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Sample records for predicting drug pharmacokinetics

  1. Predictive Performance of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Renally Cleared Drugs in Children

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, W; Johnson, TN; Xu, H; Cheung, SYA; Bui, KH; Li, J; Al‐Huniti, N

    2016-01-01

    Predictive performance of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) models of drugs predominantly eliminated through kidney in the pediatric population was evaluated. After optimization using adult clinical data, the verified PBPK models can predict 33 of 34 drug clearance within twofold of the observed values in children 1 month and older. More specifically, 10 of 11 of predicted clearance values were within 1.5‐fold of those observed in children between 1 month and 2 years old. The PopPK approach also predicted 19 of 21 drug clearance within twofold of the observed values in children. In summary, our analysis demonstrated both PBPK and PopPK adult models, after verification with additional adult pharmacokinetic (PK) studies and incorporation of known ontogeny of renal filtration, could be applied for dosing regimen recommendation in children 1 month and older for renally eliminated drugs in a first‐in‐pediatric study. PMID:27566992

  2. A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Pregnant Women to Predict the Pharmacokinetics of Drugs Metabolized Via Several Enzymatic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Dallmann, André; Ince, Ibrahim; Coboeken, Katrin; Eissing, Thomas; Hempel, Georg

    2017-09-18

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling is considered a valuable tool for predicting pharmacokinetic changes in pregnancy to subsequently guide in-vivo pharmacokinetic trials in pregnant women. The objective of this study was to extend and verify a previously developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for pregnant women for the prediction of pharmacokinetics of drugs metabolized via several cytochrome P450 enzymes. Quantitative information on gestation-specific changes in enzyme activity available in the literature was incorporated in a pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic model and the pharmacokinetics of eight drugs metabolized via one or multiple cytochrome P450 enzymes was predicted. The tested drugs were caffeine, midazolam, nifedipine, metoprolol, ondansetron, granisetron, diazepam, and metronidazole. Pharmacokinetic predictions were evaluated by comparison with in-vivo pharmacokinetic data obtained from the literature. The pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic model successfully predicted the pharmacokinetics of all tested drugs. The observed pregnancy-induced pharmacokinetic changes were qualitatively and quantitatively reasonably well predicted for all drugs. Ninety-seven percent of the mean plasma concentrations predicted in pregnant women fell within a twofold error range and 63% within a 1.25-fold error range. For all drugs, the predicted area under the concentration-time curve was within a 1.25-fold error range. The presented pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic model can quantitatively predict the pharmacokinetics of drugs that are metabolized via one or multiple cytochrome P450 enzymes by integrating prior knowledge of the pregnancy-related effect on these enzymes. This pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic model may thus be used to identify potential exposure changes in pregnant women a priori and to eventually support informed decision making when clinical trials are designed in this

  3. A perspective on the prediction of drug pharmacokinetics and disposition in drug research and development.

    PubMed

    Di, Li; Feng, Bo; Goosen, Theunis C; Lai, Yurong; Steyn, Stefanus J; Varma, Manthena V; Obach, R Scott

    2013-12-01

    Prediction of human pharmacokinetics of new drugs, as well as other disposition attributes, has become a routine practice in drug research and development. Prior to the 1990s, drug disposition science was used in a mostly descriptive manner in the drug development phase. With the advent of in vitro methods and availability of human-derived reagents for in vitro studies, drug-disposition scientists became engaged in the compound design phase of drug discovery to optimize and predict human disposition properties prior to nomination of candidate compounds into the drug development phase. This has reaped benefits in that the attrition rate of new drug candidates in drug development for reasons of unacceptable pharmacokinetics has greatly decreased. Attributes that are predicted include clearance, volume of distribution, half-life, absorption, and drug-drug interactions. In this article, we offer our experience-based perspectives on the tools and methods of predicting human drug disposition using in vitro and animal data.

  4. Predicting drug pharmacokinetic properties using molecular interaction fields and SIMCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolohan, Philippa R. N.; Clark, Robert D.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a method that combines molecular interaction fields with soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) Wold:1977 to predict pharmacokinetic drug properties. Several additional considerations to those made in traditional QSAR are required in order to develop a successful QSPR strategy that is capable of accommodating the many complex factors that contribute to key pharmacokinetic properties such as ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) and toxicology. An accurate prediction of oral bioavailability, for example, requires that absorption and first-pass hepatic elimination both be taken into consideration. To accomplish this, general properties of molecules must be related to their solubility and ability to penetrate biological membranes, and specific features must be related to their particular metabolic and toxicological profiles. Here we describe a method, which is applicable to structurally diverse data sets while utilizing as much detailed structural information as possible. We address the issue of the molecular alignment of a structurally diverse set of compounds using idiotropic field orientation (IFO), a generalization of inertial field orientation Clark:1998. We have developed a second flavor of this method, which directly incorporates electrostatics into the molecular alignment. Both variations of IFO produce a characteristic orientation for each structure and the corresponding molecular fields can then be analyzed using SIMCA. Models are presented for human intestinal absorption, blood-brain barrier penetration and bioavailability to demonstrate ways in which this tool can be used early in the drug development process to identify leads likely to exhibit poor pharmacokinetic behavior in pre-clinical studies, and we have explored the influence of conformation and molecular field type on the statistical properties of the models obtained.

  5. Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Macitentan: Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    de Kanter, Ruben; Sidharta, Patricia N; Delahaye, Stéphane; Gnerre, Carmela; Segrestaa, Jerome; Buchmann, Stephan; Kohl, Christopher; Treiber, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Macitentan is a novel dual endothelin receptor antagonist for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). It is metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, mainly CYP3A4, to its active metabolite ACT-132577. A physiological-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed by combining observations from clinical studies and physicochemical parameters as well as absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion parameters determined in vitro. The model predicted the observed pharmacokinetics of macitentan and its active metabolite ACT-132577 after single and multiple dosing. It performed well in recovering the observed effect of the CYP3A4 inhibitors ketoconazole and cyclosporine, and the CYP3A4 inducer rifampicin, as well as in predicting interactions with S-warfarin and sildenafil. The model was robust enough to allow prospective predictions of macitentan-drug combinations not studied, including an alternative dosing regimen of ketoconazole and nine other CYP3A4-interacting drugs. Among these were the HIV drugs ritonavir and saquinavir, which were included because HIV infection is a known risk factor for the development of PAH. This example of the application of PBPK modeling to predict drug-drug interactions was used to support the labeling of macitentan (Opsumit).

  6. Improving Predictive Modeling in Pediatric Drug Development: Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Mechanistic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Slikker, William; Young, John F.; Corley, Rick A.; Dorman, David C.; Conolly, Rory B.; Knudsen, Thomas; Erstad, Brian L.; Luecke, Richard H.; Faustman, Elaine M.; Timchalk, Chuck; Mattison, Donald R.

    2005-07-26

    A workshop was conducted on November 18?19, 2004, to address the issue of improving predictive models for drug delivery to developing humans. Although considerable progress has been made for adult humans, large gaps remain for predicting pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) outcome in children because most adult models have not been tested during development. The goals of the meeting included a description of when, during development, infants/children become adultlike in handling drugs. The issue of incorporating the most recent advances into the predictive models was also addressed: both the use of imaging approaches and genomic information were considered. Disease state, as exemplified by obesity, was addressed as a modifier of drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics during development. Issues addressed in this workshop should be considered in the development of new predictive and mechanistic models of drug kinetics and dynamics in the developing human.

  7. Application of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling to the Understanding of Bosutinib Pharmacokinetics: Prediction of Drug-Drug and Drug-Disease Interactions.

    PubMed

    Ono, Chiho; Hsyu, Poe-Hirr; Abbas, Richat; Loi, Cho-Ming; Yamazaki, Shinji

    2017-04-01

    Bosutinib is an orally available Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor indicated for the treatment of patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia. Bosutinib is predominantly metabolized by CYP3A4 as the primary clearance mechanism. The main objectives of this study were to 1) develop physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models of bosutinib; 2) verify and refine the PBPK models based on clinical study results of bosutinib single-dose drug-drug interaction (DDI) with ketoconazole and rifampin, as well as single-dose drug-disease interaction (DDZI) in patients with renal and hepatic impairment; 3) apply the PBPK models to predict DDI outcomes in patients with weak and moderate CYP3A inhibitors; and 4) apply the PBPK models to predict DDZI outcomes in renally and hepatically impaired patients after multiple-dose administration. Results showed that the PBPK models adequately predicted bosutinib oral exposures in patients after single- and multiple-dose administrations. The PBPK models also reasonably predicted changes in bosutinib exposures in the single-dose DDI and DDZI results, suggesting that the PBPK models were sufficiently developed and verified based on the currently available data. Finally, the PBPK models predicted 2- to 4-fold increases in bosutinib exposures by moderate CYP3A inhibitors, as well as comparable increases in bosutinib exposures in renally and hepatically impaired patients between single- and multiple-dose administrations. Given the challenges in conducting numerous DDI and DDZI studies of anticancer drugs in patients, we believe that the PBPK models verified in our study would be valuable to reasonably predict bosutinib exposures under various scenarios that have not been tested clinically. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  8. A quantitative systems pharmacology approach, incorporating a novel liver model, for predicting pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Cherkaoui-Rbati, Mohammed H; Paine, Stuart W; Littlewood, Peter; Rauch, Cyril

    2017-01-01

    All pharmaceutical companies are required to assess pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) of new chemical entities (NCEs) and mathematical prediction helps to select the best NCE candidate with regard to adverse effects resulting from a DDI before any costly clinical studies. Most current models assume that the liver is a homogeneous organ where the majority of the metabolism occurs. However, the circulatory system of the liver has a complex hierarchical geometry which distributes xenobiotics throughout the organ. Nevertheless, the lobule (liver unit), located at the end of each branch, is composed of many sinusoids where the blood flow can vary and therefore creates heterogeneity (e.g. drug concentration, enzyme level). A liver model was constructed by describing the geometry of a lobule, where the blood velocity increases toward the central vein, and by modeling the exchange mechanisms between the blood and hepatocytes. Moreover, the three major DDI mechanisms of metabolic enzymes; competitive inhibition, mechanism based inhibition and induction, were accounted for with an undefined number of drugs and/or enzymes. The liver model was incorporated into a physiological-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model and simulations produced, that in turn were compared to ten clinical results. The liver model generated a hierarchy of 5 sinusoidal levels and estimated a blood volume of 283 mL and a cell density of 193 × 106 cells/g in the liver. The overall PBPK model predicted the pharmacokinetics of midazolam and the magnitude of the clinical DDI with perpetrator drug(s) including spatial and temporal enzyme levels changes. The model presented herein may reduce costs and the use of laboratory animals and give the opportunity to explore different clinical scenarios, which reduce the risk of adverse events, prior to costly human clinical studies.

  9. Pharmacometabolomics in Endogenous Drugs: A New Approach for Predicting the Individualized Pharmacokinetics of Cholic Acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhixin; Gu, Hao; Zhao, Huizhen; Liu, Yuehong; Fu, Shuang; Wang, Meiling; Zhou, Wenjuan; Xie, Ziye; Yu, Honghong; Huang, Zhenghai; Gao, Xiaoyan

    2017-09-01

    The evaluation of individual variability in endogenous drugs' metabolism and disposition is a very challenging task. We developed and validated a metabotype to pharmacokinetics (PK) matching approach by taking cholic acid as an example to predict the individualized PK of endogenous drugs. The stable isotope-labeled cholic acid was selected as the substitute analyte of cholic acid to ensure the accurate measurement of blood concentration. First, large-scale metabolite profiling studies were performed on the predose urine samples of 28 rats. Then, to examine the individualized PK of deuterium 4-cholic acid (d4-cholic acid) in these rats, we determined its plasma concentrations and calculated the differential AUC values. Subsequently, we conducted a two-stage partial least-squares analysis in which 31 baseline metabolites were screened initially for predicting the individualized AUC values of d4-cholic acid using the data of predose urine metabolites. Finally, network biology analysis was applied to give the biological interpretation of the individual variances in cholic acid metabolism and disposition, and the result further narrowed the selection of baseline metabolites from 31 to 2 (sarcosine and S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine) for such prediction. Collectively, this pharmacometabolomics research provided a new strategy for predicting individualized PK of endogenous drugs.

  10. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to predict the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs and the impact of errors in plasma protein binding.

    PubMed

    Ye, Min; Nagar, Swati; Korzekwa, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Predicting the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs is difficult. Also, since historical plasma protein binding data were often collected using unbuffered plasma, the resulting inaccurate binding data could contribute to incorrect predictions. This study uses a generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict human plasma concentration-time profiles for 22 highly protein-bound drugs. Tissue distribution was estimated from in vitro drug lipophilicity data, plasma protein binding and the blood: plasma ratio. Clearance was predicted with a well-stirred liver model. Underestimated hepatic clearance for acidic and neutral compounds was corrected by an empirical scaling factor. Predicted values (pharmacokinetic parameters, plasma concentration-time profile) were compared with observed data to evaluate the model accuracy. Of the 22 drugs, less than a 2-fold error was obtained for the terminal elimination half-life (t1/2 , 100% of drugs), peak plasma concentration (Cmax , 100%), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-t , 95.4%), clearance (CLh , 95.4%), mean residence time (MRT, 95.4%) and steady state volume (Vss , 90.9%). The impact of fup errors on CLh and Vss prediction was evaluated. Errors in fup resulted in proportional errors in clearance prediction for low-clearance compounds, and in Vss prediction for high-volume neutral drugs. For high-volume basic drugs, errors in fup did not propagate to errors in Vss prediction. This is due to the cancellation of errors in the calculations for tissue partitioning of basic drugs. Overall, plasma profiles were well simulated with the present PBPK model. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Predict the Pharmacokinetics of Highly Protein-Bound Drugs and Impact of Errors in Plasma Protein Binding

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Min; Nagar, Swati; Korzekwa, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs is difficult. Also, since historical plasma protein binding data was often collected using unbuffered plasma, the resulting inaccurate binding data could contribute to incorrect predictions. This study uses a generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict human plasma concentration-time profiles for 22 highly protein-bound drugs. Tissue distribution was estimated from in vitro drug lipophilicity data, plasma protein binding, and blood: plasma ratio. Clearance was predicted with a well-stirred liver model. Underestimated hepatic clearance for acidic and neutral compounds was corrected by an empirical scaling factor. Predicted values (pharmacokinetic parameters, plasma concentration-time profile) were compared with observed data to evaluate model accuracy. Of the 22 drugs, less than a 2-fold error was obtained for terminal elimination half-life (t1/2, 100% of drugs), peak plasma concentration (Cmax, 100%), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0–t, 95.4%), clearance (CLh, 95.4%), mean retention time (MRT, 95.4%), and steady state volume (Vss, 90.9%). The impact of fup errors on CLh and Vss prediction was evaluated. Errors in fup resulted in proportional errors in clearance prediction for low-clearance compounds, and in Vss prediction for high-volume neutral drugs. For high-volume basic drugs, errors in fup did not propagate to errors in Vss prediction. This is due to the cancellation of errors in the calculations for tissue partitioning of basic drugs. Overall, plasma profiles were well simulated with the present PBPK model. PMID:26531057

  12. Development of a Multicompartment Permeability-Limited Lung PBPK Model and Its Application in Predicting Pulmonary Pharmacokinetics of Antituberculosis Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gaohua, L; Wedagedera, J; Small, BG; Almond, L; Romero, K; Hermann, D; Hanna, D; Jamei, M; Gardner, I

    2015-01-01

    Achieving sufficient concentrations of antituberculosis (TB) drugs in pulmonary tissue at the optimum time is still a challenge in developing therapeutic regimens for TB. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model incorporating a multicompartment permeability-limited lung model was developed and used to simulate plasma and pulmonary concentrations of seven drugs. Passive permeability of drugs within the lung was predicted using an in vitro-in vivo extrapolation approach. Simulated epithelial lining fluid (ELF):plasma concentration ratios showed reasonable agreement with observed clinical data for rifampicin, isoniazid, ethambutol, and erythromycin. For clarithromycin, itraconazole and pyrazinamide the observed ELF:plasma ratios were significantly underpredicted. Sensitivity analyses showed that changing ELF pH or introducing efflux transporter activity between lung tissue and ELF can alter the ELF:plasma concentration ratios. The described model has shown utility in predicting the lung pharmacokinetics of anti-TB drugs and provides a framework for predicting pulmonary concentrations of novel anti-TB drugs. PMID:26535161

  13. Evaluation of human pharmacokinetics, therapeutic dose and exposure predictions using marketed oral drugs.

    PubMed

    McGinnity, D F; Collington, J; Austin, R P; Riley, R J

    2007-06-01

    In this article approaches to predict human pharmacokinetics (PK) are discussed and the capability of the exemplified methodologies to estimate individual PK parameters and therapeutic dose for a set of marketed oral drugs has been assessed. For a set of 63 drugs where the minimum efficacious concentration (MEC) and human PK were known, the clinical dose was shown to be well predicted or in some cases over-estimated using a simple one-compartment oral PK model. For a subset of these drugs, in vitro potency against the primary human targets was gathered, and compared to the observed MEC. When corrected for plasma protein binding, the MEC of the majority of compounds was < or=3 fold over the respective in vitro target potency value. A series of in vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to predict the human PK parameters. Metabolic clearance was generally predicted well from human hepatocytes. Interestingly, for this compound set, allometry or glomerular filtration rate (GFR) ratio methods appeared to be applicable for renal CL even where CL(renal) > GFR. For approximately 90% of compounds studied, the predicted CL using in vitro-in vivo (IVIV) extrapolation together with a CL(renal) estimate, where appropriate, was within 2-fold of that observed clinically. Encouragingly volume of distribution at steady state (V(ss)) estimated in preclinical species (rat and dog) when corrected for plasma protein binding, predicted human V(ss) successfully on the majority of occasions--73% of compounds within 2-fold. In this laboratory, absorption estimated from oral rat PK studies was lower than the observed human absorption for most drugs, even when solubility and permeability appeared not to be limiting. Preliminary data indicate absorption in the dog may be more representative of human for compounds absorbed via the transcellular pathway. Using predicted PK and MEC values estimated from in vitro potency assays there was a good correlation between predicted and observed dose

  14. Prediction of pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interaction potential using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling approach: A case study of caffeine and ciprofloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min-Ho; Shin, Seok-Ho; Byeon, Jin-Ju; Lee, Gwan-Ho; Yu, Byung-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) application has been extended significantly not only to predicting preclinical/human PK but also to evaluating the drug-drug interaction (DDI) liability at the drug discovery or development stage. Herein, we describe a case study to illustrate the use of PBPK approach in predicting human PK as well as DDI using in silico, in vivo and in vitro derived parameters. This case was composed of five steps such as: simulation, verification, understanding of parameter sensitivity, optimization of the parameter and final evaluation. Caffeine and ciprofloxacin were used as tool compounds to demonstrate the “fit for purpose” application of PBPK modeling and simulation for this study. Compared to caffeine, the PBPK modeling for ciprofloxacin was challenging due to several factors including solubility, permeability, clearance and tissue distribution etc. Therefore, intensive parameter sensitivity analysis (PSA) was conducted to optimize the PBPK model for ciprofloxacin. Overall, the increase in Cmax of caffeine by ciprofloxacin was not significant. However, the increase in AUC was observed and was proportional to the administered dose of ciprofloxacin. The predicted DDI and PK results were comparable to observed clinical data published in the literatures. This approach would be helpful in identifying potential key factors that could lead to significant impact on PBPK modeling and simulation for challenging compounds. PMID:28066147

  15. Development of a hybrid physiologically based pharmacokinetic model with drug-specific scaling factors in rat to improve prediction of human pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Sayama, Hiroyuki; Komura, Hiroshi; Kogayu, Motohiro; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2013-11-01

    Accurate prediction of pharmacokinetics (PK) in humans has been a vital part of drug discovery. The aims of this study are to verify the usefulness of scaling factors for clearance (CL) and apparent volume of distribution at the steady state (Vss ) estimated from the difference between observed and predicted PK profiles in rats for human PK prediction, and to develop a novel hybrid physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model with the two scaling factors. The human prediction accuracies for CL with in vitro-in vivo extrapolation and Vss with a tissue composition model were improved by using rat-scaling factors. This improvement was explainable by data that the scaling factors for CL and Vss in rats were correlated with those in humans. The predictability of plasma concentration-time profiles by the hybrid PBPK model incorporating two scaling factors was compared mainly with that by the conventional PBPK model. The hybrid PBPK model yielded higher prediction accuracy for plasma concentrations than the conventional method. Furthermore, we proposed a tiered approach using the three prediction methods, including the hybrid Dedrick approach, that were previously reported (Sayama H, Komura H, Kogayu M. 2013. Drug Metab Dispos 41:498-507), taking the available information in the individual stages of drug discovery and development into consideration.

  16. Prediction of steady-state volume of distribution of acidic drugs by quantitative structure-pharmacokinetics relationships.

    PubMed

    Zhivkova, Zvetanka; Doytchinova, Irini

    2012-03-01

    The volume of distribution (VD) is one of the most important pharmacokinetic parameters of drugs. The present study employs quantitative structure-pharmacokinetics relationships (QSPkR) to derive models for VD prediction of acidic drugs. The steady-state volume of distribution (VD(ss)) values of 132 acidic drugs were collected, the chemical structures were described by 178 molecular descriptors, and QSPkR models were derived after variable selection by genetic algorithm and stepwise regression. Models were validated by cross-validation procedures and external test set. According to the molecular descriptors selected as the most predictive for VD(ss), the presence of seven- and nine-member cycles, atom type P(5+), SH groups, and large nonionized substituents increase the VD(ss), whereas atom types S(2+) and S(4+) and polar ionized substituents decrease it. Cross-validation and external validation studies on the QSPkR models derived in the present study showed good predictive ability with mean fold error values ranging from 1.58 (cross-validation) to 2.25 (external validation). The model performance is comparable to more complicated methods requiring in vitro or in vivo experiments and superior to the existing QSPkR models concerning acidic drugs. Apart from the prediction of VD in human, present models are also useful as a curator of available pharmacokinetic databases. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Quantitative Prediction of Drug–Drug Interactions Involving Inhibitory Metabolites in Drug Development: How Can Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling Help?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Mao, J; Lin, J; Yu, H; Peters, S; Shebley, M

    2016-01-01

    This subteam under the Drug Metabolism Leadership Group (Innovation and Quality Consortium) investigated the quantitative role of circulating inhibitory metabolites in drug–drug interactions using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. Three drugs with major circulating inhibitory metabolites (amiodarone, gemfibrozil, and sertraline) were systematically evaluated in addition to the literature review of recent examples. The application of PBPK modeling in drug interactions by inhibitory parent–metabolite pairs is described and guidance on strategic application is provided. PMID:27642087

  18. Prediction of Pharmacokinetic Parameters Using a Genetic Algorithm Combined with an Artificial Neural Network for a Series of Alkaloid Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Zandkarimi, Majid; Shafiei, Mohammad; Hadizadeh, Farzin; Darbandi, Mohammad Ali; Tabrizian, Kaveh

    2014-01-01

    An important goal for drug development within the pharmaceutical industry is the application of simple methods to determine human pharmacokinetic parameters. Effective computing tools are able to increase scientists’ ability to make precise selections of chemical compounds in accordance with desired pharmacokinetic and safety profiles. This work presents a method for making predictions of the clearance, plasma protein binding, and volume of distribution for alkaloid drugs. The tools used in this method were genetic algorithms (GAs) combined with artificial neural networks (ANNs) and these were applied to select the most relevant molecular descriptors and to develop quantitative structure-pharmacokinetic relationship (QSPkR) models. Results showed that three-dimensional structural descriptors had more influence on QSPkR models. The models developed in this study were able to predict systemic clearance, volume of distribution, and plasma protein binding with normalized root mean square error (NRMSE) values of 0.151, 0.263, and 0.423, respectively. These results demonstrate an acceptable level of efficiency of the developed models for the prediction of pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:24634842

  19. Pharmacokinetics of antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Tokola, R A; Neuvonen, P J

    1983-01-01

    The rational use of antiepileptic drugs requires the consideration of their pharmacokinetics, which may be influenced by the physiological and pathological factors. Pharmacokinetic interactions between antiepileptic drugs may lead to considerable fluctuation in plasma drug concentration, and monotherapy is often preferable. The absorption of phenytoin depends on pharmaceutical formulation. Phenytoin is highly bound to plasma proteins, thus the changes in the unbound fraction are of clinical significance. The saturation kinetics of its metabolism and drug interactions have further consequences. Carbamazepine is well absorbed and largely metabolized. Due to the autoinduction its half-life shortens in chronic administration. Valproate is highly, but variably bound to plasma proteins. It is eliminated mainly by metabolism. Due to the long half-life of phenobarbital its plasma concentrations change slowly, and time to the steady-state may be up to 30 days, if no loading dose is given. Primidone is partly metabolized to phenobarbital, and at steady-state plasma concentration of phenobarbital often exceeds that of primidone. Diazepam, clonazepam and nitrazepam are largely bound to plasma proteins and extensively metabolized with the half-lives of 20 to 60 hours.

  20. Simulation and Prediction of the Drug‐Drug Interaction Potential of Naloxegol by Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Bui, K; Sostek, M; Al‐Huniti, N

    2016-01-01

    Naloxegol, a peripherally acting μ‐opioid receptor antagonist for the treatment of opioid‐induced constipation, is a substrate for cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4/3A5 and the P‐glycoprotein (P‐gp) transporter. By integrating in silico, preclinical, and clinical pharmacokinetic (PK) findings, minimal and full physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models were developed to predict the drug‐drug interaction (DDI) potential for naloxegol. The models reasonably predicted the observed changes in naloxegol exposure with ketoconazole (increase of 13.1‐fold predicted vs. 12.9‐fold observed), diltiazem (increase of 2.8‐fold predicted vs. 3.4‐fold observed), rifampin (reduction of 76% predicted vs. 89% observed), and quinidine (increase of 1.2‐fold predicted vs. 1.4‐fold observed). The moderate CYP3A4 inducer efavirenz was predicted to reduce naloxegol exposure by ∼50%, whereas weak CYP3A inhibitors were predicted to minimally affect exposure. In summary, the PBPK models reasonably estimated interactions with various CYP3A modulators and can be used to guide dosing in clinical practice when naloxegol is coadministered with such agents. PMID:27299937

  1. Prediction of human volume of distribution values for drugs using linear and nonlinear quantitative structure pharmacokinetic relationship models.

    PubMed

    Louis, Bruno; Agrawal, Vijay K

    2014-03-01

    In the present study the volume of distribution values in humans of 121 drugs was estimated using quantitative structure pharmacokinetic relationship analysis. The multiple linear regression (MLR) method and nonlinear artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machines (SVM) were employed for modeling. The theoretically calculated molecular descriptors were used for modeling and best set of descriptors selected by correlation based feature selection (CFS) method. The performance and predictive capability of linear method was investigated and compared with nonlinear method. The ANN gave better model with an average fold error of 1.66. The test set prediction accuracy shows human volume of distribution values could be predicted, on average, within 2-fold of the actual value.

  2. Prediction of changes in the clinical pharmacokinetics of basic drugs on the basis of octanol-water partition coefficients.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, J; Yokogawa, K; Nakashima, E; Ichimura, F

    1997-08-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for basic drugs has been established on the basis of octanol-water partition coefficients of the non-ionized, unbound drugs (Poct). The parameters for the physiological model in man were estimated from a regression equation obtained for the relationships between the Poct and the tissue-plasma partition coefficient, the hepatic intrinsic clearance (CLint,h) and the blood-to-plasma concentration ratio in rabbits. The plasma concentrations observed after intravenous administration of ten basic drugs (3.2 mg kg-1) to rabbits agreed with the levels predicted using the physiological model (r = 0.710-0.980). In man, the predicted plasma concentrations of basic drugs were in good agreement with reported values (r = 0.729-0.973), except for diazepam and pentazocine. Variations in plasma and brain-concentration profiles of clomipramine and nitrazepam in various disease states were simulated using the model. We assumed that the changes in unbound fraction of drug in serum (fp), CLint,h and the hepatic blood flow rate were from 0.25- to 4-fold that of the control and that fat volume changed by 0.2- to 5-fold. With regard to changes in fp, we predicted that the brain-plasma concentration ratio of clomipramine was 1.5- to 25-fold that of the control 24 h after intravenous administration, although the variations in the plasma concentration-time profiles were less marked. Plasma concentrations predicted for several basic drugs were in good agreement with reported values and this physiological model could be useful for predicting drug-disposition kinetics in man.

  3. Application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in predicting drug–drug interactions for sarpogrelate hydrochloride in humans

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jee Sun; Kim, Doyun; Park, Jung Bae; Heo, Hyunjin; Bae, Soo Hyeon; Seo, Jae Hong; Oh, Euichaul; Bae, Soo Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background Evaluating the potential risk of metabolic drug–drug interactions (DDIs) is clinically important. Objective To develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for sarpogrelate hydrochloride and its active metabolite, (R,S)-1-{2-[2-(3-methoxyphenyl)ethyl]-phenoxy}-3-(dimethylamino)-2-propanol (M-1), in order to predict DDIs between sarpogrelate and the clinically relevant cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 substrates, metoprolol, desipramine, dextromethorphan, imipramine, and tolterodine. Methods The PBPK model was developed, incorporating the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of sarpogrelate hydrochloride, and M-1 based on the findings from in vitro and in vivo studies. Subsequently, the model was verified by comparing the predicted concentration-time profiles and pharmacokinetic parameters of sarpogrelate and M-1 to the observed clinical data. Finally, the verified model was used to simulate clinical DDIs between sarpogrelate hydrochloride and sensitive CYP2D6 substrates. The predictive performance of the model was assessed by comparing predicted results to observed data after coadministering sarpogrelate hydrochloride and metoprolol. Results The developed PBPK model accurately predicted sarpogrelate and M-1 plasma concentration profiles after single or multiple doses of sarpogrelate hydrochloride. The simulated ratios of area under the curve and maximum plasma concentration of metoprolol in the presence of sarpogrelate hydrochloride to baseline were in good agreement with the observed ratios. The predicted fold-increases in the area under the curve ratios of metoprolol, desipramine, imipramine, dextromethorphan, and tolterodine following single and multiple sarpogrelate hydrochloride oral doses were within the range of ≥1.25, but <2-fold, indicating that sarpogrelate hydrochloride is a weak inhibitor of CYP2D6 in vivo. Collectively, the predicted low DDIs suggest that sarpogrelate hydrochloride has limited potential for causing

  4. A Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling Approach To Predict Drug-Drug Interactions of Sonidegib (LDE225) with Perpetrators of CYP3A in Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Einolf, Heidi J; Zhou, Jocelyn; Won, Christina; Wang, Lai; Rebello, Sam

    2017-04-01

    Sonidegib (Odomzo) is an orally available Smoothened inhibitor for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma. Sonidegib was found to be metabolized primarily by cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A in vitro. The effect of multiple doses of the strong CYP3A perpetrators, ketoconazole (KTZ) and rifampin (RIF), on sonidegib pharmacokinetics (PK) after a single 800 mg dose in healthy subjects was therefore assessed. These data were used to verify a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model developed to 1) bridge the clinical drug-drug interaction (DDI) study of sonidegib with KTZ and RIF in healthy subjects to the marketed dose (200 mg) in patients 2) predict acute (14 days) versus long-term dosing of the perpetrators with sonidegib at steady state and 3) predict the effect of moderate CYP3A perpetrators on sonidegib exposure in patients. Treatment of healthy subjects with KTZ resulted in an increased sonidegib exposure of 2.25- and 1.49-fold (area under the curve0-240h and maximal concentration respectively), and RIF decreased exposure by 72% and 54%, respectively. The model simulated the single- and/or multiple-dose PK of sonidegib (healthy subjects and patients) within ∼50% of observed values. The effect of KTZ and RIF on sonidegib in healthy subjects was also simulated well, and the predicted DDI in patients was slightly less and independent of sonidegib dose. At steady state, sonidegib was predicted to have a higher DDI magnitude with strong or moderate CYP3A perpetrators compared with a single dose. Different dosing regimens of sondigeb with the perpetrators were also simulated and provided guidance to the current dosing recommendations incorporated in the product label.

  5. Prediction of the extent and variation of grapefruit juice-drug interactions from the pharmacokinetic profile in the absence of grapefruit juice.

    PubMed

    Kogure, Natsuki; Akiyoshi, Takeshi; Imaoka, Ayuko; Ohtani, Hisakazu

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method for predicting the extent of grapefruit juice (GFJ)-drug interactions and their interindividual variations from the pharmacokinetic profile in the absence of GFJ. The pharmacokinetic profiles of 13 drugs after intravenous and oral administration were used to develop and validate the method. For each drug, the proportion absorbed into the intestine and the intestinal availability (Fg ) were calculated from clinical data taken from the literature. Then, the AUC ratio (the ratio of the AUC with GFJ to that without GFJ) was predicted by assuming that Fg was 1.0 when GFJ was concomitantly ingested. According to the developed method, the AUC ratio of felodipine was 2.50 and its coefficient of variation (CV) was 45%, which agreed well with the observed AUC ratio of 2.48 and CV of 51%. Although the developed method overestimated the AUC ratios of some drugs such as nisoldipine, no underestimation occurred. The predicted CV values were consistent with those observed. The developed method might be useful to predict the AUC ratio, along with its interindividual variation, from the pharmacokinetic profile in the absence of grapefruit juice. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Prediction of Clearance in Neonates and Infants (≤ 3 Months of Age) for Drugs That Are Glucuronidated: A Comparative Study Between Allometric Scaling and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Iftekhar; Ahmad, Tasneem; Mansoor, Najia; Sharib, S M

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the predictive performances of allometric models and a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model (PBPK) to predict clearance of glucuronidated drugs in neonates (≤ 3 months of age). From the literature, clearance values for 9 drugs (glucuronidated) for neonates and adults were obtained. Three allometric models were used to predict clearances of these glucuronidated drugs. A PBPK model was developed using the physicochemical, biopharmaceutical, and metabolic properties together with known pediatric physiology and enzymatic ontogeny. The model was first developed for adult subjects and then verified using external data and then applied to simulations in neonates. The predictive performances of allometric and PBPK models were evaluated by comparing the predicted values of clearance with the observed clearance values in the neonates. For 9 drugs, there were 13 age groups (preterm and term neonates) for which prediction error in mean clearance values within 0.5- to 1.5-fold was observed in 10 and 11 age groups by 2 allometric models and a PBPK model, respectively. The proposed allometric methods can predict mean clearances of glucuronidated drugs in preterm and term neonates (≤ 3 months of age) with reasonable accuracy (within 0.5- to 1.5-fold or 50% error) and are of practical value during neonatal drug development. The predicted mean clearance values of glucuronidated drugs in neonates ≤ 3 months of age by 2 allometric methods were comparable with the PBPK model. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of drugs in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Feghali, Maisa; Venkataramanan, Raman; Caritis, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is a complex state where changes in maternal physiology have evolved to favor the development and growth of the placenta and the fetus. These adaptations may affect preexisting disease or result in pregnancy-specific disorders. Similarly, variations in physiology may alter the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics that determines drug dosing and effect. It follows that detailed pharmacologic information is required to adjust therapeutic treatment strategies during pregnancy. Understanding both pregnancy physiology and the gestation-specific pharmacology of different agents is necessary to achieve effective treatment and limit maternal and fetal risk. Unfortunately, most drug studies have excluded pregnant women based on often-mistaken concerns regarding fetal risk. Furthermore, over two-thirds of women receive prescription drugs while pregnant, with treatment and dosing strategies based on data from healthy male volunteers and non-pregnant women, and with little adjustment for the complex physiology of pregnancy and its unique disease states. This review will describe basic concepts in pharmacokinetics and their clinical relevance and highlight the variations in pregnancy that may impact the pharmacokinetic properties of medications. PMID:26452316

  8. Optimization of drug-drug interaction study design: comparison of minimal physiologically based pharmacokinetic models on prediction of CYP3A inhibition by ketoconazole.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Mao, Jialin; Chien, Jenny Y; Hall, Stephen D

    2013-07-01

    Ketoconazole is a potent CYP3A inhibitor used to assess the contribution of CYP3A to drug clearance and quantify the increase in drug exposure due to a strong inhibitor. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have been used to evaluate treatment regimens resulting in maximal CYP3A inhibition by ketoconazole but have reached different conclusions. We compare two PBPK models of the ketoconazole-midazolam interaction, model 1 (Chien et al., 2006) and model 2 implemented in Simcyp (version 11), to predict 16 published treatment regimens. With use of model 2, 41% of the study point estimates of area under the curve (AUC) ratio and 71% of the 90% confidence intervals were predicted within 1.5-fold of the observed, but these increased to 82 and 100%, respectively, with model 1. For midazolam, model 2 predicted a maximal midazolam AUC ratio of 8 and a hepatic fraction metabolized by CYP3A (f(m)) of 0.97, whereas model 1 predicted 17 and 0.90, respectively, which are more consistent with observed data. On the basis of model 1, ketoconazole (400 mg QD) for at least 3 days and substrate administration within 2 hours is required for maximal CYP3A inhibition. Ketoconazole treatment regimens that use 200 mg BID underestimate the systemic fraction metabolized by CYP3A (0.86 versus 0.90) for midazolam. The systematic underprediction also applies to CYP3A substrates with high bioavailability and long half-lives. The superior predictive performance of model 1 reflects the need for accumulation of ketoconazole at enzyme site and protracted inhibition. Model 2 is not recommended for inferring optimal study design and estimation of fraction metabolized by CYP3A.

  9. Pharmacokinetic monitoring of antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Aldaz, A; Ferriols, R; Aumente, D; Calvo, M V; Farre, M R; García, B; Marqués, R; Mas, P; Porta, B; Outeda, M; Soy, D

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring plasma levels of antiepileptic drugs for the treatment and prophylaxis of epilepsy is one of the strategies enabling clinical results to improve by reducing adverse affects and increasing effectiveness. The objective of this article is to review the basic aspects in the monitoring of antiepileptic drugs using a consensus document prepared and endorsed by the pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics working group (PK.gen) of the Sociedad Española de Farmacia Hospitalaria (Spanish Society of Hospital Pharmacists). Copyright © 2010 SEFH. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. A proposal for a pharmacokinetic interaction significance classification system (PISCS) based on predicted drug exposure changes and its potential application to alert classifications in product labelling.

    PubMed

    Hisaka, Akihiro; Kusama, Makiko; Ohno, Yoshiyuki; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are one of the major causes of adverse events in pharmacotherapy, and systematic prediction of the clinical relevance of DDIs is an issue of significant clinical importance. In a previous study, total exposure changes of many substrate drugs of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 caused by coadministration of inhibitor drugs were successfully predicted by using in vivo information. In order to exploit these predictions in daily pharmacotherapy, the clinical significance of the pharmacokinetic changes needs to be carefully evaluated. The aim of the present study was to construct a pharmacokinetic interaction significance classification system (PISCS) in which the clinical significance of DDIs was considered with pharmacokinetic changes in a systematic manner. Furthermore, the classifications proposed by PISCS were compared in a detailed manner with current alert classifications in the product labelling or the summary of product characteristics used in Japan, the US and the UK. A matrix table was composed by stratifying two basic parameters of the prediction: the contribution ratio of CYP3A4 to the oral clearance of substrates (CR), and the inhibition ratio of inhibitors (IR). The total exposure increase was estimated for each cell in the table by associating CR and IR values, and the cells were categorized into nine zones according to the magnitude of the exposure increase. Then, correspondences between the DDI significance and the zones were determined for each drug group considering the observed exposure changes and the current classification in the product labelling. Substrate drugs of CYP3A4 selected from three therapeutic groups, i.e. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), calcium-channel antagonists/blockers (CCBs) and benzodiazepines (BZPs), were analysed as representative examples. The product labelling descriptions of drugs in Japan, US and UK were obtained from the websites of each regulatory body. Among 220

  11. Application of permeability-limited physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models: part II - prediction of P-glycoprotein mediated drug-drug interactions with digoxin.

    PubMed

    Neuhoff, Sibylle; Yeo, Karen Rowland; Barter, Zoe; Jamei, Masoud; Turner, David B; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2013-09-01

    Digoxin is the recommended substrate for assessment of P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in vivo. The overall aim of our study was to investigate the inhibitory potential of both verapamil and norverapamil on the P-gp-mediated efflux of digoxin in both gut and liver. Therefore, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for verapamil and its primary metabolite was developed and validated through the recovery of observed clinical plasma concentration data for both moieties and the reported interaction with midazolam, albeit a cytochrome P450 3A4-mediated DDI. The validated inhibitor model was then used in conjunction with the model developed previously for digoxin. The range of values obtained for the 10 trials indicated that increases in area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) profiles and maximum plasma concentration observed (Cmax ) values of digoxin following administration of verapamil were more comparable with in vivo observations, when P-gp inhibition by the metabolite, norverapamil, was considered as well. The predicted decrease in AUC and Cmax values of digoxin following administration of rifampicin because of P-gp induction was 1.57- (range: 1.42-1.77) and 1.62-fold (range: 1.53-1.70), which were reasonably consistent with observed values of 1.4- and 2.2-fold, respectively. This study demonstrates the application of permeability-limited models of absorption and distribution within a PBPK framework together with relevant in vitro data on transporters to assess the clinical impact of modulated P-gp-mediated efflux by drugs in development.

  12. Drug Transport and Pharmacokinetics for Chemical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Laurent; Kanneganti, Kumud; Kim, Kwang Seok

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in continuous-stirred vessels were proposed to introduce methods in pharmacokinetics and drug transport to chemical engineering students. The activities can be incorporated into the curriculum to illustrate fundamentals learned in the classroom. An appreciation for the role of pharmacokinetics in drug discovery will also be gained…

  13. Drug Transport and Pharmacokinetics for Chemical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Laurent; Kanneganti, Kumud; Kim, Kwang Seok

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in continuous-stirred vessels were proposed to introduce methods in pharmacokinetics and drug transport to chemical engineering students. The activities can be incorporated into the curriculum to illustrate fundamentals learned in the classroom. An appreciation for the role of pharmacokinetics in drug discovery will also be gained…

  14. A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Predict Disposition of CYP2D6 and CYP1A2 Metabolized Drugs in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Alice Ban; Nallani, Srikanth C.; Zhao, Ping; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Isoherranen, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Conducting pharmacokinetic (PK) studies in pregnant women is challenging. Therefore, we asked if a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model could be used to evaluate different dosing regimens for pregnant women. We refined and verified our previously published pregnancy PBPK model by incorporating cytochrome P450 CYP1A2 suppression (based on caffeine PK) and CYP2D6 induction (based on metoprolol PK) into the model. This model accounts for gestational age–dependent changes in maternal physiology and hepatic CYP3A activity. For verification, the disposition of CYP1A2–metabolized drug theophylline (THEO) and CYP2D6–metabolized drugs paroxetine (PAR), dextromethorphan (DEX), and clonidine (CLO) during pregnancy was predicted. Our PBPK model successfully predicted THEO disposition during the third trimester (T3). Predicted mean postpartum to third trimester (PP:T3) ratios of THEO area under the curve (AUC), maximum plasma concentration, and minimum plasma concentration were 0.76, 0.95, and 0.66 versus observed values 0.75, 0.89, and 0.72, respectively. The predicted mean PAR steady-state plasma concentration (Css) ratio (PP:T3) was 7.1 versus the observed value 3.7. Predicted mean DEX urinary ratio (UR) (PP:T3) was 2.9 versus the observed value 1.9. Predicted mean CLO AUC ratio (PP:T3) was 2.2 versus the observed value 1.7. Sensitivity analysis suggested that a 100% induction of CYP2D6 during T3 was required to recover the observed PP:T3 ratios of PAR Css, DEX UR, and CLO AUC. Based on these data, it is prudent to conclude that the magnitude of hepatic CYP2D6 induction during T3 ranges from 100 to 200%. Our PBPK model can predict the disposition of CYP1A2, 2D6, and 3A drugs during pregnancy. PMID:23355638

  15. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Predict Disease-Mediated Therapeutic Protein-Drug Interactions: Modulation of Multiple Cytochrome P450 Enzymes by Interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiling; Zhuang, Yanli; Xu, Zhenhua; Wang, Weirong; Zhou, Honghui

    2016-05-01

    Disease-mediated therapeutic protein-drug interactions have recently gained attention from regulatory agencies and pharmaceutical industries in the development of new biological products. In this study, we developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model using SimCYP to predict the impact of elevated interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels on cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and the treatment effect of an anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody, sirukumab, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A virtual RA patient population was first constructed by incorporating the impact of systemic IL-6 level on hepatic and intestinal expression of multiple CYP enzymes with information from in vitro studies. Then, a PBPK model for CYP enzyme substrates was developed for healthy adult subjects. After incorporating the virtual RA patient population, the PBPK model was applied to quantitatively predict pharmacokinetics of multiple CYP substrates in RA patients before and after sirukumab treatment from a clinical cocktail drug interaction study. The results suggested that, compared with observed clinical data, changes in systemic exposure to multiple CYP substrates by anti-IL-6 treatment in virtual RA patients have been reasonably captured by the PBPK model, as manifested by modulations in area under plasma concentration versus time curves for midazolam, omeprazole, S-warfarin, and caffeine. This PBPK model reasonably captured the modulation effect of IL-6 and sirukumab on activity of CYP3A, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP1A2 and holds the potential to be utilized to assess the modulation effect of sirukumab on the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of concomitant small-molecule drugs in RA patients.

  16. Evolution of Antibody-Drug Conjugate Tumor Disposition Model to Predict Preclinical Tumor Pharmacokinetics of Trastuzumab-Emtansine (T-DM1)

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Aman P.; Maass, Katie F.; Betts, Alison M.; Wittrup, K. Dane; Kulkarni, Chethana; King, Lindsay E.; Khot, Antari; Shah, Dhaval K.

    2017-01-01

    A mathematical model capable of accurately characterizing intracellular disposition of ADCs is essential for a priori predicting unconjugated drug concentrations inside the tumor. Towards this goal, the objectives of this manuscript were to: (1) evolve previously published cellular disposition model of ADC with more intracellular details to characterize the disposition of T-DM1 in different HER2 expressing cell lines, (2) integrate the improved cellular model with the ADC tumor disposition model to a priori predict DM1 concentrations in a preclinical tumor model, and (3) identify prominent pathways and sensitive parameters associated with intracellular activation of ADCs. The cellular disposition model was augmented by incorporating intracellular ADC degradation and passive diffusion of unconjugated drug across tumor cells. Different biomeasures and chemomeasures for T-DM1, quantified in the companion manuscript, were incorporated into the modified model of ADC to characterize in vitro pharmacokinetics of T-DM1 in three HER2+ cell lines. When the cellular model was integrated with the tumor disposition model, the model was able to a priori predict tumor DM1 concentrations in xenograft mice. Pathway analysis suggested different contribution of antigen-mediated and passive diffusion pathways for intracellular unconjugated drug exposure between in vitro and in vivo systems. Global and local sensitivity analyses revealed that non-specific deconjugation and passive diffusion of the drug across tumor cell membrane are key parameters for drug exposure inside a cell. Finally, a systems pharmacokinetic model for intracellular processing of ADCs has been proposed to highlight our current understanding about the determinants of ADC activation inside a cell. PMID:27029797

  17. Evolution of Antibody-Drug Conjugate Tumor Disposition Model to Predict Preclinical Tumor Pharmacokinetics of Trastuzumab-Emtansine (T-DM1).

    PubMed

    Singh, Aman P; Maass, Katie F; Betts, Alison M; Wittrup, K Dane; Kulkarni, Chethana; King, Lindsay E; Khot, Antari; Shah, Dhaval K

    2016-07-01

    A mathematical model capable of accurately characterizing intracellular disposition of ADCs is essential for a priori predicting unconjugated drug concentrations inside the tumor. Towards this goal, the objectives of this manuscript were to: (1) evolve previously published cellular disposition model of ADC with more intracellular details to characterize the disposition of T-DM1 in different HER2 expressing cell lines, (2) integrate the improved cellular model with the ADC tumor disposition model to a priori predict DM1 concentrations in a preclinical tumor model, and (3) identify prominent pathways and sensitive parameters associated with intracellular activation of ADCs. The cellular disposition model was augmented by incorporating intracellular ADC degradation and passive diffusion of unconjugated drug across tumor cells. Different biomeasures and chemomeasures for T-DM1, quantified in the companion manuscript, were incorporated into the modified model of ADC to characterize in vitro pharmacokinetics of T-DM1 in three HER2+ cell lines. When the cellular model was integrated with the tumor disposition model, the model was able to a priori predict tumor DM1 concentrations in xenograft mice. Pathway analysis suggested different contribution of antigen-mediated and passive diffusion pathways for intracellular unconjugated drug exposure between in vitro and in vivo systems. Global and local sensitivity analyses revealed that non-specific deconjugation and passive diffusion of the drug across tumor cell membrane are key parameters for drug exposure inside a cell. Finally, a systems pharmacokinetic model for intracellular processing of ADCs has been proposed to highlight our current understanding about the determinants of ADC activation inside a cell.

  18. Species differences in pharmacokinetics and drug teratogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nau, H.

    1986-12-01

    Interspecies differences in regard to the teratogenicity of drugs can be the result of differing pharmacokinetic processes that determine the crucial concentration-time relationships in the embryo. Maternal absorption, as well as distribution, of the drugs does not usually show great species differences. The first-pass effect after oral application is often more pronounced in animals than man (e.g., valproic acid, 13-cis-retinoic acid), although in some cases the reverse was found (e.g., hydrolysis of valpromide). Existing differences can be adjusted by appropriate choice of the administration route and measurements of drug levels. Many variables determine the placental transfer of drugs: developmental stage, type of placenta, properties of the drug. Even closely related drugs (e.g., retinoids) may differ greatly in regard to placental transfer. Maternal protein binding is an important determinant of placental transfer, since only the free concentration in maternal plasma can equilibrate with the embryo during organogenesis; this parameter differs greatly across species. Laboratory animals usually have a much higher rate of drug elimination than man. Drastic drug level fluctuations are therefore present during teratogenicity testing in animals, but not to do the same degree in human therapy. It must, therefore, be investigated if peak concentrations (such as for valproic acid and possibly caffeine) or the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) (such as for cyclophosphamide and possibly retinoids) correlate with the teratogenic response. Only then is a rational and scientific basis for interspecies comparison possible. It is concluded that the prediction of the human response based on animal studies can be improved by consideration of the appropriate pharmacokinetic determinants.

  19. Species differences in pharmacokinetics and drug teratogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Nau, H

    1986-01-01

    Interspecies differences in regard to the teratogenicity of drugs can be the result of differing pharmacokinetic processes that determine the crucial concentration-time relationships in the embryo. Maternal absorption, as well as distribution, of the drugs does not usually show great species differences. The first-pass effect after oral application is often more pronounced in animals than man (e.g., valproic acid, 13-cis-retinoic acid), although in some cases the reverse was found (e.g., hydrolysis of valpromide). Existing differences can be adjusted by appropriate choice of the administration route and measurements of drug levels. Many variables determine the placental transfer of drugs: developmental stage, type of placenta, properties of the drug. Even closely related drugs (e.g., retinoids) may differ greatly in regard to placental transfer. Maternal protein binding is an important determinant of placental transfer, since only the free concentration in maternal plasma can equilibrate with the embryo during organogenesis; this parameter differs greatly across species (e.g., valproic acid: five times higher free fractions in mouse and hamster than in monkey and man). The metabolic pattern has not yet been demonstrated to be a major cause of species differences, although recent evidence on phenytoin and thalidomide support the hypothesis that some species differences can be the result of differing activation/deactivation pathways. Laboratory animals usually have a much higher rate of drug elimination than man. Drastic drug level fluctuations are therefore present during teratogenicity testing in animals, but not to the same degree in human therapy. It must, therefore, be investigated if peak concentrations (such as for valproic acid and possibly caffeine) or the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) (such as for cyclophosphamide and possibly retinoids) correlate with the teratogenic response. Only then is a rational and scientific basis for interspecies

  20. Molecular Docking and Prediction of Pharmacokinetic Properties of Dual Mechanism Drugs that Block MAO-B and Adenosine A2A Receptors for the Treatment of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Faizul; Madi, Arwa M.; Ali, Hamed I.

    2012-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitory potential of adenosine A2A receptor (AA2AR) antagonists has raised the possibility of designing dual-target–directed drugs that may provide enhanced symptomatic relief and that may also slow the progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) by protecting against further neurodegeneration. To explain the dual inhibition of MAO-B and AA2AR at the molecular level, molecular docking technique was employed. Lamarckian genetic algorithm methodology was used for flexible ligand docking studies. A good correlation (R2= 0.524 and 0.627 for MAO-B and AA2AR, respectively) was established between docking predicted and experimental Ki values, which confirms that the molecular docking approach is reliable to study the mechanism of dual interaction of caffeinyl analogs with MAO-B and AA2AR. Parameters for Lipinski's “Rule-of-Five” were also calculated to estimate the pharmacokinetic properties of dual-target–directed drugs where both MAO-B inhibition and AA2AR antagonism exhibited a positive correlation with calculated LogP having a correlation coefficient R2 of 0.535 and 0.607, respectively. These results provide some beneficial clues in structural modification for designing new inhibitors as dual-target–directed drugs with desired pharmacokinetic properties for the treatment of PD. PMID:23112538

  1. Molecular Docking and Prediction of Pharmacokinetic Properties of Dual Mechanism Drugs that Block MAO-B and Adenosine A(2A) Receptors for the Treatment of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Azam, Faizul; Madi, Arwa M; Ali, Hamed I

    2012-07-01

    Monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitory potential of adenosine A(2A) receptor (AA(2A)R) antagonists has raised the possibility of designing dual-target-directed drugs that may provide enhanced symptomatic relief and that may also slow the progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) by protecting against further neurodegeneration. To explain the dual inhibition of MAO-B and AA(2A)R at the molecular level, molecular docking technique was employed. Lamarckian genetic algorithm methodology was used for flexible ligand docking studies. A good correlation (R(2)= 0.524 and 0.627 for MAO-B and AA(2A)R, respectively) was established between docking predicted and experimental K(i) values, which confirms that the molecular docking approach is reliable to study the mechanism of dual interaction of caffeinyl analogs with MAO-B and AA(2A)R. Parameters for Lipinski's "Rule-of-Five" were also calculated to estimate the pharmacokinetic properties of dual-target-directed drugs where both MAO-B inhibition and AA(2A)R antagonism exhibited a positive correlation with calculated LogP having a correlation coefficient R(2) of 0.535 and 0.607, respectively. These results provide some beneficial clues in structural modification for designing new inhibitors as dual-target-directed drugs with desired pharmacokinetic properties for the treatment of PD.

  2. Venlafaxine pharmacokinetics focused on drug metabolism and potential biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Paulo; Alves, Gilberto; Llerena, Adrián; Falcão, Amílcar

    2014-01-01

    Venlafaxine (VEN) is one of the safest and most effective drugs used in the treatment of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors-resistant depression, and thereby it is nowadays one of the most commonly prescribed antidepressants. Nevertheless, patients treated with antidepressant drugs including VEN have exhibited large inter-individual variability in drug outcomes, possibly due to the influence of genetic and nongenetic factors on the drug pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics. Among them, an increased interest has emerged over the last few years on the genetic and/or phenotypic profile for drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and drug transporters such as potential predictive pharmacokinetic-based biomarkers of the variability found in drug biodisposition and antidepressant response. The integration of some of these key therapeutic biomarkers with classic therapeutic drug monitoring constitutes a promising way to individualization of VEN's pharmacotherapy, offering to clinicians the ability to better predict and manage pharmacological treatments to maximize the drug effectiveness. Thus, this review provides an extensive discussion of the pharmacokinetics of VEN focusing in particular on metabolism issues, without forgetting the clinically relevant sources of pharmacokinetics variability (mainly the genetic sources) and aiming on the identification of phenotypic and/or genetic biomarkers for therapy optimization.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of Botanical Drugs and Plant Extracts.

    PubMed

    Paola Domínguez Moré, Gina; Cárdenas, Paola Andrea; Costa, Geison M; Simões, Cláudia M O; Aragón, Diana Marcela

    2017-05-09

    Botanical drugs contain plant extracts, which are complex mixtures of compounds. As with conventional drugs, it is necessary to validate their efficacy and safety through preclinical and clinical studies. However, pharmacokinetic studies for active constituents or characteristic markers in botanical drugs are rare. The objective of this review was to investigate the global state of the art in pharmacokinetic studies of active ingredients present in plant extracts and botanical drugs. A review of pharmacokinetics studies of chemical constituents of plant extracts and botanical drugs was performed, with a total of 135 studies published between January 2004 and February 2015 available in recognized scientific databases. Botanical preparations were mainly found in the form of aqueous extracts of roots and rhizomes. The most widely studied species was Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, and the compound most frequently used as a pharmacokinetic marker was berberine. Most studies were performed using the Sprague Dawley rat model, and the preparations were mainly administered orally in a single dose. Quantification of plasma concentrations of pharmacokinetic markers was performed mainly by liquid-liquid extraction, followed by high efficiency liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry detector. In conclusion, in recent years there has been increasing interest among researchers worldwide in the study of the pharmacokinetics of bioactive compounds in botanical drugs and plant extracts, especially those from the Traditional Chinese Medicine. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Drug Distribution to Human Tissues: Prediction and Examination of the Basic Assumption in In Vivo Pharmacokinetics-Pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) Research.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    The tissue:plasma partition coefficients (Kp ) are good indicators of the extent of tissue distribution. Therefore, advanced tissue composition-based models were used to predict the Kp values of drugs under in vivo conditions on the basis of in vitro and physiological input data. These models, however, focus on animal tissues and do not challenge the predictions with human tissues for drugs. The first objective of this study was to predict the experimentally determined Kp values of seven human tissues for 26 drugs. In all, 95% of the predicted Kp values are within 2.5-fold error of the observed values in humans. Accordingly, these results suggest that the tissue composition-based model used in this study is able to provide accurate estimates of drug partitioning in the studied human tissues. Furthermore, as the Kp equals to the ratio of total concentration between tissue and plasma, or the ratio of unbound fraction between plasma (fup ) and tissue (fut ), this parameter Kp would deviate from the unity. Therefore, the second objective was to examine the corresponding relationships between fup and fut values experimentally determined in humans for several drugs. The results also indicate that fup may significantly deviate to fut ; the discrepancies are governed by the dissimilarities in the binding and ionization on both sides of the membrane, which were captured by the tissue composition-based model. Hence, this violated the basic assumption in in vivo pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) research, since the free drug concentration in tissue and plasma was not equal particularly for the ionizable drugs due to the pH gradient effect on the fraction of unionized drug in plasma (fuip ) and tissue (fuit ) (i.e., fup × fuip × total plasma concentration = fut × fuit × total tissue concentration, and, hence, the free drug concentration in plasma and tissue differed by fuip/fuit). Therefore, this assumption should be adjusted for the ionized drugs, and, hence, a

  5. Pharmacokinetics of Drug Entry into Cochlear Fluids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salt, Alec N.

    2005-01-01

    The inner ear is exposed to aminoglycosides or other drugs either intentionally or as a side effect of clinical treatments directed at other regions of the body. An understanding of the effects of drugs on the inner ear requires knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of the drug once it reaches the cochlear fluids, specifically how much of it reaches…

  6. Pharmacokinetics of Drug Entry into Cochlear Fluids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salt, Alec N.

    2005-01-01

    The inner ear is exposed to aminoglycosides or other drugs either intentionally or as a side effect of clinical treatments directed at other regions of the body. An understanding of the effects of drugs on the inner ear requires knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of the drug once it reaches the cochlear fluids, specifically how much of it reaches…

  7. Alterations of chemotherapeutic pharmacokinetic profiles by drug–drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ghalib, Mohammed; Chaudhary, Imran; Goel, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Background Drug interactions in oncology are common place and largely ignored as we tolerate high thresholds of ‘toxic’ drug responses in these patients. However, in the era of ‘targeted’ or seemingly ‘less toxic’ therapy, these interactions are more commonly flagged and contribute significantly towards poor ‘quality of life’ and medical fatalities. Objective This review and opinion article focuses on alteration of chemotherapeutic pharmacokinetic profiles by drug interactions in the setting of polypharmacy. The assumption is that the drugs, with changes in their pharmacokinetics, will contribute towards changes in their pharmacodynamics. Methods The examples cited for such drug–drug interactions are culled from published literature with an emphasis on those interactions that have been well characterized at the molecular level. Results Although very few drug interaction studies have been performed on approved oncology based drugs, it is clear that drugs whose pharmacokinetics profiles are closely related to their pharmacodynamics will indeed result in clinically important drug interactions. Some newer mechanisms are described that involve interactions at the level of gene transcription, whereby, drug metabolism is significantly altered. However, for any given drug interaction, there does not seem to be a comprehensive model describing interactions. Conclusions Mechanisms based drug interactions are plentiful in oncology; however, there is an absolute lack of a comprehensive model that would predict drug–drug interactions. PMID:19239394

  8. Using physiologically-based pharmacokinetic-guided "body-on-a-chip" systems to predict mammalian response to drug and chemical exposure.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jong Hwan; Srinivasan, Balaji; Esch, Mandy Brigitte; McLamb, William T; Bernabini, Catia; Shuler, Michael L; Hickman, James J

    2014-09-01

    The continued development of in vitro systems that accurately emulate human response to drugs or chemical agents will impact drug development, our understanding of chemical toxicity, and enhance our ability to respond to threats from chemical or biological agents. A promising technology is to build microscale replicas of humans that capture essential elements of physiology, pharmacology, and/or toxicology (microphysiological systems). Here, we review progress on systems for microscale models of mammalian systems that include two or more integrated cellular components. These systems are described as a "body-on-a-chip", and utilize the concept of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling in the design. These microscale systems can also be used as model systems to predict whole-body responses to drugs as well as study the mechanism of action of drugs using PBPK analysis. In this review, we provide examples of various approaches to construct such systems with a focus on their physiological usefulness and various approaches to measure responses (e.g. chemical, electrical, or mechanical force and cellular viability and morphology). While the goal is to predict human response, other mammalian cell types can be utilized with the same principle to predict animal response. These systems will be evaluated on their potential to be physiologically accurate, to provide effective and efficient platform for analytics with accessibility to a wide range of users, for ease of incorporation of analytics, functional for weeks to months, and the ability to replicate previously observed human responses. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  9. Clinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in new drug development: the capecitabine experience.

    PubMed

    Blesch, Karen S; Gieschke, Ronald; Tsukamoto, Yuko; Reigner, Bruno G; Burger, Hans U; Steimer, Jean-Louis

    2003-05-01

    Preclinical studies, along with Phase I, II, and III clinical trials demonstrate the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety and efficacy of a new drug under well controlled circumstances in relatively homogeneous populations. However, these types of studies generally do not answer important questions about variability in specific factors that predict pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PKPD) activity, in turn affecting safety and efficacy. Semi-physiological and clinical PKPD modeling and simulation offer the possibility of utilizing data obtained in the laboratory and the clinic to make accurate characterizations and predictions of PKPD activity in the target population, based on variability in predictive factors. Capecitabine is an orally administered pro-drug of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), designed to exploit tissue-specific differences in metabolic enzyme activities in order to enhance efficacy and safety. It undergoes extensive metabolism in multiple physiologic compartments, and presents particular challenges for predicting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic activity in humans. Clinical and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and pharmacodynamic models were developed to characterize the activity of capecitabine and its metabolites, and the clinical consequences under varying physiological conditions such as creatinine clearance or activity of key metabolic enzymes. The results of the modeling investigations were consistent with capecitabine's rational design as a triple pro-drug of 5-FU. This paper reviews and discusses the PKPD and PBPK modeling approaches used in capecitabine development to provide a more thorough understanding of what the key predictors of its PBPK activity are, and how variability in these predictors may affect its PKPD, and ultimately, clinical outcomes.

  10. The influences of CYP2D6 genotypes and drug interactions on the pharmacokinetics of venlafaxine: exploring predictive biomarkers for treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fen; Kim, Hae-Deun; Na, Han-Sung; Lee, Seok-Yong; Seo, Doo-Won; Choi, Jong-Yeol; Ha, Ji-Hye; Shin, Hee-Jung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Chung, Myeon-Woo

    2015-06-01

    Two biomarkers: concentration ratio of O-desmethylvenlafaxine/venlafaxine and concentration sum of venlafaxine + O-desmethylvenlafaxine were adopted to indicate venlafaxine responses, but neither is validated. To evaluate the ability of two biomarkers in reflecting venlafaxine pharmacokinetic variations, and to further examine their relationship with venlafaxine treatment outcomes. Two well-defined influencing factors: CYP2D6 genotypes and drug interactions were enriched into a three-period crossover study to produce venlafaxine pharmacokinetic variations: In each period, healthy CYP2D6 extensive metabolizers (EM group; n = 12) and CYP2D6*10/*10 intermediate metabolizers (IM group; n = 12) were pretreated with clarithromycin (CYP3A4 inhibitor), or nothing (control), or clarithromycin + paroxetine (CYP3A4 + CYP2D6 inhibitors), before administration of a single-dose of 75 mg venlafaxine. Both biomarkers were evaluated (1) for their relationship with the influencing factors in healthy volunteers and (2) for their relationships with the venlafaxine responses/adverse events reported in two patient studies. Significant venlafaxine pharmacokinetic variations were observed between the EM and IM groups (geometric mean ratio [95 % CI] of area under the curve, 3.0 [1.8-5.1] in the control period), and between the control and clarithromycin + paroxetine periods (4.1 [3.5-4.7] and 2.0 [1.7-2.4] in the EM and IM group, respectively). O-Desmethylvenlafaxine/venlafaxine was superior to venlafaxine + O-desmethylvenlafaxine to reflect the influencing factors. In the patient studies, O-desmethylvenlafaxine/venlafaxine > 4 showed high precision in predicting venlafaxine responders/partial-responders (92 %) and patients without venlafaxine-related adverse events (88 %); the O-desmethylvenlafaxine/venlafaxine < 4 and venlafaxine + O-desmethylvenlafaxine > 400 ng/ml combination showed higher precision (100 %) than O

  11. Pharmacokinetics of biotech drugs: peptides, proteins and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiunn H

    2009-09-01

    With the advances in recombinant DNA biotechnology, molecular biology and immunology, the number of biotech drugs, including peptides, proteins and monoclonal antibodies, available for clinical use has dramatically increased in recent years. Although pharmacokinetic principles are equally applicable to the large molecule drugs and conventional small molecule drugs, the underlying mechanisms for the processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of large molecule drugs are often very different from that of small molecule drugs. Therefore, a good understanding of the ADME processes of large molecule drugs is essential in support of the development of therapeutic biologics. The purpose of this article is to review the current knowledge of the ADME processes that govern the pharmacokinetics of biotech drugs. The challenges encountered by orally administered peptide and protein drugs, and the nature of lymphatic absorption after subcutaneous administration will be discussed. In addition, molecular mechanisms of biodistribution, metabolism and renal excretion of biotech drugs will also be discussed. Finally, approaches used for prediction of human pharmacokinetics of protein drugs will be briefly discussed.

  12. Pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic-driven drug development.

    PubMed

    Gallo, James M

    2010-01-01

    The drug discovery and development enterprise, traditionally an industrial juggernaut, has spanned into the academic arena that is partially motivated by the National Institutes of Health Roadmap highlighting translational science and medicine. Because drug discovery and development represents a pipeline of basic to clinical investigations, it meshes well with the "bench to the bedside" prime directive of translational medicine. The renewed interest in drug discovery and development in academia provides an opportunity to rethink the hiearchary of studies with the hope of improving the staid approaches that have been criticized for lacking innovation. One area that has received limited attention concerns the use of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies in the drug-development process. Using anticancer drug development as a focus, this review will address past and current deficencies in how pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies are conducted and offer new strategies that might bridge the gap between preclinical and clinical trials. 2010 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  13. A method for estimating pharmacokinetic risks of concentration-dependent drug interactions from preclinical data.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, M

    1999-12-01

    This article evaluates a novel approach for estimating the pharmacokinetic risks associated with drug interactions in populations. Preclinical pharmacokinetic and metabolism data are analyzed with a stochastic differential equation-based pharmacokinetic model that recognizes that the risks associated with known drug interactions involve deterministic and stochastic components. Specifically, a Bernoulli jump-diffusion pharmacokinetic model that accounts for the pharmacokinetics, the variability inherent in the pharmacokinetics, and the idiosyncratic nature of the possibility of drug interactions is proposed. In addition, the variability inherent in the extent of drug interaction is explicitly accounted for. The approach provides useful mechanistic insights into the stochastic processes that "drive" drug interactions in populations because it yields analytical results. The validity of the model predictions was tested with experimental data from two previously investigated systems: N-1 and N-3 caffeine demethylation in populations with smokers and in the terfenadine-ketoconazole system.

  14. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-12-31

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug`s effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed.

  15. Prediction of human pharmacokinetics in 2013 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Houston, J Brian

    2013-12-01

    The utility of in vitro generated kinetic data to provide quantitative prediction of in vivo pharmacokinetic behavior is well established and forms a cornerstone of many research projects in drug metabolism and disposition, particularly within the pharmaceutical industry. This issue provides several excellent examples of the use of in vitro techniques for prediction of human pharmacokinetics (PK). The general area of in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) is broad and hence the spectrum of topics covers various aspects drug clearance and distribution and drug-drug interactions. Some articles were commissioned whereas others were identified during the reviewing process. Overall they provide a snapshot of activity at the end of 2013. They document that whereas the translation of some in vitro approaches is now established, other areas are in their infancy and need more development.

  16. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug's effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed.

  17. Confirming model-predicted pharmacokinetic interactions between bedaquiline and lopinavir/ritonavir or nevirapine in patients with HIV and drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Brill, Margreke J E; Svensson, Elin M; Pandie, Mishal; Maartens, Gary; Karlsson, Mats O

    2017-02-01

    Bedaquiline and its metabolite M2 are metabolised by CYP3A4. The antiretrovirals ritonavir-boosted lopinavir (LPV/r) and nevirapine inhibit and induce CYP3A4, respectively. Here we aimed to quantify nevirapine and LPV/r drug-drug interaction effects on bedaquiline and M2 in patients co-infected with HIV and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) using population pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis and compare these with model-based predictions from single-dose studies in subjects without TB. An observational PK study was performed in three groups of MDR-TB patients during bedaquiline maintenance dosing: HIV-seronegative patients (n = 17); and HIV-infected patients using antiretroviral therapy including nevirapine (n = 17) or LPV/r (n = 14). Bedaquiline and M2 samples were collected over 48 h post-dose. A previously developed PK model of MDR-TB patients was used as prior information to inform parameter estimation using NONMEM. The model was able to describe bedaquiline and M2 concentrations well, with estimates close to their priors and earlier model-based interaction effects from single-dose studies. Nevirapine changed bedaquiline clearance to 82% (95% CI 67-99%) and M2 clearance to 119% (92-156%) of their original values, indicating no clinically significant interaction. LPV/r substantially reduced bedaquiline clearance to 25% (17-35%) and M2 clearance to 59% (44-69%) of original values. This work confirms earlier model-based predictions of nevirapine and LPV/r interaction effects on bedaquiline and M2 clearance from subjects without TB in single-dose studies, in MDR-TB/HIV co-infected patients studied here. To normalise bedaquiline exposure in patients with concomitant LPV/r therapy, an adjusted bedaquiline dosing regimen is proposed for further study.

  18. The Use of In Vitro Data and Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling to Predict Drug Metabolite Exposure: Desipramine Exposure in Cytochrome P4502D6 Extensive and Poor Metabolizers Following Administration of Imipramine.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoa Q; Callegari, Ernesto; Obach, R Scott

    2016-10-01

    Major circulating drug metabolites can be as important as the drugs themselves in efficacy and safety, so establishing methods whereby exposure to major metabolites following administration of parent drug can be predicted is important. In this study, imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant, and its major metabolite desipramine were selected as a model system to develop metabolite prediction methods. Imipramine undergoes N-demethylation to form the active metabolite desipramine, and both imipramine and desipramine are converted to hydroxylated metabolites by the polymorphic enzyme CYP2D6. The objective of the present study is to determine whether the human pharmacokinetics of desipramine following dosing of imipramine can be predicted using static and dynamic physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models from in vitro input data for CYP2D6 extensive metabolizer (EM) and poor metabolizer (PM) populations. The intrinsic metabolic clearances of parent drug and metabolite were estimated using human liver microsomes (CYP2D6 PM and EM) and hepatocytes. Passive diffusion clearance of desipramine, used in the estimation of availability of the metabolite, was predicted from passive permeability and hepatocyte surface area. The predicted area under the curve (AUCm/AUCp) of desipramine/imipramine was 12- to 20-fold higher in PM compared with EM subjects following i.v. or oral doses of imipramine using the static model. Moreover, the PBPK model was able to recover simultaneously plasma profiles of imipramine and desipramine in populations with different phenotypes of CYP2D6. This example suggested that mechanistic PBPK modeling combined with information obtained from in vitro studies can provide quantitative solutions to predict in vivo pharmacokinetics of drugs and major metabolites in a target human population.

  19. Prediction of time-dependent CYP3A4 drug-drug interactions by physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling: impact of inactivation parameters and enzyme turnover.

    PubMed

    Rowland Yeo, K; Walsky, R L; Jamei, M; Rostami-Hodjegan, A; Tucker, G T

    2011-06-14

    Predicting the magnitude of time-dependent metabolic drug-drug (mDDIs) interactions involving cytochrome P-450 3A4 (CYP3A4) from in vitro data requires accurate knowledge of the inactivation parameters of the inhibitor (K(I), k(inact)) and of the turnover of the enzyme (k(deg)) in both the gut and the liver. We have predicted the magnitude of mDDIs observed in 29 in vivo studies involving six CYP3A4 probe substrates and five mechanism based inhibitors of CYP3A4 of variable potency (azithromycin, clarithromycin, diltiazem, erythromycin and verapamil). Inactivation parameters determined anew in a single laboratory under standardised conditions together with data from substrate and inhibitor files within the Simcyp Simulator (Version 9.3) were used to determine a value of the hepatic k(deg) (0.0193 or 0.0077h(-1)) most appropriate for the prediction of mDDIs involving time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4. The higher value resulted in decreased bias (geometric mean fold error - 1.05 versus 1.30) and increased precision (root mean squared error - 1.29 versus 2.30) of predictions of mean ratios of AUC in the absence and presence of inhibitor. Depending on the k(deg) value used (0.0193 versus 0.0077h(-1)), predicted mean ratios of AUC were within 2-fold of the observed values for all (100%) and 27 (93%) of the 29 studies, respectively and within 1.5-fold for 24 (83%) and 17 (59%) of the 29 studies, respectively. Comprehensive PBPK models were applied for accurate assessment of the potential for mDDIs involving time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4 using a hepatic k(deg) value of 0.0193h(-1) in conjunction with inactivation parameters determined by the conventional experimental approach.

  20. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic-Driven Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, James M.

    2010-01-01

    The drug discovery and development enterprise, traditionally an industrial juggernaut, has spanned into the academic arena that is partially motivated by the National Institutes of Health Roadmap highlighting translational science and medicine. Since drug discovery and development represents a pipeline of basic to clinical investigations it meshes well with the prime “bench to the bedside” directive of translational medicine. The renewed interest in drug discovery and develpoment in academia provides an opportunity to rethink the hiearchary of studies with the hope to improve the staid approaches that have been critizied for lacking innovation. One area that has received limited attention concerns the use of pharmacokinetic [PK] and pharmacodynamic [PD] studies in the drug development process. Using anticancer drug development as a focus, this review will address past and current deficencies in how PK/PD studies are conducted and offer new strategies that might bridge the gap between preclinical and clinical trials. PMID:20687184

  1. Pharmacokinetic Drug Interactions with Panax ginseng.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Meenakshi R; Penzak, Scott R

    2017-08-01

    Panax ginseng is widely used as an adaptogen throughout the world. The major active constituents of P. ginseng are ginsenosides. Most naturally occurring ginsenosides are deglycosylated by colonic bacteria to intestinal metabolites. Ginsenosides along with these metabolites are widely accepted as being responsible for the pharmacologic activity and drug interaction potential of ginseng. Numerous preclinical studies have assessed the influence of various ginseng components on cytochrome P450 (CYP), glucuronidation, and drug transport activity. Results from these investigations have been largely inconclusive due to the use of different ginseng products and variations in methodology between studies. Drug interaction studies in humans have been conflicting and have largely yielded negative results or results that suggest only a weak interaction. One study using a midazolam probe found weak CYP3A induction and another using a fexofenadine probe found weak P-gp inhibition. Despite several case reports indicating a drug interaction between warfarin and P. ginseng, pharmacokinetic studies involving these agents in combination have failed to find significant pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interactions. To this end, drug interactions involving P. ginseng appear to be rare; however, close clinical monitoring is still suggested for patients taking warfarin or CYP3A or P-gp substrates with narrow therapeutic indices.

  2. [Pharmacokinetic interactions of telaprevir with other drugs].

    PubMed

    Berenguer Berenguer, Juan; González-García, Juan

    2013-07-01

    Telaprevir is a new direct-acting antiviral drug for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and is both a substrate and an inhibitor of cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoenzymes. With the introduction of this new drug, assessment of drug-drug interactions has become a key factor in the evaluation of patients under treatment for HCV infection. During the treatment of this infection, many patients require other drugs to mitigate the adverse effects of anti-HCV drugs and to control other comorbidities. Moreover, most patients coinfected with HIV and HCV require antiretroviral therapy during treatment for HCV. Physicians should therefore be familiar with the pharmacokinetic properties of direct-acting antivirals for HCV treatment and their potential drug-drug interactions. The present article reviews the available information to date on the interactions of telaprevir with other drugs and provides recommendations for daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Individual and population pharmacokinetic compartment analysis: a graphic procedure for quantification of predictive performance.

    PubMed

    Eksborg, Staffan

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic studies are important for optimizing of drug dosing, but requires proper validation of the used pharmacokinetic procedures. However, simple and reliable statistical methods suitable for evaluation of the predictive performance of pharmacokinetic analysis are essentially lacking. The aim of the present study was to construct and evaluate a graphic procedure for quantification of predictive performance of individual and population pharmacokinetic compartment analysis. Original data from previously published pharmacokinetic compartment analyses after intravenous, oral, and epidural administration, and digitized data, obtained from published scatter plots of observed vs predicted drug concentrations from population pharmacokinetic studies using the NPEM algorithm and NONMEM computer program and Bayesian forecasting procedures, were used for estimating the predictive performance according to the proposed graphical method and by the method of Sheiner and Beal. The graphical plot proposed in the present paper proved to be a useful tool for evaluation of predictive performance of both individual and population compartment pharmacokinetic analysis. The proposed method is simple to use and gives valuable information concerning time- and concentration-dependent inaccuracies that might occur in individual and population pharmacokinetic compartment analysis. Predictive performance can be quantified by the fraction of concentration ratios within arbitrarily specified ranges, e.g. within the range 0.8-1.2.

  4. Insights into drug discovery from natural medicines using reverse pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Hao, Haiping; Zheng, Xiao; Wang, Guangji

    2014-04-01

    Natural medicines (NMs) are indispensable sources for the development of modern drugs. However, the targets for most natural compounds are unknown and the current pharmacokinetic evaluation systems developed for target-defined drugs may not be directly applicable to NM-based drug discovery, which is a major hindrance in bringing natural compounds to the clinic. Here, we propose the concept of 'reverse pharmacokinetics' and discuss how a 'reverse pharmacokinetics' perspective could help clarify key questions in modern drug discovery from NMs with validated clinical benefits, thereby strengthening the translational potential. Reverse pharmacokinetics can provide physiologically relevant clues to the target identification and mechanistic study of NMs, which may also innovate drug discovery for complex diseases. We anticipate that an evolving deep understanding of the novel mode of action of natural compounds with a reverse pharmacokinetic insight may improve discovery of both single ingredient and multiple-component modern drugs from NMs.

  5. Semi-mechanistic physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling of clinical glibenclamide pharmacokinetics and drug-drug-interactions.

    PubMed

    Greupink, Rick; Schreurs, Marieke; Benne, Marina S; Huisman, Maarten T; Russel, Frans G M

    2013-08-16

    We studied if the clinical pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) of the sulfonylurea-derivative glibenclamide can be simulated via a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling approach. To this end, a glibenclamide PBPK-model was build in Simcyp using in vitro physicochemical and biotransformation data of the drug, and was subsequently optimized using plasma disappearance data observed after i.v. administration. The model was validated against data observed after glibenclamide oral dosing, including DDIs. We found that glibenclamide pharmacokinetics could be adequately modeled if next to CYP metabolism an active hepatic uptake process was assumed. This hepatic uptake process was subsequently included in the model in a non-mechanistic manner. After an oral dose of 0.875 mg predicted Cmax and AUC were 39.7 (95% CI:37.0-42.7)ng/mL and 108 (95% CI: 96.9-120)ng/mLh, respectively, which is in line with observed values of 43.6 (95% CI: 37.7-49.5)ng/mL and 133 (95% CI: 107-159)ng/mLh. For a 1.75 mg oral dose, the predicted and observed values were 82.5 (95% CI:76.6-88.9)ng/mL vs 91.1 (95% CI: 67.9-115.9) for Cmax and 224 (95% CI: 202-248) vs 324 (95% CI: 197-451)ng/mLh for AUC, respectively. The model correctly predicted a decrease in exposure after rifampicin pre-treatment. An increase in glibenclamide exposure after clarithromycin co-treatment was predicted, but the magnitude of the effect was underestimated because part of this DDI is the result of an interaction at the transporter level. Finally, the effects of glibenclamide and fluconazol co-administration were simulated. Our simulations indicated that co-administration of this potent CYP450 inhibitor will profoundly increase glibenclamide exposure, which is in line with clinical observations linking the glibenclamide-fluconazol combination to an increased risk of hypoglycemia. In conclusion, glibenclamide pharmacokinetics and its CYP-mediated DDIs can be simulated via PBPK-modeling. In addition, our

  6. Use of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to simulate drug-drug interactions between antineoplastic and antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Moltó, José; Rajoli, Rajith; Back, David; Valle, Marta; Miranda, Cristina; Owen, Andrew; Clotet, Bonaventura; Siccardi, Marco

    2017-03-01

    Co-administration of antineoplastics with ART is challenging due to potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs). However, trials specifically assessing such DDIs are lacking. Our objective was to simulate DDIs between the antineoplastics erlotinib and gefitinib with key antiretroviral drugs and to predict dose adjustments using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. In vitro data describing chemical properties and pharmacokinetic processes of each drug and their effect on cytochrome P450 isoforms were obtained from the literature. Plasma drug-concentration profiles were simulated in a virtual population of 50 individuals receiving erlotinib or gefitinib alone or with darunavir/ritonavir, efavirenz or etravirine. Simulated pharmacokinetic parameters and the magnitude of DDIs with probe drugs (midazolam, maraviroc) were compared with literature values. Erlotinib and gefitinib pharmacokinetics with and without antiretrovirals were compared and dose-adjustment strategies were evaluated. Simulated parameters of each drug and the magnitude of DDIs with probe drugs were in agreement with reference values. Darunavir/ritonavir increased erlotinib and gefitinib exposure, while efavirenz and etravirine decreased erlotinib and gefitinib concentrations. Based on our predictions, dose-adjustment strategies may consist of once-daily dosing erlotinib at 25 mg and gefitinib at 125 mg with darunavir/ritonavir; or erlotinib at 200 mg and gefitinib at 375 mg with etravirine. The interaction with efavirenz was not overcome even after doubling erlotinib or gefitinib doses. PBPK models predicted the in vivo pharmacokinetics of erlotinib, gefitinib and the antiretrovirals darunavir/ritonavir, efavirenz and etravirine, and the DDIs between them. The simulated dose-adjustments may represent valuable strategies to optimize antineoplastic therapy in HIV-infected patients.

  7. Modeling of Corneal and Retinal Pharmacokinetics after Periocular Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    Amrite, Aniruddha C.; Edelhauser, Henry F.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop pharmacokinetics models to describe the disposition of small lipophilic molecules in the cornea and retina after periocular (subconjunctival or posterior subconjunctival) administration. Methods Compartmental pharmacokinetics analysis was performed on the corneal and retinal data obtained after periocular administration of 3 mg of celecoxib (a selective COX-2 inhibitor) to Brown Norway (BN) rats. Berkeley Madonna, a differential and difference equation–based modeling software, was used for the pharmacokinetics modeling. The data were fit to different compartment models with first-order input and disposition, and the best fit was selected on the basis of coefficient of regression and Akaike information criteria (AIC). The models were validated by using the celecoxib data from a prior study in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The corneal model was also fit to the corneal data for prednisolone at a dose of 2.61 mg in albino rabbits, and the model was validated at two other doses of prednisolone (0.261 and 26.1 mg) in these rabbits. Model simulations were performed with the finalized model to understand the effect of formulation on corneal and retinal pharmacokinetics after periocular administration. Results Celecoxib kinetics in the BN rat cornea can be described by a two-compartment (periocular space and cornea, with a dissolution step for periocular formulation) model, with parallel elimination from the cornea and the periocular space. The inclusion of a distribution compartment or a dissolution step for celecoxib suspension did not lead to an overall improvement in the corneal data fit compared with the two-compartment model. The more important parameter for enhanced fit and explaining the apparent lack of an increase phase in the corneal levels is the inclusion of the initial leak-back of the dose from the periocular space into the precorneal area. The predicted celecoxib concentrations from this model also showed very good correlation (r = 0

  8. Persistent pharmacokinetic challenges to pediatric drug development.

    PubMed

    Sage, Daniel P; Kulczar, Christopher; Roth, Wyatt; Liu, Wanqing; Knipp, Gregory T

    2014-01-01

    The development of new therapeutic agents for the mitigation of pediatric disorders is largely hindered by the inability for investigators to assess pediatric pharmacokinetics (PK) in healthy patients due to substantial safety concerns. Pediatric patients are a clinical moving target for drug delivery due to changes in absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) and the potential for PK related toxicological (T) events to occur throughout development. These changes in ADMET can have profound effects on drug delivery, and may lead to toxic or sub-therapeutic outcomes. Ethical, economical, logistical, and technical barriers have resulted in insufficient investigation of these changes by industrial, regulatory, and academic bodies, leading to the classification of pediatric patients as therapeutic orphans. In response to these concerns, regulatory agencies have incentivized investigation into these ontogenic changes and their effects on drug delivery in pediatric populations. The intent of this review is to briefly present a synopsis of the development changes that occur in pediatric patients, discuss the effects of these changes on ADME and drug delivery strategies, highlight the hurdles that are still being faced, and present some opportunities to overcome these challenges.

  9. Persistent pharmacokinetic challenges to pediatric drug development

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Daniel P.; Kulczar, Christopher; Roth, Wyatt; Liu, Wanqing; Knipp, Gregory T.

    2014-01-01

    The development of new therapeutic agents for the mitigation of pediatric disorders is largely hindered by the inability for investigators to assess pediatric pharmacokinetics (PK) in healthy patients due to substantial safety concerns. Pediatric patients are a clinical moving target for drug delivery due to changes in absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) and the potential for PK related toxicological (T) events to occur throughout development. These changes in ADMET can have profound effects on drug delivery, and may lead to toxic or sub-therapeutic outcomes. Ethical, economical, logistical, and technical barriers have resulted in insufficient investigation of these changes by industrial, regulatory, and academic bodies, leading to the classification of pediatric patients as therapeutic orphans. In response to these concerns, regulatory agencies have incentivized investigation into these ontogenic changes and their effects on drug delivery in pediatric populations. The intent of this review is to briefly present a synopsis of the development changes that occur in pediatric patients, discuss the effects of these changes on ADME and drug delivery strategies, highlight the hurdles that are still being faced, and present some opportunities to overcome these challenges. PMID:25221567

  10. Characterization of preclinical in vitro and in vivo ADME properties and prediction of human PK using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for YQA-14, a new dopamine D3 receptor antagonist candidate for treatment of drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Zhuang, Xiaomei; Yang, Cuiping; Li, Zheng; Xiong, Shan; Zhang, Zhiwei; Li, Jin; Lu, Chuang; Zhang, Zhenqing

    2014-07-01

    YQA-14 is a novel and selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonist, with potential for the treatment of drug addiction. However, earlier compounds in its structural class tend to have poor oral bioavailability. The objectives of this study were to characterize the preclinical absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) properties and pharmacokinetics (PK) of YQA-14, then to simulate the clinical PK of YQA-14 using a physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) model to assess the likelihood of developing YQA-14 as a clinical candidate. For human PK prediction, PBPK models were first built in preclinical species, rats and dogs, for validation purposes. The model was then modified by input of human in vitro ADME data obtained from in vitro studies. The study data showed that YQA-14 is a basic lipophilic compound, with rapid absorption (Tmax ~ 1 h) in both rats and dogs. Liver microsomal clearances and in vivo clearances were moderate in rats and dogs consistent with the moderate bioavailability observed in both species. The PBPK models built for rats and dogs simulated the observed PK data well in both species. The PBPK model refined with human data predicted that YQA-14 would have a clearance of 8.0 ml/min/kg, a volume distribution of 1.7 l/kg and a bioavailability of 16.9%. These acceptable PK properties make YQA-14 an improved candidate for further research and development as a potential dopamine D3R antagonism for the treatment of drug addiction in the clinic.

  11. Physiology-based simulations of a pathological condition: prediction of pharmacokinetics in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Edginton, Andrea N; Willmann, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a progressive disease characterized by loss of functional hepatocytes with concomitant connective tissue and nodule formation in the liver. The morphological and physiological changes associated with the disease substantially affect drug pharmacokinetics. Whole-body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (WB-PBPK) modelling is a predictive technique that quantitatively relates the pharmacokinetic parameters of a drug to such (patho-)physiological conditions. To extend an existing WB-PBPK model, based on the physiological changes associated with liver cirrhosis, which allows for prediction of drug pharmacokinetics in patients with liver cirrhosis. The literature was searched for quantitative measures of the physiological changes associated with the presence of Child-Pugh class A through C liver cirrhosis. The parameters that were included were the organ blood flows, cardiac index, plasma binding protein concentrations, haematocrit, functional liver volume, hepatic enzymatic activity and glomerular filtration rate. Predictions of pharmacokinetic profiles and parameters were compared with literature data for the model compounds alfentanil, lidocaine (lignocaine), theophylline and levetiracetam. The predicted versus observed plasma concentration-time profiles for alfentanil and lidocaine were similar, such that the pharmacokinetic changes associated with Child-Pugh class A, B and C liver cirrhosis were adequately described. The theophylline elimination half-life was greatly increased in Child-Pugh class B and C patients compared with controls, as predicted by the model. Levetiracetam urinary excretion was consistently reduced with disease progression and very closely resembled observed values. Consideration of the physiological differences between healthy individuals and patients with liver cirrhosis was important for the simulation of drug pharmacokinetics in this compromised group. The WB-PBPK model was altered to incorporate these physiological

  12. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions involving Ginkgo biloba.

    PubMed

    Unger, Matthias

    2013-08-01

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extracts (GLEs) are popular herbal remedies for the treatment of Alzheimer's dementia, tinnitus, vertigo and peripheral arterial disease. As GLEs are taken regularly by older people who are likely to also use multiple other drugs for the treatment of, e.g. hypertension, diabetes, rheumatism or heart failure, potential herb-drug interactions are of interest. Preclinical studies of high doses/concentrations of GLEs of varying quality and standardization hinted at both an inhibition and induction of metabolic enzymes and transporters. However, in humans, positive in vitro-findings could not be replicated in vivo. At maximum recommended doses of 240 mg/day, a clinically relevant interaction potential of the standardized GLE EGb 761 could not be shown. GLE doses higher than the recommended ones led to a weak induction of the CYP2C19-mediated omeprazole 5-hydroxylation, and a weak inhibition of the CYP3A4-mediated midazolam 1'-hydroxylation, respectively. Also, the regular intake of a poorly characterized GLE at a dose of 360 mg/day slightly increased the bioavailability of talinolol, a substrate of P-glycoprotein and various organic anion-transporting polypeptides. Thus, regarding pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions, the intake of the standardized GLE, EGb 761, together with synthetic drugs appears to be safe as long as daily doses up to 240 mg are consumed. If this applies to other extracts prepared according to the European Pharmacopoeia remains uncertain. Also, a relevant potential for drug interactions cannot be excluded for poorly standardized GLEs used in many food supplements.

  13. PK/DB: database for pharmacokinetic properties and predictive in silico ADME models.

    PubMed

    Moda, Tiago L; Torres, Leonardo G; Carrara, Alexandre E; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2008-10-01

    The study of pharmacokinetic properties (PK) is of great importance in drug discovery and development. In the present work, PK/DB (a new freely available database for PK) was designed with the aim of creating robust databases for pharmacokinetic studies and in silico absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) prediction. Comprehensive, web-based and easy to access, PK/DB manages 1203 compounds which represent 2973 pharmacokinetic measurements, including five models for in silico ADME prediction (human intestinal absorption, human oral bioavailability, plasma protein binding, blood-brain barrier and water solubility). http://www.pkdb.ifsc.usp.br

  14. Pharmacokinetic properties and in silico ADME modeling in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Honório, Kathia M; Moda, Tiago L; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2013-03-01

    The discovery and development of a new drug are time-consuming, difficult and expensive. This complex process has evolved from classical methods into an integration of modern technologies and innovative strategies addressed to the design of new chemical entities to treat a variety of diseases. The development of new drug candidates is often limited by initial compounds lacking reasonable chemical and biological properties for further lead optimization. Huge libraries of compounds are frequently selected for biological screening using a variety of techniques and standard models to assess potency, affinity and selectivity. In this context, it is very important to study the pharmacokinetic profile of the compounds under investigation. Recent advances have been made in the collection of data and the development of models to assess and predict pharmacokinetic properties (ADME--absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) of bioactive compounds in the early stages of drug discovery projects. This paper provides a brief perspective on the evolution of in silico ADME tools, addressing challenges, limitations, and opportunities in medicinal chemistry.

  15. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of disposition and drug-drug interactions for atorvastatin and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao

    2015-09-18

    Atorvastatin is the most commonly used of all statins to lower cholesterol. Atorvastatin is extensively metabolized in both gut and liver to produce several active metabolites. The purpose of the present study is to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for atorvastatin and its two primary metabolites, 2-hydroxy-atorvastatin acid and atorvastatin lactone, using in vitro and in vivo data. The model was used to predict the pharmacokinetic profiles and drug-drug interaction (DDI) effect for atorvastatin and its metabolites in different DDI scenarios. The predictive performance of the model was assessed by comparing predicted results to observed data after coadministration of atorvastatin with different medications such as itraconazole, clarithromycin, cimetidine, rifampin and phenytoin. This population based PBPK model was able to describe the concentration-time profiles of atorvastatin and its two metabolites reasonably well in the absence or presence of those drugs at different dose regimens. The predicted maximum concentration (Cmax), area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) values and between-phase ratios were in good agreement with clinically observed data. The model has also revealed the importance of different metabolic pathways on the disposition of atorvastatin metabolites. This PBPK model can be utilized to assess the safety and efficacy of atorvastatin in the clinic. This study demonstrated the feasibility of applying PBPK approach to predict the DDI potential of drugs undergoing complex metabolism.

  16. Preclinical pharmacokinetics: an approach towards safer and efficacious drugs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sonu Sundd

    2006-02-01

    developed as drugs with better efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics profile; cannot be denied. Therefore, instead of considering metabolic instability a liability it can be exploited as a tool for discovering better drugs. It is equally important to identify the metabolic pathways of the drug candidates by conducting in-vitro CYP450 reaction phenotyping assays. The identification of drug metabolizing enzymes involved in the major metabolic pathways of a compound helps in predicting the probable drug-drug interactions in human. Compounds with more than one metabolic pathway have less likelihood of clinically significant drug interactions. In-vitro CYP450 inhibition and induction screens are used to evaluate the potential of compound towards drug - drug interactions and the most prone candidates may either be discarded or taken ahead with a caution. It is known that only unbound drug is pharmacologically active and therefore the assessment of bound fraction by the estimation of plasma protein binding of a compound is another important parameter to be explored in-vitro. In addition to the process of 'weeding out' weak candidates early in the drug discovery process, it is equally important to identify the probable causes of poor ADME exhibited by some compounds as this information is useful to medicinal chemists for improving upon backbones that exhibit un favorable pharmacokinetic profile. Toxicity study is the foundation of an INDA (Investigational new drug application) and therefore, the final selection of a compound can be performed only after proper toxicological evaluation in animal models. Toxicokinetics forms an integral part of toxicity study and is used to assess the exposure of candidates in toxicity models and correlate the drug levels in blood and various tissues with the toxicological findings. Although in-vivo screening of compounds in animal models and in-vitro assays in human recombinant CYP-450 enzymes help in drug candidate selection, both approaches have

  17. Single-cell and subcellular pharmacokinetic imaging allows insight into drug action in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Yang, Katy S.; Reiner, Thomas; Kohler, Rainer H.; Sorger, Peter; Mitchison, Tim; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic analysis at the organ level provides insight into how drugs distribute throughout the body but cannot explain how drugs work at the cellular level. Here we demonstrate in vivo single cell pharmacokinetic imaging of PARP-1 inhibitors (PARPi) and model drug behavior under varying conditions. We visualize intracellular kinetics of PARPi distribution in real time, showing that PARPi reaches its cellular target compartment, the nucleus, within minutes in vivo both in cancer and normal cells in various cancer models. We also use these data to validate predictive finite element modeling. Our theoretical and experimental data indicate that tumor cells are exposed to sufficiently high PARPi concentrations in vivo and suggest that drug inefficiency is likely related to proteomic heterogeneity or insensitivity of cancer cells to DNA repair inhibition. This suggests that single cell pharmacokinetic imaging and derived modeling improves our understanding of drug action at single cell resolution in vivo. PMID:23422672

  18. Use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling for assessment of drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Baneyx, Guillaume; Fukushima, Yumi; Parrott, Neil

    2012-04-01

    Interactions between co-administered medicines can reduce efficacy or lead to adverse effects. Understanding and managing such interactions is essential in bringing safe and effective medicines to the market. Ideally, interaction potential should be recognized early and minimized in compounds that reach late stages of drug development. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models combine knowledge of physiological factors with compound-specific properties to simulate how a drug behaves in the human body. These software tools are increasingly used during drug discovery and development and, when integrating relevant in vitro data, can simulate drug interaction potential. This article provides some background and presents illustrative examples. Physiologically based models are an integral tool in the discovery and development of drugs, and can significantly aid our understanding and prediction of drug interactions.

  19. A Pharmacometabonomic Approach To Predicting Metabolic Phenotypes and Pharmacokinetic Parameters of Atorvastatin in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing; Aa, Jiye; Jia, Huning; Xin, Xiaoqing; Tao, Chunlei; Liu, Linsheng; Zou, Bingjie; Song, Qinxin; Shi, Jian; Cao, Bei; Yong, Yonghong; Wang, Guangji; Zhou, Guohua

    2015-09-04

    Genetic polymorphism and environment each influence individual variability in drug metabolism and disposition. It is preferable to predict such variability, which may affect drug efficacy and toxicity, before drug administration. We examined individual differences in the pharmacokinetics of atorvastatin by applying gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling to predose plasma samples from 48 healthy volunteers. We determined the level of atorvastatin in plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. With the endogenous molecules, which showed a good correlation with pharmacokinetic parameters, a refined partial least-squares model was calculated based on predose data from a training set of 36 individuals and exhibited good predictive capability for the other 12 individuals in the prediction set. In addition, the model was successfully used to predictively classify individual pharmacokinetic responses into subgroups. Metabolites such as tryptophan, alanine, arachidonic acid, 2-hydroxybutyric acid, cholesterol, and isoleucine were indicated as candidate markers for predicting by showing better predictive capability for explaining individual differences than a conventional physiological index. These results suggest that a pharmacometabonomic approach offers the potential to predict individual differences in pharmacokinetics and therefore to facilitate individualized drug therapy.

  20. In vitro-in vivo Pharmacokinetic correlation model for quality assurance of antiretroviral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo Valencia, Piedad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The in vitro-in vivo pharmacokinetic correlation models (IVIVC) are a fundamental part of the drug discovery and development process. The ability to accurately predict the in vivo pharmacokinetic profile of a drug based on in vitro observations can have several applications during a successful development process. Objective: To develop a comprehensive model to predict the in vivo absorption of antiretroviral drugs based on permeability studies, in vitro and in vivo solubility and demonstrate its correlation with the pharmacokinetic profile in humans. Methods: Analytical tools to test the biopharmaceutical properties of stavudine, lamivudine y zidovudine were developed. The kinetics of dissolution, permeability in caco-2 cells and pharmacokinetics of absorption in rabbits and healthy volunteers were evaluated. Results: The cumulative areas under the curve (AUC) obtained in the permeability study with Caco-2 cells, the dissolution study and the pharmacokinetics in rabbits correlated with the cumulative AUC values in humans. These results demonstrated a direct relation between in vitro data and absorption, both in humans and in the in vivo model. Conclusions: The analytical methods and procedures applied to the development of an IVIVC model showed a strong correlation among themselves. These IVIVC models are proposed as alternative and cost/effective methods to evaluate the biopharmaceutical properties that determine the bioavailability of a drug and their application includes the development process, quality assurance, bioequivalence studies and pharmacosurveillance. PMID:26600625

  1. Asparaginase pharmacokinetics and implications of therapeutic drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Asselin, Barbara; Rizzari, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Asparaginase is widely used in chemotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and has led to a substantial improvement in cure rates, especially in children. Optimal therapeutic effects depend on a complete and sustained depletion of serum asparagine. However, pronounced interpatient variability, differences in pharmacokinetic properties between asparaginases and the formation of asparaginase antibodies make it difficult to predict the degree of asparagine depletion that will result from a given dose of asparaginase. The pharmacological principles underlying asparaginase therapy in the treatment of ALL are summarized in this article. A better understanding of the many factors that influence asparaginase activity and subsequent asparagine depletion may allow physicians to tailor treatment to the individual, maximizing therapeutic effect and minimizing treatment-related toxicity. Therapeutic drug monitoring provides a means of assessing a patient's current depletion status and can be used to better evaluate the potential benefit of treatment adjustments.

  2. Usefulness of minipigs for predicting human pharmacokinetics: Prediction of distribution volume and plasma clearance.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Hiromichi; Konno, Yoshihiro; Ishii, Kunikazu; Satsukawa, Masahiro; Yamashita, Shinji

    2016-02-01

    In this study, advantages of minipigs to use in preclinical study for new drug development were evaluated in terms of prediction of human pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of various drugs. Fourteen model drugs having diverse physicochemical properties were selected and intravenously administered to mice, rats and minipigs to obtain their PK parameters. The human volume of distribution (Vd) and clearance (CL) of model drugs were predicted from PK parameters in each animal species. When Vd of 14 drugs in each species were directly compared with those in humans, minipigs showed the highest correlation. Correction of Vd with an unbound fraction of drugs in tissues further improved the correlation. Allometric scaling that included minipig data resulted in high accuracy in the prediction of human Vd, clearly indicating an importance of minipig data. Minipigs also showed the high predictability of human CL. The prediction of human CL by allometric scaling showed a high accuracy when the data of minipigs were included. In conclusion, potential advantages of minipigs for predicting human Vd and CL were clearly demonstrated. Reliable prediction of human PK from data of minipigs appears to be possible in preclinical PK study, without relying on PK analysis in other species.

  3. Airway drug pharmacokinetics via analysis of exhaled breath condensate.

    PubMed

    Esther, Charles R; Boucher, Richard C; Johnson, M Ross; Ansede, John H; Donn, Karl H; O'Riordan, Thomas G; Ghio, Andrew J; Hirsh, Andrew J

    2014-02-01

    Although the airway surface is the anatomic target for many lung disease therapies, measuring drug concentrations and activities on these surfaces poses considerable challenges. We tested whether mass spectrometric analysis of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) could be utilized to non-invasively measure airway drug pharmacokinetics and predicted pharmacological activities. Mass spectrometric methods were developed to detect a novel epithelial sodium channel blocker (GS-9411/P-680), two metabolites, a chemically related internal standard, plus naturally occurring solutes including urea as a dilution marker. These methods were then applied to EBC and serum collected from four (Floridian) sheep before, during and after inhalation of nebulized GS-9411/P-680. Electrolyte content of EBC and serum was also assessed as a potential pharmacodynamic marker of drug activity. Airway surface concentrations of drug, metabolites, and electrolytes were calculated from EBC measures using EBC:serum urea based dilution factors. GS-9411/P-680 and its metabolites were quantifiable in the sheep EBC, with peak airway concentrations between 1.9 and 3.4 μM measured 1 h after inhalation. In serum, only Metabolite #1 was quantifiable, with peak concentrations ∼60-fold lower than those in the airway (45 nM at 1 h). EBC electrolyte concentrations suggested a pharmacological effect; but this effect was not statistical significant. Analysis of EBC collected during an inhalation drug study provided a method for quantification of airway drug and metabolites via mass spectrometry. Application of this methodology could provide an important tool in development and testing of drugs for airways diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Prediction of drug clearance in children.

    PubMed

    Foissac, Frantz; Bouazza, Naïm; Valade, Elodie; De Sousa Mendes, Mailys; Fauchet, Floris; Benaboud, Sihem; Hirt, Déborah; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Urien, Saïk

    2015-07-01

    The pediatric population is often exposed to drugs without sufficient knowledge about pharmacokinetics. The prediction of accurate clearance values in children, especially in neonates and infants, will improve the rational in dosing decisions. Drug clearances from birth to adulthood were compiled after a systematic review of pharmacokinetic reports. The analysis was performed using NONMEM. Clearance predictions were then evaluated by external validation. Prediction errors were also compared with those obtained from weight-based allometric scaling and physiologically based clearance (PBCL) models. For the analysis, 17 and 15 drugs were used for model building and external validation, respectively. A model based on the adult drug clearance value and taking into account both weight and age was retained. Age-related maturation of clearance reached 90% of the adult value within 1.5 years of life. For children less than 2 years old, allometric scaling alone systematically overestimated clearances. Accounting for age improved the clearance prediction in the 6 months-2 years age group (prediction error < 25%). Predictions obtained from the PBCL approach were close to our results. This analysis established a single equation using the adult clearance value as well as individual age and weight to predict drug clearance in children older than 6 months.

  5. Clinical pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and drug-drug interaction of carfilzomib.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengping; Yang, Jinfu; Kirk, Christopher; Fang, Ying; Alsina, Melissa; Badros, Ashraf; Papadopoulos, Kyriakos; Wong, Alvin; Woo, Tina; Bomba, Darrin; Li, Jin; Infante, Jeffrey R

    2013-01-01

    Carfilzomib, an irreversible proteasome inhibitor, has a favorable safety profile and significant antitumor activity in patients with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (MM). Here we summarize the clinical pharmacokinetics (PK), metabolism, and drug-drug interaction (DDI) profile of carfilzomib. The PK of carfilzomib, infused over 2-10 minutes, was evaluated in patients with solid tumors or MM. Metabolites of carfilzomib were characterized in patient plasma and urine samples. In vitro drug metabolism and DDI studies were conducted in human liver microsomes and hepatocytes. A clinical DDI study was conducted in patients with solid tumors to evaluate the effect of carfilzomib on CYP3A activity. Plasma concentrations of carfilzomib declined rapidly and in a biphasic manner after intravenous administration. The systemic half-life was short and the systemic clearance rate was higher than hepatic blood flow. Carfilzomib was cleared largely extrahepatically via peptidase cleavage and epoxide hydrolysis. Cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism played a minor role, suggesting that coadministration of P450 inhibitors or inducers is unlikely to change its PK profile. Carfilzomib showed direct and time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A in human liver microsome preparations and exposure to carfilzomib resulted in reductions in CYP3A and 1A2 gene expression in cultured human hepatocytes. However, administration of carfilzomib did not affect the PK of midazolam in patients with solid tumors, and there were no safety signals indicative of potential drug interactions. We conclude that the rapid systemic clearance and short half-life of carfilzomib limit clinically significant DDI.

  6. pkCSM: Predicting Small-Molecule Pharmacokinetic and Toxicity Properties Using Graph-Based Signatures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Drug development has a high attrition rate, with poor pharmacokinetic and safety properties a significant hurdle. Computational approaches may help minimize these risks. We have developed a novel approach (pkCSM) which uses graph-based signatures to develop predictive models of central ADMET properties for drug development. pkCSM performs as well or better than current methods. A freely accessible web server (http://structure.bioc.cam.ac.uk/pkcsm), which retains no information submitted to it, provides an integrated platform to rapidly evaluate pharmacokinetic and toxicity properties. PMID:25860834

  7. Retracted: Physiologically based pharmacokinetic predictions of intestinal BCRP-mediated effect of telmisartan on the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin in humans.

    PubMed

    Bae, Soo Hyeon; Park, Wan-Su; Han, Seunghoon; Park, Gab-Jin; Lee, Jongtae; Hong, Taegon; Jeon, Sangil; Yim, Dong-Seok

    2017-07-01

    'Physiologically based pharmacokinetic predictions of intestinal BCRP-mediated effect of telmisartan on the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin in humans' by Soo Hyeon Bae, Wan-Su Park, Seunghoon Han, Gab-jin Park, Jongtae Lee, Taegon Hong, Sangil Jeon and Dong-Seok Yim The above article, published online on 06 February 2017 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief, K. Sandy Pang, and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. The authors retracted the paper due to errors associated with use of log D vs. log P of telmisartan as inputs of the PBPK model. The authors concluded that there are too many changes in the article to be resolved by an Erratum, and had requested a retraction. Reference Bae, S. H., Park, W.-S., Han, S., Park, G., Lee, J., Hong, T., Jeon, S., and Yim, D.-S. (2016) Physiologically based pharmacokinetic predictions of intestinal BCRP-mediated effect of telmisartan on the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin in humans. Biopharm. Drug Dispos., doi: 10.1002/bdd.2060. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of Drugs in Cachectic Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Trobec, Katja; Kerec Kos, Mojca; von Haehling, Stephan; Springer, Jochen; Anker, Stefan D.; Lainscak, Mitja

    2013-01-01

    Cachexia is a weight-loss process caused by an underlying chronic disease such as cancer, chronic heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or rheumatoid arthritis. It leads to changes in body structure and function that may influence the pharmacokinetics of drugs. Changes in gut function and decreased subcutaneous tissue may influence the absorption of orally and transdermally applied drugs. Altered body composition and plasma protein concentration may affect drug distribution. Changes in the expression and function of metabolic enzymes could influence the metabolism of drugs, and their renal excretion could be affected by possible reduction in kidney function. Because no general guidelines exist for drug dose adjustments in cachectic patients, we conducted a systematic search to identify articles that investigated the pharmacokinetics of drugs in cachectic patients. PMID:24282510

  9. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Antiretroviral Drugs in Older Persons

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, John C.; Erlandson, Kristine Mace

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Combination antiretroviral therapy has enabled HIV infected persons to reach older ages in high numbers. Hepatic and renal changes that normally occur with advancing age occur earlier and with higher incidence in HIV-infected individuals. A limited number of prospective controlled studies have demonstrated small reductions (17% to 41%) in lopinavir, atazanavir, and lamivudine clearance in older versus younger adults. A much larger number of retrospective studies in adults (age range ~20 to 60 years), including all antiretroviral drugs, have evaluated age as a covariate for pharmacokinetics. Most studies did not detect substantial associations between drug exposures and age. Areas Covered This review summarizes antiretroviral drug pharmacokinetics in older persons. The authors review articles from PubMed (search terms: elderly, antiretroviral, pharmacokinetics) in addition to the bibliographies of those selected. Expert Opinion The evidence to date does not support major pharmacokinetic changes in adults between ~20 and 60 years of age. However, additional prospective, well-controlled studies are needed in more persons > 60 years, including those with frailty and comorbidities, with assessment of unbound drug clearance, and incorporation of adherence, pharmacogenetics, and concomitant medications. Until then, guidelines for drug-drug interactions and dosing in renal and hepatic impairment should be followed in older HIV infected individuals. PMID:23514375

  10. Application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in the prediction of pharmacokinetics of bicyclol controlled-release formulation in human.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baolian; Liu, Zhihao; Li, Dan; Yang, Shuang; Hu, Jinping; Chen, Hui; Sheng, Li; Li, Yan

    2015-09-18

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling can assist in formulation development. Bicyclol is a novel anti-hepatitis drug. A bilayer osmotic pump table of bicyclol is being developed. PBPK models for bicyclol immediate-release (IR) and controlled-release (CR) tablets in beagle dog, as well as PBPK model for IR tablets in human were constructed. These models incorporated physicochemical properties and in vitro preclinical data. Parameter sensitivity analysis was performed for the effects of solubility and dissolution on pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters. Models were refined by comparing simulated results to experimental measurements. Furthermore, the clinical PK for bicyclol CR tablets was predicted using the in vivo dissolution profile by deconvolution of the mean PK profile of CR tablets in dogs. In summary, the present study described a strategy employing PBPK models to evaluate the effects of formulation factors on PK profiles and predict the performance of bicyclol CR tablets in human. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Investigation of an alternative generic model for predicting pharmacokinetic changes during physiological stress.

    PubMed

    Peng, Henry T; Edginton, Andrea N; Cheung, Bob

    2013-10-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were developed using MATLAB Simulink® and PK-Sim®. We compared the capability and usefulness of these two models by simulating pharmacokinetic changes of midazolam under exercise and heat stress to verify the usefulness of MATLAB Simulink® as a generic PBPK modeling software. Although both models show good agreement with experimental data obtained under resting condition, their predictions of pharmacokinetics changes are less accurate in the stressful conditions. However, MATLAB Simulink® may be more flexible to include physiologically based processes such as oral absorption and simulate various stress parameters such as stress intensity, duration and timing of drug administration to improve model performance. Further work will be conducted to modify algorithms in our generic model developed using MATLAB Simulink® and to investigate pharmacokinetics under other physiological stress such as trauma. © The Author(s) 2013.

  12. Population pharmacokinetic model of lithium and drug compliance assessment.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Castelló, Isabel; Mangas-Sanjuan, Víctor; González-García, Ignacio; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Isabel; Bermejo, Marival; Marco-Garbayo, Jose Luis; Trocóniz, Iñaki F

    2016-12-01

    Population pharmacokinetic analysis of lithium during therapeutic drug monitoring and drug compliance assessment was performed in 54 patients and 246 plasma concentrations levels were included in this study. Patients received several treatment cycles (1-9) and one plasma concentration measurement for each patient was obtained always before starting next cycle (pre-dose) at steady state. Data were analysed using the population approach with NONMEM version 7.2. Lithium measurements were described using a two-compartment model (CL/F=0.41Lh(-1), V1/F=15.3L, Q/F=0.61Lh(-1), and V2/F = 15.8L) and the most significant covariate on lithium CL was found to be creatinine clearance (reference model). Lithium compliance was analysed using inter-occasion variability or Markovian features (previous lithium measurement as ordered categorical covariate) on bioavailability parameter. Markov-type model predicted the lithium compliance in the next cycle with higher success rate (79.8%) compared to IOV model (65.2%) and reference model (43.2%). This model becomes an efficient tool, not only being able to adequately describe the observed outcome, but also to predict the individual drug compliance in the next cycle. Therefore, Bipolar disorder patients can be classified regarding their probability to become extensive or poor compliers in the next cycle and then, individual probabilities lower than 0.5 highlight the need of intensive monitoring, as well as other pharmaceutical care measurements that might be applied to enhance drug compliance for a better and safer lithium treatment.

  13. The Role of Drug Transporters in the Pharmacokinetics of Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Hua, Wen Jin; Hua, Wei Xiao; Jian, Zhou; Wei, Peng Hong; Ni, Lu Yan; Hua, Li Yu; Wen, Cao Duan; Ying, Zhou; Li, Cao

    2016-01-01

    Various transporters, including efflux transporters and uptake transporters, play an important role in the pharmacokinetics of drugs. Currently, studies suggest that several antibiotics also serve as substrates for transporters. In addition, these antibiotics are usually combined with other drugs to treat diseases, more effectively. Therefore, it is necessary to focus on the role of transporters in pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions of antibiotics. This review summarizes the findings of recent studies as well as information retrieved from several databases (until June 2015): ISI Web of KnowledgeSM (ISI WoK), SciFinder (Caplus, Medline, Registry, Casreact, Chrmlist, and Chemcasts) and PubMed (indexed for Medline). The present review provides useful information for the study of transporters in the pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions of antibiotics, and should assist researchers investigating these topics. The drug transporters mediate intestinal absorption, hepatic uptake, and kidney or biliary excretion. It is necessary to focus on drug-drug interactions when these antibiotics are combined with other chemical substances that are also the substrates for transporters.

  14. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model linking plasma protein binding interactions with drug disposition.

    PubMed

    Buur, J L; Baynes, R E; Smith, G W; Riviere, J E

    2009-04-01

    Combination drug therapy increases the chance for an adverse drug reactions due to drug-drug interactions. Altered disposition for sulfamethazine (SMZ) when concurrently administered with flunixin meglumine (FLU) in swine could lead to increased tissue residues. There is a need for a pharmacokinetic modeling technique that can predict the consequences of possible drug interactions. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed that links plasma protein binding interactions to drug disposition for SMZ and FLU in swine. The model predicted a sustained decrease in total drug and a temporary increase in free drug concentration. An in vivo study confirmed the presence of a drug interaction. Neither the model nor the in vivo study revealed clinically significant changes that alter tissue disposition. This novel linkage approach has use in the prediction of the clinical impact of plasma protein binding interactions. Ultimately it could be used in the design of dosing regimens and in the protection of the food supply through prediction and minimization of tissue residues.

  15. Pharmacokinetic interactions between herbal medicines and prescribed drugs: focus on drug metabolic enzymes and transporters.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qiang; Liu, Kexin

    2014-01-01

    Herbal medicines have been widely used for thousands of years, and now are gaining continued popularity worldwide as a complementary or alternative treatment for a variety of diseases, rehabilitation and health care. Since herbal medicines contain more than one pharmacologically active ingredient and are commonly used with many prescribed drugs, there are potential herb-drug interactions. A variety of reported herb-drug interactions are of pharmacokinetic origin, arising from the effects of herbal medicines on metabolic enzymes and/or transporters. Such an alteration in metabolism or transport can result in changes in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (e.g., induction or inhibition of metabolic enzymes, and modulation of uptake and efflux transporters), leading to changed pharmacokinetics of the concomitantly prescribed drugs. Pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions have more clinical significance as pharmacokinetic parameters such as the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) or the elimination half-life (t1/2) of the concomitant drug alter. This review summarizes the mechanism underlying herb-drug interactions and the approaches to identify the interactions, and discusses pharmacokinetic interactions of eight widely used herbal medicines (Ginkgo biloba, ginseng, garlic, black cohosh, Echinacea, milk thistle, kava, and St. John's wort) with conventional drugs, using various in vitro, animal in vivo, and clinical studies. The increasing understanding of pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions will make health care professionals and patients pay more attention to the potential interactions.

  16. Drugs in space: Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in astronauts.

    PubMed

    Kast, Johannes; Yu, Yichao; Seubert, Christoph N; Wotring, Virginia E; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2017-05-19

    Space agencies are working intensely to push the current boundaries of human spaceflight by sending astronauts deeper into space than ever before, including missions to Mars and asteroids. Spaceflight alters human physiology due to fluid shifts, muscle and bone loss, immune system dysregulation, and changes in the gastrointestinal tract and metabolic enzymes. These alterations may change the pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics of medications used by astronauts and subsequently might impact drug efficacy and safety. Most commonly, medications are administered during space missions to treat sleep disturbances, allergies, space motion sickness, pain, and sinus congestion. These medications are administered under the assumption that they act in a similar way as on Earth, an assumption that has not been investigated systematically yet. Few inflight pharmacokinetic data have been published, and pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies during spaceflight are also lacking. Therefore, bed-rest models are often used to simulate physiological changes observed during microgravity. In addition to pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic changes, decreased drug and formulation stability in space could also influence efficacy and safety of medications. These alterations along with physiological changes and their resulting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects must to be considered to determine their ultimate impact on medication efficacy and safety during spaceflight. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of psychotropic drugs: effect of sex.

    PubMed

    Marazziti, Donatella; Baroni, Stefano; Picchetti, Michela; Piccinni, Armando; Carlini, Marina; Vatteroni, Elena; Falaschi, Valentina; Lombardi, Amedeo; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2013-06-01

    Data on the specific effects of sex on pharmacokinetics, as well as tolerability, safety, and efficacy of psychotropic medications are still meager, mainly because only recently sex-related issues have attracted a certain degree of interest within the pharmacological domain. Therefore, with the present study, we aimed to provide a comprehensive review of the literature on this topic, through careful MEDLINE and PubMed searches of the years 1990-2012. Generally, data on pharmacokinetics are more consistent and numerous than those on pharmacodynamics. Sex-related differences have been reported for several parameters that influence pharmacokinetics, such as gastric acidity, intestinal motility, body weight and composition, blood volume, liver enzymes (mainly the cytochrome P450), or renal excretion, which may alter plasma drug levels. Sex-related peculiarities may also account for a different sensitivity of men and women to side effects and toxicity of psychotropic drugs. Further, some differences in drug response, mainly to antipsychotics and antidepressants, have been described. Further studies are, however, necessary to explore more thoroughly the impact of sex on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of psychotropic drugs, in order to reach the most appropriate and tailored prescription for each patient.

  18. Studies on pharmacokinetic drug interaction potential of vinpocetine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Vinpocetine, a semi-synthetic derivative of vincamine, is a popular dietary supplement used for the treatment of several central nervous system related disorders. Despite its wide use, no pharmacokinetic drug interaction studies are reported in literature. Due to increasing use of dietar...

  19. Practical optimisation of antiarrhythmic drug therapy using pharmacokinetic principles.

    PubMed

    Bauman, J L; Schoen, M D; Hoon, T J

    1991-02-01

    The optimisation of antiarrhythmic drug therapy is dependent on the definitions and methods of short term efficacy testing and the characteristics of those drugs used for rhythm disturbances. The choice of an initial antiarrhythmic drug dosage is highly empirical, and will remain so until the measurement of free concentrations, enantiomeric fractions and genetic phenotyping becomes routine. However, the clinician can devise an efficient initial dosage for efficacy testing procedures based on pharmacokinetic principles and disposition variables in the literature. In this regard, a nomogram for commonly used agents and dosages was constructed and is offered as a guide to accomplish this goal. Verification of the accuracy and usefulness of this nomogram in a prospective manner in patients with symptomatic tachyarrhythmias is still required. On a long term basis, dosage regimens can be modified by the use of pharmacokinetic principles and patient-specific target concentrations, in accordance with the methods used to monitor arrhythmia recurrence and drug-related side effects.

  20. Simulation of differential drug pharmacokinetics under heat and exercise stress using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Pardeep; Peng, Henry T; Cheung, Bob; Edginton, Andrea

    2011-05-01

    Under extreme conditions of heat exposure and exercise stress, the human body undergoes major physiological changes. Perturbations in organ blood flows, gastrointestinal properties, and vascular physiology may impact the body's ability to absorb, distribute, and eliminate drugs. Clinical studies on the effect of these stressors on drug pharmacokinetics demonstrate that the likelihood of pharmacokinetic alteration is dependent on drug properties and the intensity of the stressor. The objectives of this study were to use literature data to quantify the correlation between exercise and heat exposure intensity to changing physiological parameters and further, to use this information for the parameterization of a whole-body, physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for the purposes of determining those drug properties most likely to demonstrate altered drug pharmacokinetics under stress. Cardiac output and most organ blood flows were correlated with heart rate using regression analysis. Other altered parameters included hematocrit and intravascular albumin concentration. Pharmacokinetic simulations of intravenous and oral administration of hypothetical drugs with either a low or high value of lipophilicity, unbound fraction in plasma, and unbound intrinsic hepatic clearance demonstrated that the area under the curve of those drugs with a high unbound intrinsic clearance was most affected (up to a 130% increase) following intravenous administration, whereas following oral administration, pharmacokinetic changes were smaller (<40% increase in area under the curve) for all hypothetical compounds. A midazolam physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was also used to demonstrate that simulated changes in pharmacokinetic parameters under exercise and heat stress were generally consistent with those reported in the literature.

  1. Clinical pharmacokinetics of new-generation antiepileptic drugs at the extremes of age: an update.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Domenico; Perucca, Emilio

    2013-08-01

    -related pharmacokinetic changes could be predicted by measuring creatinine clearance (CLCR). Overall, most recent findings confirm that age is a major factor influencing the pharmacokinetic profile of AEDs. However, pharmacokinetic variability at any age can be considerable, and the importance of other factors should not be disregarded. These include genetic factors, co-morbidities, and drug interactions, particularly those caused by concomitantly administered AEDs which induce or inhibit drug-metabolizing enzymes.

  2. Drug-drug and food-drug pharmacokinetic interactions with new insulinotropic agents repaglinide and nateglinide.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2007-01-01

    This review describes the current knowledge on drug-drug and food-drug interactions with repaglinide and nateglinide. These two meglitinide derivatives, commonly called glinides, have been developed for improving insulin secretion of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. They are increasingly used either in monotherapy or in combination with other oral antihyperglycaemic agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Compared with sulfonylureas, glinides have been shown to (i) provide a better control of postprandial hyperglycaemia, (ii) overcome some adverse effects, such as hypoglycaemia, and (iii) have a more favourable safety profile, especially in patients with renal failure. The meal-related timing of administration of glinides and the potential influence of food and meal composition on their bioavailability may be important. In addition, some food components (e.g. grapefruit juice) may cause pharmacokinetic interactions. Because glinides are metabolised via cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 isoenzyme, they are indeed exposed to pharmacokinetic interactions. In addition to CYP3A4, repaglinide is metabolised via CYP2C8, while nateglinide metabolism also involves CYP2C9. Furthermore, both compounds and their metabolites may undergo specialised transport/uptake in the intestine, another source of pharmacokinetic interactions. Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions are those that occur when glinides are administered together with other glucose-lowering agents or compounds widely coadministered to diabetic patients (e.g. lipid-lowering agents), with drugs that are known to induce (risk of lower glinide plasma levels and thus of deterioration of glucose control) or inhibit (risk of higher glinide plasma levels leading to hypoglycaemia) CYP isoenzymes concerned in their metabolism, or with drugs that have a narrow efficacy : toxicity ratio. Pharmacokinetic interactions reported in the literature appear to be more frequent and more important with repaglinide than with

  3. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions with ethanol (alcohol).

    PubMed

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander; Anderson, Gail D

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol (alcohol) is one of the most widely used legal drugs in the world. Ethanol is metabolized by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 drug-metabolizing enzyme that is also responsible for the biotransformation of xenobiotics and fatty acids. Drugs that inhibit ADH or CYP2E1 are the most likely theoretical compounds that would lead to a clinically significant pharmacokinetic interaction with ethanol, which include only a limited number of drugs. Acute ethanol primarily alters the pharmacokinetics of other drugs by changing the rate and extent of absorption, with more limited effects on clearance. Both acute and chronic ethanol use can cause transient changes to many physiologic responses in different organ systems such as hypotension and impairment of motor and cognitive functions, resulting in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions. Evaluating drug interactions with long-term use of ethanol is uniquely challenging. Specifically, it is difficult to distinguish between the effects of long-term ethanol use on liver pathology and chronic malnutrition. Ethanol-induced liver disease results in decreased activity of hepatic metabolic enzymes and changes in protein binding. Clinical studies that include patients with chronic alcohol use may be evaluating the effects of mild cirrhosis on liver metabolism, and not just ethanol itself. The definition of chronic alcohol use is very inconsistent, which greatly affects the quality of the data and clinical application of the results. Our study of the literature has shown that a significantly higher volume of clinical studies have focused on the pharmacokinetic interactions of ethanol and other drugs. The data on pharmacodynamic interactions are more limited and future research addressing pharmacodynamic interactions with ethanol, especially regarding the non-central nervous system effects, is much needed.

  4. Theoretical pharmacokinetic drug alterations in pediatric celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tran H; Smith, Candace; Mangione, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of pediatric celiac disease has risen and many of these children will receive medications at some time in their life. However, the absorption of drugs in pediatric patients with celiac disease has never been studied. The few studies that do exist have only been performed in adults and indicate that drug concentrations can be altered for some drugs. It is also noteworthy that few researchers have conducted studies to determine if the distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs are altered in celiac disease. The pharmacokinetics of drugs greatly differ between children and adults. Combined with the pathophysiological changes known to occur with celiac disease, there is compelling evidence to support that drug exposure in pediatric celiac disease may be altered. Relevant characteristics of celiac disease that may affect drug disposition include intestinal atrophy, hypoalbuminemia, reduced CYP3A enzymes, and thyroid dysfunction. The safety and efficacy of drug dosing in children with celiac disease can be enhanced with additional pharmacokinetic studies of commonly prescribed drugs in this population. Ideally, these studies should include drugs that have high bioavailability, are highly protein bound, undergo extensive CYP3A enzyme metabolism, and/or have a narrow therapeutic range.

  5. Pharmacokinetic strategies for treatment of drug overdose and addiction

    PubMed Central

    Gorelick, David A

    2012-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic treatment strategy targets the drug molecule itself, aiming to reduce drug concentration at the site of action, thereby minimizing any pharmacodynamic effect. This approach might be useful in the treatment of acute drug toxicity/overdose and in the long-term treatment of addiction. Phase IIa controlled clinical trials with anticocaine and antinicotine vaccines have shown good tolerability and some efficacy, but Phase IIb and III trials have been disappointing because of the failure to generate adequate antibody titers in most participants. Monoclonal antibodies against cocaine, methamphetamine and phencyclidine have shown promise in animal studies, as has enhancing cocaine metabolism with genetic variants of human butyrylcholinesterase, with a bacterial esterase, and with catalytic monoclonal antibodies. Pharmacokinetic treatments offer potential advantages in terms of patient adherence, absence of medication interactions and benefit for patients who cannot take standard medications. PMID:22300100

  6. Pharmacokinetic strategies for treatment of drug overdose and addiction.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, David A

    2012-02-01

    The pharmacokinetic treatment strategy targets the drug molecule itself, aiming to reduce drug concentration at the site of action, thereby minimizing any pharmacodynamic effect. This approach might be useful in the treatment of acute drug toxicity/overdose and in the long-term treatment of addiction. Phase IIa controlled clinical trials with anticocaine and antinicotine vaccines have shown good tolerability and some efficacy, but Phase IIb and III trials have been disappointing because of the failure to generate adequate antibody titers in most participants. Monoclonal antibodies against cocaine, methamphetamine and phencyclidine have shown promise in animal studies, as has enhancing cocaine metabolism with genetic variants of human butyrylcholinesterase, with a bacterial esterase, and with catalytic monoclonal antibodies. Pharmacokinetic treatments offer potential advantages in terms of patient adherence, absence of medication interactions and benefit for patients who cannot take standard medications.

  7. Variations of pharmacokinetics of drugs in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Pena, M A; Horga, J F; Zapater, P

    2016-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is the end stage of many different chronic liver diseases and is becoming an important cause of mortality and morbidity across the world. In theory, the numerous physiopathological changes suffered by these patients warrant relevant pharmacokinetic changes in most drugs. However, the influence of these changes on the efficacy and toxicity responses of patients with cirrhosis have been evaluated by few clinical trials and observational studies. As a consequence, therapeutic decisions in these patients are usually complex and subject to uncertainties. In this article, we review the regulatory guidelines to study responses to drugs according to pharmacokinetic variability and the published information that is useful for guiding the dosage adjustment of frequently used drugs in patients with cirrhosis (antivirals, antibiotics, analgesics, etc.) to obtain the best risk-benefit ratio.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and dosage regimens of anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Lees, P; May, S A; White, D

    1990-01-01

    The term anti-inflammatory drug, in its broadest sense, encompasses a number of very diverse compounds, ranging from steroids to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and from disease modifying agents (used in the treatment of canine rheumatoid arthritis) to chondroprotective agents (used in the treatment of osteoarthrosis and traumatic arthritis in the horse). For many of these drugs (eg, chondroprotective and disease modifying agents) the mode of action is unknown and even with steroids and NSAIDs there is no universal agreement on mechanism of action. It is therefore in many cases impossible to link pharmacokinetic data to a drug's pharmacodynamics, for example to an effect on a specific biochemical marker. Some agents, including corticosteroids, may have indirect modes of action, so that the pharmacodynamic half-life can be much longer than (and not clearly related to) the pharmacokinetic half-life. In other cases, clinical benefits may only become apparent after several weeks or even months. It can therefore be difficult or impossible to use classical pharmacokinetic approaches to set dosing intervals and dose rates for clinical use. To some extent, the position is more straightforward with NSAIDs. However, even with these drugs simple approaches are not possible and this paper will review briefly some of the studies undertaken in our laboratory which have attempted to utilize NSAID kinetics to set dosage schedules for clinical use.

  9. Blood Substitutes: Effects on Drug Pharmacokinetics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS 1963-A - S . *.* , S. AD __ _ _ _ _? ,:-:t’ REPORT NUMBER: 2 BLOOD SUBSTITUTES: EFFECTS ON DRUG ...ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER.1-t 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED FINAL REPORT BLOOD SUBSTITUTES: EFFECTS ON DRUG ...Identify by block number) Blood substitutes; perfluorocarbons; stroma-free hemoglobin; drug pharmaco- kinetics S. ADST RACT (Cn*tfe am revere dm* if

  10. High-throughput screening in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic support of drug discovery.

    PubMed

    White, R E

    2000-01-01

    The application of rapid methods currently used for screening discovery drug candidates for metabolism and pharmacokinetic characteristics is discussed. General considerations are given for screening in this context, including the criteria for good screens, the use of counterscreens, the proper sequencing of screens, ambiguity in the interpretation of results, strategies for false positives and negatives, and the special difficulties encountered in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic screening. Detailed descriptions of the present status of screening are provided for absorption potential, blood-brain barrier penetration, inhibition and induction of cytochrome P450, pharmacokinetics, biotransformation, and computer modeling. Although none of the systems currently employed for drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic screening can be considered truly high-throughput, several of them are rapid enough to be a practical part of the screening paradigm for modern, fast-moving discovery programs.

  11. Fractal pharmacokinetics of the drug mibefradil in the liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuite, J.; Marsh, R.; Tuszyński, J.

    2002-08-01

    We explore the ramifications of the fractal geometry of the key organ for drug elimination, the liver, on pharmacokinetic data analysis. A formalism is developed for the use of a combination of well-stirred Euclidean and fractal compartments in the body. Perturbation analysis is carried out to obtain analytical solutions for the drug concentration time evolution. These results are then fitted to experimental data collected from clinically instrumented dogs [see, A. Skerjanec et al., J. Pharm. Sci. 85, 189 (1995)] using the drug mibefradil. The thus obtained spectral fractal dimension has a range of values that is consistent with the value found in independently performed ultrasound experiments on the liver.

  12. Clinical Drug-Drug Pharmacokinetic Interaction Potential of Sucralfate with Other Drugs: Review and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sulochana, Suresh P; Syed, Muzeeb; Chandrasekar, Devaraj V; Mullangi, Ramesh; Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-10-01

    Sucralfate, a complex of aluminium hydroxide with sulfated sucrose, forms a strong gastrointestinal tract (GIT) mucosal barrier with excellent anti-ulcer property. Because sucralfate does not undergo any significant oral absorption, sucralfate resides in the GIT for a considerable length of time. The unabsorbed sucralfate may alter the pharmacokinetics of the oral drugs by impeding its absorption and reducing the oral bioavailability. Because of the increased use of sucralfate, it was important to provide a reappraisal of the published clinical drug-drug interaction studies of sucralfate with scores of drugs. This review covers several category of drugs such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, fluoroquinolones, histamine H2-receptor blockers, macrolides, anti-fungals, anti-diabetics, salicylic acid derivatives, steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and provides pharmacokinetic data summary along with study design, objectives and key remarks. While the loss of oral bioavailability was significant for the fluoroquinolone class, it generally varied for other classes of drugs, suggesting that impact of the co-administration of sucralfate is manageable in clinical situations. Given the technology advancement in formulation development, it may be in order feasible to develop appropriate formulation strategies to either avoid or minimize the absorption-related issues when co-administered with sucralfate. It is recommended that consideration of both in vitro and preclinical studies may be in order to gauge the level of interaction of a drug with sucralfate. Such data may aid in the development of appropriate strategies to navigate the co-administration of sucralfate with other drugs in this age of polypharmacy.

  13. Predicting Pulmonary Pharmacokinetics from In Vitro Properties of Dry Powder Inhalers.

    PubMed

    Bhagwat, Sharvari; Schilling, Uta; Chen, Mong-Jen; Wei, Xiangyin; Delvadia, Renishkumar; Absar, Mohammad; Saluja, Bhawana; Hochhaus, Günther

    2017-08-10

    The ability of two semi-mechanistic simulation approaches to predict the systemic pharmacokinetics (PK) of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) delivered via dry powder inhalers (DPIs) was assessed for mometasone furoate, budesonide and fluticasone propionate. Both approaches derived the total lung doses and the central to peripheral lung deposition ratios from clinically relevant cascade impactor studies, but differed in the way the pulmonary absorption rate was derived. In approach 1, the rate of in vivo drug dissolution/absorption was predicted for the included ICSs from in vitro aerodynamic particle size distribution and in vitro drug solubility estimates measured in an in vivo predictive dissolution medium. Approach 2 derived a first order absorption rate from the mean dissolution time (MDT), determined for the test formulations in an in vitro Transwell(®) based dissolution system. Approach 1 suggested PK profiles which agreed well with the published pharmacokinetic profiles. Similarly, within approach 2, input parameters for the pulmonary absorption rate constant derived from dissolution rate experiments were able to reasonably predict the pharmacokinetic profiles published in literature. Approach 1 utilizes more complex strategies for predicting the dissolution/absorption process without providing a significant advantage over approach 2 with regard to accuracy of in vivo predictions.

  14. Pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, and tolerability of paroxetine and paroxetine CR.

    PubMed

    DeVane, C Lindsay

    2003-01-01

    The development of paroxetine hydrochloride began in the late 1970s. An abundance of data have been accumulated from clinical investigations demonstrating the efficacy of paroxetine in the treatment of major depression and anxiety disorders. The published literature contains a substantial amount of supportive data documenting the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of paroxetine. The role of paroxetine in clinically significant drug-drug interactions, especially involving metabolic inhibitory effects on the substrates of cytochrome p450 2D6, has long been suspected, but only isolated cases provide any evidence. Published data for widespread patient morbidity from drug interactions with paroxetine are almost nonexistent. Considerations of the pharmacokinetic properties of paroxetine support a rationale for the development of new dosage forms that maintain the efficacy yet improve the tolerability profile of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Paroxetine controlled-release is an enteric-coated formulation with release features that may enhance clinical outcome by modifying absorption-related pharmacokinetics, improving tolerability, and maintaining therapeutic benefits

  15. Market entry, power, pharmacokinetics: what makes a successful drug innovation?

    PubMed

    Alt, Susanne; Helmstädter, Axel

    2017-09-20

    Depending on the timing of market entry, radical innovations can be distinguished from incremental innovations. Whereas a radical innovation typically is the first available derivative of a drug class, incremental innovations are launched later and show a certain benefit compared with the radical innovation. Here, we use historical market data relating to pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamic (PD), and other drug-related properties to investigate which derivatives within certain drug classes have been most successful on the market. Based on our investigations, we suggest naming the most successful drugs 'overtaking innovation', because they often exceed the market share of all the other derivatives. Seven drug classes showed that the overtaking innovation is never a radical innovation, but rather an early incremental innovation, with advantages in manageability and/or tolerance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Pharmacokinetics of bromazepam in 57 patients with acute drug intoxication].

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kazuhiro; Shimazu, Yoko; Kikuno, Takaaki; Kaziwara, Hirosi; Sekiguti, Hisanori

    2003-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters of bromazepam were analyzed by 57 cases. The patients were admitted 7.3 +/- 8.9 hours (mean +/- S.D.) after ingestion of 88 +/- 127 mg bromazepam. Most patients had taken several drugs other than bromazepam and the number was 5.5 +/- 2.6 drugs. The serum bromazepam levels were 1,871 +/- 2,428 ng/ml and the elimination half-lives were 29 +/- 4 hours. Increased serum bromazepam levels were followed by extended elimination half-lives. There was no bromazepam toxic sign under 2,300 ng/ml. One case was treated with direct hemoperfusion and the therapy was effective.

  17. Pharmacokinetic drug interaction profiles of proton pump inhibitors: an update.

    PubMed

    Wedemeyer, Ralph-Steven; Blume, Henning

    2014-04-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are used extensively for the treatment of gastric acid-related disorders, often over the long term, which raises the potential for clinically significant drug interactions in patients receiving concomitant medications. These drug-drug interactions have been previously reviewed. However, the current knowledge is likely to have advanced, so a thorough review of the literature published since 2006 was conducted. This identified new studies of drug interactions that are modulated by gastric pH. These studies showed the effect of a PPI-induced increase in intragastric pH on mycophenolate mofetil pharmacokinetics, which were characterised by a decrease in the maximum exposure and availability of mycophenolic acid, at least at early time points. Post-2006 data were also available outlining the altered pharmacokinetics of protease inhibitors with concomitant PPI exposure. New data for the more recently marketed dexlansoprazole suggest it has no impact on the pharmacokinetics of diazepam, phenytoin, theophylline and warfarin. The CYP2C19-mediated interaction that seems to exist between clopidogrel and omeprazole or esomeprazole has been shown to be clinically important in research published since the 2006 review; this effect is not seen as a class effect of PPIs. Finally, data suggest that coadministration of PPIs with methotrexate may affect methotrexate pharmacokinetics, although the mechanism of interaction is not well understood. As was shown in the previous review, individual PPIs differ in their propensities to interact with other drugs and the extent to which their interaction profiles have been defined. The interaction profiles of omeprazole and pantoprazole sodium (pantoprazole-Na) have been studied most extensively. Several studies have shown that omeprazole carries a considerable potential for drug interactions because of its high affinity for CYP2C19 and moderate affinity for CYP3A4. In contrast, pantoprazole-Na appears to have

  18. Transport vs. Metabolism: What Determines the Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Drugs? Insights From the Extended Clearance Model.

    PubMed

    Patilea-Vrana, G; Unadkat, J D

    2016-11-01

    The well-stirred hepatic clearance model (WSHM) has been expanded to include drug transporters (i.e., extended clearance model [ECM]). However, the consequences of this expansion in understanding when transporters vs. metabolic enzymes will affect the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) of drugs remains opaque. Identifying the rate-determining step(s) in systemic or tissue drug PK/PD will allow accurate predictions of drug PK/PD and drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Here, we clarify the implications of the ECM on PK/PD of drugs. © 2016 ASCPT.

  19. Design and application of microfluidic systems for in vitro pharmacokinetic evaluation of drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Maguire, T J; Novik, E; Chao, P; Barminko, J; Nahmias, Y; Yarmush, M L; Cheng, K-C

    2009-12-01

    One of the fundamental challenges facing the development of new chemical entities within the pharmaceutical industry is the extrapolation of key in vivo parameters from in vitro cell culture assays and animal studies. Development of microscale devices and screening assays incorporating primary human cells can potentially provide better, faster and more efficient prediction of in vivo toxicity and clinical drug performance. With this goal in mind, large strides have been made in the area of microfluidics to provide in vitro surrogates that are designed to mimic the physiological architecture and dynamics. More recent advancements have been made in the development of in vitro analogues to physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models - a mathematical model that represents the body as interconnected compartments specific for a particular organ. In this review we highlight recent advancements in human hepatocyte microscale culture, and describe the next generation of integrated devices, whose potential allows for the high throughput assessment of drug metabolism, distribution and pharmacokinetics.

  20. Design and Application of Microfluidic Systems for In Vitro Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Drug Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, T.J.; Novik, E.; Chao, P.; Barminko, J.; Nahmias, Y.; Yarmush, M.L.; Cheng, K.-C.

    2011-01-01

    One of the fundamental challenges facing the development of new chemical entities within the pharmaceutical industry is the extrapolation of key in vivo parameters from in vitro cell culture assays and animal studies. Development of microscale devices and screening assays incorporating primary human cells can potentially provide better, faster and more efficient prediction of in vivo toxicity and clinical drug performance. With this goal in mind, large strides have been made in the area of microfluidics to provide in vitro surrogates that are designed to mimic the physiological architecture and dynamics. More recent advancements have been made in the development of in vitro analogues to physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models – a mathematical model that represents the body as interconnected compartments specific for a particular organ. In this review we highlight recent advancements in human hepatocyte microscale culture, and describe the next generation of integrated devices, whose potential allows for the high throughput assessment of drug metabolism, distribution and pharmacokinetics. PMID:20166997

  1. Vancomycin dosing: assessment of time to therapeutic concentration and predictive accuracy of pharmacokinetic modeling software.

    PubMed

    Nunn, Maya O; Corallo, Carmela E; Aubron, Cecile; Poole, Susan; Dooley, Michael J; Cheng, Allen C

    2011-06-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring is usually required for safe and effective administration of vancomycin. However, dosing recommendations from published guidelines are not suitable in achieving therapeutic vancomycin concentrations in a timely manner in patients with normal renal function. To audit vancomycin dosing and concentrations at our institution and evaluate the predictive accuracy of a pharmacokinetic simulation program, with a view to implementing a pharmacy-based pharmacokinetic service for vancomycin monitoring. Patients receiving vancomycin were identified prospectively through the therapeutic drug monitoring archives. Patient information was obtained from medication charts and medical records that were located on wards. Data were entered into the MM-USC*Pack program (Jelliffe R, University of Southern California, 2008, version 12.10). This software was used to predict initial and subsequent concentrations of vancomycin based on patient parameters. The predictive accuracy of this software was evaluated by comparing the predicted concentrations to the observed concentrations. During a 6-week period, 204 concentrations were measured in 77 patients. The most common dosing regimen was 1 g every 12 hours. Overall, initial trough concentrations were subtherapeutic (<10 mg/L) in 58% of patients and trough concentrations did not become therapeutic at any stage throughout therapy in 25% of patients. The pharmacokinetic modeling software demonstrated little systematic bias (-3.1%), but the precision (median prediction error) was 23% (interquartile range, 11-45%). Predictions were poorer in obese patients (body mass index >35 kg/m(2)) and in patients with unstable renal function. A delay in attaining target trough concentrations was observed in a significant proportion of patients. Pharmacokinetic modeling software is a potential tool to improve the timeliness of achieving adequate dosing by allowing concentrations to be determined prior to steady-state. The program

  2. Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Optimal Sampling Strategies for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Rifampin in Patients with Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sturkenboom, Marieke G. G.; Mulder, Leonie W.; de Jager, Arthur; van Altena, Richard; Aarnoutse, Rob E.; de Lange, Wiel C. M.; Proost, Johannes H.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; van der Werf, Tjip S.

    2015-01-01

    Rifampin, together with isoniazid, has been the backbone of the current first-line treatment of tuberculosis (TB). The ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0–24) to the MIC is the best predictive pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic parameter for determinations of efficacy. The objective of this study was to develop an optimal sampling procedure based on population pharmacokinetics to predict AUC0–24 values. Patients received rifampin orally once daily as part of their anti-TB treatment. A one-compartmental pharmacokinetic population model with first-order absorption and lag time was developed using observed rifampin plasma concentrations from 55 patients. The population pharmacokinetic model was developed using an iterative two-stage Bayesian procedure and was cross-validated. Optimal sampling strategies were calculated using Monte Carlo simulation (n = 1,000). The geometric mean AUC0–24 value was 41.5 (range, 13.5 to 117) mg · h/liter. The median time to maximum concentration of drug in serum (Tmax) was 2.2 h, ranging from 0.4 to 5.7 h. This wide range indicates that obtaining a concentration level at 2 h (C2) would not capture the peak concentration in a large proportion of the population. Optimal sampling using concentrations at 1, 3, and 8 h postdosing was considered clinically suitable with an r2 value of 0.96, a root mean squared error value of 13.2%, and a prediction bias value of −0.4%. This study showed that the rifampin AUC0–24 in TB patients can be predicted with acceptable accuracy and precision using the developed population pharmacokinetic model with optimal sampling at time points 1, 3, and 8 h. PMID:26055359

  3. The use of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data in the assessment of drug safety in early drug development

    PubMed Central

    Walker, D K

    2004-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry continues to look for ways to reduce drug candidate attrition throughout the drug discovery and development process. A significant cause of attrition is due to safety issues arising either as a result of animal toxicity testing or in the clinical programme itself. A factor in the assessment of safety during early drug development is the pharmacokinetic profile of the compound. This allows safety data to be considered in the light of systemic drug exposure and therefore permits a quantitative assessment. This is particularly applicable when assessing the risk of a new chemical entity (NCE) in relation to safety parameters such as QT interval prolongation, where free plasma concentrations have been shown to be predictive of this property in relation to potency in preclinical testing. Prior to actual human exposure it is therefore important to be able to predict reliably the pharmacokinetic behaviour of an NCE in order to place such safety findings into a quantitative risk context. The emerging science of pharmacogenetics is likely to further our ability to assess the risk of NCEs to populations and individuals due to genetic variance. The drug metabolizing enzyme CYP2D6 has been recognized as providing the potential to result in widely differing systemic drug exposure in the patient population due to polymorphic expression. Further knowledge is likely to add to our understanding of population differences in exposure and response and aid in the identification of risk factors. One potential strategy for improving the effectiveness of the drug discovery process is to obtain clinical pharmacokinetic data more rapidly in order to assess more accurately the potential for both efficacy and safety of an NCE. Whilst procedures and technologies are available that allow this on the microdose scale, it is important that we recognize potential limitations of these approaches in order that they can be applied beneficially. PMID:15563358

  4. Pharmacokinetics of drugs in patients with the nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Gugler, R; Shoeman, D W; Huffman, D H; Cohlmia, J B; Azarnoff, D L

    1975-01-01

    Since the binding of drugs to plasma proteins can significantly after the intensity of pharmacological and toxicological effects of drugs, we studied the pharmacokinetics of three drugs in patients with hypoalbuminemia secondary to the nephrotic syndrome, but with relatively normal renal function. No significant differences were seen in the pharmacokinetic parameters observed for antipyrine, a drug which is less than 10% bound to plasms proteins. The percentage of unbound diphenylhydantoin, a highly plasms protein-bound drug, was found in patients with the nephrotic syndrome to be twice that of healthy individuals (19,2 vs. 10.1%, P smaller than 0.001). However, there was also a lower steady-state plasma concentration of diphenylhydantoin (2.9 plus or minus 0.6 vs. 6.8 plus or minus 0.6 mug/ml, P smaller than 0.001) secondary to an increase in the plasms clearance (0.048 plus or minus 0.019 vs. 0.022 plus or minus 0.006 liter/kg.h, P smaller than 0.001) in the nephrotic patients. The net effect is no difference in the absolute concentration of unbound diphenylhydantoin in healthy individuals (0.69 plus or minus 0.05 mug/ml) and patients with the nephrotic syndrome (0.59 plus or minus 0.06 mug/ml). Qualitatively, similar differences were observed with clofibrate. The dose of these drugs need not be routinely reduced in patients with the nephrotic syndrome as long as they have reasonably normal renal function (creatinine clearance greater than 50 ml/min). With all highly bound acidic drugs, knowledge of the concentration of unbound drug is essential to the proper interpretation of total blood levels and subsequent treatment of the patient. PMID:1133166

  5. [Evaluation of pharmacokinetic drug-drug-interactions. Critical considerations of the relevance of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of proton pump inhibitors in self medication].

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karl-Uwe

    2011-08-01

    Mechanisms and evaluation of pharmacokinetic drug interactions are discussed in general, including mechanisms beyond the hepatic phase-I reactions, and especially for the example of proton pump inhibitors (PPI), preferentially omeprazole. Particular attention is paid to the use of PPI as self-prescribed drugs. The sequelae of pharmacokinetic drug interactions can be serious. However, only the evidence of clinical consequences will convert such an interaction from a laboratory finding into a possible adverse effect. Without this, interacting drugs can still be co-administered if the specific characteristics of the concerned drugs, quantitative aspects of the interaction, and especially severity and frequency of possible clinical correlates are taken into consideration. It is encouraging that the laboratory findings reported for the PPI--in vitro or ex vivo from volunteer studies--have hardly found equivalents in clinical consequences. As of today, this is also true of the widely discussed interaction with clopidogrel. Regarding the safety of use of PPI as self-prescribed drugs, it also needs to be emphasized that a sizable number of interactions reported for omeprazole and/or pantoprazole were observed at higher dose levels than the 20 mg licensed for self medication. In conjunction with the temporal limitation of PPI self-prescription (14 days), it can be expected that pharmacokinetic drug interactions will generally be no critical factor in the usage of PPI in self-medication. However clinically relevant interactions can occur, e.g. when PPI are combined with extracts from St. John's wort, methotrexat or some inhibitors of HIV-protease with pH-dependent absorption.

  6. Bedaquiline: a review of human pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    van Heeswijk, R P G; Dannemann, B; Hoetelmans, R M W

    2014-09-01

    Bedaquiline has recently been approved for the treatment of pulmonary multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) as part of combination therapy in adults. It is metabolized primarily by the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme 3A4 (CYP3A4) to a less-active N-monodesmethyl metabolite. Phase I and Phase II studies in healthy subjects and patients with drug-susceptible or multidrug-resistant TB have assessed the pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interaction profile of bedaquiline. Potential interactions have been assessed between bedaquiline and first- and second-line anti-TB drugs (rifampicin, rifapentine, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, ethambutol, kanamycin, ofloxacin and cycloserine), commonly used antiretroviral agents (lopinavir/ritonavir, nevirapine and efavirenz) and a potent CYP3A inhibitor (ketoconazole). This review summarizes the pharmacokinetic profile of bedaquiline as well as the results of the drug-drug interaction studies.

  7. Pharmacokinetic Drug Interactions of Antimicrobial Drugs: A Systematic Review on Oxazolidinones, Rifamycines, Macrolides, Fluoroquinolones, and Beta-Lactams

    PubMed Central

    Bolhuis, Mathieu S.; Panday, Prashant N.; Pranger, Arianna D.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    2011-01-01

    Like any other drug, antimicrobial drugs are prone to pharmacokinetic drug interactions. These drug interactions are a major concern in clinical practice as they may have an effect on efficacy and toxicity. This article provides an overview of all published pharmacokinetic studies on drug interactions of the commonly prescribed antimicrobial drugs oxazolidinones, rifamycines, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and beta-lactams, focusing on systematic research. We describe drug-food and drug-drug interaction studies in humans, affecting antimicrobial drugs as well as concomitantly administered drugs. Since knowledge about mechanisms is of paramount importance for adequate management of drug interactions, the most plausible underlying mechanism of the drug interaction is provided when available. This overview can be used in daily practice to support the management of pharmacokinetic drug interactions of antimicrobial drugs. PMID:24309312

  8. Pharmacokinetic Drug Interactions of Antimicrobial Drugs: A Systematic Review on Oxazolidinones, Rifamycines, Macrolides, Fluoroquinolones, and Beta-Lactams.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Mathieu S; Panday, Prashant N; Pranger, Arianna D; Kosterink, Jos G W; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2011-11-18

    Like any other drug, antimicrobial drugs are prone to pharmacokinetic drug interactions. These drug interactions are a major concern in clinical practice as they may have an effect on efficacy and toxicity. This article provides an overview of all published pharmacokinetic studies on drug interactions of the commonly prescribed antimicrobial drugs oxazolidinones, rifamycines, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and beta-lactams, focusing on systematic research. We describe drug-food and drug-drug interaction studies in humans, affecting antimicrobial drugs as well as concomitantly administered drugs. Since knowledge about mechanisms is of paramount importance for adequate management of drug interactions, the most plausible underlying mechanism of the drug interaction is provided when available. This overview can be used in daily practice to support the management of pharmacokinetic drug interactions of antimicrobial drugs.

  9. Interspecies allometric meta-analysis of the comparative pharmacokinetics of 85 drugs across veterinary and laboratory animal species.

    PubMed

    Huang, Q; Gehring, R; Tell, L A; Li, M; Riviere, J E

    2015-06-01

    Allometric scaling is widely used for the determination of first dosage regimen and the interpolation or extrapolation of pharmacokinetic parameters across many animal species during drug development. In this article, 85 drugs used in veterinary medicine obtained from the Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank database were selected for allometric scaling analysis. Outlier species were identified by statistical methods. The results showed that 77% and 88% of drugs displayed significant correlations between total systemic clearance (CL) and volume of distribution at steady status (Vss) vs. body weight (P < 0.05) on a log-log scale, respectively. The distribution of the allometric exponent b for CL and Vss displays approximate normal distribution, with means (0.87 and 0.99) and standard deviations (0.143 and 0.157) for CL and Vss, respectively. Twelve drugs were identified to have at least one outlier species for CL and ten drugs for Vss. The human CL and Vss were predicted for selected drugs by the obtained allometric equations. The predicted CL and Vss were within a threefold error compared to observed values, except the predicted CL values for antipyrine, warfarin and diazepam. The results can be used to estimate cross-species pharmacokinetic profiles for predicting drug dosages in veterinary species, and to identify those species for which interpolation or extrapolation of pharmacokinetics properties may be problematic.

  10. Integrated Two‐Analyte Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Antibody–Drug Conjugates in Patients: Implications for Reducing Pharmacokinetic Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Gibiansky, L; Agarwal, P; Dere, RC; Li, C; Chu, Y‐W; Hirata, J; Joshi, A; Jin, JY; Girish, S

    2016-01-01

    An integrated pharmacokinetics (PK) model that simultaneously describes concentrations of total antibody (Tab) and antibody‐conjugated monomethyl auristatin E (acMMAE) following administration of monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE)‐containing antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs) was developed based on phase I PK data with extensive sampling for two ADCs. Two linear two‐compartment models that shared all parameters were used to describe the PK of Tab and acMMAE, except that the deconjugation rate was an additional clearance pathway included in the acMMAE PK model compared to Tab. Further, the model demonstrated its ability to predict Tab concentrations and PK parameters based on observed acMMAE PK and various reduced or eliminated Tab PK sampling schemes of phase II data. Thus, this integrated model allows for the reduction of Tab PK sampling in late‐phase clinical development without compromising Tab PK characterization. PMID:27863168

  11. Transporter modulation by Chinese herbal medicines and its mediated pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xu; Ma, Jiang; Ye, Yang; Lin, Ge

    2016-07-15

    The increasing use of Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs) as complementary therapy and dietary supplement has been greatly raising the concerns about potential herb-drug interactions (HDIs). HDIs may cause the augmented or antagonized effects of prescription drugs, resulting in unexpected clinical outcomes. Therefore, it is of significance to identify or predict potential HDIs, and to delineate the underlying mechanisms. Drug transporters play key roles in transmembrane passage of a large number of drugs, affecting their absorption, distribution and elimination. Modulation of drug transporters has been recognized as one of the main causes of HDIs. In the last decade, a growing number of Chinese medicinal herbs and their derived phytochemicals have been identified to have modulatory effect toward transporter proteins, leading to pharmacokinetic HDIs when concomitantly used with conventional drugs. Some of these transporter-mediated interactions have already shown clinical significance. This review article focuses on two major transporter superfamilies, the solute carrier (SLC) and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, to provide the recent advanced knowledge on CHMs and their inherent phytochemicals that interact with these transporters, and their induced pharmacokinetic HDIs from both preclinical and clinical aspects. In addition, the challenges and strategy for studying HDIs are also discussed.

  12. PREDICTING AGE-DEPENDENT PHARMACOKINETICS OF SIX VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS UTILIZING PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING OF RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, age-appropriate physiological and chemical-specific parameters were incorporated into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict changes in internal dosimetry for six volatile organic compounds (VOCs) across different lifestages of the rat and ...

  13. Predicting Age-Appropriate Pharmacokinetics of Six Volatile Organic Compounds in the Rat Utilizing Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capability of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models to incorporate age-appropriate physiological and chemical-specific parameters was utilized to predict changes in internal dosimetry for six volatile organic compounds (VOCs) across different ages of rats.

  14. Predicting Age-appropriate Pharmacokinetics of Six Volatile Organic Compounds in the Rat Utilizing Physiologically-based Pharmacokinetic Modeling (T)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capability of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to incorporate ageappropriate physiological and chemical-specific parameters was utilized in this study to predict changes in internal dosimetry for six volatile organic compounds (VOCs) across different ages o...

  15. Predicting Age-appropriate Pharmacokinetics of Six Volatile Organic Compounds in the Rat Utilizing Physiologically-based Pharmacokinetic Modeling (T)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capability of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to incorporate ageappropriate physiological and chemical-specific parameters was utilized in this study to predict changes in internal dosimetry for six volatile organic compounds (VOCs) across different ages o...

  16. PREDICTING AGE-DEPENDENT PHARMACOKINETICS OF SIX VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS UTILIZING PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING OF RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, age-appropriate physiological and chemical-specific parameters were incorporated into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict changes in internal dosimetry for six volatile organic compounds (VOCs) across different lifestages of the rat and ...

  17. Predicting Age-Appropriate Pharmacokinetics of Six Volatile Organic Compounds in the Rat Utilizing Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capability of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models to incorporate age-appropriate physiological and chemical-specific parameters was utilized to predict changes in internal dosimetry for six volatile organic compounds (VOCs) across different ages of rats.

  18. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling Suggests Limited Drug-Drug Interaction Between Clopidogrel and Dasabuvir.

    PubMed

    Shebley, M; Fu, W; Badri, P; Bow, Daj; Fischer, V

    2017-10-01

    Dasabuvir, a nonnucleoside NS5B polymerase inhibitor, is a sensitive substrate of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C8 with a potential for drug-drug interaction (DDI) with clopidogrel. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for dasabuvir to evaluate the DDI potential with clopidogrel, the acyl-β-D glucuronide metabolite of which has been reported as a strong mechanism-based inhibitor of CYP2C8 based on an interaction with repaglinide. In addition, the PBPK model for clopidogrel and its metabolite were updated with additional in vitro data. Sensitivity analyses using these PBPK models suggested that CYP2C8 inhibition by clopidogrel acyl-β-D glucuronide may not be as potent as previously suggested. The dasabuvir and updated clopidogrel PBPK models predict a moderate increase of 1.5-1.9-fold for Cmax and 1.9-2.8-fold for AUC of dasabuvir when coadministered with clopidogrel. While the PBPK results suggest there is a potential for DDI between dasabuvir and clopidogrel, the magnitude is not expected to be clinically relevant. © 2017 The Authors Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  19. Intravenous infusion of electrolyte solution changes pharmacokinetics of drugs: pharmacokinetics of ampicillin.

    PubMed

    Britzi, M; Mazon, Y; Lavy, E; Soback, S

    2014-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ampicillin in dogs was determined after intravenous (i.v.) bolus and constant rate infusion. Ampicillin was administered to six beagle dogs as an i.v. bolus at 20 mg/kg and as a constant rate i.v. infusion (CRI) at 20 mg/kg during 8 h (0.042 mL/min/kg) in Ringer's lactate (Hartmann's) solution. The concentrations were determined by an LC/MS/MS method. After i.v. bolus, ampicillin total body clearance, apparent volume of distribution at steady-state, mean residence time (MRT), and half-life were 4.53 ± 0.70 mL/min/kg, 0.275 ± 0.044 L/kg, 61 ± 13 min, and 111 (85-169) min, respectively. The corresponding parameters calculated after CRI were 13.5 ± 1.06 mL/min/kg, 0.993 ± 0.415 L/kg, 73 ± 27 min, and 49 (31-69) min. Ampicillin concentration decreased by 30% in the Ringer's lactate infusion solution mostly during the first hour after preparation of the solution. Constant rate infusion of Ringer's lactate solution during 8 h caused significant changes in ampicillin pharmacokinetics. The results suggested that special attention should be given to drug pharmacokinetics when co-administered intravenously with electrolyte solutions.

  20. Pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and biodistribution following oral administration of nanocarriers containing peptide and protein drugs.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Brendan T; Guo, Jianfeng; Presas, Elena; Donovan, Maria D; Alonso, María J; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2016-11-15

    The influence of nanoparticle (NP) formulations on the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and biodistribution profiles of peptide- and protein-like drugs following oral administration is critically reviewed. The possible mechanisms of absorption enhancement and the effects of the physicochemical properties of the NP are examined. The potential advantages and challenges of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling to help predict efficacy in man are discussed. The importance of developing and expanding the regulatory framework to help translate the technology into the clinic and accelerate the availability of oral nanoparticulate formulations is emphasized. In conclusion, opportunities for future work to improve the state of the art of oral nanomedicines are identified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic pipeline: translating anticancer drug pharmacology to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingyu; Gallo, James M

    2011-03-01

    Progress in an understanding of the genetic basis of cancer coupled to molecular pharmacology of potential new anticancer drugs calls for new approaches that are able to address key issues in the drug development process, including pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) relationships. The incorporation of predictive preclinical PK/PD models into rationally designed early-stage clinical trials offers a promising way to relieve a significant bottleneck in the drug discovery pipeline. The aim of the current review is to discuss some considerations for how quantitative PK and PD analyses for anticancer drugs may be conducted and integrated into a global translational effort, and the importance of examining drug disposition and dynamics in target tissues to support the development of preclinical PK/PD models that can be subsequently extrapolated to predict pharmacologic characteristics in patients. In this article, we describe three different physiologically based (PB) PK modeling approaches, i.e., the whole-body PBPK model, the hybrid PBPK model, and the two-pore model for macromolecules, as well as their applications. General conclusions are that greater effort should be made to generate more clinical data that could validate scaled preclinical PB-PK/PD tumor-based models and, thus, stimulate a framework for preclinical to clinical translation. Finally, given the innovative techniques to measure tissue drug concentrations and associated biomarkers of drug responses, development of predictive PK/PD models will become a standard approach for drug discovery and development.

  2. Understanding pharmacokinetics using realistic computational models of fluid dynamics: biosimulation of drug distribution within the CSF space for intrathecal drugs.

    PubMed

    Kuttler, Andreas; Dimke, Thomas; Kern, Steven; Helmlinger, Gabriel; Stanski, Donald; Finelli, Luca A

    2010-12-01

    We introduce how biophysical modeling in pharmaceutical research and development, combining physiological observations at the tissue, organ and system level with selected drug physiochemical properties, may contribute to a greater and non-intuitive understanding of drug pharmacokinetics and therapeutic design. Based on rich first-principle knowledge combined with experimental data at both conception and calibration stages, and leveraging our insights on disease processes and drug pharmacology, biophysical modeling may provide a novel and unique opportunity to interactively characterize detailed drug transport, distribution, and subsequent therapeutic effects. This innovative approach is exemplified through a three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics model of the spinal canal motivated by questions arising during pharmaceutical development of one molecular therapy for spinal cord injury. The model was based on actual geometry reconstructed from magnetic resonance imaging data subsequently transformed in a parametric 3D geometry and a corresponding finite-volume representation. With dynamics controlled by transient Navier-Stokes equations, the model was implemented in a commercial multi-physics software environment established in the automotive and aerospace industries. While predictions were performed in silico, the underlying biophysical models relied on multiple sources of experimental data and knowledge from scientific literature. The results have provided insights into the primary factors that can influence the intrathecal distribution of drug after lumbar administration. This example illustrates how the approach connects the causal chain underlying drug distribution, starting with the technical aspect of drug delivery systems, through physiology-driven drug transport, then eventually linking to tissue penetration, binding, residence, and ultimately clearance. Currently supporting our drug development projects with an improved understanding of systems

  3. Predicting Pharmacokinetic Stability by Multiple Oral Administration of Atypical Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Kazuo; Sakiyama, Yojiro; Ohnishi, Takashi; Sugita, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Lower fluctuation, i.e., lower peak-to-trough plasma-concentration variation at steady-state pharmacokinetics, has several advantages for the treatment of schizophrenia with antipsychotics. The reduction of peak concentration can decrease the risk of dose-dependent side effects, such as extrapyramidal symptom and somnolence, and by contrast the increase in trough concentration can decrease the incidence of lack of efficacy due to subtherapeutic drug concentration. Using a one-compartment simulation technique with pharmacokinetic parameters of each atypical antipsychotic collected from package inserts, the fluctuation index was calculated. Among the antipsychotics, the indices varied from 0.018 to 1.9, depending on dosing regimens, formulations and several pharmacokinetic properties. The order of simulated fluctuation index is active-moiety aripiprazole (b.i.d.)

  4. Pharmacokinetic Drug Interactions with Tobacco, Cannabinoids and Smoking Cessation Products.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gail D; Chan, Lingtak-Neander

    2016-11-01

    Tobacco smoke contains a large number of compounds in the form of metals, volatile gases and insoluble particles, as well as nicotine, a highly addictive alkaloid. Marijuana is the most widely used illicit drug of abuse in the world, with a significant increase in the USA due to the increasing number of states that allow medical and recreational use. Of the over 70 phytocannabinoids in marijuana, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)THC), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannibinol are the three main constituents. Both marijuana and tobacco smoking induce cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2 through activation of the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor, and the induction effect between the two products is additive. Smoking cessation is associated with rapid downregulation of CYP1A enzymes. On the basis of the estimated half-life of CYP1A2, dose reduction of CYP1A drugs may be necessary as early as the first few days after smoking cessation to prevent toxicity, especially for drugs with a narrow therapeutic index. Nicotine is a substrate of CYP2A6, which is induced by oestrogen, resulting in lower concentrations of nicotine in females than in males, especially in females taking oral contraceptives. The significant effects of CYP3A4 inducers and inhibitors on the pharmacokinetics of Δ(9)THC/CBD oromucosal spray suggest that CYP3A4 is the primary enzyme responsible for the metabolism of Δ(9)THC and CBD. Limited data also suggest that CBD may significantly inhibit CYP2C19. With the increasing use of marijuana and cannabis products, clinical studies are needed in order to determine the effects of other drugs on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

  5. How to avoid unbounded drug accumulation with fractional pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Hennion, Maud; Hanert, Emmanuel

    2013-12-01

    A number of studies have shown that certain drugs follow an anomalous kinetics that can hardly be represented by classical models. Instead, fractional-order pharmacokinetics models have proved to be better suited to represent the time course of these drugs in the body. Unlike classical models, fractional models can represent memory effects and a power-law terminal phase. They give rise to a more complex kinetics that better reflects the complexity of the human body. By doing so, they also spotlight potential issues that were ignored by classical models. Among those issues is the accumulation of drug that carries on indefinitely when the infusion rate is constant and the elimination flux is fractional. Such an unbounded accumulation could have important clinical implications and thus requires a solution to reach a steady state. We have considered a fractional one-compartment model with a continuous intravenous infusion and studied how the infusion rate influences the total amount of drug in the compartment. By taking an infusion rate that decays like a power law, we have been able to stabilize the amount of drug in the compartment. In the case of multiple dosing administration, we propose recurrence relations for the doses and the dosing times that also prevent drug accumulation. By introducing a numerical discretization of the model equations, we have been able to consider a more realistic two-compartment model with both continuous infusion and multiple dosing administration. That numerical model has been applied to amiodarone, a drug known to have an anomalous kinetics. Numerical results suggest that unbounded drug accumulation can again be prevented by using a drug input function that decays as a power law.

  6. Prediction of Ocular Drug Distribution from Systemic Blood Circulation.

    PubMed

    Vellonen, Kati-Sisko; Soini, Esa-Matti; Del Amo, Eva M; Urtti, Arto

    2016-09-06

    Systemically circulating drugs may distribute to ocular tissues across the blood-ocular barriers. Ocular distribution is utilized in the treatment of ocular diseases with systemic medications, but ocular delivery of systemic drugs and xenobiotics may also lead to adverse ocular effects. Ocular distribution after systemic drug administration has not been predicted or modeled. In this study, distribution clearance between vitreous and plasma was obtained from a previous QSPR model for clearance of intravitreal drugs. These values were used in a pharmacokinetic simulation model to describe entry of unbound drug from plasma to vitreous. The simulation models predicted ocular distribution of 10 systemic drugs in rabbit eyes within 1.96 mean fold error and the distribution of cefepime from plasma to vitreous in humans. This is the first attempt to predict ocular distribution of systemic drugs. Reliable predictions were obtained using systemic concentrations of unbound drug, computational value of ocular distribution clearance, and a simple pharmacokinetic model. This approach can be used in drug discovery to estimate ocular drug exposure at an early stage.

  7. Nanoparticle accumulation in angiogenic tissues: towards predictable pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Yaehne, Kristin; Tekrony, Amy; Clancy, Aisling; Gregoriou, Yiota; Walker, John; Dean, Kwin; Nguyen, Trinh; Doiron, Amber; Rinker, Kristina; Jiang, Xiao Yu; Childs, Sarah; Cramb, David

    2013-09-23

    Nanoparticles are increasingly used in medical applications such as drug delivery, imaging, and biodiagnostics, particularly for cancer. The design of nanoparticles for tumor delivery has been largely empirical, owing to a lack of quantitative data on angiogenic tissue sequestration. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, the deposition rate constants of nanoparticles into angiogenic blood vessel tissue are determined. It is shown that deposition is dependent on surface charge. Moreover, the size dependency strongly suggests that nanoparticles are taken up by a passive mechanism that depends largely on geometry. These findings imply that it is possible to tune nanoparticle pharmacokinetics simply by adjusting nanoparticle size.

  8. Clinical pharmacokinetics of drugs used to treat urge incontinence.

    PubMed

    Guay, David R P

    2003-01-01

    Urge incontinence (also known as overactive bladder) is a common form of urinary incontinence, occurring alone or as a component of mixed urinary incontinence, frequently together with stress incontinence. Because of the pathophysiology of urge incontinence, anticholinergic/antispasmodic agents form the cornerstone of therapy. Unfortunately, the pharmacological activity of these agents is not limited to the urinary tract, leading to systemic adverse effects that often promote nonadherence. Although the pharmacokinetics of flavoxate, propantheline, scopolamine, imipramine/desipramine, trospium chloride and propiverine are also reviewed here, only for oxybutynin and tolterodine are there adequate efficacy/tolerability data to support their use in urge incontinence. Oxybutynin is poorly absorbed orally (2-11% for the immediate-release tablet formulation). Controlled-release oral formulations significantly prolong the time to peak plasma concentration and reduce the degree of fluctuation around the average concentration. Significant absorption occurs after intravesical (bladder) and transdermal administration, although concentrations of the active N-desethyl metabolite are lower after transdermal compared with oral administration, possibly improving tolerability. Food has been found to significantly affect the absorption of one of the controlled-release formulations of oxybutynin, enhancing the rate of drug release. Oxybutynin is extensively metabolised, principally via N-demethylation mediated by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A isozyme. The pharmacokinetics of tolterodine are dependent in large part on the pharmacogenomics of the CYP2D6 and 3A4 isozymes. In an unselected population, oral bioavailability of tolterodine ranges from 10% to 74% (mean 33%) whereas in CYP2D6 extensive metabolisers and poor metabolisers mean bioavailabilities are 26% and 91%, respectively. Tolterodine is metabolised via CYP2D6 to the active metabolite 5-hydroxymethyl-tolterodine and via CYP3A

  9. In vivo microdialysis to determine the relative pharmacokinetics of drugs.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, M; Zhao, M F; Nakashima, M N; Sakurai, M; Sasaki, H; Matsuyama, K; Ichikawa, M

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a simultaneous microdialysis method in blood and brain striatum to determine the relative pharmacokinetics and metabolism of L-3,4-dihydroxypenylalanine (L-dopa). L-Dopa (250 mumol/kg) was administered to rats with or without the aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) inhibitor carbidopa (25 mumol/kg) or benserazide (25 or 62.5 mumol/kg). L-Dopa, its metabolites, and AADC inhibitors in dialysates were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with an electrochemical detector. A moment analysis was also made to obtain pharmacokinetic parameters. After administration of L-dopa alone, it and its related metabolites were detected in both dialysates of blood and brain striatum. Coadministration of carbidopa (25 mumol/kg) or benserazide (62.5 mumol/kg) significantly enhanced the striatal amount of L-dopa by 8.0 and 6.1 times, respectively. Carbidopa and benserazide also increased striatal amounts of L-dopa metabolites, such as 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, homovanillic acid, and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol. Inhibition effect of benserazide on an extracerebral decarboxylation of L-dopa to dopamine (DA) was stronger than that of carbidopa. Carbidopa showed a higher striatal level of DA than benserazide. These results suggest a different effect of the two inhibitors on the DA formations in blood and brain striatum, and on the L-dopa transport through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, microdialysis is an easy and available method for simultaneously assessing the in vivo relative pharmacokinetics and metabolism of drugs in systemic circulation and a target organ.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of Anti-VEGF Agent Aflibercept in Cancer Predicted by Data-Driven, Molecular-Detailed Model.

    PubMed

    Finley, S D; Angelikopoulos, P; Koumoutsakos, P; Popel, A S

    2015-11-01

    Mathematical models can support the drug development process by predicting the pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of the drug and optimal dosing regimens. We have developed a pharmacokinetic model that includes a biochemical molecular interaction network linked to a whole-body compartment model. We applied the model to study the PK of the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) cancer therapeutic agent, aflibercept. Clinical data is used to infer model parameters using a Bayesian approach, enabling a quantitative estimation of the contributions of specific transport processes and molecular interactions of the drug that cannot be examined in other PK modeling, and insight into the mechanisms of aflibercept's antiangiogenic action. Additionally, we predict the plasma and tissue concentrations of unbound and VEGF-bound aflibercept. Thus, we present a computational framework that can serve as a valuable tool for drug development efforts.

  11. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction and their implication in clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Palleria, Caterina; Di Paolo, Antonello; Giofrè, Chiara; Caglioti, Chiara; Leuzzi, Giacomo; Siniscalchi, Antonio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gallelli, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are one of the commonest causes of medication error in developed countries, particularly in the elderly due to poly-therapy, with a prevalence of 20-40%. In particular, poly-therapy increases the complexity of therapeutic management and thereby the risk of clinically important DDIs, which can both induce the development of adverse drug reactions or reduce the clinical efficacy. DDIs can be classify into two main groups: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic. In this review, using Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library and Reference lists we searched articles published until June 30 2012, and we described the mechanism of pharmacokinetic DDIs focusing the interest on their clinical implications. PMID:24516494

  12. Pharmacokinetic Herb-Drug Interactions: Insight into Mechanisms and Consequences.

    PubMed

    Oga, Enoche F; Sekine, Shuichi; Shitara, Yoshihisa; Horie, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    Herbal medicines are currently in high demand, and their popularity is steadily increasing. Because of their perceived effectiveness, fewer side effects and relatively low cost, they are being used for the management of numerous medical conditions. However, they are capable of affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of coadministered conventional drugs. These interactions are particularly of clinically relevance when metabolizing enzymes and xenobiotic transporters, which are responsible for the fate of many drugs, are induced or inhibited, sometimes resulting in unexpected outcomes. This article discusses the general use of herbal medicines in the management of several ailments, their concurrent use with conventional therapy, mechanisms underlying herb-drug interactions (HDIs) as well as the drawbacks of herbal remedy use. The authors also suggest means of surveillance and safety monitoring of herbal medicines. Contrary to popular belief that "herbal medicines are totally safe," we are of the view that they are capable of causing significant toxic effects and altered pharmaceutical outcomes when coadministered with conventional medicines. Due to the paucity of information as well as sometimes conflicting reports on HDIs, much more research in this field is needed. The authors further suggest the need to standardize and better regulate herbal medicines in order to ensure their safety and efficacy when used alone or in combination with conventional drugs.

  13. 78 FR 73199 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Studies With Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Studies With Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs Submitted Under an Abbreviated New Drug Application; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is...

  14. Population pharmacokinetics and limited sampling strategy for first-line tuberculosis drugs and moxifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Magis-Escurra, C; Later-Nijland, H M J; Alffenaar, J W C; Broeders, J; Burger, D M; van Crevel, R; Boeree, M J; Donders, A R T; van Altena, R; van der Werf, T S; Aarnoutse, R E

    2014-09-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of tuberculosis (TB) drugs currently focuses on peak plasma concentrations, yet total exposure [area under the 24-h concentration-time curve (AUC₀₋₂₄)] is probably most relevant to the efficacy of these drugs. We therefore assessed population AUC₀₋₂₄ data for all four first-line TB drugs (rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide and ethambutol) as well as moxifloxacin and developed limited sampling strategies to estimate AUC₀₋₂₄ values conveniently. AUC₀₋₂₄ and other pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were determined following intensive PK sampling in two Dutch TB referral centres. Best subset selection multiple linear regression was performed to derive limited sampling equations. Median percentage prediction error and median absolute percentage prediction error were calculated via jackknife analysis to evaluate bias and imprecision of the predictions. Geometric mean AUC₀₋₂₄ values for rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, ethambutol and moxifloxacin were 41.1, 15.2, 380, 25.5 and 33.6 hmg/L, respectively. Limited sampling at various fixed sampling points enabled an accurate and precise prediction of AUC₀₋₂₄ values of all drugs separately and simultaneously. In the absence of clinically validated target values for AUC₀₋₂₄, average AUC₀₋₂₄ values can be used as reference values in TDM. Limited sampling of AUC₀₋₂₄ is feasible in many settings and allows for TDM to be performed at a larger scale.

  15. An oracle: antituberculosis pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics, clinical correlation, and clinical trial simulations to predict the future.

    PubMed

    Pasipanodya, Jotam; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) science and clinical trial simulations have not been adequately applied to the design of doses and dose schedules of antituberculosis regimens because many researchers are skeptical about their clinical applicability. We compared findings of preclinical PK/PD studies of current first-line antituberculosis drugs to findings from several clinical publications that included microbiologic outcome and pharmacokinetic data or had a dose-scheduling design. Without exception, the antimicrobial PK/PD parameters linked to optimal effect were similar in preclinical models and in tuberculosis patients. Thus, exposure-effect relationships derived in the preclinical models can be used in the design of optimal antituberculosis doses, by incorporating population pharmacokinetics of the drugs and MIC distributions in Monte Carlo simulations. When this has been performed, doses and dose schedules of rifampin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and moxifloxacin with the potential to shorten antituberculosis therapy have been identified. In addition, different susceptibility breakpoints than those in current use have been identified. These steps outline a more rational approach than that of current methods for designing regimens and predicting outcome so that both new and older antituberculosis agents can shorten therapy duration.

  16. Antiepileptic drugs during pregnancy: pharmacokinetics and transplacental transfer.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Marco; De Luca, Carmen; Mappa, Ilenia; Cesari, Elena; Quattrocchi, Tomasella; Spagnuolo, Terryann; Visconti, Daniela; Caruso, Alessandro

    2011-05-01

    Epilepsy represents the most common maternal neurological disorder requiring continuous treatment during pregnancy. Maintaining optimum seizure control is an important objective in pregnancy, and the majority of women with epilepsy will need to continue antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). AEDs are frequently used to treat several other conditions, such as headaches and mood disorders. They have been associated with an increased risk of congenital malformations, minor anomalies, congenital syndrome and development disorders. This risk seems to be higher among women using polypharmacy and valproic acid. Neural tube defects are associated with valproic acid and carbamazepine exposure. New AEDs seem to have a less teratogenic effect, but human experience is still limited. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on AED exposure in pregnancy, focusing on pharmacokinetics and transplacental transport.

  17. A Semi-Mechanistic Metabolism Model of CYP3A Substrates in Pregnancy: Predicting Changes in Midazolam and Nifedipine Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Quinney, S K; Mohamed, A N; Hebert, M F; Haas, D M; Clark, S; Umans, J G; Caritis, S N; Li, L

    2012-01-01

    Physiological changes in pregnancy, including changes in body composition and metabolic enzyme activity, can alter drug pharmacokinetics. A semi-mechanistic metabolism model was developed to describe the pharmacokinetics of two cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) substrates, midazolam and nifedipine, in obstetrics patients. The model parameters were optimized to fit the data of oral midazolam pharmacokinetics in pregnant women, by increasing CYP3A-induced hepatic metabolism 1.6-fold in the model with no change in gut wall metabolism. Fetal metabolism had a negligible effect on maternal plasma drug concentrations. Validation of the model was performed by applying changes in volume of distribution and metabolism, consistent with those observed for midazolam, to the pharmacokinetics parameters of immediate-release nifedipine in healthy volunteers. The predicted steady-state areas under the concentration–time curve (AUCs) for nifedipine were within 15% of the data observed in pregnant women undergoing treatment for preterm labor. This model predicts the pharmacokinetics of two CYP3A substrates in pregnancy, and may be applicable to other CYP3A substrates as well. PMID:23835882

  18. Antihypertensive Drugs Metabolism: An Update to Pharmacokinetic Profiles and Computational Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Zisaki, Aikaterini; Miskovic, Ljubisa; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2015-01-01

    Drug discovery and development is a high-risk enterprise that requires significant investments in capital, time and scientific expertise. The studies of xenobiotic metabolism remain as one of the main topics in the research and development of drugs, cosmetics and nutritional supplements. Antihypertensive drugs are used for the treatment of high blood pressure, which is one the most frequent symptoms of the patients that undergo cardiovascular diseases such as myocardial infraction and strokes. In current cardiovascular disease pharmacology, four drug clusters - Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Beta-Blockers, Calcium Channel Blockers and Diuretics - cover the major therapeutic characteristics of the most antihypertensive drugs. The pharmacokinetic and specifically the metabolic profile of the antihypertensive agents are intensively studied because of the broad inter-individual variability on plasma concentrations and the diversity on the efficacy response especially due to the P450 dependent metabolic status they present. Several computational methods have been developed with the aim to: (i) model and better understand the human drug metabolism; and (ii) enhance the experimental investigation of the metabolism of small xenobiotic molecules. The main predictive tools these methods employ are rule-based approaches, quantitative structure metabolism/activity relationships and docking approaches. This review paper provides detailed metabolic profiles of the major clusters of antihypertensive agents, including their metabolites and their metabolizing enzymes, and it also provides specific information concerning the computational approaches that have been used to predict the metabolic profile of several antihypertensive drugs. PMID:25341854

  19. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling of renally excreted antiretroviral drugs in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    De Sousa Mendes, Maïlys; Hirt, Deborah; Urien, Saik; Valade, Elodie; Bouazza, Naïm; Foissac, Frantz; Blanche, Stephane; Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Benaboud, Sihem

    2015-11-01

    Physiological changes during pregnancy can affect drug disposition. Anticipating these changes will help to maximize drug efficacy and safety in pregnant women. Our objective was to determine if physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) can accurately predict changes in the disposition of renally excreted antiretroviral drugs during pregnancy. Whole body PBPK models were developed for three renally excreted antiretroviral drugs, tenofovir (TFV), emtricitabine (FTC) and lamivudine (3TC). To assess the impact of pregnancy on PK, time-varying pregnancy-related physiological parameters available within the p-PBPK Simcyp software package were used. Renal clearance during pregnancy followed glomerular filtration changes with or without alterations in secretion. PK profiles were simulated and compared with observed data, i.e. area under the curves (AUC), peak plasma concentrations (Cmax ) and oral clearances (CL/F). PBPK models successfully predicted TFV, FTC and 3TC disposition for non-pregnant and pregnant populations. Both renal secretion and filtration changed during pregnancy. Changes in renal clearance secretion were related to changes in renal plasma flow. The maximum clearance increases were approximately 30% (TFV 33%, FTC 31%, 3TC 29%). Pregnancy PBPK models are useful tools to quantify a priori the drug exposure changes during pregnancy for renally excreted drugs. These models can be applied to evaluate alternative dosing regimens to optimize drug therapy during pregnancy. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. Predicting Drug-Target Interactions Using Drug-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shinhyuk; Jin, Daeyong; Lee, Hyunju

    2013-01-01

    Computational methods for predicting drug-target interactions have become important in drug research because they can help to reduce the time, cost, and failure rates for developing new drugs. Recently, with the accumulation of drug-related data sets related to drug side effects and pharmacological data, it has became possible to predict potential drug-target interactions. In this study, we focus on drug-drug interactions (DDI), their adverse effects () and pharmacological information (), and investigate the relationship among chemical structures, side effects, and DDIs from several data sources. In this study, data from the STITCH database, from drugs.com, and drug-target pairs from ChEMBL and SIDER were first collected. Then, by applying two machine learning approaches, a support vector machine (SVM) and a kernel-based L1-norm regularized logistic regression (KL1LR), we showed that DDI is a promising feature in predicting drug-target interactions. Next, the accuracies of predicting drug-target interactions using DDI were compared to those obtained using the chemical structure and side effects based on the SVM and KL1LR approaches, showing that DDI was the data source contributing the most for predicting drug-target interactions. PMID:24278248

  1. Teicoplanin pharmacokinetics in intravenous drug abusers being treated for bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Rybak, M J; Lerner, S A; Levine, D P; Albrecht, L M; McNeil, P L; Thompson, G A; Kenny, M T; Yuh, L

    1991-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of teicoplanin were determined after multiple 30-min intravenous infusions of 10 to 15 mg/kg every 12 to 24 h in 11 intravenous drug abuse (IVDA) patients being treated for bacterial endocarditis. Multiple serum samples were obtained over 7 to 14 days. Twenty-four-hour urine collections were obtained on days 1 and 5. Serum concentration-time data were analyzed by using multiple-dose pharmacokinetic analysis (NONLIN84). Results were compared with pharmacokinetic parameters derived from previous studies in normal healthy volunteers following multiple intravenous infusions of teicoplanin (3 to 6 mg/kg/day). Total and renal clearances of teicoplanin in IVDA patients were found to be significantly greater and more highly variable than those observed previously in normal healthy volunteers. As a result, predicted steady-state trough concentrations in serum may vary up to fivefold. The mechanism responsible for this variation appears to be related to the glomerular filtration rate. In IVDA patients, individualized teicoplanin dosage may be required in the treatment of bacterial endocarditis. PMID:1829880

  2. Prediction of Nanoparticle Prodrug Metabolism by Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Biliary Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Stephan T.; Zou, Peng; Skoczen, Sarah; Xie, Sherwin; Liboiron, Barry; Harasym, Troy; Tardi, Paul; Mayer, LawrenceD.; McNeil, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation is a powerful tool for the prediction of drug concentrations in the absence of analytical techniques that allow for direct quantification. The present study applied this modeling approach to determine active drug release from a nanoparticle prodrug formulation. A comparative pharmacokinetic study of a nanoscale micellar docetaxel (DTX) prodrug, Procet 8, and commercial DTX formulation, Taxotere, was conducted in bile duct cannulated rats. The nanoscale (~40 nm) size of the Procet 8 formulation resulted in confinement within the plasma space and high prodrug plasma concentrations. Ex vivo prodrug hydrolysis during plasma sample preparation resulted in unacceptable error that precluded direct measurement of DTX concentrations. Pharmacokinetic modeling of Taxotere and Procet 8 plasma concentrations, and their associated biliary metabolites, allowed for prediction of the DTX concentration profile and DTX bioavailability, and thereby evaluation of Procet 8 metabolism. Procet 8 plasma decay and in vitro plasma hydrolytic rates were identical, suggesting systemic clearance of the prodrug was primarily metabolic. The Procet 8 and Taxotere plasma profiles, and associated docetaxel hydroxy-tert-butyl carbamate (HDTX) metabolite biliary excretion, were best fit by a two compartment model, with both linear and non-linear DTX clearance, and first order Procet 8 hydrolysis. The model estimated HDTX clearance rate agreed with in vitro literature values, supporting the predictability of the proposed model. Model simulation at the 10 mg DTX equivalent/kg dose level predicted DTX formation rate-limited kinetics and a peak plasma DTX concentration of 39 ng/mL at 4h for Procet 8, in comparison to 2826 ng/mL for Taxotere. As a result of nonlinear DTX clearance, the DTX AUCinf for the Procet 8 formulation was predicted to be 2.6 times lower than Taxotere (775 vs. 2017 h x ng/mL, respectively), resulting in an absolute bioavailability estimate of

  3. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic tissue compartment model selection in drug development and risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Matthew D.; Beard, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    The well-stirred tank (WST) has been the predominant flow-limited tissue compartment model in physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. Recently, we developed a two-region asymptotically reduced (TAR) PBPK tissue compartment model through an asymptotic approximation to a two-region vascular-extravascular system to incorporate more biophysical detail than the WST model. To determine the relevance of the novel flow-limited approach (F-TAR), 75 structurally diverse drugs are evaluated herein using a priori predicted tissue:plasma partition coefficients along with hybrid and whole-body PBPK of eight rat tissues to determine the impact of model selection on simulation and optimization. Simulations show the F-TAR model significantly improves the ability to predict drug exposure, with hybrid and whole-body WST model error approaching 50% for tissues with larger vascular volumes. When optimization is used to fit F-TAR and WST models to pseudo data, WST-optimized drug partition coefficients more appropriately represent curve-fitting parameters rather than biophysically meaningful partition coefficients. Median F-TAR-optimized error ranged from -0.4 to 0.3%, while WST-optimized median error ranged from -22.2 to 1.8%. These studies demonstrate the use of F-TAR represents a more accurate, biophysically realistic PBPK tissue model for predicting tissue exposure to drug and should be considered for use in drug development and regulatory review. PMID:21968734

  4. Development of a New Generation of 4-Aminoquinoline Antimalarial Compounds Using Predictive Pharmacokinetic and Toxicology Models

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Sunetra; Madrid, Peter B.; Catz, Paul; LeValley, Susanna E.; Furniss, Michael J.; Rausch, Linda L.; Guy, R. Kiplin; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Iyer, Lalitha V.; Green, Carol E.; Mirsalis, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    Among the known antimalarial drugs, chloroquine (CQ) and other 4-aminoquinolines have shown high potency and good bioavailability, yet complications associated with drug resistance necessitate the discovery of effective new antimalarial agents. ADMETa prediction studies were employed to evaluate a library of new molecules based on the 4-aminoquinolone-related structure of CQ. Extensive in vitro screening and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in mice helped to identify two lead molecules, 18 and 4, with promising in vitro therapeutic efficacy, improved ADMET properties, low risk for drug-drug interactions, and desirable pharmacokinetic profiles. Both 18 and 4 are highly potent antimalarial compounds, with IC50 values = 5.6 nM and 17.3 nM, respectively, against the W2 (CQ-resistant) strain of Plasmodium falciparum (IC50 for CQ = 382 nM). When tested in mice, these compounds were found to have biological half-lives and plasma exposure values similar to or higher than those of CQ; they are therefore desirable candidates to pursue in future clinical trials. PMID:20361799

  5. Selection between Michaelis-Menten and target-mediated drug disposition pharmacokinetic models.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaoyu; Mager, Donald E; Krzyzanski, Wojciech

    2010-02-01

    Target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) models have been applied to describe the pharmacokinetics of drugs whose distribution and/or clearance are affected by its target due to high binding affinity and limited capacity. The Michaelis-Menten (M-M) model has also been frequently used to describe the pharmacokinetics of such drugs. The purpose of this study is to investigate conditions for equivalence between M-M and TMDD pharmacokinetic models and provide guidelines for selection between these two approaches. Theoretical derivations were used to determine conditions under which M-M and TMDD pharmacokinetic models are equivalent. Computer simulations and model fitting were conducted to demonstrate these conditions. Typical M-M and TMDD profiles were simulated based on literature data for an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (TRX1) and phenytoin administered intravenously. Both models were fitted to data and goodness of fit criteria were evaluated for model selection. A case study of recombinant human erythropoietin was conducted to qualify results. A rapid binding TMDD model is equivalent to the M-M model if total target density R ( tot ) is constant, and R ( tot ) K ( D ) /(K ( D ) + C) ( 2 ) < 1 where K ( D ) represents the dissociation constant and C is the free drug concentration. Under these conditions, M-M parameters are defined as: V ( max ) = k ( int ) R ( tot ) V ( c ) and K ( m ) = K ( D ) where k ( int ) represents an internalization rate constant, and V ( c ) is the volume of the central compartment. R ( tot ) is constant if and only if k ( int ) = k ( deg,) where k ( deg ) is a degradation rate constant. If the TMDD model predictions are not sensitive to k ( int ) or k ( deg ) parameters, the condition of R ( tot ) K ( D ) /(K ( D ) + C) ( 2 ) < 1 alone can preserve the equivalence between rapid binding TMDD and M-M models. The model selection process for drugs that exhibit TMDD should involve a full mechanistic model as well as reduced models. The best model

  6. Drug Sensitivity in Older Adults: The Role of Physiologic and Pharmacokinetic Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Katie E.; Morton, Mark R.

    1989-01-01

    Notes that age-related changes in physiology and pharmacokinetics (how drugs are used in the body) lead to increased drug sensitivity and potentially harmful drug effects. Addresses heightened sensitivity to drug effects seen in older adults. Presents three examples of physiologic decline and discusses some broad considerations for geriatric…

  7. Evaluating a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for predicting the pharmacokinetics of midazolam in Chinese after oral administration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-yun; Chen, Xia; Jiang, Ji; Shi, Jun; Hu, Pei

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the SimCYP simulator ethnicity-specific population model for predicting the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, a typical CYP3A4/5 substrate, in Chinese after oral administration. The physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for midazolam was developed using a SimCYP population-based simulator incorporating Chinese population demographic, physiological and enzyme data. A clinical trial was conducted in 40 Chinese subjects (the half was females) receiving a single oral dose of 15 mg midazolam. The subjects were separated into 4 groups based on age (20-50, 51-65, 66-75, and above 76 years), and the pharmacokinetics profiles of each age- and gender-group were determined, and the results were used to verify the PBPK model. Following oral administration, the simulated profiles of midazolam plasma concentrations over time in virtual Chinese were in good agreement with the observed profiles, as were AUC and Cmax. Moreover, for subjects of varying ages (20-80 years), the ratios of predicted to observed clearances were between 0.86 and 1.12. The SimCYP PBPK model accurately predicted the pharmacokinetics of midazolam in Chinese from youth to old age. This study may provide novel insight into the prediction of CYP3A4/5-mediated pharmacokinetics in the Chinese population relative to Caucasians and other ethnic groups, which can support the rational design of bridging clinical trials.

  8. Evaluating a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for predicting the pharmacokinetics of midazolam in Chinese after oral administration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-yun; Chen, Xia; Jiang, Ji; Shi, Jun; Hu, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the SimCYP simulator ethnicity-specific population model for predicting the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, a typical CYP3A4/5 substrate, in Chinese after oral administration. Methods: The physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for midazolam was developed using a SimCYP population-based simulator incorporating Chinese population demographic, physiological and enzyme data. A clinical trial was conducted in 40 Chinese subjects (the half was females) receiving a single oral dose of 15 mg midazolam. The subjects were separated into 4 groups based on age (20–50, 51–65, 66–75, and above 76 years), and the pharmacokinetics profiles of each age- and gender-group were determined, and the results were used to verify the PBPK model. Results: Following oral administration, the simulated profiles of midazolam plasma concentrations over time in virtual Chinese were in good agreement with the observed profiles, as were AUC and Cmax. Moreover, for subjects of varying ages (20–80 years), the ratios of predicted to observed clearances were between 0.86 and 1.12. Conclusion: The SimCYP PBPK model accurately predicted the pharmacokinetics of midazolam in Chinese from youth to old age. This study may provide novel insight into the prediction of CYP3A4/5-mediated pharmacokinetics in the Chinese population relative to Caucasians and other ethnic groups, which can support the rational design of bridging clinical trials. PMID:26592516

  9. Hydrogen exchange-mass spectrometry measures stapled peptide conformational dynamics and predicts pharmacokinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiangguo Eric; Wales, Thomas E; Elkin, Carl; Kawahata, Noriyuki; Engen, John R; Annis, D Allen

    2013-12-03

    Peptide drugs have traditionally suffered from poor pharmacokinetic properties due to their conformational flexibility and the interaction of proteases with backbone amide bonds. "Stapled Peptides" are cyclized using an all-hydrocarbon cross-linking strategy to reinforce their α-helical conformation, yielding improved protease resistance and drug-like properties. Here we demonstrate that hydrogen exchange-mass spectrometry (HX-MS) effectively probes the conformational dynamics of Stapled Peptides derived from the survivin-borealin protein-protein interface and predicts their susceptibility to proteolytic degradation. In Stapled Peptides, amide exchange was reduced by over five orders-of-magnitude versus the native peptide sequence depending on staple placement. Furthermore, deuteration kinetics correlated directly with rates of proteolysis to reveal the optimal staple placement for improved drug properties.

  10. Genome-wide association study identifies common variants associated with pharmacokinetics of psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Athanasiu, Lavinia; Smorr, Lisa-Lena H; Tesli, Martin; Røssberg, Jan I; Sønderby, Ida E; Spigset, Olav; Djurovic, Srdjan; Andreassen, Ole A

    2015-08-01

    Individual variation in pharmacokinetics of psychotropic drugs, particularly metabolism, is an important factor to consider in pharmacological treatment in psychiatry. A large proportion of this variance is still not accounted for, but evidence so far suggests the involvement of genetic factors. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with concentration dose ratio (CDR) as sub-phenotype to assess metabolism rate of psychotropic drugs in a homogenous Norwegian sample of 1334 individuals diagnosed with a severe mental disorder. The GWAS revealed one genome-wide significant marker (rs16935279, p-value=3.95×10(-10), pperm=7.5×10(-4)) located in an intronic region of the lncRNA LOC100505718. Carriers of the minor allele have a lower metabolism rate of antiepileptic drugs compared to major allele carriers. In addition, several nominally significant associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and CDR for antipsychotic, antidepressant and antiepileptic drugs were disclosed. We consider standardised CDR to be a useful measure of the metabolism rate of a drug. The present findings indicate that common gene variants could affect the metabolism of psychotropic drugs. This warrants further investigations into the functional mechanisms involved as it may lead to identification of predictive markers as well as novel drug targets.

  11. Emerging Insights for Translational Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Studies: Towards Prediction of Nose-to-Brain Transport in Humans.

    PubMed

    Ruigrok, Mitchel J R; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the potential added value of intranasal drug administration, preclinical studies to date have typically used the area under the curve (AUC) in brain tissue or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compared to plasma following intranasal and intravenous administration to calculate measures of extent like drug targeting efficiencies (%DTE) and nose-to-brain transport percentages (%DTP). However, CSF does not necessarily provide direct information on the target site concentrations, while total brain concentrations are not specific to that end either as non-specific binding is not explicitly considered. Moreover, to predict nose-to-brain transport in humans, the use of descriptive analysis of preclinical data does not suffice. Therefore, nose-to-brain research should be performed translationally and focus on preclinical studies to obtain specific information on absorption from the nose, and distinguish between the different transport routes to the brain (absorption directly from the nose to the brain, absorption from the nose into the systemic circulation, and distribution between the systemic circulation and the brain), in terms of extent as well as rate. This can be accomplished by the use of unbound concentrations obtained from plasma and brain, with subsequent advanced mathematical modeling. To that end, brain extracellular fluid (ECF) is a preferred sampling site as it represents most closely the site of action for many targets. Furthermore, differences in nose characteristics between preclinical species and humans should be considered. Finally, pharmacodynamic measurements that can be obtained in both animals and humans should be included to further improve the prediction of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship of intranasally administered CNS drugs in humans.

  12. Definition of variables required for comprehensive description of drug dosage and clinical pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Medem, Anna V; Seidling, Hanna M; Eichler, Hans-Georg; Kaltschmidt, Jens; Metzner, Michael; Hubert, Carina M; Czock, David; Haefeli, Walter E

    2017-05-01

    Electronic clinical decision support systems (CDSS) require drug information that can be processed by computers. The goal of this project was to determine and evaluate a compilation of variables that comprehensively capture the information contained in the summary of product characteristic (SmPC) and unequivocally describe the drug, its dosage options, and clinical pharmacokinetics. An expert panel defined and structured a set of variables and drafted a guideline to extract and enter information on dosage and clinical pharmacokinetics from textual SmPCs as published by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). The set of variables was iteratively revised and evaluated by data extraction and variable allocation of roughly 7% of all centrally approved drugs. The information contained in the SmPC was allocated to three information clusters consisting of 260 variables. The cluster "drug characterization" specifies the nature of the drug. The cluster "dosage" provides information on approved drug dosages and defines corresponding specific conditions. The cluster "clinical pharmacokinetics" includes pharmacokinetic parameters of relevance for dosing in clinical practice. A first evaluation demonstrated that, despite the complexity of the current free text SmPCs, dosage and pharmacokinetic information can be reliably extracted from the SmPCs and comprehensively described by a limited set of variables. By proposing a compilation of variables well describing drug dosage and clinical pharmacokinetics, the project represents a step forward towards the development of a comprehensive database system serving as information source for sophisticated CDSS.

  13. Assessment of drug accumulation in the evaluation of pharmacokinetic data.

    PubMed

    Meineke, I; Gleiter, C H

    1998-08-01

    The evaluation of drug accumulation is approached from a practical point of view. Estimates of accumulation indices as obtained from standard estimators-AUC, peak levels, and trough levels (RAUAUC Rmax and Rmin, respectively)-are compared and differences analyzed. The estimators are based on the concentration-time curve characteristics area under the concentration-time curve (AUC), maximum concentration, and trough level. Simulated data are used for the analysis, both noise-free and with random error added. The data are based on pharmacokinetic parameters derived from a clinical study. The numerical procedures can be reproduced by the interested reader with little effort. It is shown empirically that if Rmin, > RAUC then simple kinetic behavior cannot be safely assumed, but accumulation is a complex function of time. Rmax as obtained from the data and an estimate of this value based on time to peak concentration (tmax) and apparent elimination rate constant (lambda(z)) after a single dose and at steady state can then be compared in an attempt to exclude time-dependent kinetics. This new numerical procedure can provide valuable and even pivotal information regarding the accumulation kinetics of a compound under investigation. Recommendations on how to use the available concentration-time information to the best advantage are presented. It is concluded that the assessment of drug accumulation should not be confined to the calculation of just one estimate, because the three estimators RAUC, Rmax. and Rmin reflect different aspects of accumulation. Moreover, all information about accumulation should be carefully analyzed in the clinical context. This way the relevant accumulation can be identified for safe and efficacious drug treatment.

  14. Evaluation of linear classifiers on articles containing pharmacokinetic evidence of drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Kolchinsky, A; Lourenço, A; Li, L; Rocha, L M

    2013-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. DDI research includes the study of different aspects of drug interactions, from in vitro pharmacology, which deals with drug interaction mechanisms, to pharmaco-epidemiology, which investigates the effects of DDI on drug efficacy and adverse drug reactions. Biomedical literature mining can aid both kinds of approaches by extracting relevant DDI signals from either the published literature or large clinical databases. However, though drug interaction is an ideal area for translational research, the inclusion of literature mining methodologies in DDI workflows is still very preliminary. One area that can benefit from literature mining is the automatic identification of a large number of potential DDIs, whose pharmacological mechanisms and clinical significance can then be studied via in vitro pharmacology and in populo pharmaco-epidemiology. We implemented a set of classifiers for identifying published articles relevant to experimental pharmacokinetic DDI evidence. These documents are important for identifying causal mechanisms behind putative drug-drug interactions, an important step in the extraction of large numbers of potential DDIs. We evaluate performance of several linear classifiers on PubMed abstracts, under different feature transformation and dimensionality reduction methods. In addition, we investigate the performance benefits of including various publicly-available named entity recognition features, as well as a set of internally-developed pharmacokinetic dictionaries. We found that several classifiers performed well in distinguishing relevant and irrelevant abstracts. We found that the combination of unigram and bigram textual features gave better performance than unigram features alone, and also that normalization transforms that adjusted for feature frequency and document length improved classification. For some classifiers, such as linear discriminant analysis (LDA), proper

  15. Rabbit as an animal model for intravitreal pharmacokinetics: Clinical predictability and quality of the published data.

    PubMed

    Del Amo, Eva M; Urtti, Arto

    2015-08-01

    Intravitreal administration is the method of choice in drug delivery to the retina and/or choroid. Rabbit is the most commonly used animal species in intravitreal pharmacokinetics, but it has been criticized as being a poor model of human eye. The critique is based on some anatomical differences, properties of the vitreous humor, and observed differences in drug concentrations in the anterior chamber after intravitreal injections. We have systematically analyzed all published information on intravitreal pharmacokinetics in the rabbit and human eye. The analysis revealed major problems in the design of the pharmacokinetic studies. In this review we provide advice for study design. Overall, the pharmacokinetic parameters (clearance, volume of distribution, half-life) in the human and rabbit eye have good correlation and comparable absolute values. Therefore, reliable rabbit-to-man translation of intravitreal pharmacokinetics should be feasible. The relevant anatomical and physiological parameters in rabbit and man show only small differences. Furthermore, the claimed discrepancy between drug concentrations in the human and rabbit aqueous humor is not supported by the data analysis. Based on the available and properly conducted pharmacokinetic studies, the differences in the vitreous structure in rabbits and human patients do not lead to significant pharmacokinetic differences. This review is the first step towards inter-species translation of intravitreal pharmacokinetics. More information is still needed to dissect the roles of drug delivery systems, disease states, age and ocular manipulation on the intravitreal pharmacokinetics in rabbit and man. Anyway, the published data and the derived pharmacokinetic parameters indicate that the rabbit is a useful animal model in intravitreal pharmacokinetics. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Pharmacokinetic Interactions between Drugs and Botanical Dietary Supplements.

    PubMed

    Sprouse, Alyssa A; van Breemen, Richard B

    2016-02-01

    The use of botanical dietary supplements has grown steadily over the last 20 years despite incomplete information regarding active constituents, mechanisms of action, efficacy, and safety. An important but underinvestigated safety concern is the potential for popular botanical dietary supplements to interfere with the absorption, transport, and/or metabolism of pharmaceutical agents. Clinical trials of drug-botanical interactions are the gold standard and are usually carried out only when indicated by unexpected consumer side effects or, preferably, by predictive preclinical studies. For example, phase 1 clinical trials have confirmed preclinical studies and clinical case reports that St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) induces CYP3A4/CYP3A5. However, clinical studies of most botanicals that were predicted to interact with drugs have shown no clinically significant effects. For example, clinical trials did not substantiate preclinical predictions that milk thistle (Silybum marianum) would inhibit CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and/or CYP3A4. Here, we highlight discrepancies between preclinical and clinical data concerning drug-botanical interactions and critically evaluate why some preclinical models perform better than others in predicting the potential for drug-botanical interactions. Gaps in knowledge are also highlighted for the potential of some popular botanical dietary supplements to interact with therapeutic agents with respect to absorption, transport, and metabolism.

  17. An algorithm for evaluating potential tissue drug distribution in toxicology studies from readily available pharmacokinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Patrick; Dambach, Donna M; Hartley, Dylan H; Ford, Kevin; Theil, Frank-Peter; Harstad, Eric; Halladay, Jason; Choo, Edna; Boggs, Jason; Liederer, Bianca M; Dean, Brian; Diaz, Dolores

    2013-10-01

    Having an understanding of drug tissue accumulation can be informative in the assessment of target organ toxicities; however, obtaining tissue drug levels from toxicology studies by bioanalytical methods is labor-intensive and infrequently performed. Additionally, there are no described methods for predicting tissue drug distribution for the experimental conditions in toxicology studies, which typically include non-steady-state conditions and very high exposures that may saturate several processes. The aim was the development of an algorithm to provide semiquantitative and quantitative estimates of tissue-to-plasma concentration ratios (Kp ) for several tissues from readily available parameters of pharmacokinetics (PK) such as volume of distribution (Vd ) and clearance of each drug, without performing tissue measurement in vivo. The computational approach is specific for the oral route of administration and non-steady-state conditions and was applied for a dataset of 29 Genentech small molecules such as neutral compounds as well as weak and strong organic bases. The maximum success rate in predicting Kp values within 2.5-fold error of observed Kp values was 82% at low doses (<100 mg/kg) in preclinical species. Prediction accuracy was relatively lower with saturation at high doses (≥100 mg/kg); however, an approach to perform low-to-high dose extrapolations of Kp values was presented and applied successfully in most cases. An approach for the interspecies scaling was also applied successfully. Finally, the proposed algorithm was used in a case study and successfully predicted differential tissue distribution of two small-molecule MET kinase inhibitors, which had different toxicity profiles in mice. This newly developed algorithm can be used to predict the partition coefficients Kp for small molecules in toxicology studies, which can be leveraged to optimize the PK drivers of tissue distribution in an attempt to decrease drug tissue level, and improve safety

  18. A physiologically-based model to predict individual pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of remifentanil.

    PubMed

    Cascone, Sara; Lamberti, Gaetano; Piazza, Ornella; Abbiati, Roberto Andrea; Manca, Davide

    2017-09-20

    Remifentanil based anesthesia is nowadays spread worldwide. This drug is characterized by a rapid onset of the analgesic effects, but also by a rapid onset of the side effects. For this reason, the knowledge of the remifentanil concentration in the human body is a key topic in anesthesiology. The aims of this work are to propose and validate a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model capable to predict both the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of remifentanil, and to take into account the inter-individual differences among the patients (such as height and body mass). The blood concentration of remifentanil has been successfully simulated and compared with experimental literature data. The pharmacodynamics, in terms of effect of remifentanil on minute ventilation and electroencephalogram, has been implemented in this model. Moreover, the remifentanil concentration in various organs and tissues is predicted, which is a significant improvement with respect to the traditional compartmental models. The availability of the model makes possible the prediction of the effects of remifentanil administration, also accounting for individual parameters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic Polymorphisms Affecting the Pharmacokinetics of Antiretroviral Drugs.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Andrea; Cusato, Jessica; D'Avolio, Antonio; Bonora, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Antiretroviral treatment is highly effective in enhancing HIV-positive patients' survival and quality of life. Despite an increased tolerability in recent years, a substantial amount of patients experience side effects. Antiretrovirals' efficacy and tolerability have been associated with plasma concentrations and single nucleotide polymorphisms in selected genes involved in drug disposition. Our aim was to review the current knowledge in genetic polymorphisms affecting plasma, intracellular or compartmental concentrations of antiretrovirals. A search of the PubMed database was conducted to identify relevant articles, using the following terms: 'pharmacogenetics' or 'pharmacogenomics' or 'single nucleotide polymorphisms' or 'genetic/allelic variants' and 'pharmacokinetics' or 'concentrations' and 'HIV' or 'antiretroviral'. Abstracts from the main HIV conferences during 2015 and 2016 were also searched using the same keywords. Abstracts were manually checked and, if relevant, full papers were obtained. Only articles published in English were selected. Several genetic polymorphisms in genes coding enzymes involved in drug metabolism (cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferases) and transport (P-glycoprotein, anionic and cationic transporters, other transporters), as well as nuclear receptors (pregnane X receptor and the constitutive androstane receptor), have been associated with concentrations of antiretrovirals. The extent of such influence, the conflicting data, and the potential clinical relevance are discussed in the main section of this article. Genetic polymorphisms may affect antiretroviral disposition, as well as both efficacy and toxicity. Despite a large amount of data, such precious knowledge has seldom been applied in patients. Studies on the clinical relevance and cost effectiveness of tailoring antiretroviral regimens to patients' genetic assets are lacking, but their importance may grow with the increasing age and

  20. Comparison of predictability for human pharmacokinetics parameters among monkeys, rats, and chimeric mice with humanised liver.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Maki; Iwasaki, Shinji; Chisaki, Ikumi; Nakagawa, Sayaka; Amano, Nobuyuki; Hirabayashi, Hideki

    2017-03-02

    1. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of chimeric mice with humanised liver (PXB mice) for the prediction of clearance (CLt) and volume of distribution at steady state (Vdss), in comparison with monkeys, which have been reported as a reliable model for human pharmacokinetics (PK) prediction, and with rats, as a conventional PK model. 2. CLt and Vdss values in PXB mice, monkeys and rats were determined following intravenous administration of 30 compounds known to be mainly eliminated in humans via the hepatic metabolism by various drug-metabolising enzymes. Using single-species allometric scaling, human CLt and Vdss values were predicted from the three animal models. 3. Predicted CLt values from PXB mice exhibited the highest predictability: 25 for PXB mice, 21 for monkeys and 14 for rats were predicted within a three-fold range of actual values among 30 compounds. For predicted human Vdss values, the number of compounds falling within a three-fold range was 23 for PXB mice, 24 for monkeys, and 16 for rats among 29 compounds. PXB mice indicated a higher predictability for CLt and Vdss values than the other animal models. 4. These results demonstrate the utility of PXB mice in predicting human PK parameters.

  1. A review of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions with the anthelmintic medications albendazole and mebendazole.

    PubMed

    Pawluk, Shane Ashley; Roels, Craig Allan; Wilby, Kyle John; Ensom, Mary H H

    2015-04-01

    Medications indicated for helminthes and other parasitic infections are frequently being used in mass populations in endemic areas. Currently, there is a lack of guidance for clinicians on how to appropriately manage drug interactions when faced with patients requiring short-term anthelmintic therapy with albendazole or mebendazole while concurrently taking other agents. The objective of this review was to systematically summarize and evaluate published literature on the pharmacokinetics of albendazole or mebendazole when taken with other interacting medications. A search of MEDLINE (1946 to October 2014), EMBASE (1974 to October 2014), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970 to October 2014), Google, and Google Scholar was conducted for articles describing the pharmacokinetics of albendazole or mebendazole when given with other medications (and supplemented by a bibliographic review of all relevant articles). Altogether, 17 articles were included in the review. Studies reported data on pharmacokinetic parameters for albendazole or mebendazole when taken with cimetidine, dexamethasone, ritonavir, phenytoin, carbamazepine, phenobarbital, ivermectin, praziquantel, diethylcarbamazine, azithromycin, and levamisole. Cimetidine increased the elimination half-life of albendazole and maximum concentration (Cmax) of mebendazole; dexamethasone increased the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of albendazole; levamisole decreased the Cmax of albendazole; anticonvulsants (phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine) decreased the AUC of albendazole; praziquantel increased the AUC of albendazole; and ritonavir decreased the AUC of both albendazole and mebendazole. No major interactions were found with ivermectin, azithromycin, or diethylcarbamazine. Future research is required to clarify the clinical relevance of the interactions observed.

  2. Application of Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modeling and Simulation for Antibody-Drug Conjugate Development.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aman P; Shin, Young G; Shah, Dhaval K

    2015-11-01

    Characterization and prediction of the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of Antibody-Drug Conjugates (ADCs) is challenging, since it requires simultaneous quantitative understanding about the PK-PD properties of three different molecular species i.e., the monoclonal antibody, the drug, and the conjugate. Mathematical modeling and simulation provides an excellent tool to overcome these challenges, as it can simultaneously integrate the PK-PD of ADCs and their components in a quantitative manner. Additionally, the computational PK-PD models can also serve as a cornerstone for the model-based drug development and preclinical-to-clinical translation of ADCs. To provide an overview of this subject matter, this manuscript reviews the PK-PD models applicable to ADCs. Additionally, the usage of these models during different drug development stages (i.e., discovery, preclinical development, and clinical development) is also emphasized. The importance of PK-PD modeling and simulation in making rationale go/no-go decisions throughout the drug development process is also highlighted. There is an array of PK-PD models available, ranging from the systems models specifically developed for ADCs to the empirical models applicable to all chemotherapeutic agents, which one can employ for ADCs. The decision about which model to choose depends on the questions to be answered, time at hand, and resources available.

  3. Pharmacokinetic interaction of some antitubercular drugs with caraway: implications in the enhancement of drug bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Sachin, B S; Monica, P; Sharma, S C; Satti, N K; Tikoo, M K; Tikoo, A K; Suri, K A; Gupta, B D; Johri, R K

    2009-04-01

    This study deals with the pharmacokinetic interaction of selected anti-TB drugs with a natural product (CC-1a) derived from caraway (Carum carvi, L.) seed. CC-1a, chemically standardized butanolic fraction, enhanced the plasma levels of rifampicin, pyrazinamide, and isoniazid in Wistar rat, resulting in increased bioavailability indices (C(max) and AUC) of the drugs. Moreover, a 40% reduced dose regimen of these drugs, which additionally contained CC-1a, was equivalent in terms of C(max) and AUC to a normal dose regimen. A permeation-enhancing property of CC-1a across small intestinal absorptive surface was found to be a contributing factor in its bioavailability enhancing profile.

  4. Predicting Intrinsic Clearance for Drugs and Drug Candidates Metabolized by Aldehyde Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jeffrey P.; Korzekwa, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolism by aldehyde oxidase (AO) has been responsible for a number of drug failures in clinical trials. The main reason is the clearance values for drugs metabolized by AO are underestimated by allometric scaling from preclinical species. Furthermore, in vitro human data also underestimates clearance. We have developed the first in silico models to predict both in vitro and in vivo human intrinsic clearance for 8 drugs with just two chemical descriptors. These models explain a large amount of the variance in the data using two computational estimates of the electronic and steric features of the reaction. The in vivo computational models for human metabolism are better than in vitro preclinical animal testing at predicting human intrinsic clearance. Thus, it appears that AO is amenable to computational prediction of rates, which may be used to guide drug discovery, and predict pharmacokinetics for clinical trials. PMID:23363487

  5. Hormone-related pharmacokinetic variations associated with anti-breast cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Ma, Zhiguo; Jiang, Ren-Wang; Wu, Baojian

    2013-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common female cancer, with more than one million new patients diagnosed annually worldwide. Generally speaking, there are three types of drugs used in management of breast cancer namely: hormonal treatment, chemotherapeutic agents and target-based agents. There is increasing evidence that hormones play an important role in development of both hormone-dependent and hormone-independent breast cancers. This review summarizes the pharmacokinetics of various types of drugs used to treat breast cancer. Furthermore, the authors discuss hormone-related variations including: the menstrual status, gender and exogenous hormones influencing drug absorption, distribution, metabolism or excretion (ADME). The authors also describe the physiological factors such as body weight and age that affect the pharmacokinetics of several drugs. The factors affecting the pharmacokinetics of anti-breast cancer drugs are multifaceted. Hormones appear to be a key factor determining the pharmacokinetics (and efficacy) of hormonal therapy due to their role in cancer progression. In chemotherapy, the effects of hormones on the drug pharmacokinetics are possibly mediated through P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux and/or cytochrome P450 metabolism. In many cases, dosing regimen should be adjusted for drugs used in treatment of breast cancers based on the hormone levels in the body.

  6. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Analyses of Drug-Drug Interactions between Iguratimod and Warfarin.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Kyoko; Onoda, Makoto; Tanaka, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Iguratimod (IGU), a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug launched in September 2012, has been reported to carry a risk of severe hemorrhages through a suspected interaction with warfarin (WF) in the all-case surveillance and early postmarketing-phase vigilance. To elucidate possible mechanisms of adverse interaction between IGU and WF, we analyzed the effects of IGU on the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of WF in rats. IGU was orally administered to male Wistar rats once daily for 5 d at 10 or 30 mg/kg in combination with WF at an oral dose of 0.25 mg/kg. Coadministration of IGU 30 mg/kg enhanced the anticoagulant activity of WF; prolonged blood coagulation time (prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time) and decreased levels of vitamin K (VK)-dependent blood coagulation factors (II, VII, IX, and X) were observed. On the other hand, the pharmacokinetic parameters of WF including maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0-24 h) were not affected by the combination with IGU. IGU alone did not change blood coagulation time at doses up to 100 mg/kg, while VK-dependent blood coagulation factors decreased slightly at 30 and 100 mg/kg. These results suggest that the pharmacodynamic effect of IGU on VK-dependent blood coagulation factors is involved in the mechanism of drug-drug interaction of IGU with WF.

  7. [Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis to optimize antibacterial treatments: prediction of efficacy by using Montecarlo simulation techniques].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Navarro, A

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this work is to provide a methodology to predict the potential efficacy of standard dosage schedules established for antimicrobials when used in clinical practice and administered to patients with different demographic characteristics. It is based on the application of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic criteria (PK/PD analysis) to optimize dosification of this type of drug. Pharmacokinetic parameters such as the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) or maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) can be estimated from population kinetic models for each type of patient. Microbiological information, such as the MIC value, is also required. Using the above mentioned information and applying the Montecarlo simulation technique the probability of achieving the recommended value of a substituted variable related to efficacy may be estimated. The proposed methodology has been applied to levofloxacin when reportedly administered to patients showing different characteristics. The results reveal that this method allows us to know a priori whether or not the standard dosage is appropriate for a particular patient for whom the treatment is indicated. In summary, the proposed methodology provides us with a strategy for dosage individualization of antimicrobial agents that can be applied before initiating the treatment with no need for monitoring drug concentration, leading to an increase of clinical efficacy as well as a decreased risk of resistance development.

  8. A pharmacokinetic overview of nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems: an ADME-oriented approach.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Mehrdad; Azadi, Amir; Rafiei, Pedram; Ashrafi, Hajar

    2013-01-01

    With the extensive progress in nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems, pharmacokinetic evaluations have gained much attention from researchers as a central part of the study of these systems. Because the fulfillment of any therapeutic goal(s) by a novel drug delivery system requires that the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) be considered from the early stages of the system design to the final clinical evaluations, extensive knowledge of the pharmacokinetic aspects related to ADME is a crucial part of research in this field. The main objectives of the nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems from a pharmacokinetic viewpoint are (1) an improved drug-release profile in vivo, (2) enhanced drug absorption, (3) site-directed drug distribution, (4) a modified drug metabolism pattern, (5) prolonged drug residence time in body (e.g., in blood circulation), and (6) delayed and/or decreased renal excretion of the drug. Accordingly, the purpose of the current review is to present an insightful summary of pharmacokinetic analyses of nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems along with a critical review of recent findings.

  9. When Is It Important to Measure Unbound Drug in Evaluating Nanomedicine Pharmacokinetics?

    PubMed

    Stern, Stephan T; Martinez, Marilyn N; Stevens, David M

    2016-12-01

    Nanoformulations have become important tools for modifying drug disposition, be it from the perspective of enabling prolonged drug release, protecting the drug molecule from metabolism, or achieving targeted delivery. When examining the in vivo pharmacokinetic properties of these formulations, most investigations either focus on systemic concentrations of total (encapsulated plus unencapsulated) drug, or concentrations of encapsulated and unencapsulated drug. However, it is rare to find studies that differentiate between protein-bound and unbound (free) forms of the unencapsulated drug. In light of the unique attributes of these formulations, we cannot simply assume it appropriate to rely upon the protein-binding properties of the traditionally formulated or legacy drug when trying to define the pharmacokinetic or pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic characteristics of these nanoformulations. Therefore, this commentary explores reasons why it is important to consider not only unencapsulated drug, but also the portion of unencapsulated drug that is not bound to plasma proteins. Specifically, we highlight those situations when it may be necessary to include measurement of unencapsulated, unbound drug concentrations as part of the nanoformulation pharmacokinetic evaluation.

  10. Manipulating In-House Designed Drug Databases For The Prediction of pH-Dependent Aqueous Drug Solubility

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Malcolm J.; AlAbed, Ghada J.; Earley, Melissa; Roberts, Natalia; Gerges, Fady J.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamics properties are available in the package inserts of every Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved prescription drug, including all available chemotherapy drugs. These inserts follow a specific format imposed by the FDA. Whether chemotherapy drugs are administered via the parenteral route or alimentary tract, a significant factor affecting their bioavailability, elimination and consequently the drug’s effectiveness and potency, is its state of aqueous solubility. Water solubility has always lent itself poorly to the different predictive and experimental measures employed in the determination of a useful quantitative assessment. In this project, we first built a chemical structure based searchable database for 85 FDA approved chemotherapy drugs and then used Bio-Rad’s KnowItAll® Informatics suite to focus on the drugs pH-dependent water solubility prediction. We compared the predicted values for water solubility to the available values reported in the drug inserts, testing the practical utility and the predictive ability of our model in reporting such a clinically relevant, underreported pharmacokinetic parameter. A relational cancer drug database (MySQL) was created to further facilitate analysis and/or prediction of a chemotherapy compound’s missing pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:24478935

  11. Challenges and Opportunities for Increasing the Knowledge Base Related to Drug Biotransformation and Pharmacokinetics during Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Leeder, J Steven; Meibohm, Bernd

    2016-07-01

    It is generally acknowledged that there is a need and role for informative pharmacokinetic models to improve predictions and simulation as well as individualization of drug therapy in pediatric populations of different ages and developmental stages. This special issue contains more than 20 papers responding to the challenge of providing new information on scaling factors, ontogeny functions for drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters, the mechanisms underlying the observed developmental trajectories for these gene products, age-dependent changes in physiologic processes affecting drug disposition in children, as well as in vitro and in vivo studies describing the relative contribution of ontogeny and genetic factors as sources of variability in drug disposition in children. Considered together, these contributions serve to illustrate some of the current limitations regarding sample availability, number, and quality, but also provide a framework that allows for the potential value of the results of a given study to be interpreted within the context of these limitations. Among the challenges for the future are improving our understanding of the mechanisms regulating age-dependent changes in factors influencing drug disposition and response, thereby facilitating generalization to systems lacking detailed data, better integrating age-dependent changes in pharmacokinetics with age-dependent changes in pharmacodynamics, and allowing better predictability and individualization of drug disposition and response across the pediatric age spectrum.

  12. Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, the Blood-Brain Barrier, and Central Nervous System Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Alavijeh, Mohammad S.; Chishty, Mansoor; Qaiser, M. Zeeshan; Palmer, Alan M.

    2005-01-01

    Summary: The worldwide market for therapies for CNS disorders is worth more than $50 billion and is set to grow substantially in the years ahead. This is because: 1) the incidence of many CNS disorders (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, and Parkinson’s disease) increase exponentially after age 65 and 2) the number of people in the world over 65 is about to increase sharply because of a marked rise in fertility after World War II. However, CNS research and development are associated with significant challenges: it takes longer to get a CNS drug to market (12–16 years) compared with a non-CNS drug (10–12 years) and there is a higher attrition rate for CNS drug candidates than for non-CNS drug candidates. This is attributable to a variety of factors, including the complexity of the brain, the liability of CNS drugs to cause CNS side effects, and the requirement of CNS drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This review focuses on BBB penetration, along with pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism, in the process of the discovery and development of safe and effective medicines for CNS disorders. PMID:16489365

  13. Population pharmacokinetics of bedaquiline (TMC207), a novel antituberculosis drug.

    PubMed

    McLeay, Sarah C; Vis, Peter; van Heeswijk, Rolf P G; Green, Bruce

    2014-09-01

    Bedaquiline is a novel agent for the treatment of pulmonary multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections, in combination with other agents. The objective of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model for bedaquiline to describe the concentration-time data from phase I and II studies in healthy subjects and patients with drug-susceptible or multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). A total of 5,222 PK observations from 480 subjects were used in a nonlinear mixed-effects modeling approach. The PK was described with a 4-compartment disposition model with dual zero-order input (to capture dual peaks observed during absorption) and long terminal half-life (t1/2). The model included between-subject variability on apparent clearance (CL/F), apparent central volume of distribution (Vc/F), the fraction of dose via the first input, and bioavailability (F). Bedaquiline was widely distributed, with apparent volume at steady state of >10,000 liters and low clearance. The long terminal t1/2 was likely due to redistribution from the tissue compartments. The final covariate model adequately described the data and had good simulation characteristics. The CL/F was found to be 52.0% higher for subjects of black race than that for subjects of other races, and Vc/F was 15.7% lower for females than that for males, although their effects on bedaquiline exposure were not considered to be clinically relevant. Small differences in F and CL/F were observed between the studies. The residual unexplained variability was 20.6% and was higher (27.7%) for long-term phase II studies.

  14. Controversies with self-emulsifying drug delivery system from pharmacokinetic point of view.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Bappaditya; Hamed Almurisi, Samah; Ahmed Mahdi Dukhan, Ather; Mandal, Uttam Kumar; Sengupta, Pinaki

    2016-11-01

    Self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) is an isotropic mixture of lipid, surfactant and co-surfactant, which forms a fine emulsion when comes in contact of an aqueous medium with mild agitation. SEDDS is considered as a potential platform for oral delivery of hydrophobic drug in order to overcome their poor and irregular bioavailability challenges. In spite of fewer advantages like improved solubility of drug, bypassing lymphatic transport etc., SEDDS faces different controversial issues such as the use of appropriate terminology (self-microemulsifying drug delivery system; SMEDDS or self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system; SNEDDS), presence of high amount of surfactant, correlation of in vitro model to in vivo studies, lack of human volunteer study and effect of conversion of SEDDS to final administrable dosage form on pharmacokinetic behavior of the drug. In this review, potential issues or questions on SEDDS are identified and summarized from the pharmacokinetic point of view. Primarily this review includes the conflict between the influences of droplet size, variation in correlation between in vitro lipolysis or ex-vivo intestinal permeation and pharmacokinetic parameters, variation in in vivo results of solid and liquid SEDDS, and potential challenges or limitation of pharmacokinetic studies on human volunteers with orally administered SEDDS. In the past decades, hundreds of in vivo studies on SEDDS have been published. In the present study, only the relevant article on in vivo pharmacokinetic studies with orally administered SEDDS published in past 5-6 years are analyzed for an up to date compilation.

  15. Evaluation of potential pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction between armodafinil and risperidone in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Mona; Bond, Mary; Yang, Ronghua; Hellriegel, Edward T; Robertson, Philmore

    2015-11-01

    Patients with bipolar I disorder and schizophrenia have an increased risk of obstructive sleep apnea. The effects of armodafinil, a weak cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 inducer, on pharmacokinetics and safety of risperidone, an atypical antipsychotic used to treat major psychiatric illness, were investigated. Healthy subjects received 2 mg risperidone alone and after armodafinil pretreatment (titrated to 250 mg/day). Pharmacokinetic parameters were derived from plasma concentrations of risperidone and its active metabolite, 9-hydroxyrisperidone (formed via CYP2D6 and CYP3A4), collected before and over 4 days after risperidone administration, and from steady-state plasma concentrations of armodafinil and its circulating metabolites, R-modafinil acid and modafinil sulfone. Safety and tolerability were assessed. Thirty-six subjects receiving study drug were evaluable for safety; 34 were evaluable for pharmacokinetics. Risperidone maximum plasma concentration (C max) decreased from mean 16.5 ng/mL when given alone to 9.2 ng/mL after armodafinil pretreatment (geometric mean ratio [90 % CI] 0.55 [0.50-0.61]); area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC0-∞) decreased from 92.3 to 44.5 ng·h/mL (geometric mean ratio [90 % CI] 0.51 [0.46-0.55]). C max and AUC0-∞ for 9-hydroxyrisperidone were also reduced (geometric mean ratios [90 % CI] 0.81 [0.77-0.85] and 0.73 [0.69-0.77], respectively). Adverse events were consistent with known safety profiles. Consistent with CYP3A4 induction, risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone systemic exposure was reduced in the presence of armodafinil. Concomitant armodafinil and risperidone use may necessitate risperidone dosage adjustment, particularly when starting or stopping coadministration of the two drugs. However, any such decision should be based on patient disease state and clinical status.

  16. Physiologically-based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Target-Mediated Drug Disposition of Bortezomib in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Mager, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    Bortezomib is a reversible proteasome inhibitor with potent antineoplastic activity that exhibits dose- and time-dependent pharmacokinetics (PK). Proteasome-mediated bortezomib disposition is proposed as the primary source of its nonlinear and apparent nonstationary PK behavior. Single intravenous (IV) doses of bortezomib (0.25 and 1 mg/kg) were administrated to BALB/c mice, with blood and tissue samples obtained over 144 hours, which were analyzed by LC/MS/MS. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model incorporating tissue drug-target binding was developed to test the hypothesis of proteasome-mediated bortezomib disposition. The final model reasonably captured bortezomib plasma and tissue PK profiles, and parameters were estimated with good precision. The rank-order of model estimated tissue target density correlated well with experimentally measured proteasome concentrations reported in the literature, supporting the hypothesis that binding to proteasome influences bortezomib disposition. The PBPK model was further scaled-up to humans to assess the similarity of bortezomib disposition among species. Human plasma bortezomib PK profiles following multiple IV dosing (1.3 mg/m2) on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 were simulated by appropriately scaling estimated mouse parameters. Simulated and observed bortezomib concentrations after multiple dosing were in good agreement, suggesting target-mediated bortezomib disposition is likely for both mice and humans. Furthermore, the model predicts that renal impairment should exert minimal influence on bortezomib exposure in humans, confirming that bortezomib dose adjustment is not necessary for patients with renal impairment. PMID:26391023

  17. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling of target-mediated drug disposition of bortezomib in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Mager, Donald E

    2015-10-01

    Bortezomib is a reversible proteasome inhibitor with potent antineoplastic activity that exhibits dose- and time-dependent pharmacokinetics (PK). Proteasome-mediated bortezomib disposition is proposed as the primary source of its nonlinear and apparent nonstationary PK behavior. Single intravenous (IV) doses of bortezomib (0.25 and 1 mg/kg) were administrated to BALB/c mice, with blood and tissue samples obtained over 144 h, which were analyzed by LC/MS/MS. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model incorporating tissue drug-target binding was developed to test the hypothesis of proteasome-mediated bortezomib disposition. The final model reasonably captured bortezomib plasma and tissue PK profiles, and parameters were estimated with good precision. The rank-order of model estimated tissue target density correlated well with experimentally measured proteasome concentrations reported in the literature, supporting the hypothesis that binding to proteasome influences bortezomib disposition. The PBPK model was further scaled-up to humans to assess the similarity of bortezomib disposition among species. Human plasma bortezomib PK profiles following multiple IV dosing (1.3 mg/m(2)) on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 were simulated by appropriately scaling estimated mouse parameters. Simulated and observed bortezomib concentrations after multiple dosing were in good agreement, suggesting target-mediated bortezomib disposition is likely for both mice and humans. Furthermore, the model predicts that renal impairment should exert minimal influence on bortezomib exposure in humans, confirming that bortezomib dose adjustment is not necessary for patients with renal impairment.

  18. Drug Dosing in Obese Children: A Systematic Review of Current Pharmacokinetic Data

    PubMed Central

    Harskamp-van Ginkel, Margreet W.; Hill, Kevin D.; Becker, Kristian; Testoni, Daniela; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Gonzalez, Daniel; Barrett, Jeffrey S.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Siegel, David A.; Banks, Patricia; Watt, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Obesity affects nearly one sixth of U.S. children and results in alterations to body composition and physiology that can affect drug disposition, possibly leading to therapeutic failure or toxicity. The depth of available literature regarding obesity’s effect on drug safety, pharmacokinetics (PK) and dosing in obese children is unknown. OBJECTIVE To perform a systematic literature review describing the current evidence of the effect of obesity on drug disposition in children. EVIDENCE REVIEW We searched the Medline, Cochrane, and Embase databases (January 1970–December 2012) and included studies if they contained clearance, volume of distribution, or drug concentration data in obese children (age ≤18 years). We compared exposure and weight-normalized volume of distribution and clearance between obese and non-obese children. We explored the relationship between drug physicochemical properties and clearance and volume of distribution. FINDINGS Twenty studies met inclusion criteria and contained pharmacokinetic data for 21 drugs. The median number of obese children studied per drug was 10 (range 1–112), ages ranged from 0–29 years. Dosing schema varied and were based on a fixed dose (n=6, 29%), body weight (n=10, 48%), and body surface area (n=4, 19%). Clinically significant pharmacokinetic alterations were observed in obese children for 65% (11/17) of studied drugs. Pharmacokinetic alterations resulted in substantial differences in exposure between obese and non-obese children for 38% (5/13) of drugs. We found no association between drug lipophilicity or Biopharmaceutical Drug Disposition Classification System class and changes in volume of distribution or clearance due to obesity. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Consensus is lacking on the most appropriate weight-based dosing strategy. Prospective pharmacokinetic trials in obese children are needed to ensure therapeutic efficacy and enhance drug safety. PMID:25961828

  19. [Pharmacokinetic implications associated to the use of drugs as racemates or pure enantiomers].

    PubMed

    Speisky, H; Squella, J A; Nuñez-Vergara, L J

    1995-07-01

    This article critically reviews the recent specialized literature concerning the influence of the stereochemical nature of quiral drugs on the pharmacokinetic processes and its pharmacological implications. Evidence is presented indicating that as a function of the type of enantiomer administered, profound differences in the pharmacokinetic profiles, e.g. absorption, distribution, biotransformation and elimination can occur. As a consequence of the enantioselective nature of the drug-organism interaction, major differences in the therapeutic responses can be envisaged depending on whether the drug is administered as a pure enantiomer or as a racemic mixture.

  20. Targeted drug delivery to bone: pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties of acidic oligopeptide-tagged drugs.

    PubMed

    Takahashi-Nishioka, Tatsuo; Yokogawa, Koichi; Tomatsu, Shunji; Nomura, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Shinjiro; Miyamoto, Ken-Ichi

    2008-03-01

    Site-specific drug delivery to bone is considered to be achievable by utilizing acidic amino acid homopeptides. We found that fluorescence-labeled acidic amino acid (L-Asp or L-Glu) homopeptides containing six or more residues bound strongly to hydroxyapatite, which is a major component of bone, and were selectively delivered to and retained in bone after systemic administration. We explored the applicability of this result for drug delivery by conjugation of estradiol and levofloxacin with an L-Asp hexapeptide. We also similarly tagged an enzyme, tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, to see whether this would improve the efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy. The L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs, including the enzyme, were selectively delivered to bone in comparison with the untagged drugs. It was expected that the ester linkage to the hexapeptide would be susceptible to hydrolysis in situ, releasing the drug or enzyme from the acidic oligopeptide. An in vivo experiment confirmed the efficacy of L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged estradiol and levofloxacin, although there was some loss of bioactivity of estradiol and levofloxacin in vitro, suggesting that the acidic hexapeptide was partly removed by hydrolysis in the body after delivery to bone. The adverse effect of estradiol on the uterus was greatly reduced by conjugation to the hexapeptide. These results support the usefulness of acidic oligopeptides as bone-targeting carriers for therapeutic agents. We present some pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties of the L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs and enzyme.

  1. Venetoclax (ABT-199) Might Act as a Perpetrator in Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Johanna; Gajek, Thomas; Köhler, Bruno Christian; Haefeli, Walter Emil

    2016-02-24

    Venetoclax (ABT-199) represents a specific B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) inhibitor that is currently under development for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies. So far, there is no published information on its interaction potential with important drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, or its efficacy in multidrug resistant (MDR) cells. We therefore scrutinized its drug-drug interaction potential in vitro. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) was quantified by commercial kits. Inhibition of drug transporters (P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs)) was evaluated by the use of fluorescent probe substrates. Induction of drug transporters and drug metabolizing enzymes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. The efficacy of venetoclax in MDR cells lines was evaluated with proliferation assays. Venetoclax moderately inhibited P-gp, BCRP, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, CYP3A4, and CYP2C19, whereas CYP2B6 activity was increased. Venetoclax induced the mRNA expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, UGT1A3, and UGT1A9. In contrast, expression of ABCB1 was suppressed, which might revert tumor resistance towards antineoplastic P-gp substrates. P-gp over-expression led to reduced antiproliferative effects of venetoclax. Effective concentrations for inhibition and induction lay in the range of maximum plasma concentrations of venetoclax, indicating that it might act as a perpetrator drug in pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions.

  2. Herb-drug interactions: challenges and opportunities for improved predictions.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Scott J; Argikar, Aneesh A; Lin, Yvonne S; Nagar, Swati; Paine, Mary F

    2014-03-01

    Supported by a usage history that predates written records and the perception that "natural" ensures safety, herbal products have increasingly been incorporated into Western health care. Consumers often self-administer these products concomitantly with conventional medications without informing their health care provider(s). Such herb-drug combinations can produce untoward effects when the herbal product perturbs the activity of drug metabolizing enzymes and/or transporters. Despite increasing recognition of these types of herb-drug interactions, a standard system for interaction prediction and evaluation is nonexistent. Consequently, the mechanisms underlying herb-drug interactions remain an understudied area of pharmacotherapy. Evaluation of herbal product interaction liability is challenging due to variability in herbal product composition, uncertainty of the causative constituents, and often scant knowledge of causative constituent pharmacokinetics. These limitations are confounded further by the varying perspectives concerning herbal product regulation. Systematic evaluation of herbal product drug interaction liability, as is routine for new drugs under development, necessitates identifying individual constituents from herbal products and characterizing the interaction potential of such constituents. Integration of this information into in silico models that estimate the pharmacokinetics of individual constituents should facilitate prospective identification of herb-drug interactions. These concepts are highlighted with the exemplar herbal products milk thistle and resveratrol. Implementation of this methodology should help provide definitive information to both consumers and clinicians about the risk of adding herbal products to conventional pharmacotherapeutic regimens.

  3. Herb–Drug Interactions: Challenges and Opportunities for Improved Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Brantley, Scott J.; Argikar, Aneesh A.; Lin, Yvonne S.; Nagar, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Supported by a usage history that predates written records and the perception that “natural” ensures safety, herbal products have increasingly been incorporated into Western health care. Consumers often self-administer these products concomitantly with conventional medications without informing their health care provider(s). Such herb–drug combinations can produce untoward effects when the herbal product perturbs the activity of drug metabolizing enzymes and/or transporters. Despite increasing recognition of these types of herb–drug interactions, a standard system for interaction prediction and evaluation is nonexistent. Consequently, the mechanisms underlying herb–drug interactions remain an understudied area of pharmacotherapy. Evaluation of herbal product interaction liability is challenging due to variability in herbal product composition, uncertainty of the causative constituents, and often scant knowledge of causative constituent pharmacokinetics. These limitations are confounded further by the varying perspectives concerning herbal product regulation. Systematic evaluation of herbal product drug interaction liability, as is routine for new drugs under development, necessitates identifying individual constituents from herbal products and characterizing the interaction potential of such constituents. Integration of this information into in silico models that estimate the pharmacokinetics of individual constituents should facilitate prospective identification of herb–drug interactions. These concepts are highlighted with the exemplar herbal products milk thistle and resveratrol. Implementation of this methodology should help provide definitive information to both consumers and clinicians about the risk of adding herbal products to conventional pharmacotherapeutic regimens. PMID:24335390

  4. A paradigm shift in pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) modeling: rule of thumb for estimating free drug level in tissue compared with plasma to guide drug design.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    fraction in plasma derived from a static in vitro environment might be biased to guide drug design (the old paradigm), and, hence, it is recommended to use a PBPK model to reproduce more accurately the in vivo condition in tissue (the new paradigm). This newly developed approach can be used to predict free drug concentration in diverse tissue compartments for small molecules in toxicology and pharmacology studies, which can be leveraged to optimize the pharmacokinetics drivers of tissue distribution based upon physicochemical and physiological input parameters in an attempt to optimize free drug level in tissue. Overall, this present study provides guidance on the application of plasma and tissue concentration information in PBPK/PD research in preclinical and clinical studies, which is in accordance with the recent literature.

  5. High Throughput pharmacokinetic modeling using computationally predicted parameter values: dissociation constants (TDS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimates of the ionization association and dissociation constant (pKa) are vital to modeling the pharmacokinetic behavior of chemicals in vivo. Methodologies for the prediction of compound sequestration in specific tissues using partition coefficients require a parameter that ch...

  6. High Throughput pharmacokinetic modeling using computationally predicted parameter values: dissociation constants (TDS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimates of the ionization association and dissociation constant (pKa) are vital to modeling the pharmacokinetic behavior of chemicals in vivo. Methodologies for the prediction of compound sequestration in specific tissues using partition coefficients require a parameter that ch...

  7. Effect of diabetes mellitus on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of drugs.

    PubMed

    Dostalek, Miroslav; Akhlaghi, Fatemeh; Puzanovova, Martina

    2012-08-01

    The effects of diabetes mellitus on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs have been well described in experimental animal models; however, only minimal data exist for humans and the current knowledge regarding the effects of diabetes on these properties remains unclear. Nevertheless, it has been observed that the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs are changed in subjects with diabetes. It has been reported that diabetes may affect the pharmacokinetics of various drugs by affecting (i) absorption, due to changes in subcutaneous adipose blood flow, muscle blood flow and gastric emptying; (ii) distribution, due to non-enzymatic glycation of albumin; (iii) biotransformation, due to regulation of enzymes/transporters involved in drug biotransformation; and (iv) excretion, due to nephropathy. Previously published data also suggest that diabetes-mediated changes in the pharmacokinetics of a particular drug cannot be translated to others. Although clinical studies exploring the effect of diabetes on pharmacodynamics are still very limited, there is evidence that disease-mediated effects are not limited only to pharmacokinetics but also alter pharmacodynamics. However, for many drugs it remains unclear whether these influences reflect diabetes-mediated changes in pharmacokinetics rather than pharmacodynamics. In addition, even though diabetes-mediated pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics might be anticipated, it is important to study the effect on each drug and not generalize from observed data. The available data indicate that there is a significant variability in drug response in diabetic subjects. The discrepancies between individual clinical studies as well as between ex vivo and clinical studies are probably due to (i) the restricted and focused population of subjects in clinical studies; (ii) failure to consider type, severity and duration of the disease; (iii) histopathological characteristics generally being missing; and (iv) other factors

  8. [Effects of Xenobiotics on Drug Pharmacokinetics and Safety].

    PubMed

    Katoh, Miki

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanotechnology has increased over the past 10 years, and various nanomaterials with a wide range of applications have been developed. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which are cylindrical molecules consisting of hexagonally arranged carbon atoms, are nanomaterials with high utility. Recently, applications of single-walled CNT (SWCNT) in the medical field for drug-delivery and as gene-delivery agents have been proposed. Due to its structural characteristics and physicochemical properties, the inhalation of SWCNT could be considered as one route for targeted drug delivery into the lungs. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the effects of SWCNT on the physiological state and response of the cells upon delivery into the lung. We clarified the different response of two carcinoma cell lines to SWCNT exposure, and determined these differences may be due to different cell functions. Furthermore, SWCNT exposure resulted in a global downregulation of stress-responsive genes in normal human bronchial epithelial cells, thereby indicating that the factors involved in the stress responses were not activated by SWCNT. We then tried to ascertain the possible effect of SWCNT on the fate of drugs delivered with SWCNT. Exposure to SWCNT down-regulated the mRNA expression and enzymatic activity of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 by preventing the binding of activated aryl hydrocarbon receptors to the enhancer region of these genes. This review provides basic information for the prediction of human responses to SWCNT exposure by inhalation, and in its use as a drug delivery carrier.

  9. Virtual Clinical Trial Toward Polytherapy Safety Assessment: Combination of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic-Based Modeling and Simulation Approach With Drug-Drug Interactions Involving Terfenadine as an Example.

    PubMed

    Wiśniowska, Barbara; Polak, Sebastian

    2016-11-01

    A Quantitative Systems Pharmacology approach was utilized to predict the cardiac consequences of drug-drug interaction (DDI) at the population level. The Simcyp in vitro-in vivo correlation and physiologically based pharmacokinetic platform was used to predict the pharmacokinetic profile of terfenadine following co-administration of the drug. Electrophysiological effects were simulated using the Cardiac Safety Simulator. The modulation of ion channel activity was dependent on the inhibitory potential of drugs on the main cardiac ion channels and a simulated free heart tissue concentration. ten Tusscher's human ventricular cardiomyocyte model was used to simulate the pseudo-ECG traces and further predict the pharmacodynamic consequences of DDI. Consistent with clinical observations, predicted plasma concentration profiles of terfenadine show considerable intra-subject variability with recorded Cmax values below 5 ng/mL for most virtual subjects. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects of inhibitors were predicted with reasonable accuracy. In all cases, a combination of the physiologically based pharmacokinetic and physiology-based pharmacodynamic models was able to differentiate between the terfenadine alone and terfenadine + inhibitor scenario. The range of QT prolongation was comparable in the clinical and virtual studies. The results indicate that mechanistic in vitro-in vivo correlation can be applied to predict the clinical effects of DDI even without comprehensive knowledge on all mechanisms contributing to the interaction.

  10. Using Nonexperts for Annotating Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interaction Mentions in Product Labeling: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Yifan; Hernandez, Andres; Horn, John R; Jacobson, Rebecca; Boyce, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Background Because vital details of potential pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions are often described in free-text structured product labels, manual curation is a necessary but expensive step in the development of electronic drug-drug interaction information resources. The use of nonexperts to annotate potential drug-drug interaction (PDDI) mentions in drug product label annotation may be a means of lessening the burden of manual curation. Objective Our goal was to explore the practicality of using nonexpert participants to annotate drug-drug interaction descriptions from structured product labels. By presenting annotation tasks to both pharmacy experts and relatively naïve participants, we hoped to demonstrate the feasibility of using nonexpert annotators for drug-drug information annotation. We were also interested in exploring whether and to what extent natural language processing (NLP) preannotation helped improve task completion time, accuracy, and subjective satisfaction. Methods Two experts and 4 nonexperts were asked to annotate 208 structured product label sections under 4 conditions completed sequentially: (1) no NLP assistance, (2) preannotation of drug mentions, (3) preannotation of drug mentions and PDDIs, and (4) a repeat of the no-annotation condition. Results were evaluated within the 2 groups and relative to an existing gold standard. Participants were asked to provide reports on the time required to complete tasks and their perceptions of task difficulty. Results One of the experts and 3 of the nonexperts completed all tasks. Annotation results from the nonexpert group were relatively strong in every scenario and better than the performance of the NLP pipeline. The expert and 2 of the nonexperts were able to complete most tasks in less than 3 hours. Usability perceptions were generally positive (3.67 for expert, mean of 3.33 for nonexperts). Conclusions The results suggest that nonexpert annotation might be a feasible option for comprehensive

  11. Assessing pharmacokinetic variability directly induced by drug intake behaviour through development of a feeding behaviour-pharmacokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Petit-Jetté, C E; Gohore Bi, D; Fenneteau, F; Del Castillo, J R E; Nekka, F

    2008-04-07

    Variability in drug intake is increasingly recognized as a major source of variability in drug response. The non-uniform access to medicated feed, influenced by swine individual feeding behaviour, is a determinant of antibiotic exposure, recalling the intrinsic similarity with human compliance to drug regimens. In this paper, we developed a feeding behaviour-pharmacokinetic (FBPK) model of in-feed chlortetracycline (CTC) and established, in a definite way, the effect of feeding behaviour and its induced pharmacokinetic (PK) variability. Based on reported animal behaviour, we mathematically formulated swine feeding behaviour by incorporating its main characteristics: intense feeding periods that repeat on a daily basis and random feeding periods of free access to feed, along with growth stage factors. This behaviour model was then integrated into a PK model of CTC. Moreover, we analysed the effect of each feeding behaviour component and assessed the corresponding PK variability. We have been able to delineate the impact of different feeding behaviour components and characterize the induced PK variability. We have compared different therapeutic assumptions to our model and shown that random features underlying the feeding behaviour have dramatic influence on the PK variability. A practical tool to adopt the dosing regimen in terms of dose and age has been proposed. The method developed here can be generalized to other therapeutic contexts and incorporated into medical practice, particularly to make long-term projections of drug-intake behaviour, to explain possible treatment failure and guide practitioners in adjusting the dosing regimen.

  12. Cellular pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses of ethacrynic acid: Implications in topical drug delivery in the eye

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Wen; Gonzalez, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Ethacrynic acid (ECA) is a potential trabecular meshwork (TM) drug that has shown promising results in preclinical studies for treatment of primary open-angle glaucoma. However, topical application of ECA is currently limited by adverse effects in corneal tissues. To this end, we developed a new theoretical model to evaluate time-dependent toxicity induced by ECA in corneal epithelial cells. Methods The model consisted of a cellular pharmacokinetic (PK) module to determine intracellular concentration of ECA, and a pharmacodynamic (PD) module to determine the cytotoxicity of ECA. It was assumed that ECA-induced cytotoxicity depended on drug exposure time and peak concentration of bound ECA in cells. In addition to the model development, we experimentally determined the intracellular concentration of ECA as a function of drug dose and treatment time. Results The intracellular concentration increased linearly (i.e., no saturation) with increasing the dose of ECA. It also increased initially with time and then reached a steady-state at ~40 min. The percent of cells survived after treatment decreased with increasing the dose of drug or the time of treatment. The experimental data were fit by the new PK and PD models to obtain values of model constants. One of the unique applications of these models was to predict cell survival relative to control when extracellular concentration of ECA varied with time. The prediction showed that the toxicity of ECA might be significantly overestimated by using the traditional LC50 determined in vitro. Conclusions The new PK and PD models developed in this study were capable to fit experimental data and predict time-dependent toxicity of ECA in corneal epithelial cells. The models may be useful for optimizing the dose and schedule in topical application of ECA for glaucoma treatment. PMID:21976961

  13. Flip-flop pharmacokinetics – delivering a reversal of disposition: challenges and opportunities during drug development

    PubMed Central

    Yáñez, Jaime A; Remsberg, Connie M; Sayre, Casey L; Forrest, M Laird; Davies, Neal M

    2011-01-01

    Flip-flop pharmacokinetics is a phenomenon often encountered with extravascularly administered drugs. Occurrence of flip-flop spans preclinical to human studies. The purpose of this article is to analyze both the pharmacokinetic interpretation errors and opportunities underlying the presence of flip-flop pharmacokinetics during drug development. Flip-flop occurs when the rate of absorption is slower than the rate of elimination. If it is not recognized, it can create difficulties in the acquisition and interpretation of pharmacokinetic parameters. When flip-flop is expected or discovered, a longer duration of sampling may be necessary in order to avoid overestimation of fraction of dose absorbed. Common culprits of flip-flop disposition are modified dosage formulations; however, formulation characteristics such as the drug chemical entities themselves or the incorporated excipients can also cause the phenomenon. Yet another contributing factor is the physiological makeup of the extravascular site of administration. In this article, these causes of flip-flop pharmacokinetics are discussed with incorporation of relevant examples and the implications for drug development outlined. PMID:21837267

  14. Nanoparticle Drug Loading as a Design Parameter to Improve Docetaxel Pharmacokinetics and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Kevin S.; Schorzman, Allison N.; Finniss, Mathew C.; Bowerman, Charles J.; Peng, Lei; Luft, J. Christopher; Madden, Andrew; Wang, Andrew Z.; Zamboni, William C.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) drug loading is one of the key defining characteristics of a NP formulation. However, the effect of NP drug loading on therapeutic efficacy and pharmacokinetics has not been thoroughly evaluated. Herein, we characterized the efficacy, toxicity and pharmacokinetic properties of NP docetaxel formulations that have differential drug loading but are otherwise identical. Particle Replication in Non-wetting Templates (PRINT®), a soft-lithography fabrication technique, was used to formulate NPs with identical size, shape and surface chemistry, but with variable docetaxel loading. The lower weight loading (9%-NP) of docetaxel was found to have a superior pharmacokinetic profile and enhanced efficacy in a murine cancer model when compared to that of a higher docetaxel loading (20%-NP). The 9%-NP docetaxel increased plasma and tumor docetaxel exposure and reduced liver, spleen and lung exposure when compared to that of 20%-NP docetaxel. PMID:23899444

  15. Pharmacokinetic drug interaction study between overactive bladder drugs mirabegron and tolterodine in Japanese healthy postmenopausal females.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yuki; Iitsuka, Hiromi; Toyoshima, Junko; Kuroishi, Kentaro; Hatta, Toshifumi; Kaibara, Atsunori; Katashima, Masataka; Moy, Selina; Sawamoto, Taiji

    2016-12-01

    Mirabegron, the first selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB), inhibits cytochrome P450 isozyme CYP2D6. This study was performed in Japanese healthy postmenopausal female volunteers to assess any pharmacokinetic drug interaction between mirabegron and tolterodine, another OAB drug and a sensitive substrate of CYP2D6. Tolterodine 4 mg was orally administered from Days 1-7 and co-administered with mirabegron 50 mg from Days 8-14. Mirabegron 50 mg increased maximum concentration (Cmax) and area under the concentration-time curve from zero to 24 h after dosing (AUC24h) of tolterodine by 2.06-fold (90% confidence interval [CI] 1.81, 2.34) and 1.86-fold (90% CI 1.60, 2.16), respectively, and increased Cmax and AUC24h of the metabolite 5-hydroxymethyl tolterodine by 1.36-fold (90% CI 1.26, 1.47) and 1.25-fold (90% CI 1.15, 1.37), respectively. This suggested a weak pharmacokinetic drug interaction between mirabegron and tolterodine. Mean change from baseline of Fridericia's QT correction formula (ΔQTcF) was slightly higher on Day 14 than on Day 7. No subject had QTcF >480 msec or ΔQTcF >60 msec. All the treatment-emergent adverse events were mild. Mirabegron 50 mg was considered to be safe and well tolerated when coadministered with tolterodine 4 mg in healthy postmenopausal female volunteers. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pharmacokinetic Interactions between Drugs and Botanical Dietary Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Sprouse, Alyssa A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of botanical dietary supplements has grown steadily over the last 20 years despite incomplete information regarding active constituents, mechanisms of action, efficacy, and safety. An important but underinvestigated safety concern is the potential for popular botanical dietary supplements to interfere with the absorption, transport, and/or metabolism of pharmaceutical agents. Clinical trials of drug–botanical interactions are the gold standard and are usually carried out only when indicated by unexpected consumer side effects or, preferably, by predictive preclinical studies. For example, phase 1 clinical trials have confirmed preclinical studies and clinical case reports that St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) induces CYP3A4/CYP3A5. However, clinical studies of most botanicals that were predicted to interact with drugs have shown no clinically significant effects. For example, clinical trials did not substantiate preclinical predictions that milk thistle (Silybum marianum) would inhibit CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and/or CYP3A4. Here, we highlight discrepancies between preclinical and clinical data concerning drug–botanical interactions and critically evaluate why some preclinical models perform better than others in predicting the potential for drug–botanical interactions. Gaps in knowledge are also highlighted for the potential of some popular botanical dietary supplements to interact with therapeutic agents with respect to absorption, transport, and metabolism. PMID:26438626

  17. Extraction of pharmacokinetic evidence of drug-drug interactions from the literature.

    PubMed

    Kolchinsky, Artemy; Lourenço, Anália; Wu, Heng-Yi; Li, Lang; Rocha, Luis M

    2015-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and a subject of intense scientific interest. Biomedical literature mining can aid DDI research by extracting evidence for large numbers of potential interactions from published literature and clinical databases. Though DDI is investigated in domains ranging in scale from intracellular biochemistry to human populations, literature mining has not been used to extract specific types of experimental evidence, which are reported differently for distinct experimental goals. We focus on pharmacokinetic evidence for DDI, essential for identifying causal mechanisms of putative interactions and as input for further pharmacological and pharmacoepidemiology investigations. We used manually curated corpora of PubMed abstracts and annotated sentences to evaluate the efficacy of literature mining on two tasks: first, identifying PubMed abstracts containing pharmacokinetic evidence of DDIs; second, extracting sentences containing such evidence from abstracts. We implemented a text mining pipeline and evaluated it using several linear classifiers and a variety of feature transforms. The most important textual features in the abstract and sentence classification tasks were analyzed. We also investigated the performance benefits of using features derived from PubMed metadata fields, various publicly available named entity recognizers, and pharmacokinetic dictionaries. Several classifiers performed very well in distinguishing relevant and irrelevant abstracts (reaching F1≈0.93, MCC≈0.74, iAUC≈0.99) and sentences (F1≈0.76, MCC≈0.65, iAUC≈0.83). We found that word bigram features were important for achieving optimal classifier performance and that features derived from Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms significantly improved abstract classification. We also found that some drug-related named entity recognition tools and dictionaries led to slight but significant improvements, especially in

  18. Population Pharmacokinetic Modelling and Bayesian Estimation of Tacrolimus Exposure: Is this Clinically Useful for Dosage Prediction Yet?

    PubMed

    Brooks, Emily; Tett, Susan E; Isbel, Nicole M; Staatz, Christine E

    2016-11-01

    This review summarises the available data on the population pharmacokinetics of tacrolimus and use of Maximum A Posteriori (MAP) Bayesian estimation to predict tacrolimus exposure and subsequent drug dosage requirements in solid organ transplant recipients. A literature search was conducted which identified 56 studies that assessed the population pharmacokinetics of tacrolimus based on non-linear mixed effects modelling and 14 studies that assessed the predictive performance of MAP Bayesian estimation of tacrolimus area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from time zero to the end of the dosing interval. Studies were most commonly undertaken in adult kidney transplant recipients and investigated the immediate-release formulation. The pharmacokinetics of tacrolimus were described using one- and two-compartment disposition models with first-order elimination in 61 and 39 % of population pharmacokinetic studies, respectively. Variability in tacrolimus whole blood apparent clearance amongst transplant recipients was most commonly related to cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A5 genotype (rs776746), patient haematocrit, patient weight, post-operative day and hepatic function (aspartate aminotransferase). Bias, as calculated using estimation of the mean predictive error (MPE) or mean percentage predictive error (MPPE) associated with prediction of the tacrolimus AUC, ranged from -15 to 9.95 %. Imprecision, as calculated through estimation of the root mean squared error (RMSE) or mean absolute prediction error (MAPE), was generally much poorer overall, ranging from 0.81 to 40. r (2) values ranged from 0.27 to 0.99 %. Of the Bayesian forecasting strategies that used two or more tacrolimus concentrations, 71 % showed bias of 10 % or less; however, only 39 % showed imprecision of 10 % or less. The combination of sampling times at 0, 1 and 3 h post-dose consistently showed bias and imprecision values of less than 15 %. No studies to date have examined how closely MAP

  19. Psychotropic drugs and liver disease: A critical review of pharmacokinetics and liver toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Telles-Correia, Diogo; Barbosa, António; Cortez-Pinto, Helena; Campos, Carlos; Rocha, Nuno B F; Machado, Sérgio

    2017-01-01

    The liver is the organ by which the majority of substances are metabolized, including psychotropic drugs. There are several pharmacokinetic changes in end-stage liver disease that can interfere with the metabolization of psychotropic drugs. This fact is particularly true in drugs with extensive first-pass metabolism, highly protein bound drugs and drugs depending on phase I hepatic metabolic reactions. Psychopharmacological agents are also associated with a risk of hepatotoxicity. The evidence is insufficient for definite conclusions regarding the prevalence and severity of psychiatric drug-induced liver injury. High-risk psychotropics are not advised when there is pre-existing liver disease, and after starting a psychotropic agent in a patient with hepatic impairment, frequent liver function/lesion monitoring is advised. The authors carefully review the pharmacokinetic disturbances induced by end-stage liver disease and the potential of psychopharmacological agents for liver toxicity. PMID:28217372

  20. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Drugs Commonly Used in Pregnancy and Parturition.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Jessica; Carvalho, Brendan; Shafer, Steven L; Flood, Pamela

    2016-03-01

    The majority of pregnant women will be treated with a medication other than a vitamin supplement during their pregnancy. Almost half of these medications will be category C or D according to the former US Food and Drug Administration classification system, indicating a lack of human studies with animal studies suggesting adverse fetal effects (category C) or evidence of risk in humans (category D). Changes in maternal physiology alter drug bioavailability, distribution, clearance, and thus the drug half-life in often unpredictable ways. For many drugs, good pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data in pregnancy and parturition are lacking. For other drugs, recent studies demonstrate major pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic changes that require dose adjustment in pregnancy, but current dosing guidelines do not reflect these data. In this review, we address the principles that underlie changes in pharmacology and physiology in pregnancy and provide information on drugs that anesthesiologists commonly encounter in treating pregnant patients.

  1. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug-drug interaction assessment between pradigastat and digoxin or warfarin.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing-He; Meyers, Dan; Lee, Zachary; Danis, Kate; Neelakantham, Srikanth; Majumdar, Tapan; Rebello, Sam; Sunkara, Gangadhar; Chen, Jin

    2014-07-01

    Pradigastat, a novel diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1 inhibitor, was evaluated for both pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) drug-drug interactions when co-administered with digoxin or warfarin in healthy subjects. This open-label study included two parallel subject cohorts each with three sequential treatment periods. Forty subjects were enrolled in the study with 20 subjects allocated to each cohort. PK and PD (PT/INR for warfarin only) samples were collected in each period. The statistical analysis results showed that the 90% CIs of the geometric mean ratios of digoxin, R-warfarin, and S-warfarin PK parameters (AUC and Cmax) were all within 0.80-1.25 interval. The 90% CIs of the geometric mean ratios of pradigastat PK parameters (AUC and Cmax) were within 0.80-1.25 interval when co-administered with warfarin; while co-administration with digoxin slightly reduced pradigastat exposure (∼15%). The results also showed that 90% CIs of the geometric mean ratios of warfarin PD parameters (AUC(PT), PTmax, AUC(INR), and INRmax) were within 0.80-1.25 interval. Pradigastat and digoxin or warfarin had no relevant clinical PK or PD drug-drug interactions. Administration of pradigastat and warfarin or pradigastat and digoxin as a mono or combined treatment appears to be safe and tolerated.

  2. The influence of atherosclerotic plaques on the pharmacokinetics of a drug eluted from bioabsorbable stents.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, José A; Gonçalves, Lino; Naghipoor, Jahed; de Oliveira, Paula; Rabczuk, Timon

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the effect of plaque composition, on the accumulation of drug released by a drug eluting stent, is analyzed. The mathematical model is represented by two coupled systems of partial differential equations that describe the pharmacokinetics of drug in the stent coating and in the arterial wall. The influence of the stiffness and porosity of soft and hard plaques is studied. A case study based on optical coherence tomography images is also included. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Host pharmacokinetics and drug accumulation of anthelmintics within target helminth parasites of ruminants.

    PubMed

    Lifschitz, A; Lanusse, C; Alvarez, L

    2017-07-01

    Anthelmintic drugs require effective concentrations to be attained at the site of parasite location for a certain period to assure their efficacy. The processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (pharmacokinetic phase) directly influence drug concentrations attained at the site of action and the resultant pharmacological effect. The aim of the current review article was to provide an overview of the relationship between the pharmacokinetic features of different anthelmintic drugs, their availability in host tissues, accumulation within target helminths and resulting therapeutic efficacy. It focuses on the anthelmintics used in cattle and sheep for which published information on the overall topic is available; benzimidazoles, macrocyclic lactones and monepantel. Physicochemical properties, such as water solubility and dissolution rate, determine the ability of anthelmintic compounds to accumulate in the target parasites and consequently final clinical efficacy. The transcuticular absorption process is the main route of penetration for different drugs in nematodes and cestodes. However, oral ingestion is a main route of drug entry into adult liver flukes. Among other factors, the route of administration may substantially affect the pharmacokinetic behaviour of anthelmintic molecules and modify their efficacy. Oral administration improves drug efficacy against nematodes located in the gastroinestinal tract especially if parasites have a reduced susceptibility. Partitioning of the drug between gastrointestinal contents, mucosal tissue and the target parasite is important to enhance the drug exposure of the nematodes located in the lumen of the abomasum and/or small intestine. On the other hand, large inter-animal variability in drug exposure and subsequent high variability in efficacy is observed after topical administration of anthelmintic compounds. As it has been extensively demonstrated under experimental and field conditions, understanding

  4. Evaluation of Drug-Drug Interaction Potential Between Sacubitril/Valsartan (LCZ696) and Statins Using a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen; Ji, Tao; Einolf, Heidi; Ayalasomayajula, Surya; Lin, Tsu-Han; Hanna, Imad; Heimbach, Tycho; Breen, Christopher; Jarugula, Venkateswar; He, Handan

    2017-01-13

    Sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696) has been approved for the treatment of heart failure. Sacubitril is an in vitro inhibitor of organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs). In clinical studies, LCZ696 increased atorvastatin Cmax by 1.7-fold and area under the plasma concentration-time curve by 1.3-fold, but had little or no effect on simvastatin or simvastatin acid exposure. A physiologically based pharmacokinetics modeling approach was applied to explore the underlying mechanisms behind the statin-specific LCZ696 drug interaction observations. The model incorporated OATP-mediated clearance (CLint,T) for simvastatin and simvastatin acid to successfully describe the pharmacokinetic profiles of either analyte in the absence or presence of LCZ696. Moreover, the model successfully described the clinically observed drug effect with atorvastatin. The simulations clarified the critical parameters responsible for the observation of a low, yet clinically relevant, drug-drug interaction DDI between sacubitril and atorvastatin and the lack of effect with simvastatin acid. Atorvastatin is administered in its active form and rapidly achieves Cmax that coincide with the low Cmax of sacubitril. In contrast, simvastatin requires a hydrolysis step to the acid form and therefore is not present at the site of interactions at sacubitril concentrations that are inhibitory. Similar models were used to evaluate the drug-drug interaction risk for additional OATP-transported statins which predicted to maximally result in a 1.5-fold exposure increase.

  5. Mathematical modeling and computational prediction of cancer drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Hu, Bin

    2017-06-23

    Diverse forms of resistance to anticancer drugs can lead to the failure of chemotherapy. Drug resistance is one of the most intractable issues for successfully treating cancer in current clinical practice. Effective clinical approaches that could counter drug resistance by restoring the sensitivity of tumors to the targeted agents are urgently needed. As numerous experimental results on resistance mechanisms have been obtained and a mass of high-throughput data has been accumulated, mathematical modeling and computational predictions using systematic and quantitative approaches have become increasingly important, as they can potentially provide deeper insights into resistance mechanisms, generate novel hypotheses or suggest promising treatment strategies for future testing. In this review, we first briefly summarize the current progress of experimentally revealed resistance mechanisms of targeted therapy, including genetic mechanisms, epigenetic mechanisms, posttranslational mechanisms, cellular mechanisms, microenvironmental mechanisms and pharmacokinetic mechanisms. Subsequently, we list several currently available databases and Web-based tools related to drug sensitivity and resistance. Then, we focus primarily on introducing some state-of-the-art computational methods used in drug resistance studies, including mechanism-based mathematical modeling approaches (e.g. molecular dynamics simulation, kinetic model of molecular networks, ordinary differential equation model of cellular dynamics, stochastic model, partial differential equation model, agent-based model, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model, etc.) and data-driven prediction methods (e.g. omics data-based conventional screening approach for node biomarkers, static network approach for edge biomarkers and module biomarkers, dynamic network approach for dynamic network biomarkers and dynamic module network biomarkers, etc.). Finally, we discuss several further questions and future directions for the use of

  6. [Rapid pharmacokinetics screening of drug candidates in vitro and in vivo].

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiao-na; Zhu, Xiao-xia; Meng, Zhi-yun; Liu, Jiang-lin; Cao, Ying-lin; Dou, Gui-fang

    2009-11-01

    The paper is to report the pharmacokinetic character of a series of chemical compounds in vitro and in vivo. Metabolism stability of a series of chemical compounds was screened by using rat liver microsomes. The samples of different chemical compounds were combined and then simultaneously detected by LC-MS/MS. Compounds y13, y12 and y11 were screened out by microstability assay in vitro. The pharmacokinetics of compounds y11, y12 and y13 was evaluated by using SD rat. The plasma samples were pooled at the same time. The plasma concentrations were determined by LC-MS/MS. The pharmacokinetic character of two compounds y13, y11 was good by screening in vivo, so they were developed for further research. High-throughput screening of drug candidates in vitro and in vivo was effective, to provide information for the chemical structure information and lower the drug development risk.

  7. Development of a Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Sirolimus: Predicting Bioavailability Based on Intestinal CYP3A Content

    PubMed Central

    Emoto, C; Fukuda, T; Cox, S; Christians, U; Vinks, A A

    2013-01-01

    Sirolimus is an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and is increasingly being used in transplantation and cancer therapies. Sirolimus has low oral bioavailability and exhibits large pharmacokinetic variability. The underlying mechanisms for this variability have not been explored to a large extent. Sirolimus metabolism was characterized by in vitro intrinsic clearance estimation. Pathway contribution ranked from CYP3A4 > CYP3A5 > CYP2C8. With the well stirred and Qgut models sirolimus bioavailability was predicted at 15%. Interindividual differences in bioavailability could be attributed to variable intestinal CYP3A expression. The physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) model developed in Simcyp predicted a high distribution of sirolimus into adipose tissue and another elimination pathway in addition to CYP-mediated metabolism. PBPK model predictive performance was acceptable with Cmax and area under the curve (AUC) estimates within 20% of observed data in a dose escalation study. The model also showed potential to assess the impact of hepatic impairment and drug–drug interaction (DDI) on sirolimus pharmacokinetics. PMID:23884207

  8. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (Pbpk) Model of the Cyp2d6 Probe Atomoxetine: Extrapolation to Special Populations and Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weize; Nakano, Mariko; Sager, Jennifer E; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle; Isoherranen, Nina

    2017-08-31

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling of drug disposition and drug-drug interactions has become a key component of drug development. PBPK modeling has also been considered as an approach to predict drug disposition in special populations. However, whether models developed and validated in healthy populations can be extrapolated to special populations is not well established. The goal of this study was to determine whether a drug specific PBPK model validated using healthy populations could be used to predict drug disposition in specific populations and in organ impairment. A full PBPK model of atomoxetine was developed using a training set of PK data from CYP2D6 genotyped individuals. The model was validated using drug-specific acceptance criteria and a test set of 14 healthy subject PK studies. Population PBPK models were then challenged by simulating the effects of ethnicity, drug-drug interactions, pediatrics and renal and hepatic impairment on atomoxetine PK. Atomoxetine disposition was successfully predicted in 100% of healthy subject studies, 88% of studies in Asians, 79% of drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies, and 100% of pediatric studies. However, atomoxetine AUC was overpredicted by 3-4 fold in end stage renal disease and hepatic impairment. The results show that validated PBPK models can be extrapolated to different ethnicities, DDIs, and pediatrics but not to renal and hepatic impairment patients, likely due to incomplete understanding of the physiological changes in these conditions. These results show that systematic modeling efforts can be used to further refine population models to improve the predictive value in this area. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  9. PREDICTIVE PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETICS MODELING (PBPK) OF PYRETHROID PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroids are a class of neurotoxic pesticides that have many different applications in agriculture, horticulture, and homes, and medicinal uses for animals and humans. Differences in the toxicity of pyrethroids are the result of their pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic pr...

  10. A Cell-Based Pharmacokinetics Assay for Evaluating Tubulin-Binding Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuwei; Liu, Jihua; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Liping; Chan, Jonathon; Wang, Hai; Jin, Yi; Yu, Lei; Grainger, David W.; Ying, Wenbin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence reveals that traditional pharmacokinetics parameters based on plasma drug concentrations are insufficient to reliably demonstrate accurate pharmacological effects of drugs in target organs or cells in vivo. This underscores the increasing need to improve the types and qualities of cellular pharmacokinetic information for drug preclinical screening and clinical efficacy assessments. Here we report a whole cell-based method to assess drugs that disturb microtubule dynamics to better understand different formulation-mediated intracellular drug release profiles. As proof of concept for this approach, we compared the well-known taxane class of anti-microtubule drugs based on paclitaxel (PTX), including clinically familiar albumin nanoparticle-based Abraxane™, and a polymer nanoparticle-based degradable paclitaxel carrier, poly(L-glutamic acid)-paclitaxel conjugate (PGA-PTX, also known as CT-2103) versus control PTX. This in vitro cell-based evaluation of PTX efficacy includes determining the cellular kinetics of tubulin polymerization, relative populations of cells under G2 mitotic arrest, cell proliferation and total cell viability. For these taxane tubulin-binding compounds, the kinetics of cell microtubule stabilization directly correlate with G2 arrest and cell proliferation, reflecting the kinetics and amounts of intracellular PTX release. Each individual cell-based dose-response experiment correlates with published, key therapeutic parameters and taken together, provide a comprehensive understanding of drug intracellular pharmacokinetics at both cellular and molecular levels. This whole cell-based evaluating method is convenient, quantitative and cost-effective for evaluating new formulations designed to optimize cellular pharmacokinetics for drugs perturbing tubulin polymerization as well as assisting in explaining drug mechanisms of action at cellular levels. PMID:24688312

  11. Relationship of hepatic functional imaging to irinotecan pharmacokinetics and genetic parameters of drug elimination.

    PubMed

    Michael, Michael; Thompson, Mick; Hicks, Rod J; Mitchell, Paul L; Ellis, Andrew; Milner, Alvin D; Di Iulio, Julia; Scott, Andrew M; Gurtler, Volker; Hoskins, Janelle M; Clarke, Stephen J; Tebbut, Niall C; Foo, Kian; Jefford, Michael; Zalcberg, John R

    2006-09-10

    The marked variability of irinotecan (Ir) clearance warrants individualized dosing based on hepatic drug handling. The aims of this trial were to identify parameters from functional hepatic nuclear imaging (HNI) that correlate with (1) Ir pharmacology, and (2) single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for the ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein) and UGT-1A1 genes, known to influence Ir handling. Patients underwent genotyping for ABCB1 SNPs and UTUGT-1A1*28 carriage and HNI with 99mTc-DIDA (acetanilidoiminodiacetic acid)/99mTc-DISIDA (disofenin) and MIBI (99mTc-sestamibi) scans, probes for biliary transport proteins ABCC1 and -2, and ABCB1 function. HNI data were analyzed by noncompartmental and deconvolutional analysis to provide hepatic extraction and biliary excretion parameters. Patients received Ir, fluorouracil, and folinic acid using a weekly x2, every-3-weeks schedule. Plasma was taken for Ir and SN-38 analysis on day 1, cycle 1. Of the 21 patients accrued, Ir pharmacokinetics data were obtained from 16 patients. 99mTc-DIDA/DISIDA percent retention at 1 hour (1-hour RET) correlated to baseline serum bilirubin (P = .008). Both 99mTc-DIDA/DISIDA and MIBI 1-hour RET correlated with SN-38 area under the curve (AUC; P < .01). On multiple regression analysis, SN-38 AUC = -215 + 18.68 x bilirubin + 4.27 x MIBI 1-hour RET (P = .009, R2 = 44.2%). HNI parameters did not correlate with Ir toxicity or UGT1A1*28 carriage. MIBI excretion was prolonged in patients with the ABCB1 exon 26 TT variant allele relative to wild-type (P = .015). Functional imaging of hepatic uptake and excretory pathways may have potential to predict Ir pharmacokinetics. Evaluation of a larger cohort as well as polymorphisms in other biliary transporters and UGT1A1 alleles is warranted.

  12. Systematic Prediction of Pharmacodynamic Drug-Drug Interactions through Protein-Protein-Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jialiang; Niu, Chaoqun; Green, Christopher D.; Yang, Lun; Mei, Hongkang; Han, Jing-Dong J.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is a major challenge in drug development. Previous attempts have established formal approaches for pharmacokinetic (PK) DDIs, but there is not a feasible solution for pharmacodynamic (PD) DDIs because the endpoint is often a serious adverse event rather than a measurable change in drug concentration. Here, we developed a metric “S-score” that measures the strength of network connection between drug targets to predict PD DDIs. Utilizing known PD DDIs as golden standard positives (GSPs), we observed a significant correlation between S-score and the likelihood a PD DDI occurs. Our prediction was robust and surpassed existing methods as validated by two independent GSPs. Analysis of clinical side effect data suggested that the drugs having predicted DDIs have similar side effects. We further incorporated this clinical side effects evidence with S-score to increase the prediction specificity and sensitivity through a Bayesian probabilistic model. We have predicted 9,626 potential PD DDIs at the accuracy of 82% and the recall of 62%. Importantly, our algorithm provided opportunities for better understanding the potential molecular mechanisms or physiological effects underlying DDIs, as illustrated by the case studies. PMID:23555229

  13. Absence of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction of pertuzumab with trastuzumab and docetaxel.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Javier; Swain, Sandra M; Kudaba, Iveta; Hauschild, Maik; Patel, Taral; Grincuka, Elza; Masuda, Norikazu; McNally, Virginia; Ross, Graham; Brewster, Mike; Marier, Jean-François; Trinh, My My; Garg, Amit; Nijem, Ihsan; Visich, Jennifer; Lum, Bert L; Baselga, José

    2013-11-01

    Pertuzumab is a novel antihuman epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) humanized monoclonal antibody. Combined with trastuzumab plus docetaxel, pertuzumab improved progression-free and overall survival versus trastuzumab plus docetaxel in the phase III CLEOPATRA trial (NCT00567190) in first-line HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. Thirty-seven patients participated in a pharmacokinetic (PK)/corrected QT interval substudy of CLEOPATRA, which evaluated potential PK drug-drug interaction (DDI). PK parameters were calculated using noncompartmental methods, and DDI analyses were carried out. In the presence of trastuzumab and docetaxel, the mean pertuzumab Cmin and Cmax in cycle 3 were 63.6 and 183 µg/ml, respectively. The pertuzumab concentrations observed were consistent with simulations from a validated population PK model, indicating that trastuzumab and docetaxel did not alter pertuzumab PK. Comparison of geometric least-squares mean PK parameters between arms showed no impact of pertuzumab on the PK of trastuzumab or docetaxel. In conclusion, no PK DDI was observed when pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and docetaxel were combined for the treatment of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer.

  14. A Survey of Neonatal Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Studies in Pediatric Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Avant, D; Green, D; Seo, S; Fisher, J; Mulberg, A E; McCune, S K; Burckart, G J

    2015-09-01

    Conducting clinical trials in neonates is challenging, and knowledge gaps in neonatal clinical pharmacology exist. We surveyed the US Food and Drug Administration databases and identified 43 drugs studied in neonates or referring to neonates between 1998 and 2014. Twenty drugs were approved in neonates. For 10 drugs, approval was based on efficacy data in neonates, supplemented by pharmacokinetic data for four drugs. Approval for neonates was based on full extrapolation from older patients for six drugs, and partial extrapolation was the basis of approval for four drugs. Dosing recommendations differed from older patients for most drugs, and used body-size based adjustment in neonates. Trial failures were associated with various factors including inappropriate dose selection. Successful drug development in neonates could be facilitated by an improved understanding of the natural history and pathophysiology of neonatal diseases and identification and validation of clinically relevant biomarkers.

  15. Perpetrators of pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions arising from altered cytochrome P450 activity: a criteria-based assessment

    PubMed Central

    Polasek, Thomas M; Lin, Frank P Y; Miners, John O; Doogue, Matthew P

    2011-01-01

    AIMS To catalogue the perpetrators of CYP-mediated pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions (PK-DDIs) using clinically relevant criteria, and to compare this with an analogous catalogue. METHODS Candidate inhibitors and inducers of CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A (‘perpetrators’) were evaluated using published clinical pharmacokinetic interaction studies. Studies were selected on the basis of ≥six human subjects, use of a validated in vivo probe substrate for the CYP enzyme, and clinically relevant dosing. Inhibitors were described according to the FDA classifications of strong, moderate or weak, whereas inducers were classified as major (≥twofold decrease in AUC) or weak (Drug Interaction Table (CDIT) were compared with the ‘accepted’ major perpetrators. RESULTS From a list of 216 candidate drugs (349 CYP-perpetrator pairs, CYP-PPs), 36 inhibitors and eight inducers were accepted as major perpetrators of PK-DDIs, resulting in 58 CYP-PPs. In comparison, the clinical version of the CDIT had a sensitivity of 33% and a positive predictive value of 68%. One hundred and ninety-nine CYP-PPs were rejected as major perpetrators, and 92 CYP-PPs had insufficient published human pharmacokinetic data for robust classification. CONCLUSIONS Using a criteria-based assessment, the number of drugs that are proven or likely major perpetrators of CYP-mediated PK-DDIs is relatively small. Current clinical decision support on PK-DDIs is inconsistent with the published evidence and can be improved using simple criteria. PMID:21223357

  16. Predicting clinical relevance of grapefruit-drug interactions: a complicated process.

    PubMed

    Bailey, D G

    2017-04-01

    Grapefruit juice interacts with a number of drugs. This commentary provides feedback on a previously proposed approach for predicting clinically relevant interactions with grapefruit juice based on the average inherent oral bioavailability (F) and magnitude of increase in bioavailability with other CYP3A inhibitors of the drug. Additional factors such as variability of the magnitude of the pharmacokinetic interaction among individuals, product monograph cautionary statements and vulnerability of the patient population should be considered. A flow diagram is provided that should improve prediction of the pharmacokinetic interaction and clinical relevance for affected drugs and that recommends different courses of action for patient management. Forecasting the clinical importance of a particular drug interaction with grapefruit can be improved through consideration of additional readily available drug regulatory information. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Assessing Predictive Performance of Published Population Pharmacokinetic Models of Intravenous Tobramycin in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bloomfield, Celeste; Staatz, Christine E.; Unwin, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Several population pharmacokinetic models describe the dose-exposure relationship of tobramycin in pediatric patients. Before the implementation of these models in clinical practice for dosage adjustment, their predictive performance should be externally evaluated. This study tested the predictive performance of all published population pharmacokinetic models of tobramycin developed for pediatric patients with an independent patient cohort. A literature search was conducted to identify suitable models for testing. Demographic and pharmacokinetic data were collected retrospectively from the medical records of pediatric patients who had received intravenous tobramycin. Tobramycin exposure was predicted from each model. Predictive performance was assessed by visual comparison of predictions to observations, by calculation of bias and imprecision, and through the use of simulation-based diagnostics. Eight population pharmacokinetic models were identified. A total of 269 concentration-time points from 41 pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis were collected for external evaluation. Three models consistently performed best in all evaluations and had mean errors ranging from −0.4 to 1.8 mg/liter, relative mean errors ranging from 4.9 to 29.4%, and root mean square errors ranging from 47.8 to 66.9%. Simulation-based diagnostics supported these findings. Models that allowed a two-compartment disposition generally had better predictive performance than those that used a one-compartment disposition model. Several published models of the pharmacokinetics of tobramycin showed reasonable low levels of bias, although all models seemed to have some problems with imprecision. This suggests that knowledge of typical pharmacokinetic behavior and patient covariate values alone without feedback concentration measurements from individual patients is not sufficient to make precise predictions. PMID:27001806

  18. Assessing Predictive Performance of Published Population Pharmacokinetic Models of Intravenous Tobramycin in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Celeste; Staatz, Christine E; Unwin, Sean; Hennig, Stefanie

    2016-06-01

    Several population pharmacokinetic models describe the dose-exposure relationship of tobramycin in pediatric patients. Before the implementation of these models in clinical practice for dosage adjustment, their predictive performance should be externally evaluated. This study tested the predictive performance of all published population pharmacokinetic models of tobramycin developed for pediatric patients with an independent patient cohort. A literature search was conducted to identify suitable models for testing. Demographic and pharmacokinetic data were collected retrospectively from the medical records of pediatric patients who had received intravenous tobramycin. Tobramycin exposure was predicted from each model. Predictive performance was assessed by visual comparison of predictions to observations, by calculation of bias and imprecision, and through the use of simulation-based diagnostics. Eight population pharmacokinetic models were identified. A total of 269 concentration-time points from 41 pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis were collected for external evaluation. Three models consistently performed best in all evaluations and had mean errors ranging from -0.4 to 1.8 mg/liter, relative mean errors ranging from 4.9 to 29.4%, and root mean square errors ranging from 47.8 to 66.9%. Simulation-based diagnostics supported these findings. Models that allowed a two-compartment disposition generally had better predictive performance than those that used a one-compartment disposition model. Several published models of the pharmacokinetics of tobramycin showed reasonable low levels of bias, although all models seemed to have some problems with imprecision. This suggests that knowledge of typical pharmacokinetic behavior and patient covariate values alone without feedback concentration measurements from individual patients is not sufficient to make precise predictions. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Liver fibrosis impairs hepatic pharmacokinetics of liver transplant drugs in the rat model.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yu-Hong; Liu, Xin; Khlentzos, Alexander M; Asadian, Peyman; Li, Peng; Thorling, Camilla A; Robertson, Thomas A; Fletcher, Linda M; Crawford, Darrell H G; Roberts, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to investigate hepatic pharmacokinetics of the four most common drugs (metoprolol, omeprazole, spironolactone, and furosemide) given to patients undergoing liver transplantation before surgery. The investigation was carried out in CCl(4)-induced fibrotic perfused rat livers and the results were compared to those in normal rat liver. Drug outflow fraction-time profiles were obtained after bolus injection into a single-pass-perfused normal or fibrotic rat liver. The pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using previously developed barrier-limited and space-distributed models. The results showed a marked increase in the liver fibrosis index for CCl(4)-treated rats compared to controls (p<0.05). The extraction ratios (E) for all drugs were significantly lower (p<0.05) in fibrotic than in normal livers and the decrease in E was consistent with the decrease in intrinsic clearance and permeability-surface area product. In addition, other than for furosemide, the mean transit times for all drugs were significantly longer (p<0.01) in the fibrotic livers than in normal livers. Pharmacokinetic model and stepwise regression analyses suggest that these differences arise from a reduction in both the transport of drugs across the basolateral membrane and their metabolic clearance and were in a manner similar to those previously found for another group of drugs.

  20. Drugs in nails: physiology, pharmacokinetics and forensic toxicology.

    PubMed

    Palmeri, A; Pichini, S; Pacifici, R; Zuccaro, P; Lopez, A

    2000-02-01

    In recent years, drug analysis in keratinised matrices, such as hair and nails, has received considerable attention because of several advantages over drug testing methodologies employing body fluids, such as urine or serum. For example, keratinic matrices, such as finger- and toenails, can accumulate drugs during long term exposure. Drugs are incorporated into nails by a double mechanism: (i) deposition into the root of the growing nail via the blood flow in the nail matrix; and (ii) incorporation via the nail bed during growth from the lunula to the beginning of the free margin. Together, these account for a wide retrospective window of drug detection. Nails can provide a good forensic matrix for the detection of drugs of abuse. Indeed, the international literature has reported the use of nail analysis in postmortem detection of drugs of abuse, drug testing in the workplace and drug screening to detect prenatal exposure, even though further studies are needed for correct interpretation of the data obtained. Another application of drug analysis in nails consists of the possibility of detecting the presence of an antimycotic at the site of action during antifungal therapy for patients with onychomycosis. When available, this evidence has permitted drug treatment of a shorter duration and reduced toxicity. However, so far the potential of drug monitoring in nails still lacks harmonisation and validation of analytical methodologies and a better comprehension of the possible correlation between drug concentrations in the matrix and period of exposure.

  1. Prediction of the pharmacokinetics of atorvastatin, cerivastatin, and indomethacin using kinetic models applied to isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Paine, Stuart W; Parker, Alison J; Gardiner, Philip; Webborn, Peter J H; Riley, Robert J

    2008-07-01

    The disposition of atorvastatin, cerivastatin, and indomethacin, established substrates of rat hepatic basolateral uptake transporters, has been evaluated in suspended rat hepatocytes. Cell and media concentration-time data were simultaneously fitted to a model incorporating active uptake, permeation, binding, and metabolism. Use of the model to estimate the ratio of intracellular to extracellular steady-state free drug concentrations demonstrated the strong influence of active uptake on the kinetics of atorvastatin (18:1) and cerivastatin (8:1), in comparison with indomethacin (3.5:1). Indomethacin, however, was shown to have a higher uptake clearance (599 +/- 101 microl/min/10(6) cells) than atorvastatin (375 +/- 45 microl/min/10(6) cells) and cerivastatin (413 +/- 47 microl/min/10(6) cells). The high passive permeability of indomethacin (237 +/- 63 microl/min/10(6) cells) clearly negated the effect of the active transport on the overall disposition. An analogous physiological model was constructed that allowed prediction of the in vivo pharmacokinetics, including the free intracellular concentration in liver. Hepatic clearance was well predicted by the model, in contrast to predictions based on standard methods. Volume of distribution was well predicted for indomethacin and predicted reasonably for atorvastatin and cerivastatin and higher than might be expected for an acid compound. Furthermore, the terminal half-life predictions for all three compounds were within 2-fold of the observed values. The ability to estimate the free-intracellular hepatic concentration of uptake substrates has major benefits in terms of predicting pharmacokinetics, potential CYP-mediated drug-drug interactions, and efficacy of hepatically targeted therapeutics.

  2. The application of cassette dosing for pharmacokinetic screening in small-molecule cancer drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nicola F; Raynaud, Florence I; Workman, Paul

    2007-02-01

    Pharmacokinetic evaluation is an essential component of drug discovery and should be conducted early in the process so that those compounds with the best chance of success are prioritized and progressed. However, pharmacokinetic analysis has become a serious bottleneck during the 'hit-to-lead' and lead optimization phases due to the availability of new targets and the large numbers of compounds resulting from advances in synthesis and screening technologies. Cassette dosing, which involves the simultaneous administration of several compounds to a single animal followed by rapid sample analysis by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, was developed to increase the throughput of in vivo pharmacokinetic screening. Although cassette dosing is advantageous in terms of resources and throughput, there are possible complications associated with this approach, such as the potential for compound interactions. Following an overview of the cassette dosing literature, this article focuses on the application of the technique in anticancer drug discovery. Specific examples are discussed, including the evaluation of cassette dosing to assess pharmacokinetic properties in the development of cyclin-dependent kinase and heat shock protein 90 inhibitors. Subject to critical analysis and validation in each case, the use of cassette dosing is recommended in appropriate chemical series to enhance the efficiency of drug discovery and reduce animal usage.

  3. Feline drug metabolism and disposition: pharmacokinetic evidence for species differences and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Court, Michael H

    2013-09-01

    Although it is widely appreciated that cats respond differently to certain drugs compared with other companion animal species, the causes of these differences are poorly understood. This article evaluates published evidence for altered drug effects in cats, focusing on pharmacokinetic differences between cats, dogs, and humans, and the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences. More work is needed to better understand drug metabolism and disposition differences in cats, thereby enabling more rational prescribing of existing medications, and the development of safer drugs for this species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A question-based approach to adopting pharmacogenetics to understand risk for clinical variability in pharmacokinetics in early drug development.

    PubMed

    Evers, R; Blanchard, R L; Warner, A W; Cutler, D; Agrawal, N G B; Shaw, P M

    2014-09-01

    Understanding genetic variations that influence pharmacokinetics (PK) in humans is important for optimal clinical use of drugs. Guidances for making decisions on when to conduct pharmacogenetic research during drug development have been proposed by regulatory agencies, but their uniform adoption presents problems due to an inherent lack of flexibility. A questions-based approach (QBA) was developed to enable drug development teams at Merck to iteratively and flexibly evaluate the potential impact of pharmacogenetics (PGx) on clinical pharmacokinetic variability.

  5. Assessment of chimeric mice with humanized livers in new drug development: generation of pharmacokinetics, metabolism and toxicity data for selecting the final candidate compound.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Hidetaka; Ito, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    1. Chimeric mice with humanized livers are expected to be a novel tool for new drug development. This review discusses four applications where these animals can be used efficiently to collect supportive data for selecting the best compound in the final stage of drug discovery. 2. The first application is selection of the final compound based on estimated pharmacokinetic parameters in humans. Since chimeric mouse livers are highly repopulated with human hepatocytes, hepatic clearance values in vivo could be used preferentially to estimate pharmacokinetic profiles for humans. 3. The second is prediction of human-specific or disproportionate metabolites. Chimeric mice reproduce human-specific metabolites of drugs under development to conform to ICH guidance M3(R2), except for compounds that were extensively eliminated by co-existing mouse hepatocytes. 4. The third is identifying metabolites with distinct pharmacokinetic profiles in humans. Slow metabolite elimination specifically in humans increases its exposure level, but if its elimination is faster in laboratory animals, the animal exposure level might not satisfy ICH guidance M3(R2). 5. Finally, two examples of reproducing acute liver toxicity in chimeric mice are introduced. Integrated pharmacokinetics, metabolism and toxicity information are expected to assist pharmaceutical scientists in selecting the best candidate compound in new drug development.

  6. Prediction of drug disposition on the basis of its chemical structure.

    PubMed

    Stepensky, David

    2013-06-01

    The chemical structure of any drug determines its pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Detailed understanding of relationships between the drug chemical structure and individual disposition pathways (i.e., distribution and elimination) is required for efficient use of existing drugs and effective development of new drugs. Different approaches have been developed for this purpose, ranging from statistics-based quantitative structure-property (or structure-pharmacokinetic) relationships (QSPR) analysis to physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. This review critically analyzes currently available approaches for analysis and prediction of drug disposition on the basis of chemical structure. Models that can be used to predict different aspects of disposition are presented, including: (a) value of the individual pharmacokinetic parameter (e.g., clearance or volume of distribution), (b) efficiency of the specific disposition pathway (e.g., biliary drug excretion or cytochrome P450 3A4 metabolism), (c) accumulation in a specific organ or tissue (e.g., permeability of the placenta or accumulation in the brain), and (d) the whole-body disposition in the individual patients. Examples of presented pharmacological agents include "classical" low-molecular-weight compounds, biopharmaceuticals, and drugs encapsulated in specialized drug-delivery systems. The clinical efficiency of agents from all these groups can be suboptimal, because of inefficient permeability of the drug to the site of action and/or excessive accumulation in other organs and tissues. Therefore, robust and reliable approaches for chemical structure-based prediction of drug disposition are required to overcome these limitations. PBPK models are increasingly being used for prediction of drug disposition. These models can reflect the complex interplay of factors that determine drug disposition in a mechanistically correct fashion and can be combined with other approaches, for example QSPR

  7. Scale-up of a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model to predict the disposition of monoclonal antibodies in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Glassman, Patrick M; Chen, Yang; Balthasar, Joseph P

    2015-10-01

    Preclinical assessment of monoclonal antibody (mAb) disposition during drug development often includes investigations in non-human primate models. In many cases, mAb exhibit non-linear disposition that relates to mAb-target binding [i.e., target-mediated disposition (TMD)]. The goal of this work was to develop a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict non-linear mAb disposition in plasma and in tissues in monkeys. Physiological parameters for monkeys were collected from several sources, and plasma data for several mAbs associated with linear pharmacokinetics were digitized from prior literature reports. The digitized data displayed great variability; therefore, parameters describing inter-antibody variability in the rates of pinocytosis and convection were estimated. For prediction of the disposition of individual antibodies, we incorporated tissue concentrations of target proteins, where concentrations were estimated based on categorical immunohistochemistry scores, and with assumed localization of target within the interstitial space of each organ. Kinetics of target-mAb binding and target turnover, in the presence or absence of mAb, were implemented. The model was then employed to predict concentration versus time data, via Monte Carlo simulation, for two mAb that have been shown to exhibit TMD (2F8 and tocilizumab). Model predictions, performed a priori with no parameter fitting, were found to provide good prediction of dose-dependencies in plasma clearance, the areas under plasma concentration versu time curves, and the time-course of plasma concentration data. This PBPK model may find utility in predicting plasma and tissue concentration versus time data and, potentially, the time-course of receptor occupancy (i.e., mAb-target binding) to support the design and interpretation of preclinical pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic investigations in non-human primates.

  8. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions of morphine, codeine, and their derivatives: theory and clinical reality, Part II.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Scott C; Cozza, Kelly L

    2003-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions with codeine, dihydrocodeine, hydrocodone, oxycodone, and buprenorphine are reviewed in this column. These compounds have a very similar chemical structure to morphine. Unlike morphine, which is metabolized chiefly through conjugation reactions with uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase (UGT) enzymes, these five drugs are metabolized both through oxidative reactions by the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme and conjugation by UGT enzymes. There is controversy as to whether codeine, dihydrocodeine, and hydrocodone are actually prodrugs requiring activation by the CYP450 2D6 enzyme or UGT enzymes. Oxycodone and buprenorphine, however, are clearly not prodrugs and are metabolized by the CYP450 2D6 and 3A4 enzymes, respectively. Knowledge of this metabolism assists in the understanding for the potential of drug-drug interactions with these drugs. This understanding is important so that clinicians can choose the proper dosages for analgesia and anticipate potential drug-drug interactions.

  9. Clinical, Pharmacokinetic, and In Vitro Studies to Support Bioequivalence of Ophthalmic Drug Products.

    PubMed

    Choi, Stephanie H; Lionberger, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    For ophthalmic drug products, the determination of bioequivalence can be challenging, as drug concentrations at the site of action cannot always be measured. The FDA has recommended a variety of studies that can be used to demonstrate bioequivalence for different ophthalmic drug products. Product-specific bioequivalence recommendations for 28 ophthalmic products have been posted on FDA's website as of May 2016, outlining the specific tests which should be performed to demonstrate bioequivalence. The type of study that can be used to demonstrate bioequivalence depends on the drug product's active pharmaceutical ingredient(s), dosage form, indication, site of action, mechanism of action, and scientific understanding of drug release/drug availability and drug product characteristics. This article outlines the FDA's current guidance on studies to demonstrate bioequivalence through clinical endpoint studies, pharmacokinetic studies, and in vitro studies for generic ophthalmic drug products.

  10. ABC multidrug transporters: target for modulation of drug pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Béatrice; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2011-05-01

    Nine proteins of the ABC superfamily (P-glycoprotein, 7 MRPs and BCRP) are involved in multidrug transport. Being localised at the surface of endothelial or epithelial cells, they expel drugs back to the external medium (if located at the apical side [P-glycoprotein, BCRP, MRP2, MRP4 in the kidney]) or to the blood (if located at the basolateral side [MRP1, MRP3, MRP4, MRP5]), modulating thereby their absorption, distribution, and elimination. In the CNS, most transporters are oriented to expel drugs to the blood. Transporters also cooperate with Phase I/Phase II metabolism enzymes by eliminating drug metabolites. Their major features are (i) their capacity to recognize drugs belonging to unrelated pharmacological classes, and (ii) their redundancy, a single molecule being possibly substrate for different transporters. This ensures an efficient protection of the body against invasion by xenobiotics. Competition for transport is now characterized as a mechanism of interaction between co-administered drugs, one molecule limiting the transport of the other, potentially affecting bioavailability, distribution, and/or elimination. Again, this mechanism reinforces drug interactions mediated by cytochrome P450 inhibition, as many substrates of P-glycoprotein and CYP3A4 are common. Induction of the expression of genes coding for MDR transporters is another mechanism of drug interaction, which could affect all drug substrates of the up-regulated transporter. Overexpression of MDR transporters confers resistance to anticancer agents and other therapies. All together, these data justify why studying drug active transport should be part of the evaluation of new drugs, as recently recommended by the FDA.

  11. Development of Microcomputer Methods for Analysis and Simulation of Clinical Pharmacokinetic Data Relevant to New Drug Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-02

    interpretation, and simulation of pharmacokinetic data, dose - response kinetic data, and other data relevant to new drug development, for use with the Tektronix...Statistical Programs for Clinical Pharmacological Problems; Keywords: Clinical Pharmacokinetics, Dose - Response Relations, Pharmakinetic Simulation, Non-Parametric Statistics, Mefloquine, Microcomputer Graphics, Tektronix 4052.

  12. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Fluorescently Labeled Block Copolymer Nanoparticles for Controlled Drug Delivery in Leukemia Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gilkey, MJ; Krishnan, V; Scheetz, L; Jia, X; Rajasekaran, AK; Dhurjati, PS

    2015-01-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed that describes the concentration and biodistribution of fluorescently labeled nanoparticles in mice used for the controlled delivery of dexamethasone in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) therapy. The simulated data showed initial spikes in nanoparticle concentration in the liver, spleen, and kidneys, whereas concentration in plasma decreased rapidly. These simulation results were consistent with previously published in vivo data. At shorter time scales, the simulated data predicted decrease of nanoparticles from plasma with concomitant increase in the liver, spleen, and kidneys before decaying at longer timepoints. Interestingly, the simulated data predicted an unaccounted accumulation of about 50% of the injected dose of nanoparticles. Incorporation of an additional compartment into the model justified the presence of unaccounted nanoparticles in this compartment. Our results suggest that the proposed PBPK model can be an excellent tool for prediction of optimal dose of nanoparticle-encapsulated drugs for cancer treatment. PMID:26225236

  13. Lisdexamfetamine: A pharmacokinetic review.

    PubMed

    Comiran, Eloisa; Kessler, Félix Henrique; Fröehlich, Pedro Eduardo; Limberger, Renata Pereira

    2016-06-30

    Lisdexamfetamine (LDX) is a d-amphetamine (d-AMPH) pro-drug used to treat Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Binge Eating Disorder (BED) symptoms. The in vivo pharmacodynamics of LDX is the same as that of its active product d-AMPH, although there are a few qualitative and quantitative differences due to pharmacokinetics. Due to the specific pharmacokinetics of the long-acting stimulants, this article revises the pharmacokinetic studies on LDX, the newest amphetamine pro-drug. The Medline/Pubmed, Science Direct and Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (Lilacs and Ibecs) (2007-2016) databases were searched for articles and their list of references. As for basic pharmacokinetics studies, since LDX is a newly developed medication, there are few results concerning biotransformation, distribution and the use of different biological matrices for analysis. This is the first robust review on this topic, gathering data from all clinical pharmacokinetics studies available in the literature. The particular pharmacokinetics of LDX plays a major role in studying this pro-drug, since this knowledge was essential to understand some reports on clinical effects in literature, e.g. the small likelihood of reducing the effect by interactions, the effect of long duration use and the still questionable reduction of the potential for abuse. In general the already well-known pharmacokinetic properties of amphetamine make LDX relatively predictable, simplifying the use of LDX in clinical practice.

  14. Organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP)1B1 and OATP1B3 as important regulators of the pharmacokinetics of substrate drugs.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    Nobody doubts the importance of organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP)1B1 and 1B3 in the clinical pharmacokinetics of substrate drugs. Based on the theory of pharmacokinetics, even if a drug is eliminated from the body by extensive metabolism, the rate-determining process of the hepatic intrinsic clearance of OATP substrates is often hepatic uptake. Because of their broad substrate specificities, once the functions of OATP1B1 or OATP1B3 are altered by several kinds of special occasions such as drug-drug interactions (DDI) and genetic polymorphisms of transporter genes, the hepatic clearance of many kinds of structurally-unrelated drugs is expected to be changed. In some cases, these alterations of pharmacokinetics lead to modified pharmacological effects and adverse reactions such as statin-induced myotoxicity and the glucose-lowering effect of anti-diabetes drugs. Thus, appropriate methods with which to quantitatively predict the changes in plasma and tissue concentrations of drugs are needed in the process of drug development. As for DDI, a static model that takes into consideration of the theoretically-maximum unbound inhibitor concentration is often used for the sensitive detection of possible DDI risks and this method has been adopted in several regulatory guidance/guidelines on DDI. Regarding genetic polymorphisms, the effects of SLCO1B1 c.388A>G and c.521T>C on the pharmacokinetics of substrate drugs have been extensively investigated. Even though there are some discrepancies, c.521T>C generally decreased hepatic uptake activity, while c.388A>G tended to slightly increase it. This article briefly summarizes the current status of research on hepatic OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 and the clinical significance of their functions.

  15. How fast and how often: The pharmacokinetics of drug use are decisive in addiction.

    PubMed

    Allain, Florence; Minogianis, Ellie-Anna; Roberts, David C S; Samaha, Anne-Noël

    2015-09-01

    How much, how often and how fast a drug reaches the brain determine the behavioural and neuroplastic changes associated with the addiction process. Despite the critical nature of these variables, the drug addiction field often ignores pharmacokinetic issues, which we argue can lead to false conclusions. First, we review the clinical data demonstrating the importance of the speed of drug onset and of intermittent patterns of drug intake in psychostimulant drug addiction. This is followed by a review of the preclinical literature demonstrating that pharmacokinetic variables play a decisive role in determining behavioural and neurobiological outcomes in animal models of addiction. This literature includes recent data highlighting the importance of intermittent, 'spiking' brain levels of drug in producing an increase in the motivation to take drug over time. Rapid drug onset and intermittent drug exposure both appear to push the addiction process forward most effectively. This has significant implications for refining animal models of addiction and for better understanding the neuroadaptations that are critical for the disorder.

  16. Predicting when biliary excretion of parent drug is a major route of elimination in humans.

    PubMed

    Hosey, Chelsea M; Broccatelli, Fabio; Benet, Leslie Z

    2014-09-01

    Biliary excretion is an important route of elimination for many drugs, yet measuring the extent of biliary elimination is difficult, invasive, and variable. Biliary elimination has been quantified for few drugs with a limited number of subjects, who are often diseased patients. An accurate prediction of which drugs or new molecular entities are significantly eliminated in the bile may predict potential drug-drug interactions, pharmacokinetics, and toxicities. The Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System (BDDCS) characterizes significant routes of drug elimination, identifies potential transporter effects, and is useful in understanding drug-drug interactions. Class 1 and 2 drugs are primarily eliminated in humans via metabolism and will not exhibit significant biliary excretion of parent compound. In contrast, class 3 and 4 drugs are primarily excreted unchanged in the urine or bile. Here, we characterize the significant elimination route of 105 orally administered class 3 and 4 drugs. We introduce and validate a novel model, predicting significant biliary elimination using a simple classification scheme. The model is accurate for 83% of 30 drugs collected after model development. The model corroborates the observation that biliarily eliminated drugs have high molecular weights, while demonstrating the necessity of considering route of administration and extent of metabolism when predicting biliary excretion. Interestingly, a predictor of potential metabolism significantly improves predictions of major elimination routes of poorly metabolized drugs. This model successfully predicts the major elimination route for poorly permeable/poorly metabolized drugs and may be applied prior to human dosing.

  17. Prediction of drug concentration-time profiles in children from adults: an allometric approach.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Iftekhar; Goteti, Kosalaram

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to evaluate 2 methods to predict concentration-time profiles of drugs in children (aged 5 years or older) from adult pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters. Five drugs from the literature were chosen for this study, and all these 5 drugs were described by a 2-compartment model in both adults and children. PK parameters (CL, Vc, Vss, and Vβ) were allometrically predicted in children from adults. PK constants such as A, B, α, and β were also predicted in children from adults as described in . Using predicted PK parameters and constants, concentration-time profiles of 5 drugs were predicted in children and compared with the observed profiles. Both methods of predictions provided fairly good prediction of concentration-time profiles in children. The predicted concentration-time profiles in children were comparable with the observed profiles and can be used to design first-in-children clinical trials.

  18. Robust model predictive control for optimal continuous drug administration.

    PubMed

    Sopasakis, Pantelis; Patrinos, Panagiotis; Sarimveis, Haralambos

    2014-10-01

    In this paper the model predictive control (MPC) technology is used for tackling the optimal drug administration problem. The important advantage of MPC compared to other control technologies is that it explicitly takes into account the constraints of the system. In particular, for drug treatments of living organisms, MPC can guarantee satisfaction of the minimum toxic concentration (MTC) constraints. A whole-body physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model serves as the dynamic prediction model of the system after it is formulated as a discrete-time state-space model. Only plasma measurements are assumed to be measured on-line. The rest of the states (drug concentrations in other organs and tissues) are estimated in real time by designing an artificial observer. The complete system (observer and MPC controller) is able to drive the drug concentration to the desired levels at the organs of interest, while satisfying the imposed constraints, even in the presence of modelling errors, disturbances and noise. A case study on a PBPK model with 7 compartments, constraints on 5 tissues and a variable drug concentration set-point illustrates the efficiency of the methodology in drug dosing control applications. The proposed methodology is also tested in an uncertain setting and proves successful in presence of modelling errors and inaccurate measurements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Undesirable pharmacokinetic drug-to-drug interactions affecting the effectiveness and safety of anti-infectious pharmacotherapy].

    PubMed

    Dworacka, Marzena; Nowocień, Tamara

    2017-02-20

    The occurence of pharmacokinetic drug-to-drug interactions is the serious clinical problem in the course of pharmacotherapy of infections. Its essential part is the influence of such interactions on the effectiveness and safety of antimicrobial therapy. The aim of study was to present, the most significant on clinical hand, examples of interactions and their mechanisms between antimicrobial agents and other drugs on stages of absorption, distribution, biotransformation and elimination, leading to the decreased antimicrobial activity and ineffective pharmacotherapy or to the increased antimicrobial activity and to the increased risk of adverse effects due to agents used for anti-infectious pharmacotherapy.

  20. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) polypharmacy could lead to buried pharmacokinetic interactions due to CYP450.

    PubMed

    Tolou-Ghamari, Z

    2012-09-01

    CYP450 enzymes are basics for the metabolism of several medications such as numerous AEDs. As AEDs polypharmacy could lead to hidden pharmacokinetic interactions due to CYP450, there fore, the aim of this study was to determine a proper guide line for AEDs prescription in Iranian epileptic population. A cross-sectional study of fifty-four patients' (n=23 females; n= 31 males with a mean age of 27 years) located in the Epilepsy Ward of Kashani Hospital of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences was carried out during the year 2011. Variables including sex, age, age of seizureonset, type and number of AEDs were recorded in d-Base. Results showed that the number of prescriptions based on AEDs polypharmacy was 77.8%. The most important drugs in prescriptions were carbamazepine (n=41) that is a potent inducer of CYP450 and valproic acid (n=31) that is a potent inhibitor of CYP450 simultaneously. Administration of AEDs was based on: three (n=17), four (n=7), five (n=4) or six (n=3) AEDs simultaneously. To avoid side effects, in prescribing AEDs that act as CYP450 inhibitors or inducers concomitantly, their spectrum of interactions should be predicted.

  1. Drug use in the neonate: interrelationships of pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and biochemical maturity.

    PubMed

    Warner, A

    1986-05-01

    With advances in technology, increasing numbers of premature and very ill neonates are surviving and being referred for treatment to neonatal intensive-care units. A major feature of the treatment they receive is therapy with drugs. However, because of relatively limited information available in the area of neonatal pharmacokinetics, the few drugs that currently can be monitored directly, and the lack of an effective mechanism for measuring the biochemical and functional maturity of the neonate, especially as it relates to drug clearance, therapy of neonates with drugs is certainly more hazardous and possibly less effective than in adult patients. Toxic reactions of neonates to drug therapy can usually be related to the unique pharmacokinetic processes seen in this group, particularly to the maturity of clearance mechanisms. This is the basis for a link between maturity and drug efficacy or toxicity. In this usage, maturity refers to the functional capacity of organs and biochemical pathways. Of particular concern in this regard is kidney function and the activity of drug-metabolizing enzyme systems. Because direct assessment of these functions in the neonate is difficult, other types of maturity markers that can be easily measured and which relate to drug clearance need to be identified. Such markers could serve as a guide to the physician who is planning drug therapy for a neonatal patient. Several studies looking for a gestational age marker have provided some indication that biochemical maturity markers do exist and simply await discovery, thus affording an integration of pharmacokinetics and pathophysiology to achieve a more rational and effective therapeutic approach.

  2. Optimization of human dose prediction by using quantitative and translational pharmacology in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Bueters, Tjerk; Gibson, Christopher; Visser, Sandra A G

    2015-01-01

    In this perspective article, we explain how quantitative and translational pharmacology, when well-implemented, is believed to lead to improved clinical candidates and drug targets that are differentiated from current treatment options. Quantitative and translational pharmacology aims to build and continuously improve the quantitative relationship between drug exposure, target engagement, efficacy, safety and its interspecies relationship at every phase of drug discovery. Drug hunters should consider and apply these concepts to develop compounds with a higher probability of interrogating the clinical biological hypothesis. We offer different approaches to set an initial effective concentration or pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic target in man and to predict human pharmacokinetics that determine together the predicted human dose and dose schedule. All concepts are illustrated with ample literature examples.

  3. Cochlear Pharmacokinetics with Local Inner Ear Drug Delivery Using a Three-Dimensional Finite-Element Computer Model

    PubMed Central

    Plontke, Stefan K.; Siedow, Norbert; Wegener, Raimund; Zenner, Hans-Peter; Salt, Alec N.

    2006-01-01

    Hypothesis: Cochlear fluid pharmacokinetics can be better represented by three-dimensional (3D) finite-element simulations of drug dispersal. Background: Local drug deliveries to the round window membrane are increasingly being used to treat inner ear disorders. Crucial to the development of safe therapies is knowledge of drug distribution in the inner ear with different delivery methods. Computer simulations allow application protocols and drug delivery systems to be evaluated, and may permit animal studies to be extrapolated to the larger cochlea of the human. Methods: A finite-element 3D model of the cochlea was constructed based on geometric dimensions of the guinea pig cochlea. Drug propagation along and between compartments was described by passive diffusion. To demonstrate the potential value of the model, methylprednisolone distribution in the cochlea was calculated for two clinically relevant application protocols using pharmacokinetic parameters derived from a prior one-dimensional (1D) model. In addition, a simplified geometry was used to compare results from 3D with 1D simulations. Results: For the simplified geometry, calculated concentration profiles with distance were in excellent agreement between the 1D and the 3D models. Different drug delivery strategies produce very different concentration time courses, peak concentrations and basal-apical concentration gradients of drug. In addition, 3D computations demonstrate the existence of substantial gradients across the scalae in the basal turn. Conclusion: The 3D model clearly shows the presence of drug gradients across the basal scalae of guinea pigs, demonstrating the necessity of a 3D approach to predict drug movements across and between scalae with larger cross-sectional areas, such as the human, with accuracy. This is the first model to incorporate the volume of the spiral ligament and to calculate diffusion through this structure. Further development of the 3D model will have to incorporate a more

  4. The toxicity and pharmacokinetics of carbon nanotubes as an effective drug carrier.

    PubMed

    Luo, En; Song, Guodong; Li, Yunfeng; Shi, Pengwei; Hu, Jing; Lin, Yunfeng

    2013-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown broad potential in biomedical applications, given their unique mechanical, optical, and chemical properties. Functionalized carbon nanotubes not only can deliver drug into specific organs but also can inherently produce heating by near-infrared laser radiation for cancer therapy. However, the toxicological and pharmacological profile of such carbon nanotube system will have to be determined prior to any clinical study undertaken. For providing a guide to develop safe drug carriers, this review discusses the functionalization, toxicity and pharmacokinetics of carbon nanotubes. Lastly, the drug delivery and thermal ablation on carbon nanotubes are proposed.

  5. Microdosing of a Carbon-14 Labeled Protein in Healthy Volunteers Accurately Predicts Its Pharmacokinetics at Therapeutic Dosages.

    PubMed

    Vlaming, M L H; van Duijn, E; Dillingh, M R; Brands, R; Windhorst, A D; Hendrikse, N H; Bosgra, S; Burggraaf, J; de Koning, M C; Fidder, A; Mocking, J A J; Sandman, H; de Ligt, R A F; Fabriek, B O; Pasman, W J; Seinen, W; Alves, T; Carrondo, M; Peixoto, C; Peeters, P A M; Vaes, W H J

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical development of new biological entities (NBEs), such as human protein therapeutics, requires considerable expenditure of time and costs. Poor prediction of pharmacokinetics in humans further reduces net efficiency. In this study, we show for the first time that pharmacokinetic data of NBEs in humans can be successfully obtained early in the drug development process by the use of microdosing in a small group of healthy subjects combined with ultrasensitive accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). After only minimal preclinical testing, we performed a first-in-human phase 0/phase 1 trial with a human recombinant therapeutic protein (RESCuing Alkaline Phosphatase, human recombinant placental alkaline phosphatase [hRESCAP]) to assess its safety and kinetics. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed dose linearity from microdose (53 μg) [(14) C]-hRESCAP to therapeutic doses (up to 5.3 mg) of the protein in healthy volunteers. This study demonstrates the value of a microdosing approach in a very small cohort for accelerating the clinical development of NBEs.

  6. Randomized pharmacokinetic and drug–drug interaction studies of ceftazidime, avibactam, and metronidazole in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Das, Shampa; Li, Jianguo; Armstrong, Jon; Learoyd, Maria; Edeki, Timi

    2015-01-01

    We assessed pharmacokinetic and safety profiles of ceftazidime–avibactam administered ± metronidazole, and whether drug–drug interactions exist between ceftazidime and avibactam, or ceftazidime-avibactam and metronidazole. The first study (NCT01430910) involved two cohorts of healthy subjects. Cohort 1 received ceftazidime–avibactam (2000–500 mg) as a single infusion or as multiple intravenous infusions over 11 days to evaluate ceftazidime–avibactam pharmacokinetics. Cohort 2 received ceftazidime, avibactam, or ceftazidime–avibactam over 4 days to assess drug–drug interaction between ceftazidime and avibactam. The second study (NCT01534247) assessed interaction between ceftazidime–avibactam and metronidazole in subjects receiving ceftazidime–avibactam (2000–500 mg), metronidazole (500 mg), or metronidazole followed by ceftazidime–avibactam over 4 days. In all studies, subjects received a single-dose on the first and final days, and multiple-doses every 8 h on intervening days. Concentration-time profiles for ceftazidime and avibactam administered as single- or multiple-doses separately or together with/without metronidazole were similar. There was no evidence of time-dependent pharmacokinetics or accumulation. In both interaction studies, 90% confidence intervals for geometric least squares mean ratios of area under the curve and maximum plasma concentrations for each drug were within the predefined interval (80–125%) indicating no drug–drug interaction between ceftazidime and avibactam, or ceftazidime–avibactam and metronidazole. There were no safety concerns. In conclusion, pharmacokinetic parameters and safety of ceftazidime, avibactam, and metronidazole were similar after single and multiple doses with no observed drug–drug interaction between ceftazidime and avibactam, or ceftazidime–avibactam and metronidazole. PMID:26516584

  7. Psychedelic 5-Methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine: Metabolism, Pharmacokinetics, Drug Interactions, and Pharmacological Actions

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hong-Wu; Jiang, Xi-Ling; Winter, Jerrold C.; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2011-01-01

    5-Methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) belongs to a group of naturally-occurring psychoactive indolealkylamine drugs. It acts as a nonselective serotonin (5-HT) agonist and causes many physiological and behavioral changes. 5-MeO-DMT is O-demethylated by polymorphic cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) to an active metabolite, bufotenine, while it is mainly inactivated through the deamination pathway mediated by monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A). 5-MeO-DMT is often used with MAO-A inhibitors such as harmaline. Concurrent use of harmaline reduces 5-MeO-DMT deamination metabolism and leads to a prolonged and increased exposure to the parent drug 5-MeO-DMT, as well as the active metabolite bufotenine. Harmaline, 5-MeO-DMT and bufotenine act agonistically on serotonergic systems and may result in hyperserotonergic effects or serotonin toxicity. Interestingly, CYP2D6 also has important contribution to harmaline metabolism, and CYP2D6 genetic polymorphism may cause considerable variability in the metabolism, pharmacokinetics and dynamics of harmaline and its interaction with 5-MeO-DMT. Therefore, this review summarizes recent findings on biotransformation, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacological actions of 5-MeO-DMT. In addition, the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions between harmaline and 5-MeO-DMT, potential involvement of CYP2D6 pharmacogenetics, and risks of 5-MeO-DMT intoxication are discussed. PMID:20942780

  8. Psychedelic 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine: metabolism, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, and pharmacological actions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong-Wu; Jiang, Xi-Ling; Winter, Jerrold C; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2010-10-01

    5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) belongs to a group of naturally-occurring psychoactive indolealkylamine drugs. It acts as a nonselective serotonin (5-HT) agonist and causes many physiological and behavioral changes. 5-MeO-DMT is O-demethylated by polymorphic cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) to an active metabolite, bufotenine, while it is mainly inactivated through the deamination pathway mediated by monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A). 5-MeO-DMT is often used with MAO-A inhibitors such as harmaline. Concurrent use of harmaline reduces 5-MeO-DMT deamination metabolism and leads to a prolonged and increased exposure to the parent drug 5-MeO-DMT, as well as the active metabolite bufotenine. Harmaline, 5-MeO-DMT and bufotenine act agonistically on serotonergic systems and may result in hyperserotonergic effects or serotonin toxicity. Interestingly, CYP2D6 also has important contribution to harmaline metabolism, and CYP2D6 genetic polymorphism may cause considerable variability in the metabolism, pharmacokinetics and dynamics of harmaline and its interaction with 5-MeO-DMT. Therefore, this review summarizes recent findings on biotransformation, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacological actions of 5-MeO-DMT. In addition, the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions between harmaline and 5-MeO-DMT, potential involvement of CYP2D6 pharmacogenetics, and risks of 5-MeO-DMT intoxication are discussed.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacokinetic-Dynamic Modeling of an 8- Aminoquinoline Candidate Anticyanide Drug (WR242511)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-13

    needs to be delivered, and the limitations of MOPP. A prophylactic drug for cyanide poisoning would be the treatment of choice to avert mass casualties...Therapeutics, 8th edition, 1990, pg 1630. 2 Bright, J. E. A Prophylaxis for Cyanide Poisoning in Clinical and Experimental Toxicology of Cyanides

  10. Systems pharmacology to predict drug safety in drug development.

    PubMed

    Trame, Mirjam N; Biliouris, Konstantinos; Lesko, Lawrence J; Mettetal, Jerome T

    2016-10-30

    Ensuring that drugs are safe and effective is a very high priority for drug development and the US Food and Drug Administration review process. This is especially true today because of faster approval times and smaller clinical trials, especially in oncology and rare diseases. In light of these trends, systems pharmacology is seen as an essential strategy to understand and predict adverse drug events during drug development by analyzing interactions between drugs and multiple targets rather than the traditional "one-drug-one-target" approach. This commentary offers an overview of the current trends and challenges of using systems pharmacology to reduce the risks of unintended adverse events.

  11. Prediction of modified release pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics from in vitro, immediate release, and intravenous data.

    PubMed

    Lukacova, Viera; Woltosz, Walter S; Bolger, Michael B

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the value of mechanistic simulations in gaining insight into the behaviors of modified release (MR) formulations in vivo and to use the properly calibrated models for prediction of pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD). GastroPlus (Simulations Plus, Inc.) was used to fit mechanistic models for adinazolam and metoprolol that describe the absorption, PK, and PD after intravenous (i.v.) and immediate release (IR) oral (p.o.) administration. The fitted model for adinazolam was then used to predict the PD profile for a MR formulation and to design a new formulation with desired onset and duration of action. The fitted metoprolol model was used to gain insight and to explain the in vivo behaviors of MR formulations. For each drug, a single absorption/PK model was fitted that provided simulated plasma concentration-time profiles closely matching observed in vivo profiles across several different i.v. and p.o doses. Sedation score profiles of adinazolam were fitted with an indirect PD model. For metoprolol, the fitted absorption/PK model for IR p.o. doses was used to select in vitro dissolution conditions that best matched the in vivo release of MR doses. This model also explained differences in exposure after administration of MR formulations with different release rates. Mechanistic absorption/PK models allow for detailed descriptions of all processes affecting the two drugs' bioavailability, including release/dissolution, absorption, and intestinal and hepatic first pass extraction. The insights gained can be used to design formulations that more effectively overcome identified problems.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of drugs in mutant Nagase analbuminemic rats and responses to select diuretics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Hyun; Lee, Young-Joo; Oh, Euichaul

    2014-01-01

    To report (1) the pharmacokinetics of drugs that are mainly metabolized via hepatic cytochrome P450s (CYPs) or mainly excreted via the urine and bile, (2) the mechanism for the urinary excretion of drugs (such as glomerular filtration or renal active secretion or re-absorption), and (3) the diuretic effect of some loop diuretics in mutant Nagase analbuminaemic rats (NARs), an animal model for human familial analbuminaemia based on the pharmacokinetics of drugs reported in the literatures. In NARs, the changes in the time-averaged non-renal clearances (CL(NR)s) of drugs that are mainly metabolized via CYPs were explained in terms of changes in the hepatic intrinsic clearance (mainly because of changes in CYPs), free (unbound) fractions of drugs in the plasma (fp) and hepatic blood-flow rate (QH) depending on the hepatic excretion ratios of drugs. The CL(NR) changes of drugs mainly metabolized via hepatic CYPs can be sufficiently explained by the three earlier mentioned factors. The plasma albumin (furosemide) or globulin (azosemide, bumetanide and torasemide) binding affects their diuretic effects. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  13. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship of anesthetic drugs: from modeling to clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Billard, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Anesthesia is a combination of unconsciousness, amnesia, and analgesia, expressed in sleeping patients by limited reaction to noxious stimulations. It is achieved by several classes of drugs, acting mainly on central nervous system. Compared to other therapeutic families, the anesthetic drugs, administered by intravenous or pulmonary route, are quickly distributed in the blood and induce in a few minutes effects that are fully reversible within minutes or hours. These effects change in parallel with the concentration of the drug, and the concentration time course of the drug follows with a reasonable precision mathematical models based on the Fick principle. Therefore, understanding concentration time course allows adjusting the dosing delivery scheme in order to control the effects.   The purpose of this short review is to describe the basis of pharmacokinetics and modeling, the concentration-effects relationship, and drug interactions modeling to offer to anesthesiologists and non-anesthesiologists an overview of the rules to follow to optimize anesthetic drug delivery. PMID:26918133

  14. Pharmacogenomic and clinical data link non-pharmacokinetic metabolic dysregulation to drug side effect pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Daniel C; Filipp, Fabian V; Bordbar, Aarash; Jensen, Kasper; Smith, Jeffrey W; Herrgard, Markus J; Mo, Monica L; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2015-06-09

    Drug side effects cause a significant clinical and economic burden. However, mechanisms of drug action underlying side effect pathogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we integrate pharmacogenomic and clinical data with a human metabolic network and find that non-pharmacokinetic metabolic pathways dysregulated by drugs are linked to the development of side effects. We show such dysregulated metabolic pathways contain genes with sequence variants affecting side effect incidence, play established roles in pathophysiology, have significantly altered activity in corresponding diseases, are susceptible to metabolic inhibitors and are effective targets for therapeutic nutrient supplementation. Our results indicate that metabolic dysregulation represents a common mechanism underlying side effect pathogenesis that is distinct from the role of metabolism in drug clearance. We suggest that elucidating the relationships between the cellular response to drugs, genetic variation of patients and cell metabolism may help managing side effects by personalizing drug prescriptions and nutritional intervention strategies.

  15. Pharmacogenomic and clinical data link non-pharmacokinetic metabolic dysregulation to drug side effect pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Daniel C.; Filipp, Fabian V.; Bordbar, Aarash; Jensen, Kasper; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Herrgard, Markus J.; Mo, Monica L.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2015-01-01

    Drug side effects cause a significant clinical and economic burden. However, mechanisms of drug action underlying side effect pathogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we integrate pharmacogenomic and clinical data with a human metabolic network and find that non-pharmacokinetic metabolic pathways dysregulated by drugs are linked to the development of side effects. We show such dysregulated metabolic pathways contain genes with sequence variants affecting side effect incidence, play established roles in pathophysiology, have significantly altered activity in corresponding diseases, are susceptible to metabolic inhibitors and are effective targets for therapeutic nutrient supplementation. Our results indicate that metabolic dysregulation represents a common mechanism underlying side effect pathogenesis that is distinct from the role of metabolism in drug clearance. We suggest that elucidating the relationships between the cellular response to drugs, genetic variation of patients and cell metabolism may help managing side effects by personalizing drug prescriptions and nutritional intervention strategies. PMID:26055627

  16. Effect on Acetylcholinesterase and Anti-oxidant Activity of Synthetic Chalcones Having a Good Predicted Pharmacokinetic Profile.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Renata Parruca; Figueiro, Micheli; Kawano, Daniel Fabio; Almeida, Wanda Pereira

    2017-05-25

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an important target in the development of drug to treat Alzheimer´s disease (AD). In this work, we investigated the effect of twenty-two synthesized chalcones on AChE activity. This work is aimed to synthesize and evaluate the effect of chalcones on the AChE activity, as well as anti-oxidant activity and predict their pharmacokinetic profile. Chalcones were synthesized through a Claisen-Schmidt condensation and their inhibitory effect on the AChE was evaluated by Elmann's colorimetric method. To determine the anti-oxidant activity the DPPH radical scavenging method was chosen. We found that all chalcones inhibit this activity, with IC50 values ranging from 0.008 to 4.8 µM. We selected the most active compound 19 with an IC50 value of 0.008 µM for a kinetic study demonstrating a competitive inhibition mode. Molecular docking simulations showed a good interaction between 19 and the active site of AChE. Considering the prediction of pharmacokinetic parameters being a useful tool for selecting potential drug candidates, our study results suggest that the majority of chalcones, including the most active one, have a promising pharmacokinetic profile and blood-brain barrier permeability. The involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in AD-related events has encouraged us to evaluate these chalcones as radical scavengers. We have found that compound 19 is a potent AChE inhibitor, and based on kinetic studies, it acts as a competitive inhibitor. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in drug discovery and development: a pharmaceutical industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Jones, H M; Chen, Y; Gibson, C; Heimbach, T; Parrott, N; Peters, S A; Snoeys, J; Upreti, V V; Zheng, M; Hall, S D

    2015-03-01

    The application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling has developed rapidly within the pharmaceutical industry and is becoming an integral part of drug discovery and development. In this study, we provide a cross pharmaceutical industry position on "how PBPK modeling can be applied in industry" focusing on the strategies for application of PBPK at different stages, an associated perspective on the confidence and challenges, as well as guidance on interacting with regulatory agencies and internal best practices.

  18. Herbal medicines in Brazil: pharmacokinetic profile and potential herb-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Mazzari, Andre L D A; Prieto, Jose M

    2014-01-01

    A plethora of active compounds found in herbal medicines can serve as substrate for enzymes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. When a medicinal plant is co-administered with a conventional drug and little or no information is known about the pharmacokinetics of the plant metabolites, there is an increased risk of potential herb-drug interactions. Moreover, genetic polymorphisms in a population may act to predispose individuals to adverse reactions. The use of herbal medicines is rapidly increasing in many countries, particularly Brazil where the vast biodiversity is a potential source of new and more affordable treatments for numerous conditions. Accordingly, the Brazilian Unified Public Health System (SUS) produced a list of 71 plant species of interest, which could be made available to the population in the near future. Physicians at SUS prescribe a number of essential drugs and should herbal medicines be added to this system the chance of herb-drug interactions further increases. A review of the effects of these medicinal plants on Phase 1 and Phase 2 metabolic mechanisms and the transporter P-glycoprotein was conducted. The results have shown that approximately half of these medicinal plants lack any pharmacokinetic data. Moreover, most of the studies carried out are in vitro. Only a few reports on herb-drug interactions with essential drugs prescribed by SUS were found, suggesting that very little attention is being given to the safety of herbal medicines. Here we have taken this information to discuss the potential interactions between herbal medicines and essential drugs prescribed to Brazilian patients whilst taking into account the most common polymorphisms present in the Brazilian population. A number of theoretical interactions are pinpointed but more pharmacokinetic studies and pharmacovigilance data are needed to ascertain their clinical significance.

  19. Herbal medicines in Brazil: pharmacokinetic profile and potential herb-drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mazzari, Andre L. D. A.; Prieto, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    A plethora of active compounds found in herbal medicines can serve as substrate for enzymes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. When a medicinal plant is co-administered with a conventional drug and little or no information is known about the pharmacokinetics of the plant metabolites, there is an increased risk of potential herb-drug interactions. Moreover, genetic polymorphisms in a population may act to predispose individuals to adverse reactions. The use of herbal medicines is rapidly increasing in many countries, particularly Brazil where the vast biodiversity is a potential source of new and more affordable treatments for numerous conditions. Accordingly, the Brazilian Unified Public Health System (SUS) produced a list of 71 plant species of interest, which could be made available to the population in the near future. Physicians at SUS prescribe a number of essential drugs and should herbal medicines be added to this system the chance of herb-drug interactions further increases. A review of the effects of these medicinal plants on Phase 1 and Phase 2 metabolic mechanisms and the transporter P-glycoprotein was conducted. The results have shown that approximately half of these medicinal plants lack any pharmacokinetic data. Moreover, most of the studies carried out are in vitro. Only a few reports on herb-drug interactions with essential drugs prescribed by SUS were found, suggesting that very little attention is being given to the safety of herbal medicines. Here we have taken this information to discuss the potential interactions between herbal medicines and essential drugs prescribed to Brazilian patients whilst taking into account the most common polymorphisms present in the Brazilian population. A number of theoretical interactions are pinpointed but more pharmacokinetic studies and pharmacovigilance data are needed to ascertain their clinical significance. PMID:25071580

  20. Overcoming drug resistance through in silico prediction.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, Pablo; Trosset, Jean-Yves

    2014-03-01

    Prediction tools are commonly used in pre-clinical research to assist target selection, to optimize drug potency or to predict the pharmacological profile of drug candidates. In silico prediction and overcoming drug resistance is a new opportunity that creates a high interest in pharmaceutical research. This review presents two main in silico strategies to meet this challenge: a structure-based approach to study the influence of mutations on the drug-target interaction and a system-biology approach to identify resistance pathways for a given drug. In silico screening of synergies between therapeutic and resistant pathways through biological network analysis is an example of technique to escape drug resistance. Structure-based drug design and in silico system biology are complementary approaches to reach few objectives at once: increase efficiency, reduce toxicity and overcoming drug resistance.

  1. Pharmacokinetics and toxicity of antimuscarinic drugs for overactive bladder treatment in females.

    PubMed

    Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Salvatore, Stefano; Alessandri, Franco; Remorgida, Valentino; Origoni, Massimo; Candiani, Massimo; Venturini, Pier Luigi; Ferrero, Simone

    2012-11-01

    Antimuscarinics (AMs) are the mainstay of pharmacological treatment of overactive bladder (OAB), a symptom complex defined by the presence of urinary urgency, usually associated with frequency and nocturia, with or without urgency urinary incontinence. The AMs used to treat OAB differ in their pharmacological profiles, which may affect their potential for causing adverse effects (AEs). The present article aims to review the literature about pharmacokinetics (PK) of the different AMs used in the treatment of OAB. Furthermore, the AEs related to the use of these drugs and their incidence are presented. This systematic review is based on material searched and obtained via Medline, Pubmed and EMBASE up to March 2012 using the search terms "adverse events, pharmacokinetics, tolerability" in combination with "darifenacin, fesoterodine, imidafenacin, oxybutynin, propiverine, solifenacin, tolterodine, and trospium." Antimuscarinics are the first-line pharmacological treatment for OAB. Despite the development of new molecules that improve their efficacy/safety profile, there are some drugs that are pharmacokinetically more appropriate to be prescribed in specific populations such as patients with neurological disease or the elderly. Moreover, research should be encouraged in evaluating antimuscarinics in conjunction with other drugs such as estrogens or beta-agonists. The identification of prognostic criteria for pharmacological therapy would be helpful.

  2. Interspecies pharmacokinetics as applied to the hard drug photosensitizing agent meta(tetrahydroxphenyl)chlorin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronn, Avigdor M.; Lofgren, Lennart A.; Westerborn, Anders

    1996-01-01

    Having successfully completed an extensive three year study of the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of m-THPC as a photosensitizer in three different animal models (rabbit, dog and nude rats) we began a phase one human trial in two centers. At the Orebro Medical Center Hospital, Sweden ten patients were selected for the treatment of bronchial, prostate, skin, laryngeal and nasopharyngeal tumors while at Long Island Jewish Medical Center Hospital four patients were treated for laryngeal cancers. These studies were designed to study the optimal parameters for human treatment and as such relied on data from the animal studies mentioned above. De-escalating drug doses of 0.3, 0.15, 0.075 and 0.0375 mg/kg were chosen and the pharmacokinetics of the patients plasma, tumor and adjacent healthy tissues were measured spectrofluorometrically following chemical extraction of the drug. The half life of the drug in our Cotton tail rabbit model was measured as 24.7 hours as opposed to the human half life of 44.5 hours within the studied dosing range. This illustrates the extreme care that must be exercised before translating animal pharmacokinetics data to human dosing decision.

  3. Curcumin as a clinically-promising anti-cancer agent: pharmacokinetics and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Adiwidjaja, Jeffry; McLachlan, Andrew J; Boddy, Alan V

    2017-09-01

    Curcumin has been extensively studied for its anti-cancer properties. While a diverse array of in vitro and preclinical research support the prospect of curcumin use as an anti-cancer therapeutic, most human studies have failed to meet the intended clinical expectation. Poor systemic availability of orally-administered curcumin may account for this disparity. Areas covered: This descriptive review aims to concisely summarise available clinical studies investigating curcumin pharmacokinetics when administered in different formulations. A critical analysis of pharmacokinetic- and pharmacodynamic-based interactions of curcumin with concomitantly administered drugs is also provided. Expert opinion: The encouraging clinical results of curcumin administration are currently limited to people with colorectal cancer, given that sufficient curcumin concentrations persist in colonic mucosa. Higher parent curcumin systemic exposure, which can be achieved by several newer formulations, has important implications for optimal treatment of cancers other than those in gastrointestinal tract. Curcumin-drug pharmacokinetic interactions are also almost exclusively in the enterocytes, owing to extensive first pass metabolism and poor curcumin bioavailability. Greater scope of these interactions, i.e. modulation of the systemic elimination of co-administered drugs, may be expected from more-bioavailable curcumin formulations. Further studies are still warranted, especially with newer formulations to support the inclusion of curcumin in cancer therapy regimens.

  4. Pharmacokinetic drug interaction between fexofenadine and fluvastatin mediated by organic anion-transporting polypeptides in rats.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Fu; Lee, Beom-Jin; Lee, Wonjae; Han, Hyo-Kyung

    2009-06-28

    This study aimed to examine the transporter-mediated drug interaction between fexofenadine and fluvastatin in rats. Compared to the control group given fluvastatin alone, the concurrent use of fexofenadine (10 or 20mg/kg) prior to the oral administration of fluvastatin (5mg/kg) decreased the systemic exposure of fluvastatin by 17-51% in rats. Consequently, the bioavailability of oral fluvastatin was significantly lower (p<0.05) in the presence of fexofenadine compared to that from the control group. Furthermore, the intravenous pharmacokinetics of fluvastatin (2mg/kg) was significantly altered by the pretreatment with fexofenadine (20mg/kg, p.o.). The plasma clearance of fluvastatin was reduced by 44% in the presence of fexofenadine. The effect of fluvastatin on the pharmacokinetics of fexofenadine was also investigated in rats. The pretreatment with fluvastatin (5 or 10mg/kg) decreased AUC and C(max) of oral fexofenadine (10mg/kg) by 47-53% and 28-60%, respectively, while it did not affect the intravenous pharmacokinetics of fexofenadine. Given that both fluvastatin and fexofenadine can interact with organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs) expressed in intestine and liver, the present results suggest the potential drug interaction between fluvastatin and fexofenadine via the competition for the OATP-mediated cellular transport pathway during intestinal absorption and/or hepatic uptake of drugs.

  5. Linking Suspension Nasal Spray Drug Deposition Patterns to Pharmacokinetic Profiles: A Proof of Concept Study using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rygg, Alex; Hindle, Michael; Longest, P. Worth

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to link regional nasal spray deposition patterns of suspension formulations, predicted with computational fluid dynamics (CFD), to in vivo human pharmacokinetic (PK) plasma concentration profiles. This is accomplished through the use of CFD simulations coupled with compartmental PK modeling. Results showed a rapid initial rise in plasma concentration that is due to the absorption of drug particles deposited in the nasal middle passages, followed by a slower increase in plasma concentration that is governed by the transport of drug particles from the nasal vestibule to the middle passages. Although drug deposition locations in the nasal cavity had a significant effect on the shape of the concentration profile, the absolute bioavailability remained constant provided that all of the drug remained in the nose over the course of the simulation. Loss of drug through the nostrils even after long time periods resulted in a significant decrease in bioavailability and increased variability. The results of this study quantify how differences in nasal drug deposition affect transient plasma concentrations and overall bioavailability. These findings are potentially useful for establishing bioequivalence for nasal spray devices and reducing the burden of in vitro testing, pharmacodynamics and clinical studies. PMID:27238495

  6. Quantitative Analyses of the Influence of Parameters Governing Rate-Determining Process of Hepatic Elimination of Drugs on the Magnitudes of Drug-Drug Interactions via Hepatic OATPs and CYP3A Using Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models.

    PubMed

    Yoshikado, Takashi; Maeda, Kazuya; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Furihata, Ken-Ichi; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2017-09-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were constructed for hepatic organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs) and cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) substrates (bosentan, repaglinide, clarithromycin, and simeprevir), a CYP3A probe substrate (midazolam), and selective inhibitors for OATPs (rifampicin) and CYP3A (itraconazole), although the role of OATPs in the hepatic uptake of clarithromycin is unclear. The pharmacokinetic data were obtained from our previous clinical drug-drug interaction (DDI) study. Parameters optimized from clinical PK data were confirmed to reproduce their blood concentrations in control phase. DDIs with rifampicin and itraconazole were simulated using in vivo Rdif (ratio of diffusional uptake to active uptake) and β (the fraction of the sum of intrinsic clearances for metabolism and biliary excretion in all possible itineraries of intracellular drugs including basolateral efflux) estimated by static analyses based on the extended clearance concept, in vivo inhibition constant (Ki) for hepatic OATPs reported previously, and in vivo Ki for CYP3A determined from DDI data with midazolam and itraconazole. Sensitivity analyses showed the magnitudes of DDIs largely depended on Rdif and β. In conclusion, our approach using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling showed that the rational estimation of parameters governing rate-determining process of hepatic elimination is critical to accurately predict DDI magnitudes involving OATPs/CYP3A inhibition. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions in liver disease: An update

    PubMed Central

    Palatini, Pietro; De Martin, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition and induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes are the most frequent and dangerous drug-drug interactions. They are an important cause of serious adverse events that have often resulted in early termination of drug development or withdrawal of drugs from the market. Management of such interactions by dose adjustment in clinical practice is extremely difficult because of the wide interindividual variability in their magnitude. This review examines the genetic, physiological, and environmental factors responsible for this variability, focusing on an important but so far neglected cause of variability, liver functional status. Clinical studies have shown that liver disease causes a reduction in the magnitude of interactions due to enzyme inhibition, which is proportional to the degree of liver function impairment. The effect of liver dysfunction varies quantitatively according to the nature, reversible or irreversible, of the inhibitory interaction. The magnitude of reversible inhibition is more drastically reduced and virtually vanishes in patients with advanced hepatocellular insufficiency. Two mechanisms, in order of importance, are responsible for this reduction: decreased hepatic uptake of the inhibitory drug and reduced enzyme expression. The extent of irreversible inhibitory interactions is only partially reduced, as it is only influenced by the decreased expression of the inhibited enzyme. Thus, for appropriate clinical management of inhibitory drug interactions, both the liver functional status and the mechanism of inhibition must be taken into consideration. Although the inducibility of drug-metabolizing enzymes in liver disease has long been studied, very conflicting results have been obtained, mainly because of methodological differences. Taken together, the results of early animal and human studies indicated that enzyme induction is substantially preserved in compensated liver cirrhosis, whereas no definitive conclusion as to whether it is

  8. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of drug-drug interactions among risperidone, bupropion, and sertraline in CF1 mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Sheng; DeVane, C Lindsay; Gibson, B Bryan; Donovan, Jennifer L; Markowitz, John S; Zhu, Hao-Jie

    2006-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that modulation of the activity of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and the multidrug resistance transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is responsible for many drug-drug interactions. The potential interaction of risperidone (RISP), which is metabolized by 2D6 and transported across the blood brain barrier (BBB) by P-gp, was studied in combination with bupropion (BUP) and also with sertraline (SERT). BUP, SERT, and RISP were administered intraperitoneally into CF1 mice at doses of 100, 10, and 1 microg/g mouse, respectively. Plasma and brain samples were collected at timed intervals from 0.5 to 6 h. A pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using both traditional compartmental modeling and a population pharmacokinetic approach. BUP increased the RISP plasma (5.9-fold, P<0.01) and brain (2.2-fold, P<0.01) area under the drug concentration vs time curve (AUC), but did not alter the brain-to-plasma concentration ratio. SERT did not significantly change the plasma AUC of RISP and 9-hydroxy-RISP, but increased the brain AUC of RISP and 9-hydroxy-RISP 1.5-fold (P<0.05) and 5-fold (P<0.01), respectively. RISP did not produce significant alterations of plasma or brain concentrations of BUP. It increased the plasma AUC and elimination half-life (T1/2e) of desmethyl-SERT 12.5-fold (P<0.01) and 107-fold (P<0.01), respectively. These results suggest that pharmacokinetic interactions exist among these three psychoactive drugs involving inhibition of drug metabolizing enzymes and/or P-gp and other drug transporters present in the BBB. The mechanisms and consequences of these interactions require further study in humans to establish clinical relevance.

  9. Amorphous ternary cyclodextrin nanocomposites of telmisartan for oral drug delivery: improved solubility and reduced pharmacokinetic variability.

    PubMed

    Sangwai, Mayur; Vavia, Pradeep

    2013-09-10

    Despite of advancements in dosage form design and use of multifunctional excipients, improvement in dissolution characteristics of molecules like Telmisartan (TEL) having exceedingly pH dependent and poor solubility profile is still challenging. The present research work explores an innovative particle engineering approach which synergistically coalesce two principally different solubility enhancement strategies namely ternary β-cyclodextrin complexation and top-down nanonization in a unit process. The research was aimed to improve solubility and reduce in vivo variability in pharmacokinetic parameters of TEL irrespective to physiological pH conditions. Ternary β-cyclodextrin nanocomposites of TEL were prepared with high pressure homogenization using meglumine as ternary component. TEL nanocomposites were thoroughly characterized for particle size, surface topology, surface charge, inclusion complexation, crystalinity, dissolution and in vivo pharmacokinetic performance in male wistar rats at fed and fasted state. TEL nanocomposites exhibited average particle size of 698 ± 23 nm. Remarkable improvement in in vitro dissolution characteristics in multimedia and biorelevant media was observed in comparison with plain drug and marketed formulation. Results of in vivo pharmacokinetic studies revealed that, nanocomposites effectively bypass variation in pharmacokinetic parameters at fed and fasted states with 346%, 315%, 301% and 321% increase in relative bioavailability compared to marketed formulation and pure TEL in fed and fasted conditions respectively.

  10. Herb-drug interaction of Andrographis paniculata (Nees) extract and andrographolide on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic of naproxen in rats.

    PubMed

    Balap, Aishwarya; Lohidasan, Sathiyanarayanan; Sinnathambi, Arulmozhi; Mahadik, Kakasaheb

    2017-01-04

    Andrographis paniculata Nees (Acanthacae) have broad range of pharmacological effects such as hepatoprotective, antifertility, antimalarial, antidiabetic, suppression of various cancer cells and anti-inflammatory properties and is widely used medicinal plant in the traditional Unani and Ayurvedic medicinal systems. Andrographolide (AN) is one of the active constituent of the A. paniculata Nees extract (APE). They have been found in many traditional herbal formulations in India and proven to be effective as anti-inflammatory drug. To evaluate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (anti arthritic) herb-drug interactions of A. paniculata Nees extract (APE) and pure andrographolide (AN) with naproxen (NP) after oral co-administration in wistar rats. After oral co-administration of APE (200mg/Kg) and AN (60mg/kg) with NP (7.5mg/kg) in rats, drug concentrations in plasma were determined using HPLC method. The main pharmacokinetic parameters of Cmax, tmax, t1/2, MRT, Vd, CL, and AUC were calculated by non-compartment model. Change in paw volume, mechanical nociceptive threshold, mechanical hyperalgesia, histopathology and hematological parameters were evaluated to study antiarthritic activity. Co-administration of NP with APE and pure AN decreased systemic exposure level of NP in vivo. The Cmax, tmax, AUC0-t of NP was decreased. In pharmacodynamic study, NP (10mg/kg) alone and NP+AN (10+60mg/kg) groups exhibited significant synergistic anti-arthritic activity as compared to groups NP+APE, APE and AN alone. The results obtained from this study suggested that NP, APE and pure AN existed pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions in rat which is correlated with anti-arthritic study. The knowledge regarding possible herb-drug interaction of NP might be helpful for physicians as well as patients using AP. So further studies should be done to understand the effect of other herbal ingredients of APE on NP as well as to predict the herb-drug interaction in humans. Copyright © 2016

  11. Clinically Relevant Pharmacokinetic Herb-drug Interactions in Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fasinu, Pius S; Gurley, Bill J; Walker, Larry A

    2015-01-01

    For healthcare professionals, the volume of literature available on herb-drug interactions often makes it difficult to separate experimental/potential interactions from those deemed clinically relevant. There is a need for concise and conclusive information to guide pharmacotherapy in HIV/AIDS. In this review, the bases for potential interaction of medicinal herbs with specific antiretroviral drugs are presented, and several botanicals are discussed for which clinically relevant interactions in humans are established. Such studies have provided, in most cases, sufficient ground to warrant the avoidance of concurrent administration of antiretroviral (ARVs) drugs with St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum), black pepper (Piper species) and grapefruit juice. Other botanicals that require caution in the use with antiretrovirals include African potato (Hypoxis hemerocallidea), ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba), ginseng (Panax species), garlic (Allium sativum), goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and kava kava (Piper methysticum). The knowledge of clinically significant herb-drug interaction will be important in order to avoid herb-induced risk of sub-therapeutic exposure to ARVs (which can lead to viral resistance) or the precipitation of toxicity (which may lead to poor compliance and/or discontinuation of antiretroviral therapy).

  12. Nanoformulation for anticancer drug delivery: Enhanced pharmacokinetics and circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, Gaurav

    In this study, we have explored the application of the Layer-by-Layer (LbL) assembly technique for improving injectable drug delivery systems of low soluble anticancer drugs (e.g. Camptothecin (CPT), Paclitaxel (PTX) or Doxorubicin (DOX)). For this study, a polyelectrolyte shell encapsulates different types of drug nanocores (e.g. soft core, nanomicelle or solid lipid nanocores).The low soluble drugs tend to crystallize and precipitate in an aqueous medium. This is the reason they cannot be injected and may have low concentrations and low circulation time in the blood. Even though these drugs when present in the cancer microenvironment have high anti-tumor inhibition, the delivery to the tumor site after intravenous administration is a challenge. We have used FDA-approved biopolymers for the process and elaborated formation of 60-90 nm diameter initial cores, which was stabilized by multilayer LbL shells for controlled release and longer circulation. A washless LbL assembly process was applied as an essential advancement in nano-assembly technology using low density nanocore (lipids) and preventing aggregation. This advancement reduced the number of process steps, enhanced drug loading capacity, and prevented the loss of expensive polyelectrolytes. Finally, we elaborated a general nano-encapsulation process, which allowed these three important anticancer drug core-shell nanocapsules with diameters of ca. 100-130 nm (this small size is a record for LbL encapsulation technique) to be stable in the serum and the blood for at least one week, efficient for cancer cell culture studies, injectable to mice with circulation for 4 hrs, and effective in suppressing tumors. This work is divided into three studies. The first study (CHAPTER 4) explores the application of LbL assembly for encapsulating a soft core of albumin protein and CPT anticancer drug. In order to preserve the activity of drug in the core, a unique technique of pH reversal is employed where the first few

  13. Enhancing the Pharmacokinetic Profile of Protein-Based Drugs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-12

    bioavailability when given subcutaneously. Extend Biosciences is developing proprietary carrier molecules that will allow proteins to access a...in the development of longer-lasting versions of bioscavenger proteins that could then be delivered subcutaneously and become bioavailable within...protein-based drugs have limited efficacy due to a short half-life or require intravenous delivery because of low bioavailability when given

  14. Clinically relevant pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions in antiretroviral therapy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    For healthcare professionals, the volume of literature available on herb-drug interactions often makes it difficult to separate experimental/potential interactions from those deemed clinically relevant. There is a need for concise and conclusive information to guide pharmacotherapy in HIV/AIDS. In t...

  15. Effect of Adherence on Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Relationships of Oral Targeted Anticancer Drugs.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Evelina; Csajka, Chantal; Schneider, Marie P; Widmer, Nicolas

    2017-06-20

    The emergence of oral targeted anticancer agents transformed several cancers into chronic conditions with a need for long-term oral treatment. Although cancer is a life-threatening condition, oncology medication adherence-the extent to which a patient follows the drug regimen that is intended by the prescriber-can be suboptimal in the long term, as in any other chronic disease. Poor adherence can impact negatively on clinical outcomes, notably because most of these drugs are given as a standard non-individualized dosage despite marked inter-individual variabilities that can lead to toxic or inefficacious drug concentrations. This has been especially studied with the prototypal drug imatinib. In the context of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), increasingly advocated for oral anticancer treatment optimization, unreported suboptimal adherence affecting drug intake history may lead to significant bias in the concentration interpretation and inappropriate dosage adjustments. In the same way, suboptimal adherence may also bias the results of pharmacokinetic modeling studies, which will affect in turn Bayesian TDM interpretation that relies on such population models. Detailed knowledge of the influence of adherence on plasma concentrations in pharmacokinetic studies or in routine TDM programs is however presently missing in the oncology field. Studies on this topic are therefore eagerly awaited to better pilot the treatment of cancer with the new targeted agents and to find their optimal dosage regimen. Hence, the development and assessment of effective medication adherence programs are warranted for these treatments.

  16. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetic-dynamic modeling of an 8-aminoquinoline candidate anticyanide drug (WR242511)

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, M.T.; Brewer, T.G.; Brown, L.D.; Peggins, J.O.; Urquhart, M.R.

    1993-05-13

    Cyanide is one of the most rapidly acting toxic compounds. With a sufficiently high dose one may die within minutes of exposure. Treatment must be rapid to be effective. Cyanide is used extensively in industry and agriculture in a variety of forms which may lead to inadvertent human exposure. Agents useful in treating cyanide intoxication include sodium nitrite, 4-dimethylaminophenol, cobalt EDTA, and hydroxycobalamin. Sodium nitrite and 4-dimethylaminophenol dimethylaminophenol work by converting hemoglobin to methemoglobin for which cyanide has a very high affinity thus acting as a cyanide sink. Cobalt EDTA and hydroxycobalamin act directly as cyanide chelators. Sodium thiosulfate is administered in conjunction with sodium nitrite to accelerate conversion of cyanide to thiocyanate which is nontoxic and excreted in the urine. All of the above treatments require intravenous delivery and careful monitoring by trained medical personnel. Hydrogen cyanide is considered a serious chemical warfare threat because it can be delivered to the battlefield in concentrations sufficiently to cause extensive morbidity and mortality. In military situations the administration of any of the known antidotes would be virtually impossible because of the number of casualities, the short time span in which the antidote needs to be delivered, and the limitations of MOPP. A prophylactic drug for cyanide poisoning would be the treatment of choice to avert mass casualties. The ideal drug would be effective in the majority of the population being treated, the dosing rate would be daily or less frequent, it would have minimal side effects and would not interfere with aerobic and anaerobic work necessitated in the course of military duties.

  17. The effect of enzyme-inducing antiseizure drugs on the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of procarbazine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Stuart A; Carson, Kathryn A; Batchelor, Tracy T; Lesser, Glenn; Mikkelsen, Tom; Alavi, Jane B; Phuphanich, Surasak; Hammour, Tarek; Fisher, Joy D; Supko, Jeffrey G

    2006-09-01

    Procarbazine hydrochloride (PCB) is one of the few anticancer drugs with activity against high-grade gliomas. This study was conducted to determine if the maximum tolerated dose and pharmacokinetics of PCB are affected by the concurrent use of enzyme-inducing antiseizure drugs (EIASD). Adults with recurrent high-grade glioma were divided into cohorts who were (+) and were not (-) taking EIASDs. PCB was given orally for 5 consecutive days each month. Six patients were evaluated at each dose level beginning with 200 mg/m2/d and escalated using the modified continual reassessment method. Toxicity and response were assessed. Pharmacokinetic studies were done with a new electrospray ionization mass spectrometry assay. Forty-nine patients were evaluated. The maximum tolerated dose was 393 mg/m2/d for the +EIASD group and the highest dose evaluated in -EIASD patients was 334 mg/m2/d. Myelosuppression was the primary dose-limiting toxicity. Significant hepatic dysfunction occurred in three patients in the +EIASD cohort. Four partial responses (8%) and no complete responses were observed. PCB exhibited linear pharmacokinetics with no significant differences between the two cohorts. A marked increase in peak PCB levels was noted on day 5 relative to day 1, which was not attributable to drug accumulation. This study suggests that (a) EIASD use does not significantly affect the pharmacokinetics of PCB; (b) changes in the peak plasma concentration of PCB, consistent with decreased apparent oral clearance due to autoinhibition of hepatic metabolism, occur with daily dosing; and (c) severe hepatic dysfunction may accompany this administration schedule.

  18. Potential impact of drug effects, availability, pharmacokinetics, and screening on estimates of drugs implicated in cases of assault.

    PubMed

    Carter, Lawrence P

    2011-09-01

    Drug-facilitated sexual assault (DFSA) is a serious and troubling crime. It is important to know if and how different drugs might be used to facilitate assault in order to deter such crime. There are a number of ways in which drugs that are used for DFSA might not be detected by routine screens. The purpose of this analysis was to draw reasonable inferences regarding drugs with a high likelihood of being used for DFSA and not being detected by routine screens. National data from poison control centres, hospital emergency rooms, and law enforcement seizures were used to evaluate the relative magnitude of problems and illicit availability associated with different classes of drugs. General drug classes were examined to include additional drugs that might be used for DFSA on the basis of their amnesic effects, widespread availability, and pharmacokinetics (i.e. short half-life). The benzodiazepine-site ligands zolpidem and eszopiclone, 'club drugs' GHB and ketamine, muscle relaxants such as carisoprodol, and antihistamines such as diphenhydramine were identified as drugs that might be used for DFSA and remain undetected by routine screens. Future studies that are designed to examine the role of these drugs in DFSA cases could provide better estimates of their use for DFSA. A better understanding of what is being missed in DFSA cases might help prioritize the development of new assays, provide rationale for the availability of particular assays for routine testing, and inform practitioners and the general public of the potential DFSA risks of certain drugs.

  19. SwissADME: a free web tool to evaluate pharmacokinetics, drug-likeness and medicinal chemistry friendliness of small molecules

    PubMed Central

    Daina, Antoine; Michielin, Olivier; Zoete, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    To be effective as a drug, a potent molecule must reach its target in the body in sufficient concentration, and stay there in a bioactive form long enough for the expected biologic events to occur. Drug development involves assessment of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) increasingly earlier in the discovery process, at a stage when considered compounds are numerous but access to the physical samples is limited. In that context, computer models constitute valid alternatives to experiments. Here, we present the new SwissADME web tool that gives free access to a pool of fast yet robust predictive models for physicochemical properties, pharmacokinetics, drug-likeness and medicinal chemistry friendliness, among which in-house proficient methods such as the BOILED-Egg, iLOGP and Bioavailability Radar. Easy efficient input and interpretation are ensured thanks to a user-friendly interface through the login-free website http://www.swissadme.ch. Specialists, but also nonexpert in cheminformatics or computational chemistry can predict rapidly key parameters for a collection of molecules to support their drug discovery endeavours. PMID:28256516

  20. SwissADME: a free web tool to evaluate pharmacokinetics, drug-likeness and medicinal chemistry friendliness of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Daina, Antoine; Michielin, Olivier; Zoete, Vincent

    2017-03-03

    To be effective as a drug, a potent molecule must reach its target in the body in sufficient concentration, and stay there in a bioactive form long enough for the expected biologic events to occur. Drug development involves assessment of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) increasingly earlier in the discovery process, at a stage when considered compounds are numerous but access to the physical samples is limited. In that context, computer models constitute valid alternatives to experiments. Here, we present the new SwissADME web tool that gives free access to a pool of fast yet robust predictive models for physicochemical properties, pharmacokinetics, drug-likeness and medicinal chemistry friendliness, among which in-house proficient methods such as the BOILED-Egg, iLOGP and Bioavailability Radar. Easy efficient input and interpretation are ensured thanks to a user-friendly interface through the login-free website http://www.swissadme.ch. Specialists, but also nonexpert in cheminformatics or computational chemistry can predict rapidly key parameters for a collection of molecules to support their drug discovery endeavours.

  1. Preparation of finasteride capsules-loaded drug nanoparticles: formulation, optimization, in vitro, and pharmacokinetic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tarek A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, optimized freeze-dried finasteride nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared from drug nanosuspension formulation that was developed using the bottom–up technique. The effects of four formulation and processing variables that affect the particle size and solubility enhancement of the NPs were explored using the response surface optimization design. The optimized formulation was morphologically characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Physicochemical interaction among the studied components was investigated. Crystalline change was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). Crystal growth of the freeze-dried NPs was compared to the corresponding aqueous drug nanosuspension. Freeze-dried NPs formulation was subsequently loaded into hard gelatin capsules that were examined for in vitro dissolution and pharmacokinetic behavior. Results revealed that in most of the studied variables, some of the quadratic and interaction effects had a significant effect on the studied responses. TEM image illustrated homogeneity and shape of the prepared NPs. No interaction among components was noticed. XRPD confirmed crystalline state change in the optimized NPs. An enhancement in the dissolution rate of more than 2.5 times from capsules filled with optimum drug NPs, when compared to capsules filled with pure drug, was obtained. Crystal growth, due to Ostwald ripening phenomenon and positive Gibbs free energy, was reduced following lyophilization of the nanosuspension formulation. Pharmacokinetic parameters from drug NPs were superior to that of pure drug and drug microparticles. In conclusion, freeze-dried NPs based on drug nanosuspension formulation is a successful technique in enhancing stability, solubility, and in vitro dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs with possible impact on the drug bioavailability. PMID:26893559

  2. Preparation of finasteride capsules-loaded drug nanoparticles: formulation, optimization, in vitro, and pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tarek A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, optimized freeze-dried finasteride nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared from drug nanosuspension formulation that was developed using the bottom-up technique. The effects of four formulation and processing variables that affect the particle size and solubility enhancement of the NPs were explored using the response surface optimization design. The optimized formulation was morphologically characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Physicochemical interaction among the studied components was investigated. Crystalline change was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). Crystal growth of the freeze-dried NPs was compared to the corresponding aqueous drug nanosuspension. Freeze-dried NPs formulation was subsequently loaded into hard gelatin capsules that were examined for in vitro dissolution and pharmacokinetic behavior. Results revealed that in most of the studied variables, some of the quadratic and interaction effects had a significant effect on the studied responses. TEM image illustrated homogeneity and shape of the prepared NPs. No interaction among components was noticed. XRPD confirmed crystalline state change in the optimized NPs. An enhancement in the dissolution rate of more than 2.5 times from capsules filled with optimum drug NPs, when compared to capsules filled with pure drug, was obtained. Crystal growth, due to Ostwald ripening phenomenon and positive Gibbs free energy, was reduced following lyophilization of the nanosuspension formulation. Pharmacokinetic parameters from drug NPs were superior to that of pure drug and drug microparticles. In conclusion, freeze-dried NPs based on drug nanosuspension formulation is a successful technique in enhancing stability, solubility, and in vitro dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs with possible impact on the drug bioavailability.

  3. Undesirable effects of citrus juice on the pharmacokinetics of drugs: focus on recent studies.

    PubMed

    Saito, Mitsuo; Hirata-Koizumi, Mutsuko; Matsumoto, Mariko; Urano, Tsutomu; Hasegawa, Ryuichi

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that intake of grapefruit juice affects the pharmacokinetics of various kinds of drugs. It has been reported that other citrus juices also interact with certain drugs. To re-evaluate citrus juice-drug interactions based on currently available evidence, a literature search was conducted for new and updated information since the grapefruit juice-drug interaction was last reviewed in 1998. MEDLINE (1998-October 2004) was accessed and more than 200 reports were found. The effects of grapefruit juice ingestion on the pharmacokinetics of orally administered drugs have been reported for 40 drugs since the reviews published in 1998. Increases in either area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) or maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) were found with 34 of these, the major mechanism being considered to be inactivation of intestinal cytochrome P450 3A4, a so-called mechanism-based inhibition. Although recent reports point to the inhibitory effects of grapefruit juice on the function of P-glycoprotein, which transports substrates from enterocytes back into the lumen, the contribution to the bioavailability of drugs that are substrates of P-glycoprotein has not been established yet. Dramatic decreases in AUC and C(max) for two drugs in association with grapefruit juice ingestion has been reported and, in these cases, inhibitory effects on organic anion transporting polypeptide, which mediates absorption from the intestinal lumen to enterocytes, might be involved. Other citrus juices such as Seville (sour) orange juice and commonly ingested varieties of orange juice also showed significant effects on the AUC and C(max) of some drugs. Although the situation is complex and uncertainties remain, we recommend that patients avoid citrus juice intake while taking medications and that healthcare providers advise against citrus juice intake in this setting until any interactions with subject drugs can be clarified in clinical studies.

  4. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling 2: predicting the tissue distribution of acids, very weak bases, neutrals and zwitterions.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Trudy; Rowland, Malcolm

    2006-06-01

    A key component of whole body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (WBPBPK) models is the tissue-to-plasma water partition coefficients (Kpu's). The predictability of Kpu values using mechanistically derived equations has been investigated for 7 very weak bases, 20 acids, 4 neutral drugs and 8 zwitterions in rat adipose, bone, brain, gut, heart, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, pancreas, skin, spleen and thymus. These equations incorporate expressions for dissolution in tissue water and, partitioning into neutral lipids and neutral phospholipids. Additionally, associations with acidic phospholipids were incorporated for zwitterions with a highly basic functionality, or extracellular proteins for the other compound classes. The affinity for these cellular constituents was determined from blood cell data or plasma protein binding, respectively. These equations assume drugs are passively distributed and that processes are nonsaturating. Resultant Kpu predictions were more accurate when compared to published equations, with 84% as opposed to 61% of the predicted values agreeing with experimental values to within a factor of 3. This improvement was largely due to the incorporation of distribution processes related to drug ionisation, an issue that is not addressed in earlier equations. Such advancements in parameter prediction will assist WBPBPK modelling, where time, cost and labour requirements greatly deter its application. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  5. Prediction of pharmacokinetic and toxicological parameters of a 4-phenylcoumarin isolated from geopropolis: In silico and in vitro approaches.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Franco, Gilson César Nobre; Franchin, Marcelo; Beutler, John A; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Ikegaki, Masaharu; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2016-11-30

    In silico and in vitro methodologies have been used as important tools in the drug discovery process, including from natural sources. The aim of this study was to predict pharmacokinetic and toxicity (ADME/Tox) properties of a coumarin isolated from geopropolis using in silico and in vitro approaches. Cinnamoyloxy-mammeisin (CNM) isolated from Brazilian M. scutellaris geopropolis was evaluated for its pharmacokinetic parameters by in silico models (ACD/Percepta™ and MetaDrug™ software). Genotoxicity was assessed by in vitro DNA damage signaling PCR array. CNM did not pass all parameters of Lipinski's rule of five, with a predicted low oral bioavailability and high plasma protein binding, but with good predicted blood brain barrier penetration. CNM was predicted to show low affinity to cytochrome P450 family members. Furthermore, the predicted Ames test indicated potential mutagenicity of CNM. Also, the probability of toxicity for organs and tissues was classified as moderate and high for liver and kidney, and moderate and low for skin and eye irritation, respectively. The PCR array analysis showed that CNM significantly upregulated about 7% of all DNA damage-related genes. By exploring the biological function of these genes, it was found that the predicted CNM genotoxicity is likely to be mediated by apoptosis. The predicted ADME/Tox profile suggests that external use of CNM may be preferable to systemic exposure, while its genotoxicity was characterized by the upregulation of apoptosis-related genes after treatment. The combined use of in silico and in vitro approaches to evaluate these parameters generated useful hypotheses to guide further preclinical studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Predicting risk of adverse drug reactions in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Lavan, Amanda Hanora; Gallagher, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are common in older adults, with falls, orthostatic hypotension, delirium, renal failure, gastrointestinal and intracranial bleeding being amongst the most common clinical manifestations. ADR risk increases with age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, increasing burden of comorbidity, polypharmacy, inappropriate prescribing and suboptimal monitoring of drugs. ADRs are a preventable cause of harm to patients and an unnecessary waste of healthcare resources. Several ADR risk tools exist but none has sufficient predictive value for clinical practice. Good clinical practice for detecting and predicting ADRs in vulnerable patients includes detailed documentation and regular review of prescribed and over-the-counter medications through standardized medication reconciliation. New medications should be prescribed cautiously with clear therapeutic goals and recognition of the impact a drug can have on multiple organ systems. Prescribers should regularly review medication efficacy and be vigilant for ADRs and their contributory risk factors. Deprescribing should occur at an individual level when drugs are no longer efficacious or beneficial or when safer alternatives exist. Inappropriate prescribing and unnecessary polypharmacy should be minimized. Comprehensive geriatric assessment and the use of explicit prescribing criteria can be useful in this regard. PMID:26834959

  7. A link prediction approach to cancer drug sensitivity prediction.

    PubMed

    Turki, Turki; Wei, Zhi

    2017-10-03

    Predicting the response to a drug for cancer disease patients based on genomic information is an important problem in modern clinical oncology. This problem occurs in part because many available drug sensitivity prediction algorithms do not consider better quality cancer cell lines and the adoption of new feature representations; both lead to the accurate prediction of drug responses. By predicting accurate drug responses to cancer, oncologists gain a more complete understanding of the effective treatments for each patient, which is a core goal in precision medicine. In this paper, we model cancer drug sensitivity as a link prediction, which is shown to be an effective technique. We evaluate our proposed link prediction algorithms and compare them with an existing drug sensitivity prediction approach based on clinical trial data. The experimental results based on the clinical trial data show the stability of our link prediction algorithms, which yield the highest area under the ROC curve (AUC) and are statistically significant. We propose a link prediction approach to obtain new feature representation. Compared with an existing approach, the results show that incorporating the new feature representation to the link prediction algorithms has significantly improved the performance.

  8. Drug Response Prediction as a Link Prediction Problem

    PubMed Central

    Stanfield, Zachary; Coşkun, Mustafa; Koyutürk, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Drug response prediction is a well-studied problem in which the molecular profile of a given sample is used to predict the effect of a given drug on that sample. Effective solutions to this problem hold the key for precision medicine. In cancer research, genomic data from cell lines are often utilized as features to develop machine learning models predictive of drug response. Molecular networks provide a functional context for the integration of genomic features, thereby resulting in robust and reproducible predictive models. However, inclusion of network data increases dimensionality and poses additional challenges for common machine learning tasks. To overcome these challenges, we here formulate drug response prediction as a link prediction problem. For this purpose, we represent drug response data for a large cohort of cell lines as a heterogeneous network. Using this network, we compute “network profiles” for cell lines and drugs. We then use the associations between these profiles to predict links between drugs and cell lines. Through leave-one-out cross validation and cross-classification on independent datasets, we show that this approach leads to accurate and reproducible classification of sensitive and resistant cell line-drug pairs, with 85% accuracy. We also examine the biological relevance of the network profiles. PMID:28067293

  9. Pharmacokinetics-Based Approaches for Bioequivalence Evaluation of Topical Dermatological Drug Products.

    PubMed

    Raney, Sam G; Franz, Thomas J; Lehman, Paul A; Lionberger, Robert; Chen, Mei-Ling

    2015-11-01

    The pharmacokinetic approach has accelerated the development of high-quality generic medicines with extraordinary cost savings, transforming the pharmaceutical industry and healthcare system in the USA. While this is true for systemically absorbed drug products, the availability of generic versions of topical dermatological products remains constrained due to the limited methods accepted for bioequivalence evaluation of these products. The current review explores the possibility of developing appropriate bioequivalence approaches based on pharmacokinetic principles for topical dermatological products. This review focuses on the strengths and limitations of the three most promising pharmacokinetics-based methods to evaluate the performance and bioequivalence of topical dermatological products, which include in vivo skin stripping, in vivo microdialysis, and in vitro permeation testing (IVPT) with excised human skin. It is hoped that recent advances in pharmaceutical and regulatory science will facilitate the development of robust bioequivalence approaches for these dosage forms, enable more efficient methodologies to compare the performance of new drug products in certain pre-approval or post-approval change situations, and promote the availability of high-quality generic versions of topical dermatological products.

  10. An Updated Review on Drug-Induced Cholestasis: Mechanisms and Investigation of Physicochemical Properties and Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    YANG, KYUNGHEE; KÖCK, KATHLEEN; SEDYKH, ALEXANDER; TROPSHA, ALEXANDER; BROUWER, KIM L.R.

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced cholestasis is an important form of acquired liver disease and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Bile acids are key signaling molecules, but they can exert toxic responses when they accumulate in hepatocytes. This review focuses on the physiological mechanisms of drug-induced cholestasis associated with altered bile acid homeostasis due to direct (e.g. bile acid transporter inhibition) or indirect (e.g. activation of nuclear receptors, altered function/expression of bile acid transporters) processes. Mechanistic information about the effects of a drug on bile acid homeostasis is important when evaluating the cholestatic potential of a compound, but experimental data often are not available. The relationship between physicochemical properties, pharmacokinetic parameters, and inhibition of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) among seventy-seven cholestatic drugs with different pathophysiological mechanisms of cholestasis (i.e. impaired formation of bile vs. physical obstruction of bile flow) was investigated. The utility of in silico models to obtain mechanistic information about the impact of compounds on bile acid homeostasis to aid in predicting the cholestatic potential of drugs is highlighted. PMID:23653385

  11. Chirality and neuropsychiatric drugs - An update on stereoselective disposition and clinical pharmacokinetics of bupropion.

    PubMed

    Prasad Dash, Ranjeet; Rais, Rana; Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2017-09-06

    Bupropion, an antidepressant drug has been approved as a racemate containing equal amounts of R- and S- enantiomers. Recently, the chirality of bupropion has received significant attention in the delineation of stereoselective pharmacokinetic and disposition data. Although the non-stereoselective metabolism of bupropion was well established, the emerging data suggests that bupropion exhibits complex stereoselective metabolism, leading to the formation of various stereoisomeric metabolites. Along with the chiral pharmacokinetics of bupropion, hydroxybupropion, threohydrobupropion and erythrohydrobupropion, the metabolism data also provided insights into the roles of both CYP2B6 and CYP2C19 enzymes in the stereoselective disposition. Furthermore, the metabolism studies also suggested specific involvement of CYP2B6 pathway in the stereoselective hydroxylation of bupropion to R,R- hydroxybupropion, which was considered as a better marker for CYP2B6 activity. Other significant learnings were: 1) understanding the in vivo CYP2D6 inhibitory potential of bupropion with respect to the chirality of parent drug and the metabolites; 2) the potential involvement of bupropion and metabolites towards significant down regulation of CYP2D6 mRNA; 3) significant in vivo CYP2D6 inhibitory activity (86%) exhibited by R,R-hydroxybupropion and threohydrobupropion. The newly published data on chiral pharmacokinetics and disposition of bupropion and its metabolites can be used to gauge the drug-drug interaction potential when bupropion is combined in clinical therapy. Moreover, such data would be useful to understand the consequences (if any), due to the combination of bupropion with other drugs both from a safety and efficacy perspective because of the prevalence of polypharmacy situations in many therapeutic areas including CNS indications.

  12. Lack of a pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction with venlafaxine extended-release/indinavir and desvenlafaxine extended-release/indinavir.

    PubMed

    Jann, Michael W; Spratlin, Vicky; Momary, Kathryn; Zhang, Hailing; Turner, David; Penzak, Scott R; Wright, Alan; VanDenBerg, Chad

    2012-05-01

    To assess the effects of venlafaxine extended-release (XR) capsules and desvenlafaxine extended-release (XR) tablets upon indinavir pharmacokinetic properties when co-administrated to healthy volunteers. This was an open-label, two-period, fixed-dose study conducted at the clinical research unit located on a university campus. Twenty-four healthy volunteers enrolled in the study (mean age 28.3 ± 8.0 years). Each subject received a single dose of indinavir 800 mg on day 1. Subsequently, subjects were then randomly assigned to either the venlafaxine XR group (N = 12) or the desvenlafaxine XR group (N = 12). Starting on day 2, venlafaxine XR was dosed at 37.5 mg/day for 4 days and increased to 75 mg/day for 6 days. Desvenlafaxine XR was dosed at 50 mg/day for 10 days. On day 12, indivanvir 800 mg was co-administered to both the venlafaxine XR and the desvenlafaxine XR groups. The pharmacokinetics of indinavir were determined both before and at the end of antidepressant dosing. Plasma indinavir, venlafaxine, and desvenlafaxine concentrations were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultra-violet (UV) detection. Indinavir pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by noncompartmental analysis using validated computer software. Venlafaxine XR and desvenlafaxine XR did not produce any significant changes in indinavir disposition. Both antidepressants were well tolerated by the subjects with only minor adverse side effects. No pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction was demonstrated between venlafaxine XR and indinavir or between desvenlafaxine XR and indinvair. The lack of interaction could be due to the venlafaxine and desvenlafaxine extended-release formulation.

  13. Drug release, preclinical and clinical pharmacokinetics relationships of alginate pellets prepared by melt technology.

    PubMed

    Bose, Anirbandeep; Harjoh, Nurulaini; Pal, Tapan Kumar; Dan, Shubhasis; Wong, Tin Wui

    2016-01-01

    Alginate pellets prepared by the aqueous agglomeration technique experience fast drug dissolution due to the porous pre-formed calcium alginate microstructure. This study investigated in vitro drug release, preclinical and clinical pharmacokinetics relationships of intestinal-specific calcium acetate-alginate pellets against calcium-free and calcium carbonate-alginate pellets. Alginate pellets were prepared by solvent-free melt pelletization instead of aqueous agglomeration technique using chlorpheniramine maleate as model drug. A fast in situ calcium acetate dissolution in pellets resulted in rapid pellet breakup, soluble Ca(2+) crosslinking of alginate fragments and drug dissolution retardation at pH 1.2, which were not found in other pellet types. The preclinical drug absorption rate was lower with calcium acetate loaded than calcium-free alginate pellets. In human subjects, however, the extent and the rate of drug absorption were higher from calcium acetate-loaded pellets than calcium-free alginate pellets. The fine, dispersible and weakly gastric mucoadhesive calcium alginate pellets underwent fast human gastrointestinal transit. They released the drug at a greater rate than calcium-free pellets in the intestine, thereby promoting drug bioavailability. Calcium acetate was required as a disintegrant more than as a crosslinking agent clinically to promote pellet fragmentation, fast gastrointestinal transit and drug release in intestinal medium, and intestinal-specific drug bioavailability.

  14. Pharmacokinetic changes in drugs during protein-calorie malnutrition: correlation between drug metabolism and hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 isozymes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Hyun; Suh, Ok Kyung; Lee, Myung Gull

    2004-07-01

    The rats with protein-calorie malnutrition (PCM, 5% casein diet for a period of 4-week) were reported to exhibit 60 and 80% suppression in the hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2 and CYP2C11 levels, respectively, and 40-50% decreases in CYP2E1 and CYP3A1/2 levels compared to control (23% casein diet for a period of 4-week) based on Western blot analysis. In addition, Northern blot analysis showed that CYP1A2, CYP2E1, CYP2C11, and CYP3A1/2 mRNAs decreased in the state of PCM as well. Hence, pharmacokinetic changes of the drugs in rats with PCM [especially the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to time infinity (AUC) changes of metabolite(s)] reported from literatures were tried to explain in terms of CYP isozyme changes in the rats. Otherwise, the time-averaged nonrenal clearance (CL NR) of parent drug was compared. Pharmacokinetic changes of the drugs in other types of malnutritional state, such as kwashiorkor and marasmus, in both human and animal models were also compared. The drugs reviewed are as follows: diuretics, antibiotics, anticancer agents, antiepileptics, antiarrythmics, analgesics, xanthines, antimalarials, and miscellaneous.

  15. Concomitant efavirenz reduces pharmacokinetic exposure to the antimalarial drug artemether-lumefantrine in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liusheng; Parikh, Sunil; Rosenthal, Philip J; Lizak, Patricia; Marzan, Florence; Dorsey, Grant; Havlir, Diane; Aweeka, Francesca T

    2012-11-01

    The antiretroviral drug efavirenz (EFV) and the antimalarial artemisinin-based combination therapy artemether-lumefantrine (AL) are commonly co-administered to treat HIV and malaria. EFV is a known inducer of cytochrome P450 3A4, which converts artemether to dihydroartemisinin (DHA) that is also active and metabolizes longer acting lumefantrine (LR). A study in healthy volunteers was completed to address the concern that EFV impacts AL pharmacokinetics (PKs). Adults received AL (80/480 mg twice daily) for 3-days before and during EFV co-administration (600 mg daily for 26 days) with intensive PK for artemether, DHA, and LR conducted after the last AL dose for each period. EFV PK was evaluated with and without AL. PK parameters were estimated using noncompartmental methods. Twelve subjects completed the 2-period study. PK exposure for artemether, DHA, and LR [as estimated by the area under the concentration time curve (AUClast)] decreased or trended toward decrease with EFV, compared with when administered alone [-51% (P = 0.084), -46% (P = 0.005), and -21% (P = 0.102), respectively]. Day-7 LR levels, previously deemed predictive of treatment success, were 46% lower (P = 0.002) with EFV, but the LR half-life was unchanged. EFV PK exposure was minimally altered after AL co-administration [AUC0-24 hrs decreased by 17% (P = 0.034)]. Exposure to DHA, but not LR, was significantly lower during EFV-AL co-administration compared with that during administration of AL alone. These findings may have implications for the treatment efficacy of AL, particularly in children. However, the observed modest changes probably do not warrant dosage adjustment during co-administration of AL with EFV.

  16. Concomitant efavirenz reduces pharmacokinetic exposure to the antimalarial drug artemether-lumefantrine in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liusheng; Parikh, Sunil; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Lizak, Patricia; Marzan, Florence; Dorsey, Grant; Havlir, Diane; Aweeka, Francesca T.

    2012-01-01

    Background The antiretroviral drug efavirenz (EFV) and the antimalarial artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) artemether-lumefantrine (AL) are commonly co-administered to treat HIV and malaria. EFV is a known inducer of cytochrome P450 3A4, which converts artemether to dihydroartemisinin (DHA) that is also active and metabolizes longer acting lumefantrine (LR). A study in healthy volunteers was completed to address the concern that EFV impacts AL pharmacokinetics (PK). Methods Adults received AL (80/480 mg BID) for 3-days prior to and during EFV co-administration (600 mg daily for 26-days) with intensive PK for artemether, DHA, and LR conducted after the last AL dose for each period. EFV PK was evaluated with and without AL. PK parameters were estimated using non-compartmental methods. Results Twelve subjects completed the two-period study. PK exposure for artemether, DHA, and LR [as estimated by the area under the concentration time curve (AUClast)] decreased or trended toward decrease with EFV, compared to when administered alone [−51% (p=0.084), −46% (p=0.005), and −21% (p=0.102), respectively]. Day 7 LR levels, previously deemed predictive of treatment success, were 46% lower (p=0.002) with EFV, but the LR half-life was unchanged. EFV PK exposure was minimally altered following AL co-administration [AUC0–24h decreased by 17% (p=0.034)]. Conclusions Exposure to DHA, but not LR, was significantly lower during EFV-AL co-administration compared to that during administration of AL alone. These findings may have implications for the treatment efficacy of AL, particularly in children. However, the observed modest changes probably do not warrant dosage adjustment during co-administration of AL with EFV. PMID:22918158

  17. Pharmacokinetic patterns of risperidone-associated adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Schoretsanitis, Georgios; Stegmann, Benedikt; Hiemke, Christoph; Gründer, Gerhard; Schruers, Koen R J; Walther, Sebastian; Lammertz, Sarah E; Haen, Ekkehard; Paulzen, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate a correlation between plasma concentrations of risperidone (RIS), its active metabolite 9-hydroxyrisperidone (9-OH-RIS) and the active moiety (AM) (RIS + 9-OH-RIS), and adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in a naturalistic sample. Plasma concentrations of RIS, 9-OH-RIS, and AM in patients out of a therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) database complaining ADRs were categorized according to the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersogelser side effect rating scales (UKU) (n = 97) and compared to patients without ADRs (n = 398). Patients in the ADR group received a significantly lower daily dosage of risperidone (trimmed mean 3.64 mg/day) than patients without ADRs (4.40 mg/day). No differences were found for active moiety plasma concentrations between the groups (p = 0.454). Differences were detected only in the case of dose-adjusted plasma concentration values (concentration-by-dose, C/D) for 9-OH-RIS, being higher in patients reporting ADRs (4.78 ng/mL/mg) than in patients without ADRs (4.3 ng/mL/mg) (p = 0.037 for Mann-Whitney U test). Note that differences for non-adjusted 9-OH-RIS plasma levels between groups failed to reach significance (p = 0.697). Our findings are consistent with previous data supporting a prominent role of 9-hydroxyrisperidone, but not of risperidone with regard to ADRs. When studying the various subgroups of reported ADRs separately, the size of these subsamples offers some plausible limitations by reducing the power of the analysis.

  18. Factorial design studies of antiretroviral drug-loaded stealth liposomal injectable: PEGylation, lyophilization and pharmacokinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhakar, Beeravelli; Krishna, Mylangam Chaitanya; Murthy, Kolapalli Venkata Ramana

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to formulate and evaluate the ritonavir-loaded stealth liposomes by using 32 factorial design and intended to delivered by parenteral delivery. Liposomes were prepared by ethanol injection method using 32 factorial designs and characterized for various physicochemical parameters such as drug content, size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and in vitro drug release. The optimization process was carried out using desirability and overlay plots. The selected formulation was subjected to PEGylation using 10 % PEG-10000 solution. Stealth liposomes were characterized for the above-mentioned parameters along with surface morphology, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer, differential scanning calorimeter, stability and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in rats. Stealth liposomes showed better result compared to conventional liposomes due to effect of PEG-10000. The in vivo studies revealed that stealth liposomes showed better residence time compared to conventional liposomes and pure drug solution. The conventional liposomes and pure drug showed dose-dependent pharmacokinetics, whereas stealth liposomes showed long circulation half-life compared to conventional liposomes and pure ritonavir solution. The results of statistical analysis showed significance difference as the p value is (<0.05) by one-way ANOVA. The result of the present study revealed that stealth liposomes are promising tool in antiretroviral therapy.

  19. Pharmacokinetic changes in the elderly. Do they contribute to drug abuse and dependence?

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, V; Fourie, J; Busto, U; Naranjo, C A

    1996-11-01

    The elderly frequently use psychoactive drugs including alcohol (ethanol), benzodiazepines and opioid analgesics, which have a propensity to cause abuse and dependence. Theoretically, the changes in pharmacokinetics of these agents in the elderly may modify their abuse and dependence potential. In the elderly, blood alcohol concentrations following an oral dose are higher, alcohol withdrawal syndrome follows a more severe and protracted clinical course and requires treatment with higher doses of chlordiazepoxide than needed for younger adults. However, there is no direct evidence that supports an increased direct abuse and dependence potential of alcohol because of its altered kinetics in the elderly. In the case of oxidatively metabolised benzodiazepine, both age-related pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic changes may increase their clinical effects in the elderly. The hypothesis that benzodiazepines have an increased abuse and dependence potential in the elderly has not been tested. Many of the benzodiazepines (e.g. alprazolam, triazolam and midazolam) are metabolised by the cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A subfamily. The pharmacokinetics of these agents may be modified by inhibition of CYP3A due to concurrently administered medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Unfortunately, data on the direct measures of abuse and dependence potential of benzodiazepines are not available in the elderly. Thus, a conclusive statement on the contribution of age-related pharmacokinetic changes to benzodiazepine abuse and dependence cannot be made at the present time. The clinical effects of codeine do not appear to change with age. Codeine is O-demethylated to its active metabolite morphine by the genetically polymorphic CYP2D6 isozyme. The activity of this isozyme is unaltered by age, gender or smoking habits; however, it is subject to potent inhibition by some of the frequently used medications in the elderly, such as the antidepressants paroxetine and fluoxetine

  20. Impact of enzalutamide and its main metabolite N-desmethyl enzalutamide on pharmacokinetically important drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Johanna; Kocher, Jutta; Mueller, Corina; Rosenzweig, Stephanie; Theile, Dirk

    2017-09-01

    Enzalutamide is a new drug against castration-resistant prostate cancer. Recent data indicate profound induction of drug metabolizing enzymes (e.g. cytochrome P450 isoenzyme (CYP) 3A4) but comprehensive in vitro data on other CYP enzymes, drug conjugating enzymes or drug transporters is scarce. Moreover, mechanisms of induction are poorly investigated and the effects of the active metabolite N-desmethyl enzalutamide are unknown. Using LS180 cells as an induction model and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, our study demonstrated a concentration-dependent induction of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP3A5, CYP3A4, UGT1A3, UGT1A9, ABCB1, ABCC2, and ABCG2 mRNA. Induction of CYP3A4 and ABCB1 was confirmed by western blot analysis and is likely mediated by activation of the nuclear receptor pregnane x receptor, elucidated by a luciferase-based reporter gene assay. Enzalutamide's main active metabolite N-desmethyl enzalutamide exhibited only weak induction properties. mRNA expression of UGT2B7 was suppressed by enzalutamide and its metabolite. Both compounds are apparently not transported by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). N-desmethyl enzalutamide more potently inhibited important drug transporters (P-gp, BCRP, OATPs) than enzalutamide. Taken together, pharmacokinetics of concurrently administered drugs is likely altered during enzalutamide therapy. Levels of metabolically (mainly CYP3A4) eliminated drugs are expected to be decreased, whereas abundance of compounds with solely transporter-determined pharmacokinetics (P-gp, OATPs) is likely enhanced. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of Potential Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interaction between Armodafinil and Aripiprazole in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Darwish, M; Bond, M; Yang, R; Hellriegel, E T; Robertson, P

    2015-07-01

    Armodafinil, a moderate inducer of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, has been studied as adjunctive therapy to maintenance medications for major depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder. We evaluated the effect of daily dosing with armodafinil on the pharmacokinetics and safety of the CYP3A4 substrate aripiprazole, an atypical antipsychotic used to treat bipolar I disorder. Healthy adults received 15 mg aripiprazole alone and after armodafinil (250 mg/day) pretreatment. Pharmacokinetic parameters were derived from plasma concentrations of aripiprazole and its active metabolite, dehydro-aripiprazole, obtained over 16 days after each aripiprazole administration. Steady-state pharmacokinetics of armodafinil and its 2 circulating metabolites was assessed. Of 36 subjects enrolled, 24 were evaluable for pharmacokinetic analysis. Armodafinil reduced systemic exposure to aripiprazole (Cmax, - 8%; AUC0-∞, -34%) and dehydro-aripiprazole, which is both formed and eliminated in part via CYP3A4 (Cmax, - 10%; AUC0-∞, - 32%). Adverse events were generally consistent with known safety profiles of each agent. Systemic exposure to aripiprazole and dehydro-aripiprazole was moderately reduced following armodafinil pretreatment. The combination was generally well tolerated under the conditions studied. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Feline drug metabolism and disposition: pharmacokinetic evidence for species differences and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Although it is widely appreciated that cats respond differently to certain drugs when compared with other companion animal species, the causes of these differences are poorly understood. This review critically evaluates published evidence for altered drug effects in cats, focusing on pharmacokinetic differences between cats, dogs and humans, and the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences. Pharmacokinetic studies indicate that acetaminophen, propofol, carprofen, and acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) are cleared significantly more slowly in cats versus dogs and humans. All of these drugs are metabolized by conjugation. Cats lack the major phenol UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes, including UGT1A6 and UGT1A9, that glucuronidate acetaminophen and propofol. Deficient glucuronidation may also explain slower carprofen clearance, although there is no direct evidence for this. However, poor aspirin clearance in cats appears to be mainly a consequence of slower glycine conjugation. Cats are also deficient in several other conjugation enzymes, including N-acetyltransferase (NAT) 2 and thiopurine methyltransferase (TMPT). NAT2 deficiency may be the reason cats are more prone to developing methemoglobinemia rather than hepatotoxicity from acetaminophen. TMPT deficiency may predispose cats to azathioprine toxicity. No evidence was found for slower elimination of drugs cleared by oxidation or unchanged into urine or bile. Piroxicam, an oxidized drug, was cleared much more rapidly in cats than humans and dogs, although the mechanism for this difference is unclear. More work is needed to better understand drug metabolism and disposition differences in cats, thereby enabling more rational prescribing of existing medications, and the development of safer drugs for this species. PMID:23890237

  3. Network predicting drug's anatomical therapeutic chemical code.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Cui; Chen, Shi-Long; Deng, Nai-Yang; Wang, Yong

    2013-05-15

    Discovering drug's Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification rules at molecular level is of vital importance to understand a vast majority of drugs action. However, few studies attempt to annotate drug's potential ATC-codes by computational approaches. Here, we introduce drug-target network to computationally predict drug's ATC-codes and propose a novel method named NetPredATC. Starting from the assumption that drugs with similar chemical structures or target proteins share common ATC-codes, our method, NetPredATC, aims to assign drug's potential ATC-codes by integrating chemical structures and target proteins. Specifically, we first construct a gold-standard positive dataset from drugs' ATC-code annotation databases. Then we characterize ATC-code and drug by their similarity profiles and define kernel function to correlate them. Finally, we use a kernel method, support vector machine, to automatically predict drug's ATC-codes. Our method was validated on four drug datasets with various target proteins, including enzymes, ion channels, G-protein couple receptors and nuclear receptors. We found that both drug's chemical structure and target protein are predictive, and target protein information has better accuracy. Further integrating these two data sources revealed more experimentally validated ATC-codes for drugs. We extensively compared our NetPredATC with SuperPred, which is a chemical similarity-only based method. Experimental results showed that our NetPredATC outperforms SuperPred not only in predictive coverage but also in accuracy. In addition, database search and functional annotation analysis support that our novel predictions are worthy of future experimental validation. In conclusion, our new method, NetPredATC, can predict drug's ATC-codes more accurately by incorporating drug-target network and integrating data, which will promote drug mechanism understanding and drug repositioning and discovery. NetPredATC is available at http

  4. Drug permeability prediction using PMF method.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fancui; Xu, Weiren

    2013-03-01

    Drug permeability determines the oral availability of drugs via cellular membranes. Poor permeability makes a drug unsuitable for further development. The permeability may be estimated as the free energy change that the drug should overcome through crossing membrane. In this paper the drug permeability was simulated using molecular dynamics method and the potential energy profile was calculated with potential of mean force (PMF) method. The membrane was simulated using DPPC bilayer and three drugs with different permeability were tested. PMF studies on these three drugs show that doxorubicin (low permeability) should pass higher free energy barrier from water to DPPC bilayer center while ibuprofen (high permeability) has a lower energy barrier. Our calculation indicates that the simulation model we built is suitable to predict drug permeability.

  5. Evaluation of the potential for pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction between armodafinil and carbamazepine in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Mona; Bond, Mary; Yang, Ronghua; Hellriegel, Edward T; Robertson, Philmore

    2015-02-01

    Polypharmacy is common in psychiatry practice and can lead to an increased risk of drug interactions. Armodafinil, a wakefulness-promoting agent, has been studied as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of major depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder. Armodafinil and the mood stabilizer carbamazepine are both inducers of and substrates for cytochrome P450 (CYP3A4). This study was designed to evaluate the bidirectional carbamazepine-armodafinil pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction. This was an open-label, single-center study conducted in healthy adult men. Subjects assigned to group 1 received a dose of carbamazepine (200 mg) alone and a dose after pretreatment with daily dosing of armodafinil (titrated to 250 mg/d). Subjects assigned to group 2 received a dose of armodafinil (250 mg) alone and a dose after pretreatment with carbamazepine BID (titrated to 400 mg/d). Pharmacokinetic parameters for carbamazepine, armodafinil, and their major circulating metabolites were determined when dosed alone and after pretreatment with the other drug. The safety and tolerability of armodafinil and carbamazepine were also assessed throughout the study. Eighty-one subjects enrolled in the study (group 1 = 40; group 2 = 41), of whom 79 (group 1 = 40; group 2 = 39) were evaluable for pharmacokinetic analysis and 80 (group 1 = 40; group 2 = 40) were evaluable for safety analysis. In group 1, pretreatment with armodafinil reduced systemic exposure to carbamazepine by 12% for Cmax and 25% for AUC (based on comparison of geometric means). Similarly, in group 2, pretreatment with carbamazepine reduced systemic exposure to armodafinil by 11% for Cmax and 37% for AUC. Systemic exposure to the metabolites of these agents that are formed via CYP3A4 were increased after pretreatment in each group. There were no new or unexpected adverse events. Systemic exposure to both carbamazepine and armodafinil was reduced after pretreatment with the other drug; systemic exposure to the

  6. Prediction of clinical response based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models of 5-hydroxytryptamine reuptake inhibitors in mice.

    PubMed

    Kreilgaard, M; Smith, D G; Brennum, L T; Sánchez, C

    2008-09-01

    Bridging the gap between preclinical research and clinical trials is vital for drug development. Predicting clinically relevant steady-state drug concentrations (Css) in serum from preclinical animal models may facilitate this transition. Here we used a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling approach to evaluate the predictive validity of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) transporter (SERT) occupancy and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)-potentiated behavioral syndrome induced by 5-HT reuptake inhibitor (SRI) antidepressants in mice. Serum and whole brain drug concentrations, cortical SERT occupancy and 5-HTP-potentiated behavioral syndrome were measured over 6 h after a single subcutaneous injection of escitalopram, paroxetine or sertraline. [(3)H]2-(2-dimethylaminomethylphenylsulphanyl)-5-methyl-phenylamine ([(3)H]MADAM) was used to assess SERT occupancy. For PK/PD modelling, an effect-compartment model was applied to collapse the hysteresis and predict the steady-state relationship between drug exposure and PD response. The predicted Css for escitalopram, paroxetine and sertraline at 80% SERT occupancy in mice are 18 ng mL(-1), 18 ng mL(-1) and 24 ng mL(-1), respectively, with corresponding responses in the 5-HTP behavioral model being between 20-40% of the maximum. Therapeutically effective SERT occupancy for SRIs in depressed patients is approximately 80%, and the corresponding plasma Css are 6-21 ng mL(-1), 21-95 ng mL(-1) and 20-48 ng mL(-1) for escitalopram, paroxetine and sertraline, respectively. Thus, PK/PD modelling using SERT occupancy and 5-HTP-potentiated behavioral syndrome as response markers in mice may be a useful tool to predict clinically relevant plasma Css values.

  7. Molecular and pharmacokinetic properties of 222 commercially available oral drugs in humans.

    PubMed

    Sakaeda, T; Okamura, N; Nagata, S; Yagami, T; Horinouchi, M; Okumura, K; Yamashita, F; Hashida, M

    2001-08-01

    This study was performed to determine the exclusion criteria that differentiate poorly absorbed drugs from good drug candidates, and to accelerate drug development by exclusion of unnecessary assessment. The molecular and pharmacokinetic properties of 222 commercially available oral drugs were tabulated and their correlations were analyzed. The exclusion criteria obtained were 1) a molecular weight of more than 500, and 2) a ClogP value of more than 5. Exceptions to molecular weight criteria were compounds with a sugar moiety, high atomic weight, and large cyclic structure. It was also suggested that being a substrate for MDRI (P-glycoprotein) does not always result in poor bioavailability, and that drug development by chemical modification of a seed or lead compound with quantitative structure activity relationship analysis can result in lower bioavailability, higher bound fraction and lower urinary excretion, which would hamper later development processes and might result in considerable drug-drug interaction. The criteria should be adjusted according to the pharmacological profiles of the agents in question and depending on the estimated profit, but ignoring these criteria may result in a significant waste of time and money during drug development.

  8. Clinical pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and drug-interaction profile of the integrase inhibitor dolutegravir.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Mackenzie L; Hadzic, Tanja; Kashuba, Angela D M

    2013-11-01

    . However, antacids significantly decrease dolutegravir plasma exposure and should be separated by 2 h before, or 6 h after, a dolutegravir dose. In summary, dolutegravir is the first of the second-generation INSTIs and exhibits a predictable pharmacokinetic profile and a well-defined exposure-response relationship. Dolutegravir retains activity despite the presence of some class-resistant mutations and achieves rapid and sustained virologic suppression in ARV-naive and ARV-experienced patients. Clinically, dolutegravir is poised to become a commonly used component of antiretroviral regimens.

  9. [Mephedrone, the new designer drug of abuse: pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and clinical and forensic issues].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Emanuel; Magalhães, Teresa; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Mephedrone is a semisynthetic derivative of cathinone used as a drug of abuse. Similar to amphetamine, both in chemical structure and associated signs and symptoms, has gained popularity since 2007 and it is currently the sixth most abused drug in United Kingdom. It can be easily purchased by the internet or smart shops where it is advertised as a fertilizer for plants or bath salts, although such efficacy was never proved. This article aims to review the state-of-the-art literature of mephedrone, particularly its chemical structure, forms of presentation, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, acute intoxications, diagnosis and therapy of intoxications. Mephedrone is mainly sought for the following symptoms: euphoria, social disinhibition, empathy, and increased libido. However, its use is associated with several adverse effects on cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, neurological, psychiatric and genitourinary systems, among others. There are also reported cases of consumers who have developed tolerance and dependence after a regular abuse of mephedrone. Several deaths in the United Kingdom have been confirmed as being directly related to the consumption of mephedrone. Currently this drug is legally controlled in many countries, but little is known about its pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Most data comes only from users and health professional's reports and internet surveys. Recently, the Portuguese Law 13/2012, 26 of March, included mephedrone in the list of controlled substances, and therefore it is important to better understand this xenobiotic.

  10. Pharmacokinetic interactions between rebamipide and selected nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in rats.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Dustin L; Wood, Robert C; Wyatt, Jarrett E; Harirforoosh, Sam

    2014-03-12

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) cause gastrointestinal and renal side effects. Rebamipide is a mucoprotective agent that reduces gastrointenstinal side effects when administered concomitantly with NSAIDs. In this study, we investigated the pharmacokinetic drug interactions of rebamipide with two selected NSAIDs, celecoxib or diclofenac. Rats were randomly divided into five groups. Two groups received placebo and three groups were administered rebamipide (30 mg/kg) orally twice daily for two days. On day 3, the animals treated with placebo received celecoxib (40 mg/kg) or diclofenac (10mg/kg) and rats receiving rebamipide were administerd rebamipide followed by a single dose of placebo, celecoxib, or diclofenac. To investigate drug protein interactions, blank rat plasma was spiked with known concentrations of rebamipide, diclofenac plus rebamipide, or celecoxib plus rebamipide then dialyzed through a Rapid Equilibrium Dialysis device. AUC (139.70±24.97 μg h/mL), Cmax (42.99±2.98 μg/mL), and CLoral (0.08±0.02 L/h/kg) values of diclofenac in diclofenac plus rebamipide group altered when compared to those of diclofenac treated groups. Treatment with rebamipide showed no significant change in pharmacokinetic parameters of celecoxib treated rats. Cmax (7.80±1.22 μg/mL), AUC (56.46±7.30 μg h/mL), Vd/F (7.55±1.37 L/kg), and CLoral (0.58±0.09 L/h/kg) of rebamipide were significantly altered when diclofenac was co-administered with rebamipide. Pharmacokinetic parameters of rebamipide plus celecoxib group were not significantly different from those of rebamipide group. Plasma protein binding was not affected by concomitant administration of another drug. These results indicate alteration of pharmacokinetic parameters of both rebamipide and diclofenac when co-administered and cannot be explained by a variation in plasma protein binding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. QSAR Modeling and Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Alexey V; Varlamova, Ekaterina V; Lagunin, Alexey A; Dmitriev, Alexander V; Muratov, Eugene N; Fourches, Denis; Kuz'min, Victor E; Poroikov, Vladimir V; Tropsha, Alexander; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2016-02-01

    Severe adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are the fourth leading cause of fatality in the U.S. with more than 100,000 deaths per year. As up to 30% of all ADRs are believed to be caused by drug-drug interactions (DDIs), typically mediated by cytochrome P450s, possibilities to predict DDIs from existing knowledge are important. We collected data from public sources on 1485, 2628, 4371, and 27,966 possible DDIs mediated by four cytochrome P450 isoforms 1A2, 2C9, 2D6, and 3A4 for 55, 73, 94, and 237 drugs, respectively. For each of these data sets, we developed and validated QSAR models for the prediction of DDIs. As a unique feature of our approach, the interacting drug pairs were represented as binary chemical mixtures in a 1:1 ratio. We used two types of chemical descriptors: quantitative neighborhoods of atoms (QNA) and simplex descriptors. Radial basis functions with self-consistent regression (RBF-SCR) and random forest (RF) were utilized to build QSAR models predicting the likelihood of DDIs for any pair of drug molecules. Our models showed balanced accuracy of 72-79% for the external test sets with a coverage of 81.36-100% when a conservative threshold for the model's applicability domain was applied. We generated virtually all possible binary combinations of marketed drugs and employed our models to identify drug pairs predicted to be instances of DDI. More than 4500 of these predicted DDIs that were not found in our training sets were confirmed by data from the DrugBank database.

  12. Evaluation of drug loading, pharmacokinetic behavior, and toxicity of a cisplatin-containing hydrogel nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Marc P.; Keeler, Amanda W.; Perry, Jillian L.; Reuter, Kevin G.; Luft, J. Christopher; O’Neal, Sara K.; Zamboni, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a cytotoxic drug used as a first-line therapy for a wide variety of cancers. However, significant renal and neurological toxicities limits it clinical use. It has been documented that drug toxicities can be mitigated through nanoparticle formulation, while simultaneously increasing tumor accumulation through the enhanced permeation and retention effect. Circulation persistence is a key characteristic for exploiting this effect, and to that end we have developed long-circulating, PEGylated, polymeric hydrogels using the Particle Replication In Non-wetting Templates (PRINT®) platform and complexed cisplatin into the particles (PRINT-Platin). Sustained release was demonstrated, and drug loading correlated to surface PEG density. A PEG Mushroom conformation showed the best compromise between particle pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters and drug loading (16 wt %). While the PK profile of PEG Brush was superior, the loading was poor (2 wt %). Conversely, the drug loading in non-PEGylated particles was better (20 wt %), but the PK was not desirable. We also showed comparable cytotoxicity to cisplatin in several cancer cell lines (non-small cell lung, A549; ovarian, SKOV-3; breast, MDA-MB-468) and a higher MTD in mice (10 mg/kg versus 5 mg/kg). The pharmacokinetic profiles of drug in plasma, tumor, and kidney indicate improved exposure in the blood and tumor accumulation, with concurrent renal protection, when cisplatin was formulated in a nanoparticle. PK parameters were markedly improved: a 16.4-times higher area-under-the-curve (AUC), a reduction in clearance (CL) by a factor of 11.2, and a 4.20-times increase in the volume of distribution (Vd). Additionally, non-small cell lung and ovarian tumor AUC was at least twice that of cisplatin in both models. These findings suggest the potential for PRINT-Platin to improve efficacy and reduce toxicity compared to current cisplatin therapies. PMID:25744827

  13. Evaluation of drug loading, pharmacokinetic behavior, and toxicity of a cisplatin-containing hydrogel nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Kai, Marc P; Keeler, Amanda W; Perry, Jillian L; Reuter, Kevin G; Luft, J Christopher; O'Neal, Sara K; Zamboni, William C; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2015-04-28

    Cisplatin is a cytotoxic drug used as a first-line therapy for a wide variety of cancers. However, significant renal and neurological toxicities limit its clinical use. It has been documented that drug toxicities can be mitigated through nanoparticle formulation, while simultaneously increasing tumor accumulation through the enhanced permeation and retention effect. Circulation persistence is a key characteristic for exploiting this effect, and to that end we have developed long-circulating, PEGylated, polymeric hydrogels using the Particle Replication In Non-wetting Templates (PRINT®) platform and complexed cisplatin into the particles (PRINT-Platin). Sustained release was demonstrated, and drug loading correlated to surface PEG density. A PEG Mushroom conformation showed the best compromise between particle pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters and drug loading (16wt.%). While the PK profile of PEG Brush was superior, the loading was poor (2wt.%). Conversely, the drug loading in non-PEGylated particles was better (20wt.%), but the PK was not desirable. We also showed comparable cytotoxicity to cisplatin in several cancer cell lines (non-small cell lung, A549; ovarian, SKOV-3; breast, MDA-MB-468) and a higher MTD in mice (10mg/kg versus 5mg/kg). The pharmacokinetic profiles of drug in plasma, tumor, and kidney indicate improved exposure in the blood and tumor accumulation, with concurrent renal protection, when cisplatin was formulated in a nanoparticle. PK parameters were markedly improved: a 16.4-times higher area-under-the-curve (AUC), a reduction in clearance (CL) by a factor of 11.2, and a 4.20-times increase in the volume of distribution (Vd). Additionally, non-small cell lung and ovarian tumor AUC was at least twice that of cisplatin in both models. These findings suggest the potential for PRINT-Platin to improve efficacy and reduce toxicity compared to current cisplatin therapies.

  14. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Lamivudine and Zidovudine Triphosphates Predicts Differential Pharmacokinetics in Seminal Mononuclear Cells and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Dumond, Julie B; Yang, Kuo H; Kendrick, Racheal; Reddy, Y Sunila; Kashuba, Angela D M; Troiani, Luigi; Bridges, Arlene S; Fiscus, Susan A; Forrest, Alan; Cohen, Myron S

    2015-10-01

    The male genital tract is a potential site of viral persistence. Therefore, adequate concentrations of antiretrovirals are required to eliminate HIV replication in the genital tract. Despite higher zidovudine (ZDV) and lamivudine (3TC) concentrations in seminal plasma (SP) than in blood plasma (BP) (SP/BP drug concentration ratios of 2.3 and 6.7, respectively), we have previously reported lower relative intracellular concentrations of their active metabolites, zidovudine triphosphate (ZDV-TP) and lamivudine triphosphate (3TC-TP), in seminal mononuclear cells (SMCs) than in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) (SMC/PBMC drug concentration ratios of 0.36 and 1.0, respectively). Here, we use population pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling-based methods to simultaneously describe parent and intracellular metabolite PK in blood, semen, and PBMCs and SMCs. From this model, the time to steady state in each matrix was estimated, and the results indicate that the PK of 3TC-TP and ZDV-TP in PBMCs are different from the PK of the two in SMCs and different for the two triphosphates. We found that steady-state conditions in PBMCs were achieved within 2 days for ZDV-TP and 3 days for 3TC-TP. However, steady-state conditions in SMCs were achieved within 2 days for ZDV-TP and 2 weeks for 3TC-TP. Despite this, or perhaps because of it, ZDV-TP in SMCs does not achieve the surrogate 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) (as established for PBMCs, assuming SMC IC50 = PBMC IC50) at the standard 300-mg twice-daily dosing. Mechanistic studies are needed to understand these differences and to explore intracellular metabolite behavior in SMCs for other nucleoside analogues used in HIV prevention, treatment, and cure.

  15. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Lamivudine and Zidovudine Triphosphates Predicts Differential Pharmacokinetics in Seminal Mononuclear Cells and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kuo H.; Kendrick, Racheal; Reddy, Y. Sunila; Kashuba, Angela D. M.; Troiani, Luigi; Bridges, Arlene S.; Fiscus, Susan A.; Forrest, Alan; Cohen, Myron S.

    2015-01-01

    The male genital tract is a potential site of viral persistence. Therefore, adequate concentrations of antiretrovirals are required to eliminate HIV replication in the genital tract. Despite higher zidovudine (ZDV) and lamivudine (3TC) concentrations in seminal plasma (SP) than in blood plasma (BP) (SP/BP drug concentration ratios of 2.3 and 6.7, respectively), we have previously reported lower relative intracellular concentrations of their active metabolites, zidovudine triphosphate (ZDV-TP) and lamivudine triphosphate (3TC-TP), in seminal mononuclear cells (SMCs) than in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) (SMC/PBMC drug concentration ratios of 0.36 and 1.0, respectively). Here, we use population pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling-based methods to simultaneously describe parent and intracellular metabolite PK in blood, semen, and PBMCs and SMCs. From this model, the time to steady state in each matrix was estimated, and the results indicate that the PK of 3TC-TP and ZDV-TP in PBMCs are different from the PK of the two in SMCs and different for the two triphosphates. We found that steady-state conditions in PBMCs were achieved within 2 days for ZDV-TP and 3 days for 3TC-TP. However, steady-state conditions in SMCs were achieved within 2 days for ZDV-TP and 2 weeks for 3TC-TP. Despite this, or perhaps because of it, ZDV-TP in SMCs does not achieve the surrogate 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) (as established for PBMCs, assuming SMC IC50 = PBMC IC50) at the standard 300-mg twice-daily dosing. Mechanistic studies are needed to understand these differences and to explore intracellular metabolite behavior in SMCs for other nucleoside analogues used in HIV prevention, treatment, and cure. PMID:26239974

  16. [Pharmacokinetic principles and drug-dosing adjustments during continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT)].

    PubMed

    Morabito, S; Guzzo, I; Vitaliano, E; Muzi, L; Solazzo, A; Pistolesi, V; Pierucci, A

    2006-01-01

    In the critically ill, acute renal failure (ARF) and "Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome" (MODS) can be associated with significant modifications of many pharmacokinetic parameters, such as protein binding, volume of distribution and total body clearance. The start of renal replacement therapy (RRT) represents an additional variable to take in consideration for drug-dosing adjustments. Drugs significantly eliminated by the kidney are likely to be removed during RRT and a supplemental dose or further dosing adjustments are required if extracorporeal clearance is more than 25-30% of total body clearance. The impact of RRT on plasma drug concentrations can be substantially different in relation to the type of treatment (diffusive, convective or both), membrane characteristics (low-flux or high-flux), filter surface area and prescribed dialysis dose. The molecular weight cut-offs of high-flux membrane are much higher than the molecular weight of most drugs. Therefore, molecular size will not be a limitation for the removal of the unbound fraction of the drugs most commonly used in the critically ill undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). However, diffusive clearance could be significantly lower than convective clearance for drugs in the middle molecular weight range. In any case, the extracorporeal clearances report-ed with the use of high-volume CRRT (>50-60 L/2 h) are often surprisingly elevated and can lead to drug underdosing in clinical conditions where adequate antibiotic treatment is essential.

  17. In vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models in anti-infective drug development: focus on TB

    PubMed Central

    Vaddady, Pavan K; Lee, Richard E; Meibohm, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    For rapid anti-tuberculosis (TB) drug development in vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) models are useful in evaluating the direct interaction between the drug and the bacteria, thereby guiding the selection of candidate compounds and the optimization of their dosing regimens. Utilizing in vivo drug-clearance profiles from animal and/or human studies and simulating them in an in vitro PK/PD model allows the in-depth characterization of antibiotic activity of new and existing antibacterials by generating time–kill data. These data capture the dynamic interplay between mycobacterial growth and changing drug concentration as encountered during prolonged drug therapy. This review focuses on important PK/PD parameters relevant to anti-TB drug development, provides an overview of in vitro PK/PD models used to evaluate the efficacy of agents against mycobacteria and discusses the related mathematical modeling approaches of time–kill data. Overall, it provides an introduction to in vitro PK/PD models and their application as critical tools in evaluating anti-TB drugs. PMID:21359155

  18. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion of a new photodynamic drug deuxemether.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Hao, Haiping; Wang, Guangji; Xie, Haitang; Xu, Meijuan; Wang, Wei; He, Hui; Li, Xiaoyu

    2008-03-28

    Deuxemether was a new photodynamic drug effective for many kinds of solid tumor therapy, which was mainly composed of 3-(or 8-)-(1-methoxyethyl)-8-(or 3-)-(1-hydroxyethyl)-deutero-porphyrin IX (MHD) and 3,8-di(1-methoxyethyl)-deuteroporphyrin IX (DMD). The aims of this study were to elucidate its pharmacokinetic characteristics, tissue distribution, plasma protein binding and excretion properties and underlying mechanisms of deuxemether in rats based on the simultaneous determination of MHD and DMD. The pharmacokinetic profiles of both MHD and DMD in rats after intravenous doses were linear and best fitted to a two compartment model, characterized with a rapid distribution phase (MHD: t(1/2)alpha, 0.09-0.14 h; DMD: t 1/2 alpha, 0.07-0.11h) and a relatively slow elimination phase (MHD: t 1/2 beta, 2.03-3.20 h; DMD: t 1/2 beta, 2.51-3.20 h). The tissue distributions of MHD and DMD in rats were rather limited as evidenced from their low distribution volume (0.75-1.70 L/kg) and the results of tissue distribution study. Protein binding of MHD and DMD were moderate (65.36-89.99% for MHD; 45.43-76.23% for DMD), independent of drug concentrations and similar between human and rat plasma over a concentration range of 0.50-50.0 microg/mL. Both MHD and DMD were predominantly (>74.1%) eliminated from rats as the parent drugs through the hepatobiliary systems and finally excreted into the feces. The multidrug resistance-associated proteins 2 (MRP2) inhibitors, bromosulfophthalein and probenecid, substantially inhibited the hepatobiliary elimination of MHD and DMD while the P-gp inhibitor digoxin had little effect, suggesting that MRP2 may contribute to the rapid and extensive hepatobiliary excretion of deuxemether. There were no significant differences between MHD and DMD for all pharmacokinetic characteristics studied. In conclusion, this study provided firstly the full pharmacokinetic characteristics and mechanisms of deuxemether, which would be helpful for its clinical

  19. Prediction of the distribution volumes of cefazolin and tobramycin in obese children based on physiological pharmacokinetic concepts.

    PubMed

    Koshida, R; Nakashima, E; Taniguchi, N; Tsuji, A; Benet, L Z; Ichimura, F

    1989-06-01

    So as to estimate the appropriate dose of antibacterial drugs in obese children, prediction of the volume of distribution in these children was attempted based on physiological pharmacokinetic concepts which had been constructed from results in normal-weight children. Serum concentration-time data after intravenous drip infusions of tobramycin and cefazolin were analyzed using noncompartmental analysis of obese children in whom the degree of obesity ranged from 30 to 80%. Volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) per total body weight of tobramycin was significantly less than that for normal-weight children (P less than 0.05), whereas the value of cefazolin was almost equal to that for normal-weight children. The equation to express the difference of Vss between cefazolin and tobramycin obtained in normal-weight children failed in obese children, suggesting that there is a large decrease in the extracellular space in obese children exceeding the interindividual variations in normal-weight children. The Vss value (liter) for tobramycin was predicted by using the equation 0.261 . (ideal body weight (kg) + 0.4 . [total body weight (kg) - ideal body weight (kg)]). The Vss value of cefazolin was predicted to be 0.3 . (predicted Vss of tobramycin) + 0.052 . total body weight (kg). A good correlation between the predicted and the observed Vss values was obtained.

  20. Influence of metoprolol dosage release formulation on the pharmacokinetic drug interaction with paroxetine.

    PubMed

    Stout, Stephen M; Nielsen, Jace; Welage, Lynda S; Shea, Michael; Brook, Robert; Kerber, Kevin; Bleske, Barry E

    2011-03-01

    Studies have demonstrated an influence of dosage release formulations on drug interactions and enantiomeric plasma concentrations. Metoprolol is a commonly used beta-adrenergic antagonist metabolized by CYP2D6. The CYP2D6 inhibitor paroxetine has previously been shown to interact with metoprolol tartrate. This open-label, randomized, 4-phase crossover study assessed the potential differential effects of paroxetine on stereoselective pharmacokinetics of immediate-release (IR) tartrate and extended-release (ER) succinate metoprolol formulations. Ten healthy participants received metoprolol IR (50 mg) and ER (100 mg) with and without paroxetine coadministration. Blood samples were collected over 24 hours for determination of metoprolol plasma enantiomer concentrations. Paroxetine coadministration significantly increased S and R metoprolol area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to the 24-hour blood draw (AUC(0-24h)) by 4- and 5-fold, respectively for IR, and 3- and 4-fold, respectively, for ER. S/R AUC ratios significantly decreased. These results demonstrate a pharmacokinetic interaction between paroxetine and both formulations of metoprolol. The interaction is greater with R metoprolol, and stereoselective metabolism is lost. This could theoretically result in greater beta-blockade and lost cardioselectivity. The magnitude of the interaction was similar between metoprolol formulations, which may be attributable to low doses/drug input rates employed.

  1. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions of the selective androgen receptor modulator GTx-024(Enobosarm) with itraconazole, rifampin, probenecid, celecoxib and rosuvastatin.

    PubMed

    Coss, Christopher C; Jones, Amanda; Dalton, James T

    2016-08-01

    GTx-024 (also known as enobosarm) is a first in class selective androgen receptor modulator being developed for diverse indications in oncology. Preclinical studies of GTx-024 supported the evaluation of several potential drug-drug interactions in a clinical setting. A series of open-label Phase I GTx-024 drug-drug interaction studies were designed to interrogate potential interactions with CYP3A4 inhibitor (itraconazole), a CYP3A4 inducer (rifampin), a pan-UGT inhibitor (probenecid), a CYP2C9 substrate (celecoxib) and a BCRP substrate (rosuvastatin). The plasma pharmacokinetics of GTx-024, its major metabolite (GTx-024 glucuronide), and each substrate were characterized in detail. Itraconazole administration had no effect on GTx-024 pharmacokinetics. Likewise, GTx-024 administration did not significantly change the pharmacokinetics of celecoxib or rosuvastatin. Rifampin administration had the largest impact on GTx-024 pharmacokinetics of any co-administered agent and reduced the maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) by 23 % and the area under the curve (AUC∞) by 43 %. Probenecid had a complex interaction with GTx-024 whereby both GTx-024 plasma levels and GTx-024 glucuronide plasma levels (AUC∞) were increased by co-administration of the UGT inhibitor (50 and 112 %, respectively). Overall, GTx-024 was well tolerated and poses very little risk of generating clinically relevant drug-drug interactions.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of Selected Anticancer Drugs in Elderly Cancer Patients: Focus on Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crombag, Marie-Rose B.S.; Joerger, Markus; Thürlimann, Beat; Schellens, Jan H.M.; Beijnen, Jos H.; Huitema, Alwin D.R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Elderly patients receiving anticancer drugs may have an increased risk to develop treatment-related toxicities compared to their younger peers. However, a potential pharmacokinetic (PK) basis for this increased risk has not consistently been established yet. Therefore, the objective of this study was to systematically review the influence of age on the PK of anticancer agents frequently administered to elderly breast cancer patients. Methods: A literature search was performed using the PubMed electronic database, Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC) and available drug approval reviews, as published by EMA and FDA. Publications that describe age-related PK profiles of selected anticancer drugs against breast cancer, excluding endocrine compounds, were selected and included. Results: This review presents an overview of the available data that describe the influence of increasing age on the PK of selected anticancer drugs used for the treatment of breast cancer. Conclusions: Selected published data revealed differences in the effect and magnitude of increasing age on the PK of several anticancer drugs. There may be clinically-relevant, age-related PK differences for anthracyclines and platina agents. In the majority of cases, age is not a good surrogate marker for anticancer drug PK, and the physiological state of the individual patient may better be approached by looking at organ function, Charlson Comorbidity Score or geriatric functional assessment. PMID:26729170

  3. Enhanced Oral Bioavailability of Efavirenz by Solid Lipid Nanoparticles: In Vitro Drug Release and Pharmacokinetics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Praveen Kumar; Mishra, Shikha; Bajpai, Meenakshi; Mishra, Anushika

    2014-01-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticle is an efficient lipid based drug delivery system which can enhance the bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs. Efavirenz is a highly lipophilic drug from nonnucleoside inhibitor category for treatment of HIV. Present work illustrates development of an SLN formulation for Efavirenz with increased bioavailability. At first, suitable lipid component and surfactant were chosen. SLNs were prepared and analyzed for physical parameters, stability, and pharmacokinetic profile. Efavirenz loaded SLNs were formulated using Glyceryl monostearate as main lipid and Tween 80 as surfactant. ESLN-3 has shown mean particle size of 124.5 ± 3.2 nm with a PDI value of 0.234, negative zeta potential, and 86% drug entrapment. In vitro drug release study has shown 60.6–98.22% drug release in 24 h by various SLN formulations. Optimized SLNs have shown good stability at 40°C ± 2°C and 75 ± 5% relative humidity (RH) for 180 days. ESLN-3 exhibited 5.32-fold increase in peak plasma concentration (Cmax⁡) and 10.98-fold increase in AUC in comparison to Efavirenz suspension (ES). PMID:24967360

  4. Utility of population pharmacokinetic modeling in the assessment of therapeutic protein-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Chow, Andrew T; Earp, Justin C; Gupta, Manish; Hanley, William; Hu, Chuanpu; Wang, Diane D; Zajic, Stefan; Zhu, Min

    2014-05-01

    Assessment of pharmacokinetic (PK) based drug-drug interactions (DDI) is essential for ensuring patient safety and drug efficacy. With the substantial increase in therapeutic proteins (TP) entering the market and drug development, evaluation of TP-drug interaction (TPDI) has become increasingly important. Unlike for small molecule (e.g., chemical-based) drugs, conducting TPDI studies often presents logistical challenges, while the population PK (PPK) modeling may be a viable approach dealing with the issues. A working group was formed with members from the pharmaceutical industry and the FDA to assess the utility of PPK-based TPDI assessment including study designs, data analysis methods, and implementation strategy. This paper summarizes key issues for consideration as well as a proposed strategy with focuses on (1) PPK approach for exploratory assessment; (2) PPK approach for confirmatory assessment; (3) importance of data quality; (4) implementation strategy; and (5) potential regulatory implications. Advantages and limitations of the approach are also discussed. © 2013, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  5. Prodrug design to improve pharmacokinetic and drug delivery properties: challenges to the discovery scientists.

    PubMed

    Jana, S; Mandlekar, S; Marathe, P

    2010-01-01

    The prodrug design is a versatile, powerful method that can be applied to a wide range of parent drug molecules, administration routes, and formulations. Clinically, the majority of prodrugs are used with the aim of enhancing drug permeation by increasing lipophilicity, or by improving aqueous solubility. Prodrug design may improve the bioavailability of parent molecule, and thus can be integrated into the iterative process of lead optimization, rather than employing it as a post-hoc approach. The purpose of this review is to provide an update of advances and progress in the knowledge of current strategic approaches of prodrug design, along with their real-world utility in drug discovery and development. The review covers the type of prodrugs and functional groups that are amenable to prodrug design. Various prodrug approaches for improving oral drug delivery are discussed, with numerous examples of marketed prodrugs, including improved aqueous solubility, improved lipophilicity, transporter-mediated absorption, and prodrug design to achieve site-specific delivery. Tools employed for prodrug screening, and specific challenges in prodrug research and development are also elaborated. This article is intended to encourage discovery scientists to be creative and consider a rationally designed prodrug approach during the lead optimization phase of drug discovery programs, when the structure activity relationship (SAR) for the drug target is incompatible with pharmacokinetic or biopharmaceutical objectives.

  6. A framework for meta-analysis of veterinary drug pharmacokinetic data using mixed effect modeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengjie; Gehring, Ronette; Lin, Zhoumeng; Riviere, Jim

    2015-04-01

    Combining data from available studies is a useful approach to interpret the overwhelming amount of data generated in medical research from multiple studies. Paradoxically, in veterinary medicine, lack of data requires integrating available data to make meaningful population inferences. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling is a useful tool to apply meta-analysis to diverse pharmacokinetic (PK) studies of veterinary drugs. This review provides a summary of the characteristics of PK data of veterinary drugs and how integration of these data may differ from human PK studies. The limits of meta-analysis include the sophistication of data mining, and generation of misleading results caused by biased or poor quality data. The overriding strength of meta-analysis applied to this field is that robust statistical analysis of the diverse sparse data sets inherent to veterinary medicine applications can be accomplished, thereby allowing population inferences to be made.

  7. Comparative clinical pharmacokinetics of antibody-drug conjugates in first-in-human Phase 1 studies

    PubMed Central

    Deslandes, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Although there are currently more than 30 antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) in clinical development for the treatment of blood cancers and solid tumors, comparison of their clinical pharmacokinetics (PK) is challenging because of the large number of, and differences between, the targets, ADC constructs, dosing regimens, and patient populations. In this review, we standardized the evaluation, using non-compartmental PK data reported at Cycle 1, i.e., following the first drug administration of what is usually a repeated-dose treatment, in monotherapy. We report ADC clinical PK properties, dosing regimen, determination of doses ranges and associated maximum tolerated doses. We also evaluated the effect of structural characteristics and target types (hematological vs. solid tumors) on PK. In addition, we discuss how integration of PK/pharmacodynamics approaches on top of classical dose escalation in first-in-human studies may improve dosing regimen determination for subsequent phases of clinical development. PMID:24852950

  8. The influence of drug sorption on pharmacokinetic studies of chlormethiazole and lignocaine.

    PubMed

    Upton, R N; Mather, L E; Runciman, W B

    1987-06-01

    The influence of drug sorption on the measurement of dose and blood concentrations during pharmacokinetic studies of chlormethiazole and lignocaine in a chronically catheterized sheep preparation has been examined. There was no sorption to soda glass tubes, borosilicate glass volumetric flasks or soda glass microlitre syringes but minor sorption to polypropylene syringes, polypropylene pipette tips and rubber bottle stoppers after 240 min contact. During infusions through administration sets including either polyvinyl chloride or polyethylene catheters, no significant loss of lignocaine occurred, but only 41.7-63.9% of the chlormethiazole dose was delivered. No significant decreases in either drug occurred from blood sampled through an intravascular catheter and stopcock system. There was negligible degradation of the samples over 4 h. Sorption of chlormethiazole or lignocaine to the laboratory equipment used was not a significant source of error but polyvinyl chloride infusion catheters could result in significant reductions in chlormethiazole dose.

  9. A Model for Predicting the Interindividual Variability of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Tod, M; Bourguignon, L; Bleyzac, N; Goutelle, S

    2017-03-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions are frequently characterized and quantified by an AUC ratio (Rauc). The typical value of the AUC ratio in case of cytochrome-mediated interactions may be predicted by several approaches, based on in vitro or in vivo data. Prediction of the interindividual variability of Rauc would help to anticipate more completely the consequences of a drug-drug interaction. We propose and evaluate a simple approach for predicting the standard deviation (sd) of Ln(Rauc), a metric close to the interindividual coefficient of variation of Rauc. First, a model was derived to link sd(Ln Rauc) with the substrate fraction metabolized by each cytochrome and the potency of the interactors, in case of induction or inhibition. Second, the parameters involved in these equations were estimated by a Bayesian hierarchical model, using the data from 56 interaction studies retrieved from the literature. Third, the model was evaluated by several metrics based on the fold prediction error (PE) of sd(Ln Rauc). The median PE was 0.998 (the ideal value is 1) and the interquartile range was 0.96-1.03. The PE was in the acceptable interval (0.5 to 2) in 52 cases out of 56. Fourth, a surface plot of sd(Ln Rauc) as a function of the characteristics of the substrate and the interactor has been built. The minimal value of sd(Ln Rauc) was about 0.08 (obtained for Rauc = 1) while the maximal value, 0.7, was obtained for interactions involving highly metabolized substrates with strong interactors.

  10. Mass spectrometry imaging of cassette-dosed drugs for higher throughput pharmacokinetic and biodistribution analysis.

    PubMed

    Swales, John G; Tucker, James W; Strittmatter, Nicole; Nilsson, Anna; Cobice, Diego; Clench, Malcolm R; Mackay, C Logan; Andren, Per E; Takáts, Zoltán; Webborn, Peter J H; Goodwin, Richard J A

    2014-08-19

    Cassette dosing of compounds for preclinical drug plasma pharmacokinetic analysis has been shown to be a powerful strategy within the pharmaceutical industry for increasing throughput while decreasing the number of animals used. Presented here for the first time is data on the application of a cassette dosing strategy for label-free tissue distribution studies. The aim of the study was to image the spatial distribution of eight nonproprietary drugs (haloperidol, bufuralol, midazolam, clozapine, terfenadine, erlotinib, olanzapine, and moxifloxacin) in multiple tissues after oral and intravenous cassette dosing (four compounds per dose route). An array of mass spectrometry imaging technologies, including matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI), liquid extraction surface analysis tandem mass spectrometry (LESA-MS/MS), and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was used. Tissue analysis following intravenous and oral administration of discretely and cassette-dosed compounds demonstrated similar relative abundances across a range of tissues indicating that a cassette dosing approach was applicable. MALDI MSI was unsuccessful in detecting all of the target compounds; therefore, DESI MSI, a complementary mass spectrometry imaging technique, was used to detect additional target compounds. In addition, by adapting technology used for tissue profiling (LESA-MS/MS) low spatial resolution mass spectrometry imaging (∼1 mm) was possible for all targets across all tissues. This study exemplifies the power of multiplatform MSI analysis within a pharmaceutical research and development (R&D) environment. Furthermore, we have illustrated that the cassette dosing approach can be readily applied to provide combined, label-free pharmacokinetic and drug distribution data at an early stage of the drug discovery/development process while minimizing animal usage.

  11. Clinical Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacodynamic and Drug-Interaction Profile of the Integrase Inhibitor Dolutegravir

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Mackenzie L.; Hadzic, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    decrease dolutegravir plasma exposure and should be separated by 2 hours before, or 6 hours after, a dolutegravir dose. In summary, dolutegravir is the first of the second generation INSTIs, which exhibits a predictable pharmacokinetic profile and a well-defined exposure-response relationship. Dolutegravir retains activity despite the presence of some class resistant mutations and achieves rapid and sustained virologic suppression in ARV-naïve and -experienced patients. Clinically dolutegravir is poised to become a commonly used component of antiretroviral regimens. PMID:23824675

  12. In Vivo and in Vitro Study on Drug-Drug Interaction of Lovastatin and Berberine from Pharmacokinetic and HepG2 Cell Metabolism Studies.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hanming; Wang, Jialong; Zhang, Qiuyan; Dang, Mengmeng; Liu, Hui; Dong, Yu; Zhang, Lu; Yang, Fang; Wu, Jianhua; Tong, Xiaolin

    2016-04-08

    We assumed that the pharmacokinetics of lovastatin could be changed by the induction effect of berberine. An UPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the pharmacokinetics tudy of lovastatin to investigate the in vivo drug-drug interactions between lovastatin and berberine. SD male rats were random divided into lovastatin group and berberine induced prior to lovastatin group for the in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. Meanwhile HepG2 cells were induced by berberine for three days to study the metabolism of lovastatin. The AUC (p < 0.01) and Cmax (p < 0.01) could be significantly decreased in the berberine-induced group in vivo, and the metabolic activity of HepG2 cell ccould be increased by berberine induction in vitro. The metabolism parameters of lovastatin such as CL, Vmax and Km were increased after the induction of berberine. From the pharmacokinetic study of lovastatin induced with berberine, we obtained pharmacokinetic parameters which are compliance with the metabolic parameters of lovastatin in HepG2 cells with berberine induction in vitro. From the in vivo pharmacokinetics study and the HepG2 cell metabolism study in vitro, berberine could be an inducer for the metabolism of lovastatin according to our previous research on berberine induction effects on HepG2 cells, which may be relevant to the fact that berberine possesses induction effects through the CYP 450 3A4 enzyme.

  13. Antiparasitic drugs for paediatrics: systematic review, formulations, pharmacokinetics, safety, efficacy and implications for control.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Jennifer; Ingram, Katrin; Utzinger, Jürg

    2011-10-01

    Drug development for paediatric applications entails a number of challenges, such as the wide age spectrum covered - from birth to adolescence - and developmental changes in physiology during biological maturation that influence the efficacy and toxicity of drugs. Safe and efficacious antiparasitic drugs for children are of pivotal importance given the large proportion of burden attributable to parasitic diseases in this age group, and growing efforts to administer, as widely as possible, antiparasitic drugs to at-risk populations, such as infants and school-aged children, often without prior diagnosis. The purpose of this review is to investigate whether antiparasitic drugs have been adequately studied for use in paediatrics. We approached this issue through a systematic review using PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Trials covering a period of 10 years and 8 months until the end of August 2010 to identify trials that investigated efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of antiparasitic drugs for paediatrics. Overall, 269 clinical drug trials and 17 PK studies met our inclusion criteria. Antimalarial drugs were the most commonly studied medicines (82·6%). Most trials were carried out in Africa and children aged 2-11 years were the age group most often investigated. Additionally, we critically examined available drug formulations for anthelminthics and identified a number of shortcomings that are discussed. Finally, we shed new light on current proposals to expand 'preventive chemotherapy' to preschool-aged children and emphasise that new research, including risk-benefit analyses, are needed before such a strategy can be adopted more widely.

  14. Evaluation of Altered Drug Pharmacokinetics in Critically Ill Adults Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Ha, Michael A; Sieg, Adam C

    2017-02-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life-support modality used in patients with refractory cardiac and/or respiratory failure. A significant resurgence in the use ECMO has been seen in recent years as a result of substantial improvements in technology and survival benefit. With expanding ECMO use, a better understanding of how ECMO affects drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is necessary. The vast majority of PK studies in patients receiving ECMO have been conducted within neonatal or pediatric populations or within a controlled environment (e.g., in vitro or ex vivo). Because of significant differences in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, it may be inappropriate to extrapolate these PK data to adults. Thus, the aims of this review are to evaluate the changes in drug PK during ECMO and to summarize the available PK data for common drugs used in the adult critically ill patients during ECMO support. A search of the PubMed (1965-July 2016), EMBASE (1965-July 2016), and Cochrane Controlled Trial Register databases was performed. All relevant studies describing PK alterations during ECMO in ex vivo experiments and in adults were included. Evaluation of the data indicated that drug PK in adults receiving ECMO support may be significantly altered. Factors influencing these alterations are numerous and have intricate relationships with each other but can generally be classified as ECMO circuit factors, drug factors, and patient factors. Commonly used drugs in these patients include antimicrobials, sedatives, and analgesics. PK data for most of these drugs are generally lacking; however, recent research efforts in this patient population have provided some limited guidance in drug dosing. With an improved understanding of altered drug PK secondary to ECMO therapy, optimization of pharmacotherapy within this critically ill population continues to move forward.

  15. Evaluation of the potential for a pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction between armodafinil and ziprasidone in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Mona; Bond, Mary; Yang, Ronghua; Hellriegel, Edward T; Robertson, Philmore

    2014-10-01

    Armodafinil has been studied as adjunctive therapy for major depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder. This open-label, single-centre, 2-period study evaluated the effect of armodafinil, a moderate inducer of cytochrome-P450 (CYP) isoenzyme CYP3A4, on the pharmacokinetics and safety of ziprasidone, an atypical antipsychotic used to treat bipolar I disorder and metabolized in part by CYP3A4. Thirty-five healthy subjects received ziprasidone (20 mg) alone and after armodafinil pretreatment (titrated to 250 mg/day); of those, 25 were evaluable for pharmacokinetics. Pharmacokinetic parameters were derived from plasma concentrations of ziprasidone collected prior to and over the 48 h after each ziprasidone administration. Plasma concentrations of armodafinil and its circulating metabolites, R-modafinil acid and modafinil sulfone, were also obtained after repeated daily dosing of armodafinil alone. Safety and tolerability were assessed. Systemic exposure to ziprasidone was similar following administration alone or after pretreatment with armodafinil, as assessed by mean peak plasma concentration (C max, 52.1 vs 50.4 ng/mL) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC0-∞, 544.6 vs 469.1 ng·h/mL). Geometric mean ratios of systemic exposure (ziprasidone alone: ziprasidone after pretreatment with armodafinil) were close to unity, with associated 90 % confidence intervals (CIs) within the range of 0.80-1.25 (C max, 0.97; 90 % CI, 0.87-1.08; AUC0-∞, 0.86; 90 % CI, 0.82-0.91). Adverse events were consistent with the known safety profiles of each agent. Systemic exposure to ziprasidone was not affected by pretreatment with armodafinil. Both drugs were generally safe and well tolerated under the conditions studied.

  16. Oral pharmacokinetics of the acidic drugs, diclofenac and sulfamonomethoxine in male Shiba goats

    PubMed Central

    ELBADAWY, Mohamed; SAKIYAMA, Takara; ABOHATAB, Rania; SASAKI, Kazuaki; SHIMODA, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the oral pharmacokinetics of the acidic drugs, diclofenac (DF) and sulfamonomethoxine (SMM), which have different physicochemical properties, in Shiba goats. DF and SMM were intravenously and orally administered to 5 male goats using a crossover design. The Tmax of DF and SMM were reached 1.5 and 5.6 hr after they have been orally administered, respectively, and this was followed by their slow elimination. The elimination of both drugs was markedly faster after being intravenously rather than orally administered, which indicated flip-flop phenomena after the oral administration. The mean absorption times (MATs) of DF and SMM were 6 and 15 hr, respectively. This slow absorption may have been due to slow gastric emptying in goats. The large difference observed in MATs between DF and SMM may have been because DF, which is more lipophilic than SMM, was partly absorbed from the forestomach. Therefore, these results suggest that the absorption of highly lipophilic drugs from the forestomach may be markedly high in Shiba goats. In case of drugs whose elimination is quite fast, their efficacies may appear from the early stage after oral administration even in ruminants, because elimination rate is the determinant factor of Tmax in flip-flop phenomena. Such drugs may be used orally even in ruminants. PMID:25311913

  17. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic integration in drug development and dosage-regimen optimization for veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Toutain, Pierre-Louis

    2002-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) modeling is a scientific tool to help developers select a rational dosage regimen for confirmatory clinical testing. This article describes some of the limitations associated with traditional dose-titration designs (parallel and crossover designs) for determining an appropriate dosage regimen. It also explains how a PK/PD model integrates the PK model (describing the relationship between dose, systemic drug concentrations, and time) with the PD model (describing the relationship between systemic drug concentration and the effect vs time profile) and a statistical model (particularly, the intra- and interindividual variability of PK and/or PD origin). Of equal importance is the utility of these models for promoting rational drug selection on the basis of effectiveness and selectivity. PK/PD modeling can be executed using various approaches, such as direct versus indirect response models and parametric versus nonparametric models. PK/PD concepts can be applied to individual dose optimization. Examples of the application of PK/PD approaches in veterinary drug development are provided, with particular emphasis given to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The limits of PK/PD approaches include the development of appropriate models, the validity of surrogate endpoints, and the acceptance of these models in a regulatory environment.

  18. Effects of Hormonal Contraception on Anti-Retroviral Drug Metabolism, Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Andrea Ries; Anderson, Sharon; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2014-01-01

    Among women, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is most prevalent in those of reproductive age. These women are also at risk of unintended or mistimed pregnancies. Hormonal contraceptives (HCs) are one of the most commonly used methods of family planning world-wide. Therefore concurrent use of HC among women on anti-retroviral medications (ARVs) is increasingly common. ARVs are being investigated and have been approved for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and therefore drug-drug interactions must also be considered in HIV-1 negative women who want to prevent both unintended pregnancy and HIV-1 infection. This article will review four main interactions: (1) the effect of HCs on ARV pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) during therapy, (2) the effect of ARVs on HC PK and PD, (3) the role of drug transporters on drug-drug interactions and (4) ongoing research into the effect of HCs on pre-exposure prophylaxis PK and PD. PMID:24521428

  19. [Release characteristics in vitro and pharmacokinetics of da chuanxiong fang multiunit drug delivery system in rats].

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuan-feng; Zhang, Ning; Lin, Xiao; Feng, Yi

    2011-09-01

    The drug release characteristics ofDa Chuanxiong Fang multiunit drug delivery system (DCXFMDDS) in vivo and in vitro were evaluated. Ferulic acid (FA) and senkyunolide I (SI) were used as marker components, which were two of the effective components of Da Chuanxiong Fang. And their contents were determined by HPLC. Drug release characteristics in vitro of DCXFMDDS and Da Chuanxiong pills and pharmacokinetics characteristics of DCXFMDDS and Da Chuanxiong Fang active fraction (DCXFAF) in rats were compared. It was obvious that FA released from the DCXFMDDS in a sustained fashion but SI in a fast fashion both in vitro and in vivo. The releasing process and the releasing mechanism of FA and SI from DCXFMDDS were different, but the AUC value indicated that compared with DCXFAF the extent of absorption of FA and SI from DCXFMDDS was increased. Though from the same multiunit drug delivery system, FA an SI had different drug release characteristics both in vitro and in vivo, and that may be one of the reason why DCXFMDDS has the good properties such as rapid and long-lasting effect and high efficiency.

  20. Effects of the ABCG2 and ABCB1 drug transporter polymorphisms on the pharmacokinetics of bicalutamide in humans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Ah; Cha, Yu-Jung; Lee, Hae-Mi; Joo, Hyun-Jin; Park, Ji-Young

    2015-01-01

    Bicalutamide is an oral non-steroidal anti-androgen used in the treatment of prostate cancer. Drug transporters P-glycoprotein encoded by ABCB1 and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) encoded by ABCG2 are involved in the transportation of bicalutamide and its treatment failure. We evaluated the roles of ABCB1 and ABCG2 genetic polymorphisms in the pharmacokinetics of bicalutamide in humans. After a single oral dose of 150mg bicalutamide was administered, plasma concentrations of bicalutamide were measured, and pharmacokinetic analyses were performed in 27 healthy subjects according to ABCB1 (c.1236C>T, c.2677G>T/A, and c.3435C>T) and ABCG2 (c.34G>A and c.421C>A). ABCB1 polymorphisms did not affect the plasma levels of bicalutamide and the pharmacokinetic parameters did not differ among ABCB1 genotype groups. However, the ABCG2 c.421C>A polymorphism significantly influenced the plasma levels and pharmacokinetics of bicalutamide gene dose-dependently. The ABCB1 genetic polymorphisms did not influence the pharmacokinetics of bicalutamide. However, ABCG2 c.421C>A significantly and gene dose-dependently influenced its pharmacokinetics, but c.34G>A did not. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling to predict concentrations and actions of sodium-dependent glucose transporter 2 inhibitor canagliflozin in human intestines and renal tubules.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kazumi; Saito, Ryuta; Nakamaru, Yoshinobu; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Canagliflozin is a recently developed sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) 2 inhibitor that promotes renal glucose excretion and is considered to inhibit renal SGLT2 from the luminal side of proximal tubules. Canagliflozin reportedly inhibits SGLT1 weakly and suppresses postprandial plasma glucose, suggesting that it also inhibits intestinal SGLT1. However, it is difficult to measure the drug concentrations of these assumed sites of action directly. The pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationships of canagliflozin remain poorly characterized. Therefore, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of canagliflozin was developed based on clinical data from healthy volunteers and it was used to simulate luminal concentrations in intestines and renal tubules. In small intestine simulations, the inhibition ratios for SGLT1 were predicted to be 40%-60% after the oral administration of clinical doses (100-300 mg/day). In contrast, inhibition ratios of canagliflozin for renal SGLT2 and SGLT1 were predicted to be approximately 100% and 0.2%-0.4%, respectively. These analyses suggest that canagliflozin only inhibits SGLT2 in the kidney. Using the simulated proximal tubule luminal concentrations of canagliflozin, the urinary glucose excretion rates in canagliflozin-treated diabetic patients were accurately predicted using the renal glucose reabsorption model as a PD model. Because the simulation of canagliflozin pharmacokinetics was successful, this PBPK methodology was further validated by successfully simulating the pharmacokinetics of dapagliflozin, another SGLT2 inhibitor. The present results suggest the utility of this PBPK/PD model for predicting canagliflozin concentrations at target sites and help to elucidate the pharmacological effects of SGLT1/2 inhibition in humans. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Pharmacokinetic drug interaction profile of omeprazole with adverse consequences and clinical risk management

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Zeng, Su; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zhou, Quan

    2013-01-01

    Background Omeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), is widely used for the treatment of dyspepsia, peptic ulcer, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and functional dyspepsia. Polypharmacy is common in patients receiving omeprazole. Drug toxicity and treatment failure resulting from inappropriate combination therapy with omeprazole have been reported sporadically. Systematic review has not been available to address the pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction (DDI) profile of omeprazole with adverse consequences, the factors determining the degree of DDI between omeprazole and comedication, and the corresponding clinical risk management. Methods Literature was identified by performing a PubMed search covering the period from January 1988 to March 2013. The full text of each article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed. Results Omeprazole has actual adverse influences on the pharmacokinetics of medications such as diazepam, carbamazepine, clozapine, indinavir, nelfinavir, atazanavir, rilpivirine, methotrexate, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, clopidogrel, digoxin, itraconazole, posaconazole, and oral iron supplementation. Meanwhile, low efficacy of omeprazole treatment would be anticipated, as omeprazole elimination could be significantly induced by comedicated efavirenz and herb medicines such as St John’s wort, Ginkgo biloba, and yin zhi huang. The mechanism for DDI involves induction or inhibition of cytochrome P450, inhibition of P-glycoprotein or breast cancer resistance protein-mediated drug transport, and inhibition of oral absorption by gastric acid suppression. Sometimes, DDIs of omeprazole do not exhibit a PPI class effect. Other suitable PPIs or histamine 2 antagonists may be therapeutic alternatives that can be used to avoid adverse consequences. The degree of DDIs associated with omeprazole and clinical outcomes depend on factors such as genotype status of CYP2C19 and CYP1A2, ethnicity, dose and treatment course of precipitant

  3. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic drug interactions with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Williams, David; Feely, John

    2002-01-01

    The HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are effective in both the primary and secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease. As a group, these drugs are well tolerated apart from two uncommon but potentially serious adverse effects: elevation of liver enzymes and skeletal muscle abnormalities, which range from benign myalgias to life-threatening rhabdomyolysis. Adverse effects with statins are frequently associated with drug interactions because of their long-term use in older patients who are likely to be exposed to polypharmacy. The recent withdrawal of cerivastatin as a result of deaths from rhabdomyolysis illustrates the clinical importance of such interactions. Drug interactions involving the statins may have either a pharmacodynamic or pharmacokinetic basis, or both. As these drugs are highly extracted by the liver, displacement interactions are of limited importance. The cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme system plays an important part in the metabolism of the statins, leading to clinically relevant interactions with other agents, particularly cyclosporin, erythromycin, itraconazole, ketoconazole and HIV protease inhibitors, that are also metabolised by this enzyme system. An additional complicating feature is that individual statins are metabolised to differing degrees, in some cases producing active metabolites. The CYP3A family metabolises lovastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin and cerivastatin, whereas CYP2C9 metabolises fluvastatin. Cerivastatin is also metabolised by CYP2C8. Pravastatin is not significantly metabolised by the CYP system. In addition, the statins are substrates for P-glycoprotein, a drug transporter present in the small intestine that may influence their oral bioavailability. In clinical practice, the risk of a serious interaction causing myopathy is enhanced when statin metabolism is markedly inhibited. Thus, rhabdomyolysis has occurred following the coadministration of cyclosporin, a potent CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein inhibitor, and

  4. A pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic (p-PBPK) model for disposition of drugs metabolized by CYP1A2, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4

    PubMed Central

    Gaohua, Lu; Abduljalil, Khaled; Jamei, Masoud; Johnson, Trevor N; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2012-01-01

    Aims Pregnant women are usually not part of the traditional drug development programme. Pregnancy is associated with major biological and physiological changes that alter the pharmacokinetics (PK) of drugs. Prediction of the changes to drug exposure in this group of patients may help to prevent under- or overtreatment. We have used a pregnancy physiologically based pharmacokinetic (p-PBPK) model to assess the likely impact of pregnancy on three model compounds, namely caffeine, metoprolol and midazolam, based on the knowledge of their disposition in nonpregnant women and information from in vitro studies. Methods A perfusion-limited form of a 13-compartment full-PBPK model (Simcyp® Simulator) was used for the nonpregnant women, and this was extended to the pregnant state by applying known changes to all model components (including the gestational related activity of specific cytochrome P450 enzymes) and through the addition of an extra compartment to represent the fetoplacental unit. The uterus and the mammary glands were grouped into the muscle compartment. The model was implemented in Matlab Simulink and validated using clinical observations. Results The p-PBPK model predicted the PK changes of three model compounds (namely caffeine, metoprolol and midazolam) for CYP1A2, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 during pregnancy within twofold of observed values. The changes during the third trimester were predicted to be a 100% increase, a 30% decrease and a 35% decrease in the exposure of caffeine, metoprolol and midazolam, respectively, compared with the nonpregnant women. Conclusions In the absence of clinical data, the in silico prediction of PK behaviour during pregnancy can provide a valuable aid to dose adjustment in pregnant women. The performance of the model for drugs metabolized by a single enzyme to different degrees (high and low extraction) and for drugs that are eliminated by several different routes warrants further study. PMID:22725721

  5. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions involving vortioxetine (Lu AA21004), a multimodal antidepressant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Grace; Lee, Ronald; Højer, Astrid-Maria; Buchbjerg, Jeppe Klint; Serenko, Michael; Zhao, Zhen

    2013-10-01

    The identification and quantification of potential drug-drug interactions is important for avoiding or minimizing the interaction-induced adverse events associated with specific drug combinations. Clinical studies in healthy subjects were performed to evaluate potential pharmacokinetic interactions between vortioxetine (Lu AA21004) and co-administered agents, including fluconazole (cytochrome P450 [CYP] 2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP3A inhibitor), ketoconazole (CYP3A and P-glycoprotein inhibitor), rifampicin (CYP inducer), bupropion (CYP2D6 inhibitor and CYP2B6 substrate), ethinyl estradiol/levonorgestrel (CYP3A substrates) and omeprazole (CYP2C19 substrate and inhibitor). The ratio of central values of the test treatment to the reference treatment for relevant parameters (e.g., area under the plasma concentration-time curve [AUC] and maximum plasma concentration [C max]) was used to assess pharmacokinetic interactions. Co-administration of vortioxetine had no effect on the AUC or C max of ethinyl estradiol/levonorgestrel or 5'-hydroxyomeprazole, or the AUC of bupropion; the 90 % confidence intervals for these ratios of central values were within 80-125 %. Steady-state AUC and C max of vortioxetine increased when co-administered with bupropion (128 and 114 %, respectively), fluconazole (46 and 15 %, respectively) and ketoconazole (30 and 26 %, respectively), and decreased by 72 and 51 %, respectively, when vortioxetine was co-administered with rifampicin. Concomitant therapy was generally well tolerated; most adverse events were mild or moderate in intensity. Dosage adjustment may be required when vortioxetine is co-administered with bupropion or rifampicin.

  6. PhRMA CPCDC initiative on predictive models of human pharmacokinetics, part 1: goals, properties of the PhRMA dataset, and comparison with literature datasets.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Patrick; Jones, Hannah M; Jones, Rhys Do; Yates, James W T; Gibson, Christopher R; Chien, Jenny Y; Ring, Barbara J; Adkison, Kimberly K; He, Handan; Vuppugalla, Ragini; Marathe, Punit; Fischer, Volker; Dutta, Sandeep; Sinha, Vikash K; Björnsson, Thorir; Lavé, Thierry; Ku, M Sherry

    2011-10-01

    This study is part of the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) initiative on predictive models of efficacy, safety, and compound properties. The overall goal of this part was to assess the predictability of human pharmacokinetics (PK) from preclinical data and to provide comparisons of available prediction methods from the literature, as appropriate, using a representative blinded dataset of drug candidates. The key objectives were to (i) appropriately assemble and blind a diverse dataset of in vitro, preclinical in vivo, and clinical data for multiple drug candidates, (ii) evaluate the dataset with empirical and physiological methodologies from the literature used to predict human PK properties and plasma concentration-time profiles, (iii) compare the predicted properties with the observed clinical data to assess the prediction accuracy using routine statistical techniques and to evaluate prediction method(s) based on the degree of accuracy of each prediction method, and (iv) compile and summarize results for publication. Another objective was to provide a mechanistic understanding as to why one methodology provided better predictions than another, after analyzing the poor predictions. A total of 108 clinical lead compounds were collected from 12 PhRMA member companies. This dataset contains intravenous (n = 19) and oral pharmacokinetic data (n = 107) in humans as well as the corresponding preclinical in vitro, in vivo, and physicochemical data. All data were blinded to protect the anonymity of both the data and the company submitting the data. This manuscript, which is the first of a series of manuscripts, summarizes the PhRMA initiative and the 108 compound dataset. More details on the predictability of each method are reported in companion manuscripts. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Oral drug absorption in pediatrics: the intestinal wall, its developmental changes and current tools for predictions

    PubMed Central

    Bouzom, François; Hugues, Chanteux; Ungell, Anna‐Lena

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The dissolution, intestinal absorption and presystemic metabolism of a drug depend on its physicochemical characteristics but also on numerous physiological (e.g. gastrointestinal pH, volume, transit time, morphology) and biochemical factors (e.g. luminal enzymes and flora, intestinal wall enzymes and transporters). Over the past decade, evidence has accumulated indicating that these factors may differ in children and adults resulting in age‐related changes in drug exposure and drug response. Thus, drug dosage may require adjustment for the pediatric population to ensure the desired therapeutic outcome and to avoid side‐effects. Although tremendous progress has been made in understanding the effects of age on intestinal physiology and function, significant knowledge gaps remain. Studying and predicting pharmacokinetics in pediatric patients remains challenging due to ethical concerns associated with clinical trials in this vulnerable population, and because of the paucity of predictive in vitro and in vivo animal assays. This review details the current knowledge related to developmental changes determining intestinal drug absorption and pre‐systemic metabolism. Supporting experimental approaches as well as physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling are also discussed together with their limitations and challenges. © 2016 UCB Biopharma sprl. Biopharmaceutics & Drug Disposition Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27976409

  8. Pharmacokinetics and Efficacy of Topically Applied Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Retinochoroidal Tissues in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Tetsuo; Kozai, Seiko; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Isaka, Mitsuyoshi; Tokushige, Hideki; Sakamoto, Taiji

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of topically applied nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the retinochoroidal tissues of rabbits. Methods The cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitory activity of diclofenac, bromfenac, and amfenac, an active metabolite of nepafenac, were determined using human-derived COX-1 and COX-2. Each of the three NSAIDs was applied topically to rabbits, and after 0.5 to 8 hrs, the concentration of each drug in the aqueous humor and the retinochoroidal tissues was measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The pharmacokinetics of the drugs in the tissues after repeated doses as is done on patients was calculated by a simulation software. The inhibitory effect of each NSAID on the breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier was assessed by the vitreous protein concentration on concanavalin A-induced retinochoroidal inflammation in rabbits. Results The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of diclofenac, bromfenac, and amfenac was 55.5, 5.56, and 15.3 nM for human COX-1, and 30.7, 7.45, and 20.4 nM for human COX-2, respectively. The three NSAIDs were detected in the aqueous humor and the retinochoroidal tissue at all-time points. Simulated pharmacokinetics showed that the levels of the three NSAIDs were continuously higher than the IC50 of COX-2, as an index of efficacy, in the aqueous humor, whereas only the bromfenac concentration was continuously higher than the IC50 at its trough level in the retinochoroidal tissues. The intravitreous concentration of proteins was significantly reduced in rabbits that received topical bromfenac (P = 0.026) but not the other two NSAIDs. Conclusions Topical bromfenac can penetrate into the retinochoroidal tissues in high enough concentrations to inhibit COX-2 and exerts its inhibitory effect on the blood-retinal barrier breakdown in an experimental retinochoroidal inflammation in rabbits. Topical bromfenac may have a better therapeutic benefit than diclofenac and

  9. Extraction of Pharmacokinetic Evidence of Drug–Drug Interactions from the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kolchinsky, Artemy; Lourenço, Anália; Wu, Heng-Yi; Li, Lang; Rocha, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and a subject of intense scientific interest. Biomedical literature mining can aid DDI research by extracting evidence for large numbers of potential interactions from published literature and clinical databases. Though DDI is investigated in domains ranging in scale from intracellular biochemistry to human populations, literature mining has not been used to extract specific types of experimental evidence, which are reported differently for distinct experimental goals. We focus on pharmacokinetic evidence for DDI, essential for identifying causal mechanisms of putative interactions and as input for further pharmacological and pharmacoepidemiology investigations. We used manually curated corpora of PubMed abstracts and annotated sentences to evaluate the efficacy of literature mining on two tasks: first, identifying PubMed abstracts containing pharmacokinetic evidence of DDIs; second, extracting sentences containing such evidence from abstracts. We implemented a text mining pipeline and evaluated it using several linear classifiers and a variety of feature transforms. The most important textual features in the abstract and sentence classification tasks were analyzed. We also investigated the performance benefits of using features derived from PubMed metadata fields, various publicly available named entity recognizers, and pharmacokinetic dictionaries. Several classifiers performed very well in distinguishing relevant and irrelevant abstracts (reaching F1≈0.93, MCC≈0.74, iAUC≈0.99) and sentences (F1≈0.76, MCC≈0.65, iAUC≈0.83). We found that word bigram features were important for achieving optimal classifier performance and that features derived from Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms significantly improved abstract classification. We also found that some drug-related named entity recognition tools and dictionaries led to slight but significant improvements, especially in

  10. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies of centrally acting drugs in rat: effect of pentobarbital and chlorpromazine on electroencephalogram in rat.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Koshiro, A; Kakemi, M; Fukasawa, Y; Katayama, K; Koizumi, T

    1995-08-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) alterations in rat after the i.v. administration of pentobarbital (PTB) and chlorpromazine (CPZ) were measured by power spectral analysis. The time courses of PTB concentrations in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain were determined after the i.v. administration of PTB (20, 40 mg/kg) by GC-MS. The PTB concentrations in plasma, CSF and brain could be described by a biexponential equation, a CSF model and a blood flow limited model, respectively. The relationship between the alteration of EEG and the PTB concentrations in the CSF or brain or the effect compartment were analyzed using the sigmoid Emax model. The alteration of EEG after PTB administration could be described by the PTB concentration in these compartments using the sigmoid Emax model. These results indicated that the site of action for the alteration of EEG after PTB administration is in instantaneous equilibrium with the CSF, the brain and the effect compartment. Thus, alterations in EEG after PTB administration can be predicted by monitoring the total PTB concentration in plasma. The alteration of EEG after i.v. administration of CPZ (4 mg/kg) showed a two-phase variation. Although the relationship between the alteration of EEG and the CPZ concentrations in CSF or the striatum or the effect compartment (total and free drug) were analyzed using the linear model, the Emax model or the sigmoid Emax model, the two-phase alteration of EEG after CPZ administration could not be described by any of these models. These results indicated that the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling of CPZ during the alteration of EEG may be complicated due to several pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors, such as an alteration of the free fraction of CPZ in the striatum, the formation of active metabolites, and two different intrinsic effects of CPZ on the EEG (one in an increase and the other in a decrease of the brain's electrical activity.

  11. Role of phenmetrazine as an active metabolite of phendimetrazine: evidence from studies of drug discrimination and pharmacokinetics in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Matthew L; Blough, Bruce E; Fennell, Timothy R.; Snyder, Rodney W.; Negus, S. Stevens

    2012-01-01

    Background Monoamine releasers such as d-amphetamine that selectively promote release of dopamine/norepinephrine versus serotonin are one class of candidate medications for treating cocaine dependence; however, their clinical utility is limited by undesirable effects such as abuse liability. Clinical utility of these compounds may be increased by development of prodrugs to reduce abuse potential by slowing onset of drug effects. This study examined the behavioral and pharmacokinetic profile of the Schedule III compound phendimetrazine, which may serve as a prodrug for the N-demethylated metabolite and potent dopamine/norepinephrine releaser phenmetrazine. Methods Monkeys (n=5) were trained in a two-key food-reinforced discrimination procedure to discriminate cocaine (0.32 mg/kg, IM) from saline, and the potency and time course of cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects were determined for (+)-phenmetrazine, (−)-phenmetrazine, (+)-phendimetrazine, (−)-phendimetrazine, and (! )-phendimetrazine. Parallel pharmacokinetic studies in the same monkeys examined plasma phenmetrazine and phendimetrazine levels for correlation with cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects. Results Both isomers of phenmetrazine, and the racemate and both isomers of phendimetrazine, produced dose- and time-dependent substitution for the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine, with greater potency residing in the (+) isomers. In general, plasma phenmetrazine levels increased to similar levels after administration of behaviorally active doses of either phenmetrazine or phendimetrazine. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that phenmetrazine is an active metabolite that contributes to the effects of phendimetrazine. However, behavioral effects of phendimetrazine had a more rapid onset than would have been predicted by phenmetrazine levels alone, suggesting that other mechanisms may also contribute. PMID:23211394

  12. Design optimisation for pharmacokinetic modeling of a cocktail of phenotyping drugs.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thu Thuy; Bénech, Henri; Delaforge, Marcel; Lenuzza, Natacha

    2016-01-01

    Our paper proposes a methodological strategy to select optimal sampling designs for phenotyping studies including a cocktail of drugs. A cocktail approach is of high interest to determine the simultaneous activity of enzymes responsible for drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics, therefore useful in anticipating drug-drug interactions and in personalized medicine. Phenotyping indexes, which are area under the concentration-time curves, can be derived from a few samples using nonlinear mixed effect models and maximum a posteriori estimation. Because of clinical constraints in phenotyping studies, the number of samples that can be collected in individuals is limited and the sampling times must be as flexible as possible. Therefore to optimize joint design for several drugs (i.e., to determine a compromise between informative times that best characterize each drug's kinetics), we proposed to use a compound optimality criterion based on the expected population Fisher information matrix in nonlinear mixed effect models. This criterion allows weighting different models, which might be useful to take into account the importance accorded to each target in a phenotyping test. We also computed windows around the optimal times based on recursive random sampling and Monte-Carlo simulation while maintaining a reasonable level of efficiency for parameter estimation. We illustrated this strategy for two drugs often included in phenotyping cocktails, midazolam (probe for CYP3A) and digoxin (P-glycoprotein), based on the data of a previous study, and were able to find a sparse and flexible design. The obtained design was evaluated by clinical trial simulations and shown to be efficient for the estimation of population and individual parameters. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions with clopidogrel: updated review and risk management in combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Yu; Chen, Meng; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zeng, Su; Xiang, Mei-Xiang; Zhou, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Background Coprescribing of clopidogrel and other drugs is common. Available reviews have addressed the drug–drug interactions (DDIs) when clopidogrel is as an object drug, or focused on combination use of clopidogrel and a special class of drugs. Clinicians may still be ignorant of those DDIs when clopidogrel is a precipitant drug, the factors determining the degree of DDIs, and corresponding risk management. Methods A literature search was performed using PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library to analyze the pharmacokinetic DDIs of clopidogrel and new P2Y12 receptor inhibitors. Results Clopidogrel affects the pharmacokinetics of cerivastatin, repaglinide, ferulic acid, sibutramine, efavirenz, and omeprazole. Low efficacy of clopidogrel is anticipated in the presence of omeprazole, esomeprazole, morphine, grapefruit juice, scutellarin, fluoxetine, azole antifungals, calcium channel blockers, sulfonylureas, and ritonavir. Augmented antiplatelet effects are anticipated when clopidogrel is coprescribed with aspirin, curcumin, cyclosporin, St John’s wort, rifampicin, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The factors determining the degree of DDIs with clopidogrel include genetic status (eg, cytochrome P540 [CYP]2B6*6, CYP2C19 polymorphism, CYP3A5*3, CYP3A4*1G, and CYP1A2-163C.A), species differences, and dose strength. The DDI risk does not exhibit a class effect, eg, the effects of clopidogrel on cerivastatin versus other statins, the effects of proton pump inhibitors on clopidogrel (omeprazole, esomeprazole versus pantoprazole, rabeprazole), the effects of rifampicin on clopidogrel versus ticagrelor and prasugrel, and the effects of calcium channel blockers on clopidogrel (amlodipine versus P-glycoprotein-inhibiting calcium channel blockers). The mechanism of the DDIs with clopidogrel involves modulating CYP enzymes (eg, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4), paraoxonase-1, hepatic carboxylesterase 1, P-glycoprotein, and organic anion

  14. Predicting new molecular targets for known drugs

    PubMed Central

    Keiser, Michael J.; Setola, Vincent; Irwin, John J.; Laggner, Christian; Abbas, Atheir; Hufeisen, Sandra J.; Jensen, Niels H.; Kuijer, Michael B.; Matos, Roberto C.; Tran, Thuy B.; Whaley, Ryan; Glennon, Richard A.; Hert, Jérôme; Thomas, Kelan L.H.; Edwards, Douglas D.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2009-01-01

    Whereas drugs are intended to be selective, at least some bind to several physiologic targets, explaining both side effects and efficacy. As many drug-target combinations exist, it would be useful to explore possible interactions computationally. Here, we compared 3,665 FDA-approved and investigational drugs against hundreds of targets, defining each target by its ligands. Chemical similarities between drugs and ligand sets predicted thousands of unanticipated associations. Thirty were tested experimentally, including the antagonism of the β1 receptor by the transporter inhibitor Prozac, the inhibition of the 5-HT transporter by the ion channel drug Vadilex, and antagonism of the histamine H4 receptor by the enzyme inhibitor Rescriptor. Overall, 23 new drug-target associations were confirmed, five of which were potent (< 100 nM). The physiological relevance of one such, the drug DMT on serotonergic receptors, was confirmed in a knock-out mouse. The chemical similarity approach is systematic and comprehensive, and may suggest side-effects and new indications for many drugs. PMID:19881490

  15. Deciding on success criteria for predictability of pharmacokinetic parameters from in vitro studies: an analysis based on in vivo observations.

    PubMed

    Abduljalil, Khaled; Cain, Theresa; Humphries, Helen; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2014-09-01

    Prediction accuracy of pharmacokinetic parameters is often assessed using prediction fold error, i.e., being within 2-, 3-, or n-fold of observed values. However, published studies disagree on which fold error represents an accurate prediction. In addition, "observed data" from only one clinical study are often used as the gold standard for in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) studies, despite data being subject to significant interstudy variability and subjective selection from various available reports. The current study involved analysis of published systemic clearance (CL) and volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) values taken from over 200 clinical studies. These parameters were obtained for 17 different drugs after intravenous administration. Data were analyzed with emphasis on the appropriateness to use a parameter value from one particular clinical study to judge the performance of IVIVE and the ability of CL and Vss values obtained from one clinical study to "predict" the same values obtained in a different clinical study using the n-fold criteria for prediction accuracy. The twofold criteria method was of interest because it is widely used in IVIVE predictions. The analysis shows that in some cases the twofold criteria method is an unreasonable expectation when the observed data are obtained from studies with small sample size. A more reasonable approach would allow prediction criteria to include clinical study information such as sample size and the variance of the parameter of interest. A method is proposed that allows the "success" criteria to be linked to the measure of variation in the observed value. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  16. How the Probability and Potential Clinical Significance of Pharmacokinetically Mediated Drug-Drug Interactions Are Assessed in Drug Development: Desvenlafaxine as an Example

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Alice I.; Preskorn, Sheldon H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The avoidance of adverse drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is a high priority in terms of both the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the individual prescriber. With this perspective in mind, this article illustrates the process for assessing the risk of a drug (example here being desvenlafaxine) causing or being the victim of DDIs, in accordance with FDA guidance. Data Sources/Study Selection: DDI studies for the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor desvenlafaxine conducted by the sponsor and published since 2009 are used as examples of the systematic way that the FDA requires drug developers to assess whether their new drug is either capable of causing clinically meaningful DDIs or being the victim of such DDIs. In total, 8 open-label studies tested the effects of steady-state treatment with desvenlafaxine (50–400 mg/d) on the pharmacokinetics of cytochrome (CYP) 2D6 and/or CYP 3A4 substrate drugs, or the effect of CYP 3A4 inhibition on desvenlafaxine pharmacokinetics. The potential for DDIs mediated by the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transporter was assessed in in vitro studies using Caco-2 monolayers. Data Extraction: Changes in area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC; CYP studies) and efflux (P-gp studies) were reviewed for potential DDIs in accordance with FDA criteria. Results: Desvenlafaxine coadministration had minimal effect on CYP 2D6 and/or 3A4 substrates per FDA criteria. Changes in AUC indicated either no interaction (90% confidence intervals for the ratio of AUC geometric least-squares means [GM] within 80%–125%) or weak inhibition (AUC GM ratio 125% to < 200%). Coadministration with ketoconazole resulted in a weak interaction with desvenlafaxine (AUC GM ratio of 143%). Desvenlafaxine was not a substrate (efflux ratio < 2) or inhibitor (50% inhibitory drug concentration values > 250 μM) of P-gp. Conclusions: A 2-step process based on FDA guidance can be used first to determine whether a pharmacokinetically mediated

  17. QSAR and QM/MM approaches applied to drug metabolism prediction.

    PubMed

    Braga, R C; Andrade, C H

    2012-06-01

    In modern drug discovery process, ADME/Tox properties should be determined as early as possible in the test cascade to allow a timely assessment of their property profiles. To help medicinal chemists in designing new compounds with improved pharmacokinetics, the knowledge of the soft spot position or the site of metabolism (SOM) is needed. In recent years, large number of in silico approaches for metabolism prediction have been developed and reported. Among these methods, QSAR models and combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods for predicting drug metabolism have undergone significant advances. This review provides a perspective of the utility of QSAR and QM/MM approaches on drug metabolism prediction, highlighting the present challenges, limitations, and future perspectives in medicinal chemistry.

  18. Computational prediction of human drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ekins, Sean; Andreyev, Sergey; Ryabov, Andy; Kirillov, Eugene; Rakhmatulin, Eugene A; Bugrim, Andrej; Nikolskaya, Tatiana

    2005-08-01

    There is an urgent requirement within the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, regulatory authorities and academia to improve the success of molecules that are selected for clinical trials. Although absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADME/Tox) properties are some of the many components that contribute to successful drug discovery and development, they represent factors for which we currently have in vitro and in vivo data that can be modelled computationally. Understanding the possible toxicity and the metabolic fate of xenobiotics in the human body is particularly important in early drug discovery. There is, therefore, a need for computational methodologies for uncovering the relationships between the structure and the biological activity of novel molecules. The convergence of numerous technologies, including high-throughput techniques, databases, ADME/Tox modelling and systems biology modelling, is leading to the foundation of systems-ADME/Tox. Results from experiments can be integrated with predictions to globally simulate and understand the likely complete effects of a molecule in humans. The development and early application of major components of MetaDrug (GeneGo, Inc.) software will be described, which includes rule-based metabolite prediction, quantitative structure-activity relationship models for major drug metabolising enzymes, and an extensive database of human protein-xenobiotic interactions. This represents a combined approach to predicting drug metabolism. MetaDrug can be readily used for visualising Phase I and II metabolic pathways, as well as interpreting high-throughput data derived from microarrays as networks of interacting objects. This will ultimately aid in hypothesis generation and the early triaging of molecules likely to have undesirable predicted properties or measured effects on key proteins and cellular functions.

  19. Armodafinil and modafinil in patients with excessive sleepiness associated with shift work disorder: a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model for predicting and comparing their concentration-effect relationships.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Mona; Bond, Mary; Ezzet, Farkad

    2012-09-01

    Armodafinil, the longer lasting R-isomer of racemic modafinil, improves wakefulness in patients with excessive sleepiness associated with shift work disorder (SWD). Pharmacokinetic studies suggest that armodafinil achieves higher plasma concentrations than modafinil late in a dose interval following equal oral doses. Pooled Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) data from 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in 463 patients with SWD, 1 with armodafinil 150 mg/d and 1 with modafinil 200 mg/d (both administered around 2200 h before night shifts), were used to build a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model. Predicted plasma drug concentrations were obtained by developing and applying a population pharmacokinetic model using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. Armodafinil 200 mg produced a plasma concentration above the EC(50) (4.6 µg/mL) for 9 hours, whereas modafinil 200 mg did not exceed the EC(50). Consequently, armodafinil produced greater increases in predicted placebo-subtracted MSLT times of 0.5-1 minute (up to 10 hours after dosing) compared with modafinil. On a milligram-to-milligram basis, armodafinil 200 mg consistently increased wakefulness more than modafinil 200 mg, including times late in the 8-hour shift.

  20. Analgesics in Pregnancy: An Update on Use, Safety and Pharmacokinetic Changes in Drug Disposition.

    PubMed

    Price, Hayley R; Collier, Abby C

    2017-08-25

    Although medications should only be prescribed in pregnancy if benefits to the mother outweigh the risk to the fetus, drug use in pregnancy especially prescribed and over-the-counter analgesics, is very common. The objective of this review is to present an update on known changes in analgesic disposition in pregnancy caused by pharmacokinetic mechanisms. Herein, we discuss a wide range of medical, biomedical and scientific literature that includes reports from the fields of dentistry, general medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, pharmacology and toxicology to provide an update on the use (including indications, contraindications and concerns) of major classes of analgesics during human pregnancy. Over 50% of analgesics are in pregnancy category C, and even more category D specifically in the third trimester. Changes in renal filtration, cardiac output, plasma protein concentration and plasma volume particularly affect analgesics and dose adjustments may be necessary to maintain therapeutic concentrations in pregnant woman, and/or to protect the developing fetus. Analgesics are one of the most frequently used drug classes in pregnancy. More than 60% of women self-report using analgesics while pregnant, both prescribed and by self-medication. For the majority of analgesics available (excepting acetaminophen and the NSAIDs, and to a lesser extent certain opioids), good prospective clinical trials documenting pharmacokinetic changes do not exist. More research is needed in both the scientific and clinical community to understand the risks and benefits of analgesic use in pregnancy, particularly as prevalence is rising. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of the chemoprophylactic and chemotherapeutic trypanocidal drug isometamidium chloride (Samorin) in cattle.

    PubMed

    Eisler, M C

    1996-12-01

    Pharmacokinetics of the prophylactic and therapeutic trypanocidal drug isometamidium chloride were examined comprehensively for the first time in cattle using a recently described, highly sensitive ELISA. Cattle were administered single intravenous (N = 4) or intramuscular (N = 5) doses of isometamidium at a rate of 1.0 mg x kg(-1) body weight. Concentration data were analyzed over at least 14 days (intravenous treatment) or 30 days (intramuscular treatment) using compartmental and noncompartmental methods. After intravenous administration, apparent volumes of the central compartment (mean = 0.695 liter x kg(-1); range = 0.59-0.95) were large, and volumes of distribution at steady-state (mean = 24.5 liter x kg(-1): range = 18.5-39.3) were particularly large. After intramuscular administration, there was considerable individual variability in Cmax (mean = 111 ng x ml(-1); range = 37-197) and other pharmacokinetic parameters. Absorption kinetics seemed to be multifunctional, with fast and slow components; the mean t(max) was only 36 min (range = 20-60), although the mean absorption time was 282 hr, and the mean terminal elimination phase half-life after intramuscular administration (286 hr; range = 215-463) was over twice that after intravenous administration (mean = 135 hr; range = 123-165). The overall absolute bioavailability of intramuscular-administered isometamidium was 65.7%. These findings were consistent with extensive tissue binding at the intramuscular injection site to form a primary depot responsible for most of the prolonged chemoprophylactic effect of isometamidium, and an additional role for significant secondary drug depots formed by tissue binding elsewhere, particularly after intravenous administration.

  2. Assessment of in vitro high throughput pharmacokinetic data to predict in vivo pharmacokinetic data of environmental chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing the health risks of the thousands of chemicals in use requires both toxicology and pharmacokinetic (PK) data that can be generated more quickly. For PK, in vitro clearance assays with hepatocytes and serum protein binding assays provide a means to generate high throughp...

  3. Assessment of in vitro high throughput pharmacokinetic data to predict in vivo pharmacokinetic data of environmental chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing the health risks of the thousands of chemicals in use requires both toxicology and pharmacokinetic (PK) data that can be generated more quickly. For PK, in vitro clearance assays with hepatocytes and serum protein binding assays provide a means to generate high throughp...

  4. Prediction of transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions using endogenous compounds.

    PubMed

    Fromm, M F

    2012-11-01

    Therapy with two or more drugs is more the rule than the exception, particularly in aging societies. Drug-drug interactions are frequently undesirable and may lead to increased toxicity and mortality. Inhibition of transporters is one major mechanism underlying drug-drug interactions. The myriad of potential drug combinations makes it very challenging to predict drug-drug interactions. This Commentary discusses potential advantages and limitations of endogenous compounds for predicting transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions.

  5. Desipramine, substrate for CYP2D6 activity: population pharmacokinetic model and design elements of drug–drug interaction trials

    PubMed Central

    Gueorguieva, Ivelina; Jackson, Kimberley; Wrighton, Steven A; Sinha, Vikram P; Chien, Jenny Y

    2010-01-01

    AIMS To develop a population pharmacokinetic model to describe the pharmacokinetics of desipramine in healthy subjects, after oral administration of a 50 mg dose. Additional objectives were to develop a semi-mechanistic population pharmacokinetic model for desipramine, which allowed simulation of CYP2D6-mediated inhibition, when using desipramine as a probe substrate, and to evaluate certain study design elements, such as duration of desipramine pharmacokinetic sampling, required sample size and optimal pharmacokinetic sampling schedule for intermediate, extensive and ultrarapid metabolizers of CYP2D6 substrates. RESULTS The mean population estimates of the first order absorption rate constant (ka), apparent clearance (CL/F) and apparent volume of distribution at steady state (Vss/F) were 0.15 h−1, 111 l h−1 and 2950 l, respectively. Further, using the proposed semi-mechanistic hepatic intrinsic clearance model with Bayesian inference, mean population desipramine hepatic intrinsic clearance was estimated to be 262 l h−1 with between-subject variability of 84%. d-optimal PK sampling times for intermediate metabolizers were calculated to be approximately 0.25, 24, 75 and 200 h. Similar sampling times were found for ultrarapid and extensive metabolizers except that the second d-optimal sample was earlier at 14 and 19 h, respectively, compared with 24 h for intermediate metabolizers. This difference in sampling times between the three genotypes can be attributed to the different intrinsic clearances and elimination rates. CONCLUSIONS A two compartment population pharmacokinetic model best described desipramine disposition. The semi-mechanistic population model developed is suitable to describe the pharmacokinetic behaviour of desipramine for the dose routinely used in drug–drug interaction (DDI) studies. Based on this meta-analysis of seven trials, a sample size of 21 subjects in cross-over design is appropriate for assessing CYP2D6 interaction with novel

  6. Choice of Initial Antiepileptic Drug for Older Veterans: Possible Pharmacokinetic Drug Interactions With Existing Medications

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Mary Jo V.; VanCott, Anne C.; Steinman, Michael A.; Mortensen, Eric M.; Amuan, Megan E.; Wang, Chen-Pin; Knoefel, Janice E.; Berlowitz, Dan R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Identify clinically-meaningful potential drug-drug interactions with antiepileptic drugs (AED-PDI), the AEDs and co-administered drugs commonly associated with AED-PDI, and characteristics of patients with increased likelihood of AED-PDI exposure. Design Five-year retrospective cohort study of veterans with new-onset epilepsy. Setting National VA and Medicare databases. Participants Veterans age 66 years and older with a new diagnosis of epilepsy between October 1, 1999-September 30, 2004 (N=9,682). Measurements We restricted AED-PDI to clinically-meaningful potential drug interactions identified by prior literature review. AED-PDI were identified using participants' date of initial AED prescription and overlapping concomitant medications. Logistic regression analysis identified factors associated with AED-PDI including demographic characteristics, chronic disease states and diagnostic setting. Results AED-PDI exposure was found in 45.5% (4,406/9,682); phenytoin, a drug with many potential drug interactions, was the most commonly prescribed AED. Cardiovascular drugs, lipid-lowering medications and psychotropic agents were the most commonly co-administered AED-PDI medications. Individuals at higher likelihood of AED-PDI exposure had 1) hypertension (OR=1.46, 99% CI 1.24-1.82), 2) hypercholesterolemia (OR=1.40, 99% CI 1.24-1.57) and 3) were diagnosed in emergency or primary care vs. Neurology settings (emergency OR: 1.30 99% CI=1.08-1.58; primary care OR: 1.29 99% CI 1.12-1.49). Conclusion Exposure to AED-PDI was substantial, but less common in epilepsy patients diagnosed in a neurology setting. Because potential outcomes associated with AED-PDI include stroke and myocardial infarction in a population already at elevated risk, clinicians should closely monitor blood pressure, coagulation, and lipid measures to minimize adverse effects of AED-PDI. Interventions to reduce AED-PDI may improve patient outcomes. PMID:20398114

  7. Predicting the oral pharmacokinetic profiles of multiple-unit (pellet) dosage forms using a modeling and simulation approach coupled with biorelevant dissolution testing: case example diclofenac sodium.

    PubMed

    Kambayashi, Atsushi; Blume, Henning; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this research was to characterize the dissolution profile of a poorly soluble drug, diclofenac, from a commercially available multiple-unit enteric coated dosage form, Diclo-Puren® capsules, and to develop a predictive model for its oral pharmacokinetic profile. The paddle method was used to obtain the dissolution profiles of this dosage form in biorelevant media, with the exposure to simulated gastric conditions being varied in order to simulate the gastric emptying behavior of pellets. A modified Noyes-Whitney theory was subsequently fitted to the dissolution data. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for multiple-unit dosage forms was designed using STELLA® software and coupled with the biorelevant dissolution profiles in order to simulate the plasma concentration profiles of diclofenac from Diclo-Puren® capsule in both the fasted and fed state in humans. Gastric emptying kinetics relevant to multiple-units pellets were incorporated into the PBPK model by setting up a virtual patient population to account for physiological variations in emptying kinetics. Using in vitro biorelevant dissolution coupled with in silico PBPK modeling and simulation it was possible to predict the plasma profile of this multiple-unit formulation of diclofenac after oral administration in both the fasted and fed state. This approach might be useful to predict variability in the plasma profiles for other drugs housed in multiple-unit dosage forms.

  8. Microprocessor-controlled iontophoretic drug delivery of 5-fluorouracil: pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, N S; Shobha Rani, R H

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to fabricate monolithic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) transdermal patch with microprocessor- controlled iontophoretic delivery, to evaluate the pharmacodynamic effects on Dalton's lymphoma ascites (DLA) induced in Balb/c mice, and to study pharmacokinetics in rabbits. The transdermal patches were prepared by solvent casting method; a reprogrammable microprocessor was developed and connected to the patches. DLA cells were injected to the hind limb of Balb/c mice (10 animals/group). In the first group of mice 5-FU was administered i.v. (12 mg/kg). In the second group of mice, transdermal patches (20 mg/patch/animal) were installed and kept for 10 consecutive days, while the third (control) group was kept without any treatment. The tumor diameter was measured every 5th day for 30 days, and the animal survival time and death pattern were studied. The electric current density protocol of 0.5 mA/cm(2) for 30 min was used in the pharmacokinetic study in rabbits. There was a significant reduction in tumor volume in the animals treated with monolithic matrix 5-FU transdermal patch compared to untreated controls and i.v. therapy. Tumor volume of the control animals was 5.8 cm(3) on the 30th day, while in 5-FU with transdermal patch delivery animals it was only 0.23 cm(3) (p <0.05). DLA cells tumor-bearing mice treated with 5-FU with transdermal patch had significantly increased lifespan (ILS). Control animals survived only 21+/-1 days after the tumor inoculation, while i.v. 5-FU and 5-FU patches animals survived 24+/-2.7 days and 39.5+/-1.87 days with ILS of 25.58% and 88.09%, respectively (p <0.01). There was significant sustained release of 5-FU through microprocessor-controlled patches and half-life was significantly higher (p <0.05) compared to the i.v. route. Cytotoxic concentration of 5-FU can be achieved through the transdermal drug delivery and effective therapeutic drug concentration can be maintained up to 24 h, with less toxicity. A new

  9. Pharmacokinetics of toxic chemicals in breast milk: use of PBPK models to predict infant exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Clewell, Rebecca A; Gearhart, Jeffery M

    2002-01-01

    Factors controlling the transfer of potentially toxic chemicals in the breast milk of nursing mothers include both chemical characteristics, such as lipophilicity, and physiologic changes during lactation. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models can aid in the prediction of infant exposure via breast milk. Benefits of these quantitative models include the ability to account for changing maternal physiology and transfer kinetics, as well as the chemical-specific characteristics, in order to produce more accurate estimates of neonatal risk. A recently developed PBPK model for perchlorate and iodide kinetics in the lactating and neonatal rat demonstrates the utility of PBPK modeling in predicting maternal and neonatal distribution of these two compounds. This model incorporates time-dependent changes in physiologic characteristics and includes interactions between iodide and perchlorate that alter the distribution and kinetics of iodide. PMID:12055064

  10. Pharmacokinetic modeling of an induction regimen for in vivo combined testing of novel drugs against pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts.

    PubMed

    Szymanska, Barbara; Wilczynska-Kalak, Urszula; Kang, Min H; Liem, Natalia L M; Carol, Hernan; Boehm, Ingrid; Groepper, Daniel; Reynolds, C Patrick; Stewart, Clinton F; Lock, Richard B

    2012-01-01

    Current regimens for induction therapy of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), or for re-induction post relapse, use a combination of vincristine (VCR), a glucocorticoid, and L-asparaginase (ASP) with or without an anthracycline. With cure rates now approximately 80%, robust pre-clinical models are necessary to prioritize active new drugs for clinical trials in relapsed/refractory patients, and the ability of these models to predict synergy/antagonism with established therapy is an essential attribute. In this study, we report optimization of an induction-type regimen by combining VCR, dexamethasone (DEX) and ASP (VXL) against ALL xenograft models established from patient biopsies in immune-deficient mice. We demonstrate that the VXL combination was synergistic in vitro against leukemia cell lines as well as in vivo against ALL xenografts. In vivo, VXL treatment caused delays in progression of individual xenografts ranging from 22 to >146 days. The median progression delay of xenografts derived from long-term surviving patients was 2-fold greater than that of xenografts derived from patients who died of their disease. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that systemic DEX exposure in mice increased 2-fold when administered in combination with VCR and ASP, consistent with clinical findings, which may contribute to the observed synergy between the 3 drugs. Finally, as proof-of-principle we tested the in vivo efficacy of combining VXL with either the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL/Bcl-w inhibitor, ABT-737, or arsenic trioxide to provide evidence of a robust in vivo platform to prioritize new drugs for clinical trials in children with relapsed/refractory ALL.

  11. Development of a mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model to characterize the thermoregulatory effects of serotonergic drugs in mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xi-Ling; Shen, Hong-Wu; Mager, Donald E; Schmidt, Stephan; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2016-09-01

    We have shown recently that concurrent harmaline, a monoamine oxidase-A inhibitor (MAOI), potentiates serotonin (5-HT) receptor agonist 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT)-induced hyperthermia. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model to characterize and predict the thermoregulatory effects of such serotonergic drugs in mice. Physiological thermoregulation was described by a mechanism-based indirect-response model with adaptive feedback control. Harmaline-induced hypothermia and 5-MeO-DMT-elicited hyperthermia were attributable to the loss of heat through the activation of 5-HT1A receptor and thermogenesis via the stimulation of 5-HT2A receptor, respectively. Thus serotonergic 5-MeO-DMT-induced hyperthermia was readily distinguished from handling/injection stress-provoked hyperthermic effects. This PK/PD model was able to simultaneously describe all experimental data including the impact of drug-metabolizing enzyme status on 5-MeO-DMT and harmaline PK properties, and drug- and stress-induced simple hypo/hyperthermic and complex biphasic effects. Furthermore, the modeling results revealed a 4-fold decrease of apparent SC50 value (1.88-0.496 µmol/L) for 5-MeO-DMT when harmaline was co-administered, providing a quantitative assessment for the impact of concurrent MAOI harmaline on 5-MeO-DMT-induced hyperthermia. In addition, the hyperpyrexia caused by toxic dose combinations of harmaline and 5-MeO-DMT were linked to the increased systemic exposure to harmaline rather than 5-MeO-DMT, although the body temperature profiles were mispredicted by the model. The results indicate that current PK/PD model may be used as a new conceptual framework to define the impact of serotonergic agents and stress factors on thermoregulation.

  12. No Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interaction Between Prasugrel and Vorapaxar Following Multiple-Dose Administration in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Matt S; Kosoglou, Teddy; Statkevich, Paul; Li, Jing; Rotonda, Jennifer; Meehan, Alan G; Cutler, David L

    2017-04-12

    Vorapaxar is a first-in-class antagonist of the protease-activated receptor-1, the primary thrombin receptor on human platelets, which mediates the downstream effects of thrombin in hemostasis and thrombosis. Prasugrel is a platelet inhibitor that acts as a P2Y12 receptor antagonist through an active metabolite, R-138727. This study investigated the interaction of these 2 platelet antagonists when coadministered. This was a randomized, open-label, multiple-dose study in 54 healthy volunteers consisting of a fixed-sequence crossover and a parallel group design. In sequence 1, 36 subjects received prasugrel 60 mg on day 1 and then prasugrel 10 mg once daily on days 2 to 7, followed by vorapaxar 40 mg and prasugrel 10 mg on day 8 and then vorapaxar 2.5 mg and prasugrel 10 mg orally once daily on days 9 to 28. In sequence 2, 18 subjects received vorapaxar 40 mg on day 1 and then vorapaxar 2.5 mg once daily on days 2 to 21. The geometric mean ratios (90% confidence intervals) for AUCτ and Cmax of coadministration/monotherapy for vorapaxar (0.93 ng·h/mL[0.85-1.02 ng·h/mL] and 0.95 ng/mL [0.86-1.05 ng/mL]) and R-138727 (0.91 ng·h/mL [0.85- 0.99 ng·h/mL] and 1.02 ng/mL [0.89-1.17 ng/mL]) were within prespecified bounds, demonstrating the absence of a pharmacokinetic interaction between vorapaxar and prasugrel. There was no specific safety or tolerability risk associated with multiple-dose coadministration of vorapaxar and prasugrel. In conclusion, in this study in healthy volunteers, there was no pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction between vorapaxar and prasugrel. Multiple-dose coadministration of the 2 drugs was generally well tolerated.

  13. Determination of digoxin clearance in Japanese elderly patients for optimization of drug therapy: a population pharmacokinetics analysis using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Miho; Yukawa, Eiji; Suematsu, Fumihiro; Takiguchi, Takako; Ikeda, Hirohito; Aki, Hatsumi; Mimemoto, Masao

    2011-10-01

    Optimal use of digoxin in the elderly population requires information about the drug's pharmacokinetics and the influence of various factors on the drug's disposition. However, because of sampling restrictions, it is often difficult to perform traditional pharmacokinetic studies in elderly patients. This study was conducted to determine the apparent total clearance of digoxin from serum after oral administration (CL/F) and to establish the role of patient characteristics in estimating doses of digoxin for elderly patients (age ≥65 years), using routine therapeutic drug monitoring data. Analyses of the pharmacokinetics of digoxin were conducted using the nonlinear mixed-effects modelling (NONMEM®) software, a computer program designed to analyse pharmacokinetics in study populations by allowing pooling of data. Steady-state data (140 observations) obtained by routine therapeutic drug monitoring following repeated oral administration of digoxin in 94 hospitalized elderly patients (age ≥65 years) were analysed to establish the role of patient characteristics in estimating doses of digoxin for elderly patients. Estimates generated by NONMEM® indicated that digoxin CL/F was influenced by the demographic variables of total bodyweight (TBW), serum creatinine (SCr), age (AGE), presence of congestive heart failure (CHF), concomitant administration of the calcium channel antagonists (calcium channel blockers [CCBs]: verapamil, diltiazem or nifedipine), sex (SEX) and elderly clearance factor (trough serum concentration of digoxin; [C(trough)] θ). The full version of the final NONMEM® model was where CCB is 1 for concomitant administration of a CCB and is 0 otherwise; CHF is 1 for patients with CHF and is 0 otherwise; SEX is 0 for male and is 1 for female; and the elderly clearance factor C(trough)-0.180 is 1 for digoxin C(trough) <1.7 ng/mL. We developed a new model for elderly patient dosing of digoxin with good predictive performance. Clinical application of the

  14. Making Transporter Models for Drug-Drug Interaction Prediction Mobile.

    PubMed

    Ekins, Sean; Clark, Alex M; Wright, Stephen H

    2015-10-01

    The past decade has seen increased numbers of studies publishing ligand-based computational models for drug transporters. Although they generally use small experimental data sets, these models can provide insights into structure-activity relationships for the transporter. In addition, such models have helped to identify new compounds as substrates or inhibitors of transporters of interest. We recently proposed that many transporters are promiscuous and may require profiling of new chemical entities against multiple substrates for a specific transporter. Furthermore, it should be noted that virtually all of the published ligand-based transporter models are only accessible to those involved in creating them and, consequently, are rarely shared effectively. One way to surmount this is to make models shareable or more accessible. The development of mobile apps that can access such models is highlighted here. These apps can be used to predict ligand interactions with transporters using Bayesian algorithms. We used recently published transporter data sets (MATE1, MATE2K, OCT2, OCTN2, ASBT, and NTCP) to build preliminary models in a commercial tool and in open software that can deliver the model in a mobile app. In addition, several transporter data sets extracted from the ChEMBL database were used to illustrate how such public data and models can be shared. Predicting drug-drug interactions for various transporters using computational models is potentially within reach of anyone with an iPhone or iPad. Such tools could help prioritize which substrates should be used for in vivo drug-drug interaction testing and enable open sharing of models.

  15. A pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interaction between rosuvastatin and valsartan in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jin Ah; Lee, Soo-Yun; Kim, Jung-Ryul; Ko, Jae-Wook; Jang, Seong Bok; Nam, Su Youn; Huh, Wooseong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Valsartan, an angiotensin-receptor blocker, and rosuvastatin, a competitive inhibitor of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, are frequently coadministered to treat patients with hypertension and dyslipidemia. The study reported here sought to evaluate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between rosuvastatin and valsartan in healthy Korean subjects. Subjects and methods Thirty healthy male Korean subjects were administered with rosuvastatin (20 mg/day), valsartan (160 mg/day), and both drugs concomitantly for 4 days in a randomized, open-label, multiple-dose, three-treatment, three-period crossover study. Plasma concentrations of rosuvastatin, N-desmethyl rosuvastatin, and valsartan were determined using validated high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Lipid profiles and vital signs (systolic and diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate) were measured for the pharmacodynamic assessment. Results For rosuvastatin, the geometric mean ratios (90% confidence intervals [CIs]) of coadministration to mono-administration were 0.8809 (0.7873−0.9857) for maximum plasma concentration at steady state and 0.9151 (0.8632−0.9701) for area under the concentration–time curve (AUC) over a dosing interval at steady state. For valsartan, the geometric mean ratios (90% CIs) of those were 0.9300 (0.7946−1.0884) and 1.0072 (0.8893−1.1406), respectively. There were no significant differences in the metabolic ratio of N-desmethyl rosuvastatin AUC to rosuvastatin AUC between coadministration and rosuvastatin alone. No interaction was found in terms of systolic or diastolic blood pressure or lipid profiles. Combined treatment with valsartan and rosuvastatin was generally well tolerated without serious adverse events. Conclusion The pharmacokinetic profiles of rosuvastatin and valsartan in combination were comparable with those of rosuvastatin and valsartan administered individually, suggesting that their

  16. Pharmacokinetic interactions between telaprevir and antiretroviral drugs in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with advanced liver fibrosis and prior HCV non-responders.

    PubMed

    Milazzo, Laura; Cattaneo, Dario; Calvi, Elisa; Gervasoni, Cristina; Mazzali, Cristina; Ronzi, Paola; Peri, Anna Maria; Ridolfo, Anna Lisa; D'Avolio, Antonio; Antinori, Spinello

    2015-05-01

    Complex drug-drug interactions have been reported with concurrent administration of telaprevir (TVR) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (PIs), leading to relevant limitations of the therapeutic options for patients coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV. However, little is known about the pharmacokinetics and drug interactions between TVR and antiretrovirals in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with advanced liver fibrosis. Here we report the pharmacokinetics of TVR and antiretrovirals in a cohort of HIV/HCV genotype 1-coinfected patients with advanced liver fibrosis treated with TVR-based triple anti-HCV therapy. No significant differences were observed in the pharmacokinetics of atazanavir, amprenavir or tenofovir at baseline and at Day 15 of TVR, whereas the AUC0-4h of darunavir was 36% lower in the presence of TVR (AUC0-4h 15007ngh/mL and 9563ngh/mL at baseline and at Day 15 of TVR administration, respectively). Noteworthy, the AUC0-4h, Cmin and Cmax of raltegravir were reduced by 61%, 50% and 64%, respectively. However, none of the patient's plasma levels of tenofovir, atazanavir, amprenavir or raltegravir declined below their minimum effective concentrations even in association with TVR, and no HIV treatment failure occurred. A non-significant trend for lower TVR exposure was seen in patients concomitantly given amprenavir versus those given atazanavir (AUC0-4h, 9840ngh/mL and 13345ngh/mL, respectively). In conclusion, this study highlighted the feasibility of maintaining the current antiretroviral regimen in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients, even when significant interactions with TVR are predictable, whenever a change of HIV PIs is not deemed appropriate.

  17. A Comparative Pharmacokinetics Study of the Anti-Parkinsonian Drug Pramipexole.

    PubMed

    Putri, Ratih S I; Setiawati, Effi; Aziswan, Syifa A; Ong, Fenny; Tjandrawinata, Raymond R; Susanto, Liana W

    2016-11-18

    The present study aimed to compare pharmacokinetic parameters of two pramipexole 0.25 mg formulations in order to show bioequivalence. The study was conducted in a randomized, open-label, two-period, two-sequence, and crossover design, involving 23 healthy volunteers. One of the 0.25 mg formulations of pramipexole evaluated in the study was manufactured by PT Dexa Medica, Palembang, Indonesia, the other, used as the reference, by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH & Co. KG, Ingelheim am Rhein, Germany. All eligible subjects were required to fast before each drug administration period, which was separated by a one-week washout period. Pramipexole concentrations in plasma were assayed using a validated ultra performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) detector. The evaluated pharmacokinetic parameters included the area under the plasma concentration curve from time zero to the last observed measurable concentration (AUC0-t), the area under the plasma concentration curve extrapolated to infinite time (AUC0-∞), the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), the time to reach Cmax (tmax), and the plasma concentration half-life (t1/2). To evaluate the bioequivalence of those two pramipexole formulations, 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for geometric mean ratios of both formulations were calculated for AUC and Cmax parameters, while tmax and t1/2 differences were analyzed on the non-transformed data using Wilcoxon matched-pairs and a Student's paired t-test, respectively. The 90% CIs for the geometric mean ratios of the two pramipexole formulations were 95.89% (90.73%-101.34%), 95.53% (89.75%-101.68%), and 92.11% (84.35%-100.58%) for AUC0-t, AUC0-∞, and Cmax, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences for tmax and t1/2 between the two pramipexole formulations. It is concluded that two pramipexole formulations in this study were bioequivalent.

  18. A Comparative Pharmacokinetics Study of the Anti-Parkinsonian Drug Pramipexole

    PubMed Central

    Putri, Ratih S. I.; Setiawati, Effi; Aziswan, Syifa A.; Ong, Fenny; Tjandrawinata, Raymond R.; Susanto, Liana W.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare pharmacokinetic parameters of two pramipexole 0.25 mg formulations in order to show bioequivalence. The study was conducted in a randomized, open-label, two-period, two-sequence, and crossover design, involving 23 healthy volunteers. One of the 0.25 mg formulations of pramipexole evaluated in the study was manufactured by PT Dexa Medica, Palembang, Indonesia, the other, used as the reference, by Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH & Co. KG, Ingelheim am Rhein, Germany. All eligible subjects were required to fast before each drug administration period, which was separated by a one-week washout period. Pramipexole concentrations in plasma were assayed using a validated ultra performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) detector. The evaluated pharmacokinetic parameters included the area under the plasma concentration curve from time zero to the last observed measurable concentration (AUC0-t), the area under the plasma concentration curve extrapolated to infinite time (AUC0-∞), the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), the time to reach Cmax (tmax), and the plasma concentration half-life (t1/2). To evaluate the bioequivalence of those two pramipexole formulations, 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for geometric mean ratios of both formulations were calculated for AUC and Cmax parameters, while tmax and t1/2 differences were analyzed on the non-transformed data using Wilcoxon matched-pairs and a Student’s paired t-test, respectively. The 90% CIs for the geometric mean ratios of the two pramipexole formulations were 95.89% (90.73%–101.34%), 95.53% (89.75%–101.68%), and 92.11% (84.35%–100.58%) for AUC0-t, AUC0-∞, and Cmax, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences for tmax and t1/2 between the two pramipexole formulations. It is concluded that two pramipexole formulations in this study were bioequivalent. PMID:27869754

  19. Coffee-Antihypertensive Drug Interaction: A Hemodynamic and Pharmacokinetic Study With Felodipine.

    PubMed

    Bailey, David G; Dresser, George K; Urquhart, Brad L; Freeman, David J; Arnold, John Malcolm

    2016-12-01

    A period of abstinence from coffee to permit caffeine elimination appears to enable increased blood pressure on subsequent exposure. We hypothesized that this would offset the antihypertensive effect of the dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker felodipine. A randomized, single-dose, crossover study assessed hemodynamic and pharmacokinetic effects following 2 days without coffee and caffeine-containing foods. Consistently brewed black coffee (2×300ml), felodipine maximum recommended dose (10mg), and coffee plus felodipine were tested in middle-aged normotensive subjects. Pretreatment plasma caffeine concentrations were unquantifiable. After coffee, blood pressure changes (mm Hg) averaged over study hours 1-4 were increased for brachial systolic (7.6, P < 0.001) and diastolic (4.9, P < 0.001) and aortic systolic (7.4, P < 0.001), pulse (3.0, P < 0.05) and augmentation (1.4, P < 0.05) relative to baseline. After coffee plus felodipine, they were higher for brachial systolic (4.0, P < 0.05) and diastolic (3.9, P < 0.001) and aortic systolic (4.6, P < 0.05) compared to felodipine alone. The pressor effects of coffee and its modulation by felodipine were variable among individuals. Coffee containing caffeine (127mg) caused maximum pressor effect. Caffeine and felodipine pharmacokinetics were similar for coffee and felodipine given alone or in combination indicating an interaction having a pharmacodynamic basis. Plasma felodipine concentration-diastolic blood pressure reduction relationship shifted with coffee such that doubling the felodipine concentration would eliminate the pressor effect. However, this may increase the risk of adverse drug events particularly during the timeframe without coffee. Intermittent coffee ingestion might complicate hypertension diagnosis and management for many individuals.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of the anti-androgenic drug flutamide in healthy stallions.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Francisco Javier; Serrano-Rodriguez, Juan Manuel; Buzon-Cuevas, Antonio; Perez-Ecija, Alejandro

    2017-06-01

    Alternatives to surgical castration are necessary for controlling the sexual behaviour of stallions with breeding potential in training and competition. Flutamide is a potent selective non-steroidal androgen receptor competitive antagonist that has been used in human beings as an anti-androgenic drug. In this study, the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of flutamide and its main active metabolite, 2-hydroflutamide, were determined in seven healthy mature stallions. Single doses of flutamide (1mg/kg intravenously, 1mg/kg orally in fasted horses, 5mg/kg orally in fasted horses and 5mg/kg orally in fed horses) were administered randomly at intervals of 2 weeks. All horses had full physical examinations and blood samples were collected for pharmacokinetics, complete blood counts and biochemistry before and after drug administration. Administration of flutamide did not result in any abnormalities on physical examination or in blood parameters. After intravenous administration of flutamide, the volume of distribution was 0.83L/kg and clearance was 1.20L/h/kg. Flutamide and its metabolite had high protein binding values (93-97%). After oral administration, flutamide was rapidly transformed to 2-hydroxyflutamide, with areas under the concentration-time curve ratios of metabolite:drug ∼7. Oral bioavailability was 6.63% after 1mg/kg flutamide in fasted horses, 6.50% after 5mg/kg flutamide in fasted horses and 6.95% after 5mg/kg in fed horses. Half lives of flutamide were close to 1h after intravenous administration and 2h after oral administration. Half lives of 2-hydroxyflutamide were 4.79-6.84h for all routes and doses. After oral administration, oral flutamide reached plasma concentrations that could be effective as an anti-androgenic agent in horses, but further studies are needed to determine whether flutamide has clinical value as an alternative to castration for controlling sexual behaviour in stallions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hypericum perforatum: pharmacokinetic, mechanism of action, tolerability, and clinical drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Russo, Emilio; Scicchitano, Francesca; Whalley, Benjamin J; Mazzitello, Carmela; Ciriaco, Miriam; Esposito, Stefania; Patanè, Marinella; Upton, Roy; Pugliese, Michela; Chimirri, Serafina; Mammì, Maria; Palleria, Caterina; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2014-05-01

    Hypericum perforatum (HP) belongs to the Hypericaceae family and is one of the oldest used and most extensively investigated medicinal herbs. The medicinal form comprises the leaves and flowering tops of which the primary ingredients of interest are naphthodianthrones, xanthones, flavonoids, phloroglucinols (e.g. hyperforin), and hypericin. Although several constituents elicit pharmacological effects that are consistent with HP's antidepressant activity, no single mechanism of action underlying these effects has thus far been found. Various clinical trials have shown that HP has a comparable antidepressant efficacy as some currently used antidepressant drugs in the treatment of mild/moderate depression. Interestingly, low-hyperforin-content preparations are effective in the treatment of depression. Moreover, HP is also used to treat certain forms of anxiety. However, HP can induce various cytochrome P450s isozymes and/or P-glycoprotein, of which many drugs are substrates and which are the main origin of HP-drug interactions. Here, we analyse the existing evidence describing the clinical consequence of HP-drug interactions. Although some of the reported interactions are based on findings from in vitro studies, the clinical importance of which remain to be demonstrated, others are based on case reports where causality can, in some cases, be determined to reveal clinically significant interactions that suggest caution, consideration, and disclosure of potential interactions prior to informed use of HP.

  2. Impact of target-mediated drug disposition on Linagliptin pharmacokinetics and DPP-4 inhibition in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Retlich, Silke; Duval, Vincent; Graefe-Mody, Ulrike; Jaehde, Ulrich; Staab, Alexander

    2010-08-01

    The pharmacokinetics of the novel dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitor linagliptin is nonlinear. Based on in vitro experiments, concentration-dependent binding to DPP-4 is the most likely cause for the nonlinearity. Population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling was performed using linagliptin plasma concentrations and plasma DPP-4 activities from 2 phase 2a studies. In these studies, type 2 diabetic patients received either 1, 2.5, 5, or 10 mg of linagliptin once daily over 12 days (study 1) or 2.5, 5, or 10 mg of linagliptin once daily over 28 days (study 2). The modeling results supported the hypothesis that linagliptin exhibits target-mediated drug disposition. The linagliptin plasma concentrations were best described by a 2-compartment model including concentration-dependent protein binding in the central and peripheral compartment. The plasma DPP-4 activity was included in the model in a semi-mechanistic way by relating it to the model-calculated plasma DPP-4 occupancy with linagliptin. The target binding has a major impact on linagliptin pharmacokinetics. Although unbound linagliptin is cleared efficiently (CL/F 220 L/h), the concentration-dependent binding is responsible for the long terminal half-life (approximatelly 120 hours) of linagliptin and its nonlinear pharmacokinetics. The model allowed a comprehensive understanding of the impact of target-mediated drug disposition and provides a useful tool to support clinical development.

  3. Rifampicin and anti-hypertensive drugs in chronic kidney disease: Pharmacokinetic interactions and their clinical impact

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, A.; Agarwal, S. K.; Kaleekal, T.; Gupta, Y. K.

    2016-01-01

    Patients on dialysis have an increased incidence of tuberculosis (TB). Rifampicin, a first-line antitubercular therapy (ATT) drug, is a potent inducer of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP). There is potential for pharmacokinetic interaction between rifampicin and anti-hypertensives that are CYP substrates: amlodipine and metoprolol. Therefore, hypertensive patients receiving rifampicin-based ATT are at risk for worsening of hypertension. However, this hypothesis has not yet been systematically studied. In this prospective study, hypertensive CKD 5D patients with TB were followed after rifampicin initiation. Blood pressure (BP) was ≤140/90 mmHg with stable anti-HT requirement at inclusion. Serum amlodipine, metoprolol, and prazosin levels were estimated by high-performance liquid chromatography at baseline and 3, 7, 10, and 14 days after rifampicin initiation. BP and anti-HT requirement were monitored for 2 weeks or until stabilization. All 24 patients in the study had worsening of hypertension after rifampicin and 83.3% required increase in drugs to maintain BP <140/90 mmHg. Serial amlodipine levels were estimated in 16 patients; metoprolol and prazosin in four patients each. Drug levels declined by >50% in all patients and became undetectable in 50-75%. Drug requirement increased from 4.5 ± 3.6 to 8.5 ± 6.4 units (P < 0.0001). Mean time to first increase in dose was 6.5 ± 3.6 days. Eleven (46%) patients experienced a hypertensive crisis at 9.1 ± 3.8 days. Three of them had a hypertensive emergency with acute pulmonary edema. In two patients, rifampicin had to be discontinued to achieve BP control. In conclusion, rifampicin caused a significant decrease in blood levels of commonly used anti hypertensives. This decrease in levels correlated well with worsening of hypertension. Thus, we suggest very close BP monitoring in CKD patients after rifampicin initiation. PMID:27795624

  4. Pharmacokinetics, Metabolism, and Excretion of the Antiviral Drug Arbidol in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Pan; Zhong, Dafang; Yu, Kate; Zhang, Yifan; Wang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Arbidol is a broad-spectrum antiviral drug that is used clinically to treat influenza. In this study, the pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and excretion of arbidol were investigated in healthy male Chinese volunteers after a single oral administration of 200 mg of arbidol hydrochloride. A total of 33 arbidol metabolites were identified in human plasma, urine, and feces. The principal biotransformation pathways included sulfoxidation, dimethylamine N-demethylation, glucuronidation, and sulfate conjugation. The major drug-related component in the plasma was sulfinylarbidol (M6-1), followed by unmetabolized arbidol, N-demethylsulfinylarbidol (M5), and sulfonylarbidol (M8). The exposures of M5, M6-1, and M8, as determined by the metabolite-to-parent area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to t (AUC0-t) ratio, were 0.9 ± 0.3, 11.5 ± 3.6, and 0.5 ± 0.2, respectively. In human urine, glucuronide and sulfate conjugates were detected as the major metabolites, accounting for 6.3% of the dose excreted within 0 to 96 h after drug administration. The fecal specimens mainly contained the unchanged arbidol, accounting for 32.4% of the dose. Microsomal incubation experiments demonstrated that the liver and intestines were the major organs that metabolize arbidol in humans. CYP3A4 was the major isoform involved in arbidol metabolism, whereas the other P450s and flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) played minor roles. These results indicated possible drug interactions between arbidol and CYP3A4 inhibitors and inducers. Further investigations are needed to understand the importance of M6-1 in the efficacy and safety of arbidol, because of its high plasma exposure and long elimination half-life (25.0 h). PMID:23357765

  5. Improvement of pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines pharmacokinetic properties: nanosystem approaches for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vignaroli, Giulia; Calandro, Pierpaolo; Zamperini, Claudio; Coniglio, Federica; Iovenitti, Giulia; Tavanti, Matteo; Colecchia, David; Dreassi, Elena; Valoti, Massimo; Schenone, Silvia; Chiariello, Mario; Botta, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines are a class of compounds with a good activity against several cancer cell lines. Despite the promising anticancer activity, these molecules showed a poor aqueous solubility. This issue could threat the future development of pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines as clinical drug candidates. With the aim of improving their solubility profile and consequently their pharmacokinetic properties, we have chosen four compounds (1–4) on the base of their anti-neuroblastoma activity and we have developed albumin nanoparticles and liposomes for the selected candidates. Albumin nanoparticles and liposomes were prepared and characterized regarding size and ζ-potential distribution, polidispersity index, entrapment efficiency and activity against SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. The most promising nanosystem, namely LP-2, was chosen to perform further studies: confocal microscopy, stability and drug release in physiological conditions, and biodistribution. Altogether, the obtained data strongly indicate that the encapsulation of pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines in liposomes represent an effective method to overcome the poor water solubility. PMID:26898318

  6. Safety and pharmacokinetics of escalating daily doses of the antituberculosis drug rifapentine in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dooley, K E; Bliven-Sizemore, E E; Weiner, M; Lu, Y; Nuermberger, E L; Hubbard, W C; Fuchs, E J; Melia, M T; Burman, W J; Dorman, S E

    2012-05-01

    Rifapentine (RP T) is an antituberculosis drug that may shorten treatment duration when substituted for rifampin (RI F).The maximal tolerated daily dose of RP T and its potential for cytochrome 3A4 induction and autoinduction at clinically relevant doses are unknown. In this phase I, dose-escalation study among healthy volunteers, daily doses as high asa prespecified maximum of 20 mg/kg/day were well tolerated. Steady-state RP T concentrations increased with dose from 5 to 15 mg/kg, but area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AU C0–24) and maximum concentration (Cmax)were similar in the 15- and 20-mg/kg cohorts. Although RP T pharmacokinetics (PK) appeared to be time-dependent,accumulation occurred with daily dosing. The mean AU C0–12 of oral midazolam (MDZ), a cytochrome 3A (CYP 3A) probe drug, was reduced by 93% with the coadministration of RPT and by 74% with the coadministration of RIF (P < 0.01).Changes in the oral clearance of MDZ did not vary by RP T dose. In conclusion, RP T was tolerated at doses as high as20 mg/kg/day, its PK were less than dose-proportional, and its CYP 3A induction was robust.

  7. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Escalating Daily Doses of the Antituberculosis Drug Rifapentine in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, KE; Bliven-Sizemore, EE; Weiner, M; Lu, Y; Nuermberger, EL; Hubbard, WC; Fuchs, EJ; Melia, MT; Burman, WJ; Dorman, SE

    2013-01-01

    Rifapentine (RPT) is an antituberculosis drug that may shorten treatment duration when substituted for rifampin (RIF). The maximal tolerated daily dose of RPT and its potential for cytochrome 3A4 induction and autoinduction at clinically relevant doses are unknown. In this phase I, dose-escalation study among healthy volunteers, daily doses as high as a prespecified maximum of 20 mg/kg/day were well tolerated. Steady-state RPT concentrations increased with dose from 5 to 15 mg/kg, but area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC0–24) and maximum concentration (Cmax) were similar in the 15- and 20-mg/kg cohorts. Although RPT pharmacokinetics (PK) appeared to be time-dependent, accumulation occurred with daily dosing. The mean AUC0–12 of oral midazolam (MDZ), a cytochrome 3A (CYP3A) probe drug, was reduced by 93% with the coadministration of RPT and by 74% with the coadministration of RIF (P < 0.01). Changes in the oral clearance of MDZ did not vary by RPT dose. In conclusion, RPT was tolerated at doses as high as 20 mg/kg/day, its PK were less than dose-proportional, and its CYP3A induction was robust. PMID:22472995

  8. HPLC Determination of Fexofenadine in Human Plasma For Therapeutic Drug Monitoring and Pharmacokinetic Studies.

    PubMed

    Helmy, S A; El Bedaiwy, H M

    2016-07-01

    A simple and sensitive method was developed for fexofenadine determination in human plasma by liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Satisfactory separation was achieved on a Hypersil® BDS C18 column (250 × 4.6 mm, 5μm) using a mobile phase comprising 20 mm sodium dihydrogen phosphate-2 hydrate (pH adjusted to 3 with phosphoric acid)-acetonitrile at a ratio of 52:48, v/v. The elution was isocratic at ambient temperature with a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The UV detector was set at 215 nm for the drug and 330 nm for the internal standared (tinidazole). The total time for a chromatographic separation was ~6.5 min. Linearity was demonstrated over the concentration range 0.01-4 μg/mL. The observed within- and between-day assay precision ranged from 0.346 to 13.6%; accuracy varied between 100.4 and 111.2%. This method was successfully applied for therapeutic drug monitoring in patients treated with clinical doses of fexofenadine and for pharmacokinetic studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Hepatocellular necrosis, fibrosis and microsomal activity determine the hepatic pharmacokinetics of basic drugs in right-heart-failure-induced liver damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Robertson, Thomas A; Zhang, Qian; Fletcher, Linda M; Crawford, Darrell H G; Weiss, Michael; Roberts, Michael S

    2012-06-01

    To explore how liver damage arising from cardio-hepatic syndromes in RHF affect the hepatic pharmacokinetics of basic drugs. The hepatic pharmacokinetics of five selected basic drugs with different physicochemical properties were studied in IPRL from control rats and rats with RHF. Hepatic pharmacokinetic modelling was performed with a two-phase physiologically-based organ pharmacokinetic model with the vascular space and dispersion evaluated with the MID technique. The liver damage arising from RHF was assessed by changes in liver biochemistry and histopathology. The expression of various CYP isoforms was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR analysis. Four of the five basic drugs had a significantly lower E in RHF rat livers compared to the control rat livers. Hepatic pharmacokinetic analysis showed that both the CL int and PS were significantly decreased in the RHF rat livers. Stepwise regression analysis showed that the alterations in the pharmacokinetic parameters (E, CL int and PS) can be correlated to the observed histopathological changes (NI, CYP concentration and FI) as well as to the lipophilicity of the basic drugs (logP app). Serious hepatocellular necrosis and fibrosis induced by RHF affects both hepatic microsomal activity and hepatocyte wall permeability, leading to significant impairment in the hepatic pharmacokinetics of basic drugs.

  10. Pharmacokinetics & Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrew S.; Salpekar, Jay A.

    2009-01-01

    Medications administered in clinical practice obtain their therapeutic effect only to the extent that the drug is present in the appropriate concentration at the desired site. To achieve this goal, the prescribing clinician must be aware of how a drug may interact with the physiology of the patient. Pharmacokinetics is the study of this process…

  11. Pharmacokinetics & Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrew S.; Salpekar, Jay A.

    2009-01-01

    Medications administered in clinical practice obtain their therapeutic effect only to the extent that the drug is present in the appropriate concentration at the desired site. To achieve this goal, the prescribing clinician must be aware of how a drug may interact with the physiology of the patient. Pharmacokinetics is the study of this process…

  12. Impact of drug conjugation on pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of anti-STEAP1 antibody-drug conjugates in rats.

    PubMed

    Boswell, C Andrew; Mundo, Eduardo E; Zhang, Crystal; Bumbaca, Daniela; Valle, Nicole R; Kozak, Katherine R; Fourie, Aimee; Chuh, Josefa; Koppada, Neelima; Saad, Ola; Gill, Herman; Shen, Ben-Quan; Rubinfeld, Bonnee; Tibbitts, Jay; Kaur, Surinder; Theil, Frank-Peter; Fielder, Paul J; Khawli, Leslie A; Lin, Kedan

    2011-10-19

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are designed to combine the exquisite specificity of antibodies to target tumor antigens with the cytotoxic potency of chemotherapeutic drugs. In addition to the general chemical stability of the linker, a thorough understanding of the relationship between ADC composition and biological disposition is necessary to ensure that the therapeutic window is not compromised by altered pharmacokinetics (PK), tissue distribution, and/or potential organ toxicity. The six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of prostate 1 (STEAP1) is being pursued as a tumor antigen target. To assess the role of ADC composition in PK, we evaluated plasma and tissue PK profiles in rats, following a single dose, of a humanized anti-STEAP1 IgG1 antibody, a thio-anti-STEAP1 (ThioMab) variant, and two corresponding thioether-linked monomethylauristatin E (MMAE) drug conjugates modified through interchain disulfide cysteine residues (ADC) and engineered cysteines (TDC), respectively. Plasma PK of total antibody measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed ∼45% faster clearance for the ADC relative to the parent antibody, but no apparent difference in clearance between the TDC and unconjugated parent ThioMab. Total antibody clearances of the two unconjugated antibodies were similar, suggesting minimal effects on PK from cysteine mutation. An ELISA specific for MMAE-conjugated antibody indicated that the ADC cleared more rapidly than the TDC, but total antibody ELISA showed comparable clearance for the two drug conjugates. Furthermore, consistent with relative drug load, the ADC had a greater magnitude of drug deconjugation than the TDC in terms of free plasma MMAE levels. Antibody conjugation had a noticeable, albeit minor, impact on tissue distribution with a general trend toward increased hepatic uptake and reduced levels in other highly vascularized organs. Liver uptakes of ADC and TDC at 5 days postinjection were 2-fold and 1.3-fold higher

  13. Pharmacokinetics of drugs in adult living donor liver transplant patients: regulatory factors and observations based on studies in animals and humans.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Zhao, Yang; Humar, Abhinav; Tevar, Amit D; Hughes, Christopher; Venkataramanan, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Limited information is available on the pharmacokinetics of drugs in the donors and recipients following adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Given that both the donors and recipients receive multiple drug therapies, it is important to assess the pharmacokinetics of drugs used in these patients. Pathophysiological changes that occur post-surgery and regulatory factors that may influence pharmacokinetics of drugs, especially hepatic drug metabolism and transport in both LDLT donors and the recipients are discussed. Pharmacokinetic data in animals with partial hepatectomy are presented. Clinical pharmacokinetic data of certain drugs in LDLT recipients are further reviewed. It takes up to six months for the liver volume to return to normal after LDLT surgery. In the LDLT recipients, drug exposure generally is higher with lower clearance during early period post-transplant; lower initial dosages of immunosuppressants are used than deceased donor liver transplant recipients during the first six months post-transplantation. In animals, the activities of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters are known to be altered differentially during liver regeneration. Future studies on the actual hepatic function with reference to drug metabolism, drug transport, and biliary secretion in both LDLT donors and recipients are required.

  14. The pharmacokinetics of JS-38, a novel antineoplastic drug, in rats.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hong Zha; Fang, Yu; Li, Ying; Fan, Ting-Ting; Qin, Yan; Liu, Quan-Hai

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the pre-clinical pharmacokinetics of JS-38(C22H1404N2S2F6, MW: 548), a study was conducted in Wistar rats (3 female, 2 male: 200-250 g about 6 or 7 months). The concentration-time curve of JS-38 in rats demonstrated the pharmacokinetic (PK) characteristics of a two-compartmental model. The area under the concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUC(0-infinity)) for the low, middle and high dosage (i.e., 20, 50 and 125 mg x kg(-1)) amounted to 46.850 +/- 19.946, 161.101 +/- 58.877 and 312.565 +/- 187.273 mg/L x h respectively; a positive correlation was demonstrated between the AUC(0-infinity). and the dosages in question (r = 0.99). The average time to reach maximum concentration (Tmax) was 3.( RSD: 20.4% and the half-life (t(1/2)) was 11.4 h( RSD: 8.8% P > 0.05. For the low, middle and high dosage, the maximum concentration (Cmax) was 4.882, 11.248, and 13.431 microg x mL(-1) respectively. After the administration of JS-38, except for the brain and spinal marrow, the drug distribution in the different body tissues varied, in particular in the liver, intestine and thyroid gland. A significant distribution of JS-38 was detected in cancerous tissues, and its concentrations demonstrated a tendency increase over time. There was a certain degree of distribution in the bone marrow. The urine samples showed that JS-38 nearly was practically not eliminated in its original form. The amount eliminated after 72h via the bile was only 1.03 +/- 0.1% of the administered dose. In the rat model, most of the JS-38 in its original form (53.58 +/- 22.28%) was excreted via the feces. When the intragastric administration of doses of 20, 50 and 125 mg x kg(-1) was compared with i.v. administered JS-38 (1 mg x kg(-1)), the absolute bioavailability amounted to 22.2 +/- 9.5%, 30.4 +/- 14.5% and 23.6 +/- 11.3% respectively. It was found that this compound is well absorbed in to the system and that it shows favorable PK properties. The outcome of this early pre

  15. Pharmacokinetics prediction and drugability assessment of diphenylheptanoids from turmeric (Curcuma longa L).

    PubMed

    Balaji, S; Chempakam, B

    2009-03-01

    Cheminformatics approaches are currently not employed in any of the spices to study the medicinal properties traditionally attributed to them. The aim of this study is to find the most efficacious molecule which do not have toxic effects but at the same time have desired pharmacokinetic profile. In the present study of the class 'diphenylheptanoids' from turmeric, cheminformatics methods were employed to predict properties such as physicochemical properties, Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Toxicity (mutagenicity, rodent carcinogenicity and human hepatotoxicity). These studies confirmed that curcumin and its derivatives cause dose-dependent hepatotoxicity. The results of these studies indicate that, in contrast to curcumin, few other compounds in turmeric such as compounds (8) and (9) [refer text], exhibit better activities and are drugable and do not have any side-effects.

  16. A simplified PBPK modeling approach for prediction of pharmacokinetics of four primarily renally excreted and CYP3A metabolized compounds during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Xia, Binfeng; Heimbach, Tycho; Gollen, Rakesh; Nanavati, Charvi; He, Handan

    2013-10-01

    During pregnancy, a drug's pharmacokinetics may be altered and hence anticipation of potential systemic exposure changes is highly desirable. Physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) models have recently been used to influence clinical trial design or to facilitate regulatory interactions. Ideally, whole-body PBPK models can be used to predict a drug's systemic exposure in pregnant women based on major physiological changes which can impact drug clearance (i.e., in the kidney and liver) and distribution (i.e., adipose and fetoplacental unit). We described a simple and readily implementable multitissue/organ whole-body PBPK model with key pregnancy-related physiological parameters to characterize the PK of reference drugs (metformin, digoxin, midazolam, and emtricitabine) in pregnant women compared with the PK in nonpregnant or postpartum (PP) women. Physiological data related to changes in maternal body weight, tissue volume, cardiac output, renal function, blood flows, and cytochrome P450 activity were collected from the literature and incorporated into the structural PBPK model that describes HV or PP women PK data. Subsequently, the changes in exposure (area under the curve (AUC) and maximum concentration (C max)) in pregnant women were simulated. Model-simulated PK profiles were overall in agreement with observed data. The prediction fold error for C max and AUC ratio (pregnant vs. nonpregnant) was less than 1.3-fold, indicating that the pregnant PBPK model is useful. The utilization of this simplified model in drug development may aid in designing clinical studies to identify potential exposure changes in pregnant women a priori for compounds which are mainly eliminated renally or metabolized by CYP3A4.

  17. Potentials of polymeric nanoparticle as drug carrier for cancer therapy: with a special reference to pharmacokinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Biswajit; Das, Surajit; Chakraborty, Samrat; Satapathy, Bhabani Sankar; Das, Pranab Jyoti; Mondal, Laboni; Hossain, Chowdhury Mobaswar; Dey, Niladri Shekhar; Chaudhury, Anumita

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials have made a significant impact on cancer therapeutics and an emergence of polymeric nanoparticle provides a unique platform for delivery of drug molecules of diverse nature. Nanoparticles can be targeted at the tumor cells due to enhanced permeability and retention effect. Moreover, nanoparticles can be grafted by various ligands on their surface to target the specific receptors overexpressed by cancer cells or angiogenic endothelial cells. These approaches ultimately result in longer circulation half-lives, improved drug pharmacokinetics, reduced side effects of therapeutically active substances and overcoming cancer chemo-resistance thereby enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of the treatment. This review article summarizes the recent efforts in cancer nanochemotherapeutics using polymeric nanoparticles with a special reference to their pharmacokinetic and biodistribution profiles, their role in reversing multidrug resistance in cancer and strategies of tumor targeting with them, along with the challenges in the field.

  18. GLP principles and their role in supporting pharmacokinetic and residue depletion studies for drug registration and licensing.

    PubMed

    Croubels, Siska; De Backer, Patrick; Devreese, Mathias

    2016-05-01

    Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) is a quality system concerned with the organizational process and the conditions under which non-clinical health and environmental safety studies are planned, performed, monitored, recorded, archived, and reported. This paper focuses on the GLP principles applicable for veterinary drug registration and licensing purposes. First, a general overview of the GLP requirements is given, followed by a more specific comparison and discussion of the analytical method validation parameters and acceptance criteria of different international guidelines applied in the context of veterinary drug pharmacokinetic and residue depletion studies. Finally, some needs with respect to method validation and new developments in pharmacokinetic and residue depletion studies are highlighted. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. A new goldfish model to evaluate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects of drugs used for motion sickness in different gravity loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathers, Claire M.; Mukai, Chiaki; Smith, Cedric M.; Schraeder, Paul L.

    2001-08-01

    This paper proposes a new goldfish model to predict pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic effects of drugs used to treat motion sickness administered in differing gravity loads. The assumption of these experiments is that the vestibular system is dominant in producing motion sickness and that the visual system is secondary or of small import in the production of motion sickness. Studies will evaluate the parameter of gravity and the contribution of vision to the role of the neurovestibular system in the initiation of motion sickness with and without pharmacologic agents. Promethazine will be studied first. A comparison of data obtained in different groups of goldfish will be done (normal vs. acutely and chronically bilaterally blinded vs. sham operated). Some fish will be bilaterally blinded 10 months prior to initiation of the experiment (designated the chronically bilaterally blinded group of goldfish) to evaluate the neuroplasticity of the nervous system and the associated return of neurovestibular function. Data will be obtained under differing gravity loads with and without a pharmacological agent for motion sickness. Experiments will differentiate pharmacological effects on vision vs. neurovestibular input to motion sickness. Comparison of data obtained in the normal fish and in acutely and chronically bilaterally blinded fish with those obtained in fish with intact and denervated otoliths will differentiate if the visual or neurovestibular system is dominant in response to altered gravity and/or drugs. Experiments will contribute to validation of the goldfish as a model for humans since plasticity of the central nervous system allows astronauts to adapt to the altered visual stimulus conditions of 0-g. Space motion sickness may occur until such an adaptation is achieved.

  20. High prevalence of potential drug interactions affecting mycophenolic acid pharmacokinetics in nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Jaklič, Alenka; Collins, Carol J.; Mrhar, Aleš; Sorror, Mohamed L.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Locatelli, Igor; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Mycophenolic acid (MPA) exposure is associated with clinical outcomes in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. Various drug interaction studies, predominantly in healthy volunteers or solid organ transplant recipients, have identified medications which impact MPA pharmacokinetics. Recipients of nonmyeloablative HCT, however, have an increased burden of comorbidities, potentially increasing the number of concomitant medications and potential drug interactions (PDI) affecting MPA exposure. Thus, we sought to be the first to characterize these PDI in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Materials and methods: We compiled PDI affecting MPA pharmacokinetics and characterized the prevalence of PDI in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. A comprehensive literature evaluation of four databases and PubMed was conducted to identify medications with PDI affecting MPA pharmacokinetics. Subsequently, a retrospective medication review was conducted to characterize the cumulative PDI burden, defined as the number of PDI for an individual patient over the first 21 days after allogeneic graft infusion, in 84 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Results: Of the 187 concomitant medications, 11 (5.9%) had a PDI affecting MPA pharmacokinetics. 87% of 84 patients had one PDI, with a median cumulative PDI burden of 2 (range 0 – 4). The most common PDI, in descending order, were cyclosporine, omeprazole and pantoprazole. Conclusion: Only a minority of medications (5.9%) have a PDI affecting MPA pharmacokinetics. However, the majority of nonmyeloablative HCT recipients had a PDI, with cyclosporine and the proton pump inhibitors being the most common. A better understanding of PDI and their management should lead to safer medication regimens for nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:23782584

  1. Drug-drug interactions for UDP-glucuronosyltransferase substrates: a pharmacokinetic explanation for typically observed low exposure (AUCi/AUC) ratios.

    PubMed

    Williams, J Andrew; Hyland, Ruth; Jones, Barry C; Smith, Dennis A; Hurst, Susan; Goosen, Theunis C; Peterkin, Vincent; Koup, Jeffrey R; Ball, Simon E

    2004-11-01

    Glucuronidation is a listed clearance mechanism for 1 in 10 of the top 200 prescribed drugs. The objective of this article is to encourage those studying ligand interactions with UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) to adequately consider the potential consequences of in vitro UGT inhibition in humans. Spurred on by interest in developing potent and selective inhibitors for improved confidence around UGT reaction phenotyping, and the increased availability of recombinant forms of human UGTs, several recent studies have reported in vitro inhibition of UGT enzymes. In some cases, the observed potency of UGT inhibitors in vitro has been interpreted as having potential relevance in humans via pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. Although there are reported examples of clinically relevant drug-drug interactions for UGT substrates, exposure increases of the aglycone are rarely greater than 100% in the presence of an inhibitor relative to its absence (i.e., AUCi/AUC < or = 2). This small magnitude in change is in contrast to drugs primarily cleared by cytochrome P450 enzymes, where exposures have been reported to increase as much as 35-fold on coadministration with an inhibitor (e.g., ketoconazole inhibition of CYP3A4-catalyzed terfenadine metabolism). In this article the evidence for purported clinical relevance of potent in vitro inhibition of UGT enzymes will be assessed, taking the following into account: in vitro data on the enzymology of glucuronide formation from aglycone, pharmacokinetic principles based on empirical data for inhibition of metabolism, and clinical data on the pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of drugs primarily cleared by glucuronidation.

  2. A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model for the quantitative prediction of dofetilide clinical QT prolongation from human ether-a-go-go-related gene current inhibition data.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Daniël M; Kenna, Leslie A; Leishman, Derek; Wallis, Rob; Milligan, Peter A; Jonsson, E Niclas

    2005-06-01

    QT prolongation is an important biomarker of the arrhythmia torsades de pointes and appears to be related mainly to blockade of delayed inward cardiac rectifier potassium currents. The aim of this study was to quantify the relationship between in vitro human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channel blockade and the magnitude of QT prolongation in humans for the class III antiarrhythmic dofetilide. The in vitro affinity and activity of dofetilide were determined in recombinant cell cultures expressing the hERG channel, and the QT-prolonging effect of dofetilide was assessed in 5 clinical studies (80 healthy volunteers and 17 patients with ischemic heart disease). A population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analysis of the in vitro and in vivo data was performed in NONMEM by use of the operational model of pharmacologic agonism to estimate the efficiency of transduction from ion channel binding to Fridericia-corrected QT response. A 3-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order absorption characterized the time course of dofetilide concentrations. On the basis of an in vitro potency of 5.13 ng/mL for potassium current inhibition and predicted unbound dofetilide concentrations, the estimated transducer ratio (tau) of 6.2 suggests that the QT response plateaus before currents are fully blocked. In our study population, 10% hERG blockade corresponds to a QT prolongation of 20 ms (95% confidence interval, 12-32 ms). With long-term dofetilide administration, tolerance develops with a half-life of 4.7 days. The current mechanism-based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model quantified the relationship between in vitro hERG channel blockade and clinical QT prolongation for dofetilide. This model may prove valuable for assessing the risk of QT prolongation in humans for other drugs that selectively block the hERG channel on the basis of in vitro assays and pharmacokinetic properties.

  3. In silico prediction of drug properties.

    PubMed

    Hutter, M C

    2009-01-01

    Drug design has become inconceivable without the assistance of computer-aided methods. In this context in silico was chosen as designation to emphasize the relationship to in vitro and in vivo testing. Nowadays, virtual screening covers much more than estimation of solubility and oral bioavailability of compounds. Along with the challenge of parsing virtual compound libraries, the necessity to model more specific metabolic and toxicological aspects has emerged. Here, recent developments in prediction models are summarized, covering optimization problems in the fields of cytochrome P450 metabolism, blood-brain-barrier permeability, central nervous system activity, and blockade of the hERG-potassium channel. Aspects arising from the use of homology models and quantum chemical calculations are considered with respect to the biological functions. Furthermore, approaches to distinguish drug-like substances from nondrugs by the means of machine learning algorithms are compared in order to derive guidelines for the design of new agents with appropriate properties.

  4. Targeting anticancer drugs to the brain: II. Physiological pharmacokinetic model of oxantrazole following intraarterial administration to rat glioma-2 (RG-2) bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Gallo, J M; Varkonyi, P; Hassan, E E; Groothius, D R

    1993-10-01

    The disposition of the anticancer drug oxantrazole (OX) was characterized in rats bearing the rat glioma-2 (RG-2) brain tumor. Following intraarterial administration of 3 mg/kg of OX, serial sacrifices were completed from 5 min to 5 hr after administration. Blood and tissue samples collected at the time of sacrifice were processed and measured for OX concentrations by HPLC. The kidney had the greatest affinity for OX with the Cmax being 40.6 micrograms/ml at 15 min after administration. OX concentrations in brain tumor were higher than in normal right and left brain hemispheres, and consistent with enhanced drug blood-tumor barrier (BTB) permeability seen in experimental models for brain tumors. Observed heart, liver, lung, and spleen OX concentrations were similar, ranging from approximately 2 micrograms/ml to 20 micrograms/ml. A unique technique was used to develop a global physiological pharmacokinetic model for OX. A hybrid or forcing function method was used to estimate individual tissue compartment biochemical parameters (i.e., partition and mass transfer coefficients). A log likelihood optimization scheme was used to determine the best model structure and parameter sets for each tissue. Most tissues required a 3-subcompartment structure to adequately describe the observed data. The global model was then reconstructed with an arterial blood and rest of body compartments that provided predicted OX concentrations in agreement with the data. The model development strategy provides a systematic approach to physiological pharmacokinetic model development.

  5. Preclinical pharmacokinetics of TPN729MA, a novel PDE5 inhibitor, and prediction of its human pharmacokinetics using a PBPK model

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhi-wei; Zhu, Yun-ting; Yu, Ming-ming; Zan, Bin; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Yi-fan; Chen, Xiao-yan; Li, Xue-ning; Zhong, Da-fang

    2015-01-01

    Aim: TPN729MA is a novel selective PDE5 inhibitor currently under clinical development in China for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. In this study we characterized its preclinical pharmacokinetics (PK) and predict its human PK using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Methods: The preclinical PK of TPN729MA was studied in rats and dogs. Human clearance (CL) values for TPN729MA were predicted from various allometric methods and from intrinsic CL determined in human liver microsomes. Human PK and plasma concentration versus time profiles of TPN729MA were predicted by using a PBPK model in GastroPlus. Considering the uncertainties in the prediction, a preliminary human study was conducted in 3 healthy male volunteers with an oral dose of 25 mg. Results: After a single intravenous administration of TPN729MA at a dose of 1 mg/kg in rats and 3 mg/kg in dogs, the plasma CL was 69.7 mL·min−1·kg