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Sample records for predicting nursing times

  1. Predicting bacteremia based on nurse-assessed food consumption at the time of blood culture.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takayuki; Onda, Toshihito; Murayama, Go; Yamanouchi, Masashi; Inukai, Minori; Sakai, Ai; Kikuta, Masumi; Branch, Joel; Aoki, Makoto; Tierney, Lawrence M; Inoue, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Bacteremia and its complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. However, the yield of blood cultures is relatively low, with many false-positive results from bacterial contamination. We investigated the relationship between patient food consumption and the presence of bacteremia. This was an observational analysis of a cohort of 1179 patients who underwent blood culture analysis between January 2005 and December 2009. Patients with anorexia-inducing conditions, such as gastrointestinal illness and malignant disease treated with chemotherapy, were excluded. Food consumption was rated by nurses as the percentage of food consumed during the meal preceding the blood culture. Groupings were as follows: low consumption (<50%), moderate (>50% to <80%), and high (>80%). Low consumption was observed in 39.8% of patients, moderate in 17.8%, and high in 41.6%. The average body temperature was 38.1 ± 1.1°C. Bacteremia was present in 18.5%, 3.9%, and 1.4% of patients in the low, moderate, and high food consumption groups, respectively. The negative predictive value was 98.3%, suggesting that bacteremia is very unlikely in the setting of good food intake. Bacteremia is an unlikely occurrence in hospitalized patients who maintain adequate food consumption at the time of blood culture. Copyright © 2012 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  2. The predictive ability of critical thinking, nursing GPA, and SAT scores on first-time NCLEX-RN performance.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Elizabeth M

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the predictability of several variables in achieving first-time success on the NCLEX-RN. Several researchers have attempted to investigate the differences between students who passed the NCLEX-RN the first time and those who failed. No studies used a large enough failure group to have statistical significance. The three specific variables in this study were nursing GPA, SAT combined math and verbal scores, and critical thinking measured on a standardized assessment examination. An ex post facto study design was used to examine data from the records of associate degree nursing graduates during a three-year period. The most significant predictors of NCLEX-RN success were the students' nursing GPA and the overall standardized assessment examination score. The findings of this study could potentially influence the identification of students at risk for NCLEX-RN failure.

  3. Nurse Staffing and Hospital Characteristics Predictive of Time to Diagnostic Evaluation for Patients in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Shindul-Rothschild, Judith; Read, Catherine Y; Stamp, Kelly D; Flanagan, Jane

    2017-03-01

    In the 2014 Emergency Department Benchmarking Alliance Summit, for the first time, participants recommended tracking nursing and advanced practice nurse hours. Performance data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services provides an opportunity to analyze factors associated with delays in emergency care. The purpose of this study was to investigate hospital characteristics associated with time to a diagnostic evaluation in 67 Massachusetts emergency departments from 2013 to 2014. Covariates significantly correlated with time to diagnostic evaluation, and factors associated with timely care in emergency departments were included in the stepwise linear regression analysis. Differences in nurse staffing and performance measures in trauma and nontrauma emergency departments were examined with analysis of variance and t tests. Two predictors explained 38% of the variance in time a diagnostic evaluation (1): nurse staffing (P < .001) and (2) trauma centers (P <.001). In trauma centers, the time to a diagnostic evaluation significantly increased (P = .042) from 30.2 minutes when a nurse cared for fewer than 11.32 patients in 24 hours to 61.4 minutes when a nurse cared for 14.85 or more patients in 24 hours. Efforts to improve patient flow often focus on process interventions such as improved utilization of observation beds or transfers of patients to inpatient units. In this study, time to diagnostic evaluation significantly increased when emergency nurses care for higher numbers of patients. The findings present new evidence identifying the relationship of specific nurse to patient ratios to wait time in emergency departments. Copyright © 2016 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A comparison of two nursing program exit exams that predict first-time NCLEX-RN outcome.

    PubMed

    Brodersen, Lisa D; Mills, Andrew C

    2014-08-01

    This retrospective descriptive correlational study compared the predictive accuracy of the Health Education Systems, Inc, Exit Exam (Elsevier) and Assessment Technologies Institute's RN Comprehensive Predictor, both of which were administered to nursing students in an upper-division baccalaureate nursing program during their final semester of study. Using logistic regression analyses, it was determined that the two examinations were statistically significant but weak predictors of success on the RN licensure examination. The RN Comprehensive Predictor had a slightly better odds ratio; however, both examinations had similar sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy. Because the RN Comprehensive Predictor was included in the Assessment Technologies Institute's Comprehensive Assessment and Review Program already being used by the BSN program, based on the results of this study, the nursing faculty decided to use only the RN Comprehensive Predictor during its NCLEX-RN preparation course.

  5. Predicting nursing turnover with catastrophe theory.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Cheryl M

    2010-09-01

    This paper is a report of a study comparing an innovative nonlinear model and a traditional linear model for accuracy in prediction of nursing turnover. An international, sustained nursing shortage creates a need to target accurately the staff population at risk for turnover. Existing linear methodology is cumbersome with the number of variables needed, while producing inadequate results. Nonlinear modelling methods offer increased simplicity and accuracy in predictability. A correlational survey with a longitudinal cohort prospective study was carried out in 2005-2006 with a convenience sample of 1033 Registered Nurses from the Midwest region of the United States of America. At time 1, 756 usable questionnaires were returned and 496 at time 2. Data analysis included analyses of a cusp catastrophe model, a cube-shaped four-dimensional figure with a top that provided a down-turning slope area (the catastrophe/cusp zone). This fluid, dynamic cusp version employed the smallest number of control and dependent variables. The exceedingly small turnover sample preempted the use of the computerized program Cuspfit; a proven quasi-quantitative methodology demonstrated 80.4% predictability in the cusp catastrophe model overall and 53.6% correct predictions of actual terminations, particularly in nurses with <5 years of nursing experience. Additional accurate predictions were obtained with the use of a time-staged model. Organizational commitment and anticipated turnover were accurate predictor variables; job tension was not. Catastrophe models are useful in predicting nursing turnover. Future nursing researchers should act on this evidence to benefit forthcoming studies and the profession.

  6. Time to market nursing.

    PubMed

    Henry, Heather

    2016-06-29

    For too long nursing has been seen as a cost rather than a way of providing efficient and cost-effective care. My hope is that the nursing framework, Leading Change, Adding Value, will help nurses re-establish their place in the system.

  7. Changing how nurses spend their time.

    PubMed

    Prescott, P A; Phillips, C Y; Ryan, J W; Thompson, K O

    1991-01-01

    The results of work sampling studies are used to examine how nurses spend their time and to relate nurses' time to the shortage of nursing practice in hospitals. Four types of proposals for improving the delivery of nursing care in hospitals are discussed. The likely impact of these proposals on how nurses spend their time and the consequences of increasing the effectiveness of professional nursing practice are explored.

  8. Predicting Success in Nursing Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Cheryl; Blair, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    As the U.S. population ages and policy changes emerge, such as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, the U.S. will experience a significant shortage of Registered Nurses (RNs). Many colleges and universities are attempting to increase the size of nursing cohorts to respond to this imminent shortage. Notwithstanding a 2.6%…

  9. Dimensions of nurse work time: Progress in instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Terry L; Yoder, Linda H

    2015-09-01

    Because the work of health care is embedded in time, understanding nursing time-allocation practices is essential for identifying nurse staffing and workflow patterns that optimize healthcare cost and quality outcomes. The interdependent nature of nursing care requires that nurses share time with other members of their work group. Shared time, also known as social or organizational time, requires careful negotiation of workflows within healthcare teams. Evaluation of negotiated workflows is contingent upon valid and reliable measures of sociological nursing time. In this study, we evaluated the psychometric properties of a newly adapted instrument for measuring sociological nursing time and describe the experience of sociological time among hospital-employed nurses. Using a cross-sectional survey design with a convenience sample of nurses (n = 359), we identified nine reliable components of sociological nursing time: insufficient time allocation; strict adherence to schedules; increased time awareness; value of quality over speed; fast and unpredictable pace changes; predictable job duties punctuated with unpredictable job demands; expectations for a fast work pace; inconsistent work-hour expectations across departments; and high expectations for punctuality.

  10. Predicting Success in Nursing Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouch, Suzanne J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the merit of the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal as a pre-admission criterion in conjunction with the frequently utilized admission criteria of the college prerequisite grade point average and the National League of Nursing pre-admission test. Data were collected from 192 first-year nursing…

  11. Baccalaureate student nurse success prediction: a replication.

    PubMed

    Wold, J E; Worth, C

    1990-02-01

    The use of group testing that predicts success in understanding and using the nursing process suggests a tempting solution to a vexing problem: selecting those students from an applicant pool who have the potential to successfully complete a nursing program. Failure to replicate or extend previous studies has been recognized as a major limitation in nursing research (Brown, Tanner, & Padrick, 1984). The purpose of this research was to replicate a study using a set of four short test instruments identified as being successful predictors (Kissinger & Munjas, 1982). As part of a larger research project, four successive classes of students admitted to the school of nursing (N = 155) were tested and followed over a 4 1/2-year period with 100% participation. The results were not supportive of the findings in the previous study. The importance of cross validation of prediction studies, as well as the need for periodic sampling of previously validated prediction batteries due to changing elements in selection programs, was demonstrated. The study's outcome and the nursing literature suggest that some configuration of prerequisite grade point average, with all of its limitations and student manipulations, and a required verbal SAT/ACT score may still be the most efficient predictors available to admission committees in schools of nursing.

  12. Mentoring new nurses in stressful times.

    PubMed

    Young, Lisa E

    2009-06-01

    Meeting benchmarks of Ontario's Wait Time Strategy and the expansion of The Ottawa Hospital are key issues driving the recruitment of perioperative nurses in Ottawa and Eastern Ontario. Added pressures resulting from Canada's aging population and a nationwide nursing shortage mean perioperative nurses are overworked and understaffed. Preceptoring new members of staff raises valid concerns as many of the new recruits have little or no operating room experience. The Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition demonstrates the importance of time and patience in supporting the learning process. Mentoring is a valuable strategy in an effort to teach and guide new nurses, to increase nursing retention, and to promote professional growth and recognition. Building successful mentorship programs, through the creation of healthy organizational cultures, transformational leadership and staff development programs, will strengthen support for nurses in stressful times. The stress of meeting the province-wide benchmarks outlined in Ontario's Wait Time Strategy and the expansion of perioperative services at The Ottawa Hospital in Ontario are two key issues driving the need for the recruitment of nurses into the specialty of perioperative nursing. As a result of Canada's aging population and a nationwide nursing shortage, perioperative nurses are over-worked and under-staffed while being faced with the pressure to preceptor new staff members while struggling to meet the daily demands of the wait list strategy. This article discusses current trends in healthcare and the career path changes being made by many nurses in response to the demand for specialty trained nurses. It is followed by a brief explanation of the Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition. Mentoring is presented as an effective strategy in the guidance and teaching of new nurses with a discussion of the benefits and suggestions on how to build a successful mentorship program to support nurses in these stressful times.

  13. Predicting Nursing Human Resources: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Squires, Allison; Beltrán-Sánchez, Hiram

    2010-01-01

    The nurse-to-population ratio (NPOP) is a standard indicator used to indicate a country’s health care human resources capacity for responding to its disease burden. This study sought to explore if socioeconomic development indicators could predict the NPOP in a country. Mexico served as the case example for this exploratory study, with the final five variables selected based on findings from a qualitative study analyzing the development of nursing human resources in the country. Multiple linear regression showed that two variables proved significant predictors of the NPOP and the model itself explained 70% of the variance (r2 = .7; p = .0000). The findings have multiple implications for nursing human resources policy in Mexico and at a global level as governments attempt to build human capital to respond to population health needs. PMID:19628510

  14. Time Spent in Indirect Nursing Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    Part of the FY 83 Army Study Program and intended to augment the FY 81 completed study titled ’ Nursing Care Hours Standards’ by providing valid and...reliable percentages for hospital patient nursing care unit requirements (i.e., direct care, indirect care, and non-productive time). These data

  15. Predicting nurses' acceptance of radiofrequency identification technology.

    PubMed

    Norten, Adam

    2012-10-01

    The technology of radiofrequency identification allows for the scanning of radiofrequency identification-tagged objects and individuals without line-of-sight requirements. Healthcare organizations use radiofrequency identification to ensure the health and safety of patients and medical personnel and to uncover inefficiencies. Although the successful implementation of a system incorporating radiofrequency identification technologies requires acceptance and use of the technology, some nurses using radiofrequency identification in hospitals feel like "Big Brother" is watching them. This predictive study used a theoretical model assessing the effect of five independent variables: privacy concerns, attitudes, subjective norms, controllability, and self-efficacy, on a dependent variable, nurses' behavioral intention to use radiofrequency identification. A Web-based questionnaire containing previously validated questions was answered by 106 US RNs. Multiple linear regression showed that all constructs together accounted for 60% of the variance in nurses' intention to use radiofrequency identification. Of the predictors in the model, attitudes provided the largest unique contribution when the other predictors in the model were held constant; subjective norms also provided a unique contribution. Privacy concerns, controllability, and self-efficacy did not provide a significant contribution to nurses' behavioral intention to use radiofrequency identification.

  16. Crunch time for US nurses.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Daloni

    Americans are preparing to vote in the presidential election. Nurses on both sides of the political divide explain why they are supporting President Obama, and his landmark healthcare reforms, or his Republican opponent Mitt Romney, who would scrap 'Obamacare' and reduce the role of government in health care.

  17. Curriculum Development for Part-Time Programs for Certified Nurse Assistant to Licensed Vocational Nurse; and Licensed Vocational Nurse to Associate Degree Nurse Program (CNA-VN-RN).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxe, Ellen; And Others

    This report describes the Imperial Valley College nursing program, a program developed to provide for the nursing needs of Imperial County, California. The program provides part-time education to help train nursing assistants and to allow nursing assistants to upgrade their skills to vocational nurse level and vocational nurses to become…

  18. Predicting research use in nursing organizations: a multilevel analysis.

    PubMed

    Estabrooks, Carole A; Midodzi, William K; Cummings, Greta G; Wallin, Lars

    2007-01-01

    No empirical literature was found that explained how organizational context (operationalized as a composite of leadership, culture, and evaluation) influences research utilization. Similarly, no work was found on the interaction of individuals and contextual factors, or the relative importance or contribution of forces at different organizational levels to either such proposed interactions or, ultimately, to research utilization. To determine independent factors that predict research utilization among nurses, taking into account influences at individual nurse, specialty, and hospital levels. Cross-sectional survey data for 4,421 registered nurses in Alberta, Canada were used in a series of multilevel (three levels) modeling analyses to predict research utilization. A multilevel model was developed in MLwiN version 2.0 and used to: (a) estimate simultaneous effects of several predictors and (b) quantify the amount of explained variance in research utilization that could be apportioned to individual, specialty, and hospital levels. There was significant variation in research utilization (p <.05). Factors (remaining in the final model at statistically significant levels) found to predict more research utilization at the three levels of analysis were as follows. At the individual nurse level (Level 1): time spent on the Internet and lower levels of emotional exhaustion. At the specialty level (Level 2): facilitation, nurse-to-nurse collaboration, a higher context (i.e., of nursing culture, leadership, and evaluation), and perceived ability to control policy. At the hospital level (Level 3): only hospital size was significant in the final model. The total variance in research utilization was 1.04, and the intraclass correlations (the percent contribution by contextual factors) were 4% (variance = 0.04, p <.01) at the hospital level and 8% (variance = 0.09, p <.05) at the specialty level. The contribution attributable to individual factors alone was 87% (variance = 0

  19. Prediction of Successful Nursing Performance. Part I and Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwirian, Patricia M.

    Two of three phases of a study were conducted to (1) assess the state of the art on the prediction of nursing clinical performance and (2) obtain current information from nursing education programs about prediction criteria in use by them. Phase one involved a review of the 1965 through 1975 literature pertaining to studies that focused on the…

  20. Nurses who do not nurse: factors that predict non-nursing work in the U.S. registered nursing labor market.

    PubMed

    Black, Lisa; Spetz, Joanne; Harrington, Charlene

    2010-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) who work outside of nursing have seldom been examined. This aim of this study was to compare the 122,178 (4%) of RNs who are employed outside of nursing to those who work in nursing jobs in terms of sociodemographic, market, and political variables to determine if these groups are substantively different from one another. Using a logit regression model, wages were a significant predictor of working outside of nursing for unmarried nurses but not for married nurses. Married and unmarried male nurses were more likely to work outside of nursing. Baccalaureate education, children under age 6, higher family income, and years since graduation increased the odds of working outside of nursing for married nurses. Ultimately, identifying characteristics on which these groups differ may inform future policy directions that could target nurses who may leave nursing at a time when retention efforts might be effective to alter their trajectory away from the profession.

  1. [Time, education and nursing training].

    PubMed

    Héron, Myriam

    2012-10-01

    Time is a complex reality. In education, time is a concept, a transversal aid and an omnipresent element. Using the past, practising in the present and anticipating the future are the objectives; but learning is often anchored in the "here and now".

  2. Predicting early academic achievement in a baccalaureate nursing program.

    PubMed

    Newton, Sarah E; Smith, Laureen H; Moore, Gary; Magnan, Morris

    2007-01-01

    Baccalaureate nursing programs are under increased pressure to graduate greater numbers of students to meet the demands of the nurse workforce of the future. Schools of nursing are admitting larger cohorts of students, but early academic achievement in the nursing major and retention are problematic. Historical predictors of early academic achievement, such as scholastic aptitude, may not be the best for identifying students at risk of early academic failure. Increasingly, baccalaureate nursing programs are relying on standardized nursing aptitude tests to evaluate the readiness of applicants for the nursing major. However, reliable predictors of early academic achievement have yet to be identified. The purpose of this study was to explore whether scholastic aptitude and nursing aptitude are predictive of early academic achievement in a baccalaureate nursing program. Using an exploratory descriptive design, data from 164 sophomore nursing students were examined. The data indicated that scholastic aptitude and nursing aptitude together predicted 20.2% of the variance in early academic achievement, with scholastic aptitude accounting for 15.4% of the variance.

  3. GABA predicts time perception.

    PubMed

    Terhune, Devin B; Russo, Sonia; Near, Jamie; Stagg, Charlotte J; Cohen Kadosh, Roi

    2014-03-19

    Our perception of time constrains our experience of the world and exerts a pivotal influence over a myriad array of cognitive and motor functions. There is emerging evidence that the perceived duration of subsecond intervals is driven by sensory-specific neural activity in human and nonhuman animals, but the mechanisms underlying individual differences in time perception remain elusive. We tested the hypothesis that elevated visual cortex GABA impairs the coding of particular visual stimuli, resulting in a dampening of visual processing and concomitant positive time-order error (relative underestimation) in the perceived duration of subsecond visual intervals. Participants completed psychophysical tasks measuring visual interval discrimination and temporal reproduction and we measured in vivo resting state GABA in visual cortex using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Time-order error selectively correlated with GABA concentrations in visual cortex, with elevated GABA associated with a rightward horizontal shift in psychometric functions, reflecting a positive time-order error (relative underestimation). These results demonstrate anatomical, neurochemical, and task specificity and suggest that visual cortex GABA contributes to individual differences in time perception.

  4. Predictability at intraseasonal time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, V.; Sharma, A. S.

    2017-08-01

    Establishing the predictability of the climate system beyond the weather time scale of about 10 days is essential for extended range prediction. To overcome the limitation imposed by deterministic chaos on long-range prediction, we exploit the near-oscillatory behavior of monsoon intraseasonal oscillation (MISO) and other such phenomena in the tropical climate. These are nonlinear oscillations in the time range of 30-60 days. Based on the phase space reconstruction method of nonlinear dynamical systems theory, we have developed a prediction model using the time series of MISO. We demonstrate that the Indian monsoon intraseasonal oscillation can be predicted with more accuracy at extended range. The phase space reconstruction model performs better than the Climate Forecast System of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction in predicting the MISO. Our results show that intraseasonal variability can be modeled as a low-dimensional dynamical system and demonstrate extended predictability of climate.

  5. Predicting Nonlinear Time Series

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    response becomes R,(k) = f (Y FV,(k)) (2.4) where Wy specifies the weight associated with the output of node i to the input of nodej in the next layer and...interconnections for each of these previous nodes. 18 prr~~~o• wfe :t iam i -- ---- --- --- --- Figure 5: Delay block for ATNN [9] Thus, nodej receives the...computed values, aj(tn), and dj(tn) denotes the desired output of nodej at time in. In this thesis, the weights and time delays update after each input

  6. Predictive coding of multisensory timing

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhuanghua; Burr, David

    2016-01-01

    The sense of time is foundational for perception and action, yet it frequently departs significantly from physical time. In the paper we review recent progress on temporal contextual effects, multisensory temporal integration, temporal recalibration, and related computational models. We suggest that subjective time arises from minimizing prediction errors and adaptive recalibration, which can be unified in the framework of predictive coding, a framework rooted in Helmholtz’s ‘perception as inference’. PMID:27695705

  7. Grade Point Average as a Predictor of Timely Graduation from Associate Degree Registered Nursing Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Delores J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if admission selection strategies that utilize cumulative and/or pre-requisite GPA are predictive of timely graduation for associate degree nursing (RN-AD) students. Data were obtained from de-identified records of 437 associate degree nursing students enrolled in three Midwest community colleges from…

  8. Time series prediction in agroecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortina-Januchs, M. G.; Quintanilla-Dominguez, J.; Vega-Corona, A.; Andina, D.

    2012-04-01

    This work proposes a novel model to predict time series such as frost, precipitation, temperature, solar radiation, all of them important variables for the agriculture process. In the proposed model, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) combined with clustering algorithms and sensor data fusion are used. The real time series are obtained from different sensors. The clustering algorithms find relationships between variables, clustering involves the task of dividing data sets, which assigns the same label to members who belong to the same group, so that each group is homogeneous and distinct from the others. Those relationships provide information to the ANN in order to obtain the time series prediction. The most important issue of ANN in time series prediction is generalization, which refers to their ability to produce reasonable predictions on data sets other than those used for the estimation of the model parameters.

  9. Nurses' working time use - how value adding it is?

    PubMed

    Antinaho, Tuula; Kivinen, Tuula; Turunen, Hannele; Partanen, Pirjo

    2015-11-01

    To investigate registered nurses' (RN) and licensed practical nurses' (LPN) working time use in adult inpatient units. There is only scarce information about value-adding patient care. Nursing care can be divided into three major categories: value-adding care (direct care, indirect care, patient documentation), necessary activities (indirect work, unit-related work) and non-value-adding work (personal time, miscellaneous work). A cross-sectional quantitative work sampling study. Total of 11,029 nursing activities were collected from two Finnish tertiary hospitals using registered nurses' (n = 66) and licensed practical nurses' (n = 12) self-reporting. Nearly three-quarters of nurses' work was value-adding care (71%). The working time division was almost identical for necessary activities and non-value-adding work. Registered nurses spent more time carrying out unit-related work, while licensed practical nurses' spent more time on direct care. Nurses' working time use was divided nearly identically in somatic units but there were differences when compared with psychiatric units. Nurses' work seemed to concentrate on value-adding care. The results of working time use studies can be used when developing nursing work for more value-adding care for the patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Time control, catecholamines and back pain among young nurses.

    PubMed

    Elfering, Achim; Grebner, Simone; Semmer, Norbert K; Gerber, Hans

    2002-12-01

    This study had two objectives. First, it addressed concern with the contribution of work stressors and resources to the development of back pain, over and above the influence of biomechanical work factors. Second, using recent models about the role of the sympathetic-adrenal medullar system in musculoskeletal problems as its basis, it tested whether low-back pain is associated with higher levels of catecholamines. Altogether 114 nurses filled out a questionnaire in their first year of practice and again one year later. In addition, in a subsample of 24 nurses studied intensively at follow-up, urinary catecholamines were assessed at noon, before the end of work, in the evening, and at corresponding times on a day off. Daily stressful experiences and daily mood were also recorded. With control for baseline pain, biomechanical workload, and other potentially confounding variables, time control at the beginning of the study predicted low-back pain a year later. In the subsample, the epinephrine and norepinephrine levels were higher in those reporting more frequent episodes of back pain, the largest differences occurring at the end of work. In addition, control over stressful events at work was lower in this group. Time control is a risk factor for low-back pain among nurses beyond the influence of physical work load. Low control at work may increase the activity of the sympathetic-adrenal medullar system, which seems to play an important role in the development of musculoskeletal pain.

  11. A 36-Hospital Time and Motion Study: How Do Medical-Surgical Nurses Spend Their Time?

    PubMed Central

    Hendrich, Ann; Chow, Marilyn P; Skierczynski, Boguslaw A; Lu, Zhenqiang

    2008-01-01

    Context: Nurses are the primary hospital caregivers. Increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of nursing care is essential to hospital function and the delivery of safe patient care. Objective: We undertook a time and motion study to document how nurses spend their time. The goal was to identify drivers of inefficiency in nursing work processes and nursing unit design. Design: Nurses from 36 medical-surgical units were invited to participate in research protocols designed to assess how nurses spend their time, nurse location and movement, and nurse physiologic response. Main Outcome Measures: Nurses' time was divided into categories of activities (nursing practice, unit-related functions, nonclinical activities, and waste) and locations (patient room, nurse station, on-unit, off-unit). Total distance traveled and energy expenditure were assessed. Distance traveled was evaluated across types of unit design. Results: A total of 767 nurses participated. More than three-quarters of all reported time was devoted to nursing practice. Three subcategories accounted for most of nursing practice time: documentation (35.3%; 147.5 minutes), medication administration (17.2%; 72 minutes), and care coordination (20.6%; 86 minutes). Patient care activities accounted for 19.3% (81 minutes) of nursing practice time, and only 7.2% (31 minutes) of nursing practice time was considered to be used for patient assessment and reading of vital signs. Conclusion: The time and motion study identified three main targets for improving the efficiency of nursing care: documentation, medication administration, and care coordination. Changes in technology, work processes, and unit organization and design may allow for substantial improvements in the use of nurses' time and the safe delivery of care. PMID:21331207

  12. Non-value-added time: the million dollar nursing opportunity.

    PubMed

    Storfjell, Judith Lloyd; Ohlson, Susan; Omoike, Osei; Fitzpatrick, Therese; Wetasin, Kanokwan

    2009-01-01

    The dual crises of high healthcare costs and the nursing shortage require a better understanding of inpatient nursing unit activities and, more specifically, their costs and the drivers of inefficiencies. This includes knowing not only how staff spend their time but also how much of this time is non-value-added (NVA) because wasted time leads to both high costs and nurse dissatisfaction. The authors discuss a study that determined the NVA time and costs of acute care nursing unit staff, identified drivers of high-cost NVA time, and compared activities and costs by type of nursing unit. These data have considerable implications for developing efficient and effective nursing care delivery models and for implementing process improvement and staff satisfaction initiatives.

  13. Time in Care for Older People Living in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Thorsell, K. B. E.; Nordström, B. M.; Fagerström, L.; Sivberg, B. V.

    2010-01-01

    In order to measure actual care needs in relation to resources required to fulfill these needs, an instrument (Time in Care) with which to evaluate care needs and determine the time needed for various care activities has been developed with the aim of assessing nursing intensity in municipal care for older people. Interreliability (ICC = 0.854) of time measurements (n = 10'546) of 32 nursing activities in relation to evaluated care levels in two nursing homes (staff n = 81) has been determined. Nursing intensity for both periods at the two nursing homes comprised on average a direct care time of 75 (45%) and 101 (42%) minutes, respectively. Work time was measured according to actual schedule (462 hours per nursing home during two weeks). Given that the need for care was high, one must further investigate if the quality of care the recipients received was sufficiently addressed. PMID:21994810

  14. Starting Out: A time-lagged study of new graduate nurses' transition to practice.

    PubMed

    Laschinger, Heather K Spence; Cummings, Greta; Leiter, Michael; Wong, Carol; MacPhee, Maura; Ritchie, Judith; Wolff, Angela; Regan, Sandra; Rhéaume-Brüning, Ann; Jeffs, Lianne; Young-Ritchie, Carol; Grinspun, Doris; Gurnham, Mary Ellen; Foster, Barbara; Huckstep, Sherri; Ruffolo, Maurio; Shamian, Judith; Burkoski, Vanessa; Wood, Kevin; Read, Emily

    2016-05-01

    As the nursing profession ages, new graduate nurses are an invaluable health human resource. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors influencing new graduate nurses' successful transition to their full professional role in Canadian hospital settings and to determine predictors of job and career satisfaction and turnover intentions over a one-year time period in their early employment. A national two-wave survey of new graduate nurses across Canada. A random sample of 3906 Registered Nurses with less than 3 years of experience currently working in direct patient care was obtained from the provincial registry databases across Canada. At Time 1, 1020 of 3743 eligible nurses returned completed questionnaires (usable response rate=27.3%). One year later, Time 1 respondents were mailed a follow-up survey; 406 returned a completed questionnaire (response rate=39.8%). Surveys containing standardized questionnaires were mailed to participants' home address. Descriptive statistics, correlations, and hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted using SPSS software. Overall, new graduate nurses were positive about their experiences and committed to nursing. However, over half of new nurses in the first year of practice reported high levels of emotional exhaustion and many witnessed or experienced incivility (24-42%) at work. Findings from hierarchical linear regression analyses revealed that situational and personal factors explained significant amounts of variance in new graduate nurses' job and career satisfaction and turnover intentions. Cynicism was a significant predictor of all four outcomes one year later, while Psycap predicted job and career satisfaction and career turnover intentions. Results provide a look into the worklife experiences of Canadian new graduate nurses over a one-year time period and identify factors that influence their job-related outcomes. These findings show that working conditions for new graduate nurses are generally

  15. Inability of Physicians and Nurses to Predict Patient Satisfaction in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    DeLaney, Matthew C.; Page, David B.; Kunstadt, Ethan B.; Ragan, Matt; Rodgers, Joel; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patient satisfaction is a commonly assessed dimension of emergency department (ED) care quality. The ability of ED clinicians to estimate patient satisfaction is unknown. We sought to evaluate the ability of emergency medicine resident physicians and nurses to predict patient-reported satisfaction with physician and nursing care, pain levels, and understanding of discharge instructions. Methods We studied a convenience sample of 100 patients treated at an urban academic ED. Patients rated satisfaction with nursing care, physician care, pain level at time of disposition and understanding of discharge instructions. Resident physicians and nurses estimated responses for each patient. We compared patient, physician and nursing responses using Cohen’s kappa, weighting the estimates to account for the ordinal responses. Results Overall, patients had a high degree of satisfaction with care provided by the nurses and physicians, although this was underestimated by providers. There was poor agreement between physician estimation of patient satisfaction (weighted κ=0.23, standard error: 0.078) and nursing estimates of patient satisfaction (weighted κ=0.11, standard error: 0.043); physician estimation of patient pain (weighted κ=0.43, standard error: 0.082) and nursing estimates (weighted κ=0.39, standard error: 0.081); physician estimates of patient comprehension of discharge instruction (weighted κ=0.19, standard error: 0.082) and nursing estimates (weighted κ=0.13, standard error: 0.078). Providers underestimated pain and patient comprehension of discharge instructions. Conclusion ED providers were not able to predict patient satisfaction with nurse or physician care, pain level, or understanding of discharge instructions. PMID:26759661

  16. Inability of Physicians and Nurses to Predict Patient Satisfaction in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    DeLaney, Matthew C; Page, David B; Kunstadt, Ethan B; Ragan, Matt; Rodgers, Joel; Wang, Henry E

    2015-12-01

    Patient satisfaction is a commonly assessed dimension of emergency department (ED) care quality. The ability of ED clinicians to estimate patient satisfaction is unknown. We sought to evaluate the ability of emergency medicine resident physicians and nurses to predict patient-reported satisfaction with physician and nursing care, pain levels, and understanding of discharge instructions. We studied a convenience sample of 100 patients treated at an urban academic ED. Patients rated satisfaction with nursing care, physician care, pain level at time of disposition and understanding of discharge instructions. Resident physicians and nurses estimated responses for each patient. We compared patient, physician and nursing responses using Cohen's kappa, weighting the estimates to account for the ordinal responses. Overall, patients had a high degree of satisfaction with care provided by the nurses and physicians, although this was underestimated by providers. There was poor agreement between physician estimation of patient satisfaction (weighted κ=0.23, standard error: 0.078) and nursing estimates of patient satisfaction (weighted κ=0.11, standard error: 0.043); physician estimation of patient pain (weighted κ=0.43, standard error: 0.082) and nursing estimates (weighted κ=0.39, standard error: 0.081); physician estimates of patient comprehension of discharge instruction (weighted κ=0.19, standard error: 0.082) and nursing estimates (weighted κ=0.13, standard error: 0.078). Providers underestimated pain and patient comprehension of discharge instructions. ED providers were not able to predict patient satisfaction with nurse or physician care, pain level, or understanding of discharge instructions.

  17. How registered nurses, licensed practical nurses and resident aides spend time in nursing homes: An observational study.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, Rose; Donovan, Cindy; Stewart, Connie; Donovan, Alicia

    2015-09-01

    Calls for improved conditions in nursing homes have pointed to the importance of optimizing the levels and skills of care providers. Understanding the work of care providers will help to determine if staff are being used to their full potential and if opportunities exist for improved efficiencies. To explore the activities of care providers in different nursing homes and to identify if variations exist within and across homes and shifts. A multi-centre cross-sectional observational work flow study was conducted in seven different nursing homes sites in one Canadian province. Data were collected by a research assistant who conducted 368 h of observation. The research assistant collected data by following an identical route in each site and recording observations on staff activities. Findings indicate staff activities vary across roles, sites and shifts. Licensed practical nurses (nursing assistants) have the greatest variation in their role while registered nurses have the least amount of variability. In some sites both registered nurses and licensed practical nurses perform activities that may be safely delegated to others. Care providers spend as much as 53.7% of their time engaged in non-value added activities. There may be opportunities for registered nurses and licensed practical nurses to delegate some of their activities to non-regulated workers. The time care providers spend in non-value activities suggest there may be opportunities to improve efficiencies within the nursing home setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Patient- and ward-level determinants of nursing time in nursing facilities.

    PubMed

    Laine, Juha; Noro, Anja; Finne-Soveri, Harriet; Häkkinen, Unto

    2005-10-01

    To explore the patient- and ward-level determinants of wage-adjusted nursing time in long-term care wards for the elderly with a view to improving efficiency of the use of labour resources. The wage-adjusted nursing time given to patients was obtained from a time measurement study. Patient characteristics were based on the Minimum Data Set 2.0 of the Resident Assessment Instrument for nursing homes. Ordinary least-squares regression analysis and multilevel modelling were used to disentangle the effect of patient- and ward-level factors on nursing time. A significant difference in wage-adjusted nursing time between wards was detected, which was partly explained by characteristics of patients in wards. The combination of patients' physical functioning and cognition and the Resource Utilization Groups RUG-III/22 resource use classification explained 20-25% of patients' nursing time over a 24-hour period. Variables related to the operational environment of the ward did not explain differences in wage-adjusted nursing time once the patient profile of the ward had been controlled for. The results also showed notable unmeasured patient and ward level effects, inefficiency and randomness in the allocation of nursing time. By improving the allocation and use of labour resources, the substantial variation in nursing time between wards could be diminished. Managers should allocate their staff primarily according to patients' resource needs.

  19. Time well spent? Assessing nursing-supply chain activities.

    PubMed

    Ferenc, Jeff

    2010-02-01

    The amount of time nurses spend providing direct patient care seems to be continually eroding. So it's little wonder a survey conducted last year of critical care, OR nurses and nurse executives found that half of the 1600 respondents feel they spend too much time on supply chain duties. Most also said their supply chain duties impact patient safe ty and their ability to provide bedside care. Experts interviewed for this report believe it's time for supply chain leaders and nurses to develop a closer working partnership. Included are their recommendations to improve performance.

  20. Nursing students' confidence in medication calculations predicts math exam performance.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Sharon; Salamonson, Yenna; Halcomb, Elizabeth J

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties, including predictive validity, of the newly-developed nursing self-efficacy for mathematics (NSE-Math). The NSE-Math is a 12 item scale that comprises items related to mathematic and arithmetic concepts underpinning medication calculations. The NSE-Math instrument was administered to second year Bachelor of Nursing students enrolled in a nursing practice subject. Students' academic results for a compulsory medication calculation examination for this subject were collected. One-hundred and twelve students (73%) completed both the NSE-Math instrument and the drug calculation assessment task. The NSE-Math demonstrated two factors 'Confidence in application of mathematic concepts to nursing practice' and 'Confidence in arithmetic concepts' with 63.5% of variance explained. Cronbach alpha for the scale was 0.90. The NSE-Math demonstrated predictive validity with the medication calculation examination results (p=0.009). Psychometric testing suggests the NSE-Math is a valid measure of mathematics self-efficacy of second year nursing students.

  1. Factors influencing job satisfaction of oncology nurses over time.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Greta; Olson, Karin; Raymond-Seniuk, Christy; Lo, Eliza; Masaoud, Elmabrok; Bakker, Debra; Fitch, Margaret; Green, Esther; Butler, Lorna; Conlon, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tested a structural equation model to examine work environment factors related to changes in job satisfaction of oncology nurses between 2004 and 2006. Relational leadership and good physician/nurse relationships consistently influenced perceptions of enough RNs to provide quality care, and freedom to make patient care decisions, which, in turn, directly influenced nurses' job satisfaction over time. Supervisor support in resolving conflict and the ability to influence patient care outcomes were significant influences on job satisfaction in 2004, whereas, in 2006, a clear philosophy of nursing had a greater significant influence. Several factors that influence job satisfaction of oncology nurses in Canada have changed over time, which may reflect changes in work environments and work life. These findings suggest opportunities to modify work conditions that could improve nurses' job satisfaction and work life.

  2. Decreased Stress Levels in Nurses: A Benefit of Quiet Time.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Heather C; Mates, Joanna; Ryan, Linda; Schleder, Bonnie J

    2015-09-01

    The benefits of quiet time, a therapeutic method of improving the health care environment, have been evaluated in patients, but only a few studies have examined the effects of quiet time on intensive care nurses. To evaluate the effects of implementing quiet time in a medical-surgical intensive care unit on levels of light, noise, and nurses' stress. Quiet time consisted of turning down the unit lights for a designated time. Levels of light, noise, and nurses' stress were measured. Nurses' stress levels were measured by using a 100-point visual analog scale; unit noise, by using a digital sound level meter (model 407736, Extech Instruments); and unit light, by using an illumination light meter (model 615, Huygen Corporation). Measurements were obtained 30 minutes before and 30 minutes, 1 hour, and 2 hours after implementation of quiet time. Analysis of variance and comparisons of means indicated that both light levels and nurses' stress levels were significantly decreased after quiet time (both P < .001). Noise levels were also decreased after quiet time, but the decrease was not significant (P = .08). Use of quiet time resulted in decreased light levels and decreased stress levels among nurses. Quiet time is an easily performed energy-saving intervention to promote a healthy work environment. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  3. Predicting Success Using HESI A2 Entrance Tests in an Associate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodman, Susan

    2012-01-01

    A challenge presented to nurse educators is retention of nursing students. This has led nursing faculty to review admission requirements and question how well entrance tests predict success in Associate Degree Nursing Programs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the HESI Admission Assessment Exam (HESI A2) and…

  4. Predicting Success Using HESI A2 Entrance Tests in an Associate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodman, Susan

    2012-01-01

    A challenge presented to nurse educators is retention of nursing students. This has led nursing faculty to review admission requirements and question how well entrance tests predict success in Associate Degree Nursing Programs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the HESI Admission Assessment Exam (HESI A2) and…

  5. The lived experience of part-time baccalaureate nursing faculty.

    PubMed

    Gazza, Elizabeth A; Shellenbarger, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Hiring part-time nursing faculty may impact students, faculty careers, and the institution. Yet, little has been studied, particularly in nursing, regarding the experiences of these faculty. This hermeneutic phenomenological study seeks to understand the lived experience of being a part-time faculty member in a baccalaureate nursing program. Through purposive and snowball sampling, nine nursing faculty in part-time positions in northeastern baccalaureate nursing programs participated in in-depth personal interviews. Four themes were uncovered during data analysis, including achieving the dream, a group divided, for the love of the students, and jump in and figure it out. Results of the study seem to indicate that the experience of being a part-time faculty differs in several ways from being a full-time faculty. Understanding part-time faculty experiences provides insight into faculty needs, issues, and concerns while facilitating the development of research-based recruitment and retention strategies. Recommendations for those involved in nursing education, including nursing faculty and administrators, are provided.

  6. Pre-Implementation Study of a Nursing e-Chart: How Nurses Use Their Time.

    PubMed

    Schachner, Maria B; Recondo, Francisco J; Sommer, Janine A; González, Zulma A; García, Gabriela M; Luna, Daniel R; Benítez, Sonia E

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, nurses perform different activities that exceed direct care of patients, and influence workload and time administration among different tasks. When implementing changes in an electronic nursing record, it is important to measure how it affects the time committed to documentation. The objective of this study was to determine the time dedicated to different activities, including those related to electronic documentation prior to implementing a redesigned nurse chart in an Electronic Health Record at the Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires. An observational work sampling study was performed. Nursing activities observed were categorized as direct care, indirect care, support, non-patient related, and personal activities. During the study, 74 nurses were observed and 2,418 observations were made in the Intensive Care Unit (32.22%), the Intermediate Care Unit (29.57%), and the General Care Unit (38.21%). Nurses' activities included 37.40% of direct care, 41.18% of indirect care, 0.43% support tasks, 11.14% non-related to patient tasks, and 9.77% personal activities. The results allow for the estimation of the impact of a nursing e-chart on nurses' activities, workflow and patient care.

  7. Using timed event sequential data in nursing research.

    PubMed

    Pecanac, Kristen E; Doherty-King, Barbara; Yoon, Ju Young; Brown, Roger; Schiefelbein, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Measuring behavior is important in nursing research, and innovative technologies are needed to capture the "real-life" complexity of behaviors and events. The purpose of this article is to describe the use of timed event sequential data in nursing research and to demonstrate the use of this data in a research study. Timed event sequencing allows the researcher to capture the frequency, duration, and sequence of behaviors as they occur in an observation period and to link the behaviors to contextual details. Timed event sequential data can easily be collected with handheld computers, loaded with a software program designed for capturing observations in real time. Timed event sequential data add considerable strength to analysis of any nursing behavior of interest, which can enhance understanding and lead to improvement in nursing practice.

  8. Orientation, Evaluation, and Integration of Part-Time Nursing Faculty.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Joanne S

    2015-07-10

    This study helps to quantify and describe orientation, evaluation, and integration practices pertaining to part-time clinical nursing faculty teaching in prelicensure nursing education programs. A researcher designed Web-based survey was used to collect information from a convenience sample of part-time clinical nursing faculty teaching in prelicensure nursing programs. Survey questions focused on the amount and type of orientation, evaluation, and integration practices. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze results. Respondents reported on average four hours of orientation, with close to half reporting no more than two hours. Evaluative feedback was received much more often from students than from full-time faculty. Most respondents reported receiving some degree of mentoring and that it was easy to get help from full-time faculty. Respondents reported being most informed about student evaluation procedures, grading, and the steps to take when students are not meeting course objectives, and less informed about changes to ongoing curriculum and policy.

  9. Predictive validity of neuropsychiatric subgroups on nursing home placement and survival in patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Tun, Saw-Myo; Murman, Daniel L; Long, Heidi L; Colenda, Christopher C; von Eye, Alexander

    2007-04-01

    The aim of the study was to conceptualize neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with Alzheimer disease as distinct symptom profiles with differential disease outcomes. Two outcomes of interest in the study were nursing home placement and survival. Cluster analysis was used to categorize 122 patients with Alzheimer disease based on their neuropsychiatric symptoms as assessed by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Both the presence as well as the severity and frequency of symptoms were considered. After identification of the subgroups, the predictive validity of the categorization was tested on time to nursing home placement and time to death over a three-year period. Cox proportional hazard models were used to perform survival analysis. Important covariates such as severity of cognitive and functional impairments, comorbid medical conditions, presence of parkinsonism, and marital status were adjusted at baseline. Based on the presence of neuropsychiatric symptoms, three subgroups were identified: minimally symptomatic, highly symptomatic, and affective/apathetic. Over a three-year period, the highly symptomatic group had an increased risk of nursing home placement. In addition, the rates of survival were significantly lower for the highly symptomatic and the affective/apathetic subgroups. Based on the severity and frequency of symptoms, two-cluster and four-cluster solutions were produced. The groupings based on severity and frequency of symptoms predicted significant differential outcomes in survival and nursing home placement. Neuropsychiatric subgroups were able to predict differential outcomes and identify those with an increased risk for a worse prognosis. The findings were discussed through their research and clinical implications.

  10. Japanese professional nurses spend unnecessarily long time doing nursing assistants' tasks.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yasushi; Yoshimura, Emiko; Shahzad, Machiko Taruzuka; Shibuya, Akitaka; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2012-01-01

    In environments in which professional nurses do simple tasks, e.g., laundry, cleaning, and waste disposal, they cannot concentrate on technical jobs by utilizing their expertise to its fullest benefit. Particularly, in Japan, the nursing shortage is a serious problem. If professional nurses take their time to do any of these simple tasks, the tasks should be preferentially allocated to nursing assistants. Because there has been no descriptive study to investigate the amount of time Japanese professional nurses spent doing such simple tasks during their working time, their actual conditions remain unclear. Professional nurses recorded their total working time and the time they spent doing such simple tasks during the week of the survey period. The time an individual respondent spent doing one or more simple tasks during that week was summed up, as was their working time. Subsequently, the percentage of the summed time he or she spent doing any of those tasks in his or her summed working time was calculated. A total of 1,086 respondents in 19 hospitals that had 87 to 376 beds were analyzed (response rate: 53.3%). The average time (SD) that respondents spent doing those simple tasks and their total working time were 2.24 (3.35) hours and 37.48 (10.88) hours, respectively. The average percentage (SD) of the time they spent doing the simple tasks in their working time was 6.00% (8.39). Hospital administrators must decrease this percentage. Proper working environments in which professional nurses can concentrate more on their technical jobs must be created.

  11. Predicting academic progression for student registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Burns, Sharon M

    2011-06-01

    In order to foster academic progression and improve retention in nurse anesthesia programs, admission selection criteria require attention. With the escalating cost of graduate education coupled with the current economic crisis, efforts by educational leaders to minimize attrition remain pivotal. Selecting potential candidates who are most likely to succeed, aligned with data-driven evidence, offers the greatest potential for academic success for student registered nurse anesthetists. The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to determine if a relationship existed between admission criteria (grade point average [GPA], science grade point average [SGPA], Graduate Record Examination scores, and critical care experience) and academic progression (current academic status and GPA). Key findings revealed that statistically significant relationships exist between the admission selection criteria and academic progression. Findings also indicated that a combination of the independent variables, specifically the GPA and SGPA, predict academic progression. Further research that includes examination of cognitive and noncognitive admission criteria may offer greater evidence predicting academic performance by student registered nurse anesthetists.

  12. Methodological Challenges in Examining the Impact of Healthcare Predictive Analytics on Nursing-Sensitive Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Alvin D

    2015-06-01

    The expansion of real-time analytic abilities within current electronic health records has led to innovations in predictive modeling and clinical decision support systems. However, the ability of these systems to influence patient outcomes is currently unknown. Even though nurses are the largest profession within the healthcare workforce, little research has been performed to explore the impact of clinical decision support on their decisions and the patient outcomes associated with them. A scoping literature review explored the impact clinical decision support systems containing healthcare predictive analytics have on four nursing-sensitive patient outcomes (pressure ulcers, failure to rescue, falls, and infections). While many articles discussed variable selection and predictive model development/validation, only four articles examined the impact on patient outcomes. The novelty of predictive analytics and the inherent methodological challenges in studying clinical decision support impact are likely responsible for this paucity of literature. Major methodological challenges include (1) multilevel nature of intervention, (2) treatment fidelity, and (3) adequacy of clinicians' subsequent behavior. There is currently insufficient evidence to demonstrate efficacy of healthcare predictive analytics-enhanced clinical decision support systems on nursing-sensitive patient outcomes. Innovative research methods and a greater emphasis on studying this phenomenon are needed.

  13. Accelerated second-degree nursing students: predictors of graduation and NCLEX-RN first-time pass rates.

    PubMed

    Penprase, Barbara B; Harris, Margaret A

    2013-01-01

    It is important to understand and identify factors that affect students' academic performance before entry into a nursing program and as they progress through the program. The authors discuss a study, and its outcomes, that assessed accelerated second-degree nursing students' prenursing and core nursing grades that served to predict their success at completing the nursing program and passing NCLEX-RN on first attempt. Strategies were identified to help at-risk students to be successful in the program and with first-time passage of NCLEX-RN.

  14. Disaggregating Activities of Daily Living Limitations for Predicting Nursing Home Admission

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Joelle H; Mitchell, Olivia S; Koh, Benedict S K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine whether disaggregated activities of daily living (ADL) limitations better predict the risk of nursing home admission compared to conventionally used ADL disability counts. Data Sources We used panel data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) for years 1998–2010. The HRS is a nationally representative survey of adults older than 50 years (n = 18,801). Study Design We fitted Cox regressions in a continuous time survival model with age at first nursing home admission as the outcome. Time-varying ADL disability types were the key explanatory variables. Principal Findings Of the six ADL limitations, bathing difficulty emerged as the strongest predictor of subsequent nursing home placement across cohorts. Eating and dressing limitations were also influential in driving admissions among more recent cohorts. Using simple ADL counts for analysis yielded similar adjusted R2s; however, the amount of explained variance doubled when we allowed the ADL disability measures to time-vary rather than remain static. Conclusions Looking beyond simple ADL counts can provide health professionals insights into which specific disability types trigger long-term nursing home use. Functional disabilities measured closer in time carry more prognostic power than static measures. PMID:25256014

  15. Comparing variations in labor costs for two vs. one full-time nurse manager.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Cathryn A; Lacey, Susan R; Cox, Karen S

    2004-01-01

    Labor costs for two versus one full-time nurse manager were compared. Results revealed reductions in nursing costs per patient day. These results suggest that innovative models may hold promise as organizations struggle to retain nurses and decrease costs.

  16. Most Likely to Achieve: Predicting Early Success of the Practical Nurse Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, April P.

    2013-01-01

    It is important that practical nurse (PN) educators be able to identify which students are likely to be successful in their programs. However, the majority of literature related to predicting success of nursing students has been done on baccalaureate nursing students in the university setting. This study sought to determine whether the same…

  17. The Prediction of Success in Nursing Education. Phase III, 1967-1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurston, John R.; And Others

    Specific aims of Phase III, planned as a 4-year program, included: (1) evaluating the efficiency of three instruments--Nursing Sentence Completions (NSC), Nurse Attitudes Inventory (NAI), and Luther Hospital Sentence Completions (LHSC)--for the prediction of success early in nursing school, (2) developing attitudinal area scores for the three…

  18. Most Likely to Achieve: Predicting Early Success of the Practical Nurse Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, April P.

    2013-01-01

    It is important that practical nurse (PN) educators be able to identify which students are likely to be successful in their programs. However, the majority of literature related to predicting success of nursing students has been done on baccalaureate nursing students in the university setting. This study sought to determine whether the same…

  19. Expansion tube test time predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gourlay, Christopher M.

    1988-01-01

    The interaction of an interface between two gases and strong expansion is investigated and the effect on flow in an expansion tube is examined. Two mechanisms for the unsteady Pitot-pressure fluctuations found in the test section of an expansion tube are proposed. The first mechanism depends on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the driver-test gas interface in the presence of a strong expansion. The second mechanism depends on the reflection of the strong expansion from the interface. Predictions compare favorably with experimental results. The theory is expected to be independent of the absolute values of the initial expansion tube filling pressures.

  20. Nurse-Administered, Gut-Directed Hypnotherapy in IBS: Efficacy and Factors Predicting a Positive Response.

    PubMed

    Lövdahl, Jenny; Ringström, Gisela; Agerforz, Pia; Törnblom, Hans; Simrén, Magnus

    2015-07-01

    Hypnotherapy is an effective treatment in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is often delivered by a psychotherapist and is costly and time consuming. Nurse-administered hypnotherapy could increase availability and reduce costs. In this study the authors evaluate the effectiveness of nurse-administered, gut-directed hypnotherapy and identify factors predicting treatment outcome. Eighty-five patients were included in the study. Participants received hypnotherapy by a nurse once/week for 12 weeks. Patients reported marked improvement in gastrointestinal (GI) and extra-colonic symptoms after treatment, as well as a reduction in GI-specific anxiety, general anxiety, and depression. Fifty-eight percent were responders after the 12 weeks treatment period, and of these 82% had a favorable clinical response already at week 6. Women were more likely than men to respond favorably to the treatment. Nurse-administered hypnotherapy is an effective treatment for IBS. Being female and reporting a favorable response to treatment by week 6 predicted a positive treatment response at the end of the 12 weeks treatment period.

  1. Application of the Workload Indicators of Staffing Need method to predict nursing human resources at a Family Health Service

    PubMed Central

    Bonfim, Daiana; Laus, Ana Maria; Leal, Ana Emilia; Fugulin, Fernanda Maria Togeiro; Gaidzinski, Raquel Rapone

    2016-01-01

    Objective verify the application of the Workload Indicators of Staffing Need method in the prediction of nursing human resources at a Family Health service. Method descriptive and quantitative study, undertaken at a Family Health service in the city of São Paulo. The set of sequential operations recommended in the Workload Indicators of Staffing Need method was used: definition of the professional category, type of health service and calculation of Available Work Time; definition of workload components; identification of mean time for workload components; dimensioning of staff needs based on the method, application and interpretation of the data. Result the workload proposed in the Workload Indicators of Staffing Need method to nursing technicians/auxiliary nurses was balanced with the number of professionals available at the Family Health service. The Workload Indicators of Staffing Need index amounted to 0.6 for nurses and 1.0 for nursing technicians/auxiliary nurses. Conclusion the application of the Workload Indicators of Staffing Need method was relevant to identify the components of the nursing professionals' workload. Therefore, it is recommendable as a nursing staffing tool at Family Health services, contributing to the access and universal health coverage. PMID:27143538

  2. Application of the Workload Indicators of Staffing Need method to predict nursing human resources at a Family Health Service.

    PubMed

    Bonfim, Daiana; Laus, Ana Maria; Leal, Ana Emilia; Fugulin, Fernanda Maria Togeiro; Gaidzinski, Raquel Rapone

    2016-01-01

    verify the application of the Workload Indicators of Staffing Need method in the prediction of nursing human resources at a Family Health service. descriptive and quantitative study, undertaken at a Family Health service in the city of São Paulo. The set of sequential operations recommended in the Workload Indicators of Staffing Need method was used: definition of the professional category, type of health service and calculation of Available Work Time; definition of workload components; identification of mean time for workload components; dimensioning of staff needs based on the method, application and interpretation of the data. the workload proposed in the Workload Indicators of Staffing Need method to nursing technicians/auxiliary nurses was balanced with the number of professionals available at the Family Health service. The Workload Indicators of Staffing Need index amounted to 0.6 for nurses and 1.0 for nursing technicians/auxiliary nurses. the application of the Workload Indicators of Staffing Need method was relevant to identify the components of the nursing professionals' workload. Therefore, it is recommendable as a nursing staffing tool at Family Health services, contributing to the access and universal health coverage.

  3. Utility of the theory of planned behavior to predict nursing staff blood pressure monitoring behaviours.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Joan M; Cook, Paul F; Ingram, Jennifer C

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate constructs from the theory of planned behavior (TPB, Ajzen 2002) - attitudes, sense of control, subjective norms and intentions - as predictors of accuracy in blood pressure monitoring. Despite numerous initiatives aimed at teaching blood pressure measurement techniques, many healthcare providers measure blood pressures incorrectly. Descriptive, cohort design. Medical assistants and licensed practical nurses were asked to complete a questionnaire on TPB variables. These nursing staff's patients had their blood pressures measured and completed a survey about techniques used to measure their blood pressure. We correlated nursing staff's responses on the TBP questionnaire with their intention to measure an accurate blood pressure and with the difference between their actual blood pressure measurement and a second measurement taken by a researcher immediately after the clinic visit. Patients' perceptions of MAs' and LPNs' blood pressure measurement techniques were examined descriptively. Perceived control and social norm predicted intention to measure an accurate blood pressure, with a negative relationship between knowledge and intention. Consistent with the TPB, intention was the only significant predictor of blood pressure measurement accuracy. Theory of planned behavior constructs predicted the healthcare providers' intention to measure blood pressure accurately and intention predicted the actual accuracy of systolic blood pressure measurement. However, participants' knowledge about blood pressure measurement had an unexpected negative relationship with their intentions. These findings have important implications for nursing education departments and organisations which traditionally invest significant time and effort in annual competency training focused on knowledge enhancement by staff. This study suggests that a better strategy might involve efforts to enhance providers' intention to change, particularly by changing social norms or increasing

  4. A moment in time: emergency nurses and the Canterbury earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Richardson, S; Ardagh, M; Grainger, P; Robinson, V

    2013-06-01

    To outline the impact of the Canterbury, New Zealand (NZ) earthquakes on Christchurch Hospital, and the experiences of emergency nurses during this time. NZ has experienced earthquakes and aftershocks centred in the Canterbury region of the South Island. The location of these, around and within the major city of Christchurch, was unexpected and associated with previously unknown fault lines. While the highest magnitude quake occurred in September 2010, registering 7.1 on the Richter scale, it was the magnitude 6.3 event on 22 February 2011 which was associated with the greatest injury burden and loss of life. Staff working in the only emergency department in the city were faced with an external emergency while also being directly affected as part of the disaster. SOURCES OF EVIDENCE: This paper developed following interviews with nurses who worked during this period, and draws on literature related to healthcare responses to earthquakes and natural disasters. The establishment of an injury database allowed for an accurate picture to emerge of the injury burden, and each of the authors was present and worked in a clinical capacity during the earthquake. Nurses played a significant role in the response to the earthquakes and its aftermath. However, little is known regarding the impact of this, either in personal or professional terms. This paper presents an overview of the earthquakes and experiences of nurses working during this time, identifying a range of issues that will benefit from further exploration and research. It seeks to provide a sense of the experiences and the potential meanings that were derived from being part of this 'moment in time'. Examples of innovations in practice emerged during the earthquake response and a number of recommendations for nursing practice are identified. © 2013 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2013 International Council of Nurses.

  5. Predicting factors of positive orientation and attitudes towards nursing: A quantitative cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ten Hoeve, Yvonne; Castelein, Stynke; Jansen, Wiebren; Jansen, Gerard; Roodbol, Petrie

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have identified various reasons for students to choose a career in nursing. Students at the start of their programme hold a great variety of images and perceptions of nursing which can affect their orientation and attitudes towards their future profession. This paper aims to examine nursing students' orientation and attitudes towards nursing at the beginning of their educational programme, and to explore predictors of positive orientation and attitudes. The study used a quantitative cross-sectional design. A survey was conducted among first-year nursing students at four nursing universities of applied sciences in the Netherlands. Questionnaires were administered to all students enrolled in a bachelor of nursing programme (n=1414) at these universities. Respondents completed a survey consisting of: 1) Nursing Orientation Tool, 2) Nursing Attitude Questionnaire, and 3) demographic data such as gender, living status, nursing experience, preliminary training, first-choice programme, and career choice. Kruskal Wallis tests, with post hoc Mann Whitney U tests, were used to compare group scores. Multiple regression was performed to investigate predictors of positive orientation and attitudes towards nursing. Students in this study sample (n=1244) strongly agreed with statements related to caring, nursing expertise, professional nursing knowledge and the application of this knowledge. Predictors of positive orientation and attitudes towards nursing include having nursing/caring experience, indicating nursing as the first choice for study, preliminary vocational training, and a desire to make a career in nursing. Data from this survey suggest a link between personal and environmental characteristics and motivations to select nursing as a career. Understanding which factors predict positive orientation and attitudes towards nursing could offer educators a tool in the recruitment and selection assessment of new students. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  6. Interactions of Timing and Prediction Error Learning

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Timing and prediction error learning have historically been treated as independent processes, but growing evidence has indicated that they are not orthogonal. Timing emerges at the earliest time point when conditioned responses are observed, and temporal variables modulate prediction error learning in both simple conditioning and cue competition paradigms. In addition, prediction errors, through changes in reward magnitude or value alter timing of behavior. Thus, there appears to be a bi-directional interaction between timing and prediction error learning. Modern theories have attempted to integrate the two processes with mixed success. A neurocomputational approach to theory development is espoused, which draws on neurobiological evidence to guide and constrain computational model development. Heuristics for future model development are presented with the goal of sparking new approaches to theory development in the timing and prediction error fields. PMID:23962670

  7. Interactions of timing and prediction error learning.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Timing and prediction error learning have historically been treated as independent processes, but growing evidence has indicated that they are not orthogonal. Timing emerges at the earliest time point when conditioned responses are observed, and temporal variables modulate prediction error learning in both simple conditioning and cue competition paradigms. In addition, prediction errors, through changes in reward magnitude or value alter timing of behavior. Thus, there appears to be a bi-directional interaction between timing and prediction error learning. Modern theories have attempted to integrate the two processes with mixed success. A neurocomputational approach to theory development is espoused, which draws on neurobiological evidence to guide and constrain computational model development. Heuristics for future model development are presented with the goal of sparking new approaches to theory development in the timing and prediction error fields.

  8. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... registered nurse. 57.313 Section 57.313 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... in full-time employment as a registered nurse (including teaching in any of the fields of nurse... for full-time employment as a registered nurse will be made by the institution to whose fund his...

  9. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... registered nurse. 57.313 Section 57.313 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... in full-time employment as a registered nurse (including teaching in any of the fields of nurse... for full-time employment as a registered nurse will be made by the institution to whose fund his...

  10. Purposeful and timely nursing rounds: a best practice implementation project.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Juli F

    2016-01-01

    Purposeful and timely rounding is a best practice intervention to routinely meet patient care needs, ensure patient safety, decrease the occurrence of patient preventable events, and proactively address problems before they occur. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) endorsed hourly rounding as the best way to reduce call lights and fall injuries, and increase both quality of care and patient satisfaction. Nurse knowledge regarding purposeful rounding and infrastructure supporting timeliness are essential components for consistency with this patient centred practice. The project aimed to improve patient satisfaction and safety through implementation of purposeful and timely nursing rounds. Goals for patient satisfaction scores and fall volume were set. Specific objectives were to determine current compliance with evidence-based criteria related to rounding times and protocols, improve best practice knowledge among staff nurses, and increase compliance with these criteria. For the objectives of this project the Joanna Briggs Institute's Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research into Practice audit tool were used. Direct observation of staff nurses on a medical surgical unit in the United States was employed to assess timeliness and utilization of a protocol when rounding. Interventions were developed in response to baseline audit results. A follow-up audit was conducted to determine compliance with the same criteria. For the project aims, pre- and post-intervention unit-level data related to nursing-sensitive elements of patient satisfaction and safety were compared. Rounding frequency at specified intervals during awake and sleeping hours nearly doubled. Use of a rounding protocol increased substantially to 64% compliance from zero. Three elements of patient satisfaction had substantive rate increases but the hospital's goals were not reached. Nurse communication and pain management scores increased modestly (5% and 11

  11. Sitting Time: An Increasing Heath Risk Among Nurse Educators.

    PubMed

    Main, M Eve; Garrett-Wright, Dawn; Sturgeon, Lizbeth P; Jones, M Susan; Blackburn, Donna S

    Prolonged sitting time (ST) is a distinct risk factor for early mortality and cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine ST and health of Kentucky nurse educators. The written survey included demographic items, general health items, and ST. Total average ST was 10.8 hours (workdays) and 8 hours (non-workdays). There was no relationship between body mass index and ST; however, the medication used to treat hypertension and hypercholesterolemia was associated with increased ST. Nurse educators are at risk for negative health effects of prolonged ST, and effective interventions are imperative.

  12. An evaluation of the time for nursing activity in a hospital using a full Electronic Medical Record System (EMR).

    PubMed

    Chung, Eun-Ja; Kim, Hyun-Ja; Park, Kwang-Hee; Song, Young-Ae; Lee, Boek-Nam; Lee, Mi-Jeong; Lee, Jeong-Hee; Lee, Hye-A; Lim, Yeon-Sook; Choi, Eun-Young; Hwang, Hye-Young; Lee, Hyun-Sook

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to analyze the time for direct and indirect nursing activity to evaluate the workload of nurses using a full Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system on practice. The result is that the mean time for nursing activity per nurse was 499.56 minutes, the mean time for direct nursing activity per nurse was 251.1 minutes (50.3%), and the mean time for indirect nursing activity per nurse was 248.42 minutes(49.7%). The time for direct nursing activity was more than the time for indirect nursing activity. There was a significant difference in the time for nursing activity according to workplace (p < 0.00*), but no difference according to nursing career. Regarding 3 duty-shifts, the time for direct nursing activity was highest in the evening shift and the time for indirect nursing activity was highest in the night shift.

  13. Predicting emotional exhaustion among haemodialysis nurses: a structural equation model using Kanter's structural empowerment theory.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Bronwyn; Douglas, Clint; Bonner, Ann

    2014-12-01

    To test an explanatory model of the relationships between the nursing work environment, job satisfaction, job stress and emotional exhaustion for haemodialysis nurses, drawing on Kanter's theory of organizational empowerment. Understanding the organizational predictors of burnout (emotional exhaustion) in haemodialysis nurses is critical for staff retention and improving nurse and patient outcomes. Previous research has demonstrated high levels of emotional exhaustion among haemodialysis nurses, yet the relationships between nurses' work environment, job satisfaction, stress and emotional exhaustion in this population are poorly understood. A cross-sectional online survey. 417 nurses working in haemodialysis units completed an online survey between October 2011-April 2012 using validated measures of the work environment, job satisfaction, job stress and emotional exhaustion. Overall, the structural equation model demonstrated adequate fit and we found partial support for the hypothesized relationships. Nurses' work environment had a direct positive effect on job satisfaction, explaining 88% of the variance. Greater job satisfaction, in turn, predicted lower job stress, explaining 82% of the variance. Job satisfaction also had an indirect effect on emotional exhaustion by mitigating job stress. However, job satisfaction did not have a direct effect on emotional exhaustion. The work environment of haemodialysis nurses is pivotal to the development of job satisfaction. Nurses' job satisfaction also predicts their level of job stress and emotional exhaustion. Our findings suggest staff retention can be improved by creating empowering work environments that promote job satisfaction among haemodialysis nurses. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... registered nurse. 57.313 Section 57.313 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... nurse. (a) For loans made after November 18, 1971, and before September 29, 1979. A person who: (1... in full-time employment as a registered nurse (including teaching in any of the fields of nurse...

  15. Uncertainties in container failure time predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Williford, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Stochastic variations in the local chemical environment of a geologic waste repository can cause corresponding variations in container corrosion rates and failure times, and thus in radionuclide release rates. This paper addresses how well the future variations in repository chemistries must be known in order to predict container failure times that are bounded by a finite time period within the repository lifetime. Preliminary results indicate that a 5000 year scatter in predicted container failure times requires that repository chemistries be known to within {plus minus}10% over the repository lifetime. These are small uncertainties compared to current estimates. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Flood prediction using Time Series Data Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damle, Chaitanya; Yalcin, Ali

    2007-02-01

    SummaryThis paper describes a novel approach to river flood prediction using Time Series Data Mining which combines chaos theory and data mining to characterize and predict events in complex, nonperiodic and chaotic time series. Geophysical phenomena, including earthquakes, floods and rainfall, represent a class of nonlinear systems termed chaotic, in which the relationships between variables in a system are dynamic and disproportionate, however completely deterministic. Chaos theory provides a structured explanation for irregular behavior and anomalies in systems that are not inherently stochastic. While nonlinear approaches such as Artificial Neural Networks, Hidden Markov Models and Nonlinear Prediction are useful in forecasting of daily discharge values in a river, the focus of these approaches is on forecasting magnitudes of future discharge values rather than the prediction of floods. The described Time Series Data Mining methodology focuses on the prediction of events where floods constitute the events in a river daily discharge time series. The methodology is demonstrated using data collected at the St. Louis gauging station located on the Mississippi River in the USA. Results associated with the impact of earliness of prediction and the acceptable risk-level vs. prediction accuracy are presented.

  17. Predicting application run times using historical information.

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, I.; Smith, W.; Taylor, V.

    1999-06-25

    The authors present a technique for deriving predictions for the run times of parallel applications from the run times of similar applications that have executed in the past. The novel aspect of the work is the use of search techniques to determine those application characteristics that yield the best definition of similarity for the purpose of making predictions. They use four workloads recorded from parallel computers at Argonne National Laboratory, the Cornell Theory Center, and the San Diego Supercomputer Center to evaluate the effectiveness of the approach.They show that on these workloads the techniques achieve predictions that are between 14 and 60% better than those achieved by other researchers; the approach achieves mean prediction errors that are between 41 and 65% of mean application run times.

  18. Do personality traits predict work outcomes of certified nursing assistants?

    PubMed

    Kovach, Christine R; Simpson, Michelle R; Reitmaier, Amy B; Johnson, Addie; Kelber, Sheryl T

    2010-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to describe personality traits of certified nursing assistants (CNAs) employed at nursing homes and explore relationships between personality traits, job satisfaction, and job performance. The sample included 177 CNAs providing direct care to residents in three nursing homes. CNAs with high and low job performance skills were distinguished by the cluster of traits associated with teamwork skills. Overall, 21.3% of the variance in job satisfaction was explained by the personality traits of Adjustment, Prudence, Likeability, Excitable, and Dutiful, F(8, 145) = 4.899, p < 0.001. The links found between personality, job satisfaction, and job performance provide important information about the personality traits of nursing staff who are most likely to enjoy and perform well in the nursing home setting. Knowledge of these links may be useful for hiring the appropriate person for direct care nursing home positions. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Enhancing Nursing Staffing Forecasting With Safety Stock Over Lead Time Modeling.

    PubMed

    McNair, Douglas S

    2015-01-01

    In balancing competing priorities, it is essential that nursing staffing provide enough nurses to safely and effectively care for the patients. Mathematical models to predict optimal "safety stocks" have been routine in supply chain management for many years but have up to now not been applied in nursing workforce management. There are various aspects that exhibit similarities between the 2 disciplines, such as an evolving demand forecast according to acuity and the fact that provisioning "stock" to meet demand in a future period has nonzero variable lead time. Under assumptions about the forecasts (eg, the demand process is well fit as an autoregressive process) and about the labor supply process (≥1 shifts' lead time), we show that safety stock over lead time for such systems is effectively equivalent to the corresponding well-studied problem for systems with stationary demand bounds and base stock policies. Hence, we can apply existing models from supply chain analytics to find the optimal safety levels of nurse staffing. We use a case study with real data to demonstrate that there are significant benefits from the inclusion of the forecast process when determining the optimal safety stocks.

  20. Predicting licensure success with a computerized comprehensive nursing exam: The HESI exit exam.

    PubMed

    Lauchner, Kathryn A; Newman, Mary; Britt, Robin B

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the accuracy of computerized comprehensive nursing exams, HESI Exit Exams (E2s), in predicting registered nurse and practical nurse students' success on the licensing exam. Schools of nursing that administered Els during the academic year 1996-97 were surveyed to determine how many students (n = 2809) predicted by the E2 to pass the licensure exam had failed, and if the exam administration was monitored or proctored. Based on the findings of this study, the E2 was determined to be an accurate-predictor of students' success on the licensing exam. However, it was significantly more accurate (P = .05) when the exam was monitored (99.49%) than unmonitored (96.82%}. The E2 was determined to be highly predictive of students' success on the licensing exam for all groups tested: associate degree, baccalaureate, diploma, and practical nursing students.

  1. Predicting licensure success with a computerized comprehensive nursing exam. The HESI Exit Exam.

    PubMed

    Lauchner, K A; Newman, M; Britt, R B

    1999-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the accuracy of computerized comprehensive nursing exams, HESI Exit Exams (E2s), in predicting registered nurse and practical nurse students success on the licensing exam. Schools of nursing that administered E2s during the academic year 1996-97 were surveyed to determine how many students (n = 2809) predicted by the E2 to pass the licensure exam had failed, and if the exam administration was monitored or proctored. Based on the findings of this study, the E2 was determined to be an accurate predictor of students' success on the licensing exam. However, it was significantly more accurate (P = .05) when the exam was monitored (99.49%) than unmonitored (96.82%). The E2 was determined to be highly predictive of students' success on the licensing exam for all groups tested: associate degree, baccalaureate, diploma, and practical nursing students.

  2. Predicting licensure success with a computerized comprehensive nursing exam: the HESI Exit Exam.

    PubMed

    Lauchner, Kathryn A; Newman, Mary; Britt, Robin B

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the accuracy of computerized comprehensive nursing exams, HESI Exit Exams (Es), in predicting registered nurse and practical nurse students' success on the licensing exam. Schools of nursing that administered Es during the academic year 1996-97 were surveyed to determine how many students (n = 2809) predicted by the E to pass the licensure exam had failed, and if the exam administration was monitored or proctored. Based on the findings of this study, the E was determined to be an accurate predictor of students' success on the licensing exam. However, it was significantly more accurate (P = .05) when the exam was monitored (99.49%) than unmonitored (96.82%). The E was determined to be highly predictive of students' success on the licensing exam for all groups tested: associate degree, baccalaureate, diploma, and practical nursing students.

  3. Time management behaviors of head nurses and staff nurses employed in Tehran Social Security Hospitals, Iran in 2011

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Hosseinzadeh, Rahele; Tefreshi, Mansoreh Zaghari; Hosseinzadeh, Sadaf

    2014-01-01

    Background: Effective time management is considered important for managers for achieving the goals in an organization. Head nurses can improve their efficiency and performance with effective use of time. There has always been a lot of disagreement in understanding time management behaviors of head nurses; therefore, the present study was conducted with an aim to compare the understanding of head nurses and staff nurses of the time management behaviors of head nurses employed in Social Security Hospitals in Tehran, Iran in 2011. Materials and Methods: This was a comparative descriptive study in which 85 head nurses were selected through census and 170 staff nurses were also selected through simple random sampling method from hospitals covered by the Social Security. Data collection was done through a standard inventory with high validity and reliability, which consisted of two parts: Socio-demographic characteristics and time management inventory. The obtained data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics through SPSS software version 13. Results: Mean score of time management in head nurses’ viewpoint was 143.22 (±18.66) and in staff nurses’ viewpoint was 136.04 (±21.45). There was a significant correlation between the mean scores of head nurses’ time management and some of their socio-demographic characteristics such as gender, clinical experience, passing a time management course, and book reading (P < 0.05). There was a significant correlation between the mean scores of staff nurses’ time management and their clinical working experience, education, using time management approach, and type of hospital (P < 0.05). The majority of head nurses (52.9%) believed that their time management was in a high level; besides, most of the staff nurses also (40%) believed that time management of their head nurses was high. However, there was a significant difference between the perceptions of both groups on using Mann–Whitney test (P < 0

  4. Predictors of lost time from work among nursing personnel who sought treatment for back pain.

    PubMed

    Pompeii, Lisa A; Lipscomb, Hester J; Dement, John M

    2010-01-01

    To examine possible predictors of lost workdays among nurses and nurses' aides who sought treatment for work-related back pain. Nursing staff employed at a tertiary care medical center over a 13-year time period (1994 through 2006). We used existing data from clinic surveys administered to nursing personnel during their initial treatment visit to the hospital's occupational health clinic. Predictors of losing ≤ 7 and ≥ 8 workdays was examined. 589 of 708 (83%) nursing personnel with complaints of work-related back pain completed the survey, with 31% resulting in lost workdays. Experiencing sudden onset of pain (RR:1.9; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.1), a combination of severe pain with numbness and tingling in the back/legs (RR: 7.4; 95% CI: 2.9, 18.6), severe pain only (RR: 4.4; 95% CI: 1.8, 11.1), numbness and tingling in the back/legs only (RR: 3.5; 95% CI: 1.0, 12.2), and working < 5 years at the hospital (RR: 2.3; 95% CI: 1.2, 4.7) were predictive of losing ≥ 8 workdays. Job title, work demands, work conflicts, and most psychosocial factors were not predictive. Severe pain, neurologic symptoms and sudden onset of pain were predictive of delayed return-to-work; however, these symptoms alone should not be considered indicators of poor outcomes given that most workers who reported these symptoms returned to work in less than 8~days. Among these health care workers, lost workdays appear to be related to more severe pathology rather than workplace characteristics.

  5. Practice to Pedagogy: A Study of the Lived Experiences of Part-Time Nursing Faculty Transitioning from Expert Nurse to Novice Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testut, Tammy A.

    2013-01-01

    Part-time faculty in nursing programs are increasingly being hired as a supplement to the deteriorating pool of full-time nursing faculty. There is a growing need to fill the many vacant slots in nursing academe at the same time that there is substantial growth in prospective students inspiring to become nurses. While these "expert"…

  6. Practice to Pedagogy: A Study of the Lived Experiences of Part-Time Nursing Faculty Transitioning from Expert Nurse to Novice Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testut, Tammy A.

    2013-01-01

    Part-time faculty in nursing programs are increasingly being hired as a supplement to the deteriorating pool of full-time nursing faculty. There is a growing need to fill the many vacant slots in nursing academe at the same time that there is substantial growth in prospective students inspiring to become nurses. While these "expert"…

  7. Estimated Time to Complete Direct Nursing Interventions Using the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) at Eight Hospitals in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunjoo; Park, Hyejin

    2016-12-14

    Without data on the average time for performing nursing interventions, it is not possible to identify the cost-effective nursing practices, nurse staffing levels, and skill mix that are associated with improved patient outcomes, nor can reimbursement rates be accurately determined. The purpose of this study was to estimate the time needed to perform direct nursing interventions in Korea using the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) system, and then compare the findings with time estimates made by U.S. nurses. Data were collected from 721 registered nurses working in eight hospitals in South Korea. Each nurse was asked to choose the 30 most frequently used direct nursing interventions from a list of 433 from the Korean version of the NIC and to estimate the time needed to perform their selections. The U.S. data from the second edition of NIC were used for comparative purposes. Among the 92 nursing interventions studied, the majority were in the physiological domain, with 46 (50%) in Physiological: Basic and 25 (27%) in Physiological: Complex. In Korea, the intervention reported as taking the shortest time was Tube Care: Umbilical Line, while the intervention reported as taking the longest time was Bowel Irrigation. Comparisons of the time to perform interventions in the two countries indicated that only 38 (41.3%) interventions are performed in 15 min or less in both countries. Of the remainder, six interventions showed considerable variation in time to perform between the two countries. Findings from the study will provide fundamental data for calculating the cost of nursing interventions, which is critical for the establishment of reimbursement rates for interventions provided. © 2016 NANDA International, Inc.

  8. Prediction of Sucessful Nursing Performance. Part III and Part IV. Health Manpower References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwirian, Patricia M.; And Others

    As part of the three-phase national study to provide information to form a basis for predictions about successful nursing performance, a review was conducted of the performance of nursing school graduates at their first jobs. In March, 1976, questionnaires were mailed to a cohort of 1975 graduates who were selected by school officials as having…

  9. Informal Workplace Learning among Nurses: Organisational Learning Conditions and Personal Characteristics That Predict Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyndt, Eva; Vermeire, Eva; Cabus, Shana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine which organisational learning conditions and individual characteristics predict the learning outcomes nurses achieve through informal learning activities. There is specific relevance for the nursing profession because of the rapidly changing healthcare systems. Design/Methodology/Approach: In total, 203 nurses…

  10. A Model for Intervention and Predicting Success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heupel, Carol

    1994-01-01

    The relationship of selected academic variables to National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) performance was studied and a "best set" of indicators predictive of NCLEX-RN success was identified. Results indicated that selected nursing theory courses and the junior year grade point average could be used to…

  11. Informal Workplace Learning among Nurses: Organisational Learning Conditions and Personal Characteristics That Predict Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyndt, Eva; Vermeire, Eva; Cabus, Shana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine which organisational learning conditions and individual characteristics predict the learning outcomes nurses achieve through informal learning activities. There is specific relevance for the nursing profession because of the rapidly changing healthcare systems. Design/Methodology/Approach: In total, 203 nurses…

  12. Improving predictions by cross pollination in time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schevenhoven, Francine; Selten, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Given a set of imperfect weather models, one could ask how these models can be combined in order to improve weather predictions produced with these models. In this study we explore a technique called cross-pollination in time (CPT, Smith 2001). In the CPT approach the models exchange states during the prediction. The number of possible predictions grows quickly with time and a strategy to retain only a small number of predictions, called pruning, needs to be developed. In the learning phase a pruning strategy is proposed based on retaining those solutions that remain closest to the truth. From the learning phase probabilities are derived that determine weights to be applied to the imperfect models in the forecast phase. The CPT technique is explored using low-order dynamical systems and applied to a global atmospheric model. First results indicate that the CPT approach improves the forecast quality over the individual models.

  13. Parturition prediction and timing of canine pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, YeunHee; Travis, Alexander J.; Meyers-Wallen, Vicki N.

    2007-01-01

    An accurate method of predicting the date of parturition in the bitch is clinically useful to minimize or prevent reproductive losses by timely intervention. Similarly, an accurate method of timing canine ovulation and gestation is critical for development of assisted reproductive technologies, e.g. estrous synchronization and embryo transfer. This review discusses present methods for accurately timing canine gestational age and outlines their use in clinical management of high-risk pregnancies and embryo transfer research. PMID:17904630

  14. Predicting National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    The Baccalaureate Nursing program in San Antonio, Texas experienced a decrease in National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) on the first attempt for students graduating between 2009 and 2014 without a clear explanation for the decline. The purpose of this quantitative non-experimental correlational study was to…

  15. Predicting National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    The Baccalaureate Nursing program in San Antonio, Texas experienced a decrease in National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) on the first attempt for students graduating between 2009 and 2014 without a clear explanation for the decline. The purpose of this quantitative non-experimental correlational study was to…

  16. Nurses' perception of time availability in patient communication in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chan, Engle A; Jones, Aled; Fung, Sylvia; Wu, Sui Chu

    2012-04-01

    To explore nurses' perceptions of their patient communication in practice and to identify their ways of communicating. Nurse theorists and clinicians are aware of the importance of nurse-patient communication in providing patient-centred care. However, barriers remain that prevent nurses from implementing quality/effective communication, and time is often viewed as a critical variable. Continuous emphasis on efficiency contravenes patient-centred care, warranting a re-examination of nurses' perception of time in nurse-patient communication. Focus group interviews were adopted. Thirty-nine registered nurses participated. Interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed and translated, and data were analysed using thematic analysis to identify codes, categories and themes/patterns. Three themes were identified regarding nurses' perception of communication with time: (1) Patterns of communication. (2) Routine scheduled communication vs. meeting individuals' needs. (3) Saving time through communication. Patterns of communication, based on participants' criteria such as the purpose, who initiated it, the nature of communication, expectation to perform, therapeutic value and relation with time were explicated. By integrating communication into routines as intended actions, nurses demonstrate that communication and relationship building with patients take no extra time. Good communication and good relationships help nurses save time. Nurses' communication behaviour is closely related to their perception of communication. This study suggests the need for a paradigm shift in thinking about communication as requiring time. Additionally, nurses should recognise the value of short, iterative interaction and chit-chat as quality communication for knowing their patients and providing patient-centred care. Nurses should think beyond time in the discourse of effective nurse-patient communication, as it often relates to manpower. An understanding of how nurses perceive their time

  17. A Holistic Framework for Nursing Time: Implications for Theory, Practice, and Research

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    Topic Nursing time has relevance for those who produce it, those who receive it and those who must pay for it. Though the term nursing time may be commonly used, a common understanding of the concept within the fields of nursing and healthcare administration is lacking. Purpose The purposes of this paper are to explore the concept of nursing time and to identify implications for theory development, clinical and administrative practice, and research. Discussion Both physical and psychological forms of time are viewed as fundamental to our experience of time as social beings. Nursing time has significant intrinsic and instrumental value in nursing and healthcare. A holistic approach incorporating the physical, psychological, and sociological aspects and dimensions of nursing time is advocated. Conclusions Multiple strategies to enhance the patient experience of nursing time are warranted and should address how much time nurses spend with patients as well as how they spend that time. Patterns of overlapping and competing time structures for nurses should be identified and evaluated for their effect on physical time available for patient care and the psychological experiences of time by nurses and patients. PMID:20690994

  18. Predicting quality of work life on nurses' intention to leave.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ya-Wen; Dai, Yu-Tzu; Park, Chang-Gi; McCreary, Linda L

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between quality of work life (QWL) and nurses' intention to leave their organization (ITLorg). A descriptive cross-sectional survey design was conducted using purposive sampling of 1,283 nurses at seven hospitals in Taiwan. Data were collected from March to June 2012. Three questionnaires, including the Chinese version of the Quality of Nursing Work Life scale (C-QNWL), a questionnaire of intention to leave the organization, and a demographic questionnaire, with two informed consent forms were delivered to the nurses at their workplaces. Descriptive data, Pearson's correlations, and the ordinal regression model were analyzed. Over half (52.5%) of nurses had ITLorg. Seven QWL dimensions were significantly negatively correlated with ITLorg (r = -0.17 to -0.37, p < .01). Significant predictors (p < .05) of ITLorg (the pseudo R(2) = 0.282) were being single, having a diploma or lower educational level, working in a nonteaching hospital. Four of the QWL dimensions--supportive milieu with job security and professional recognition, work arrangement and workload, work or home life balance, and nursing staffing and patient care--were also predictors of ITLorg. Three QWL dimensions were not predictors of ITLorg. This study showed that individual-related variables (being single, having a diploma or lower educational level), a work-related variable (working at a nonteaching hospital), and the four QWL dimensions play a significant role in nurses' ITLorg. After the QWL dimensions were added to the regression, the variance explained by the model more than doubled. To reduce nurses' ITLorg, nursing administrators may offer more focused interventions to improve the supportive milieu with job security and professional recognition, work arrangement and workload, work or home life balance, and nursing staffing and patient care. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  19. Predicting river travel time from hydraulic characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    Predicting the effect of a pollutant spill on downstream water quality is primarily dependent on the water velocity, longitudinal mixing, and chemical/physical reactions. Of these, velocity is the most important and difficult to predict. This paper provides guidance on extrapolating travel-time information from one within bank discharge to another. In many cases, a time series of discharge (such as provided by a U.S. Geological Survey stream gauge) will provide an excellent basis for this extrapolation. Otherwise, the accuracy of a travel time extrapolation based on a resistance equation can be greatly improved by assuming the total flow area is composed of two parts, an active and an inactive area. For 60 reaches of 12 rivers with slopes greater than about 0.0002, travel times could be predicted to within about 10% by computing the active flow area using the Manning equation with n = 0.035 and assuming a constant inactive area for each reach. The predicted travel times were not very sensitive to the assumed values of bed slope or channel width.

  20. Nursing care time and quality indicators for adult intensive care: correlation analysis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo Carlos; Fugulin, Fernanda Maria Togeiro

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this quantitative, correlational and descriptive study was to analyze the time the nursing staff spends to assist patients in Adult Intensive Care Units, as well as to verify its correlation with quality care indicators. The average length of time spent on care and the quality care indicators were identified by consulting management instruments the nursing head of the Unit employs. The average hours of nursing care delivered to patients remained stable, but lower than official Brazilian agencies' indications. The correlation between time of nursing care and the incidence of accidental extubation indicator indicated that it decreases with increasing nursing care delivered by nurses. The results of this investigation showed the influence of nursing care time, provided by nurses, in the outcome of care delivery.

  1. Teachers' perceptions of full- and part-time nurses at school.

    PubMed

    Biag, Manuelito; Srivastava, Ashini; Landau, Melinda; Rodriguez, Eunice

    2015-06-01

    Teachers and school nurses partner together to help ensure students stay healthy and engaged in school. The purpose of this study is to generate a deeper understanding of teachers' perceptions on the benefits and challenges of working with full- or part-time school nurses. We conducted a qualitative analysis of open-ended survey responses from 129 teachers in nine low-income, ethnically diverse urban schools. These schools were part of a multiyear project that placed full-time nurses in four schools, while five schools with part-time nurses were used as a comparison group. Findings indicate that teachers had strong appreciation for the wide range of responsibilities undertaken by the school nurse. Teachers' level of satisfaction was linked to the number of hours the nurse is on-site, where teachers reported greater satisfaction with nurses who worked on campus full time. Results point to factors that may improve working relations between teachers and nurses.

  2. Perceptions of Teaching Effectiveness of Part-Time and Full-Time Clinical Nursing Faculty of BSN Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSantis, Kimberly L.

    2012-01-01

    The United States faces a critical shortage of full-time registered nurses, which is . directly affected by the shortage of nurse educators. Many schools of nursing are already seeing the impact as qualified program applicants are being turned away due to the lack of qualified educators available to teach them. The trend has become to employ…

  3. Perceptions of Teaching Effectiveness of Part-Time and Full-Time Clinical Nursing Faculty of BSN Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSantis, Kimberly L.

    2012-01-01

    The United States faces a critical shortage of full-time registered nurses, which is . directly affected by the shortage of nurse educators. Many schools of nursing are already seeing the impact as qualified program applicants are being turned away due to the lack of qualified educators available to teach them. The trend has become to employ…

  4. Affective and instrumental communication in primary care interactions: predicting the satisfaction of nursing staff and patients.

    PubMed

    Haskard, Kelly B; DiMatteo, M Robin; Heritage, John

    2009-01-01

    Verbal and nonverbal communication between nursing staff and patients has received scant research attention. This study examined patients' and nursing staff members' global affective and instrumental communication, mutual influence, and relationship to postvisit satisfaction. This study employed ratings of videotaped primary care visits of 81 nursing staff members with 235 patients, and assessed communication in 2 channels: nonverbal visual and speech including vocal tone. Communication channel differences and prediction of patient satisfaction were examined. The visual and vocal communication of nursing staff members and patients robustly predicted each other's satisfaction and reflected their own satisfaction with the dyadic visit. Affect was communicated more clearly through the speech with vocal tone channel, whereas instrumental communication was stronger in visual nonverbal behavior. Patients' and nursing staff members' behaviors of pleasantness and involvement frequently co-occurred.

  5. CHANGING INFUSION PRACTICE GENERATES SIGNIFICANT EFFICIENCIES IN NURSING TIME AND RESOURCE USAGE IN PAEDIATRIC INTENSIVE CARE.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Adam; Jemmett, Liz; Barber, Rachael

    2016-09-01

    Infusion preparation in British PICUs uses the Rule of Six (ROS) which was developed for administration without infusion devices. This method is inaccurate.1 Regulators recommend standardised approaches to IV infusions to improve patient safety and quality of care.2 Administration set changes also have an association with resource use and central line infections.3 We report the impact of fixed concentration infusions and reduced administration set changes on nursing time and infusion equipment cost. Morphine and midazolam infusions were standardised in September 2014. Direct observation of infusion preparation was carried out beforeand after the introduction of fixed-concentration (FC) infusions to quantify the nursing time required to prepare infusions. Administration was prospectively documented using purposive sampling until a population-representative sample for age and weight was obtained (1 month). This data was then scaled up to predict activity over one year. Syringe use and administration set use was calculated. Reducing frequency of administration set changes to 72 hrs in accordance with infection control policy was then calculated retrospectively. It takes 40 minutes (2 nurses×20 minutes) to prepare ROS syringes and 30 minutes (2 nurses×15 minutes) for FC syringes.In total ROS infusions required 2433 hrs of nursing time to prepare. FC infusions reduced this time by 25% (608 hrs) releasing 0.5 WTE nursing time back to patient care.Mean duration of IV sedation in these patients was 100 hrs. The cost associated with replacing administration sets with each syringe was £16,060. By changing every 72 hrs, this cost is reduced to £4,400 - a cost saving of £11,660. FC syringes are more efficient than ROS. FC preparations have released 0.5 WTE nurses back to patient care. Changing administration sets 72 hrly realises significant cost efficiencies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted

  6. Psychosocial work environment and prediction of job satisfaction among Swedish registered nurses and physicians - a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Sandra

    2012-06-01

    In Sweden, the health care sector was subject to considerable changes during the 1990s: decreased costs, related staff redundancies and high rates of sick leave. The situation has now changed, and the sector is not facing the same all-embracing and turbulent changes. In addition, there is a shortage of nurses and physicians and a difficulty in retaining qualified staff. Regarding the psychosocial work environment, there is a lack of studies where both physicians and nurses are in focus. It is from a managerial perspective important to take a holistic approach towards questions regarding the work environment in general and the psychosocial work environment in particular. The aims of this study were to analyse similarities and differences in Registered Nurses and physicians' experience of quantitative and qualitative demands, control, role conflicts, role clarity, social support and job satisfaction in 2002 and 2009 and to analyse the stability in the prediction of job satisfaction over time. Questionnaires regarding psychosocial work environment aspects were distributed in 2002 and 2009, and a total of 860 nurses and 866 physicians answered the questionnaire. Independent t tests and linear stepwise regression analyses were conducted. The results indicate that the work environment has improved between 2002 and 2009 and that nurses experience their psychosocial working environment as more satisfactory than physicians. Social support, control, role conflicts, role clarity and qualitative demands were the best predictors of job satisfaction in 2002 and 2009. Quantitative demands did not contribute to predicting job satisfaction. Variables predicting job satisfaction are quite stable over time and are quite comparable for both nurses and physicians.

  7. Meanings of knowledge and identity in public health nursing in a time of transition: interpretations of public health nurses' narratives.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Berit Misund; Clancy, Anne

    2015-12-01

    A changing healthcare system affects the professional identity of nursing groups. Public health nursing has experienced challenges in balancing the paternalistic expert ideology and the empowerment participation ideology. A strong professional identity can legitimate nursing, and possibly influence the quality of nursing work. Narrations from practice can illuminate the nurses' theoretical and practical knowledge and help illustrate their collective professional identity. To illuminate the meaning of public health nursing knowledge and professional identity in a continuously changing public health nursing practice. A qualitative interview study with a purposeful sample of 23 Norwegian public health nurses was carried out. Data were analysed using phenomenological hermeneutics, a descriptive method inspired by Ricoeur's philosophy of interpretation. Three themes emerged (i) Being a generalist: emphasising the need for generalised knowledge and using clinical judgement, (ii) Being one who empowers: focusing on resources and coping strategies, (iii) Being occupied with individual problem solving: focusing on individuals with special needs, using standardised techniques and protocols, and lacking specialised knowledge. Interpretation of the nurses' stories illuminated their need for generalised evidence-based knowledge, but also the importance of using sound clinical judgement in a diverse complex practice, where service users need encouragement, support and expert advice. Time pressures can limit the nurses' involvement. Many had an individual problem-focus more than a primary prevention focus, in contrast to governmental regulations stating that Norwegian public health nurses should focus on health promotion and primary prevention. Public health nurses have a broad generalised knowledge of their special target group giving them a 'specialist generalist' role. Clarification of this role, in relation to jurisdictional borders, can create a strong identity at a time

  8. School nursing in the 21st century: prediction and readiness.

    PubMed

    Iverson, C J; Hays, B J

    1994-12-01

    The complex health and education needs of today's students are prompting schools to develop more responsive school health programs. School nurses' preparation for roles in these emerging programs requires both a vision of future practice and a clear recognition of present skill levels. This study compared the vision of practice in the twenty-first century held by school nurses in a rural, mid-plains state with the vision of a national expert school nurse panel. The findings have implications for role evolution and educational preparation.

  9. Time will show: real time predictions during interpersonal action perception.

    PubMed

    Manera, Valeria; Schouten, Ben; Verfaillie, Karl; Becchio, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Predictive processes are crucial not only for interpreting the actions of individual agents, but also to predict how, in the context of a social interaction between two agents, the actions of one agent relate to the actions of a second agent. In the present study we investigated whether, in the context of a communicative interaction between two agents, observers can use the actions of one agent to predict when the action of a second agent will take place. Participants observed point-light displays of two agents (A and B) performing separate actions. In the communicative condition, the action performed by agent B responded to a communicative gesture performed by agent A. In the individual condition, agent A's communicative action was substituted with a non-communicative action. For each condition, we manipulated the temporal coupling of the actions of the two agents, by varying the onset of agent A's action. Using a simultaneous masking detection task, we demonstrated that the timing manipulation had a critical effect on the communicative condition, with the visual discrimination of agent B increasing linearly while approaching the original interaction timing. No effect of the timing manipulation was found for the individual condition. Our finding complements and extends previous evidence for interpersonal predictive coding, suggesting that the communicative gestures of one agent can serve not only to predict what the second agent will do, but also when his/her action will take place.

  10. HELCATS Prediction of Planetary CME arrival times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boakes, Peter; Moestl, Christian; Davies, Jackie; Harrison, Richard; Byrne, Jason; Barnes, David; Isavnin, Alexey; Kilpua, Emilia; Rollett, Tanja

    2015-04-01

    We present the first results of CME arrival time prediction at different planetary locations and their comparison to the in situ data within the HELCATS project. The EU FP7 HELCATS (Heliospheric Cataloguing, Analysis & Techniques Service) is a European effort to consolidate the exploitation of the maturing field of heliospheric imaging. HELCATS aims to catalogue solar wind transients, observed by the NASA STEREO Heliospheric Imager (HI) instruments, and validate different methods for the determination of their kinematic properties. This validation includes comparison with arrivals at Earth, and elsewhere in the heliosphere, as well as onsets at the Sun (http://www.helcats-fp7.eu/). A preliminary catalogue of manually identified CMEs, with over 1000 separate events, has been created from observations made by the STEREO/HI instruments covering the years 2007-2013. Initial speeds and directions of each CME have been derived through fitting the time elongation profile to the state of the art Self-Similar Expansion Fitting (SSEF) geometric technique (Davies et al., 2012). The technique assumes that, in the plane corresponding to the position angle of interest, CMEs can be modelled as circles subtending a fixed angular width to Sun-center and propagating anti-sunward in a fixed direction at a constant speed (we use an angular width of 30 degrees in our initial results). The model has advantages over previous geometric models (e.g. harmonic mean or fixed phi) as it allows one to predict whether a CME will 'hit' a specific heliospheric location, as well as to what degree (e.g. direct assault or glancing blow). We use correction formulae (Möstl and Davies, 2013) to convert CME speeds, direction and launch time to speed and arrival time at any in situ location. From the preliminary CME dataset, we derive arrival times for over 400 Earth-directed CMEs, and for over 100 Mercury-, Venus-, Mars- and Saturn-directed CMEs predicted to impact each planet. We present statistics of

  11. Burnout during nursing education predicts lower occupational preparedness and future clinical performance: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Rudman, Ann; Gustavsson, J Petter

    2012-08-01

    Early-career burnout among nurses can influence health and professional development, as well as quality of care. However, the prospective occupational consequences of study burnout have not previously been investigated in a national sample using a longitudinal design. To prospectively monitor study burnout for a national sample of nursing students during their years in higher education and at follow-up 1 year post graduation. Further, to relate the possible development of study burnout to prospective health and life outcomes, as well as student and occupational outcomes. A longitudinal cohort of Swedish nursing students (within the population-based LANE (Longitudinal Analysis of Nursing Education/Entry) study) from all sites of education in Sweden was surveyed annually. Data were collected at four points in time over 4 years: three times during higher education and 1 year post graduation. : A longitudinal sample of 1702 respondents was prospectively followed from late autumn 2002 to spring 2006. Mean level changes of study burnout (as measured by the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory, i.e. the Exhaustion and Disengagement subscales) across time, as well as prospective effects of baseline study burnout and changes in study burnout levels, were estimated using Latent Growth Curve Modeling. An increase in study burnout (from 30% to 41%) across 3 years in higher education was found, and levels of both Exhaustion and Disengagement increased significantly across the years in education (p<0.001). Baseline levels, as well as development of study burnout, predicted lower levels of in-class learner engagement and occupational preparedness in the final year. At follow-up 1 year post graduation, earlier development of study burnout was related to lower mastery of occupational tasks, less research utilization in everyday clinical practice and higher turnover intentions. The results suggest that study burnout may have interfered with learning and psychological well-being. Aspects

  12. Does organizational justice predict empowerment? Nurses assess their work environment.

    PubMed

    Kuokkanen, Liisa; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Katajisto, Jouko; Heponiemi, Tarja; Sinervo, Timo; Elovainio, Marko

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore how nurses assess their empowerment and clarify organizational justice compared to other work-related factors. In addition, we examined the major variables pertinent to empowerment. Cross-sectional survey data were used. A total of 2,152 nurses returned the completed questionnaire. The instruments consisted of nurse empowerment, organizational justice, job control, and possibilities for developing work. The data analysis was based on descriptive statistics and further statistical tests. Organizational justice and empowerment had a clear correlation. Job control, possibilities for developing work and organizational justice were statistically significant predictors of nurse empowerment. Organizational justice and the possibility to use one's individual skills at work are significant factors in staff activity and its development in nursing. They increase the level of empowerment and commitment as well as motivation to work. The results of this study confirm that nurses regard organizational justice as highly important. We can facilitate both work-related empowerment and organizational justice by creating and maintaining a culture of fairness and justice. Employees should be heard and involved more in the planning and decision making of work. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  13. Predicting the arrival times of solar particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, D. F.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure has been developed to generate a computerized time-intensity profile of the solar proton intensity expected at the earth after the occurrence of a significant solar flare on the sun. This procedure is a combination of many pieces of independent research and theoretical results. Many of the concepts used were first reported by Smart and Shea (1979) and are summarized by Smart and Shea (1985). Extracts from the general procedure that relate to predicting the expected onset time and time of maximum at the earth after the occurrence of a solar flare are presented.

  14. [Working time structure of pediatric nurses in hospital wards representing different referential levels].

    PubMed

    Smoleń, Ewa; Ksykiewicz-Dorota, Anna

    2017-02-28

    Working time is a non-renewable and important element in the management of an organization. The implementation of changes in the structure of working time may be facilitated by the insight into activities undertaken by employees during work. Such an approach plays an important role since the effective use of time improves the quality of care, prevents timewasting and optimizes the use of the full potential of employees, including nurses. The objective of the study was to determine the structure of working time of pediatric nurses in hospital wards of 2 referential levels. The study was conducted in 2 wards (2nd and 3rd levels of reference) in the Regional Specialist Children's Hospital in Olsztyn. The research method involved the measurement of working time, as well as continuous and snap-shot observation techniques. Standardized research instruments were used in the study; 8 continuous observations and 2333 snap-shot observations were carried out. In the structure of working time of pediatric nurses indirect nursing-related activities predominated (52.2%). Direct nursing made 28.7% of the working time. The nurses devoted the smallest amount of time to coordination and organization - 8%. The percentage of time associated with non-duty activities and breaks at work was 11.1%. In direct nursing activities associated with diagnosing (9%) and treatment (11.7%) prevailed. In indirect nursing activities pertaining to documentation of activities related to direct nursing made 24.6%. Pediatric nurses devote insufficient amount of time to direct nursing. Activities associated with documentation of activities related to direct nursing, preparation for direct nursing, as well as treatment and diagnosing predominate in the working time structure of nurses. Med Pr 2017;68(1):95-103.

  15. Part-time employment in Jordan as a nursing policy solution.

    PubMed

    Al-Motlaq, M; Azar, N; Squires, A

    2017-03-01

    Explore the potential of a part-time work option for nurses as a strategy for managing domestic markets in Jordan by examining perceptions of working nurses and nursing students in the context of current social and cultural variables. Unemployment among Jordanian nurses has become a reality in recent years. However, labor markets literature in nursing rarely studies what kind of policy responses should occur during a surplus of nurses. A cross-sectional design structured the study. The perceptions of nurses and students were measured through a questionnaire developed specifically for the purpose of this exploratory study. Both nurses (n = 51) and students (n = 56) supported the introduction of the new suggested part-time option. However, students were more willing to start working or transfer into part-time work, take payment on hourly basis, and support colleagues to transfer into part-time work. Different solutions were also suggested by participants. The results were useful for providing the foundational data to further study the viability of a part-time work option for Jordanian nurses. The results show how optimistic current and future Jordanian nurses are regarding this employment option. For countries that may need to diversify their employment models due to excess supply of nurses and to address gender imbalances, this work may help inform policy development. Both employed and unemployed nurses will benefit if health care managers consider its application. The flexibility of this option may help improve the quality of life of many nurses. The results of this study provide nursing leaders and managers with foundational evidence that may be applicable in the Jordanian health sector. Although further studies are recommended, nursing leaders and policy makers should consider such a solution. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  16. Work-related stressors experienced by part-time clinical affiliate nursing faculty in baccalaureate education.

    PubMed

    Whalen, Kathleen S

    2009-01-01

    This descriptive and multivariate correlational study identifies work-related situations that were perceived as stressful in a sample of part-time clinical affiliate nursing faculty (n = 91) from a western state who teach in baccalaureate programs. The most stressful conditions include being physically and emotionally drained; working outside regular hours; dealing with the number of role expectations; and receiving inadequate monetary compensation. Subjects reported other specific stressful situations related to their work with clinical agencies, universities, and students. The researcher also examined the relationships between selected background factors (number of years of clinical teaching experience, clinical teacher education, and holding a second job), role stress, and job satisfaction. Even though this sample had a high job satisfaction rating, the variable, role stress, was shown to significantly predict job satisfaction. Lastly, implications for nurse educators in baccalaureate programs are explored.

  17. On understanding and predicting groundwater response time.

    PubMed

    Sophocleous, Marios

    2012-01-01

    An aquifer system, when perturbed, has a tendency to evolve to a new equilibrium, a process that can take from just a few seconds to possibly millions of years. The time scale on which a system adjusts to a new equilibrium is often referred to as "response time" or "lag time." Because groundwater response time affects the physical and economic viability of various management options in a basin, natural resource managers are increasingly interested in incorporating it into policy. However, the processes of how groundwater responds to land-use change are not well understood, making it difficult to predict the timing of groundwater response to such change. The difficulty in estimating groundwater response time is further compounded because the data needed to quantify this process are not usually readily available. This article synthesizes disparate pieces of information on aquifer response times into a relatively brief but hopefully comprehensive review that the community of water professionals can use to better assess the impact of aquifer response time in future groundwater management investigations. A brief exposition on dimensional/scaling analysis is presented first, followed by an overview of aquifer response time for simplified aquifer systems. The aquifer response time is considered first from a water-quantity viewpoint and later expanded to incorporate groundwater age and water-quality aspects. Monitoring programs today, as well as water policies and regulations, should address this issue of aquifer response time so that more realistic management expectations can be reached.

  18. A Full-Time Nurse for Every School: A Call to Action to Make It Happen.

    PubMed

    Nikpour, Jacqueline; Hassmiller, Susan

    2017-09-01

    In June 2016, the American Academy of Pediatrics released its new policy statement recommending a full-time registered nurse in every school building. Indeed, increasing attention is being focused on school nursing, in part due to recent legislation, including the Affordable Care Act, the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act, and the Every Student Succeeds Act. Advocating for nursing practice within an education setting presents unique challenges in terms of changing the common perception of school nurses, variances in funding streams for school nursing, and the ability to link health outcomes with educational outcomes. The purpose of this article is to discuss the rationale for a school nurse in every building along with presenting action steps that individual and groups of school nurses can utilize to advocate for a full-time registered nurse in every school.

  19. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.313 Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered... registered nurse. 57.313 Section 57.313 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...) Received one or more nursing student loans after November 18, 1971, and before September 29, 1979; (2) is...

  20. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... registered nurse. 57.313 Section 57.313 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... nurse. (a) For loans made after November 18, 1971, and before September 29, 1979. A person who: (1... in full-time employment as a registered nurse (including teaching in any of the fields of...

  1. A clockwork nursing unit. Analyzing how nurses spend their time is the first step toward improving productivity.

    PubMed

    Helmer, T; Olson, S F

    1990-09-01

    Until recently, productivity analysis has been a relatively underdeveloped tool in nursing. As healthcare costs continue their upward spiral, however, managers have been pressured to measure and evaluate nursing productivity. The right combination of efficiency and effectiveness is the key to optimal productivity. Nursing can be efficient but highly ineffective and thus of little value to the patient; conversely, nursing can be effective and valuable, but grossly inefficient. To determine a nursing unit's level of productivity, managers can keep a daily record of the number of nursing hours per patient day. When the record indicates too many ineffective or inefficient days, an analysis of how nurses use their time can help solve the problem. The first step is such an analysis is to have management engineering or the nursing staff itself collect data on time spent per task. Once these data are collected, they can be analyzed by shift (for the entire hospital), by individual unit, by task category, etc. With this information in view, managers can ask key questions to help pinpoint areas where efficiency might be improved.

  2. Partnership Negotiations: Innovation for Nurse Contract Negotiations During Turbulent Times.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Maryalice; Donahue, Moreen

    2016-01-01

    Health care delivery is undergoing rapid change, with frontline nurses at the epicenter. A mind-set requiring innovative collaboration, creativity, flexibility, and openness to new care delivery models is necessary. This article describes an innovative approach to modern world contract negotiations in a 371-bed university-affiliated hospital. The nurses' contract negotiations were scheduled to begin 6 months after a layoff affected nurses and other caregivers. Concurrently, a strike was underway at a hospital in the state with the same union. Contentious negotiations were anticipated. Strategies employed to prepare for negotiations included consultation with a nurse expert, and an agreement between the chief nursing officer and chairman of the Shared Governance Committee to conduct negotiations that would allow for more dialogue between the staff nurse and nursing leadership teams. Sessions opened with a video address by a major health care nurse thought leader who provided an overview of the current health care landscape and future direction of nursing. Joint presentations by staff nurses and nurse leaders on topics of interest were conducted. "Nurses for Nurses" round table sessions took place each day, and valuable work was completed at breakout sessions. Ultimately, the partnership negotiations resulted in a successfully negotiated contract.

  3. Managing distribution changes in time series prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matias, J. M.; Gonzalez-Manteiga, W.; Taboada, J.; Ordonez, C.

    2006-07-01

    When a problem is modeled statistically, a single distribution model is usually postulated that is assumed to be valid for the entire space. Nonetheless, this practice may be somewhat unrealistic in certain application areas, in which the conditions of the process that generates the data may change; as far as we are aware, however, no techniques have been developed to tackle this problem.This article proposes a technique for modeling and predicting this change in time series with a view to improving estimates and predictions. The technique is applied, among other models, to the hypernormal distribution recently proposed. When tested on real data from a range of stock market indices the technique produces better results that when a single distribution model is assumed to be valid for the entire period of time studied.Moreover, when a global model is postulated, it is highly recommended to select the hypernormal distribution parameter in the same likelihood maximization process.

  4. Factors Predicting the Provision of Smoking Cessation Services Among Occupational Health Nurses in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chatdokmaiprai, Kannikar; Kalampakorn, Surintorn; McCullagh, Marjorie; Lagampan, Sunee; Keeratiwiriyaporn, Sansanee

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors predicting occupational health nurses' provision of smoking cessation services. Data were collected via a self-administered questionnaire distributed to 254 occupational health nurses in Thailand. Analysis by structural equation modeling revealed that self-efficacy directly and positively influenced smoking cessation services, and mediated the relationship between workplace factors, nurse factors, and smoking cessation services. The final model had good fit to the data, accounting for 20.4% and 38.0% of the variance in self-efficacy and smoking cessation services, respectively. The findings show that self-efficacy is a mediator that influences provision of smoking cessation services by occupational health nurses. Interventions to enhance nurses' self-efficacy in providing smoking cessation services are expected to promote provision of smoking cessation services to workers.

  5. Predicting road accidents: Structural time series approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junus, Noor Wahida Md; Ismail, Mohd Tahir

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the model for occurrence of road accidents in Malaysia between the years of 1970 to 2010 was developed and throughout this model the number of road accidents have been predicted by using the structural time series approach. The models are developed by using stepwise method and the residual of each step has been analyzed. The accuracy of the model is analyzed by using the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) and the best model is chosen based on the smallest Akaike information criterion (AIC) value. A structural time series approach found that local linear trend model is the best model to represent the road accidents. This model allows level and slope component to be varied over time. In addition, this approach also provides useful information on improving the conventional time series method.

  6. Predicting survival time for cold exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikuisis, Peter

    1995-06-01

    The prediction of survival time (ST) for cold exposure is speculative as reliable controlled data of deep hypothermia are unavailable. At best, guidance can be obtained from case histories of accidental exposure. This study describes the development of a mathematical model for the prediction of ST under sedentary conditions in the cold. The model is based on steady-state heat conduction in a single cylinder comprised of a core and two concentric annular shells representing the fat plus skin and the clothing plus still boundary layer, respectively. The ambient condition can be either air or water; the distinction is made by assigning different values of insulation to the still boundary layer. Metabolic heat production ( M) is comprised of resting and shivering components with the latter predicted by temperature signals from the core and skin. Where the cold exposure is too severe for M to balance heat loss, ST is largely determined by the rate of heat loss from the body. Where a balance occurs, ST is governed by the endurance time for shivering. End of survival is marked by the deep core temperature reaching a value of 30° C. The model was calibrated against survival data of cold water (0 to 20° C) immersion and then applied to cold air exposure. A sampling of ST predictions for the nude exposure of an average healthy male in relatively calm air (1 km/h wind speed) are the following: 1.8, 2.5, 4.1, 9.0, and >24 h for -30, -20, -10, 0, and 10° C, respectively. With two layers of loose clothing (average thickness of 1 mm each) in a 5 km/h wind, STs are 4.0, 5.6, 8.6, 15.4, and >24 h for -50, -40, -30, -20, and -10° C. The predicted STs must be weighted against the extrapolative nature of the model. At present, it would be prudent to use the predictions in a relative sense, that is, to compare or rank-order predicted STs for various combinations of ambient conditions and clothing protection.

  7. Reorganizing nursing work on surgical units: a time-and-motion study.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, France; Cardinal, Linda; Belzile, Eric; McCusker, Jane

    2008-01-01

    A time-and-motion study was conducted in response to perceptions that the surgical nursing staff at a Montreal hospital was spending an excessive amount of time on non-nursing care. A sample of 30 nurse shifts was observed by trained observers who timed nurses' activities for their entire working shift using a hand-held Personal Digital Assistant. Activities were grouped into four main categories: direct patient care, indirect patient care, non-nursing and personal activities. Break and meal times were excluded from the denominator of total worked hours. A total of 201 working hours were observed, an average of 6 hours, 42 minutes per nurse shift. The mean proportions of each nurse shift spent on the main activity categories were: direct care 32.8%, indirect care 55.7%, non-nursing tasks 9.0% and personal 2.5%. Three activities (communication among health professionals, medication verification/preparation and documentation) comprised 78.9% of indirect care time. Greater time on indirect care was associated with work on night shifts and on the short-stay surgical unit. Subsequent work reorganization focused on reducing time spent on communication and medications. The authors conclude that time-and-motion studies are a useful method of monitoring appropriate use of nursing staff, and may provide results that assist in restructuring nursing tasks.

  8. Teacher time spent on student health issues and school nurse presence.

    PubMed

    Hill, Nina Jean; Hollis, Marianne

    2012-06-01

    Elementary school teacher time spent on student health issues and the relationship to school nurse services was the focus of this 2-year study. A cross-sectional design was used to survey traditional and exceptional (special needs) classroom teachers about the time they spent on health issues and their perception of school nurse presence. The school nurses were surveyed regarding the impact of their presence on early releases due to illness. Study findings related to teacher perceptions indicate with school nurse presence there are fewer early releases, increased communication, less time spent on health issues, students with chronic illnesses are safer, and there is a resource available for health information. The data provide the groundwork for discussions to improve the communication of the nurses' schedules, increase teacher confidence in consistent nurse hours at their school and aid the nurse in protecting valuable on-site school hours from other interferences or commitments.

  9. Globally disruptive events show predictable timing patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillman, Michael P.; Erenler, Hilary E.

    2017-01-01

    Globally disruptive events include asteroid/comet impacts, large igneous provinces and glaciations, all of which have been considered as contributors to mass extinctions. Understanding the overall relationship between the timings of the largest extinctions and their potential proximal causes remains one of science's great unsolved mysteries. Cycles of about 60 Myr in both fossil diversity and environmental data suggest external drivers such as the passage of the Solar System through the galactic plane. While cyclic phenomena are recognized statistically, a lack of coherent mechanisms and a failure to link key events has hampered wider acceptance of multi-million year periodicity and its relevance to earth science and evolution. The generation of a robust predictive model of timings, with a clear plausible primary mechanism, would signal a paradigm shift. Here, we present a model of the timings of globally disruptive events and a possible explanation of their ultimate cause. The proposed model is a symmetrical pattern of 63 Myr sequences around a central value, interpreted as the occurrence of events along, and parallel to, the galactic midplane. The symmetry is consistent with multiple dark matter disks, aligned parallel to the midplane. One implication of the precise pattern of timings and the underlying physical model is the ability to predict future events, such as a major extinction in 1-2 Myr.

  10. Nurses' Assessment of Rehabilitation Potential and Prediction of Functional Status at Discharge from Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Jamie S.; Grigsby, Jim; Teel, Cynthia S.; Kramer, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the accuracy of nurses' predictions of rehabilitation potential in older adults admitted to inpatient rehabilitation facilities and to ascertain whether the addition of a measure of executive cognitive function would enhance predictive accuracy. Secondary analysis was performed on prospective data collected…

  11. Nurses' Assessment of Rehabilitation Potential and Prediction of Functional Status at Discharge from Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Jamie S.; Grigsby, Jim; Teel, Cynthia S.; Kramer, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the accuracy of nurses' predictions of rehabilitation potential in older adults admitted to inpatient rehabilitation facilities and to ascertain whether the addition of a measure of executive cognitive function would enhance predictive accuracy. Secondary analysis was performed on prospective data collected…

  12. A real-time prediction of UTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Claudine; Allan, David W.

    1994-05-01

    The reference time scale for all scientific and technologic applications on the Earth, the Universal Coordinated Time (UTC), must be as stable, reliable, and accurate as possible. With this in view the BIPM and before it the BIH, have always calculated and then disseminated UTC with a delay of about 80 days. There are three fundamental reasons for doing this: (1) It takes some weeks for data, gathered from some 200 clocks spread world-wide, to be collected and for errors to be eliminated; (2) changes in clock rates can only be measured with high precision well after the fact; and (3) the measurement noise originating in time links, in particular using Loran-C, is smoothed out only when averaging over an extended period. Until mid-1992, the ultimate stability of UTC was reached at averaging times of about 100 days and corresponded to an Allan deviation sigma(sub y)(tau) of about 1,5x10(exp -14) then compared to the best primary clock in the world, the PTB CS2. For several years now, a predicted UTC has been computed by the USNO through an extrapolation of the values as published in deferred time by the BIPM. This is made available through the USNO Series 4, through the USNO Automated Data Service, and through GPS signals. Due to the instability of UTC, the poor predictability of the available clocks, and the intentional SA degradation of GPS signals, the real-time access to this extrapolated UTC has represented the true deferred-time UTC only to within several hundreds of nanoseconds.

  13. A real-time prediction of UTC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Claudine; Allan, David W.

    1994-01-01

    The reference time scale for all scientific and technologic applications on the Earth, the Universal Coordinated Time (UTC), must be as stable, reliable, and accurate as possible. With this in view the BIPM and before it the BIH, have always calculated and then disseminated UTC with a delay of about 80 days. There are three fundamental reasons for doing this: (1) It takes some weeks for data, gathered from some 200 clocks spread world-wide, to be collected and for errors to be eliminated; (2) changes in clock rates can only be measured with high precision well after the fact; and (3) the measurement noise originating in time links, in particular using Loran-C, is smoothed out only when averaging over an extended period. Until mid-1992, the ultimate stability of UTC was reached at averaging times of about 100 days and corresponded to an Allan deviation sigma(sub y)(tau) of about 1,5x10(exp -14) then compared to the best primary clock in the world, the PTB CS2. For several years now, a predicted UTC has been computed by the USNO through an extrapolation of the values as published in deferred time by the BIPM. This is made available through the USNO Series 4, through the USNO Automated Data Service, and through GPS signals. Due to the instability of UTC, the poor predictability of the available clocks, and the intentional SA degradation of GPS signals, the real-time access to this extrapolated UTC has represented the true deferred-time UTC only to within several hundreds of nanoseconds.

  14. Can Triage Nurses Accurately Predict Patient Dispositions in the Emergency Department?

    PubMed

    Alexander, Danette; Abbott, Lincoln; Zhou, Qiuping; Staff, Ilene

    2016-11-01

    Contemporary emergency departments experience crowded conditions with poor patient outcomes. If triage nurses could accurately predict admission, one theoretical intervention to reduce crowding is to place patients in the admission cue on arrival to the emergency department. The purpose of this study was to determine if triage nurses could accurately predict patient dispositions. This prospective study was conducted in a tertiary academic hospital's emergency department using a data collection tool embedded in the ED electronic information system. Study variables included the predicted and actual disposition, as well as level of care, gender, age, and Emergency Severity Index level. Data were collected for 28 consecutive days from September 17 through October 9, 2013. Sensitivity and specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of prediction, as well as the associations between patient characteristics and nurse prediction, were calculated. A total of 5,135 cases were included in the analysis. The triage nurses predicted admissions with a sensitivity of 71.5% and discharges with a specificity of 88.0%. Accuracy was significantly higher for younger patients and for patients at very low or very high severity levels. Although the ability to predict admissions at triage by nurses was not adequate to support a change in the bed procurement process, a specificity of 88.0% could have implications for rapid ED discharges or other low-acuity processes designed within the emergency department. Further studies in additional settings and on alternative interventions are needed. Copyright © 2016 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A mixed methods exploration of the team and organizational factors that may predict new graduate nurse engagement in collaborative practice.

    PubMed

    Pfaff, Kathryn A; Baxter, Pamela E; Ploeg, Jenny; Jack, Susan M

    2014-03-01

    Although engagement in collaborative practice is reported to support the role transition and retention of new graduate (NG) nurses, it is not known how to promote collaborative practice among these nurses. This mixed methods study explored the team and organizational factors that may predict NG nurse engagement in collaborative practice. A total of 514 NG nurses from Ontario, Canada completed the Collaborative Practice Assessment Tool. Sixteen NG nurses participated in follow-up interviews. The team and organizational predictors of NG engagement in collaborative practice were as follows: satisfaction with the team (β = 0.278; p = 0.000), number of team strategies (β = 0.338; p = 0.000), participation in a mentorship or preceptorship experience (β = 0.137; p = 0.000), accessibility of manager (β = 0.123; p = 0.001), and accessibility and proximity of educator or professional practice leader (β = 0.126; p = 0.001 and β = 0.121; p = 0.002, respectively). Qualitative analysis revealed the team facilitators to be respect, team support and face-to-face interprofessional interactions. Organizational facilitators included supportive leadership, participation in a preceptorship or mentorship experience and time. Interventions designed to facilitate NG engagement in collaborative practice should consider these factors.

  16. Predicting Nursing Facility Transition Candidates Using AID: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Mary L.; Wiley, Elizabeth; Fries, Brant E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Although the nursing facility transition literature is growing, little research has analyzed the characteristics of individuals so assisted or compared participants to those who remain institutionalized. This article describes an analytic method that researchers can apply to address these knowledge gaps, using the Arkansas Passages…

  17. Predicting Nursing Facility Transition Candidates Using AID: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Mary L.; Wiley, Elizabeth; Fries, Brant E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Although the nursing facility transition literature is growing, little research has analyzed the characteristics of individuals so assisted or compared participants to those who remain institutionalized. This article describes an analytic method that researchers can apply to address these knowledge gaps, using the Arkansas Passages…

  18. Do Past Experiences Predict Agitation in Nursing Home Residents?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Marx, Marcia S.

    1989-01-01

    Examined relationships between agitated behavior and past personality in 408 nursing home residents. Agitated and nonaggressive behaviors were correlated with past stressful events, and physically aggressive behavior was correlated with the lack thereof; no relationships were found between agitated behavior and history of a mental disorder or past…

  19. The nursing profession in Sri Lanka: time for policy changes.

    PubMed

    Aluwihare-Samaranayake, D; Ogilvie, L; Cummings, G G; Gellatly, Ian R

    2017-09-01

    We address issues and challenges in nursing in Sri Lanka with the aim of identifying where and how policy changes need to be made. Increased global interconnectivity calls for professional leadership, research, education, and policy reform in nursing as these are identified as enhancing health workforce performance and professionalization, thereby improving health systems. We draw on first-hand knowledge of health care and nursing in Sri Lanka and a recent survey of nurses at a large urban government hospital in Sri Lanka, followed by discussion and proposed action on themes identified through analysis of published and unpublished literature about the nursing profession. Policy and action are needed to: (a) establish mandatory nurse licensure in the public and private healthcare sectors; (b) implement realistic policies to further develop nursing education; (c) develop a professionalization process to support nursing autonomy and voice; and (d) promote systematic processes for educational accreditation, curriculum revision, continuing professional development, evidence-based practice, research, leadership, and information systems. There is a policy vacuum that requires careful analysis and strategic planning by formal nurse leaders. Implementing change will require political and professional power and strategic, innovative, and evolutionary policy initiatives as well as organizational infrastructure modifications best achieved through committed multidisciplinary collaboration, augmented research capacity, bolstered nursing leadership, and promotion of partnerships with policy makers. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  20. Predictive factors for the Nursing Diagnoses in people living with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Richardson Augusto Rosendo; Costa, Romanniny Hévillyn Silva; Nelson, Ana Raquel Cortês; Duarte, Fernando Hiago da Silva; Prado, Nanete Caroline da Costa; Rodrigues, Eduardo Henrique Fagundes

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the predictive factors for the nursing diagnoses in people living with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. Method: a cross-sectional study, undertaken with 113 people living with AIDS. The data were collected using an interview script and physical examination. Logistic regression was used for the data analysis, considering a level of significance of 10%. Results: the predictive factors identified were: for the nursing diagnosis of knowledge deficit-inadequate following of instructions and verbalization of the problem; for the nursing diagnosis of failure to adhere - years of study, behavior indicative of failure to adhere, participation in the treatment and forgetfulness; for the nursing diagnosis of sexual dysfunction - family income, reduced frequency of sexual practice, perceived deficit in sexual desire, perceived limitations imposed by the disease and altered body function. Conclusion: the predictive factors for these nursing diagnoses involved sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, defining characteristics, and related factors, which must be taken into consideration during the assistance provided by the nurse. PMID:27384466

  1. The Statistical Predictability of the Academic Performance of Registered Nursing Students at Macomb. Project No. 0141-77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stankovich, Mary Jo

    A study was conducted at Macomb County Community College to determine whether there was a significant relationship between grades earned in individual nursing courses and the scores earned on corresponding subsets of the state board exam for nursing graduates and also whether a nursing student's success could be predicted from admissions…

  2. Perceived barriers to communication between hospital and nursing home at time of patient transfer.

    PubMed

    Shah, Faraaz; Burack, Orah; Boockvar, Kenneth S

    2010-05-01

    To identify perceived barriers to communication between hospital and nursing home at the time of patient transfer and examine associations between perceived barriers and hospital and nursing home characteristics. Mailed survey. Medicare- or Medicaid-certified nursing homes in New York State. Nursing home administrators, with input from other nursing home staff. Respondents rated the importance as a barrier to hospital-nursing home communication of (1) hospital providers' attitude, time, effort, training, payment, and familiarity with nursing home patients; (2) unplanned and off-hours transfers; (3) HIPAA privacy regulations; and (4) lost or failed information transmission. Associations were determined between barriers and the following organizational characteristics: (1) hospital-nursing home affiliations, pharmacy or laboratory agreements, cross-site staff visits, and cross-site physician care; (2) hospital size, teaching status, and frequency of geriatrics specialty care; (3) nursing home size, location, type, staffing, and Medicare quality indicators; and (4) hospital-to-nursing home communication, consistency of hospital care with health care goals, and communication quality improvement efforts. Of 647 questionnaires sent, 229 were returned (35.4%). The most frequently reported perceived barriers to communication were sudden or unplanned transfers (44.4%), transfers that occur at night or on the weekend (41.4%), and hospital providers' lack of effort (51.0%), lack of familiarity with patients (45.0%), and lack of time (43.5%). Increased hospital size, teaching hospitals, and urban nursing home location were associated with greater perceived importance of these barriers, and cross-site staff visits and hospital provision of laboratory and pharmacy services to the nursing home were associated with lower perceived importance of these barriers. Hospital and nursing home characteristics and interorganizational relationships were associated with nursing home

  3. Participation in a national nursing outcomes database: monitoring outcomes over time.

    PubMed

    Loan, Lori A; Patrician, Patricia A; McCarthy, Mary

    2011-01-01

    The current and future climates in health care require increased accountability of health care organizations for the quality of the care they provide. Never before in the history of health care in America has this focus on quality been so critical. The imperative to measure nursing's impact without fully developed and tested monitoring systems is a critical issue for nurse executives and managers alike. This article describes a project to measure nursing structure, process, and outcomes in the military health system, the Military Nursing Outcomes Database project. Here we review the effectiveness of this project in monitoring changes over time, in satisfying expectations of nurse leaders in participating hospitals, and evaluate the potential budgetary impacts of such a system. We conclude that the Military Nursing Outcomes Database did meet the needs of a monitoring system that is sensitive to changes over time in outcomes, provides interpretable data for nurse leaders, and could result in cost benefits and patient care improvements in organizations.

  4. Time-dependence in mixture toxicity prediction.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Douglas A; Allen, Erin M G; Allen, Joshua L; Baumann, Hannah J; Bensinger, Heather M; Genco, Nicole; Guinn, Daphne; Hull, Michael W; Il'Giovine, Zachary J; Kaminski, Chelsea M; Peyton, Jennifer R; Schultz, T Wayne; Pöch, Gerald

    2014-12-04

    The value of time-dependent toxicity (TDT) data in predicting mixture toxicity was examined. Single chemical (A and B) and mixture (A+B) toxicity tests using Microtox(®) were conducted with inhibition of bioluminescence (Vibrio fischeri) being quantified after 15, 30 and 45-min of exposure. Single chemical and mixture tests for 25 sham (A1:A2) and 125 true (A:B) combinations had a minimum of seven duplicated concentrations with a duplicated control treatment for each test. Concentration/response (x/y) data were fitted to sigmoid curves using the five-parameter logistic minus one parameter (5PL-1P) function, from which slope, EC25, EC50, EC75, asymmetry, maximum effect, and r(2) values were obtained for each chemical and mixture at each exposure duration. Toxicity data were used to calculate percentage-based TDT values for each individual chemical and mixture of each combination. Predicted TDT values for each mixture were calculated by averaging the TDT values of the individual components and regressed against the observed TDT values obtained in testing, resulting in strong correlations for both sham (r(2)=0.989, n=25) and true mixtures (r(2)=0.944, n=125). Additionally, regression analyses confirmed that observed mixture TDT values calculated for the 50% effect level were somewhat better correlated with predicted mixture TDT values than at the 25 and 75% effect levels. Single chemical and mixture TDT values were classified into five levels in order to discern trends. The results suggested that the ability to predict mixture TDT by averaging the TDT of the single agents was modestly reduced when one agent of the combination had a positive TDT value and the other had a minimal or negative TDT value. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Application of Predictive Nursing Reduces Psychiatric Complications in ICU Patients after Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Qiong; ZHU, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our aim was to investigate the effects of clinical application of perioperative predictive nursing on reducing psychiatric complications in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients after neurosurgery. Methods: A total of 129 patients who underwent neurosurgery and received intensive care were enrolled in our study from February 2013 to February 2014. These patients were divided into two groups: the experimental group (n=68) receiving predictive nursing before and after operation, and the control group (n=61) with general nursing. Clinical data including length of ICU stay, duration of the patients’ psychiatric symptoms, form and incidence of adverse events, and patient satisfaction ratings were recorded, and their differences between the two groups were analyzed. Results: The duration of psychiatric symptoms and the length of ICU stay for patients in the experimental group were significantly shorter than those in the control group (P<0.05). The incidence of adverse events and psychiatric symptoms, such as sensory and intuition disturbance, thought disturbance, emotional disorder, and consciousness disorder, in the experimental group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05). Patient satisfaction ratings were significantly higher in the experimental group than those in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Application of predictive nursing on ICU patients who undergo neurosurgery could effectively reduce the incidence of psychiatric symptoms as well as other adverse events. Our study provided clinical evidences to encourage predictive nursing in routine settings for patients in critical conditions. PMID:27252916

  6. 'Moral distress'--time to abandon a flawed nursing construct?

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Hutchinson, Alison

    2015-02-01

    Moral distress has been characterised in the nursing literature as a major problem affecting nurses in all healthcare systems. It has been portrayed as threatening the integrity of nurses and ultimately the quality of patient care. However, nursing discourse on moral distress is not without controversy. The notion itself is conceptually flawed and suffers from both theoretical and practical difficulties. Nursing research investigating moral distress is also problematic on account of being methodologically weak and disparate. Moreover, the ultimate purpose and significance of the research is unclear. In light of these considerations, it is contended that the notion of moral distress ought to be abandoned and that concerted attention be given to advancing inquiries that are more conducive to improving the quality and safety of moral decision-making, moral conduct and moral outcomes in nursing and healthcare domains.

  7. Developing students' time management skills in clinical settings: practical considerations for busy nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan

    2011-06-01

    In clinical settings, nursing staff often find themselves responsible for students who have varying time management skills. Nurses need to respond sensitively and appropriately, and to teach nursing students how to prioritize and better allocate time. This is important not only for developing students' clinical skills but also for shaping their perceptions about the quality of the placement and their willingness to consider it as a potential work specialty. In this column, some simple, practical strategies that nurses can use to assist students with improving their time management skills are identified. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Geriatric nursing: an idea whose time has gone? A polemic.

    PubMed

    Nolan, M

    1994-12-01

    The future role of the nursing profession in providing health care for older people is considered. It is argued that, despite claims to holism, nursing has maintained a narrow focus, concentrating mainly on acute hospital care. The concepts of professional protectionism and professional reductionism are used to explain the manifest failure of nursing and other professions working with older people and their carers to place the needs of their clients at the top of their agendas. A reorientation of nursing practice is advocated in order that the profession fulfils its potential with respect to older people.

  9. Working condition factors associated with time pressure of nurses in Japanese hospitals.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yukiko

    2008-01-01

    In Japan, the most common reason for medical errors is a lack of cross-checking. To prevent errors, efforts to strengthen cross-checking behaviors are being adopted. However, time pressures also lead to errors, and increasing cross-checking activities leads to an increased workload and even greater time pressures. The purpose of this study was to identify working conditions that lead to time pressure for nurses, and to find ways to reduce time pressure and prevent subsequent errors. Self-reporting questionnaires were distributed over 10 days to 416 nurses working in 17 wards at two hospitals; 357 nurses (85.8%) responded anonymously, providing data on 2,150 person-days. In multivariate analyses, medical support services and the number of nurse calls answered were associated with subjective assessments of time pressures and nursing service delays due to busyness. Moreover, working the "evening-day shift" (when a nurse works a day shift after working the evening shift with no days off in between) led to a high level of fatigue before work and was associated with nursing service delays due to busyness. Reducing time pressures and preventing errors requires an adequate number of nurses, shift plans that consider rest periods and order of rotation, increased task discretion for nurses, and the prevention of chronic fatigue.

  10. 'It is Time to Prepare the Next patient' Real-Time Prediction of Procedure Duration in Laparoscopic Cholecystectomies.

    PubMed

    Guédon, Annetje C P; Paalvast, M; Meeuwsen, F C; Tax, D M J; van Dijke, A P; Wauben, L S G L; van der Elst, M; Dankelman, J; van den Dobbelsteen, J J

    2016-12-01

    Operating Room (OR) scheduling is crucial to allow efficient use of ORs. Currently, the predicted durations of surgical procedures are unreliable and the OR schedulers have to follow the progress of the procedures in order to update the daily planning accordingly. The OR schedulers often acquire the needed information through verbal communication with the OR staff, which causes undesired interruptions of the surgical process. The aim of this study was to develop a system that predicts in real-time the remaining procedure duration and to test this prediction system for reliability and usability in an OR. The prediction system was based on the activation pattern of one single piece of equipment, the electrosurgical device. The prediction system was tested during 21 laparoscopic cholecystectomies, in which the activation of the electrosurgical device was recorded and processed in real-time using pattern recognition methods. The remaining surgical procedure duration was estimated and the optimal timing to prepare the next patient for surgery was communicated to the OR staff. The mean absolute error was smaller for the prediction system (14 min) than for the OR staff (19 min). The OR staff doubted whether the prediction system could take all relevant factors into account but were positive about its potential to shorten waiting times for patients. The prediction system is a promising tool to automatically and objectively predict the remaining procedure duration, and thereby achieve optimal OR scheduling and streamline the patient flow from the nursing department to the OR.

  11. The experience of being a full-time nursing faculty member in a baccalaureate nursing education program.

    PubMed

    Gazza, Elizabeth A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this hermeneutic phenomenological study was to understand the experience of being a full-time nursing faculty member in a baccalaureate nursing program. Eight female informants, with an average of 6.1 years of experience in a full-time faculty position, shared their experiences through in-depth personal interviews and a follow-up telephone interview. Field notes and a demographic questionnaire also served as data sources. Data were analyzed using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach based on the Urecht School of phenomenology. Five themes were uncovered through data analysis, including (a) making a difference in the student, profession, and the world; (b) being a gatekeeper to the profession; (c) trying ways to balance multiple roles; (d) support is vital: can't do it alone; and (e) workplace relationships: the good, the bad, and the ugly. Findings have implications for the development of research-based faculty recruitment and retention strategies. Implications for the practice of nursing education focus on current nursing faculty, administrators in nursing education, and those responsible for developing higher education policies. Future research is recommended for exploring the rewards of making a difference, the rationale for incivility in the workplace, and the level of faculty mentoring occurring in nursing education.

  12. Predicting the future of the adult nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Glynn, P M

    1998-05-01

    In the late 1980s, the future of the adult nurse practitioner (ANP) was less than certain. This study, conducted in 1987, explored the opinions of ANPs, physicians, and healthcare administrators regarding the future of the ANP in 1995. A sociological framework was used to identify factors potentially affecting the ANPs future and to assess the ANP's functionality vis-à-vis the healthcare delivery system. Findings are discussed within the context of the healthcare delivery system as it emerged by 1995, and recommendations are made for ensuring the future viability of the ANP role.

  13. Applying theory of planned behavior in predicting of patient safety behaviors of nurses.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Marzieh; Kadkhodaee, Maryam; Yaghoubi, Maryam; Maroufi, Maryam; Shams, Asadollah

    2013-01-01

    Patient safety has become a major concern throughout the world. It is the absence of preventable harm to a patient during the process of health care, ensuring safer care is an enormous challenge, psychosocial variables influences behaviors of human. The theory of planned behavior (TPB) is a well-validated behavioral decision-making model that has been used to predict social and health behaviors. This study is aimed to investigate predictors of nurse's patient safety intentions and behavior, using a TPB framework. Stratified sampling technique was used to choose 124 nurses who worked at the selected hospitals of Isfahan in 2011. Study tool was a questionnaire, designed by researchers team including 3 nurses a physician and a psychologist based on guideline of TPB model. Questionnaire Validity was confirmed by experts and its reliability was assessed by Cronbach's alpha as 0.87. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate how well each TPB variables predicted the variance in patient safety behavior. Analyzing was done by SPSS18. Finding revealed that "normative beliefs" had the greatest influence on nurses intention to implement patient safety behaviors. Analyzing data by hospital types and workplace wards showed that both in public and private hospitals normative beliefs has affected safety behaviors of nurses more than other variables. Also in surgical wards, nurses behaviors have been affected by "control beliefs" and in medical wards by normative beliefs. Normative beliefs, and subjective norms were the most influential factor of safety behavior of nurses in this study. Considering the role of cultural context in these issues, it seemseducation of managers and top individuals about patient safety and its importance is a priority also control believes were another important predicting factor of behavior in surgical wards and intensive care units. Regarding the complexity of work in these spaces, applying medical guidelines and effective

  14. Effect of full-time versus part-time school nurses on attendance of elementary students with asthma.

    PubMed

    Telljohann, Susan K; Dake, Joseph A; Price, James H

    2004-12-01

    Asthma, the most common chronic disease in children today, is the leading cause of absenteeism among students. It accounts for nearly 20 million lost school days annually. This study examined whether full-time (5 days per week) or part-time (2 days per week) school nurses would have a differential effect on the frequency of absences among elementary school students with asthma. This study found that students with asthma who were poor or who were African American and in schools with full-time nurses missed significantly fewer days (3 days, or 23% fewer missed days) than did their counterparts with asthma in schools with part-time nurses.

  15. Teacher Time Spent on Student Health Issues and School Nurse Presence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Nina Jean; Hollis, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Elementary school teacher time spent on student health issues and the relationship to school nurse services was the focus of this 2-year study. A cross-sectional design was used to survey traditional and exceptional (special needs) classroom teachers about the time they spent on health issues and their perception of school nurse presence. The…

  16. Teacher Time Spent on Student Health Issues and School Nurse Presence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Nina Jean; Hollis, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Elementary school teacher time spent on student health issues and the relationship to school nurse services was the focus of this 2-year study. A cross-sectional design was used to survey traditional and exceptional (special needs) classroom teachers about the time they spent on health issues and their perception of school nurse presence. The…

  17. Effect of Time Management Program on Job Satisfaction for Head Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsabahy, Hanan ELsayed; Sleem, Wafaa Fathi; El Atroush, Hala Gaber

    2015-01-01

    Background: Time management and job satisfaction all related to each other and greatly affect success of organization. Subjects and Methods: The study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a designed program of time management on job satisfaction for head nurses. A Quasi-experimental design was used for a total number of head nurses participated. Two…

  18. More time where it matters: improving work environments in home healthcare nursing.

    PubMed

    Ray, Karen; Decicco, Julie; Lefebre, Nancy; Bender, Danielle

    2011-04-01

    The nursing profession is currently experiencing a shift to community care, more complex clients and a shortage of human resources. Home healthcare organizations can increase job satisfaction and retention by better managing nurses' workloads and ensuring more time for direct client care. This project used innovative technology and dynamic methods to document nurses' work lives, identify areas for process improvements and increase time available for direct client care. This case study provides insight into ways in which organizations can streamline non-care activities and discusses implications for nursing leaders at the local and regional levels.

  19. Predicting intentions of nurses to adopt patient personal health records: A structural equation modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Chung, Min-Huey; Ho, Cheng-Hsun; Wen, Hsyien-Chia

    2016-11-01

    The American Nurses Association endorsed the use of online patient personal health records (PHRs) and challenged all nurses to obtain the health records of patients. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with the intentions of nurses to use patient PHRs. Our study used an extended technology acceptance model, with the theory of planned behavior and perceived credibility, to explore factors associated with the intentions of nurses to use patient PHRs. This cross-sectional quantitative study comprised a sample of 635 nurses who had worked full time for at least 3 months, and they were recruited from three hospitals affiliated with a university in northern Taiwan. We used a questionnaire to obtain information on perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, perceived credibility, subjective norms, computer self-efficacy, attitudes, and intentions to use patient PHRs. This study indicated that perceived usefulness, computer self-efficacy, and subjective norms significantly and positively affected intentions to use patient PHRs. The attitudes of nurses toward PHR adoption directly influenced their intentions to use patient PHRs. Moreover, subjective norms indirectly affected intentions to use patient PHRs through the factor of attitudes. The proposed model explained 82.1% of the variance in the intentions of nurses to use patient PHRs. Subjective norms had stronger total effects on the attitudes and intentions of nurses to use patient PHRs than perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, or perceived credibility did. The results may help practitioners further understand that the attitudes of nurses toward using patient PHRs are influenced by peer groups and administrators. The current study provides evidence that peer groups influence the attitudes of nurses to use patient PHRs, which in turn influence their intentions toward PHR adoption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fitness and lifestyle parameters fail to predict back injuries in nurses.

    PubMed

    Ready, A E; Boreskie, S L; Law, S A; Russell, R

    1993-03-01

    Performance on fitness and back related isometric strength tests, as well as the response to a lifestyle questionnaire, were related to the subsequent occurrence of back injuries in 119 nurses. In all, 22% of subjects sustained injuries during the 18-month study. Injured nurses were more likely to be from high-risk wards and to have received worker's compensation pay for past back injuries. Fitness and lifestyle characteristics did not differ significantly between injured and not-injured groups. Using backward stepwise logistic regression, a model was developed that accounted for 41% of the variability between groups and predicted 67% of those injured. Prior compensation pay, smoking status, and job satisfaction were the most useful discriminators. It was concluded, however, that the fitness and lifestyle parameters measured did not effectively predict back injury in nurses.

  1. Real Time Seismic Prediction while Drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, F. R.; Bohlen, T.; Edelmann, T.; Kassel, A.; Heim, A.; Gehring, M.; Lüth, S.; Giese, R.; Jaksch, K.; Rechlin, A.; Kopf, M.; Stahlmann, J.; Gattermann, J.; Bruns, B.

    2009-12-01

    Efficient and safe drilling is a prerequisite to enhance the mobility of people and goods, to improve the traffic as well as utility infrastructure of growing megacities, and to ensure the growing energy demand while building geothermal and in hydroelectric power plants. Construction within the underground is often building within the unknown. An enhanced risk potential for people and the underground building may arise if drilling enters fracture zones, karsts, brittle rocks, mixed solid and soft rocks, caves, or anthropogenic obstacles. Knowing about the material behavior ahead of the drilling allows reducing the risk during drilling and construction operation. In drilling operations direct observations from boreholes can be complemented with geophysical investigations. In this presentation we focus on “real time” seismic prediction while drilling which is seen as a prerequisite while using geophysical methods in modern drilling operations. In solid rocks P- and S-wave velocity, refraction and reflection as well as seismic wave attenuation can be used for the interpretation of structures ahead of the drilling. An Integrated Seismic Imaging System (ISIS) for exploration ahead of a construction is used, where a pneumatic hammer or a magnetostrictive vibration source generate repetitive signals behind the tunneling machine. Tube waves are generated which travel along the tunnel to the working face. There the tube waves are converted to mainly S- but also P-Waves which interact with the formation ahead of the heading face. The reflected or refracted waves travel back to the working front are converted back to tube waves and recorded using three-component geophones which are fit into the tips of anchor rods. In near real time, the ISIS software allows for an integrated 3D imaging and interpretation of the observed data, geological and geotechnical parameters. Fracture zones, heterogeneities, and variations in the rock properties can be revealed during the drilling

  2. Patient cues that predict nurses' triage decisions for acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the patient cues that emergency department (ED) nurses use to triage male and female patients with complaints suggestive of acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) and to determine if cues used by ED nurses to make clinical inferences varied by patient sex or nurses' demographic characteristics. Using clinical vignette questionnaires with different patient characteristics, ED nurses' triage decisions were evaluated to determine the patient cues used to predict ACS. Men and women were equally likely to be given an ACS triage decision and this was not affected by nurses' demographic characteristics. However, nurses used different cues to triage men and women with complaints suggestive of ACS, although by receiver operating characteristic curves, the differences between sexes were small. In addition, female vignette patients were more likely than male vignette patients to be assigned a suspected cause of cholecystitis for their presentation in a small subset of 13 (11:2; odds ratio, 1.653; 95% confidence interval, 1.115-24.47; p=.036). This study provides insight into the complex phenomenon of triage decision making and warrants further exploration.

  3. Nurses' prediction of volume status after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Reinier G; Rinkel, Gabriel JE; Verweij, Bon H; Algra, Ale; Kalkman, Cor J

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Patients who have suffered aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) often have derangements in blood volume, contributing to poor outcome. To guide fluid management, regular assessments of volume status must be conducted. We studied the ability of nursing staff to predict hypovolaemia or hypervolaemia, based on their interpretation of available haemodynamic data. Methods In a prospective cohort study, intensive care unit and medium care unit nurses, currently treating patients with recent SAH, were asked to predict present volume status. For their assessment they could use all available haemodynamic parameters (for example, heart rate, blood pressure, fluid balance). The nurses' assessments were compared with the actual circulating blood volume (CBV), as measured daily with pulse dye densitometry during the first 10 days after SAH. Normovolaemia was defined as a CBV of 60 to 80 ml/kg body weight; hypovolaemia as CBV under 60 ml/kg; severe hypovolaemia as CBV under 50 ml/kg and hypervolaemia as CBV above 80 ml/kg. Results A total of 350 combinations of volume predictions and CBV measurements were obtained in 43 patients. Prediction of hypovolaemia had a sensitivity of 0.10 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.06 to 0.16) and a positive predictive value of 0.37 (95% CI = 0.23 to 0.53) for actual hypovolaemia. The prediction of hypervolaemia had a sensitivity of 0.06 (95% CI = 0.01 to 0.16) and a positive predictive value of 0.06 (95% CI = 0.02 to 0.19) for actual hypervolaemia. Mean CBV was significantly lower in instances considered hypervolaemic than in instances considered normovolaemic. Conclusions Assessment of haemodynamic condition in patients with SAH by intensive care unit or medium care unit nurses does not adequately predict hypovolaemia or hypervolaemia, as measured using pulse dye densitometry. Fluid therapy after SAH may require guidance with more advanced techniques than interpretation of usual haemodynamic parameters. PMID:19046461

  4. Nursing students' time management, reducing stress and gaining satisfaction: a grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Tayebeh; Oskouie, Fatemeh; Rafii, Forough

    2012-03-01

    In the course of their studies, nursing students must learn many skills and acquire the knowledge required for their future profession. This study investigates how Iranian nursing students manage their time according to the circumstances and obstacles of their academic field. Research was conducted using the grounded theory method. Twenty-one nursing students were purposefully chosen as participants. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using the method suggested by Corbin and Strauss. One of the three processes that the nursing students used was "unidirectional time management." This pattern consists of accepting the nursing field, overcoming uncertainty, assessing conditions, feeling stress, and trying to reduce stress and create satisfaction. It was found that students allotted most of their time to academic tasks in an attempt to overcome their stress. The findings of this study indicate the need for these students to have time for the extra-curricular activities and responsibilities that are appropriate to their age.

  5. [Nurses in the first times of World War one].

    PubMed

    Marc, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    The First World War originated in new and huge problems for both military authorities and military health service. The modern war which begun in 1914 overflowed this Service reformed in 1912. Famous journalists and political men such as Barrès and Clémenceau took part against dramatic conditions encountered by wounded soldiers. The First World War saw the introduction of many new technologies to the art of killing one's enemy among them the machine gun and the heavy use of artillery. It resulted in massive amount of wounded and ill soldiers which overflowed the military health service and every evacuation mean to the rear front. From August 2nd, 1914 to December 31st, 1914, 798. 833 French wounded soldiers and 322.672 ill soldiers were treated by the French Army 7th direction, in charge of the military health service. In such circumstances, a voluntary, parallel and the efficient sanitary organisation took an importance unknown until yet. This organisation, the Red Cross, associated the Société française de secours aux blessés militaires (French society for help to the wounded soldiers), the Union des Femmes de France (French Women Union) and the Association des Dames françaises (French Ladies Association). These three organisations, associated to many religious ones, brought a real sanitary structure so necessary in the troubled period as the beginning of the First World War. Everywhere in France, health service structures such as the hôpital temporaire no. 103 (Temporary Hospital number 103) in Paris, model hospital from the Union des Femmes de France, associated volunteers civilian doctors and surgeons. To increase the professional value of the paramedical staffs, a very specific effort was done for the formation of nurses in number, as correctly and as quickly as possible. During the first year of the First World War, nurses will be estimated since they had been able by their action to balance the disorder of the very first time of the conflict.

  6. Time allocation and temporal focus in nursing management: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Bjerregård Madsen, Johanna; Kaila, Arja; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Miettinen, Merja

    2016-11-01

    To describe the time allocation and temporal focus in nursing management. There is limited information about the time allocation and temporal focus of nursing management activities. The role of nurse administrators is changing, resulting in challenges related to time management. Published literature in 2005-2014 related to the time allocation or temporal focus of nurse administrators' management activities was retrieved from five databases, and an integrative review was conducted. Data extraction, quality assessment and quantitative content analysis were performed for eight reviewed articles. Daily reactive management activities and administrative routines were dominant in the nurse administrators' work, and strategic, proactive activities were scarce. Their daily work was fragmented by a variety of activities and numerous interruptions. Little information exists about time allocation or temporal focus in nurse administrators' management activities. Further research on this topic is needed. The evidence was fairly modest, although the studies' results were generally similar. These results can be used to clarify the job descriptions of nurse administrators and to plan and focus their education and training. Organisations need to use evidence to standardise the job descriptions of different levels of nurse managers and directors. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Nursing and en route care: history in time of war.

    PubMed

    Davis, R Scott; Connelly, Linda K

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the en route caregiver is to provide critical care in military helicopters for wounded Warriors. This care minimizes the effects of the wounds and injuries, and improves morbidity and mortality. This article will focus on the history of Army Nursing en route care. From World War II through Vietnam, and continuing through the War on Terrorism in Iraq and Afghanistan, Army nurses served in providing en route care in military airplanes and helicopters for patients being transported to higher echelons of care. From aid stations on the battlefield to forward surgical teams which provide life, limb, and eyesight saving care, to the next higher level of care in combat support hospitals, these missions require specialized nursing skills to safely care for the high acuity patients. Before the en route care concept existed, there was not a program to train nurses in these critical skills. There was also a void of information about patient outcomes associated with the nursing assessment and care provided during helicopter medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) of such unstable patients, and the consequent impact on the patient's condition after transport. The role of critical care nurses has proven to be essential and irreplaceable in providing full-spectrum care to casualties of war, in particular, the postsurgical patients transferred from one surgical facility to another in theatre. However, we have only recently developed the concepts over the required skill set, training, equipment, functionality, evidenced-based care, and sustainability of nursing in the en route care role. Much of the work to quantify and qualify nursing care has been done by individuals and individual units whose lessons-learned have only recently been captured.

  8. Study time within pre-registration nurse education: A critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Barker, Caroline; King, Nigel; Snowden, Michael; Ousey, Karen

    2016-06-01

    Pre-registration nursing students throughout the United Kingdom (UK) are required to complete a minimum number of theory hours within the course. Anecdotal evidence suggests that students are required to attend campus for approximately fifty percent of the theory hours. The remaining theory hours are often labelled as 'study time' in which students are not required to attend campus. There is a general assumption amongst many academics that all students are prepared and motivated to direct their learning and therefore use this time to study. However some students chose to work during this time and many have dependents. Considering the increasing cost of nurse education combined with the government cuts to student bursaries in England it is timely to review the literature to determine how study time is used within pre-registration nurse education. To present a critical review of the literature pertaining to study time in pre-registration nurse education. An integrative review of the literature. A search of electronic databases: Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL); Cochrane; Medline; Science Direct; Blackwell Synergy; Electronic Journals Service (EJS); Scopus; Taylor & Francis, Eric and Routledge Wiley was undertaken. The inclusion criteria consisted of peer reviewed primary research, discussion papers, unpublished doctoral theses' and editorial papers directly related to the key words and nurse education published in English. Twelve papers were included in the review. Analysis of the papers led to the development of two themes: orientation to self-directed learning (SDL) and preparation for SDL. The literature demonstrates that pre-registration nursing students lack the necessary skills for SDL. There is a lack of research on how study time is used within pre-registration nurse education. This calls for empirical research to fully explore how nursing students and lecturers perceive study time within pre-registration nursing curricula. Crown

  9. On-Admission Pressure Ulcer Prediction Using the Nursing Needs Score

    PubMed Central

    Setoguchi, Yoko; Mitani, Kazue; Abe, Yoshiro; Hashimoto, Ichiro; Moriguchi, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcers (PUs) are considered a serious problem in nursing care and require preventive measures. Many risk assessment methods are currently being used, but most require the collection of data not available on admission. Although nurses assess the Nursing Needs Score (NNS) on a daily basis in Japanese acute care hospitals, these data are primarily used to standardize the cost of nursing care in the public insurance system for appropriate nurse staffing, and have never been used for PU risk assessment. Objective The objective of this study was to predict the risk of PU development using only data available on admission, including the on-admission NNS score. Methods Logistic regression was used to generate a prediction model for the risk of developing PUs after admission. A random undersampling procedure was used to overcome the problem of imbalanced data. Results A combination of gender, age, surgical duration, and on-admission total NNS score (NNS group B; NNS-B) was the best predictor with an average sensitivity, specificity, and area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 69.2% (6920/100), 82.8% (8280/100), and 84.0% (8400/100), respectively. The model with the median AUC achieved 80% (4/5) sensitivity, 81.3% (669/823) specificity, and 84.3% AUC. Conclusions We developed a model for predicting PU development using gender, age, surgical duration, and on-admission total NNS-B score. These results can be used to improve the efficiency of nurses and reduce the number of PU cases by identifying patients who require further examination. PMID:25673118

  10. Predicting turnover and retention in nursing home administrators: management and policy implications.

    PubMed

    Singh, D A; Schwab, R C

    2000-06-01

    Administrator turnover and its impact on the quality of patient care are important concerns in the nursing home industry. This study evaluates a model to determine which factors, attitudes, and personal characteristics can predict tenure. Responses to a survey from 290 nursing home administrators (NHAs) who furnished data on their previous positions were analyzed using logistic regression methods. The extracted model correlates tenure with the administrator's past patterns of stability, community attachment, organizational commitment, and facility performance. The model is particularly effective (85% accuracy) in flagging NHAs who are likely to depart within their first 3 years of employment. Implications of these findings for recruitment, retention, and licensure policy are discussed.

  11. Fall Risk in Community Dwelling Elderly Cancer Survivors—A Predictive Model for Gerontological Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Spoelstra, Sandra; Given, Barbara; von Eye, Alexander; Given, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this predictive study was to test a structural model to establish predictors of fall risk. An aging and nursing model of care was synthesized and used to examine 6912 older adult participants who are low income, using the Minimum Data Set in a community setting in the Midwest. Data analysis established relationships among age, race, a history of a previous fall, depression, pain, and ADLs, IADLs, incontinence, vision, and cognitive status. Factors leading to fall risk can direct nursing activities that have the potential to prevent falls, improving quality of life. PMID:20128528

  12. "I get to spend time with my patients": nursing home physicians discuss their role.

    PubMed

    Bern-Klug, Mercedes; Buenaver, Maritza; Skirchak, Danielle; Tunget, Charla

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to learn about the role of the nursing home physician, and to begin to identify and articulate key concepts related to the role. A qualitative exploratory methodology was selected. Two medical students interviewed nursing home physicians in person, using open-ended questions. The data reflect the nursing home setting. Twelve physicians who practice full-time or part-time in a nursing home setting were interviewed. Six physicians were fellowship trained and seven were affiliated with an academic medical center. Eight physicians were from an urban area, and four were from a rural area in a Midwestern state. Qualitative data were grouped and coded to develop conceptual categories. Physicians were categorized as "pursuers, inheritors, or practice builders," based on their path to coming to care for nursing home residents. The medical directors among the physicians reported that their role was heavily dependent upon the desires of the nursing home administrator. Students were encouraged to visit many nursing homes to learn about the different ways in which the medical director role can be played out. Physicians reported positive aspects of their role including relationships with residents, families,staff; interesting and meaningful patient care; and autonomy. Less desirable aspects included: staff turnover, difficult expectations, and administrative issues. Although physicians indicated that social and indeed professional stigma are troublesome to people who work in nursing homes, they assured the medical student interviewer that caring for nursing home residents was gratifying and meaningful work. The need for physicians to care for the growing number of nursing home residents will continue for decades. Learning more about how physicians come to care for nursing home residents can be used to develop better ways to recruit, train, and retain physicians. Information about what nursing home physicians value about their role can be used to

  13. Who's talking? Communication and the casual/part-time nurse: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Batch, Mary; Barnard, Alan; Windsor, Carol

    2009-08-01

    The rapidly evolving nursing working environment has seen the increased use of flexible non standard employment, including part-time, casual and itinerate workers. Evidence suggests that the nursing workforce has been at the forefront of the flexibility push which has seen the appearance of a dual workforce and marginalization of part-time and casual workers by their full-time peers and managers. The resulting fragmentation has meant that effective communication management has become difficult. Additionally, it is likely that poor organisational communication exacerbated by the increased use of non standard staff, is a factor underlying current discontent in the nursing industry and may impact on both recruitment and retention problems as well as patient outcomes. This literature review explores the relationship between the increasing casualisation of the nursing workforce and, among other things, the communication practices of nurses within healthcare organisations.

  14. Teachers' Perceptions of Full- and Part-Time Nurses at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biag, Manuelito; Srivastava, Ashini; Landau, Melinda; Rodriguez, Eunice

    2015-01-01

    Teachers and school nurses partner together to help ensure students stay healthy and engaged in school. The purpose of this study is to generate a deeper understanding of teachers' perceptions on the benefits and challenges of working with full- or part-time school nurses. We conducted a qualitative analysis of open-ended survey responses from 129…

  15. Teachers' Perceptions of Full- and Part-Time Nurses at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biag, Manuelito; Srivastava, Ashini; Landau, Melinda; Rodriguez, Eunice

    2015-01-01

    Teachers and school nurses partner together to help ensure students stay healthy and engaged in school. The purpose of this study is to generate a deeper understanding of teachers' perceptions on the benefits and challenges of working with full- or part-time school nurses. We conducted a qualitative analysis of open-ended survey responses from 129…

  16. What predicts nurse faculty members' intent to stay in the academic organization? A structural equation model of a national survey of nursing faculty.

    PubMed

    Candela, Lori; Gutierrez, Antonio P; Keating, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the relations among several factors regarding the academic context within a nationally representative sample of U.S. nursing faculty. Correlational design using structural equation modeling to explore the predictive nature of several factors related to the academic organization and the work life of nursing faculty. A survey was used to evaluate several aspects of the work life of U.S. nursing faculty members. Nursing faculty members in academic organizations across the U.S. serving at either CCNE- or NLNAC-accredited institutions of higher education. Standard confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess the validity of a proposed measurement model, and structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the validity of a structural/latent variable model. Several direct and indirect effects were observed among the factors under investigation. Of special importance, perceptions of nurse administration's support and perceived teaching expertise positively predicted U.S. nursing faculty members' intent to stay in the academic organization. Understanding the way that nursing faculty members' perceptions of the various factors common to the academic context interact with intent to stay in the academic organization is essential for faculty and nursing administrators. This information can assist administrators in obtaining more resources for faculty development to lobby for additional faculty in order to meet the teaching, research, and service missions of the organization; and to personalize relationships with individual faculty members to understand their needs and acknowledge their efforts. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Missed nursing care and predicting factors in the Italian medical care setting.

    PubMed

    Palese, Alvisa; Ambrosi, Elisa; Prosperi, Letizia; Guarnier, Annamaria; Barelli, Paolo; Zambiasi, Paola; Allegrini, Elisabetta; Bazoli, Letizia; Casson, Paola; Marin, Meri; Padovan, Marisa; Picogna, Michele; Taddia, Patrizia; Salmaso, Daniele; Chiari, Paolo; Marognolli, Oliva; Canzan, Federica; Gonella, Silvia; Saiani, Luisa

    2015-09-01

    Missed nursing care (MNC), such as nursing care omitted or delayed, has not been measured in the Italian context where several cost containment interventions affect the care offered in medical units. The aim of the study is to identify the amount, type, and reasons for MNC in the Italian medical care setting and to explore the factors that affect the occurrence of MNC. A 3-month longitudinal survey was carried out followed by a cross-sectional study design in 12 north eastern acute medical units. A total of 314 nursing staff members were involved. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify the predictors of MNC. Patient ambulation (91.4 %), turning the patient every 2 h (74.2 %), and right timing in administering medications (64.6 %) were the most perceived MNC. Among the most frequent reasons were the unexpected rise in patient volume or critical conditions (95.2 %), inadequate numbers of staff (94.9 %), and large numbers of admissions/discharges (93.3 %). The R (2) 33.2 % of the variance in MNC were explained by a full-time position (OR 4.743, 95 % CI 1.146-19.629), communication tensions between Registered Nurses and Nurses' Aides (OR 1.601, 95 % CI 1.020-2.515), the amount of experience in medical unit (OR 1.564, 95 % CI 1.021-2.397), and the amount of daily care offered by Nurses' Aides (1.039, 95 % CI 1.011-1.067). A substantial amount of basic and clinically relevant nursing interventions was perceived to be missed, and this may lead to an increase in negative outcomes for patients admitted to a medical unit. Appropriate standards of nursing care should be adopted urgently in medical units aiming to protect frail patients.

  18. Bernstein polynomials for evolutionary algebraic prediction of short time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukoseviciute, Kristina; Howard, Daniel; Ragulskis, Minvydas

    2017-07-01

    Short time series prediction technique based on Bernstein polynomials is presented in this paper. Firstly, the straightforward Bernstein polynomial extrapolation scheme is improved by extending the interval of approximation. Secondly, the forecasting scheme is designed in the evolutionary computational setup which is based on the conciliation between the coarseness of the algebraic prediction and the smoothness of the time average prediction. Computational experiments with the test time series suggest that this time series prediction technique could be applicable for various forecasting applications.

  19. Predicting nurse staffing needs for a labor and birth unit in a large-volume perinatal service.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kathleen Rice

    2015-01-01

    This project was designed to test a nurse staffing model for its ability to accurately determine staffing needs for a large-volume labor and birth unit based on a staffing gap analysis using the nurse staffing guidelines from the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN). The staffing model and the AWHONN staffing guidelines were found to be reliable methods to predict staffing needs for a large-volume labor and birth unit.

  20. Predicting admission at triage: are nurses better than a simple objective score?

    PubMed

    Cameron, Allan; Ireland, Alastair J; McKay, Gerard A; Stark, Adam; Lowe, David J

    2017-01-01

    We compared two methods of predicting hospital admission from ED triage: probabilities estimated by triage nurses and probabilities calculated by the Glasgow Admission Prediction Score (GAPS). In this single-centre prospective study, triage nurses estimated the probability of admission using a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS), and GAPS was generated automatically from triage data. We compared calibration using rank sum tests, discrimination using area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) and accuracy with McNemar's test. Of 1829 attendances, 745 (40.7%) were admitted, not significantly different from GAPS' prediction of 750 (41.0%, p=0.678). In contrast, the nurses' mean VAS predicted 865 admissions (47.3%), overestimating by 6.6% (p<0.0001). GAPS discriminated between admission and discharge as well as nurses, its AUC 0.876 compared with 0.875 for VAS (p=0.93). As a binary predictor, its accuracy was 80.6%, again comparable with VAS (79.0%), p=0.18. In the minority of attendances, when nurses felt at least 95% certain of the outcome, VAS' accuracy was excellent, at 92.4%. However, in the remaining majority, GAPS significantly outperformed VAS on calibration (+1.2% vs +9.2%, p<0.0001), discrimination (AUC 0.810 vs 0.759, p=0.001) and accuracy (75.1% vs 68.9%, p=0.0009). When we used GAPS, but 'over-ruled' it when clinical certainty was ≥95%, this significantly outperformed either method, with AUC 0.891 (0.877-0.907) and accuracy 82.5% (80.7%-84.2%). GAPS, a simple clinical score, is a better predictor of admission than triage nurses, unless the nurse is sure about the outcome, in which case their clinical judgement should be respected. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Nursing, pharmacy, or medicine? Disgust sensitivity predicts career interest among trainee health professionals.

    PubMed

    Consedine, Nathan S; Yu, Tzu-Chieh; Windsor, John A

    2013-12-01

    Given global demand on health workforces, understanding student enrollment motivations are critical. Prior studies have concentrated on variation in career and lifestyle values; the current work evaluated the importance of disgust sensitivity in the prediction of health career interests. We argue that emotional proclivities may be important and that disgust sensitivity may help explain differential student interest in nursing, pharmacy, or medical careers. 303 first year students attending a required course in human behavior provided consent before completing questionnaires assessing: (1) demographics, (2) career intentions/interests, (3) traditional determinants of career intention/interest, and (4) dispositional disgust sensitivity. As expected, disgust sensitivity varied across the three majors, with those targeting medical careers being less sensitive than those interested in either nursing or pharmacy. As importantly, even when controlling for demographics and traditional career determinants, analyses showed that greater disgust sensitivity was associated with reduced odds of intended enrolment in pharmacy versus medicine or nursing but did not predict the distinction between nursing and medicine. The impact of disgust sensitivity on career interest was substantial and equivalent to established predictors of career intention. Disgust sensitivity may represent an important factor impacting the specific choices students make within the health professions, particular when students are choosing between careers involving greater and lesser degrees of exposure to the normative elicitors of disgust.

  2. Predictable Programming on a Precision Timed Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-18

    NYSTAR. Lee received support for this work in part by the Center for Hybrid and Embedded Software Systems (CHESS) at UC Berkeley, which receives support...University, NY 10027, USA April 18, 2008 Abstract In a hard real-time embedded system , the time at which a result is computed is as important as the result...performance. Real-time operating systems provide timing-aware scheduling policies, but without precise worst-case execution time bounds they cannot

  3. [Determinants of the choice of part time employment and nurses' satisfaction: a multicentre descriptive study].

    PubMed

    Ferrazzo, Martino; Filippi, Mauro; Meneghetti, Giulia; Palese, Alvisa

    2012-01-01

    To describe the main determinants for the choice of part time employment in Italian nurses and its' impact on work satisfaction. The main factors were identified with a focus-group. A questionnaire with 26 items for the choice of part time and 24 for work satisfaction was then devised and administered to part time nurses (503) of 5 North Italian hospitals. Two-hundred fifty-five nurses/471 answered the questionnaire. The choice of part time was voluntary for the large majority of nurses (251, 98.4%) except for 4 (1.6%) that asked for it for health problems (personal or of the spouse). Part time nurses are more satisfied for the relationships with colleagues (average 3; SD 0.6), the opportunity to deal with responsibilities (2.9; SD 0.6) and to have free time (2.9; SD 0.6). CONCLUSIONS; Part time is a need for mothers. Part time nurses complain for lack of access to information on patients and lack of involvement in ward projects and planned changes, possibly to be considered signals of isolation.

  4. Can Student Nurse Critical Thinking Be Predicted from Perceptions of Structural Empowerment within the Undergraduate, Pre-Licensure Learning Environment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caswell-Moore, Shelley P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a model using Rosabeth Kanter's theory (1977; 1993) of structural empowerment to determine if this model can predict student nurses' level of critical thinking. Major goals of nursing education are to cultivate graduates who can think critically with a keen sense of clinical judgment, and who can perform…

  5. The Efficacy of ATI Predictive Testing and Remediation on National Certification and Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse Pass Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Alexandra Selman

    2013-01-01

    This project study sought to evaluate the effects of implementing quarterly predictive testing and remediation on National Certification and Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN) pass rates of an associate's degree nursing program at a small Midwestern community college. The college's pass rate on the NCLEX-RN has been below both the…

  6. The Efficacy of ATI Predictive Testing and Remediation on National Certification and Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse Pass Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Alexandra Selman

    2013-01-01

    This project study sought to evaluate the effects of implementing quarterly predictive testing and remediation on National Certification and Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN) pass rates of an associate's degree nursing program at a small Midwestern community college. The college's pass rate on the NCLEX-RN has been below both the…

  7. Can Student Nurse Critical Thinking Be Predicted from Perceptions of Structural Empowerment within the Undergraduate, Pre-Licensure Learning Environment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caswell-Moore, Shelley P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a model using Rosabeth Kanter's theory (1977; 1993) of structural empowerment to determine if this model can predict student nurses' level of critical thinking. Major goals of nursing education are to cultivate graduates who can think critically with a keen sense of clinical judgment, and who can perform…

  8. Predicting Persistence in Practical Nursing and Success on the NCLEX-PN: Examining Demographic, Non-Academic, and Academic Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Alicia Debra

    2015-01-01

    The United States is now in the midst of a major nursing shortage that is predicted to get worse over the next ten years (Kurzen, 2005). The Health Resources and Services Administration reports that all 50 states will suffer from a nursing shortage by 2020 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2004). This means that there will be a…

  9. Predicting Persistence in Practical Nursing and Success on the NCLEX-PN: Examining Demographic, Non-Academic, and Academic Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Alicia Debra

    2015-01-01

    The United States is now in the midst of a major nursing shortage that is predicted to get worse over the next ten years (Kurzen, 2005). The Health Resources and Services Administration reports that all 50 states will suffer from a nursing shortage by 2020 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2004). This means that there will be a…

  10. Nursing Students' Alcohol Knowledge and Drinking Behavior over Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engs, Ruth C.; Hanson, David J.

    The knowledge of alcohol and drinking behavior of collegiate nursing students was studied in 1982-1983 and 1984-1985. The questionnaire included demographic items, questions regarding the consumption of alcohol, 36 items tapping knowledge of alcohol, and 17 items concerning possible consequences of drinking. The 1982 sample consisted of 291…

  11. Trapezius Muscle Load, Heart Rate and Time Pressure during Day and Night Shift in Swiss and Japanese Nurses

    PubMed Central

    NICOLETTI, Corinne; MÜLLER, Christian; TOBITA, Itoko; NAKASEKO, Masaru; LÄUBLI, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the activity of the trapezius muscle, the heart rate and the time pressure of Swiss and Japanese nurses during day and night shifts. The parameters were measured during a day and a night shift of 17 Swiss and 22 Japanese nurses. The observed rest time of the trapezius muscle was longer for Swiss than for Japanese nurses during both shifts. The 10th and the 50th percentile of the trapezius muscle activity showed a different effect for Swiss than for Japanese nurses. It was higher during the day shift of Swiss nurses and higher during the night shift of Japanese nurses. Heart rate was higher for both Swiss and Japanese nurses during the day. The time pressure was significantly higher for Japanese than for Swiss nurses. Over the duration of the shifts, time pressure increased for Japanese nurses and slightly decreased for those from Switzerland. Considering trapezius muscle activity and time pressure, the nursing profession was more burdening for the examined Japanese nurses than for Swiss nurses. In particular, the night shift for Japanese nurses was characterized by a high trapezius muscle activity and only few rest times for the trapezius muscle. PMID:24633074

  12. Stressors, Appraisal of Stressors, Experienced Stress and Cardiac Response: A Real-Time, Real-Life Investigation of Work Stress in Nurses.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Derek; Bell, Cheryl; Jones, Martyn; Farquharson, Barbara; Allan, Julia; Schofield, Patricia; Ricketts, Ian; Johnston, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Stress in health care professionals may reflect both the work and appraisal of work and impacts on the individuals, their patients, colleagues and managers. The purpose of the present study is to examine physiological and psychological effects of stressors (tasks) and theory-based perceptions of work stressors within and between nurses in real time. During two work shifts, 100 nurses rated experienced stress, affect, fatigue, theory-based measures of work stress and nursing tasks on electronic diaries every 90 min, whereas heart rate and activity were measured continuously. Heart rate was associated with both demand and effort. Experienced stress was related to demand, control, effort and reward. Effort and reward interacted as predicted (but only within people). Results were unchanged when allowance was made for work tasks. Real-time appraisals were more important than actual tasks in predicting both psychological and physiological correlates of stress. At times when effort was high, perceived reward reduced stress.

  13. So much to learn, so little time: educational priorities for the future of emergency nursing.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Anna Maria

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how and to what extent current societal and healthcare trends impact the educational needs of the emergency nurse. In addition, this study sought to draw upon that information to facilitate the development of expert consensus about the major educational priorities for emergency nurses during the time period from 2008 to 2018. A mixed methodology, qualitative-then-quantitative study design using a Delphi method was employed for this research. The 3-round Delphi study engaged a total of 50 emergency nursing experts with prior experience in emergency nursing practice and education to identify societal and healthcare trends and major educational priorities of relevance to emergency nurses. In this study, 3 rounds of questioning resulted in a total of 42 societal and healthcare priorities and 63 educational priorities with moderate to high consensus achieved in all categories. Societal and healthcare trends that were ranked as having the most significant impact on emergency nursing included emergency department overcrowding, increasing patient complexity and acuity, access to healthcare, mental and behavioral health needs, and an aging population. Educational themes or topics that were ranked as being an extremely high priority for emergency nursing included critical thinking, core emergency nursing competencies, triage, pediatric patient care, medication and patient safety, and individualized orientation programs for emergency nurses. An analysis of the highest priority educational themes indicates that emergency nursing experts are concerned with not only the content of educational programs but also the pedagogy used to provide educational opportunities to current and future emergency nurses.

  14. Gerontological nurse practitioners (GNPs) for the first time in Israel: Physicians' and nurses' attitudes.

    PubMed

    Yafa, Haron; Dorit, Rubinstein; Shoshana, Riba

    2016-08-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) have recently been partially introduced by the Israel Ministry of Health. This study examines the attitudes among gerontological physicians and nurses toward the scope of practice and effects on healthcare quality of the new role of gerontological NPs (GNPs). A descriptive survey methodology, with a cross-sectional design, was used. According to about 50% of the respondents, GNPs would be expected to have various positive effects on health care, such as reducing the number of referrals to emergency care, as well as readmissions. Despite the overall positive attitude to the GNPs' role, nurses and physicians perceived its scope of practice somewhat differently. Implementing the NP role involves multiple challenges and provides insights into this complex new function. Especially in these early stages, identified intentions for the NP role and value of the role by healthcare teams are expected to be useful to policy makers for planning effective utilization of NPs in healthcare workforce. This role is also a new role in other countries, so these findings should be relevant beyond Israel. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  15. International doctoral education partnership: the first full-time doctoral program for nurses in china.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Marie T; Liu, Huaping; Li, Zheng; Lu, Chongmei; Hill, Martha N

    2011-01-01

    In July 2008, five nurses graduated from the first full-time doctoral program for nurses in China at Peking Union Medical College (PUMC) in Beijing. The purpose of this article is to describe the doctoral program partnership between the Schools of Nursing at PUMC and Johns Hopkins University (Hopkins) in the United States that led to this historic event. The planning, implementation, evaluation, and early outcomes of the program are described to provide a model for rapidly increasing capacity for doctoral education in nursing in countries without sufficient or any doctoral education in nursing. One of the main objectives of this doctoral program partnership was to transition the Chinese University to an independent doctoral program as rapidly as possible. Lessons learned are presented as well as the next steps for this program. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. How many research nurses for how many clinical trials in an oncology setting? Definition of the Nursing Time Required by Clinical Trial-Assessment Tool (NTRCT-AT).

    PubMed

    Milani, Alessandra; Mazzocco, Ketti; Stucchi, Sara; Magon, Giorgio; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Passoni, Claudia; Ciccarelli, Chiara; Tonali, Alessandra; Profeta, Teresa; Saiani, Luisa

    2017-02-01

    Few resources are available to quantify clinical trial-associated workload, needed to guide staffing and budgetary planning. The aim of the study is to describe a tool to measure clinical trials nurses' workload expressed in time spent to complete core activities. Clinical trials nurses drew up a list of nursing core activities, integrating results from literature searches with personal experience. The final 30 core activities were timed for each research nurse by an outside observer during daily practice in May and June 2014. Average times spent by nurses for each activity were calculated. The "Nursing Time Required by Clinical Trial-Assessment Tool" was created as an electronic sheet that combines the average times per specified activities and mathematic functions to return the total estimated time required by a research nurse for each specific trial. The tool was tested retrospectively on 141 clinical trials. The increasing complexity of clinical research requires structured approaches to determine workforce requirements. This study provides a tool to describe the activities of a clinical trials nurse and to estimate the associated time required to deliver individual trials. The application of the proposed tool in clinical research practice could provide a consistent structure for clinical trials nursing workload estimation internationally. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Emotional intelligence increases over time: A longitudinal study of Australian pre-registration nursing students.

    PubMed

    Foster, Kim; Fethney, Judith; McKenzie, Heather; Fisher, Murray; Harkness, Emily; Kozlowski, Desirée

    2017-08-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) has been associated with positive outcomes for nursing students. Higher EI is associated with personal wellbeing and stress management, higher academic performance, stronger nursing leadership and practice performance, and greater patient safety. While there is an increasing body of evidence on nursing students' EI, there is minimal evidence on EI over time during pre-registration programs. To measure EI in pre-registration nursing students from program commencement to conclusion to ascertain EI over time and examine the relationship between EI and academic performance. Longitudinal repeated measures study between March 2010-February 2013 at a metropolitan university in Australia. 111 nursing students (74.8% female) contributed data on at least two occasions. Participants were enrolled in a pre-registration Master of Nursing degree. Half the cohort (55.0%) comprised Graduate Entry students who completed the course in two years full time. The other 45% were enrolled in an undergraduate degree in arts, science or health science, combined with the same pre-registration Master of Nursing Degree. These students completed their Combined Degree program in four years full time. Participants had a mean age of 24.7years (SD=7.36). EI was measured for commencing students (T1) using the Assessing Emotions Scale (AES), then a further three times: end of first year (T2; 9 months follow up); beginning of second year (12 months follow up; T3) and end of the program (T4; 24/36 months follow up). Students' EI was found to increase across the program; one subscale of EI (managing others' emotions) was related to higher academic performance; and there was a significant increase in the Utilising Emotions subscale scores over time. Pre-registration nurse education contributes to strengthening students' EI over time. Specific EI education scaffolded throughout programs is recommended in pre-registration curricula. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. A novel time series link prediction method: Learning automata approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradabadi, Behnaz; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2017-09-01

    Link prediction is a main social network challenge that uses the network structure to predict future links. The common link prediction approaches to predict hidden links use a static graph representation where a snapshot of the network is analyzed to find hidden or future links. For example, similarity metric based link predictions are a common traditional approach that calculates the similarity metric for each non-connected link and sort the links based on their similarity metrics and label the links with higher similarity scores as the future links. Because people activities in social networks are dynamic and uncertainty, and the structure of the networks changes over time, using deterministic graphs for modeling and analysis of the social network may not be appropriate. In the time-series link prediction problem, the time series link occurrences are used to predict the future links In this paper, we propose a new time series link prediction based on learning automata. In the proposed algorithm for each link that must be predicted there is one learning automaton and each learning automaton tries to predict the existence or non-existence of the corresponding link. To predict the link occurrence in time T, there is a chain consists of stages 1 through T - 1 and the learning automaton passes from these stages to learn the existence or non-existence of the corresponding link. Our preliminary link prediction experiments with co-authorship and email networks have provided satisfactory results when time series link occurrences are considered.

  19. Average sunrise time predicts depression prevalence.

    PubMed

    Olders, Henry

    2003-08-01

    Folk wisdom has it that early rising is associated with being "healthy, wealthy and wise." A physiologic explanation may be Wiegand's "Depressiogenic Theory of Sleep," which posits that excessive REM sleep causes depression. Sleeping late increases REM sleep, and thus may increase depression risk. Published depression prevalence research does not use arising time, but average sunrise time (AST) for cities might serve as an analogue for arising time. Two studies of depression prevalence in urban populations, the EURODEP Programme, which measured geriatric depression in nine European cities, and the Epidemiologic Catchment Area (ECA) study of five US centres, have so far lacked satisfactory explanations for the striking differences in depression prevalence between cities. It was hypothesized that differences in rising times between cities, as determined by AST, could explain the variability in depression prevalences. Correlations were calculated for published depression prevalences from the EURODEP and ECA studies, and AST for each site. For both studies, depression prevalences are significantly correlated with AST, with later sunrise (corresponding to earlier arising times in relation to sunrise) associated with lower depression prevalence. The hypothesis that later rising from sleep is associated with increased depression was supported. The findings also suggest that a city's depression prevalence could be reduced by simple public health measures to manipulate AST, such as going to Daylight Saving Time (DST) year-round or shifting time-zone boundaries. For individuals, getting up earlier from sleep may be helpful in depression.

  20. Factors predicting clinical nurses' willingness to care for Ebola virus disease-infected patients: A cross-sectional, descriptive survey.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Soo; Choi, Jeong Sil

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors predicting clinical nurses' willingness to care for Ebola virus disease (EVD)-infected patients. Data were collected from 179 nurses employed at 10 hospitals in Korea using self-reporting questionnaires. Only 26.8% of the participants were willing to care for EVD-infected patients. Factors predicting their willingness to provide care were their belief in public service, risk perception, and age. Nurses' willingness to provide care was high when their belief in public service was high, low when their risk perception was high, and low as their age increased. In order to strengthen nurses' willingness to care for EVD-infected patients, education that targets the enhancement of belief in public service should be included in nurse training. Efforts should be directed toward lowering EVD risk perception and developing systematic responses through government-led organized support.

  1. Resource Selection Using Execution and Queue Wait Time Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Smith; Wong, Parkson; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Computational grids provide users with many possible places to execute their applications. We wish to help users select where to run their applications by providing predictions of the execution times of applications on space shared parallel computers and predictions of when scheduling systems for such parallel computers will start applications. Our predictions are based on instance based learning techniques and simulations of scheduling algorithms. We find that our execution time prediction techniques have an average error of 37 percent of the execution times for trace data recorded from SGI Origins at NASA Ames Research Center and that this error is 67 percent lower than the error of user estimates. We also find that the error when predicting how long applications will wait in scheduling queues is 95 percent of mean queue wait times when using our execution time predictions and this is 57 percent lower than if we use user execution time estimates.

  2. War time experiences of triage and resuscitation: Australian Army nurses in the Vietnam War, 1967-1971.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, N E; Harvey, N R

    2001-07-01

    The experiences of nurses in war is prolifically described in the North American scholarly literature, and in the Australian nursing literature to a lesser extent. The literature describes the plights and achievements of nurses caring for soldiers and civilians often under the most undesirable of circumstances. A central focus of war time nursing is the resuscitation of critically wounded soldiers. This paper addresses the experiences of the Australian Army nurses who were involved in the triage and resuscitation of critically wounded allied and enemy soldiers in the Vietnam War between 1967 and 1971. As part of a research study to explore and analyse the nature of nursing work in the Vietnam War, seventeen Vietnam veteran nurses were interviewed about their experiences. This paper explores the progression of the triage department in the Australian military hospital in Vung Tau, and it highlights that the majority of the nurses who took part in this study were clinically unprepared, particularly as emergency nurses.

  3. Nursing intuition as an assessment tool in predicting severity of injury in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Cork, Lora L

    2014-01-01

    Emergency nurses assess patients using objective and subjective data. When the charge nurse takes report from a paramedic, another form of assessment occurs. By eliciting apt data and using trauma-scoring criteria, a decision to enact a "trauma code" occurs. Considering the cost and staff utilization, it is important for the charge nurse to make sound decisions when activating a trauma code. The objective of this study is to explore the validity of nurses' use of intuition in patients to predict the severity of their injuries, and whether it impacts their choice to institute a trauma code.The study design was a descriptive, quantitative, cross-sectional record review and cohort analysis. The setting was a rural Trauma Level III emergency department (ED) located 80 miles from the nearest Level I trauma center. Phase I was a convenience cluster sample of all charge nurses in an ED. Phase II was a collection of all trauma records from June 2010 to May 2012. The inclusion criterion for Phase I subjects was that all participants were currently working as ED charge nurses. Analysis for Phase I data consisted of evaluating demographic information provided in questions 1 through 6 in a questionnaire. For Phase II data, a power analysis using Cohen's d was performed to determine the sample size to be evaluated. On the basis of the 2012 trauma data, a total of 419 records needed to be assessed (confidence interval, 0.164; P < .286). Two groups were created: (1) gut instinct only, and (2) all other criteria. Injury severity scores were categorized by ascending severity: (1) 0 to 4, (2) 5 to 9, (3) 10 to 16, (4) 17 to 24, and (5) greater than 25. The data analysis consisted of a 2-tailed t test for probability and a linear regression analysis using Pearson's r for correlation. In Phase I, 6 of the 8 charge nurses responded. Results showed an average of greater than 10 years of experience as an ED registered nurse, certification was equally yes and no, and highest level of

  4. Attributions, future time perspective and career maturity in nursing undergraduates: correlational study design.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Yang, Liu; Chen, Yuxia; Zou, Huijing; Su, Yonggang; Fan, Xiuzhen

    2016-01-25

    Career maturity is an important parameter as nursing undergraduates prepare for their future careers. However, little is known regarding the relationships between attributions, future time perspective and career maturity among nursing undergraduates. The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree of career maturity and its relationship with attributions and future time perspective. A cross-sectional survey was designed. This survey was administered to 431 Chinese nursing undergraduates. Independent-sample t-tests and one-way ANOVA were performed to examine the mean differences between categories of binary and categorical demographic characteristics, respectively. Pearson correlations and multiple linear regressions were used to test the relationships between attributions, future time perspective and career maturity. The degree of career maturity was moderate among nursing undergraduates and that internal attributions of academic achievement, future efficacy and future purpose consciousness were positively associated with career maturity (all p < 0.01). These three factors accounted for 37.6% of the variance in career maturity (adjusted R(2) = 0.376). These findings might assist nursing educators and career counselors to improve nursing undergraduate career maturity by elucidating the imperative roles of internal attributions and future time perspective and to facilitate their transition from school to clinical practice.

  5. Eternal inflation predicts that time will end

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Freivogel, Ben; Leichenauer, Stefan; Rosenhaus, Vladimir

    2011-01-15

    Present treatments of eternal inflation regulate infinities by imposing a geometric cutoff. We point out that some matter systems reach the cutoff in finite time. This implies a nonzero probability for a novel type of catastrophe. According to the most successful measure proposals, our galaxy is likely to encounter the cutoff within the next 5x10{sup 9} years.

  6. Creative alliances between nursing service and education in times of economic constraint.

    PubMed

    Patton, J G; Cook, L R

    1994-01-01

    Health care and higher education in America are both in economic crisis and undergoing reform. Forming collaborative relationships between health care providers and nursing educational institutions is a savvy, economical, and mutually beneficial strategy in these changing times. Creative alliances between service and education are addressed in terms of clinical educational preceptorships for senior nursing students and joint appointments between service and education. The educational and service perspectives are discussed, from development to implementation.

  7. Effect of Full-Time versus Part-Time School Nurses on Attendance of Elementary Students with Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telljohann, Susan K.; Dake, Joseph A.; Price, James H.

    2004-01-01

    Asthma, the most common chronic disease in children today, is the leading cause of absenteeism among students. It accounts for nearly 20 million lost school days annually. This study examined whether full-time (5 days per week) or part-time (2 days per week) school nurses would have a differential effect on the frequency of absences among…

  8. Effect of Full-Time versus Part-Time School Nurses on Attendance of Elementary Students with Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telljohann, Susan K.; Dake, Joseph A.; Price, James H.

    2004-01-01

    Asthma, the most common chronic disease in children today, is the leading cause of absenteeism among students. It accounts for nearly 20 million lost school days annually. This study examined whether full-time (5 days per week) or part-time (2 days per week) school nurses would have a differential effect on the frequency of absences among…

  9. Predicting who will drop out of nursing courses: a machine learning exercise.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Laurence G; Mead, Donna M

    2008-05-01

    The concepts of causation and prediction are different, and have different implications for practice. This distinction is applied here to studies of the problem of student attrition (although it is more widely applicable). Studies of attrition from nursing courses have tended to concentrate on causation, trying, largely unsuccessfully, to elicit what causes drop out. However, the problem may more fruitfully be cast in terms of predicting who is likely to drop out. One powerful method for attempting to make predictions is rule induction. This paper reports the use of the Answer Tree package from SPSS for that purpose. The main data set consisted of 3978 records on 528 nursing students, split into a training set and a test set. The source was standard university student records. The method obtained 84% sensitivity, 70% specificity, and 94% accuracy on previously unseen cases. The method requires large amounts of high quality data. When such data are available, rule induction offers a way to reduce attrition. It would be desirable to compare its results with those of predictions made by tutors using more informal conventional methods.

  10. Examination of wireless technology to improve nurse communication, response time to bed alarms, and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Guarascio-Howard, Linda

    2011-01-01

    A medical-surgical unit in a southwestern United States hospital examined the results of adding wireless communication technology to assist nurses in identifying patient bed status changes and enhancing team communication. Following the addition of wireless communication, response time to patient calls and the number of nurse-initiated communications were compared to pre-wireless calls and response time sampling period. In the baseline study, nurse-initiated communications and response time to patient calls were investigated for a team nursing model (Guarascio-Howard & Malloch, 2007). At this time, technology consisted of a nurse call system and telephones located at each decentralized nurse station and health unit coordinator (HUC) station. For this follow-up study, a wireless device was given to nurses and their team members following training on device use and privacy issues. Four registered nurses (RNs) were shadowed for 8 hours (32 hours total) before and after the introduction of the wireless devices. Data were collected regarding patient room visits, number of patient calls, bed status calls, response time to calls, and the initiator of the communication episodes. Follow-up study response time to calls significantly decreased (t-test p = .03). RNs and licensed practical nurses responded to bed status calls in less than 1 minute-62% of the 37 calls. Communication results indicated a significant shift (One Proportion Z Test) in RN-initiated communications, suggesting an enhanced ability to communicate with team members and to assist in monitoring patient status. Patient falls trended downward, although not significantly (p > .05), for a 6-month period of wireless technology use compared to the same period the previous year. The addition of a wireless device has advantages in team nursing, namely increasing communication with staff members and decreasing response time to patient and bed status calls. Limitations of the study included a change in caregiver team

  11. The promise of the state space approach to time series analysis for nursing research.

    PubMed

    Levy, Janet A; Elser, Heather E; Knobel, Robin B

    2012-01-01

    Nursing research, particularly related to physiological development, often depends on the collection of time series data. The state space approach to time series analysis has great potential to answer exploratory questions relevant to physiological development but has not been used extensively in nursing. The aim of the study was to introduce the state space approach to time series analysis and demonstrate potential applicability to neonatal monitoring and physiology. We present a set of univariate state space models; each one describing a process that generates a variable of interest over time. Each model is presented algebraically and a realization of the process is presented graphically from simulated data. This is followed by a discussion of how the model has been or may be used in two nursing projects on neonatal physiological development. The defining feature of the state space approach is the decomposition of the series into components that are functions of time; specifically, slowly varying level, faster varying periodic, and irregular components. State space models potentially simulate developmental processes where a phenomenon emerges and disappears before stabilizing, where the periodic component may become more regular with time, or where the developmental trajectory of a phenomenon is irregular. The ultimate contribution of this approach to nursing science will require close collaboration and cross-disciplinary education between nurses and statisticians.

  12. Predicting Functional Decline and Recovery for Residents in Veterans Affairs Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Wojtusiak, Janusz; Levy, Cari R; Williams, Allison E; Alemi, Farrokh

    2016-02-01

    This article describes methods and accuracy of predicting change in activities of daily living (ADLs) for nursing home patients following hospitalization. Electronic Health Record data for 5,595 residents of Veterans Affairs' (VAs') Community Living Centers (CLCs) aged 70 years and older were analyzed within the VA Informatics and Computing Infrastructure. Data included diagnoses from 7,106 inpatient records, 21,318 functional status evaluations, and 69,140 inpatient diagnoses. The Barthel Index extracted from CLC's Minimum Data Set was used to assess ADLs loss and recovery. Patients' diagnoses on hospital admission, ADL status prior to hospitalization, age, and gender were used alone or in combination to predict ADL loss/gain following hospitalization. Area under the Receiver-Operator Curve (AUC) was used to report accuracy of predictions in short (14 days) and long-term (15-365 days) follow-up post-hospitalization. Admissions fell into 7 distinct patterns of recovery and loss: early recovery 19%, delayed recovery 9%, delayed recovery after temporary decline 9%, early decline 29%, delayed decline 10%, delayed decline after temporary recovery 6%, and no change 18%. Models accurately predicted ADL's 14-day post-hospitalization (AUC for bathing 0.917, bladder 0.842, bowels 0.875, dressing 0.871, eating 0.867, grooming 0.902, toileting 0.882, transfer 0.852, and walking deficits was 0.882). Accuracy declined but remained relatively high when predicting 14-365 days post-hospitalization (AUC ranging from 0.798 to 0.875). Predictive modeling may allow development of more personalized predictions of functional loss and recovery after hospitalization among nursing home patients. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Gerontological Society of America 2015.

  13. Evaluation of Fast-Time Wake Vortex Prediction Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hamilton, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Current fast-time wake models are reviewed and three basic types are defined. Predictions from several of the fast-time models are compared. Previous statistical evaluations of the APA-Sarpkaya and D2P fast-time models are discussed. Root Mean Square errors between fast-time model predictions and Lidar wake measurements are examined for a 24 hr period at Denver International Airport. Shortcomings in current methodology for evaluating wake errors are also discussed.

  14. PREDICTING EVAPORATION RATES AND TIMES FOR SPILLS OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Spreadsheet and short-cut methods have been developed for predicting evaporation rates and evaporation times for spills (and constrained baths) of chemical mixtures. Steady-state and time-varying predictions of evaporation rates can be made for six-component mixtures, includ...

  15. PREDICTING EVAPORATION RATES AND TIMES FOR SPILLS OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Spreadsheet and short-cut methods have been developed for predicting evaporation rates and evaporation times for spills (and constrained baths) of chemical mixtures. Steady-state and time-varying predictions of evaporation rates can be made for six-component mixtures, includ...

  16. Nurses and doctors in prime time series: the dynamics of depicting professional power.

    PubMed

    Turow, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This essay sketches a comparison of 1960s' television portrayals with those of the present to show that a limited and incomplete portrayal of nurses has been an enduring feature of prime-time medical television programs. They have depicted physicians then and now as captains of the medical ship and nurses then and now their ancillary and ill-defined helpers. As the comparison makes clear, part of nurses' lack of clear power in TV medical scenarios has to do with the explicit and implicit clout exercised by physicians' organizations to present doctor images effectively. That clout contrasts with nursing organizations' lack of attempts or ability (it's hard to gauge which) to influence network television's most prominent representations of their roles and the environments in which they work.

  17. Medication Administration Time Study (MATS): nursing staff performance of medication administration.

    PubMed

    Elganzouri, Erika Sharpnack; Standish, Cynthia A; Androwich, Ida

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and test a method for assessing nursing effort and workflow in the medication administration process. Thousands of patients die each year from medication errors, and hospitals strive for error reduction. Bar-coding medication administration systems have been proposed as a solution; however, many hospitals lack the necessary pre-implementation workflow process data on medication administration processes to evaluate the effectiveness of their current systems. A descriptive observation study of 151 nurses during 980 unique medication observations in medical-surgical units at a rural hospital, an urban community hospital, and an academic medical center was conducted. Nurses averaged more than 15 minutes on each medication pass and were at risk of an interruption or distraction with every medication pass. System challenges faced by nurses during the medication administration process lead to threats to patient safety, work-arounds, workflow inefficiencies, and distractions during a time when focus is most needed to prevent error.

  18. Cynicism in hospital staff nurses: the effect of intention to leave and job change over time.

    PubMed

    Mantler, Janet; Godin, Judith; Cameron, Sheila J; Horsburgh, Martha E

    2015-07-01

    To determine whether cynicism changes over time as a function of job change for nurses with high and low intentions to leave. Cynicism develops in reaction to organisational events including leaders' actions and can result in costly passive withdrawal behaviours. Hospital staff nurses (n = 436) completed a survey assessing their intentions to leave the job and cynicism and then completed follow-up surveys assessing cynicism and job change 1 or 2 years later. Hierarchical linear modelling was used to examine the effect of the interaction between intention to leave, job change and time on cynicism. Nurses who left their hospital and nurses with high initial intention to leave who changed jobs within their hospital reported declining levels of cynicism over 2 years. Cynicism increased for nurses with low intention to leave who remained at the same job and for those who experienced an internal job change despite low intention to leave. For those who desire it, an internal job change may allow for a recalibration of cynicism and increase employee engagement. To attenuate cynicism, hospital leaders need to act and communicate with integrity and be cautious not to arbitrarily change the jobs of nurses with low intention to leave. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Nursing stress and patient care: real-time investigation of the effect of nursing tasks and demands on psychological stress, physiological stress, and job performance: study protocol.

    PubMed

    Farquharson, Barbara; Bell, Cheryl; Johnston, Derek; Jones, Martyn; Schofield, Pat; Allan, Julia; Ricketts, Ian; Morrison, Kenny; Johnston, Marie

    2013-10-01

    To examine the effects of nursing tasks (including their physiological and psychological demands, and the moderating effects of reward and control) on distress and job performance in real time. Nurses working in hospital settings report high levels of occupational stress. Stress in nurses has been linked to reduced physical and psychological health, reduced job satisfaction, increased sickness absence, increased staff turnover, and poorer job performance. In this study, we will investigate theoretical models of stress and use multiple methods, including real-time data collection, to assess the relationship between stress and different nursing tasks in general medical and surgical ward nurses. A real-time, repeated measures design. During 2011/2012, 100 nurses from a large general teaching hospital in Scotland will: (a) complete self-reports of mood; (b) have their heart rate and activity monitored over two shifts to obtain physiological indices of stress and energy expenditure; (c) provide perceptions of the determinants of stress in complex ward environments; and (d) describe their main activities. All measures will be taken repeatedly in real time over two working shifts. Data obtained in this study will be analysed to examine the relationships between nursing tasks, self-reported and physiological measures of stress and to assess the effect of occupational stress on multiple work outcomes. The results will inform theoretical understanding of nurse stress and its determinants and suggest possible targets for intervention to reduce stress and associated harmful consequences. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. On-time clinical phenotype prediction based on narrative reports

    PubMed Central

    Bejan, Cosmin A.; Vanderwende, Lucy; Evans, Heather L.; Wurfel, Mark M.; Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a natural language processing system which is able to predict whether or not a patient exhibits a specific phenotype using the information extracted from the narrative reports associated with the patient. Furthermore, the phenotypic annotations from our report dataset were performed at the report level which allows us to perform the prediction of the clinical phenotype at any point in time during the patient hospitalization period. Our experiments indicate that an important factor in achieving better results for this problem is to determine how much information to extract from the patient reports in the time interval between the patient admission time and the current prediction time. PMID:24551325

  1. Comparison of indexing times among articles from medical, nursing, and pharmacy journals.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Ryan W

    2016-04-15

    Results of an analysis of the times to indexing of articles published in medical, nursing, and pharmacy journals are reported. MEDLINE data were retrieved for articles published in selected general practice medical, nursing, and pharmacy journals and entered into the PubMed system in 2012 and 2013. Collected data included PubMed entry date, date of indexing with Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms, and publication characteristics. Survival analysis was performed to assess the primary outcome of time to indexing. Cox proportional hazards models were developed to assess the effect of healthcare discipline and source journal on the primary outcome. Data were collected for 19,259 articles, of which 78.7%, 12.6%, and 8.7% originated from medical, nursing, and pharmacy journals, respectively. For medical, pharmacy, and nursing journals, 97.8%, 90.8%, and 50.1% of articles, respectively, were indexed within one year of PubMed entry; the corresponding median (interquartile range) times to indexing were 52 (20-68), 186 (150-246), and 252 (168-301) days. Unadjusted hazard ratios derived from Cox models indicated that indexing within one year was significantly less likely for articles published in pharmacy or nursing journals versus medical journals and for articles from all evaluated journals versus a designated reference publication (New England Journal of Medicine). Analysis of major medical, nursing, and pharmacy journals found that articles from nursing and pharmacy journals were indexed with MeSH terms more slowly than articles from medical journals. Journal identity was significantly associated with time to indexing. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Annual Released Time for Faculty: The Experience of One School of Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Sarah R.

    1987-01-01

    The experience of the University of Alabama School of Nursing with a plan that provides released time for faculty by reducing their teaching load is described. The availability of released time increased the involvement of the faculty in research, writing, education, clinical practice, and consultation. (MLW)

  3. Timing makes a difference: early nurse case management intervention and low back pain.

    PubMed

    Butler, Richard J; Johnson, William G; Gray, Brenda Peavy

    2007-01-01

    * To examine whether early nurse contacts influenced workers' satisfaction with their nurse case management, their healthcare, and the way the firm was treating their injury.* To examine whether early nurse contacts influenced self-reported measures of back pain and returns to work. Workers with low back pain resulting in workers' compensation claims. To quantify the influence of nurse case management on workers' satisfaction with their treatment by the firm and their healthcare provider, as well return to work, we follow 747 Marriott workers with incident episodes of low back pain in a prospective analysis. Predictors of outcomes include demographics, injury severity, and the timing of nurse case manager and work supervisor contacts. While early contacts do not have much impact on satisfaction with the treatment by the healthcare provider, early nurse case management contacts improve worker satisfaction with the firm's treatment of their claim, increasing satisfaction by 0.5 standard deviations (on a 4-point scale). The change in odds ratio with respect to a contact during the first week after injury is 8, indicating a 50-percentage point increase in the likelihood of continual employment. *Among workers with low back pain, early nurse case management contacts improved workers' satisfaction with their healthcare provider and their treatment by the firm.* Contacts made during the first week after the injury were most valuable, but in our sample it did not matter when during that first week the contact was made (as long as it was within the first week).* Early nurse case management contacts substantially improved the odds of continual employment, dominating the influence of age, job satisfaction, and the expectation of a good recovery.

  4. Method for Predicting Which Customers' Time Deposit Balances Will Increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Toshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Morita, Masahiro; Komoda, Norihisa

    This paper proposes a method of predicting which customers' account balances will increase by using data mining to effectively and efficiently promote sales. Prediction by mining all the data in a business is difficult because of much time required to collect, process, and calculate it. The selection of which features are used for prediction is a critical issue. We propose a method of selecting features to improve the accuracy of prediction within practical time limits. It consists of three parts: (1) converting collected features into financial behavior features that reflect customer actions, (2) extracting features affecting increases in account balances from these collected and financial behavior features, and (3) predicting customers whose account balances will increase based on the extracted features. We found the accuracy of prediction in an experiment with our method to be higher than with other conventional methods.

  5. Health and Illness Over Time: The Trajectory Perspective in Nursing Science

    PubMed Central

    Henly, Susan J.; Wyman, Jean F.; Findorff, Mary J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding change in health and illness over time is central to creating and evaluating interventions for individuals, families, and populations. The term health trajectory is a succinct and useful way to describe change in health status over time. Objectives To define the notion of a health trajectory; comment on the usefulness and current status of health trajectory research for nursing science and practice; and identify and illustrate key elements of theory, design, and statistical models for health trajectory research. Approach Constructs in theory about individual change are summarized, synthesized with characteristics of longitudinal design and statistical models for change, and discussed in light of current and emerging health care priorities and trends in nursing research. Recommendations Health trajectory research is person-focused and congruent with the person-centered emphasis of nursing practice. The contribution of nursing science to the overall effort to improve health will be enhanced when change over time is explicit in nursing theory, longitudinal designs are used, and contemporary statistical approaches for modeling change in health status are incorporated into research plans. PMID:21543961

  6. The use of selective admissions tools to predict students' success in an advanced standing baccalaureate nursing program.

    PubMed

    Timer, Jennifer E; Clauson, Marion I

    2011-08-01

    The judicious selection of nursing school applicants is important, and universities are increasingly incorporating non-academic criteria into their admission processes. We undertook a retrospective, correlational study of the predictive utility of an admissions process for nursing students' "in-program" success. The sample consisted of all 249 students admitted to a Canadian accelerated baccalaureate nursing program over a four-year study period. The students' arithmetic mean grade for six nursing courses (both theoretical and clinical) and their final grade point average (GPA) at graduation were the outcome measures of student success. The predictor variables included the applicants' demographic characteristics (e.g., age, gender, ethnic minority status, and previous educational attainment), their supplemental application materials and interview scores (assessing non-academic criteria), and their admission GPA. Linear regression was conducted on the outcome measures to determine whether the selection tools added information over that obtained through the use of admission GPA in predicting success. Although their admission GPAs were consistently predictive of the students' success, neither the supplemental application nor the interview scores had predictive utility. The variables consistently predictive of student success were age, ethnic minority status, and admission GPA, accounting for 26% of the variance in the selected nursing grades and 36% of the variance in GPA at graduation. The results provided little evidence to justify using the selective admissions tools. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of learning adaptability and time management disposition on study engagement among Chinese baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Ying; Liu, Yan-Hui; Yang, Ji-Peng

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationships among study engagement, learning adaptability, and time management disposition in a sample of Chinese baccalaureate nursing students. A convenient sample of 467 baccalaureate nursing students was surveyed in two universities in Tianjin, China. Students completed a questionnaire that included their demographic information, Chinese Utrecht Work Engagement Scale-Student Questionnaire, Learning Adaptability Scale, and Adolescence Time Management Disposition Scale. One-way analysis of variance tests were used to assess the relationship between certain characteristics of baccalaureate nursing students. Pearson correlation was performed to test the correlation among study engagement, learning adaptability, and time management disposition. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the mediating role of time management disposition. The results revealed that study engagement (F = 7.20, P < .01) and learning adaptability (F = 4.41, P < .01) differed across grade groups. Learning adaptability (r = 0.382, P < .01) and time management disposition (r = 0.741, P < .01) were positively related with study engagement. Time management disposition had a partially mediating effect on the relationship between study engagement and learning adaptability. The findings implicate that educators should not only promote interventions to increase engagement of baccalaureate nursing students but also focus on development, investment in adaptability, and time management.

  8. Understanding and Visualizing Multitasking and Task Switching Activities: A Time Motion Study to Capture Nursing Workflow.

    PubMed

    Yen, Po-Yin; Kelley, Marjorie; Lopetegui, Marcelo; Rosado, Amber L; Migliore, Elaina M; Chipps, Esther M; Buck, Jacalyn

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of multitasking within nursing workflow is important in today's dynamic and complex healthcare environment. We conducted a time motion study to understand nursing workflow, specifically multitasking and task switching activities. We used TimeCaT, a comprehensive electronic time capture tool, to capture observational data. We established inter-observer reliability prior to data collection. We completed 56 hours of observation of 10 registered nurses. We found, on average, nurses had 124 communications and 208 hands-on tasks per 4-hour block of time. They multitasked (having communication and hands-on tasks simultaneously) 131 times, representing 39.48% of all times; the total multitasking duration ranges from 14.6 minutes to 109 minutes, 44.98 minutes (18.63%) on average. We also reviewed workflow visualization to uncover the multitasking events. Our study design and methods provide a practical and reliable approach to conducting and analyzing time motion studies from both quantitative and qualitative perspectives.

  9. Understanding and Visualizing Multitasking and Task Switching Activities: A Time Motion Study to Capture Nursing Workflow

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Po-Yin; Kelley, Marjorie; Lopetegui, Marcelo; Rosado, Amber L.; Migliore, Elaina M.; Chipps, Esther M.; Buck, Jacalyn

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of multitasking within nursing workflow is important in today’s dynamic and complex healthcare environment. We conducted a time motion study to understand nursing workflow, specifically multitasking and task switching activities. We used TimeCaT, a comprehensive electronic time capture tool, to capture observational data. We established inter-observer reliability prior to data collection. We completed 56 hours of observation of 10 registered nurses. We found, on average, nurses had 124 communications and 208 hands-on tasks per 4-hour block of time. They multitasked (having communication and hands-on tasks simultaneously) 131 times, representing 39.48% of all times; the total multitasking duration ranges from 14.6 minutes to 109 minutes, 44.98 minutes (18.63%) on average. We also reviewed workflow visualization to uncover the multitasking events. Our study design and methods provide a practical and reliable approach to conducting and analyzing time motion studies from both quantitative and qualitative perspectives. PMID:28269924

  10. Coping with SLE: just in case vs. just in time: nurse's perspective.

    PubMed

    Brown, S

    2013-10-01

    This paper considers the experiences of people with lupus in comparison with those with diabetes, and discusses the impact of lupus specialist nurses in information-giving and education under the guise of 'just in case' vs. 'just in time'. Now recognized as a difficult condition to diagnose, lupus can lead to significant worry and distress especially during delays to diagnosis and times of high disease activity. Providing appropriate, individualized information to people with lupus is embedded in specialist nursing practice and enables individuals to use the tools of self-management approaches in gaining control over everyday symptoms.

  11. Characterizing Complex Time Series from the Scaling of Prediction Error.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, Brant Eric

    This thesis concerns characterizing complex time series from the scaling of prediction error. We use the global modeling technique of radial basis function approximation to build models from a state-space reconstruction of a time series that otherwise appears complicated or random (i.e. aperiodic, irregular). Prediction error as a function of prediction horizon is obtained from the model using the direct method. The relationship between the underlying dynamics of the time series and the logarithmic scaling of prediction error as a function of prediction horizon is investigated. We use this relationship to characterize the dynamics of both a model chaotic system and physical data from the optic tectum of an attentive pigeon exhibiting the important phenomena of nonstationary neuronal oscillations in response to visual stimuli.

  12. "Time enough! Or not enough time!" An oral history investigation of some British and Australian community nurses' responses to demands for "efficiency" in health care, 1960-2000.

    PubMed

    Hallett, Christine E; Madsen, Wendy; Pateman, Brian; Bradshaw, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Oral history methodology was used to investigate the perspectives of retired British district nurses and Australian domiciliary nurses who had practiced between 1960 and 2000. Interviews yielded insights into the dramatic changes in community nursing practice during the last four decades of the 20th century. Massive changes in health care and government-led drives for greater efficiency meant moving from practice governed by "experiential time" (in which perception of time depends on the quality of experience) to practice governed by "measured time" (in which experience itself is molded by the measurement of time). Nurses recognized that the quality of their working lives and their relationships with families had been altered by the social, cultural, and political changes, including the drive for professional recognition in nursing itself, soaring economic costs of health care and push for deinstitutionalization of care. Community nurses faced several dilemmas as they grappled with the demands for efficiency created by these changes.

  13. Chaotic time series prediction using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, E.B.

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes the use of artificial neural networks to model the complex oscillations defined by a chaotic Verhuist animal population dynamic. A predictive artificial neural network model is developed and tested, and results of computer simulations are given. These results show that the artificial neural network model predicts the chaotic time series with various initial conditions, growth parameters, or noise.

  14. Chaotic time series prediction using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, E.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the use of artificial neural networks to model the complex oscillations defined by a chaotic Verhuist animal population dynamic. A predictive artificial neural network model is developed and tested, and results of computer simulations are given. These results show that the artificial neural network model predicts the chaotic time series with various initial conditions, growth parameters, or noise.

  15. Three Millennia of Seemingly Time-Predictable Earthquakes, Tell Ateret

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnon, Amotz; Marco, Shmuel; Ellenblum, Ronnie

    2014-05-01

    Among various idealized recurrence models of large earthquakes, the "time-predictable" model has a straightforward mechanical interpretation, consistent with simple friction laws. On a time-predictable fault, the time interval between an earthquake and its predecessor is proportional to the slip during the predecessor. The alternative "slip-predictable" model states that the slip during earthquake rupture is proportional to the preceding time interval. Verifying these models requires extended records of high precision data for both timing and amount of slip. The precision of paleoearthquake data can rarely confirm or rule out predictability, and recent papers argue for either time- or slip-predictable behavior. The Ateret site, on the trace of the Dead Sea fault at the Jordan Gorge segment, offers unique precision for determining space-time patterns. Five consecutive slip events, each associated with deformed and offset sets of walls, are correlated with historical earthquakes. Two correlations are based on detailed archaeological, historical, and numismatic evidence. The other three are tentative. The offsets of three of the events are determined with high precision; the other two are not as certain. Accepting all five correlations, the fault exhibits a striking time-predictable behavior, with a long term slip rate of 3 mm/yr. However, the 30 October 1759 ~0.5 m rupture predicts a subsequent rupture along the Jordan Gorge toward the end of the last century. We speculate that earthquakres on secondary faults (the 25 November 1759 on the Rachaya branch and the 1 January 1837 on the Roum branch, both M≥7) have disrupted the 3 kyr time-predictable pattern.

  16. In real time: exploring nursing students' learning during an international experience.

    PubMed

    Afriyie Asenso, Barbara; Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl; Astle, Barbara

    2013-10-11

    Abstract Nursing education has increasingly turned to international learning experiences to educate students who are globally minded and aware of social injustices in local and global communities. To date, research with international learning experiences has focused on the benefits for the students participating, after they have completed the international experience. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how nursing students learn during the international experience. The sample consisted of eight nursing students who enrolled in an international learning experience, and data were collected in "real time" in Zambia. The students were observed during learning activities and were interviewed three times. Three major themes emerged from the thematic analysis: expectations shaped students' learning, engagement facilitated learning, and critical reflection enhanced learning. Implications are discussed, related to disrupting media representations of Africa that shape students' expectations, and educational strategies for transformative learning and global citizenship.

  17. Model-free quantification of time-series predictability.

    PubMed

    Garland, Joshua; James, Ryan; Bradley, Elizabeth

    2014-11-01

    This paper provides insight into when, why, and how forecast strategies fail when they are applied to complicated time series. We conjecture that the inherent complexity of real-world time-series data, which results from the dimension, nonlinearity, and nonstationarity of the generating process, as well as from measurement issues such as noise, aggregation, and finite data length, is both empirically quantifiable and directly correlated with predictability. In particular, we argue that redundancy is an effective way to measure complexity and predictive structure in an experimental time series and that weighted permutation entropy is an effective way to estimate that redundancy. To validate these conjectures, we study 120 different time-series data sets. For each time series, we construct predictions using a wide variety of forecast models, then compare the accuracy of the predictions with the permutation entropy of that time series. We use the results to develop a model-free heuristic that can help practitioners recognize when a particular prediction method is not well matched to the task at hand: that is, when the time series has more predictive structure than that method can capture and exploit.

  18. Predicting Use of Nurse Care Coordination by Older Adults With Chronic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Vanderboom, Catherine E; Holland, Diane E; Mandrekar, Jay; Lohse, Christine M; Witwer, Stephanie G; Hunt, Vicki L

    2017-07-01

    To be effective, nurse care coordination must be targeted at individuals who will use the service. The purpose of this study was to identify variables that predicted use of care coordination by primary care patients. Data on the potential predictor variables were obtained from patient interviews, the electronic health record, and an administrative database of 178 adults eligible for care coordination. Use of care coordination was obtained from an administrative database. A multivariable logistic regression model was developed using a bootstrap sampling approach. Variables predicting use of care coordination were dependence in both activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL; odds ratio [OR] = 5.30, p = .002), independent for ADL but dependent for IADL (OR = 2.68, p = .01), and number of prescription medications (OR = 1.12, p = .002). Consideration of these variables may improve identification of patients to target for care coordination.

  19. Weight Suppression Predicts Time to Remission from Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Michael R.; Berner, Laura A.; Swanson, Sonja A.; Clark, Vicki L.; Eddy, Kamryn T.; Franko, Debra L.; Shaw, Jena A.; Ross, Stephanie; Herzog, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether, at study entry, (a) weight suppression (WS), the difference between highest past adult weight and current weight, prospectively predicts time to first full remission from bulimia nervosa (BN) over a follow-up period of 8 years, and (b) weight change over time mediates the relationship between WS and time to first…

  20. Weight Suppression Predicts Time to Remission from Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Michael R.; Berner, Laura A.; Swanson, Sonja A.; Clark, Vicki L.; Eddy, Kamryn T.; Franko, Debra L.; Shaw, Jena A.; Ross, Stephanie; Herzog, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether, at study entry, (a) weight suppression (WS), the difference between highest past adult weight and current weight, prospectively predicts time to first full remission from bulimia nervosa (BN) over a follow-up period of 8 years, and (b) weight change over time mediates the relationship between WS and time to first…

  1. Using the theory of planned behaviour to predict nurses' intention to integrate research evidence into clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Côté, Françoise; Gagnon, Johanne; Houme, Philippe Kouffé; Abdeljelil, Anis Ben; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre

    2012-10-01

    Using an extended theory of planned behaviour, this article is a report of a study to identify the factors that influence nurses' intention to integrate research evidence into their clinical decision-making. Health professionals are increasingly asked to adopt evidence-based practice. The integration of research evidence in nurses' clinical decision-making would have an important impact on the quality of care provided for patients. Despite evidence supporting this practice and the availability of high quality research in the field of nursing, the gap between research and practice is still present. A predictive correlational study. A total of 336 nurses working in a university hospital participated in this research. Data were collected in February and March 2008 by means of a questionnaire based on an extension of the theory of planned behaviour. Descriptive statistics of the model variables, Pearson correlations between all the variables and multiple linear regression analysis were performed. Nurses' intention to integrate research findings into clinical decision-making can be predicted by moral norm, normative beliefs, perceived behavioural control and past behaviour. The moral norm is the most important predictor. Overall, the final model explains 70% of the variance in nurses' intention. The present study supports the use of an extended psychosocial theory for identifying the determinants of nurses' intention to integrate research evidence into their clinical decision-making. Interventions that focus on increasing nurses' perceptions that using research is their responsibility for ensuring good patient care and providing a supportive environment could promote an evidence-based nursing practice. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Improving Predictability in Embedded Real-Time Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-01

    Systems CMU/SEI-2000-SR-011 Peter H. Feiler , Software Engineering Institute Bruce Lewis, U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command Steve Vestal...SUBTITLE Improving Predictability in Embedded Real-Time Systems 5. FUNDING NUMBERS F19628-00-C-0003 6. AUTHOR(S) Peter H. Feiler , Bruce ...Carnegie Metton Software Engineering Institute Improving Predictability in Embedded Real-Time Systems Peter H. Feiler , Software Engineering

  3. Identification of cognitive and non-cognitive predictive variables related to attrition in baccalaureate nursing education programs in Mississippi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Catherine

    2005-07-01

    This study sought to identify a variable or variables predictive of attrition among baccalaureate nursing students. The study was quantitative in design and multivariate correlational statistics and discriminant statistical analysis were used to identify a model for prediction of attrition. The analysis then weighted variables according to their predictive value to determine the most parsimonious model with the greatest predictive value. Three public university nursing education programs in Mississippi offering a Bachelors Degree in Nursing were selected for the study. The population consisted of students accepted and enrolled in these three programs for the years 2001 and 2002 and graduating in the years 2003 and 2004 (N = 195). The categorical dependent variable was attrition (includes academic failure or withdrawal) from the program of nursing education. The ten independent variables selected for the study and considered to have possible predictive value were: Grade Point Average for Pre-requisite Course Work; ACT Composite Score, ACT Reading Subscore, and ACT Mathematics Subscore; Letter Grades in the Courses: Anatomy & Physiology and Lab I, Algebra I, English I (101), Chemistry & Lab I, and Microbiology & Lab I; and Number of Institutions Attended (Universities, Colleges, Junior Colleges or Community Colleges). Descriptive analysis was performed and the means of each of the ten independent variables was compared for students who attrited and those who were retained in the population. The discriminant statistical analysis performed created a matrix using the ten variable model that was able to correctly predicted attrition in the study's population in 77.6% of the cases. Variables were then combined and recombined to produce the most efficient and parsimonious model for prediction. A six variable model resulted which weighted each variable according to predictive value: GPA for Prerequisite Coursework, ACT Composite, English I, Chemistry & Lab I, Microbiology

  4. Assessment of Predictable Productivity of Nurses Working in Kerman University of Medical Sciences' Teaching Hospitals via the Dimensions of Quality of Work Life.

    PubMed

    Borhani, Fariba; Arbabisarjou, Azizollah; Kianian, Toktam; Saber, Saman

    2016-10-01

    Despite the existence of a large community of nurses, specific mechanisms have not been developed yet to consider their needs and the quality of their work life. Moreover, few studies have been conducted to analyze the nature of nursing, nursing places or nurses' quality of work life. In this regard, the present study aimed to assess predictable productivity of nurses working in Kerman University of Medical Sciences' teaching hospitals via the dimensions of Quality of Work Life. The present descriptive-correlational study was conducted to assess predictable productivity of nurses via the dimensions of Quality of Work Life. The study's population consisted of all nurses working in different wards of teaching hospitals associated with Kerman University of Medical Sciences. Out of the whole population, 266 nurses were selected based on the simple random sampling method. To collect data, the questionnaires of 'Quality of Nursing Work Life' and 'Productivity' were used after confirming their reliability (test-retest) and content validity. Finally, the collected data were analyzed through the SPSS software (version 16). Although the quality of work life for nurses was average and their productivity was low but the results showed that quality of life is directly related to nurses' productivity. Quality of life and its dimensions are predictive factors in the in the nurses' productivity. It can conclude that by recognizing the nurses' quality of work life situation, it can realize this group productivity and their values to the efficiency of the health system. For the quality of working life improvement and increasing nurses' productivity more efforts are needed by authorities. The findings can be applied by managers of hospitals and nursing services along with head nurses to enhance the quality of health services and nursing profession in general.

  5. Relationship between time management skills and anxiety and academic motivation of nursing students in Tehran.

    PubMed

    Ghiasvand, Arezoo Mohamadkhani; Naderi, Manijeh; Tafreshi, Mansoureh Zagheri; Ahmadi, Farzane; Hosseini, Meimanat

    2017-01-01

    Time management skills are essential for nursing students' success, and development of clinical competence. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between time management skills and anxiety and academic motivation of nursing students in Tehran medical sciences universities in 2015. This cross-sectional study was carried out on 441 nursing students in three medical universities in Tehran. Random stratified sampling was done to select the samples. Data were collected using demographic Questionnaire, Time Management Questionnaire (TMQ), Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Academic Motivation Scale (AMS), which was completed t by self-report. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18 software with descriptive and analytical statistics such as ANOVA, independent t-test, Regression and Pearson Correlation Coefficient. Most participants had a moderate level of time Management skills (49%), State Anxiety (58%), Trait Anxiety (60%) and Academic Motivation (58%). The results also showed a statistically significant negative correlation between the students' TMQ scores and the state anxiety (r= -0.282, p< 0.001) and trait anxiety scores (r= -0.325, p<0.001). Moreover, there was a statistically significant positive correlation between the students' TMQ scores and AMS scores (r= 0.279, p< 0.001). Regarding the findings, it seems that it is necessary to plan for improving time management skills in order to enhance academic motivation and reduce anxiety rates among nursing students.

  6. Relationship between time management skills and anxiety and academic motivation of nursing students in Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Ghiasvand, Arezoo Mohamadkhani; Naderi, Manijeh; Tafreshi, Mansoureh Zagheri; Ahmadi, Farzane; Hosseini, Meimanat

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Time management skills are essential for nursing students’ success, and development of clinical competence. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between time management skills and anxiety and academic motivation of nursing students in Tehran medical sciences universities in 2015. Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out on 441 nursing students in three medical universities in Tehran. Random stratified sampling was done to select the samples. Data were collected using demographic Questionnaire, Time Management Questionnaire (TMQ), Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Academic Motivation Scale (AMS), which was completed t by self-report. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18 software with descriptive and analytical statistics such as ANOVA, independent t-test, Regression and Pearson Correlation Coefficient. Results Most participants had a moderate level of time Management skills (49%), State Anxiety (58%), Trait Anxiety (60%) and Academic Motivation (58%). The results also showed a statistically significant negative correlation between the students’ TMQ scores and the state anxiety (r= −0.282, p< 0.001) and trait anxiety scores (r= −0.325, p<0.001). Moreover, there was a statistically significant positive correlation between the students’ TMQ scores and AMS scores (r= 0.279, p< 0.001). Conclusion Regarding the findings, it seems that it is necessary to plan for improving time management skills in order to enhance academic motivation and reduce anxiety rates among nursing students. PMID:28243424

  7. Results of a national survey indicating information technology skills needed by nurses at time of entry into the work force.

    PubMed

    McCannon, Melinda; O'Neal, Pamela V

    2003-08-01

    A national survey was conducted to determine the information technology skills nurse administrators consider critical for new nurses entering the work force. The sample consisted of 2,000 randomly selected members of the American Organization of Nurse Executives. Seven hundred fifty-two usable questionnaires were returned, for a response rate of 38%. The questionnaire used a 5-point Likert scale and consisted of 17 items that assessed various technology skills and demographic information. The questionnaire was developed and pilot tested with content experts to establish content validity. Descriptive analysis of the data revealed that using e-mail effectively, operating basic Windows applications, and searching databases were critical information technology skills. The most critical information technology skill involved knowing nursing-specific software, such as bedside charting and computer-activated medication dispensers. To effectively prepare nursing students with technology skills needed at the time of entry into practice, nursing faculty need to incorporate information technology skills into undergraduate nursing curricula.

  8. Time-to-event analysis of individual variables associated with nursing students' academic failure: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Dante, Angelo; Fabris, Stefano; Palese, Alvisa

    2013-12-01

    Empirical studies and conceptual frameworks presented in the extant literature offer a static imagining of academic failure. Time-to-event analysis, which captures the dynamism of individual factors, as when they determine the failure to properly tailor timely strategies, impose longitudinal studies which are still lacking within the field. The aims of this longitudinal study were to investigate the time which elapses from a nursing student's admission to a Bachelor of Nursing program to their academic failure and to estimate the predictive power of individual variables on academic failure. Enrolled students (n = 170) in two Italian nursing degree programs during academic year 2008-2009, received at the beginning of each years a questionnaire which evaluated individual variables. Academic failure rate was 37.2 %. Time-to-event analysis has shown that academic failure occurred after an average of 664.52 days of course attendance ((95 %)CI = 623.2-705.8). Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated a high likelihood of failure among males (χ(2) 7.790, p 0.005) and among those who had obtained a final average grade in their secondary education ≤73/100 (χ(2)11.676, p 0.001). Cox regression analysis confirmed an increased likelihood of failure over time among males as compared to females (HR 1.931, (95 %)CI = 1.017-3.670), and among students living more than a 30 min commute from their place of study (HR 1.898, (95 %)CI = 1.015-3.547). The effect of these two factors on academic failure has been seen to manifest primarily toward the end of students' second academic year; students at risk might be supported by the appropriate university staff prior to this period.

  9. Factors Associated with Time to Identify Physical Problems of Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kovach, Christine R.; Logan, Brent R.; Simpson, Michelle R.; Reynolds, Sheila

    2010-01-01

    This study describes new problems emerging over six weeks for nursing home residents with advanced dementia and factors associated with time to identify the problems. The sample of 65 developed 149 new acute problems or exacerbations of existing conditions over the six weeks of data collection. The majority of these problems involved uncontrolled pain, new infections and severe psychoses. Nurse assessment skill was associated with a shorter time to identify the new problem and more time spent on the problem. A higher ratio of new to existing interventions was also associated with a shorter time to identify the problem. Other patient characteristics associated with time to identify problems included non-specific vocalizations, physical signs, cognitive status and length of stay. While future research is warranted, findings from this study highlight the frequency of problems requiring treatment and suggest that improved assessment of residents may decrease the time to identify new problems. PMID:20237337

  10. Ability of nurse clinicians to predict unplanned returns to hospital within thirty days of discharge.

    PubMed

    Pace, Romina; Spevack, Rachel; Menendez, Claudia; Kouriambalis, Maria; Green, Laurence; Jayaraman, Dev

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the ability of nurse clinician discharge flow coordinators (DFCs) to identify medical patients at risk of unplanned return to the hospital emergency department within 30 days of discharge and whether a higher predicted risk of return was correlated with preventability. Prospective cohort study of patients discharged from medical wards at 2 hospital sites of the McGill University Health Center between September 1, 2011, and January 1, 2012. Univariate and multivariate analyses of factors including the ability of DFCs to predict 30-day unplanned returns to the hospital. Assessment of the preventability of returns to the hospital was performed by chart review using prespecified criteria. The ability of DFCs to predict returns was compared to the LACE criteria (length of stay, acute admission through the emergency department, comorbidities, and emergency department visits in the past 6 months). We found that 25.0% (95% CI, 21.3-28.5) of our patients returned to the emergency department within 30 days. The DFC predictions were found to be significant in both univariate and multivariate analysis. Patient age, sex, and length of stay were not significant predictors in univariate or multivariate analysis; 13.9% (95% CI, 8.2-19.6) of returns were preventable and a further 25.8% (95% CI, 18.1-33.5) were potentially preventable with added services in the community. There was a trend toward more preventable or potentially preventable returns with higher predicted probability of return. In contrast the LACE criteria did not have a good predictive capacity in our patient population. In a large urban center, experienced nurse clinician DFCs were able to predict 30-day emergency department returns with reasonable accuracy. They were also able to identify the returns to the hospital that were most likely to be preventable. Our data suggests that DFCs can be used to target patients identified as having an increased probability of return with interventions that may be

  11. Scalable Prediction of Energy Consumption using Incremental Time Series Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Simmhan, Yogesh; Noor, Muhammad Usman

    2013-10-09

    Time series datasets are a canonical form of high velocity Big Data, and often generated by pervasive sensors, such as found in smart infrastructure. Performing predictive analytics on time series data can be computationally complex, and requires approximation techniques. In this paper, we motivate this problem using a real application from the smart grid domain. We propose an incremental clustering technique, along with a novel affinity score for determining cluster similarity, which help reduce the prediction error for cumulative time series within a cluster. We evaluate this technique, along with optimizations, using real datasets from smart meters, totaling ~700,000 data points, and show the efficacy of our techniques in improving the prediction error of time series data within polynomial time.

  12. Changes to physician and nurse time burdens when caring for patients under contact precautions.

    PubMed

    Barker, Anna K; Codella, James; Ewers, Tola; Dundon, Adam; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Safdar, Nasia

    2017-03-13

    Contact precautions are complex behavioral interventions. To better understand barriers to compliance, we conducted a prospective study that compared the time burden for health care workers caring for contact precautions patients versus other patients. We found that nurses spent significantly more time in the rooms of contact precautions patients. There was no significant change in physician timing. Future studies need to evaluate workflow changes so that barriers to contact precaution implementation can be fully understood and addressed.

  13. Can We Predict Burnout among Student Nurses? An Exploration of the ICWR-1 Model of Individual Psychological Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Clare S.; Heritage, Brody; Osseiran-Moisson, Rebecca; Chamberlain, Diane; Cusack, Lynette; Anderson, Judith; Terry, Victoria; Rogers, Cath; Hemsworth, David; Cross, Wendy; Hegney, Desley G.

    2016-01-01

    The nature of nursing work is demanding and can be stressful. Previous studies have shown a high rate of burnout among employed nurses. Recently, efforts have been made to understand the role of resilience in determining the psychological adjustment of employed nurses. A theoretical model of resilience was proposed recently that includes several constructs identified in the literature related to resilience and to psychological functioning. As nursing students are the future of the nursing workforce it is important to advance our understanding of the determinants of resilience in this population. Student nurses who had completed their final practicum were invited to participate in an online survey measuring the key constructs of the ICWR-1 model. 422 students from across Australia and Canada completed the survey between July 2014 and July 2015. As well as several key demographics, trait negative affect, mindfulness, self-efficacy, coping, resilience, and burnout were measured. We used structural equation modeling and found support for the major pathways of the model; namely that resilience had a significant influence on the relationship between mindfulness, self-efficacy and coping, and psychological adjustment (burnout scores). Furthermore, as predicted, Neuroticism moderated the relationship between coping and burnout. Results are discussed in terms of potential approaches to supporting nursing students who may be at risk of burnout. PMID:27486419

  14. Kalman Filtering USNO's GPS Observations for Improved Time Transfer Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutsell, Steven T.

    1996-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) Master Control Station (MCS) performs the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) time transfer mission by uploading and broadcasting predictions of the GPS-UTC offset in subframe 4 of the GS navigation message. These predictions are based on only two successive daily data points obtained from the US Naval Observatory (USNO). USNO produces these daily smoothed data points by performing a least-squares fit on roughly 38 hours worth of data from roughly 160 successive 13-minute tracks of GPS satellites. Though sufficient for helping to maintain a time transfer error specification of 28 ns (1 Sigma), the MCS's prediction algorithm does not make the best use of the available data from from USNO, and produces data that can degrade quickly over extended prediction spans. This paper investigates how, by applying Kalman filtering to the same available tracking data, the MCS could improve its estimate of GPS-UTC, and in particular, the GPS-UTC A(sub 1) term. By refining the A(sub 1) (frequency) estimate for GPS-UTC predictions, error in GPS time transfer could drop significantly. Additional, the risk of future spikes in GPS's time transfer error could similarly be minimized, by employing robust Kalman filtering for GPS-UTC predictions.

  15. Time evolution of predictability of epidemics on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Takaguchi, Taro

    2015-04-01

    Epidemic outbreaks of new pathogens, or known pathogens in new populations, cause a great deal of fear because they are hard to predict. For theoretical models of disease spreading, on the other hand, quantities characterizing the outbreak converge to deterministic functions of time. Our goal in this paper is to shed some light on this apparent discrepancy. We measure the diversity of (and, thus, the predictability of) outbreak sizes and extinction times as functions of time given different scenarios of the amount of information available. Under the assumption of perfect information—i.e., knowing the state of each individual with respect to the disease—the predictability decreases exponentially, or faster, with time. The decay is slowest for intermediate values of the per-contact transmission probability. With a weaker assumption on the information available, assuming that we know only the fraction of currently infectious, recovered, or susceptible individuals, the predictability also decreases exponentially most of the time. There are, however, some peculiar regions in this scenario where the predictability decreases. In other words, to predict its final size with a given accuracy, we would need increasingly more information about the outbreak.

  16. Predicting analysis times in randomized clinical trials with cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tai-Tsang

    2016-02-01

    A new class of immuno-oncology agents has recently been shown to induce long-term survival in a proportion of treated patients. This phenomenon poses unique challenges for the prediction of analysis time in event-driven studies. If the phenomenon of long-term survival is not accounted for properly, the accuracy of the prediction based on the existing methods may be substantially compromised. Parametric mixture cure rate models with the best fit to empirical clinical trial data were proposed to predict analysis times in immuno-oncology studies during the course of the study. The proposed prediction procedure also accounts for the mechanism of action introduced by cancer immunotherapies, such as delayed and long-term survival effects. The proposed methodology was retrospectively applied to a randomized phase III immuno-oncology clinical trial. Among various parametric mixture cure rate models, the Weibull cure rate model was found to be the best-fitting model for this study. The unique survival kinetics of cancer immunotherapy was captured in the longitudinal predictions of the final analysis times. Parametric mixture cure rate models, along with estimated long-term survival rates, probabilities of study incompletion, and expected statistical powers over time, provide immuno-oncology clinical trial researchers with a useful tool for continuous event monitoring and prediction of analysis times, such that informed decisions with quantifiable risks can be made for better resource and logistic planning.

  17. The contribution of nursing data to the development of a predictive model for the detection of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cho, In Sook; Haug, Peter J

    2006-01-01

    The increasing use of information system has resulted in the accumulation of a large volume of nursing data in electronic medical records. These data have great potential for supporting the various clinical decisions made by physicians, nurses, and managers. However, how to re-use of nursing data remains largely an issue of informatics. The aim of this study was to demonstrate how these nursing data can be used and how much they could contribute to developing a predictive model for an expert system for early detection of acute pancreatitis. We employed a probability-based model consisting of a Bayesian network and trained this model with the patient data retrospectively retrieved from the enterprise data warehouse of a tertiary hospital. The performance of the predictive model was measured based on the error rate and the area under receiver operating characteristics curve, which were 13.89 % and 0.93, respectively. The sensitivity of the acute pancreatitis to the findings from each nursing data was measured using a test of sensitivity. The results showed that the role of nursing data is as important as laboratory data in formulating a model for an expert system.

  18. Transforming Nursing Programs to Reduce Time to Completion. Strategies for Transformative Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, A.; King, D.; Combs, M.

    2016-01-01

    This brief focuses on the efforts of the nursing programs at Phillips Community College of the University of Arkansas (PCCUA) to reduce time to completion, increase achievement, and enhance student support. To accomplish these goals, PCCUA involved healthcare providers, faculty, students, college curriculum committees, the Accreditation Commission…

  19. Communication among cancer patients, caregivers, and hospice nurses: Content, process and change over time.

    PubMed

    Ellington, Lee; Clayton, Margaret F; Reblin, Maija; Donaldson, Gary; Latimer, Seth

    2017-09-22

    First, to describe communication of home hospice nurse visits to cancer patient-caregiver dyads. Second, to assess change in communication related to domains of care over the course of visits. Multi-site prospective observational longitudinal study of audio-recorded home hospice visits (N=537 visits; 101 patient-caregiver dyads; 58 nurses). Communication was coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System to describe content and process. Conversation representing three care domains (physical, psychosocial/daily life, and emotional) was calculated from RIAS categories across speakers and analyzed to assess change in communication over time. On average, nurses spoke 54% of total utterances, caregivers 29%, and patients 17%. For all participants, the predominant conversational focus was on physical care. Linear mixed effects models indicated that combined participant emotional talk showed a small systematic decrease over time; however, the results for all domains indicated variability unexplained by time or speaker effects. Home hospice conversations are predominantly focused on physical care. Systematic change in communication versus responsiveness to the dynamic effects of patient death and family response over time are discussed. Communication strategies already in use by hospice nurses could be leveraged and expanded upon to better facilitate family competence and confidence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Nurse-led risk assessment/management clinics reduce predicted cardiac morbidity and mortality in claudicants.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Josephine; Gulati, Sumit; Abdul Rahman, Morhisham N A; Coughlin, Patrick A; Chetter, Ian C

    2008-12-01

    Nurse-led assessment/management of risk factors is effective in many chronic medical conditions. We aimed to evaluate whether this finding was true for patients with intermittent claudication and to analyze its impact on patient-reported quality of life and predicted mortality due to coronary heart disease. We prospectively studied a series of 78 patients (51 men; median age, 65 years [IQR: 56-74 years]), diagnosed with intermittent claudication and referred to a nurse-led risk assessment/management clinic (NLC) from a consultant-led vascular surgical clinic. The NLC used clinical care pathways to manage antiplatelet medication, smoking cessation, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes and to provide exercise advice. All patients were reassessed at a 3 months. Medication compliance, smoking status, fasting lipid profiles, blood pressure, and HbA1c were recorded. Disease-specific quality of life was assessed using King's College VascuQoL and predicted cardiac morbidity and mortality were calculated using the PROCAM and Framingham risk scores. We found that NLC enrollment produced an antiplatelet and a statin compliance of 100%, a smoking cessation rate of 17% (9 patients) and significant improvements in total cholesterol (median, 5.2-4.5 mmol/l), LDL (median, 3.1-2.5 mmol/l) and triglyceride (median, 1.7-1.4 mmol/l) levels. Significant disease-specific quality of life improvements and significant reduction in both the PROCAM (14% to 10%) and Framingham (14% to 11%) coronary risk scores were observed. Providing care at NLCs for claudicants is effective in assessing and managing risk factors, improves disease-specific quality of life and reduces predicted morbidity and mortality due to coronary heart disease.

  1. Clinical time series prediction: Toward a hierarchical dynamical system framework.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zitao; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2015-09-01

    Developing machine learning and data mining algorithms for building temporal models of clinical time series is important for understanding of the patient condition, the dynamics of a disease, effect of various patient management interventions and clinical decision making. In this work, we propose and develop a novel hierarchical framework for modeling clinical time series data of varied length and with irregularly sampled observations. Our hierarchical dynamical system framework for modeling clinical time series combines advantages of the two temporal modeling approaches: the linear dynamical system and the Gaussian process. We model the irregularly sampled clinical time series by using multiple Gaussian process sequences in the lower level of our hierarchical framework and capture the transitions between Gaussian processes by utilizing the linear dynamical system. The experiments are conducted on the complete blood count (CBC) panel data of 1000 post-surgical cardiac patients during their hospitalization. Our framework is evaluated and compared to multiple baseline approaches in terms of the mean absolute prediction error and the absolute percentage error. We tested our framework by first learning the time series model from data for the patients in the training set, and then using it to predict future time series values for the patients in the test set. We show that our model outperforms multiple existing models in terms of its predictive accuracy. Our method achieved a 3.13% average prediction accuracy improvement on ten CBC lab time series when it was compared against the best performing baseline. A 5.25% average accuracy improvement was observed when only short-term predictions were considered. A new hierarchical dynamical system framework that lets us model irregularly sampled time series data is a promising new direction for modeling clinical time series and for improving their predictive performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical time series prediction: towards a hierarchical dynamical system framework

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zitao; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2014-01-01

    Objective Developing machine learning and data mining algorithms for building temporal models of clinical time series is important for understanding of the patient condition, the dynamics of a disease, effect of various patient management interventions and clinical decision making. In this work, we propose and develop a novel hierarchical framework for modeling clinical time series data of varied length and with irregularly sampled observations. Materials and methods Our hierarchical dynamical system framework for modeling clinical time series combines advantages of the two temporal modeling approaches: the linear dynamical system and the Gaussian process. We model the irregularly sampled clinical time series by using multiple Gaussian process sequences in the lower level of our hierarchical framework and capture the transitions between Gaussian processes by utilizing the linear dynamical system. The experiments are conducted on the complete blood count (CBC) panel data of 1000 post-surgical cardiac patients during their hospitalization. Our framework is evaluated and compared to multiple baseline approaches in terms of the mean absolute prediction error and the absolute percentage error. Results We tested our framework by first learning the time series model from data for the patient in the training set, and then applying the model in order to predict future time series values on the patients in the test set. We show that our model outperforms multiple existing models in terms of its predictive accuracy. Our method achieved a 3.13% average prediction accuracy improvement on ten CBC lab time series when it was compared against the best performing baseline. A 5.25% average accuracy improvement was observed when only short-term predictions were considered. Conclusion A new hierarchical dynamical system framework that lets us model irregularly sampled time series data is a promising new direction for modeling clinical time series and for improving their predictive

  3. The art versus science of predicting prognosis: can a prognostic index predict short-term mortality better than experienced nurses do?

    PubMed

    Casarett, David J; Farrington, Sue; Craig, Teresa; Slattery, Julie; Harrold, Joan; Oldanie, Betty; Roy, Jason; Biehl, Richard; Teno, Joan

    2012-06-01

    To determine whether a prognostic index could predict one-week mortality more accurately than hospice nurses can. An electronic health record-based retrospective cohort study of 21,074 hospice patients was conducted in three hospice programs in the Southeast, Northeast, and Midwest United States. Model development used logistic regression with bootstrapped confidence intervals and multiple imputation to account for missing data. The main outcome measure was mortality within 7 days of hospice enrollment. A total of 21,074 patients were admitted to hospice between October 1, 2008 and May 31, 2011, and 5562 (26.4%) died within 7 days. An optimal predictive model included the Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) score, admission from a hospital, and gender. The model had a c-statistic of 0.86 in the training sample and 0.84 in the validation sample, which was greater than that of nurses' predictions (0.72). The index's performance was best for patients with pulmonary disease (0.89) and worst for patients with cancer and dementia (both 0.80). The index's predictions of mortality rates in each index category were within 5.0% of actual rates, whereas nurses underestimated mortality by up to 18.9%. Using the optimal index threshold (<3), the index's predictions had a better c-statistic (0.78 versus 0.72) and higher sensitivity (74.4% versus 47.8%) than did nurses' predictions but a lower specificity (80.6% versus 95.1%). Although nurses can often identify patients who will die within 7 days, a simple model based on available clinical information offers improved accuracy and could help to identify those patients who are at high risk for short-term mortality.

  4. Time use of stroke patients with stroke admitted for rehabilitation in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Chantal J A H R; Buijck, Bianca I; van der Stegen, John C G H; van Eijk, Monica Spruit-; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B

    2013-01-01

    To describe the time use of patients with stroke in five Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNFs) in the Netherlands, focusing on the time spent on therapeutic activities, nontherapeutic activities, interaction with others, and the location where the activities took place. Evidence suggest that task-oriented interventions are the most effective for patients with stroke and that some of these interventions are relevant and feasible for use by nurses. The question arises to what extent elderly patients who had a stroke and rehabilitate in a SNF receive therapeutic training and engage in therapeutic activities. Descriptive, observational design. Therapeutic and nontherapeutic activities of patients were observed at 10-minute intervals during one weekday (8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) using behavioral mapping. Forty-two patients with stroke with a mean age of 76 years participated in the study. The patients spent 56% of the day on therapeutic activities, whereas 44% of the day was spent on nontherapeutic activities. Most therapeutic time was spent on nursing care (9%) and physical therapy (4%). Patients stayed an average 41% of the day in their own room and were alone 49% of the day. Therapeutic time use was significantly related to improved functional status, patients with higher functional status spent more time on therapeutic activities. Patients spent more than half of the day on therapeutic activities. Nurses are faced with the challenge of activating patients with stroke and to assist them to engage in purposeful task-oriented exercises including daily activities. Thereby better rehabilitation results and recovery of patients may be reached. © 2013 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  5. Nurse and patient factors that influence nursing time in chest tube management early after open heart surgery: A descriptive, correlational study.

    PubMed

    Cook, Myra; Idzior, Laura; Bena, James F; Albert, Nancy M

    2017-04-27

    Determine nurse characteristics and patient factors that affect nurses' time in managing chest tubes in the first 24-hours of critical-care stay. Prospective, descriptive. Cardiovascular critical-care nurses and post-operative heart surgery patients with chest tubes were enrolled from a single center in Ohio. Nurses completed case report forms about themselves, comfort and time in managing chest tubes, chest tube placement and management factors. Analysis included correlational and comparative statistics; Bonferroni corrections were applied, as appropriate. Of 29 nurses, 86.2% were very comfortable managing chest tubes and oozing/non-secure dressings, but only 41.4% were very comfortable managing clogged chest tubes. Of 364 patients, mean age was 63.1 (±12.3) years and 36% had previous heart surgery. Total minutes of chest tube management was higher with≥3 chest tubes, tube size <28 French, and when both mediastinal and pleural tubes were present (all p<0.001). In the first 4-hours, time spent on chest tubes was higher when patients had previous cardiac surgeries (p≤0.002), heart failure (p<0.001), preoperative anticoagulant medications (p=0.031) and reoperation for postoperative bleeding/tamponade (p=0.005). Time to manage chest tubes can be anticipated by patient characteristics. Nurse comfort with chest tube-related tasks affected time spent on chest tube management. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. The Prediction of Teacher Turnover Employing Time Series Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Crist H.

    The purpose of this study was to combine knowledge of teacher demographic data with time-series forecasting methods to predict teacher turnover. Moving averages and exponential smoothing were used to forecast discrete time series. The study used data collected from the 22 largest school districts in Iowa, designated as FACT schools. Predictions…

  7. Advanced propeller noise prediction in the time domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Dunn, M. H.; Spence, P. L.

    1992-01-01

    The time domain code ASSPIN gives acousticians a powerful technique of advanced propeller noise prediction. Except for nonlinear effects, the code uses exact solutions of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation with exact blade geometry and kinematics. By including nonaxial inflow, periodic loading noise, and adaptive time steps to accelerate computer execution, the development of this code becomes complete.

  8. Glass Fibre/Epoxy Resin Interface Life-Time Prediction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    RD-Ai32 26 GLASS FIBRE /POXY RESIN INTERFACE LIFE-TIME PREDICTION 1/1 (U) BRISTOL UNIV (ENGLAND) H H WILLS PHYSICS LAB K H RSHBEE ET AL. APR 83...D 3005-MS GLASS FIBRE /EPOXY RESIN INTERFACE LIFE-TIME PREDICTION - Final Report by K H G Ashbee, Principal Investigator R Ho~l J P Sargent Elizabeth...REPORT h PERIOD COVERED. Glass Fibre /Epoxy Resin Interface Life-time F-inal Technical 11’ port PreictonApril 1981 - A:’ril 1983 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT

  9. Real-time Tsunami Inundation Prediction Using High Performance Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Y.; Imamura, F.; Sugawara, D.

    2014-12-01

    Recently off-shore tsunami observation stations based on cabled ocean bottom pressure gauges are actively being deployed especially in Japan. These cabled systems are designed to provide real-time tsunami data before tsunamis reach coastlines for disaster mitigation purposes. To receive real benefits of these observations, real-time analysis techniques to make an effective use of these data are necessary. A representative study was made by Tsushima et al. (2009) that proposed a method to provide instant tsunami source prediction based on achieving tsunami waveform data. As time passes, the prediction is improved by using updated waveform data. After a tsunami source is predicted, tsunami waveforms are synthesized from pre-computed tsunami Green functions of linear long wave equations. Tsushima et al. (2014) updated the method by combining the tsunami waveform inversion with an instant inversion of coseismic crustal deformation and improved the prediction accuracy and speed in the early stages. For disaster mitigation purposes, real-time predictions of tsunami inundation are also important. In this study, we discuss the possibility of real-time tsunami inundation predictions, which require faster-than-real-time tsunami inundation simulation in addition to instant tsunami source analysis. Although the computational amount is large to solve non-linear shallow water equations for inundation predictions, it has become executable through the recent developments of high performance computing technologies. We conducted parallel computations of tsunami inundation and achieved 6.0 TFLOPS by using 19,000 CPU cores. We employed a leap-frog finite difference method with nested staggered grids of which resolution range from 405 m to 5 m. The resolution ratio of each nested domain was 1/3. Total number of grid points were 13 million, and the time step was 0.1 seconds. Tsunami sources of 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake were tested. The inundation prediction up to 2 hours after the

  10. Prospects for eruption prediction in near real-time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voight, B.; Cornelius, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    THE 'materials science' method for eruption prediction1-3 arises from the application of a general law governing the failure of materials: ??-?? ??-A=0, where A and ?? are empirical constants, and ?? is an observable quantity such as ground deformation, seismicity or gas emission. This law leads to the idea of the 'inverse-rate' plot, in which the time of failure can be estimated by extrapolation of the curve of ??-1 versus time to a pre-deter-mined intercept. Here we suggest that this method can be combined with real-time seismic amplitude monitoring to provide a tool for near-real-time eruption prediction, and we demonstrate how it might have been used to predict two dome-growth episodes at Mount St Helens volcano in 1985 and 1986, and two explosive eruptions at Redoubt volcano in 1989-90.

  11. Meanings Over Time of Working as a Nurse in Elderly Care

    PubMed Central

    Blomberg, Karin; James, Inger; Kihlgren, Annica

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although registered nurses (RNs) play a central role in the care of older persons, their work in elderly care has historically been described as “low status” in nursing. This is especially problematic due to the global issue of RN turnover, but there is still little evidence of how to change this trend. Better understanding is needed of the reasons why RNs work in elderly care, as well as knowledge of whether these reasons have changed over time. Aim: The aim was to explore the meaning of working in elderly care, over time, from the perspective of RNs. Method: We interviewed thirteen RNs working in nursing homes, six of them in 2000 and the remaining seven in 2012, and analysed the resulting data using Interpretive Description. Results: The results show similarities and differences over time in the RNs’ reasoning about the meaning of their work with older persons, from a focus on obstacles to a view of opportunities. Conclusion: An RN’s intention to continue working in elderly care might be based on their beliefs; their view of older people, and their experiences of being able to influence the care. Managing this knowledge could be an essential factor in reversing the historical trend of RN work in elderly care being seen as low status, and the increasing turnover in such nurses. Our results could stimulate reflection on daily care and beliefs about caring for older persons. PMID:24044032

  12. Discriminative Accuracy of Physician and Nurse Predictions for Survival and Functional Outcomes 6 Months After an ICU Admission.

    PubMed

    Detsky, Michael E; Harhay, Michael O; Bayard, Dominique F; Delman, Aaron M; Buehler, Anna E; Kent, Saida A; Ciuffetelli, Isabella V; Cooney, Elizabeth; Gabler, Nicole B; Ratcliffe, Sarah J; Mikkelsen, Mark E; Halpern, Scott D

    2017-06-06

    Predictions of long-term survival and functional outcomes influence decision making for critically ill patients, yet little is known regarding their accuracy. To determine the discriminative accuracy of intensive care unit (ICU) physicians and nurses in predicting 6-month patient mortality and morbidity, including ambulation, toileting, and cognition. Prospective cohort study conducted in 5 ICUs in 3 hospitals in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and enrolling patients who spent at least 3 days in the ICU from October 2013 until May 2014 and required mechanical ventilation, vasopressors, or both. These patients' attending physicians and bedside nurses were also enrolled. Follow-up was completed in December 2014. ICU physicians' and nurses' binary predictions of in-hospital mortality and 6-month outcomes, including mortality, return to original residence, ability to toilet independently, ability to ambulate up 10 stairs independently, and ability to remember most things, think clearly, and solve day-to-day problems (ie, normal cognition). For each outcome, physicians and nurses provided a dichotomous prediction and rated their confidence in that prediction on a 5-point Likert scale. Outcomes were assessed via interviews with surviving patients or their surrogates at 6 months. Discriminative accuracy was measured using positive and negative likelihood ratios (LRs), C statistics, and other operating characteristics. Among 340 patients approached, 303 (89%) consented (median age, 62 years [interquartile range, 53-71]; 57% men; 32% African American); 6-month follow-up was completed for 299 (99%), of whom 169 (57%) were alive. Predictions were made by 47 physicians and 128 nurses. Physicians most accurately predicted 6-month mortality (positive LR, 5.91 [95% CI, 3.74-9.32]; negative LR, 0.41 [95% CI, 0.33-0.52]; C statistic, 0.76 [95% CI, 0.72-0.81]) and least accurately predicted cognition (positive LR, 2.36 [95% CI, 1.36-4.12]; negative LR, 0.75 [95% CI, 0.61-0.92]; C

  13. Predicting proton event time characteristics from radio burst data

    SciTech Connect

    Bakshi, P.; Nguyen, T.

    1981-06-01

    For events originating on the Western hemisphere, the delay before onset of the solar flare protons is shown to be well correlated (r about 0.80) with the rise time of the associated radio-burst at 2-3 GHz or the rise time of the H sub alpha flare. The peak flux time of the protons is shown to be very well correlated (r about 0.90) with the delay before onset, and fairly well correlated (r about 0.70) with the flare or radio rise time. These results allow a prediction of the proton event time characteristics from real time radio burst data.

  14. Online Anomaly Prediction for Real-Time Stream Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuanqiang; Luan, Zhongzhi; Qian, Depei; Du, Zhigao; Chen, Ting; Bai, Yuebin

    With the consideration of real-time stream processing technology, it's important to develop high availability mechanism to guarantee stream-based application not interfered by faults caused by potential anomalies. In this paper, we present a novel online prediction technique for predicting some anomalies which may occur in the near future. Concretely, we first present a value prediction which combines the Hidden Markov Model and the Mixture of Expert Model to predict the values of feature metrics in the near future. Then we employ the Support Vector Machine to do anomaly identification, which is a procedure to identify the kind of anomaly that we are about to alarm. The purpose of our approach is to achieve a tradeoff between fault penalty and resource cost. The experiment results show that our approach is of high accuracy for common anomaly prediction and low runtime overhead.

  15. Development and validation of classifiers and variable subsets for predicting nursing home admission.

    PubMed

    Nuutinen, Mikko; Leskelä, Riikka-Leena; Suojalehto, Ella; Tirronen, Anniina; Komssi, Vesa

    2017-04-13

    In previous years a substantial number of studies have identified statistically important predictors of nursing home admission (NHA). However, as far as we know, the analyses have been done at the population-level. No prior research has analysed the prediction accuracy of a NHA model for individuals. This study is an analysis of 3056 longer-term home care customers in the city of Tampere, Finland. Data were collected from the records of social and health service usage and RAI-HC (Resident Assessment Instrument - Home Care) assessment system during January 2011 and September 2015. The aim was to find out the most efficient variable subsets to predict NHA for individuals and validate the accuracy. The variable subsets of predicting NHA were searched by sequential forward selection (SFS) method, a variable ranking metric and the classifiers of logistic regression (LR), support vector machine (SVM) and Gaussian naive Bayes (GNB). The validation of the results was guaranteed using randomly balanced data sets and cross-validation. The primary performance metrics for the classifiers were the prediction accuracy and AUC (average area under the curve). The LR and GNB classifiers achieved 78% accuracy for predicting NHA. The most important variables were RAI MAPLE (Method for Assigning Priority Levels), functional impairment (RAI IADL, Activities of Daily Living), cognitive impairment (RAI CPS, Cognitive Performance Scale), memory disorders (diagnoses G30-G32 and F00-F03) and the use of community-based health-service and prior hospital use (emergency visits and periods of care). The accuracy of the classifier for individuals was high enough to convince the officials of the city of Tampere to integrate the predictive model based on the findings of this study as a part of home care information system. Further work need to be done to evaluate variables that are modifiable and responsive to interventions.

  16. Predicting the timing of dynamic events through sound: Bouncing balls.

    PubMed

    Gygi, Brian; Giordano, Bruno L; Shafiro, Valeriy; Kharkhurin, Anatoliy; Zhang, Peter Xinya

    2015-07-01

    Dynamic information in acoustical signals produced by bouncing objects is often used by listeners to predict the objects' future behavior (e.g., hitting a ball). This study examined factors that affect the accuracy of motor responses to sounds of real-world dynamic events. In experiment 1, listeners heard 2-5 bounces from a tennis ball, ping-pong, basketball, or wiffle ball, and would tap to indicate the time of the next bounce in a series. Across ball types and number of bounces, listeners were extremely accurate in predicting the correct bounce time (CT) with a mean prediction error of only 2.58% of the CT. Prediction based on a physical model of bouncing events indicated that listeners relied primarily on temporal cues when estimating the timing of the next bounce, and to a lesser extent on the loudness and spectral cues. In experiment 2, the timing of each bounce pattern was altered to correspond to the bounce timing pattern of another ball, producing stimuli with contradictory acoustic cues. Nevertheless, listeners remained highly accurate in their estimates of bounce timing. This suggests that listeners can adopt their estimates of bouncing-object timing based on acoustic cues that provide most veridical information about dynamic aspects of object behavior.

  17. Time series prediction using artificial neural network for power stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Puranik, G.; Philip, T.; Nail, B.

    1996-12-31

    Time series prediction has been applied to many business and scientific applications. Prominent among them are stock market prediction, weather forecasting, etc. Here, this technique has been applied to forecast plasma torch voltages to stabilize power using a backpropagation, a model of artificial neural network. The Extended-Delta-Bar-Delta algorithm is used to improve the convergence rate of the network and also to avoid local minima. Results from off-line data was quite promising to use in on-line.

  18. Feeding assistance needs of long-stay nursing home residents and staff time to provide care.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Sandra F; Schnelle, John F

    2006-06-01

    To describe the staff time requirements to provide feeding assistance to nursing home residents who require three different types of assistance to improve oral food and fluid intake (social stimulation, verbal cuing, or both; physical guidance; or full physical assistance) and to determine whether physically dependent residents require more staff time, as defined in the national Resource Utilization Group System (RUGS) used for reimbursement. Descriptive. Six skilled nursing homes. Ninety-one long-stay residents with low oral intake who responded to improved feeding assistance. Research staff conducted direct observations of usual nursing home care for 2 consecutive days (total of six meals) to measure oral food and fluid consumption (total percentage eaten) and staff time spent providing assistance (minutes and seconds). Research staff then implemented a standardized graduated-assistance protocol on 2 separate days (total of six meals) that enhanced residents' oral food and fluid intake. Staff time to provide feeding assistance that improved food and fluid consumption was comparable across different levels of eating dependency. Across all levels, residents required an average of 35 to 40 minutes of staff time per meal; thus, residents who needed only supervision and verbal cuing required just as much time as those who were physically dependent on staff for eating. The current RUGS system used for reimbursement likely underestimates the staff time required to provide feeding assistance care that improves oral intake.

  19. On the Prediction of α-Stable Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Mohammad; Mohammadpour, Adel

    2016-07-01

    This paper addresses the point prediction of α-stable time series. Our key idea is to define a new Hilbert space that contains α-stable processes. Then, we apply the advantage of Hilbert space theory for finding the best linear prediction. We show how to use the presented predictor practically for α-stable linear processes. The implementation of the presented method is easier than the implementation of the minimum dispersion method. We reveal the appropriateness of the presented method through an empirical study on predicting the natural logarithms of the volumes of SP500 market.

  20. Predictive validity of the post-enrolment English language assessment tool for commencing undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Glew, Paul J; Hillege, Sharon P; Salamonson, Yenna; Dixon, Kathleen; Good, Anthony; Lombardo, Lien

    2015-12-01

    Nursing students with English as an additional language (EAL) may underperform academically. The post-enrolment English language assessment (PELA) is used in literacy support, but its predictive validity in identifying those at risk of underperformance remains unknown. To validate a PELA, as a predictor of academic performance. Prospective survey design. The study was conducted at a university located in culturally and linguistically diverse areas of western Sydney, Australia. Commencing undergraduate nursing students who were Australian-born (n=1323, 49.6%) and born outside of Australia (n=1346, 50.4%) were recruited for this study. The 2669 (67% of 3957) participants provided consent and completed a first year nursing unit that focussed on developing literacy skills. Between 2010 and 2013, commencing students completed the PELA and English language acculturation scale (ELAS), a previously validated instrument. The grading levels of the PELA tool were: Level 1 (proficient), Level 2 (borderline), and Level 3 (poor, and requiring additional support). Participants with a PELA Level 2 or 3 were more likely to be: a) non-Australian-born (χ(2): 520.6, df: 2, p<0.001); b) spoke a language other than English at home (χ(2): 490.2, df: 2, p<0.001); and c) an international student (χ(2): 225.6, df: 2, p<0.001). There was an inverse relationship between participants' ELAS scores and PELA levels (r=-0.52, p<0.001), and those graded as 'proficient' with a PELA Level 1 were more likely to obtain higher scores in their: i) unit essay assessment (χ(2): 40.2, df: 2, p<0.001); ii) final unit mark (χ(2): 218.6, df: 2, p<0.001), and attain a higher GPA (χ(2): 100.8, df: 2, p<0.001). The PELA is a useful screening tool in identifying commencing nursing students who are at risk of academic underachievement. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of word predictability on reading time is logarithmic.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nathaniel J; Levy, Roger

    2013-09-01

    It is well known that real-time human language processing is highly incremental and context-driven, and that the strength of a comprehender's expectation for each word encountered is a key determinant of the difficulty of integrating that word into the preceding context. In reading, this differential difficulty is largely manifested in the amount of time taken to read each word. While numerous studies over the past thirty years have shown expectation-based effects on reading times driven by lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, and other information sources, there has been little progress in establishing the quantitative relationship between expectation (or prediction) and reading times. Here, by combining a state-of-the-art computational language model, two large behavioral data-sets, and non-parametric statistical techniques, we establish for the first time the quantitative form of this relationship, finding that it is logarithmic over six orders of magnitude in estimated predictability. This result is problematic for a number of established models of eye movement control in reading, but lends partial support to an optimal perceptual discrimination account of word recognition. We also present a novel model in which language processing is highly incremental well below the level of the individual word, and show that it predicts both the shape and time-course of this effect. At a more general level, this result provides challenges for both anticipatory processing and semantic integration accounts of lexical predictability effects. And finally, this result provides evidence that comprehenders are highly sensitive to relative differences in predictability - even for differences between highly unpredictable words - and thus helps bring theoretical unity to our understanding of the role of prediction at multiple levels of linguistic structure in real-time language comprehension. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of word predictability on reading time is logarithmic

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nathaniel J.; Levy, Roger

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that real-time human language processing is highly incremental and context-driven, and that the strength of a comprehender’s expectation for each word encountered is a key determinant of the difficulty of integrating that word into the preceding context. In reading, this differential difficulty is largely manifested in the amount of time taken to read each word. While numerous studies over the past thirty years have shown expectation-based effects on reading times driven by lexical, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, and other information sources, there has been little progress in establishing the quantitative relationship between expectation (or prediction) and reading times. Here, by combining a state-of-the-art computational language model, two large behavioral data-sets, and non-parametric statistical techniques, we establish for the first time the quantitative form of this relationship, finding that it is logarithmic over six orders of magnitude in estimated predictability. This result is problematic for a number of established models of eye movement control in reading, but lends partial support to an optimal perceptual discrimination account of word recognition. We also present a novel model in which language processing is highly incremental well below the level of the individual word, and show that it predicts both the shape and time-course of this effect. At a more general level, this result provides challenges for both anticipatory processing and semantic integration accounts of lexical predictability effects. And finally, this result provides evidence that comprehenders are highly sensitive to relative differences in predictability – even for differences between highly unpredictable words – and thus helps bring theoretical unity to our understanding of the role of prediction at multiple levels of linguistic structure in real-time language comprehension. PMID:23747651

  3. Measuring HIV stigma for PLHAs and nurses over time in five African countries.

    PubMed

    Holzemer, William L; Makoae, Lucy N; Greeff, Minrie; Dlamini, Priscilla S; Kohi, Thecla W; Chirwa, Maureen L; Naidoo, Joanne R; Durrheim, Kevin; Cuca, Yvette; Uys, Yvette R

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this article is to document the levels of HIV stigma reported by persons living with HIV infections and nurses in Lesotho, Malawi, South Africa, Swaziland and Tanzania over a 1-year period. HIV stigma has been shown to negatively affect the quality of life for people living with HIV infection, their adherence to medication, and their access to care. Few studies have documented HIV stigma by association as experienced by nurses or other health care workers who care for people living with HIV infection. This study used standardised scales to measure the level of HIV stigma over time. A repeated measures cohort design was used to follow persons living with HIV infection and nurses involved in their care from five countries over a 1-year period in a three-wave longitudinal design. The average age of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHAs) (N=948) was 36.15 years (SD=8.69), and 67.1% (N=617) were female. The average age of nurses (N=887) was 38.44 years (SD=9.63), and 88.6% (N=784) were females. Eighty-four per cent of all PLHAs reported one or more HIV-stigma events at baseline. This declined, but was still significant 1 year later, when 64.9% reported experiencing at least one HIV-stigma event. At baseline, 80.3% of the nurses reported experiencing one or more HIV-stigma events and this increased to 83.7% 1 year later. The study documented high levels of HIV stigma as reported by both PLHAs and nurses in all five of these African countries. These results have implications for stigma reduction interventions, particularly focused at health care providers who experience HIV stigma by association.

  4. Measuring HIV Stigma for PLHAs and Nurses over Time in Five African Countries

    PubMed Central

    Holzemer, William L.; Makoae, Lucy N.; Greeff, Minrie; Dlamini, Priscilla S.; Kohi, Thecla W.; Chirwa, Maureen L.; Naidoo, Joanne R.; Durrheim, Kevin; Cuca, Yvette; Uys, Leana R.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to document the levels of HIV stigma reported by persons living with HIV infections and nurses in Lesotho, Malawi, South Africa, Swaziland and Tanzania over a one-year period. HIV stigma has been shown to affect negatively the quality of life for people living with HIV infection, their adherence to medication, and their access to care. Few studies have documented HIV stigma by association as experienced by nurses or other health care workers who care for people living with HIV infection. This study used standardized scales to measure the level of HIV stigma over time. A repeated measures cohort design was used to follow persons living with HIV infection and nurses involved in their care from five countries over a one-year period in a three-wave longitudinal design. The average age of PLHAs (n = 948) was 36.15 years (SD= 8.69), and 67.1% (n= 617) were female. The average age of nurses (n = 887) was 38.44 years (SD=9.63), and 88.6% (n=784) were females. Eighty-four percent of all PLHAs reported one or more HIV stigma event at baseline. This declined, but was still significant one year later when 64.9% reported experiencing at least one HIV stigma event. At baseline, 80.3% of the nurses reported experiencing one or more HIV stigma events and this increased to 83.7% one year later. The study documented high levels of HIV stigma as reported by both PLHAs and nurses in all five of these African countries. These results have implications for stigma reduction interventions, particularly focused at health care providers who experience HIV stigma by association. PMID:19936409

  5. Impaired predictive motor timing in patients with cerebellar disorders.

    PubMed

    Bares, Martin; Lungu, Ovidiu; Liu, Tao; Waechter, Tobias; Gomez, Christopher M; Ashe, James

    2007-06-01

    The ability to precisely time events is essential for both perception and action. There is evidence that the cerebellum is important for the neural representation of time in a variety of behaviors including time perception, the tapping of specific time intervals, and eye-blink conditioning. It has been difficult to assess the contribution of the cerebellum to timing during more dynamic motor behavior because the component movements themselves may be abnormal or any motor deficit may be due to an inability to combine the component movements into a complete action rather than timing per se. Here we investigated the performance of subjects with cerebellar disease in predictive motor timing using a task that involved mediated interception of a moving target, and we tested the effect of movement type (acceleration, deceleration, constant), speed (slow, medium, fast), and angle (0 degrees , 15 degrees and 30 degrees) on performance. The subjects with cerebellar damage were significantly worse at interception than healthy controls even when we controlled for basic motor impairments such as response time. Our data suggest that subjects with damage to the cerebellum have a fundamental problem with predictive motor timing and indicate that the cerebellum plays an essential role in integrating incoming visual information with motor output when making predictions about upcoming actions. The findings demonstrate that the cerebellum may have properties that would facilitate the processing or storage of internal models of motor behavior.

  6. Nurses' Time Use in Forensic Psychiatry: Core Interventions Outlined in the Finnish Clinical Practice Guideline on Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tenkanen, Helena; Taskinen, Helena; Kontio, Raija; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Tiihonen, Jari; Kinnunen, Juha

    2016-01-01

    Forensic psychiatric nurses are key in implementing the core interventions outlined in the clinical practice guideline on schizophrenia. This study endeavors to ascertain how these were implemented in routine practice in forensic psychiatry by measuring how nurses use their time. Data were collected from registered nurses and practical mental nurses in all forensic psychiatric facilities in Finland using self-report diary forms for 1 week. In total, nurses used 20% of their weekly working hours on core interventions. The differences between the nurse groups were statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) regarding the following core interventions: (a) care planning with physicians, (b) pharmacotherapy, and (c) basic clinical care. Nurses' qualifications, types of facilities and units, working experience, gender, and staffing levels explained the time used on core interventions. In summary, forensic psychiatric inpatients received insufficient appropriate nursing services according to the relevant guideline regarding schizophrenia. Furthermore, managerial recommendations need to restructure nurses' time use to increase the proportion of productive working hours spent with patients.

  7. Measuring nursing care time and tasks in long-term services and supports: one size does not fit all.

    PubMed

    Bettger, Janet Prvu; Sochalski, Julie A; Foust, Janice B; Zubritsky, Cynthia D; Hirschman, Karen B; Abbott, Katherine M; Naylor, Mary D

    2012-09-01

    Although most staff in long-term care services and support (LTSS) are nursing care personnel, a method for measuring the provision of nursing care has not yet been developed. We sought to understand the challenges of measuring nursing care across different types of LTSS using a qualitative approach that included the triangulation of data from three unique sources. Six primary challenges to measuring nursing care across LTSS emerged. These included (a) level of detail about time of day, amount of time, or type of tasks varied by type of nursing and organization; (b) time and tasks were documented across clinical records and administrative databases; (c) data existed in both paper and electronic formats; (d) several sources of information were needed to create the fullest picture of nursing care; (e) data were inconsistently available for contracted providers; and (f) documentation of informal caregiving was unavailable. Differences were observed between assisted living facilities and home- and community-based services compared with nursing homes. Differences were also observed across organizations within a setting. A commonality across settings and organizations was the availability of an electronically stored care plan specifying individual needs, but not necessarily how these would be met. Findings demonstrate the variability of data availability and specificity across three distinct LTSS settings. This study is an initial step toward establishing a process for measuring the provision of nursing care across LTSS in order to explore the range of nursing care needs of LTSS recipients and how these needs are currently fulfilled.

  8. Financial Time Series Prediction Using Elman Recurrent Random Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Jun; Fang, Wen; Niu, Hongli

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, financial market dynamics forecasting has been a focus of economic research. To predict the price indices of stock markets, we developed an architecture which combined Elman recurrent neural networks with stochastic time effective function. By analyzing the proposed model with the linear regression, complexity invariant distance (CID), and multiscale CID (MCID) analysis methods and taking the model compared with different models such as the backpropagation neural network (BPNN), the stochastic time effective neural network (STNN), and the Elman recurrent neural network (ERNN), the empirical results show that the proposed neural network displays the best performance among these neural networks in financial time series forecasting. Further, the empirical research is performed in testing the predictive effects of SSE, TWSE, KOSPI, and Nikkei225 with the established model, and the corresponding statistical comparisons of the above market indices are also exhibited. The experimental results show that this approach gives good performance in predicting the values from the stock market indices. PMID:27293423

  9. Symplectic geometry spectrum regression for prediction of noisy time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hong-Bo; Dokos, Socrates; Sivakumar, Bellie; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2016-05-01

    We present the symplectic geometry spectrum regression (SGSR) technique as well as a regularized method based on SGSR for prediction of nonlinear time series. The main tool of analysis is the symplectic geometry spectrum analysis, which decomposes a time series into the sum of a small number of independent and interpretable components. The key to successful regularization is to damp higher order symplectic geometry spectrum components. The effectiveness of SGSR and its superiority over local approximation using ordinary least squares are demonstrated through prediction of two noisy synthetic chaotic time series (Lorenz and Rössler series), and then tested for prediction of three real-world data sets (Mississippi River flow data and electromyographic and mechanomyographic signal recorded from human body).

  10. Predicting evaporation rates and times for spills of chemical mixtures.

    PubMed

    Smith, R L

    2001-08-01

    Spreadsheet and short-cut methods have been developed for predicting evaporation rates and evaporation times for spills and constrained baths of chemical mixtures. Steady-state and time-varying predictions of evaporation rates can be made for six-component mixtures, including liquid-phase non-idealities as expressed through the UNIFAC method for activity coefficients. A group-contribution method is also used to estimate vapor-phase diffusion coefficients, which makes the method completely predictive. The predictions are estimates that require professional judgement in their application. One application that the evaporation time calculations suggest is a method for labeling chemical containers that allows one to quickly assess the time for complete evaporation of spills of both pure components and mixtures. The labeling would take the form of an evaporation time that depends on the local environment. For instance, evaporation time depends on indoor or outdoor conditions and the amount of each chemical among other parameters. This labeling would provide rapid information and an opportunity to premeditate a response before a spill occurs.

  11. Prediction of Long-Memory Time Series: A Tutorial Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhansali, R. J.; Kokoszka, P. S.

    Two different approaches, called Type-I and Type-II, to linear least-squares prediction of a long-memory time series are distinguished. In the former, no new theory is required and a long-memory time series is treated on par with a standard short-memory time series and its multistep predictions are obtained by using the existing modelling approaches to prediction of such time series. The latter, by contrast, seeks to model the long-memory stochastic characteristics of the observed time series by a fractional process such that its dth fractional difference, 0 < d < 0.5, follows a standard short-memory process. The various approaches to constructing long-memory stochastic models are reviewed, and the associated question of parameter estimation for these models is discussed. Having fitted a long-memory stochastic model to a time series, linear multi-step forecasts of its future values are constructed from the model itself. The question of how to evaluate the multistep prediction constants is considered and three different methods proposed for doing so are outlined; it is further noted that, under appropriate regularity conditions, these methods apply also to the class of linear long memory processes with infinite variance. In addition, a brief review of the class of non-linear chaotic maps implying long-memory is given.

  12. Improving prediction of fall risk among nursing home residents using electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Marier, Allison; Olsho, Lauren E W; Rhodes, William; Spector, William D

    2016-03-01

    Falls are physically and financially costly, but may be preventable with targeted intervention. The Minimum Data Set (MDS) is one potential source of information on fall risk factors among nursing home residents, but its limited breadth and relatively infrequent updates may limit its practical utility. Richer, more frequently updated data from electronic medical records (EMRs) may improve ability to identify individuals at highest risk for falls. The authors applied a repeated events survival model to analyze MDS 3.0 and EMR data for 5129 residents in 13 nursing homes within a single large California chain that uses a centralized EMR system from a leading vendor. Estimated regression parameters were used to project resident fall probability. The authors examined the proportion of observed falls within each projected fall risk decile to assess improvements in predictive power from including EMR data. In a model incorporating fall risk factors from the MDS only, 28.6% of observed falls occurred among residents in the highest projected risk decile. In an alternative specification incorporating more frequently updated measures for the same risk factors from the EMR data, 32.3% of observed falls occurred among residents in the highest projected risk decile, a 13% increase over the base MDS-only specification. Incorporating EMR data improves ability to identify those at highest risk for falls relative to prediction using MDS data alone. These improvements stem chiefly from the greater frequency with which EMR data are updated, with minimal additional gains from availability of additional risk factor variables. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Physician and nurse supply in Serbia using time-series data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Unemployment among health professionals in Serbia has risen in the recent past and continues to increase. This highlights the need to understand how to change policies to meet real and projected needs. This study identified variables that were significantly related to physician and nurse employment rates in the public healthcare sector in Serbia from 1961 to 2008 and used these to develop parameters to model physician and nurse supply in the public healthcare sector through to 2015. Methods The relationships among six variables used for planning physician and nurse employment in public healthcare sector in Serbia were identified for two periods: 1961 to 1982 and 1983 to 2008. Those variables included: the annual total national population; gross domestic product adjusted to 1994 prices; inpatient care discharges; outpatient care visits; students enrolled in the first year of medical studies at public universities; and the annual number of graduated physicians. Based on historic trends, physician supply and nurse supply in the public healthcare sector by 2015 (with corresponding 95% confidence level) have been modeled using Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) / Transfer function (TF) models. Results The ARIMA/TF modeling yielded stable and significant forecasts of physician supply (stationary R2 squared = 0.71) and nurse supply (stationary R2 squared = 0.92) in the public healthcare sector in Serbia through to 2015. The most significant predictors for physician employment were the population and GDP. The supply of nursing staff was, in turn, related to the number of physicians. Physician and nurse rates per 100,000 population increased by 13%. The model predicts a seven-year mismatch between the supply of graduates and vacancies in the public healthcare sector is forecasted at 8,698 physicians - a net surplus. Conclusion The ARIMA model can be used to project trends, especially those that identify significant mismatches between forecasted

  14. Physician and nurse supply in Serbia using time-series data.

    PubMed

    Santric-Milicevic, Milena; Vasic, Vladimir; Marinkovic, Jelena

    2013-06-17

    Unemployment among health professionals in Serbia has risen in the recent past and continues to increase. This highlights the need to understand how to change policies to meet real and projected needs. This study identified variables that were significantly related to physician and nurse employment rates in the public healthcare sector in Serbia from 1961 to 2008 and used these to develop parameters to model physician and nurse supply in the public healthcare sector through to 2015. The relationships among six variables used for planning physician and nurse employment in public healthcare sector in Serbia were identified for two periods: 1961 to 1982 and 1983 to 2008. Those variables included: the annual total national population; gross domestic product adjusted to 1994 prices; inpatient care discharges; outpatient care visits; students enrolled in the first year of medical studies at public universities; and the annual number of graduated physicians. Based on historic trends, physician supply and nurse supply in the public healthcare sector by 2015 (with corresponding 95% confidence level) have been modeled using Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) / Transfer function (TF) models. The ARIMA/TF modeling yielded stable and significant forecasts of physician supply (stationary R2 squared = 0.71) and nurse supply (stationary R2 squared = 0.92) in the public healthcare sector in Serbia through to 2015. The most significant predictors for physician employment were the population and GDP. The supply of nursing staff was, in turn, related to the number of physicians. Physician and nurse rates per 100,000 population increased by 13%. The model predicts a seven-year mismatch between the supply of graduates and vacancies in the public healthcare sector is forecasted at 8,698 physicians - a net surplus. The ARIMA model can be used to project trends, especially those that identify significant mismatches between forecasted supply of physicians and vacancies and can

  15. Impact of patient-controlled analgesia on required nursing time and duration of postoperative recovery.

    PubMed

    Chan, V W; Chung, F; McQuestion, M; Gomez, M

    1995-01-01

    Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) offers effective postoperative pain management. However, the evidence of economic benefits associated with its use is lacking. Although suggestive, the potential economic advantages of PCA in saving nursing time and shortening hospital stay need objective documentation. This study compared the effects of morphine administered by PCA systems with intramuscular (i.m.) morphine injection on patient analgesic response, satisfaction, nursing time requirements, and postoperative recovery in 23 patients undergoing "open" cholecystectomy and 44 patients undergoing lumbar laminectomy and bony fusion. After the operation, patients in the PCA group received 1.5-2 mg morphine with a lockout of 5-10 minutes on demand, whereas those in the i.m. group received 0.15-0.2 mg/kg every 4 hours on demand. Visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores and satisfaction scores were evaluated at 4-hour intervals while nursing time spent on both analgesia-related and non-analgesia-related activities was recorded continuously by a team of independent observers on the ward. Recovery time profile for the return of bowel function, activities of daily living, ambulation without support, and length of hospital stay was also recorded. It was found that morphine consumption, VAS, and satisfaction scores were similar in both PCA and i.m. treatment groups following both types of surgery. However, the delay in nurse response to i.m. morphine request ranged from 27.2 +/- to 42.1 +/- 11.8 minutes. The demand of nursing time on analgesia administration was less with PCA. The magnitude of time saving was 10 min/patient/d in cholecystectomy patients and 13 min/patient/d in laminectomy patients. The speed of postoperative patient recovery was similar between the two analgesia groups. Length of hospital stay following cholecystectomy was shorter--92.0 +/- 5.9 hours with PCA versus 128.6 +/- 22.2 hours with i.m. (not statistically significant)--whereas that following laminectomy was

  16. Optimal model-free prediction from multivariate time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Jakob; Donner, Reik V.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Forecasting a complex system's time evolution constitutes a challenging problem, especially if the governing physical equations are unknown or too complex to be simulated with first-principle models. Here a model-free prediction scheme based on the observed multivariate time series is discussed. It efficiently overcomes the curse of dimensionality in finding good predictors from large data sets and yields information-theoretically optimal predictors. The practical performance of the prediction scheme is demonstrated on multivariate nonlinear stochastic delay processes and in an application to an index of El Nino-Southern Oscillation.

  17. Nursing the patient with complex communication needs: time as a barrier and a facilitator to successful communication in hospital.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Bronwyn; Balandin, Susan; Worrall, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Effective nurse-patient communication is an essential aspect of health care. Time to communicate, however, is limited and subject to workload demands. Little is known about how nurses manage this 'lack of time' when caring for patients with developmental disability and complex communication needs, who typically communicate at a slow rate. The aim of this study was to investigate nurses' expressed concepts of 'time' in stories about communicating with patients with developmental disability and complex communication needs in hospital. In 2009, 15 hospital nurses from a range of wards in two metropolitan hospitals participated in interviews about barriers to and strategies for successful communication with patients with developmental disability and complex communication needs in hospital. The data were analysed using narrative inquiry methodology and the stories verified with the participants. Nurses identified 'time' as a barrier and a facilitator to successful communication. Time as a barrier was related thematically to avoiding direct communication and preferring that family or paid carers communicated on behalf of the patient. Time as a facilitator was related to valuing communication, investing extra time, and to applying a range of adaptive communication strategies to establish successful communication. Time is perceived by nurses as both an enemy and friend for improving communication. Nurses who perceive that communication takes too long may avoid communication and miss opportunities to improve communication through increased familiarity with the person's communication methods. Those who take time to communicate narrate applying a range of strategies to achieve success in basic needs communication. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Time dependent patient no-show predictive modelling development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Li; Hanauer, David A

    2016-05-09

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to develop evident-based predictive no-show models considering patients' each past appointment status, a time-dependent component, as an independent predictor to improve predictability. Design/methodology/approach - A ten-year retrospective data set was extracted from a pediatric clinic. It consisted of 7,291 distinct patients who had at least two visits along with their appointment characteristics, patient demographics, and insurance information. Logistic regression was adopted to develop no-show models using two-thirds of the data for training and the remaining data for validation. The no-show threshold was then determined based on minimizing the misclassification of show/no-show assignments. There were a total of 26 predictive model developed based on the number of available past appointments. Simulation was employed to test the effective of each model on costs of patient wait time, physician idle time, and overtime. Findings - The results demonstrated the misclassification rate and the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic gradually improved as more appointment history was included until around the 20th predictive model. The overbooking method with no-show predictive models suggested incorporating up to the 16th model and outperformed other overbooking methods by as much as 9.4 per cent in the cost per patient while allowing two additional patients in a clinic day. Research limitations/implications - The challenge now is to actually implement the no-show predictive model systematically to further demonstrate its robustness and simplicity in various scheduling systems. Originality/value - This paper provides examples of how to build the no-show predictive models with time-dependent components to improve the overbooking policy. Accurately identifying scheduled patients' show/no-show status allows clinics to proactively schedule patients to reduce the negative impact of patient no-shows.

  19. Predictable Components of ENSO Evolution in Real-time Multi-Model Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhihai; Hu, Zeng-Zhen; L’Heureux, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    The most predictable components of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) evolution in real-time multi-model predictions are identified by applying an empirical orthogonal function analysis of the model data that maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio (MSN EOF). The normalized Niño3.4 index is analyzed for nine 3-month overlapping seasons. In this sense, the first most predictable component (MSN EOF1) is the decaying phase of ENSO during the Northern Hemisphere spring, followed by persistence through autumn and winter. The second most predictable component of ENSO evolution, with lower prediction skill and smaller explained variance than MSN EOF1, corresponds to the growth during spring and then persistence in summer and autumn. This result suggests that decay phase of ENSO is more predictable than the growth phase. Also, the most predictable components and the forecast skills in dynamical and statistical models are similar overall, with some differences arising during spring season initial conditions. Finally, the reconstructed predictions, with only the first two MSN components, show higher skill than the model raw predictions. Therefore this method can be used as a diagnostic for model comparison and development, and it can provide a new perspective for the most predictable components of ENSO. PMID:27775016

  20. Predictable Components of ENSO Evolution in Real-time Multi-Model Predictions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhihai; Hu, Zeng-Zhen; L'Heureux, Michelle

    2016-10-24

    The most predictable components of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) evolution in real-time multi-model predictions are identified by applying an empirical orthogonal function analysis of the model data that maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio (MSN EOF). The normalized Niño3.4 index is analyzed for nine 3-month overlapping seasons. In this sense, the first most predictable component (MSN EOF1) is the decaying phase of ENSO during the Northern Hemisphere spring, followed by persistence through autumn and winter. The second most predictable component of ENSO evolution, with lower prediction skill and smaller explained variance than MSN EOF1, corresponds to the growth during spring and then persistence in summer and autumn. This result suggests that decay phase of ENSO is more predictable than the growth phase. Also, the most predictable components and the forecast skills in dynamical and statistical models are similar overall, with some differences arising during spring season initial conditions. Finally, the reconstructed predictions, with only the first two MSN components, show higher skill than the model raw predictions. Therefore this method can be used as a diagnostic for model comparison and development, and it can provide a new perspective for the most predictable components of ENSO.

  1. Repeated Hospital Transfers and Associated Outcomes by Residency Time Among Nursing Home Residents in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsiu-Hsin; Tsai, Yun-Fang; Liu, Chia-Yih

    2016-11-01

    Nursing home residents' repeated transfers to hospital are costly and can lead to in-hospital complications and high mortality for frail residents. However, no research has examined the trajectory of residents' symptoms over their nursing home residency and its relationship to hospital transfer. The purpose of this retrospective chart-review study was to examine associations between nursing home residents' characteristics, including length of residency, and repeated hospital transfers as well as the trajectory of transfers during residency. For this retrospective study, we reviewed 583 residents' charts in 6 randomly selected nursing homes from northern Taiwan. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, chi-squared tests, and 1-way analysis of variance. About half of nursing home residents who had been transferred to hospital (n = 320) were transferred more than twice during their residency (50.97%). Residents who had been transferred 1, 2, 3, or ≥4 times differed significantly in length of residency (F = 3.85, P = .01), physical status (F = 2.65, P = .05), medical history of pneumonia (χ(2) = 13.03, P = .01), and fractures (χ(2) = 8.52, P = .04). Residents with different numbers of transfers differed significantly in their reasons for transfer, that is, falls (χ(2) = 13.01, P = .01) and tube problems (χ(2) = 8.87, P = .03). Among 705 total transfers, fever was the top reason for transfer, and transfer prevalence increased with nursing home residency. To decrease the chance of residents' hospital transfer, nursing home staff should be educated about recognizing and managing fever symptoms, infection-control programs such as influenza vaccination should be initiated, and fall-prevention/education programs should be started when residents first relocate to nursing homes. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Taxi Time Prediction at Charlotte Airport Using Fast-Time Simulation and Machine Learning Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hanbong

    2016-01-01

    Accurate taxi time prediction is required for enabling efficient runway scheduling that can increase runway throughput and reduce taxi times and fuel consumptions on the airport surface. Currently NASA and American Airlines are jointly developing a decision-support tool called Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) that assists airport ramp controllers to make gate pushback decisions and improve the overall efficiency of airport surface traffic. In this presentation, we propose to use Linear Optimized Sequencing (LINOS), a discrete-event fast-time simulation tool, to predict taxi times and provide the estimates to the runway scheduler in real-time airport operations. To assess its prediction accuracy, we also introduce a data-driven analytical method using machine learning techniques. These two taxi time prediction methods are evaluated with actual taxi time data obtained from the SARDA human-in-the-loop (HITL) simulation for Charlotte Douglas International Airport (CLT) using various performance measurement metrics. Based on the taxi time prediction results, we also discuss how the prediction accuracy can be affected by the operational complexity at this airport and how we can improve the fast time simulation model before implementing it with an airport scheduling algorithm in a real-time environment.

  3. Nursing faculty shortage in 2009.

    PubMed

    Sims, Jennifer M

    2009-01-01

    As everyone is well aware, we are in the midst of a nursing shortage-one with no end in sight at the present time. But are you aware that we also have a shortage of nursing faculty? This article will briefly describe the current and predicted shortage of faculty, potential reasons for the shortage, current ways of coping, and the future for nursing faculty.

  4. Job demands-resources predicting burnout and work engagement among Belgian home health care nurses: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Vander Elst, Tinne; Cavents, Carolien; Daneels, Katrien; Johannik, Kristien; Baillien, Elfi; Van den Broeck, Anja; Godderis, Lode

    A better knowledge of the job aspects that may predict home health care nurses' burnout and work engagement is important in view of stress prevention and health promotion. The Job Demands-Resources model predicts that job demands and resources relate to burnout and work engagement but has not previously been tested in the specific context of home health care nursing. The present study offers a comprehensive test of the Job-Demands Resources model in home health care nursing. We investigate the main and interaction effects of distinctive job demands (workload, emotional demands and aggression) and resources (autonomy, social support and learning opportunities) on burnout and work engagement. Analyses were conducted using cross-sectional data from 675 Belgian home health care nurses, who participated in a voluntary and anonymous survey. The results show that workload and emotional demands were positively associated with burnout, whereas aggression was unrelated to burnout. All job resources were associated with higher levels of work engagement and lower levels of burnout. In addition, social support buffered the positive relationship between workload and burnout. Home health care organizations should invest in dealing with workload and emotional demands and stimulating the job resources under study to reduce the risk of burnout and increase their nurses' work engagement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Broadband Trailing Edge Noise Predictions in the Time Domain. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, Jay; Farassat, Fereidoun

    2003-01-01

    A recently developed analytic result in acoustics, "Formulation 1B," is used to compute broadband trailing edge noise from an unsteady surface pressure distribution on a thin airfoil in the time domain. This formulation is a new solution of the Ffowcs Willliams-Hawkings equation with the loading source term, and has been shown in previous research to provide time domain predictions of broadband noise that are in excellent agreement with experimental results. Furthermore, this formulation lends itself readily to rotating reference frames and statistical analysis of broadband trailing edge noise. Formulation 1B is used to calculate the far field noise radiated from the trailing edge of a NACA 0012 airfoil in low Mach number flows, by using both analytical and experimental data on the airfoil surface. The acoustic predictions are compared with analytical results and experimental measurements that are available in the literature. Good agreement between predictions and measurements is obtained.

  6. Predicting Operator Execution Times Using CogTool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago-Espada, Yamira; Latorella, Kara A.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and developers of NextGen systems can use predictive human performance modeling tools as an initial approach to obtain skilled user performance times analytically, before system testing with users. This paper describes the CogTool models for a two pilot crew executing two different types of a datalink clearance acceptance tasks, and on two different simulation platforms. The CogTool time estimates for accepting and executing Required Time of Arrival and Interval Management clearances were compared to empirical data observed in video tapes and registered in simulation files. Results indicate no statistically significant difference between empirical data and the CogTool predictions. A population comparison test found no significant differences between the CogTool estimates and the empirical execution times for any of the four test conditions. We discuss modeling caveats and considerations for applying CogTool to crew performance modeling in advanced cockpit environments.

  7. Transformation by design: nursing workforce innovation and reduction strategies in turbulent times of change.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Mary O

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of care delivery from an acute care and inpatient standard to the outpatient setting and health promotion model is generating the need for innovative workforce and infrastructure adjustments to meet the new paradigm of population health management. Successful transformation of the nursing workforce necessitates a positive style of thinking that addresses rational concerns during times of difficult transition. Nurse leaders are called to recognize and appreciate the strengths of the nursing workforce by involving them in the course of change through collaboration, planning, and discussion. One unique way to plan and develop new care delivery models is to adopt the framework used in health facility planning and design for new services, units, or hospitals. This framework is flexible and can be adjusted easily to meet the objectives of a small nursing workforce innovation project or expanded to encompass the needs of a large-scale hospital transformation. Structured questioning further helps the team to identify barriers to care and allows for the development of new concepts that are objective and in accord with evidence-based practice and data. This article explores the advantages and disadvantages of implementing innovative workforce redesign and workforce reduction strategies.

  8. Rumination and Loneliness Independently Predict Six-Month Later Depression Symptoms among Chinese Elderly in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Gan, Pei; Xie, Yan; Duan, Wenjie; Deng, Qing; Yu, Xiuli

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies conducted in Western countries independently demonstrated that loneliness and rumination are remarkable risk factors of depression among the elderly in both community and nursing homes. However, knowledge on the relationship between these three constructs among the elderly in Eastern countries is scarce. The current study aims to determine the relationship between loneliness, rumination, and depression among Chinese elderly in nursing homes. A total of 71 elderly participants with an average age of 82.49 years completed this six-month longitudinal study. Physical reports indicated that none of the participants were clinically depressed before the study. At Time 1, their loneliness and rumination were measured using UCLA-8 Loneliness Scale and Ruminative Responses Scale. Six months later, the participants completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale to assess depressive symptoms (Time 2). Multiple regression analysis revealed that both loneliness and rumination at Time 1 were the predictors of depression symptoms at Time 2 among the Chinese elderly in nursing homes. However, in the mediation analysis using PROCESS, the indirect effect between loneliness at Time 1 and depression symptoms at Time 2 was insignificant. Results suggest that previous loneliness and rumination thinking are predictors of future depression symptoms among the Chinese elderly in nursing homes. However, the insignificant mediation further suggests that the differences between loneliness and rumination should be explored in future studies. Findings have important implications for mental health professionals in nursing homes in China.

  9. Rumination and Loneliness Independently Predict Six-Month Later Depression Symptoms among Chinese Elderly in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Pei; Xie, Yan; Duan, Wenjie; Deng, Qing; Yu, Xiuli

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies conducted in Western countries independently demonstrated that loneliness and rumination are remarkable risk factors of depression among the elderly in both community and nursing homes. However, knowledge on the relationship between these three constructs among the elderly in Eastern countries is scarce. The current study aims to determine the relationship between loneliness, rumination, and depression among Chinese elderly in nursing homes. Methods A total of 71 elderly participants with an average age of 82.49 years completed this six-month longitudinal study. Physical reports indicated that none of the participants were clinically depressed before the study. At Time 1, their loneliness and rumination were measured using UCLA-8 Loneliness Scale and Ruminative Responses Scale. Six months later, the participants completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale to assess depressive symptoms (Time 2). Results Multiple regression analysis revealed that both loneliness and rumination at Time 1 were the predictors of depression symptoms at Time 2 among the Chinese elderly in nursing homes. However, in the mediation analysis using PROCESS, the indirect effect between loneliness at Time 1 and depression symptoms at Time 2 was insignificant. Conclusions Results suggest that previous loneliness and rumination thinking are predictors of future depression symptoms among the Chinese elderly in nursing homes. However, the insignificant mediation further suggests that the differences between loneliness and rumination should be explored in future studies. Findings have important implications for mental health professionals in nursing homes in China. PMID:26334298

  10. Analyzing the teaching effectiveness of clinical nursing faculty of full- and part-time generic BSN, LPN-BSN, and RN-BSN nursing students.

    PubMed

    Beitz, Janice M; Wieland, Diane

    2005-01-01

    Effective clinical teaching has been a focus for scrutiny across the health-care disciplines. Nursing researchers have investigated students' and faculty members' views of effective clinical teaching. Various students (diploma, ADN, BSN) and their respective faculty have been studied, and some investigators have researched opinions of part-time students. No study was available that analyzed effective clinical teaching from the perspectives of students representing various formats of nursing education (basic BSN, RN-BSN, LPN-BSN students) and whether they were full or part time. The purpose of the study was to examine full- and part-time basic BSN, LPN-BSN, and RN-BSN students' ratings of effective clinical teaching behaviors. A stratified sample (n = 198) of baccalaureate nursing students (basic, LPN-BSN, RN-BSN) who represented both full- and part-time attendees was obtained. Students were informed about the study's purpose and asked to complete a demographic questionnaire and two instruments, by Knox and Mogan [Knox, J. E., & Mogan, J. (1985). Important clinical teaching behaviors as perceived by university nursing faculty, students, and graduates. The Journal of Nursing Education , 10, 295-301] and Zimmerman and Westfall [Zimmerman, L., & Westfall, J. (1988). The development and validation of a scale measuring effective clinical teaching behaviors. The Journal of Nursing Education , 27, 274-277], measuring perceptions of effective clinical teaching. Responses to open-ended questions were recorded on one instrument. Data were analyzed using summary and inferential statistics utilizing SPSS version 12.0. Responses to open-ended questions were thematically analyzed. Findings from the study demonstrated that part-time students rated their clinical instructors statistically significantly higher in effective clinical teaching and associated subscales. Type of student (basic BSN, LPN-BSN, RN-BSN) did not affect students' ratings. Type of program format and type of

  11. Long-term time series prediction using OP-ELM.

    PubMed

    Grigorievskiy, Alexander; Miche, Yoan; Ventelä, Anne-Mari; Séverin, Eric; Lendasse, Amaury

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, an Optimally Pruned Extreme Learning Machine (OP-ELM) is applied to the problem of long-term time series prediction. Three known strategies for the long-term time series prediction i.e. Recursive, Direct and DirRec are considered in combination with OP-ELM and compared with a baseline linear least squares model and Least-Squares Support Vector Machines (LS-SVM). Among these three strategies DirRec is the most time consuming and its usage with nonlinear models like LS-SVM, where several hyperparameters need to be adjusted, leads to relatively heavy computations. It is shown that OP-ELM, being also a nonlinear model, allows reasonable computational time for the DirRec strategy. In all our experiments, except one, OP-ELM with DirRec strategy outperforms the linear model with any strategy. In contrast to the proposed algorithm, LS-SVM behaves unstably without variable selection. It is also shown that there is no superior strategy for OP-ELM: any of three can be the best. In addition, the prediction accuracy of an ensemble of OP-ELM is studied and it is shown that averaging predictions of the ensemble can improve the accuracy (Mean Square Error) dramatically. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Comparison of CTAS and Airline Time of Arrival Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heere, Karen R.; Zelenka, Richard E.; Hsu, Rose Y.

    1999-01-01

    A statistically-based comparison of aircraft times of arrival between Center/TRACON Automation System (CTAS) air traffic control scheduling and airline predictions is presented. CTAS is found to provide much improved values, forming the foundation for airline operational improvements, as observed during an airline field trial of a CTAS display.

  13. Regional Travel-Time Predictions, Uncertainty and Location Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, M; Myers, S

    2004-07-15

    We investigate our ability to improve regional travel-time prediction and seismic event location using an a priori three-dimensional (3D) velocity model of Western Eurasia and North Africa (WENA 1.0). Three principal results are presented. First, the 3D WENA 1.0 velocity model improves travel-time prediction over the IASPI91 model, as measured by variance reduction, for regional phases recorded at 22 stations throughout the modeled region, including aseismic areas. Second, a distance-dependent uncertainty model is developed and tested for the WENA 1.0 model. Third, relocation using WENA 1.0 and the associated uncertainty model provides an end-to-end validation test. Model validation is based on a comparison of approximately 10,000 Pg, Pn, and P travel-time predictions and empirical observations from ground truth (GT) events. Ray coverage for the validation dataset provides representative, regional-distances sampling across Eurasia and North Africa. The WENA 1.0 model markedly improves travel-time predictions for most stations with an average variance reduction of 14% for all ray paths. We find that improvement is station dependent, with some stations benefiting greatly from WENA predictions (25% at OBN, and 16% at BKR), some stations showing moderate improvement (12% at ARU, and 17% at NIL), and some stations benefiting only slightly (7% at AAE, and 8% at TOL). We further test WENA 1.0 by relocating five calibration events. Again, relocation of these events is dependent on ray paths that evenly sample WENA 1.0 and therefore provide an unbiased assessment of location performance. These results highlight the importance of accurate GT datasets in assessing regional travel-time models and demonstrate that an a priori 3D model can markedly improve our ability to locate small magnitude events in a regional monitoring context.

  14. Predictive influence in the accelerated failure time model.

    PubMed

    Bedrick, Edward J; Exuzides, Alex; Johnson, Wesley O; Thurmond, Mark C

    2002-09-01

    We develop case deletion diagnostics for prediction of future observations in the accelerated failure time model. We view prediction to be an important inferential goal in a survival analysis and thus it is important to identify whether particular observations may be influencing the quality of predictions. We use the Kullback-Leibler divergence as a measure of the discrepancy between the estimated probability distributions for the full and the case-deleted samples. In particular, we focus on the effect of case deletion on estimated survival curves but where we regard the survival curve estimate as a vehicle for prediction. We also develop a diagnostic for assessing the effect of case deletion on inferences for the median time to failure. The estimated median can be used with both predictive and estimative purposes in mind. We also discuss the relationship between our suggested measures and the corresponding Cook distance measure, which was designed with the goal of assessing estimative influence. Several applications of the proposed diagnostics are presented.

  15. Predicting Nurses' Turnover: The Aversive Effects of Decreased Identity, Poor Interpersonal Communication, and Learned Helplessness.

    PubMed

    Moreland, Jennifer J; Ewoldsen, David R; Albert, Nancy M; Kosicki, Gerald M; Clayton, Margaret F

    2015-01-01

    Through a social identity theoretical lens, this study examines how nurses' identification with their working small group, unit, or floor, nursing role (e.g., staff ER nurse, nurse practitioner), and nursing profession relate to nurses' interaction involvement, willingness to confront conflict, feelings of learned helplessness, and tenure (employment turnover) intentions. A cross-sectional survey (N = 466) was conducted at a large, quaternary care hospital system. Structural equation modeling uncovered direct and indirect effects between the five primary variables. Findings demonstrate direct relationships between nurse identity (as a latent variable) and interaction involvement, willingness to confront conflict, and tenure intentions. Feelings of learned helplessness are attenuated by increased nurse identity through interaction involvement and willingness to confront conflict. In addition, willingness to confront conflict and learned helplessness mediate the relationship between interaction involvement and nurses' tenure intentions. Theoretical extensions include indirect links between nurse identity and learned helplessness via interaction involvement and willingness to confront conflict. Implications for interpersonal communication theory development, health communication, and the nursing profession are discussed.

  16. Predicting the success of minority students in a baccalaureate nursing program.

    PubMed

    Boyle, K K

    1986-05-01

    Entering grade point average (ENTGPA), American College Test Assessment (ACT), high school rank (HSRANK), high school GPA (HSGPA), number of college credit hours prior to program admission (HRSPTA), age at admission, and an index of applicant motivation and related experience (MEP) were investigated to determine the best predictive combination of variables for success among minorities in a baccalaureate nursing program. Final GPA, program completion, and State Board Examination (SBTPE) performance were used as indicators of success. Minority students (N = 145) admitted between 1971-1981 were identified by record review. Two minority subgroups, blacks (n = 111) and nonblack minorities (n = 34) were compared using multiple regression and discriminant analysis procedures. ACT was the strongest, most consistent predictor of SBTPE performance and final GPA for all minorities. ENTGPA and ACT provided substantial predictive power for both subgroups, but explained markedly less variance for blacks. HSGPA, HRSPTA, and HSRANK explained some variance differently by subgroup. ENTGPA provided the only discrimination between graduates and dropouts. Cognitive attributes are critical to academic success among minorities, although predictors may vary in explanatory power by minority group. Variables interfering with program completion need to be explored.

  17. Predicting patient satisfaction with nurses' call light responsiveness in 4 US hospitals.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Yin, Chang-Yi

    2010-10-01

    This multihospital study determined the contributors to patient/family satisfaction levels with nurses' call light responsiveness and compared the reasons for call light usage as perceived by patients and nurses. Delayed responses to answering call lights may result in a patient falling and can affect patient satisfaction. This cross-sectional survey study was conducted from September 2008 to November 2009 in 4 US hospitals; 1,253 patients/family participants and 988 nurses were surveyed. Descriptive and multiple regression analyses were conducted. Women, older patient/family participants, and those who perceived that nurses often answered call lights in person, that their problems were resolved after pushing the call light, and that their call lights less frequently involved safety issues were more satisfied with nurses' responsiveness. The top 5 reasons for using call lights were the same for patients and nurses. Nursing administrators should emphasize increasing staff's call light responsiveness.

  18. The use of content and timing to predict turn transitions.

    PubMed

    Garrod, Simon; Pickering, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    For addressees to respond in a timely fashion, they cannot simply process the speaker's utterance as it occurs and wait till it finishes. Instead, they predict both when the speaker will conclude and what linguistic forms will be used. While doing this, they must also prepare their own response. To explain this, we draw on the account proposed by Pickering and Garrod (2013a), in which addressees covertly imitate the speaker's utterance and use this to determine the intention that underlies their upcoming utterance. They use this intention to predict when and how the utterance will end, and also to drive their own production mechanisms for preparing their response. Following Arnal and Giraud (2012), we distinguish between mechanisms that predict timing and content. In particular, we propose that the timing mechanism relies on entrainment of low-frequency oscillations between speech envelope and brain. This constrains the context that feeds into the determination of the speaker's intention and hence the timing and form of the upcoming utterance. This approach typically leads to well-timed contributions, but also provides a mechanism for resolving conflicts, for example when there is unintended speaker overlap.

  19. The use of content and timing to predict turn transitions

    PubMed Central

    Garrod, Simon; Pickering, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    For addressees to respond in a timely fashion, they cannot simply process the speaker's utterance as it occurs and wait till it finishes. Instead, they predict both when the speaker will conclude and what linguistic forms will be used. While doing this, they must also prepare their own response. To explain this, we draw on the account proposed by Pickering and Garrod (2013a), in which addressees covertly imitate the speaker's utterance and use this to determine the intention that underlies their upcoming utterance. They use this intention to predict when and how the utterance will end, and also to drive their own production mechanisms for preparing their response. Following Arnal and Giraud (2012), we distinguish between mechanisms that predict timing and content. In particular, we propose that the timing mechanism relies on entrainment of low-frequency oscillations between speech envelope and brain. This constrains the context that feeds into the determination of the speaker's intention and hence the timing and form of the upcoming utterance. This approach typically leads to well-timed contributions, but also provides a mechanism for resolving conflicts, for example when there is unintended speaker overlap. PMID:26124728

  20. Individual differences in time perspective predict autonoetic experience.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Kathleen M; McDermott, Kathleen B; Szpunar, Karl K

    2011-09-01

    Tulving (1985) posited that the capacity to remember is one facet of a more general capacity-autonoetic (self-knowing) consciousness. Autonoetic consciousness was proposed to underlie the ability for "mental time travel" both into the past (remembering) and into the future to envision potential future episodes (episodic future thinking). The current study examines whether individual differences can predict autonoetic experience. Specifically, the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI, Zimbardo & Boyd, 1999) was administered to 133 undergraduate students, who also rated phenomenological experiences accompanying autobiographical remembering and episodic future thinking. Scores on two of the five subscales of the ZTPI (Future and Present-Hedonistic) predicted the degree to which people reported feelings of mentally traveling backward (or forward) in time and the degree to which they reported re- or pre-experiencing the event, but not ten other rated properties less related to autonoetic consciousness.

  1. Prediction-Correction Algorithms for Time-Varying Constrained Optimization

    DOE PAGES

    Dall-Anese, Emiliano; Simonetto, Andrea

    2017-07-26

    This paper develops online algorithms to track solutions of time-varying constrained optimization problems. Particularly, resembling workhorse Kalman filtering-based approaches for dynamical systems, the proposed methods involve prediction-correction steps to provably track the trajectory of the optimal solutions of time-varying convex problems. The merits of existing prediction-correction methods have been shown for unconstrained problems and for setups where computing the inverse of the Hessian of the cost function is computationally affordable. This paper addresses the limitations of existing methods by tackling constrained problems and by designing first-order prediction steps that rely on the Hessian of the cost function (and do notmore » require the computation of its inverse). In addition, the proposed methods are shown to improve the convergence speed of existing prediction-correction methods when applied to unconstrained problems. Numerical simulations corroborate the analytical results and showcase performance and benefits of the proposed algorithms. A realistic application of the proposed method to real-time control of energy resources is presented.« less

  2. Real-time prediction of the occurrence of GLE events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, Marlon; Reyes-Santiago, Pedro J.; Malandraki, Olga E.

    2017-07-01

    A tool for predicting the occurrence of Ground Level Enhancement (GLE) events using the UMASEP scheme is presented. This real-time tool, called HESPERIA UMASEP-500, is based on the detection of the magnetic connection, along which protons arrive in the near-Earth environment, by estimating the lag correlation between the time derivatives of 1 min soft X-ray flux (SXR) and 1 min near-Earth proton fluxes observed by the GOES satellites. Unlike current GLE warning systems, this tool can predict GLE events before the detection by any neutron monitor (NM) station. The prediction performance measured for the period from 1986 to 2016 is presented for two consecutive periods, because of their notable difference in performance. For the 2000-2016 period, this prediction tool obtained a probability of detection (POD) of 53.8% (7 of 13 GLE events), a false alarm ratio (FAR) of 30.0%, and average warning times (AWT) of 8 min with respect to the first NM station's alert and 15 min to the GLE Alert Plus's warning. We have tested the model by replacing the GOES proton data with SOHO/EPHIN proton data, and the results are similar in terms of POD, FAR, and AWT for the same period. The paper also presents a comparison with a GLE warning system.

  3. The contribution of personality and workplace characteristics in predicting turnover intention among sexual assault nurse examiners: a path analytic study.

    PubMed

    Strunk, Kathleen C; Strunk, Kamden K

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how personality characteristics, sense of organizational empowerment, and job satisfaction combine to predict turnover intention among a population of Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANEs). Data were collected from 161 SANEs from 23 SANE organizations across the central and west United States through standardized tools and a demographic questionnaire. Both personality, namely agreeableness and workplace characteristics, particularly perceived empowerment and job satisfaction, combine to predict intention to leave the job of these sampled SANEs. One particularly curious finding was the positive prediction of agreeableness on turnover intention - that is, more agreeable people would be more likely to leave their jobs as SANEs. Professionals can gain insight from the path analysis results that show the need to address both personal and organizational factors in mitigating turnover intention among SANEs. This appears to be particularly true in providing a sense of empowerment and opportunity within the organization. © 2012 International Association of Forensic Nurses.

  4. The neural substrate of predictive motor timing in spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Bares, Martin; Lungu, Ovidiu V; Liu, Tao; Waechter, Tobias; Gomez, Christopher M; Ashe, James

    2011-06-01

    The neural mechanisms involved in motor timing are subcortical, involving mainly cerebellum and basal ganglia. However, the role played by these structures in predictive motor timing is not well understood. Unlike motor timing, which is often tested using rhythm production tasks, predictive motor timing requires visuo-motor coordination in anticipation of a future event, and it is evident in behaviors such as catching a ball or shooting a moving target. We examined the role of the cerebellum and striatum in predictive motor timing in a target interception task in healthy (n = 12) individuals and in subjects (n = 9) with spinocerebellar ataxia types 6 and 8. The performance of the healthy subjects was better than that of the spinocerebellar ataxia. Successful performance in both groups was associated with increased activity in the cerebellum (right dentate nucleus, left uvula (lobule V), and lobule VI), thalamus, and in several cortical areas. The superior performance in the controls was related to activation in thalamus, putamen (lentiform nucleus) and cerebellum (right dentate nucleus and culmen-lobule IV), which were not activated either in the spinocerebellar subjects or within a subgroup of controls who performed poorly. Both the cerebellum and the basal ganglia are necessary for the predictive motor timing. The degeneration of the cerebellum associated with spinocerebellar types 6 and 8 appears to lead to quantitative rather than qualitative deficits in temporal processing. The lack of any areas with greater activity in the spinocerebellar group than in controls suggests that limited functional reorganization occurs in this condition.

  5. Comparison of coronary microcirculation in female nurses after day-time versus night-time shifts.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Tomoichiro; Fukuda, Shota; Hirata, Kumiko; Shimada, Kenei; Maeda, Kumiko; Komukai, Kenichi; Kono, Yasushi; Miyahana, Reiko; Nakanishi, Koki; Otsuka, Kenichiro; Jissho, Satoshi; Taguchi, Haruyuki; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Akasaka, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2011-12-01

    Nightshift work, which is known to cause mental stress and disrupt normal biological diurnal rhythms, leads to endothelial dysfunction resulting in increased risk for cardiovascular disease. This study aimed to investigate the acute effect of night-shift work on coronary microcirculation through assessment of coronary flow reserve (CFR) by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography. This study consisted of 36 women nurses who underwent transthoracic Doppler echocardiographic examinations after working a nightshift and on a regular day without previous nightshift work. Flow velocity in the distal portion of the left anterior descending coronary artery was measured at baseline and during adenosine infusion. CFR was calculated as the ratio of hyperemic to basal mean diastolic flow velocity. CFR after night work was lower than that on a regular workday (3.8 ± 0.6 vs 4.1 ± 0.6, p <0.001). Degree of decreases in CFR after night work was correlated to Framingham risk score (r = 0.35, p = 0.036). In conclusion, this study demonstrated that coronary microcirculation was impaired after nightshift work in women nurses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Predicting Time Series Outputs and Time-to-Failure for an Aircraft Controller Using Bayesian Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Yuning

    2015-01-01

    Safety of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) is paramount, but the large number of dynamically changing controller parameters makes it hard to determine if the system is currently stable, and the time before loss of control if not. We propose a hierarchical statistical model using Treed Gaussian Processes to predict (i) whether a flight will be stable (success) or become unstable (failure), (ii) the time-to-failure if unstable, and (iii) time series outputs for flight variables. We first classify the current flight input into success or failure types, and then use separate models for each class to predict the time-to-failure and time series outputs. As different inputs may cause failures at different times, we have to model variable length output curves. We use a basis representation for curves and learn the mappings from input to basis coefficients. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our prediction methods on a NASA neuro-adaptive flight control system.

  7. Real-time Neural Network predictions of geomagnetic activity indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, R.; Reiff, P. H.

    2009-12-01

    The Boyle potential or the Boyle Index (BI), Φ (kV)=10-4 (V/(km/s))2 + 11.7 (B/nT) sin3(θ/2), is an empirically-derived formula that can characterize the Earth's polar cap potential, which is readily derivable in real time using the solar wind data from ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer). The BI has a simplistic form that utilizes a non-magnetic "viscous" and a magnetic "merging" component to characterize the magnetospheric behavior in response to the solar wind. We have investigated its correlation with two of conventional geomagnetic activity indices in Kp and the AE index. We have shown that the logarithms of both 3-hr and 1-hr averages of the BI correlate well with the subsequent Kp: Kp = 8.93 log10(BI) - 12.55 along with 1-hr BI correlating with the subsequent log10(AE): log10(AE) = 1.78 log10(BI) - 3.6. We have developed a new set of algorithms based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) suitable for short term space weather forecasts with an enhanced lead-time and better accuracy in predicting Kp and AE over some leading models; the algorithms omit the time history of its targets to utilize only the solar wind data. Inputs to our ANN models benefit from the BI and its proven record as a forecasting parameter since its initiation in October, 2003. We have also performed time-sensitivity tests using cross-correlation analysis to demonstrate that our models are as efficient as those that incorporates the time history of the target indices in their inputs. Our algorithms can predict the upcoming full 3-hr Kp, purely from the solar wind data and achieve a linear correlation coefficient of 0.840, which means that it predicts the upcoming Kp value on average to within 1.3 step, which is approximately the resolution of the real-time Kp estimate. Our success in predicting Kp during a recent unexpected event (22 July ’09) is shown in the figure. Also, when predicting an equivalent "one hour Kp'', the correlation coefficient is 0.86, meaning on average a prediction

  8. Model predictive control of P-time event graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamri, H.; Kara, R.; Amari, S.

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with model predictive control of discrete event systems modelled by P-time event graphs. First, the model is obtained by using the dater evolution model written in the standard algebra. Then, for the control law, we used the finite-horizon model predictive control. For the closed-loop control, we used the infinite-horizon model predictive control (IH-MPC). The latter is an approach that calculates static feedback gains which allows the stability of the closed-loop system while respecting the constraints on the control vector. The problem of IH-MPC is formulated as a linear convex programming subject to a linear matrix inequality problem. Finally, the proposed methodology is applied to a transportation system.

  9. Trends over time in prescribing by English primary care nurses: a secondary analysis of a national prescription database

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A growing number of countries legislate for nurses to have medication prescribing authority although it is a contested issue. The UK is one of these countries, giving authority to nurses with additional qualifications since 1992 and incrementally widened the scope of nurse prescribing, most recently in 2006. The policy intention for primary care was to improve efficiency in service delivery through flexibility between medical and nursing roles. The extent to which this has occurred is uncertain. This study investigated nurses prescribing activities, over time, in English primary care settings. Methods A secondary data analysis of a national primary care prescription database 2006-2010 and National Health Service workforce database 2010 was undertaken. Results The numbers of nurses issuing more than one prescription annually in primary care rose from 13,391 in 2006 to 15,841 in 2010. This represented forty three percent of those with prescribing qualifications and authorisation from their employers. The number of items prescribed by nurses rose from 1.1% to 1.5% of total items prescribed in primary care. The greatest volume of items prescribed by independent nurse prescribers was in the category of penicillins, followed by dressings. However, the category where independent nurse prescribers contributed the largest proportion of all primary care prescriptions was emergency contraception (9.1%). In contrast, community practitioner nurse prescribers’ greatest volume and contribution was in the category of gel and colloid dressings (27%), medicated stockings (14.5%) and incontinence appliances (4.2%). There were slightly higher rates of nurse prescribing in areas with higher levels of socio-economic deprivation and fewer physicians per capita, but the correlations were weak and warrant further investigation. Conclusions The percentage of prescriptions written by nurses in primary care in England is very small in comparison to physicians. Our findings

  10. The protective role of self-efficacy against workplace incivility and burnout in nursing: A time-lagged study.

    PubMed

    Fida, Roberta; Laschinger, Heather K Spence; Leiter, Michael P

    2016-10-14

    Incivility has negative consequences in the workplace and remains a prevalent issue in nursing. Research has consistently linked incivility to nurse burnout and, in turn, to poor mental health and turnover intentions. To retain high-quality nurses, it is important to understand what factors might protect nurses from the negative effects of workplace mistreatment. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of relational occupational coping self-efficacy in protecting nurses from workplace incivility and related burnout and turnover intentions. A two-wave national sample of 596 Canadian nurses completed mail surveys both at Time 1 and one year later at Time 2. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized model. The model showed a good fit, and most of the hypothesized paths were significant. Overall, the results supported the hypothesized protective effect of relational occupational coping self-efficacy against incivility and later burnout, mental health, and turnover intentions. Relational occupational coping self-efficacy is an important protective factor against negative work behavior. Organizations should provide nurses with opportunities to build their coping strategies for managing job demands and difficult interpersonal interactions. Similarly, providing exposure to effective role models and providing meaningful verbal encouragement are other sources of efficacy information for building nurses' relational coping self-efficacy.

  11. Optimal model-free prediction from multivariate time series.

    PubMed

    Runge, Jakob; Donner, Reik V; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    Forecasting a time series from multivariate predictors constitutes a challenging problem, especially using model-free approaches. Most techniques, such as nearest-neighbor prediction, quickly suffer from the curse of dimensionality and overfitting for more than a few predictors which has limited their application mostly to the univariate case. Therefore, selection strategies are needed that harness the available information as efficiently as possible. Since often the right combination of predictors matters, ideally all subsets of possible predictors should be tested for their predictive power, but the exponentially growing number of combinations makes such an approach computationally prohibitive. Here a prediction scheme that overcomes this strong limitation is introduced utilizing a causal preselection step which drastically reduces the number of possible predictors to the most predictive set of causal drivers making a globally optimal search scheme tractable. The information-theoretic optimality is derived and practical selection criteria are discussed. As demonstrated for multivariate nonlinear stochastic delay processes, the optimal scheme can even be less computationally expensive than commonly used suboptimal schemes like forward selection. The method suggests a general framework to apply the optimal model-free approach to select variables and subsequently fit a model to further improve a prediction or learn statistical dependencies. The performance of this framework is illustrated on a climatological index of El Niño Southern Oscillation.

  12. Optimal model-free prediction from multivariate time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Jakob; Donner, Reik V.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    Forecasting a time series from multivariate predictors constitutes a challenging problem, especially using model-free approaches. Most techniques, such as nearest-neighbor prediction, quickly suffer from the curse of dimensionality and overfitting for more than a few predictors which has limited their application mostly to the univariate case. Therefore, selection strategies are needed that harness the available information as efficiently as possible. Since often the right combination of predictors matters, ideally all subsets of possible predictors should be tested for their predictive power, but the exponentially growing number of combinations makes such an approach computationally prohibitive. Here a prediction scheme that overcomes this strong limitation is introduced utilizing a causal preselection step which drastically reduces the number of possible predictors to the most predictive set of causal drivers making a globally optimal search scheme tractable. The information-theoretic optimality is derived and practical selection criteria are discussed. As demonstrated for multivariate nonlinear stochastic delay processes, the optimal scheme can even be less computationally expensive than commonly used suboptimal schemes like forward selection. The method suggests a general framework to apply the optimal model-free approach to select variables and subsequently fit a model to further improve a prediction or learn statistical dependencies. The performance of this framework is illustrated on a climatological index of El Niño Southern Oscillation.

  13. Program Predicts Time Courses of Human/Computer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vera, Alonso; Howes, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    CPM X is a computer program that predicts sequences of, and amounts of time taken by, routine actions performed by a skilled person performing a task. Unlike programs that simulate the interaction of the person with the task environment, CPM X predicts the time course of events as consequences of encoded constraints on human behavior. The constraints determine which cognitive and environmental processes can occur simultaneously and which have sequential dependencies. The input to CPM X comprises (1) a description of a task and strategy in a hierarchical description language and (2) a description of architectural constraints in the form of rules governing interactions of fundamental cognitive, perceptual, and motor operations. The output of CPM X is a Program Evaluation Review Technique (PERT) chart that presents a schedule of predicted cognitive, motor, and perceptual operators interacting with a task environment. The CPM X program allows direct, a priori prediction of skilled user performance on complex human-machine systems, providing a way to assess critical interfaces before they are deployed in mission contexts.

  14. Predicting physical time series using dynamic ridge polynomial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Al-Jumeily, Dhiya; Ghazali, Rozaida; Hussain, Abir

    2014-01-01

    Forecasting naturally occurring phenomena is a common problem in many domains of science, and this has been addressed and investigated by many scientists. The importance of time series prediction stems from the fact that it has wide range of applications, including control systems, engineering processes, environmental systems and economics. From the knowledge of some aspects of the previous behaviour of the system, the aim of the prediction process is to determine or predict its future behaviour. In this paper, we consider a novel application of a higher order polynomial neural network architecture called Dynamic Ridge Polynomial Neural Network that combines the properties of higher order and recurrent neural networks for the prediction of physical time series. In this study, four types of signals have been used, which are; The Lorenz attractor, mean value of the AE index, sunspot number, and heat wave temperature. The simulation results showed good improvements in terms of the signal to noise ratio in comparison to a number of higher order and feedforward neural networks in comparison to the benchmarked techniques.

  15. Financial time series prediction using spiking neural networks.

    PubMed

    Reid, David; Hussain, Abir Jaafar; Tawfik, Hissam

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a novel application of a particular type of spiking neural network, a Polychronous Spiking Network, was used for financial time series prediction. It is argued that the inherent temporal capabilities of this type of network are suited to non-stationary data such as this. The performance of the spiking neural network was benchmarked against three systems: two "traditional", rate-encoded, neural networks; a Multi-Layer Perceptron neural network and a Dynamic Ridge Polynomial neural network, and a standard Linear Predictor Coefficients model. For this comparison three non-stationary and noisy time series were used: IBM stock data; US/Euro exchange rate data, and the price of Brent crude oil. The experiments demonstrated favourable prediction results for the Spiking Neural Network in terms of Annualised Return and prediction error for 5-Step ahead predictions. These results were also supported by other relevant metrics such as Maximum Drawdown and Signal-To-Noise ratio. This work demonstrated the applicability of the Polychronous Spiking Network to financial data forecasting and this in turn indicates the potential of using such networks over traditional systems in difficult to manage non-stationary environments.

  16. Financial Time Series Prediction Using Spiking Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Reid, David; Hussain, Abir Jaafar; Tawfik, Hissam

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a novel application of a particular type of spiking neural network, a Polychronous Spiking Network, was used for financial time series prediction. It is argued that the inherent temporal capabilities of this type of network are suited to non-stationary data such as this. The performance of the spiking neural network was benchmarked against three systems: two “traditional”, rate-encoded, neural networks; a Multi-Layer Perceptron neural network and a Dynamic Ridge Polynomial neural network, and a standard Linear Predictor Coefficients model. For this comparison three non-stationary and noisy time series were used: IBM stock data; US/Euro exchange rate data, and the price of Brent crude oil. The experiments demonstrated favourable prediction results for the Spiking Neural Network in terms of Annualised Return and prediction error for 5-Step ahead predictions. These results were also supported by other relevant metrics such as Maximum Drawdown and Signal-To-Noise ratio. This work demonstrated the applicability of the Polychronous Spiking Network to financial data forecasting and this in turn indicates the potential of using such networks over traditional systems in difficult to manage non-stationary environments. PMID:25170618

  17. Predicting Physical Time Series Using Dynamic Ridge Polynomial Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jumeily, Dhiya; Ghazali, Rozaida; Hussain, Abir

    2014-01-01

    Forecasting naturally occurring phenomena is a common problem in many domains of science, and this has been addressed and investigated by many scientists. The importance of time series prediction stems from the fact that it has wide range of applications, including control systems, engineering processes, environmental systems and economics. From the knowledge of some aspects of the previous behaviour of the system, the aim of the prediction process is to determine or predict its future behaviour. In this paper, we consider a novel application of a higher order polynomial neural network architecture called Dynamic Ridge Polynomial Neural Network that combines the properties of higher order and recurrent neural networks for the prediction of physical time series. In this study, four types of signals have been used, which are; The Lorenz attractor, mean value of the AE index, sunspot number, and heat wave temperature. The simulation results showed good improvements in terms of the signal to noise ratio in comparison to a number of higher order and feedforward neural networks in comparison to the benchmarked techniques. PMID:25157950

  18. A Stochastic Semiclassical Time Front Prediction for Ocean Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegewisch, Katherine; Tomsovic, Steven

    2008-05-01

    Low frequency sound propagates in the ocean within a wave guide formed by the confining effects of temperature, salinity and pressure on the sound speed. This wave guide enables long range propagation upwards of 3000 km. Within the wave guide, sound scatters due to range dependent sound speed oscillations from internal waves and gives rise to wave chaos, where most of the classical rays are chaotic. This chaos poses challenges to ray predictions of the range and frequency dependence of properties of the 'time fronts', the acoustic arrivals in depth and time. Though semiclassical theory works well for strongly chaotic systemss, finding the necessary eigenrays for long ranges is unrealistic here. Instead, we utilize semiclassical and perturbation theories ONLY for short ranges and extend these results to long ranges using a previously introduced diffusive theory. We verify the diffusive assumptions and demonstrate the analytic results for these theories for short ranges before arriving at a stochastic prediction.

  19. Earthquake prediction in Japan and natural time analysis of seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyeda, S.; Varotsos, P.

    2011-12-01

    M9 super-giant earthquake with huge tsunami devastated East Japan on 11 March, causing more than 20,000 casualties and serious damage of Fukushima nuclear plant. This earthquake was predicted neither short-term nor long-term. Seismologists were shocked because it was not even considered possible to happen at the East Japan subduction zone. However, it was not the only un-predicted earthquake. In fact, throughout several decades of the National Earthquake Prediction Project, not even a single earthquake was predicted. In reality, practically no effective research has been conducted for the most important short-term prediction. This happened because the Japanese National Project was devoted for construction of elaborate seismic networks, which was not the best way for short-term prediction. After the Kobe disaster, in order to parry the mounting criticism on their no success history, they defiantly changed their policy to "stop aiming at short-term prediction because it is impossible and concentrate resources on fundamental research", that meant to obtain "more funding for no prediction research". The public were and are not informed about this change. Obviously earthquake prediction would be possible only when reliable precursory phenomena are caught and we have insisted this would be done most likely through non-seismic means such as geochemical/hydrological and electromagnetic monitoring. Admittedly, the lack of convincing precursors for the M9 super-giant earthquake has adverse effect for us, although its epicenter was far out off shore of the range of operating monitoring systems. In this presentation, we show a new possibility of finding remarkable precursory signals, ironically, from ordinary seismological catalogs. In the frame of the new time domain termed natural time, an order parameter of seismicity, κ1, has been introduced. This is the variance of natural time kai weighted by normalised energy release at χ. In the case that Seismic Electric Signals

  20. Work–Family Conflict, Task Interruptions, and Influence at Work Predict Musculoskeletal Pain in Operating Room Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Nützi, Marina; Koch, Patricia; Baur, Heiner; Elfering, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to examine the prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints in Swiss operating room (OR) nurses, and to investigate how work–family conflict, work interruptions, and influence at work are related to lumbar and cervical back pain. Methods Participants in this correlational questionnaire study included 116 OR nurses from eight different hospitals in Switzerland. Results We found that 66% of the OR staff suffered from musculoskeletal problems. The most prevalent musculoskeletal complaints were lumbar (52.7%) and cervical pain (38.4%). Furthermore, 20.5% reported pain in the mid spine region, 20.5% in the knees and legs, and 9.8% in the hands and feet. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that work–family conflict (p < 0.05) and interruptions (p < 0.05) significantly predicted lumbar and cervical pain in OR nurses, while influence at work (p < 0.05) only predicted lumbar pain. Conclusion These results suggest that reducing the work–family conflict and interruptions at work, as well as offering opportunities to influence one's workplace, help to promote OR nurses' health. PMID:26929846

  1. [Analysis of cost and efficiency of a medical nursing unit using time-driven activity-based costing].

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji Young; Kim, Mi Ja; Park, Chang Gi

    2011-08-01

    Time-driven activity-based costing was applied to analyze the nursing activity cost and efficiency of a medical unit. Data were collected at a medical unit of a general hospital. Nursing activities were measured using a nursing activities inventory and classified as 6 domains using Easley-Storfjell Instrument. Descriptive statistics were used to identify general characteristics of the unit, nursing activities and activity time, and stochastic frontier model was adopted to estimate true activity time. The average efficiency of the medical unit using theoretical resource capacity was 77%, however the efficiency using practical resource capacity was 96%. According to these results, the portion of non-added value time was estimated 23% and 4% each. The sums of total nursing activity costs were estimated 109,860,977 won in traditional activity-based costing and 84,427,126 won in time-driven activity-based costing. The difference in the two cost calculating methods was 25,433,851 won. These results indicate that the time-driven activity-based costing provides useful and more realistic information about the efficiency of unit operation compared to traditional activity-based costing. So time-driven activity-based costing is recommended as a performance evaluation framework for nursing departments based on cost management.

  2. Nursing students' prosocial motivation: does it predict professional commitment and involvement in the job?

    PubMed

    Nesje, Kjersti

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated how prosocial motivation reported by nursing students in their final year of academic studies relates to career commitment and job involvement three years after graduation. Most studies investigating nurses' prosocial motivation for choosing the nursing profession examine only their prosocial motivation for entering nursing training; they do not investigate whether this motivation is associated with job involvement or commitment to the profession. A longitudinal survey design was used. The present longitudinal study included 160 nurses. In their final academic year of spring 2007, the nurses received a questionnaire about their motivation for entering nursing. Three years after graduation, spring 2010, they received another questionnaire about their level of job involvement and career commitment. The results showed that prosocial motivation measured in their last academic year was related to career commitment three years after graduation, but unrelated to job involvement. The results indicated that prosocial motivation is important in identifying with the profession but not necessarily for personal involvement in the job. The study gives important knowledge on how a commonly reported motivation for entering nursing relates to the nurses' attitudes about their work life. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The Part-Time Student Role: Implications for the Emotional Experience of Managing Multiple Roles amongst Hong Kong Public Health Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiu, Ann Tak-Ying

    1999-01-01

    Nine public-health nurses studying part time and 11 other nurses sampled their mood states randomly over seven days. The part-time student role created additional strain for nurses with children. The stress of managing multiple roles was greatest when both work and nonwork role responsibilities were heavy. (SK)

  4. Real-time Adaptive Control Using Neural Generalized Predictive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haley, Pam; Soloway, Don; Gold, Brian

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of a Nonlinear Generalized Predictive Control algorithm by showing real-time adaptive control on a plant with relatively fast time-constants. Generalized Predictive Control has classically been used in process control where linear control laws were formulated for plants with relatively slow time-constants. The plant of interest for this paper is a magnetic levitation device that is nonlinear and open-loop unstable. In this application, the reference model of the plant is a neural network that has an embedded nominal linear model in the network weights. The control based on the linear model provides initial stability at the beginning of network training. In using a neural network the control laws are nonlinear and online adaptation of the model is possible to capture unmodeled or time-varying dynamics. Newton-Raphson is the minimization algorithm. Newton-Raphson requires the calculation of the Hessian, but even with this computational expense the low iteration rate make this a viable algorithm for real-time control.

  5. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, Manfred

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights.

  6. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    SciTech Connect

    Cuntz, M. Heidelberg Universitaet )

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights. 74 refs.

  7. An Approximation of a Hierarchical Logistic Regression Model Used To Establish the Predictive Validity of Scores on a Nursing Licensure Exam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Amy Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    Conducted a validity study to examine the degree to which scores on the newly developed Diagnostic Readiness Test (DRT) and National League for Nursing Pre-Admission Test scores could predict success or failure on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Results for 5,698 students indicate that the DRT is a…

  8. Factors influencing new graduate nurse burnout development, job satisfaction and patient care quality: a time-lagged study.

    PubMed

    Boamah, Sheila A; Read, Emily A; Spence Laschinger, Heather K

    2017-05-01

    To test a hypothesized model linking new graduate nurses' perceptions of their manager's authentic leadership behaviours to structural empowerment, short-staffing and work-life interference and subsequent burnout, job satisfaction and patient care quality. Authentic leadership and structural empowerment have been shown to reduce early career burnout among nurses. Short-staffing and work-life interference are also linked to burnout and may help explain the impact of positive, empowering leadership on burnout, which in turn influences job satisfaction and patient care quality. A time-lagged study of Canadian new graduate nurses was conducted. At Time 1, surveys were sent to 3,743 nurses (November 2012-March 2013) and 1,020 were returned (27·3% response rate). At Time 2 (May-July 2014), 406 nurses who responded at Time 1 completed surveys (39·8% response rate). Descriptive analysis was conducted in SPSS. Structural equation modelling in Mplus was used to test the hypothesized model. The hypothesized model was supported. Authentic leadership had a significant positive effect on structural empowerment, which in turn decreased both short-staffing and work-life interference. Short-staffing and work-life imbalance subsequently resulted in nurse burnout, lower job satisfaction and lower patient care quality 1 year later. The findings suggest that short-staffing and work-life interference are important factors influencing new graduate nurse burnout. Developing nurse managers' authentic leadership behaviours and working with them to create and sustain empowering work environments may help reduce burnout, increase nurse job satisfaction and improve patient care quality. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Chaos Time Series Prediction Based on Membrane Optimization Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Yi, Liangzhong; Pei, Zheng; Gao, Zhisheng

    2015-01-01

    This paper puts forward a prediction model based on membrane computing optimization algorithm for chaos time series; the model optimizes simultaneously the parameters of phase space reconstruction (τ, m) and least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) (γ, σ) by using membrane computing optimization algorithm. It is an important basis for spectrum management to predict accurately the change trend of parameters in the electromagnetic environment, which can help decision makers to adopt an optimal action. Then, the model presented in this paper is used to forecast band occupancy rate of frequency modulation (FM) broadcasting band and interphone band. To show the applicability and superiority of the proposed model, this paper will compare the forecast model presented in it with conventional similar models. The experimental results show that whether single-step prediction or multistep prediction, the proposed model performs best based on three error measures, namely, normalized mean square error (NMSE), root mean square error (RMSE), and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). PMID:25874249

  10. The assessment of patients' waiting and nursing consultation times at urban clinics in the National Capital District, Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Amos L

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted in the National Capital District during the months of August, September and October 2000. The study sites were the 3 urban clinics situated in the suburbs of Six Mile, Hohola and Konedobu. The aim of the study was to determine the patients' waiting times and nursing consultation times in the urban clinics. A total of 1075 patients were surveyed, including 264 children under 5 years of age. 58% of patients were males. 24% of patients were able to see a nurse within 30 minutes and 70% within 2 hours. 47% had to wait 1-3 hours to see a consulting nurse and a further 9.5% had to wait 3-5 hours. 67% of nursing consultations were 5 minutes or less, which is too short to interview, examine and prescribe treatment for the patients and to use the Paediatric 10 Steps. The short consultations of 5 minutes or less did not involve children under 5 years of age. There were only one to two nurses seeing the patients when 79% of patients were seen. This explains why the patients' waiting time was long. After consultations many patients (71%) were able to get their treatment within 30 minutes but 28% had to wait from 30 minutes to 2 hours for their treatment. The small number of nurses giving treatment leads to long waiting times. From the time of entry to exit out of the clinic, only 11% of patients spent 30 minutes or less in the clinic while 51% spent between 1 and 3 hours. The patients' waiting times and the short nursing consultation times are directly related to the insufficient number of nursing officers working in the clinics.

  11. Nurses' daily life: gender relations from the time spent in hospital1

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Audrey Vidal

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the everyday life of nurses through the sexual work division as well as through interdependence relations and the time in hospital. Method: quanti-qualitative study, based on the Time Use Survey and in Norbert Elias's Configuration Theory of Interdependencies. Daily shifts distribution record, directed by 42 participants - with self-confrontation - by interviews which drew dialogues on subjective aspects of the everyday experiences related to use of time, based on a job at a university hospital. The theoretical intake that founded data analysis was based on concepts of conflicts of interest, power struggles, sexual work division and polychronic-monochronic concepts - whether the work environment demands multitasking nurses or not. Results: time records allowed to observe differences between the groups studied, useful to identify conflicts, tensions, power struggles and gender inequalities in interviewees' everyday affairs that do not only affect physical and mental health, but also their way of life. Conclusion: the analytical path pointed out the need for public policies that promote equity in gender relations, keeping at sight the exercise of plural discourses and tolerant stances capable to respect differences between individual and collective time. PMID:26487146

  12. Connectionist Architectures for Time Series Prediction of Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigend, Andreas Sebastian

    We investigate the effectiveness of connectionist networks for predicting the future continuation of temporal sequences. The problem of overfitting, particularly serious for short records of noisy data, is addressed by the method of weight-elimination: a term penalizing network complexity is added to the usual cost function in back-propagation. We describe the dynamics of the procedure and clarify the meaning of the parameters involved. From a Bayesian perspective, the complexity term can be usefully interpreted as an assumption about prior distribution of the weights. We analyze three time series. On the benchmark sunspot series, the networks outperform traditional statistical approaches. We show that the network performance does not deteriorate when there are more input units than needed. In the second example, the notoriously noisy foreign exchange rates series, we pick one weekday and one currency (DM vs. US). Given exchange rate information up to and including a Monday, the task is to predict the rate for the following Tuesday. Weight-elimination manages to extract a significant part of the dynamics and makes the solution interpretable. In the third example, the networks predict the resource utilization of a chaotic computational ecosystem for hundreds of steps forward in time.

  13. Long Term Mean Local Time of the Ascending Node Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinley, David P.

    2007-01-01

    Significant error has been observed in the long term prediction of the Mean Local Time of the Ascending Node on the Aqua spacecraft. This error of approximately 90 seconds over a two year prediction is a complication in planning and timing of maneuvers for all members of the Earth Observing System Afternoon Constellation, which use Aqua's MLTAN as the reference for their inclination maneuvers. It was determined that the source of the prediction error was the lack of a solid Earth tide model in the operational force models. The Love Model of the solid Earth tide potential was used to derive analytic corrections to the inclination and right ascension of the ascending node of Aqua's Sun-synchronous orbit. Additionally, it was determined that the resonance between the Sun and orbit plane of the Sun-synchronous orbit is the primary driver of this error. The analytic corrections have been added to the operational force models for the Aqua spacecraft reducing the two-year 90-second error to less than 7 seconds.

  14. A Cerebellar Deficit in Sensorimotor Prediction Explains Movement Timing Variability

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Jin; Block, Hannah J.; Clark, Jane E.; Bastian, Amy J.

    2008-01-01

    A popular theory is that the cerebellum functions as a timer for clocking motor events (e.g., initiation, termination). Consistent with this idea, cerebellar patients have been reported to show greater deficits during hand movements that repeatedly start and stop (i.e., discontinuous movements) compared with continuous hand movements. Yet, this finding could potentially be explained by an alternate theory in which the cerebellum acts as an internal model of limb mechanics. We tested whether a timing or internal model hypothesis best explains results from a circle-drawing task, where individuals trace a circle with the hand at a desired tempo. We first attempted to replicate prior results showing greater impairment for discontinuous versus continuous circling movements, and then asked whether we could improve patient performance by reducing demands in each domain. First, we slowed the movement down to reduce the need to predict and compensate for limb dynamics. Second, we supplied external timing information to reduce the need for an internal event timer. Results showed that we did not replicate the previous findings—cerebellar patients were impaired in both discontinuous and continuous movements. Slowing the movement improved cerebellar performance to near control values. The addition of an external visual timing signal paradoxically worsened timing deficits rather than mitigating them. One interpretation of these combined results is that the cerebellum is indeed functioning as an internal model and is needed to make appropriate predictions for movement initiation and termination. PMID:18815350

  15. A cerebellar deficit in sensorimotor prediction explains movement timing variability.

    PubMed

    Bo, Jin; Block, Hannah J; Clark, Jane E; Bastian, Amy J

    2008-11-01

    A popular theory is that the cerebellum functions as a timer for clocking motor events (e.g., initiation, termination). Consistent with this idea, cerebellar patients have been reported to show greater deficits during hand movements that repeatedly start and stop (i.e., discontinuous movements) compared with continuous hand movements. Yet, this finding could potentially be explained by an alternate theory in which the cerebellum acts as an internal model of limb mechanics. We tested whether a timing or internal model hypothesis best explains results from a circle-drawing task, where individuals trace a circle with the hand at a desired tempo. We first attempted to replicate prior results showing greater impairment for discontinuous versus continuous circling movements, and then asked whether we could improve patient performance by reducing demands in each domain. First, we slowed the movement down to reduce the need to predict and compensate for limb dynamics. Second, we supplied external timing information to reduce the need for an internal event timer. Results showed that we did not replicate the previous findings-cerebellar patients were impaired in both discontinuous and continuous movements. Slowing the movement improved cerebellar performance to near control values. The addition of an external visual timing signal paradoxically worsened timing deficits rather than mitigating them. One interpretation of these combined results is that the cerebellum is indeed functioning as an internal model and is needed to make appropriate predictions for movement initiation and termination.

  16. Determining the agent factors related with time management of responsible doctors and nurses in clinics at Ankara University hospitals.

    PubMed

    Acuner, Ahmet Munir; Nilgun, Sarp; Cifteli, F Gulay

    2006-01-01

    This research has been planned and conducted as a descriptive scanning model field study in order to determine the agent factors related with time management of doctors and nurses in positions of responsibility at Ankara University hospitals. As data collection instruments; the "Personal Information Form" which has been developed to determine the socio-demographical characteristics of the research group, the questionnaire of "Determining the Time Management Attitudes and Behaviour of Managers, Time Management Opportunities of the Managers, Prodcutive Working Times of the Managers and the Factors Causing Them to Lose Time", developed by Erdem has been used. It has been determined that the time management attitudes and behaviour of doctors, nurses and nurse assistants responsible for clinics are all different. It was found that nurse assistants graduated from pre-undergraduate or high schools are the least conscious of time management. In particular, nurse assistants of 36 years old and over with 21 years of work experience and 11 years of management experience show little awareness of time management. The time losing factors of the research group were found to be unnecessary visitors, lack of materials and the excessive amount of time spent on obtaining the necessary equipment.

  17. Psychological Distress among Nursing, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy Students: A Longitudinal and Predictive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerdrum, Per; Rustoen, Tone; Helge Ronnestad, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we present longitudinal data on changes in psychological distress among 232 Norwegian undergraduate students of nursing, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy. Psychological distress was assessed by applying the 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire. Nursing students became substantially more distressed during the…

  18. Factors Predicting Lawsuits against Nursing Homes in Florida 1997-2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Christopher E.; Dobalian, Aram; Burkhard, Janet; Hedgecock, Deborah K.; Harman, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: We explore how nursing home characteristics affect the number of lawsuits filed against the facilities in Florida during the period from 1997 to 2001. Design and Methods: We examined data from 478 nursing homes in 30 Florida counties from 1997 to 2001. We obtained the data from Westlaw's Adverse Filings: Lawsuits database, the Online…

  19. Psychological Distress among Nursing, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy Students: A Longitudinal and Predictive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerdrum, Per; Rustoen, Tone; Helge Ronnestad, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we present longitudinal data on changes in psychological distress among 232 Norwegian undergraduate students of nursing, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy. Psychological distress was assessed by applying the 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire. Nursing students became substantially more distressed during the…

  20. Characteristics Predicting Nursing Home Admission in the Program of All-Inclusive Care for Elderly People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Susan M.; Steinwachs, Donald M.; Rathouz, Paul J.; Burton, Lynda C.; Mukamel, Dana B.

    2005-01-01

    Long term care in a nursing home prior to enrollment in PACE remain at high risk of readmission, despite the availability of comprehensive services. This study determined overall risk and predictors of long-term nursing home admission within the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE). Design and Methods: Data PACE records for 4,646…

  1. The Prediction of Success in Nursing Education: Phase I and Phase II, 1959-1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurston, John R.; And Others

    This study concerned the development and testing of an instrument designed to provide nursing schools with meaningful information about the personalities and potential problems of their students. In Phase I, the instrument--the Luther Hospital Sentence Completions (LHSC)--was constructed along with a Nursing Education Scale (NES) which provided…

  2. The Effectiveness of Six Personality Variables in Predicting Success on the Nursing State Board Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cusick, Patricia; Harckham, Laura D.

    A study was conducted to determine whether six personality variables, presently used in admissions decisions by a nursing school, were effective predictors of success on the State Board Examination (SBE), the nursing licensing examination. The personality variables were measured by subtests of the Personal Preference Schedule of the Psychological…

  3. Factors Predicting Lawsuits against Nursing Homes in Florida 1997-2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Christopher E.; Dobalian, Aram; Burkhard, Janet; Hedgecock, Deborah K.; Harman, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: We explore how nursing home characteristics affect the number of lawsuits filed against the facilities in Florida during the period from 1997 to 2001. Design and Methods: We examined data from 478 nursing homes in 30 Florida counties from 1997 to 2001. We obtained the data from Westlaw's Adverse Filings: Lawsuits database, the Online…

  4. Two-parameter Failure Model Improves Time-independent and Time-dependent Failure Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Huddleston, R L

    2004-01-27

    A new analytical model for predicting failure under a generalized, triaxial stress state was developed by the author and initially reported in 1984. The model was validated for predicting failure under elevated-temperature creep-rupture conditions. Biaxial data for three alloy steels, Types 304 and 316 stainless steels and Inconel 600, demonstrated two to three orders of magnitude reduction in the scatter of predicted versus observed creep-rupture times as compared to the classical failure models of Mises, Tresca, and Rankine. In 1990, the new model was incorporated into American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code Case N47-29 for design of components operating under creep-rupture conditions. The current report provides additional validation of the model for predicting failure under time-independent conditions and also outlines a methodology for predicting failure under cyclic, time-dependent, creep-fatigue conditions. The later extension of the methodology may have the potential to improve failure predictions there as well. These results are relevant to most design applications, but they have special relevance to high-performance design applications such as components for high-pressure equipment, nuclear reactors, and jet engines.

  5. Forecasts of time averages with a numerical weather prediction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roads, J. O.

    1986-01-01

    Forecasts of time averages of 1-10 days in duration by an operational numerical weather prediction model are documented for the global 500 mb height field in spectral space. Error growth in very idealized models is described in order to anticipate various features of these forecasts and in order to anticipate what the results might be if forecasts longer than 10 days were carried out by present day numerical weather prediction models. The data set for this study is described, and the equilibrium spectra and error spectra are documented; then, the total error is documented. It is shown how forecasts can immediately be improved by removing the systematic error, by using statistical filters, and by ignoring forecasts beyond about a week. Temporal variations in the error field are also documented.

  6. Predicting chaotic time series with a partial model.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Franz; Berry, Tyrus; Sauer, Timothy

    2015-07-01

    Methods for forecasting time series are a critical aspect of the understanding and control of complex networks. When the model of the network is unknown, nonparametric methods for prediction have been developed, based on concepts of attractor reconstruction pioneered by Takens and others. In this Rapid Communication we consider how to make use of a subset of the system equations, if they are known, to improve the predictive capability of forecasting methods. A counterintuitive implication of the results is that knowledge of the evolution equation of even one variable, if known, can improve forecasting of all variables. The method is illustrated on data from the Lorenz attractor and from a small network with chaotic dynamics.

  7. NASA AVOSS Fast-Time Wake Prediction Models: User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nash'at N.; VanValkenburg, Randal L.; Pruis, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing and testing fast-time wake transport and decay models to safely enhance the capacity of the National Airspace System (NAS). The fast-time wake models are empirical algorithms used for real-time predictions of wake transport and decay based on aircraft parameters and ambient weather conditions. The aircraft dependent parameters include the initial vortex descent velocity and the vortex pair separation distance. The atmospheric initial conditions include vertical profiles of temperature or potential temperature, eddy dissipation rate, and crosswind. The current distribution includes the latest versions of the APA (3.4) and the TDP (2.1) models. This User's Guide provides detailed information on the model inputs, file formats, and the model output. An example of a model run and a brief description of the Memphis 1995 Wake Vortex Dataset is also provided.

  8. Urban air pollution by odor sources: Short time prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettarin, Nicola; Campolo, Marina; Soldati, Alfredo

    2015-12-01

    A numerical approach is proposed to predict the short time dispersion of odors in the urban environment. The model is based on (i) a three dimensional computational domain describing the urban topography at fine spatial scale (1 m) and on (ii) highly time resolved (1 min frequency) meteorological data used as inflow conditions. The time dependent, three dimensional wind velocity field is reconstructed in the Eulerian framework using a fast response finite volume solver of Navier-Stokes equations. Odor dispersion is calculated using a Lagrangian approach. An application of the model to the historic city of Verona (Italy) is presented. Results confirm that this type of odor dispersion simulations can be used (i) to assess the impact of odor emissions in urban areas and (ii) to evaluate the potential mitigation produced by odor abatement systems.

  9. "Finding my own time": examining the spatially produced experiences of rural RNs in the rural nursing certificate program.

    PubMed

    Place, Jessica; MacLeod, Martha; John, Norma; Adamack, Monica; Lindsey, A Elizabeth

    2012-07-01

    Rural nurses require access to education that exposes them to the most up-to-date information and skill development. However, since most education opportunities are located in urban centers and focused on providing skills to urban nurses, geography effectively acts as a barrier to accessing education that meets the needs of rural nurses. The Rural Nursing Certificate Program is a post-basic education program that addresses these concerns by providing rural-relevant content online, with limited campus sessions. Does online delivery of rural nursing curriculum overcome challenges related to geography? This study employed surveys with some open-ended questions. Analysis included descriptive statistics and content analysis. Students reported that online delivery improved access. Benefits included not having to relocate; being able to continue working; and, flexibility. Challenges included travel for practical experiences and time management related to staffing shortages, personal-professional overlap and family responsibilities. Online learning improved access to nursing education. However, the realities of rural nursing made it impossible to completely overcome geography: sense of obligation to work overtime, cost and time of traveling to workshops and practicums, uneven access to the Internet and computer services, and distance from peer and university support remained challenges. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Real-time multi-model decadal climate predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Doug M.; Scaife, Adam A.; Boer, George J.; Caian, Mihaela; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco J.; Guemas, Virginie; Hawkins, Ed; Hazeleger, Wilco; Hermanson, Leon; Ho, Chun Kit; Ishii, Masayoshi; Kharin, Viatcheslav; Kimoto, Masahide; Kirtman, Ben; Lean, Judith; Matei, Daniela; Merryfield, William J.; Müller, Wolfgang A.; Pohlmann, Holger; Rosati, Anthony; Wouters, Bert; Wyser, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    We present the first climate prediction of the coming decade made with multiple models, initialized with prior observations. This prediction accrues from an international activity to exchange decadal predictions in near real-time, in order to assess differences and similarities, provide a consensus view to prevent over-confidence in forecasts from any single model, and establish current collective capability. We stress that the forecast is experimental, since the skill of the multi-model system is as yet unknown. Nevertheless, the forecast systems used here are based on models that have undergone rigorous evaluation and individually have been evaluated for forecast skill. Moreover, it is important to publish forecasts to enable open evaluation, and to provide a focus on climate change in the coming decade. Initialized forecasts of the year 2011 agree well with observations, with a pattern correlation of 0.62 compared to 0.31 for uninitialized projections. In particular, the forecast correctly predicted La Niña in the Pacific, and warm conditions in the north Atlantic and USA. A similar pattern is predicted for 2012 but with a weaker La Niña. Indices of Atlantic multi-decadal variability and Pacific decadal variability show no signal beyond climatology after 2015, while temperature in the Niño3 region is predicted to warm slightly by about 0.5 °C over the coming decade. However, uncertainties are large for individual years and initialization has little impact beyond the first 4 years in most regions. Relative to uninitialized forecasts, initialized forecasts are significantly warmer in the north Atlantic sub-polar gyre and cooler in the north Pacific throughout the decade. They are also significantly cooler in the global average and over most land and ocean regions out to several years ahead. However, in the absence of volcanic eruptions, global temperature is predicted to continue to rise, with each year from 2013 onwards having a 50 % chance of exceeding the

  11. The Family Time Squeeze: Perceived Family Time Adequacy Buffers Work Strain in Certified Nursing Assistants With Multiple Caregiving Roles.

    PubMed

    DePasquale, Nicole; Mogle, Jacqueline; Zarit, Steven H; Okechukwu, Cassandra; Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Almeida, David M

    2017-01-10

    This study examined how certified nursing assistants (CNAs) with unpaid family caregiving roles for children ("double-duty-child caregivers"), older adults ("double-duty-elder caregivers"), and both children and older adults ("triple-duty caregivers") differed from their nonfamily caregiving counterparts ("workplace-only caregivers") on four work strain indicators (emotional exhaustion, job satisfaction, turnover intentions, and work climate for family sacrifices). The moderating effects of perceived family time adequacy were also evaluated. Regression analyses were conducted on survey data from 972 CNAs working in U.S.-based nursing homes. Compared with workplace-only caregivers, double-and-triple-duty caregivers reported more emotional exhaustion and pressure to make family sacrifices for the sake of work. Triple-duty caregivers also reported less job satisfaction. Perceived family time adequacy buffered double-duty-child and triple-duty caregivers' emotional exhaustion and turnover intentions, as well as reversed triple-duty caregivers' negative perceptions of the work climate. Perceived family time adequacy constitutes a salient psychological resource for double-duty-child and triple-duty caregivers' family time squeezes. Amid an unprecedented demand for long-term care and severe direct-care workforce shortages, future research on workplace factors that increase double-and-triple-duty caregiving CNAs' perceived family time adequacy is warranted to inform long-term care organizations' development of targeted recruitment, retention, and engagement strategies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Timing and duration of nursing from birth affect neonatal porcine uterine matrix metalloproteinase 9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1.

    PubMed

    Ho, T Y; Rahman, K M; Camp, M E; Wiley, A A; Bartol, F F; Bagnell, C A

    2017-04-01

    Nursing for 2 d from birth supports neonatal porcine uterine and cervical development. However, it is not clear how timing or duration of lactocrine signaling from birth (postnatal day = PND 0) affects development of neonatal female reproductive tract tissues. Therefore, studies were conducted to determine effects of age at first nursing and duration of nursing from birth on specific elements of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) system in uterine and cervical tissues at PND 2. When nursing was initiated at 0 h or 30 min of age, targeted proteins, including proMMP9 and MMP9, were detected in uterine and cervical tissues on PND 2, as was uterine TIMP1. However, these proteins were undetectable when nursing was delayed for 12 h and when gilts were fed milk replacer for 48 h from birth. Increasing the duration of nursing from 30 min to 12 h from birth increased uterine (P < 0.05) and cervical (P < 0.001) MMP9 levels to those observed in gilts nursed for 48 h. Similarly, uterine TIMP1 levels increased with duration of nursing. Uterine MMP2 levels were detectable but unaffected by age at first nursing or duration of nursing from birth. Uterine MMP2 and MMP9 activities, monitored by zymography, reflected immunoblotting data. Results provide evidence for the utility of MMP9 and TIMP1 as markers of age- and lactocrine-sensitive porcine female reproductive tract development.

  13. Predicting the decay time of solid body electric guitar tones.

    PubMed

    Paté, Arthur; Le Carrou, Jean-Loïc; Fabre, Benoît

    2014-05-01

    Although it can be transformed by various electronic devices, the sound of the solid body electric guitar originates from, and is strongly linked with, the string vibration. The coupling of the string with the guitar alters its vibration and can lead to decay time inhomogeneities. This paper implements and justifies a framework for the study of decay times of electric guitar tones. Two damping mechanisms are theoretically and experimentally identified: the string intrinsic damping and the damping due to mechanical coupling with the neck of the guitar. The electromagnetic pickup is shown to not provide any additional damping to the string. The pickup is also shown to be far more sensitive to the out-of-plane polarization of the string. Finally, an accurate prediction of the decay time of electric guitar tones is made possible, whose only requirements are the knowledge of the isolated string dampings and the out-of-plane conductance at the neck of the guitar. This prediction can be of great help for instrument makers and manufacturers.

  14. Real-time MJO Identification and Subseasonal Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, E. K.; Weickmann, K.

    2012-12-01

    There is evidence that the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) can enhance predictability of sensible weather possibly out to lead times of ~40-50 days. This includes high impact events such as extreme surface air temperatures and extended periods of severe storms/excessive precipitation. However, identification of MJOs in real-time is challenging because the weather-climate system is dominated by noise. In fact, stochastic extratropical dynamics can organize large scale subtropical wind fields and envelopes of tropical rainfall that can be misrepresented as MJOs especially when using combined wind and outgoing longwave radiation indices (Wheeler and Hendon, 2004). These mixed global wind-tropical convective variations (Weickmann and Berry, 2009) partially reflect the Global Wind Oscillation (GWO), which is non-oscillatory and does not provide useful forecast information beyond ~15 days. An analysis of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and global circulation data sets is performed for the 2006-07 through 2011-12 boreal cold seasons (which included the DYNAMO field experiment). During this roughly six year period nine MJOs were identified that had the potential to extend the range of skillful or useful prediction. The breakdown of these events and their interactions with ENSO are discussed. Examples of red noise dominated variations and predictability ramifications will also be given. These include the premature ending of the 2006-07 El-Niño, extratropical feedbacks during 2010-11 leading to a strong jet stream not consistent with La-Niña, and constructive interference of an MJO and La-Niña that contributed to the March 2012 Midwest-eastern USA "heat wave". The criticality to distinguish in real time between "sustained, coherent MJOs" and other types of coherent or noisy tropical-extratropical variability is emphasized. The fast, moderate MJOs that initiated during DYNAMO might provide clues about MJO initiation and succession.

  15. Predictive modeling of respiratory tumor motion for real-time prediction of baseline shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, A.; Shamsuddin, R.; Prabhakaran, B.; Sawant, A.

    2017-03-01

    Baseline shifts in respiratory patterns can result in significant spatiotemporal changes in patient anatomy (compared to that captured during simulation), in turn, causing geometric and dosimetric errors in the administration of thoracic and abdominal radiotherapy. We propose predictive modeling of the tumor motion trajectories for predicting a baseline shift ahead of its occurrence. The key idea is to use the features of the tumor motion trajectory over a 1 min window, and predict the occurrence of a baseline shift in the 5 s that immediately follow (lookahead window). In this study, we explored a preliminary trend-based analysis with multi-class annotations as well as a more focused binary classification analysis. In both analyses, a number of different inter-fraction and intra-fraction training strategies were studied, both offline as well as online, along with data sufficiency and skew compensation for class imbalances. The performance of different training strategies were compared across multiple machine learning classification algorithms, including nearest neighbor, Naïve Bayes, linear discriminant and ensemble Adaboost. The prediction performance is evaluated using metrics such as accuracy, precision, recall and the area under the curve (AUC) for repeater operating characteristics curve. The key results of the trend-based analysis indicate that (i) intra-fraction training strategies achieve highest prediction accuracies (90.5-91.4%) (ii) the predictive modeling yields lowest accuracies (50-60%) when the training data does not include any information from the test patient; (iii) the prediction latencies are as low as a few hundred milliseconds, and thus conducive for real-time prediction. The binary classification performance is promising, indicated by high AUCs (0.96-0.98). It also confirms the utility of prior data from previous patients, and also the necessity of training the classifier on some initial data from the new patient for reasonable

  16. Predictive modeling of respiratory tumor motion for real-time prediction of baseline shifts.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, A; Shamsuddin, R; Prabhakaran, B; Sawant, A

    2017-03-07

    Baseline shifts in respiratory patterns can result in significant spatiotemporal changes in patient anatomy (compared to that captured during simulation), in turn, causing geometric and dosimetric errors in the administration of thoracic and abdominal radiotherapy. We propose predictive modeling of the tumor motion trajectories for predicting a baseline shift ahead of its occurrence. The key idea is to use the features of the tumor motion trajectory over a 1 min window, and predict the occurrence of a baseline shift in the 5 s that immediately follow (lookahead window). In this study, we explored a preliminary trend-based analysis with multi-class annotations as well as a more focused binary classification analysis. In both analyses, a number of different inter-fraction and intra-fraction training strategies were studied, both offline as well as online, along with data sufficiency and skew compensation for class imbalances. The performance of different training strategies were compared across multiple machine learning classification algorithms, including nearest neighbor, Naïve Bayes, linear discriminant and ensemble Adaboost. The prediction performance is evaluated using metrics such as accuracy, precision, recall and the area under the curve (AUC) for repeater operating characteristics curve. The key results of the trend-based analysis indicate that (i) intra-fraction training strategies achieve highest prediction accuracies (90.5-91.4%); (ii) the predictive modeling yields lowest accuracies (50-60%) when the training data does not include any information from the test patient; (iii) the prediction latencies are as low as a few hundred milliseconds, and thus conducive for real-time prediction. The binary classification performance is promising, indicated by high AUCs (0.96-0.98). It also confirms the utility of prior data from previous patients, and also the necessity of training the classifier on some initial data from the new patient for reasonable

  17. Around-the-World Atomic Clocks: Predicted Relativistic Time Gains.

    PubMed

    Hafele, J C; Keating, R E

    1972-07-14

    During October 1971, four cesium beam atomic clocks were flown on regularly scheduled commercial jet flights around the world twice, once eastward and once westward, to test Einstein's theory of relativity with macroscopic clocks. From the actual flight paths of each trip, the theory predicts that the flying clocks, compared with reference clocks at the U.S. Naval Observatory, should have lost 40 +/- 23 nanoseconds during the eastward trip, and should have gained 275 +/- 21 nanoseconds during the westward trip. The observed time differences are presented in the report that follows this one.

  18. Have Nursing Home Compare quality measure scores changed over time in response to competition?

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas G; Engberg, John; Liu, Darren

    2007-06-01

    Currently, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services report on 15 Quality Measures (QMs) on the Nursing Home Compare (NHC) website. It is assumed that nursing homes are able to make improvements on these QMs, and in doing so they will attract more residents. In this investigation, we examine changes in QM scores, and whether competition and/or excess demand have influenced these change scores over a period of 1 year. Data come from NHC and the On-line Survey Certification And Recording (OSCAR) system. QM change scores are calculated using values from January 2003 to January 2004. A series of regression analyses are used to examine the association of competition and excess demand on QM scores. Eight QMs show an average decrease in scores (ie, better quality) and six QMs show an average increase in scores (ie, worse quality). However, for 13 of the 14 QMs these average changes averaged less than 1%. The regression analyses show an association between higher competition and improving QM scores and an association between lower occupancy and improving QM scores. As would be predicted based on the market-driven mechanism underlying quality improvements using report cards, we show that it is in the most competitive markets and those with the lowest average occupancy rates that improvements in the QM scores are more likely.

  19. Insufflation using carbon dioxide versus room air during colonoscopy: comparison of patient comfort, recovery time, and nursing resources.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Isabelle; Hayes, Ann; Buffum, Martha D; Conners, Erin E

    2015-01-01

    The standard of practice for colonoscopy is room air insufflation. Recent research demonstrates safety and significant decrease in postcolonoscopy discomfort from distention when carbon dioxide (CO2) is used during insufflation. Reducing abdominal pain after colonoscopy may lead to increased acceptance of colonoscopy screening for colorectal cancer. This study aims to compare patient comfort intra- and postprocedure, length of recovery, and nursing time in patients undergoing colonoscopy using room air vs. CO2 insufflation. This study uses an experimental design with patients randomly assigned to either room air or CO2 during colonoscopy. Physician endoscopists, postprocedure nurses, and patients were blinded to assignment. Prior bowel surgery, inflammatory bowel disease, or inability to consent excluded participants. Outcome measures included discomfort assessment, nursing tasks, and recovery time.Of 191 participants, 177 were men and 14 were women; 94 received room air; 97 received CO2. Patients insufflated with room air reported higher levels of some measures of discomfort: (a) during colonoscopy (p = .02), (b) on admission to recovery (p = .001), and (c) on discharge from recovery (p = .001). Patients receiving room air required more nursing tasks in recovery (p = .001) and more total nursing time (p = .001).Compared with room air, CO2 insufflation increases patient comfort and decreases nursing tasks and time.

  20. Time to clarify--the value of advanced practice nursing roles in health care.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Grainne; Plummer, Virginia; O'Brien, Anthony Paul; Boyd, Leanne

    2012-03-01

    This article presents a discussion of the importance of providing meaningful advanced practice nursing role definition and clarity to improve international standards of nursing titles and scopes of practice. A plethora of international literature exists discussing advanced practice nursing roles and their contribution to healthcare delivery in various countries. However, lack of consistency around title, role definition and scope of practice remains. CINAHL and Medline databases were searched using 'nurse practitioner', 'nurse practitioner role', 'nurse practitioner practice', 'nurse practitioner in public health', 'advanced practice nursing roles' and 'development of new nursing roles' with articles limited to years 1995-2010. Citations used in those articles were also explored. All cited articles were in the English language. This article supports the need to strengthen the Nurse Practitioner role in health care and professional clarity is identified as a strategy to enhance this. Themes around role clarity, professional identity, ability to enhance healthcare provision and inter-professional issues are examined. The need to more clearly articulate advanced nursing roles in light of the evolution of the Nurse Practitioner role is highlighted. Much work has already occurred in this domain and a means of adapting and broadening these developments for a wider, more global audience whilst maintaining local context is discussed. Although evidence exists that advanced practice nursing roles are increasing internationally, uncertainty around role clarity remains. This is problematic because the valuable contribution of nursing roles is lost, if the ability to clearly express their function does not exist. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Discriminability of Prediction Artifacts in a Time Delayed Virtual Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelstein, Bernard D.; Jung, Jae Y.; Ellis, Stephen R.

    2001-01-01

    Overall latency remains an impediment to perceived image stability and consequently to human performance in virtual environment (VE) systems. Predictive compensators have been proposed as a means to mitigate these shortcomings, but they introduce rendering errors because of induced motion overshoot and heightened noise. Discriminability of these compensator artifacts was investigated by a protocol in which head tracked image stability for 35 ms baseline VE system latency was compared against artificially added (16.7 to 100 ms) latency compensated by a previously studied Kalman Filter (K-F) predictor. A control study in which uncompensated 16.7 to 100 ms latencies were compared against the baseline was also performed. Results from 10 subjects in the main study and 8 in the control group indicate that predictive compensation artifacts are less discernible than the disruptions of uncompensated time delay for the shorter but not the longer added latencies. We propose that noise magnification and overshoot are contributory cues to the presence of predictive compensation.

  2. Predicting the level of job satisfaction based on hardiness and its components among nurses with tension headache.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, A; Nikmanesh, E; AghaeI, M; Kamran, F; Zahra Tavakoli, Z; Khaki Seddigh, F

    2015-01-01

    Nurses are the most significant part of human resources in a sanitary and health system. Job satisfaction results in the enhancement of organizational productivity, employee commitment to the organization and ensuring his/ her physical and mental health. The present research was conducted with the aim of predicting the level of job satisfaction based on hardiness and its components among the nurses with tension headache. The research method was correlational. The population consisted of all the nurses with tension headache who referred to the relevant specialists in Tehran. The sample size consisted of 50 individuals who were chosen by using the convenience sampling method and were measured and investigated by using the research tools of "Job Satisfaction Test" of Davis, Lofkvist and Weiss and "Personal Views Survey" of Kobasa. The data analysis was carried out by using the Pearson Correlation Coefficient and the Regression Analysis. The research findings demonstrated that the correlation coefficient obtained for "hardiness", "job satisfaction" was 0.506, and this coefficient was significant at the 0.01 level. Moreover, it was specified that the sense of commitment and challenge were stronger predictors for job satisfaction of nurses with tension headache among the components of hardiness, and, about 16% of the variance of "job satisfaction" could be explained by the two components (sense of commitment and challenge).

  3. Predicting the level of job satisfaction based on hardiness and its components among nurses with tension headache

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, A; Nikmanesh, E; AghaeI, M; Kamran, F; Zahra Tavakoli, Z; Khaki Seddigh, F

    2015-01-01

    Nurses are the most significant part of human resources in a sanitary and health system. Job satisfaction results in the enhancement of organizational productivity, employee commitment to the organization and ensuring his/ her physical and mental health. The present research was conducted with the aim of predicting the level of job satisfaction based on hardiness and its components among the nurses with tension headache. The research method was correlational. The population consisted of all the nurses with tension headache who referred to the relevant specialists in Tehran. The sample size consisted of 50 individuals who were chosen by using the convenience sampling method and were measured and investigated by using the research tools of “Job Satisfaction Test” of Davis, Lofkvist and Weiss and “Personal Views Survey” of Kobasa. The data analysis was carried out by using the Pearson Correlation Coefficient and the Regression Analysis. The research findings demonstrated that the correlation coefficient obtained for “hardiness”, “job satisfaction” was 0.506, and this coefficient was significant at the 0.01 level. Moreover, it was specified that the sense of commitment and challenge were stronger predictors for job satisfaction of nurses with tension headache among the components of hardiness, and, about 16% of the variance of “job satisfaction” could be explained by the two components (sense of commitment and challenge). PMID:28316713

  4. Time-dependent Predictive Values of Prognostic Biomarkers with Failure Time Outcome.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yingye; Cai, Tianxi; Pepe, Margaret S; Levy, Wayne C

    2008-01-01

    In a prospective cohort study, information on clinical parameters, tests and molecular markers is often collected. Such information is useful to predict patient prognosis and to select patients for targeted therapy. We propose a new graphical approach, the positive predictive value (PPV) curve, to quantify the predictive accuracy of prognostic markers measured on a continuous scale with censored failure time outcome. The proposed method highlights the need to consider both predictive values and the marker distribution in the population when evaluating a marker, and it provides a common scale for comparing different markers. We consider both semiparametric and nonparametric based estimating procedures. In addition, we provide asymptotic distribution theory and resampling based procedures for making statistical inference. We illustrate our approach with numerical studies and datasets from the Seattle Heart Failure Study.

  5. Data assimialation for real-time prediction and reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Y.; Kellerman, A. C.; Podladchikova, T.; Kondrashov, D. A.; Ghil, M.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss the how data assimilation can be used for the analysis of individual satellite anomalies, development of long-term evolution reconstruction that can be used for the specification models, and use of data assimilation to improve the now-casting and focusing of the radiation belts. We also discuss advanced data assimilation methods such as parameter estimation and smoothing.The 3D data assimilative VERB allows us to blend together data from GOES, RBSP A and RBSP B. Real-time prediction framework operating on our web site based on GOES, RBSP A, B and ACE data and 3D VERB is presented and discussed. In this paper we present a number of application of the data assimilation with the VERB 3D code. 1) Model with data assimilation allows to propagate data to different pitch angles, energies, and L-shells and blends them together with the physics based VERB code in an optimal way. We illustrate how we use this capability for the analysis of the previous events and for obtaining a global and statistical view of the system. 2) The model predictions strongly depend on initial conditions that are set up for the model. Therefore the model is as good as the initial conditions that it uses. To produce the best possible initial condition data from different sources ( GOES, RBSP A, B, our empirical model predictions based on ACE) are all blended together in an optimal way by means of data assimilation as described above. The resulting initial condition does not have gaps. That allows us to make a more accurate predictions.

  6. Predictive validity of the Macleod Clark Professional Identity Scale for undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Melissa; Salamonson, Yenna; Weaver, Roslyn; Cleary, Michelle

    2013-03-01

    The self-identification of nursing students with the profession has been linked with a successful transition, from being a student to being a professional nurse. Although there is no empirical evidence, there are suggestions that students with high professional identity are more likely to persist and complete their studies in their chosen profession. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of a professional identity scale and to determine the relationship between professional identity and student retention in a large group of first year nursing students. A survey design was used to examine the professional identity of first year nursing students, as measured by the Macleod Clark Professional Identity Scale (MCPIS-9). Baseline data obtained from the initial surveys were then compared with student drop-out rates 12 months later. Exploratory factor analysis of the MCPIS-9 yielded a one-component solution, accounting for 43.3% of the variance. All 9 items loaded highly on one component, ranging from 0.50 to 0.79. Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the MCPIS-9 was 0.83 and corrected item-total correlation values all scored well above the 0.3 cut-off. Students who: were females, had previous nursing-related vocational training, reported nursing as their first choice, or engaged in nursing-related paid work, had statistically significant higher professional identity scores. Using logistic regression analysis, students with high professional identity scores at baseline were more likely to be still enrolled in the nursing program at 12 months, controlling for gender, language spoken at home and engagement in nursing-related employment. These results support the psychometric properties of the MCPIS-9. Professional identity has a direct relationship with student retention in the nursing program. It is important to adequately measure professional identity in nursing students for the purpose of monitoring and identifying students who are at risk of

  7. Time-predictable recurrence model for large earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Shimazaki, K.; Nakata, T.

    1980-04-01

    We present historical and geomorphological evidence of a regularity in earthquake recurrence at three different sites of plate convergence around the Japan arcs. The regularity shows that the larger an earthquake is, the longer is the following quiet period. In other words, the time interval between two successive large earthquakes is approximately proportional to the amount of coseismic displacement of the preceding earthquake and not of the following earthquake. The regularity enables us, in principle, to predict the approximate occurrence time of earthquakes. The data set includes 1) a historical document describing repeated measurements of water depth at Murotsu near the focal region of Nankaido earthquakes, 2) precise levelling and /sup 14/C dating of Holocene uplifted terraces in the southern boso peninsula facing the Sagami trough, and 3) similar geomorphological data on exposed Holocene coral reefs in Kikai Island along the Ryukyu arc.

  8. Satellite attitude prediction by multiple time scales method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Y. C.; Ramnath, R.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is made of the problem of predicting the attitude of satellites under the influence of external disturbing torques. The attitude dynamics are first expressed in a perturbation formulation which is then solved by the multiple scales approach. The independent variable, time, is extended into new scales, fast, slow, etc., and the integration is carried out separately in the new variables. The theory is applied to two different satellite configurations, rigid body and dual spin, each of which may have an asymmetric mass distribution. The disturbing torques considered are gravity gradient and geomagnetic. Finally, as multiple time scales approach separates slow and fast behaviors of satellite attitude motion, this property is used for the design of an attitude control device. A nutation damping control loop, using the geomagnetic torque for an earth pointing dual spin satellite, is designed in terms of the slow equation.

  9. Using Latent Transition Analysis in Nursing Research to Explore Change Over Time

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Tonya J.; Ward, Sandra E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Latent transition analysis is a method of modeling change over time in categorical variables. It has been used in the social sciences for many years, but not in nursing research. Objective To illustrate the utility of latent transition analysis for nursing research by presenting a case example (a secondary analysis of data from a previously conducted randomized control trial testing the effectiveness of a tailored psychoeducational intervention to decrease patient-related attitudinal barriers to cancer pain management) and to understand for whom, and in what direction, the tailored intervention resulted in change with respect to attitudinal barriers and pain symptoms. Method The model was developed by (a) defining a class structure based on individuals’ barrier patterns, (b) adding demographic predictors and distal pain outcomes, and (c) modeling and testing transitions across classes. Results There were two classes of individuals: Low Barriers and High Barriers. Older, less educated individuals were more likely to be in the High Barriers class at time 1. Individuals in either class did not have different pain outcomes at the end of the study. Of those individuals that transitioned across classes, those who received the intervention were statistically more likely to move in a favorable direction (to the Low Barriers class). Furthermore, there is evidence that some individuals in the control group had unfavorable outcomes. Discussion The results from the example provide useful information about for whom, and in what direction, the intervention resulted in change. Latent transition analysis is a valuable procedure for nurse researchers because it collapses large arrays of categorical data into meaningful patterns. It is a flexible modeling procedure with extensions allowing further understanding of a change process. PMID:21127448

  10. Predicting aquifer response time for application in catchment modeling.

    PubMed

    Walker, Glen R; Gilfedder, Mat; Dawes, Warrick R; Rassam, David W

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that changes in catchment land use can lead to significant impacts on water resources. Where land-use changes increase evapotranspiration there is a resultant decrease in groundwater recharge, which in turn decreases groundwater discharge to streams. The response time of changes in groundwater discharge to a change in recharge is a key aspect of predicting impacts of land-use change on catchment water yield. Predicting these impacts across the large catchments relevant to water resource planning can require the estimation of groundwater response times from hundreds of aquifers. At this scale, detailed site-specific measured data are often absent, and available spatial data are limited. While numerical models can be applied, there is little advantage if there are no detailed data to parameterize them. Simple analytical methods are useful in this situation, as they allow the variability in groundwater response to be incorporated into catchment hydrological models, with minimal modeling overhead. This paper describes an analytical model which has been developed to capture some of the features of real, sloping aquifer systems. The derived groundwater response timescale can be used to parameterize a groundwater discharge function, allowing groundwater response to be predicted in relation to different broad catchment characteristics at a level of complexity which matches the available data. The results from the analytical model are compared to published field data and numerical model results, and provide an approach with broad application to inform water resource planning in other large, data-scarce catchments. © 2014, CommonWealth of Australia. Groundwater © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  11. A New Time Domain Formulation for Broadband Noise Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, J.; Farassat, F.

    2002-01-01

    A new analytic result in acoustics called "Formulation 1B," proposed by Farassat, is used to compute the loading noise from an unsteady surface pressure distribution on a thin airfoil in the time domain. This formulation is a new solution of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation with the loading source term. The formulation contains a far field surface integral that depends on the time derivative and the surface gradient of the pressure on the airfoil, as well as a contour integral on the boundary of the airfoil surface. As a first test case, the new formulation is used to compute the noise radiated from a flat plate, moving through a sinusoidal gust of constant frequency. The unsteady surface pressure for this test case is analytically specified from a result based on linear airfoil theory. This test case is used to examine the velocity scaling properties of Formulation 1B and to demonstrate its equivalence to Formulation 1A of Farassat. The new acoustic formulation, again with an analytic surface pressure, is then used to predict broadband noise radiated from an airfoil immersed in homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. The results are compared with experimental data previously reported by Paterson and Amiet. Good agreement between predictions and measurements is obtained. Finally, an alternative form of Formulation 1B is described for statistical analysis of broadband noise.

  12. A New Time Domain Formulation for Broadband Noise Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, Jay H.; Farassat, Fereidoun

    2002-01-01

    A new analytic result in acoustics called "Formulation 1B," proposed by Farassat, is used to compute the loading noise from an unsteady surface pressure distribution on a thin airfoil in the time domain. This formulation is a new solution of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation with the loading source term. The formulation contains a far field surface integral that depends on the time derivative and the surface gradient of the pressure on the airfoil, as well as a contour integral on the boundary of the airfoil surface. As a first test case, the new formulation is used to compute the noise radiated from a flat plate, moving through a sinusoidal gust of constant frequency. The unsteady surface pressure for this test case is analytically specied from a result based on linear airfoil theory. This test case is used to examine the velocity scaling properties of Formulation 1B and to demonstrate its equivalence to Formulation 1A of Farassat. The new acoustic formulation, again with an analytic surface pressure, is then used to predict broadband noise radiated from an airfoil immersed in homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. The results are compared with experimental data previously reported by Paterson and Amiet. Good agreement between predictions and measurements is obtained. Finally, an alternative form of Formulation 1B is described for statistical analysis of broadband noise.

  13. Predicting maximal aerobic speed through set distance time-trials.

    PubMed

    Bellenger, Clint R; Fuller, Joel T; Nelson, Maximillian J; Hartland, Micheal; Buckley, Jonathan D; Debenedictis, Thomas A

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of aerobic performance capacity allows for the optimisation of training programs in aerobically dominant sports. Maximal aerobic speed (MAS) is a measure of aerobic performance; however, the time and personnel demands of establishing MAS are considerable. This study aimed to determine whether time-trials (TT), which are shorter and less onerous than traditional MAS protocols, may be used to predict MAS. 28 Australian Rules football players completed a test of MAS, followed by TTs of six different distances in random order, each separated by at least 48 h. Half of the participants completed TT distances of 1200, 1600 and 2000 m, and the others completed distances of 1400, 1800 and 2200 m. Average speed for the 1200 and 1400 m TTs were greater than MAS (P < 0.01). Average speed for 1600, 1800, 2000 and 2200 m TTs were not different from MAS (P > 0.08). Average speed for all TT distances correlated with MAS (r = 0.69-0.84; P < 0.02), but there was a negative association between the difference in average TT speed and MAS with increasing TT distance (r = -0.79; P < 0.01). Average TT speed over the 2000 m distance exhibited the best agreement with MAS. MAS may be predicted from the average speed during a TT for any distance between 1200 and 2200 m, with 2000 m being optimal. Performance of a TT may provide a simple alternative to traditional MAS testing.

  14. Toward the Real-Time Tsunami Parameters Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentyev, Mikhail; Romanenko, Alexey; Marchuk, Andrey

    2013-04-01

    Today, a wide well-developed system of deep ocean tsunami detectors operates over the Pacific. Direct measurements of tsunami-wave time series are available. However, tsunami-warning systems fail to predict basic parameters of tsunami waves on time. Dozens examples could be provided. In our view, the lack of computational power is the main reason of these failures. At the same time, modern computer technologies such as, GPU (graphic processing unit) and FPGA (field programmable gates array), can dramatically improve data processing performance, which may enhance timely tsunami-warning prediction. Thus, it is possible to address the challenge of real-time tsunami forecasting for selected geo regions. We propose to use three new techniques in the existing tsunami warning systems to achieve real-time calculation of tsunami wave parameters. First of all, measurement system (DART buoys location, e.g.) should be optimized (both in terms of wave arriving time and amplitude parameter). The corresponding software application exists today and is ready for use [1]. We consider the example of the coastal line of Japan. Numerical tests show that optimal installation of only 4 DART buoys (accounting the existing sea bed cable) will reduce the tsunami wave detection time to only 10 min after an underwater earthquake. Secondly, as was shown by this paper authors, the use of GPU/FPGA technologies accelerates the execution of the MOST (method of splitting tsunami) code by 100 times [2]. Therefore, tsunami wave propagation over the ocean area 2000*2000 km (wave propagation simulation: time step 10 sec, recording each 4th spatial point and 4th time step) could be calculated at: 3 sec with 4' mesh 50 sec with 1' mesh 5 min with 0.5' mesh The algorithm to switch from coarse mesh to the fine grain one is also available. Finally, we propose the new algorithm for tsunami source parameters determination by real-time processing the time series, obtained at DART. It is possible to approximate

  15. Using timing of ice retreat to predict timing of fall freeze-up in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroeve, Julienne C.; Crawford, Alex D.; Stammerjohn, Sharon

    2016-06-01

    Reliable forecasts of the timing of sea ice advance are needed in order to reduce risks associated with operating in the Arctic as well as planning of human and environmental emergencies. This study investigates the use of a simple statistical model relating the timing of ice retreat to the timing of ice advance, taking advantage of the inherent predictive power supplied by the seasonal ice-albedo feedback and ocean heat uptake. Results show that using the last retreat date to predict the first advance date is applicable in some regions, such as Baffin Bay and the Laptev and East Siberian seas, where a predictive skill is found even after accounting for the long-term trend in both variables. Elsewhere, in the Arctic, there is some predictive skills depending on the year (e.g., Kara and Beaufort seas), but none in regions such as the Barents and Bering seas or the Sea of Okhotsk. While there is some suggestion that the relationship is strengthening over time, this may reflect that higher correlations are expected during periods when the underlying trend is strong.

  16. [Dialogues in psychology and nursing in a time of shifting paradigms].

    PubMed

    Corradi-Webster, Clarissa Mendonça; Carvalho, Ana Maria Pimenta

    2011-08-01

    Currently, we are experiencing a paradigm shift in relation to how we understand health and care. The biomedical model has been replaced by a vision of an integral being, and care emphasis is being placed on health promotion and disease prevention. However, the discourse of personal responsibility for health can generate in patients feelings of guilt, shame, fear and paranoia, while in professionals it can cause feelings of powerlessness and frustration. These feelings disrupt attachments and, thus, reduce the effectiveness of care. The objective of this theoretical study is to propose a dialogue between Psychology, with social constructionist sensitivity, and Nursing, to examine the possibilities of improving care from this approach. As an alternative to the discourse of personal responsibility, relational responsibility and understanding health and care in the long time, lived time and short time, is proposed.

  17. Time-Motion Analysis of Clinical Nursing Documentation During Implementation of an Electronic Operating Room Management System for Ophthalmic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Read-Brown, Sarah; Sanders, David S.; Brown, Anna S.; Yackel, Thomas R.; Choi, Dongseok; Tu, Daniel C.; Chiang, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Efficiency and quality of documentation are critical in surgical settings because operating rooms are a major source of revenue, and because adverse events may have enormous consequences. Electronic health records (EHRs) have potential to impact surgical volume, quality, and documentation time. Ophthalmology is an ideal domain to examine these issues because procedures are high-throughput and demand efficient documentation. This time-motion study examines nursing documentation during implementation of an EHR operating room management system in an ophthalmology department. Key findings are: (1) EHR nursing documentation time was significantly worse during early implementation, but improved to a level near but slightly worse than paper baseline, (2) Mean documentation time varied significantly among nurses during early implementation, and (3) There was no decrease in operating room turnover time or surgical volume after implementation. These findings have important implications for ambulatory surgery departments planning EHR implementation, and for research in system design. PMID:24551402

  18. Time-motion analysis of clinical nursing documentation during implementation of an electronic operating room management system for ophthalmic surgery.

    PubMed

    Read-Brown, Sarah; Sanders, David S; Brown, Anna S; Yackel, Thomas R; Choi, Dongseok; Tu, Daniel C; Chiang, Michael F

    2013-01-01

    Efficiency and quality of documentation are critical in surgical settings because operating rooms are a major source of revenue, and because adverse events may have enormous consequences. Electronic health records (EHRs) have potential to impact surgical volume, quality, and documentation time. Ophthalmology is an ideal domain to examine these issues because procedures are high-throughput and demand efficient documentation. This time-motion study examines nursing documentation during implementation of an EHR operating room management system in an ophthalmology department. Key findings are: (1) EHR nursing documentation time was significantly worse during early implementation, but improved to a level near but slightly worse than paper baseline, (2) Mean documentation time varied significantly among nurses during early implementation, and (3) There was no decrease in operating room turnover time or surgical volume after implementation. These findings have important implications for ambulatory surgery departments planning EHR implementation, and for research in system design.

  19. Construction and evaluation of FiND, a fall risk prediction model of inpatients from nursing data.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Shinichiroh; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    To construct and evaluate an easy-to-use fall risk prediction model based on the daily condition of inpatients from secondary use electronic medical record system data. The present authors scrutinized electronic medical record system data and created a dataset for analysis by including inpatient fall report data and Intensity of Nursing Care Needs data. The authors divided the analysis dataset into training data and testing data, then constructed the fall risk prediction model FiND from the training data, and tested the model using the testing data. The dataset for analysis contained 1,230,604 records from 46,241 patients. The sensitivity of the model constructed from the training data was 71.3% and the specificity was 66.0%. The verification result from the testing dataset was almost equivalent to the theoretical value. Although the model's accuracy did not surpass that of models developed in previous research, the authors believe FiND will be useful in medical institutions all over Japan because it is composed of few variables (only age, sex, and the Intensity of Nursing Care Needs items), and the accuracy for unknown data was clear. © 2016 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  20. Gut microbiota may predict host divergence time during Glires evolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan; Qu, Jiapeng; Li, Tongtong; Yao, Minjie; Li, Jiaying; Li, Xiangzhen

    2017-01-29

    The gut microbial communities of animals play key roles in host evolution. However, the possible relationship between gut microbiota and host divergence time remains unknown. Here, we investigated the gut microbiota of eight Glires species (four lagomorpha species and four rodent species) distributed throughout the Qinghai-Tibet plateau and Inner Mongolia grassland. Lagomorphs and rodents had distinct gut microbial compositions. Three out of four lagomorpha species were dominated by Firmicutes, while rodents were dominated by Bacteroidetes in general. The alpha diversity values (Shannon diversity and evenness) exhibited significant differences between any two species within lagomorphs, whereas there were no significant differences among rodents. The structure of the gut microbiota between lagomorphs and rodents showed significant differences. In addition, we calculated host phylogeny and divergence times, and used a phylogenetic approach to reconstruct how the animal gut microbiota has diverged from their ancestral species. Some core bacterial genera (e.g. Prevotella and Clostridium) shared by more than nine-tenths of all the Glires individuals associated with plant polysaccharide degradation showed marked changes within lagomorphs. Differences in Glires gut microbiota (based on weighted UniFrac and Bray-Curtis dissimilarity metrics) were positively correlated with host divergence time. Our results thus suggest the gut microbial composition is associated with host phylogeny, and further suggest that dissimilarity of animal gut microbiota may predict host divergence time.

  1. Nursing students' attitudes toward science in the nursing curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroo, Jill Deanne

    The nursing profession combines the art of caregiving with scientific concepts. Nursing students need to learn science in order to start in a nursing program. However, previous research showed that students left the nursing program, stating it included too much science (Andrew et al., 2008). Research has shown a correlation between students' attitudes and their performance in a subject (Osborne, Simon, & Collins, 2003). However, little research exists on the overall attitude of nursing students toward science. At the time of my study there existed no large scale quantitative study on my topic. The purpose of my study was to identify potential obstacles nursing students face, specifically, attitude and motivation toward learning science. According to research the nation will soon face a nursing shortage and students cite the science content as a reason for not completing the nursing program. My study explored nursing students' attitudes toward science and reasons these students are motivated to learn science. I ran a nationwide mixed methods approach with 1,402 participants for the quantitative portion and 4 participants for the qualitative portion. I validated a questionnaire in order to explore nursing students' attitudes toward science, discovered five different attitude scales in that questionnaire and determined what demographic factors provided a statistically significant prediction of a student's score. In addition, I discovered no statistical difference in attitude exists between students who have the option of taking nursing specific courses and those who do not have that option. I discovered in the qualitative interviews that students feel science is necessary in nursing but do not feel nurses are scientists. My study gives a baseline of the current attitude of nursing students toward science and why these students feel the need to learn the science.

  2. Integrated Cox's model for predicting survival time of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Ai, Zhibing; Li, Longti; Fu, Rui; Lu, Jing-Min; He, Jing-Dong; Li, Sen

    2017-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common primary brain tumor and is highly lethal. This study aims to figure out signatures for predicting the survival time of patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Clinical information, messenger RNA expression, microRNA expression, and single-nucleotide polymorphism array data of patients with glioblastoma multiforme were retrieved from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Patients were separated into two groups by using 1 year as a cutoff, and a logistic regression model was used to figure out any variables that can predict whether the patient was able to live longer than 1 year. Furthermore, Cox's model was used to find out features that were correlated with the survival time. Finally, a Cox model integrated the significant clinical variables, messenger RNA expression, microRNA expression, and single-nucleotide polymorphism was built. Although the classification method failed, signatures of clinical features, messenger RNA expression levels, and microRNA expression levels were figured out by using Cox's model. However, no single-nucleotide polymorphisms related to prognosis were found. The selected clinical features were age at initial diagnosis, Karnofsky score, and race, all of which had been suggested to correlate with survival time. Both of the two significant microRNAs, microRNA-221 and microRNA-222, were targeted to p27(Kip1) protein, which implied the important role of p27(Kip1) on the prognosis of glioblastoma multiforme patients. Our results suggested that survival modeling was more suitable than classification to figure out prognostic biomarkers for patients with glioblastoma multiforme. An integrated model containing clinical features, messenger RNA levels, and microRNA expression levels was built, which has the potential to be used in clinics and thus to improve the survival status of glioblastoma multiforme patients.

  3. Predicting race time in male amateur marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Salinero, Juan J; Soriano, María L; Lara, Beatriz; Gallo-Salazar, César; Areces, Francisco; Ruiz-Vicente, Diana; Abián-Vicén, Javier; González-Millán, Cristina; Del Coso, Juan

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the relationship between anthropometry, training characteristics, muscular strength and effort-related cardiovascular response and marathon race time in male amateur runners. A total of 84 male amateur marathon runners aged between 23 and 70 years took part in this study (41.0±9.5 years). All of them competed in the 2013 edition of the Madrid Marathon with a finish time between 169.8 and 316 minutes (226.0±28.5 minutes). Age, running experience, number of marathon races finished, mean kilometers run weekly in the last three months, and previous personal best time in the 10 km, half marathon and marathon were recorded. Moreover, anthropometric characteristics, and the results from the Ruffier Test and a whole-body isometric force test were measured. After the marathon, the race time was registered. Training volume (r=-0.479; P=0.001), previous running milestones (marathon r=0.756; half-marathon r=0.812; 10-km r=0.732; P<0.001), cardiovascular fitness (r=0.371; P=0.001) and anthropometric variables (body mass, Body Mass Index, body fat percentage, skinfolds and lower leg volume) were correlated to marathon performance (P<0.05). Two regression models appeared from the data with r2>0.50. The best, including body fat percentage, heart rate change during the recovery after the Ruffier Test and the half-marathon race time, was strongly correlated with real marathon performance (r=0.77; P<0.001). A second regression model was proposed replacing the half-marathon performance with the 10-km race time, reducing the correlation to 0.73 (P<0.001). Marathon performance could be partially predicted by two different equations, including body fat percentage, recovery heart rate in the Ruffier Test and a half-marathon or 10-km performance.

  4. Real-time prediction of cell division timing in developing zebrafish embryo.

    PubMed

    Kozawa, Satoshi; Akanuma, Takashi; Sato, Tetsuo; Sato, Yasuomi D; Ikeda, Kazushi; Sato, Thomas N

    2016-09-06

    Combination of live-imaging and live-manipulation of developing embryos in vivo provides a useful tool to study developmental processes. Identification and selection of target cells for an in vivo live-manipulation are generally performed by experience- and knowledge-based decision-making of the observer. Computer-assisted live-prediction method would be an additional approach to facilitate the identification and selection of the appropriate target cells. Herein we report such a method using developing zebrafish embryos. We choose V2 neural progenitor cells in developing zebrafish embryo as their successive shape changes can be visualized in real-time in vivo. We developed a relatively simple mathematical method of describing cellular geometry of V2 cells to predict cell division-timing based on their successively changing shapes in vivo. Using quantitatively measured 4D live-imaging data, features of V2 cell-shape at each time point prior to division were extracted and a statistical model capturing the successive changes of the V2 cell-shape was developed. By applying sequential Bayesian inference method to the model, we successfully predicted division-timing of randomly selected individual V2 cells while the cell behavior was being live-imaged. This system could assist pre-selecting target cells desirable for real-time manipulation-thus, presenting a new opportunity for in vivo experimental systems.

  5. Real-time prediction of cell division timing in developing zebrafish embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozawa, Satoshi; Akanuma, Takashi; Sato, Tetsuo; Sato, Yasuomi D.; Ikeda, Kazushi; Sato, Thomas N.

    2016-09-01

    Combination of live-imaging and live-manipulation of developing embryos in vivo provides a useful tool to study developmental processes. Identification and selection of target cells for an in vivo live-manipulation are generally performed by experience- and knowledge-based decision-making of the observer. Computer-assisted live-prediction method would be an additional approach to facilitate the identification and selection of the appropriate target cells. Herein we report such a method using developing zebrafish embryos. We choose V2 neural progenitor cells in developing zebrafish embryo as their successive shape changes can be visualized in real-time in vivo. We developed a relatively simple mathematical method of describing cellular geometry of V2 cells to predict cell division-timing based on their successively changing shapes in vivo. Using quantitatively measured 4D live-imaging data, features of V2 cell-shape at each time point prior to division were extracted and a statistical model capturing the successive changes of the V2 cell-shape was developed. By applying sequential Bayesian inference method to the model, we successfully predicted division-timing of randomly selected individual V2 cells while the cell behavior was being live-imaged. This system could assist pre-selecting target cells desirable for real-time manipulation–thus, presenting a new opportunity for in vivo experimental systems.

  6. Real-time prediction of cell division timing in developing zebrafish embryo

    PubMed Central

    Kozawa, Satoshi; Akanuma, Takashi; Sato, Tetsuo; Sato, Yasuomi D.; Ikeda, Kazushi; Sato, Thomas N.

    2016-01-01

    Combination of live-imaging and live-manipulation of developing embryos in vivo provides a useful tool to study developmental processes. Identification and selection of target cells for an in vivo live-manipulation are generally performed by experience- and knowledge-based decision-making of the observer. Computer-assisted live-prediction method would be an additional approach to facilitate the identification and selection of the appropriate target cells. Herein we report such a method using developing zebrafish embryos. We choose V2 neural progenitor cells in developing zebrafish embryo as their successive shape changes can be visualized in real-time in vivo. We developed a relatively simple mathematical method of describing cellular geometry of V2 cells to predict cell division-timing based on their successively changing shapes in vivo. Using quantitatively measured 4D live-imaging data, features of V2 cell-shape at each time point prior to division were extracted and a statistical model capturing the successive changes of the V2 cell-shape was developed. By applying sequential Bayesian inference method to the model, we successfully predicted division-timing of randomly selected individual V2 cells while the cell behavior was being live-imaged. This system could assist pre-selecting target cells desirable for real-time manipulation–thus, presenting a new opportunity for in vivo experimental systems. PMID:27597656

  7. Changing Times: A Survey of Registered Nurses in 1998. IES Report 351.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, G.; Seccombe, I.

    A national survey of registered nurses and analysis of official statistics provided an overview of the dimensions and dynamics of the labor market for nurses in the United Kingdom. Findings indicated the following: enrollment in preregistration nurse training courses decreased by 27 percent over the 1990s; initial entries to the UK Central Council…

  8. Predictability and prediction of tropical cyclones on daily to interannual time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belanger, James Ian

    The spatial and temporal complexity of tropical cyclones (TCs) raises a number of scientific questions regarding their genesis, movement, intensification, and variability. In this dissertation, the principal goal is to determine the current state of predictability for each of these processes using global numerical prediction systems. The predictability findings are then used in conjunction with several new statistical calibration techniques to develop a proof-of-concept, operational forecast system for North Atlantic TCs on daily to intraseasonal time scales. To quantify the current extent of tropical cyclone predictability, we assess probabilistic forecasts from the most advanced global numerical weather prediction system to date, the ECMWF Variable Resolution Ensemble Prediction System (VarEPS; Hamill et al. 2008, Hagedorn et al. 2012). Using a new false alarm clustering technique to maximize the utility of the VarEPS, the ensemble system is shown to provide well-calibrated probabilistic forecasts for TC genesis through a lead-time of one week and pregenesis track forecasts with similar skill compared to the VarEPS's postgenesis track forecasts. These findings provide evidence that skillful real-time TC genesis predictions may be made in the North Indian Ocean—a region that even today has limited forecast warning windows for TCs relative to other ocean basins. To quantify the predictability of TCs on intraseasonal time scales, forecasts from the ECMWF Monthly Forecast System (ECMFS) are examined for the North Atlantic Ocean. From this assessment, dynamically based forecasts from the ECMFS provide forecast skill exceeding climatology out to weeks three and four for portions of the southern Gulf of Mexico, western Caribbean and the Main Development Region. Forecast skill in these regions is traced to the model's ability to capture correctly the variability in deep-layer vertical wind shear as well as the relative frequency of easterly waves moving through these

  9. Variability and predictability of finals times of elite rowers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tiaki Brett; Hopkins, Will G

    2011-11-01

    Little is known about the competitive performance characteristics of elite rowers. We report here analyses of performance times for finalists in world-class regattas from 1999 to 2009. The data were official race times for the 10 men's and 7 women's single and crewed boat classes, each with ∼ 200-300 different boats competing in 1-33 of the 46 regattas at 18 venues. A linear mixed model of race times for each boat class provided estimates of variability as coefficients of variation after adjustment for means of calendar year, level of competition (Olympics, world championship, World Cup), venue, and level of final (A, B, C, …). Mean performance was substantially slower between consecutive levels of competition (1.5%, 2.7%) and consecutive levels of finals (∼ 1%-2%). Differences in the effects of venue and of environmental conditions, estimated as variability in mean race time between venues and finals, were extremely large (∼ 3.0%). Within-boat race-to-race variability for A finalists was 1.1% for single sculls and 0.9% for crewed boats, with little difference between men and women and only a small increase in lower-level finalists. Predictability of performance, expressed as intraclass correlation coefficients, showed considerable differences between boat classes, but the mean was high (∼ 0.63), with little difference between crewed and single boats, between men and women, and between within and between years. The race-to-race variability of boat times of ∼ 1.0% is similar to that in comparable endurance sports performed against water or air resistance. Estimates of the smallest important performance enhancement (∼ 0.3%) and the effects of level of competition, level of final, venue, environment, and boat class will help inform investigations of factors affecting elite competitive rowing performance.

  10. A simple approach for predicting time-optimal slew capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeffery T.; Karpenko, Mark

    2016-03-01

    The productivity of space-based imaging satellite sensors to collect images is directly related to the agility of the spacecraft. Increasing the satellite agility, without changing the attitude control hardware, can be accomplished by using optimal control to design shortest-time maneuvers. The performance improvement that can be obtained using optimal control is tied to the specific configuration of the satellite, e.g. mass properties and reaction wheel array geometry. Therefore, it is generally difficult to predict performance without an extensive simulation study. This paper presents a simple idea for estimating the agility enhancement that can be obtained using optimal control without the need to solve any optimal control problems. The approach is based on the concept of the agility envelope, which expresses the capability of a spacecraft in terms of a three-dimensional agility volume. Validation of this new approach is conducted using both simulation and on-orbit data.

  11. Predictability and Prediction of Tropical Cyclones on Daily to Interannual Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belanger, J. I.

    2012-12-01

    The spatial and temporal complexity of tropical cyclones (TCs) raises a number of scientific questions regarding their genesis, movement, intensification, and variability. In this presentation, we review the current state of predictability for each of these processes by evaluating probabilistic forecasts from the most advanced global numerical weather prediction system to date, the ECMWF Variable Resolution Ensemble Prediction System (VarEPS). Using a new false alarm clustering technique to maximize the utility of the VarEPS, the ensemble system is shown to provide well-calibrated probabilistic forecasts for TC genesis through a lead-time of one week, and pregenesis track forecasts with similar skill compared to the VarEPS's postgenesis track forecasts. To quantify the predictability of TCs on intraseasonal time scales, forecasts from the ECMWF Monthly Forecast System (ECMFS) are examined for the North Atlantic Ocean. From this assessment, dynamically based forecasts from the ECMFS provide forecast skill exceeding climatology out to weeks three and four for portions of the southern Gulf of Mexico, western Caribbean and the Main Development Region. Forecast skill in these regions is traced to the model's ability to capture correctly the variability in deep-layer vertical wind shear, the relative frequency of easterly waves moving through these regions, and the intraseasonal modulation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation. On interannual time scales, the predictability of TCs is examined by considering their relationship with tropical Atlantic easterly waves. First, a set of easterly wave climatologies for the CFS-R, ERA-Interim, ERA-40, and NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis are developed using a new easterly wave-tracking algorithm. From the reanalysis-derived climatologies, a moderately positive and statistically significant relationship is seen with tropical Atlantic TCs. In relation to large-scale climate modes, the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and Atlantic Meridional

  12. Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Kader

    2007-01-01

    A semi-empirical theoretical model and a C++ computer program that implements the model have been developed for use in predicting the noise generated by a rocket or jet engine. The computer program, entitled the Realtime Rocket and Jet Engine Noise Analysis and Prediction Software, is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for real-time prediction and measurement of noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. [The other main subsystem, consisting largely of acoustic instrumentation and electronic hardware, is described in Wireless Acoustic Measurement System, which appears elsewhere in this section.] The theoretical model was derived from the fundamental laws of fluid mechanics, as first was done by M. J. Lighthill in his now famous theory of aerodynamically generated sound. The far-field approximation of the Lighthill theory is incorporated into this model. Many other contributions from various researchers have also been introduced into the model. The model accounts for two noise components: shear noise and self noise. The final result of the model is expressed in terms of a volume integral of the acoustic intensities attributable to these two components, subject to various directivity coefficients. The computer program was written to solve the volume integral. The inputs required by the program are two data files from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the flow of interest: the computational-grid file and the solution file. The CFD solution should be one that has been obtained for conditions that closely approximate those of an experimental test that is yet to be performed. In the current state of development of the model and software, it is recommended that the observation points lie along a radius at an angle >60 from the jet axis. The software provides, and is driven via, a graphical user interface

  13. Predicting Lawsuits against Nursing Homes in the United States, 1997–2001

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Christopher E; Dobalian, Aram; Burkhard, Janet; Hedgecock, Deborah K; Harman, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Objectives To examine how nursing home characteristics impacted the number of lawsuits filed against the facilities in the United States during 1997–2001. Data Sources/Study Setting A stratified random sample of 2,378 nursing home in 45 states from 1997–2001. Data were obtained from Westlaw's Adverse Filings: Lawsuits database, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' (CMS) Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting (OSCAR) database, state complaint surveys, and through primary data. Study Design Negative binomial regression was used to explain total lawsuit variance by year. Explanatory variables included (a) facility characteristics—including staffing, number of beds, multistate system membership, for-profit ownership, (b) quality indicators—including total number and type of quality survey deficiencies, pressure sore development, and (c) market area—state has resident rights statutes, state complaint information. Resident acuity levels and year effects were controlled for. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Nursing homes were identified and linked to Westlaw data that was searched for the number of lawsuits filed against the home, and then linked to OSCAR data and a primary data analysis of multistate chain membership. Principal Findings Staffing levels for certified nursing assistants (CNAs) and registered nurses (RNs) and multistate chain membership were negatively related with higher numbers of lawsuits. More deficiencies on the licensing survey, larger, for-profit nursing homes, and being located in resident rights states were positively related with higher numbers of lawsuits. Conclusion This study suggests that nursing homes that meet long-stay staffing standards and minimum quality indicators, are nonprofit, smaller, and not located in resident rights states will experience fewer lawsuits. PMID:15533183

  14. A real time monitoring system of ringer's solution residual amount for automatic nursing in hopsitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jong-Won; Ha, Kwan-Yong; Nam, Chul; Ayurzana, Odgelral; Kim, Hie-Sik

    2005-12-01

    A real-time embedded system was developed for remote monitoring and checking the residual quantity and changing of Ringer's solution. It is monitored nurses' room. A Load Cell was applied as a sensor to check the residual quantity of Ringer's solution. This Load Cell detects the physical changes of Ringer's solution and transfers electronic signal to the amplifier. Amplified analog signal is converted into digital signal by A/D converter. Developed Embedded system, which computes these data with microprocess (8052) then makes it possible to monitor the residual quantity of Ringer's solution real-time on a server computer. A Checking system on Residual Quantity of Ringer's Solution Using Load cell cut costs using a simple design for a circuit.

  15. Attrition of full-time faculty from schools of nursing with baccalaureate and graduate programs, 2010 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Fang, Di; Bednash, Geraldine D

    2014-01-01

    The shortage of qualified faculty has been consistently reported as a major barrier impeding acceptance of all qualified applicants into nursing programs. In addition to faculty recruitment, the attrition of faculty is also a concern for schools of nursing. In this study, we found that nationally 11.8% of full-time faculty who worked in 2010 left their full-time jobs by 2011. Nearly half of total attrition, or 5.7% of full-time faculty members, were related to leaving for nonacademic nursing positions, whereas another 20% of attrition, or 2.4% of full-time faculty, resulted from retirement. Nearly 20% of faculty egressions, or 2.2% of full-time faculty, was due to leaving for nursing administrative positions or full-time faculty positions in an academic setting. Leaving for part-time faculty positions made up slightly more than 10% of faculty attrition or 1.3% of full-time faculty. Our bivariate analysis identifies distinctive academic and demographic profiles of faculty who left full-time positions for different reasons, and our multivariate analysis further shows that different individual and institutional attributes are significantly associated with different types of attrition.

  16. Obtaining a Foundation for Nursing Care at the Time of Patient Admission: A Grounded Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Inger; Pilhammar, Ewa; Forsberg, Anna

    2009-01-01

    The nursing process can be viewed as a problem-solving model, but we do not know whether use of the whole process including care plans with interventions based on nursing diagnoses improves nurses’ ability to carry out assessments. Therefore, the aim of this study was to illuminate and describe the assessment and decision-making process performed by nurses who formulated individual care plans including nursing diagnosis, goals and interventions or who used standardized care plans when a patient was admitted to their ward for care, and those who did not. Data collection and analysis were carried out by means of Grounded theory. Nurses were observed while assessing patients, after which they were interviewed. The main concern of all nurses was to obtain a foundation for nursing care based on four strategies; building pre-understanding, creating a caring environment, collecting information on symptoms and signs and performing an analysis from different perspectives. It appeared that the most important aspect for nurses who did not employ care plans was the medical reason for the patient’s admission. The nurses who employed care plans discussed their decisions in terms of nursing problems, needs and risks. The results indicate that nurses who formulated care plans were more aware of their professional role. PMID:19746207

  17. Time Granularity Transformation of Time Series Data for Failure Prediction of Overhead Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yan; Zhu, Wenbing; Yao, Jinxia; Gu, Chao; Bai, Demeng; Wang, Kun

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we give an approach of transforming time series data with different time granularities into the same plane, which is the basis of further association analysis. We focus on the application of overhead line tripping. First all the relative state variables with line tripping are collected into our big data platform. We collect line account, line fault, lightning, power load and meteorological data. Second we respectively pre-process the five kinds of data to guarantee the integrality of data and simplicity of analysis. We use a representation way combining the aggregated representation and trend extraction methods, which considers both short term variation and long term trend of time sequence. Last we use extensive experiments to demonstrate that the proposed time granularity transformation approach not only lets multiple variables analysed on the same plane, but also has a high prediction accuracy and low running time no matter for SVM or logistic regression algorithm.

  18. Quantitative research on critical thinking and predicting nursing students' NCLEX-RN performance.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Elizabeth M

    2010-07-01

    The concept of critical thinking has been influential in several disciplines. Both education and nursing in general have been attempting to define, teach, and measure this concept for decades. Nurse educators realize that critical thinking is the cornerstone of the objectives and goals for nursing students. The purpose of this article is to review and analyze quantitative research findings relevant to the measurement of critical thinking abilities and skills in undergraduate nursing students and the usefulness of critical thinking as a predictor of National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN) performance. The specific issues that this integrative review examined include assessment and analysis of the theoretical and operational definitions of critical thinking, theoretical frameworks used to guide the studies, instruments used to evaluate critical thinking skills and abilities, and the role of critical thinking as a predictor of NCLEX-RN outcomes. A list of key assumptions related to critical thinking was formulated. The limitations and gaps in the literature were identified, as well as the types of future research needed in this arena.

  19. Evaluation of Time Management Behaviors and Its Related Factors in the Senior Nurse Managers, Kermanshah-Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ziapour, Arash; Khatony, Alireza; Jafari, Faranak; Kianipour, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Time management is an extensive concept that is associated with promoting the performance of managers. The present study was carried out to investigate the time management behaviors along with its related factors among senior nurse mangers. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study, 180 senior nurse managers were selected using census method. The instrument for data collection was a standard time behavior questionnaire. Data were analyzed by descriptive and analytical statistics. Results: The findings showed that among the dimensions of time management behaviors, setting objectives and prioritization, and mechanics of time management dimensions obtained the highest and lowest frequency, respectively. Comparison of the mean scores of time management behaviors indicated a significant difference in the gender (p<0.05), age (p<0.001), education (p=0.015), job experience (p<0.001), managerial experience (p<0.001) and management rank management (p<0.029). Conclusion: On the whole, senior nurse managers enjoyed a favorable time management skill. Given the importance of time management behaviors, it seems that teaching these behaviors more seriously through regular educational programs can effectively promote the performance of senior nurse managers. PMID:25716413

  20. Bayesian profiling of molecular signatures to predict event times

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dabao; Zhang, Min

    2007-01-01

    Background It is of particular interest to identify cancer-specific molecular signatures for early diagnosis, monitoring effects of treatment and predicting patient survival time. Molecular information about patients is usually generated from high throughput technologies such as microarray and mass spectrometry. Statistically, we are challenged by the large number of candidates but only a small number of patients in the study, and the right-censored clinical data further complicate the analysis. Results We present a two-stage procedure to profile molecular signatures for survival outcomes. Firstly, we group closely-related molecular features into linkage clusters, each portraying either similar or opposite functions and playing similar roles in prognosis; secondly, a Bayesian approach is developed to rank the centroids of these linkage clusters and provide a list of the main molecular features closely related to the outcome of interest. A simulation study showed the superior performance of our approach. When it was applied to data on diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), we were able to identify some new candidate signatures for disease prognosis. Conclusion This multivariate approach provides researchers with a more reliable list of molecular features profiled in terms of their prognostic relationship to the event times, and generates dependable information for subsequent identification of prognostic molecular signatures through either biological procedures or further data analysis. PMID:17239251

  1. The Ontario nursing workload demonstration projects: rethinking how we measure, cost and plan the work of nurses.

    PubMed

    Ferguson-Paré, Mary; Bandurchin, Annabelle

    2010-05-01

    In 2008 the Nursing Secretariat of Ontario's Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care formed a Nursing Workload Steering Committee to oversee the implementation of three demonstration projects with the objectives: to assess the feasibility of Health Outcomes for Better Information and Care (HOBIC) data as a measure of nursing workload, determine the indicators that best support nurse leaders to measure nursing work and make informed staffing decisions, and develop a model that predicts acute care nursing costs. Three HOBIC scales--activities of daily living (ADLs), continence and fatigue--explained a small amount of the variance in nurse judgment of the amount of nursing time patients require in the first 24 hours of care. Nurses in the study appreciated providing their professional judgment to help estimate the nursing work requirements of patients. The priority and secondary indicators most important for decision-making included medical severity of patients, environmental complexity, nurse experience, patient turnover, nurse-to-patient ratio, cognitive status, infection control, nurse vacancy, predictability of patient types, nursing interventions, patient volumes, co-morbidities, patient self-care abilities, physical and psychosocial functioning, unit type and medical diagnosis. A fairly robust model was developed using existing data sources to estimate nursing input into a patient's costs. The model explained between 69% and 80% of the variation in nursing costs for each patient. In order to effectively measure, plan and cost nursing, we need to determine what nursing is. In the future, recognition of nurses as knowledge workers will require us to consider the many patient and environmental factors that affect the ability of nurses to apply their professional judgment to care for patients.

  2. Predicting armed conflict: Time to adjust our expectations?

    PubMed

    Cederman, Lars-Erik; Weidmann, Nils B

    2017-02-03

    This Essay provides an introduction to the general challenges of predicting political violence, particularly compared with predicting other types of events (such as earthquakes). What is possible? What is less realistic? We aim to debunk myths about predicting violence, as well as to illustrate the substantial progress in this field. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Prediction of Shock Arrival Times from CME and Flare Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunez, Marlon; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Pulkkinen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the Shock ARrival Model (SARM) for predicting shock arrival times for distances from 0.72 AU to 8.7 AU by using coronal mass ejections (CME) and flare data. SARM is an aerodynamic drag model described by a differential equation that has been calibrated with a dataset of 120 shocks observed from 1997 to 2010 by minimizing the mean absolute error (MAE), normalized to 1 AU. SARM should be used with CME data (radial, earthward or plane-of-sky speeds), and flare data (peak flux, duration, and location). In the case of 1 AU, the MAE and the median of absolute errors were 7.0 h and 5.0 h respectively, using the available CMEflare data. The best results for 1 AU (an MAE of 5.8 h) were obtained using both CME data, either radial or cone-model-estimated speeds, and flare data. For the prediction of shock arrivals at distances from 0.72 AU to 8.7 AU, the normalized MAE and the median were 7.1 h and 5.1 h respectively, using the available CMEflare data. SARM was also calibrated to be used with CME data alone or flare data alone, obtaining normalized MAE errors of 8.9 h and 8.6 h respectively for all shock events. The model verification was carried out with an additional dataset of 20 shocks observed from 2010 to 2012 with radial CME speeds to compare SARM with the empirical ESA model [Gopalswamy et al., 2005a] and the numerical MHD-based ENLIL model [Odstrcil et al., 2004]. The results show that the ENLIL's MAE was lower than the SARM's MAE, which was lower than the ESA's MAE. The SARM's best results were obtained when both flare and true CME speeds were used.

  4. Prediction of shock arrival times from CME and flare data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, Marlon; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Pulkkinen, Antti

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the Shock Arrival Model (SARM) for predicting shock arrival times for distances from 0.72 AU to 8.7 AU by using coronal mass ejections (CME) and flare data. SARM is an aerodynamic drag model described by a differential equation that has been calibrated with a data set of 120 shocks observed from 1997 to 2010 by minimizing the mean absolute error (MAE), normalized to 1 AU. SARM should be used with CME data (radial, earthward, or plane-of-sky speeds) and flare data (peak flux, duration, and location). In the case of 1 AU, the MAE and the median of absolute errors were 7.0 h and 5.0 h, respectively, using the available CME/flare data. The best results for 1 AU (an MAE of 5.8 h) were obtained using both CME data, either radial or cone model-estimated speeds, and flare data. For the prediction of shock arrivals at distances from 0.72 AU to 8.7 AU, the normalized MAE and the median were 7.1 h and 5.1 h, respectively, using the available CME/flare data. SARM was also calibrated to be used with CME data alone or flare data alone, obtaining normalized MAE errors of 8.9 h and 8.6 h, respectively, for all shock events. The model verification was carried out with an additional data set of 20 shocks observed from 2010 to 2012 with radial CME speeds to compare SARM with the empirical ESA model and the numerical MHD-based ENLIL model. The results show that the ENLIL's MAE was lower than the SARM's MAE, which was lower than the ESA's MAE. The SARM's best results were obtained when both flare and true CME speeds were used.

  5. St. Gallen endocrine response classes predict recurrence rates over time.

    PubMed

    Koornstra, R H T; Beelen, K J; Vincent, A D; van der Noort, V; van Diest, P J; Linn, S C

    2015-12-01

    In 2007 the St. Gallen consensus panel defined three endocrine response classes: highly endocrine responsive (ER-H), incomplete endocrine responsive (ER-I) and non-endocrine responsive tumours (ER-N). However, it is uncertain whether ER-I tumours are less responsive than ER-H tumours. We investigated whether recurrence rates vary over time between response classes. Additionally, we investigated the most predictive response class definition for tamoxifen benefit. We recollected tumours from 646 patients who participated in a randomized trial of adjuvant tamoxifen vs. Estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), HER2 status and tumour grade were revised centrally. St. Gallen classes were evaluated for recurrence free interval (RFI). Change in hazards over time was assessed. Subsequently, 6 alternative response class definitions were compared to optimize the cut-off for PgR and ER. Schoenfeld residuals indicate a failure of proportional hazards between the endocrine response groups (p = 0.0001). The HR for recurrence risk shifted over time with the ER-H group initially being at lower risk (HR ER-H vs. ER-I 0.5), but after six years the recurrence risk increased (HR 1.9). The cut-off values for ER and PgR that statistically best discriminated RFI in the first 4 years for lymph node positive patients were ER ≥ 50% and PgR ≥ 75%. We demonstrated a marked variability in endocrine therapy benefit. Patients with ER-H tumours have a larger benefit during adjuvant tamoxifen and in the first years after accomplishing of the therapy, but suffer from late recurrences. This might have implications for optimal treatment duration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Food pattern analysis over time: unhealthful eating trajectories predict obesity.

    PubMed

    Pachucki, M A

    2012-05-01

    Analysis of dietary patterns is prominent in nutrition literatures, yet few studies have taken advantage of multiple repeated measurements to understand the nature of individual-level changes over time in food choice, or the relation between these changes and body mass index (BMI). To investigate changes in eating patterns at the individual level across three exam periods, and to prospectively examine the relation of eating trajectories to BMI at the cohort level. The study included 3418 participants at baseline. Clinically measured BMI and dietary intake were assessed during three exam periods between 1991 and 2001 using a validated food frequency questionnaire. An individual's eating trajectory across exam periods was analyzed using sequence analysis, and then used to estimate outcomes of continuous BMI and categorical obesity status. Ordinary least squares regression models with robust standard errors were adjusted for socio-economic and demographic confounders, baseline BMI and baseline eating. A total of 66.2% (n=1614) of participants change their diet pattern during the study period, 33.8% (n=823) remain stable. After accounting for potential confounders, an unhealthful trajectory is significantly associated with a 0.42 kg m(-2) increase in BMI (confidence interval (CI): 0.1, 0.7). Those with an unhealthful trajectory are 1.79 times more likely to be overweight (relative risk ratio, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.8) and 2.4 times more likely to be obese (relative risk ratio, 95% CI: 1.3, 4.4). Moreover, a number of specific diet transitions between exams are predictive of weight gain or loss. Contextualizing an individual's current eating behaviors with an eye towards diet history may be an important boon in the reduction of obesity. Although it may not be realistic for many people to shift from the least to most healthful diet, results from this study suggest that consistent movement in an overall healthier direction is associated with less weight gain.

  7. Predicting nurses' turnover intentions by demographic characteristics, perception of health, quality of work attitudes.

    PubMed

    Al-Hussami, Mahmoud; Darawad, Muhammad; Saleh, Ali; Hayajneh, Ferial Ahmed

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of demographic variables, organizational commitment levels, perception of health and quality of work on turnover intentions. A self-reported cross-sectional survey design was used to collect data from Jordanian registered nurses who were working between June 2011 and November 2011. The findings showed strong effects of the quality of work, perception of health and normative organizational commitments on turnover intentions. This study sheds the light on the important work outcomes in health-care organizations. Increasing nursing quality of work and normative organizational commitment are good strategies for reducing turnover intentions. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Qualitative real-time analysis by nurses of sublingual microcirculation in intensive care unit: the MICRONURSE study.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Sébastien; Harrois, Anatole; Nicolaï, Camille; Flores, Mélanie; Hamada, Sophie; Vicaut, Eric; Duranteau, Jacques

    2015-11-06

    We aimed to determine i) the feasibility of nurses taking bedside measurements of microcirculatory parameters in real time in intensive care patients; and ii) whether such measurements would be comparable to those obtained by the classical delayed semi quantitative analysis made by a physician. This prospective observational study was conducted in a university hospital and was approved by our local Institutional Review Board (IRB 00006477). After ICU admission and study inclusion, a set of measurements of macrocirculatory and microcirculatory parameters was taken by the nurse in charge of the patient every 4 h within the first 12 h after admission and before and after every hemodynamic therapeutic intervention. Seventy-four sublingual microvascular measurements were performed with incident dark field illumination (IDF) microscopy in 20 mechanically ventilated patients hospitalized in the ICU. There were no significant differences between the microvascular flow index (MFI) taken in real time by the nurses and the delayed evaluation by the physician. In fact, the nurses' real-time measurement of MFI demonstrated good agreement with the physician's delayed measurement. The mean difference between the two MFIs was -0.15, SD = 0.28. The nurses' real-time MFI assessment showed 97 % sensitivity (95 % CI: 84-99 %) and 95 % specificity (95 % CI: 84-99 %) at detecting a MFI <2.5 obtained by a physician upon delayed semiquantitative measurement. Concerning the density, 81 % of the paramedical qualitative density measurements corresponded with the automatized total vessel density (TVD) measurements. The nurses' real-time TVD assessment showed 77 % sensitivity (95 % CI: 46-95 %) and 100 % specificity (95 % CI: 89-100 %) at detecting a TVD <8 mm/mm(2). A real-time qualitative bedside evaluation of MFI by nurses showed good agreement with the conventional delayed analysis by physicians. The bedside evaluations of MFI and TVD were highly sensitive and specific for detecting

  9. Comparing response time, errors, and satisfaction between text-based and graphical user interfaces during nursing order tasks.

    PubMed

    Staggers, N; Kobus, D

    2000-01-01

    Despite the general adoption of graphical users interfaces (GUIs) in health care, few empirical data document the impact of this move on system users. This study compares two distinctly different user interfaces, a legacy text-based interface and a prototype graphical interface, for differences in nurses' response time (RT), errors, and satisfaction when the interfaces are used in the performance of computerized nursing order tasks. In a medical center on the East Coast of the United States, 98 randomly selected male and female nurses completed 40 tasks using each interface. Nurses completed four different types of order tasks (create, activate, modify, and discontinue). Using a repeated-measures and Latin square design, the study was counterbalanced for tasks, interface types, and blocks of trials. Overall, nurses had significantly faster response times (P < 0.0001) and fewer errors (P < 0.0001) using the prototype GUI than the text-based interface. The GUI was also rated significantly higher for satisfaction than the text system, and the GUI was faster to leam (P < 0.0001). Therefore, the results indicated that the use of a prototype GUI for nursing orders significantly enhances user performance and satisfaction. Consideration should be given to redesigning older user interfaces to create more modern ones by using human factors principles and input from user-centered focus groups. Future work should examine prospective nursing interfaces for highly complex interactions in computer-based patient records, detail the severity of errors made on line, and explore designs to optimize interactions in life-critical systems.

  10. The technology acceptance model: predicting nurses' intention to use telemedicine technology (eICU).

    PubMed

    Kowitlawakul, Yanika

    2011-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine factors and predictors that influence nurses' intention to use the eICU technology, to examine the applicability of the Technology Acceptance Model in explaining nurses' intention to use the eICU technology in healthcare settings, and to provide psychometric evidence of the measurement scales used in the study. The study involved 117 participants from two healthcare systems. The Telemedicine Technology Acceptance Model was developed based on the original Technology Acceptance Model that was initially developed by Fred Davis in 1986. The eICU Acceptance Survey was used as an instrument for the study. Content validity was examined, and the reliability of the instrument was tested. The results show that perceived usefulness is the most influential factor that influences nurses' intention to use the eICU technology. The principal factors that influence perceived usefulness are perceived ease of use, support from physicians, and years working in the hospital. The model fit was reasonably adequate and able to explain 58% of the variance (R = 0.58) in intention to use the eICU technology with the nursing sample.

  11. Predicting Student Retention and Academic Achievement in Western United States Associate Degree in Nursing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Margaret

    This study addresses the extreme shortage of registered nurses (RNs) in California and the changing demographics of those entering the occupation. It focuses on the issue that racially diverse RN students have shown a significantly lower completion rate than their white counterparts. Since community colleges provide 70% of the hospital-based RN…

  12. Predictive validity of Perceived Emotional Intelligence on nursing students' self-concept.

    PubMed

    Augusto Landa, José María; López-Zafra, Esther; Aguilar-Luzón, Maria del Carmen; de Ugarte, Maria Fe Salguero

    2009-10-01

    This study examines the role of Perceived Emotional Intelligence, in nursing students' self-concept, controlling personality dimensions. Self-image is a cognitive component of the self that contains images of who we are, what we want to be and what we express and wish to express to others. Likewise, there is also an emotional and assessable component known as self-esteem. For a profession that requires not only technical expertise but also psychologically oriented care, knowledge about the self in nursing would be crucial to further development and growth of the profession. However, the role of emotions in the formation of nursing professionals has been scarcely studied. One hundred and thirty five undergraduates from nursing studies voluntarily participated in our study. They completed a questionnaire that comprises several scales. Our results show positive correlations between the Clarity and Emotional Repair components of Perceived Emotional Intelligence and all scales of the self-concept scale. Furthermore, we found positive relationships between the Extraversion and Accountability components of personality with almost all the scales of the self-concept and negative relationships with personality and neuroticism components of the self-concept.

  13. Predicting Student Nurse Academic Failures: An Analysis of Four Baccalaureate Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wold, Jean E.; Worth, Charles

    A study was done of pre-admission or early performance predictors of persistence versus academic failure among baccalaureate program nursing students. As part of a larger longitudinal research project, 155 students from four successive classes of students admitted to the program were studied, using multiple predictor and criterion variables. The…

  14. The lived experience of non-degree learners from a time-modified traditional baccalaureate nursing program.

    PubMed

    DeBoor, Stephanie S; Smyer, Tish

    2012-04-01

    An emerging trend to temper the nursing shortage is to accelerate the pace of traditional 4-year baccalaureate programs, with minimal curricular or programmatic changes, which we refer to as a Time-Modified Traditional Program (TMTP) study. Many students enrolled in a TMTP reflect the characteristics of entry-level, traditional nursing students. The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of how those non-degree, traditional baccalaureate nursing students experience education in a TMTP. Van Manen's six research activities of hermeneutic phenomenology guided this study. Colaizzi's seven-step method was used for analyzing the research data. Eight main themes were identified that provide a description of the phenomenon. Due to the intensity and time requirements of the program, students become disengaged from their previous lifestyles and relationships. Building a strong support system with faculty and peers and assuming personal accountability for learning contributes to the overall success of the program. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Understanding and Predicting Time-Dependent Dune Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, J.; Stockdon, H. F.; Smith, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The vulnerability of coastal ecosystems, habitats, and infrastructure is largely dictated by how protective sand dunes respond to extreme waves and water levels during storms. Predicting the type of dune response (e.g., scarping, overwashing, breaching) is often done with conditional storm-impact scale models (e.g. Sallenger 2000) however, these models do not describe the magnitude of expected changes or account for the continuum of dune responses throughout the duration of a storm event. Alternatively, process-based dune erosion models like XBeach explicitly compute interactions between waves, water levels, and sediment transport but are limited in regional applications due to computational requirements and inadequate knowledge of required boundary conditions. Using historical observations of storm-induced coastal change, we are developing and testing a variety of new static, probabilistic, and time-dependent models for dune erosion. Model development is informed by the observed dune response from four events that impacted geomorphically diverse regions along the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coastlines. Results from the static models indicate that alongshore differences in the magnitude of dune elevation change can be related to the depth of water over of the dune crest (e.g. freeboard) but that increasing freeboard does not always correspond to an increased lowering of the dune crest. Applying the concept of dune freeboard in a time-dependent approach that incorporates rising water levels that cause a dune to sequentially experience collision, overwash and then inundation shows that reasonable estimates of dune erosion are obtained. The accuracy of each of the models is now being evaluated along the large and diverse regions of coast that were impacted by Hurricane Sandy in 2012 where dune response was highly variable.

  16. Navy Global Predictions for the Dynamo Time Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, C. A.; Ridout, J. A.; Flatau, M. K.; Chen, J.; Richman, J. G.; Jensen, T. G.; Shriver, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    The performance of 30-day simulations of the Navy Global Environmental Model (NAVGEM) is evaluated under several metrics. The time period of interest is the DYNAMO (Dynamics of Madden Julian Oscillation) field experiment period, starting late October 2011. The NAVGEM experiments are run at an effective 37-km resolution with several different SST configurations. The in the first set of experiments, the initial SST analysis, provided by the NCODA (Navy Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation) system, is either held fixed to the initial value (fixed SST) or updated every 6 hours. These forecasts are compared with forecasts in which the SST is updated with 3-h analyses from the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM), and forecasts in which NAVGEM is interactively coupled to HYCOM. Experiments are also performed with different physical parameterization options. The extended integrations are verified using observed OLR, TRMM precipitation estimates, and global analyses. The use of fixed SSTs is clearly sub-optimal. Biases in monthly mean fields are far more pronounced in the simulations where the SST is held fixed as compared to those in simulations where updated SST analyses are used. Biases in the monthly mean fields are further reduced when NAVGEM is coupled to HYCOM. Differences in SST can "migrate" to substantial changes in the time-mean land-surface temperatures, illustrating the substantial impact of SSTs over the full domain. Concerning the simulation of the MJO, some improvement is noted when the system is fully coupled, although the simulations still exhibit deficiencies such as eastward propagation that is too slow, and difficulty propagating over the maritime continent. Simulations that are started every 5 days indicate that the NAVGEM uncoupled system has difficulty predicting MJO initiation, but simulations started when the MJO is active in the Indian Ocean are able to capture eastward propagation characteristics. The coupled NAVGEM-HYCOM system shows ability to

  17. Fixed recurrence and slip models better predict earthquake behavior than the time- and slip-predictable models: 2. Laboratory earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Justin L.; Ellsworth, William L.; Beeler, Nicholas M.; Kilgore, Brian D.; Lockner, David A.; Savage, Heather M.

    2012-02-01

    The behavior of individual stick-slip events observed in three different laboratory experimental configurations is better explained by a "memoryless" earthquake model with fixed inter-event time or fixed slip than it is by the time- and slip-predictable models for earthquake occurrence. We make similar findings in the companion manuscript for the behavior of natural repeating earthquakes. Taken together, these results allow us to conclude that the predictions of a characteristic earthquake model that assumes either fixed slip or fixed recurrence interval should be preferred to the predictions of the time- and slip-predictable models for all earthquakes. Given that the fixed slip and recurrence models are the preferred models for all of the experiments we examine, we infer that in an event-to-event sense the elastic rebound model underlying the time- and slip-predictable models does not explain earthquake behavior. This does not indicate that the elastic rebound model should be rejected in a long-term-sense, but it should be rejected for short-term predictions. The time- and slip-predictable models likely offer worse predictions of earthquake behavior because they rely on assumptions that are too simple to explain the behavior of earthquakes. Specifically, the time-predictable model assumes a constant failure threshold and the slip-predictable model assumes that there is a constant minimum stress. There is experimental and field evidence that these assumptions are not valid for all earthquakes.

  18. Evidence toads may modulate landing preparation without predicting impact time

    PubMed Central

    Cox, S. M.; Gillis, Gary

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Within anurans (frogs and toads), cane toads (Bufo marinus) perform particularly controlled landings in which the forelimbs are exclusively used to decelerate and stabilize the body after impact. Here we explore how toads achieve dynamic stability across a wide range of landing conditions. Specifically, we suggest that torques during landing could be reduced by aligning forelimbs with the body's instantaneous velocity vector at impact (impact angle). To test whether toad forelimb orientation varies with landing conditions, we used high-speed video to collect forelimb and body kinematic data from six animals hopping off platforms of different heights (0, 5 and 9 cm). We found that toads do align forelimbs with the impact angle. Further, toads align forelimbs with the instantaneous velocity vector well before landing and then track its changes until touchdown. This suggests that toads may be prepared to land well before they hit the ground rather than preparing for impact at a specific moment, and that they may use a motor control strategy that allows them to perform controlled landings without the need to predict impact time. PMID:27895052

  19. Heat transfer model for predicting squib ignition times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sernas, V.

    1974-01-01

    A squib ignition model based on transient heat condition from the hot bridgewire to the pyrotechnic is described. No Arrhenius-type chemical reaction is included. Instead, a thermal contact resistance is postulated to exist between the hot bridgewire and the pyrotechnic. Ignition is assumed to occur when a 2.5 micron layer of pyrotechnic next to the bridgewire reaches a characteristic ignition temperature for that pyrotechnic. This model was applied to the JPL squib, which uses a 50 micron (0.002-in.) diameter Tophet A bridgewire to ignite a boron, potassium perchlorate mix. A computer program was utilized that solves the transient heat condition problem with the boundary conditions stipulated by the model. The thermal contact conductance at the interface was determined by trial and error so that the experimentally determined ignition time for one firing condition would be properly predicted by the model. The agreement was quite good for tests run between -129 C and +93.3 C at current levels of 3.5 and 5 A. Axial heat conduction along the bridgewire is shown to be negligible.

  20. Predictive active disturbance rejection control for processes with time delay.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qinling; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2014-07-01

    Active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) has been shown to be an effective tool in dealing with real world problems of dynamic uncertainties, disturbances, nonlinearities, etc. This paper addresses its existing limitations with plants that have a large transport delay. In particular, to overcome the delay, the extended state observer (ESO) in ADRC is modified to form a predictive ADRC, leading to significant improvements in the transient response and stability characteristics, as shown in extensive simulation studies and hardware-in-the-loop tests, as well as in the frequency response analysis. In this research, it is assumed that the amount of delay is approximately known, as is the approximated model of the plant. Even with such uncharacteristic assumptions for ADRC, the proposed method still exhibits significant improvements in both performance and robustness over the existing methods such as the dead-time compensator based on disturbance observer and the Filtered Smith Predictor, in the context of some well-known problems of chemical reactor and boiler control problems.

  1. The relationship between nurse staffing and length of stay in acute-care: a one-year time-series data.

    PubMed

    Pitkäaho, Taina; Partanen, Pirjo; Miettinen, Merja H; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2016-07-01

    To examine the relationship between nurse staffing and patient length of stay in an acute-care hospital over a 1-year period. Although there has been prior research on the relationship between nurse staffing and length of stay in acute-care hospitals, there is a need for more information on how nurse staffing is related to length of stay longitudinally. Retrospective time-series registry data from 20 acute-care inpatient units of a Finnish university hospital as a monthly time series in 2008 were analysed by linear mixed models. The ratio of registered nurses to all nurses was 72.4%. Nurses worked mainly (96%) full time, and 63% had permanent employment contracts. Statistically significant variation was found in time series of five variables. Statistically significant relationships were found between length of stay and patient acuity, diagnosis-related group-volume, census and nursing hours per patient day at the unit level. Nursing hours per patient day had the strongest correlation with length of stay. A rational response to the variations in patient care needs and intensity in the complex care environment is flexible nurse staffing. Increasing nursing hours per patient day to achieve shorter length of stays is not the only solution, well-functioning care processes are also essential. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Type of oral solid medication packaging and medication preparation time in nursing homes: A direct observation study.

    PubMed

    Cready, C M; Hudson, C; Dreyer, K

    2017-06-05

    Medication administration is a substantial portion of the workday in nursing homes, with the medication preparation step being the most time-consuming. However, little is known about how medication preparation time is affected by the type of packaging used for oral solid medications (ie, tablets/capsules). We examined the effects of two types of packaging. As fewer steps are associated with strip packaging compared to bingo card packaging, we hypothesized that the increase in medication preparation seconds per resident with each additional oral solid medication would be smaller when strip packaging was used. A total of 430 medication preparations conducted by eight nurses during the regularly scheduled morning medication administration period in two nursing homes-using strip packaging and bingo card packaging, respectively-were observed. Each medication preparation observation was matched to its corresponding medication administration record and observations averaged across resident. Using the resident sample (N=149), we estimated three regression models (adjusting the standard errors for the clustering of resident by nurse). The first model regressed medication preparation seconds on the number of oral solid medications. The second model added the type of packaging used and the control variables (type of unit [long-term care, post-acute care], the number of one-half pills and the dosage form diversity in the preparation). To test our hypothesis, the third model added an interaction term between the number of oral solid medications and the type of packaging used. As hypothesized, all else equal, the number of oral solid medications tended to increase medication preparation time per resident in both nursing homes, but the increase was smaller in the strip packaging nursing home (P<.05). Each additional oral solid medication in the bingo card packaging nursing home increased medication preparation by an average of 13 seconds (b=13.077), whereas each oral solid

  3. Evaluating nursing hours per patient day as a nurse staffing measure.

    PubMed

    Min, Ari; Scott, Linda D

    2016-05-01

    To identify the techniques used to measure nurse staffing and to evaluate the reliability, validity and limitations of nursing hours per patient day (NHPPD). Numerous studies have attempted to identify appropriate nurse staffing levels; however, variations in nurse staffing measures may have caused inconsistent findings regarding the relationships between nurse staffing and quality of care. Seventeen studies using nurse staffing measures were reviewed. Six common nurse staffing measures were identified: nurse-to-patient ratios, full-time equivalents, NHPPD, skill mix, nurse-perceived staffing adequacy and nurse-reported number of assigned patients. Among nurse staffing measures, NHPPD is the most frequently used and is considered to be highly beneficial. This measure shows some evidence of high inter-rater reliability. The predictive validity of NHPPD for patient falls is high, whereas that for pressure ulcers is low. For NHPPD to be applied more effectively as a nurse staffing measure, there is a need for additional reliability testing in various types of units with large sample sizes; further validity research for additional patient outcomes; appropriate adjustments in its application to capture variations in the characteristics of nurses, patients and hospital units; and a consistent data collection procedure. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Turnover of registered nurses in Israel: characteristics and predictors.

    PubMed

    Toren, Orly; Zelker, Revital; Lipschuetz, Michal; Riba, Shoshana; Reicher, Sima; Nirel, Nurit

    2012-05-01

    In an era of global and local nursing shortages, nursing turnover has negative consequences in terms of diminished quality of care, increased costs and economic losses and decreased job satisfaction. To examine the turnover rate of registered nurses in Israel by assessing the varying degree of turnover between economic sectors, between hospital and community facilities, and/or between types of hospitals; and by examining potential predicting factors of turnover among registered nurses. A national phone survey was undertaken in Israel consisting of a random sampling of registered nurses of working age (up to age 60). The subjects comprised 10% of a national database of 32,000 registered nurses. The turnover rate among working nurses in Israel currently stands at 23%. In addition, 13% of employed nurses have taken a temporary leave of absence for a period greater than 6 months in the past 10 years, most up to 1 year. While job satisfaction rates were relatively high (72%), Professional satisfaction rates were 60% with no significant difference between hospital and community nurses. The turnover rate of registered nurses from a hospital setting to the community was significantly higher (p<.01) than that of community registered nurses to hospitals. Predicting factors of turnover were found to be: young age, part-time work, lack of advanced professional education, academic education and low satisfaction with the nursing profession. The shift of nursing workforce is mainly from hospitals to community health settings. There is a need to monitor and understand the characteristics of job and professional satisfaction among hospital nurses in order to implement crucial organizational interventions and retain hospital nursing staffs. Since young nurses, nurses working part time and nurses with no advanced professional and academic education, tend to move more than others, efforts should be targeted at these specific groups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  5. [Hygiene during leisure time among third year students from the Department of Nursing and Health Sciences].

    PubMed

    Czabak-Garbacz, Róza; Skibniewska, Agnieszka; Mazurkiewicz, Piotr; Wisowska, Anna

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was the assessment of hygiene of leisure time among third year students from Faculty of Nursing and Health Science of Lublin Medical Academy. It analysed passive and active ways of spending free time. The study involved 106 students (55 stationary and 51 extramural) and it was conducted by means of questionnaire. The study revealed that students prefer passive types of spending their leisure time. The most popular activity was listening to the radio, to which they devoted average 2.9 hours a day (listening to music mainly). Extramural students listened to the radio shorter than stationary ones (the difference was statistically significant). Students spent also a lot of their time watching television (average 1.5 hours a day), reading books and newspapers (average 1.85 hours a day) and doing housework, which is an active way of rest (average 2.7 hours a day), mainly preparing meals and shopping. Students devoted the least of their free time to sleep during the day in spite of the fact it is an excellent way of rest. The study found also that physical activity was not a favourite type of spending free time. Every third student did not do any sport. Stationary students did sport 4 times longer than extramural (the difference was statistically significant). Only 31% practiced taking a daily walk and only 44% of students made tourist trips. 81.9% of them went away during summer holidays, but only 31% of them during the winter break. Undoubtedly, the way of spending free time by the students under examination was not hygienic as it did not give them a sense of relaxation and rest; also the students themselves were not satisfied with it.

  6. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ponce-Monter, Héctor A.; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C.; O'Brien, Jessica P.; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas. PMID:26543643

  7. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Mario I; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C; O'Brien, Jessica P; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas.

  8. Fixed recurrence and slip models better predict earthquake behavior than the time- and slip-predictable models: 1. Repeating earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Justin L.; Ellsworth, William L.; Chen, Kate H.; Uchida, Naoki

    2012-02-01

    The behavior of individual events in repeating earthquake sequences in California, Taiwan and Japan is better predicted by a model with fixed inter-event time or fixed slip than it is by the time- and slip-predictable models for earthquake occurrence. Given that repeating earthquakes are highly regular in both inter-event time and seismic moment, the time- and slip-predictable models seem ideally suited to explain their behavior. Taken together with evidence from the companion manuscript that shows similar results for laboratory experiments we conclude that the short-term predictions of the time- and slip-predictable models should be rejected in favor of earthquake models that assume either fixed slip or fixed recurrence interval. This implies that the elastic rebound model underlying the time- and slip-predictable models offers no additional value in describing earthquake behavior in an event-to-event sense, but its value in a long-term sense cannot be determined. These models likely fail because they rely on assumptions that oversimplify the earthquake cycle. We note that the time and slip of these events is predicted quite well by fixed slip and fixed recurrence models, so in some sense they are time- and slip-predictable. While fixed recurrence and slip models better predict repeating earthquake behavior than the time- and slip-predictable models, we observe a correlation between slip and the preceding recurrence time for many repeating earthquake sequences in Parkfield, California. This correlation is not found in other regions, and the sequences with the correlative slip-predictable behavior are not distinguishable from nearby earthquake sequences that do not exhibit this behavior.

  9. Fixed recurrence and slip models better predict earthquake behavior than the time- and slip-predictable models 1: repeating earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubinstein, Justin L.; Ellsworth, William L.; Chen, Kate Huihsuan; Uchida, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    The behavior of individual events in repeating earthquake sequences in California, Taiwan and Japan is better predicted by a model with fixed inter-event time or fixed slip than it is by the time- and slip-predictable models for earthquake occurrence. Given that repeating earthquakes are highly regular in both inter-event time and seismic moment, the time- and slip-predictable models seem ideally suited to explain their behavior. Taken together with evidence from the companion manuscript that shows similar results for laboratory experiments we conclude that the short-term predictions of the time- and slip-predictable models should be rejected in favor of earthquake models that assume either fixed slip or fixed recurrence interval. This implies that the elastic rebound model underlying the time- and slip-predictable models offers no additional value in describing earthquake behavior in an event-to-event sense, but its value in a long-term sense cannot be determined. These models likely fail because they rely on assumptions that oversimplify the earthquake cycle. We note that the time and slip of these events is predicted quite well by fixed slip and fixed recurrence models, so in some sense they are time- and slip-predictable. While fixed recurrence and slip models better predict repeating earthquake behavior than the time- and slip-predictable models, we observe a correlation between slip and the preceding recurrence time for many repeating earthquake sequences in Parkfield, California. This correlation is not found in other regions, and the sequences with the correlative slip-predictable behavior are not distinguishable from nearby earthquake sequences that do not exhibit this behavior.

  10. Can the care transitions measure predict rehospitalization risk or home health nursing use of home healthcare patients?

    PubMed

    Ryvicker, Miriam; McDonald, Margaret V; Trachtenberg, Melissa; Peng, Timothy R; Sridharan, Sridevi; Feldman, Penny H

    2013-01-01

    The Care Transitions Measure (CTM) was designed to assess the quality of patient transitions from the hospital. Many hospitals are using the measure to inform their efforts to improve transitional care. We sought to determine if the measure would have utility for home healthcare providers by predicting newly admitted patients at heightened risk for emergency department use, rehospitalization, or increased home health nursing visits. The CTM was administered to 495 home healthcare patients shortly after hospital discharge and home healthcare admission. Follow-up interviews were completed 30 and 60 days post hospital discharge. Interview data were supplemented with agency assessment and service use data. We did not find evidence that the CTM could predict home healthcare patients having an elevated risk for emergent care, rehospitalization, or higher home health nursing use. Because Medicare/Medicaid-certified home healthcare providers already use a comprehensive, mandated start of care assessment, the CTM may not provide them additional crucial information. Process and outcome measurement is increasingly becoming part of usual care. Selection of measures appropriate for each service setting requires thorough site-specific evaluation. In light of our findings, we cannot recommend the CTM as an additional measure in the home healthcare setting.

  11. Prediction of Universal Time using the artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, J. Y.; Lopes, P.; Barache, C.; Bizouard, C.; Gambis, D.

    2014-12-01

    The monitoring of the Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) variations is the main task of the Earth orientation Center of the IERS. In addition, for various applications linked in particular to navigation, precise orbit determination or leap seconds announcements, short and long term predictions are required. The method which is currently applied for predictions is based on deterministic processes, Least Square fitting, autoregressive filtering (Gambis and Luzum 2011). We present an alternative method, the Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) which has have already been successfully applied for pattern recognition. It has been tested as well by various authors for EOP predictions but with so far no real improvement compared to the current methods (Schuh et. al. 2002). New formalisms recently developed allow reconsidering the use of neural networks for EOP predictions. Series of simulations were performed for both short and long term predictions. Statistics and comparisons with the current methods are presented.

  12. Occupational factors associated with obesity and leisure-time physical activity among nurses: A cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Dal Lae; Nam, Soohyun; Lee, Soo-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Adverse working conditions contribute to obesity and physical inactivity. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations of occupational factors with obesity and leisure-time physical activity among nurses. Methods This study used cross-sectional data of 394 nurses (mean age 48 years, 91% females, 61% white) randomly selected from the California Board of Registered Nursing list. Data on demographic and employment characteristics, musculoskeletal symptom comorbidity, physical and psychosocial occupational factors, body mass index (BMI), and physical activity were collected using postal and on-line surveys from January to July in 2013. Results Of the participants, 31% were overweight and 18% were obese; 41% engaged in regular aerobic physical activity (≥150 min/week) and 57% performed regular muscle-strengthening activity (≥2 days/week). In multivariable logistic regression models, overweight/obesity (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2) was significantly more common among nurse managers/supervisors (OR = 2.54, 95% CI: 1.16–5.59) and nurses who worked full-time (OR = 2.18, 95% CI: 1.29–3.70) or worked ≥40 h per week (OR = 2.53, 95% CI: 1.58–4.05). Regular aerobic physical activity was significantly associated with high job demand (OR = 1.63, 95% CI: 1.06–2.51). Nurses with passive jobs (low job demand combined with low job control) were significantly less likely to perform aerobic physical activity (OR = 0.49, 95% CI: 0.26–0.93). Regular muscle-strengthening physical activity was significantly less common among nurses working on non-day shifts (OR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.34–0.89). Physical workload was not associated with obesity and physical activity. Conclusions Our study findings suggest that occupational factors significantly contribute to obesity and physical inactivity among nurses. Occupational characteristics in the work environment should be considered in designing effective workplace health promotion programs targeting physical

  13. Strategies for retaining midcareer nurses.

    PubMed

    McGillis Hall, Linda; Lalonde, Michelle; Dales, Lorraine; Peterson, Jessica; Cripps, Lauren

    2011-12-01

    One method of reducing predicted shortages because of the aging nursing workforce is to increase retention. Few studies have examined the unique needs of midcareer nurses. A mixed-method approach including surveys and focus groups was used to identify key retention strategies and desires for midcareer nurses. Salary, benefits, positive working relationships, flexible scheduling, and the opportunity for continued education were identified as key retention strategies from this study. Registered nurses in this study reported higher perceptions of their work and work environment than licensed practical nurses did. Differences in work outcomes were evident across sectors, with community nurses reporting higher levels of job satisfaction and perceptions of work quality than nurses in acute and long-term care. Findings suggest that recruitment opportunities may exist with midcareer nurses seeking employment to return to work after time off to have a family. Proactive retention policies that focus on the needs of midcareer nurses would demonstrate a commitment and interest in keeping them in their work positions and in the profession.

  14. The effect of automated monitoring and real-time prompting on nurses' hand hygiene performance.

    PubMed

    Levchenko, Alexander I; Boscart, Veronique M; Fernie, Geoff R

    2013-10-01

    Adequate hand hygiene compliance by healthcare staff is considered an effective method to reduce hospital-acquired infections. The electronic system developed at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute automatically detects hand hygiene opportunities and records hand hygiene actions. It includes an optional visual hand hygiene status indication, generates real-time hand hygiene prompting signals, and enables automated monitoring of individual and aggregated hand hygiene performance. The system was installed on a complex continuous care unit at the entrance to 17 patient rooms and a utility room. A total of 93 alcohol gel and soap dispensers were instrumented and 14 nurses were provided with the personal wearable electronic monitors. The study included three phases with the system operating in three different modes: (1) an inactive mode during the first phase when hand hygiene opportunities and hand hygiene actions were recorded but prompting and visual indication functions were disabled, (2) only hand hygiene status indicators were enabled during the second phase, and (3) both hand hygiene status and real-time hand hygiene prompting signals were enabled during the third phase. Data collection was performed automatically during all of the three phases. The system indicated significantly higher hand hygiene activity rates and compliance during the third phase, with both hand hygiene indication and real-time prompting functions enabled. To increase the efficacy of the technology, its use was supplemented with individual performance reviews of the automatically collected data.

  15. Learning in the First Professional Job: The First Year of Full Time Employment After College for Accountants, Engineers and Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eraut, Michael; Maillardet, Fred; Miller, Carolyn; Steadman, Stephen; Ali, Amer; Blackman, Claire; Furner, Judith

    Learning in the first professional job was examined in a study of 40 nurses, 27 engineers, and 16 accountants who were in their first full year of full-time employment after college in hospitals and firms located in the United Kingdom. Data were collected through the following activities: (1) interviews with the respondents; (2) 1- to 2-day visits…

  16. Referral and Timing of Referral to Hospice Care in Nursing Homes: The Significant Role of Staff Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Lisa C.; Miller, Susan C.; Martin, Edward W.; Nanda, Aman

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Given concerns about end-of-life care for many nursing home (NH) residents, this study sought to understand factors influencing hospice referral or nonreferral as well as timing of referral. Design and Methods: We conducted semistructured interviews with personnel from seven participating NHs and two hospices. We interviewed NH directors…

  17. Politeness Strategies in Healthcare Communication at "Difficult Times": A Pragmatic Analysis of the "Manga" Discourse in "Nurse Aoi"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuoka, Rieko; Poole, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the ways in which healthcare professionals interact with patients' family members, and/or colleagues. The data are from healthcare discourses at difficult times found in the manga series entitled Nurse AOI. As the first step, we selected several communication scenes for analysis in terms of politeness strategies. From these…

  18. Referral and Timing of Referral to Hospice Care in Nursing Homes: The Significant Role of Staff Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Lisa C.; Miller, Susan C.; Martin, Edward W.; Nanda, Aman

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Given concerns about end-of-life care for many nursing home (NH) residents, this study sought to understand factors influencing hospice referral or nonreferral as well as timing of referral. Design and Methods: We conducted semistructured interviews with personnel from seven participating NHs and two hospices. We interviewed NH directors…

  19. The Influence of Orientation, Integration, and Evaluation on Intent to Stay in Part-Time Clinical Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Joanne S.

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which orientation, evaluation, and integration practices, along with other select job aspects and demographic characteristics, were correlated with and explained intent to stay among part-time clinical nursing faculty. A conceptual model was developed and tested. A researcher…

  20. Opening Doors to Nursing Degrees: Time for Action. A Proposal from Ontario's Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colleges Ontario, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This report argues that Ontario must expand the educational options for people who want to become registered nurses (RNs). It argues that the change Ontario requires is to authorize colleges to offer their own high-quality nursing degrees. Until 2005, about 70 per cent of Ontario's RNs were educated at colleges. Today, tens of thousands of RNs who…

  1. Organizational and Individual Conditions Associated with Depressive Symptoms among Nursing Home Residents over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassie, Kimberly M.; Cassie, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of organizational culture and climate on depressive symptoms among nursing home residents. Design and Methods: Using a pooled cross-sectional design, this study examines a sample of 23 nursing homes, 1,114 employees, and 5,497 residents. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Minimum Data Set, Depression Rating…

  2. [Is It Time to Implement a 12-Hour Shift for Nurses in Taiwan?

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Fung; Chang, Shiow-Ru; Wang, Li-Ting

    2017-04-01

    The twelve-hour shift system, first introduced in the U.S. in 1967 to address a nursing shortage, is now the main system of shift rotation used in numerous countries. In recent years, several hospitals in Taiwan have implemented the 12-hour shift model as one initiative to improve the problems of overtime and high turnover rate among nursing staff. Under this model, nurses work only three to four days per week for 12-hour shifts per day. Despite the increase in numbers of days off, there is growing concern that long shift hours may harm both the safety of patients and the well being of the nurses. The aim of the present article is to explain the application of the 12-hour shift system and to review the potential impacts of this model. Benefits of the 12-hour shift system include improving quality of life for nursing staff, reducing the turnover rate, and increasing job satisfaction. Primary concerns regarding this system include patient safety, nurse fatigue, and the potential negative effects on the sleep quality of nurses. These findings may be referenced by policymakers considering the development / implementation of flexible work schedules in Taiwan. The government must set a ceiling on work hours allowed per week and impose limits on overtime in order to prevent burnout in nursing staff.

  3. Organizational and Individual Conditions Associated with Depressive Symptoms among Nursing Home Residents over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassie, Kimberly M.; Cassie, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of organizational culture and climate on depressive symptoms among nursing home residents. Design and Methods: Using a pooled cross-sectional design, this study examines a sample of 23 nursing homes, 1,114 employees, and 5,497 residents. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Minimum Data Set, Depression Rating…

  4. Survey of Current Academic Practices for Full-Time Postlicensure Nursing Faculty Who Teach Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanford, Karen J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine current academic practices of compensation, workload, rewards, and tenure and promotion for nursing faculty who teach graduate and postlicensure programs that are delivered 50% to 100% online. Deans and directors who are members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) were the…

  5. Political participation of registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Vandenhouten, Christine L; Malakar, Crystalmichelle L; Kubsch, Sylvia; Block, Derryl E; Gallagher-Lepak, Susan

    2011-08-01

    Level of political participation and factors contributing to participation were measured among Midwest RNs (n = 468) via an online survey (Cronbach's α = .95). Respondents reported engaging in primarily "low cost" activities (e.g., voting, discussing politics, and contacting elected officials), with fewer reporting speaking at public gatherings, participating in demonstrations, and membership in nursing organizations. Psychological engagement was most predictive (p < .001) of political participation with the dimensions of political interest, political efficacy, and political information/knowledge highly significant (p < .001). Resources (time/money/civic skills) significantly contributed to political participation (p < .001). Less than half (40%) felt they could impact local decisions, and fewer (32%) felt they could impact state or national government decisions. Most respondents (80%) indicated their nursing courses lacked political content and did not prepare them for political participation. Findings showed that nurse educators and leaders of professional nursing organizations need to model and cultivate greater psychological engagement among students and nurses.

  6. Predicting nurses' use of healthcare technology using the technology acceptance model: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Strudwick, Gillian

    2015-05-01

    The benefits of healthcare technologies can only be attained if nurses accept and intend to fully use them. One of the most common models utilized to understand user acceptance of technology is the Technology Acceptance Model. This model and modified versions of it have only recently been applied in the healthcare literature among nurse participants. An integrative literature review was conducted on this topic. Ovid/MEDLINE, PubMed, Google Scholar, and CINAHL were searched yielding a total of 982 references. Upon eliminating duplicates and applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, the review included a total of four dissertations, three symposium proceedings, and 13 peer-reviewed journal articles. These documents were appraised and reviewed. The results show that a modified Technology Acceptance Model with added variables could provide a better explanation of nurses' acceptance of healthcare technology. These added variables to modified versions of the Technology Acceptance Model are discussed, and the studies' methodologies are critiqued. Limitations of the studies included in the integrative review are also examined.

  7. Orthostatic hypotension does not predict recurrent falling in a nursing home population.

    PubMed

    Hartog, L C; Cimzar-Sweelssen, M; Knipscheer, A; Groenier, K H; Kleefstra, N; Bilo, H J G; van Hateren, K J J

    Most studies regard orthostatic hypotension (OH) as a causal factor for falls. However, the evidence is lacking for this assumption. We aimed to investigate the relationship between orthostatic hypotension and fall incidents in nursing home residents. A total of 249 patients was included in a prospective observational cohort study of nursing home residents. Falls were prospectively registered. Cox proportional hazard modelling and the conditional frailty model were used to analyse the relationship between OH and (recurrent) falling. Among the 249 patients, 450 falls were recorded during follow-up and OH was present in 93 out of 249 patients. No significant associations were found between OH and the first fall incident (Hazard Ratio (HR) 1.01 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.60-1.69) and recurrent falling (HR 1.21 (95%CI 0.65-2.24)). Although falling and OH were both highly prevalent in nursing home residents, no relationship between OH and falling was found. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Probabilistic Prediction of Late-Time Nuclear Clouds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    unlimited. 13. ABSTRACT (Me.amum 200 words) Developments, applications, and evaluation of the SCIPUFF (Second-order Closure Integrated PUFF) model are...a prediction of the ’uncertainty’ in a model prediction arising from the random ve- locity fluctuations. SCIPUFF has been extended to include a...since Unclassified VAMM CIMCM F ISP UNCLASSIFED SUMMARY Developments, applications, and evaluation of the SCIPUFF (Second-order Closure Integrated PUFF

  9. Effectiveness of a nurse educational oral feeding programme on feeding outcomes in neonates: protocol for an interrupted time series design

    PubMed Central

    Touzet, Sandrine; Beissel, Anne; Denis, Angélique; Pillet, Fabienne; Gauthier-Moulinier, Hélène; Hommey, Sophie; Claris, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oral feeding is a complex physiological process. Several scales have been developed to assess the ability of the neonate to begin suck feedings and assist caregivers in determining feeding advancement. However, feeding premature neonates remains an ongoing challenge and depends above all on caregivers' feeding expertise. We will evaluate the effect of a nurse training programme on the achievement of full oral feeding with premature neonates. Methods and analysis The study design will be an interrupted time series design with 3 phases: (1) A 6-month baseline period; (2) a 22-month intervention period and (3) a 6-month postintervention period. The intervention will consist of an educational programme, for nurses and assistant nurses, on feeding patterns in neonates. The training modules will be composed of a 2-day conference, 2 interactive multidisciplinary workshops, and routine practice nurse coaching. A total of 120 nurses and 12 assistant nurses, who work at the neonatal unit during the study period, will participate in the study. All premature neonates of <34 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA) will be included. The primary outcome will be the age of tube withdrawal PMA and chronological age are taken into account. The secondary outcomes will be the transition time, length of hospital stay, competent suckle feeding without cardiorespiratory compromise, rate of neonates presenting with feeding issues or feeding rejection signs, and current neonatal pathologies or deaths during hospital stay. A segmented regression analysis will be performed to assess the impact of the programme. Ethics and dissemination Approval for the study was obtained from the Hospital Ethics Committee, and the Institutional Review Board, as well as the French Data Protection Agency. The findings from the study will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, national and international conference presentations and public events. Trial registration number NCT02404272 (https

  10. Effectiveness of a nurse educational oral feeding programme on feeding outcomes in neonates: protocol for an interrupted time series design.

    PubMed

    Touzet, Sandrine; Beissel, Anne; Denis, Angélique; Pillet, Fabienne; Gauthier-Moulinier, Hélène; Hommey, Sophie; Claris, Olivier

    2016-04-15

    Oral feeding is a complex physiological process. Several scales have been developed to assess the ability of the neonate to begin suck feedings and assist caregivers in determining feeding advancement. However, feeding premature neonates remains an ongoing challenge and depends above all on caregivers' feeding expertise. We will evaluate the effect of a nurse training programme on the achievement of full oral feeding with premature neonates. The study design will be an interrupted time series design with 3 phases: (1) A 6-month baseline period; (2) a 22-month intervention period and (3) a 6-month postintervention period. The intervention will consist of an educational programme, for nurses and assistant nurses, on feeding patterns in neonates. The training modules will be composed of a 2-day conference, 2 interactive multidisciplinary workshops, and routine practice nurse coaching. A total of 120 nurses and 12 assistant nurses, who work at the neonatal unit during the study period, will participate in the study. All premature neonates of <34 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA) will be included. The primary outcome will be the age of tube withdrawal PMA and chronological age are taken into account. The secondary outcomes will be the transition time, length of hospital stay, competent suckle feeding without cardiorespiratory compromise, rate of neonates presenting with feeding issues or feeding rejection signs, and current neonatal pathologies or deaths during hospital stay. A segmented regression analysis will be performed to assess the impact of the programme. Approval for the study was obtained from the Hospital Ethics Committee, and the Institutional Review Board, as well as the French Data Protection Agency. The findings from the study will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, national and international conference presentations and public events. NCT02404272 (https://clinicaltrials.gov). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  11. Obesity as a Possible Risk Factor for Lost-time Injury in Registered Nurses: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Gillian; Nowrouzi-Kia, Behnam; Gohar, Basem; Nowrouzi, Behdin

    2015-01-01

    Time-loss injuries are still a major occurrence in Canada, injuring thousands of Canadian workers each year. With obesity rates on the rise across the country, as well as around the world, it is important that the possible effects of obesity in the workplace be fully understood, especially those effects linked to lost-time injuries. The aim of this paper was to evaluate predictors of workplace lost-time injuries and how they may be related to obesity or high body mass index by examining factors associated with lost-time injuries in the health care sector, a well-studied industry with the highest number of reported time loss injuries in Canada. A literature review focusing on lost-time injuries in Registered Nurses (RNs) was conducted using the keywords and terms: lost time injury, workers' compensation, occupational injury, workplace injury, injury, injuries, work, workplace, occupational, nurse, registered nurse, RN, health care, predictors, risk factors, risk, risks, cause, causes, obese, obesity, and body mass index. Data on predictors or factors associated with lost-time injuries in RNs were gathered and organized using Loisel's Work Disability Prevention Management Model and extrapolated upon using existing literature surrounding obesity in the Canadian workplace. PMID:25830063

  12. Real-Time Reporting of Small Operational Failures in Nursing Care

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Addressing microsystem problems from the frontline holds promise for quality enhancement. Frontline providers are urged to apply quality improvement; yet no systematic approach to problem detection has been tested. This study investigated a self-report approach to detecting operational failures encountered during patient care. Methods. Data were collected from 5 medical-surgical units over 4 weeks. Unit staff documented operational failures on a small distinctive Pocket Card. Frequency distributions for the operational failures in each category were calculated for each hospital overall and disaggregated by shift. Rate of operational failures on each unit was also calculated. Results. A total of 160 nurses participated in this study reporting a total of 2,391 operational failures over 429 shifts. Mean number of problems per shift varied from 4.0 to 8.5 problems with equipment/supply problems being the most commonly reported category. Conclusions. Operational failures are common on medical-surgical clinical units. It is feasible for unit staff to record these failures in real time. Many types of failures were recognized by frontline staff. This study provides preliminary evidence that the Pocket Card is a feasible approach to detecting operational failures in real time. Continued research on methodologies to investigate the impact of operational failures is warranted. PMID:27895940

  13. Real-Time Reporting of Small Operational Failures in Nursing Care.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kathleen R; Ferrer, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Addressing microsystem problems from the frontline holds promise for quality enhancement. Frontline providers are urged to apply quality improvement; yet no systematic approach to problem detection has been tested. This study investigated a self-report approach to detecting operational failures encountered during patient care. Methods. Data were collected from 5 medical-surgical units over 4 weeks. Unit staff documented operational failures on a small distinctive Pocket Card. Frequency distributions for the operational failures in each category were calculated for each hospital overall and disaggregated by shift. Rate of operational failures on each unit was also calculated. Results. A total of 160 nurses participated in this study reporting a total of 2,391 operational failures over 429 shifts. Mean number of problems per shift varied from 4.0 to 8.5 problems with equipment/supply problems being the most commonly reported category. Conclusions. Operational failures are common on medical-surgical clinical units. It is feasible for unit staff to record these failures in real time. Many types of failures were recognized by frontline staff. This study provides preliminary evidence that the Pocket Card is a feasible approach to detecting operational failures in real time. Continued research on methodologies to investigate the impact of operational failures is warranted.

  14. Nursing shortages and international nurse migration.

    PubMed

    Ross, S J; Polsky, D; Sochalski, J

    2005-12-01

    The United Kingdom and the United States are among several developed countries currently experiencing nursing shortages. While the USA has not yet implemented policies to encourage nurse immigration, nursing shortages will likely result in the growth of foreign nurse immigration to the USA. Understanding the factors that drive the migration of nurses is critical as the USA exerts more pull on the foreign nurse workforce. To predict the international migration of nurses to the UK using widely available data on country characteristics. The Nursing and Midwifery Council serves as the source of data on foreign nurse registrations in the UK between 1998 and 2002. We develop and test a regression model that predicts the number of foreign nurse registrants in the UK based on source country characteristics. We collect country-level data from sources such as the World Bank and the World Health Organization. The shortage of nurses in the UK has been accompanied by massive and disproportionate growth in the number of foreign nurses from poor countries. Low-income, English-speaking countries that engage in high levels of bilateral trade experience greater losses of nurses to the UK. Poor countries seeking economic growth through international trade expose themselves to the emigration of skilled labour. This tendency is currently exacerbated by nursing shortages in developed countries. Countries at risk for nurse emigration should adjust health sector planning to account for expected losses in personnel. Moreover, policy makers in host countries should address the impact of recruitment on source country health service delivery.

  15. Climate predictability and prediction skill on seasonal time scales over South America from CHFP models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Marisol; Vera, C. S.

    2016-11-01

    This work presents an assessment of the predictability and skill of climate anomalies over South America. The study was made considering a multi-model ensemble of seasonal forecasts for surface air temperature, precipitation and regional circulation, from coupled global circulation models included in the Climate Historical Forecast Project. Predictability was evaluated through the estimation of the signal-to-total variance ratio while prediction skill was assessed computing anomaly correlation coefficients. Both indicators present over the continent higher values at the tropics than at the extratropics for both, surface air temperature and precipitation. Moreover, predictability and prediction skill for temperature are slightly higher in DJF than in JJA while for precipitation they exhibit similar levels in both seasons. The largest values of predictability and skill for both variables and seasons are found over northwestern South America while modest but still significant values for extratropical precipitation at southeastern South America and the extratropical Andes. The predictability levels in ENSO years of both variables are slightly higher, although with the same spatial distribution, than that obtained considering all years. Nevertheless, predictability at the tropics for both variables and seasons diminishes in both warm and cold ENSO years respect to that in all years. The latter can be attributed to changes in signal rather than in the noise. Predictability and prediction skill for low-level winds and upper-level zonal winds over South America was also assessed. Maximum levels of predictability for low-level winds were found were maximum mean values are observed, i.e. the regions associated with the equatorial trade winds, the midlatitudes westerlies and the South American Low-Level Jet. Predictability maxima for upper-level zonal winds locate where the subtropical jet peaks. Seasonal changes in wind predictability are observed that seem to be related to

  16. Effect of bar-code-assisted medication administration on nurses' activities in an intensive care unit: a time-motion study.

    PubMed

    Dwibedi, Nilanjana; Sansgiry, Sujit S; Frost, Craig P; Dasgupta, Anandaroop; Jacob, Sheeba M; Tipton, Joyce A; Shippy, Angela A

    2011-06-01

    The effect of bar-code-assisted medication administration (BCMA) on nurses' activities in an intensive care unit was evaluated. A prospective, observational, time-motion study was conducted by considering two approaches to medication administration in an intensive care unit: paper-based medication administration (PBMA) and BCMA. The time spent on nursing activities was measured using a prevalidated time-motion observation instrument and categorized based on workflow factors such as direct patient care, indirect patient care, administration, and miscellaneous or other. A descriptive analysis was conducted with the amount of time spent on each of the nursing activities. A multivariate analysis of covariance was conducted to assess the difference between the two approaches for the amount of time spent on various categorized nursing activities. Covariates included in the analysis were patient characteristics, medication administration characteristics, and number of nurses involved in medication administration. A total of 101 PBMAs and 151 BCMAs were reviewed. The mean duration of total medication administration time was higher in the BCMA phase compared with the PBMA phase, as was the mean time spent on direct patient care activity. However, nurses spent less time on administration activity during BCMA. Statistical analysis revealed that the medication administration approach (BCMA versus PBMA) had a significant effect on time spent on direct patient care and medication administration activities. The implementation of BCMA led to a reduction in the time spent by nurses on medication administration activities and increased the time spent on direct patient care activities.

  17. [Diabetes and predictive medicine--parallax of the present time].

    PubMed

    Rybka, J

    2010-04-01

    Predictive genetics uses genetic testing to estimate the risk in asymptomatic persons. Since in the case of multifactorial diseases predictive genetic analysis deals with findings which allow wider interpretation, it has a higher predictive value in expressly qualified diseases (monogenous) with high penetration compared to multifactorial (polygenous) diseases with high participation of environmental factors. In most "civilisation" (multifactorial) diseases including diabetes, heredity and environmental factors do not play two separate, independent roles. Instead, their interactions play a principal role. The new classification of diabetes is based on the implementation of not only ethiopathogenetic, but also genetic research. Diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1T) is a polygenous multifactorial disease with the genetic component carrying about one half of the risk, the non-genetic one the other half. The study of the autoimmune nature of DM1T in connection with genetic analysis is going to bring about new insights in DM1T prediction. The author presents new pieces of knowledge on molecular genetics concerning certain specific types of diabetes. Issues relating to heredity in diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2T) are even more complex. The disease has a polygenous nature, and the phenotype of a patient with DM2T, in addition to environmental factors, involves at least three, perhaps even tens of different genetic variations. At present, results at the genom-wide level appear to be most promising. The current concept of prediabetes is a realistic foundation for our prediction and prevention of DM2T. A multifactorial, multimarker approach based on our understanding of new pathophysiological factors of DM2T, tries to outline a "map" of prediabetes physiology, and if these tests are combined with sophisticated methods of genetic forecasting of DM2T, this may represent a significant step in our methodology of diabetes prediction. So far however, predictive genetics is limited by the

  18. The effect of clinical experience, judgment task difficulty and time pressure on nurses' confidence calibration in a high fidelity clinical simulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huiqin; Thompson, Carl; Bland, Martin

    2012-10-03

    Misplaced or poorly calibrated confidence in healthcare professionals' judgments compromises the quality of health care. Using higher fidelity clinical simulations to elicit clinicians' confidence 'calibration' (i.e. overconfidence or underconfidence) in more realistic settings is a promising but underutilized tactic. In this study we examine nurses' calibration of confidence with judgment accuracy for critical event risk assessment judgments in a high fidelity simulated clinical environment. The study also explores the effects of clinical experience, task difficulty and time pressure on the relationship between confidence and accuracy. 63 student and 34 experienced nurses made dichotomous risk assessments on 25 scenarios simulated in a high fidelity clinical environment. Each nurse also assigned a score (0-100) reflecting the level of confidence in their judgments. Scenarios were derived from real patient cases and classified as easy or difficult judgment tasks. Nurses made half of their judgments under time pressure. Confidence calibration statistics were calculated and calibration curves generated. Nurse students were underconfident (mean over/underconfidence score -1.05) and experienced nurses overconfident (mean over/underconfidence score 6.56), P = 0.01. No significant differences in calibration and resolution were found between the two groups (P = 0.80 and P = 0.51, respectively). There was a significant interaction between time pressure and task difficulty on confidence (P = 0.008); time pressure increased confidence in easy cases but reduced confidence in difficult cases. Time pressure had no effect on confidence or accuracy. Judgment task difficulty impacted significantly on nurses' judgmental accuracy and confidence. A 'hard-easy' effect was observed: nurses were overconfident in difficult judgments and underconfident in easy judgments. Nurses were poorly calibrated when making risk assessment judgments in a high fidelity simulated setting. Nurses with

  19. The Validity of College Grade Prediction Equations Over Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Richard L.; Maxey, James

    A sample of 260 colleges was surveyed during the years 1972-1976 to determine the validity of predicting college freshmen grades from standardized test scores and high school grades using the American College Testing (ACT) Assessment Program, an evaluative and placement service for students and educators involved in the transition from high school…

  20. Predicting the Timing and Location of the next Hawaiian Volcano

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Joseph; Mattox, Stephen; Kildau, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    The wealth of geologic data on Hawaiian volcanoes makes them ideal for study by middle school students. In this paper the authors use existing data on the age and location of Hawaiian volcanoes to predict the location of the next Hawaiian volcano and when it will begin to grow on the floor of the Pacific Ocean. An inquiry-based lesson is also…

  1. The Validity of College Grade Prediction Equations Over Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Richard L.; Maxey, James

    A sample of 260 colleges was surveyed during the years 1972-1976 to determine the validity of predicting college freshmen grades from standardized test scores and high school grades using the American College Testing (ACT) Assessment Program, an evaluative and placement service for students and educators involved in the transition from high school…

  2. Implicit Alcohol Associations, Especially Drinking Identity, Predict Drinking Over Time

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Kristen P.; Neighbors, Clayton; Teachman, Bethany A.; Baldwin, Scott A.; Norris, Jeanette; Kaysen, Debra; Gasser, Melissa L.; Wiers, Reinout W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is considerable excitement about implicit alcohol associations (IAAs) as predictors of college student hazardous drinking; however, few studies have investigated IAAs prospectively, included multiple assessments, or controlled for previous drinking. Doing so is essential to show their utility as a predictor and, ultimately, target for screening or intervention. Therefore, three IAAs (drinking identity, alcohol approach, alcohol excitement) were evaluated as prospective predictors of drinking in first- and second-year US undergraduates. Method A sample of 506 undergraduates completed eight online assessments of IAAs, explicit measures of the IAA constructs, and hazardous drinking (consumption, problems, and risk of alcohol use disorders) every three months over a 21-month period. Retention rates, ordered by follow-up points were 90%, 76%, 76%, 77%, 72%, 67%, and 66%, respectively. Fifty percent of participants were non-drinkers at baseline; 21% were above clinical cutoffs for hazardous drinking. Results Drinking identity and alcohol excitement associations predicted future alcohol consumption and problems after controlling for previous drinking and explicit measures; drinking identity also predicted future risk of alcohol use disorder. Relative to the other IAAs, drinking identity predicted alcohol consumption for the longest duration (i.e., 21 months). Alcohol approach associations rarely predicted variance in drinking. Conclusions IAAs vary in their utility as prospective predictors of college student hazardous drinking. Drinking identity and, to a lesser extent, alcohol excitement emerged as robust prospective predictors of hazardous drinking. Intervention and screening efforts could likely benefit from targeting those associations. PMID:27505215

  3. Predicting the Timing and Location of the next Hawaiian Volcano

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Joseph; Mattox, Stephen; Kildau, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    The wealth of geologic data on Hawaiian volcanoes makes them ideal for study by middle school students. In this paper the authors use existing data on the age and location of Hawaiian volcanoes to predict the location of the next Hawaiian volcano and when it will begin to grow on the floor of the Pacific Ocean. An inquiry-based lesson is also…

  4. Generalized dualities in one-time physics as holographic predictions from two-time physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Ignacio J.; Bars, Itzhak

    2014-03-01

    In the conventional formalism of physics, with one time, systems with different Hamiltonians or Lagrangians have different physical interpretations and are considered to be independent systems unrelated to each other. However, in this paper we construct explicitly canonical maps in one-time (1T) phase space (including timelike components, specifically the Hamiltonian) to show that it is appropriate to regard various 1T physics systems, with different Lagrangians or Hamiltonians, as being duals of each other. This concept is similar in spirit to dualities discovered in more complicated examples in field theory or string theory. Our approach makes it evident that such generalized dualities are widespread. This suggests that, as a general phenomenon, there are hidden relations and hidden symmetries that conventional 1T physics does not capture, implying the existence of a more unified formulation of physics that naturally supplies the hidden information. In fact, we show that two-time (2T) physics in (d +2) dimensions is the generator of these dualities in 1T physics in d dimensions by providing a holographic perspective that unifies all the dual 1T systems into one. The unifying ingredient is a gauge symmetry in phase space. Via such dualities it is then possible to gain new insights toward new physical predictions not suspected before, and suggest new methods of computation that yield results not obtained before. As an illustration, we will provide concrete examples of 1T systems in classical mechanics that are solved analytically for the first time via our dualities. These dualities in classical mechanics have counterparts in quantum mechanics and field theory, and in some simpler cases they have already been constructed in field theory. We comment on the impact of our approach on the meaning of space-time and on the development of new computational methods based on dualities.

  5. Beliefs and practices of pediatric emergency physicians and nurses regarding counseling alcohol-using adolescents: can counseling practice be predicted?

    PubMed

    Chun, Thomas H; Spirito, Anthony; Rakowski, William; D'Onofrio, Gail; Woolard, Robert H

    2011-09-01

    The objectives of the study were to investigate the attitudes and practices of pediatric emergency department (PED) physicians (MDs), MD extenders (MD's assistants [PAs], nurse practitioners [NPs]), and nurses (RNs) regard