Sequence-only evolutionary and predicted structural features for the prediction of stability changes in protein mutants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Even a single amino acid substitution in a protein sequence may result in significant changes in protein stability, structure, and therefore in protein function as well. In the post-genomic era, computational methods for predicting stability changes from only the sequence of a protein are of importance. While evolutionary relationships of protein mutations can be extracted from large protein databases holding millions of protein sequences, relevant evolutionary features for the prediction of stability changes have not been proposed. Also, the use of predicted structural features in situations when a protein structure is not available has not been explored. Results We proposed a number of evolutionary and predicted structural features for the prediction of stability changes and analysed which of them capture the determinants of protein stability the best. We trained and evaluated our machine learning method on a non-redundant data set of experimentally measured stability changes. When only the direction of the stability change was predicted, we found that the best performance improvement can be achieved by the combination of the evolutionary features mutation likelihood and SIFTscore in conjunction with the predicted structural feature secondary structure. The same two evolutionary features in the combination with the predicted structural feature accessible surface area achieved the lowest error when the prediction of actual values of stability changes was assessed. Compared to similar studies, our method achieved improvements in prediction performance. Conclusion Although the strongest feature for the prediction of stability changes appears to be the vector of amino acid identities in the sequential neighbourhood of the mutation, the most relevant combination of evolutionary and predicted structural features further improves prediction performance. Even the predicted structural features, which did not perform well on their own, turn out to be beneficial

  10. Graphlet kernels for prediction of functional residues in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Vacic, Vladimir; Iakoucheva, Lilia M; Lonardi, Stefano; Radivojac, Predrag

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a novel graph-based kernel method for annotating functional residues in protein structures. A structure is first modeled as a protein contact graph, where nodes correspond to residues and edges connect spatially neighboring residues. Each vertex in the graph is then represented as a vector of counts of labeled non-isomorphic subgraphs (graphlets), centered on the vertex of interest. A similarity measure between two vertices is expressed as the inner product of their respective count vectors and is used in a supervised learning framework to classify protein residues. We evaluated our method on two function prediction problems: identification of catalytic residues in proteins, which is a well-studied problem suitable for benchmarking, and a much less explored problem of predicting phosphorylation sites in protein structures. The performance of the graphlet kernel approach was then compared against two alternative methods, a sequence-based predictor and our implementation of the FEATURE framework. On both tasks, the graphlet kernel performed favorably; however, the margin of difference was considerably higher on the problem of phosphorylation site prediction. While there is data that phosphorylation sites are preferentially positioned in intrinsically disordered regions, we provide evidence that for the sites that are located in structured regions, neither the surface accessibility alone nor the averaged measures calculated from the residue microenvironments utilized by FEATURE were sufficient to achieve high accuracy. The key benefit of the graphlet representation is its ability to capture neighborhood similarities in protein structures via enumerating the patterns of local connectivity in the corresponding labeled graphs.

  11. How Good Are Simplified Models for Protein Structure Prediction?

    PubMed Central

    Newton, M. A. Hakim; Rashid, Mahmood A.; Pham, Duc Nghia; Sattar, Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Protein structure prediction (PSP) has been one of the most challenging problems in computational biology for several decades. The challenge is largely due to the complexity of the all-atomic details and the unknown nature of the energy function. Researchers have therefore used simplified energy models that consider interaction potentials only between the amino acid monomers in contact on discrete lattices. The restricted nature of the lattices and the energy models poses a twofold concern regarding the assessment of the models. Can a native or a very close structure be obtained when structures are mapped to lattices? Can the contact based energy models on discrete lattices guide the search towards the native structures? In this paper, we use the protein chain lattice fitting (PCLF) problem to address the first concern; we developed a constraint-based local search algorithm for the PCLF problem for cubic and face-centered cubic lattices and found very close lattice fits for the native structures. For the second concern, we use a number of techniques to sample the conformation space and find correlations between energy functions and root mean square deviation (RMSD) distance of the lattice-based structures with the native structures. Our analysis reveals weakness of several contact based energy models used that are popular in PSP. PMID:24876837

  12. Structure Prediction: New Insights into Decrypting Long Noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Kun; Arfat, Yasir; Li, Dijie; Zhao, Fan; Chen, Zhihao; Yin, Chong; Sun, Yulong; Hu, Lifang; Yang, Tuanmin; Qian, Airong

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which form a diverse class of RNAs, remain the least understood type of noncoding RNAs in terms of their nature and identification. Emerging evidence has revealed that a small number of newly discovered lncRNAs perform important and complex biological functions such as dosage compensation, chromatin regulation, genomic imprinting, and nuclear organization. However, understanding the wide range of functions of lncRNAs related to various processes of cellular networks remains a great experimental challenge. Structural versatility is critical for RNAs to perform various functions and provides new insights into probing the functions of lncRNAs. In recent years, the computational method of RNA structure prediction has been developed to analyze the structure of lncRNAs. This novel methodology has provided basic but indispensable information for the rapid, large-scale and in-depth research of lncRNAs. This review focuses on mainstream RNA structure prediction methods at the secondary and tertiary levels to offer an additional approach to investigating the functions of lncRNAs. PMID:26805815

  13. Functional structure of biological communities predicts ecosystem multifunctionality.

    PubMed

    Mouillot, David; Villéger, Sébastien; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Mason, Norman W H

    2011-01-01

    The accelerating rate of change in biodiversity patterns, mediated by ever increasing human pressures and global warming, demands a better understanding of the relationship between the structure of biological communities and ecosystem functioning (BEF). Recent investigations suggest that the functional structure of communities, i.e. the composition and diversity of functional traits, is the main driver of ecological processes. However, the predictive power of BEF research is still low, the integration of all components of functional community structure as predictors is still lacking, and the multifunctionality of ecosystems (i.e. rates of multiple processes) must be considered. Here, using a multiple-processes framework from grassland biodiversity experiments, we show that functional identity of species and functional divergence among species, rather than species diversity per se, together promote the level of ecosystem multifunctionality with a predictive power of 80%. Our results suggest that primary productivity and decomposition rates, two key ecosystem processes upon which the global carbon cycle depends, are primarily sustained by specialist species, i.e. those that hold specialized combinations of traits and perform particular functions. Contrary to studies focusing on single ecosystem functions and considering species richness as the sole measure of biodiversity, we found a linear and non-saturating effect of the functional structure of communities on ecosystem multifunctionality. Thus, sustaining multiple ecological processes would require focusing on trait dominance and on the degree of community specialization, even in species-rich assemblages.

  14. EVO—Evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahmann, Silvia; Kortus, Jens

    2013-06-01

    We present EVO—an evolution strategy designed for crystal structure search and prediction. The concept and main features of biological evolution such as creation of diversity and survival of the fittest have been transferred to crystal structure prediction. EVO successfully demonstrates its applicability to find crystal structures of the elements of the 3rd main group with their different spacegroups. For this we used the number of atoms in the conventional cell and multiples of it. Running EVO with different numbers of carbon atoms per unit cell yields graphite as the lowest energy structure as well as a diamond-like structure, both in one run. Our implementation also supports the search for 2D structures and was able to find a boron sheet with structural features so far not considered in literature. Program summaryProgram title: EVO Catalogue identifier: AEOZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 23488 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1830122 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python. Computer: No limitations known. Operating system: Linux. RAM: Negligible compared to the requirements of the electronic structure programs used Classification: 7.8. External routines: Quantum ESPRESSO (http://www.quantum-espresso.org/), GULP (https://projects.ivec.org/gulp/) Nature of problem: Crystal structure search is a global optimisation problem in 3N+3 dimensions where N is the number of atoms in the unit cell. The high dimensional search space is accompanied by an unknown energy landscape. Solution method: Evolutionary algorithms transfer the main features of biological evolution to use them in global searches. The combination of the "survival of the fittest" (deterministic) and the

  15. Prediction of three-dimensional transmembrane helical protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Patrick

    Membrane proteins are critical to living cells and their dysfunction can lead to serious diseases. High-resolution structures of these proteins would provide very valuable information for designing eficient therapies but membrane protein crystallization is a major bottleneck. As an important alternative approach, methods for predicting membrane protein structures have been developed in recent years. This chapter focuses on the problem of modeling the structure of transmembrane helical proteins, and describes recent advancements, current limitations, and future challenges facing de novo modeling, modeling with experimental constraints, and high-resolution comparative modeling of these proteins. Abbreviations: MP, membrane protein; SP, water-soluble protein; RMSD, root-mean square deviation; Cα RMSD, root-mean square deviation over Cα atoms; TM, transmembrane; TMH, transmembrane helix; GPCR, G protein-coupled receptor; 3D, three dimensional; NMR, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; EPR, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy; FTIR, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  16. Predicting the stability of large structured food webs.

    PubMed

    Allesina, Stefano; Grilli, Jacopo; Barabás, György; Tang, Si; Aljadeff, Johnatan; Maritan, Amos

    2015-01-01

    The stability of ecological systems has been a long-standing focus of ecology. Recently, tools from random matrix theory have identified the main drivers of stability in ecological communities whose network structure is random. However, empirical food webs differ greatly from random graphs. For example, their degree distribution is broader, they contain few trophic cycles, and they are almost interval. Here we derive an approximation for the stability of food webs whose structure is generated by the cascade model, in which 'larger' species consume 'smaller' ones. We predict the stability of these food webs with great accuracy, and our approximation also works well for food webs whose structure is determined empirically or by the niche model. We find that intervality and broad degree distributions tend to stabilize food webs, and that average interaction strength has little influence on stability, compared with the effect of variance and correlation. PMID:26198207

  17. Predicting the stability of large structured food webs

    PubMed Central

    Allesina, Stefano; Grilli, Jacopo; Barabás, György; Tang, Si; Aljadeff, Johnatan; Maritan, Amos

    2015-01-01

    The stability of ecological systems has been a long-standing focus of ecology. Recently, tools from random matrix theory have identified the main drivers of stability in ecological communities whose network structure is random. However, empirical food webs differ greatly from random graphs. For example, their degree distribution is broader, they contain few trophic cycles, and they are almost interval. Here we derive an approximation for the stability of food webs whose structure is generated by the cascade model, in which ‘larger' species consume ‘smaller' ones. We predict the stability of these food webs with great accuracy, and our approximation also works well for food webs whose structure is determined empirically or by the niche model. We find that intervality and broad degree distributions tend to stabilize food webs, and that average interaction strength has little influence on stability, compared with the effect of variance and correlation. PMID:26198207

  18. Predicting the stability of large structured food webs.

    PubMed

    Allesina, Stefano; Grilli, Jacopo; Barabás, György; Tang, Si; Aljadeff, Johnatan; Maritan, Amos

    2015-07-22

    The stability of ecological systems has been a long-standing focus of ecology. Recently, tools from random matrix theory have identified the main drivers of stability in ecological communities whose network structure is random. However, empirical food webs differ greatly from random graphs. For example, their degree distribution is broader, they contain few trophic cycles, and they are almost interval. Here we derive an approximation for the stability of food webs whose structure is generated by the cascade model, in which 'larger' species consume 'smaller' ones. We predict the stability of these food webs with great accuracy, and our approximation also works well for food webs whose structure is determined empirically or by the niche model. We find that intervality and broad degree distributions tend to stabilize food webs, and that average interaction strength has little influence on stability, compared with the effect of variance and correlation.

  19. Predicting modes of toxic action from chemical structure: an overview.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, S P

    1994-01-01

    In the field of environmental toxicology, and especially aquatic toxicology, quantitative structure activity relationships (QSARs) have developed as scientifically-credible tools for predicting the toxicity of chemicals when little or no empirical data are available. A basic and fundamental understanding of toxicological principles has been considered crucial to the continued acceptance and application of these techniques as biologically relevant. As a consequence, there has been an evolution of QSAR development and application from that of a chemical-class perspective to one that is more consistent with assumptions regarding modes of toxic action. The assessment of a compound's likely mode of toxic action is critical for a correct QSAR selection; incorrect mode of action-based QSAR selections can result in 10- to 1000-fold errors in toxicity predictions. The establishment of toxicologically-credible techniques to assess mode of toxic action from chemical structure requires toxicodynamic knowledge bases that are clearly defined with regard to exposure regimes and biological models/endpoints and based on compounds that adequately span the diversity of chemicals anticipated for future applications. With such knowledge bases classification systems, including rule-based experts systems, have been established for use in predictive aquatic toxicology applications. PMID:8790641

  20. RNAex: an RNA secondary structure prediction server enhanced by high-throughput structure-probing data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Qu, Rihao; Huang, Yiming; Shi, Binbin; Liu, Mengrong; Li, Yang; Lu, Zhi John

    2016-07-01

    Several high-throughput technologies have been developed to probe RNA base pairs and loops at the transcriptome level in multiple species. However, to obtain the final RNA secondary structure, extensive effort and considerable expertise is required to statistically process the probing data and combine them with free energy models. Therefore, we developed an RNA secondary structure prediction server that is enhanced by experimental data (RNAex). RNAex is a web interface that enables non-specialists to easily access cutting-edge structure-probing data and predict RNA secondary structures enhanced by in vivo and in vitro data. RNAex annotates the RNA editing, RNA modification and SNP sites on the predicted structures. It provides four structure-folding methods, restrained MaxExpect, SeqFold, RNAstructure (Fold) and RNAfold that can be selected by the user. The performance of these four folding methods has been verified by previous publications on known structures. We re-mapped the raw sequencing data of the probing experiments to the whole genome for each species. RNAex thus enables users to predict secondary structures for both known and novel RNA transcripts in human, mouse, yeast and Arabidopsis The RNAex web server is available at http://RNAex.ncrnalab.org/.

  1. RNAex: an RNA secondary structure prediction server enhanced by high-throughput structure-probing data

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yang; Qu, Rihao; Huang, Yiming; Shi, Binbin; Liu, Mengrong; Li, Yang; Lu, Zhi John

    2016-01-01

    Several high-throughput technologies have been developed to probe RNA base pairs and loops at the transcriptome level in multiple species. However, to obtain the final RNA secondary structure, extensive effort and considerable expertise is required to statistically process the probing data and combine them with free energy models. Therefore, we developed an RNA secondary structure prediction server that is enhanced by experimental data (RNAex). RNAex is a web interface that enables non-specialists to easily access cutting-edge structure-probing data and predict RNA secondary structures enhanced by in vivo and in vitro data. RNAex annotates the RNA editing, RNA modification and SNP sites on the predicted structures. It provides four structure-folding methods, restrained MaxExpect, SeqFold, RNAstructure (Fold) and RNAfold that can be selected by the user. The performance of these four folding methods has been verified by previous publications on known structures. We re-mapped the raw sequencing data of the probing experiments to the whole genome for each species. RNAex thus enables users to predict secondary structures for both known and novel RNA transcripts in human, mouse, yeast and Arabidopsis. The RNAex web server is available at http://RNAex.ncrnalab.org/. PMID:27137891

  2. Addressing the Role of Conformational Diversity in Protein Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Palopoli, Nicolas; Monzon, Alexander Miguel; Parisi, Gustavo; Fornasari, Maria Silvina

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of tertiary structures has become of standard use to study proteins that lack experimental characterization. Unfortunately, 3D structure prediction methods and model quality assessment programs often overlook that an ensemble of conformers in equilibrium populates the native state of proteins. In this work we collected sets of publicly available protein models and the corresponding target structures experimentally solved and studied how they describe the conformational diversity of the protein. For each protein, we assessed the quality of the models against known conformers by several standard measures and identified those models ranked best. We found that model rankings are defined by both the selected target conformer and the similarity measure used. 70% of the proteins in our datasets show that different models are structurally closest to different conformers of the same protein target. We observed that model building protocols such as template-based or ab initio approaches describe in similar ways the conformational diversity of the protein, although for template-based methods this description may depend on the sequence similarity between target and template sequences. Taken together, our results support the idea that protein structure modeling could help to identify members of the native ensemble, highlight the importance of considering conformational diversity in protein 3D quality evaluations and endorse the study of the variability of the native structure for a meaningful biological analysis. PMID:27159429

  3. Addressing the Role of Conformational Diversity in Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Gustavo; Fornasari, Maria Silvina

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of tertiary structures has become of standard use to study proteins that lack experimental characterization. Unfortunately, 3D structure prediction methods and model quality assessment programs often overlook that an ensemble of conformers in equilibrium populates the native state of proteins. In this work we collected sets of publicly available protein models and the corresponding target structures experimentally solved and studied how they describe the conformational diversity of the protein. For each protein, we assessed the quality of the models against known conformers by several standard measures and identified those models ranked best. We found that model rankings are defined by both the selected target conformer and the similarity measure used. 70% of the proteins in our datasets show that different models are structurally closest to different conformers of the same protein target. We observed that model building protocols such as template-based or ab initio approaches describe in similar ways the conformational diversity of the protein, although for template-based methods this description may depend on the sequence similarity between target and template sequences. Taken together, our results support the idea that protein structure modeling could help to identify members of the native ensemble, highlight the importance of considering conformational diversity in protein 3D quality evaluations and endorse the study of the variability of the native structure for a meaningful biological analysis. PMID:27159429

  4. FOURIER ANALYSIS OF EXTENDED FINE STRUCTURE WITH AUTOREGRESSIVE PREDICTION

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.; Shirley, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Autoregressive prediction is adapted to double the resolution of Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) Fourier transforms. Even with the optimal taper (weighting function), the commonly used taper-and-transform Fourier method has limited resolution: it assumes the signal is zero beyond the limits of the measurement. By seeking the Fourier spectrum of an infinite extent oscillation consistent with the measurements but otherwise having maximum entropy, the errors caused by finite data range can be reduced. Our procedure developed to implement this concept applies autoregressive prediction to extrapolate the signal to an extent controlled by a taper width. Difficulties encountered when processing actual ARPEFS data are discussed. A key feature of this approach is the ability to convert improved measurements (signal-to-noise or point density) into improved Fourier resolution.

  5. Cortical structure predicts success in performing musical transformation judgments.

    PubMed

    Foster, Nicholas E V; Zatorre, Robert J

    2010-10-15

    Recognizing melodies by their interval structure, or "relative pitch," is a fundamental aspect of musical perception. By using relative pitch, we are able to recognize tunes regardless of the key in which they are played. We sought to determine the cortical areas important for relative pitch processing using two morphometric techniques. Cortical differences have been reported in musicians within right auditory cortex (AC), a region considered important for pitch-based processing, and we have previously reported a functional correlation between relative pitch processing in the anterior intraparietal sulcus (IPS). We addressed the hypothesis that regional variation of cortical structure within AC and IPS is related to relative pitch ability using two anatomical techniques, cortical thickness (CT) analysis and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of magnetic resonance imaging data. Persons with variable amounts of formal musical training were tested on a melody transposition task, as well as two musical control tasks and a speech control task. We found that gray matter concentration and cortical thickness in right Heschl's sulcus and bilateral IPS both predicted relative pitch task performance and correlated to a lesser extent with performance on the two musical control tasks. After factoring out variance explained by musical training, only relative pitch performance was predicted by cortical structure in these regions. These results directly demonstrate the functional relevance of previously reported anatomical differences in the auditory cortex of musicians. The findings in the IPS provide further support for the existence of a multimodal network for systematic transformation of stimulus information in this region. PMID:20600982

  6. ArchPRED: a template based loop structure prediction server.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Zhai, Jun; Fiser, András

    2006-07-01

    ArchPRED server (http://www.fiserlab.org/servers/archpred) implements a novel fragment-search based method for predicting loop conformations. The inputs to the server are the atomic coordinates of the query protein and the position of the loop. The algorithm selects candidate loop fragments from a regularly updated loop library (Search Space) by matching the length, the types of bracing secondary structures of the query and by satisfying the geometrical restraints imposed by the stem residues. Subsequently, candidate loops are inserted in the query protein framework where their side chains are rebuilt and their fit is assessed by the root mean square deviation (r.m.s.d.) of stem regions and by the number of rigid body clashes with the environment. In the final step remaining candidate loops are ranked by a Z-score that combines information on sequence similarity and fit of predicted and observed [/psi] main chain dihedral angle propensities. The final loop conformation is built in the protein structure and annealed in the environment using conjugate gradient minimization. The prediction method was benchmarked on artificially prepared search datasets where all trivial sequence similarities on the SCOP superfamily level were removed. Under these conditions it was possible to predict loops of length 4, 8 and 12 with coverage of 98, 78 and 28% with at least of 0.22, 1.38 and 2.47 A of r.m.s.d. accuracy, respectively. In a head to head comparison on loops extracted from freshly deposited new protein folds the current method outperformed in a approximately 5:1 ratio an earlier developed database search method. PMID:16844985

  7. Integrating chemical footprinting data into RNA secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Zarringhalam, Kourosh; Meyer, Michelle M; Dotu, Ivan; Chuang, Jeffrey H; Clote, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Chemical and enzymatic footprinting experiments, such as shape (selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension), yield important information about RNA secondary structure. Indeed, since the [Formula: see text]-hydroxyl is reactive at flexible (loop) regions, but unreactive at base-paired regions, shape yields quantitative data about which RNA nucleotides are base-paired. Recently, low error rates in secondary structure prediction have been reported for three RNAs of moderate size, by including base stacking pseudo-energy terms derived from shape data into the computation of minimum free energy secondary structure. Here, we describe a novel method, RNAsc (RNA soft constraints), which includes pseudo-energy terms for each nucleotide position, rather than only for base stacking positions. We prove that RNAsc is self-consistent, in the sense that the nucleotide-specific probabilities of being unpaired in the low energy Boltzmann ensemble always become more closely correlated with the input shape data after application of RNAsc. From this mathematical perspective, the secondary structure predicted by RNAsc should be 'correct', in as much as the shape data is 'correct'. We benchmark RNAsc against the previously mentioned method for eight RNAs, for which both shape data and native structures are known, to find the same accuracy in 7 out of 8 cases, and an improvement of 25% in one case. Furthermore, we present what appears to be the first direct comparison of shape data and in-line probing data, by comparing yeast asp-tRNA shape data from the literature with data from in-line probing experiments we have recently performed. With respect to several criteria, we find that shape data appear to be more robust than in-line probing data, at least in the case of asp-tRNA.

  8. Tailor-made force fields for crystal-structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Marcus A

    2008-08-14

    A general procedure is presented to derive a complete set of force-field parameters for flexible molecules in the crystalline state on a case-by-case basis. The force-field parameters are fitted to the electrostatic potential as well as to accurate energies and forces generated by means of a hybrid method that combines solid-state density functional theory (DFT) calculations with an empirical van der Waals correction. All DFT calculations are carried out with the VASP program. The mathematical structure of the force field, the generation of reference data, the choice of the figure of merit, the optimization algorithm, and the parameter-refinement strategy are discussed in detail. The approach is applied to cyclohexane-1,4-dione, a small flexible ring. The tailor-made force field obtained for cyclohexane-1,4-dione is used to search for low-energy crystal packings in all 230 space groups with one molecule per asymmetric unit, and the most stable crystal structures are reoptimized in a second step with the hybrid method. The experimental crystal structure is found as the most stable predicted crystal structure both with the tailor-made force field and the hybrid method. The same methodology has also been applied successfully to the four compounds of the fourth CCDC blind test on crystal-structure prediction. For the five aforementioned compounds, the root-mean-square deviations between lattice energies calculated with the tailor-made force fields and the hybrid method range from 0.024 to 0.053 kcal/mol per atom around an average value of 0.034 kcal/mol per atom.

  9. Tailor-made force fields for crystal-structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Marcus A

    2008-08-14

    A general procedure is presented to derive a complete set of force-field parameters for flexible molecules in the crystalline state on a case-by-case basis. The force-field parameters are fitted to the electrostatic potential as well as to accurate energies and forces generated by means of a hybrid method that combines solid-state density functional theory (DFT) calculations with an empirical van der Waals correction. All DFT calculations are carried out with the VASP program. The mathematical structure of the force field, the generation of reference data, the choice of the figure of merit, the optimization algorithm, and the parameter-refinement strategy are discussed in detail. The approach is applied to cyclohexane-1,4-dione, a small flexible ring. The tailor-made force field obtained for cyclohexane-1,4-dione is used to search for low-energy crystal packings in all 230 space groups with one molecule per asymmetric unit, and the most stable crystal structures are reoptimized in a second step with the hybrid method. The experimental crystal structure is found as the most stable predicted crystal structure both with the tailor-made force field and the hybrid method. The same methodology has also been applied successfully to the four compounds of the fourth CCDC blind test on crystal-structure prediction. For the five aforementioned compounds, the root-mean-square deviations between lattice energies calculated with the tailor-made force fields and the hybrid method range from 0.024 to 0.053 kcal/mol per atom around an average value of 0.034 kcal/mol per atom. PMID:18642947

  10. Structure prediction and analysis of neuraminidase sequence variants.

    PubMed

    Thayer, Kelly M

    2016-07-01

    Analyzing protein structure has become an integral aspect of understanding systems of biochemical import. The laboratory experiment endeavors to introduce protein folding to ascertain structures of proteins for which the structure is unavailable, as well as to critically evaluate the quality of the prediction obtained. The model system used is the highly mutable influenza virus protein neuraminidase, which is the key target in the development of therapeutics. In light of recent pandemics, understanding how mutations confer drug resistance, which translates at the molecular level to understanding how different sequence variants differ, constitutes an area of great interest because of the ramifications in public health. This lab targets upper level undergraduate biochemistry students, and aims to introduce tools to be used to explore protein folding and protein visualization in the context of the neuraminidase case study. Students proceed to critically evaluate the folded models by comparison with crystallographic structures. When validity is established, they fold a neuraminidase sequence for which a structure is not available. Through structural alignment and visual inspection of the 150 loop, students gain molecular insight into two possible conformations of the protein, which are actively being studied. Folding the third chosen sequence mimics a true research environment in allowing students to generate a structure from a sequence for which a structure was not previously available, and to assess whether their particular variant has an open or closed loop. From this vantage, they are then challenged to speculate about the connection between loop conformation and drug susceptibility. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):361-376, 2016. PMID:26900942

  11. Structural brain MRI trait polygenic score prediction of cognitive abilities

    PubMed Central

    Luciano, Michelle; Marioni, Riccardo E; Hernández, Maria Valdés; Maniega, Susana Munoz; Hamilton, Iona F; Royle, Natalie A.; Scotland, Generation; Chauhan, Ganesh; Bis, Joshua C.; Debette, Stephanie; DeCarli, Charles; Fornage, Myriam; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ikram, M. Arfan; Launer, Lenore J.; Seshadri, Sudha; Bastin, Mark E.; Porteous, David J.; Wardlaw, Joanna; Deary, Ian J

    2016-01-01

    Structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) traits share part of their genetic variance with cognitive traits. Here, we use genetic association results from large meta-analytic studies of genome-wide association for brain infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, intracranial, hippocampal and total brain volumes to estimate polygenic scores for these traits in three Scottish samples: Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS), and the Lothian Birth Cohorts of 1936 (LBC1936) and 1921 (LBC1921). These five brain MRI trait polygenic scores were then used to 1) predict corresponding MRI traits in the LBC1936 (numbers ranged 573 to 630 across traits) and 2) predict cognitive traits in all three cohorts (in 8,115 to 8,250 persons). In the LBC1936, all MRI phenotypic traits were correlated with at least one cognitive measure; and polygenic prediction of MRI traits was observed for intracranial volume. Meta-analysis of the correlations between MRI polygenic scores and cognitive traits revealed a significant negative correlation (maximal r=0.08) between the hippocampal volume polygenic score and measures of global cognitive ability collected in childhood and in old age in the Lothian Birth Cohorts. The lack of association to a related general cognitive measure when including the GS:SFHS points to either type 1 error or the importance of using prediction samples that closely match the demographics of the genome-wide association samples from which prediction is based. Ideally, these analyses should be repeated in larger samples with data on both MRI and cognition, and using MRI GWA results from even larger meta-analysis studies. PMID:26427786

  12. Translocation and deletion breakpoints in cancer genomes are associated with potential non-B DNA-forming sequences.

    PubMed

    Bacolla, Albino; Tainer, John A; Vasquez, Karen M; Cooper, David N

    2016-07-01

    Gross chromosomal rearrangements (including translocations, deletions, insertions and duplications) are a hallmark of cancer genomes and often create oncogenic fusion genes. An obligate step in the generation of such gross rearrangements is the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Since the genomic distribution of rearrangement breakpoints is non-random, intrinsic cellular factors may predispose certain genomic regions to breakage. Notably, certain DNA sequences with the potential to fold into secondary structures [potential non-B DNA structures (PONDS); e.g. triplexes, quadruplexes, hairpin/cruciforms, Z-DNA and single-stranded looped-out structures with implications in DNA replication and transcription] can stimulate the formation of DNA DSBs. Here, we tested the postulate that these DNA sequences might be found at, or in close proximity to, rearrangement breakpoints. By analyzing the distribution of PONDS-forming sequences within ±500 bases of 19 947 translocation and 46 365 sequence-characterized deletion breakpoints in cancer genomes, we find significant association between PONDS-forming repeats and cancer breakpoints. Specifically, (AT)n, (GAA)n and (GAAA)n constitute the most frequent repeats at translocation breakpoints, whereas A-tracts occur preferentially at deletion breakpoints. Translocation breakpoints near PONDS-forming repeats also recur in different individuals and patient tumor samples. Hence, PONDS-forming sequences represent an intrinsic risk factor for genomic rearrangements in cancer genomes. PMID:27084947

  13. Translocation and deletion breakpoints in cancer genomes are associated with potential non-B DNA-forming sequences

    PubMed Central

    Bacolla, Albino; Tainer, John A.; Vasquez, Karen M.; Cooper, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Gross chromosomal rearrangements (including translocations, deletions, insertions and duplications) are a hallmark of cancer genomes and often create oncogenic fusion genes. An obligate step in the generation of such gross rearrangements is the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Since the genomic distribution of rearrangement breakpoints is non-random, intrinsic cellular factors may predispose certain genomic regions to breakage. Notably, certain DNA sequences with the potential to fold into secondary structures [potential non-B DNA structures (PONDS); e.g. triplexes, quadruplexes, hairpin/cruciforms, Z-DNA and single-stranded looped-out structures with implications in DNA replication and transcription] can stimulate the formation of DNA DSBs. Here, we tested the postulate that these DNA sequences might be found at, or in close proximity to, rearrangement breakpoints. By analyzing the distribution of PONDS-forming sequences within ±500 bases of 19 947 translocation and 46 365 sequence-characterized deletion breakpoints in cancer genomes, we find significant association between PONDS-forming repeats and cancer breakpoints. Specifically, (AT)n, (GAA)n and (GAAA)n constitute the most frequent repeats at translocation breakpoints, whereas A-tracts occur preferentially at deletion breakpoints. Translocation breakpoints near PONDS-forming repeats also recur in different individuals and patient tumor samples. Hence, PONDS-forming sequences represent an intrinsic risk factor for genomic rearrangements in cancer genomes. PMID:27084947

  14. Structure prediction and targeted synthesis: a new NanN2 diazenide crystalline structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiuwen; Zunger, Alex; Trimarchi, Giancarlo

    2010-01-01

    Significant progress in theoretical and computational techniques for predicting stable crystal structures has recently begun to stimulate targeted synthesis of such predicted structures. Using a global space-group optimization (GSGO) approach that locates ground-statestructures and stable stoichiometries from first-principles energy functionals by objectively starting from randomly selected lattice vectors and random atomic positions, we predict the first alkali diazenide compound Na{sub n} N{sub 2} , manifesting homopolar N–N bonds. The previously predicted Na{sub 3} N structure manifests only heteropolar Na–N bonds and has positive formation enthalpy. It was calculated based on local Hartree–Fock relaxation of a fixed-structure type (Li{sub 3} P -type) found by searching an electrostatic point-ion model. Synthesis attempts of this positive ΔH compound using activated nitrogen yielded another structure (anti-ReO{sub 3} -type). The currently predicted (negative formation enthalpy) diazenide Na{sub 2} N{sub 2} completes the series of previously known BaN{sub 2} and SrN{sub 2} diazenides where the metal sublattice transfers charge into the empty N{sub 2} Π{sub g} orbital. This points to a new class of alkali nitrides with fundamentally different bonding, i.e., homopolar rather than heteropolar bonds and, at the same time, illustrates some of the crucial subtleties and pitfalls involved in structure predictions versus planned synthesis. Attempts at synthesis of the stable Na{sub 2} N{sub 2} predicted here will be interesting.

  15. Failure prediction of thin beryllium sheets used in spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roschke, Paul N.; Papados, Photios; Mascorro, Edward

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to predict failure for cross-rolled beryllium sheet structures, high order macroscopic failure criteria are used. These require the knowledge of in-plane uniaxial and shear strengths. Test results are included for in-plane biaxial tension, uniaxial compression for two different material orientations, and shear. All beryllium specimens have the same chemical composition. In addition, all experimental work was performed in a controlled laboratory environment. Numerical simulation complements these tests. A brief bibliography supplements references listed in a previous report.

  16. The sequential structure of brain activation predicts skill.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John R; Bothell, Daniel; Fincham, Jon M; Moon, Jungaa

    2016-01-29

    In an fMRI study, participants were trained to play a complex video game. They were scanned early and then again after substantial practice. While better players showed greater activation in one region (right dorsal striatum) their relative skill was better diagnosed by considering the sequential structure of whole brain activation. Using a cognitive model that played this game, we extracted a characterization of the mental states that are involved in playing a game and the statistical structure of the transitions among these states. There was a strong correspondence between this measure of sequential structure and the skill of different players. Using multi-voxel pattern analysis, it was possible to recognize, with relatively high accuracy, the cognitive states participants were in during particular scans. We used the sequential structure of these activation-recognized states to predict the skill of individual players. These findings indicate that important features about information-processing strategies can be identified from a model-based analysis of the sequential structure of brain activation. PMID:26707716

  17. Computer-aided prediction of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed Central

    Auron, P E; Rindone, W P; Vary, C P; Celentano, J J; Vournakis, J N

    1982-01-01

    A brief survey of computer algorithms that have been developed to generate predictions of the secondary structures of RNA molecules is presented. Two particular methods are described in some detail. The first utilizes a thermodynamic energy minimization algorithm that takes into account the likelihood that short-range folding tends to be favored over long-range interactions. The second utilizes an interactive computer graphic modelling algorithm that enables the user to consider thermodynamic criteria as well as structural data obtained by nuclease susceptibility, chemical reactivity and phylogenetic studies. Examples of structures for prokaryotic 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs, several eukaryotic 5S ribosomal RNAs and rabbit beta-globin messenger RNA are presented as case studies in order to describe the two techniques. Anm argument is made for integrating the two approaches presented in this paper, enabling the user to generate proposed structures using thermodynamic criteria, allowing interactive refinement of these structures through the application of experimentally derived data. PMID:6174937

  18. Offspring social network structure predicts fitness in families

    PubMed Central

    Royle, Nick J.; Pike, Thomas W.; Heeb, Philipp; Richner, Heinz; Kölliker, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Social structures such as families emerge as outcomes of behavioural interactions among individuals, and can evolve over time if families with particular types of social structures tend to leave more individuals in subsequent generations. The social behaviour of interacting individuals is typically analysed as a series of multiple dyadic (pair-wise) interactions, rather than a network of interactions among multiple individuals. However, in species where parents feed dependant young, interactions within families nearly always involve more than two individuals simultaneously. Such social networks of interactions at least partly reflect conflicts of interest over the provision of costly parental investment. Consequently, variation in family network structure reflects variation in how conflicts of interest are resolved among family members. Despite its importance in understanding the evolution of emergent properties of social organization such as family life and cooperation, nothing is currently known about how selection acts on the structure of social networks. Here, we show that the social network structure of broods of begging nestling great tits Parus major predicts fitness in families. Although selection at the level of the individual favours large nestlings, selection at the level of the kin-group primarily favours families that resolve conflicts most effectively. PMID:23097505

  19. Predicting fracture in micron-scale polycrystalline silicon MEMS structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, Siddharth S.; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Boyce, Brad Lee; Ohlhausen, James Anthony; Foulk, James W., III; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2010-09-01

    Designing reliable MEMS structures presents numerous challenges. Polycrystalline silicon fractures in a brittle manner with considerable variability in measured strength. Furthermore, it is not clear how to use a measured tensile strength distribution to predict the strength of a complex MEMS structure. To address such issues, two recently developed high throughput MEMS tensile test techniques have been used to measure strength distribution tails. The measured tensile strength distributions enable the definition of a threshold strength as well as an inferred maximum flaw size. The nature of strength-controlling flaws has been identified and sources of the observed variation in strength investigated. A double edge-notched specimen geometry was also tested to study the effect of a severe, micron-scale stress concentration on the measured strength distribution. Strength-based, Weibull-based, and fracture mechanics-based failure analyses were performed and compared with the experimental results.

  20. Methods for evaluating the predictive accuracy of structural dynamic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselman, T. K.; Chrostowski, Jon D.

    1990-01-01

    Uncertainty of frequency response using the fuzzy set method and on-orbit response prediction using laboratory test data to refine an analytical model are emphasized with respect to large space structures. Two aspects of the fuzzy set approach were investigated relative to its application to large structural dynamics problems: (1) minimizing the number of parameters involved in computing possible intervals; and (2) the treatment of extrema which may occur in the parameter space enclosed by all possible combinations of the important parameters of the model. Extensive printer graphics were added to the SSID code to help facilitate model verification, and an application of this code to the LaRC Ten Bay Truss is included in the appendix to illustrate this graphics capability.

  1. Prediction of Halocarbon Toxicity from Structure: A Hierarchical QSAR Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Gute, B D; Balasubramanian, K; Geiss, K; Basak, S C

    2003-04-11

    Mathematical structural invariants and quantum theoretical descriptors have been used extensively in quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for the estimation of pharmaceutical activities, biological properties, physicochemical properties, and the toxicities of chemicals. Recently our research team has explored the relative importance of various levels of chemodescriptors, i.e., topostructural, topochemical, geometrical, and quantum theoretical descriptors, in property estimation. This study examines the contribution of chemodescriptors ranging from topostructural to quantum theoretic calculations up to the Gaussian STO-3G level in the prediction of the toxicity of a set of twenty halocarbons. We also report the results of experimental cell-level toxicity studies on these twenty halocarbons to validate our models.

  2. Factors Influencing Progressive Failure Analysis Predictions for Laminated Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Progressive failure material modeling methods used for structural analysis including failure initiation and material degradation are presented. Different failure initiation criteria and material degradation models are described that define progressive failure formulations. These progressive failure formulations are implemented in a user-defined material model for use with a nonlinear finite element analysis tool. The failure initiation criteria include the maximum stress criteria, maximum strain criteria, the Tsai-Wu failure polynomial, and the Hashin criteria. The material degradation model is based on the ply-discounting approach where the local material constitutive coefficients are degraded. Applications and extensions of the progressive failure analysis material model address two-dimensional plate and shell finite elements and three-dimensional solid finite elements. Implementation details are described in the present paper. Parametric studies for laminated composite structures are discussed to illustrate the features of the progressive failure modeling methods that have been implemented and to demonstrate their influence on progressive failure analysis predictions.

  3. Generic eukaryotic core promoter prediction using structural features of DNA.

    PubMed

    Abeel, Thomas; Saeys, Yvan; Bonnet, Eric; Rouzé, Pierre; Van de Peer, Yves

    2008-02-01

    Despite many recent efforts, in silico identification of promoter regions is still in its infancy. However, the accurate identification and delineation of promoter regions is important for several reasons, such as improving genome annotation and devising experiments to study and understand transcriptional regulation. Current methods to identify the core region of promoters require large amounts of high-quality training data and often behave like black box models that output predictions that are difficult to interpret. Here, we present a novel approach for predicting promoters in whole-genome sequences by using large-scale structural properties of DNA. Our technique requires no training, is applicable to many eukaryotic genomes, and performs extremely well in comparison with the best available promoter prediction programs. Moreover, it is fast, simple in design, and has no size constraints, and the results are easily interpretable. We compared our approach with 14 current state-of-the-art implementations using human gene and transcription start site data and analyzed the ENCODE region in more detail. We also validated our method on 12 additional eukaryotic genomes, including vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, fungi, and protists.

  4. The purification and properties of hen oviduct form B DNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, Michael; Cox, Ronald F.

    1974-01-01

    Hen oviduct form B DNA-dependent RNA polymerase has been extensively purified and its properties analysed. It seems likely to consist of a mixture of two forms of the type observed in tissues from other species. Furthermore using S1 nuclease to digest single-stranded DNA, we show that although form B can transcribe double-stranded DNA template it has a very strong preference for single-stranded regions. Also the rate of elongation on native DNA in vitro was measured and is an order of magnitude slower than that reported to be operative in vivo. Images PMID:4472377

  5. Symmetry-adapted digital modeling II. The double-helix B-DNA.

    PubMed

    Janner, A

    2016-05-01

    The positions of phosphorus in B-DNA have the remarkable property of occurring (in axial projection) at well defined points in the three-dimensional space of a projected five-dimensional decagonal lattice, subdividing according to the golden mean ratio τ:1:τ [with τ = (1+\\sqrt {5})/2] the edges of an enclosing decagon. The corresponding planar integral indices n1, n2, n3, n4 (which are lattice point coordinates) are extended to include the axial index n5 as well, defined for each P position of the double helix with respect to the single decagonal lattice ΛP(aP, cP) with aP = 2.222 Å and cP = 0.676 Å. A finer decagonal lattice Λ(a, c), with a = aP/6 and c = cP, together with a selection of lattice points for each nucleotide with a given indexed P position (so as to define a discrete set in three dimensions) permits the indexing of the atomic positions of the B-DNA d(AGTCAGTCAG) derived by M. J. P. van Dongen. This is done for both DNA strands and the single lattice Λ. Considered first is the sugar-phosphate subsystem, and then each nucleobase guanine, adenine, cytosine and thymine. One gets in this way a digital modeling of d(AGTCAGTCAG) in a one-to-one correspondence between atomic and indexed positions and a maximal deviation of about 0.6 Å (for the value of the lattice parameters given above). It is shown how to get a digital modeling of the B-DNA double helix for any given code. Finally, a short discussion indicates how this procedure can be extended to derive coarse-grained B-DNA models. An example is given with a reduction factor of about 2 in the number of atomic positions. A few remarks about the wider interest of this investigation and possible future developments conclude the paper. PMID:27126108

  6. Evaluation of the information content of RNA structure mapping data for secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Quarrier, Scott; Martin, Joshua S; Davis-Neulander, Lauren; Beauregard, Arthur; Laederach, Alain

    2010-06-01

    Structure mapping experiments (using probes such as dimethyl sulfate [DMS], kethoxal, and T1 and V1 RNases) are used to determine the secondary structures of RNA molecules. The process is iterative, combining the results of several probes with constrained minimum free-energy calculations to produce a model of the structure. We aim to evaluate whether particular probes provide more structural information, and specifically, how noise in the data affects the predictions. Our approach involves generating "decoy" RNA structures (using the sFold Boltzmann sampling procedure) and evaluating whether we are able to identify the correct structure from this ensemble of structures. We show that with perfect information, we are always able to identify the optimal structure for five RNAs of known structure. We then collected orthogonal structure mapping data (DMS and RNase T1 digest) under several solution conditions using our high-throughput capillary automated footprinting analysis (CAFA) technique on two group I introns of known structure. Analysis of these data reveals the error rates in the data under optimal (low salt) and suboptimal solution conditions (high MgCl(2)). We show that despite these errors, our computational approach is less sensitive to experimental noise than traditional constraint-based structure prediction algorithms. Finally, we propose a novel approach for visualizing the interaction of chemical and enzymatic mapping data with RNA structure. We project the data onto the first two dimensions of a multidimensional scaling of the sFold-generated decoy structures. We are able to directly visualize the structural information content of structure mapping data and reconcile multiple data sets.

  7. Evaluation of the information content of RNA structure mapping data for secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Quarrier, Scott; Martin, Joshua S; Davis-Neulander, Lauren; Beauregard, Arthur; Laederach, Alain

    2010-06-01

    Structure mapping experiments (using probes such as dimethyl sulfate [DMS], kethoxal, and T1 and V1 RNases) are used to determine the secondary structures of RNA molecules. The process is iterative, combining the results of several probes with constrained minimum free-energy calculations to produce a model of the structure. We aim to evaluate whether particular probes provide more structural information, and specifically, how noise in the data affects the predictions. Our approach involves generating "decoy" RNA structures (using the sFold Boltzmann sampling procedure) and evaluating whether we are able to identify the correct structure from this ensemble of structures. We show that with perfect information, we are always able to identify the optimal structure for five RNAs of known structure. We then collected orthogonal structure mapping data (DMS and RNase T1 digest) under several solution conditions using our high-throughput capillary automated footprinting analysis (CAFA) technique on two group I introns of known structure. Analysis of these data reveals the error rates in the data under optimal (low salt) and suboptimal solution conditions (high MgCl(2)). We show that despite these errors, our computational approach is less sensitive to experimental noise than traditional constraint-based structure prediction algorithms. Finally, we propose a novel approach for visualizing the interaction of chemical and enzymatic mapping data with RNA structure. We project the data onto the first two dimensions of a multidimensional scaling of the sFold-generated decoy structures. We are able to directly visualize the structural information content of structure mapping data and reconcile multiple data sets. PMID:20413617

  8. RNAalifold: improved consensus structure prediction for RNA alignments

    PubMed Central

    Bernhart, Stephan H; Hofacker, Ivo L; Will, Sebastian; Gruber, Andreas R; Stadler, Peter F

    2008-01-01

    Background The prediction of a consensus structure for a set of related RNAs is an important first step for subsequent analyses. RNAalifold, which computes the minimum energy structure that is simultaneously formed by a set of aligned sequences, is one of the oldest and most widely used tools for this task. In recent years, several alternative approaches have been advocated, pointing to several shortcomings of the original RNAalifold approach. Results We show that the accuracy of RNAalifold predictions can be improved substantially by introducing a different, more rational handling of alignment gaps, and by replacing the rather simplistic model of covariance scoring with more sophisticated RIBOSUM-like scoring matrices. These improvements are achieved without compromising the computational efficiency of the algorithm. We show here that the new version of RNAalifold not only outperforms the old one, but also several other tools recently developed, on different datasets. Conclusion The new version of RNAalifold not only can replace the old one for almost any application but it is also competitive with other approaches including those based on SCFGs, maximum expected accuracy, or hierarchical nearest neighbor classifiers. PMID:19014431

  9. Structure-Based Predictive model for Coal Char Combustion.

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, R.; Colo, J; Essenhigh, R.; Hadad, C; Stanley, E.

    1997-09-24

    During the third quarter of this project, progress was made on both major technical tasks. Progress was made in the chemistry department at OSU on the calculation of thermodynamic properties for a number of model organic compounds. Modelling work was carried out at Brown to adapt a thermodynamic model of carbonaceous mesophase formation, originally applied to pitch carbonization, to the prediction of coke texture in coal combustion. This latter work makes use of the FG-DVC model of coal pyrolysis developed by Advanced Fuel Research to specify the pool of aromatic clusters that participate in the order/disorder transition. This modelling approach shows promise for the mechanistic prediction of the rank dependence of char structure and will therefore be pursued further. Crystalline ordering phenomena were also observed in a model char prepared from phenol-formaldehyde carbonized at 900{degrees}C and 1300{degrees}C using high-resolution TEM fringe imaging. Dramatic changes occur in the structure between 900 and 1300{degrees}C, making this char a suitable candidate for upcoming in situ work on the hot stage TEM. Work also proceeded on molecular dynamics simulations at Boston University and on equipment modification and testing for the combustion experiments with widely varying flame types at Ohio State.

  10. RNA tertiary structure prediction with ModeRNA.

    PubMed

    Rother, Magdalena; Rother, Kristian; Puton, Tomasz; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2011-11-01

    Noncoding RNAs perform important roles in the cell. As their function is tightly connected with structure, and as experimental methods are time-consuming and expensive, the field of RNA structure prediction is developing rapidly. Here, we present a detailed study on using the ModeRNA software. The tool uses the comparative modeling approach and can be applied when a structural template is available and an alignment of reasonable quality can be performed. We guide the reader through the entire process of modeling Escherichia coli tRNA(Thr) in a conformation corresponding to the complex with an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS). We describe the choice of a template structure, preparation of input files, and explore three possible modeling strategies. In the end, we evaluate the resulting models using six alternative benchmarks. The ModeRNA software can be freely downloaded from http://iimcb.genesilico.pl/moderna/ under the conditions of the General Public License. It runs under LINUX, Windows and Mac OS. It is also available as a server at http://iimcb.genesilico.pl/modernaserver/. The models and the script to reproduce the study from this article are available at http://www.genesilico.pl/moderna/examples/.

  11. Protein structure prediction with local adjust tabu search algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein folding structure prediction is one of the most challenging problems in the bioinformatics domain. Because of the complexity of the realistic protein structure, the simplified structure model and the computational method should be adopted in the research. The AB off-lattice model is one of the simplification models, which only considers two classes of amino acids, hydrophobic (A) residues and hydrophilic (B) residues. Results The main work of this paper is to discuss how to optimize the lowest energy configurations in 2D off-lattice model and 3D off-lattice model by using Fibonacci sequences and real protein sequences. In order to avoid falling into local minimum and faster convergence to the global minimum, we introduce a novel method (SATS) to the protein structure problem, which combines simulated annealing algorithm and tabu search algorithm. Various strategies, such as the new encoding strategy, the adaptive neighborhood generation strategy and the local adjustment strategy, are adopted successfully for high-speed searching the optimal conformation corresponds to the lowest energy of the protein sequences. Experimental results show that some of the results obtained by the improved SATS are better than those reported in previous literatures, and we can sure that the lowest energy folding state for short Fibonacci sequences have been found. Conclusions Although the off-lattice models is not very realistic, they can reflect some important characteristics of the realistic protein. It can be found that 3D off-lattice model is more like native folding structure of the realistic protein than 2D off-lattice model. In addition, compared with some previous researches, the proposed hybrid algorithm can more effectively and more quickly search the spatial folding structure of a protein chain. PMID:25474708

  12. Crystal structure prediction from first principles: The crystal structures of glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Albert M.; Pagola, Gabriel I.; Orendt, Anita M.; Ferraro, Marta B.; Facelli, Julio C.

    2015-04-01

    Here we present the results of our unbiased searches of glycine polymorphs obtained using the genetic algorithms search implemented in MGAC, modified genetic algorithm for crystals, coupled with the local optimization and energy evaluation provided by Quantum Espresso. We demonstrate that it is possible to predict the crystal structures of a biomedical molecule using solely first principles calculations. We were able to find all the ambient pressure stable glycine polymorphs, which are found in the same energetic ordering as observed experimentally and the agreement between the experimental and predicted structures is of such accuracy that the two are visually almost indistinguishable.

  13. Crystal Structure Prediction from First Principles: The Crystal Structures of Glycine

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Albert M.; Pagola, Gabriel I.; Orendt, Anita M.; Ferraro, Marta B.; Facelli, Julio C.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the results of our unbiased searches of glycine polymorphs obtained using the Genetic Algorithms search implemented in Modified Genetic Algorithm for Crystals coupled with the local optimization and energy evaluation provided by Quantum Espresso. We demonstrate that it is possible to predict the crystal structures of a biomedical molecule using solely first principles calculations. We were able to find all the ambient pressure stable glycine polymorphs, which are found in the same energetic ordering as observed experimentally and the agreement between the experimental and predicted structures is of such accuracy that the two are visually almost indistinguishable. PMID:25843964

  14. How evolutionary crystal structure prediction works--and why.

    PubMed

    Oganov, Artem R; Lyakhov, Andriy O; Valle, Mario

    2011-03-15

    Once the crystal structure of a chemical substance is known, many properties can be predicted reliably and routinely. Therefore if researchers could predict the crystal structure of a material before it is synthesized, they could significantly accelerate the discovery of new materials. In addition, the ability to predict crystal structures at arbitrary conditions of pressure and temperature is invaluable for the study of matter at extreme conditions, where experiments are difficult. Crystal structure prediction (CSP), the problem of finding the most stable arrangement of atoms given only the chemical composition, has long remained a major unsolved scientific problem. Two problems are entangled here: search, the efficient exploration of the multidimensional energy landscape, and ranking, the correct calculation of relative energies. For organic crystals, which contain a few molecules in the unit cell, search can be quite simple as long as a researcher does not need to include many possible isomers or conformations of the molecules; therefore ranking becomes the main challenge. For inorganic crystals, quantum mechanical methods often provide correct relative energies, making search the most critical problem. Recent developments provide useful practical methods for solving the search problem to a considerable extent. One can use simulated annealing, metadynamics, random sampling, basin hopping, minima hopping, and data mining. Genetic algorithms have been applied to crystals since 1995, but with limited success, which necessitated the development of a very different evolutionary algorithm. This Account reviews CSP using one of the major techniques, the hybrid evolutionary algorithm USPEX (Universal Structure Predictor: Evolutionary Xtallography). Using recent developments in the theory of energy landscapes, we unravel the reasons evolutionary techniques work for CSP and point out their limitations. We demonstrate that the energy landscapes of chemical systems have an

  15. Hypersonic vehicle structural weight prediction using parametric modeling, finite element modeling, and structural optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Dung A.; Koshiba, David A.; Moses, Paul L.

    1993-04-01

    Detailed structural analysis/optimization is required in the conceptual design stage because of the combination of aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic environment. This is a time and manpower consuming activity which is exasperated by constant vehicle moldline changes as a configuration matures. A simple parametric math model is presented that takes into consideration static loads and the geometry and structural weight of a baseline hypersonic vehicle in predicting the structural weight of a new configuration scaled from the baseline. The approach in developing the math model was to consider a generic parametric cross-sectional geometry that could be used to approximate the baseline geometry and to predict the behavior of this baselne when it is scaled to provide performance and design benefits. This mathematical model, calibrated to finite element analysis and structural optimization sizing results, provides accurate weight prediction for a new configuration which has been moderately scaled from a thoroughly analyzed baseline configuration. This paper will present the structural optimization weight results and the math model weight predictions for a baseline configuration and 15 scaled configurations.

  16. Unbiased charge oscillations in B-DNA: monomer polymers and dimer polymers.

    PubMed

    Lambropoulos, K; Chatzieleftheriou, M; Morphis, A; Kaklamanis, K; Theodorakou, M; Simserides, C

    2015-09-01

    We call monomer a B-DNA base pair and examine, analytically and numerically, electron or hole oscillations in monomer and dimer polymers, i.e., periodic sequences with repetition unit made of one or two monomers. We employ a tight-binding (TB) approach at the base-pair level to readily determine the spatiotemporal evolution of a single extra carrier along a N base-pair B-DNA segment. We study highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital eigenspectra as well as the mean over time probabilities to find the carrier at a particular monomer. We use the pure mean transfer rate k to evaluate the easiness of charge transfer. The inverse decay length β for exponential fits k(d), where d is the charge transfer distance, and the exponent η for power-law fits k(N) are computed; generally power-law fits are better. We illustrate that increasing the number of different parameters involved in the TB description, the fall of k(d) or k(N) becomes steeper and show the range covered by β and η. Finally, for both the time-independent and the time-dependent problems, we analyze the palindromicity and the degree of eigenspectrum dependence of the probabilities to find the carrier at a particular monomer.

  17. Unbiased charge oscillations in B-DNA: Monomer polymers and dimer polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambropoulos, K.; Chatzieleftheriou, M.; Morphis, A.; Kaklamanis, K.; Theodorakou, M.; Simserides, C.

    2015-09-01

    We call monomer a B-DNA base pair and examine, analytically and numerically, electron or hole oscillations in monomer and dimer polymers, i.e., periodic sequences with repetition unit made of one or two monomers. We employ a tight-binding (TB) approach at the base-pair level to readily determine the spatiotemporal evolution of a single extra carrier along a N base-pair B-DNA segment. We study highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital eigenspectra as well as the mean over time probabilities to find the carrier at a particular monomer. We use the pure mean transfer rate k to evaluate the easiness of charge transfer. The inverse decay length β for exponential fits k (d ) , where d is the charge transfer distance, and the exponent η for power-law fits k (N ) are computed; generally power-law fits are better. We illustrate that increasing the number of different parameters involved in the TB description, the fall of k (d ) or k (N ) becomes steeper and show the range covered by β and η . Finally, for both the time-independent and the time-dependent problems, we analyze the palindromicity and the degree of eigenspectrum dependence of the probabilities to find the carrier at a particular monomer.

  18. Unbiased charge oscillations in B-DNA: monomer polymers and dimer polymers.

    PubMed

    Lambropoulos, K; Chatzieleftheriou, M; Morphis, A; Kaklamanis, K; Theodorakou, M; Simserides, C

    2015-09-01

    We call monomer a B-DNA base pair and examine, analytically and numerically, electron or hole oscillations in monomer and dimer polymers, i.e., periodic sequences with repetition unit made of one or two monomers. We employ a tight-binding (TB) approach at the base-pair level to readily determine the spatiotemporal evolution of a single extra carrier along a N base-pair B-DNA segment. We study highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital eigenspectra as well as the mean over time probabilities to find the carrier at a particular monomer. We use the pure mean transfer rate k to evaluate the easiness of charge transfer. The inverse decay length β for exponential fits k(d), where d is the charge transfer distance, and the exponent η for power-law fits k(N) are computed; generally power-law fits are better. We illustrate that increasing the number of different parameters involved in the TB description, the fall of k(d) or k(N) becomes steeper and show the range covered by β and η. Finally, for both the time-independent and the time-dependent problems, we analyze the palindromicity and the degree of eigenspectrum dependence of the probabilities to find the carrier at a particular monomer. PMID:26465516

  19. RNA-Puzzles: A CASP-like evaluation of RNA three-dimensional structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, José Almeida; Blanchet, Marc-Frédérick; Boniecki, Michal; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Chen, Shi-Jie; Cao, Song; Das, Rhiju; Ding, Feng; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Flores, Samuel Coulbourn; Huang, Lili; Lavender, Christopher A.; Lisi, Véronique; Major, François; Mikolajczak, Katarzyna; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Philips, Anna; Puton, Tomasz; Santalucia, John; Sijenyi, Fredrick; Hermann, Thomas; Rother, Kristian; Rother, Magdalena; Serganov, Alexander; Skorupski, Marcin; Soltysinski, Tomasz; Sripakdeevong, Parin; Tuszynska, Irina; Weeks, Kevin M.; Waldsich, Christina; Wildauer, Michael; Leontis, Neocles B.; Westhof, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of a first, collective, blind experiment in RNA three-dimensional (3D) structure prediction, encompassing three prediction puzzles. The goals are to assess the leading edge of RNA structure prediction techniques; compare existing methods and tools; and evaluate their relative strengths, weaknesses, and limitations in terms of sequence length and structural complexity. The results should give potential users insight into the suitability of available methods for different applications and facilitate efforts in the RNA structure prediction community in ongoing efforts to improve prediction tools. We also report the creation of an automated evaluation pipeline to facilitate the analysis of future RNA structure prediction exercises. PMID:22361291

  20. The extended evolutionary synthesis: its structure, assumptions and predictions

    PubMed Central

    Laland, Kevin N.; Uller, Tobias; Feldman, Marcus W.; Sterelny, Kim; Müller, Gerd B.; Moczek, Armin; Jablonka, Eva; Odling-Smee, John

    2015-01-01

    Scientific activities take place within the structured sets of ideas and assumptions that define a field and its practices. The conceptual framework of evolutionary biology emerged with the Modern Synthesis in the early twentieth century and has since expanded into a highly successful research program to explore the processes of diversification and adaptation. Nonetheless, the ability of that framework satisfactorily to accommodate the rapid advances in developmental biology, genomics and ecology has been questioned. We review some of these arguments, focusing on literatures (evo-devo, developmental plasticity, inclusive inheritance and niche construction) whose implications for evolution can be interpreted in two ways—one that preserves the internal structure of contemporary evolutionary theory and one that points towards an alternative conceptual framework. The latter, which we label the ‘extended evolutionary synthesis' (EES), retains the fundaments of evolutionary theory, but differs in its emphasis on the role of constructive processes in development and evolution, and reciprocal portrayals of causation. In the EES, developmental processes, operating through developmental bias, inclusive inheritance and niche construction, share responsibility for the direction and rate of evolution, the origin of character variation and organism–environment complementarity. We spell out the structure, core assumptions and novel predictions of the EES, and show how it can be deployed to stimulate and advance research in those fields that study or use evolutionary biology. PMID:26246559

  1. The extended evolutionary synthesis: its structure, assumptions and predictions.

    PubMed

    Laland, Kevin N; Uller, Tobias; Feldman, Marcus W; Sterelny, Kim; Müller, Gerd B; Moczek, Armin; Jablonka, Eva; Odling-Smee, John

    2015-08-22

    Scientific activities take place within the structured sets of ideas and assumptions that define a field and its practices. The conceptual framework of evolutionary biology emerged with the Modern Synthesis in the early twentieth century and has since expanded into a highly successful research program to explore the processes of diversification and adaptation. Nonetheless, the ability of that framework satisfactorily to accommodate the rapid advances in developmental biology, genomics and ecology has been questioned. We review some of these arguments, focusing on literatures (evo-devo, developmental plasticity, inclusive inheritance and niche construction) whose implications for evolution can be interpreted in two ways—one that preserves the internal structure of contemporary evolutionary theory and one that points towards an alternative conceptual framework. The latter, which we label the 'extended evolutionary synthesis' (EES), retains the fundaments of evolutionary theory, but differs in its emphasis on the role of constructive processes in development and evolution, and reciprocal portrayals of causation. In the EES, developmental processes, operating through developmental bias, inclusive inheritance and niche construction, share responsibility for the direction and rate of evolution, the origin of character variation and organism-environment complementarity. We spell out the structure, core assumptions and novel predictions of the EES, and show how it can be deployed to stimulate and advance research in those fields that study or use evolutionary biology.

  2. Significant role of the DNA backbone in mediating the transition origin of electronic excitations of B-DNA - implication from long range corrected TDDFT and quantified NTO analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Hao; Chai, Jeng-Da; Guo, Guang-Yu; Hayashi, Michitoshi

    We systematically investigate the possible complex transition origin of electronic excitations of giant molecular systems by using the recently proposed QNTO analysis [J.-H. Li, J.-D. Chai, G. Y. Guo and M. Hayashi, Chem. Phys. Lett., 2011, 514, 362.] combined with long-range corrected TDDFT calculations. Thymine (Thy) related excitations of biomolecule B-DNA are then studied as examples, where the model systems have been constructed extracting from the perfect or a X-ray crystal (PDB code 3BSE) B-DNA structure with at least one Thy included. In the first part, we consider the systems composed of a core molecular segment (e.g. Thy, di-Thy) and a surrounding physical/chemical environment of interest (e.g. backbone, adjacent stacking nucleobases) and examine how the excitation properties of the core vary in response to the environment. We find that the orbitals contributed from DNA backbone and surrounding nucleobases often participate in a transition of Thy-related excitations affecting their composition, absorption energy, and oscillator strength. In the second part, we take into account geometrically induced variation of the excitation properties of various B-DNA segments, e.g. di-Thy, dTpdT etc., obtained from different sources (ideal and 3BSE). It is found that the transition origin of several Thy-related excitations of these segments is sensitive to slight conformational variations, suggesting that DNA with thermal motions in cells may from time to time exhibit very different photo-induced physical and/or chemical processes.

  3. Lifetime Reliability Prediction of Ceramic Structures Under Transient Thermomechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Jadaan, Osama J.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2005-01-01

    An analytical methodology is developed to predict the probability of survival (reliability) of ceramic components subjected to harsh thermomechanical loads that can vary with time (transient reliability analysis). This capability enables more accurate prediction of ceramic component integrity against fracture in situations such as turbine startup and shutdown, operational vibrations, atmospheric reentry, or other rapid heating or cooling situations (thermal shock). The transient reliability analysis methodology developed herein incorporates the following features: fast-fracture transient analysis (reliability analysis without slow crack growth, SCG); transient analysis with SCG (reliability analysis with time-dependent damage due to SCG); a computationally efficient algorithm to compute the reliability for components subjected to repeated transient loading (block loading); cyclic fatigue modeling using a combined SCG and Walker fatigue law; proof testing for transient loads; and Weibull and fatigue parameters that are allowed to vary with temperature or time. Component-to-component variation in strength (stochastic strength response) is accounted for with the Weibull distribution, and either the principle of independent action or the Batdorf theory is used to predict the effect of multiaxial stresses on reliability. The reliability analysis can be performed either as a function of the component surface (for surface-distributed flaws) or component volume (for volume-distributed flaws). The transient reliability analysis capability has been added to the NASA CARES/ Life (Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Life) code. CARES/Life was also updated to interface with commercially available finite element analysis software, such as ANSYS, when used to model the effects of transient load histories. Examples are provided to demonstrate the features of the methodology as implemented in the CARES/Life program.

  4. Detecting and representing predictable structure during auditory scene analysis.

    PubMed

    Sohoglu, Ediz; Chait, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We use psychophysics and MEG to test how sensitivity to input statistics facilitates auditory-scene-analysis (ASA). Human subjects listened to 'scenes' comprised of concurrent tone-pip streams (sources). On occasional trials a new source appeared partway. Listeners were more accurate and quicker to detect source appearance in scenes comprised of temporally-regular (REG), rather than random (RAND), sources. MEG in passive listeners and those actively detecting appearance events revealed increased sustained activity in auditory and parietal cortex in REG relative to RAND scenes, emerging ~400 ms of scene-onset. Over and above this, appearance in REG scenes was associated with increased responses relative to RAND scenes. The effect of temporal structure on appearance-evoked responses was delayed when listeners were focused on the scenes relative to when listening passively, consistent with the notion that attention reduces 'surprise'. Overall, the results implicate a mechanism that tracks predictability of multiple concurrent sources to facilitate active and passive ASA.

  5. Structural Acoustic Prediction and Interior Noise Control Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, G. P.; Chin, C. L.; Simpson, M. A.; Lee, J. T.; Palumbo, Daniel L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report documents the results of Task 14, "Structural Acoustic Prediction and Interior Noise Control Technology". The task was to evaluate the performance of tuned foam elements (termed Smart Foam) both analytically and experimentally. Results taken from a three-dimensional finite element model of an active, tuned foam element are presented. Measurements of sound absorption and sound transmission loss were taken using the model. These results agree well with published data. Experimental performance data were taken in Boeing's Interior Noise Test Facility where 12 smart foam elements were applied to a 757 sidewall. Several configurations were tested. Noise reductions of 5-10 dB were achieved over the 200-800 Hz bandwidth of the controller. Accelerometers mounted on the panel provided a good reference for the controller. Configurations with far-field error microphones outperformed near-field cases.

  6. An RNA secondary structure prediction method based on minimum and suboptimal free energy structures.

    PubMed

    Fu, Haoyue; Yang, Lianping; Zhang, Xiangde

    2015-09-01

    The function of an RNA-molecule is mainly determined by its tertiary structures. And its secondary structure is an important determinant of its tertiary structure. The comparative methods usually give better results than the single-sequence methods. Based on minimum and suboptimal free energy structures, the paper presents a novel method for predicting conserved secondary structure of a group of related RNAs. In the method, the information from the known RNA structures is used as training data in a SVM (Support Vector Machine) classifier. Our method has been tested on the benchmark dataset given by Puton et al. The results show that the average sensitivity of our method is higher than that of other comparative methods such as CentroidAlifold, MXScrana, RNAalifold, and TurboFold. PMID:26100179

  7. High Precision Prediction of Functional Sites in Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Buturovic, Ljubomir; Wong, Mike; Tang, Grace W.; Altman, Russ B.; Petkovic, Dragutin

    2014-01-01

    We address the problem of assigning biological function to solved protein structures. Computational tools play a critical role in identifying potential active sites and informing screening decisions for further lab analysis. A critical parameter in the practical application of computational methods is the precision, or positive predictive value. Precision measures the level of confidence the user should have in a particular computed functional assignment. Low precision annotations lead to futile laboratory investigations and waste scarce research resources. In this paper we describe an advanced version of the protein function annotation system FEATURE, which achieved 99% precision and average recall of 95% across 20 representative functional sites. The system uses a Support Vector Machine classifier operating on the microenvironment of physicochemical features around an amino acid. We also compared performance of our method with state-of-the-art sequence-level annotator Pfam in terms of precision, recall and localization. To our knowledge, no other functional site annotator has been rigorously evaluated against these key criteria. The software and predictive models are incorporated into the WebFEATURE service at http://feature.stanford.edu/wf4.0-beta. PMID:24632601

  8. Engineering Property Prediction Tools for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Foss, Peter; Wyzgoski, Michael; Trantina, Gerry; Kunc, Vlastimil; Schutte, Carol; Smith, Mark T.

    2009-12-23

    This report summarizes our FY 2009 research activities for the project titled:"Engineering Property Prediction Tools for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures." These activities include (i) the completion of the development of a fiber length attrition model for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs), (ii) development of the a fatigue damage model for LFTs and its implementation in ABAQUS, (iii) development of an impact damage model for LFTs and its implementation in ABAQUS, (iv) development of characterization methods for fatigue testing, (v) characterization of creep and fatigue responses of glass-fiber/polyamide (PA6,6) and glass-fiber/polypropylene (PP), (vi) characterization of fiber length distribution along the flow length of glass/PA6,6 and glass-fiber/PP, and (vii) characterization of impact responses of glass-fiber/PA6,6. The fiber length attrition model accurately captures the fiber length distribution along the flow length of the studied glass-fiber/PP material. The fatigue damage model is able to predict the S-N and stiffness reduction data which are valuable to the fatigue design of LFTs. The impact damage model correctly captures damage accumulation observed in experiments of glass-fiber/PA6,6 plaques.Further work includes validations of these models for representative LFT materials and a complex LFT part.

  9. Can we predict lattice energy from molecular structure?

    PubMed

    Ouvrard, Carole; Mitchell, John B O

    2003-10-01

    By using simply the numbers of occurrences of different atom types as descriptors, a conceptually transparent and remarkably accurate model for the prediction of the enthalpies of sublimation of organic compounds has been generated. The atom types are defined on the basis of atomic number, hybridization state and bonded environment. Models of this kind were applied firstly to aliphatic hydrocarbons, secondly to both aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, thirdly to a wide range of non-hydrogen-bonding molecules, and finally to a set of 226 organic compounds including 70 containing hydrogen-bond donors and acceptors. The final model gives squared correlation coefficients of 0.925 for the 226 compounds in the training set and 0.937 for an independent test set of 35 compounds. The success of such a simple model implies that the enthalpy of sublimation can be predicted accurately without knowledge of the crystal packing. This hypothesis is in turn consistent with the idea that, rather than being determined by the particular features of the lowest-energy packing, the lattice energy is similar for a number of hypothetical alternative crystal structures of a molecule.

  10. Structure activity relationships: their function in biological prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, T.W.

    1982-01-01

    Quantitative structure activity relationships provide a means of ranking or predicting biological effects based on chemical structure. For each compound used to formulate a structure activity model two kinds of quantitative information are required: (1) biological activity and (2) molecular properties. Molecular properties are of three types: (1) molecular shape, (2) physiochemical parameters, and (3) abstract quantitations of molecular structure. Currently the two best descriptors are the hydrophobic parameter, log 1-octanol/water partition coefficient (log P), and the /sup 1/X/sup v/(one-chi-v) molecular connectivity index. Biological responses can be divided into three main categories: (1) non-specific effects due to membrane perturbation, (2) non-specific effects due to interaction with functional groups of proteins, and (3) specific effects due to interaction with receptors. Twenty-six synthetic fossil fuel-related nitrogen-containing aromatic compounds were examined to determine the quantitative correlation between log P and /sup 1/X/sup v/ and population growth impairment of Tetrahymena pyriformis. Nitro-containing compounds are the most active, followed by amino-containing compounds and azaarenes. Within each analog series activity increases with alkyl substitution and ring addition. The planar model log BR = 0.5564 log P + 0.3000 /sup 1/X/sup v/ -2.0138 was determined using mono-nitrogen substituted compounds. Attempts to extrapolate this model to dinitrogen-containing molecules were, for the most part, unsuccessful because of a change in mode of action from membrane perturbation to uncoupling of oxidative phosphoralation.

  11. Interaction of Iron II Complexes with B-DNA. Insights from Molecular Modeling, Spectroscopy, and Cellular Biology

    PubMed Central

    Gattuso, Hugo; Duchanois, Thibaut; Besancenot, Vanessa; Barbieux, Claire; Assfeld, Xavier; Becuwe, Philippe; Gros, Philippe C.; Grandemange, Stephanie; Monari, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We report the characterization of the interaction between B-DNA and three terpyridin iron II complexes. Relatively long time-scale molecular dynamics (MD) is used in order to characterize the stable interaction modes. By means of molecular modeling and UV-vis spectroscopy, we prove that they may lead to stable interactions with the DNA duplex. Furthermore, the presence of larger π-conjugated moieties also leads to the appearance of intercalation binding mode. Non-covalent stabilizing interactions between the iron complexes and the DNA are also characterized and evidenced by the analysis of the gradient of the electronic density. Finally, the structural deformations induced on the DNA in the different binding modes are also evidenced. The synthesis and chemical characterization of the three complexes is reported, as well as their absorption spectra in presence of DNA duplexes to prove the interaction with DNA. Finally, their effects on human cell cultures have also been evidenced to further enlighten their biological effects. PMID:26734600

  12. Interaction of Iron II Complexes with B-DNA. Insights from Molecular Modeling, Spectroscopy, and Cellular Biology.

    PubMed

    Gattuso, Hugo; Duchanois, Thibaut; Besancenot, Vanessa; Barbieux, Claire; Assfeld, Xavier; Becuwe, Philippe; Gros, Philippe C; Grandemange, Stephanie; Monari, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We report the characterization of the interaction between B-DNA and three terpyridin iron II complexes. Relatively long time-scale molecular dynamics (MD) is used in order to characterize the stable interaction modes. By means of molecular modeling and UV-vis spectroscopy, we prove that they may lead to stable interactions with the DNA duplex. Furthermore, the presence of larger π-conjugated moieties also leads to the appearance of intercalation binding mode. Non-covalent stabilizing interactions between the iron complexes and the DNA are also characterized and evidenced by the analysis of the gradient of the electronic density. Finally, the structural deformations induced on the DNA in the different binding modes are also evidenced. The synthesis and chemical characterization of the three complexes is reported, as well as their absorption spectra in presence of DNA duplexes to prove the interaction with DNA. Finally, their effects on human cell cultures have also been evidenced to further enlighten their biological effects. PMID:26734600

  13. Protein structure prediction provides comparable performance to crystallographic structures in docking-based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Du, Hongying; Brender, Jeffrey R; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Structure based virtual screening has largely been limited to protein targets for which either an experimental structure is available or a strongly homologous template exists so that a high-resolution model can be constructed. The performance of state of the art protein structure predictions in virtual screening in systems where only weakly homologous templates are available is largely untested. Using the challenging DUD database of structural decoys, we show here that even using templates with only weak sequence homology (<30% sequence identity) structural models can be constructed by I-TASSER which achieve comparable enrichment rates to using the experimental bound crystal structure in the majority of the cases studied. For 65% of the targets, the I-TASSER models, which are constructed essentially in the apo conformations, reached 70% of the virtual screening performance of using the holo-crystal structures. A correlation was observed between the success of I-TASSER in modeling the global fold and local structures in the binding pockets of the proteins versus the relative success in virtual screening. The virtual screening performance can be further improved by the recognition of chemical features of the ligand compounds. These results suggest that the combination of structure-based docking and advanced protein structure modeling methods should be a valuable approach to the large-scale drug screening and discovery studies, especially for the proteins lacking crystallographic structures.

  14. Shape and secondary structure prediction for ncRNAs including pseudoknots based on linear SVM

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate secondary structure prediction provides important information to undefirstafinding the tertiary structures and thus the functions of ncRNAs. However, the accuracy of the native structure derivation of ncRNAs is still not satisfactory, especially on sequences containing pseudoknots. It is recently shown that using the abstract shapes, which retain adjacency and nesting of structural features but disregard the length details of helix and loop regions, can improve the performance of structure prediction. In this work, we use SVM-based feature selection to derive the consensus abstract shape of homologous ncRNAs and apply the predicted shape to structure prediction including pseudoknots. Results Our approach was applied to predict shapes and secondary structures on hundreds of ncRNA data sets with and without psuedoknots. The experimental results show that we can achieve 18% higher accuracy in shape prediction than the state-of-the-art consensus shape prediction tools. Using predicted shapes in structure prediction allows us to achieve approximate 29% higher sensitivity and 10% higher positive predictive value than other pseudoknot prediction tools. Conclusions Extensive analysis of RNA properties based on SVM allows us to identify important properties of sequences and structures related to their shapes. The combination of mass data analysis and SVM-based feature selection makes our approach a promising method for shape and structure prediction. The implemented tools, Knot Shape and Knot Structure are open source software and can be downloaded at: http://www.cse.msu.edu/~achawana/KnotShape. PMID:23369147

  15. Prediction of grain structures in various solidification processes

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaz, M.; Gandin, C.A.; Desbiolles, J.L.; Thevoz, P.

    1996-03-01

    Grain structure formation during solidification can be simulated via the use of stochastic models providing the physical mechanisms of nucleation and dendrite growth are accounted for. With this goal in mind, a physically based cellular automaton (CA) model has been coupled with finite element (FE) heat flow computations and implemented into the code 3-MOS. The CA enmeshment of the solidifying domain with small square cells is first generated automatically from the FE mesh. Within each time-step, the variation of enthalpy at each node of the FE mesh is calculated using an implicit scheme and a Newton-type linearization method. After interpolation of the explicit temperature and of the enthalpy variation at the cell location, the nucleation and growth of grains are simulated using the CA algorithm. This algorithm accounts for the heterogeneous nucleation in the bulk and at the surface of the ingot, for the growth and preferential growth directions of the dendrites, and for microsegregation. The variation of volume fraction of solid at the cell location are then summed up at the FE nodes in order to find the new temperatures. This CAFE model, which allows the prediction and the visualization of grain structures during and after solidification, is applied to various solidification processes: the investment casting of turbine blades, the continuous casting of rods, and the laser remelting or welding of plates. Because the CAFE model is yet two-dimensional (2-D), the simulation results are compared in a qualitative way with experimental findings.

  16. Structure-Based Predictive model for Coal Char Combustion.

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, R.; Calo, J.; Essenhigh, R.; Hadad, C.; Stanley, E.

    1997-06-25

    During the second quarter of this project, progress was made on both major technical tasks. Three parallel efforts were initiated on the modeling of carbon structural evolution. Structural ordering during carbonization was studied by a numerical simulation scheme proposed by Alan Kerstein involving molecular weight growth and rotational mobility. Work was also initiated to adapt a model of carbonaceous mesophase formation, originally developed under parallel NSF funding, to the prediction of coke texture. This latter work makes use of the FG-DVC model of coal pyrolysis developed by Advanced Fuel Research to specify the pool of aromatic clusters that participate in the order/disorder transition. Boston University has initiated molecular dynamics simulations of carbonization processes and Ohio State has begun theoretical treatment of surface reactions. Experimental work has also begun on model compound studies at Brown and on pilot-scale combustion systems with widely varying flame types at OSE. The work on mobility / growth models shows great promise and is discussed in detail in the body of the report.

  17. Failure prediction of thin beryllium sheets used in spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roschke, Paul N.; Mascorro, Edward; Papados, Photios; Serna, Oscar R.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to develop a method for prediction of failure of thin beryllium sheets that undergo complex states of stress. Major components of the research include experimental evaluation of strength parameters for cross-rolled beryllium sheet, application of the Tsai-Wu failure criterion to plate bending problems, development of a high order failure criterion, application of the new criterion to a variety of structures, and incorporation of both failure criteria into a finite element code. A Tsai-Wu failure model for SR-200 sheet material is developed from available tensile data, experiments carried out by NASA on two circular plates, and compression and off-axis experiments performed in this study. The failure surface obtained from the resulting criterion forms an ellipsoid. By supplementing experimental data used in the the two-dimensional criterion and modifying previously suggested failure criteria, a multi-dimensional failure surface is proposed for thin beryllium structures. The new criterion for orthotropic material is represented by a failure surface in six-dimensional stress space. In order to determine coefficients of the governing equation, a number of uniaxial, biaxial, and triaxial experiments are required. Details of these experiments and a complementary ultrasonic investigation are described in detail. Finally, validity of the criterion and newly determined mechanical properties is established through experiments on structures composed of SR200 sheet material. These experiments include a plate-plug arrangement under a complex state of stress and a series of plates with an out-of-plane central point load. Both criteria have been incorporated into a general purpose finite element analysis code. Numerical simulation incrementally applied loads to a structural component that is being designed and checks each nodal point in the model for exceedance of a failure criterion. If stresses at all locations do not exceed the failure

  18. Structural kinematics based damage zone prediction in gradient structures using vibration database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talha, Mohammad; Ashokkumar, Chimpalthradi R.

    2014-05-01

    To explore the applications of functionally graded materials (FGMs) in dynamic structures, structural kinematics based health monitoring technique becomes an important problem. Depending upon the displacements in three dimensions, the health of the material to withstand dynamic loads is inferred in this paper, which is based on the net compressive and tensile displacements that each structural degree of freedom takes. These net displacements at each finite element node predicts damage zones of the FGM where the material is likely to fail due to a vibration response which is categorized according to loading condition. The damage zone prediction of a dynamically active FGMs plate have been accomplished using Reddy's higher-order theory. The constituent material properties are assumed to vary in the thickness direction according to the power-law behavior. The proposed C0 finite element model (FEM) is applied to get net tensile and compressive displacement distributions across the structures. A plate made of Aluminum/Ziconia is considered to illustrate the concept of structural kinematics-based health monitoring aspects of FGMs.

  19. Detecting and representing predictable structure during auditory scene analysis.

    PubMed

    Sohoglu, Ediz; Chait, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We use psychophysics and MEG to test how sensitivity to input statistics facilitates auditory-scene-analysis (ASA). Human subjects listened to 'scenes' comprised of concurrent tone-pip streams (sources). On occasional trials a new source appeared partway. Listeners were more accurate and quicker to detect source appearance in scenes comprised of temporally-regular (REG), rather than random (RAND), sources. MEG in passive listeners and those actively detecting appearance events revealed increased sustained activity in auditory and parietal cortex in REG relative to RAND scenes, emerging ~400 ms of scene-onset. Over and above this, appearance in REG scenes was associated with increased responses relative to RAND scenes. The effect of temporal structure on appearance-evoked responses was delayed when listeners were focused on the scenes relative to when listening passively, consistent with the notion that attention reduces 'surprise'. Overall, the results implicate a mechanism that tracks predictability of multiple concurrent sources to facilitate active and passive ASA. PMID:27602577

  20. Detecting and representing predictable structure during auditory scene analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sohoglu, Ediz; Chait, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We use psychophysics and MEG to test how sensitivity to input statistics facilitates auditory-scene-analysis (ASA). Human subjects listened to ‘scenes’ comprised of concurrent tone-pip streams (sources). On occasional trials a new source appeared partway. Listeners were more accurate and quicker to detect source appearance in scenes comprised of temporally-regular (REG), rather than random (RAND), sources. MEG in passive listeners and those actively detecting appearance events revealed increased sustained activity in auditory and parietal cortex in REG relative to RAND scenes, emerging ~400 ms of scene-onset. Over and above this, appearance in REG scenes was associated with increased responses relative to RAND scenes. The effect of temporal structure on appearance-evoked responses was delayed when listeners were focused on the scenes relative to when listening passively, consistent with the notion that attention reduces ‘surprise’. Overall, the results implicate a mechanism that tracks predictability of multiple concurrent sources to facilitate active and passive ASA. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19113.001 PMID:27602577

  1. Composite failure prediction of π-joint structures under bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hong-mei; Yuan, Shen-fang

    2012-03-01

    In this article, the composite -joint is investigated under bending loads. The "L" preform is the critical component regarding composite -joint failure. The study is presented in the failure detection of a carbon fiber composite -joint structure under bending loads using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor. Firstly, based on the general finite element method (FEM) software, the 3-D finite element (FE) model of composite -joint is established, and the failure process and every lamina failure load of composite -joint are investigated by maximum stress criteria. Then, strain distributions along the length of FBG are extracted, and the reflection spectra of FBG are calculated according to the strain distribution. Finally, to verify the numerical results, a test scheme is performed and the experimental spectra of FBG are recorded. The experimental results indicate that the failure sequence and the corresponding critical loads of failure are consistent with the numerical predictions, and the computational error of failure load is less than 6.4%. Furthermore, it also verifies the feasibility of the damage detection system.

  2. Prediction of Silicon-Based Layered Structures for Optoelectronic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Ma, Yanming; Gong, Xingao; Xiang, Hongjun; CCMG Team

    2015-03-01

    A method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is presented to design quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) materials. With this development, various single-layer and bi-layer materials in C, Si, Ge, Sn, and Pb were predicted. A new Si bi-layer structure is found to have a much-favored energy than the previously widely accepted configuration. Both single-layer and bi-layer Si materials have small band gaps, limiting their usages in optoelectronic applications. Hydrogenation has therefore been used to tune the electronic and optical properties of Si layers. We discover two hydrogenated materials of layered Si8H2andSi6H2 possessing quasi-direct band gaps of 0.75 eV and 1.59 eV, respectively. Their potential applications for light emitting diode and photovoltaics are proposed and discussed. Our study opened up the possibility of hydrogenated Si layered materials as next-generation optoelectronic devices.

  3. Predictive modeling of pedestal structure in KSTAR using EPED model

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hyunsun; Kim, J. Y.; Kwon, Ohjin

    2013-10-15

    A predictive calculation is given for the structure of edge pedestal in the H-mode plasma of the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) device using the EPED model. Particularly, the dependence of pedestal width and height on various plasma parameters is studied in detail. The two codes, ELITE and HELENA, are utilized for the stability analysis of the peeling-ballooning and kinetic ballooning modes, respectively. Summarizing the main results, the pedestal slope and height have a strong dependence on plasma current, rapidly increasing with it, while the pedestal width is almost independent of it. The plasma density or collisionality gives initially a mild stabilization, increasing the pedestal slope and height, but above some threshold value its effect turns to a destabilization, reducing the pedestal width and height. Among several plasma shape parameters, the triangularity gives the most dominant effect, rapidly increasing the pedestal width and height, while the effect of elongation and squareness appears to be relatively weak. Implication of these edge results, particularly in relation to the global plasma performance, is discussed.

  4. AWSEM-MD: Protein Structure Prediction Using Coarse-grained Physical Potentials and Bioinformatically Based Local Structure Biasing

    PubMed Central

    Davtyan, Aram; Schafer, Nicholas P.; Zheng, Weihua; Clementi, Cecilia; Wolynes, Peter G.; Papoian, Garegin A.

    2012-01-01

    The Associative memory, Water mediated, Structure and Energy Model (AWSEM) is a coarse-grained protein force field. AWSEM contains physically motivated terms, such as hydrogen bonding, as well as a bioinformatically based local structure biasing term, which efficiently takes into account many-body effects that are modulated by the local sequence. When combined with appropriate local or global alignments to choose memories, AWSEM can be used to perform de novo protein structure prediction. Herein we present structure prediction results for a particular choice of local sequence alignment method based on short residue sequences called fragments. We demonstrate the model’s structure prediction capabilities for three levels of global homology between the target sequence and those proteins used for local structure biasing, all of which assume that the structure of the target sequence is not known. When there are no homologs in the database of structures used for local structure biasing, AWSEM calculations produce structural predictions that are somewhat improved compared with prior works using related approaches. The inclusion of a small number of structures from homologous sequences improves structure prediction only marginally but when the fragment search is restricted to only homologous sequences, AWSEM can perform high resolution structure prediction and can be used for kinetics and dynamics studies. PMID:22545654

  5. Predicting aphasia type from brain damage measured with structural MRI.

    PubMed

    Yourganov, Grigori; Smith, Kimberly G; Fridriksson, Julius; Rorden, Chris

    2015-12-01

    Chronic aphasia is a common consequence of a left-hemisphere stroke. Since the early insights by Broca and Wernicke, studying the relationship between the loci of cortical damage and patterns of language impairment has been one of the concerns of aphasiology. We utilized multivariate classification in a cross-validation framework to predict the type of chronic aphasia from the spatial pattern of brain damage. Our sample consisted of 98 patients with five types of aphasia (Broca's, Wernicke's, global, conduction, and anomic), classified based on scores on the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB). Binary lesion maps were obtained from structural MRI scans (obtained at least 6 months poststroke, and within 2 days of behavioural assessment); after spatial normalization, the lesions were parcellated into a disjoint set of brain areas. The proportion of damage to the brain areas was used to classify patients' aphasia type. To create this parcellation, we relied on five brain atlases; our classifier (support vector machine - SVM) could differentiate between different kinds of aphasia using any of the five parcellations. In our sample, the best classification accuracy was obtained when using a novel parcellation that combined two previously published brain atlases, with the first atlas providing the segmentation of grey matter, and the second atlas used to segment the white matter. For each aphasia type, we computed the relative importance of different brain areas for distinguishing it from other aphasia types; our findings were consistent with previously published reports of lesion locations implicated in different types of aphasia. Overall, our results revealed that automated multivariate classification could distinguish between aphasia types based on damage to atlas-defined brain areas. PMID:26465238

  6. RNA Secondary Structure Prediction by Using Discrete Mathematics: An Interdisciplinary Research Experience for Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellington, Roni; Wachira, James; Nkwanta, Asamoah

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) project was on RNA secondary structure prediction by using a lattice walk approach. The lattice walk approach is a combinatorial and computational biology method used to enumerate possible secondary structures and predict RNA secondary structure from RNA sequences. The method uses…

  7. Analysis and prediction of RNA-binding residues using sequence, evolutionary conservation, and predicted secondary structure and solvent accessibility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Ke; Ruan, Jishou; Shen, Shiyi; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2010-11-01

    Identification and prediction of RNA-binding residues (RBRs) provides valuable insights into the mechanisms of protein-RNA interactions. We analyzed the contributions of a wide range of factors including amino acid sequence, evolutionary conservation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility, to the prediction/characterization of RBRs. Five feature sets were designed and feature selection was performed to find and investigate relevant features. We demonstrate that (1) interactions with positively charged amino acids Arg and Lys are preferred by the egatively charged nucleotides; (2) Gly provides flexibility for the RNA binding sites; (3) Glu with negatively charged side chain and several hydrophobic residues such as Leu, Val, Ala and Phe are disfavored in the RNA-binding sites; (4) coil residues, especially in long segments, are more flexible (than other secondary structures) and more likely to interact with RNA; (5) helical residues are more rigid and consequently they are less likely to bind RNA; and (6) residues partially exposed to the solvent are more likely to form RNA-binding sites. We introduce a novel sequence-based predictor of RBRs, RBRpred, which utilizes the selected features. RBRpred is comprehensively tested on three datasets with varied atom distance cutoffs by performing both five-fold cross validation and jackknife tests and achieves Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.51, 0.48 and 0.42, respectively. The quality is comparable to or better than that for state-of-the-art predictors that apply the distancebased cutoff definition. We show that the most important factor for RBRs prediction is evolutionary conservation, followed by the amino acid sequence, predicted secondary structure and predicted solvent accessibility. We also investigate the impact of using native vs. predicted secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The predictions are sufficient for the RBR prediction and the knowledge of the actual solvent accessibility

  8. Energy-based RNA consensus secondary structure prediction in multiple sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Washietl, Stefan; Bernhart, Stephan H; Kellis, Manolis

    2014-01-01

    Many biologically important RNA structures are conserved in evolution leading to characteristic mutational patterns. RNAalifold is a widely used program to predict consensus secondary structures in multiple alignments by combining evolutionary information with traditional energy-based RNA folding algorithms. Here we describe the theory and applications of the RNAalifold algorithm. Consensus secondary structure prediction not only leads to significantly more accurate structure models, but it also allows to study structural conservation of functional RNAs. PMID:24639158

  9. Energy-based RNA consensus secondary structure prediction in multiple sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Washietl, Stefan; Bernhart, Stephan H; Kellis, Manolis

    2014-01-01

    Many biologically important RNA structures are conserved in evolution leading to characteristic mutational patterns. RNAalifold is a widely used program to predict consensus secondary structures in multiple alignments by combining evolutionary information with traditional energy-based RNA folding algorithms. Here we describe the theory and applications of the RNAalifold algorithm. Consensus secondary structure prediction not only leads to significantly more accurate structure models, but it also allows to study structural conservation of functional RNAs.

  10. A permutation based simulated annealing algorithm to predict pseudoknotted RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Herbert H; Wiese, Kay C

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoknots are RNA tertiary structures which perform essential biological functions. This paper discusses SARNA-Predict-pk, a RNA pseudoknotted secondary structure prediction algorithm based on Simulated Annealing (SA). The research presented here extends previous work of SARNA-Predict and further examines the effect of the new algorithm to include prediction of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. An evaluation of the performance of SARNA-Predict-pk in terms of prediction accuracy is made via comparison with several state-of-the-art prediction algorithms using 20 individual known structures from seven RNA classes. We measured the sensitivity and specificity of nine prediction algorithms. Three of these are dynamic programming algorithms: Pseudoknot (pknotsRE), NUPACK, and pknotsRG-mfe. One is using the statistical clustering approach: Sfold and the other five are heuristic algorithms: SARNA-Predict-pk, ILM, STAR, IPknot and HotKnots algorithms. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that SARNA-Predict-pk can out-perform other state-of-the-art algorithms in terms of prediction accuracy. This supports the use of the proposed method on pseudoknotted RNA secondary structure prediction of other known structures. PMID:26558299

  11. "Well-determined" regions in RNA secondary structure prediction: analysis of small subunit ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Zuker, M; Jacobson, A B

    1995-01-01

    Recent structural analyses of genomic RNAs from RNA coliphages suggest that both well-determined base paired helices and well-determined structural domains that are identified by "energy dot plot" analysis using the RNA folding package mfold, are likely to be predicted correctly. To test these observations with another group of large RNAs, we have analyzed 15 ribosomal RNAs. Published secondary structure models that were derived by comparative sequence analysis were used to evaluate the predicted structures. Both the optimal predicted fold and the predicted "energy dot plot" of each sequence were examined. Each prediction was obtained from a single computer run on an entire ribosomal RNA sequence. All predicted base pairs in optimal foldings were examined for agreement with proven base pairs in the comparative models. Our analyses show that the overall correspondence between the predicted and comparative models varied for different RNAs and ranges from a low of 27% to high of 70%, with a mean value of 49%. The correspondence improves to a mean value of 81% when the analysis is limited to well-determined helices. In addition to well-determined helices, large well-determined structural domains can be observed in "energy dot plots" of some 16S ribosomal RNAs. The predicted domains correspond closely with structural domains that are found by the comparative method in the same RNAs. Our analyses also show that measuring the agreement between predicted and comparative secondary structure models underestimates the reliability of structural prediction by mfold. PMID:7544463

  12. Comparative modeling: the state of the art and protein drug target structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianyun; Tang, Grace W; Capriotti, Emidio

    2011-07-01

    The goal of computational protein structure prediction is to provide three-dimensional (3D) structures with resolution comparable to experimental results. Comparative modeling, which predicts the 3D structure of a protein based on its sequence similarity to homologous structures, is the most accurate computational method for structure prediction. In the last two decades, significant progress has been made on comparative modeling methods. Using the large number of protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (~65,000), automatic prediction pipelines are generating a tremendous number of models (~1.9 million) for sequences whose structures have not been experimentally determined. Accurate models are suitable for a wide range of applications, such as prediction of protein binding sites, prediction of the effect of protein mutations, and structure-guided virtual screening. In particular, comparative modeling has enabled structure-based drug design against protein targets with unknown structures. In this review, we describe the theoretical basis of comparative modeling, the available automatic methods and databases, and the algorithms to evaluate the accuracy of predicted structures. Finally, we discuss relevant applications in the prediction of important drug target proteins, focusing on the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and protein kinase families.

  13. Surface pressure profiles, vortex structure and initialization for hurricane prediction. Part II: numerical simulations of track, structure and intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Noel E.; Ma, Yimin

    2012-07-01

    In part 1 of this study, an assessment of commonly used surface pressure profiles to represent TC structures was made. Using the Australian tropical cyclone model, the profiles are tested in case studies of high-resolution prediction of track, structure and intensity. We demonstrate that: (1) track forecasts are mostly insensitive to the imposed structure; (2) in some cases [here Katrina (2005)], specification of vortex structure can have a large impact on prediction of structure and intensity; (3) the forecast model mostly preserves the characteristics of the initial structure and so correct structure at t = 0 is a requirement for improved structure forecasting; and (4) skilful prediction of intensity does not guarantee skilful prediction of structure. It is shown that for Ivan (2004) the initial structure from each profile is preserved during the simulations, and that markedly different structures can have similar intensities. Evidence presented suggests that different initial profiles can sometimes change the timing of intensification. Thus, correct initial vortex structure is an essential ingredient for more accurate intensity and structure prediction.

  14. Aircraft Structural Mass Property Prediction Using Conceptual-Level Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexstone, Matthew G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology that extends the use of the Equivalent LAminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) structural analysis code from conceptual-level aircraft structural analysis to conceptual-level aircraft mass property analysis. Mass property analysis in aircraft structures has historically depended upon parametric weight equations at the conceptual design level and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) at the detailed design level ELAPS allows for the modeling of detailed geometry, metallic and composite materials, and non-structural mass coupled with analytical structural sizing to produce high-fidelity mass property analyses representing fully configured vehicles early in the design process. This capability is especially valuable for unusual configuration and advanced concept development where existing parametric weight equations are inapplicable and FEA is too time consuming for conceptual design. This paper contrasts the use of ELAPS relative to empirical weight equations and FEA. ELAPS modeling techniques are described and the ELAPS-based mass property analysis process is detailed Examples of mass property stochastic calculations produced during a recent systems study are provided This study involved the analysis of three remotely piloted aircraft required to carry scientific payloads to very high altitudes at subsonic speeds. Due to the extreme nature of this high-altitude flight regime,few existing vehicle designs are available for use in performance and weight prediction. ELAPS was employed within a concurrent engineering analysis process that simultaneously produces aerodynamic, structural, and static aeroelastic results for input to aircraft performance analyses. The ELAPS models produced for each concept were also used to provide stochastic analyses of wing structural mass properties. The results of this effort indicate that ELAPS is an efficient means to conduct multidisciplinary trade studies at the conceptual design level.

  15. Aircraft Structural Mass Property Prediction Using Conceptual-Level Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexstone, Matthew G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology that extends the use of the Equivalent LAminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) structural analysis code from conceptual-level aircraft structural analysis to conceptual-level aircraft mass property analysis. Mass property analysis in aircraft structures has historically depended upon parametric weight equations at the conceptual design level and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) at the detailed design level. ELAPS allows for the modeling of detailed geometry, metallic and composite materials, and non-structural mass coupled with analytical structural sizing to produce high-fidelity mass property analyses representing fully configured vehicles early in the design process. This capability is especially valuable for unusual configuration and advanced concept development where existing parametric weight equations are inapplicable and FEA is too time consuming for conceptual design. This paper contrasts the use of ELAPS relative to empirical weight equations and FEA. ELAPS modeling techniques are described and the ELAPS-based mass property analysis process is detailed. Examples of mass property stochastic calculations produced during a recent systems study are provided. This study involved the analysis of three remotely piloted aircraft required to carry scientific payloads to very high altitudes at subsonic speeds. Due to the extreme nature of this high-altitude flight regime, few existing vehicle designs are available for use in performance and weight prediction. ELAPS was employed within a concurrent engineering analysis process that simultaneously produces aerodynamic, structural, and static aeroelastic results for input to aircraft performance analyses. The ELAPS models produced for each concept were also used to provide stochastic analyses of wing structural mass properties. The results of this effort indicate that ELAPS is an efficient means to conduct multidisciplinary trade studies at the conceptual design level.

  16. Predicting toxicity through a computer automated structure evaluation program

    SciTech Connect

    Klopman, G.

    1985-09-01

    The computer automated structure evaluation program (CASE) has been extended to perform automatic quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR). Applications include the carcinogenicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and of N-nitrosamines. Agreement with experiment is satisfactory.

  17. CASP11--An Evaluation of a Modular BCL::Fold-Based Protein Structure Prediction Pipeline.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Axel W; Heinze, Sten; Putnam, Daniel K; Li, Bian; Pino, James C; Xia, Yan; Lopez, Carlos F; Meiler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    In silico prediction of a protein's tertiary structure remains an unsolved problem. The community-wide Critical Assessment of Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) experiment provides a double-blind study to evaluate improvements in protein structure prediction algorithms. We developed a protein structure prediction pipeline employing a three-stage approach, consisting of low-resolution topology search, high-resolution refinement, and molecular dynamics simulation to predict the tertiary structure of proteins from the primary structure alone or including distance restraints either from predicted residue-residue contacts, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear overhauser effect (NOE) experiments, or mass spectroscopy (MS) cross-linking (XL) data. The protein structure prediction pipeline was evaluated in the CASP11 experiment on twenty regular protein targets as well as thirty-three 'assisted' protein targets, which also had distance restraints available. Although the low-resolution topology search module was able to sample models with a global distance test total score (GDT_TS) value greater than 30% for twelve out of twenty proteins, frequently it was not possible to select the most accurate models for refinement, resulting in a general decay of model quality over the course of the prediction pipeline. In this study, we provide a detailed overall analysis, study one target protein in more detail as it travels through the protein structure prediction pipeline, and evaluate the impact of limited experimental data.

  18. PREDICTING TOXICOLOGICAL ENDPOINTS OF CHEMICALS USING QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS (QSARS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) are being developed to predict the toxicological endpoints for untested chemicals similar in structure to chemicals that have known experimental toxicological data. Based on a very large number of predetermined descriptors, a...

  19. STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP STUIDES AND THEIR ROLE IN PREDICTING AND INVESTIGATING CHEMICAL TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Structure-Activity Relationship Studies and their Role in Predicting and Investigating Chemical Toxicity

    Structure-activity relationships (SAR) represent attempts to generalize chemical information relative to biological activity for the twin purposes of generating insigh...

  20. Prediction of structure-borne sound transmission in large welded ship structures using statistical energy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynná, P.; Klinge, P.; Vuoksinen, J.

    1995-03-01

    An efficient method is presented for the prediction of structure-borne sound transmission in large welded ship structures. SEA (Statistical Energy Analysis) is used, and the equations used for the SEA parameters are also presented. Traditionally, the SEA method requires a great deal of work when steel structures are modelled. It is almost impossible to prepare models manually for large structures such as ships. In the method developed, the preprocessing programs used in the context of the finite element method (FEM) are applied to reduce the modelling work. To date, one-dimensional beam, two-dimensional triangular and quadrilateral plate, and three-dimensional volume elements have been implemented. The assemblage of the loss factor matrix is made in a manner analogous to the stiffness matrix in FEM. In the computer implementation of the SEA program, standard FEM techniques are used to reduce calculation time, including the skyline matrix technique and LDLT-matrix decomposition of the loss factor matrix. The effectiveness of the present method is illustrated by the computer run of the model of the passenger cruise vessel, which contained over 5000 elements and 17 000 coupling branches. It took only 17 min in the Iris Indigo R4000 workstation. Application calculations for an echo sweeping vessel, a timber-container carrier, and a passenger cruise vessel are discussed, and comparison is made with full scale measurements.

  1. Optimal Mutation Sites for PRE Data Collection and Membrane Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huiling; Ji, Fei; Olman, Victor; Mobley, Charles K.; Liu, Yizhou; Zhou, Yunpeng; Bushweller, John H.; Prestegard, James H.; Xu, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Summary NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) measures long-range distances to isotopically labeled residues, providing useful constraints for protein structure prediction. The method usually requires labor-intensive conjugation of nitroxide labels to multiple locations on the protein, one at a time. Here a computational procedure, based on protein sequence and simple secondary structure models, is presented to facilitate optimal placement of a minimum number of labels needed to determine the correct topology of a helical transmembrane protein. Test on DsbB (4 helices) using just one label leads to correct topology prediction in four of five cases, with the predicted structures <6Å to the native structure. Benchmark results using simulated PRE data show we can generally predict correct topology for five and six-to-seven helices using two and three labels, respectively, with an average success rate of 76% and structures of similar precision, showing promises in facilitating experimentally constrained structure prediction of membrane proteins. PMID:21481772

  2. Predicting Gene Structures from Multiple RT-PCR Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kováč, Jakub; Vinař, Tomáš; Brejová, Broňa

    It has been demonstrated that the use of additional information such as ESTs and protein homology can significantly improve accuracy of gene prediction. However, many sources of external information are still being omitted from consideration. Here, we investigate the use of product lengths from RT-PCR experiments in gene finding. We present hardness results and practical algorithms for several variants of the problem and apply our methods to a real RT-PCR data set in the Drosophila genome. We conclude that the use of RT-PCR data can improve the sensitivity of gene prediction and locate novel splicing variants.

  3. Perspective: Role of structure prediction in materials discovery and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needs, Richard J.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2016-05-01

    Materials informatics owes much to bioinformatics and the Materials Genome Initiative has been inspired by the Human Genome Project. But there is more to bioinformatics than genomes, and the same is true for materials informatics. Here we describe the rapidly expanding role of searching for structures of materials using first-principles electronic-structure methods. Structure searching has played an important part in unraveling structures of dense hydrogen and in identifying the record-high-temperature superconducting component in hydrogen sulfide at high pressures. We suggest that first-principles structure searching has already demonstrated its ability to determine structures of a wide range of materials and that it will play a central and increasing part in materials discovery and design.

  4. Probabilistic predictions of penetrating injury to anatomic structures.

    PubMed Central

    Ogunyemi, O.; Webber, B.; Clarke, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an interactive 3D graphical system which allows the user to visualize different bullet path hypotheses and stab wound paths and computes the probability that an anatomical structure associated with a given penetration path is injured. Probabilities can help to identify those anatomical structures which have potentially critical damage from penetrating trauma and differentiate these from structures that are not seriously injured. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9357718

  5. Prediction of Harmful Human Health Effects of Chemicals from Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Mark T. D.

    There is a great need to assess the harmful effects of chemicals to which man is exposed. Various in silico techniques including chemical grouping and category formation, as well as the use of (Q)SARs can be applied to predict the toxicity of chemicals for a number of toxicological effects. This chapter provides an overview of the state of the art of the prediction of the harmful effects of chemicals to human health. A variety of existing data can be used to obtain information; many such data are formalized into freely available and commercial databases. (Q)SARs can be developed (as illustrated with reference to skin sensitization) for local and global data sets. In addition, chemical grouping techniques can be applied on "similar" chemicals to allow for read-across predictions. Many "expert systems" are now available that incorporate these approaches. With these in silico approaches available, the techniques to apply them successfully have become essential. Integration of different in silico approaches with each other, as well as with other alternative approaches, e.g., in vitro and -omics through the development of integrated testing strategies, will assist in the more efficient prediction of the harmful health effects of chemicals

  6. The Predictive Validity of the Structured Assessment of Violence Risk in Youth in Secondary Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGowan, Mark R.; Horn, Robert A.; Mellott, Ramona N.

    2011-01-01

    Current developments in violence risk assessment warrant consideration for use within educational settings. Using a structured professional judgment (SPJ) model, the present study investigated the predictive validity of the Structured Assessment of Violence in Youth (SAVRY) within educational settings. The predictive accuracy of the SAVRY scales…

  7. Statistical mechanical modeling of RNA folding: from free energy landscape to tertiary structural prediction

    PubMed Central

    CAO, Song; CHEN, Shi-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the success of computational methods for predicting RNA secondary structure, the problem of predicting RNA tertiary structure folding remains. Low-resolution structural models show promise as they allow for rigorous statistical mechanical computation for the conformational entropies, free energies, and the coarse-grained structures of tertiary folds. Molecular dynamics refinement of coarse-grained structures leads to all-atom 3D structures. Modeling based on statistical mechanics principles also has the unique advantage of predicting the full free energy landscape, including local minima and the global free energy minimum. The energy landscapes combined with the 3D structures form the basis for quantitative predictions of RNA functions. In this chapter, we present an overview of statistical mechanical models for RNA folding and then focus on a recently developed RNA statistical mechanical model -- the Vfold model. The main emphasis is placed on the physics underpinning the models, the computational strategies, and the connections to RNA biology. PMID:27293312

  8. Superfamily Assignments for the Yeast Proteome through Integration of Structure Prediction with the Gene Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Malmström, Lars; Riffle, Michael; Strauss, Charlie E. M; Chivian, Dylan; Davis, Trisha N; Bonneau, Richard; Baker, David

    2007-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best-studied model organisms, yet the three-dimensional structure and molecular function of many yeast proteins remain unknown. Yeast proteins were parsed into 14,934 domains, and those lacking sequence similarity to proteins of known structure were folded using the Rosetta de novo structure prediction method on the World Community Grid. This structural data was integrated with process, component, and function annotations from the Saccharomyces Genome Database to assign yeast protein domains to SCOP superfamilies using a simple Bayesian approach. We have predicted the structure of 3,338 putative domains and assigned SCOP superfamily annotations to 581 of them. We have also assigned structural annotations to 7,094 predicted domains based on fold recognition and homology modeling methods. The domain predictions and structural information are available in an online database at http://rd.plos.org/10.1371_journal.pbio.0050076_01. PMID:17373854

  9. Superfamily assignments for the yeast proteome through integration of structure prediction with the gene ontology.

    PubMed

    Malmström, Lars; Riffle, Michael; Strauss, Charlie E M; Chivian, Dylan; Davis, Trisha N; Bonneau, Richard; Baker, David

    2007-04-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best-studied model organisms, yet the three-dimensional structure and molecular function of many yeast proteins remain unknown. Yeast proteins were parsed into 14,934 domains, and those lacking sequence similarity to proteins of known structure were folded using the Rosetta de novo structure prediction method on the World Community Grid. This structural data was integrated with process, component, and function annotations from the Saccharomyces Genome Database to assign yeast protein domains to SCOP superfamilies using a simple Bayesian approach. We have predicted the structure of 3,338 putative domains and assigned SCOP superfamily annotations to 581 of them. We have also assigned structural annotations to 7,094 predicted domains based on fold recognition and homology modeling methods. The domain predictions and structural information are available in an online database at http://rd.plos.org/10.1371_journal.pbio.0050076_01.

  10. Pfold: RNA secondary structure prediction using stochastic context-free grammars.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Bjarne; Hein, Jotun

    2003-07-01

    RNA secondary structures are important in many biological processes and efficient structure prediction can give vital directions for experimental investigations. Many available programs for RNA secondary structure prediction only use a single sequence at a time. This may be sufficient in some applications, but often it is possible to obtain related RNA sequences with conserved secondary structure. These should be included in structural analyses to give improved results. This work presents a practical way of predicting RNA secondary structure that is especially useful when related sequences can be obtained. The method improves a previous algorithm based on an explicit evolutionary model and a probabilistic model of structures. Predictions can be done on a web server at http://www.daimi.au.dk/~compbio/pfold.

  11. Finite Element Based HWB Centerbody Structural Optimization and Weight Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gern, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a scalable structural model suitable for Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) centerbody analysis and optimization. The geometry of the centerbody and primary wing structure is based on a Vehicle Sketch Pad (VSP) surface model of the aircraft and a FLOPS compatible parameterization of the centerbody. Structural analysis, optimization, and weight calculation are based on a Nastran finite element model of the primary HWB structural components, featuring centerbody, mid section, and outboard wing. Different centerbody designs like single bay or multi-bay options are analyzed and weight calculations are compared to current FLOPS results. For proper structural sizing and weight estimation, internal pressure and maneuver flight loads are applied. Results are presented for aerodynamic loads, deformations, and centerbody weight.

  12. Statistical potential for assessment and prediction of protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Min-yi; Sali, Andrej

    2006-01-01

    Protein structures in the Protein Data Bank provide a wealth of data about the interactions that determine the native states of proteins. Using the probability theory, we derive an atomic distance-dependent statistical potential from a sample of native structures that does not depend on any adjustable parameters (Discrete Optimized Protein Energy, or DOPE). DOPE is based on an improved reference state that corresponds to noninteracting atoms in a homogeneous sphere with the radius dependent on a sample native structure; it thus accounts for the finite and spherical shape of the native structures. The DOPE potential was extracted from a nonredundant set of 1472 crystallographic structures. We tested DOPE and five other scoring functions by the detection of the native state among six multiple target decoy sets, the correlation between the score and model error, and the identification of the most accurate non-native structure in the decoy set. For all decoy sets, DOPE is the best performing function in terms of all criteria, except for a tie in one criterion for one decoy set. To facilitate its use in various applications, such as model assessment, loop modeling, and fitting into cryo-electron microscopy mass density maps combined with comparative protein structure modeling, DOPE was incorporated into the modeling package MODELLER-8. PMID:17075131

  13. Principles for Predicting RNA Secondary Structure Design Difficulty.

    PubMed

    Anderson-Lee, Jeff; Fisker, Eli; Kosaraju, Vineet; Wu, Michelle; Kong, Justin; Lee, Jeehyung; Lee, Minjae; Zada, Mathew; Treuille, Adrien; Das, Rhiju

    2016-02-27

    Designing RNAs that form specific secondary structures is enabling better understanding and control of living systems through RNA-guided silencing, genome editing and protein organization. Little is known, however, about which RNA secondary structures might be tractable for downstream sequence design, increasing the time and expense of design efforts due to inefficient secondary structure choices. Here, we present insights into specific structural features that increase the difficulty of finding sequences that fold into a target RNA secondary structure, summarizing the design efforts of tens of thousands of human participants and three automated algorithms (RNAInverse, INFO-RNA and RNA-SSD) in the Eterna massive open laboratory. Subsequent tests through three independent RNA design algorithms (NUPACK, DSS-Opt and MODENA) confirmed the hypothesized importance of several features in determining design difficulty, including sequence length, mean stem length, symmetry and specific difficult-to-design motifs such as zigzags. Based on these results, we have compiled an Eterna100 benchmark of 100 secondary structure design challenges that span a large range in design difficulty to help test future efforts. Our in silico results suggest new routes for improving computational RNA design methods and for extending these insights to assess "designability" of single RNA structures, as well as of switches for in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:26902426

  14. Principles for Predicting RNA Secondary Structure Design Difficulty.

    PubMed

    Anderson-Lee, Jeff; Fisker, Eli; Kosaraju, Vineet; Wu, Michelle; Kong, Justin; Lee, Jeehyung; Lee, Minjae; Zada, Mathew; Treuille, Adrien; Das, Rhiju

    2016-02-27

    Designing RNAs that form specific secondary structures is enabling better understanding and control of living systems through RNA-guided silencing, genome editing and protein organization. Little is known, however, about which RNA secondary structures might be tractable for downstream sequence design, increasing the time and expense of design efforts due to inefficient secondary structure choices. Here, we present insights into specific structural features that increase the difficulty of finding sequences that fold into a target RNA secondary structure, summarizing the design efforts of tens of thousands of human participants and three automated algorithms (RNAInverse, INFO-RNA and RNA-SSD) in the Eterna massive open laboratory. Subsequent tests through three independent RNA design algorithms (NUPACK, DSS-Opt and MODENA) confirmed the hypothesized importance of several features in determining design difficulty, including sequence length, mean stem length, symmetry and specific difficult-to-design motifs such as zigzags. Based on these results, we have compiled an Eterna100 benchmark of 100 secondary structure design challenges that span a large range in design difficulty to help test future efforts. Our in silico results suggest new routes for improving computational RNA design methods and for extending these insights to assess "designability" of single RNA structures, as well as of switches for in vitro and in vivo applications.

  15. Prediction of gene expression in embryonic structures of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Samsonova, Anastasia A; Niranjan, Mahesan; Russell, Steven; Brazma, Alvis

    2007-07-01

    Understanding how sets of genes are coordinately regulated in space and time to generate the diversity of cell types that characterise complex metazoans is a major challenge in modern biology. The use of high-throughput approaches, such as large-scale in situ hybridisation and genome-wide expression profiling via DNA microarrays, is beginning to provide insights into the complexities of development. However, in many organisms the collection and annotation of comprehensive in situ localisation data is a difficult and time-consuming task. Here, we present a widely applicable computational approach, integrating developmental time-course microarray data with annotated in situ hybridisation studies, that facilitates the de novo prediction of tissue-specific expression for genes that have no in vivo gene expression localisation data available. Using a classification approach, trained with data from microarray and in situ hybridisation studies of gene expression during Drosophila embryonic development, we made a set of predictions on the tissue-specific expression of Drosophila genes that have not been systematically characterised by in situ hybridisation experiments. The reliability of our predictions is confirmed by literature-derived annotations in FlyBase, by overrepresentation of Gene Ontology biological process annotations, and, in a selected set, by detailed gene-specific studies from the literature. Our novel organism-independent method will be of considerable utility in enriching the annotation of gene function and expression in complex multicellular organisms.

  16. Exponential repulsion improves structural predictability of molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Bazgier, Václav; Berka, Karel; Otyepka, Michal; Banáš, Pavel

    2016-10-30

    Molecular docking is a powerful tool for theoretical prediction of the preferred conformation and orientation of small molecules within protein active sites. The obtained poses can be used for estimation of binding energies, which indicate the inhibition effect of designed inhibitors, and therefore might be used for in silico drug design. However, the evaluation of ligand binding affinity critically depends on successful prediction of the native binding mode. Contemporary docking methods are often based on scoring functions derived from molecular mechanical potentials. In such potentials, nonbonded interactions are typically represented by electrostatic interactions between atom-centered partial charges and standard 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential. Here, we present implementation and testing of a scoring function based on more physically justified exponential repulsion instead of the standard Lennard-Jones potential. We found that this scoring function significantly improved prediction of the native binding modes in proteins bearing narrow active sites such as serine proteases and kinases. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27620738

  17. Climate and species richness predict the phylogenetic structure of African mammal communities.

    PubMed

    Kamilar, Jason M; Beaudrot, Lydia; Reed, Kaye E

    2015-01-01

    We have little knowledge of how climatic variation (and by proxy, habitat variation) influences the phylogenetic structure of tropical communities. Here, we quantified the phylogenetic structure of mammal communities in Africa to investigate how community structure varies with respect to climate and species richness variation across the continent. In addition, we investigated how phylogenetic patterns vary across carnivores, primates, and ungulates. We predicted that climate would differentially affect the structure of communities from different clades due to between-clade biological variation. We examined 203 communities using two metrics, the net relatedness (NRI) and nearest taxon (NTI) indices. We used simultaneous autoregressive models to predict community phylogenetic structure from climate variables and species richness. We found that most individual communities exhibited a phylogenetic structure consistent with a null model, but both climate and species richness significantly predicted variation in community phylogenetic metrics. Using NTI, species rich communities were composed of more distantly related taxa for all mammal communities, as well as for communities of carnivorans or ungulates. Temperature seasonality predicted the phylogenetic structure of mammal, carnivoran, and ungulate communities, and annual rainfall predicted primate community structure. Additional climate variables related to temperature and rainfall also predicted the phylogenetic structure of ungulate communities. We suggest that both past interspecific competition and habitat filtering have shaped variation in tropical mammal communities. The significant effect of climatic factors on community structure has important implications for the diversity of mammal communities given current models of future climate change.

  18. Climate and Species Richness Predict the Phylogenetic Structure of African Mammal Communities

    PubMed Central

    Kamilar, Jason M.; Beaudrot, Lydia; Reed, Kaye E.

    2015-01-01

    We have little knowledge of how climatic variation (and by proxy, habitat variation) influences the phylogenetic structure of tropical communities. Here, we quantified the phylogenetic structure of mammal communities in Africa to investigate how community structure varies with respect to climate and species richness variation across the continent. In addition, we investigated how phylogenetic patterns vary across carnivores, primates, and ungulates. We predicted that climate would differentially affect the structure of communities from different clades due to between-clade biological variation. We examined 203 communities using two metrics, the net relatedness (NRI) and nearest taxon (NTI) indices. We used simultaneous autoregressive models to predict community phylogenetic structure from climate variables and species richness. We found that most individual communities exhibited a phylogenetic structure consistent with a null model, but both climate and species richness significantly predicted variation in community phylogenetic metrics. Using NTI, species rich communities were composed of more distantly related taxa for all mammal communities, as well as for communities of carnivorans or ungulates. Temperature seasonality predicted the phylogenetic structure of mammal, carnivoran, and ungulate communities, and annual rainfall predicted primate community structure. Additional climate variables related to temperature and rainfall also predicted the phylogenetic structure of ungulate communities. We suggest that both past interspecific competition and habitat filtering have shaped variation in tropical mammal communities. The significant effect of climatic factors on community structure has important implications for the diversity of mammal communities given current models of future climate change. PMID:25875361

  19. Knowledge base and neural network approach for protein secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Maulika S; Mazumdar, Himanshu S

    2014-11-21

    Protein structure prediction is of great relevance given the abundant genomic and proteomic data generated by the genome sequencing projects. Protein secondary structure prediction is addressed as a sub task in determining the protein tertiary structure and function. In this paper, a novel algorithm, KB-PROSSP-NN, which is a combination of knowledge base and modeling of the exceptions in the knowledge base using neural networks for protein secondary structure prediction (PSSP), is proposed. The knowledge base is derived from a proteomic sequence-structure database and consists of the statistics of association between the 5-residue words and corresponding secondary structure. The predicted results obtained using knowledge base are refined with a Backpropogation neural network algorithm. Neural net models the exceptions of the knowledge base. The Q3 accuracy of 90% and 82% is achieved on the RS126 and CB396 test sets respectively which suggest improvement over existing state of art methods.

  20. μABC: a systematic microsecond molecular dynamics study of tetranucleotide sequence effects in B-DNA

    PubMed Central

    Pasi, Marco; Maddocks, John H.; Beveridge, David; Bishop, Thomas C.; Case, David A.; Cheatham, Thomas; Dans, Pablo D.; Jayaram, B.; Lankas, Filip; Laughton, Charles; Mitchell, Jonathan; Osman, Roman; Orozco, Modesto; Pérez, Alberto; Petkevičiūtė, Daiva; Spackova, Nada; Sponer, Jiri; Zakrzewska, Krystyna; Lavery, Richard

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of microsecond molecular dynamics simulations carried out by the ABC group of laboratories on a set of B-DNA oligomers containing the 136 distinct tetranucleotide base sequences. We demonstrate that the resulting trajectories have extensively sampled the conformational space accessible to B-DNA at room temperature. We confirm that base sequence effects depend strongly not only on the specific base pair step, but also on the specific base pairs that flank each step. Beyond sequence effects on average helical parameters and conformational fluctuations, we also identify tetranucleotide sequences that oscillate between several distinct conformational substates. By analyzing the conformation of the phosphodiester backbones, it is possible to understand for which sequences these substates will arise, and what impact they will have on specific helical parameters. PMID:25260586

  1. Prediction of structural features and application to outer membrane protein identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Renxiang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Huang, Lanqing; Yan, Feidi; Xue, Xiaoyu; Cai, Weiwen

    2015-06-01

    Protein three-dimensional (3D) structures provide insightful information in many fields of biology. One-dimensional properties derived from 3D structures such as secondary structure, residue solvent accessibility, residue depth and backbone torsion angles are helpful to protein function prediction, fold recognition and ab initio folding. Here, we predict various structural features with the assistance of neural network learning. Based on an independent test dataset, protein secondary structure prediction generates an overall Q3 accuracy of ~80%. Meanwhile, the prediction of relative solvent accessibility obtains the highest mean absolute error of 0.164, and prediction of residue depth achieves the lowest mean absolute error of 0.062. We further improve the outer membrane protein identification by including the predicted structural features in a scoring function using a simple profile-to-profile alignment. The results demonstrate that the accuracy of outer membrane protein identification can be improved by ~3% at a 1% false positive level when structural features are incorporated. Finally, our methods are available as two convenient and easy-to-use programs. One is PSSM-2-Features for predicting secondary structure, relative solvent accessibility, residue depth and backbone torsion angles, the other is PPA-OMP for identifying outer membrane proteins from proteomes.

  2. RNA-Puzzles Round II: assessment of RNA structure prediction programs applied to three large RNA structures.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhichao; Adamiak, Ryszard W; Blanchet, Marc-Frédérick; Boniecki, Michal; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Chen, Shi-Jie; Cheng, Clarence; Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Cordero, Pablo; Cruz, José Almeida; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R; Das, Rhiju; Ding, Feng; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Kladwang, Wipapat; Krokhotin, Andrey; Lach, Grzegorz; Magnus, Marcin; Major, François; Mann, Thomas H; Masquida, Benoît; Matelska, Dorota; Meyer, Mélanie; Peselis, Alla; Popenda, Mariusz; Purzycka, Katarzyna J; Serganov, Alexander; Stasiewicz, Juliusz; Szachniuk, Marta; Tandon, Arpit; Tian, Siqi; Wang, Jian; Xiao, Yi; Xu, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jinwei; Zhao, Peinan; Zok, Tomasz; Westhof, Eric

    2015-06-01

    This paper is a report of a second round of RNA-Puzzles, a collective and blind experiment in three-dimensional (3D) RNA structure prediction. Three puzzles, Puzzles 5, 6, and 10, represented sequences of three large RNA structures with limited or no homology with previously solved RNA molecules. A lariat-capping ribozyme, as well as riboswitches complexed to adenosylcobalamin and tRNA, were predicted by seven groups using RNAComposer, ModeRNA/SimRNA, Vfold, Rosetta, DMD, MC-Fold, 3dRNA, and AMBER refinement. Some groups derived models using data from state-of-the-art chemical-mapping methods (SHAPE, DMS, CMCT, and mutate-and-map). The comparisons between the predictions and the three subsequently released crystallographic structures, solved at diffraction resolutions of 2.5-3.2 Å, were carried out automatically using various sets of quality indicators. The comparisons clearly demonstrate the state of present-day de novo prediction abilities as well as the limitations of these state-of-the-art methods. All of the best prediction models have similar topologies to the native structures, which suggests that computational methods for RNA structure prediction can already provide useful structural information for biological problems. However, the prediction accuracy for non-Watson-Crick interactions, key to proper folding of RNAs, is low and some predicted models had high Clash Scores. These two difficulties point to some of the continuing bottlenecks in RNA structure prediction. All submitted models are available for download at http://ahsoka.u-strasbg.fr/rnapuzzles/.

  3. RNA-Puzzles Round II: assessment of RNA structure prediction programs applied to three large RNA structures

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Zhichao; Adamiak, Ryszard W.; Blanchet, Marc-Frédérick; Boniecki, Michal; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Chen, Shi-Jie; Cheng, Clarence; Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Cordero, Pablo; Cruz, José Almeida; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R.; Das, Rhiju; Ding, Feng; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Kladwang, Wipapat; Krokhotin, Andrey; Lach, Grzegorz; Magnus, Marcin; Major, François; Mann, Thomas H.; Masquida, Benoît; Matelska, Dorota; Meyer, Mélanie; Peselis, Alla; Popenda, Mariusz; Purzycka, Katarzyna J.; Serganov, Alexander; Stasiewicz, Juliusz; Szachniuk, Marta; Tandon, Arpit; Tian, Siqi; Wang, Jian; Xiao, Yi; Xu, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jinwei; Zhao, Peinan; Zok, Tomasz; Westhof, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a report of a second round of RNA-Puzzles, a collective and blind experiment in three-dimensional (3D) RNA structure prediction. Three puzzles, Puzzles 5, 6, and 10, represented sequences of three large RNA structures with limited or no homology with previously solved RNA molecules. A lariat-capping ribozyme, as well as riboswitches complexed to adenosylcobalamin and tRNA, were predicted by seven groups using RNAComposer, ModeRNA/SimRNA, Vfold, Rosetta, DMD, MC-Fold, 3dRNA, and AMBER refinement. Some groups derived models using data from state-of-the-art chemical-mapping methods (SHAPE, DMS, CMCT, and mutate-and-map). The comparisons between the predictions and the three subsequently released crystallographic structures, solved at diffraction resolutions of 2.5–3.2 Å, were carried out automatically using various sets of quality indicators. The comparisons clearly demonstrate the state of present-day de novo prediction abilities as well as the limitations of these state-of-the-art methods. All of the best prediction models have similar topologies to the native structures, which suggests that computational methods for RNA structure prediction can already provide useful structural information for biological problems. However, the prediction accuracy for non-Watson–Crick interactions, key to proper folding of RNAs, is low and some predicted models had high Clash Scores. These two difficulties point to some of the continuing bottlenecks in RNA structure prediction. All submitted models are available for download at http://ahsoka.u-strasbg.fr/rnapuzzles/. PMID:25883046

  4. Evaluating the accuracy of SHAPE-directed RNA secondary structure predictions.

    PubMed

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Swenson, M Shel; Kjems, Jørgen; Heitsch, Christine E

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in RNA structure determination include using data from high-throughput probing experiments to improve thermodynamic prediction accuracy. We evaluate the extent and nature of improvements in data-directed predictions for a diverse set of 16S/18S ribosomal sequences using a stochastic model of experimental SHAPE data. The average accuracy for 1000 data-directed predictions always improves over the original minimum free energy (MFE) structure. However, the amount of improvement varies with the sequence, exhibiting a correlation with MFE accuracy. Further analysis of this correlation shows that accurate MFE base pairs are typically preserved in a data-directed prediction, whereas inaccurate ones are not. Thus, the positive predictive value of common base pairs is consistently higher than the directed prediction accuracy. Finally, we confirm sequence dependencies in the directability of thermodynamic predictions and investigate the potential for greater accuracy improvements in the worst performing test sequence.

  5. A set of nearest neighbor parameters for predicting the enthalpy change of RNA secondary structure formation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhi John; Turner, Douglas H.; Mathews, David H.

    2006-01-01

    A complete set of nearest neighbor parameters to predict the enthalpy change of RNA secondary structure formation was derived. These parameters can be used with available free energy nearest neighbor parameters to extend the secondary structure prediction of RNA sequences to temperatures other than 37°C. The parameters were tested by predicting the secondary structures of sequences with known secondary structure that are from organisms with known optimal growth temperatures. Compared with the previous set of enthalpy nearest neighbor parameters, the sensitivity of base pair prediction improved from 65.2 to 68.9% at optimal growth temperatures ranging from 10 to 60°C. Base pair probabilities were predicted with a partition function and the positive predictive value of structure prediction is 90.4% when considering the base pairs in the lowest free energy structure with pairing probability of 0.99 or above. Moreover, a strong correlation is found between the predicted melting temperatures of RNA sequences and the optimal growth temperatures of the host organism. This indicates that organisms that live at higher temperatures have evolved RNA sequences with higher melting temperatures. PMID:16982646

  6. The unexpected structure of the designed protein Octarellin V.1 forms a challenge for protein structure prediction tools.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Maximiliano; Sleutel, Mike; Vandevenne, Marylene; Parvizi, Gregory; Attout, Sophie; Jacquin, Olivier; Vandenameele, Julie; Fischer, Axel W; Damblon, Christian; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Valerio-Lepiniec, Marie; Urvoas, Agathe; Durand, Dominique; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Minard, Philippe; Maes, Dominique; Meiler, Jens; Matagne, André; Martial, Joseph A; Van de Weerdt, Cécile

    2016-07-01

    Despite impressive successes in protein design, designing a well-folded protein of more 100 amino acids de novo remains a formidable challenge. Exploiting the promising biophysical features of the artificial protein Octarellin V, we improved this protein by directed evolution, thus creating a more stable and soluble protein: Octarellin V.1. Next, we obtained crystals of Octarellin V.1 in complex with crystallization chaperons and determined the tertiary structure. The experimental structure of Octarellin V.1 differs from its in silico design: the (αβα) sandwich architecture bears some resemblance to a Rossman-like fold instead of the intended TIM-barrel fold. This surprising result gave us a unique and attractive opportunity to test the state of the art in protein structure prediction, using this artificial protein free of any natural selection. We tested 13 automated webservers for protein structure prediction and found none of them to predict the actual structure. More than 50% of them predicted a TIM-barrel fold, i.e. the structure we set out to design more than 10years ago. In addition, local software runs that are human operated can sample a structure similar to the experimental one but fail in selecting it, suggesting that the scoring and ranking functions should be improved. We propose that artificial proteins could be used as tools to test the accuracy of protein structure prediction algorithms, because their lack of evolutionary pressure and unique sequences features.

  7. A Structural Equation Model for Predicting Business Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pomykalski, James J.; Dion, Paul; Brock, James L.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the authors developed a structural equation model that accounted for 79% of the variability of a student's final grade point average by using a sample size of 147 students. The model is based on student grades in 4 foundational business courses: introduction to business, macroeconomics, statistics, and using databases. Educators and…

  8. Structure Building Predicts Grades in College Psychology and Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Kathleen M.; Daniel, David B.; Jensen, Jamie L.; McDaniel, Mark A.; Marsh, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Knowing what skills underlie college success can allow students, teachers, and universities to identify and to help at-risk students. One skill that may underlie success across a variety of subject areas is structure building, the ability to create mental representations of narratives (Gernsbacher, Varner, & Faust, 1990). We tested if…

  9. Validation of finite element and boundary element methods for predicting structural vibration and radiated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Wu, X. F.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical and experimental validation of methods to predict structural vibration and radiated noise are presented. A rectangular box excited by a mechanical shaker was used as a vibrating structure. Combined finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM) models of the apparatus were used to predict the noise radiated from the box. The FEM was used to predict the vibration, and the surface vibration was used as input to the BEM to predict the sound intensity and sound power. Vibration predicted by the FEM model was validated by experimental modal analysis. Noise predicted by the BEM was validated by sound intensity measurements. Three types of results are presented for the total radiated sound power: (1) sound power predicted by the BEM modeling using vibration data measured on the surface of the box; (2) sound power predicted by the FEM/BEM model; and (3) sound power measured by a sound intensity scan. The sound power predicted from the BEM model using measured vibration data yields an excellent prediction of radiated noise. The sound power predicted by the combined FEM/BEM model also gives a good prediction of radiated noise except for a shift of the natural frequencies that are due to limitations in the FEM model.

  10. A Historical Perspective and Overview of Protein Structure Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooley, John C.; Ye, Yuzhen

    Carrying on many different biological functions, proteins are all composed of one or more polypeptide chains, each containing from several to hundreds or even thousands of the 20 amino acids. During the 1950s at the dawn of modern biochemistry, an essential question for biochemists was to understand the structure and function of these polypeptide chains. The sequences of protein, also referred to as their primary structures, determine the different chemical properties for different proteins, and thus continue to captivate much of the attention of biochemists. As an early step in characterizing protein chemistry, British biochemist Frederick Sanger designed an experimental method to identify the sequence of insulin (Sanger et al., 1955). He became the first person to obtain the primary structure of a protein and in 1958 won his first Nobel Price in Chemistry. This important progress in sequencing did not answer the question of whether a single (individual) protein has a distinctive shape in three dimensions (3D), and if so, what factors determine its 3D architecture. However, during the period when Sanger was studying the primary structure of proteins, American biochemist Christian Anfinsen observed that the active polypeptide chain of a model protein, bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase), could fold spontaneously into a unique 3D structure, which was later called native conformation of the protein (Anfinsen et al., 1954). Anfinsen also studied the refolding of RNase enzyme and observed that an enzyme unfolded under extreme chemical environment could refold spontaneously back into its native conformation upon changing the environment back to natural conditions (Anfinsen et al., 1961). By 1962, Anfinsen had developed his theory of protein folding (which was summarized in his 1972 Nobel acceptance speech): "The native conformation is determined by the totality of interatomic interactions and hence, by the amino acid sequence, in a given environment."

  11. The Prediction of Botulinum Toxin Structure Based on in Silico and in Vitro Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Tomonori; Miyazaki, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    Many of biological system mediated through protein-protein interactions. Knowledge of protein-protein complex structure is required for understanding the function. The determination of huge size and flexible protein-protein complex structure by experimental studies remains difficult, costly and five-consuming, therefore computational prediction of protein structures by homolog modeling and docking studies is valuable method. In addition, MD simulation is also one of the most powerful methods allowing to see the real dynamics of proteins. Here, we predict protein-protein complex structure of botulinum toxin to analyze its property. These bioinformatics methods are useful to report the relation between the flexibility of backbone structure and the activity.

  12. Ab initio NMR Confirmed Evolutionary Structure Prediction for Organic Molecular Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Cong-Huy; Kucukbenli, Emine; de Gironcoli, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    Ab initio crystal structure prediction of even small organic compounds is extremely challenging due to polymorphism, molecular flexibility and difficulties in addressing the dispersion interaction from first principles. We recently implemented vdW-aware density functionals and demonstrated their success in energy ordering of aminoacid crystals. In this work we combine this development with the evolutionary structure prediction method to study cholesterol polymorphs. Cholesterol crystals have paramount importance in various diseases, from cancer to atherosclerosis. The structure of some polymorphs (e.g. ChM, ChAl, ChAh) have already been resolved while some others, which display distinct NMR spectra and are involved in disease formation, are yet to be determined. Here we thoroughly assess the applicability of evolutionary structure prediction to address such real world problems. We validate the newly predicted structures with ab initio NMR chemical shift data using secondary referencing for an improved comparison with experiments.

  13. The structure of evaporating and combusting sprays: Measurements and predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, J. S.; Solomon, A. S. P.; Faeth, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    An apparatus was constructed to provide measurements in open sprays with no zones of recirculation, in order to provide well-defined conditions for use in evaluating spray models. Measurements were completed in a gas jet, in order to test experimental methods, and are currently in progress for nonevaporating sprays. A locally homogeneous flow (LHF) model where interphase transport rates are assumed to be infinitely fast; a separated flow (SF) model which allows for finite interphase transport rates but neglects effects of turbulent fluctuations on drop motion; and a stochastic SF model which considers effects of turbulent fluctuations on drop motion were evaluated using existing data on particle-laden jets. The LHF model generally overestimates rates of particle dispersion while the SF model underestimates dispersion rates. The stochastic SF flow yield satisfactory predictions except at high particle mass loadings where effects of turbulence modulation may have caused the model to overestimate turbulence levels.

  14. The structure of evaporating and combusting sprays: Measurements and predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, J. S.; Solomon, A. S. P.; Faeth, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    An apparatus developed, to allow observations of monodisperse sprays, consists of a methane-fueled turbulent jet diffusion flame with monodisperse methanol drops injected at the burner exit. Mean and fluctuating-phase velocities, drop sizes, drop-mass fluxes and mean-gas temperatures were measured. Initial drop diameters of 100 and 180 microns are being considered in order to vary drop penetration in the flow and effects of turbulent dispersion. Baseline tests of the burner flame with no drops present were also conducted. Calibration tests, needed to establish methods for predicting drop transport, involve drops supported in the post-flame region of a flat-flame burner operated at various mixture ratios. Spray models which are being evaluated include: (1) locally homogeneous flow (LFH) analysis, (2) deterministic separated flow (DSF) analysis and (3) stochastic separated flow (SSF) analysis.

  15. Practical theories for service life prediction of critical aerospace structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Monaghan, Richard C.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1992-01-01

    A new second-order theory was developed for predicting the service lives of aerospace structural components. The predictions based on this new theory were compared with those based on the Ko first-order theory and the classical theory of service life predictions. The new theory gives very accurate service life predictions. An equivalent constant-amplitude stress cycle method was proposed for representing the random load spectrum for crack growth calculations. This method predicts the most conservative service life. The proposed use of minimum detectable crack size, instead of proof load established crack size as an initial crack size for crack growth calculations, could give a more realistic service life.

  16. Hill-Climbing search and diversification within an evolutionary approach to protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Chira, Camelia; Horvath, Dragos; Dumitrescu, D

    2011-01-01

    Proteins are complex structures made of amino acids having a fundamental role in the correct functioning of living cells. The structure of a protein is the result of the protein folding process. However, the general principles that govern the folding of natural proteins into a native structure are unknown. The problem of predicting a protein structure with minimum-energy starting from the unfolded amino acid sequence is a highly complex and important task in molecular and computational biology. Protein structure prediction has important applications in fields such as drug design and disease prediction. The protein structure prediction problem is NP-hard even in simplified lattice protein models. An evolutionary model based on hill-climbing genetic operators is proposed for protein structure prediction in the hydrophobic - polar (HP) model. Problem-specific search operators are implemented and applied using a steepest-ascent hill-climbing approach. Furthermore, the proposed model enforces an explicit diversification stage during the evolution in order to avoid local optimum. The main features of the resulting evolutionary algorithm - hill-climbing mechanism and diversification strategy - are evaluated in a set of numerical experiments for the protein structure prediction problem to assess their impact to the efficiency of the search process. Furthermore, the emerging consolidated model is compared to relevant algorithms from the literature for a set of difficult bidimensional instances from lattice protein models. The results obtained by the proposed algorithm are promising and competitive with those of related methods.

  17. Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impacts: Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfer, N. C.

    1996-01-01

    This handbook reviews the analysis of structural damage on spacecraft due to hypervelocity impacts by meteoroid and space debris. These impacts can potentially cause structural damage to a Space Station module wall. This damage ranges from craters, bulges, minor penetrations, and spall to critical damage associated with a large hole, or even rupture. The analysis of damage depends on a variety of assumptions and the area of most concern is at a velocity beyond well controlled laboratory capability. In the analysis of critical damage, one of the key questions is how much momentum can actually be transfered to the pressure vessel wall. When penetration occurs without maximum bulging at high velocity and obliquities (if less momentum is deposited in the rear wall), then large tears and rupture may be avoided. In analysis of rupture effects of cylindrical geometry, biaxial loading, bending of the crack, a central hole strain rate and R-curve effects are discussed.

  18. Molecular docking studies of phytochemicals from Phyllanthus niruri against Hepatitis B DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Mekha; James, Priyanka; Valsalan, Ravisankar; Nazeem, Puthiyaveetil Abdulla

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the leading cause for liver disorders and can lead to hepatocellular carcinoma, cirrhosis and liver damage which in turn can cause death of patients. HBV DNA Polymerase is essential for HBV replication in the host and hence is used as one of the most potent pharmacological target for the inhibition of HBV. Chronic hepatitis B is currently treated with nucleotide analogues that suppress viral reverse transcriptase activity and most of them are reported to have viral resistance. Therefore, it is of interest to model HBV DNA polymerase to dock known phytochemicals. The present study focuses on homology modeling and molecular docking analysis of phytocompounds from the traditional antidote Phyllanthus niruri and other nucleoside analogues against HBV DNA Polymerase using the software Discovery studio 4.0. 3D structure of HBV DNA Polymerase was predicted based on previously reported alignment. Docking studies revealed that a few phytochemicals from Phyllanthus niruri had good interactions with HBV DNA Polymerase. These compounds had acceptable binding properties for further in vitro validation. Thus the study puts forth experimental validation for traditional antidote and these phytocompounds could be further promoted as potential lead molecule. PMID:26527851

  19. Molecular stripping in the NF-κB/IκB/DNA genetic regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Potoyan, Davit A; Zheng, Weihua; Komives, Elizabeth A; Wolynes, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    Genetic switches based on the [Formula: see text] system are master regulators of an array of cellular responses. Recent kinetic experiments have shown that [Formula: see text] can actively remove NF-κB bound to its genetic sites via a process called "molecular stripping." This allows the [Formula: see text] switch to function under kinetic control rather than the thermodynamic control contemplated in the traditional models of gene switches. Using molecular dynamics simulations of coarse-grained predictive energy landscape models for the constituent proteins by themselves and interacting with the DNA we explore the functional motions of the transcription factor [Formula: see text] and its various binary and ternary complexes with DNA and the inhibitor IκB. These studies show that the function of the [Formula: see text] genetic switch is realized via an allosteric mechanism. Molecular stripping occurs through the activation of a domain twist mode by the binding of [Formula: see text] that occurs through conformational selection. Free energy calculations for DNA binding show that the binding of [Formula: see text] not only results in a significant decrease of the affinity of the transcription factor for the DNA but also kinetically speeds DNA release. Projections of the free energy onto various reaction coordinates reveal the structural details of the stripping pathways.

  20. Genomic-scale comparison of sequence- and structure-based methods of function prediction: Does structure provide additional insight?

    PubMed Central

    Fetrow, Jacquelyn S.; Siew, Naomi; Di Gennaro, Jeannine A.; Martinez-Yamout, Maria; Dyson, H. Jane; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    A function annotation method using the sequence-to-structure-to-function paradigm is applied to the identification of all disulfide oxidoreductases in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. The method identifies 27 sequences as potential disulfide oxidoreductases. All previously known thioredoxins, glutaredoxins, and disulfide isomerases are correctly identified. Three of the 27 predictions are probable false-positives. Three novel predictions, which subsequently have been experimentally validated, are presented. Two additional novel predictions suggest a disulfide oxidoreductase regulatory mechanism for two subunits (OST3 and OST6) of the yeast oligosaccharyltransferase complex. Based on homology, this prediction can be extended to a potential tumor suppressor gene, N33, in humans, whose biochemical function was not previously known. Attempts to obtain a folded, active N33 construct to test the prediction were unsuccessful. The results show that structure prediction coupled with biochemically relevant structural motifs is a powerful method for the function annotation of genome sequences and can provide more detailed, robust predictions than function prediction methods that rely on sequence comparison alone. PMID:11316881

  1. Structure Based Predictive Model for Coal Char Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Hurt; Joseph Calo; Robert Essenhigh; Christopher Hadad

    2000-12-30

    This unique collaborative project has taken a very fundamental look at the origin of structure, and combustion reactivity of coal chars. It was a combined experimental and theoretical effort involving three universities and collaborators from universities outside the U.S. and from U.S. National Laboratories and contract research companies. The project goal was to improve our understanding of char structure and behavior by examining the fundamental chemistry of its polyaromatic building blocks. The project team investigated the elementary oxidative attack on polyaromatic systems, and coupled with a study of the assembly processes that convert these polyaromatic clusters to mature carbon materials (or chars). We believe that the work done in this project has defined a powerful new science-based approach to the understanding of char behavior. The work on aromatic oxidation pathways made extensive use of computational chemistry, and was led by Professor Christopher Hadad in the Department of Chemistry at Ohio State University. Laboratory experiments on char structure, properties, and combustion reactivity were carried out at both OSU and Brown, led by Principle Investigators Joseph Calo, Robert Essenhigh, and Robert Hurt. Modeling activities were divided into two parts: first unique models of crystal structure development were formulated by the team at Brown (PI'S Hurt and Calo) with input from Boston University and significant collaboration with Dr. Alan Kerstein at Sandia and with Dr. Zhong-Ying chen at SAIC. Secondly, new combustion models were developed and tested, led by Professor Essenhigh at OSU, Dieter Foertsch (a collaborator at the University of Stuttgart), and Professor Hurt at Brown. One product of this work is the CBK8 model of carbon burnout, which has already found practical use in CFD codes and in other numerical models of pulverized fuel combustion processes, such as EPRI's NOxLOI Predictor. The remainder of the report consists of detailed technical

  2. GTfold: Enabling parallel RNA secondary structure prediction on multi-core desktops

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Accurate and efficient RNA secondary structure prediction remains an important open problem in computational molecular biology. Historically, advances in computing technology have enabled faster and more accurate RNA secondary structure predictions. Previous parallelized prediction programs achieved significant improvements in runtime, but their implementations were not portable from niche high-performance computers or easily accessible to most RNA researchers. With the increasing prevalence of multi-core desktop machines, a new parallel prediction program is needed to take full advantage of today’s computing technology. Findings We present here the first implementation of RNA secondary structure prediction by thermodynamic optimization for modern multi-core computers. We show that GTfold predicts secondary structure in less time than UNAfold and RNAfold, without sacrificing accuracy, on machines with four or more cores. Conclusions GTfold supports advances in RNA structural biology by reducing the timescales for secondary structure prediction. The difference will be particularly valuable to researchers working with lengthy RNA sequences, such as RNA viral genomes. PMID:22747589

  3. In silico predicted structural and functional robustness of piscine steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hala, D; Huggett, D B

    2014-03-21

    Assessments of metabolic robustness or susceptibility are inherently dependent on quantitative descriptions of network structure and associated function. In this paper a stoichiometric model of piscine steroidogenesis was constructed and constrained with productions of selected steroid hormones. Structural and flux metrics of this in silico model were quantified by calculating extreme pathways and optimal flux distributions (using linear programming). Extreme pathway analysis showed progestin and corticosteroid synthesis reactions to be highly participant in extreme pathways. Furthermore, reaction participation in extreme pathways also fitted a power law distribution (degree exponent γ=2.3), which suggested that progestin and corticosteroid reactions act as 'hubs' capable of generating other functionally relevant pathways required to maintain steady-state functionality of the network. Analysis of cofactor usage (O2 and NADPH) showed progestin synthesis reactions to exhibit high robustness, whereas estrogen productions showed highest energetic demands with low associated robustness to maintain such demands. Linear programming calculated optimal flux distributions showed high heterogeneity of flux values with a near-random power law distribution (degree exponent γ≥2.7). Subsequently, network robustness was tested by assessing maintenance of metabolite flux-sum subject to targeted deletions of rank-ordered (low to high metric) extreme pathway participant and optimal flux reactions. Network robustness was susceptible to deletions of extreme pathway participant reactions, whereas minimal impact of high flux reaction deletion was observed. This analysis shows that the steroid network is susceptible to perturbation of structurally relevant (extreme pathway) reactions rather than those carrying high flux. PMID:24333207

  4. Genotyping Oral Commensal Bacteria to Predict Social Contact and Structure

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Amelia D.; Riley, Lee W.

    2016-01-01

    Social network structure is a fundamental determinant of human health, from infectious to chronic diseases. However, quantitative and unbiased approaches to measuring social network structure are lacking. We hypothesized that genetic relatedness of oral commensal bacteria could be used to infer social contact between humans, just as genetic relatedness of pathogens can be used to determine transmission chains of pathogens. We used a traditional, questionnaire survey-based method to characterize the contact network of the School of Public Health at a large research university. We then collected saliva from a subset of individuals to analyze their oral microflora using a modified deep sequencing multilocus sequence typing (MLST) procedure. We examined micro-evolutionary changes in the S. viridans group to uncover transmission patterns reflecting social network structure. We amplified seven housekeeping gene loci from the Streptococcus viridans group, a group of ubiquitous commensal bacteria, and sequenced the PCR products using next-generation sequencing. By comparing the generated S. viridans reads between pairs of individuals, we reconstructed the social network of the sampled individuals and compared it to the network derived from the questionnaire survey-based method. The genetic relatedness significantly (p-value < 0.001) correlated with social distance in the questionnaire-based network, and the reconstructed network closely matched the network derived from the questionnaire survey-based method. Oral commensal bacterial are thus likely transmitted through routine physical contact or shared environment. Their genetic relatedness can be used to represent a combination of social contact and shared physical space, therefore reconstructing networks of contact. This study provides the first step in developing a method to measure direct social contact based on commensal organism genotyping, potentially capable of unmasking hidden social networks that contribute to

  5. STRUCTURE BASED PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR COAL CHAR COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Hurt; Joseph Calo; Robert Essenhigh; Christopher Hadad

    2001-06-15

    This report is part on the ongoing effort at Brown University and Ohio State University to develop structure based models of coal combustion. A very fundamental approach is taken to the description of coal chars and their reaction processes, and the results are therefore expected to have broad applicability to the spectrum of carbon materials of interest in energy technologies. This quarter, the project was in a period no-cost extension and discussions were held about the end phase of the project and possible continuations. The technical tasks were essentially dormant this period, but presentations of results were made, and plans were formulated for renewed activity in the fiscal year 2001.

  6. Bad to the bone: facial structure predicts unethical behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Haselhuhn, Michael P.; Wong, Elaine M.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers spanning many scientific domains, including primatology, evolutionary biology and psychology, have sought to establish an evolutionary basis for morality. While researchers have identified social and cognitive adaptations that support ethical behaviour, a consensus has emerged that genetically determined physical traits are not reliable signals of unethical intentions or actions. Challenging this view, we show that genetically determined physical traits can serve as reliable predictors of unethical behaviour if they are also associated with positive signals in intersex and intrasex selection. Specifically, we identify a key physical attribute, the facial width-to-height ratio, which predicts unethical behaviour in men. Across two studies, we demonstrate that men with wider faces (relative to facial height) are more likely to explicitly deceive their counterparts in a negotiation, and are more willing to cheat in order to increase their financial gain. Importantly, we provide evidence that the link between facial metrics and unethical behaviour is mediated by a psychological sense of power. Our results demonstrate that static physical attributes can indeed serve as reliable cues of immoral action, and provide additional support for the view that evolutionary forces shape ethical judgement and behaviour. PMID:21733897

  7. Fibpredictor: a computational method for rapid prediction of amyloid fibril structures.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei Ghomi, Hamed; Topp, Elizabeth M; Lill, Markus A

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid fibrils are important in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, and are also a common instability in peptide and protein drug products. Despite their importance, experimental structures of amyloid fibrils in atomistic detail are rare. To address this limitation, we have developed a novel, rapid computational method to predict amyloid fibril structures (Fibpredictor). The method combines β-sheet model building, β-sheet replication, and symmetry operations with side-chain prediction and statistical scoring functions. When applied to nine amyloid fibrils with experimentally determined structures, the method predicted the correct structures of amyloid fibrils and enriched those among the top-ranked structures. These models can be used as the initial heuristic structures for more complicated computational studies. Fibpredictor is available at http://nanohub.org/resources/fibpredictor .

  8. Fibpredictor: a computational method for rapid prediction of amyloid fibril structures.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei Ghomi, Hamed; Topp, Elizabeth M; Lill, Markus A

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid fibrils are important in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, and are also a common instability in peptide and protein drug products. Despite their importance, experimental structures of amyloid fibrils in atomistic detail are rare. To address this limitation, we have developed a novel, rapid computational method to predict amyloid fibril structures (Fibpredictor). The method combines β-sheet model building, β-sheet replication, and symmetry operations with side-chain prediction and statistical scoring functions. When applied to nine amyloid fibrils with experimentally determined structures, the method predicted the correct structures of amyloid fibrils and enriched those among the top-ranked structures. These models can be used as the initial heuristic structures for more complicated computational studies. Fibpredictor is available at http://nanohub.org/resources/fibpredictor . PMID:27502172

  9. Extended Aging Theories for Predictions of Safe Operational Life of Critical Airborne Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Chen, Tony

    2006-01-01

    The previously developed Ko closed-form aging theory has been reformulated into a more compact mathematical form for easier application. A new equivalent loading theory and empirical loading theories have also been developed and incorporated into the revised Ko aging theory for the prediction of a safe operational life of airborne failure-critical structural components. The new set of aging and loading theories were applied to predict the safe number of flights for the B-52B aircraft to carry a launch vehicle, the structural life of critical components consumed by load excursion to proof load value, and the ground-sitting life of B-52B pylon failure-critical structural components. A special life prediction method was developed for the preflight predictions of operational life of failure-critical structural components of the B-52H pylon system, for which no flight data are available.

  10. Combining Evolutionary Information and an Iterative Sampling Strategy for Accurate Protein Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Braun, Tatjana; Koehler Leman, Julia; Lange, Oliver F

    2015-12-01

    Recent work has shown that the accuracy of ab initio structure prediction can be significantly improved by integrating evolutionary information in form of intra-protein residue-residue contacts. Following this seminal result, much effort is put into the improvement of contact predictions. However, there is also a substantial need to develop structure prediction protocols tailored to the type of restraints gained by contact predictions. Here, we present a structure prediction protocol that combines evolutionary information with the resolution-adapted structural recombination approach of Rosetta, called RASREC. Compared to the classic Rosetta ab initio protocol, RASREC achieves improved sampling, better convergence and higher robustness against incorrect distance restraints, making it the ideal sampling strategy for the stated problem. To demonstrate the accuracy of our protocol, we tested the approach on a diverse set of 28 globular proteins. Our method is able to converge for 26 out of the 28 targets and improves the average TM-score of the entire benchmark set from 0.55 to 0.72 when compared to the top ranked models obtained by the EVFold web server using identical contact predictions. Using a smaller benchmark, we furthermore show that the prediction accuracy of our method is only slightly reduced when the contact prediction accuracy is comparatively low. This observation is of special interest for protein sequences that only have a limited number of homologs.

  11. Geometric programming prediction of design trends for OMV protective structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mog, R. A.; Horn, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    The global optimization trends of protective honeycomb structural designs for spacecraft subject to hypervelocity meteroid and space debris are presented. This nonlinear problem is first formulated for weight minimization of the orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) using a generic monomial predictor. Five problem formulations are considered, each dependent on the selection of independent design variables. Each case is optimized by considering the dual geometric programming problem. The dual variables are solved for in terms of the generic estimated exponents of the monomial predictor. The primal variables are then solved for by conversion. Finally, parametric design trends are developed for ranges of the estimated regression parameters. Results specify nonmonotonic relationships for the optimal first and second sheet mass per unit areas in terms of the estimated exponents.

  12. Link prediction based on hyperbolic mapping with community structure for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zuxi; Wu, Yao; Li, Qingguang; Jin, Fengdong; Xiong, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Link prediction is becoming a concerned topic in the complex network field in recent years. However, the existing link prediction methods are unsatisfactory for processing topological information and have high time complexity. This paper presents a novel method of Link Prediction with Community Structure (LPCS) based on hyperbolic mapping. Different from the existing link prediction methods, to utilize global structure information of the network, LPCS deals with the network from an overall perspective. LPCS takes full advantage of the community structure and its hierarchical organization to map networks into hyperbolic space, and obtains the hyperbolic coordinates which depict the global structure information of the network, then uses hyperbolic distance to describe the similarity between the nodes, finally predicts missing links according to the degree of the similarity between unconnected node pairs. The combination of the hyperbolic geometry framework and the community structure makes LPCS perform well in predicting missing links, and the time complexity of LPCS is linear, which makes LPCS can be applied to handle large scale networks in acceptable time. LPCS outperforms many state-of-the-art link prediction methods in the networks obeying power-law degree distribution.

  13. Predicting multi-wall structural response to hypervelocity impact using the hull code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.

    1993-01-01

    Previously, multi-wall structures have been analyzed extensively, primarily through experiment, as a means of increasing the meteoroid/space debris impact protection of spacecraft. As structural configurations become more varied, the number of tests required to characterize their response increases dramatically. As an alternative to experimental testing, numerical modeling of high-speed impact phenomena is often being used to predict the response of a variety of structural systems under different impact loading conditions. The results of comparing experimental tests to Hull Hydrodynamic Computer Code predictions are reported. Also, the results of a numerical parametric study of multi-wall structural response to hypervelocity cylindrical projectile impact are presented.

  14. RNA secondary structure prediction by centroids in a Boltzmann weighted ensemble.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ye; Chan, Chi Yu; Lawrence, Charles E

    2005-08-01

    Prediction of RNA secondary structure by free energy minimization has been the standard for over two decades. Here we describe a novel method that forsakes this paradigm for predictions based on Boltzmann-weighted structure ensemble. We introduce the notion of a centroid structure as a representative for a set of structures and describe a procedure for its identification. In comparison with the minimum free energy (MFE) structure using diverse types of structural RNAs, the centroid of the ensemble makes 30.0% fewer prediction errors as measured by the positive predictive value (PPV) with marginally improved sensitivity. The Boltzmann ensemble can be separated into a small number (3.2 on average) of clusters. Among the centroids of these clusters, the "best cluster centroid" as determined by comparison to the known structure simultaneously improves PPV by 46.5% and sensitivity by 21.7%. For 58% of the studied sequences for which the MFE structure is outside the cluster containing the best centroid, the improvements by the best centroid are 62.5% for PPV and 31.4% for sensitivity. These results suggest that the energy well containing the MFE structure under the current incomplete energy model is often different from the one for the unavailable complete model that presumably contains the unique native structure. Centroids are available on the Sfold server at http://sfold.wadsworth.org.

  15. PSRna: Prediction of small RNA secondary structures based on reverse complementary folding method.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Xu, Chengzhen; Wang, Lei; Liang, Hong; Feng, Weixing; Cai, Zhongxi; Wang, Ying; Cong, Wang; Liu, Yunlong

    2016-08-01

    Prediction of RNA secondary structures is an important problem in computational biology and bioinformatics, since RNA secondary structures are fundamental for functional analysis of RNA molecules. However, small RNA secondary structures are scarce and few algorithms have been specifically designed for predicting the secondary structures of small RNAs. Here we propose an algorithm named "PSRna" for predicting small-RNA secondary structures using reverse complementary folding and characteristic hairpin loops of small RNAs. Unlike traditional algorithms that usually generate multi-branch loops and 5[Formula: see text] end self-folding, PSRna first estimated the maximum number of base pairs of RNA secondary structures based on the dynamic programming algorithm and a path matrix is constructed at the same time. Second, the backtracking paths are extracted from the path matrix based on backtracking algorithm, and each backtracking path represents a secondary structure. To improve accuracy, the predicted RNA secondary structures are filtered based on their free energy, where only the secondary structure with the minimum free energy was identified as the candidate secondary structure. Our experiments on real data show that the proposed algorithm is superior to two popular methods, RNAfold and RNAstructure, in terms of sensitivity, specificity and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC). PMID:27045556

  16. PSRna: Prediction of small RNA secondary structures based on reverse complementary folding method.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Xu, Chengzhen; Wang, Lei; Liang, Hong; Feng, Weixing; Cai, Zhongxi; Wang, Ying; Cong, Wang; Liu, Yunlong

    2016-08-01

    Prediction of RNA secondary structures is an important problem in computational biology and bioinformatics, since RNA secondary structures are fundamental for functional analysis of RNA molecules. However, small RNA secondary structures are scarce and few algorithms have been specifically designed for predicting the secondary structures of small RNAs. Here we propose an algorithm named "PSRna" for predicting small-RNA secondary structures using reverse complementary folding and characteristic hairpin loops of small RNAs. Unlike traditional algorithms that usually generate multi-branch loops and 5[Formula: see text] end self-folding, PSRna first estimated the maximum number of base pairs of RNA secondary structures based on the dynamic programming algorithm and a path matrix is constructed at the same time. Second, the backtracking paths are extracted from the path matrix based on backtracking algorithm, and each backtracking path represents a secondary structure. To improve accuracy, the predicted RNA secondary structures are filtered based on their free energy, where only the secondary structure with the minimum free energy was identified as the candidate secondary structure. Our experiments on real data show that the proposed algorithm is superior to two popular methods, RNAfold and RNAstructure, in terms of sensitivity, specificity and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC).

  17. Mediating role of multivalent cations in DNA electrostatics: an epsilon-modified Poisson-Boltzmann study of B-DNA-B-DNA interactions in mixture of NaCl and MgCl2 solutions.

    PubMed

    Gavryushov, Sergei

    2009-02-19

    Potentials of mean force acting between two ions in SPC/E water have been determined via molecular dynamics simulations using the spherical cavity approach ( J. Phys. Chem. B 2006 , 110 , 10878 ). The potentials were obtained for Me(2+)-Me(+) pairs, where Me(2+) means cations Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) and Me(+) denotes monovalent ions Li(+), Na(+), and K(+). The hard-core interaction distance for effective Me(2+)-Me(+) potentials appears to be of about 5 A that looks like a sum of the effective radii of a Me(2+) ion (3 A) and of an alkali metal ion Me(+) (about 2 A). These ion-ion interaction parameters were used in the epsilon-Modified Poisson-Boltzmann (epsilon-MPB) calculations ( J. Phys. Chem. B 2007 , 111 , 5264 ) of ionic distributions around DNA generalized for the arbitrary mixture of different ion species. Ionic distributions around an all-atom geometry model of B-DNA in solution of a mixture of NaCl and MgCl(2) were obtained. It was found that even a small fraction of ions Mg(2+) led to sharp condensation of Mg(2+) near the phosphate groups of DNA due to polarization deficiency of cluster [Mg(H(2)O)(6)](2+) in an external field. The epsilon-MPB calculations of the B-DNA-B-DNA interaction energies suggest that adding 1 mM of Mg(2+) to 50 mM solution of NaCl notably affects the force acting between the two macromolecules. Being compared to Poisson-Boltzmann results and to MPB calculations for the primitive model of ions, the epsilon-MPB results also indicate an important contribution of dielectric saturation effects to the mediating role of divalent cations in the DNA-DNA interaction energies. PMID:19199702

  18. Correlation of predicted and measured thermal stresses on a truss-type aircraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.; Schuster, L. S.; Carter, A. L.

    1978-01-01

    A test structure representing a portion of a hypersonic vehicle was instrumented with strain gages and thermocouples. This test structure was then subjected to laboratory heating representative of supersonic and hypersonic flight conditions. A finite element computer model of this structure was developed using several types of elements with the NASA structural analysis (NASTRAN) computer program. Temperature inputs from the test were used to generate predicted model thermal stresses and these were correlated with the test measurements.

  19. Synconset waves and chains: spiking onsets in synchronous populations predict and are predicted by network structure.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Mohan; Amrutur, Bharadwaj; Narayanan, Rishikesh; Sikdar, Sujit Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Synfire waves are propagating spike packets in synfire chains, which are feedforward chains embedded in random networks. Although synfire waves have proved to be effective quantification for network activity with clear relations to network structure, their utilities are largely limited to feedforward networks with low background activity. To overcome these shortcomings, we describe a novel generalisation of synfire waves, and define 'synconset wave' as a cascade of first spikes within a synchronisation event. Synconset waves would occur in 'synconset chains', which are feedforward chains embedded in possibly heavily recurrent networks with heavy background activity. We probed the utility of synconset waves using simulation of single compartment neuron network models with biophysically realistic conductances, and demonstrated that the spread of synconset waves directly follows from the network connectivity matrix and is modulated by top-down inputs and the resultant oscillations. Such synconset profiles lend intuitive insights into network organisation in terms of connection probabilities between various network regions rather than an adjacency matrix. To test this intuition, we develop a Bayesian likelihood function that quantifies the probability that an observed synfire wave was caused by a given network. Further, we demonstrate it's utility in the inverse problem of identifying the network that caused a given synfire wave. This method was effective even in highly subsampled networks where only a small subset of neurons were accessible, thus showing it's utility in experimental estimation of connectomes in real neuronal-networks. Together, we propose synconset chains/waves as an effective framework for understanding the impact of network structure on function, and as a step towards developing physiology-driven network identification methods. Finally, as synconset chains extend the utilities of synfire chains to arbitrary networks, we suggest utilities of our

  20. Free energy minimization to predict RNA secondary structures and computational RNA design.

    PubMed

    Churkin, Alexander; Weinbrand, Lina; Barash, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Determining the RNA secondary structure from sequence data by computational predictions is a long-standing problem. Its solution has been approached in two distinctive ways. If a multiple sequence alignment of a collection of homologous sequences is available, the comparative method uses phylogeny to determine conserved base pairs that are more likely to form as a result of billions of years of evolution than by chance. In the case of single sequences, recursive algorithms that compute free energy structures by using empirically derived energy parameters have been developed. This latter approach of RNA folding prediction by energy minimization is widely used to predict RNA secondary structure from sequence. For a significant number of RNA molecules, the secondary structure of the RNA molecule is indicative of its function and its computational prediction by minimizing its free energy is important for its functional analysis. A general method for free energy minimization to predict RNA secondary structures is dynamic programming, although other optimization methods have been developed as well along with empirically derived energy parameters. In this chapter, we introduce and illustrate by examples the approach of free energy minimization to predict RNA secondary structures.

  1. Protein structure validation by generalized linear model root-mean-square deviation prediction.

    PubMed

    Bagaria, Anurag; Jaravine, Victor; Huang, Yuanpeng J; Montelione, Gaetano T; Güntert, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Large-scale initiatives for obtaining spatial protein structures by experimental or computational means have accentuated the need for the critical assessment of protein structure determination and prediction methods. These include blind test projects such as the critical assessment of protein structure prediction (CASP) and the critical assessment of protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (CASD-NMR). An important aim is to establish structure validation criteria that can reliably assess the accuracy of a new protein structure. Various quality measures derived from the coordinates have been proposed. A universal structural quality assessment method should combine multiple individual scores in a meaningful way, which is challenging because of their different measurement units. Here, we present a method based on a generalized linear model (GLM) that combines diverse protein structure quality scores into a single quantity with intuitive meaning, namely the predicted coordinate root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) value between the present structure and the (unavailable) "true" structure (GLM-RMSD). For two sets of structural models from the CASD-NMR and CASP projects, this GLM-RMSD value was compared with the actual accuracy given by the RMSD value to the corresponding, experimentally determined reference structure from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The correlation coefficients between actual (model vs. reference from PDB) and predicted (model vs. "true") heavy-atom RMSDs were 0.69 and 0.76, for the two datasets from CASD-NMR and CASP, respectively, which is considerably higher than those for the individual scores (-0.24 to 0.68). The GLM-RMSD can thus predict the accuracy of protein structures more reliably than individual coordinate-based quality scores.

  2. Experimental validation of finite element and boundary element methods for predicting structural vibration and radiated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Wu, T. W.; Wu, X. F.

    1994-01-01

    This research report is presented in three parts. In the first part, acoustical analyses were performed on modes of vibration of the housing of a transmission of a gear test rig developed by NASA. The modes of vibration of the transmission housing were measured using experimental modal analysis. The boundary element method (BEM) was used to calculate the sound pressure and sound intensity on the surface of the housing and the radiation efficiency of each mode. The radiation efficiency of each of the transmission housing modes was then compared to theoretical results for a finite baffled plate. In the second part, analytical and experimental validation of methods to predict structural vibration and radiated noise are presented. A rectangular box excited by a mechanical shaker was used as a vibrating structure. Combined finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM) models of the apparatus were used to predict the noise level radiated from the box. The FEM was used to predict the vibration, while the BEM was used to predict the sound intensity and total radiated sound power using surface vibration as the input data. Vibration predicted by the FEM model was validated by experimental modal analysis; noise predicted by the BEM was validated by measurements of sound intensity. Three types of results are presented for the total radiated sound power: sound power predicted by the BEM model using vibration data measured on the surface of the box; sound power predicted by the FEM/BEM model; and sound power measured by an acoustic intensity scan. In the third part, the structure used in part two was modified. A rib was attached to the top plate of the structure. The FEM and BEM were then used to predict structural vibration and radiated noise respectively. The predicted vibration and radiated noise were then validated through experimentation.

  3. Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfer, Norman

    1995-01-01

    It is necessary to integrate a wide variety of technical disciplines to provide an analysis of structural damage to a spacecraft due to hypervelocity impact. There are many uncertainties, and more detailed investigation is warranted, in each technical discipline. However, a total picture of the debris and meteoroid hazard is required to support manned spaceflight in general, and the international Space Station in particular. In the performance of this contract, besides producing a handbook, research and development was conducted in several different areas. The contract was broken into six separate tasks. Each task objectives and accomplishments will be reviewed in the following sections. The Handbook and separate task reports are contained as attachments to the final report. The final section summarizes all of the recommendations coming out of this study. The analyses and comments are general design guidelines and not necessarily applicable to final Space Station designs since several configuration and detailed design changes were being made during the course of this contract. Rather, the analyses and comments may indicate either a point-in-time concept analysis, available test data, or desirable protection goals, not hindered by the design and operation constraints faced by Space Station designers.

  4. Predictability of gene ontology slim-terms from primary structure information in Embryophyta plant proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proteins are the key elements on the path from genetic information to the development of life. The roles played by the different proteins are difficult to uncover experimentally as this process involves complex procedures such as genetic modifications, injection of fluorescent proteins, gene knock-out methods and others. The knowledge learned from each protein is usually annotated in databases through different methods such as the proposed by The Gene Ontology (GO) consortium. Different methods have been proposed in order to predict GO terms from primary structure information, but very few are available for large-scale functional annotation of plants, and reported success rates are much less than the reported by other non-plant predictors. This paper explores the predictability of GO annotations on proteins belonging to the Embryophyta group from a set of features extracted solely from their primary amino acid sequence. Results High predictability of several GO terms was found for Molecular Function and Cellular Component. As expected, a lower degree of predictability was found on Biological Process ontology annotations, although a few biological processes were easily predicted. Proteins related to transport and transcription were particularly well predicted from primary structure information. The most discriminant features for prediction were those related to electric charges of the amino-acid sequence and hydropathicity derived features. Conclusions An analysis of GO-slim terms predictability in plants was carried out, in order to determine single categories or groups of functions that are most related with primary structure information. For each highly predictable GO term, the responsible features of such successfulness were identified and discussed. In addition to most published studies, focused on few categories or single ontologies, results in this paper comprise a complete landscape of GO predictability from primary structure encompassing 75 GO

  5. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain.

    PubMed

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S; Seemann, Stefan E; Jensen, Mads Krogh; Hansen, Mathias; Gorodkin, Jan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-12-01

    A distance constrained secondary structural model of the ≈10 kb RNA genome of the HIV-1 has been predicted but higher-order structures, involving long distance interactions, are currently unknown. We present the first global RNA secondary structure model for the HIV-1 genome, which integrates both comparative structure analysis and information from experimental data in a full-length prediction without distance constraints. Besides recovering known structural elements, we predict several novel structural elements that are conserved in HIV-1 evolution. Our results also indicate that the structure of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping protein-coding regions the COS is supported by a particular high frequency of compensatory base changes, suggesting functional importance for this element. This new structural element potentially organizes the whole genome into three major domains protruding from a conserved core structure with potential roles in replication and evolution for the virus. PMID:26476446

  6. Revisiting the blind tests in crystal structure prediction: accurate energy ranking of molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Asmadi, Aldi; Neumann, Marcus A; Kendrick, John; Girard, Pascale; Perrin, Marc-Antoine; Leusen, Frank J J

    2009-12-24

    In the 2007 blind test of crystal structure prediction hosted by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a hybrid DFT/MM method correctly ranked each of the four experimental structures as having the lowest lattice energy of all the crystal structures predicted for each molecule. The work presented here further validates this hybrid method by optimizing the crystal structures (experimental and submitted) of the first three CCDC blind tests held in 1999, 2001, and 2004. Except for the crystal structures of compound IX, all structures were reminimized and ranked according to their lattice energies. The hybrid method computes the lattice energy of a crystal structure as the sum of the DFT total energy and a van der Waals (dispersion) energy correction. Considering all four blind tests, the crystal structure with the lowest lattice energy corresponds to the experimentally observed structure for 12 out of 14 molecules. Moreover, good geometrical agreement is observed between the structures determined by the hybrid method and those measured experimentally. In comparison with the correct submissions made by the blind test participants, all hybrid optimized crystal structures (apart from compound II) have the smallest calculated root mean squared deviations from the experimentally observed structures. It is predicted that a new polymorph of compound V exists under pressure.

  7. Revisiting the blind tests in crystal structure prediction: accurate energy ranking of molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Asmadi, Aldi; Neumann, Marcus A; Kendrick, John; Girard, Pascale; Perrin, Marc-Antoine; Leusen, Frank J J

    2009-12-24

    In the 2007 blind test of crystal structure prediction hosted by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a hybrid DFT/MM method correctly ranked each of the four experimental structures as having the lowest lattice energy of all the crystal structures predicted for each molecule. The work presented here further validates this hybrid method by optimizing the crystal structures (experimental and submitted) of the first three CCDC blind tests held in 1999, 2001, and 2004. Except for the crystal structures of compound IX, all structures were reminimized and ranked according to their lattice energies. The hybrid method computes the lattice energy of a crystal structure as the sum of the DFT total energy and a van der Waals (dispersion) energy correction. Considering all four blind tests, the crystal structure with the lowest lattice energy corresponds to the experimentally observed structure for 12 out of 14 molecules. Moreover, good geometrical agreement is observed between the structures determined by the hybrid method and those measured experimentally. In comparison with the correct submissions made by the blind test participants, all hybrid optimized crystal structures (apart from compound II) have the smallest calculated root mean squared deviations from the experimentally observed structures. It is predicted that a new polymorph of compound V exists under pressure. PMID:19950907

  8. Lattice-free prediction of three-dimensional structure of programmed DNA assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Keyao; Kim, Do-Nyun; Zhang, Fei; Adendorff, Matthew R.; Yan, Hao; Bathe, Mark

    2014-12-01

    DNA can be programmed to self-assemble into high molecular weight 3D assemblies with precise nanometer-scale structural features. Although numerous sequence design strategies exist to realize these assemblies in solution, there is currently no computational framework to predict their 3D structures on the basis of programmed underlying multi-way junction topologies constrained by DNA duplexes. Here, we introduce such an approach and apply it to assemblies designed using the canonical immobile four-way junction. The procedure is used to predict the 3D structure of high molecular weight planar and spherical ring-like origami objects, a tile-based sheet-like ribbon, and a 3D crystalline tensegrity motif, in quantitative agreement with experiments. Our framework provides a new approach to predict programmed nucleic acid 3D structure on the basis of prescribed secondary structure motifs, with possible application to the design of such assemblies for use in biomolecular and materials science.

  9. Lattice-free prediction of three-dimensional structure of programmed DNA assemblies.

    PubMed

    Pan, Keyao; Kim, Do-Nyun; Zhang, Fei; Adendorff, Matthew R; Yan, Hao; Bathe, Mark

    2014-01-01

    DNA can be programmed to self-assemble into high molecular weight 3D assemblies with precise nanometer-scale structural features. Although numerous sequence design strategies exist to realize these assemblies in solution, there is currently no computational framework to predict their 3D structures on the basis of programmed underlying multi-way junction topologies constrained by DNA duplexes. Here, we introduce such an approach and apply it to assemblies designed using the canonical immobile four-way junction. The procedure is used to predict the 3D structure of high molecular weight planar and spherical ring-like origami objects, a tile-based sheet-like ribbon, and a 3D crystalline tensegrity motif, in quantitative agreement with experiments. Our framework provides a new approach to predict programmed nucleic acid 3D structure on the basis of prescribed secondary structure motifs, with possible application to the design of such assemblies for use in biomolecular and materials science. PMID:25470497

  10. Multithreaded comparative RNA secondary structure prediction using stochastic context-free grammars

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The prediction of the structure of large RNAs remains a particular challenge in bioinformatics, due to the computational complexity and low levels of accuracy of state-of-the-art algorithms. The pfold model couples a stochastic context-free grammar to phylogenetic analysis for a high accuracy in predictions, but the time complexity of the algorithm and underflow errors have prevented its use for long alignments. Here we present PPfold, a multithreaded version of pfold, which is capable of predicting the structure of large RNA alignments accurately on practical timescales. Results We have distributed both the phylogenetic calculations and the inside-outside algorithm in PPfold, resulting in a significant reduction of runtime on multicore machines. We have addressed the floating-point underflow problems of pfold by implementing an extended-exponent datatype, enabling PPfold to be used for large-scale RNA structure predictions. We have also improved the user interface and portability: alongside standalone executable and Java source code of the program, PPfold is also available as a free plugin to the CLC Workbenches. We have evaluated the accuracy of PPfold using BRaliBase I tests, and demonstrated its practical use by predicting the secondary structure of an alignment of 24 complete HIV-1 genomes in 65 minutes on an 8-core machine and identifying several known structural elements in the prediction. Conclusions PPfold is the first parallelized comparative RNA structure prediction algorithm to date. Based on the pfold model, PPfold is capable of fast, high-quality predictions of large RNA secondary structures, such as the genomes of RNA viruses or long genomic transcripts. The techniques used in the parallelization of this algorithm may be of general applicability to other bioinformatics algorithms. PMID:21501497

  11. All-atom 3D structure prediction of transmembrane β-barrel proteins from sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Sikander; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S.

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane β-barrels (TMBs) carry out major functions in substrate transport and protein biogenesis but experimental determination of their 3D structure is challenging. Encouraged by successful de novo 3D structure prediction of globular and α-helical membrane proteins from sequence alignments alone, we developed an approach to predict the 3D structure of TMBs. The approach combines the maximum-entropy evolutionary coupling method for predicting residue contacts (EVfold) with a machine-learning approach (boctopus2) for predicting β-strands in the barrel. In a blinded test for 19 TMB proteins of known structure that have a sufficient number of diverse homologous sequences available, this combined method (EVfold_bb) predicts hydrogen-bonded residue pairs between adjacent β-strands at an accuracy of ∼70%. This accuracy is sufficient for the generation of all-atom 3D models. In the transmembrane barrel region, the average 3D structure accuracy [template-modeling (TM) score] of top-ranked models is 0.54 (ranging from 0.36 to 0.85), with a higher (44%) number of residue pairs in correct strand–strand registration than in earlier methods (18%). Although the nonbarrel regions are predicted less accurately overall, the evolutionary couplings identify some highly constrained loop residues and, for FecA protein, the barrel including the structure of a plug domain can be accurately modeled (TM score = 0.68). Lower prediction accuracy tends to be associated with insufficient sequence information and we therefore expect increasing numbers of β-barrel families to become accessible to accurate 3D structure prediction as the number of available sequences increases. PMID:25858953

  12. The current status and future applicability of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) in predicting toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Mark T D

    2002-12-01

    The current status of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) in predicting toxicity is assessed. Widespread use of these methods to predict toxicity from chemical structure is possible, both by industry to develop new compounds, and also by regulatory agencies. The current use of QSARs is restricted by the lack of suitable toxicity data available for modelling, the suitability of simplistic modelling approaches for the prediction of certain endpoints, and the poor definition and utilisation of the applicability domain of models. Suggestions to resolve these issues are made.

  13. An Integrated Theory for Predicting the Hydrothermomechanical Response of Advanced Composite Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    An integrated theory is developed for predicting the hydrothermomechanical (HDTM) response of fiber composite components. The integrated theory is based on a combined theoretical and experimental investigation. In addition to predicting the HDTM response of components, the theory is structured to assess the combined hydrothermal effects on the mechanical properties of unidirectional composites loaded along the material axis and off-axis, and those of angleplied laminates. The theory developed predicts values which are in good agreement with measured data at the micromechanics, macromechanics, laminate analysis and structural analysis levels.

  14. Critical assessment of methods of protein structure prediction-Round VII.

    PubMed

    Moult, John; Fidelis, Krzysztof; Kryshtafovych, Andriy; Rost, Burkhard; Hubbard, Tim; Tramontano, Anna

    2007-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to the supplemental issue of the journal PROTEINS, dedicated to the seventh CASP experiment to assess the state of the art in protein structure prediction. The paper describes the conduct of the experiment, the categories of prediction included, and outlines the evaluation and assessment procedures. Highlights are improvements in model accuracy relative to that obtainable from knowledge of a single best template structure; convergence of the accuracy of models produced by automatic servers toward that produced by human modeling teams; the emergence of methods for predicting the quality of models; and rapidly increasing practical applications of the methods. PMID:17918729

  15. Hybrid experimental/analytical models of structural dynamics - Creation and use for predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balmes, Etienne

    1993-01-01

    An original complete methodology for the construction of predictive models of damped structural vibrations is introduced. A consistent definition of normal and complex modes is given which leads to an original method to accurately identify non-proportionally damped normal mode models. A new method to create predictive hybrid experimental/analytical models of damped structures is introduced, and the ability of hybrid models to predict the response to system configuration changes is discussed. Finally a critical review of the overall methodology is made by application to the case of the MIT/SERC interferometer testbed.

  16. Protein structure prediction: combining de novo modeling with sparse experimental data.

    PubMed

    Latek, Dorota; Ekonomiuk, Dariusz; Kolinski, Andrzej

    2007-07-30

    Routine structure prediction of new folds is still a challenging task for computational biology. The challenge is not only in the proper determination of overall fold but also in building models of acceptable resolution, useful for modeling the drug interactions and protein-protein complexes. In this work we propose and test a comprehensive approach to protein structure modeling supported by sparse, and relatively easy to obtain, experimental data. We focus on chemical shift-based restraints from NMR, although other sparse restraints could be easily included. In particular, we demonstrate that combining the typical NMR software with artificial intelligence-based prediction of secondary structure enhances significantly the accuracy of the restraints for molecular modeling. The computational procedure is based on the reduced representation approach implemented in the CABS modeling software, which proved to be a versatile tool for protein structure prediction during the CASP (CASP stands for critical assessment of techniques for protein structure prediction) experiments (see http://predictioncenter/CASP6/org). The method is successfully tested on a small set of representative globular proteins of different size and topology, including the two CASP6 targets, for which the required NMR data already exist. The method is implemented in a semi-automated pipeline applicable to a large scale structural annotation of genomic data. Here, we limit the computations to relatively small set. This enabled, without a loss of generality, a detailed discussion of various factors determining accuracy of the proposed approach to the protein structure prediction.

  17. Improved prediction of RNA tertiary structure with insights into native state dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bida, John Paul; Maher, L James

    2012-03-01

    The importance of RNA tertiary structure is evident from the growing number of published high resolution NMR and X-ray crystallographic structures of RNA molecules. These structures provide insights into function and create a knowledge base that is leveraged by programs such as Assemble, ModeRNA, RNABuilder, NAST, FARNA, Mc-Sym, RNA2D3D, and iFoldRNA for tertiary structure prediction and design. While these methods sample native-like RNA structures during simulations, all struggle to capture the native RNA conformation after scoring. We propose RSIM, an improved RNA fragment assembly method that preserves RNA global secondary structure while sampling conformations. This approach enhances the quality of predicted RNA tertiary structure, provides insights into the native state dynamics, and generates a powerful visualization of the RNA conformational space. RSIM is available for download from http://www.github.com/jpbida/rsim.

  18. A comparative study of the reported performance of ab initio protein structure prediction algorithms.

    PubMed

    Helles, Glennie

    2008-04-01

    Protein structure prediction is one of the major challenges in bioinformatics today. Throughout the past five decades, many different algorithmic approaches have been attempted, and although progress has been made the problem remains unsolvable even for many small proteins. While the general objective is to predict the three-dimensional structure from primary sequence, our current knowledge and computational power are simply insufficient to solve a problem of such high complexity. Some prediction algorithms do, however, appear to perform better than others, although it is not always obvious which ones they are and it is perhaps even less obvious why that is. In this review, the reported performance results from 18 different recently published prediction algorithms are compared. Furthermore, the general algorithmic settings most likely responsible for the difference in the reported performance are identified, and the specific settings of each of the 18 prediction algorithms are also compared. The average normalized r.m.s.d. scores reported range from 11.17 to 3.48. With a performance measure including both r.m.s.d. scores and CPU time, the currently best-performing prediction algorithm is identified to be the I-TASSER algorithm. Two of the algorithmic settings--protein representation and fragment assembly--were found to have definite positive influence on the running time and the predicted structures, respectively. There thus appears to be a clear benefit from incorporating this knowledge in the design of new prediction algorithms.

  19. Lessons from application of the UNRES force field to predictions of structures of CASP10 targets

    PubMed Central

    He, Yi; Mozolewska, Magdalena A.; Krupa, Paweł; Sieradzan, Adam K.; Wirecki, Tomasz K.; Liwo, Adam; Kachlishvili, Khatuna; Rackovsky, Shalom; Jagieła, Dawid; Ślusarz, Rafał; Czaplewski, Cezary R.; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the physics-based protocol, whose main component is the United Residue (UNRES) physics-based coarse-grained force field, developed in our laboratory for the prediction of protein structure from amino acid sequence, is illustrated. Candidate models are selected, based on probabilities of the conformational families determined by multiplexed replica-exchange simulations, from the 10th Community Wide Experiment on the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP10). For target T0663, classified as a new fold, which consists of two domains homologous to those of known proteins, UNRES predicted the correct symmetry of packing, in which the domains are rotated with respect to each other by 180° in the experimental structure. By contrast, models obtained by knowledge-based methods, in which each domain is modeled very accurately but not rotated, resulted in incorrect packing. Two UNRES models of this target were featured by the assessors. Correct domain packing was also predicted by UNRES for the homologous target T0644, which has a similar structure to that of T0663, except that the two domains are not rotated. Predictions for two other targets, T0668 and T0684_D2, are among the best ones by global distance test score. These results suggest that our physics-based method has substantial predictive power. In particular, it has the ability to predict domain–domain orientations, which is a significant advance in the state of the art. PMID:23980156

  20. Predicting faunal fire responses in heterogeneous landscapes: the role of habitat structure.

    PubMed

    Swan, Matthew; Christie, Fiona; Sitters, Holly; York, Alan; Di Stefano, Julian

    2015-12-01

    Predicting the effects of fire on biota is important for biodiversity conservation in fire-prone landscapes. Time since fire is often used to predict the occurrence of fauna, yet for many species, it is a surrogate variable and it is temporal change in resource availability to which animals actually respond. Therefore prediction of fire-fauna relationships will be uncertain if time since fire is not strongly related to resources. In this study, we used a space-for-time substitution across a large diverse landscape to investigate interrelationships between the occurrence of ground-dwelling mammals, time since fire, and structural resources. We predicted that much variation in habitat structure would remain unexplained by time since fire and that habitat structure would predict species' occurrence better than time since fire. In line with predictions, we found that time since fire was moderately correlated with habitat structure yet was a poor surrogate for mammal occurrence. Variables representing habitat structure were better predictors of occurrence than time since fire for all species considered. Our results suggest that time since fire is unlikely to be a useful surrogate for ground-dwelling mammals in heterogeneous landscapes. Faunal conservation in fire-prone landscapes will benefit from a combined understanding of fauna-resource relationships and the ways in which fire (including planned fires and wildfires) alters the spatial and temporal distribution of faunal resources.

  1. Theoretical predictions of structures in dispersions containing charged colloidal particles and non-adsorbing polymers.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fei; Turesson, Martin; Woodward, Clifford E; van Gruijthuijsen, Kitty; Stradner, Anna; Forsman, Jan

    2016-04-28

    We develop a theoretical model to describe structural effects on a specific system of charged colloidal polystyrene particles, upon the addition of non-adsorbing PEG polymers. This system has previously been investigated experimentally, by scattering methods, so we are able to quantitatively compare predicted structure factors with corresponding experimental data. Our aim is to construct a model that is coarse-grained enough to be computationally manageable, yet detailed enough to capture the important physics. To this end, we utilize classical polymer density functional theory, wherein all possible polymer configurations are accounted for, subject to a mean-field Boltzmann weight. We make efforts to counteract drawbacks with this mean-field approach, resulting in structural predictions that agree very well with computationally more demanding simulations. Electrostatic interactions are handled at the fully non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann level, and we demonstrate that a linearization leads to less accurate predictions. The particle charge is an experimentally unknown parameter. We define the surface charge such that the experimental and theoretical gel point at equal polymer concentration coincide. Assuming a fixed surface charge for a certain salt concentration, we find very good agreements between measured and predicted structure factors across a wide range of polymer concentrations. We also present predictions for other structural quantities, such as radial distribution functions, and cluster size distributions. Finally, we demonstrate that our model predicts the occurrence of equilibrium clusters at high polymer concentrations, but low particle volume fractions and salt levels. PMID:27056112

  2. Evaluation of a universal flow-through model for predicting and designing phosphorus removal structures.

    PubMed

    Penn, Chad; Bowen, James; McGrath, Joshua; Nairn, Robert; Fox, Garey; Brown, Glenn; Wilson, Stuart; Gill, Clinton

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) removal structures have been shown to decrease dissolved P loss from agricultural and urban areas which may reduce the threat of eutrophication. In order to design or quantify performance of these structures, the relationship between discrete and cumulative removal with cumulative P loading must be determined, either by individual flow-through experiments or model prediction. A model was previously developed for predicting P removal with P sorption materials (PSMs) under flow-through conditions, as a function of inflow P concentration, retention time (RT), and PSM characteristics. The objective of this study was to compare model results to measured P removal data from several PSM under a range of conditions (P concentrations and RT) and scales ranging from laboratory to field. Materials tested included acid mine drainage residuals (AMDRs), treated and non-treated electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag at different size fractions, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum. Equations for P removal curves and cumulative P removed were not significantly different between predicted and actual values for any of the 23 scenarios examined. However, the model did tend to slightly over-predict cumulative P removal for calcium-based PSMs. The ability of the model to predict P removal for various materials, RTs, and P concentrations in both controlled settings and field structures validate its use in design and quantification of these structures. This ability to predict P removal without constant monitoring is vital to widespread adoption of P removal structures, especially for meeting discharge regulations and nutrient trading programs.

  3. Qualitative and quantitative structure-activity relationship modelling for predicting blood-brain barrier permeability of structurally diverse chemicals.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Basant, N; Singh, K P

    2015-01-01

    In this study, structure-activity relationship (SAR) models have been established for qualitative and quantitative prediction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of chemicals. The structural diversity of the chemicals and nonlinear structure in the data were tested. The predictive and generalization ability of the developed SAR models were tested through internal and external validation procedures. In complete data, the QSAR models rendered ternary classification accuracy of >98.15%, while the quantitative SAR models yielded correlation (r(2)) of >0.926 between the measured and the predicted BBB permeability values with the mean squared error (MSE) <0.045. The proposed models were also applied to an external new in vitro data and yielded classification accuracy of >82.7% and r(2) > 0.905 (MSE < 0.019). The sensitivity analysis revealed that topological polar surface area (TPSA) has the highest effect in qualitative and quantitative models for predicting the BBB permeability of chemicals. Moreover, these models showed predictive performance superior to those reported earlier in the literature. This demonstrates the appropriateness of the developed SAR models to reliably predict the BBB permeability of new chemicals, which can be used for initial screening of the molecules in the drug development process.

  4. RNA secondary structure prediction based on SHAPE data in helix regions.

    PubMed

    Lotfi, Mohadeseh; Zare-Mirakabad, Fatemeh; Montaseri, Soheila

    2015-09-01

    RNA molecules play important and fundamental roles in biological processes. Frequently, the functional form of single-stranded RNA molecules requires a specific tertiary structure. Classically, RNA structure determination has mostly been accomplished by X-Ray crystallography or Nuclear Magnetic Resonance approaches. These experimental methods are time consuming and expensive. In the past two decades, some computational methods and algorithms have been developed for RNA secondary structure prediction. In these algorithms, minimum free energy is known as the best criterion. However, the results of algorithms show that minimum free energy is not a sufficient criterion to predict RNA secondary structure. These algorithms need some additional knowledge about the structure, which has to be added in the methods. Recently, the information obtained from some experimental data, called SHAPE, can greatly improve the consistency between the native and predicted RNA secondary structure. In this paper, we investigate the influence of SHAPE data on four types of RNA substructures, helices, loops, base pairs from the start and end of helices and two base pairs from the start and end of helices. The results show that SHAPE data in helix regions can improve the prediction. We represent a new method to apply SHAPE data in helix regions for finding RNA secondary structure. Finally, we compare the results of the method on a set of RNAs to predict minimum free energy structure based on considering all SHAPE data and only SHAPE data in helix regions as pseudo free energy and without SHAPE data (without any pseudo free energy). The results show that RNA secondary structure prediction based on considering only SHAPE data in helix regions is more successful than not considering SHAPE data and it provides competitive results in comparison with considering all SHAPE data.

  5. Mimicking the folding pathway to improve homology-free protein structure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Karl; Debartolo, Joe; Colubri, Andres; Jha, Abhishek; Fitzgerald, James; Sosnick, Tobin

    2010-03-01

    Since demonstrating that a protein's sequence encodes its structure, the prediction of structure from sequence remains an outstanding problem that impacts numerous scientific disciplines including many genome projects. By iteratively fixing secondary structure assignments of residues during Monte Carlo simulations of folding, our coarse grained model without information concerning homology or explicit side chains outperforms current homology-based secondary structure prediction methods for many proteins. The computationally rapid algorithm using only single residue (phi, psi) dihedral angle moves also generates tertiary structures of comparable accuracy to existing all-atom methods for many small proteins, particularly ones with low homology. Hence, given appropriate search strategies and scoring functions, reduced representations can be used for accurately predicting secondary structure as well as providing three-dimensional structures, thereby increasing the size of proteins approachable by homology-free methods and the accuracy of template methods whose accuracy depends on the quality of the input secondary structure. Inclusion of information from evolutionarily related sequences enhances the statistics and the accuracy of the predictions.

  6. New Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Models Improve Predictability of Ames Mutagenicity for Aromatic Azo Compounds.

    PubMed

    Manganelli, Serena; Benfenati, Emilio; Manganaro, Alberto; Kulkarni, Sunil; Barton-Maclaren, Tara S; Honma, Masamitsu

    2016-10-01

    Existing Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have limited predictive capabilities for aromatic azo compounds. In this study, 2 new models were built to predict Ames mutagenicity of this class of compounds. The first one made use of descriptors based on simplified molecular input-line entry system (SMILES), calculated with the CORAL software. The second model was based on the k-nearest neighbors algorithm. The statistical quality of the predictions from single models was satisfactory. The performance further improved when the predictions from these models were combined. The prediction results from other QSAR models for mutagenicity were also evaluated. Most of the existing models were found to be good at finding toxic compounds but resulted in many false positive predictions. The 2 new models specific for this class of compounds avoid this problem thanks to a larger set of related compounds as training set and improved algorithms.

  7. New Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Models Improve Predictability of Ames Mutagenicity for Aromatic Azo Compounds.

    PubMed

    Manganelli, Serena; Benfenati, Emilio; Manganaro, Alberto; Kulkarni, Sunil; Barton-Maclaren, Tara S; Honma, Masamitsu

    2016-10-01

    Existing Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have limited predictive capabilities for aromatic azo compounds. In this study, 2 new models were built to predict Ames mutagenicity of this class of compounds. The first one made use of descriptors based on simplified molecular input-line entry system (SMILES), calculated with the CORAL software. The second model was based on the k-nearest neighbors algorithm. The statistical quality of the predictions from single models was satisfactory. The performance further improved when the predictions from these models were combined. The prediction results from other QSAR models for mutagenicity were also evaluated. Most of the existing models were found to be good at finding toxic compounds but resulted in many false positive predictions. The 2 new models specific for this class of compounds avoid this problem thanks to a larger set of related compounds as training set and improved algorithms. PMID:27413112

  8. Structure Prediction of the Second Extracellular Loop in G-Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kmiecik, Sebastian; Jamroz, Michal; Kolinski, Michal

    2014-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play key roles in living organisms. Therefore, it is important to determine their functional structures. The second extracellular loop (ECL2) is a functionally important region of GPCRs, which poses significant challenge for computational structure prediction methods. In this work, we evaluated CABS, a well-established protein modeling tool for predicting ECL2 structure in 13 GPCRs. The ECL2s (with between 13 and 34 residues) are predicted in an environment of other extracellular loops being fully flexible and the transmembrane domain fixed in its x-ray conformation. The modeling procedure used theoretical predictions of ECL2 secondary structure and experimental constraints on disulfide bridges. Our approach yielded ensembles of low-energy conformers and the most populated conformers that contained models close to the available x-ray structures. The level of similarity between the predicted models and x-ray structures is comparable to that of other state-of-the-art computational methods. Our results extend other studies by including newly crystallized GPCRs. PMID:24896119

  9. Optimal mutation sites for PRE data collection and membrane protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huiling; Ji, Fei; Olman, Victor; Mobley, Charles K; Liu, Yizhou; Zhou, Yunpeng; Bushweller, John H; Prestegard, James H; Xu, Ying

    2011-04-13

    Nuclear magnetic resonance paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) measures long-range distances to isotopically labeled residues, providing useful constraints for protein structure prediction. The method usually requires labor-intensive conjugation of nitroxide labels to multiple locations on the protein, one at a time. Here a computational procedure, based on protein sequence and simple secondary structure models, is presented to facilitate optimal placement of a minimum number of labels needed to determine the correct topology of a helical transmembrane protein. Tests on DsbB (four helices) using just one label lead to correct topology predictions in four of five cases, with the predicted structures <6 Å to the native structure. Benchmark results using simulated PRE data show that we can generally predict the correct topology for five and six to seven helices using two and three labels, respectively, with an average success rate of 76% and structures of similar precision. The results show promise in facilitating experimentally constrained structure prediction of membrane proteins.

  10. A multilayer evaluation approach for protein structure prediction and model quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingfen; Wang, Qingguo; Vantasin, Kittinun; Zhang, Jiong; He, Zhiquan; Kosztin, Ioan; Shang, Yi; Xu, Dong

    2011-01-01

    Protein tertiary structures are essential for studying functions of proteins at molecular level. An indispensable approach for protein structure solution is computational prediction. Most protein structure prediction methods generate candidate models first and select the best candidates by model quality assessment (QA). In many cases, good models can be produced, but the QA tools fail to select the best ones from the candidate model pool. Because of incomplete understanding of protein folding, each QA method only reflects partial facets of a structure model and thus has limited discerning power with no one consistently outperforming others. In this article, we developed a set of new QA methods, including two QA methods for evaluating target/template alignments, a molecular dynamics (MD)-based QA method, and three consensus QA methods with selected references to reveal new facets of protein structures complementary to the existing methods. Moreover, the underlying relationship among different QA methods were analyzed and then integrated into a multilayer evaluation approach to guide the model generation and model selection in prediction. All methods are integrated and implemented into an innovative and improved prediction system hereafter referred to as MUFOLD. In CASP8 and CASP9, MUFOLD has demonstrated the proof of the principles in terms of both QA discerning power and structure prediction accuracy. PMID:21997706

  11. A multilayer evaluation approach for protein structure prediction and model quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingfen; Wang, Qingguo; Vantasin, Kittinun; Zhang, Jiong; He, Zhiquan; Kosztin, Ioan; Shang, Yi; Xu, Dong

    2011-01-01

    Protein tertiary structures are essential for studying functions of proteins at molecular level. An indispensable approach for protein structure solution is computational prediction. Most protein structure prediction methods generate candidate models first and select the best candidates by model quality assessment (QA). In many cases, good models can be produced, but the QA tools fail to select the best ones from the candidate model pool. Because of incomplete understanding of protein folding, each QA method only reflects partial facets of a structure model and thus has limited discerning power with no one consistently outperforming others. In this article, we developed a set of new QA methods, including two QA methods for evaluating target/template alignments, a molecular dynamics (MD)-based QA method, and three consensus QA methods with selected references to reveal new facets of protein structures complementary to the existing methods. Moreover, the underlying relationship among different QA methods were analyzed and then integrated into a multilayer evaluation approach to guide the model generation and model selection in prediction. All methods are integrated and implemented into an innovative and improved prediction system hereafter referred to as MUFOLD. In CASP8 and CASP9, MUFOLD has demonstrated the proof of the principles in terms of both QA discerning power and structure prediction accuracy.

  12. Predicting three-dimensional structures of transmembrane domains of β-barrel membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Naveed, Hammad; Xu, Yun; Jackups, Ronald; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    β-barrel membrane proteins are found in the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. They are important for pore formation, membrane anchoring, enzyme activity, and are often responsible for bacterial virulence. Due to difficulties in experimental structure determination, they are sparsely represented in the protein structure databank. We have developed a computational method for predicting structures of the trans-membrane (TM) domains of β-barrel membrane proteins. Our method based on key organization principles, can predict structures of the TM domain of β-barrel membrane proteins of novel topology, including those from eukaryotic mitochondria. Our method is based on a model of physical interactions, a discrete conformational state-space, an empirical potential function, as well as a model to account for interstrand loop entropy. We are able to construct three dimensional atomic structure of the TM-domains from sequences for a set of 23 non-homologous proteins (resolution 1.8 – 3.0 Å). The median RMSD of TM-domains containing 75–222 residues between predicted and measured structures is 3.9 Å for main chain atoms. In addition, stability determinants and protein-protein interaction sites can be predicted. Such predictions on eukaryotic mitochondria outer membrane protein Tom40 and VDAC are confirmed by independent mutagenesis and chemical cross-linking studies. These results suggest that our model captures key components of the organization principles of β-barrel membrane protein assembly. PMID:22148174

  13. Using crystal structure prediction to rationalize the hydration propensities of substituted adamantane hydrochloride salts.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Sharmarke; Karothu, Durga Prasad; Naumov, Panče

    2016-08-01

    The crystal energy landscapes of the salts of two rigid pharmaceutically active molecules reveal that the experimental structure of amantadine hydrochloride is the most stable structure with the majority of low-energy structures adopting a chain hydrogen-bond motif and packings that do not have solvent accessible voids. By contrast, memantine hydrochloride which differs in the substitution of two methyl groups on the adamantane ring has a crystal energy landscape where all structures within 10 kJ mol(-1) of the global minimum have solvent-accessible voids ranging from 3 to 14% of the unit-cell volume including the lattice energy minimum that was calculated after removing water from the hydrated memantine hydrochloride salt structure. The success in using crystal structure prediction (CSP) to rationalize the different hydration propensities of these substituted adamantane hydrochloride salts allowed us to extend the model to predict under blind test conditions the experimental crystal structures of the previously uncharacterized 1-(methylamino)adamantane base and its corresponding hydrochloride salt. Although the crystal structure of 1-(methylamino)adamantane was correctly predicted as the second ranked structure on the static lattice energy landscape, the crystallization of a Z' = 3 structure of 1-(methylamino)adamantane hydrochloride reveals the limits of applying CSP when the contents of the crystallographic asymmetric unit are unknown.

  14. Using crystal structure prediction to rationalize the hydration propensities of substituted adamantane hydrochloride salts.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Sharmarke; Karothu, Durga Prasad; Naumov, Panče

    2016-08-01

    The crystal energy landscapes of the salts of two rigid pharmaceutically active molecules reveal that the experimental structure of amantadine hydrochloride is the most stable structure with the majority of low-energy structures adopting a chain hydrogen-bond motif and packings that do not have solvent accessible voids. By contrast, memantine hydrochloride which differs in the substitution of two methyl groups on the adamantane ring has a crystal energy landscape where all structures within 10 kJ mol(-1) of the global minimum have solvent-accessible voids ranging from 3 to 14% of the unit-cell volume including the lattice energy minimum that was calculated after removing water from the hydrated memantine hydrochloride salt structure. The success in using crystal structure prediction (CSP) to rationalize the different hydration propensities of these substituted adamantane hydrochloride salts allowed us to extend the model to predict under blind test conditions the experimental crystal structures of the previously uncharacterized 1-(methylamino)adamantane base and its corresponding hydrochloride salt. Although the crystal structure of 1-(methylamino)adamantane was correctly predicted as the second ranked structure on the static lattice energy landscape, the crystallization of a Z' = 3 structure of 1-(methylamino)adamantane hydrochloride reveals the limits of applying CSP when the contents of the crystallographic asymmetric unit are unknown. PMID:27484376

  15. TT2NE: a novel algorithm to predict RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots

    PubMed Central

    Bon, Michaël; Orland, Henri

    2011-01-01

    We present TT2NE, a new algorithm to predict RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots. The method is based on a classification of RNA structures according to their topological genus. TT2NE is guaranteed to find the minimum free energy structure regardless of pseudoknot topology. This unique proficiency is obtained at the expense of the maximum length of sequences that can be treated, but comparison with state-of-the-art algorithms shows that TT2NE significantly improves the quality of predictions. Analysis of TT2NE's incorrect predictions sheds light on the need to study how sterical constraints limit the range of pseudoknotted structures that can be formed from a given sequence. An implementation of TT2NE on a public server can be found at http://ipht.cea.fr/rna/tt2ne.php. PMID:21593129

  16. Predicting the thermal/structural performance of the atmospheric trace molecules spectroscopy /ATMOS/ Fourier transform spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    ATMOS is a Fourier transform spectrometer to measure atmospheric trace molecules over a spectral range of 2-16 microns. Assessment of the system performance of ATMOS includes evaluations of optical system errors induced by thermal and structural effects. In order to assess the optical system errors induced from thermal and structural effects, error budgets are assembled during system engineering tasks and line of sight and wavefront deformations predictions (using operational thermal and vibration environments and computer models) are subsequently compared to the error budgets. This paper discusses the thermal/structural error budgets, modelling and analysis methods used to predict thermal/structural induced errors and the comparisons that show that predictions are within the error budgets.

  17. Manual for the prediction of blast and fragment loadings on structures

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide Architect-Engineer (AE) firms guidance for the prediction of air blast, ground shock and fragment loadings on structures as a result of accidental explosions in or near these structures. Information in this manual is the result of an extensive literature survey and data gathering effort, supplemented by some original analytical studies on various aspects of blast phenomena. Many prediction equations and graphs are presented, accompanied by numerous example problems illustrating their use. The manual is complementary to existing structural design manuals and is intended to reflect the current state-of-the-art in prediction of blast and fragment loads for accidental explosions of high explosives at the Pantex Plant. In some instances, particularly for explosions within blast-resistant structures of complex geometry, rational estimation of these loads is beyond the current state-of-the-art.

  18. New structures of bilayer germanium nanosheets predicted by a particle swarm optimization method.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongdong; Li, Pengfei; Qu, Bingyan; Pan, B C; Zhang, B; He, H Y; Zhou, Rulong

    2016-09-28

    A global search for the stable structures of bilayer Ge (BLG) is performed, and the most stable and meta-stable BLG structures are predicted for the first time. Phonon-spectrum calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations confirm their dynamical and thermal stability. The computed electronic structures suggest that the most stable structure is metal while the meta-stable structure of BLG is a semiconductor with an indirect band gap (0.32 eV at the level of PBE functional and 0.81 eV at the level of HSE06). By straining the layer plane of the meta-stable BLG, we observe a phase transition from semiconductor to metal. Furthermore, the adsorption of gas molecules of CO, CO2, NH3, NO and NO2 on the meta-stable structure is also studied. Our results show that the predicted meta-stable BLG also possesses a good feature in gas sensors. PMID:27602788

  19. Towards crystal structure prediction of complex organic compounds – a report on the fifth blind test

    PubMed Central

    Bardwell, David A.; Adjiman, Claire S.; Arnautova, Yelena A.; Bartashevich, Ekaterina; Boerrigter, Stephan X. M.; Braun, Doris E.; Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J.; Day, Graeme M.; Della Valle, Raffaele G.; Desiraju, Gautam R.; van Eijck, Bouke P.; Facelli, Julio C.; Ferraro, Marta B.; Grillo, Damian; Habgood, Matthew; Hofmann, Detlef W. M.; Hofmann, Fridolin; Jose, K. V. Jovan; Karamertzanis, Panagiotis G.; Kazantsev, Andrei V.; Kendrick, John; Kuleshova, Liudmila N.; Leusen, Frank J. J.; Maleev, Andrey V.; Misquitta, Alston J.; Mohamed, Sharmarke; Needs, Richard J.; Neumann, Marcus A.; Nikylov, Denis; Orendt, Anita M.; Pal, Rumpa; Pantelides, Constantinos C.; Pickard, Chris J.; Price, Louise S.; Price, Sarah L.; Scheraga, Harold A.; van de Streek, Jacco; Thakur, Tejender S.; Tiwari, Siddharth; Venuti, Elisabetta; Zhitkov, Ilia K.

    2011-01-01

    Following on from the success of the previous crystal structure prediction blind tests (CSP1999, CSP2001, CSP2004 and CSP2007), a fifth such collaborative project (CSP2010) was organized at the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre. A range of methodologies was used by the participating groups in order to evaluate the ability of the current computational methods to predict the crystal structures of the six organic molecules chosen as targets for this blind test. The first four targets, two rigid molecules, one semi-flexible molecule and a 1:1 salt, matched the criteria for the targets from CSP2007, while the last two targets belonged to two new challenging categories – a larger, much more flexible molecule and a hydrate with more than one polymorph. Each group submitted three predictions for each target it attempted. There was at least one successful prediction for each target, and two groups were able to successfully predict the structure of the large flexible molecule as their first place submission. The results show that while not as many groups successfully predicted the structures of the three smallest molecules as in CSP2007, there is now evidence that methodologies such as dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) are able to reliably do so. The results also highlight the many challenges posed by more complex systems and show that there are still issues to be overcome. PMID:22101543

  20. Towards crystal structure prediction of complex organic compounds--a report on the fifth blind test.

    PubMed

    Bardwell, David A; Adjiman, Claire S; Arnautova, Yelena A; Bartashevich, Ekaterina; Boerrigter, Stephan X M; Braun, Doris E; Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J; Day, Graeme M; Della Valle, Raffaele G; Desiraju, Gautam R; van Eijck, Bouke P; Facelli, Julio C; Ferraro, Marta B; Grillo, Damian; Habgood, Matthew; Hofmann, Detlef W M; Hofmann, Fridolin; Jose, K V Jovan; Karamertzanis, Panagiotis G; Kazantsev, Andrei V; Kendrick, John; Kuleshova, Liudmila N; Leusen, Frank J J; Maleev, Andrey V; Misquitta, Alston J; Mohamed, Sharmarke; Needs, Richard J; Neumann, Marcus A; Nikylov, Denis; Orendt, Anita M; Pal, Rumpa; Pantelides, Constantinos C; Pickard, Chris J; Price, Louise S; Price, Sarah L; Scheraga, Harold A; van de Streek, Jacco; Thakur, Tejender S; Tiwari, Siddharth; Venuti, Elisabetta; Zhitkov, Ilia K

    2011-12-01

    Following on from the success of the previous crystal structure prediction blind tests (CSP1999, CSP2001, CSP2004 and CSP2007), a fifth such collaborative project (CSP2010) was organized at the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre. A range of methodologies was used by the participating groups in order to evaluate the ability of the current computational methods to predict the crystal structures of the six organic molecules chosen as targets for this blind test. The first four targets, two rigid molecules, one semi-flexible molecule and a 1:1 salt, matched the criteria for the targets from CSP2007, while the last two targets belonged to two new challenging categories - a larger, much more flexible molecule and a hydrate with more than one polymorph. Each group submitted three predictions for each target it attempted. There was at least one successful prediction for each target, and two groups were able to successfully predict the structure of the large flexible molecule as their first place submission. The results show that while not as many groups successfully predicted the structures of the three smallest molecules as in CSP2007, there is now evidence that methodologies such as dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) are able to reliably do so. The results also highlight the many challenges posed by more complex systems and show that there are still issues to be overcome. PMID:22101543

  1. Compound Structure-Independent Activity Prediction in High-Dimensional Target Space.

    PubMed

    Balfer, Jenny; Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-08-01

    Profiling of compound libraries against arrays of targets has become an important approach in pharmaceutical research. The prediction of multi-target compound activities also represents an attractive task for machine learning with potential for drug discovery applications. Herein, we have explored activity prediction in high-dimensional target space. Different types of models were derived to predict multi-target activities. The models included naïve Bayesian (NB) and support vector machine (SVM) classifiers based upon compound structure information and NB models derived on the basis of activity profiles, without considering compound structure. Because the latter approach can be applied to incomplete training data and principally depends on the feature independence assumption, SVM modeling was not applicable in this case. Furthermore, iterative hybrid NB models making use of both activity profiles and compound structure information were built. In high-dimensional target space, NB models utilizing activity profile data were found to yield more accurate activity predictions than structure-based NB and SVM models or hybrid models. An in-depth analysis of activity profile-based models revealed the presence of correlation effects across different targets and rationalized prediction accuracy. Taken together, the results indicate that activity profile information can be effectively used to predict the activity of test compounds against novel targets.

  2. Structure prediction, disorder and dynamics in a DMSO solvate of carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J; Day, Graeme M; Jones, William

    2011-07-28

    We have applied crystal structure prediction methods to understand and predict the formation of a DMSO solvate of the anti-convulsant drug carbamazepine (CBZ), in which the DMSO molecules are disordered. Crystal structure prediction calculations on the 1:1 CBZ:DMSO solvate revealed the generation of two similar low energy structures which differ only in the orientation of the DMSO molecules. Analysis of crystal energy landscapes generated at 0 K suggests the possibility of solvent disorder. A combined computational and experimental study of the changes in the orientation of the DMSO within the crystal structure revealed that the nature of the disorder changes with temperature. At low temperature, the DMSO disorder is static whilst at high temperature the DMSO configurations can interconvert by a 180° rotation of the DMSO molecules within the lattice. This 180° rotation of the DMSO molecules drives a phase change from a high temperature dynamically disordered phase to a low temperature phase with static disorder. Crystallisation of a DMSO solvate of the related molecule epoxycarbamazepine resulted in a different degree of DMSO disorder in the crystal structure, despite the similarity of the carbamazepine and epoxycarbamazepine molecules. We believe consideration of disorder and its contribution to entropy and crystal free energies at temperature other than 0 K is fundamental for the accuracy of future energy rankings in crystal structure prediction calculations of similar solvated structures. PMID:21670828

  3. Evaluating our ability to predict the structural disruption of RNA by SNPs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The structure of RiboNucleic Acid (RNA) has the potential to be altered by a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP). Disease-associated SNPs mapping to non-coding regions of the genome that are transcribed into RiboNucleic Acid (RNA) can potentially affect cellular regulation (and cause disease) by altering the structure of the transcript. We performed a large-scale meta-analysis of Selective 2'-Hydroxyl Acylation analyzed by Primer Extension (SHAPE) data, which probes the structure of RNA. We found that several single point mutations exist that significantly disrupt RNA secondary structure in the five transcripts we analyzed. Thus, every RNA that is transcribed has the potential to be a “RiboSNitch;” where a SNP causes a large conformational change that alters regulatory function. Predicting the SNPs that will have the largest effect on RNA structure remains a contemporary computational challenge. We therefore benchmarked the most popular RNA structure prediction algorithms for their ability to identify mutations that maximally affect structure. We also evaluated metrics for rank ordering the extent of the structural change. Although no single algorithm/metric combination dramatically outperformed the others, small differences in AUC (Area Under the Curve) values reveal that certain approaches do provide better agreement with experiment. The experimental data we analyzed nonetheless show that multiple single point mutations exist in all RNA transcripts that significantly disrupt structure in agreement with the predictions. PMID:22759654

  4. Computational prediction of riboswitch tertiary structures including pseudoknots by RAGTOP: a hierarchical graph sampling approach.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namhee; Zahran, Mai; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    The modular organization of RNA structure has been exploited in various computational and theoretical approaches to identify RNA tertiary (3D) motifs and assemble RNA structures. Riboswitches exemplify this modularity in terms of both structural and functional adaptability of RNA components. Here, we extend our computational approach based on tree graph sampling to the prediction of riboswitch topologies by defining additional edges to mimick pseudoknots. Starting from a secondary (2D) structure, we construct an initial graph deduced from predicted junction topologies by our data-mining algorithm RNAJAG trained on known RNAs; we sample these graphs in 3D space guided by knowledge-based statistical potentials derived from bending and torsion measures of internal loops as well as radii of gyration for known RNAs. We present graph sampling results for 10 representative riboswitches, 6 of them with pseudoknots, and compare our predictions to solved structures based on global and local RMSD measures. Our results indicate that the helical arrangements in riboswitches can be approximated using our combination of modified 3D tree graph representations for pseudoknots, junction prediction, graph moves, and scoring functions. Future challenges in the field of riboswitch prediction and design are also discussed. PMID:25726463

  5. Data mining approaches to high-throughput crystal structure and compound prediction.

    PubMed

    Hautier, Geoffroy

    2014-01-01

    Predicting unknown inorganic compounds and their crystal structure is a critical step of high-throughput computational materials design and discovery. One way to achieve efficient compound prediction is to use data mining or machine learning methods. In this chapter we present a few algorithms for data mining compound prediction and their applications to different materials discovery problems. In particular, the patterns or correlations governing phase stability for experimental or computational inorganic compound databases are statistically learned and used to build probabilistic or regression models to identify novel compounds and their crystal structures. The stability of those compound candidates is then assessed using ab initio techniques. Finally, we report a few cases where data mining driven computational predictions were experimentally confirmed through inorganic synthesis.

  6. Structural link prediction based on ant colony approach in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherkat, Ehsan; Rahgozar, Maseud; Asadpour, Masoud

    2015-02-01

    As the size and number of online social networks are increasing day by day, social network analysis has become a popular issue in many branches of science. The link prediction is one of the key rolling issues in the analysis of social network's evolution. As the size of social networks is increasing, the necessity for scalable link prediction algorithms is being felt more. The aim of this paper is to introduce a new unsupervised structural link prediction algorithm based on the ant colony approach. Recently, ant colony approach has been used for solving some graph problems. Different kinds of networks are used for testing the proposed approach. In some networks, the proposed scalable algorithm has the best result in comparison to other structural unsupervised link prediction algorithms. In order to evaluate the algorithm results, methods like the top- n precision, area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Precision-Recall curves are carried out on real-world networks.

  7. Predicting RNA 3D structure using a coarse-grain helix-centered model.

    PubMed

    Kerpedjiev, Peter; Höner Zu Siederdissen, Christian; Hofacker, Ivo L

    2015-06-01

    A 3D model of RNA structure can provide information about its function and regulation that is not possible with just the sequence or secondary structure. Current models suffer from low accuracy and long running times and either neglect or presume knowledge of the long-range interactions which stabilize the tertiary structure. Our coarse-grained, helix-based, tertiary structure model operates with only a few degrees of freedom compared with all-atom models while preserving the ability to sample tertiary structures given a secondary structure. It strikes a balance between the precision of an all-atom tertiary structure model and the simplicity and effectiveness of a secondary structure representation. It provides a simplified tool for exploring global arrangements of helices and loops within RNA structures. We provide an example of a novel energy function relying only on the positions of stems and loops. We show that coupling our model to this energy function produces predictions as good as or better than the current state of the art tools. We propose that given the wide range of conformational space that needs to be explored, a coarse-grain approach can explore more conformations in less iterations than an all-atom model coupled to a fine-grain energy function. Finally, we emphasize the overarching theme of providing an ensemble of predicted structures, something which our tool excels at, rather than providing a handful of the lowest energy structures. PMID:25904133

  8. Predicting RNA 3D structure using a coarse-grain helix-centered model.

    PubMed

    Kerpedjiev, Peter; Höner Zu Siederdissen, Christian; Hofacker, Ivo L

    2015-06-01

    A 3D model of RNA structure can provide information about its function and regulation that is not possible with just the sequence or secondary structure. Current models suffer from low accuracy and long running times and either neglect or presume knowledge of the long-range interactions which stabilize the tertiary structure. Our coarse-grained, helix-based, tertiary structure model operates with only a few degrees of freedom compared with all-atom models while preserving the ability to sample tertiary structures given a secondary structure. It strikes a balance between the precision of an all-atom tertiary structure model and the simplicity and effectiveness of a secondary structure representation. It provides a simplified tool for exploring global arrangements of helices and loops within RNA structures. We provide an example of a novel energy function relying only on the positions of stems and loops. We show that coupling our model to this energy function produces predictions as good as or better than the current state of the art tools. We propose that given the wide range of conformational space that needs to be explored, a coarse-grain approach can explore more conformations in less iterations than an all-atom model coupled to a fine-grain energy function. Finally, we emphasize the overarching theme of providing an ensemble of predicted structures, something which our tool excels at, rather than providing a handful of the lowest energy structures.

  9. Protein design by fusion: implications for protein structure prediction and evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Skorupka, Katarzyna; Han, Seong Kyu; Nam, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Sanguk; Faham, Salem

    2013-11-19

    Domain fusion is a useful tool in protein design. Here, the structure of a fusion of the heterodimeric flagella-assembly proteins FliS and FliC is reported. Although the ability of the fusion protein to maintain the structure of the heterodimer may be apparent, threading-based structural predictions do not properly fuse the heterodimer. Additional examples of naturally occurring heterodimers that are homologous to full-length proteins were identified. These examples highlight that the designed protein was engineered by the same tools as used in the natural evolution of proteins and that heterodimeric structures contain a wealth of information, currently unused, that can improve structural predictions.

  10. Theoretical prediction of low-density hexagonal ZnO hollow structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuoc, Vu Ngoc; Huan, Tran Doan; Thao, Nguyen Thi; Tuan, Le Manh

    2016-10-01

    Along with wurtzite and zinc blende, zinc oxide (ZnO) has been found in a large number of polymorphs with substantially different properties and, hence, applications. Therefore, predicting and synthesizing new classes of ZnO polymorphs are of great significance and have been gaining considerable interest. Herein, we perform a density functional theory based tight-binding study, predicting several new series of ZnO hollow structures using the bottom-up approach. The geometry of the building blocks allows for obtaining a variety of hexagonal, low-density nanoporous, and flexible ZnO hollow structures. Their stability is discussed by means of the free energy computed within the lattice-dynamics approach. Our calculations also indicate that all the reported hollow structures are wide band gap semiconductors in the same fashion with bulk ZnO. The electronic band structures of the ZnO hollow structures are finally examined in detail.

  11. Reducing model structural uncertainty in predictions for ungauged basins via Bayesian approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Cristina; Le Vine, Nataliya; Vitolo, Claudia; García, Eduardo; Medina, Raúl

    2016-04-01

    A catchment is a complex system where a multitude of interrelated energy, water and vegetation processes occur at different temporal and spatial scales. A rainfall-runoff model is a simplified representation of the system, and serves as a hypothesis about an inner catchment working. In predictions for ungauged basins, a common practice is to use a pre-selected assumed-to-be-perfect model structure to represent all catchments under analysis. However, it is unlikely that the same model structure is appropriate for diverse catchments due to the 'uniqueness of the place'. At the same time, there is no obvious justification to select a single model structure as a suitable description of the system. The contribution of this research is a move forward in the 'one size fits all' problem for predicting flows in ungauged basins. We present a statistical methodology, which allows regionalization that considers the information given by different hydrological model structures. First, the information to be regionalised is compactly represented via Principal Component Analysis. Second, the most significant principal components are regionalised using non-linear regionalisation method based on Random Forests. Third, a regionalisation error structure is derived based on the gauged catchments to be used in the Bayesian condition of the rainfall-runoff structures and their parameters. The methodological developments are demonstrated for predicting flows in ungauged basins of Northern Spain; and the results show that the methodology allows improving the flow prediction.

  12. Prediction of biodegradability from chemical structure: Modeling or ready biodegradation test data

    SciTech Connect

    Loonen, H.; Lindgren, F.; Hansen, B.

    1999-08-01

    Biodegradation data were collected and evaluated for 894 substances with widely varying chemical structures. All data were determined according to the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) I test protocol. The MITI I test is a screening test for ready biodegradability and has been described by Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) test guideline 301 C and European Union (EU) test guideline C4F. The chemicals were characterized by a set of 127 predefined structural fragments. This data set was used to develop a model for the prediction of the biodegradability of chemicals under standardized OECD and EU ready biodegradation test conditions. Partial least squares (PLS) discriminant analysis was used for the model development. The model was evaluated by means of internal cross-validation and repeated external validation. The importance of various structural fragments and fragment interactions was investigated. The most important fragments include the presence of a long alkyl chain; hydroxy, ester, and acid groups (enhancing biodegradation); and the presence of one or more aromatic rings and halogen substituents (regarding biodegradation). More than 85% of the model predictions were correct for using the complete data set. The not readily biodegradable predictions were slightly better than the readily biodegradable predictions (86 vs 84%). The average percentage of correct predictions from four external validation studies was 83%. Model optimization by including fragment interactions improve the model predicting capabilities to 89%. It can be concluded that the PLS model provides predictions of high reliability for a diverse range of chemical structures. The predictions conform to the concept of readily biodegradable (or not readily biodegradable) as defined by OECD and EU test guidelines.

  13. Target Highlights in CASP9: Experimental Target Structures for the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Kryshtafovych, Andriy; Moult, John; Bartual, Sergio G.; Bazan, J. Fernando; Berman, Helen; Casteel, Darren E.; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Everett, John K.; Hausmann, Jens; Heidebrecht, Tatjana; Hills, Tanya; Hui, Raymond; Hunt, John F.; Jayaraman, Seetharaman; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Kennedy, Michael A.; Kim, Choel; Lingel, Andreas; Michalska, Karolina; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Otero, José M.; Perrakis, Anastassis; Pizarro, Juan C.; van Raaij, Mark J.; Ramelot, Theresa A.; Rousseau, Francois; Tong, Liang; Wernimont, Amy K.; Young, Jasmine; Schwede, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    One goal of the CASP Community Wide Experiment on the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction is to identify the current state of the art in protein structure prediction and modeling. A fundamental principle of CASP is blind prediction on a set of relevant protein targets, i.e. the participating computational methods are tested on a common set of experimental target proteins, for which the experimental structures are not known at the time of modeling. Therefore, the CASP experiment would not have been possible without broad support of the experimental protein structural biology community. In this manuscript, several experimental groups discuss the structures of the proteins which they provided as prediction targets for CASP9, highlighting structural and functional peculiarities of these structures: the long tail fibre protein gp37 from bacteriophage T4, the cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase Iβ (PKGIβ) dimerization/docking domain, the ectodomain of the JTB (Jumping Translocation Breakpoint) transmembrane receptor, Autotaxin (ATX) in complex with an inhibitor, the DNA-Binding J-Binding Protein 1 (JBP1) domain essential for biosynthesis and maintenance of DNA base-J (β-D-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil) in Trypanosoma and Leishmania, an so far uncharacterized 73 residue domain from Ruminococcus gnavus with a fold typical for PDZ-like domains, a domain from the Phycobilisome (PBS) core-membrane linker (LCM) phycobiliprotein ApcE from Synechocystis, the Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) activators PFC0360w and PFC0270w from Plasmodium falciparum, and 2-oxo-3-deoxygalactonate kinase from Klebsiella pneumoniae. PMID:22020785

  14. Efficient method for predicting crystal structures at finite temperature: variable box shape simulations.

    PubMed

    Filion, Laura; Marechal, Matthieu; van Oorschot, Bas; Pelt, Daniël; Smallenburg, Frank; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2009-10-30

    We present an efficient and robust method based on Monte Carlo simulations for predicting crystal structures at finite temperature. We apply this method, which is surprisingly easy to implement, to a variety of systems, demonstrating its effectiveness for hard, attractive, and anisotropic interactions, binary mixtures, semi-long-range soft interactions, and truly long-range interactions where the truly long-range interactions are treated using Ewald sums. In the case of binary hard-sphere mixtures, star polymers, and binary Lennard-Jones mixtures, the crystal structures predicted by this algorithm are consistent with literature, providing confidence in the method. Finally, we predict new crystal structures for hard asymmetric dumbbell particles, bowl-like particles and hard oblate cylinders and present the phase diagram for the oblate cylinders based on full free energy calculations. PMID:19905838

  15. Integration of QUARK and I-TASSER for Ab Initio Protein Structure Prediction in CASP11.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenxuan; Yang, Jianyi; He, Baoji; Walker, Sara Elizabeth; Zhang, Hongjiu; Govindarajoo, Brandon; Virtanen, Jouko; Xue, Zhidong; Shen, Hong-Bin; Zhang, Yang

    2016-09-01

    We tested two pipelines developed for template-free protein structure prediction in the CASP11 experiment. First, the QUARK pipeline constructs structure models by reassembling fragments of continuously distributed lengths excised from unrelated proteins. Five free-modeling (FM) targets have the model successfully constructed by QUARK with a TM-score above 0.4, including the first model of T0837-D1, which has a TM-score = 0.736 and RMSD = 2.9 Å to the native. Detailed analysis showed that the success is partly attributed to the high-resolution contact map prediction derived from fragment-based distance-profiles, which are mainly located between regular secondary structure elements and loops/turns and help guide the orientation of secondary structure assembly. In the Zhang-Server pipeline, weakly scoring threading templates are re-ordered by the structural similarity to the ab initio folding models, which are then reassembled by I-TASSER based structure assembly simulations; 60% more domains with length up to 204 residues, compared to the QUARK pipeline, were successfully modeled by the I-TASSER pipeline with a TM-score above 0.4. The robustness of the I-TASSER pipeline can stem from the composite fragment-assembly simulations that combine structures from both ab initio folding and threading template refinements. Despite the promising cases, challenges still exist in long-range beta-strand folding, domain parsing, and the uncertainty of secondary structure prediction; the latter of which was found to affect nearly all aspects of FM structure predictions, from fragment identification, target classification, structure assembly, to final model selection. Significant efforts are needed to solve these problems before real progress on FM could be made. Proteins 2016; 84(Suppl 1):76-86. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Taking Materials Design Into The Space Of Polymorphs: Structure Predictions And Realizability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevanovic, Vladan

    The phenomenon of polymorphism exemplifies the significance of structural degrees of freedom in determining physical properties of solids. Classic case is elemental carbon with markedly different mechanical, optical and electronic properties between its graphite and diamond forms. To harness the richness of this phenomenon and extend rational materials design into the space of polymorphs, there is a need for developing approaches that are capable of exploring systematically and efficiently the potential energy surface, and (desirably) assist in experimental realization of different structures. While the former presents a common place in the field of structure predictions, less attention is given to the latter. Namely, available experimental data indicate that the energy above the ground state alone is insufficient to quantify the realizability of different structures. For example, MgO crystallizes exclusively as the rocksalt despite the predicted existence of a number of low-energy structures. Similarly, ZnO is realized in the wurtzite, zincblende and a relatively high-energy rocksalt structure, again, apparently disregarding a number of theoretically predicted low-energy structures. In this talk I will present recent attempts to tackle these issues focused on partially ionic systems. The structure prediction part is carried out by performing local DFT relaxations on a large set of random supperlattices (RSLs) with atoms distributed randomly over different planes in a way that favors cation-anion coordination. Second, application of the RSL sampling to a range of binary ionic systems such as MgO, ZnO, SnO2 and other, reveals that the frequency of occurrence of a given structure offers an estimate of the volume of configuration space occupied by the corresponding local minimum, which is shown to be connected to the realizability of different structures. This work is part of the Center for Next Generation of Materials by Design, a US DOE funded Energy Frontier

  17. PAIRpred: partner-specific prediction of interacting residues from sequence and structure.

    PubMed

    Minhas, Fayyaz ul Amir Afsar; Geiss, Brian J; Ben-Hur, Asa

    2014-07-01

    We present a novel partner-specific protein-protein interaction site prediction method called PAIRpred. Unlike most existing machine learning binding site prediction methods, PAIRpred uses information from both proteins in a protein complex to predict pairs of interacting residues from the two proteins. PAIRpred captures sequence and structure information about residue pairs through pairwise kernels that are used for training a support vector machine classifier. As a result, PAIRpred presents a more detailed model of protein binding, and offers state of the art accuracy in predicting binding sites at the protein level as well as inter-protein residue contacts at the complex level. We demonstrate PAIRpred's performance on Docking Benchmark 4.0 and recent CAPRI targets. We present a detailed performance analysis outlining the contribution of different sequence and structure features, together with a comparison to a variety of existing interface prediction techniques. We have also studied the impact of binding-associated conformational change on prediction accuracy and found PAIRpred to be more robust to such structural changes than existing schemes. As an illustration of the potential applications of PAIRpred, we provide a case study in which PAIRpred is used to analyze the nature and specificity of the interface in the interaction of human ISG15 protein with NS1 protein from influenza A virus. Python code for PAIRpred is available at http://combi.cs.colostate.edu/supplements/pairpred/. PMID:24243399

  18. RPI-Pred: predicting ncRNA-protein interaction using sequence and structural information

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, V.; Liu, Liang; Adjeroh, Donald; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    RNA-protein complexes are essential in mediating important fundamental cellular processes, such as transport and localization. In particular, ncRNA-protein interactions play an important role in post-transcriptional gene regulation like mRNA localization, mRNA stabilization, poly-adenylation, splicing and translation. The experimental methods to solve RNA-protein interaction prediction problem remain expensive and time-consuming. Here, we present the RPI-Pred (RNA-protein interaction predictor), a new support-vector machine-based method, to predict protein-RNA interaction pairs, based on both the sequences and structures. The results show that RPI-Pred can correctly predict RNA-protein interaction pairs with ∼94% prediction accuracy when using sequence and experimentally determined protein and RNA structures, and with ∼83% when using sequences and predicted protein and RNA structures. Further, our proposed method RPI-Pred was superior to other existing ones by predicting more experimentally validated ncRNA-protein interaction pairs from different organisms. Motivated by the improved performance of RPI-Pred, we further applied our method for reliable construction of ncRNA-protein interaction networks. The RPI-Pred is publicly available at: http://ctsb.is.wfubmc.edu/projects/rpi-pred. PMID:25609700

  19. A Deep Learning Network Approach to ab initio Protein Secondary Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Matt; Eickholt, Jesse; Cheng, Jianlin

    2014-01-01

    Ab initio protein secondary structure (SS) predictions are utilized to generate tertiary structure predictions, which are increasingly demanded due to the rapid discovery of proteins. Although recent developments have slightly exceeded previous methods of SS prediction, accuracy has stagnated around 80% and many wonder if prediction cannot be advanced beyond this ceiling. Disciplines that have traditionally employed neural networks are experimenting with novel deep learning techniques in attempts to stimulate progress. Since neural networks have historically played an important role in SS prediction, we wanted to determine whether deep learning could contribute to the advancement of this field as well. We developed an SS predictor that makes use of the position-specific scoring matrix generated by PSI-BLAST and deep learning network architectures, which we call DNSS. Graphical processing units and CUDA software optimize the deep network architecture and efficiently train the deep networks. Optimal parameters for the training process were determined, and a workflow comprising three separately trained deep networks was constructed in order to make refined predictions. This deep learning network approach was used to predict SS for a fully independent test data set of 198 proteins, achieving a Q3 accuracy of 80.7% and a Sov accuracy of 74.2%. PMID:25750595

  20. A Deep Learning Network Approach to ab initio Protein Secondary Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Matt; Eickholt, Jesse; Jianlin Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Ab initio protein secondary structure (SS) predictions are utilized to generate tertiary structure predictions, which are increasingly demanded due to the rapid discovery of proteins. Although recent developments have slightly exceeded previous methods of SS prediction, accuracy has stagnated around 80 percent and many wonder if prediction cannot be advanced beyond this ceiling. Disciplines that have traditionally employed neural networks are experimenting with novel deep learning techniques in attempts to stimulate progress. Since neural networks have historically played an important role in SS prediction, we wanted to determine whether deep learning could contribute to the advancement of this field as well. We developed an SS predictor that makes use of the position-specific scoring matrix generated by PSI-BLAST and deep learning network architectures, which we call DNSS. Graphical processing units and CUDA software optimize the deep network architecture and efficiently train the deep networks. Optimal parameters for the training process were determined, and a workflow comprising three separately trained deep networks was constructed in order to make refined predictions. This deep learning network approach was used to predict SS for a fully independent test dataset of 198 proteins, achieving a Q3 accuracy of 80.7 percent and a Sov accuracy of 74.2 percent.

  1. ASTRO-FOLD 2.0: an Enhanced Framework for Protein Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Subramani, A; Wei, Y; Floudas, C A

    2012-05-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) structure prediction of proteins, given their amino acid sequence, is addressed using the first principles-based approach ASTRO-FOLD 2.0. The key features presented are: (1) Secondary structure prediction using a novel optimization-based consensus approach, (2) β-sheet topology prediction using mixed-integer linear optimization (MILP), (3) Residue-to-residue contact prediction using a high-resolution distance-dependent force field and MILP formulation, (4) Tight dihedral angle and distance bound generation for loop residues using dihedral angle clustering and non-linear optimization (NLP), (5) 3-D structure prediction using deterministic global optimization, stochastic conformational space annealing, and the full-atomistic ECEPP/3 potential, (6) Near-native structure selection using a traveling salesman problem-based clustering approach, ICON, and (7) Improved bound generation using chemical shifts of subsets of heavy atoms, generated by SPARTA and CS23D. Computational results of ASTRO-FOLD 2.0 on 47 blind targets of the recently concluded CASP9 experiment are presented.

  2. ASTRO-FOLD 2.0: an Enhanced Framework for Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Subramani, A.; Wei, Y.; Floudas, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) structure prediction of proteins, given their amino acid sequence, is addressed using the first principles–based approach ASTRO-FOLD 2.0. The key features presented are: (1) Secondary structure prediction using a novel optimization-based consensus approach, (2) β-sheet topology prediction using mixed-integer linear optimization (MILP), (3) Residue-to-residue contact prediction using a high-resolution distance-dependent force field and MILP formulation, (4) Tight dihedral angle and distance bound generation for loop residues using dihedral angle clustering and non-linear optimization (NLP), (5) 3-D structure prediction using deterministic global optimization, stochastic conformational space annealing, and the full-atomistic ECEPP/3 potential, (6) Near-native structure selection using a traveling salesman problem-based clustering approach, ICON, and (7) Improved bound generation using chemical shifts of subsets of heavy atoms, generated by SPARTA and CS23D. Computational results of ASTRO-FOLD 2.0 on 47 blind targets of the recently concluded CASP9 experiment are presented. PMID:23049093

  3. An automatic method for CASP9 free modeling structure prediction assessment

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Qian; Kinch, Lisa N.; Pei, Jimin; Shi, Shuoyong; Grishin, Vyacheslav N.; Li, Wenlin; Grishin, Nick V.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Manual inspection has been applied to and is well accepted for assessing critical assessment of protein structure prediction (CASP) free modeling (FM) category predictions over the years. Such manual assessment requires expertise and significant time investment, yet has the problems of being subjective and unable to differentiate models of similar quality. It is beneficial to incorporate the ideas behind manual inspection to an automatic score system, which could provide objective and reproducible assessment of structure models. Results: Inspired by our experience in CASP9 FM category assessment, we developed an automatic superimposition independent method named Quality Control Score (QCS) for structure prediction assessment. QCS captures both global and local structural features, with emphasis on global topology. We applied this method to all FM targets from CASP9, and overall the results showed the best agreement with Manual Inspection Scores among automatic prediction assessment methods previously applied in CASPs, such as Global Distance Test Total Score (GDT_TS) and Contact Score (CS). As one of the important components to guide our assessment of CASP9 FM category predictions, this method correlates well with other scoring methods and yet is able to reveal good-quality models that are missed by GDT_TS. Availability: The script for QCS calculation is available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/QCS/. Contact: grishin@chop.swmed.edu Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21994223

  4. Towards Practical Carbonation Prediction and Modelling for Service Life Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekolu, O. S.

    2015-11-01

    Amongst the scientific community, the interest in durability of concrete structures has been high for quite a long time of over 40 years. Of the various causes of degradation of concrete structures, corrosion is the most widespread durability problem and carbonation is one of the two causes of steel reinforcement corrosion. While much scientific understanding has been gained from the numerous carbonation studies undertaken over the past years, it is still presently not possible to accurately predict carbonation and apply it in design of structures. This underscores the complex nature of the mechanisms as influenced by several interactive factors. Based on critical literature and some experience of the author, it is found that there still exist major challenges in establishing a mathematical constitutive relation for realistic carbonation prediction. While most current models employ permeability /diffusion as the main model property, analysis shows that the most practical material property would be compressive strength, which has a low coefficient of variation of 20% compared to 30 to 50% for permeability. This important characteristic of compressive strength, combined with its merit of simplicity and data availability at all stages of a structure's life, promote its potential use in modelling over permeability. By using compressive strength in carbonation prediction, the need for accelerated testing and permeability measurement can be avoided. This paper attempts to examine the issues associated with carbonation prediction, which could underlie the current lack of a sound established prediction method. Suggestions are then made for possible employment of different or alternative approaches.

  5. Structure-aided prediction of mammalian transcription factor complexes in conserved non-coding elements.

    PubMed

    Guturu, Harendra; Doxey, Andrew C; Wenger, Aaron M; Bejerano, Gill

    2013-12-19

    Mapping the DNA-binding preferences of transcription factor (TF) complexes is critical for deciphering the functions of cis-regulatory elements. Here, we developed a computational method that compares co-occurring motif spacings in conserved versus unconserved regions of the human genome to detect evolutionarily constrained binding sites of rigid TF complexes. Structural data were used to estimate TF complex physical plausibility, explore overlapping motif arrangements seldom tackled by non-structure-aware methods, and generate and analyse three-dimensional models of the predicted complexes bound to DNA. Using this approach, we predicted 422 physically realistic TF complex motifs at 18% false discovery rate, the majority of which (326, 77%) contain some sequence overlap between binding sites. The set of mostly novel complexes is enriched in known composite motifs, predictive of binding site configurations in TF-TF-DNA crystal structures, and supported by ChIP-seq datasets. Structural modelling revealed three cooperativity mechanisms: direct protein-protein interactions, potentially indirect interactions and 'through-DNA' interactions. Indeed, 38% of the predicted complexes were found to contain four or more bases in which TF pairs appear to synergize through overlapping binding to the same DNA base pairs in opposite grooves or strands. Our TF complex and associated binding site predictions are available as a web resource at http://bejerano.stanford.edu/complex.

  6. Gene conversion causing human inherited disease: evidence for involvement of non-B-DNA-forming sequences and recombination-promoting motifs in DNA breakage and repair

    PubMed Central

    Chuzhanova, Nadia; Chen, Jian-Min; Bacolla, Albino; Patrinos, George P.; Férec, Claude; Wells, Robert D.; Cooper, David N.

    2009-01-01

    A variety of DNA sequence motifs including inverted repeats, minisatellites, and the χ recombination hotspot, have been reported in association with gene conversion in human genes causing inherited disease. However, no methodical statistically-based analysis has been performed to formalize these observations. We have performed an in silico analysis of the DNA sequence tracts involved in 27 non-overlapping gene conversion events in 19 different genes reported in the context of inherited disease. We found that gene conversion events tend to occur within (C+G)- and CpG-rich regions and that sequences with the potential to form non-B-DNA structures, and which may be involved in the generation of double-strand breaks that could in turn serve to promote gene conversion, occur disproportionately within maximal converted tracts and/or short flanking regions. Maximal converted tracts were also found to be enriched (p<0.01) in a truncated version of the χ-element (a TGGTGG motif), immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch repeats, translin target sites and several novel motifs including (or overlapping) the classical meiotic recombination hotspot, CCTCCCCT. Finally, gene conversions tend to occur in genomic regions that have the potential to fold into stable hairpin conformations. These findings support the concept that recombination-inducing motifs, in association with alternative DNA conformations, can promote recombination in the human genome. PMID:19431182

  7. Prediction of service life of aircraft structural components using the half-cycle method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1987-01-01

    The service life of aircraft structural components undergoing random stress cycling was analyzed by the application of fracture mechanics. The initial crack sizes at the critical stress points for the fatigue-crack growth analysis were established through proof load tests. The fatigue-crack growth rates for random stress cycles were calculated using the half-cycle method. A new equation was developed for calculating the number of remaining flights for the structural components. The number of remaining flights predicted by the new equation is much lower than that predicted by the conventional equation.

  8. Fast computational methods for predicting protein structure from primary amino acid sequence

    DOEpatents

    Agarwal, Pratul Kumar

    2011-07-19

    The present invention provides a method utilizing primary amino acid sequence of a protein, energy minimization, molecular dynamics and protein vibrational modes to predict three-dimensional structure of a protein. The present invention also determines possible intermediates in the protein folding pathway. The present invention has important applications to the design of novel drugs as well as protein engineering. The present invention predicts the three-dimensional structure of a protein independent of size of the protein, overcoming a significant limitation in the prior art.

  9. Artificial Intelligence in Prediction of Secondary Protein Structure Using CB513 Database

    PubMed Central

    Avdagic, Zikrija; Purisevic, Elvir; Omanovic, Samir; Coralic, Zlatan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we describe CB513 a non-redundant dataset, suitable for development of algorithms for prediction of secondary protein structure. A program was made in Borland Delphi for transforming data from our dataset to make it suitable for learning of neural network for prediction of secondary protein structure implemented in MATLAB Neural-Network Toolbox. Learning (training and testing) of neural network is researched with different sizes of windows, different number of neurons in the hidden layer and different number of training epochs, while using dataset CB513. PMID:21347158

  10. Ab-initio crystal structure prediction. A case study: NaBH{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Caputo, Riccarda; Tekin, Adem

    2011-07-15

    Crystal structure prediction from first principles is still one of the most challenging and interesting issue in condensed matter science. we explored the potential energy surface of NaBH{sub 4} by a combined ab-initio approach, based on global structure optimizations and quantum chemistry. In particular, we used simulated annealing (SA) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The methodology enabled the identification of several local minima, of which the global minimum corresponded to the tetragonal ground-state structure (P4{sub 2}/nmc), and the prediction of higher energy stable structures, among them a monoclinic (Pm) one was identified to be 22.75 kJ/mol above the ground-state at T=298 K. In between, orthorhombic and cubic structures were recovered, in particular those with Pnma and F4-bar 3m symmetries. - Graphical abstract: The total electron energy difference of the calculated stable structures. Here, the tetragonal (IT 137) and the monoclinic (IT 6) symmetry groups corresponded to the lowest and the highest energy structures, respectively. Highlights: > Potential energy surface of NaBH{sub 4} is investigated. > This is done a combination of global structure optimizations based on simulated annealing and density functional calculations. > We successfully reproduced experimentally found tetragonal and orthorhombic structures of NaBH{sub 4}. > Furthermore, we found a new stable high energy structure.

  11. ORION: a web server for protein fold recognition and structure prediction using evolutionary hybrid profiles.

    PubMed

    Ghouzam, Yassine; Postic, Guillaume; Guerin, Pierre-Edouard; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Gelly, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Protein structure prediction based on comparative modeling is the most efficient way to produce structural models when it can be performed. ORION is a dedicated webserver based on a new strategy that performs this task. The identification by ORION of suitable templates is performed using an original profile-profile approach that combines sequence and structure evolution information. Structure evolution information is encoded into profiles using structural features, such as solvent accessibility and local conformation -with Protein Blocks-, which give an accurate description of the local protein structure. ORION has recently been improved, increasing by 5% the quality of its results. The ORION web server accepts a single protein sequence as input and searches homologous protein structures within minutes. Various databases such as PDB, SCOP and HOMSTRAD can be mined to find an appropriate structural template. For the modeling step, a protein 3D structure can be directly obtained from the selected template by MODELLER and displayed with global and local quality model estimation measures. The sequence and the predicted structure of 4 examples from the CAMEO server and a recent CASP11 target from the 'Hard' category (T0818-D1) are shown as pertinent examples. Our web server is accessible at http://www.dsimb.inserm.fr/ORION/. PMID:27319297

  12. ORION: a web server for protein fold recognition and structure prediction using evolutionary hybrid profiles

    PubMed Central

    Ghouzam, Yassine; Postic, Guillaume; Guerin, Pierre-Edouard; de Brevern, Alexandre G.; Gelly, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Protein structure prediction based on comparative modeling is the most efficient way to produce structural models when it can be performed. ORION is a dedicated webserver based on a new strategy that performs this task. The identification by ORION of suitable templates is performed using an original profile-profile approach that combines sequence and structure evolution information. Structure evolution information is encoded into profiles using structural features, such as solvent accessibility and local conformation —with Protein Blocks—, which give an accurate description of the local protein structure. ORION has recently been improved, increasing by 5% the quality of its results. The ORION web server accepts a single protein sequence as input and searches homologous protein structures within minutes. Various databases such as PDB, SCOP and HOMSTRAD can be mined to find an appropriate structural template. For the modeling step, a protein 3D structure can be directly obtained from the selected template by MODELLER and displayed with global and local quality model estimation measures. The sequence and the predicted structure of 4 examples from the CAMEO server and a recent CASP11 target from the ‘Hard’ category (T0818-D1) are shown as pertinent examples. Our web server is accessible at http://www.dsimb.inserm.fr/ORION/. PMID:27319297

  13. ORION: a web server for protein fold recognition and structure prediction using evolutionary hybrid profiles.

    PubMed

    Ghouzam, Yassine; Postic, Guillaume; Guerin, Pierre-Edouard; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Gelly, Jean-Christophe

    2016-06-20

    Protein structure prediction based on comparative modeling is the most efficient way to produce structural models when it can be performed. ORION is a dedicated webserver based on a new strategy that performs this task. The identification by ORION of suitable templates is performed using an original profile-profile approach that combines sequence and structure evolution information. Structure evolution information is encoded into profiles using structural features, such as solvent accessibility and local conformation -with Protein Blocks-, which give an accurate description of the local protein structure. ORION has recently been improved, increasing by 5% the quality of its results. The ORION web server accepts a single protein sequence as input and searches homologous protein structures within minutes. Various databases such as PDB, SCOP and HOMSTRAD can be mined to find an appropriate structural template. For the modeling step, a protein 3D structure can be directly obtained from the selected template by MODELLER and displayed with global and local quality model estimation measures. The sequence and the predicted structure of 4 examples from the CAMEO server and a recent CASP11 target from the 'Hard' category (T0818-D1) are shown as pertinent examples. Our web server is accessible at http://www.dsimb.inserm.fr/ORION/.

  14. Thermodynamic Properties of Asphaltenes: A Predictive Approach Based On Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation and Atomistic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, Mamadou S.; Cagin, Tahir; Faulon, Jean Loup; Goddard, William A.

    2000-08-01

    The authors describe a new methodology for predicting the thermodynamic properties of petroleum geomacromolecules (asphaltenes and resins). This methodology combines computer assisted structure elucidation (CASE) with atomistic simulations (molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics and statistical mechanics). They use quantitative and qualitative structural data as input to a CASE program (SIGNATURE) to generate a sample of ten asphaltene model structures for a Saudi crude oil (Arab Berri). MM calculations and MD simulations are used to estimate selected volumetric and thermal properties of the model structures.

  15. Analysis and Design of Fuselage Structures Including Residual Strength Prediction Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research project is to develop and assess methodologies for the design and analysis of fuselage structures accounting for residual strength. Two primary objectives are included in this research activity: development of structural analysis methodology for predicting residual strength of fuselage shell-type structures; and the development of accurate, efficient analysis, design and optimization tool for fuselage shell structures. Assessment of these tools for robustness, efficient, and usage in a fuselage shell design environment will be integrated with these two primary research objectives.

  16. Protein structure prediction using residue- and fragment-environment potentials in CASP11.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyungrae; Kihara, Daisuke

    2016-09-01

    An accurate scoring function that can select near-native structure models from a pool of alternative models is key for successful protein structure prediction. For the critical assessment of techniques for protein structure prediction (CASP) 11, we have built a protocol of protein structure prediction that has novel coarse-grained scoring functions for selecting decoys as the heart of its pipeline. The score named PRESCO (Protein Residue Environment SCOre) developed recently by our group evaluates the native-likeness of local structural environment of residues in a structure decoy considering positions and the depth of side-chains of spatially neighboring residues. We also introduced a helix interaction potential as an additional scoring function for selecting decoys. The best models selected by PRESCO and the helix interaction potential underwent structure refinement, which includes side-chain modeling and relaxation with a short molecular dynamics simulation. Our protocol was successful, achieving the top rank in the free modeling category with a significant margin of the accumulated Z-score to the subsequent groups when the top 1 models were considered. Proteins 2016; 84(Suppl 1):105-117. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effect of Using Suboptimal Alignments in Template-Based Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Kihara, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    Computational protein structure prediction remains a challenging task in protein bioinformatics. In the recent years, the importance of template-based structure prediction is increasing due to the growing number of protein structures solved by the structural genomics projects. To capitalize the significant efforts and investments paid on the structural genomics projects, it is urgent to establish effective ways to use the solved structures as templates by developing methods for exploiting remotely related proteins that cannot be simply identified by homology. In this work, we examine the effect of employing suboptimal alignments in template-based protein structure prediction. We showed that suboptimal alignments are often more accurate than the optimal one, and such accurate suboptimal alignments can occur even at a very low rank of the alignment score. Suboptimal alignments contain a significant number of correct amino acid residue contacts. Moreover, suboptimal alignments can improve template-based models when used as input to Modeller. Finally, we employ suboptimal alignments for handling a contact potential in a probabilistic way in a threading program, SUPRB. The probabilistic contacts strategy outperforms the partly thawed approach which only uses the optimal alignment in defining residue contacts and also the reranking strategy, which uses the contact potential in reranking alignments. The comparison with existing methods in the template-recognition test shows that SUPRB is very competitive and outperform existing methods. PMID:21058297

  18. Small-molecule 3D structure prediction using open crystallography data.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, Peter; Baldi, Pierre

    2013-12-23

    Predicting the 3D structures of small molecules is a common problem in chemoinformatics. Even the best methods are inaccurate for complex molecules, and there is a large gap in accuracy between proprietary and free algorithms. Previous work presented COSMOS, a novel data-driven algorithm that uses knowledge of known structures from the Cambridge Structural Database and demonstrates performance that was competitive with proprietary algorithms. However, dependence on the Cambridge Structural Database prevented its widespread use. Here, we present an updated version of the COSMOS structure predictor, complete with a free structure library derived from open data sources. We demonstrate that COSMOS performs better than other freely available methods, with a mean RMSD of 1.16 and 1.68 Å for organic and metal-organic structures, respectively, and a mean prediction time of 60 ms per molecule. This is a 17% and 20% reduction, respectively, in RMSD compared to the free predictor provided by Open Babel, and it is 10 times faster. The ChemDB Web portal provides a COSMOS prediction Web server, as well as downloadable copies of the COSMOS executable and library of molecular substructures.

  19. Protein Structure Prediction using a Docking-based Hierarchical Folding scheme

    PubMed Central

    Kifer, Ilona; Nussinov, Ruth; Wolfson, Haim J.

    2011-01-01

    The pathways by which proteins fold into their specific native structure is still an unsolved mystery. Currently many methods for protein structure prediction are available, most of them tackle the problem by relying on the vast amounts of data collected from known protein structures. These methods are often not concerned with the route the protein follows to reach its final fold. This work is based on the premise that proteins fold in a hierarchical manner. We present FOBIA, an automated method for predicting a protein structure. FOBIA consists of two main stages: the first finds matches between parts of the target sequence and independently-folding structural units using profile-profile comparison. The second assembles these units into a 3D structure by searching and ranking their possible orientations towards each other using a docking-based approach. We have previously reported an application of an initial version of this strategy to homology based targets. Since then we have considerably enhanced our method’s abilities to allow it to address the more difficult template-based target category. This allows us to now apply FOBIA to the Template-Based targets of CASP8 and to show that it is both very efficient and promising. Our method can provide an alternative for Template-Based structure prediction, and in particular, the docking-based ranking technique presented here can be incorporated into any profile-profile comparison based method. PMID:21445943

  20. Protein structure prediction using a docking-based hierarchical folding scheme.

    PubMed

    Kifer, Ilona; Nussinov, Ruth; Wolfson, Haim J

    2011-06-01

    The pathways by which proteins fold into their specific native structure are still an unsolved mystery. Currently, many methods for protein structure prediction are available, and most of them tackle the problem by relying on the vast amounts of data collected from known protein structures. These methods are often not concerned with the route the protein follows to reach its final fold. This work is based on the premise that proteins fold in a hierarchical manner. We present FOBIA, an automated method for predicting a protein structure. FOBIA consists of two main stages: the first finds matches between parts of the target sequence and independently folding structural units using profile-profile comparison. The second assembles these units into a 3D structure by searching and ranking their possible orientations toward each other using a docking-based approach. We have previously reported an application of an initial version of this strategy to homology based targets. Since then we have considerably enhanced our method's abilities to allow it to address the more difficult template-based target category. This allows us to now apply FOBIA to the template-based targets of CASP8 and to show that it is both very efficient and promising. Our method can provide an alternative for template-based structure prediction, and in particular, the docking-basedranking technique presented here can be incorporated into any profile-profile comparison based method. PMID:21445943

  1. Protein Folding and Structure Prediction from the Ground Up: The Atomistic Associative Memory, Water Mediated, Structure and Energy Model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingchen; Lin, Xingcheng; Zheng, Weihua; Onuchic, José N; Wolynes, Peter G

    2016-08-25

    The associative memory, water mediated, structure and energy model (AWSEM) is a coarse-grained force field with transferable tertiary interactions that incorporates local in sequence energetic biases using bioinformatically derived structural information about peptide fragments with locally similar sequences that we call memories. The memory information from the protein data bank (PDB) database guides proper protein folding. The structural information about available sequences in the database varies in quality and can sometimes lead to frustrated free energy landscapes locally. One way out of this difficulty is to construct the input fragment memory information from all-atom simulations of portions of the complete polypeptide chain. In this paper, we investigate this approach first put forward by Kwac and Wolynes in a more complete way by studying the structure prediction capabilities of this approach for six α-helical proteins. This scheme which we call the atomistic associative memory, water mediated, structure and energy model (AAWSEM) amounts to an ab initio protein structure prediction method that starts from the ground up without using bioinformatic input. The free energy profiles from AAWSEM show that atomistic fragment memories are sufficient to guide the correct folding when tertiary forces are included. AAWSEM combines the efficiency of coarse-grained simulations on the full protein level with the local structural accuracy achievable from all-atom simulations of only parts of a large protein. The results suggest that a hybrid use of atomistic fragment memory and database memory in structural predictions may well be optimal for many practical applications. PMID:27148634

  2. Protein Folding and Structure Prediction from the Ground Up: The Atomistic Associative Memory, Water Mediated, Structure and Energy Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingchen; Lin, Xingcheng; Zheng, Weihua; Onuchic, José N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    The associative memory, water mediated, structure and energy model (AWSEM) is a coarse-grained force field with transferable tertiary interactions that incorporates local in sequence energetic biases using bioinformatically derived structural information about peptide fragments with locally similar sequence that we call memories. The memory information from the protein data bank (PDB) database guides proper protein folding. The structural information about available sequences in the database varies in quality and can sometimes lead to frustrated free energy landscapes locally. One way out of this difficulty is to construct the input fragment memory information from all-atom simulations of portions of the complete polypeptide chain. In this paper, we investigate this approach first put forward by Kwac and Wolynes in a more complete way by studying the structure prediction capabilities of this approach for six alpha-helical proteins. This scheme which we call the atomistic associative memory, water mediated, structure and energy model (AAWSEM) amounts to an ab initio protein structure prediction method that starts from the ground-up without using bioinformatic input. The free energy profiles from AAWSEM show that atomistic fragment memories are sufficient to guide the correct folding when tertiary forces are included. AAWSEM combines the efficiency of coarse-grained simulations on the full protein level with the local structural accuracy achievable from all-atom simulations of only parts of a large protein. The results suggest that a hybrid use of atomistic fragment memory and database memory in structural predictions may well be optimal for many practical applications. PMID:27148634

  3. RNA folding with soft constraints: reconciliation of probing data and thermodynamic secondary structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Washietl, Stefan; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Stadler, Peter F.; Kellis, Manolis

    2012-01-01

    Thermodynamic folding algorithms and structure probing experiments are commonly used to determine the secondary structure of RNAs. Here we propose a formal framework to reconcile information from both prediction algorithms and probing experiments. The thermodynamic energy parameters are adjusted using ‘pseudo-energies’ to minimize the discrepancy between prediction and experiment. Our framework differs from related approaches that used pseudo-energies in several key aspects. (i) The energy model is only changed when necessary and no adjustments are made if prediction and experiment are consistent. (ii) Pseudo-energies remain biophysically interpretable and hold positional information where experiment and model disagree. (iii) The whole thermodynamic ensemble of structures is considered thus allowing to reconstruct mixtures of suboptimal structures from seemingly contradicting data. (iv) The noise of the energy model and the experimental data is explicitly modeled leading to an intuitive weighting factor through which the problem can be seen as folding with ‘soft’ constraints of different strength. We present an efficient algorithm to iteratively calculate pseudo-energies within this framework and demonstrate how this approach can be used in combination with SHAPE chemical probing data to improve secondary structure prediction. We further demonstrate that the pseudo-energies correlate with biophysical effects that are known to affect RNA folding such as chemical nucleotide modifications and protein binding. PMID:22287623

  4. New insights from cluster analysis methods for RNA secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Emily; Heitsch, Christine

    2016-05-01

    A widening gap exists between the best practices for RNA secondary structure prediction developed by computational researchers and the methods used in practice by experimentalists. Minimum free energy predictions, although broadly used, are outperformed by methods which sample from the Boltzmann distribution and data mine the results. In particular, moving beyond the single structure prediction paradigm yields substantial gains in accuracy. Furthermore, the largest improvements in accuracy and precision come from viewing secondary structures not at the base pair level but at lower granularity/higher abstraction. This suggests that random errors affecting precision and systematic ones affecting accuracy are both reduced by this 'fuzzier' view of secondary structures. Thus experimentalists who are willing to adopt a more rigorous, multilayered approach to secondary structure prediction by iterating through these levels of granularity will be much better able to capture fundamental aspects of RNA base pairing. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:278-294. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1334 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  5. M3Ag17(SPh)12 Nanoparticles and Their Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, Sameera; Atnagulov, Aydar; Yoon, Bokwon; Barnett, Robert N; Griffith, Wendell P; Landman, Uzi; Bigioni, Terry P

    2015-09-16

    Although silver nanoparticles are of great fundamental and practical interest, only one structure has been determined thus far: M4Ag44(SPh)30, where M is a monocation, and SPh is an aromatic thiolate ligand. This is in part due to the fact that no other molecular silver nanoparticles have been synthesized with aromatic thiolate ligands. Here we report the synthesis of M3Ag17(4-tert-butylbenzene-thiol)12, which has good stability and an unusual optical spectrum. We also present a rational strategy for predicting the structure of this molecule. First-principles calculations support the structural model, predict a HOMO-LUMO energy gap of 1.77 eV, and predict a new "monomer mount" capping motif, Ag(SR)3, for Ag nanoparticles. The calculated optical absorption spectrum is in good correspondence with the measured spectrum. Heteroatom substitution was also used as a structural probe. First-principles calculations based on the structural model predicted a strong preference for a single Au atom substitution in agreement with experiment.

  6. Novel proteases from the genome of the carnivorous plant Drosera capensis: Structural prediction and comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Butts, Carter T; Bierma, Jan C; Martin, Rachel W

    2016-10-01

    In his 1875 monograph on insectivorous plants, Darwin described the feeding reactions of Drosera flypaper traps and predicted that their secretions contained a "ferment" similar to mammalian pepsin, an aspartic protease. Here we report a high-quality draft genome sequence for the cape sundew, Drosera capensis, the first genome of a carnivorous plant from order Caryophyllales, which also includes the Venus flytrap (Dionaea) and the tropical pitcher plants (Nepenthes). This species was selected in part for its hardiness and ease of cultivation, making it an excellent model organism for further investigations of plant carnivory. Analysis of predicted protein sequences yields genes encoding proteases homologous to those found in other plants, some of which display sequence and structural features that suggest novel functionalities. Because the sequence similarity to proteins of known structure is in most cases too low for traditional homology modeling, 3D structures of representative proteases are predicted using comparative modeling with all-atom refinement. Although the overall folds and active residues for these proteins are conserved, we find structural and sequence differences consistent with a diversity of substrate recognition patterns. Finally, we predict differences in substrate specificities using in silico experiments, providing targets for structure/function studies of novel enzymes with biological and technological significance. Proteins 2016; 84:1517-1533. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. TRFolder-W: a web server for telomerase RNA structure prediction in yeast genomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dong; Xue, Xingran; Malmberg, Russell L.; Cai, Liming

    2012-01-01

    Summary: TRFolder-W is a web server capable of predicting core structures of telomerase RNA (TR) in yeast genomes. TRFolder is a command-line Python toolkit for TR-specific structure prediction. We developed a web-version built on the django web framework, leveraging the work done previously, to include enhancements to increase flexibility of usage. To date, there are five core sub-structures commonly found in TR of fungal species, which are the template region, downstream pseudoknot, boundary element, core-closing stem and triple helix. The aim of TRFolder-W is to use the five core structures as fundamental units to predict potential TR genes for yeast, and to provide a user-friendly interface. Moreover, the application of TRFolder-W can be extended to predict the characteristic structure on species other than fungal species. Availability: The web server TRFolder-W is available at http://rna-informatics.uga.edu/?f=software&p=TRFolder-w. Contact: cai@cs.uga.edu Supplementary information: http://rna-informatics.uga.edu/?f=software&p=TRFolder-w-supplement. PMID:22923293

  8. The four ingredients of single-sequence RNA secondary structure prediction. A unifying perspective

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Any method for RNA secondary structure prediction is determined by four ingredients. The architecture is the choice of features implemented by the model (such as stacked basepairs, loop length distributions, etc.). The architecture determines the number of parameters in the model. The scoring scheme is the nature of those parameters (whether thermodynamic, probabilistic, or weights). The parameterization stands for the specific values assigned to the parameters. These three ingredients are referred to as “the model.” The fourth ingredient is the folding algorithms used to predict plausible secondary structures given the model and the sequence of a structural RNA. Here, I make several unifying observations drawn from looking at more than 40 years of methods for RNA secondary structure prediction in the light of this classification. As a final observation, there seems to be a performance ceiling that affects all methods with complex architectures, a ceiling that impacts all scoring schemes with remarkable similarity. This suggests that modeling RNA secondary structure by using intrinsic sequence-based plausible “foldability” will require the incorporation of other forms of information in order to constrain the folding space and to improve prediction accuracy. This could give an advantage to probabilistic scoring systems since a probabilistic framework is a natural platform to incorporate different sources of information into one single inference problem. PMID:23695796

  9. The four ingredients of single-sequence RNA secondary structure prediction. A unifying perspective.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Elena

    2013-07-01

    Any method for RNA secondary structure prediction is determined by four ingredients. The architecture is the choice of features implemented by the model (such as stacked basepairs, loop length distributions, etc.). The architecture determines the number of parameters in the model. The scoring scheme is the nature of those parameters (whether thermodynamic, probabilistic, or weights). The parameterization stands for the specific values assigned to the parameters. These three ingredients are referred to as "the model." The fourth ingredient is the folding algorithms used to predict plausible secondary structures given the model and the sequence of a structural RNA. Here, I make several unifying observations drawn from looking at more than 40 years of methods for RNA secondary structure prediction in the light of this classification. As a final observation, there seems to be a performance ceiling that affects all methods with complex architectures, a ceiling that impacts all scoring schemes with remarkable similarity. This suggests that modeling RNA secondary structure by using intrinsic sequence-based plausible "foldability" will require the incorporation of other forms of information in order to constrain the folding space and to improve prediction accuracy. This could give an advantage to probabilistic scoring systems since a probabilistic framework is a natural platform to incorporate different sources of information into one single inference problem.

  10. Novel proteases from the genome of the carnivorous plant Drosera capensis: Structural prediction and comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Butts, Carter T; Bierma, Jan C; Martin, Rachel W

    2016-10-01

    In his 1875 monograph on insectivorous plants, Darwin described the feeding reactions of Drosera flypaper traps and predicted that their secretions contained a "ferment" similar to mammalian pepsin, an aspartic protease. Here we report a high-quality draft genome sequence for the cape sundew, Drosera capensis, the first genome of a carnivorous plant from order Caryophyllales, which also includes the Venus flytrap (Dionaea) and the tropical pitcher plants (Nepenthes). This species was selected in part for its hardiness and ease of cultivation, making it an excellent model organism for further investigations of plant carnivory. Analysis of predicted protein sequences yields genes encoding proteases homologous to those found in other plants, some of which display sequence and structural features that suggest novel functionalities. Because the sequence similarity to proteins of known structure is in most cases too low for traditional homology modeling, 3D structures of representative proteases are predicted using comparative modeling with all-atom refinement. Although the overall folds and active residues for these proteins are conserved, we find structural and sequence differences consistent with a diversity of substrate recognition patterns. Finally, we predict differences in substrate specificities using in silico experiments, providing targets for structure/function studies of novel enzymes with biological and technological significance. Proteins 2016; 84:1517-1533. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27353064

  11. Combined computational metabolite prediction and automated structure-based analysis of mass spectrometric data.

    PubMed

    Stranz, David D; Miao, Shichang; Campbell, Scott; Maydwell, George; Ekins, Sean

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT As high-throughput technologies have developed in the pharmaceutical industry, the demand for identification of possible metabolites using predominantly liquid chromatographic/mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS/MS) for a large number of molecules in drug discovery has also increased. In parallel, computational technologies have also been developed to generate predictions for metabolites alongside methods to predict MS spectra and score the quality of the match with experimental spectra. The goal of the current study was to generate metabolite predictions from molecular structure with a software product, MetaDrug. In vitro microsomal incubations were used to ultimately produce MS data that could be used to verify the predictions with Apex, which is a new software tool that can predict the molecular ion spectrum and a fragmentation spectrum, automating the detailed examination of both MS and MS/MS spectra. For the test molecule imipramine used to illustrate the combined in vitro/in silico process proposed, MetaDrug predicts 16 metabolites. Following rat microsomal incubations with imipramine and analysis of the MS(n) data using the Apex software, strong evidence was found for imipramine and five metabolites and weaker evidence for five additional metabolites. This study suggests a new approach to streamline MS data analysis using a combination of predictive computational approaches with software capable of comparing the predicted metabolite output with empirical data when looking at drug metabolites.

  12. Evaluation of a universal flow-through model for predicting and designing phosphorus removal structures.

    PubMed

    Penn, Chad; Bowen, James; McGrath, Joshua; Nairn, Robert; Fox, Garey; Brown, Glenn; Wilson, Stuart; Gill, Clinton

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) removal structures have been shown to decrease dissolved P loss from agricultural and urban areas which may reduce the threat of eutrophication. In order to design or quantify performance of these structures, the relationship between discrete and cumulative removal with cumulative P loading must be determined, either by individual flow-through experiments or model prediction. A model was previously developed for predicting P removal with P sorption materials (PSMs) under flow-through conditions, as a function of inflow P concentration, retention time (RT), and PSM characteristics. The objective of this study was to compare model results to measured P removal data from several PSM under a range of conditions (P concentrations and RT) and scales ranging from laboratory to field. Materials tested included acid mine drainage residuals (AMDRs), treated and non-treated electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag at different size fractions, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum. Equations for P removal curves and cumulative P removed were not significantly different between predicted and actual values for any of the 23 scenarios examined. However, the model did tend to slightly over-predict cumulative P removal for calcium-based PSMs. The ability of the model to predict P removal for various materials, RTs, and P concentrations in both controlled settings and field structures validate its use in design and quantification of these structures. This ability to predict P removal without constant monitoring is vital to widespread adoption of P removal structures, especially for meeting discharge regulations and nutrient trading programs. PMID:26950026

  13. ENTPRISE: An Algorithm for Predicting Human Disease-Associated Amino Acid Substitutions from Sequence Entropy and Predicted Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongyi; Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The advance of next-generation sequencing technologies has made exome sequencing rapid and relatively inexpensive. A major application of exome sequencing is the identification of genetic variations likely to cause Mendelian diseases. This requires processing large amounts of sequence information and therefore computational approaches that can accurately and efficiently identify the subset of disease-associated variations are needed. The accuracy and high false positive rates of existing computational tools leave much room for improvement. Here, we develop a boosted tree regression machine-learning approach to predict human disease-associated amino acid variations by utilizing a comprehensive combination of protein sequence and structure features. On comparing our method, ENTPRISE, to the state-of-the-art methods SIFT, PolyPhen-2, MUTATIONASSESSOR, MUTATIONTASTER, FATHMM, ENTPRISE exhibits significant improvement. In particular, on a testing dataset consisting of only proteins with balanced disease-associated and neutral variations defined as having the ratio of neutral/disease-associated variations between 0.3 and 3, the Mathews Correlation Coefficient by ENTPRISE is 0.493 as compared to 0.432 by PPH2-HumVar, 0.406 by SIFT, 0.403 by MUTATIONASSESSOR, 0.402 by PPH2-HumDiv, 0.305 by MUTATIONTASTER, and 0.181 by FATHMM. ENTPRISE is then applied to nucleic acid binding proteins in the human proteome. Disease-associated predictions are shown to be highly correlated with the number of protein-protein interactions. Both these predictions and the ENTPRISE server are freely available for academic users as a web service at http://cssb.biology.gatech.edu/entprise/. PMID:26982818

  14. ENTPRISE: An Algorithm for Predicting Human Disease-Associated Amino Acid Substitutions from Sequence Entropy and Predicted Protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongyi; Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The advance of next-generation sequencing technologies has made exome sequencing rapid and relatively inexpensive. A major application of exome sequencing is the identification of genetic variations likely to cause Mendelian diseases. This requires processing large amounts of sequence information and therefore computational approaches that can accurately and efficiently identify the subset of disease-associated variations are needed. The accuracy and high false positive rates of existing computational tools leave much room for improvement. Here, we develop a boosted tree regression machine-learning approach to predict human disease-associated amino acid variations by utilizing a comprehensive combination of protein sequence and structure features. On comparing our method, ENTPRISE, to the state-of-the-art methods SIFT, PolyPhen-2, MUTATIONASSESSOR, MUTATIONTASTER, FATHMM, ENTPRISE exhibits significant improvement. In particular, on a testing dataset consisting of only proteins with balanced disease-associated and neutral variations defined as having the ratio of neutral/disease-associated variations between 0.3 and 3, the Mathews Correlation Coefficient by ENTPRISE is 0.493 as compared to 0.432 by PPH2-HumVar, 0.406 by SIFT, 0.403 by MUTATIONASSESSOR, 0.402 by PPH2-HumDiv, 0.305 by MUTATIONTASTER, and 0.181 by FATHMM. ENTPRISE is then applied to nucleic acid binding proteins in the human proteome. Disease-associated predictions are shown to be highly correlated with the number of protein-protein interactions. Both these predictions and the ENTPRISE server are freely available for academic users as a web service at http://cssb.biology.gatech.edu/entprise/.

  15. Structural predictions based on the compositions of cathodic materials by first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Lian, Fang; Chen, Ning; Hao, Zhen-jia; Chou, Kuo-chih

    2015-05-01

    A first-principles method is applied to comparatively study the stability of lithium metal oxides with layered or spinel structures to predict the most energetically favorable structure for different compositions. The binding and reaction energies of the real or virtual layered LiMO2 and spinel LiM2O4 (M = Sc-Cu, Y-Ag, Mg-Sr, and Al-In) are calculated. The effect of element M on the structural stability, especially in the case of multiple-cation compounds, is discussed herein. The calculation results indicate that the phase stability depends on both the binding and reaction energies. The oxidation state of element M also plays a role in determining the dominant structure, i.e., layered or spinel phase. Moreover, calculation-based theoretical predictions of the phase stability of the doped materials agree with the previously reported experimental data.

  16. Structural prediction and analysis of VIH-related peptides from selected crustacean species.

    PubMed

    Nagaraju, Ganji Purna Chandra; Kumari, Nunna Siva; Prasad, Ganji Lakshmi Vara; Rajitha, Balney; Meenu, Madan; Rao, Manam Sreenivasa; Naik, Bannoth Reddya

    2009-08-17

    The tentative elucidation of the 3D-structure of vitellogenesis inhibiting hormone (VIH) peptides is conversely underprivileged by difficulties in gaining enough peptide or protein, diffracting crystals, and numerous extra technical aspects. As a result, no structural information is available for VIH peptide sequences registered in the Genbank. In this situation, it is not surprising that predictive methods have achieved great interest. Here, in this study the molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) of the kuruma prawn (Marsupenaeus japonicus) is used, to predict the structure of four VIHrelated peptides in the crustacean species. The high similarity of the 3D-structures and the calculated physiochemical characteristics of these peptides suggest a common fold for the entire family.

  17. Antibody modeling using the prediction of immunoglobulin structure (PIGS) web server [corrected].

    PubMed

    Marcatili, Paolo; Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Chailyan, Anna; Tramontano, Anna

    2014-12-01

    Antibodies (or immunoglobulins) are crucial for defending organisms from pathogens, but they are also key players in many medical, diagnostic and biotechnological applications. The ability to predict their structure and the specific residues involved in antigen recognition has several useful applications in all of these areas. Over the years, we have developed or collaborated in developing a strategy that enables researchers to predict the 3D structure of antibodies with a very satisfactory accuracy. The strategy is completely automated and extremely fast, requiring only a few minutes (∼10 min on average) to build a structural model of an antibody. It is based on the concept of canonical structures of antibody loops and on our understanding of the way light and heavy chains pack together.

  18. Towards universal structure-based prediction of class II MHC epitopes for diverse allotypes.

    PubMed

    Bordner, Andrew J

    2010-01-01

    The binding of peptide fragments of antigens to class II MHC proteins is a crucial step in initiating a helper T cell immune response. The discovery of these peptide epitopes is important for understanding the normal immune response and its misregulation in autoimmunity and allergies and also for vaccine design. In spite of their biomedical importance, the high diversity of class II MHC proteins combined with the large number of possible peptide sequences make comprehensive experimental determination of epitopes for all MHC allotypes infeasible. Computational methods can address this need by predicting epitopes for a particular MHC allotype. We present a structure-based method for predicting class II epitopes that combines molecular mechanics docking of a fully flexible peptide into the MHC binding cleft followed by binding affinity prediction using a machine learning classifier trained on interaction energy components calculated from the docking solution. Although the primary advantage of structure-based prediction methods over the commonly employed sequence-based methods is their applicability to essentially any MHC allotype, this has not yet been convincingly demonstrated. In order to test the transferability of the prediction method to different MHC proteins, we trained the scoring method on binding data for DRB1*0101 and used it to make predictions for multiple MHC allotypes with distinct peptide binding specificities including representatives from the other human class II MHC loci, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ, as well as for two murine allotypes. The results showed that the prediction method was able to achieve significant discrimination between epitope and non-epitope peptides for all MHC allotypes examined, based on AUC values in the range 0.632-0.821. We also discuss how accounting for peptide binding in multiple registers to class II MHC largely explains the systematically worse performance of prediction methods for class II MHC compared with those for class I MHC

  19. Structure-dynamics relationships in bursting neuronal networks revealed using a prediction framework.

    PubMed

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Ruohonen, Keijo; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2013-01-01

    The question of how the structure of a neuronal network affects its functionality has gained a lot of attention in neuroscience. However, the vast majority of the studies on structure-dynamics relationships consider few types of network structures and assess limited numbers of structural measures. In this in silico study, we employ a wide diversity of network topologies and search among many possibilities the aspects of structure that have the greatest effect on the network excitability. The network activity is simulated using two point-neuron models, where the neurons are activated by noisy fluctuation of the membrane potential and their connections are described by chemical synapse models, and statistics on the number and quality of the emergent network bursts are collected for each network type. We apply a prediction framework to the obtained data in order to find out the most relevant aspects of network structure. In this framework, predictors that use different sets of graph-theoretic measures are trained to estimate the activity properties, such as burst count or burst length, of the networks. The performances of these predictors are compared with each other. We show that the best performance in prediction of activity properties for networks with sharp in-degree distribution is obtained when the prediction is based on clustering coefficient. By contrast, for networks with broad in-degree distribution, the maximum eigenvalue of the connectivity graph gives the most accurate prediction. The results shown for small ([Formula: see text]) networks hold with few exceptions when different neuron models, different choices of neuron population and different average degrees are applied. We confirm our conclusions using larger ([Formula: see text]) networks as well. Our findings reveal the relevance of different aspects of network structure from the viewpoint of network excitability, and our integrative method could serve as a general framework for structure

  20. A graph-theoretic approach for classification and structure prediction of transmembrane β-barrel proteins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transmembrane β-barrel proteins are a special class of transmembrane proteins which play several key roles in human body and diseases. Due to experimental difficulties, the number of transmembrane β-barrel proteins with known structures is very small. Over the years, a number of learning-based methods have been introduced for recognition and structure prediction of transmembrane β-barrel proteins. Most of these methods emphasize on homology search rather than any biological or chemical basis. Results We present a novel graph-theoretic model for classification and structure prediction of transmembrane β-barrel proteins. This model folds proteins based on energy minimization rather than a homology search, avoiding any assumption on availability of training dataset. The ab initio model presented in this paper is the first method to allow for permutations in the structure of transmembrane proteins and provides more structural information than any known algorithm. The model is also able to recognize β-barrels by assessing the pseudo free energy. We assess the structure prediction on 41 proteins gathered from existing databases on experimentally validated transmembrane β-barrel proteins. We show that our approach is quite accurate with over 90% F-score on strands and over 74% F-score on residues. The results are comparable to other algorithms suggesting that our pseudo-energy model is close to the actual physical model. We test our classification approach and show that it is able to reject α-helical bundles with 100% accuracy and β-barrel lipocalins with 97% accuracy. Conclusions We show that it is possible to design models for classification and structure prediction for transmembrane β-barrel proteins which do not depend essentially on training sets but on combinatorial properties of the structures to be proved. These models are fairly accurate, robust and can be run very efficiently on PC-like computers. Such models are useful for the genome

  1. PiDNA: Predicting protein-DNA interactions with structural models.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Kang; Chen, Chien-Yu

    2013-07-01

    Predicting binding sites of a transcription factor in the genome is an important, but challenging, issue in studying gene regulation. In the past decade, a large number of protein-DNA co-crystallized structures available in the Protein Data Bank have facilitated the understanding of interacting mechanisms between transcription factors and their binding sites. Recent studies have shown that both physics-based and knowledge-based potential functions can be applied to protein-DNA complex structures to deliver position weight matrices (PWMs) that are consistent with the experimental data. To further use the available structural models, the proposed Web server, PiDNA, aims at first constructing reliable PWMs by applying an atomic-level knowledge-based scoring function on numerous in silico mutated complex structures, and then using the PWM constructed by the structure models with small energy changes to predict the interaction between proteins and DNA sequences. With PiDNA, the users can easily predict the relative preference of all the DNA sequences with limited mutations from the native sequence co-crystallized in the model in a single run. More predictions on sequences with unlimited mutations can be realized by additional requests or file uploading. Three types of information can be downloaded after prediction: (i) the ranked list of mutated sequences, (ii) the PWM constructed by the favourable mutated structures, and (iii) any mutated protein-DNA complex structure models specified by the user. This study first shows that the constructed PWMs are similar to the annotated PWMs collected from databases or literature. Second, the prediction accuracy of PiDNA in detecting relatively high-specificity sites is evaluated by comparing the ranked lists against in vitro experiments from protein-binding microarrays. Finally, PiDNA is shown to be able to select the experimentally validated binding sites from 10,000 random sites with high accuracy. With PiDNA, the users can

  2. Multiscale model for predicting shear zone structure and permeability in deforming rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Paul W.; Pereira, Gerald G.; Lemiale, Vincent; Piane, Claudio Delle; Clennell, M. Ben

    2016-04-01

    A novel multiscale model is proposed for the evolution of faults in rocks, which predicts their internal properties and permeability as strain increases. The macroscale model, based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), predicts system scale deformation by a pressure-dependent elastoplastic representation of the rock and shear zone. Being a continuum method, SPH contains no intrinsic information on the grain scale structure or behaviour of the shear zone, so a series of discrete element method microscale shear cell models are embedded into the macroscale model at specific locations. In the example used here, the overall geometry and kinematics of a direct shear test on a block of intact rock is simulated. Deformation is imposed by a macroscale model where stresses and displacement rates are applied at the shear cell walls in contact with the rock. Since the microscale models within the macroscale block of deforming rock now include representations of the grains, the structure of the shear zone, the evolution of the size and shape distribution of these grains, and the dilatancy of the shear zone can all be predicted. The microscale dilatancy can be used to vary the macroscale model dilatancy both spatially and temporally to give a full two-way coupling between the spatial scales. The ability of this model to predict shear zone structure then allows the prediction of the shear zone permeability using the Lattice-Boltzmann method.

  3. Family of G protein alpha chains: amphipathic analysis and predicted structure of functional domains.

    PubMed

    Masters, S B; Stroud, R M; Bourne, H R

    1986-01-01

    The G proteins transduce hormonal and other signals into regulation of enzymes such as adenylyl cyclase and retinal cGMP phosphodiesterase. Each G protein contains an alpha subunit that binds and hydrolyzes guanine nucleotides and interacts with beta gamma subunits and specific receptor and effector proteins. Amphipathic and secondary structure analysis of the primary sequences of five different alpha chains (bovine alpha s, alpha t1 and alpha t2, mouse alpha i, and rat alpha o) predicted the secondary structure of a composite alpha chain (alpha avg). The alpha chains contain four short regions of sequence homologous to regions in the GDP binding domain of bacterial elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu). Similarities between the predicted secondary structures of these regions in alpha avg and the known secondary structure of EF-Tu allowed us to construct a three-dimensional model of the GDP binding domain of alpha avg. Identification of the GDP binding domain of alpha avg defined three additional domains in the composite polypeptide. The first includes the amino terminal 41 residues of alpha avg, with a predicted amphipathic alpha helical structure; this domain may control binding of the alpha chains to the beta gamma complex. The second domain, containing predicted beta strands and alpha helices, several of which are strongly amphipathic, probably contains sequences responsible for interaction of alpha chains with effector enzymes. The predicted structure of the third domain, containing the carboxy terminal 100 amino acids, is predominantly beta sheet with an amphipathic alpha helix at the carboxy terminus. We propose that this domain is responsible for receptor binding.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3148932

  4. Predicting community structure in snakes on Eastern Nearctic islands using ecological neutral theory and phylogenetic methods.

    PubMed

    Burbrink, Frank T; McKelvy, Alexander D; Pyron, R Alexander; Myers, Edward A

    2015-11-22

    Predicting species presence and richness on islands is important for understanding the origins of communities and how likely it is that species will disperse and resist extinction. The equilibrium theory of island biogeography (ETIB) and, as a simple model of sampling abundances, the unified neutral theory of biodiversity (UNTB), predict that in situations where mainland to island migration is high, species-abundance relationships explain the presence of taxa on islands. Thus, more abundant mainland species should have a higher probability of occurring on adjacent islands. In contrast to UNTB, if certain groups have traits that permit them to disperse to islands better than other taxa, then phylogeny may be more predictive of which taxa will occur on islands. Taking surveys of 54 island snake communities in the Eastern Nearctic along with mainland communities that have abundance data for each species, we use phylogenetic assembly methods and UNTB estimates to predict island communities. Species richness is predicted by island area, whereas turnover from the mainland to island communities is random with respect to phylogeny. Community structure appears to be ecologically neutral and abundance on the mainland is the best predictor of presence on islands. With regard to young and proximate islands, where allopatric or cladogenetic speciation is not a factor, we find that simple neutral models following UNTB and ETIB predict the structure of island communities. PMID:26609083

  5. Predicting community structure in snakes on Eastern Nearctic islands using ecological neutral theory and phylogenetic methods.

    PubMed

    Burbrink, Frank T; McKelvy, Alexander D; Pyron, R Alexander; Myers, Edward A

    2015-11-22

    Predicting species presence and richness on islands is important for understanding the origins of communities and how likely it is that species will disperse and resist extinction. The equilibrium theory of island biogeography (ETIB) and, as a simple model of sampling abundances, the unified neutral theory of biodiversity (UNTB), predict that in situations where mainland to island migration is high, species-abundance relationships explain the presence of taxa on islands. Thus, more abundant mainland species should have a higher probability of occurring on adjacent islands. In contrast to UNTB, if certain groups have traits that permit them to disperse to islands better than other taxa, then phylogeny may be more predictive of which taxa will occur on islands. Taking surveys of 54 island snake communities in the Eastern Nearctic along with mainland communities that have abundance data for each species, we use phylogenetic assembly methods and UNTB estimates to predict island communities. Species richness is predicted by island area, whereas turnover from the mainland to island communities is random with respect to phylogeny. Community structure appears to be ecologically neutral and abundance on the mainland is the best predictor of presence on islands. With regard to young and proximate islands, where allopatric or cladogenetic speciation is not a factor, we find that simple neutral models following UNTB and ETIB predict the structure of island communities.

  6. Striatal structure and function predict individual biases in learning to avoid pain

    PubMed Central

    Eldar, Eran; Hauser, Tobias U.; Dayan, Peter; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2016-01-01

    Pain is an elemental inducer of avoidance. Here, we demonstrate that people differ in how they learn to avoid pain, with some individuals refraining from actions that resulted in painful outcomes, whereas others favor actions that helped prevent pain. These individual biases were best explained by differences in learning from outcome prediction errors and were associated with distinct forms of striatal responses to painful outcomes. Specifically, striatal responses to pain were modulated in a manner consistent with an aversive prediction error in individuals who learned predominantly from pain, whereas in individuals who learned predominantly from success in preventing pain, modulation was consistent with an appetitive prediction error. In contrast, striatal responses to success in preventing pain were consistent with an appetitive prediction error in both groups. Furthermore, variation in striatal structure, encompassing the region where pain prediction errors were expressed, predicted participants’ predominant mode of learning, suggesting the observed learning biases may reflect stable individual traits. These results reveal functional and structural neural components underlying individual differences in avoidance learning, which may be important contributors to psychiatric disorders involving pathological harm avoidance behavior. PMID:27071092

  7. Prediction of the Fundamental Period of Infilled RC Frame Structures Using Artificial Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Asteris, Panagiotis G.; Tsaris, Athanasios K.; Cavaleri, Liborio; Repapis, Constantinos C.; Papalou, Angeliki; Di Trapani, Fabio; Karypidis, Dimitrios F.

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental period is one of the most critical parameters for the seismic design of structures. There are several literature approaches for its estimation which often conflict with each other, making their use questionable. Furthermore, the majority of these approaches do not take into account the presence of infill walls into the structure despite the fact that infill walls increase the stiffness and mass of structure leading to significant changes in the fundamental period. In the present paper, artificial neural networks (ANNs) are used to predict the fundamental period of infilled reinforced concrete (RC) structures. For the training and the validation of the ANN, a large data set is used based on a detailed investigation of the parameters that affect the fundamental period of RC structures. The comparison of the predicted values with analytical ones indicates the potential of using ANNs for the prediction of the fundamental period of infilled RC frame structures taking into account the crucial parameters that influence its value. PMID:27066069

  8. HAAD: A quick algorithm for accurate prediction of hydrogen atoms in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunqi; Roy, Ambrish; Zhang, Yang

    2009-08-20

    Hydrogen constitutes nearly half of all atoms in proteins and their positions are essential for analyzing hydrogen-bonding interactions and refining atomic-level structures. However, most protein structures determined by experiments or computer prediction lack hydrogen coordinates. We present a new algorithm, HAAD, to predict the positions of hydrogen atoms based on the positions of heavy atoms. The algorithm is built on the basic rules of orbital hybridization followed by the optimization of steric repulsion and electrostatic interactions. We tested the algorithm using three independent data sets: ultra-high-resolution X-ray structures, structures determined by neutron diffraction, and NOE proton-proton distances. Compared with the widely used programs CHARMM and REDUCE, HAAD has a significantly higher accuracy, with the average RMSD of the predicted hydrogen atoms to the X-ray and neutron diffraction structures decreased by 26% and 11%, respectively. Furthermore, hydrogen atoms placed by HAAD have more matches with the NOE restraints and fewer clashes with heavy atoms. The average CPU cost by HAAD is 18 and 8 times lower than that of CHARMM and REDUCE, respectively. The significant advantage of HAAD in both the accuracy and the speed of the hydrogen additions should make HAAD a useful tool for the detailed study of protein structure and function. Both an executable and the source code of HAAD are freely available at http://zhang.bioinformatics.ku.edu/HAAD.

  9. Evolutionary crystal structure prediction: discovering new minerals in the deep Earth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oganov, A. R.; Glass, C. W.

    2006-12-01

    Experimental determination of crystal structures at high pressure is often extremely difficult; given this and the strengths of quantum-mechanical simulations, theory presents an attractive tool to investigate matter at extreme conditions. However, crystal structure prediction on the basis of just the chemical formula has long been considered a formidable or even insoluble problem. Solving it would enable structural studies of planetary materials at extreme conditions [1,2] and probe changing chemistry at high pressure, solve structures where experimental data are insufficient, and design new materials entirely on the computer (once the structure is known, it is relatively easy to predict many of its properties e.g., [3]). Recently, we addressed this problem and devised a new method based on an ab initio evolutionary algorithm, which we implemented in the USPEX code (Universal Structure Predictor: Evolutionary Xtallography, [4-6]). USPEX uses ab initio free energy as evaluation function and features local optimization and spatial heredity, as well as further operators such as mutation and permutation. At given P-T conditions, USPEX finds the stable structure and a set of robust metastable structures, using no experimental information except the chemical composition. This method has been widely tested and applied to solve a number of important problems. In this talk I will discuss some of the applications of this method to a number of interesting materials at high pressure (C, O, S, MgSiO3, CO2, CaCO3, MgCO3). 1. Oganov A.R. & Ono S. (2004). Theoretical and experimental evidence for a post-perovskite phase of MgSiO3 in Earth's D" layer. Nature 430, 445-448. 2. Oganov A.R., Ono S. (2005). The high pressure phase of alumina and implications for Earth's D" layer. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 102, 10828-10831. 3. Oganov A.R., Brodholt J.P., Price G.D. (2001). The elastic constants of MgSiO3 perovskite at pressures and temperatures of the Earth's mantle. Nature 411, 934-937. 4

  10. FINDSITE: a combined evolution/structure-based approach to protein function prediction

    PubMed Central

    Brylinski, Michal

    2009-01-01

    A key challenge of the post-genomic era is the identification of the function(s) of all the molecules in a given organism. Here, we review the status of sequence and structure-based approaches to protein function inference and ligand screening that can provide functional insights for a significant fraction of the ∼50% of ORFs of unassigned function in an average proteome. We then describe FINDSITE, a recently developed algorithm for ligand binding site prediction, ligand screening and molecular function prediction, which is based on binding site conservation across evolutionary distant proteins identified by threading. Importantly, FINDSITE gives comparable results when high-resolution experimental structures as well as predicted protein models are used. PMID:19324930

  11. Protein Tertiary Structure Prediction Based on Main Chain Angle Using a Hybrid Bees Colony Optimization Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Zakaria N.; Mahmuddin, Massudi; Mahmood, Mohammed Nooraldeen

    Encoding proteins of amino acid sequence to predict classified into their respective families and subfamilies is important research area. However for a given protein, knowing the exact action whether hormonal, enzymatic, transmembranal or nuclear receptors does not depend solely on amino acid sequence but on the way the amino acid thread folds as well. This study provides a prototype system that able to predict a protein tertiary structure. Several methods are used to develop and evaluate the system to produce better accuracy in protein 3D structure prediction. The Bees Optimization algorithm which inspired from the honey bees food foraging method, is used in the searching phase. In this study, the experiment is conducted on short sequence proteins that have been used by the previous researches using well-known tools. The proposed approach shows a promising result.

  12. Vertical structure of predictability and information transport over the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ai-Xia; Wang, Qi-Gang; Gong, Zhi-Qiang; Feng, Guo-Lin

    2014-02-01

    Based on nonlinear prediction and information theory, vertical heterogeneity of predictability and information loss rate in geopotential height field are obtained over the Northern Hemisphere. On a seasonal-to-interannual time scale, the predictability is low in the lower troposphere and high in the mid-upper troposphere. However, within mid-upper troposphere over the subtropics ocean area, there is a relatively poor predictability. These conclusions also fit the seasonal time scale. Moving to the interannual time scale, the predictability becomes high in the lower troposphere and low in the mid-upper troposphere, contrary to the former case. On the whole the interannual trend is more predictable than the seasonal trend. The average information loss rate is low over the mid-east Pacific, west of North America, Atlantic and Eurasia, and the atmosphere over other places has a relatively high information loss rate on all-time scales. Two channels are found steadily over the Pacific Ocean and Atlantic Ocean in subtropics. There are also unstable channels. The four-season influence on predictability and information communication are studied. The predictability is low, no matter which season data are removed and each season plays an important role in the existence of the channels, except for the winter. The predictability and teleconnections are paramount issues in atmospheric science, and the teleconnections may be established by communication channels. So, this work is interesting since it reveals the vertical structure of predictability distribution, channel locations, and the contributions of different time scales to them and their variations under different seasons.

  13. Incorporating chemical modification constraints into a dynamic programming algorithm for prediction of RNA secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, David H.; Disney, Matthew D.; Childs, Jessica L.; Schroeder, Susan J.; Zuker, Michael; Turner, Douglas H.

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic programming algorithm for prediction of RNA secondary structure has been revised to accommodate folding constraints determined by chemical modification and to include free energy increments for coaxial stacking of helices when they are either adjacent or separated by a single mismatch. Furthermore, free energy parameters are revised to account for recent experimental results for terminal mismatches and hairpin, bulge, internal, and multibranch loops. To demonstrate the applicability of this method, in vivo modification was performed on 5S rRNA in both Escherichia coli and Candida albicans with 1-cyclohexyl-3-(2-morpholinoethyl) carbodiimide metho-p-toluene sulfonate, dimethyl sulfate, and kethoxal. The percentage of known base pairs in the predicted structure increased from 26.3% to 86.8% for the E. coli sequence by using modification constraints. For C. albicans, the accuracy remained 87.5% both with and without modification data. On average, for these sequences and a set of 14 sequences with known secondary structure and chemical modification data taken from the literature, accuracy improves from 67% to 76%. This enhancement primarily reflects improvement for three sequences that are predicted with <40% accuracy on the basis of energetics alone. For these sequences, inclusion of chemical modification constraints improves the average accuracy from 28% to 78%. For the 11 sequences with <6% pseudoknotted base pairs, structures predicted with constraints from chemical modification contain on average 84% of known canonical base pairs. PMID:15123812

  14. Ocean circulation model predicts high genetic structure observed in a long-lived pelagic developer.

    PubMed

    Sunday, J M; Popovic, I; Palen, W J; Foreman, M G G; Hart, M W

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the movement of genes and individuals across marine seascapes is a long-standing challenge in marine ecology and can inform our understanding of local adaptation, the persistence and movement of populations, and the spatial scale of effective management. Patterns of gene flow in the ocean are often inferred based on population genetic analyses coupled with knowledge of species' dispersive life histories. However, genetic structure is the result of time-integrated processes and may not capture present-day connectivity between populations. Here, we use a high-resolution oceanographic circulation model to predict larval dispersal along the complex coastline of western Canada that includes the transition between two well-studied zoogeographic provinces. We simulate dispersal in a benthic sea star with a 6-10 week pelagic larval phase and test predictions of this model against previously observed genetic structure including a strong phylogeographic break within the zoogeographical transition zone. We also test predictions with new genetic sampling in a site within the phylogeographic break. We find that the coupled genetic and circulation model predicts the high degree of genetic structure observed in this species, despite its long pelagic duration. High genetic structure on this complex coastline can thus be explained through ocean circulation patterns, which tend to retain passive larvae within 20-50 km of their parents, suggesting a necessity for close-knit design of Marine Protected Area networks.

  15. Improved Displacement Transfer Functions for Structure Deformed Shape Predictions Using Discretely Distributed Surface Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2012-01-01

    In the formulations of earlier Displacement Transfer Functions for structure shape predictions, the surface strain distributions, along a strain-sensing line, were represented with piecewise linear functions. To improve the shape-prediction accuracies, Improved Displacement Transfer Functions were formulated using piecewise nonlinear strain representations. Through discretization of an embedded beam (depth-wise cross section of a structure along a strain-sensing line) into multiple small domains, piecewise nonlinear functions were used to describe the surface strain distributions along the discretized embedded beam. Such piecewise approach enabled the piecewise integrations of the embedded beam curvature equations to yield slope and deflection equations in recursive forms. The resulting Improved Displacement Transfer Functions, written in summation forms, were expressed in terms of beam geometrical parameters and surface strains along the strain-sensing line. By feeding the surface strains into the Improved Displacement Transfer Functions, structural deflections could be calculated at multiple points for mapping out the overall structural deformed shapes for visual display. The shape-prediction accuracies of the Improved Displacement Transfer Functions were then examined in view of finite-element-calculated deflections using different tapered cantilever tubular beams. It was found that by using the piecewise nonlinear strain representations, the shape-prediction accuracies could be greatly improved, especially for highly-tapered cantilever tubular beams.

  16. Plant genetics predicts intra-annual variation in phytochemistry and arthropod community structure.

    PubMed

    Wimp, G M; Wooley, S; Bangert, R K; Young, W P; Martinsen, G D; Keim, P; Rehill, B; Lindroth, R L; Whitham, T G

    2007-12-01

    With the emerging field of community genetics, it is important to quantify the key mechanisms that link genetics and community structure. We studied cottonwoods in common gardens and in natural stands and examined the potential for plant chemistry to be a primary mechanism linking plant genetics and arthropod communities. If plant chemistry drives the relationship between plant genetics and arthropod community structure, then several predictions followed. We would find (i) the strongest correlation between plant genetic composition and chemical composition; (ii) an intermediate correlation between plant chemical composition and arthropod community composition; and (iii) the weakest relationship between plant genetic composition and arthropod community composition. Our results supported our first prediction: plant genetics and chemistry had the strongest correlation in the common garden and the wild. Our results largely supported our second prediction, but varied across space, seasonally, and according to arthropod feeding group. Plant chemistry played a larger role in structuring common garden arthropod communities relative to wild communities, free-living arthropods relative to leaf and stem modifiers, and early-season relative to late-season arthropods. Our results did not support our last prediction, as host plant genetics was at least as tightly linked to arthropod community structure as plant chemistry, if not more so. Our results demonstrate the consistency of the relationship between plant genetics and biodiversity. Additionally, plant chemistry can be an important mechanism by which plant genetics affects arthropod community composition, but other genetic-based factors are likely involved that remain to be measured.

  17. DSSTOX WEBSITE LAUNCH: IMPROVING PUBLIC ACCESS TO DATABASES FOR BUILDING STRUCTURE-TOXICITY PREDICTION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    DSSTox Website Launch: Improving Public Access to Databases for Building Structure-Toxicity Prediction Models
    Ann M. Richard
    US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA

    Distributed: Decentralized set of standardized, field-delimited databases,...

  18. Ocean circulation model predicts high genetic structure observed in a long-lived pelagic developer.

    PubMed

    Sunday, J M; Popovic, I; Palen, W J; Foreman, M G G; Hart, M W

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the movement of genes and individuals across marine seascapes is a long-standing challenge in marine ecology and can inform our understanding of local adaptation, the persistence and movement of populations, and the spatial scale of effective management. Patterns of gene flow in the ocean are often inferred based on population genetic analyses coupled with knowledge of species' dispersive life histories. However, genetic structure is the result of time-integrated processes and may not capture present-day connectivity between populations. Here, we use a high-resolution oceanographic circulation model to predict larval dispersal along the complex coastline of western Canada that includes the transition between two well-studied zoogeographic provinces. We simulate dispersal in a benthic sea star with a 6-10 week pelagic larval phase and test predictions of this model against previously observed genetic structure including a strong phylogeographic break within the zoogeographical transition zone. We also test predictions with new genetic sampling in a site within the phylogeographic break. We find that the coupled genetic and circulation model predicts the high degree of genetic structure observed in this species, despite its long pelagic duration. High genetic structure on this complex coastline can thus be explained through ocean circulation patterns, which tend to retain passive larvae within 20-50 km of their parents, suggesting a necessity for close-knit design of Marine Protected Area networks. PMID:25231198

  19. RaptorX-Property: a web server for protein structure property prediction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Li, Wei; Liu, Shiwang; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-07-01

    RaptorX Property (http://raptorx2.uchicago.edu/StructurePropertyPred/predict/) is a web server predicting structure property of a protein sequence without using any templates. It outperforms other servers, especially for proteins without close homologs in PDB or with very sparse sequence profile (i.e. carries little evolutionary information). This server employs a powerful in-house deep learning model DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) to predict secondary structure (SS), solvent accessibility (ACC) and disorder regions (DISO). DeepCNF not only models complex sequence-structure relationship by a deep hierarchical architecture, but also interdependency between adjacent property labels. Our experimental results show that, tested on CASP10, CASP11 and the other benchmarks, this server can obtain ∼84% Q3 accuracy for 3-state SS, ∼72% Q8 accuracy for 8-state SS, ∼66% Q3 accuracy for 3-state solvent accessibility, and ∼0.89 area under the ROC curve (AUC) for disorder prediction.

  20. Predictions of Crystal Structure Based on Radius Ratio: How Reliable Are They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathan, Lawrence C.

    1985-01-01

    Discussion of crystalline solids in undergraduate curricula often includes the use of radius ratio rules as a method for predicting which type of crystal structure is likely to be adopted by a given ionic compound. Examines this topic, establishing more definitive guidelines for the use and reliability of the rules. (JN)

  1. Aircraft interior noise prediction using a structural-acoustic analogy in NASTRAN modal synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Sullivan, Brenda M.; Marulo, Francesco

    1988-01-01

    The noise induced inside a cylindrical fuselage model by shaker excitation is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The NASTRAN modal-synthesis program is used in the theoretical analysis, and the predictions are compared with experimental measurements in extensive graphs. Good general agreement is obtained, but the need for further refinements to account for acoustic-cavity damping and structural-acoustic interaction is indicated.

  2. RaptorX-Property: a web server for protein structure property prediction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng; Li, Wei; Liu, Shiwang; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-01-01

    RaptorX Property (http://raptorx2.uchicago.edu/StructurePropertyPred/predict/) is a web server predicting structure property of a protein sequence without using any templates. It outperforms other servers, especially for proteins without close homologs in PDB or with very sparse sequence profile (i.e. carries little evolutionary information). This server employs a powerful in-house deep learning model DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) to predict secondary structure (SS), solvent accessibility (ACC) and disorder regions (DISO). DeepCNF not only models complex sequence–structure relationship by a deep hierarchical architecture, but also interdependency between adjacent property labels. Our experimental results show that, tested on CASP10, CASP11 and the other benchmarks, this server can obtain ∼84% Q3 accuracy for 3-state SS, ∼72% Q8 accuracy for 8-state SS, ∼66% Q3 accuracy for 3-state solvent accessibility, and ∼0.89 area under the ROC curve (AUC) for disorder prediction. PMID:27112573

  3. RaptorX-Property: a web server for protein structure property prediction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Li, Wei; Liu, Shiwang; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-07-01

    RaptorX Property (http://raptorx2.uchicago.edu/StructurePropertyPred/predict/) is a web server predicting structure property of a protein sequence without using any templates. It outperforms other servers, especially for proteins without close homologs in PDB or with very sparse sequence profile (i.e. carries little evolutionary information). This server employs a powerful in-house deep learning model DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) to predict secondary structure (SS), solvent accessibility (ACC) and disorder regions (DISO). DeepCNF not only models complex sequence-structure relationship by a deep hierarchical architecture, but also interdependency between adjacent property labels. Our experimental results show that, tested on CASP10, CASP11 and the other benchmarks, this server can obtain ∼84% Q3 accuracy for 3-state SS, ∼72% Q8 accuracy for 8-state SS, ∼66% Q3 accuracy for 3-state solvent accessibility, and ∼0.89 area under the ROC curve (AUC) for disorder prediction. PMID:27112573

  4. Predicting hepatotoxicity using ToxCast in vitro bioactivity and chemical structure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The U.S. EPA ToxCastTM program is screening thousands of environmental chemicals for bioactivity using hundreds of high-throughput in vitro assays to build predictive models of toxicity. We represented chemicals based on bioactivity and chemical structure descriptors ...

  5. Comparison of Algorithms for Prediction of Protein Structural Features from Evolutionary Data

    PubMed Central

    Bywater, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins have many functions and predicting these is still one of the major challenges in theoretical biophysics and bioinformatics. Foremost amongst these functions is the need to fold correctly thereby allowing the other genetically dictated tasks that the protein has to carry out to proceed efficiently. In this work, some earlier algorithms for predicting protein domain folds are revisited and they are compared with more recently developed methods. In dealing with intractable problems such as fold prediction, when different algorithms show convergence onto the same result there is every reason to take all algorithms into account such that a consensus result can be arrived at. In this work it is shown that the application of different algorithms in protein structure prediction leads to results that do not converge as such but rather they collude in a striking and useful way that has never been considered before. PMID:26963911

  6. Comparison of Algorithms for Prediction of Protein Structural Features from Evolutionary Data.

    PubMed

    Bywater, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Proteins have many functions and predicting these is still one of the major challenges in theoretical biophysics and bioinformatics. Foremost amongst these functions is the need to fold correctly thereby allowing the other genetically dictated tasks that the protein has to carry out to proceed efficiently. In this work, some earlier algorithms for predicting protein domain folds are revisited and they are compared with more recently developed methods. In dealing with intractable problems such as fold prediction, when different algorithms show convergence onto the same result there is every reason to take all algorithms into account such that a consensus result can be arrived at. In this work it is shown that the application of different algorithms in protein structure prediction leads to results that do not converge as such but rather they collude in a striking and useful way that has never been considered before.

  7. De novo prediction of protein folding pathways and structure using the principle of sequential stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Aashish N.; Freed, Karl F.; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the relationship between the folding mechanism and the native structure, we develop a unified approach for predicting folding pathways and tertiary structure using only the primary sequence as input. Simulations begin from a realistic unfolded state devoid of secondary structure and use a chain representation lacking explicit side chains, rendering the simulations many orders of magnitude faster than molecular dynamics simulations. The multiple round nature of the algorithm mimics the authentic folding process and tests the effectiveness of sequential stabilization (SS) as a search strategy wherein 2° structural elements add onto existing structures in a process of progressive learning and stabilization of structure found in prior rounds of folding. Because no a priori knowledge is used, we can identify kinetically significant non-native interactions and intermediates, sometimes generated by only two mutations, while the evolution of contact matrices is often consistent with experiments. Moreover, structure prediction improves substantially by incorporating information from prior rounds. The success of our simple, homology-free approach affirms the validity of our description of the primary determinants of folding pathways and structure, and the effectiveness of SS as a search strategy. PMID:23045636

  8. Local structure based method for prediction of the biochemical function of proteins: Applications to glycoside hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Parasuram, Ramya; Mills, Caitlyn L; Wang, Zhouxi; Somasundaram, Saroja; Beuning, Penny J; Ondrechen, Mary Jo

    2016-01-15

    Thousands of protein structures of unknown or uncertain function have been reported as a result of high-throughput structure determination techniques developed by Structural Genomics (SG) projects. However, many of the putative functional assignments of these SG proteins in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) are incorrect. While high-throughput biochemical screening techniques have provided valuable functional information for limited sets of SG proteins, the biochemical functions for most SG proteins are still unknown or uncertain. Therefore, computational methods for the reliable prediction of protein function from structure can add tremendous value to the existing SG data. In this article, we show how computational methods may be used to predict the function of SG proteins, using examples from the six-hairpin glycosidase (6-HG) and the concanavalin A-like lectin/glucanase (CAL/G) superfamilies. Using a set of predicted functional residues, obtained from computed electrostatic and chemical properties for each protein structure, it is shown that these superfamilies may be sorted into functional families according to biochemical function. Within these superfamilies, a total of 18 SG proteins were analyzed according to their predicted, local functional sites: 13 from the 6-HG superfamily, five from the CAL/G superfamily. Within the 6-HG superfamily, an uncharacterized protein BACOVA_03626 from Bacteroides ovatus (PDB 3ON6) and a hypothetical protein BT3781 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (PDB 2P0V) are shown to have very strong active site matches with exo-α-1,6-mannosidases, thus likely possessing this function. Also in this superfamily, it is shown that protein BH0842, a putative glycoside hydrolase from Bacillus halodurans (PDB 2RDY), has a predicted active site that matches well with a known α-L-galactosidase. In the CAL/G superfamily, an uncharacterized glycosyl hydrolase family 16 protein from Mycobacterium smegmatis (PDB 3RQ0) is shown to have local structural

  9. Facing the challenges of structure-based target prediction by inverse virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Schomburg, Karen T; Bietz, Stefan; Briem, Hans; Henzler, Angela M; Urbaczek, Sascha; Rarey, Matthias

    2014-06-23

    Computational target prediction for bioactive compounds is a promising field in assessing off-target effects. Structure-based methods not only predict off-targets, but, simultaneously, binding modes, which are essential for understanding the mode of action and rationally designing selective compounds. Here, we highlight the current open challenges of computational target prediction methods based on protein structures and show why inverse screening rather than sequential pairwise protein-ligand docking methods are needed. A new inverse screening method based on triangle descriptors is introduced: iRAISE (inverse Rapid Index-based Screening Engine). A Scoring Cascade considering the reference ligand as well as the ligand and active site coverage is applied to overcome interprotein scoring noise of common protein-ligand scoring functions. Furthermore, a statistical evaluation of a score cutoff for each individual protein pocket is used. The ranking and binding mode prediction capabilities are evaluated on different datasets and compared to inverse docking and pharmacophore-based methods. On the Astex Diverse Set, iRAISE ranks more than 35% of the targets to the first position and predicts more than 80% of the binding modes with a root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) accuracy of <2.0 Å. With a median computing time of 5 s per protein, large amounts of protein structures can be screened rapidly. On a test set with 7915 protein structures and 117 query ligands, iRAISE predicts the first true positive in a ranked list among the top eight ranks (median), i.e., among 0.28% of the targets. PMID:24851945

  10. Prediction of the conformation and geometry of loops in globular proteins: testing ArchDB, a structural classification of loops.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Querol, Enrique; Aviles, Francesc X; Sternberg, Michael J E; Oliva, Baldomero

    2005-09-01

    In protein structure prediction, a central problem is defining the structure of a loop connecting 2 secondary structures. This problem frequently occurs in homology modeling, fold recognition, and in several strategies in ab initio structure prediction. In our previous work, we developed a classification database of structural motifs, ArchDB. The database contains 12,665 clustered loops in 451 structural classes with information about phi-psi angles in the loops and 1492 structural subclasses with the relative locations of the bracing secondary structures. Here we evaluate the extent to which sequence information in the loop database can be used to predict loop structure. Two sequence profiles were used, a HMM profile and a PSSM derived from PSI-BLAST. A jack-knife test was made removing homologous loops using SCOP superfamily definition and predicting afterwards against recalculated profiles that only take into account the sequence information. Two scenarios were considered: (1) prediction of structural class with application in comparative modeling and (2) prediction of structural subclass with application in fold recognition and ab initio. For the first scenario, structural class prediction was made directly over loops with X-ray secondary structure assignment, and if we consider the top 20 classes out of 451 possible classes, the best accuracy of prediction is 78.5%. In the second scenario, structural subclass prediction was made over loops using PSI-PRED (Jones, J Mol Biol 1999;292:195-202) secondary structure prediction to define loop boundaries, and if we take into account the top 20 subclasses out of 1492, the best accuracy is 46.7%. Accuracy of loop prediction was also evaluated by means of RMSD calculations. PMID:16021623

  11. Predicting the structure of the light-harvesting complex II of Rhodospirillum molischianum.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, X.; Xu, D.; Hamer, K.; Schulten, K.; Koepke, J.; Michel, H.

    1995-01-01

    We attempted to predict through computer modeling the structure of the light-harvesting complex II (LH-II) of Rhodospirillum molischianum, before the impending publication of the structure of a homologous protein solved by means of X-ray diffraction. The protein studied is an integral membrane protein of 16 independent polypeptides, 8 alpha-apoproteins and 8 beta-apoproteins, which aggregate and bind to 24 bacteriochlorophyll-a's and 12 lycopenes. Available diffraction data of a crystal of the protein, which could not be phased due to a lack of heavy metal derivatives, served to test the predicted structure, guiding the search. In order to determine the secondary structure, hydropathy analysis was performed to identify the putative transmembrane segments and multiple sequence alignment propensity analyses were used to pinpoint the exact sites of the 20-residue-long transmembrane segment and the 4-residue-long terminal sequence at both ends, which were independently verified and improved by homology modeling. A consensus assignment for the secondary structure was derived from a combination of all the prediction methods used. Three-dimensional structures for the alpha- and the beta-apoprotein were built by comparative modeling. The resulting tertiary structures are combined, using X-PLOR, into an alpha beta dimer pair with bacteriochlorophyll-a's attached under constraints provided by site-directed mutagenesis and spectral data. The alpha beta dimer pairs were then aggregated into a quaternary structure through further molecular dynamics simulations and energy minimization. The structure of LH-II so determined is an octamer of alpha beta heterodimers forming a ring with a diameter of 70 A. PMID:8528066

  12. A Fully Bayesian Approach to Improved Calibration and Prediction of Groundwater Models With Structure Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, T.; Valocchi, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Effective water resource management typically relies on numerical models to analyse groundwater flow and solute transport processes. These models are usually subject to model structure error due to simplification and/or misrepresentation of the real system. As a result, the model outputs may systematically deviate from measurements, thus violating a key assumption for traditional regression-based calibration and uncertainty analysis. On the other hand, model structure error induced bias can be described statistically in an inductive, data-driven way based on historical model-to-measurement misfit. We adopt a fully Bayesian approach that integrates a Gaussian process error model to account for model structure error to the calibration, prediction and uncertainty analysis of groundwater models. The posterior distributions of parameters of the groundwater model and the Gaussian process error model are jointly inferred using DREAM, an efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler. We test the usefulness of the fully Bayesian approach towards a synthetic case study of surface-ground water interaction under changing pumping conditions. We first illustrate through this example that traditional least squares regression without accounting for model structure error yields biased parameter estimates due to parameter compensation as well as biased predictions. In contrast, the Bayesian approach gives less biased parameter estimates. Moreover, the integration of a Gaussian process error model significantly reduces predictive bias and leads to prediction intervals that are more consistent with observations. The results highlight the importance of explicit treatment of model structure error especially in circumstances where subsequent decision-making and risk analysis require accurate prediction and uncertainty quantification. In addition, the data-driven error modelling approach is capable of extracting more information from observation data than using a groundwater model alone.

  13. Prediction of the rodent carcinogenicity of organic compounds from their chemical structures using the FALS method.

    PubMed Central

    Moriguchi, I; Hirano, H; Hirono, S

    1996-01-01

    Fuzzy adaptive least-squares (FALS), a pattern recognition method recently developed in our laboratory for correlating structure with activity rating, was used to generate quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models on the carcinogenicity of organic compounds of several chemical classes. Using the predictive models obtained from the chemical class-based FALS QSAR approach, the rodent carcinogenicity or noncarcinogenicity of a group of organic chemicals currently being tested by the U.S. National Toxicology Program was estimated from their chemical structures. PMID:8933054

  14. Prediction of the three-dimensional structure of human interleukin-7 by homology modeling.

    PubMed

    Kroemer, R T; Doughty, S W; Robinson, A J; Richards, W G

    1996-06-01

    The three-dimensional structure of human interleukin (IL)-7 has been predicted based on homology to human IL-2, IL-4, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor and growth hormone. The model has a topology common to other cytokines and displays a unique disulfide pattern. Knowledge of the tertiary structure of IL-7 has implications for analysis of key binding regions, suggestions for mutagenesis experiments and design of (ant)agonists. In this context, the model is discussed and compared with other cytokine structures. PMID:8862549

  15. Prediction of the rodent carcinogenicity of organic compounds from their chemical structures using the FALS method

    SciTech Connect

    Moriguchi, Ikuo; Hirono, Shuichi; Hirano, Hiroyuki

    1996-10-01

    Fuzzy adaptive least-squares (FALS), a pattern recognition method recently developed in our laboratory for correlating structure with activity rating, was used to generate quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models on the carcinogenicity of organic compounds of several chemical classes. Using the predictive models obtained from the chemical class-based FALS QSAR approach, the rodent carcinogenicity or noncarcinogenicity of a group of organic chemicals currently being tested by the U.S. National Toxicology Program was estimated from their chemical structures. 12 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Staple Fitness: A Concept to Understand and Predict the Structures of Thiolated Gold Nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Deen

    2011-01-01

    A profound connection has been found between the structures of thiolated gold clusters and the combinatorial problem of pairing up dots on a surface. The bridge is the concept of staple fitness: the fittest combination corresponds to the experimental structure. This connection has been demonstrated for both Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18} and Au{sub 38}(SR){sub 24} (-SR being a thiolate group) and applied to predict a promising structure for the recently synthesized Au{sub 19}(SR){sub 13}.

  17. The prediction of structural response to buffet flow: A state-of-the-art review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, P. W.

    1974-01-01

    Certain aspects of the dynamic system being discussed are reviewed and important structural and aerodynamic quantities of the system are discussed. A theoretical model is presented which relates these quantities to each other. These quantities are then each, in turn, considered in terms of the state of the art of determining the quantities and in terms of areas where further research is needed. The similarity laws and scaling relationships applicable to determining buffet structural response are then discussed, and areas where simplification is required or may be permissible are mentioned. Finally, the various types of model tests pertinent to predicting response of the aircraft structure to buffet flow are discussed.

  18. Microbes as Engines of Ecosystem Function: When Does Community Structure Enhance Predictions of Ecosystem Processes?

    PubMed

    Graham, Emily B; Knelman, Joseph E; Schindlbacher, Andreas; Siciliano, Steven; Breulmann, Marc; Yannarell, Anthony; Beman, J M; Abell, Guy; Philippot, Laurent; Prosser, James; Foulquier, Arnaud; Yuste, Jorge C; Glanville, Helen C; Jones, Davey L; Angel, Roey; Salminen, Janne; Newton, Ryan J; Bürgmann, Helmut; Ingram, Lachlan J; Hamer, Ute; Siljanen, Henri M P; Peltoniemi, Krista; Potthast, Karin; Bañeras, Lluís; Hartmann, Martin; Banerjee, Samiran; Yu, Ri-Qing; Nogaro, Geraldine; Richter, Andreas; Koranda, Marianne; Castle, Sarah C; Goberna, Marta; Song, Bongkeun; Chatterjee, Amitava; Nunes, Olga C; Lopes, Ana R; Cao, Yiping; Kaisermann, Aurore; Hallin, Sara; Strickland, Michael S; Garcia-Pausas, Jordi; Barba, Josep; Kang, Hojeong; Isobe, Kazuo; Papaspyrou, Sokratis; Pastorelli, Roberta; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Lindström, Eva S; Basiliko, Nathan; Nemergut, Diana R

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms are vital in mediating the earth's biogeochemical cycles; yet, despite our rapidly increasing ability to explore complex environmental microbial communities, the relationship between microbial community structure and ecosystem processes remains poorly understood. Here, we address a fundamental and unanswered question in microbial ecology: 'When do we need to understand microbial community structure to accurately predict function?' We present a statistical analysis investigating the value of environmental data and microbial community structure independently and in combination for explaining rates of carbon and nitrogen cycling processes within 82 global datasets. Environmental variables were the strongest predictors of process rates but left 44% of variation unexplained on average, suggesting the potential for microbial data to increase model accuracy. Although only 29% of our datasets were significantly improved by adding information on microbial community structure, we observed improvement in models of processes mediated by narrow phylogenetic guilds via functional gene data, and conversely, improvement in models of facultative microbial processes via community diversity metrics. Our results also suggest that microbial diversity can strengthen predictions of respiration rates beyond microbial biomass parameters, as 53% of models were improved by incorporating both sets of predictors compared to 35% by microbial biomass alone. Our analysis represents the first comprehensive analysis of research examining links between microbial community structure and ecosystem function. Taken together, our results indicate that a greater understanding of microbial communities informed by ecological principles may enhance our ability to predict ecosystem process rates relative to assessments based on environmental variables and microbial physiology. PMID:26941732

  19. On the need for another type of predictive model in structured foods.

    PubMed

    Dens, E J; Van Impe, J F

    2001-03-20

    Most of the models discussed up till now in predictive microbiology do not take into account the variability of microbial growth with respect to space. In structured (solid) foods, microbial growth can strongly depend on the position in the food and the assumption of homogeneity can thus not be accepted: space must be considered as an independent variable. Indeed, experimental evidence exists of bacteria competition on agar not showing the same behavior as the competition in a well-mixed liquid culture system. It is conjectured that this is due to the spatially structured habitat. Therefore, in the current paper, a prototype two species competition model proposed in previous work by the authors is extended to take space into account. The extended model describes two phenomena: (i) local evolution of biomass and (ii) transfer of biomass through the medium. The structure of the food product is taken into account by limiting the diffusion through the medium. The smaller mobility of the micro-organisms in solid foods allows spatial segregation which causes pattern formation. Evidence is given for the fact that taking space into account indeed has an influence on the behavior (coexistence/extinction) of the populations. Although the reported simulations are by no means to be interpreted as accurate predictions, the proposed model structure allows one to highlight (i) important characteristics of microbial growth in structured foods and (ii) future research trends in predictive microbiology.

  20. Microbes as Engines of Ecosystem Function: When Does Community Structure Enhance Predictions of Ecosystem Processes?

    PubMed

    Graham, Emily B; Knelman, Joseph E; Schindlbacher, Andreas; Siciliano, Steven; Breulmann, Marc; Yannarell, Anthony; Beman, J M; Abell, Guy; Philippot, Laurent; Prosser, James; Foulquier, Arnaud; Yuste, Jorge C; Glanville, Helen C; Jones, Davey L; Angel, Roey; Salminen, Janne; Newton, Ryan J; Bürgmann, Helmut; Ingram, Lachlan J; Hamer, Ute; Siljanen, Henri M P; Peltoniemi, Krista; Potthast, Karin; Bañeras, Lluís; Hartmann, Martin; Banerjee, Samiran; Yu, Ri-Qing; Nogaro, Geraldine; Richter, Andreas; Koranda, Marianne; Castle, Sarah C; Goberna, Marta; Song, Bongkeun; Chatterjee, Amitava; Nunes, Olga C; Lopes, Ana R; Cao, Yiping; Kaisermann, Aurore; Hallin, Sara; Strickland, Michael S; Garcia-Pausas, Jordi; Barba, Josep; Kang, Hojeong; Isobe, Kazuo; Papaspyrou, Sokratis; Pastorelli, Roberta; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Lindström, Eva S; Basiliko, Nathan; Nemergut, Diana R

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms are vital in mediating the earth's biogeochemical cycles; yet, despite our rapidly increasing ability to explore complex environmental microbial communities, the relationship between microbial community structure and ecosystem processes remains poorly understood. Here, we address a fundamental and unanswered question in microbial ecology: 'When do we need to understand microbial community structure to accurately predict function?' We present a statistical analysis investigating the value of environmental data and microbial community structure independently and in combination for explaining rates of carbon and nitrogen cycling processes within 82 global datasets. Environmental variables were the strongest predictors of process rates but left 44% of variation unexplained on average, suggesting the potential for microbial data to increase model accuracy. Although only 29% of our datasets were significantly improved by adding information on microbial community structure, we observed improvement in models of processes mediated by narrow phylogenetic guilds via functional gene data, and conversely, improvement in models of facultative microbial processes via community diversity metrics. Our results also suggest that microbial diversity can strengthen predictions of respiration rates beyond microbial biomass parameters, as 53% of models were improved by incorporating both sets of predictors compared to 35% by microbial biomass alone. Our analysis represents the first comprehensive analysis of research examining links between microbial community structure and ecosystem function. Taken together, our results indicate that a greater understanding of microbial communities informed by ecological principles may enhance our ability to predict ecosystem process rates relative to assessments based on environmental variables and microbial physiology.

  1. Ligand-Target Prediction by Structural Network Biology Using nAnnoLyze

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Jiménez, Francisco; Marti-Renom, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Target identification is essential for drug design, drug-drug interaction prediction, dosage adjustment and side effect anticipation. Specifically, the knowledge of structural details is essential for understanding the mode of action of a compound on a target protein. Here, we present nAnnoLyze, a method for target identification that relies on the hypothesis that structurally similar binding sites bind similar ligands. nAnnoLyze integrates structural information into a bipartite network of interactions and similarities to predict structurally detailed compound-protein interactions at proteome scale. The method was benchmarked on a dataset of 6,282 pairs of known interacting ligand-target pairs reaching a 0.96 of area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (AUC) when using the drug names as an input feature for the classifier, and a 0.70 of AUC for “anonymous” compounds or compounds not present in the training set. nAnnoLyze resulted in higher accuracies than its predecessor, AnnoLyze. We applied the method to predict interactions for all the compounds in the DrugBank database with each human protein structure and provide examples of target identification for known drugs against human diseases. The accuracy and applicability of our method to any compound indicate that a comparative docking approach such as nAnnoLyze enables large-scale annotation and analysis of compound–protein interactions and thus may benefit drug development. PMID:25816344

  2. Advances in Rosetta structure prediction for difficult molecular-replacement problems

    SciTech Connect

    DiMaio, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Modeling advances using Rosetta structure prediction to aid in solving difficult molecular-replacement problems are discussed. Recent work has shown the effectiveness of structure-prediction methods in solving difficult molecular-replacement problems. The Rosetta protein structure modeling suite can aid in the solution of difficult molecular-replacement problems using templates from 15 to 25% sequence identity; Rosetta refinement guided by noisy density has consistently led to solved structures where other methods fail. In this paper, an overview of the use of Rosetta for these difficult molecular-replacement problems is provided and new modeling developments that further improve model quality are described. Several variations to the method are introduced that significantly reduce the time needed to generate a model and the sampling required to improve the starting template. The improvements are benchmarked on a set of nine difficult cases and it is shown that this improved method obtains consistently better models in less running time. Finally, strategies for best using Rosetta to solve difficult molecular-replacement problems are presented and future directions for the role of structure-prediction methods in crystallography are discussed.

  3. Prediction of Spontaneous Protein Deamidation from Sequence-Derived Secondary Structure and Intrinsic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, J. Ramiro; Alonso, Leonardo G.; Sánchez, Ignacio E.

    2015-01-01

    Asparagine residues in proteins undergo spontaneous deamidation, a post-translational modification that may act as a molecular clock for the regulation of protein function and turnover. Asparagine deamidation is modulated by protein local sequence, secondary structure and hydrogen bonding. We present NGOME, an algorithm able to predict non-enzymatic deamidation of internal asparagine residues in proteins in the absence of structural data, using sequence-based predictions of secondary structure and intrinsic disorder. Compared to previous algorithms, NGOME does not require three-dimensional structures yet yields better predictions than available sequence-only methods. Four case studies of specific proteins show how NGOME may help the user identify deamidation-prone asparagine residues, often related to protein gain of function, protein degradation or protein misfolding in pathological processes. A fifth case study applies NGOME at a proteomic scale and unveils a correlation between asparagine deamidation and protein degradation in yeast. NGOME is freely available as a webserver at the National EMBnet node Argentina, URL: http://www.embnet.qb.fcen.uba.ar/ in the subpage “Protein and nucleic acid structure and sequence analysis”. PMID:26674530

  4. Prediction of Spontaneous Protein Deamidation from Sequence-Derived Secondary Structure and Intrinsic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, J Ramiro; Alonso, Leonardo G; Sánchez, Ignacio E

    2015-01-01

    Asparagine residues in proteins undergo spontaneous deamidation, a post-translational modification that may act as a molecular clock for the regulation of protein function and turnover. Asparagine deamidation is modulated by protein local sequence, secondary structure and hydrogen bonding. We present NGOME, an algorithm able to predict non-enzymatic deamidation of internal asparagine residues in proteins in the absence of structural data, using sequence-based predictions of secondary structure and intrinsic disorder. Compared to previous algorithms, NGOME does not require three-dimensional structures yet yields better predictions than available sequence-only methods. Four case studies of specific proteins show how NGOME may help the user identify deamidation-prone asparagine residues, often related to protein gain of function, protein degradation or protein misfolding in pathological processes. A fifth case study applies NGOME at a proteomic scale and unveils a correlation between asparagine deamidation and protein degradation in yeast. NGOME is freely available as a webserver at the National EMBnet node Argentina, URL: http://www.embnet.qb.fcen.uba.ar/ in the subpage "Protein and nucleic acid structure and sequence analysis".

  5. RNA Secondary Structure Prediction by Using Discrete Mathematics: An Interdisciplinary Research Experience for Undergraduate Students

    PubMed Central

    Ellington, Roni; Wachira, James

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) project was on RNA secondary structure prediction by using a lattice walk approach. The lattice walk approach is a combinatorial and computational biology method used to enumerate possible secondary structures and predict RNA secondary structure from RNA sequences. The method uses discrete mathematical techniques and identifies specified base pairs as parameters. The goal of the REU was to introduce upper-level undergraduate students to the principles and challenges of interdisciplinary research in molecular biology and discrete mathematics. At the beginning of the project, students from the biology and mathematics departments of a mid-sized university received instruction on the role of secondary structure in the function of eukaryotic RNAs and RNA viruses, RNA related to combinatorics, and the National Center for Biotechnology Information resources. The student research projects focused on RNA secondary structure prediction on a regulatory region of the yellow fever virus RNA genome and on an untranslated region of an mRNA of a gene associated with the neurological disorder epilepsy. At the end of the project, the REU students gave poster and oral presentations, and they submitted written final project reports to the program director. The outcome of the REU was that the students gained transferable knowledge and skills in bioinformatics and an awareness of the applications of discrete mathematics to biological research problems. PMID:20810968

  6. RNA secondary structure prediction by using discrete mathematics: an interdisciplinary research experience for undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    Ellington, Roni; Wachira, James; Nkwanta, Asamoah

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) project was on RNA secondary structure prediction by using a lattice walk approach. The lattice walk approach is a combinatorial and computational biology method used to enumerate possible secondary structures and predict RNA secondary structure from RNA sequences. The method uses discrete mathematical techniques and identifies specified base pairs as parameters. The goal of the REU was to introduce upper-level undergraduate students to the principles and challenges of interdisciplinary research in molecular biology and discrete mathematics. At the beginning of the project, students from the biology and mathematics departments of a mid-sized university received instruction on the role of secondary structure in the function of eukaryotic RNAs and RNA viruses, RNA related to combinatorics, and the National Center for Biotechnology Information resources. The student research projects focused on RNA secondary structure prediction on a regulatory region of the yellow fever virus RNA genome and on an untranslated region of an mRNA of a gene associated with the neurological disorder epilepsy. At the end of the project, the REU students gave poster and oral presentations, and they submitted written final project reports to the program director. The outcome of the REU was that the students gained transferable knowledge and skills in bioinformatics and an awareness of the applications of discrete mathematics to biological research problems.

  7. An integrative structure-based framework for predicting biological effects mediated by antipeptide antibodies.

    PubMed

    Caoili, Salvador Eugenio C

    2015-12-01

    A general framework is presented for predicting quantitative biological effects mediated by antipeptide antibodies, primarily on the basis of antigen structure (possibly featuring intrinsic disorder) analyzed to estimate epitope-paratope binding affinities, which in turn is considered within the context of dose-response relationships as regards antibody concentration. This is illustrated mainly using an approach based on protein structural energetics, whereby expected amounts of solvent-accessible surface area buried upon epitope-paratope binding are related to the corresponding binding affinity, which is estimated from putative B-cell epitope structure with implicit treatment of paratope structure, for antipeptide antibodies either reacting with peptides or cross-reacting with cognate protein antigens. Key methods described are implemented in SAPPHIRE/SUITE (Structural-energetic Analysis Program for Predicting Humoral Immune Response Epitopes/SAPPHIRE User Interface Tool Ensemble; publicly accessible via http://freeshell.de/~badong/suite.htm). Representative results thus obtained are compared with published experimental data on binding affinities and quantitative biological effects, with special attention to loss of paratope sidechain conformational entropy (neglected in previous analyses) and in light of key in-vivo constraints on antigen-antibody binding affinity and antibody-mediated effects. Implications for further refinement of B-cell epitope prediction methods are discussed as regards envisioned biomedical applications including the development of prophylactic and therapeutic antibodies, peptide-based vaccines and immunodiagnostics. PMID:26410103

  8. Predicting protein ligand binding sites by combining evolutionary sequence conservation and 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Capra, John A; Laskowski, Roman A; Thornton, Janet M; Singh, Mona; Funkhouser, Thomas A

    2009-12-01

    Identifying a protein's functional sites is an important step towards characterizing its molecular function. Numerous structure- and sequence-based methods have been developed for this problem. Here we introduce ConCavity, a small molecule binding site prediction algorithm that integrates evolutionary sequence conservation estimates with structure-based methods for identifying protein surface cavities. In large-scale testing on a diverse set of single- and multi-chain protein structures, we show that ConCavity substantially outperforms existing methods for identifying both 3D ligand binding pockets and individual ligand binding residues. As part of our testing, we perform one of the first direct comparisons of conservation-based and structure-based methods. We find that the two approaches provide largely complementary information, which can be combined to improve upon either approach alone. We also demonstrate that ConCavity has state-of-the-art performance in predicting catalytic sites and drug binding pockets. Overall, the algorithms and analysis presented here significantly improve our ability to identify ligand binding sites and further advance our understanding of the relationship between evolutionary sequence conservation and structural and functional attributes of proteins. Data, source code, and prediction visualizations are available on the ConCavity web site (http://compbio.cs.princeton.edu/concavity/).

  9. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling by the Cockayne syndrome B DNA repair-transcription-coupling factor.

    PubMed

    Citterio, E; Van Den Boom, V; Schnitzler, G; Kanaar, R; Bonte, E; Kingston, R E; Hoeijmakers, J H; Vermeulen, W

    2000-10-01

    The Cockayne syndrome B protein (CSB) is required for coupling DNA excision repair to transcription in a process known as transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Cockayne syndrome patients show UV sensitivity and severe neurodevelopmental abnormalities. CSB is a DNA-dependent ATPase of the SWI2/SNF2 family. SWI2/SNF2-like proteins are implicated in chromatin remodeling during transcription. Since chromatin structure also affects DNA repair efficiency, chromatin remodeling activities within repair are expected. Here we used purified recombinant CSB protein to investigate whether it can remodel chromatin in vitro. We show that binding of CSB to DNA results in an alteration of the DNA double-helix conformation. In addition, we find that CSB is able to remodel chromatin structure at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Specifically, CSB can alter DNase I accessibility to reconstituted mononucleosome cores and disarrange an array of nucleosomes regularly spaced on plasmid DNA. In addition, we show that CSB interacts not only with double-stranded DNA but also directly with core histones. Finally, intact histone tails play an important role in CSB remodeling. CSB is the first repair protein found to play a direct role in modulating nucleosome structure. The relevance of this finding to the interplay between transcription and repair is discussed. PMID:11003660

  10. Measuring and Predicting the Internal Structure of Semiconductor Nanocrystals through Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Lim, Sung Jun; Wrobel, Tomasz P; Bhargava, Rohit; Smith, Andrew M

    2016-08-31

    Nanocrystals composed of mixed chemical domains have diverse properties that are driving their integration in next-generation electronics, light sources, and biosensors. However, the precise spatial distribution of elements within these particles is difficult to measure and control, yet profoundly impacts their quality and performance. Here we synthesized a unique series of 42 different quantum dot nanocrystals, composed of two chemical domains (CdS:CdSe), arranged in 7 alloy and (core)shell structural classes. Chemometric analyses of far-field Raman spectra accurately classified their internal structures from their vibrational signatures. These classifications provide direct insight into the elemental arrangement of the alloy as well as an independent prediction of fluorescence quantum yield. This nondestructive, rapid approach can be broadly applied to greatly enhance our capacity to measure, predict and monitor multicomponent nanomaterials for precise tuning of their structures and properties. PMID:27472011

  11. Neural-network design applied to protein-secondary-structure predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, R.C.; Head-Gordon, T.

    1995-04-01

    The success of neural networks is often limited by a sparse database of training examples, deficient neural-network architectures, and nonglobal optimization of the network variables. The convolution of these three problems has curtailed the application of network models to protein-structure predictions, where homology modeling or information theory approaches are considered better controlled alternatives. This paper introduces our broad objective of disentangling the three degrading features of neural networks cited above, beginning with improved designs of network architectures used in the prediction of protein secondary structure. This work demonstrates that network architecture design considerations greatly improve generalization and more efficiently extract complex sequence-structure relationships from the existing database, as compared to arbitrary architectures with the same size input window.

  12. Protein subcellular localization prediction based on compartment-specific features and structure conservation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Emily Chia-Yu; Chiu, Hua-Sheng; Lo, Allan; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Sung, Ting-Yi; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2007-01-01

    Background Protein subcellular localization is crucial for genome annotation, protein function prediction, and drug discovery. Determination of subcellular localization using experimental approaches is time-consuming; thus, computational approaches become highly desirable. Extensive studies of localization prediction have led to the development of several methods including composition-based and homology-based methods. However, their performance might be significantly degraded if homologous sequences are not detected. Moreover, methods that integrate various features could suffer from the problem of low coverage in high-throughput proteomic analyses due to the lack of information to characterize unknown proteins. Results We propose a hybrid prediction method for Gram-negative bacteria that combines a one-versus-one support vector machines (SVM) model and a structural homology approach. The SVM model comprises a number of binary classifiers, in which biological features derived from Gram-negative bacteria translocation pathways are incorporated. In the structural homology approach, we employ secondary structure alignment for structural similarity comparison and assign the known localization of the top-ranked protein as the predicted localization of a query protein. The hybrid method achieves overall accuracy of 93.7% and 93.2% using ten-fold cross-validation on the benchmark data sets. In the assessment of the evaluation data sets, our method also attains accurate prediction accuracy of 84.0%, especially when testing on sequences with a low level of homology to the training data. A three-way data split procedure is also incorporated to prevent overestimation of the predictive performance. In addition, we show that the prediction accuracy should be approximately 85% for non-redundant data sets of sequence identity less than 30%. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that biological features derived from Gram-negative bacteria translocation pathways yield a significant

  13. Displacement Theories for In-Flight Deformed Shape Predictions of Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Richards, W. L.; Tran, Van t.

    2007-01-01

    Displacement theories are developed for a variety of structures with the goal of providing real-time shape predictions for aerospace vehicles during flight. These theories are initially developed for a cantilever beam to predict the deformed shapes of the Helios flying wing. The main structural configuration of the Helios wing is a cantilever wing tubular spar subjected to bending, torsion, and combined bending and torsion loading. The displacement equations that are formulated are expressed in terms of strains measured at multiple sensing stations equally spaced on the surface of the wing spar. Displacement theories for other structures, such as tapered cantilever beams, two-point supported beams, wing boxes, and plates also are developed. The accuracy of the displacement theories is successfully validated by finite-element analysis and classical beam theory using input-strains generated by finite-element analysis. The displacement equations and associated strain-sensing system (such as fiber optic sensors) create a powerful means for in-flight deformation monitoring of aerospace structures. This method serves multiple purposes for structural shape sensing, loads monitoring, and structural health monitoring. Ultimately, the calculated displacement data can be visually displayed to the ground-based pilot or used as input to the control system to actively control the shape of structures during flight.

  14. Contact prediction for beta and alpha-beta proteins using integer linear optimization and its impact on the first principles 3D structure prediction method ASTRO-FOLD.

    PubMed

    Rajgaria, R; Wei, Y; Floudas, C A

    2010-06-01

    An integer linear optimization model is presented to predict residue contacts in beta, alpha + beta, and alpha/beta proteins. The total energy of a protein is expressed as sum of a C(alpha)-C(alpha) distance dependent contact energy contribution and a hydrophobic contribution. The model selects contact that assign lowest energy to the protein structure as satisfying a set of constraints that are included to enforce certain physically observed topological information. A new method based on hydrophobicity is proposed to find the beta-sheet alignments. These beta-sheet alignments are used as constraints for contacts between residues of beta-sheets. This model was tested on three independent protein test sets and CASP8 test proteins consisting of beta, alpha + beta, alpha/beta proteins and it was found to perform very well. The average accuracy of the predictions (separated by at least six residues) was approximately 61%. The average true positive and false positive distances were also calculated for each of the test sets and they are 7.58 A and 15.88 A, respectively. Residue contact prediction can be directly used to facilitate the protein tertiary structure prediction. This proposed residue contact prediction model is incorporated into the first principles protein tertiary structure prediction approach, ASTRO-FOLD. The effectiveness of the contact prediction model was further demonstrated by the improvement in the quality of the protein structure ensemble generated using the predicted residue contacts for a test set of 10 proteins.

  15. Contact Prediction for Beta and Alpha-Beta Proteins Using Integer Linear Optimization and its Impact on the First Principles 3D Structure Prediction Method ASTRO-FOLD

    PubMed Central

    Rajgaria, R.; Wei, Y.; Floudas, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    An integer linear optimization model is presented to predict residue contacts in β, α + β, and α/β proteins. The total energy of a protein is expressed as sum of a Cα – Cα distance dependent contact energy contribution and a hydrophobic contribution. The model selects contacts that assign lowest energy to the protein structure while satisfying a set of constraints that are included to enforce certain physically observed topological information. A new method based on hydrophobicity is proposed to find the β-sheet alignments. These β-sheet alignments are used as constraints for contacts between residues of β-sheets. This model was tested on three independent protein test sets and CASP8 test proteins consisting of β, α + β, α/β proteins and was found to perform very well. The average accuracy of the predictions (separated by at least six residues) was approximately 61%. The average true positive and false positive distances were also calculated for each of the test sets and they are 7.58 Å and 15.88 Å, respectively. Residue contact prediction can be directly used to facilitate the protein tertiary structure prediction. This proposed residue contact prediction model is incorporated into the first principles protein tertiary structure prediction approach, ASTRO-FOLD. The effectiveness of the contact prediction model was further demonstrated by the improvement in the quality of the protein structure ensemble generated using the predicted residue contacts for a test set of 10 proteins. PMID:20225257

  16. Structural MRI-Based Predictions in Patients with Treatment-Refractory Depression (TRD)

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Blair A.; Steele, J. Douglas; Tolomeo, Serenella; Christmas, David; Matthews, Keith

    2015-01-01

    The application of machine learning techniques to psychiatric neuroimaging offers the possibility to identify robust, reliable and objective disease biomarkers both within and between contemporary syndromal diagnoses that could guide routine clinical practice. The use of quantitative methods to identify psychiatric biomarkers is consequently important, particularly with a view to making predictions relevant to individual patients, rather than at a group-level. Here, we describe predictions of treatment-refractory depression (TRD) diagnosis using structural T1-weighted brain scans obtained from twenty adult participants with TRD and 21 never depressed controls. We report 85% accuracy of individual subject diagnostic prediction. Using an automated feature selection method, the major brain regions supporting this significant classification were in the caudate, insula, habenula and periventricular grey matter. It was not, however, possible to predict the degree of ‘treatment resistance’ in individual patients, at least as quantified by the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH-S) clinical staging method; but the insula was again identified as a region of interest. Structural brain imaging data alone can be used to predict diagnostic status, but not MGH-S staging, with a high degree of accuracy in patients with TRD. PMID:26186455

  17. Structural MRI-Based Predictions in Patients with Treatment-Refractory Depression (TRD).

    PubMed

    Johnston, Blair A; Steele, J Douglas; Tolomeo, Serenella; Christmas, David; Matthews, Keith

    2015-01-01

    The application of machine learning techniques to psychiatric neuroimaging offers the possibility to identify robust, reliable and objective disease biomarkers both within and between contemporary syndromal diagnoses that could guide routine clinical practice. The use of quantitative methods to identify psychiatric biomarkers is consequently important, particularly with a view to making predictions relevant to individual patients, rather than at a group-level. Here, we describe predictions of treatment-refractory depression (TRD) diagnosis using structural T1-weighted brain scans obtained from twenty adult participants with TRD and 21 never depressed controls. We report 85% accuracy of individual subject diagnostic prediction. Using an automated feature selection method, the major brain regions supporting this significant classification were in the caudate, insula, habenula and periventricular grey matter. It was not, however, possible to predict the degree of 'treatment resistance' in individual patients, at least as quantified by the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH-S) clinical staging method; but the insula was again identified as a region of interest. Structural brain imaging data alone can be used to predict diagnostic status, but not MGH-S staging, with a high degree of accuracy in patients with TRD.

  18. Prediction and Design of Materials from Crystal Structures to Nanocrystal Morphology and Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Richard

    2012-02-01

    Predictions of structure formation by computational methods have the potential to accelerate materials discovery and design. Here we present two computational approaches for the prediction of crystal structures and the morphology of nanoparticles. Many materials properties are controlled by composition and crystal structure. We show that evolutionary algorithms coupled to ab-initio relaxations can accurately predict the crystal structure and composition of compounds without any prior information about the system. We will discuss results for various systems including the prediction of unexpected quasi-1D and 2D electronic structures in Li-Be compounds under pressure [1] and of the crystal structure of the superconducting high-pressure phase of Eu [2]. The self-assembly of nanocrystals into mesoscale superlattices provides a path to the design of materials with tunable electronic, physical and chemical properties for various applications. The self-assembly is controlled by the nanocrystal shape and by ligand-mediated interactions between them. To understand this, it is necessary to know the effect of the ligands on the surface energies (which tune the nanocrystal shape), as well as the relative coverage of the different facets (which control the interactions). Density functional calculations for the binding energy of oleic acid-based ligands on PbSe nanocrystals determine the surface energies as a function of ligand coverage. The Wulff construction predicts the thermodynamic equilibrium shape of the PbSe nanocrystals as a function of the ligand coverage. We show that the different ligand binding energies on the 100 and 111 facets results in different ligand coverages on the facets and predict a transition in the equilibrium shape from octahedral to cubic when increasing the ligand concentration during synthesis. Our results furthermore suggest that the experimentally observed transformation of the nanocrystal superlattice structure from fcc to bcc is caused by the

  19. QuaBingo: A Prediction System for Protein Quaternary Structure Attributes Using Block Composition.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chi-Hua; Chen, Chi-Wei; Guo, Ren-Chao; Ng, Hui-Fuang; Chu, Yen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background. Quaternary structures of proteins are closely relevant to gene regulation, signal transduction, and many other biological functions of proteins. In the current study, a new method based on protein-conserved motif composition in block format for feature extraction is proposed, which is termed block composition. Results. The protein quaternary assembly states prediction system which combines blocks with functional domain composition, called QuaBingo, is constructed by three layers of classifiers that can categorize quaternary structural attributes of monomer, homooligomer, and heterooligomer. The building of the first layer classifier uses support vector machines (SVM) based on blocks and functional domains of proteins, and the second layer SVM was utilized to process the outputs of the first layer. Finally, the result is determined by the Random Forest of the third layer. We compared the effectiveness of the combination of block composition, functional domain composition, and pseudoamino acid composition of the model. In the 11 kinds of functional protein families, QuaBingo is 23% of Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) higher than the existing prediction system. The results also revealed the biological characterization of the top five block compositions. Conclusions. QuaBingo provides better predictive ability for predicting the quaternary structural attributes of proteins. PMID:27610389

  20. QuaBingo: A Prediction System for Protein Quaternary Structure Attributes Using Block Composition.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chi-Hua; Chen, Chi-Wei; Guo, Ren-Chao; Ng, Hui-Fuang; Chu, Yen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background. Quaternary structures of proteins are closely relevant to gene regulation, signal transduction, and many other biological functions of proteins. In the current study, a new method based on protein-conserved motif composition in block format for feature extraction is proposed, which is termed block composition. Results. The protein quaternary assembly states prediction system which combines blocks with functional domain composition, called QuaBingo, is constructed by three layers of classifiers that can categorize quaternary structural attributes of monomer, homooligomer, and heterooligomer. The building of the first layer classifier uses support vector machines (SVM) based on blocks and functional domains of proteins, and the second layer SVM was utilized to process the outputs of the first layer. Finally, the result is determined by the Random Forest of the third layer. We compared the effectiveness of the combination of block composition, functional domain composition, and pseudoamino acid composition of the model. In the 11 kinds of functional protein families, QuaBingo is 23% of Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) higher than the existing prediction system. The results also revealed the biological characterization of the top five block compositions. Conclusions. QuaBingo provides better predictive ability for predicting the quaternary structural attributes of proteins.

  1. QuaBingo: A Prediction System for Protein Quaternary Structure Attributes Using Block Composition

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Chi-Hua; Chen, Chi-Wei; Guo, Ren-Chao; Ng, Hui-Fuang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Quaternary structures of proteins are closely relevant to gene regulation, signal transduction, and many other biological functions of proteins. In the current study, a new method based on protein-conserved motif composition in block format for feature extraction is proposed, which is termed block composition. Results. The protein quaternary assembly states prediction system which combines blocks with functional domain composition, called QuaBingo, is constructed by three layers of classifiers that can categorize quaternary structural attributes of monomer, homooligomer, and heterooligomer. The building of the first layer classifier uses support vector machines (SVM) based on blocks and functional domains of proteins, and the second layer SVM was utilized to process the outputs of the first layer. Finally, the result is determined by the Random Forest of the third layer. We compared the effectiveness of the combination of block composition, functional domain composition, and pseudoamino acid composition of the model. In the 11 kinds of functional protein families, QuaBingo is 23% of Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) higher than the existing prediction system. The results also revealed the biological characterization of the top five block compositions. Conclusions. QuaBingo provides better predictive ability for predicting the quaternary structural attributes of proteins. PMID:27610389

  2. Hybrid scaled structural dynamic models and their use in damping prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Sigler, Jonathan L.; Van Schoor, Marthinus C.; Gronet, Marc J.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical and experimental techniques for the prediction and ground verification of the damped structural dynamics of space structures are developed. The options available for similarity-scaled model testing, including replica and multiple scale approaches, are reviewed. For the case when the distortion of potentially dissipative or nonlinear joints, which would be required in multiple-scale modeling, is impractical, a new type of modeling is introduced, which uses a hybrid of joints at replica scale and connecting elements at a modified multiple scale. The model design requirements for replica, multiple-scale, and hybrid models are developed, and the expected scaling of nonlinear dissipation in joints is derived. A damping prediction scheme is developed that relies on a finite element model of the undamped structure and measurements of the individual joint properties to predict the modal damping of the truss attributable to the joints. A hybrid-scaled model of a segment of the Space Station was built and dynamically tested. The predicted and measured truss damping compared favorably.

  3. Predicting US Infants' and Toddlers' TV/Video Viewing Rates: Mothers' Cognitions and Structural Life Circumstances.

    PubMed

    Vaala, Sarah E; Hornik, Robert C

    2014-04-01

    There has been rising international concern over media use with children under two. As little is known about the factors associated with more or less viewing among very young children, this study examines maternal factors predictive of TV/video viewing rates among American infants and toddlers. Guided by the Integrative Model of Behavioral Prediction, this survey study examines relationships between children's rates of TV/video viewing and their mothers' structural life circumstances (e.g., number of children in the home; mother's screen use), and cognitions (e.g., attitudes; norms). Results suggest that mothers' structural circumstances and cognitions respectively contribute independent explanatory power to the prediction of children's TV/video viewing. Influence of structural circumstances is partially mediated through cognitions. Mothers' attitudes as well as their own TV/video viewing behavior were particularly predictive of children's viewing. Implications of these findings for international efforts to understand and reduce infant/toddler TV/video exposure are discussed. PMID:25489335

  4. QuaBingo: A Prediction System for Protein Quaternary Structure Attributes Using Block Composition

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Chi-Hua; Chen, Chi-Wei; Guo, Ren-Chao; Ng, Hui-Fuang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Quaternary structures of proteins are closely relevant to gene regulation, signal transduction, and many other biological functions of proteins. In the current study, a new method based on protein-conserved motif composition in block format for feature extraction is proposed, which is termed block composition. Results. The protein quaternary assembly states prediction system which combines blocks with functional domain composition, called QuaBingo, is constructed by three layers of classifiers that can categorize quaternary structural attributes of monomer, homooligomer, and heterooligomer. The building of the first layer classifier uses support vector machines (SVM) based on blocks and functional domains of proteins, and the second layer SVM was utilized to process the outputs of the first layer. Finally, the result is determined by the Random Forest of the third layer. We compared the effectiveness of the combination of block composition, functional domain composition, and pseudoamino acid composition of the model. In the 11 kinds of functional protein families, QuaBingo is 23% of Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) higher than the existing prediction system. The results also revealed the biological characterization of the top five block compositions. Conclusions. QuaBingo provides better predictive ability for predicting the quaternary structural attributes of proteins.

  5. Enhanced hybrid search algorithm for protein structure prediction using the 3D-HP lattice model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changjun; Hou, Caixia; Zhang, Qiang; Wei, Xiaopeng

    2013-09-01

    The problem of protein structure prediction in the hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice model is the prediction of protein tertiary structure. This problem is usually referred to as the protein folding problem. This paper presents a method for the application of an enhanced hybrid search algorithm to the problem of protein folding prediction, using the three dimensional (3D) HP lattice model. The enhanced hybrid search algorithm is a combination of the particle swarm optimizer (PSO) and tabu search (TS) algorithms. Since the PSO algorithm entraps local minimum in later evolution extremely easily, we combined PSO with the TS algorithm, which has properties of global optimization. Since the technologies of crossover and mutation are applied many times to PSO and TS algorithms, so enhanced hybrid search algorithm is called the MCMPSO-TS (multiple crossover and mutation PSO-TS) algorithm. Experimental results show that the MCMPSO-TS algorithm can find the best solutions so far for the listed benchmarks, which will help comparison with any future paper approach. Moreover, real protein sequences and Fibonacci sequences are verified in the 3D HP lattice model for the first time. Compared with the previous evolutionary algorithms, the new hybrid search algorithm is novel, and can be used effectively to predict 3D protein folding structure. With continuous development and changes in amino acids sequences, the new algorithm will also make a contribution to the study of new protein sequences. PMID:23824509

  6. Predicting total organic halide formation from drinking water chlorination using quantitative structure-property relationships.

    PubMed

    Luilo, G B; Cabaniss, S E

    2011-10-01

    Chlorinating water which contains dissolved organic matter (DOM) produces disinfection byproducts, the majority of unknown structure. Hence, the total organic halide (TOX) measurement is used as a surrogate for toxic disinfection byproducts. This work derives a robust quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) for predicting the TOX formation potential of model compounds. Literature data for 49 compounds were used to train the QSPR in moles of chlorine per mole of compound (Cp) (mol-Cl/mol-Cp). The resulting QSPR has four descriptors, calibration [Formula: see text] of 0.72 and standard deviation of estimation of 0.43 mol-Cl/mol-Cp. Internal and external validation indicate that the QSPR has good predictive power and low bias (‰<‰1%). Applying this QSPR to predict TOX formation by DOM surrogates - tannic acid, two model fulvic acids and two agent-based model assemblages - gave a predicted TOX range of 136-184 µg-Cl/mg-C, consistent with experimental data for DOM, which ranged from 78 to 192 µg-Cl/mg-C. However, the limited structural variation in the training data may limit QSPR applicability; studies of more sulfur-containing compounds, heterocyclic compounds and high molecular weight compounds could lead to a more widely applicable QSPR.

  7. Prediction of HIV drug resistance from genotype with encoded three-dimensional protein structure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug resistance has become a severe challenge for treatment of HIV infections. Mutations accumulate in the HIV genome and make certain drugs ineffective. Prediction of resistance from genotype data is a valuable guide in choice of drugs for effective therapy. Results In order to improve the computational prediction of resistance from genotype data we have developed a unified encoding of the protein sequence and three-dimensional protein structure of the drug target for classification and regression analysis. The method was tested on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. Our graph based sequence-structure approach gives high accuracy with a new sparse dictionary classification method, as well as support vector machine and artificial neural networks classifiers. Cross-validated regression analysis with the sparse dictionary gave excellent correlation between predicted and observed resistance. Conclusion The approach of encoding the protein structure and sequence as a 210-dimensional vector, based on Delaunay triangulation, has promise as an accurate method for predicting resistance from sequence for drugs inhibiting HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. PMID:25081370

  8. Hazard of pharmaceuticals for aquatic environment: Prioritization by structural approaches and prediction of ecotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sangion, Alessandro; Gramatica, Paola

    2016-10-01

    Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs) are recognized as Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CEC) since they are detected in the environment in increasing amount, mainly in aquatic compartment, where they may be hazardous for wildlife. The huge lack of experimental data for a large number of end-points requires tools able to quickly highlight the potentially most hazardous and toxic pharmaceuticals, focusing experiments on the prioritized compounds. In silico tools, like QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) models based on structural molecular descriptors, can predict missing data for toxic end-points necessary to prioritize existing, or even not yet synthesized chemicals for their potential hazard. In the present study, new externally validated QSAR models, specific to predict acute toxicity of APIs in key organisms of the three main aquatic trophic levels, i.e. algae, Daphnia and two species of fish, were developed using the QSARINS software. These Multiple Linear regressions - Ordinary Least Squares (MLR-OLS) models are based on theoretical molecular descriptors calculated by free PaDEL-Descriptor software and selected by Genetic Algorithm. The models are statistically robust, externally predictive and characterized by a wide structural applicability domain. They were applied to predict acute toxicity for a large set of APIs without experimental data. Then predictions were processed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and a trend, driven by the combination of toxicities for all the studied organisms, was highlighted. This trend, named Aquatic Toxicity Index (ATI), allowed the raking of pharmaceuticals according to their potential toxicity upon the whole aquatic environment. Finally a QSAR model for the prediction of this Aquatic Toxicity Index (ATI) was proposed to be applicable in QSARINS for the screening of existing APIs for their potential hazard and the a priori chemical design of not environmentally hazardous APIs.

  9. PETcofold: predicting conserved interactions and structures of two multiple alignments of RNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Seemann, Stefan E.; Richter, Andreas S.; Gesell, Tanja; Backofen, Rolf; Gorodkin, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Predicting RNA–RNA interactions is essential for determining the function of putative non-coding RNAs. Existing methods for the prediction of interactions are all based on single sequences. Since comparative methods have already been useful in RNA structure determination, we assume that conserved RNA–RNA interactions also imply conserved function. Of these, we further assume that a non-negligible amount of the existing RNA–RNA interactions have also acquired compensating base changes throughout evolution. We implement a method, PETcofold, that can take covariance information in intra-molecular and inter-molecular base pairs into account to predict interactions and secondary structures of two multiple alignments of RNA sequences. Results: PETcofold's ability to predict RNA–RNA interactions was evaluated on a carefully curated dataset of 32 bacterial small RNAs and their targets, which was manually extracted from the literature. For evaluation of both RNA–RNA interaction and structure prediction, we were able to extract only a few high-quality examples: one vertebrate small nucleolar RNA and four bacterial small RNAs. For these we show that the prediction can be improved by our comparative approach. Furthermore, PETcofold was evaluated on controlled data with phylogenetically simulated sequences enriched for covariance patterns at the interaction sites. We observed increased performance with increased amounts of covariance. Availability: The program PETcofold is available as source code and can be downloaded from http://rth.dk/resources/petcofold. Contact: gorodkin@rth.dk; backofen@informatik.uni-freiburg.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21088024

  10. Hazard of pharmaceuticals for aquatic environment: Prioritization by structural approaches and prediction of ecotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sangion, Alessandro; Gramatica, Paola

    2016-10-01

    Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs) are recognized as Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CEC) since they are detected in the environment in increasing amount, mainly in aquatic compartment, where they may be hazardous for wildlife. The huge lack of experimental data for a large number of end-points requires tools able to quickly highlight the potentially most hazardous and toxic pharmaceuticals, focusing experiments on the prioritized compounds. In silico tools, like QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) models based on structural molecular descriptors, can predict missing data for toxic end-points necessary to prioritize existing, or even not yet synthesized chemicals for their potential hazard. In the present study, new externally validated QSAR models, specific to predict acute toxicity of APIs in key organisms of the three main aquatic trophic levels, i.e. algae, Daphnia and two species of fish, were developed using the QSARINS software. These Multiple Linear regressions - Ordinary Least Squares (MLR-OLS) models are based on theoretical molecular descriptors calculated by free PaDEL-Descriptor software and selected by Genetic Algorithm. The models are statistically robust, externally predictive and characterized by a wide structural applicability domain. They were applied to predict acute toxicity for a large set of APIs without experimental data. Then predictions were processed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and a trend, driven by the combination of toxicities for all the studied organisms, was highlighted. This trend, named Aquatic Toxicity Index (ATI), allowed the raking of pharmaceuticals according to their potential toxicity upon the whole aquatic environment. Finally a QSAR model for the prediction of this Aquatic Toxicity Index (ATI) was proposed to be applicable in QSARINS for the screening of existing APIs for their potential hazard and the a priori chemical design of not environmentally hazardous APIs. PMID:27568576

  11. Polarized Raman spectra of oriented fibers of A DNA and B DNA: anisotropic and isotropic local Raman tensors of base and backbone vibrations.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, G J; Benevides, J M; Overman, S A; Ueda, T; Ushizawa, K; Saitoh, M; Tsuboi, M

    1995-01-01

    Polarized Raman spectra of oriented fibers of calf thymus DNA in the A and B conformations have been obtained by use of a Raman microscope operating in the 180 degrees back-scattering geometry. The following polarized Raman intensities in the spectral interval 200-1800 cm-1 were measured with both 514.5 and 488.0 nm laser excitations: (1) Icc, in which the incident and scattered light are polarized parallel to the DNA helical axis (c axis); (2) Ibb, in which the incident and scattered light are polarized perpendicular to c; and (3) Ibc and Icb, in which the incident and scattered light are polarized in mutually perpendicular directions. High degrees of structural homogeneity and unidirectional orientation were confirmed for both the A and B form fibers, as judged by comparison of the observed Raman markers and intensity anisotropies with measurements reported previously for oligonucleotide single crystals of known three-dimensional structures. The fiber Raman anisotropies have been combined with solution Raman depolarization ratios to evaluate the local tensors corresponding to key conformation-sensitive Raman bands of the DNA bases and sugar-phosphate backbone. The present study yields novel vibrational assignments for both A DNA and BDNA conformers and also confirms many previously proposed Raman vibrational assignments. Among the significant new findings are the demonstration of complex patterns of A form and B form indicator bands in the spectral intervals 750-900 and 1050-1100 cm-1, the identification of highly anisotropic tensors corresponding to vibrations of base, deoxyribose, and phosphate moieties, and the determination of relatively isotropic Raman tensors for the symmetrical stretching mode of phosphodioxy groups in A and B DNA. The present fiber results provide a basis for exploitation of polarized Raman spectroscopy to determine DNA helix orientation as well as to probe specific nucleotide residue orientations in nucleoproteins, viruses, and other

  12. Predicting acute aquatic toxicity of structurally diverse chemicals in fish using artificial intelligence approaches.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kunwar P; Gupta, Shikha; Rai, Premanjali

    2013-09-01

    The research aims to develop global modeling tools capable of categorizing structurally diverse chemicals in various toxicity classes according to the EEC and European Community directives, and to predict their acute toxicity in fathead minnow using set of selected molecular descriptors. Accordingly, artificial intelligence approach based classification and regression models, such as probabilistic neural networks (PNN), generalized regression neural networks (GRNN), multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPN), radial basis function neural network (RBFN), support vector machines (SVM), gene expression programming (GEP), and decision tree (DT) were constructed using the experimental toxicity data. Diversity and non-linearity in the chemicals' data were tested using the Tanimoto similarity index and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman statistics. Predictive and generalization abilities of various models constructed here were compared using several statistical parameters. PNN and GRNN models performed relatively better than MLPN, RBFN, SVM, GEP, and DT. Both in two and four category classifications, PNN yielded a considerably high accuracy of classification in training (95.85 percent and 90.07 percent) and validation data (91.30 percent and 86.96 percent), respectively. GRNN rendered a high correlation between the measured and model predicted -log LC50 values both for the training (0.929) and validation (0.910) data and low prediction errors (RMSE) of 0.52 and 0.49 for two sets. Efficiency of the selected PNN and GRNN models in predicting acute toxicity of new chemicals was adequately validated using external datasets of different fish species (fathead minnow, bluegill, trout, and guppy). The PNN and GRNN models showed good predictive and generalization abilities and can be used as tools for predicting toxicities of structurally diverse chemical compounds.

  13. BetaSCPWeb: side-chain prediction for protein structures using Voronoi diagrams and geometry prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Joonghyun; Lee, Mokwon; Cha, Jehyun; Laskowski, Roman A.; Ryu, Seong Eon; Kim, Deok-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Many applications, such as protein design, homology modeling, flexible docking, etc. require the prediction of a protein's optimal side-chain conformations from just its amino acid sequence and backbone structure. Side-chain prediction (SCP) is an NP-hard energy minimization problem. Here, we present BetaSCPWeb which efficiently computes a conformation close to optimal using a geometry-prioritization method based on the Voronoi diagram of spherical atoms. Its outputs are visual, textual and PDB file format. The web server is free and open to all users at http://voronoi.hanyang.ac.kr/betascpweb with no login requirement. PMID:27151195

  14. Flow structure generated by perpendicular blade vortex interaction and implications for helicopter noise predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devenport, William J.; Glegg, Stewart A. L.

    1994-01-01

    Activities carried out in support of research on flow structure generated by perpendicular blade vortex interaction and implications for helicopter noise prediction are summarized. Progress in the following areas is described: (1) construction of 8 inch-chord NACA 0012 full-span blade; (2) Acquisition of two full-span blades; (3) preparation for hot wire measurements; (4) related work on a modified Betz's theory; and (5) work related to helicopter noise prediction. In addition, a list of publications based on the results of prior experimentation is presented.

  15. SPOT-Seq-RNA: predicting protein-RNA complex structure and RNA-binding function by fold recognition and binding affinity prediction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuedong; Zhao, Huiying; Wang, Jihua; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2014-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play key roles in RNA metabolism and post-transcriptional regulation. Computational methods have been developed separately for prediction of RBPs and RNA-binding residues by machine-learning techniques and prediction of protein-RNA complex structures by rigid or semiflexible structure-to-structure docking. Here, we describe a template-based technique called SPOT-Seq-RNA that integrates prediction of RBPs, RNA-binding residues, and protein-RNA complex structures into a single package. This integration is achieved by combining template-based structure-prediction software, SPARKS X, with binding affinity prediction software, DRNA. This tool yields reasonable sensitivity (46 %) and high precision (84 %) for an independent test set of 215 RBPs and 5,766 non-RBPs. SPOT-Seq-RNA is computationally efficient for genome-scale prediction of RBPs and protein-RNA complex structures. Its application to human genome study has revealed a similar sensitivity and ability to uncover hundreds of novel RBPs beyond simple homology. The online server and downloadable version of SPOT-Seq-RNA are available at http://sparks-lab.org/server/SPOT-Seq-RNA/.

  16. Structure classification and melting temperature prediction in octet AB solids via machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilania, G.; Gubernatis, J. E.; Lookman, T.

    2015-06-01

    Machine learning methods are being increasingly used in condensed matter physics and materials science to classify crystals structures and predict material properties. However, the reliability of these methods for a given problem, especially when large data sets are unavailable, has not been well studied. By addressing the tasks of classifying crystal structure and predicting melting temperatures of the octet subset of AB solids, we performed such a study and found potential problems with using machine learning methods on relatively small data sets. At the same time, however, we can reaffirm the potential power of such methods for these tasks. In particular, we uncovered an important new material feature, the excess Born effective charge, that significantly increased the accuracy of the predictions for the classification problem we defined. This discovery leads us to propose a new scale for the degree of ionicity and covalency in these solids. More specifically, we partitioned the crystal structures of a set of 75 octet solids into those that are ionic and covalent bonded and thus performed a binary classification task. We found that using the standard indices (rσ,rπ) , suggested by St. John and Bloch several decades ago, enabled an average success in classification of 92 % . Using just rσ and the excess Born effective charge Δ ZA of the A atom enabled an average success of 97 % , but we also found relatively large variations about these averages that were dependent on how certain machine learning methods were used and for which a standard deviation was not a proper measure of the degree of confidence we can place in either average. Instead, we calculated and report with 95 % confidence that the traditional classification pair predicts an accuracy in the interval [89 %,95 %] and the accuracy of the new pair lies in the interval [96 %,99 %] . For melting temperature predictions, the size of our data set was 46. We estimate the root-mean-squared error of our

  17. A DIRICHLET PROCESS MIXTURE OF HIDDEN MARKOV MODELS FOR PROTEIN STRUCTURE PREDICTION1

    PubMed Central

    Lennox, Kristin P.; Dahl, David B.; Vannucci, Marina; Day, Ryan; Tsai, Jerry W.

    2010-01-01

    By providing new insights into the distribution of a protein’s torsion angles, recent statistical models for this data have pointed the way to more efficient methods for protein structure prediction. Most current approaches have concentrated on bivariate models at a single sequence position. There is, however, considerable value in simultaneously modeling angle pairs at multiple sequence positions in a protein. One area of application for such models is in structure prediction for the highly variable loop and turn regions. Such modeling is difficult due to the fact that the number of known protein structures available to estimate these torsion angle distributions is typically small. Furthermore, the data is “sparse” in that not all proteins have angle pairs at each sequence position. We propose a new semiparametric model for the joint distributions of angle pairs at multiple sequence positions. Our model accommodates sparse data by leveraging known information about the behavior of protein secondary structure. We demonstrate our technique by predicting the torsion angles in a loop from the globin fold family. Our results show that a template-based approach can now be successfully extended to modeling the notoriously difficult loop and turn regions. PMID:21031154

  18. VfoldCPX Server: Predicting RNA-RNA Complex Structure and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojun; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2016-01-01

    RNA-RNA interactions are essential for genomic RNA dimerization, mRNA splicing, and many RNA-related gene expression and regulation processes. The prediction of the structure and folding stability of RNA-RNA complexes is a problem of significant biological importance and receives substantial interest in the biological community. The VfoldCPX server provides a new web interface to predict the two-dimensional (2D) structures of RNA-RNA complexes from the nucleotide sequences. The VfoldCPX server has several novel advantages including the ability to treat RNAs with tertiary contacts (crossing base pairs) such as loop-loop kissing interactions and the use of physical loop entropy parameters. Based on a partition function-based algorithm, the server enables prediction for structure with and without tertiary contacts. Furthermore, the server outputs a set of energetically stable structures, ranked by their stabilities. The results allow users to gain extensive physical insights into RNA-RNA interactions and their roles in RNA function. The web server is freely accessible at “http://rna.physics.missouri.edu/vfoldCPX”. PMID:27657918

  19. Automated antibody structure prediction using Accelrys tools: Results and best practices

    PubMed Central

    Fasnacht, Marc; Butenhof, Ken; Goupil-Lamy, Anne; Hernandez-Guzman, Francisco; Huang, Hongwei; Yan, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    We describe the methodology and results from our participation in the second Antibody Modeling Assessment experiment. During the experiment we predicted the structure of eleven unpublished antibody Fv fragments. Our prediction methods centered on template-based modeling; potential templates were selected from an antibody database based on their sequence similarity to the target in the framework regions. Depending on the quality of the templates, we constructed models of the antibody framework regions either using a single, chimeric or multiple template approach. The hypervariable loop regions in the initial models were rebuilt by grafting the corresponding regions from suitable templates onto the model. For the H3 loop region, we further refined models using ab initio methods. The final models were subjected to constrained energy minimization to resolve severe local structural problems. The analysis of the models submitted show that Accelrys tools allow for the construction of quite accurate models for the framework and the canonical CDR regions, with RMSDs to the X-ray structure on average below 1 Å for most of these regions. The results show that accurate prediction of the H3 hypervariable loops remains a challenge. Furthermore, model quality assessment of the submitted models show that the models are of quite high quality, with local geometry assessment scores similar to that of the target X-ray structures. Proteins 2014; 82:1583–1598. © 2014 The Authors. Proteins published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24833271

  20. Less-structured time in children's daily lives predicts self-directed executive functioning

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Jane E.; Semenov, Andrei D.; Michaelson, Laura; Provan, Lindsay S.; Snyder, Hannah R.; Munakata, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Executive functions (EFs) in childhood predict important life outcomes. Thus, there is great interest in attempts to improve EFs early in life. Many interventions are led by trained adults, including structured training activities in the lab, and less-structured activities implemented in schools. Such programs have yielded gains in children's externally-driven executive functioning, where they are instructed on what goal-directed actions to carry out and when. However, it is less clear how children's experiences relate to their development of self-directed executive functioning, where they must determine on their own what goal-directed actions to carry out and when. We hypothesized that time spent in less-structured activities would give children opportunities to practice self-directed executive functioning, and lead to benefits. To investigate this possibility, we collected information from parents about their 6–7 year-old children's daily, annual, and typical schedules. We categorized children's activities as “structured” or “less-structured” based on categorization schemes from prior studies on child leisure time use. We assessed children's self-directed executive functioning using a well-established verbal fluency task, in which children generate members of a category and can decide on their own when to switch from one subcategory to another. The more time that children spent in less-structured activities, the better their self-directed executive functioning. The opposite was true of structured activities, which predicted poorer self-directed executive functioning. These relationships were robust (holding across increasingly strict classifications of structured and less-structured time) and specific (time use did not predict externally-driven executive functioning). We discuss implications, caveats, and ways in which potential interpretations can be distinguished in future work, to advance an understanding of this fundamental aspect of growing up