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Sample records for predicting ovarian cancer

  1. Ovarian Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing ovarian cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  2. Predictive and therapeutic markers in ovarian cancer

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Guan, Yinghui; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Fridlyand, Jane; Mills, Gordon B.

    2013-03-26

    Cancer markers may be developed to detect diseases characterized by increased expression of apoptosis-suppressing genes, such as aggressive cancers. Genes in the human chromosomal regions, 8q24, 11q13, 20q11-q13, were found to be amplified indicating in vivo drug resistance in diseases such as ovarian cancer. Diagnosis and assessment of amplification levels certain genes shown to be amplified, including PVT1, can be useful in prediction of poor outcome of patient's response and drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates. Certain genes were found to be high priority therapeutic targets by the identification of recurrent aberrations involving genome sequence, copy number and/or gene expression are associated with reduced survival duration in certain diseases and cancers, specifically ovarian cancer. Therapeutics to inhibit amplification and inhibitors of one of these genes, PVT1, target drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates is described.

  3. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Ovarian Cancer There are five main types of cancer that affect a woman’s reproductive organs: cervical, ovarian, uterine, ... rare fallopian tube cancer.) This fact sheet about ovarian cancer is part of the Centers for Disease Control ...

  4. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... deaths than other female reproductive cancers. The sooner ovarian cancer is found and treated, the better your chance for recovery. But ovarian cancer is hard to detect early. Women with ovarian ...

  5. Optimized Prediction of Extreme Treatment Outcomes in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Misganaw, Burook; Ahsen, Eren; Singh, Nitin; Baggerly, Keith A.; Unruh, Anna; White, Michael A.; Vidyasagar, M.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of death among female cancers. Front-line therapy for ovarian cancer is platinum-based chemotherapy. However, the response of patients is highly nonuniform. The TCGA database of serous ovarian carcinomas shows that ~10% of patients respond poorly to platinum-based chemotherapy, with tumors relapsing in seven months or less. Another 10% or so enjoy disease-free survival of three years or more. The objective of the present research is to identify a small number of highly predictive biomarkers that can distinguish between the two extreme responders and then extrapolate to all patients. This is achieved using the lone star algorithm that is specifically developed for biological applications. Using this algorithm, we are able to identify biomarker panels of 25 genes (of 12,000 genes) that can be used to classify patients into one of the three groups: super responders, medium responders, and nonresponders. We are also able to determine a discriminant function that can divide the entire patient population into two classes, such that one group has a clear survival advantage over the other. These biomarkers are developed using the TCGA Agilent platform data and cross-validated on the TCGA Affymetrix platform data, as well as entirely independent data from Tothill et al. The P-values on the training data are extremely small, sometimes below machine zero, while the P-values on cross-validation are well below the widely accepted threshold of 0.05. PMID:27034613

  6. KRAS Genomic Status Predicts the Sensitivity of Ovarian Cancer Cells to Decitabine | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Decitabine, a cancer therapeutic that inhibits DNA methylation, produces variable antitumor response rates in patients with solid tumors that might be leveraged clinically with identification of a predictive biomarker. In this study, we profiled the response of human ovarian, melanoma, and breast cancer cells treated with decitabine, finding that RAS/MEK/ERK pathway activation and DNMT1 expression correlated with cytotoxic activity. Further, we showed that KRAS genomic status predicted decitabine sensitivity in low-grade and high-grade serous ovarian cancer cells.

  7. Ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Matulonis, Ursula A; Sood, Anil K; Fallowfield, Lesley; Howitt, Brooke E; Sehouli, Jalid; Karlan, Beth Y

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is not a single disease and can be subdivided into at least five different histological subtypes that have different identifiable risk factors, cells of origin, molecular compositions, clinical features and treatments. Ovarian cancer is a global problem, is typically diagnosed at a late stage and has no effective screening strategy. Standard treatments for newly diagnosed cancer consist of cytoreductive surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. In recurrent cancer, chemotherapy, anti-angiogenic agents and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors are used, and immunological therapies are currently being tested. High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most commonly diagnosed form of ovarian cancer and at diagnosis is typically very responsive to platinum-based chemotherapy. However, in addition to the other histologies, HGSCs frequently relapse and become increasingly resistant to chemotherapy. Consequently, understanding the mechanisms underlying platinum resistance and finding ways to overcome them are active areas of study in ovarian cancer. Substantial progress has been made in identifying genes that are associated with a high risk of ovarian cancer (such as BRCA1 and BRCA2), as well as a precursor lesion of HGSC called serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma, which holds promise for identifying individuals at high risk of developing the disease and for developing prevention strategies. PMID:27558151

  8. Ovarian Cancer FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ovarian Cancer Patient Education FAQs Ovarian Cancer Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Ovarian Cancer FAQ096, April 2015 PDF Format Ovarian ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  9. Kindlin-2 inhibits serous epithelial ovarian cancer peritoneal dissemination and predicts patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Caixia; Du, Juan; Xi, Chenguang; Yu, Yu; Hu, Ajin; Zhan, Jun; Guo, Hongyan; Fang, Weigang; Liu, Congrong; Zhang, Hongquan

    2014-03-28

    Kindlin-2 has been known to promote most cancer progression through regulation of multiple signaling pathways. However, a novel tumor suppressive role of Kindlin-2 was identified in serous epithelial ovarian cancer progression, which sharply contrasts to the tumor promoting roles for Kindlin-2 in most other cancers. While we demonstrated that Kindlin-2 was highly expressed in control tissues, a drastic low expression of Kindlin-2 was found in the tumor tissues of serous epithelial ovarian cancer, especially in the high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer. Importantly, Kindlin-2 inhibited serous epithelial ovarian cancer cell peritoneal dissemination in a mouse model. For clinical relevance, low Kindlin-2 expression correlated with higher tumor grade and older patients. Intriguingly, decreased Kindlin-2 expression predicts poor overall and progression-free survivals in serous epithelial ovarian cancer patients. Mechanistically, Kindlin-2 induced a mesenchymal to epithelial transition in serous epithelial ovarian cancer cells, at least in part, by up-regulation of estrogen receptor α which was recruited to the promoter of E-cadherin and thereby enhanced the transcription of E-cadherin. Collectively, we concluded that inadequate Kindlin-2 is an independent risk factor for serous epithelial ovarian cancer patients.

  10. What Is Ovarian Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about ovarian cancer? What is ovarian cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... section . Other cancers that are similar to epithelial ovarian cancer Primary peritoneal carcinoma Primary peritoneal carcinoma (PPC) is ...

  11. KRAS Genomic Status Predicts the Sensitivity of Ovarian Cancer Cells to Decitabine.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michelle L; Tamayo, Pablo; Wilson, Andrew J; Wang, Stephanie; Chang, Yun Min; Kim, Jong W; Khabele, Dineo; Shamji, Alykhan F; Schreiber, Stuart L

    2015-07-15

    Decitabine, a cancer therapeutic that inhibits DNA methylation, produces variable antitumor response rates in patients with solid tumors that might be leveraged clinically with identification of a predictive biomarker. In this study, we profiled the response of human ovarian, melanoma, and breast cancer cells treated with decitabine, finding that RAS/MEK/ERK pathway activation and DNMT1 expression correlated with cytotoxic activity. Further, we showed that KRAS genomic status predicted decitabine sensitivity in low-grade and high-grade serous ovarian cancer cells. Pretreatment with decitabine decreased the cytotoxic activity of MEK inhibitors in KRAS-mutant ovarian cancer cells, with reciprocal downregulation of DNMT1 and MEK/ERK phosphorylation. In parallel with these responses, decitabine also upregulated the proapoptotic BCL-2 family member BNIP3, which is known to be regulated by MEK and ERK, and heightened the activity of proapoptotic small-molecule navitoclax, a BCL-2 family inhibitor. In a xenograft model of KRAS-mutant ovarian cancer, combining decitabine and navitoclax heightened antitumor activity beyond administration of either compound alone. Our results define the RAS/MEK/DNMT1 pathway as a determinant of sensitivity to DNA methyltransferase inhibition, specifically implicating KRAS status as a biomarker of drug response in ovarian cancer.

  12. BRCA1 epigenetic inactivation predicts sensitivity to platinum-based chemotherapy in breast and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stefansson, Olafur A.; Villanueva, Alberto; Vidal, August; Martí, Lola; Esteller, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes are associated with an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer development. Both genes are involved in DNA repair, and tumors harboring genetic defects in them are thought to be more sensitive to DNA-damaging agents used in chemotherapy. However, as only a minority of breast and ovarian cancer patients carry BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, few patients are likely to benefit from these pharmacogenetic biomarkers. Herein, we show that, in cancer cell lines and xenografted tumors, BRCA1 CpG island promoter hypermethylation-associated silencing also predicts enhanced sensitivity to platinum-derived drugs to the same extent as BRCA1 mutations. Most importantly, BRCA1 hypermethylation proves to be a predictor of longer time to relapse and improved overall survival in ovarian cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy with cisplatin. PMID:23069641

  13. Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Informed Cancer Home What Are the Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Gynecologic cancer symptoms diaries Ovarian cancer may cause one or more of these signs ...

  14. Irregular menses predicts ovarian cancer: Prospective evidence from the Child Health and Development Studies.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Piera M; Wang, Erica T; Cedars, Marcelle I; Chen, Lee-May; Cohn, Barbara A

    2016-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that irregular menstruation predicts lower risk for ovarian cancer, possibly due to less frequent ovulation. We conducted a 50-year prospective study of 15,528 mothers in the Child Health and Development Studies cohort recruited from the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan from 1959 to 1966. Irregular menstruation was classified via medical record and self-report at age 26. We identified 116 cases and 84 deaths due to ovarian cancer through 2011 via linkage to the California Cancer Registry and Vital Statistics. Contrary to expectation, women with irregular menstrual cycles had a higher risk of ovarian cancer incidence and mortality over the 50-year follow-up. Associations increased with age (p <0.05). We observed a 2-fold increased incidence and mortality by age 70 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1, 3.4) rising to a 3-fold increase by age 77 (95% CI = 1.5, 6.7 for incidence; 95% CI = 1.4, 5.9 for mortality). We also found a 3-fold higher risk of mortality for high-grade serous tumors (95% CI = 1.3, 7.6) that did not vary by age. This is the first prospective study to show an association between irregular menstruation and ovarian cancer-we unexpectedly found higher risk for women with irregular cycles. These women are easy to identify and many may have polycystic ovarian syndrome. Classifying high-risk phenotypes such as irregular menstruation creates opportunities to find novel early biomarkers, refine clinical screening protocols and potentially develop new risk reduction strategies. These efforts can lead to earlier detection and better survival for ovarian cancer. PMID:27082375

  15. Prediction of key genes in ovarian cancer treated with decitabine based on network strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Zhen; Qiu, Sheng-Chun

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to predict key genes in ovarian cancer before and after treatment with decitabine utilizing a network approach and to reveal the molecular mechanism. Pathogenic networks of ovarian cancer before and after treatment were identified based on known pathogenic genes (seed genes) and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) detected by Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM) method. A weight was assigned to each gene in the pathogenic network and then candidate genes were evaluated. Topological properties (degree, betweenness, closeness and stress) of candidate genes were analyzed to investigate more confident pathogenic genes. Pathway enrichment analysis for candidate and seed genes were conducted. Validation of candidate gene expression in ovarian cancer was performed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays. There were 73 nodes and 147 interactions in the pathogenic network before treatment, while 47 nodes and 66 interactions after treatment. A total of 32 candidate genes were identified in the before treatment group of ovarian cancer, of which 16 were rightly candidate genes after treatment and the others were silenced. We obtained 5 key genes (PIK3R2, CCNB1, IL2, IL1B and CDC6) for decitabine treatment that were validated by RT-PCR. In conclusion, we successfully identified 5 key genes (PIK3R2, CCNB1, IL2, IL1B and CDC6) and validated them, which provides insight into the molecular mechanisms of decitabine treatment and may be potential pathogenic biomarkers for the therapy of ovarian cancer.

  16. Predictive and Prognostic Value of sPRR in Patients with Primary Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Annika; Richter, Rolf; Dragun, Duska; Heidecke, Harald; Dechend, Ralf; Muller, Dominik N.; Sehouli, Jalid; Braicu, Elena I.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the predictive and prognostic role of soluble (pro)renin receptor (sPRR) as a biomarker for clinicopathological outcome in patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). As part of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) whose activity is known to increase in ovarian cancer patients, the relation of sPRR and ovarian cancer should be further investigated. Patients and Methods. In this study 197 patients with primary EOC in our institution from 2000 to 2011 were included. sPRR was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in preoperative taken blood sera. Associations with clinicopathological outcome were analyzed and serum levels of sPRR in patients have been compared to those in healthy specimen. Kaplan-Meier and logistic/Cox regression assessed the impact of the markers on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results. There have been no correlations proved of sPRR levels with neither clinicopathological factors nor prognostic data. Also the distribution of sPRR in patients and controls was normal. Conclusion. sPRR seems to have no predictive, prognostic, or diagnostic value in EOC. As several factors of the RAS which might indicate cancer events have been shown, sPRR seems not to be affected. PMID:27660742

  17. Predictive and Prognostic Value of sPRR in Patients with Primary Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Annika; Richter, Rolf; Dragun, Duska; Heidecke, Harald; Dechend, Ralf; Muller, Dominik N.; Sehouli, Jalid; Braicu, Elena I.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the predictive and prognostic role of soluble (pro)renin receptor (sPRR) as a biomarker for clinicopathological outcome in patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). As part of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) whose activity is known to increase in ovarian cancer patients, the relation of sPRR and ovarian cancer should be further investigated. Patients and Methods. In this study 197 patients with primary EOC in our institution from 2000 to 2011 were included. sPRR was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in preoperative taken blood sera. Associations with clinicopathological outcome were analyzed and serum levels of sPRR in patients have been compared to those in healthy specimen. Kaplan-Meier and logistic/Cox regression assessed the impact of the markers on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results. There have been no correlations proved of sPRR levels with neither clinicopathological factors nor prognostic data. Also the distribution of sPRR in patients and controls was normal. Conclusion. sPRR seems to have no predictive, prognostic, or diagnostic value in EOC. As several factors of the RAS which might indicate cancer events have been shown, sPRR seems not to be affected.

  18. Ovarian Cancer Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... States, ovarian cancer is the eighth most common cancer and the fifth leading cause of cancer death. Around one in every 60 ... States, ovarian cancer is the eighth most common cancer and the fifth leading cause of cancer death. Are some women more at ...

  19. A VEGF-dependent gene signature enriched in mesenchymal ovarian cancer predicts patient prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xia; Wang, Xiaojie; Shen, Boqiang; Jing, Ying; Li, Qing; Cai, Mei-Chun; Gu, Zhuowei; Yang, Qi; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Liu, Jin; Li, Hongxia; Di, Wen; Zhuang, Guanglei

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported surrogate biomarkers of VEGF pathway activities with the potential to provide predictive information for anti-VEGF therapies. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate a new VEGF-dependent gene signature (VDGs) in relation to molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer and patient prognosis. Using microarray profiling and cross-species analysis, we identified 140-gene mouse VDGs and corresponding 139-gene human VDGs, which displayed enrichment of vasculature and basement membrane genes. In patients who received bevacizumab therapy and showed partial response, the expressions of VDGs (summarized to yield VDGs scores) were markedly decreased in post-treatment biopsies compared with pre-treatment baselines. In contrast, VDGs scores were not significantly altered following bevacizumab treatment in patients with stable or progressive disease. Analysis of VDGs in ovarian cancer showed that VDGs as a prognostic signature was able to predict patient outcome. Correlation estimation of VDGs scores and molecular features revealed that VDGs was overrepresented in mesenchymal subtype and BRCA mutation carriers. These findings highlighted the prognostic role of VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in ovarian cancer, and proposed a VEGF-dependent gene signature as a molecular basis for developing novel diagnostic strategies to aid patient selection for VEGF-targeted agents. PMID:27498762

  20. Overexpression of centromere protein K (CENPK) in ovarian cancer is correlated with poor patient survival and associated with predictive and prognostic relevance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Chao; Huang, Chi-Chen; Lin, Ding-Yen; Chang, Wen-Chang; Lee, Kuen-Haur

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer has a poor prognosis. Most patients are diagnosed with ovarian cancer when the disease has reached an advanced stage and cure rates are generally under 30%. Hence, early diagnosis of ovarian cancer is the best means to control the disease in the long term and abate mortality. So far, cancer antigen 125 (CA125) and human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) are the gold-standard tumor markers for ovarian cancer; however, these two markers can be elevated in a number of conditions unrelated to ovarian cancer, resulting in decreased specifically and positive predictive value. Therefore, it is urgent to identify novel biomarkers with high reliability and sensitivity for ovarian cancer. In this study for the first time, we identified a member of the centromere protein (CENP) family, CENPK, which was specifically upregulated in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines and the overexpression of which was associated with poor prognoses in patients with ovarian cancer. In addition, the presence of CENPK significantly improved the sensitivity of CA125 or HE4 for predicting clinical outcomes of ovarian cancer patients. In conclusion, we identified that CENPK was specifically upregulated in ovarian cancer cells and can be used as a novel tumor marker of ovarian cancer. PMID:26587348

  1. Ovarian Cancer Stage IV

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1335 View Download Large: 2400x2670 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Description: Drawing of stage IV shows ...

  2. Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1530x1350 View Download Large: 3060x2700 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC Description: Drawing of stage IIIC shows ...

  3. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage II Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1650x675 View Download Large: 3300x1350 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage II Description: Three-panel drawing of stage ...

  4. Ovarian Cancer Stage I

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage I Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1650x675 View Download Large: 3300x1350 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage I Description: Three-panel drawing of stage ...

  5. Can primary optimal cytoreduction be predicted in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer preoperatively?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Prediction of optimal cytoreduction in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian caner preoperatively. Methods Patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer who underwent surgery for the first time from Jan. to June 2008 at gynecologic oncology ward of TUMS (Tehran University of Medical Sciences) were eligible for this study. The possibility of predicting primary optimal cytoreduction considering multiple variables was evaluated. Variables were peritoneal carcinomatosis, serum CA125, ascites, pleural effusion, physical status and imaging findings. Univariate comparisons of patients underwent suboptimal cytoreduction carried out using Fisher's exact test for each of the potential predictors. The wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare variables between patients with optimal versus suboptimal cytoreduction. Results 41 patients met study inclusion criteria. Statistically significant association was noted between peritoneal carcinomatosis and suboptimal cytoreduction. There were no statistically significant differences between physical status, pleural effusion, imaging findings, serum CA125 and ascites of individuals with optimal cytoreduction compared to those with suboptimal cytoreduction. Conclusions Because of small populations in our study the results are not reproducible in alternate populations. Only the patient who is most unlikely to undergo optimal cytoreduction should be offered neoadjuvant chemotherapy, unless her medical condition renders her unsuitable for primary surgery. PMID:20170515

  6. Can Ovarian Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer Can ovarian cancer be found early? About 20% of ovarian cancers ... cancer in its earliest stage. Ways to find ovarian cancer early Regular women's health exams During a pelvic ...

  7. IL17a and IL21 combined with surgical status predict the outcome of ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Li; Chou, Cheng-Yang; Chang, Ming-Cheng; Lin, Han-Wei; Huang, Ching-Ting; Hsieh, Shu-Feng; Chen, Chi-An; Cheng, Wen-Fang

    2015-10-01

    Aside from tumor cells, ovarian cancer-related ascites contains the immune components. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a combination of clinical and immunological parameters can predict survival in patients with ovarian cancer. Ascites specimens and medical records from 144 ovarian cancer patients at our hospital were used as the derivation group to select target clinical and immunological factors to generate a risk-scoring system to predict patient survival. Eighty-two cases from another hospital were used as the validation group to evaluate this system. The surgical status and expression levels of interleukin 17a (IL17a) and IL21 in ascites were selected for the risk-scoring system in the derivation group. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curves of the overall score for disease-free survival (DFS) of the ovarian cancer patients were 0.84 in the derivation group, 0.85 in the validation group, and 0.84 for all the patients. The AUROC curves of the overall score for overall survival (OS) of cases were 0.78 in the derivation group, 0.76 in the validation group, and 0.76 for all the studied patients. Good correlations between overall risk score and survival of the ovarian cancer patients were demonstrated by sub-grouping all participants into four groups (P for trend <0.001 for DFS and OS). Therefore, acombination of clinical and immunological parameters can provide a practical scoring system to predict the survival of patients with ovarian carcinoma. IL17a and IL21 can potentially be used as prognostic and therapeutic biomarkers.

  8. Ovarian Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 22,280 % of All New Cancer Cases 1.3% Estimated Deaths in 2016 14,240 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 195,767 women living with ovarian cancer in ...

  9. Recurrent ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Pujade-Lauraine, E; Combe, P

    2016-04-01

    Recurrence still occurs in a majority of patients with advanced ovarian cancer. However, progress in the management has allowed a significant prolongation of survival for relapsing disease. These last years, the field of interest has moved from chemotherapy to targeted therapy which is dominated by anti-angiogenic and anti-PARP agents. It is assumed that platinum-free interval will not remain the main prognostic and predictive criterion in the future, and will be replaced by a multi-factorial approach. This trend for personalization of therapy has highlighted important neglected fields for clinical research such as multi-line (≥3) relapse, frail patients including elderly and symptomatic and supportive measures. PMID:27141075

  10. Prediction of Postchemotherapy Ovarian Function Using Markers of Ovarian Reserve

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Rong; Schott, Anne F.; McConnell, Daniel; Banerjee, Mousumi; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Reproductive-aged women frequently receive both chemotherapy and endocrine therapy as part of their treatment regimen for early stage hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Chemotherapy results in transient or permanent ovarian failure in the majority of women. The difficulty in determining which patients will recover ovarian function has implications for adjuvant endocrine therapy decision making. We hypothesized that pretreatment serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) and inhibin B concentrations would predict for ovarian function following chemotherapy. Methods. Pre- and perimenopausal women aged 25–50 years with newly diagnosed breast cancer were enrolled. Subjects underwent phlebotomy for assessment of serum AMH, inhibin B, follicle-stimulating hormone, and estradiol prior to chemotherapy and 1 month and 1 year following completion of treatment. Associations among hormone concentrations, clinical factors, and biochemically assessed ovarian function were assessed. Results. Twenty-seven subjects were evaluable for the primary endpoint. Median age was 41. Twenty subjects (74.1%) experienced recovery of ovarian function within 18 months. Of the 26 evaluable subjects assessed prior to chemotherapy, 19 (73.1%) had detectable serum concentrations of AMH. The positive predictive value of a detectable baseline serum AMH concentration for recovery of ovarian function was 94.7%, and the negative predictive value was 85.7%. On univariate analysis, younger age and detectable serum AMH concentration at chemotherapy initiation were predictive of increased likelihood of recovery of ovarian function. Conclusion. Prechemotherapy assessment of serum AMH may be useful for predicting postchemotherapy ovarian function. This finding has implications for decision making about adjuvant endocrine therapy in premenopausal women treated with chemotherapy. PMID:24319018

  11. Ixabepilone and Liposomal Doxorubicin in Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-11

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Female Reproductive Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  12. Molecular imaging in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Reyners, A K L; Broekman, K E; Glaudemans, A W J M; Brouwers, A H; Arts, H J G; van der Zee, A G J; de Vries, E G E; Jalving, M

    2016-04-01

    Ovarian cancer has a high mortality and novel-targeted treatment strategies have not resulted in breakthroughs for this disease. Insight into the molecular characteristics of ovarian tumors may improve diagnosis and selection of patients for treatment with targeted therapies. A potential way to achieve this is by means of molecular imaging. Generic tumor processes, such as glucose metabolism ((18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose) and DNA synthesis ((18)F-fluorodeoxythymidine), can be visualized non-invasively. More specific targets, such as hormone receptors, growth factor receptors, growth factors and targets of immunotherapy, can also be visualized. Molecular imaging can capture data on intra-patient tumor heterogeneity and is of potential value for individualized, target-guided treatment selection. Early changes in molecular characteristics during therapy may serve as early predictors of response. In this review, we describe the current knowledge on molecular imaging in the diagnosis and as an upfront or early predictive biomarker in patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:27141066

  13. Talc and ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hartge, P.; Hoover, R.; Lesher, L.P.; McGowan, L.

    1983-01-01

    The potential link between epithelial talc use and ovarian cancer was examined in records of women treated for pathologically confirmed epitherial ovarian cancer. We estimated the relative risk to talc users as 0.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.4 to 1.1). The estimate was unaffected by adjustment for race, age, and gravidity. Neither women who used talc on their diaphragms nor those who used it as body powder seemed to be at excess risk. Our data thus indicate no overall association between talc use and risk of ovarian cancer. Although a small group of women who specifically reported genital use of body talcum powders showed an excess relative risk, use of talc on a diaphragm, which would be the closest exposure to the ovaries, did not seem to elevate risk.

  14. Expression of transcription factor AP-2α predicts survival in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Anttila, M A; Kellokoski, J K; Moisio, K I; Mitchell, P J; Saarikoski, S; Syrjänen, K; Kosma, V-M

    2000-01-01

    The 52-kDa activator protein (AP)-2 is a DNA-binding transcription factor which has been reported to have growth inhibitory effects in cancer cell lines and in human tumours. In this study the expression of AP-2α was analysed in 303 epithelial ovarian carcinomas by immunohistochemistry (IHC) with a polyclonal AP-2α antibody and its mRNA status was determined by in situ hybridization (ISH) and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The immunohistochemical expression of AP-2α was correlated with clinicopathological variables, p21/WAF1 protein expression and survival. In normal ovaries, epithelial cells expressed AP-2α protein only in the cytoplasm. In carcinomas nuclear AP-2α expression was observed in 28% of the cases although cytoplasmic expression was more common (51%). The expression of AP-2α varied according to the histological subtype and differentiation. AP-2α and p21/WAF1 expressions did not correlate with each other. Both in univariate (P = 0.002) and multivariate analyses (relative risks (RR) 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13–2.18, P = 0.007) the high cytoplasmic AP-2α expression favoured the overall survival. In contrast, the nuclear AP-2α expression combined with low cytoplasmic expression increased the risk of dying of ovarian cancer (RR = 2.10, 95% CI 1.13–3.83, P = 0.018). The shift in the expression pattern of AP-2α (nuclear vs cytoplasmic) in carcinomas points out to the possibility that this transcription factor may be used by oncogenes in certain histological subtypes. Based on the mRNA analyses, the incomplete expression and translation of AP-2α in ovarian cancer may be due to post-transcriptional regulation. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10864206

  15. Denileukin Diftitox Used in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Ovarian Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma, or Epithelial Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-02

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  16. Do We Know What Causes Ovarian Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... ovarian cancer be prevented? Do we know what causes ovarian cancer? We don’t yet know exactly what causes ... Another theory is that male hormones (androgens) can cause ovarian cancer. Researchers have made great progress in understanding how ...

  17. Prognostic nomogram to predict progression-free survival in patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C K; Simes, R J; Brown, C; Lord, S; Wagner, U; Plante, M; Vergote, I; Pisano, C; Parma, G; Burges, A; Bourgeois, H; Högberg, T; Bentley, J; Angleitner-Boubenizek, L; Ferrero, A; Richter, B; Hirte, H; Gebski, V; Pfisterer, J; Pujade-Lauraine, E; Friedlander, M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer are a heterogeneous group, and it is not possible to accurately predict the progression-free survival (PFS) in these patients. We developed and validated a nomogram to help improve prediction of PFS in patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. Methods: The nomogram was developed in a training cohort (n=955) from the CALYPSO trial and validated in the AGO-OVAR 2.5 Study (n=340). The proportional-hazards model (nomogram) was based on pre-treatment characteristics. Results: The nomogram had a concordance index (C-index) of 0.645. Significant predictors were tumour size platinum-chemotherapy-free interval, CA-125, number of organ metastatic sites and white blood count. When the nomogram was applied without CA-125 (CA-125 was not available in validation cohort), the C-indices were 0.624 (training) and 0.594 (validation). When classification was based only on the platinum-chemotherapy-free interval, the indices were 0.571 (training) and 0.560 (validation). The calibration plot in the validation cohort based on four predictors (without CA-125) suggested good agreement between actual and nomogram-predicted 12-month PFS probabilities. Conclusion: This nomogram, using five pre-treatment characteristics, improves prediction of PFS in patients with platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer having platinum-based chemotherapy. It will be useful for the design and stratification of patients in clinical trials and also for counselling patients. PMID:21915127

  18. Prediction of the presence of ovarian cancer at surgery by an immunochemical panel: CA 125 and copper-to-zinc ratio.

    PubMed

    Gal, D; Lischinsky, S; Friedman, M; Zinder, O

    1989-11-01

    Preoperative levels of the trace elements copper and zinc, in addition to the level of the known marker CA 125, were studied in sera of 32 patients undergoing exploratory laparotomy for suspicion of ovarian cancer and in sera of 49 patients with the diagnosis of ovarian cancer prior to second-look operation. Most patients (63/81) had stage III or IV disease. CA 125 levels greater than 35 U/ml, copper levels greater than 1.5 mg/liter, and zinc levels less than 0.9 mg/liter were considered pathologic. An immunochemical panel composed of CA 125 serum level and ratio of copper to zinc (Cu/Zn) (normal less than 1.65) was found to be most sensitive (98%) in predicting the existence of ovarian cancer before laparotomy, and its overall predictability was 89%. In 14 of 14 patients (100%) who had complete primary surgery for ovarian cancer, the panel was correct in predicting no tumor at second-look operation. In 13 of 14 patients (93%) who had incomplete primary surgery but had no clinical evidence of disease prior to second-look operation, the panel was correct in predicting ovarian cancer. In these two groups of patients, second-look operation could have been replaced by the results of the immunochemical panel.

  19. The Cancer Genome Atlas ovarian cancer analysis

    Cancer.gov

    An analysis of genomic changes in ovarian cancer has provided the most comprehensive and integrated view of cancer genes for any cancer type to date. Ovarian serous adenocarcinoma tumors from 500 patients were examined by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Re

  20. Can Ovarian Cancer Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... ovaries removed with your doctor. Prevention strategies for women with a family history of ovarian cancer or BRCA mutation If your ... what the results mean to you. For some women with a strong family history of ovarian cancer, knowing they do not have ...

  1. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Stage III Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  2. Serum folate receptor alpha as a biomarker for ovarian cancer: Implications for diagnosis, prognosis and predicting its local tumor expression.

    PubMed

    Kurosaki, Akira; Hasegawa, Kosei; Kato, Tomomi; Abe, Kenji; Hanaoka, Tatsuya; Miyara, Akiko; O'Shannessy, Daniel J; Somers, Elizabeth B; Yasuda, Masanori; Sekino, Tetsuo; Fujiwara, Keiichi

    2016-04-15

    Folate receptor alpha (FRA) is a GPI-anchored glycoprotein and encoded by the FOLR1 gene. High expression of FRA is observed in specific malignant tumors of epithelial origin, including ovarian cancer, but exhibits very limited normal tissue expression, making it as an attractive target for the ovarian cancer therapy. FRA is known to shed from the cell surface into the circulation which allows for its measurement in the serum of patients. Recently, methods to detect the soluble form of FRA have been developed and serum FRA (sFRA) is considered a highly promising biomarker for ovarian cancer. We prospectively investigated the levels of sFRA in patients clinically suspected of having malignant ovarian tumors. A total of 231 patients were enrolled in this study and analyzed for sFRA as well as tumor expression of FRA by immunohistochemistry. High sFRA was predominantly observed in epithelial ovarian cancer patients, but not in patients with benign or borderline gynecological disease or metastatic ovarian tumors from advanced colorectal cancers. Levels of sFRA were highly correlated to clinical stage, tumor grade and histological type and demonstrated superior accuracy for the detection of ovarian cancer than did serum CA125. High sFRA was significantly associated with shorter progression-free survival in both early and advanced ovarian cancer patients. Finally, tumor FRA expression status was strongly correlated with sFRA levels. Taken together, these data suggest that sFRA might be a useful noninvasive serum biomarkers for future clinical trials assessing FRA-targeted therapy.

  3. Ovarian cancer stem cells enrichment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lijuan; Lai, Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    The concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) provides a new paradigm for understanding cancer biology. Cancer stem cells are defined as a minority of cancer cells with stem cell properties responsible for maintenance and growth of tumors. The targeting of CSCs is a potential therapeutic strategy to combat ovarian cancer. Ovarian epithelial cancer cells cultured in serum-free medium can form sphere cells. These sphere cells may be enriched for cancer stem cells (CSCs). The isolation of sphere cells from solid tumors is an important technique in studying cancer cell biology. Here we describe the isolation of sphere cells from primary ovarian cancer tissue, ascites fluid, and the cancer cell line SKOV3 with stem cell selection medium. PMID:23913228

  4. "Incessant ovulation" and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Casagrande, J T; Louie, E W; Pike, M C; Roy, S; Ross, R K; Henderson, B E

    1979-07-28

    A case-control study of 150 ovarian cancer patients under the age of 50 and individually matched controls was done to study the influence of fertility and oral contraceptive use on the risk of ovarian cancer. The risk decreased with increasing numbers of live births, with increasing numbers of incomplete pregnancies, and with the use of oral contraceptives. These three factors can be amalgamated into a single index of protection--"protected time"--by considering them all as periods of anovulation. The complement of protected time--viz., "ovulatory age", the period between menarche and diagnosis of ovarian cancer (or cessation of menses) minus "protected time"--was strongly related to risk of ovarian cancer. Other factors found to be associated with increased ovarian cancer risk were obesity, cervical polyps, and gallbladder disease. Women who had an "immediate" intolerance to oral contraceptive use had a fourfold increased risk of ovarian cancer. 7 patients, but no controls, could recall a family history of ovarian cancer.

  5. The epidemiology of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Tortolero-Luna, G; Mitchell, M F

    1995-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the second most common cancer of the female reproductive system and the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancies. In 1995, 26,600 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer in the U.S., and 14,500 women will die from the disease. Between 1986-1900, the overall age-adjusted incidence was 14.3/100,000 women; mortality was 7.8/100,000 women. Ovarian cancer, rare before age 40, increases steeply thereafter and peaks at ages 65-75. Incidence and mortality rates are higher among white women than among African-American women. Over the last three decades, ovarian cancer incidence has remained stable in high-risk countries, while an increasing trend has been reported in low-risk countries. Despite recent advancements in treatment, the overall five-year survival rates continues to be low (39%). Over 70% of ovarian tumors are diagnosed when regional or distant involvement has already occurred, causing survival rates to remain stable. The etiology of ovarian cancer is poorly understood. Most studies have focused on the epidemiology of invasive epithelial ovarian tumors, while few have explored the epidemiology of epithelial tumors of low malignant potential and nonepithelial tumors. Factors associated with an increased risk for invasive epithelial ovarian cancer include age, race, nulliparity, family history of ovarian cancer, and history of endometrial or breast cancer. Factors associated with a reduced risk are history of one or more full-term pregnancies, use of oral contraceptives, history of breast feeding, tubal ligation, and hysterectomy. Other factors such as infertility drugs, hormone replacement therapy, age at menarche, age at menopause, dietary factors, lactose intolerance, talc use, coffee and alcohol consumption have been suggested, but their role is still inconclusive.

  6. Ovarian cancer in the older woman.

    PubMed

    Tew, William P

    2016-09-01

    Ovarian cancer is the seventh most common cancer in women worldwide and accounts for nearly 4% of all new cases of cancer in women. Almost half of all patients with ovarian cancer are over the age of 65 at diagnosis, and over 70% of deaths from ovarian cancer occur in this same age group. As the population ages, the number of older women with ovarian cancer is increasing. Compared to younger women, older women with ovarian cancer receive less surgery and chemotherapy, develop worse toxicity, and have poorer outcomes. They are also significantly under-represented in clinical trials and thus application of standard treatment regimens can be challenging. Performance status alone has been shown to be an inadequate tool to predict toxicity of older patients from chemotherapy. Use of formal geriatric assessment tools is a promising direction for stratifying older patients on trials. Elderly-specific trials, adjustments to the eligibility criteria, modified treatment regimens, and interventions to decrease morbidities in the vulnerable older population should be encouraged.

  7. Polyglutamate Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial, Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-07

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  8. Molecular Imaging of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sai Kiran; Nemieboka, Brandon; Sala, Evis; Lewis, Jason S.; Zeglis, Brian M.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy and the fifth leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Over the past decade, medical imaging has played an increasingly valuable role in the diagnosis, staging, and treatment planning of the disease. In this “Focus on Molecular Imaging” review, we seek to provide a brief yet informative survey of the current state of the molecular imaging of ovarian cancer. The article is divided into sections according to modality, covering recent advances in the MR, PET, SPECT, ultrasound, and optical imaging of ovarian cancer. Although primary emphasis is given to clinical studies, preclinical investigations that are particularly innovative and promising are discussed as well. Ultimately, we are hopeful that the combination of technologic innovations, novel imaging probes, and further integration of imaging into clinical protocols will lead to significant improvements in the survival rate for ovarian cancer. PMID:27127223

  9. Epigenetic biomarkers in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Gloss, Brian S; Samimi, Goli

    2014-01-28

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy and the 5th leading cause of cancer death in women. Women with ovarian cancer are typically diagnosed at late stage, when the cancer has spread into the peritoneal cavity and complete surgical removal is difficult. The 5-year survival time for patients diagnosed at this stage is 30%, in contrast to a 5-year survival of 90% for patients diagnosed at early stage. Cancer screening and early detection have the potential to greatly decrease the mortality and morbidity from cancer. The emerging field of epigenetics offers a valuable opportunity to identify cancer-specific DNA methylation changes that can be used in the clinic to improve early-stage diagnosis and better predict response in treated patients. To date, numerous DNA methylation aberrations have been identified in epithelial ovarian cancer; here we review some candidate genes and pathways with potential clinical utility as biomarkers for diagnosis and/or prognosis. It has become clear that even with the great promise of DNA methylation biomarkers in epithelial ovarian cancer, the identification of highly specific, sensitive and robust panels of markers and the standardization of analysis techniques are still required in order to improve detection, treatment and thus patient outcome.

  10. Prognostic factors in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, M L

    1998-06-01

    There is obvious merit in being able to accurately predict outcome and tailor treatment according to individual risk and potential for benefit. Epithelial ovarian cancers are characterized by a broad spectrum of biological behavior ranging from tumors that have an excellent prognosis and high likelihood of cure to those that progress rapidly and have a very poor prognosis. This wide clinical spectrum is partly reflected by a number of clinicopathological prognostic variables which include International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, histologic subtype and grade, volume of residual tumor remaining after surgical resection, performance status, and age. There has been increasing interest by many groups to incorporate the independent prognostic variables into multivariate models that could better predict outcome. This approach does appear to allow the identification of different prognostic subsets and requires confirmation in prospective studies. There has been, and there continues to be a lot of effort in identifying new prognostic factors that have a biologic rationale and these will be discussed. Most of these new prognostic factors have not been subjected to rigorous testing and this will be clearly necessary before they find clinical application. This is an area that is rapidly evolving with the increased understanding of the molecular basis for ovarian carcinogenesis and progression coupled with technological advances such as DNA arrays and automated polymerase chain reaction. We are at the threshold of developing a new and more objective as well as rational approach to predict prognosis and response to therapy.

  11. The epidemiology of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Greene, M H; Clark, J W; Blayney, D W

    1984-09-01

    Although no unequivocally effective ovarian cancer prevention strategies have emerged, epidemiologic studies have identified high-risk populations. The striking international variation (apparently a fivefold difference) can probably be explained on the basis of differential parity, differing classification measures, and differences in the underlying population age distribution. United States age-adjusted mortality has increased slightly in the past 30 years, and the cancer remains predominantly a disease of older adult white women of northern European extraction. The increases in age-specific mortality and age-adjusted mortality over time may be related to a decrease in average family size. Pregnancy, especially pregnancy before age 25 years, and use of oral contraceptives are protective; the risk of ovarian cancer increases with increasing years of ovulation. A positive family history is also associated with a substantial increase in ovarian cancer risk. Survivors of ovarian cancer are more susceptible to cancers of the breast, endometrium, and colon than are similarly-aged normal women, most probably because all four cancers share some common risk factor(s). Various alkylating agents are clearly leukemogenic in survivors of ovarian cancer, an observation that suggests caution in the use of adjuvant chemotherapy in women at relatively low risk of relapse.

  12. Survivorship Care Planning in Improving Quality of Life in Survivors of Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  13. Hypodontia and ovarian cancer: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Iavazzo, Christos; Papakiritsis, Matthaios; Gkegkes, Ioannis D.

    2016-01-01

    Hypodontia can be defined as the non-formation of one or more teeth during the developmental period. Mutation in several genes related to tooth formation has previously been correlated with cancer. Regarding the ovarian cancer, there are few studies that associate the presence of hypodontia with ovarian cancer. A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed and Scopus. In total, 385 patients were included in this study. Control group was present in 3 out of 4 studies (340 patients). Hypodontia was present in 56 out of 290 patients (incidence of 19.3%). Only in 2 out of 4 studies, the number of missing teeth was mentioned (47 teeth), while the majority of them were either maxillary second premolars or maxillary lateral incisors. Unilateral distribution of the missing teeth was present in 28 out of 46 patients, while bilateral distribution of the missing teeth was present in 18 out of 46 patients. The presence of ovarian cancer in the family medical history occurred in 12 out of 33 patients. Only 1 out of 4 studies examined the presence of genes with mutations in the included patients. Based on our findings, the lack of clinical studies was the principal obstacle to clarify the possible predictive value of hypodontia in the early prediction of patients with higher risk of ovarian cancer. PMID:27026778

  14. FDA Warns Ovarian Cancer Tests Not Reliable

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160880.html FDA Warns Ovarian Cancer Tests Not Reliable May delay preventive therapies for ... Sept. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Screening tests for ovarian cancer are not reliable and should not be used, ...

  15. Calculator for ovarian carcinoma subtype prediction.

    PubMed

    Kalloger, Steve E; Köbel, Martin; Leung, Samuel; Mehl, Erika; Gao, Dongxia; Marcon, Krista M; Chow, Christine; Clarke, Blaise A; Huntsman, David G; Gilks, C Blake

    2011-04-01

    With the emerging evidence that the five major ovarian carcinoma subtypes (high-grade serous, clear cell, endometrioid, mucinous, and low-grade serous) are distinct disease entities, management of ovarian carcinoma will become subtype specific in the future. In an effort to improve diagnostic accuracy, we set out to determine if an immunohistochemical panel of molecular markers could reproduce consensus subtype assignment. Immunohistochemical expression of 22 biomarkers were examined on tissue microarrays constructed from 322 archival ovarian carcinoma samples from the British Columbia Cancer Agency archives, for the period between 1984 and 2000, and an independent set of 242 cases of ovarian carcinoma from the Gynaecologic Tissue Bank at Vancouver General Hospital from 2001 to 2008. Nominal logistic regression was used to produce a subtype prediction model for each of these sets of cases. These models were then cross-validated against the other cohort, and then both models were further validated in an independent cohort of 81 ovarian carcinoma samples from five different centers. Starting with data for 22 markers, full model fit, backwards, nominal logistic regression identified the same nine markers (CDKN2A, DKK1, HNF1B, MDM2, PGR, TFF3, TP53, VIM, WT1) as being most predictive of ovarian carcinoma subtype in both the archival and tumor bank cohorts. These models were able to predict subtype in the respective cohort in which they were developed with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity (κ statistics of 0.88±0.02 and 0.86±0.04, respectively). When the models were cross-validated (ie using the model developed in one case series to predict subtype in the other series), the prediction equation's performances were reduced (κ statistics of 0.70±0.04 and 0.61±0.04, respectively) due to differences in frequency of expression of some biomarkers in the two case series. Both models were then validated on the independent series of 81 cases, with very good to

  16. Population-based genetic risk prediction and stratification for ovarian cancer: views from women at high risk.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Belinda; Meisel, Susanne F; Fraser, Lindsay; Side, Lucy; Gessler, Sue; Wardle, Jane; Lanceley, Anne

    2015-03-01

    There is an opportunity to improve outcomes for ovarian cancer (OC) through advances in risk stratification, early detection and diagnosis. A population-based OC genetic risk prediction and stratification program is being developed. A previous focus group study with individuals from the general population showed support for the proposed program. This qualitative interview study explores the attitudes of women at high risk of OC. Eight women participated in one-on-one, in-depth, semi-structured interviews to explore: experiences of learning of OC risk, risk perceptions, OC knowledge and awareness, and opinions on risk stratification approach. There was evidence of strong support for the proposed program. Benefits were seen as providing reassurance to women at low risk, and reducing worry in women at high risk through appropriate clinical management. Stratification into 'low' and 'high' risk groups was well-received. Participants were more hesitant about stratification to the 'intermediate' risk group. The data suggest formats to effectively communicate OC risk estimates will require careful thought. Interactions with GPs were highlighted as a barrier to OC risk assessment and diagnosis. These results are encouraging for the possible introduction and uptake of a risk prediction and stratification program for OC in the general population.

  17. Etiology, biology, and epidemiology of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, T R; Piver, M S

    1994-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer kills more women per year than all other gynecologic cancers combined. Pregnancy, oral contraceptive use, and tubal ligation decrease the risk of the disease, whereas risk is increased for women whose family history is consistent with one of the familial ovarian cancer syndromes. Several theories have been postulated concerning the etiology of ovarian cancer, including the incessant ovulation theory and that based on the model of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Chromosomal abnormalities and allele losses have been described in ovarian cancers. Involvement of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes has been investigated as well. Genetic linkage studies are ongoing in families whose history is consistent with one of the familial ovarian cancer syndromes.

  18. Applying quantitative adiposity feature analysis models to predict benefit of bevacizumab-based chemotherapy in ovarian cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunzhi; Qiu, Yuchen; Thai, Theresa; More, Kathleen; Ding, Kai; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2016-03-01

    How to rationally identify epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients who will benefit from bevacizumab or other antiangiogenic therapies is a critical issue in EOC treatments. The motivation of this study is to quantitatively measure adiposity features from CT images and investigate the feasibility of predicting potential benefit of EOC patients with or without receiving bevacizumab-based chemotherapy treatment using multivariate statistical models built based on quantitative adiposity image features. A dataset involving CT images from 59 advanced EOC patients were included. Among them, 32 patients received maintenance bevacizumab after primary chemotherapy and the remaining 27 patients did not. We developed a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to automatically segment subcutaneous fat areas (VFA) and visceral fat areas (SFA) and then extracted 7 adiposity-related quantitative features. Three multivariate data analysis models (linear regression, logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression) were performed respectively to investigate the potential association between the model-generated prediction results and the patients' progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). The results show that using all 3 statistical models, a statistically significant association was detected between the model-generated results and both of the two clinical outcomes in the group of patients receiving maintenance bevacizumab (p<0.01), while there were no significant association for both PFS and OS in the group of patients without receiving maintenance bevacizumab. Therefore, this study demonstrated the feasibility of using quantitative adiposity-related CT image features based statistical prediction models to generate a new clinical marker and predict the clinical outcome of EOC patients receiving maintenance bevacizumab-based chemotherapy.

  19. Long non-coding RNA ANRIL predicts poor prognosis and promotes invasion/metastasis in serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jun-Jun; Lin, Ying-Ying; Ding, Jing-Xin; Feng, Wei-Wei; Jin, Hong-Yan; Hua, Ke-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in carcinogenesis and have suggested that genes of this class might be used as biomarkers in cancer. However, whether lncRNAs are involved in serous ovarian cancer (SOC) remains largely unknown. In the present study, we focused on lncRNA antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL) and investigated its expression pattern, clinical significance, and biological function in SOC. We found that ANRIL levels were elevated in SOC tissues compared with normal controls and were highly correlated with advanced FIGO stage, high histological grade, lymph node metastasis, and poor prognosis. Multivariate analysis further revealed that ANRIL is an independent prognostic factor for predicting overall survival of SOC patients. In vitro, we compared differential ANRIL levels between SOC parental cell lines (SK-OV-3, HO8910) and highly metastatic sublines (SK-OV-3.ip1, HO8910-PM). Notably, ANRIL was highly expressed in both SK-OV-3.ip1 cells and HO8910-PM cells. SiRNA-mediated ANRIL silencing in these cells impaired cell migration and invasion. Based on the metastasis-related mRNA microarray analysis and subsequent western blotting confirmation, we found that MET and MMP3 are key downstream genes of ANRIL involved in SOC cell migration/invasion. Together, our data suggest that lncRNA ANRIL plays an important role in SOC invasion/metastasis and could represent a novel biomarker for predicting poor survival as well a promising therapeutic target.

  20. [Ovarian surface epithelium and its histogenic relation to ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Dietl, J; Buchholz, F; Stoll, P

    1986-09-01

    Approximately 80 to 90 per cent of adult ovarian cancers are assumed to originate from ovarian surface cells. A series of morphological and biochemical studies has been recently conducted to test this. The ovarian surface epithelium shows permanent morphological changes such as crypts, inclusion cysts, villous processes and different forms of müllerian epithelium. The unique nature of ovarian surface changes and their abrupt disappearance in immediately adjacent mesothelia suggest that local factors may play an important part in modifying the growth and morphogenesis of the epithelium of the ovarian surface. Whether these endogenous and/or exogenous factors may also induce surface neoplasia is a moot point.

  1. 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian Past Issues / Spring 2007 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian NCI estimates that endometrial, ...

  2. Exercise May Help Thwart Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159486.html Exercise May Help Thwart Ovarian Cancer Chronic inactivity linked ... TUESDAY, June 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Lack of exercise is associated with an increased risk of ovarian ...

  3. Ovarian cancer: etiology, risk factors, and epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Hunn, Jessica; Rodriguez, Gustavo C

    2012-03-01

    Little is known regarding the early aspects of ovarian carcinogenesis. As a consequence, the identification of women at risk for the disease is based primarily on clinical grounds, with family history being the most important risk factor. In this review, we will discuss the various hypotheses regarding ovarian etiology and pathogenesis. In addition, we will discuss the epidemiology of ovarian cancer, including hereditary, reproductive, hormonal, inflammatory, dietary, surgical, and geographic factors that influence ovarian cancer risk.

  4. Aberrant DNA damage response pathways may predict the outcome of platinum chemotherapy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Stefanou, Dimitra T; Bamias, Aristotelis; Episkopou, Hara; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A; Likka, Maria; Kalampokas, Theodore; Photiou, Stylianos; Gavalas, Nikos; Sfikakis, Petros P; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Souliotis, Vassilis L

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma (OC) is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Despite the advances in the treatment of OC with combinatorial regimens, including surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy, patients generally exhibit poor prognosis due to high chemotherapy resistance. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are involved in resistance of OC patients to platinum chemotherapy. Selected DDR signals were evaluated in two human ovarian carcinoma cell lines, one sensitive (A2780) and one resistant (A2780/C30) to platinum treatment as well as in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from OC patients, sensitive (n = 7) or resistant (n = 4) to subsequent chemotherapy. PBMCs from healthy volunteers (n = 9) were studied in parallel. DNA damage was evaluated by immunofluorescence γH2AX staining and comet assay. Higher levels of intrinsic DNA damage were found in A2780 than in A2780/C30 cells. Moreover, the intrinsic DNA damage levels were significantly higher in OC patients relative to healthy volunteers, as well as in platinum-sensitive patients relative to platinum-resistant ones (all P<0.05). Following carboplatin treatment, A2780 cells showed lower DNA repair efficiency than A2780/C30 cells. Also, following carboplatin treatment of PBMCs ex vivo, the DNA repair efficiency was significantly higher in healthy volunteers than in platinum-resistant patients and lowest in platinum-sensitive ones (t1/2 for loss of γH2AX foci: 2.7±0.5h, 8.8±1.9h and 15.4±3.2h, respectively; using comet assay, t1/2 of platinum-induced damage repair: 4.8±1.4h, 12.9±1.9h and 21.4±2.6h, respectively; all P<0.03). Additionally, the carboplatin-induced apoptosis rate was higher in A2780 than in A2780/C30 cells. In PBMCs, apoptosis rates were inversely correlated with DNA repair efficiencies of these cells, being significantly higher in platinum-sensitive than in platinum-resistant patients and lowest in healthy volunteers (all P<0.05). We conclude that

  5. Cisplatin and Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Advanced Ovarian Epithelial Cancer or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-06

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  6. Protection of ovarian function during chemotherapy for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Tianmin, X; Weiqin, C; Shuying, W; Yang, L; Manhua, C

    2014-01-01

    The protection of ovarian function during chemotherapy is an urgent issue to be resolved after the fertility preserving surgery on patients with ovarian cancer. The paper summarizes and analyzes the research progress on the protective measures in the aspects of gonadotropin releasing hormone analogue (GnRHa), cell protecting agents, and traditional Chinese medical science and drugs.

  7. A risk prediction algorithm for ovarian cancer incorporating BRCA1, BRCA2, common alleles and other familial effects

    PubMed Central

    Jervis, Sarah; Song, Honglin; Lee, Andrew; Dicks, Ed; Harrington, Patricia; Baynes, Caroline; Manchanda, Ranjit; Easton, Douglas F; Jacobs, Ian; Pharoah, Paul P D; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2015-01-01

    Background Although BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations account for only ∼27% of the familial aggregation of ovarian cancer (OvC), no OvC risk prediction model currently exists that considers the effects of BRCA1, BRCA2 and other familial factors. Therefore, a currently unresolved problem in clinical genetics is how to counsel women with family history of OvC but no identifiable BRCA1/2 mutations. Methods We used data from 1548 patients with OvC and their relatives from a population-based study, with known BRCA1/2 mutation status, to investigate OvC genetic susceptibility models, using segregation analysis methods. Results The most parsimonious model included the effects of BRCA1/2 mutations, and the residual familial aggregation was accounted for by a polygenic component (SD 1.43, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.86), reflecting the multiplicative effects of a large number of genes with small contributions to the familial risk. We estimated that 1 in 630 individuals carries a BRCA1 mutation and 1 in 195 carries a BRCA2 mutation. We extended this model to incorporate the explicit effects of 17 common alleles that are associated with OvC risk. Based on our models, assuming all of the susceptibility genes could be identified we estimate that the half of the female population at highest genetic risk will account for 92% of all OvCs. Conclusions The resulting model can be used to obtain the risk of developing OvC on the basis of BRCA1/2, explicit family history and common alleles. This is the first model that accounts for all OvC familial aggregation and would be useful in the OvC genetic counselling process. PMID:26025000

  8. Why have ovarian cancer mortality rates declined? Part I. Incidence.

    PubMed

    Sopik, Victoria; Iqbal, Javaid; Rosen, Barry; Narod, Steven A

    2015-09-01

    The age-adjusted mortality rate from ovarian cancer in the United States has declined over the past several decades. The decline in mortality might be the consequence of a reduced number of cases (incidence) or a reduction in the proportion of patients who die from their cancer (case-fatality). In part I of this three-part series, we examine rates of ovarian cancer incidence and mortality from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry database and we explore to what extent the observed decline in mortality can be explained by a downward shift in the stage distribution of ovarian cancer (i.e. due to early detection) or by fewer cases of ovarian cancer (i.e. due to a change in risk factors). The proportion of localized ovarian cancers did not increase, suggesting that a stage-shift did not contribute to the decline in mortality. The observed decline in mortality paralleled a decline in incidence. The trends in ovarian cancer incidence coincided with temporal changes in the exposure of women from different birth cohorts to various reproductive risk factors, in particular, to changes in the use of the oral contraceptive pill and to declining parity. Based on recent changes in risk factor propensity, we predict that the trend of the declining age-adjusted incidence rate of ovarian cancer in the United States will reverse and rates will increase in coming years. PMID:26080287

  9. Antivascular Therapy for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Duhoux, Francois P.; Machiels, Jean-Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth largest cancer killer in women. Improved understanding of the molecular pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer has led to the investigation of novel targeted therapies. Ovarian cancer is characterized by an imbalance between pro- and antiangiogenic factors in favor of angiogenesis activation. Various antivascular strategies are currently under investigation in ovarian cancer. They can schematically be divided into antiangiogenic and vascular-disrupting therapies. This paper provides a comprehensive review of these new treatments targeting the tumor vasculature in this disease. Promising activities have been detected in phase II trials, and results of phase III clinical trials are awaited eagerly. PMID:20072701

  10. Early Detection Biomarkers for Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sarojini, Sreeja; Tamir, Ayala; Lim, Heejin; Li, Shihong; Zhang, Shifang; Goy, Andre; Pecora, Andrew; Suh, K. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of conventional and contemporary methods to detect ovarian cancer development, ovarian cancer remains a common and commonly fatal gynecological malignancy. The identification and validation of early detection biomarkers highly specific to ovarian cancer, which would permit development of minimally invasive screening methods for detecting early onset of the disease, are urgently needed. Current practices for early detection of ovarian cancer include transvaginal ultrasonography, biomarker analysis, or a combination of both. In this paper we review recent research on novel and robust biomarkers for early detection of ovarian cancer and provide specific details on their contributions to tumorigenesis. Promising biomarkers for early detection of ovarian cancer include KLK6/7, GSTT1, PRSS8, FOLR1, ALDH1, and miRNAs. PMID:23319948

  11. Migration-inducing gene 7 promotes tumorigenesis and angiogenesis and independently predicts poor prognosis of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bihui; Yin, Mingzhu; Li, Xia; Cao, Guosheng; Qi, Jin; Lou, Ge; Sheng, Shijie; Kou, Junping; Chen, Kang; Yu, Boyang

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinomas (EOC) cause more mortality than any other cancer of the female reproductive system. New therapeutic approaches to reduce EOC mortality have been largely unsuccessful due to the poor understanding of the mechanisms underlying EOC proliferation and metastasis. Progress in EOC treatment is further hampered by a lack of reliable prognostic biomarkers for early risk assessment. In this study, we identify that Migration-Inducting Gene 7 (MIG-7) is specifically induced in human EOC tissues but not normal ovaries or ovarian cyst. Ovarian MIG-7 expression strongly correlated with EOC progression. Elevated MIG-7 level at the time of primary cytoreductive surgery was a strong and independent predictor of poor survival of EOC patients. Cell and murine xenograft models showed that MIG-7 was required for EOC proliferation and invasion, and MIG-7 enhanced EOC-associated angiogenesis by promoting the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor. Inhibiting MIG-7 by RNA interference in grafted EOC cells retarded tumor growth, angiogenesis and improved host survival, and suppressing MIG-7 expression with a small molecule inhibitor D-39 identified from the medicinal plant Liriope muscari mitigated EOC growth and invasion and specifically abrogated the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor. Our data not only reveal a critical function of MIG-7 in EOC growth and metastasis and support MIG-7 as an independent prognostic biomarker for EOC, but also demonstrate that therapeutic targeting of MIG-7 is likely beneficial in the treatment of EOC. PMID:27050277

  12. Belinostat and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That Did Not Respond to Carboplatin or Cisplatin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  13. Accumulation of ALDH1-positive cells after neoadjuvant chemotherapy predicts treatment resistance and prognosticates poor outcome in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Debald, Manuel; Rostamzadeh, Babak; Thiesler, Thore; Schröder, Lars; Barchet, Winfried; Abramian, Alina; Kaiser, Christina; Kristiansen, Glen; Kuhn, Walther; Kübler, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Although ovarian cancer is a highly chemosensitive disease, it is only infrequently cured. One of the major reasons lies in the presence of drug-resistant cancer stem-like cells, sufficient to fuel recurrence. We phenotyped cancer stem-like cells by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry in 55 matched samples before and after taxane/platinum-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy. All used markers of stemness (ALDH1, CD24, CD117, CD133) isolated low frequencies of malignant cells. ALDH1 was the most valuable marker for tracking stemness in vivo. The enrichment of ALDH1 expression after treatment was associated with a poor response to chemotherapy, with platinum resistance and independently prognosticated unfavorable outcome. Our results suggest that increased ALDH1 expression after treatment identifies patients with aggressive tumor phenotypes. PMID:25999351

  14. Accumulation of ALDH1-positive cells after neoadjuvant chemotherapy predicts treatment resistance and prognosticates poor outcome in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ayub, Tiyasha H; Keyver-Paik, Mignon-Denise; Debald, Manuel; Rostamzadeh, Babak; Thiesler, Thore; Schröder, Lars; Barchet, Winfried; Abramian, Alina; Kaiser, Christina; Kristiansen, Glen; Kuhn, Walther; Kübler, Kirsten

    2015-06-30

    Although ovarian cancer is a highly chemosensitive disease, it is only infrequently cured. One of the major reasons lies in the presence of drug-resistant cancer stem-like cells, sufficient to fuel recurrence. We phenotyped cancer stem-like cells by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry in 55 matched samples before and after taxane/platinum-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy. All used markers of stemness (ALDH1, CD24, CD117, CD133) isolated low frequencies of malignant cells. ALDH1 was the most valuable marker for tracking stemness in vivo. The enrichment of ALDH1 expression after treatment was associated with a poor response to chemotherapy, with platinum resistance and independently prognosticated unfavorable outcome. Our results suggest that increased ALDH1 expression after treatment identifies patients with aggressive tumor phenotypes. PMID:25999351

  15. Estrogen Biosynthesis and Action in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mungenast, Felicitas; Thalhammer, Theresia

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is still the deadliest of all gynecologic malignancies in women worldwide. This is attributed to two main features of these tumors, namely, (i) a diagnosis at an advanced tumor stage, and, (ii) the rapid onset of resistance to standard chemotherapy after an initial successful therapy with platin- and taxol-derivatives. Therefore, novel targets for an early diagnosis and better treatment options for these tumors are urgently needed. Epidemiological data show that induction and biology of ovarian cancer is related to life-time estrogen exposure. Also experimental data reveal that ovarian cancer cells share a number of estrogen regulated pathways with other hormone-dependent cancers, e.g., breast and endometrial cancer. However, ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease and the subtypes are quite different with respect to mutations, origins, behaviors, markers, and prognosis and respond differently to standard chemotherapy. Therefore, a characterization of ovarian cancer subtypes may lead to better treatment options for the various subtypes and in particular for the most frequently observed high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. For this intention, further studies on estrogen-related pathways and estrogen formation in ovarian cancer cells are warranted. The review gives an overview on ovarian cancer subtypes and explains the role of estrogen in ovarian cancer. Furthermore, enzymes active to synthesize and metabolize estrogens are described and strategies to target these pathways are discussed. PMID:25429284

  16. Early Preinvasive Lesions in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chene, Gautier; Lamblin, Gery; Le Bail-Carval, Karine; Chabert, Philippe; Bakrin, Naoual; Mellier, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Faced with the catastrophic prognosis for ovarian cancer due to the fact that it is most often diagnosed late at the peritoneal carcinomatosis stage, screening and early detection could probably reduce the mortality rate. A better understanding of the molecular characteristics of the different ovarian cancer subtypes and their specific molecular signatures is indispensable prior to development of new screening strategies. We discuss here the early natural history of ovarian cancer and its origins. PMID:24804229

  17. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients With Stage III-IV Pancreatic or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  18. Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio in the pre-treatment phase of final-line chemotherapy predicts the outcome of patients with recurrent ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    NAKAMURA, KEIICHIRO; NAGASAKA, TAKESHI; NISHIDA, TAKESHI; HARUMA, TOMOKO; OGAWA, CHIKAKO; KUSUMOTO, TOMOYUKI; SEKI, NORIKO; HIRAMATSU, YUJI

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and tumor immunology are associated with prognosis in a variety of cancers. The aim of the present retrospective study was to identify associations between the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR), cancer antigen 125 (CA125) concentrations, tumor response, performance status (PS) and survival of patients that developed recurrent ovarian cancer subsequent to receiving chemotherapy. The NLR and PLR measured prior to fourth-line chemotherapy were significantly increased compared with those measured prior to second-line chemotherapy (P=0.029 and 0.049, respectively). By using receiver operating characteristic curves, the cut-off values were determined for the NLR, PLR and CA125 levels that were measured during the pre-treatment phase, which predicted the outcomes. According to univariate analyses, pre-treatment NLR >3.91, PLR >299.0 and PS 2 were each significantly associated with poor outcomes (P=0.001, 0.005 and 0.021, respectively). According to multivariate analyses, only pre-treatment NLR was associated with poor outcome (P=0.035). The present findings indicate that pre-treatment NLR is an important predictor of prognosis in patients with ovarian cancer that experience recurrence following chemotherapy. PMID:27313726

  19. Possible role of ovarian epithelial inflammation in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ness, R B; Cottreau, C

    1999-09-01

    Ovarian cancer is a commonly fatal disease for which prevention strategies have been limited, in part because of a lack of understanding of the underlying biology. This paper reviews the epidemiologic literature in the English language on risk factors and protective factors for ovarian cancer and proposes a novel hypothesis that a common mechanism underlying this disease is inflammation. Previous hypotheses about the causes of ovarian cancer have attributed risk to an excess number of lifetime ovulations or to elevations in steroid hormones. Inflammation may underlie ovulatory events because an inflammatory reaction is induced during the process of ovulation. Additional risk factors for ovarian cancer, including asbestos and talc exposure, endometriosis (i.e., ectopic implantation of uterine lining tissue), and pelvic inflammatory disease, cannot be directly linked to ovulation or to hormones but do cause local pelvic inflammation. On the other hand, tubal ligation and hysterectomy act as protective factors, perhaps by diminishing the likelihood that the ovarian epithelium will be exposed to environmental initiators of inflammation. Inflammation entails cell damage, oxidative stress, and elevations of cytokines and prostaglandins, all of which may be mutagenic. The possibility that inflammation is a pathophysiologic contributor to the development of ovarian cancer suggests a directed approach to future research

  20. Benign epithelial ovarian tumours-cancer precursors or markers for ovarian cancer risk?

    PubMed

    Jordan, Susan; Green, Adèle; Webb, Penelope

    2006-06-01

    The natural history of the development of epithelial ovarian cancer remains obscure and no effective screening test exists. In several human malignancies progression from benign to invasive tumour occurs, but this sequence has not been established for epithelial ovarian cancer. We have reviewed epidemiological, histopathological and molecular studies of benign epithelial ovarian tumours to assess the evidence for and against such a progression in ovarian cancer. These data suggest that a diagnosis of a benign ovarian cyst or tumour is associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer later in life. Current evidence also suggests that benign serous tumours can progress to low-grade serous cancer and that benign mucinous tumours can progress to mucinous cancer. The more common high-grade serous ovarian cancers are likely to arise de novo.

  1. Ovarian and cervical cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C.

    1992-01-01

    Death rates from cervical cancer have already fallen this century and for patients with invasive cervical cancer five year survival rates are greater than for most solid tumours. Better screening for premalignant changes may further reduce the incidence of invasive cancer; indeed, it has been claimed that the reduction in mortality could be as high as 90%, though estimates of screening efficacy have varied greatly. For those with advanced invasive carcinoma neoadjuvant chemotherapy may reduce the risk of relapse and improve survival. Images FIG 2 p1504-a PMID:1611377

  2. OVARIAN CANCER: INVOLVEMENT OF THE MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASES

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alem, Linah; Curry, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancies. Reasons for the high mortality rate associated with ovarian cancer include a late diagnosis at which time the cancer has metastasized throughout the peritoneal cavity. Cancer metastasis is facilitated by the remodeling of the extracellular tumor matrix by a family of proteolytic enzymes known as the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). There are 23 members in the MMP family, many of which have been reported to be associated with ovarian cancer. In the current paradigm, ovarian tumor cells and the surrounding stromal cells stimulate the synthesis and/or activation of various MMPs to aid in tumor growth, invasion, and eventual metastasis. This review sheds light on the different MMPs in the various types of ovarian cancer and their impact on the progression of this gynecologic malignancy. PMID:25918438

  3. Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Lengyel, E; Burdette, JE; Kenny, HA; Matei, D; Pilrose, J; Haluska, P.; Nephew, KP; Hales, DB; Stack, MS

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (OvCa) is associated with high mortality and, as the majority (>75%) of women with OvCa have metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis, rates of survival have not changed appreciably over 30 years. A mechanistic understanding of OvCa initiation and progression is hindered by the complexity of genetic and/or environmental initiating events and lack of clarity regarding the cell(s) or tissue(s) of origin. Metastasis of OvCa involves direct extension or exfoliation of cells and cellular aggregates into the peritoneal cavity, survival of matrix-detached cells in a complex ascites fluid phase, and subsequent adhesion to the mesothelium lining covering abdominal organs to establish secondary lesions containing host stromal and inflammatory components. Development of experimental models to recapitulate this unique mechanism of metastasis presents a remarkable scientific challenge and many approaches used to study other solid tumors (lung, colon, and breast, for example) are not transferable to OvCa research given the distinct metastasis pattern and unique tumor microenvironment. This review will discuss recent progress in the development and refinement of experimental models to study OvCa. Novel cellular, three-dimensional organotypic, and ex vivo models are considered and the current in vivo models summarized. The review critically evaluates currently available genetic mouse models of OvCa, the emergence of xenopatients, and the utility of the hen model to study OvCa prevention, tumorigenesis, metastasis, and chemoresistance. As these new approaches more accurately recapitulate the complex tumor microenvironment, it is predicted that new opportunities for enhanced understanding of disease progression, metastasis and therapeutic response will emerge. PMID:23934194

  4. Ovarian cancer, Part II: Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ozols, R F

    1992-01-01

    The death rate from epithelial ovarian cancer has only slightly decreased in the past decade. In contrast, there have been dramatic improvements in the treatment of germ cell tumors of the ovary and the majority of patients even with advanced disease is now cured because of the development of effective platinum-based combination chemotherapy. Unfortunately, most patients with ovarian cancer have the epithelial histologic type, and only one third of these patients can be cured with standard approaches. It has recently been shown that a subset of patients with early stage ovarian cancer has a greater than 90% cure rate without chemotherapy. Consequently, a major focus of current research is to develop effective screening modalities in order to diagnose epithelial tumors when they are still confined to the ovaries and pelvis. Currently, three fourths of patients are diagnosed at the time the disease has spread throughout the peritoneal cavity, and the standard approach has been cytoreductive surgery followed by combination chemotherapy. The two-drug combination of carboplatin plus cyclophosphamide has now become the treatment of choice, although it is equally effective as and less toxic than a regimen of cisplatin plus cyclophosphamide. In addition, Taxol has been identified as an extremely active agent against this disease, and new Taxol-containing combinations are under clinical investigation. Clinical trials are also in progress with hexamethylmelamine and ifosfamide combinations as well as with more dose-intense regimens based on considerable retrospective evidence that survival is correlated with the dose intensity of platinum compounds. New agents such as WR2721, IL-3, and IL-1 alpha are undergoing clinical evaluation to determine whether the toxicities of platinum compounds can be decreased and lead to further exploitation of the dose response relationship. After induction chemotherapy, approximately 50% of patients will be in a clinical complete remission

  5. Ovarian cancer mortality and industrial pollution.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Javier; Lope, Virginia; López-Abente, Gonzalo; González-Sánchez, Mario; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo

    2015-10-01

    We investigated whether there might be excess ovarian cancer mortality among women residing near Spanish industries, according to different categories of industrial groups and toxic substances. An ecologic study was designed to examine ovarian cancer mortality at a municipal level (period 1997-2006). Population exposure to pollution was estimated by means of distance from town to facility. Using Poisson regression models, we assessed the relative risk of dying from ovarian cancer in zones around installations, and analyzed the effect of industrial groups and pollutant substances. Excess ovarian cancer mortality was detected in the vicinity of all sectors combined, and, principally, near refineries, fertilizers plants, glass production, paper production, food/beverage sector, waste treatment plants, pharmaceutical industry and ceramic. Insofar as substances were concerned, statistically significant associations were observed for installations releasing metals and polycyclic aromatic chemicals. These results support that residing near industries could be a risk factor for ovarian cancer mortality.

  6. Natural history of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Arturo Novoa

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a disease laden with paradigms, and it is a serious health problem. It is important to know its natural history, as it is multifactorial in origin, and also to understand its behaviour given its risk factors which can lead to death from metastasis in patients. It continues to be a challenge for oncologists. An analytical literature review was performed to update the latest concepts of its origin, evolution, risk factors, pre-clinical horizon, and its clinical manifestations; until the death of the patient. PMID:25371706

  7. Natural history of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Arturo Novoa

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a disease laden with paradigms, and it is a serious health problem. It is important to know its natural history, as it is multifactorial in origin, and also to understand its behaviour given its risk factors which can lead to death from metastasis in patients. It continues to be a challenge for oncologists. An analytical literature review was performed to update the latest concepts of its origin, evolution, risk factors, pre-clinical horizon, and its clinical manifestations; until the death of the patient.

  8. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Ovarian Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer? What should you ask your doctor about ovarian cancer? It is important for you to have honest, ... are some questions to consider: What type of ovarian cancer do I have? Has my cancer spread beyond ...

  9. Metformin Hydrochloride, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Ovarian Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  10. Oncolytic reovirus against ovarian and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Kensuke; Nishikawa, Sandra G; Norman, Kara L; Alain, Tommy; Kossakowska, Anna; Lee, Patrick W K

    2002-03-15

    Reovirus selectively replicates in and destroys cancer cells with an activated Ras signaling pathway. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using reovirus (serotype 3, strain Dearing) as an antihuman colon and ovarian cancer agent. In in vitro studies, reovirus infection in human colon and ovarian cell lines was assessed by cytopathic effect as detected by light microscopy, [(35)S]Methionine labeling of infected cells for viral protein synthesis and progeny virus production by plaque assay. We observed that reovirus efficiently infected all five human colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2, DLD-1, HCT-116, HT-29, and SW48) and four human ovarian cancer cell lines (MDAH2774, PA-1, SKOV3, and SW626) which were tested, but not a normal colon cell line (CCD-18Co) or a normal ovarian cell line (NOV-31). We also observed that the Ras activity in the human colon and ovarian cancer cell lines was elevated compared with that in normal colon and ovarian cell lines. In animal models, intraneoplastic as well as i.v. inoculation of reovirus resulted in significant regression of established s.c. human colon and ovarian tumors implanted at the hind flank. Histological studies revealed that reovirus infection in vivo was restricted to tumor cells, whereas the surrounding normal tissue remained uninfected. Additionally, in an i.p. human ovarian cancer xenograft model, inhibition of ascites tumor formation and the survival of animals treated with live reovirus was significantly greater than of control mice treated with UV-inactivated reovirus. Reovirus infection in ex vivo primary human ovarian tumor surgical samples was also confirmed, further demonstrating the potential of reovirus therapy. These results suggest that reovirus holds promise as a novel agent for human colon and ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:11912142

  11. Bevacizumab and Intravenous or Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  12. OPT-821 With or Without Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Peritoneal Cancer in Second or Third Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  13. STAT3 polymorphisms may predict an unfavorable response to first-line platinum-based therapy for women with advanced serous epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Fulp, William J; Reid, Brett M; Chen, Zhihua; Georgeades, Christina; Cheng, Jin Q; Magliocco, Anthony; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Lancaster, Johnathan M

    2016-02-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) contribute to epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) progression and therapeutic response. We hypothesized that germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CSC-related genes may predict an initial therapeutic response for women newly diagnosed with EOC. A nested case-control design was used to study 361 women with advanced-stage serous EOC treated with surgery followed by first-line platinum-based combination therapy at Moffitt Cancer Center or as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas Study. "Cases" included 102 incomplete responders (IRs) and "controls" included 259 complete clinical responders (CRs) to therapy. Using Illumina genotyping arrays and imputation, DNA samples were evaluated for 5,509 SNPs in 24 ovarian CSC-related genes. We also evaluated the overall significance of each CSC gene using the admixture maximum likelihood (AML) test, and correlated genotype with EOC tumor tissue expression. The strongest SNP-level associations with an IR to therapy were identified for correlated (r(2) > 0.80) SNPs within signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) [odds ratio (OR), 2.24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.32-3.78; p = 0.0027], after adjustment for age, population stratification, grade and residual disease. At the gene level, STAT3 was significantly associated with an IR to therapy (pAML = 0.006). rs1053004, a STAT3 SNP in a putative miRNA-binding site, was associated with STAT3 expression (p = 0.057). This is the first study to identify germline STAT3 variants as independent predictors of an unfavorable therapeutic response for EOC patients. Findings suggest that STAT3 genotype may identify high-risk women likely to respond more favorably to novel therapeutic combinations that include STAT3 inhibitors. PMID:26264211

  14. Ovarian cancer: emerging molecular-targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Sourbier, Carole

    2012-01-01

    With about 22,000 new cases estimated in 2012 in the US and 15,500 related deaths, ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous and aggressive disease. Even though most of patients are sensitive to chemotherapy treatment following surgery, recurring disease is almost always lethal, and only about 30% of the women affected will be cured. Thanks to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying ovarian cancer malignancy, new therapeutic options with molecular-targeted agents have become available. This review discusses the rationale behind molecular-targeted therapies and examines how newly identified molecular targets may enhance personalized therapies for ovarian cancer patients. PMID:22807625

  15. Genomic similarities between breast and ovarian cancers

    Cancer.gov

    One subtype of breast cancer shares many genetic features with high-grade serous ovarian cancer, a cancer that is very difficult to treat, according to researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health. The findings suggest that the two cancers a

  16. Ormeloxifene efficiently inhibits ovarian cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Diane M.; Khan, Sheema; Nordquist, Jordan; Ebeling, Mara C.; Bauer, Nichole A.; Kopel, Lucas; Singh, Man Mohan; Halaweish, Fathi; Bell, Maria C.; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer continues to be a leading cause of cancer related deaths for women. Anticancer agents effective against chemo-resistant cells are greatly needed for ovarian cancer treatment. Repurposing drugs currently in human use is an attractive strategy for developing novel cancer treatments with expedited translation into clinical trials. Therefore, we examined whether ormeloxifene (ORM), a non-steroidal Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator (SERM) currently used for contraception, is therapeutically effective at inhibiting ovarian cancer growth. We report that ORM treatment inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in ovarian cancer cell lines, including cell lines resistant to cisplatin. Furthermore, ORM treatment decreases Akt phosphorylation, increases p53 phosphorylation, and modulates the expression and localization patterns of p27, cyclin E, cyclin D1, and CDK2. In a pre-clinical xenograft mouse ORM treatment significantly reduces tumorigenesis and metastasis. These results indicate that ORM effectively inhibits the growth of cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells. ORM is currently in human use and has an established record of patient safety. Our encouraging in vitro and pre-clinical in vivo findings indicate that ORM is a promising candidate for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:25306892

  17. General Information about Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Primary Peritoneal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  18. Genetic and molecular changes in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Robert L; Gourley, Charlie

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer represents the most lethal gynecological malignancy in the developed world, and can be divided into five main histological subtypes: high grade serous, endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous and low grade serous. These subtypes represent distinct disease entities, both clinically and at the molecular level. Molecular analysis has revealed significant genetic heterogeneity in ovarian cancer, particularly within the high grade serous subtype. As such, this subtype has been the focus of much research effort to date, revealing molecular subgroups at both the genomic and transcriptomic level that have clinical implications. However, stratification of ovarian cancer patients based on the underlying biology of their disease remains in its infancy. Here, we summarize the molecular changes that characterize the five main ovarian cancer subtypes, highlight potential opportunities for targeted therapeutic intervention and outline priorities for future research. PMID:27458531

  19. The treatment of early stage ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, R C

    1995-10-01

    Approximately one third of women with ovarian cancer present with localized disease. A series of recent studies have identified a population of patients who require only comprehensive surgical staging for optimal results and another group that may benefit from adjuvant therapy. A series of national and international studies are evaluating a variety of adjuvant treatments in prospective randomized trials that may enhance long-term survival in poor-prognosis early ovarian cancer. PMID:7481865

  20. Unbalanced Estrogen Metabolism in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zahid, Muhammad; Beseler, Cheryl L.; Hall, James B.; LeVan, Tricia; Cavalieri, Ercole L.; Rogan, Eleanor G.

    2013-01-01

    Greater exposure to estrogens is a risk factor for ovarian cancer. To investigate the role of estrogens in ovarian cancer, a spot urine sample and a saliva sample were obtained from 33 women with ovarian cancer and 34 age-matched controls. Thirty-eight estrogen metabolites, conjugates and DNA adducts were analyzed in the urine samples by using ultraperformance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, and the ratio of adducts to metabolites and conjugates was calculated for each sample. The ratio of depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts to estrogen metabolites and conjugates was significantly higher in cases compared to controls (p<0.0001), demonstrating high specificity and sensitivity. DNA was purified from the saliva samples and analyzed for genetic polymorphisms in the genes for two estrogen-metabolizing enzymes. Women with two low-activity alleles of catechol-O-methyltransferase plus one or two high-activity alleles of cytochrome P450 1B1 had higher levels of estrogen-DNA adducts and were more likely to have ovarian cancer. These findings indicate that estrogen metabolism is unbalanced in ovarian cancer and suggest that formation of estrogen-DNA adducts plays a critical role in the initiation of ovarian cancer. PMID:24170413

  1. Features of ovarian cancer in Lynch syndrome (Review)

    PubMed Central

    NAKAMURA, KANAKO; BANNO, KOUJI; YANOKURA, MEGUMI; IIDA, MIHO; ADACHI, MASATAKA; MASUDA, KENTA; UEKI, ARISA; KOBAYASHI, YUSUKE; NOMURA, HIROYUKI; HIRASAWA, AKIRA; TOMINAGA, EIICHIRO; AOKI, DAISUKE

    2014-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is a hereditary ovarian cancer with a prevalence of 0.9–2.7%. Lynch syndrome accounts for 10–15% of hereditary ovarian cancers, while hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome accounts for 65–75% of these cancers. The lifetime risk for ovarian cancer in families with Lynch syndrome is ~8%, which is lower than colorectal and endometrial cancers, and ovarian cancer is not listed in the Amsterdam Criteria II. More than half of sporadic ovarian cancers are diagnosed in stage III or IV, but ≥80% of ovarian cancers in Lynch syndrome are diagnosed in stage I or II. Ovarian cancers in Lynch syndrome mostly have non-serous histology and different properties from those of sporadic ovarian cancers. A screening method for ovarian cancers in Lynch syndrome has yet to be established and clinical studies of prophylactic administration of oral contraceptives are not available. However, molecular profiles at the genetic level indicate that ovarian cancer in Lynch syndrome has a more favorable prognosis than sporadic ovarian cancer. Inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of the rapamycin pathway and anti-epidermal growth factor antibodies may have efficacy for the disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review focusing on ovarian cancer in Lynch syndrome. PMID:25279173

  2. Lost expression of DCC gene in ovarian cancer and its inhibition in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Meimei, Liu; Peiling, Li; Baoxin, Li; Changmin, Li; Rujin, Zhuang; Chunjie, Hu

    2011-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related women mortality in China. In recent years, the molecular mechanisms involved in ovarian carcinoma development and/or progression have been intensely studied, and several genes have been identified. Deleted in Colorectal Carcinoma (DCC), is an important tumor suppressor gene, which is inactivated in many kinds of tumors, and its function(s) is not clarified. Even though the lost expression of DCC occurred in later stages of multistep colorectal carcinogenesis, its contribution to the onset or progression of ovarian cancer is not fully understood. To investigate DCC expression in ovarian cancer, we studied 254 clinical samples by RT-PCR. Our results revealed that 52% malignant ovarian cancer did not express DCC gene. By contrast, DCC expression was observed in all normal ovary tissues and 80% benign ovarian tumors. Obviously, there was a significant correlation between DCC expression and ovarian cancer, especially in the epithelial ovarian cancer. The present study also suggested that the loss expression of DCC occurred more frequently in the cases of later clinical stage, higher pathological grade, and poorer prognosis. In the other part of this study, we further explored DCC expression after transfection in two kinds of ovarian cancer cell lines, namely SKOV3 cell and HO-8910 cell, using RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. The results indicated that DCC expressed in SKOV3-DCC and HO-8910-DCC cells, and ultrastructural analysis showed the appearance of apoptotic features in them. Furthermore, cell growth was markedly down-regulated in above groups of cells, indicating that transfection with the DCC constructs can suppress the growth of tumor cells. In conclusion, our results suggest an association of lost expression of DCC with the ovarian cancer, and DCC gene may inhibit the growth of ovarian carcinoma cells. However, this result needs further trials with a larger sample. PMID:20054719

  3. Genetic heterogeneity of breast-ovarian cancer revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Narod, S.; Ford, D.; Easton, D.

    1995-10-01

    We have recently reported the results of a linkage analysis of 145 breast-ovarian cancer families. Each family has three or more cases of early-onset breast cancer (age {le}60) or of ovarian cancer, and all families have at least one case of ovarian cancer (there were nine site-specific ovarian cancer families). Overall, we estimated that 76% of the families were linked to the BRCA1 locus. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  4. 77 FR 55095 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ..., who have a family history of ovarian or breast cancer, or who have had certain cancers in the past are... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8853 of August 31, 2012 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2012 By the... their lives to ovarian cancer. They are mothers and daughters, sisters and grandmothers,...

  5. Cisplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage IIB, Stage IIC, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Gastrointestinal Complication; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  6. Quality control in ovarian cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Hacker, N F

    2011-12-01

    This study is a literature review of papers in the English language dealing with quality control for ovarian cancer surgery. Quality control in surgery has long been a neglected area of medicine. Initial attempts were limited to cardiac surgery, but only very recently has there been any attempt to look at quality control in ovarian cancer surgery. Investigators from Hesse, Germany were the first to document the surgical quality of patients with ovarian cancer. Subsequently, investigators in the United States and other European countries have demonstrated that patients treated by gynaecological oncologists in large-volume tertiary institutions had the best outcomes. The Gynaecological Cancer Group of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer has developed a series of process quality indicators for ovarian cancer surgery that could be used by surgeons or units to audit and improve their practice. These and or other initiatives are important, because pressure is coming from consumers, government, health care insurers and medical risk insurers for surgeons and hospitals to provide transparent patient outcome data. If the profession does not institute adequate internal regulation of the quality of ovarian cancer surgery, regulation is likely to be imposed by government.

  7. Ovarian stimulation in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Elkin; González, Naira; Muñoz, Luis; Aguilar, Jesús; Velasco, Juan A García

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent malignancy among women under 50. Improvements in diagnosis and treatment have yielded an important decrease in mortality in the last 20 years. In many cases, chemotherapy and radiotherapy develop side effects on the reproductive function. Therefore, before the anti-cancer treatment impairs fertility, clinicians should offer some techniques for fertility preservation for women planning motherhood in the future. In order to obtain more available oocytes for IVF, the ovary must be stimulated. New protocols which prevent exposure to increased estrogen during gonadotropin stimulation, measurements to avoid the delay in starting anti-cancer treatment or the outcome of ovarian stimulation have been addressed in this review. There is no evidence of association between ovarian stimulation and breast cancer. It seems that there are more relevant other confluent factors than ovarian stimulation. Factors that can modify the risk of breast cancer include: parity, age at full-term birth, age of menarche, and family history. There is an association between breast cancer and exogenous estrogen. Therefore, specific protocols to stimulate patients with breast cancer include anti-estrogen agents such as letrozole. By using letrozole plus recombinant follicular stimulating hormone, patients develop a multifollicular growth with only a mild increase in estradiol serum levels. Controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) takes around 10 days, and we discuss new strategies to start COS as soon as possible. Protocols starting during the luteal phase or after inducing the menses currently prevent a delay in starting ovarian stimulation. Patients with breast cancer have a poorer response to COS compared with patients without cancer who are stimulated with conventional protocols of gonadotropins. Although many centres offer fertility preservation and many patients undergo ovarian stimulation, there are not enough studies to evaluate the recurrence, breast cancer

  8. Paclitaxel, Cisplatin, and Topotecan With or Without Filgrastim in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III or Stage IV Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  9. A photobleaching-based PDT dose metric predicts PDT efficacy over certain BPD concentration ranges in a three-dimensional model of ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbil, S.; Rizvi, I.; Celli, J. P.; Alagic, N.; Hasan, T.

    2013-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) dosimetry is an active area of study that is motivated by the need to reliably predict treatment outcomes. Implicit dosimetric parameters, such as photosensitizer (PS) photobleaching, may indicate PDT efficacy and could establish a framework to provide patient-customized PDT. Here, tumor destruction and benzoporphryin-derivative (BPD) photobleaching are characterized by systematically varying BPD-light combinations to achieve fixed PDT doses (M * J * cm-2) in a three-dimensional (3D) model of micrometastatic ovarian cancer (OvCa). It is observed that the BPD-light parameters used to construct a given PDT dose significantly impact nodule viability and BPD photobleaching. As a result, PDT dose, when measured by the product of BPD concentration and fluence, does not reliably predict overall efficacy. A PDT dose metric that incorporates a term for BPD photobleaching more robustly predicts PDT efficacy at low concentrations of BPD. These results suggest that PDT dose metrics that are informed by implicit approaches to dosimetry could improve the reliability of PDT-based regimens and provide opportunities for patient-specific treatment planning.

  10. Quantitative measurement of adiposity using CT images to predict the benefit of bevacizumab-based chemotherapy in epithelial ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YUNZHI; THAI, THERESA; MOORE, KATHLEEN; DING, KAI; MCMEEKIN, SCOTT; LIU, HONG; ZHENG, BIN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to quantitatively measure adiposity-related image features and to test the feasibility of applying multivariate statistical data analysis-based prediction models to generate a novel clinical marker and predict the benefit of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients with and without maintenance bevacizumab-based chemotherapy. A dataset involving computed tomography (CT) images acquired from 59 patients diagnosed with advanced EOC was retrospectively collected. Among them, 32 patients received maintenance bevacizumab following primary chemotherapy, while 27 did not. A computer-aided detection scheme was developed to automatically segment visceral and subcutaneous fat areas depicted on CT images of abdominal sections, and 7 adiposity-related image features were computed. Upon combining these features with the measured body mass index, multivariate data analyses were performed using three statistical models (multiple linear, logistic and Cox proportional hazards regressions) to analyze the association between the model-generated prediction results and the treatment outcome, including progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of the patients. The results demonstrated that applying all three prediction models yielded a significant association between the adiposity-related image features and patients' PFS or OS in the group of the patients who received maintenance bevacizumab (P<0.010), while there was no significant difference when these prediction models were applied to predict both PFS and OS in the group of patients that did not receive maintenance bevacizumab. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that the use of a quantitative adiposity-related image feature-based statistical model may generate a novel clinical marker to predict who will benefit among EOC patients receiving maintenance bevacizumab-based chemotherapy. PMID:27347200

  11. Breast and Ovarian Cancer and Family History Risk Categories

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases Genomic Resources Breast and Ovarian Cancer and Family History Risk Categories Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... Screening. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. February 2016. Family Health History, Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk, and ...

  12. Does Breast or Ovarian Cancer Run in Your Family?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does Breast or Ovarian Cancer Run in Your Family? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... get ovarian cancer by age 70. Does Your Family Health History Put You At Risk? Tell your ...

  13. Know Your Risk for Ovarian Cancer -- and The Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_160881.html Know Your Risk for Ovarian Cancer -- and the Symptoms Because early signs are often ... is needed in the prevention and treatment of ovarian cancer, according to a doctor who specializes in the ...

  14. Olaparib in the management of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bixel, Kristin; Hays, John L

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in the homologous repair pathway are thought to occur in 30%–50% of epithelial ovarian cancers. Cells deficient in homologous recombination rely on alternative pathways for DNA repair in order to survive, thereby providing a potential target for therapy. Olaparib, a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, capitalizes on this concept and is the first drug in its class approved for patients with ovarian cancer. This review article will provide an overview of the BRCA genes and homologous recombination, the role of PARP in DNA repair and the biological rationale for the use of PARP inhibitors as cancer therapy, and ultimately will focus on the use of olaparib in the management of ovarian cancer. PMID:26309417

  15. Distinct prognostic values of four-Notch-receptor mRNA expression in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xinling; Teng, Lingling; Wang, Min

    2016-05-01

    Notch signaling pathway includes ligands and Notch receptors, which are frequently deregulated in several human malignancies including ovarian cancer. Aberrant activation of Notch signaling has been linked to ovarian carcinogenesis and progression. In the current study, we used the "Kaplan-Meier plotter" (KM plotter) database, in which updated gene expression data and survival information from a total of 1306 ovarian cancer patients were used to access the prognostic value of four Notch receptors in ovarian cancer patients. Hazard ratio (HR), 95 % confidence intervals, and log-rank P were calculated. Notch1 messenger RNA (mRNA) high expression was not found to be correlated to overall survival (OS) for all ovarian cancer, as well as in serous and endometrioid cancer patients followed for 20 years. However, Notch1 mRNA high expression is significantly associated with worsen OS in TP53 wild-type ovarian cancer patients, while it is significantly associated with better OS in TP53 mutation-type ovarian cancer patients. Notch2 mRNA high expression was found to be significantly correlated to worsen OS for all ovarian cancer patients, as well as in grade II ovarian cancer patients. Notch3 mRNA high expression was found to be significantly correlated to better OS for all ovarian cancer patients, but not in serous cancer patients and endometrioid cancer patients. Notch4 mRNA high expression was not found to be significantly correlated to OS for all ovarian cancer patients, serous cancer patients, and endometrioid cancer patients. These results indicate that there are distinct prognostic values of four Notch receptors in ovarian cancer. This information will be useful for better understanding of the heterogeneity and complexity in the molecular biology of ovarian cancer and for developing tools to more accurately predict their prognosis. Based on our results, Notch1 could be a potential drug target of TP53 wild-type ovarian cancer and Notch2 could be a potential drug

  16. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-15

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  17. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santoiemma, Phillip P; Powell, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in ovarian cancer is prognostic for increased survival while increases in immunosuppressive regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are associated with poor outcomes. Approaches that bolster tumor-reactive TILs may limit tumor progression. However, identifying tumor-reactive TILs in ovarian cancer has been challenging, though adoptive TIL therapy in patients has been encouraging. Other forms of TIL immunomodulation remain under investigation including Treg depletion, antibody-based checkpoint modification, activation and amplification using dendritic cells, antigen presenting cells or IL-2 cytokine culture, adjuvant cytokine injections, and gene-engineered T-cells. Many approaches to TIL manipulation inhibit ovarian cancer progression in preclinical or clinical studies as monotherapy. Here, we review the impact of TILs in ovarian cancer and attempts to mobilize TILs to halt tumor progression. We conclude that effective TIL therapy for ovarian cancer is at the brink of translation and optimal TIL activity may require combined methodologies to deliver clinically-relevant treatment. PMID:25894333

  18. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Santoiemma, Phillip P; Powell, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in ovarian cancer is prognostic for increased survival while increases in immunosuppressive regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are associated with poor outcomes. Approaches that bolster tumor-reactive TILs may limit tumor progression. However, identifying tumor-reactive TILs in ovarian cancer has been challenging, though adoptive TIL therapy in patients has been encouraging. Other forms of TIL immunomodulation remain under investigation including Treg depletion, antibody-based checkpoint modification, activation and amplification using dendritic cells, antigen presenting cells or IL-2 cytokine culture, adjuvant cytokine injections, and gene-engineered T-cells. Many approaches to TIL manipulation inhibit ovarian cancer progression in preclinical or clinical studies as monotherapy. Here, we review the impact of TILs in ovarian cancer and attempts to mobilize TILs to halt tumor progression. We conclude that effective TIL therapy for ovarian cancer is at the brink of translation and optimal TIL activity may require combined methodologies to deliver clinically-relevant treatment.

  19. Changes in Brain Function in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Who Are Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Malignant Ovarian Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Polyembryoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Teratoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  20. The epidemiology of endometrial and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Daniel W

    2012-02-01

    This review highlights similarities in the epidemiology of endometrial and ovarian cancer, including highly correlated incidence rates and similar risk factor profiles. Factors that decrease risk for both cancers include a late menarche, early age at first birth, giving birth and breastfeeding, and use of oral contraceptives. Short or irregular cycles and late menopause are associated with increased risk for both. Other risk factors that appear to operate in a similar direction include decreased risk associated with IUD use or a tubal ligation, and increased risk associated with obesity, lack of exercise, and use of talc powders in genital hygiene. Estrogen excess is proposed as the underlying mechanism for most endometrial cancers, whereas incessant ovulation has been suggested as the explanation for ovarian cancer. However, an increased number of estimated ovulatory cycles correlates directly with risk for both endometrial and ovarian cancer, suggesting that reproductive tissue turnover with an accumulation of PTEN or p53 mutations represents a possible common mechanism. An immune-based explanation involving mucin proteins represents another common mechanism that could explain additional risk factors. Maintenance of ideal weight, breastfeeding children, use of oral contraceptives, and avoidance of talc powders in genital hygiene are measures that could lower the risk for both types of cancer. Careful selection of patients for prophylactic oophorectomy for those women who are coming to hysterectomy for benign disease is an additional measure to consider for ovarian cancer.

  1. Breast cancer susceptibility variants alter risk in familial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Latif, A; McBurney, H J; Roberts, S A; Lalloo, F; Howell, A; Evans, D G; Newman, W G

    2010-12-01

    Recent candidate gene and genome wide association studies have revealed novel loci associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. We evaluated the effect of these breast cancer associated variants on ovarian cancer risk in individuals with familial ovarian cancer both with and without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. A total of 158 unrelated white British women (54 BRCA1/2 mutation positive and 104 BRCA1/2 mutation negative) with familial ovarian cancer were genotyped for FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3 and CASP8 variants. The p.Asp302His CASP8 variant was associated with reduced ovarian cancer risk in the familial BRCA1/2 mutation negative ovarian cancer cases (P = 0.016). The synonymous TNRC9/TOX3 (Ser51) variant was present at a significantly lower frequency than in patients with familial BRCA1/2 positive breast cancer (P = 0.0002). Our results indicate that variants in CASP8 and TNRC9/TOX3 alter the risk of disease in individuals affected with familial ovarian cancer.

  2. Ovarian cancer treatment: The end of empiricism?

    PubMed

    Lheureux, Stephanie; Karakasis, Katherine; Kohn, Elise C; Oza, Amit M

    2015-09-15

    The diagnosis, investigation, and management of ovarian cancer are in a state of flux-balancing ever rapid advances in our understanding of its biology with 3 decades of clinical trials. Clinical trials that started with empirically driven selections have evolved in an evidence-informed manner to gradually improve outcome. Has this improved understanding of the biology and associated calls to action led to appropriate changes in therapy? In this review, the authors discuss incorporating emerging data on biology, combinations, dose, and scheduling of new and existing agents with patient preferences in the management of women with ovarian cancer.

  3. Ovarian cancer treatment: The end of empiricism?

    PubMed

    Lheureux, Stephanie; Karakasis, Katherine; Kohn, Elise C; Oza, Amit M

    2015-09-15

    The diagnosis, investigation, and management of ovarian cancer are in a state of flux-balancing ever rapid advances in our understanding of its biology with 3 decades of clinical trials. Clinical trials that started with empirically driven selections have evolved in an evidence-informed manner to gradually improve outcome. Has this improved understanding of the biology and associated calls to action led to appropriate changes in therapy? In this review, the authors discuss incorporating emerging data on biology, combinations, dose, and scheduling of new and existing agents with patient preferences in the management of women with ovarian cancer. PMID:26096019

  4. Ovarian Cancer Biomarker Performance in Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Daniel W.; Bast, Robert C.; Berg, Christine D.; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Hartge, Patricia; Lokshin, Anna E.; Lu, Karen H.; McIntosh, Martin W.; Mor, Gil; Patriotis, Christos; Pinsky, Paul F.; Thornquist, Mark D.; Scholler, Nathalie; Skates, Steven J.; Sluss, Patrick M.; Srivastava, Sudhir; Ward, David C.; Zhang, Zhen; Zhu, Claire S.; Urban, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Establishing a cancer screening biomarker’s intended performance requires “phase III” specimens obtained in asymptomatic individuals before clinical diagnosis rather than “phase II” specimens obtained from symptomatic individuals at diagnosis. We used specimens from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) cancer screening trial to evaluate ovarian cancer biomarkers previously assessed in phase II sets. Phase II specimens from 180 ovarian cancer cases and 660 benign disease or general population controls were assembled from four Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) or Ovarian Cancer Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) sites and used to rank 49 biomarkers. Thirty-five markers, including 6 additional markers from a fifth site, were then evaluated in PLCO proximate specimens from 118 women with ovarian cancer and 474 matched controls. Top markers in phase II specimens included CA125, HE4, transthyretin, CA15.3, and CA72.4 with sensitivity at 95% specificity ranging from 0.73 to 0.40. Except for transthyretin, these markers had similar or better sensitivity when moving to phase III specimens that had been drawn within six months of the clinical diagnosis. Performance of all markers declined in phase III specimens more remote than 6 months from diagnosis. Despite many promising new markers for ovarian cancer, CA125 remains the single-best biomarker in the phase II and phase III specimens tested in this study. PMID:21372036

  5. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-21

    Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinofibroma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  6. Management of Ovarian Cancer in Elderly.

    PubMed

    Giri, Sushil K; Nayak, Bhagyalaxmi

    2015-01-01

    As a result of increasing life expectancy, the cancer incidence in older population is on the rise. Ovarian cancer (OC) is predominantly the disease of elderly women. More than half of all OC occur in women older than 65 years. The incidence of the disease increases with the advancing age, peaking during 7(th) decade of life and remains elevated until the age of 80 years. With the changing demographic scenario the percentage of elderly patients is increasing and gynaecologic oncologists need to focus more on these patients and their specific needs. Due to their higher risk of morbidity and mortality compared to younger patients, elderly patients with advanced ovarian cancer are challenging to treat and are often treated less radically. Their outcome is impaired despite no consistent prognostic effect of age itself. To offer optimal radical management of the elderly women with ovarian cancer and to avoid suboptimal treatment, biological age and functional status need to be considered before individualized treatment plans are defined. Pretreatment assessment can be achieved by using different assessment tools. Patients can tolerate surgery and chemotherapy, as long as they are individually assessed for their medical, psychological, and functional capabilities before therapeutic intervention is initiated. Prospective trials involving elderly women with ovarian cancer are the need of the day to offer justified evidenced based optimal treatment for those who will be benefited from the treatment. PMID:26411955

  7. Inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is a potential therapeutic strategy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mashiko, Satsuki; Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Toyoshima, Masafumi; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Dan, Takashi; Usui, Toshinori; Ishibashi, Masumi; Shigeta, Shogo; Nagase, Satoru; Miyata, Toshio; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is predictive of poor outcome in several types of cancer. The present study investigated the biological role for PAI-1 in ovarian cancer and potential of targeted pharmacotherapeutics. In patients with ovarian cancer, PAI-1 mRNA expression in tumor tissues was positively correlated with poor prognosis. To determine the role of PAI-1 in cell proliferation in ovarian cancer, the effects of PAI-1 inhibition were examined in PAI-1-expressing ovarian cancer cells. PAI-1 knockdown by small interfering RNA resulted in significant suppression of cell growth accompanied with G2/M cell cycle arrest and intrinsic apoptosis. Similarly, treatment with the small molecule PAI-1 inhibitor TM5275 effectively blocked cell proliferation of ovarian cancer cells that highly express PAI-1. Together these results suggest that PAI-1 promotes cell growth in ovarian cancer. Interestingly, expression of PAI-1 was increased in ovarian clear cell carcinoma compared with that in serous tumors. Our results suggest that PAI-1 inhibition promotes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in ovarian cancer and that PAI-1 inhibitors potentially represent a novel class of anti-tumor agents.

  8. Dub3 expression correlates with tumor progression and poor prognosis in human epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Shu, Bin; Xi, Tao; Su, Ning; Liu, Jing

    2015-03-01

    Dub3 is a deubiquitinating enzyme. It is highly expressed in tumor-derived cell lines and has an established role in tumor proliferation. However, the role of Dub3 in human ovarian cancer remains unclear. Expression of Dub3 was evaluated in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The relationship between Dub3 expression and clinicopathological characteristics was analyzed. Using RNA interference, the effects of Dub3 on cell proliferation and apoptosis were investigated in ovarian cancer cell line. All normal ovary tissues exhibited very little or no Dub3 immunoreactivity. High levels of Dub3 expression were examined by immunohistochemical analysis in 13.3% of cystadenomas, in 30.0% of borderline tumors, and in 58.9% of ovarian carcinomas, respectively. Dub3 expression was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and clinical staging (P<0.05). Multivariate survival analysis indicated that Dub3 expression was an independent prognostic indicator of the survival of patients with ovarian cancer. Furthermore, the expression of Cdc25A was closely correlated with that of Dub3 in cancer cells and tissues. Knockdown of Dub3 could inhibit the proliferation of ovarian cancer cells and increase cell apoptosis. These data indicate that the Dub3 might be a valuable biomarker for the prediction of ovarian cancer prognosis and Dub3 inhibition might be a potential strategy for ovarian cancer treatment.

  9. The diagnostic value of serum HE4 and CA-125 and ROMA index in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    WEI, SU; LI, HUI; ZHANG, BEI

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a common malignancy of the female reproductive system. Tumor markers serve as tools in the diagnosis of the disease. The aim of the present study was to determine the diagnostic value of sera levels of carbohydrate antigen-125 (CA-125), human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) as well as the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and the risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm (ROMA) index in ovarian cancer. The sera were measured using an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay on 158 individuals (64 patients with ovarian cancer, 64 with ovarian benign tumor and 30 healthy individuals) between September 2013 and May 2015. The results showed that levels of HE4 and CA-125 in the sera of the ovarian benign tumor group as well as their ROMA index were significantly higher (P<0.05) than those of the ovarian benign tumor and control groups, regardless of pre- or postmenopausal status. However, the level of CA-125 was significantly higher (P<0.05) in the ovarian benign tumor group compared with the healthy group, while the level of HE4 was similar in the two groups. The sensitivity of the ROMA index was higher (P<0.01) with detection of HE4 and CA-125. In the ovarian cancer group, the areas under ROC curves of ROMA, HE4 and CA-125 were 0.994, 0.990 and 0.941, respectively. The specificity and positive predictive value of HE4 in the premenopausal ovarian cancer group reached 98.36 and 95%, respectively. In conclusion, the results showed that the serum level of HE4 and the ROMA index are important indicators in the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. However, in addition to HE4 and CA-125 detection, the ROMA index is extremely valuable in improving the diagnostic efficiency of ovarian cancer. PMID:27347403

  10. Targeting the EGF Receptor for Ovarian Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zeineldin, Reema; Muller, Carolyn Y.; Stack, M. Sharon; Hudson, Laurie G.

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the US. Factors such as the molecular heterogeneity of ovarian tumors and frequent diagnosis at advanced stages hamper effective disease treatment. There is growing emphasis on the identification and development of targeted therapies to disrupt molecular pathways in cancer. The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is one such protein target with potential utility in the management of ovarian cancer. This paper will discuss contributions of EGF receptor activation to ovarian cancer pathogenesis and the status of EGF receptor inhibitors and EGF receptor targeted therapies in ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:20066160

  11. Targeted Immune Therapy of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Keith L.; Karyampudi, Lavakumar; Lamichhane, Purushottam; Preston, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Clinical outcomes, such as recurrence free survival and overall survival, in ovarian cancer are quite variable, independent of common characteristics such as stage, response to therapy and grade. This disparity in outcomes warrants further exploration and therapeutic targeting into the interaction between the tumor and host. One compelling host characteristic that contributes both to the initiation and progression of ovarian cancer is the immune system. Hundreds of studies have confirmed a prominent role for the immune system in modifying the clinical course of the disease. Recent studies also show that anti-tumor immunity is often negated by immune regulatory cells present in the tumor microenvironment. Regulatory immune cells also directly enhance the pathogenesis through the release of various cytokines and chemokines, which together form an integrated pathologic network. Thus, in the future, research into immunotherapy targeting ovarian cancer will probably become increasingly focused on combination approaches that simultaneously augment immunity while preventing local immune suppression. In this article, we summarize important immunological targets that influence ovarian cancer outcome as well as include an update on newer immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:25544369

  12. Quality of Life and Care Needs of Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Anxiety; Fatigue; Nausea and Vomiting; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  13. Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal ... primary peritoneal cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal ...

  14. Ovarian cancer treatment: The end of empiricism?

    PubMed Central

    Lheureux, Stephanie; Karakasis, Katherine; Kohn, Elise C.

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis, investigation, and management of ovarian cancer are in a state of flux—balancing ever rapid advances in our understanding of its biology with 3 decades of clinical trials. Clinical trials that started with empirically driven selections have evolved in an evidence‐informed manner to gradually improve outcome. Has this improved understanding of the biology and associated calls to action led to appropriate changes in therapy? In this review, the authors discuss incorporating emerging data on biology, combinations, dose, and scheduling of new and existing agents with patient preferences in the management of women with ovarian cancer. Cancer 2015;121:3203–3211. © 2015 American Cancer Society. PMID:26096019

  15. ARID3B Directly Regulates Ovarian Cancer Promoting Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bobbs, Alexander; Gellerman, Katrina; Hallas, William Morgan; Joseph, Stancy; Yang, Chao; Kurkewich, Jeffrey; Cowden Dahl, Karen D.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-binding protein AT-Rich Interactive Domain 3B (ARID3B) is elevated in ovarian cancer and increases tumor growth in a xenograft model of ovarian cancer. However, relatively little is known about ARID3B's function. In this study we perform the first genome wide screen for ARID3B direct target genes and ARID3B regulated pathways. We identified and confirmed numerous ARID3B target genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by microarray and quantitative RT-PCR. Using motif-finding algorithms, we characterized a binding site for ARID3B, which is similar to the previously known site for the ARID3B paralogue ARID3A. Functionality of this predicted site was demonstrated by ChIP analysis. We next demonstrated that ARID3B induces expression of its targets in ovarian cancer cell lines. We validated that ARID3B binds to an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) enhancer and increases mRNA expression. ARID3B also binds to the promoter of Wnt5A and its receptor FZD5. FZD5 is highly expressed in ovarian cancer cell lines, and is upregulated by exogenous ARID3B. Both ARID3B and FZD5 expression increase adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) components including collagen IV, fibronectin and vitronectin. ARID3B-increased adhesion to collagens II and IV require FZD5. This study directly demonstrates that ARID3B binds target genes in a sequence-specific manner, resulting in increased gene expression. Furthermore, our data indicate that ARID3B regulation of direct target genes in the Wnt pathway promotes adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. PMID:26121572

  16. Cisplatin induces stemness in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wiechert, Andrew; Saygin, Caner; Thiagarajan, Praveena S; Rao, Vinay S; Hale, James S; Gupta, Nikhil; Hitomi, Masahiro; Nagaraj, Anil Belur; DiFeo, Analisa; Lathia, Justin D; Reizes, Ofer

    2016-05-24

    The mainstay of treatment for ovarian cancer is platinum-based cytotoxic chemotherapy. However, therapeutic resistance and recurrence is a common eventuality for nearly all ovarian cancer patients, resulting in poor median survival. Recurrence is postulated to be driven by a population of self-renewing, therapeutically resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). A current limitation in CSC studies is the inability to interrogate their dynamic changes in real time. Here we utilized a GFP reporter driven by the NANOG-promoter to enrich and track ovarian CSCs. Using this approach, we identified a population of cells with CSC properties including enhanced expression of stem cell transcription factors, self-renewal, and tumor initiation. We also observed elevations in CSC properties in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells as compared to cisplatin-naïve ovarian cancer cells. CD49f, a marker for CSCs in other solid tumors, enriched CSCs in cisplatin-resistant and -naïve cells. NANOG-GFP enriched CSCs (GFP+ cells) were more resistant to cisplatin as compared to GFP-negative cells. Moreover, upon cisplatin treatment, the GFP signal intensity and NANOG expression increased in GFP-negative cells, indicating that cisplatin was able to induce the CSC state. Taken together, we describe a reporter-based strategy that allows for determination of the CSC state in real time and can be used to detect the induction of the CSC state upon cisplatin treatment. As cisplatin may provide an inductive stress for the stem cell state, future efforts should focus on combining cytotoxic chemotherapy with a CSC targeted therapy for greater clinical utility. PMID:27105520

  17. Gene expression profiling analysis of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    YIN, JI-GANG; LIU, XIAN-YING; WANG, BIN; WANG, DAN-YANG; WEI, MAN; FANG, HUA; XIANG, MEI

    2016-01-01

    As a gynecological oncology, ovarian cancer has high incidence and mortality. To study the mechanisms of ovarian cancer, the present study analyzed the GSE37582 microarray. GSE37582 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus and included data from 74 ovarian cancer cases and 47 healthy controls. The differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) were screened using linear models for microarray data package in R and were further screened for functional annotation. Next, Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs was conducted. The interaction associations of the proteins encoded by the DEGs were searched using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes, and the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was visualized by Cytoscape. Moreover, module analysis of the PPI network was performed using the BioNet analysis tool in R. A total of 284 DEGs were screened, consisting of 145 upregulated genes and 139 downregulated genes. In particular, downregulated FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS) was an oncogene, while downregulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A) was a tumor suppressor gene and upregulated cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) was classed as an ‘other’ gene. The enriched functions included collagen catabolic process, stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinases cascade and insulin receptor signaling pathway. Meanwhile, FOS (degree, 15), CD44 (degree, 9), B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2; degree, 7), CDKN1A (degree, 7) and matrix metallopeptidase 3 (MMP3; degree, 6) had higher connectivity degrees in the PPI network for the DEGs. These genes may be involved in ovarian cancer by interacting with other genes in the module of the PPI network (e.g., BCL2-FOS, BCL2-CDKN1A, FOS-CDKN1A, FOS-CD44, MMP3-MMP7 and MMP7-CD44). Overall, BCL2, FOS, CDKN1A, CD44, MMP3 and MMP7 may be correlated with ovarian cancer. PMID:27347159

  18. Glutathione in Preventing Peripheral Neuropathy Caused by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Patients With Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, and/or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-22

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Neuropathy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  19. The role of surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cameán, María; Delgado-Sánchez, Elsa; Piñera, Antonio; Diestro, Maria Dolores; De Santiago, Javier; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the standard management of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer is correct surgical staging and optimal tumour cytoreduction followed by platinum and taxane-based chemotherapy. Standard surgical staging consists of peritoneal washings, total hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, inspection of all abdominal organs and the peritoneal surface, biopsies of suspicious areas or randomised biopsies if they are not present, omentectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. After this complete surgical staging, the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system for ovarian cancer is applied to determine the management and prognosis of the patient. Complete tumour cytoreduction has shown an improvement in survival. There are some criteria to predict cytoreduction outcomes based on serum biomarkers levels, preoperative imaging techniques, and laparoscopic-based scores. Optimised patient selection for primary cytoreduction would determine patients who could benefit from an optimal cytoreduction and might benefit from interval surgery. The administration of intraperitoneal chemotherapy after debulking surgery has shown an increase in progression-free survival and overall survival, especially in patients with no residual disease after surgery. It is considered that 3–17% of all epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) occur in young women that have not fulfilled their reproductive desires. In these patients, fertility-sparing surgery is a worthy option in early ovarian cancer.

  20. The role of surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cameán, María; Delgado-Sánchez, Elsa; Piñera, Antonio; Diestro, Maria Dolores; De Santiago, Javier; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the standard management of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer is correct surgical staging and optimal tumour cytoreduction followed by platinum and taxane-based chemotherapy. Standard surgical staging consists of peritoneal washings, total hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, inspection of all abdominal organs and the peritoneal surface, biopsies of suspicious areas or randomised biopsies if they are not present, omentectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. After this complete surgical staging, the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system for ovarian cancer is applied to determine the management and prognosis of the patient. Complete tumour cytoreduction has shown an improvement in survival. There are some criteria to predict cytoreduction outcomes based on serum biomarkers levels, preoperative imaging techniques, and laparoscopic-based scores. Optimised patient selection for primary cytoreduction would determine patients who could benefit from an optimal cytoreduction and might benefit from interval surgery. The administration of intraperitoneal chemotherapy after debulking surgery has shown an increase in progression-free survival and overall survival, especially in patients with no residual disease after surgery. It is considered that 3–17% of all epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) occur in young women that have not fulfilled their reproductive desires. In these patients, fertility-sparing surgery is a worthy option in early ovarian cancer. PMID:27594911

  1. The role of surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cameán, María; Delgado-Sánchez, Elsa; Piñera, Antonio; Diestro, Maria Dolores; De Santiago, Javier; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the standard management of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer is correct surgical staging and optimal tumour cytoreduction followed by platinum and taxane-based chemotherapy. Standard surgical staging consists of peritoneal washings, total hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, inspection of all abdominal organs and the peritoneal surface, biopsies of suspicious areas or randomised biopsies if they are not present, omentectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. After this complete surgical staging, the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system for ovarian cancer is applied to determine the management and prognosis of the patient. Complete tumour cytoreduction has shown an improvement in survival. There are some criteria to predict cytoreduction outcomes based on serum biomarkers levels, preoperative imaging techniques, and laparoscopic-based scores. Optimised patient selection for primary cytoreduction would determine patients who could benefit from an optimal cytoreduction and might benefit from interval surgery. The administration of intraperitoneal chemotherapy after debulking surgery has shown an increase in progression-free survival and overall survival, especially in patients with no residual disease after surgery. It is considered that 3-17% of all epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) occur in young women that have not fulfilled their reproductive desires. In these patients, fertility-sparing surgery is a worthy option in early ovarian cancer. PMID:27594911

  2. Familial ovarian cancer: a study of 11 families.

    PubMed

    Villani, C; Ficorella, C; Tomao, S

    1989-01-01

    In a group of 152 ovarian cancer patients, 11 cases with familial recurrence were investigated (7.23%). Of the families evaluated we found 26 patients with ovarian cancer and twenty two with different cancers in other sites. In ovarian cancer the familial aspect, despite its relatively low frequency, is one of the few factors for identifying "high risk" patients, thus allowing effective secondary prevention. PMID:2776785

  3. Sargramostim and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With Advanced Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That Did Not Respond to Previous Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-15

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  4. BRCA1 founder mutations compared to ovarian cancer in Belarus.

    PubMed

    Savanevich, Alena; Oszurek, Oleg; Lubiński, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Narod, Steven A; Gronwald, Jacek

    2014-09-01

    In Belarus and other Slavic countries, founder mutations in the BRCA1 gene are responsible for a significant proportion of breast cancer cases, but the data on contribution of these mutations to ovarian cancers are limited. To estimate the proportion of ovarian cancers in Belarus, which are dependent on BRCA1 Slavic founder mutations, we sought the presence of three most frequent mutations (BRCA1: 5382insC, C61G and, 4153delA) in 158 consecutive unselected cases of ovarian cancer. One of the three founder mutations was present in 25 of 158 unselected cases of ovarian cancer (15.8 %). We recommend that all cases of ovarian cancer in Belarus be offered genetic testing for these founder mutations. Furthermore, genetic testing of the Belarusian population will provide the opportunity to prevent a significant proportion of ovarian cancer.

  5. Ovarian cancer proteomics: Many technologies one goal.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Kothandaraman; Changqing, Zhao; Choolani, Mahesh

    2008-02-01

    The last decade has seen major changes in the technologies used to identify markers for diagnosing cancer. This review focuses on recent developments on the evolving field of biomarker discovery, and validation techniques using proteomics platforms for ovarian cancer. It is possible now to diagnose various disease conditions using microliter quantities of body fluids. Currently the major developments were made in three distinct areas: (i) protein profiling, (ii) high-throughput validation techniques, and (iii) solid and liquid phase protein microarray platforms for analyzing candidate markers across subclasses and stages of cancers. The recent addition to the long list of technologies is metabolomics using metabolite profiling and informatics-based filtering of information for biomarker discovery of ovarian cancer. Emerging technologies need to address ways to eliminate the limitations posed by the complex dynamic nature of body fluids as well as ways to enrich low-abundance tumor markers if they were to become a successful biomarker discovery tool. These new technologies hold significant promise in identifying more robust markers for ovarian cancer. Since the prevalence of this disease in the population is low, the test must have a high specificity. PMID:21136825

  6. Guanylate-Binding Protein-1 protects ovarian cancer cell lines but not breast cancer cell lines from killing by paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Aaron R; Nyabuto, Geoffrey O; Trendel, Jill A; Mazur, Travis M; Wilson, John P; Wadi, Suzan; Justinger, Jacob S; Moore, Garret L; Nguyen, Peter T; Vestal, Deborah J

    2016-09-30

    Forced expression of the cytokine-induced large GTPase, human Guanylate-Binding Protein-1 (hGBP-1), in ovarian cancer cell lines increases resistance to paclitaxel. Elevated hGBP-1 RNA in ovarian tumors correlates with shorter recurrence-free survival. In contract, hGBP-1 is part of a gene signature predicting improved prognosis in all subtypes of breast cancers. hGBP-1 does not confer paclitaxel resistance on MCF-7 and TMX2-28 breast cancer cells. Expression of the isotype of the hGBP-1-interacting protein, PIM1, which may contribute to paclitaxel resistance when associated with hGBP-1, is different in breast and ovarian cancer cell lines. Breast cancer cell lines express the 44 kDa isoform of PIM-1, and ovarian cancer cell lines express the 33 kDa isoform. PMID:27590579

  7. Biologic and immunologic therapy of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bookman, M A; Berek, J S

    1992-08-01

    Conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy fails to cure the majority of patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer, in spite of encouraging initial antitumor responses. With the emergence of drug resistance in refractory tumors, new biologic and immunologic treatment strategies are needed. Small-volume residual peritoneal disease remains an attractive target for therapeutic trials; however, even in this optimal circumstance, few regimens have yet achieved a high frequency of pathologically confirmed complete remissions. Considerable progress has been made in understanding the impact of growth factors and their receptors on tumor growth regulation and modulation of response to chemotherapy. Better characterization of the antigens recognized by monoclonal antibodies, as well as sequencing of the antibodies themselves, has permitted the rational design of therapeutic reagents that take full advantage of molecular biology techniques for production and conjugation. Important limitations of preclinical models for prediction of host toxicity are recognized, and the reasons for treatment failure in situ, as well as strategies to prevent serious dose-limiting toxicities, are being explored. Further developments in cytokine biology, adoptive cellular therapy, monoclonal antibody conjugation, and molecular biology will continue to provide a growing array of reagents for critical evaluation.

  8. The Chicken Model of Spontaneous Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hawkridge, Adam M.

    2014-01-01

    The chicken is a unique experimental model for studying the spontaneous onset and progression of ovarian cancer (OVC). The prevalence of OVC in chickens can range from 10–35% depending on age, genetic strain, reproductive history, and diet. Furthermore, the chicken presents epidemiological, morphological, and molecular traits that are similar to human OVC making it a relevant experimental model for translation research. Similarities to humans include associated increased risk of OVC with the number of ovulations, common histopathological sub-types including high-grade serous, and molecular-level markers or pathways such as CA-125 expression and p53 mutation frequency. Collectively, the similarities between chicken and human OVC combined with a tightly controlled genetic background and predictable onset window provides an outstanding experimental model for studying the early events and progression of spontaneous OVC tumors under controlled environmental conditions. This review will cover the existing literature on OVC in the chicken and highlight potential opportunities for further exploitation (e.g, biomarkers, prevention, treatment, and genomics). PMID:25130871

  9. Mayo Clinic experience with epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Decker, D G

    1983-08-01

    Clinical investigation of epithelial ovarian cancer must involve the precise definition of the lesion, careful application of new techniques, the objective evaluation of such techniques, the comparison of results in a randomized fashion with prior forms of therapy, careful pathological evaluation of the tumour, and the evaluation of toxicity to the patient. The interdisciplinary team approach to the treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer and the development of randomized, prospective trials are essential. Utilizing these two elements, a better integration of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy can be accomplished. Of great importance is the evaluation of response patterns by an observer who is skilled in pelvic examinations and familiar with the natural history of epithelial ovarian cancer. The increasingly important role of surgery in the treatment of this cancer is now more clearly defined. The psychological effects of chemotherapy as well as the response patterns to chemotherapy must be evaluated. During the past 20 years, considerable progress has been made in prolonging the useful, functional life of the patient. The ultimate cure is still a matter for the future and is predicated on more effective combinations of potent chemotherapeutic combinations and a clearer definition of the role of radiation therapy.

  10. Epidemiology of ovarian cancer: a summary review.

    PubMed

    La Vecchia, C

    2001-04-01

    Ovarian cancer is among the five leading sites for cancer incidence and mortality in women from developed countries. Its incidence and mortality rates have, however, been declining over the last few decades following the introduction of oral contraceptives, which - together with parity - are the best recognized protective factor for the disease. Late menopause and irregular menstrual cycles may also reduce the risk, while the role of hormone replacement therapy in menopause and fertility treatments is still unclear. Cosmetic talc use and some aspect of diet (i.e. saturated fats, refined carbohydrates) have been associated with increased risk, in some--though not all--studies), while vegetable consumption appears to be inversely related to risk. These issues remain open to debate. Women with a family history of ovarian and breast cancer in first-degree relatives are also at increased risk, but family history accounts for only 4-5% of cases. Most ovarian cancers are therefore environmental in origin and consequently, at least in principle, avoidable.

  11. Hormone Therapy and Ovarian Cancer: Incidence and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Wernli, Karen J.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Hampton, John; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Egan, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective We conducted a population-based case-control study to investigate the association between hormone therapy (HT) and ovarian cancer incidence, and followed all these cancer cases to determine the association of HT use with ovarian cancer mortality. Methods Seven hundred fifty-one incident cases of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer aged 40–79 years were diagnosed in Wisconsin and Massachusetts between 1993–1995 and 1998–2001 and matched to similarly-aged controls (n=5808). Study subjects were interviewed by telephone, which ascertained information on HT use and specific preparation, estrogen alone (E-alone) or estrogen plus progestin (EP). Ovarian cancer cases were followed-up for mortality through December 2005. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for ovarian cancer incidence, and Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to estimate hazard ratios and corresponding confidence intervals for ovarian cancer mortality. Results Ever use of HT was significantly associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer (odds ratio 1.57, 95% CI 1.31–1.87). The excess risk was confined to women who used E-alone preparations (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.85–2.95). No significant associations were detected between pre-diagnosis HT use and ovarian cancer survival. Conclusions Hormone therapy increases risk of ovarian cancer among E-alone users, but there is no substantial impact on survival after diagnosis. PMID:18264784

  12. Mathematical models of breast and ovarian cancers.

    PubMed

    Botesteanu, Dana-Adriana; Lipkowitz, Stanley; Lee, Jung-Min; Levy, Doron

    2016-07-01

    Women constitute the majority of the aging United States (US) population, and this has substantial implications on cancer population patterns and management practices. Breast cancer is the most common women's malignancy, while ovarian cancer is the most fatal gynecological malignancy in the US. In this review, we focus on these subsets of women's cancers, seen more commonly in postmenopausal and elderly women. In order to systematically investigate the complexity of cancer progression and response to treatment in breast and ovarian malignancies, we assert that integrated mathematical modeling frameworks viewed from a systems biology perspective are needed. Such integrated frameworks could offer innovative contributions to the clinical women's cancers community, as answers to clinical questions cannot always be reached with contemporary clinical and experimental tools. Here, we recapitulate clinically known data regarding the progression and treatment of the breast and ovarian cancers. We compare and contrast the two malignancies whenever possible in order to emphasize areas where substantial contributions could be made by clinically inspired and validated mathematical modeling. We show how current paradigms in the mathematical oncology community focusing on the two malignancies do not make comprehensive use of, nor substantially reflect existing clinical data, and we highlight the modeling areas in most critical need of clinical data integration. We emphasize that the primary goal of any mathematical study of women's cancers should be to address clinically relevant questions. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:337-362. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1343 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27259061

  13. NMDA receptors are expressed in human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    North, William G; Liu, Fuli; Tian, Ruiyang; Abbasi, Hamza; Akerman, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    We have earlier demonstrated that breast cancer and small-cell lung cancer express functional NMDA receptors that can be targeted to promote cancer cell death. Human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV3, A2008, and A2780) have now been shown to also express NMDA-receptor subunit 1 (GluN1) and subunit 2B (GluN2B). Seventeen ovarian cancers in two arrays were screened by immunohistochemistry using polyclonal antibodies that recognize an extracellular moiety on GluN1 and on GluN2B. These specimens comprised malignant tissue with pathology diagnoses of serous papillary cystadenocarcinoma, endometrioid adenocarcinoma, and clear-cell carcinoma. Additionally, archival tissues defined as ovarian adenocarcinoma from ten patients treated at this institute were also evaluated. All of the cancerous tissues demonstrated positive staining patterns with the NMDA-receptor antibodies, while no staining was found for tumor-adjacent normal tissues or sections of normal ovarian tissue. Human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell lines (A2008, A2780, SKOV3) were demonstrated to express GluN1 by Western blotting, but displayed different levels of expression. Through immunocytochemistry utilizing GluN1 antibodies and imaging using a confocal microscope, we were able to demonstrate that GluN1 protein is expressed on the surface of these cells. In addition to these findings, GluN2B protein was demonstrated to be expressed using polyclonal antibodies against this protein. Treatment of all ovarian cell lines with antibodies against GluN1 was found to result in decreased cell viability (P<0.001), with decreases to 10%–25% that of untreated cells. Treatment of control HEK293 cells with various dilutions of GluN1 antibodies had no effect on cell viability. The GluN1 antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine maleate) and the GluN2B antagonist ifenprodil, like antibodies, dramatically decreased the viability of A2780 ovarian tumor cells (P<0.01). Treatment of A2780 tumor xenografts with

  14. NMDA receptors are expressed in human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    North, William G; Liu, Fuli; Tian, Ruiyang; Abbasi, Hamza; Akerman, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    We have earlier demonstrated that breast cancer and small-cell lung cancer express functional NMDA receptors that can be targeted to promote cancer cell death. Human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV3, A2008, and A2780) have now been shown to also express NMDA-receptor subunit 1 (GluN1) and subunit 2B (GluN2B). Seventeen ovarian cancers in two arrays were screened by immunohistochemistry using polyclonal antibodies that recognize an extracellular moiety on GluN1 and on GluN2B. These specimens comprised malignant tissue with pathology diagnoses of serous papillary cystadenocarcinoma, endometrioid adenocarcinoma, and clear-cell carcinoma. Additionally, archival tissues defined as ovarian adenocarcinoma from ten patients treated at this institute were also evaluated. All of the cancerous tissues demonstrated positive staining patterns with the NMDA-receptor antibodies, while no staining was found for tumor-adjacent normal tissues or sections of normal ovarian tissue. Human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell lines (A2008, A2780, SKOV3) were demonstrated to express GluN1 by Western blotting, but displayed different levels of expression. Through immunocytochemistry utilizing GluN1 antibodies and imaging using a confocal microscope, we were able to demonstrate that GluN1 protein is expressed on the surface of these cells. In addition to these findings, GluN2B protein was demonstrated to be expressed using polyclonal antibodies against this protein. Treatment of all ovarian cell lines with antibodies against GluN1 was found to result in decreased cell viability (P<0.001), with decreases to 10%-25% that of untreated cells. Treatment of control HEK293 cells with various dilutions of GluN1 antibodies had no effect on cell viability. The GluN1 antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine maleate) and the GluN2B antagonist ifenprodil, like antibodies, dramatically decreased the viability of A2780 ovarian tumor cells (P<0.01). Treatment of A2780 tumor xenografts with

  15. Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... lifestyle or eating habits. Avoiding things known to cause cancer. Taking medicines to treat a precancerous condition or ... called the endometrium. Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer of the female reproductive system. In recent years, ...

  16. Transcription factor-microRNA-target gene networks associated with ovarian cancer survival and recurrence.

    PubMed

    Delfino, Kristin R; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L

    2013-01-01

    The identification of reliable transcriptome biomarkers requires the simultaneous consideration of regulatory and target elements including microRNAs (miRNAs), transcription factors (TFs), and target genes. A novel approach that integrates multivariate survival analysis, feature selection, and regulatory network visualization was used to identify reliable biomarkers of ovarian cancer survival and recurrence. Expression profiles of 799 miRNAs, 17,814 TFs and target genes and cohort clinical records on 272 patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer were simultaneously considered and results were validated on an independent group of 146 patients. Three miRNAs (hsa-miR-16, hsa-miR-22*, and ebv-miR-BHRF1-2*) were associated with both ovarian cancer survival and recurrence and 27 miRNAs were associated with either one hazard. Two miRNAs (hsa-miR-521 and hsa-miR-497) were cohort-dependent, while 28 were cohort-independent. This study confirmed 19 miRNAs previously associated with ovarian cancer and identified two miRNAs that have previously been associated with other cancer types. In total, the expression of 838 and 734 target genes and 12 and eight TFs were associated (FDR-adjusted P-value <0.05) with ovarian cancer survival and recurrence, respectively. Functional analysis highlighted the association between cellular and nucleotide metabolic processes and ovarian cancer. The more direct connections and higher centrality of the miRNAs, TFs and target genes in the survival network studied suggest that network-based approaches to prognosticate or predict ovarian cancer survival may be more effective than those for ovarian cancer recurrence. This study demonstrated the feasibility to infer reliable miRNA-TF-target gene networks associated with survival and recurrence of ovarian cancer based on the simultaneous analysis of co-expression profiles and consideration of the clinical characteristics of the patients.

  17. Ovarian Cancer: In Search of Better Marker Systems Based on DNA Repair Defects

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Dominic; Deniz, Miriam; Schwentner, Lukas; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common female cancer in the Western world, and the deadliest gynecological malignancy. The overall poor prognosis for ovarian cancer patients is a consequence of aggressive biological behavior and a lack of adequate diagnostic tools for early detection. In fact, approximately 70% of all patients with epithelial ovarian cancer are diagnosed at advanced tumor stages. These facts highlight a significant clinical need for reliable and accurate detection methods for ovarian cancer, especially for patients at high risk. Because CA125 has not achieved satisfactory sensitivity and specificity in detecting ovarian cancer, numerous efforts, including those based on single and combined molecule detection and “omics” approaches, have been made to identify new biomarkers. Intriguingly, more than 10% of all ovarian cancer cases are of familial origin. BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations are the most common genetic defects underlying hereditary ovarian cancer, which is why ovarian cancer risk assessment in developed countries, aside from pedigree analysis, relies on genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Because not only BRCA1 and BRCA2 but also other susceptibility genes are tightly linked with ovarian cancer-specific DNA repair defects, another possible approach for defining susceptibility might be patient cell-based functional testing, a concept for which support came from a recent case-control study. This principle would be applicable to risk assessment and the prediction of responsiveness to conventional regimens involving platinum-based drugs and targeted therapies involving poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. PMID:23344037

  18. Targeting the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jean M; Coleman, Robert L; Sood, Anil K

    2016-03-01

    The study of cancer initiation, growth, and metastasis has traditionally been focused on cancer cells, and the view that they proliferate due to uncontrolled growth signalling owing to genetic derangements. However, uncontrolled growth in tumours cannot be explained solely by aberrations in cancer cells themselves. To fully understand the biological behaviour of tumours, it is essential to understand the microenvironment in which cancer cells exist, and how they manipulate the surrounding stroma to promote the malignant phenotype. Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynaecologic cancer worldwide. The majority of patients will have objective responses to standard tumour debulking surgery and platinum-taxane doublet chemotherapy, but most will experience disease recurrence and chemotherapy resistance. As such, a great deal of effort has been put forth to develop therapies that target the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer. Herein, we review the key components of the tumour microenvironment as they pertain to this disease, outline targeting opportunities and supporting evidence thus far, and discuss resistance to therapy.

  19. Ovarian cysts and cancer in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Asima; Shinde, Aditi; Naik, Raj

    2016-05-01

    Adnexal masses are diagnosed in 5% pregnancies and pose diagnostic and management challenges. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the mainstay as an evaluation procedure; surgery is warranted for persistent masses with a diameter of >5 cm and sonographic signs of possible malignancy. Optimal timing for a planned surgery is the second trimester and does not adversely affect neonatal outcome. Laparoscopy is safe in pregnancy. Management for ovarian cancer during pregnancy should be individualised and formulated by a multidisciplinary team in a specialised centre while also considering the patients' wishes to preserve pregnancy. The following options can be considered: (i) induced abortion followed by standard management of ovarian cancer, (ii) pregnancy-preserving surgery followed by chemotherapy, planned delivery and secondary surgical completion or (iii) neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery during the postpartum period. Standard chemotherapy administered in non-pregnant population can only be used during the first trimester of pregnancy. PMID:26707193

  20. 78 FR 54741 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... of risk factors is critical to fighting this disease. Chances of developing ovarian cancer are greater in women who are middle-aged or older, women with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer... increased risk, to talk to their doctors. For more information, visit www.Cancer.gov . My Administration...

  1. Validating a mouse model of ovarian cancer for early detection through imaging | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Despite advances in treatment strategies, ovarian cancer remains the deadliest gynecological malignancy and the 5th largest cancer killer in women. Located deep in the body, with few early symptoms and no effective screening technique, ovarian cancer has remained stubbornly difficult to understand, much less effectively combat. Ovarian cancer is almost always discovered at an advanced stage. |

  2. Pathogenesis of ovarian cancer: clues from selected overexpressed genes

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Ie-Ming; Davidson, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most malignant gynecologic neoplasm. Although new chemotherapeutic agents have improved patients' 5-year survival rate, the overall mortality of ovarian cancer has remained largely unchanged in the past several decades. The main reason for the lack of success in effectively treating ovarian cancer is our limited understanding of its etiology and the very few molecular diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets known so far. Identification and characterization of ovarian cancer-associated genes are fundamental for unveiling the pathogenesis of its initiation and progression, especially the development of recurrent diseases. As there are a vast number of genes for which molecular genetic changes and aberrant gene expression have been reported in ovarian cancer, this review will only focus on summarizing those exemplified genes that have been demonstrated to have biological functions in promoting ovarian cancer development and potential clinical significance. The genes to be discussed include nuclear proteins (Notch3, HBXAP [Rsf-1], NAC1 and NFκB), cytoplasmic proteins (fatty acid synthase and apolipoprotein E) and cell surface/secretory proteins (mucin-4, mesothelin, claudin, HLA-G, kallikrein and folate receptor and osteopontin). Since the study of ovarian cancer-associated genes is complicated by several factors unique to ovarian cancer, we will also present our views on the limitations and challenges of current ovarian cancer research. PMID:20001801

  3. Transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Singha, Bipradeb; Gatla, Himavanth R; Vancurova, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    The increased expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic chemokines contributes to ovarian cancer progression through the induction of tumor cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and metastasis. The substantial potential of these chemokines to facilitate the progression and metastasis of ovarian cancer underscores the need for their stringent transcriptional regulation. In this Review, we highlight the key mechanisms that regulate the transcription of pro-inflammatory chemokines in ovarian cancer cells, and that have important roles in controlling ovarian cancer progression. We further discuss the potential mechanisms underlying the increased chemokine expression in drug resistance, along with our perspective for future studies. PMID:25790431

  4. Risk factors for ovarian cancer: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Booth, M; Beral, V; Smith, P

    1989-10-01

    A hospital-based case-control study of ovarian cancer was conducted in London and Oxford between October 1978 and February 1983. Menstrual characteristics, reproductive and contraceptive history and history of exposure to various environmental factors were compared between 235 women with histologically diagnosed epithelial ovarian cancer and 451 controls. High gravidity, hysterectomy, female sterilisation and oral contraceptive use were associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer. Infertility and late age at menopause were associated with an increase in risk. While these factors were related, they were each found to be independently associated with ovarian cancer risk after adjusting for the effect of the other factors.

  5. Transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Singha, Bipradeb; Gatla, Himavanth R; Vancurova, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    The increased expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic chemokines contributes to ovarian cancer progression through the induction of tumor cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and metastasis. The substantial potential of these chemokines to facilitate the progression and metastasis of ovarian cancer underscores the need for their stringent transcriptional regulation. In this Review, we highlight the key mechanisms that regulate the transcription of pro-inflammatory chemokines in ovarian cancer cells, and that have important roles in controlling ovarian cancer progression. We further discuss the potential mechanisms underlying the increased chemokine expression in drug resistance, along with our perspective for future studies.

  6. Three-photon imaging of ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Amirsolaimani, Babak; Rice, Photini; Hatch, Kenneth; Kieu, Khanh

    2016-02-01

    Optical imaging methods have the potential to detect ovarian cancer at an early, curable stage. Optical imaging has the disadvantage that high resolution techniques require access to the tissue of interest, but miniature endoscopes that traverse the natural orifice of the reproductive tract, or access the ovaries and fallopian tubes through a small incision in the vagina wall, can provide a minimally-invasive solution. We have imaged both rodent and human ovaries and fallopian tubes with a variety of endoscope-compatible modalities. The recent development of fiber-coupled femtosecond lasers will enable endoscopic multiphoton microscopy (MPM). We demonstrated two- and three-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF, 3PEF), and second- and third-harmonic generation microscopy (SHG, THG) in human ovarian and fallopian tube tissue. A study was undertaken to understand the mechanisms of contrast in these images. Six patients (normal, cystadenoma, and ovarian adenocarcinoma) provided ovarian and fallopian tube biopsies. The tissue was imaged with three-dimensional optical coherence tomography, multiphoton microscopy, and frozen for histological sectioning. Tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, and Sudan black. Approximately 1 μm resolution images were obtained with an excitation source at 1550 nm. 2PEF signal was absent. SHG signal was mainly from collagen. 3PEF and THG signal came from a variety of sources, including a strong signal from fatty connective tissue and red blood cells. Adenocarcinoma was characterized by loss of SHG signal, whereas cystic abnormalities showed strong SHG. There was limited overlap of two- and three- photon signals, suggesting that three-photon imaging can provide additional information for early diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

  7. Sirolimus and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  8. Ovarian Cancer Biomarker Discovery Based on Genomic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Yun; Kim, Hee Seung; Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Song, Yong-Sang

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer presents at an advanced stage in more than 75% of patients. Early detection has great promise to improve clinical outcomes. Although the advancing proteomic technologies led to the discovery of numerous ovarian cancer biomarkers, no screening method has been recommended for early detection of ovarian cancer. Complexity and heterogeneity of ovarian carcinogenesis is a major obstacle to discover biomarkers. As cancer arises due to accumulation of genetic change, understanding the close connection between genetic changes and ovarian carcinogenesis would provide the opportunity to find novel gene-level ovarian cancer biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the various gene-based biomarkers by genomic technologies, including inherited gene mutations, epigenetic changes, and differential gene expression. In addition, we suggest the strategy to discover novel gene-based biomarkers with recently introduced next generation sequencing. PMID:25337559

  9. Metformin Hydrochloride and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ascites; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  10. Obesity and survival among women with ovarian cancer: results from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, C M; Dixon, S C; Jensen, A; Kjaer, S K; Modugno, F; deFazio, A; Fereday, S; Hung, J; Johnatty, S E; Fasching, P A; Beckmann, M W; Lambrechts, D; Vergote, I; Van Nieuwenhuysen, E; Lambrechts, S; Risch, H A; Rossing, M A; Doherty, J A; Wicklund, K G; Chang-Claude, J; Goodman, M T; Ness, R B; Moysich, K; Heitz, F; du Bois, A; Harter, P; Schwaab, I; Matsuo, K; Hosono, S; Goode, E L; Vierkant, R A; Larson, M C; Fridley, B L; Høgdall, C; Schildkraut, J M; Weber, R P; Cramer, D W; Terry, K L; Bandera, E V; Paddock, L; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, L; Wentzensen, N; Yang, H P; Brinton, L A; Lissowska, J; Høgdall, E; Lundvall, L; Whittemore, A; McGuire, V; Sieh, W; Rothstein, J; Sutphen, R; Anton-Culver, H; Ziogas, A; Pearce, C L; Wu, A H; Webb, P M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Observational studies have reported a modest association between obesity and risk of ovarian cancer; however, whether it is also associated with survival and whether this association varies for the different histologic subtypes are not clear. We undertook an international collaborative analysis to assess the association between body mass index (BMI), assessed shortly before diagnosis, progression-free survival (PFS), ovarian cancer-specific survival and overall survival (OS) among women with invasive ovarian cancer. Methods: We used original data from 21 studies, which included 12 390 women with ovarian carcinoma. We combined study-specific adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) using random-effects models to estimate pooled HRs (pHR). We further explored associations by histologic subtype. Results: Overall, 6715 (54%) deaths occurred during follow-up. A significant OS disadvantage was observed for women who were obese (BMI: 30–34.9, pHR: 1.10 (95% confidence intervals (CIs): 0.99–1.23); BMI: ⩾35, pHR: 1.12 (95% CI: 1.01–1.25)). Results were similar for PFS and ovarian cancer-specific survival. In analyses stratified by histologic subtype, associations were strongest for women with low-grade serous (pHR: 1.12 per 5 kg m−2) and endometrioid subtypes (pHR: 1.08 per 5 kg m−2), and more modest for the high-grade serous (pHR: 1.04 per 5 kg m−2) subtype, but only the association with high-grade serous cancers was significant. Conclusions: Higher BMI is associated with adverse survival among the majority of women with ovarian cancer. PMID:26151456

  11. Potential for cure in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Piver, M S; Marchetti, D L

    1986-12-01

    There has been steady progress in improving the survival stage by stage for women with ovarian carcinoma. Part of this is the "Will Rogers" phenomenon: the improvement in results among two groups by movement of a subset of patients from one stage to the other stage. For those stage I patients at low risk (stage I-A1, I-B1, well or moderately differentiated) for recurrence, the exceeding of 90% survival rates in these carefully staged patients without postoperative radiation or chemotherapy represents significant progress in comparison to results a decade ago. Moreover, those patients thought to be stage I or II but found to have upper abdominal metastasis by careful surgical staging will now receive the best therapy for stage III ovarian cancer. The combination of the small volume of upper abdominal tumor discovered in these latter patients and the effects of receiving the best therapy for stage III disease should result in improved survival for this subset of patients. The impact of cisplatin-based chemotherapy has already impacted positively on improved survival for women with stage III and IV ovarian carcinoma. With more surgeons now trained in the techniques of debulking surgery in advanced ovarian carcinoma, the recent survival rates for patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy should improve significantly in the next decade.

  12. Molecular and clinical implementations of ovarian cancer mouse avatar models.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Amira A; Mandrekar, Sumithra J; Haluska, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Innovation in oncology drug development has been hindered by lack of preclinical models that reliably predict clinical activity of novel therapies in cancer patients. Increasing desire for individualize treatment of patients with cancer has led to an increase in the use of patient-derived xenografts (PDX) engrafted into immune-compromised mice for preclinical modeling. Large numbers of tumor-specific PDX models have been established and proved to be powerful tools in pre-clinical testing. A subset of PDXs, referred to as Avatars, establish tumors in an orthotopic and treatment naïve fashion that may represent the most clinical relevant model of individual human cancers. This review will discuss ovarian cancer (OC) PDX models demonstrating the opportunities and limitations of these models in cancer drug development, and describe concepts of clinical trials design in Avatar guided therapy.

  13. Familial site-specific Ovarian cancer is linked to BRCA1 on 17q12-21

    SciTech Connect

    Steichen-Gersdorf, E.; Gallion, H.H.; Ponder, M.A.; Pye, C.; Mazoyer, S.; Smith, S.A.; Ponder, B.A.J.; Ford, D.; Easton, D.F.; Girodet, C.

    1994-11-01

    In a study of nine families with {open_quotes}site-specific{close_quotes} ovarian cancer (criterion: three or more cases of epithelial ovarian cancer and no cases of breast cancer diagnosed at age <50 years) we have obtained evidence of linkage to the breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1 on 17q12-21. If the risk of cancer in these families is assumed to be restricted to the ovary, the best estimate of the proportion of families linked to BRCA1 is .78 (95% confidence interval .32-1.0). If predisposition to both breast and ovarian cancer is assumed, the proportion linked is 1.0 (95% confidence interval .46-1.0). The linkage of familial site-specific ovarian cancer to BRCA1 indicates the possibility of predictive testing in such families; however, this is only appropriate in families where the evidence for linkage to BRCA1 is conclusive. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Management of relapsed ovarian cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Giornelli, Gonzalo H

    2016-01-01

    Around 70 % of ovarian cancer patients relapse after primary cytoreductive surgery and standard first-line chemotherapy. The biology of relapse remains unclear, but cancer stem cells seem to play an important role. There are still some areas of controversy on how to manage these relapses and or progressions that occur almost unavoidably in the course of this disease with shorter intervals between them as the natural history of this disease develops. The goal of treatments investigated in this neoplasm has shifted to maintenance therapy, trying to extend the progression free intervals in a disease that is becoming more and more protracted. PMID:27516935

  15. Perineal application of talc and cornstarch powders: evaluation of ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Whysner, J; Mohan, M

    2000-03-01

    Some epidemiologic studies have reported associations between perineal talc exposure and epithelial ovarian cancer, which raises parallel questions about the consequences of perineal exposure to cornstarch. Cornstarch powder is an alternative to talc powder that by its nature is a completely different substance. In this review of the literature the epidemiologic data on ovarian cancer risk and perineal application of both powders are reviewed, and the chemical natures of the two powders are compared. All available data indicate that whereas associations between talc exposure and ovarian cancer have suggested but not proved a casual relationship, the application of perineal powder containing cornstarch exclusively is not predicted to be a risk factor for ovarian cancer.

  16. Role of immunohistochemical overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-11 in the prognosis of death by ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Périgny, Martine; Bairati, Isabelle; Harvey, Isabelle; Beauchemin, Michel; Harel, François; Plante, Marie; Têtu, Bernard

    2008-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are enzymes thought to be involved in tumor invasion. We hypothesized that MMP-2 and MMP-11 overexpression was associated with the aggressiveness of ovarian carcinoma. This study was performed on samples from 100 patients with stage III ovarian carcinomas treated surgically between 1990 and 2000. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on ovarian tumors and peritoneal implants using monoclonal antibodies. Overexpression was defined as more than 10% of cells expressing the marker. Multivariate analyses showed that only MMP-2 overexpression by cancer cells in peritoneal implants was associated with a significant risk of death by disease (hazard ratio, 2.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.41-4.97; P =.003). MMP-11 overexpression was not predictive of survival. These results suggest that MMP-2 overexpression by cancer cells in peritoneal implants and not in the primary ovarian cancer is predictive of ovarian cancer prognosis and more likely reflects the presence of particularly aggressive clones of cancer cells.

  17. Proteins' promise--progress and challenges in ovarian cancer proteomics.

    PubMed

    Koehn, H; Oehler, M K

    2007-12-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of gynaecological cancer death. The mortality rate of ovarian cancer could be greatly decreased if there were a screening test which was able to detect the disease at an early stage, resulting in an increased probability of cure. The most promising prospect for the early detection of ovarian cancer comes from the rapidly advancing field of clinical proteomics. An increasing number of reports on the potential clinical application of proteomics research for early detection as well as risk assessment and management of ovarian cancer are being published. Although the research is very promising, major technical challenges are still preventing new discoveries in ovarian cancer proteomics from being translated into clinical practice.

  18. Platinum resistance in breast and ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Breast and ovarian cancers are among the 10 leading cancer types in females with mortalities of 15% and 6%, respectively. Despite tremendous efforts to conquer malignant diseases, the war on cancer declared by Richard Nixon four decades ago seems to be lost. Approximately 21,800 women in the US will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2011. Therefore, its incidence is relatively low compared to breast cancer with 207.090 prognosed cases in 2011. However, overall survival unmasks ovarian cancer as the most deadly gynecological neoplasia. Platinum-based chemotherapy is emerging as an upcoming treatment modality especially in triple negative breast cancer. However, in ovarian cancer Platinum-complexes for a long time are established as first line treatment. Emergence of a resistant phenotype is a major hurdle in curative cancer therapy approaches and many scientists around the world are focussing on this issue. This review covers new findings in this field during the past decade. PMID:21967738

  19. Factors related to inflammation of the ovarian epithelium and risk of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ness, R B; Grisso, J A; Cottreau, C; Klapper, J; Vergona, R; Wheeler, J E; Morgan, M; Schlesselman, J J

    2000-03-01

    Previous epidemiologic observations consistently suggest that suppression of ovulation, tubal ligation, and hysterectomy reduce the risk of ovarian cancer and that perineal talc use increases the risk. We examined these and other risk factors in the context of a new hypothesis: that inflammation may play a role in ovarian cancer risk. Ovulation entails ovarian epithelial inflammation; talc, endometriosis, cysts, and hyperthyroidism may be associated with inflammatory responses of the ovarian epithelium; gynecologic surgery may preclude irritants from reaching the ovaries via ascension from the lower genital tract. We evaluated these risk factors in a population-based case-control study. Cases 20-69 years of age with a recent diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer (767) were compared with community controls (1,367). We found that a number of reproductive and contraceptive factors that suppress ovulation, including gravidity, breast feeding, and oral contraception, reduced the risk of ovarian cancer. Environmental factors and medical conditions that increased risk included talc use, endometriosis, ovarian cysts, and hyperthyroidism. Gynecologic surgery including hysterectomy and tubal ligation were protective. Tubal ligation afforded a risk reduction even 20 or more years after the surgery. The spectrum of associations provides support for the hypothesis that inflammation may mediate ovarian cancer risk.

  20. Dietary influences on survival after ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Christina M; Purdie, David M; Webb, Penelope M; Green, Adèle; Harvey, Philip W; Bain, Christopher J

    2003-08-20

    We evaluated the effects of various food groups and micronutrients in the diet on survival among women who originally participated in a population-based case-control study of ovarian cancer conducted across 3 Australian states between 1990 and 1993. This analysis included 609 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer, primarily because there was negligible mortality in women with borderline tumors. The women's usual diet was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Deaths in the cohort were identified using state-based cancer registries and the Australian National Death Index (NDI). Crude 5-year survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier technique, and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained from Cox regression models. After adjusting for important confounding factors, a survival advantage was observed for those who reported higher intake of vegetables in general (HR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.57-0.99, p-value trend 0.01 for the highest third, compared to the lowest third), and cruciferous vegetables in particular (HR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.57-0.98, p-value trend 0.03), and among women in the upper third of intake of vitamin E (HR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.58-1.01, p-value trend 0.04). Inverse associations were also seen with protein (p-value trend 0.09), red meat (p-value trend 0.06) and white meat (p-value trend 0.07), and modest positive trends (maximum 30% excess) with lactose (p-value trend 0.04), calcium and dairy products. Although much remains to be learned about the influence of nutritional factors after a diagnosis of ovarian cancer, our study suggests the possibility that a diet high in vegetable intake may help improve survival. PMID:12800204

  1. 75 FR 54451 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-22427 Filed 9-3-10; 11:15 am] Billing code 3195-W0-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8551 of August 31, 2010 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2010 By the... against ovarian cancer, this disease continues to claim more lives than any other gynecologic...

  2. General Information About Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition or to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer ... PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  3. Paclitaxel targets VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in ovarian cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ai, Bin; Bie, Zhixin; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Ailing

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the gynecologic cancers with the highest mortality, wherein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is involved in regulating tumor vascularization, growth, migration, and invasion. VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in tumors has been targeted in various cancer treatments, and anti-VEGF therapy has been used clinically for treatment of several types of cancer. Paclitaxel is a natural antitumor agent in the standard front-line treatment that has significant efficiency to treat advanced cancers, including ovarian cancer. Although platinum/paclitaxel-based chemotherapy has good response rates, most patients eventually relapse because the disease develops drug resistance. We aim to review the recent advances in paclitaxel treatment of ovarian cancer via antiangiogenesis. Single-agent therapy may be used in selected cases of ovarian cancer. However, to prevent drug resistance, drug combinations should be identified for optimal effectiveness and existing therapies should be improved. PMID:27648354

  4. Paclitaxel targets VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in ovarian cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Bin; Bie, Zhixin; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Ailing

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the gynecologic cancers with the highest mortality, wherein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is involved in regulating tumor vascularization, growth, migration, and invasion. VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in tumors has been targeted in various cancer treatments, and anti-VEGF therapy has been used clinically for treatment of several types of cancer. Paclitaxel is a natural antitumor agent in the standard front-line treatment that has significant efficiency to treat advanced cancers, including ovarian cancer. Although platinum/paclitaxel-based chemotherapy has good response rates, most patients eventually relapse because the disease develops drug resistance. We aim to review the recent advances in paclitaxel treatment of ovarian cancer via antiangiogenesis. Single-agent therapy may be used in selected cases of ovarian cancer. However, to prevent drug resistance, drug combinations should be identified for optimal effectiveness and existing therapies should be improved. PMID:27648354

  5. Paclitaxel targets VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in ovarian cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Bin; Bie, Zhixin; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Ailing

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the gynecologic cancers with the highest mortality, wherein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is involved in regulating tumor vascularization, growth, migration, and invasion. VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in tumors has been targeted in various cancer treatments, and anti-VEGF therapy has been used clinically for treatment of several types of cancer. Paclitaxel is a natural antitumor agent in the standard front-line treatment that has significant efficiency to treat advanced cancers, including ovarian cancer. Although platinum/paclitaxel-based chemotherapy has good response rates, most patients eventually relapse because the disease develops drug resistance. We aim to review the recent advances in paclitaxel treatment of ovarian cancer via antiangiogenesis. Single-agent therapy may be used in selected cases of ovarian cancer. However, to prevent drug resistance, drug combinations should be identified for optimal effectiveness and existing therapies should be improved.

  6. DNA methylation changes in epithelial ovarian cancer histotypes

    PubMed Central

    Earp, Madalene A.; Cunningham, Julie M.

    2016-01-01

    Survival after a diagnosis of ovarian cancer has not improved, and despite histological differences, treatment is similar for all cases. Understanding the molecular basis for ovarian cancer risk and prognosis is fundamental, and to this end much has been gleaned about genetic changes contributing to risk, and to a lesser extent, survival. There’s considerable evidence for genetic differences between the four pathologically defined histological subtypes; however, the contribution of epigenetics is less well documented. In this report, we review alterations in DNA methylation in ovarian cancer, focusing on histological subtypes, and studies examining the roles of methylation in determining therapy response. As epigenetics is making its way into clinical care, we review the application of cell free DNA methylation to ovarian cancer diagnosis and care. Finally, we comment on recurrent limitations in the DNA methylation literature for ovarian cancer, which can and should be addressed to mature this field. PMID:26363302

  7. Genetic Variation at 9p22.2 and Ovarian Cancer Risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Kartsonaki, Christiana; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Roversi, Gaia; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Gismondi, Viviana; Capra, Fabio; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Cruger, Dorthe; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; Karlsson, Per; Stenmark Askmalm, Marie; Borg, Ake; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Górski, Bohdan; Cybulski, Cezary; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Benítez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti A.; Verhoef, Senno; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine A.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.; Bodmer, Danielle; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; van Os, Theo A.; Asperen, Christi J.; Blok, Marinus J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Dunning, Alison M.; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Pichert, Gabriella; Cole, Trevor; Hodgson, Shirley; Brewer, Carole; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary; Kennedy, M. John; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Gregory, Helen; Godwin, Andrew; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Moncoutier, Virginie; Castera, Laurent; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Barjhoux, Laure; Bonadona, Valérie; Leroux, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Lidereau, Rosette; Nogues, Catherine; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Prieur, Fabienne; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnès; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Fert-Ferrer, Sandra; Miron, Alex; Buys, Saundra S.; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Terry, Mary Beth; Goldgar, David; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Jønson, Lars; Ejlertsen, Bent; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Vijai, Joseph; Dutra-Clarke, Ana V. C.; Przybylo, Jennifer A.; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Blanco, Ignacio; Lázaro, Conxi; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Beattie, Mary S.; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Meindl, Alfons; Ruehl, Ina; Fiebig, Britta; Sutter, Christian; Arnold, Norbert; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Kast, Karin; Niederacher, Dieter; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Simard, Jacques; Soucy, Penny; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Although several common variants have been associated with breast cancer susceptibility in mutation carriers, none have been associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility. A genome-wide association study recently identified an association between the rare allele of the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3814113 (ie, the C allele) at 9p22.2 and decreased risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated the association of this SNP with ovarian cancer risk among BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers by use of data from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. Methods We genotyped rs3814113 in 10 029 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 5837 BRCA2 mutation carriers. Associations with ovarian and breast cancer were assessed with a retrospective likelihood approach. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results The minor allele of rs3814113 was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer among BRCA1 mutation carriers (per-allele hazard ratio of ovarian cancer = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.72 to 0.85; P = 4.8 × 10-9) and BRCA2 mutation carriers (hazard ratio of ovarian cancer = 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.67 to 0.90; P = 5.5 × 10-4). This SNP was not associated with breast cancer risk among either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. BRCA1 mutation carriers with the TT genotype at SNP rs3814113 were predicted to have an ovarian cancer risk to age 80 years of 48%, and those with the CC genotype were predicted to have a risk of 33%. Conclusion Common genetic variation at the 9p22.2 locus was associated with decreased risk of ovarian cancer for carriers of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. PMID:21169536

  8. Prevalence screening for ovarian cancer in postmenopausal women by CA 125 measurement and ultrasonography.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, I; Davies, A P; Bridges, J; Stabile, I; Fay, T; Lower, A; Grudzinskas, J G; Oram, D

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the performance of the sequential combination of serum CA 125 measurement and ultrasonography in screening for ovarian cancer. DESIGN--The serum CA 125 concentration of each subject was determined and those with a concentration > or = 30 U/ml were recalled for abdominal ultrasonography. If ultrasonography gave abnormal results surgical investigation was arranged. Volunteers were followed up by annual postal questionnaire. SETTING--General practice, occupational health departments, ovarian cancer screening clinic. SUBJECTS--22,000 women volunteers who were postmenopausal and aged over 45 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Apparent sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, years of cancer detected. RESULTS--41 women had a positive screening result and were investigated surgically. 11 had ovarian cancer (true positive result) and 30 had other disorders or no abnormality (false positive result). Of the 21,959 volunteers with a negative screening result, eight subsequently presented clinically with ovarian cancer (false negative result) and 21,951 had not developed ovarian cancer during follow up (apparent true negative result). The screening protocol achieved a specificity of 99.9%, a positive predictive value of 26.8%, and an apparent sensitivity of 78.6% and 57.9% at one year and two year follow up respectively. The estimated number of years of cancer detected by the prevalence screen was 1.4 years. CONCLUSIONS--This screening protocol is highly specific for ovarian cancer and can detect a substantial proportion of cases at a preclinical stage. Further investigation is required to determine the effect of the screening protocol on the ratio of early to late stage disease detected and on mortality from ovarian cancer. PMID:8490497

  9. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 serum levels in ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hefler, L; Tempfer, C; Heinze, G; Mayerhofer, K; Breitenecker, G; Leodolter, S; Reinthaller, A; Kainz, C

    1999-01-01

    The chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 is an important mediator of monocyte infiltration in various solid tumours of epithelial origin. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of MCP-1 in the natural history of ovarian cancer and to determine its value as differentiation marker and prognostic marker regarding disease free and overall survival. This retrospective study comprises 86 patients with ovarian cancer, 48 with primary ovarian cancer and 38 with recurrent ovarian cancer, 67 patients with benign ovarian cysts and 42 healthy women. Median serum levels in patients with primary ovarian cancer, recurrent ovarian cancer, benign ovarian cysts and in healthy women were 535.6 (range 129.6–1200) pg ml–1, 427.3 (range 193.4–1101) pg ml–1, 371.2 (range 222–986.8) pg ml–1 and 318.7 (range 241.3–681.4) pg ml–1 respectively (Mann–Whitney U-test, P < 0.001). Univariate logistic regression models revealed a significant influence of MCP-1 serum levels on the odds of presenting with primary ovarian cancer versus benign cysts and versus healthy women respectively (univariate logistic regression, P < 0.001 and P < 0.001 respectively). In a multivariate logistic regression model considering MCP-1 and CA 125 serum levels simultaneously, both MCP-1 and CA 125 revealed statistical significance on the odds of presenting with primary ovarian cancer versus benign cysts (multivariate logistic regression, P = 0.05 and P < 0.001 respectively). In ovarian cancer patients, MCP-1 serum levels showed a statistically significant correlation with histological grade (Mann–Whitney U-test, P = 0.02) and age at the time of diagnosis (Mann–Whitney U-test, P = 0.03). Elevated MCP-1 serum levels prior to therapy were not associated with disease-free and overall survival (log-rank test, P = 0.2 and P = 0.7 respectively). In summary these data indicate that MCP-1 might play a functional role in the natural history of ovarian cancer and might serve as

  10. Chromosome abnormalities in primary ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yonescu, R.; Currie, J.; Griffin, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosome abnormalities that are specific and recurrent may occur in regions of the genome that are involved in the conversion of normal cells to those with tumorigenic potential. Ovarian cancer is the primary cause of death among patients with gynecological malignancies. We have performed cytogenetic analysis of 16 ovarian tumors from women age 28-82. Three tumors of low malignant potential and three granulosa cell tumors had normal karyotypes. To look for the presence of trisomy 12, which has been suggested to be a common aberration in this group of tumors, interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on direct preparations from three of these tumors using a probe for alpha satellite sequences of chromosome 12. In the 3 preparations, 92-98 percent of the cells contained two copies of chromosome 12, indicating that trisomy 12 is not a universal finding in low grade ovarian tumors. Endometrioid carcinoma of the ovary is histologically indistinguishable from endometial carcinoma of the uterus. We studied 10 endometrioid tumors to determine the degree of genetic similarity between these two carcinomas. Six out of ten endometrioid tumors showed a near-triploid modal number, and one presented with a tetraploid modal number. Eight of the ten contained structural chromosome abnormalities, of which the most frequent were 1p- (5 tumors), 19q+ (3 tumors), 6q- or ins(6) (4 tumors), 3q- or 3q+ (4 tumors). These cytogenetic results resemble those reported for papillary ovarian tumors and differ from those of endometrial carcinoma of the uterus. We conclude that despite the histologic similarities between the endometrioid and endometrial carcinomas, the genetic abnormalities in the genesis of these tumors differ significantly.

  11. Validating genetic risk associations for ovarian cancer through the international Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, C L; Near, A M; Van Den Berg, D J; Ramus, S J; Gentry-Maharaj, A; Menon, U; Gayther, S A; Anderson, A R; Edlund, C K; Wu, A H; Chen, X; Beesley, J; Webb, P M; Holt, S K; Chen, C; Doherty, J A; Rossing, M A; Whittemore, A S; McGuire, V; DiCioccio, R A; Goodman, M T; Lurie, G; Carney, M E; Wilkens, L R; Ness, R B; Moysich, K B; Edwards, R; Jennison, E; Kjaer, S K; Hogdall, E; Hogdall, C K; Goode, E L; Sellers, T A; Vierkant, R A; Cunningham, J C; Schildkraut, J M; Berchuck, A; Moorman, P G; Iversen, E S; Cramer, D W; Terry, K L; Vitonis, A F; Titus-Ernstoff, L; Song, H; Pharoah, P D P; Spurdle, A B; Anton-Culver, H; Ziogas, A; Brewster, W; Galitovskiy, V; Chenevix-Trench, G

    2009-01-01

    The search for genetic variants associated with ovarian cancer risk has focused on pathways including sex steroid hormones, DNA repair, and cell cycle control. The Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC) identified 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes in these pathways, which had been genotyped by Consortium members and a pooled analysis of these data was conducted. Three of the 10 SNPs showed evidence of an association with ovarian cancer at P⩽0.10 in a log-additive model: rs2740574 in CYP3A4 (P=0.011), rs1805386 in LIG4 (P=0.007), and rs3218536 in XRCC2 (P=0.095). Additional genotyping in other OCAC studies was undertaken and only the variant in CYP3A4, rs2740574, continued to show an association in the replication data among homozygous carriers: ORhomozygous(hom)=2.50 (95% CI 0.54-11.57, P=0.24) with 1406 cases and 2827 controls. Overall, in the combined data the odds ratio was 2.81 among carriers of two copies of the minor allele (95% CI 1.20–6.56, P=0.017, phet across studies=0.42) with 1969 cases and 3491 controls. There was no association among heterozygous carriers. CYP3A4 encodes a key enzyme in oestrogen metabolism and our finding between rs2740574 and risk of ovarian cancer suggests that this pathway may be involved in ovarian carcinogenesis. Additional follow-up is warranted. PMID:19127255

  12. Cancer Risk Awareness and Concern among Women with a Family History of Breast or Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Andersen, M Robyn; Thorpe, Jason; Buist, Diana S M; Beatty, J David; Watabayashi, Kate; Hanson, Nancy; Resta, Robert; Chubak, Jessica; Urban, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Women with a documented deleterious mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are at substantially elevated risk for ovarian cancer. To understand what percentage of women with high-risk family histories know their risk is elevated we surveyed 1,885 women with a high- or moderate-risk family history and no personal history of breast or ovarian cancer, and asked about their perceived risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Among high-risk women, fewer than 20% reported use of genetic counseling, and knowledge of elevated risk of ovarian cancer was low. Prior genetic counseling was associated with greater perceived risk for ovarian cancer. Results suggest that most high-risk women (>75%) do not know their risk for ovarian cancer. Identification of potentially high-risk women for referral to genetic counseling may improve informed ovarian cancer risk management.

  13. Intraoperative radiation therapy in recurrent ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, O.W. Stephanie . E-mail: stbeast@stanford.edu; Kapp, Daniel S.; Teng, Nelson N.H.; Husain, Amreen

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate disease outcomes and complications in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer treated with cytoreductive surgery and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 24 consecutive patients with ovarian carcinoma who underwent secondary cytoreduction and intraoperative radiation therapy at our institution between 1994 and 2002 was conducted. After optimal cytoreductive surgery, IORT was delivered with orthovoltage X-rays (200 kVp) using individually sized and beveled cone applications. Outcomes measures were local control of disease, progression-free interval, overall survival, and treatment-related complications. Results: Of these 24 patients, 22 were available for follow-up analysis. Additional treatment at the time of and after IORT included whole abdominopelvic radiation, 9; pelvic or locoregional radiation, 5; chemotherapy, 6; and no adjuvant treatment, 2. IORT doses ranged from 9-14 Gy (median, 12 Gy). The anatomic sites treated were pelvis (sidewalls, vaginal cuff, presacral area, anterior pubis), para-aortic and paracaval lymph node beds, inguinal region, or porta hepatitis. At a median follow-up of 24 months, 5 patients remain free of disease, whereas 17 patients have recurred, of whom 4 are alive with disease and 13 died from disease. Five patients recurred within the radiation fields for a locoregional relapse rate of 32% and 12 patients recurred at distant sites with a median time to recurrence of 13.7 months. Five-year overall survival was 22% with a median survival of 26 months from time of IORT. Nine patients (41%) experienced Grade 3 toxicities from their treatments. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with locally recurrent ovarian cancer, combined IORT and tumor reductive surgery is reasonably tolerated and may contribute to achieving local control and disease palliation.

  14. Is CA72-4 a Useful Biomarker in Differential Diagnosis between Ovarian Endometrioma and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Anastasi, Emanuela; Manganaro, Lucia; Granato, Teresa; Benedetti Panici, Pierluigi; Frati, Luigi; Porpora, Maria Grazia

    2013-01-01

    Background. Surgical excision of ovarian endometriomas in patients desiring pregnancy has recently been criticized because of the risk of damage to healthy ovarian tissue and consequent reduction of ovarian reserve. A correct diagnosis in cases not scheduled for surgery is therefore mandatory in order to avoid unexpected ovarian cancer misdiagnosis. Endometriosis is often associated with high levels of CA125. This marker is therefore not useful for discriminating ovarian endometrioma from ovarian malignancy. The aim of this study was to establish if the serum marker CA72-4 could be helpful in the differential diagnosis between ovarian endometriosis and epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods. Serums CA125 and CA72-4 were measured in 72 patients with ovarian endometriomas and 55 patients with ovarian cancer. Results. High CA125 concentrations were observed in patients with ovarian endometriosis and in those with ovarian cancer. A marked difference in CA72-4 values was observed between women with ovarian cancer (71.0%) and patients with endometriosis (13.8%) (P < 0.0001). Conclusions. This study suggests that CA72-4 determination can be useful to confirm the benign nature of ovarian endometriomas in women with high CA125 levels. PMID:24191126

  15. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel or Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine With or Without Bevacizumab as First-Line Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV or Recurrent Stage I Epithelial Ovarian or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-21

    Borderline Ovarian Mucinous Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer

  16. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab Compared to Docetaxel, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Carcinoma (Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  17. Elevated blood plasma concentrations of active ghrelin and obestatin in benign ovarian neoplasms and ovarian cancers.

    PubMed

    Markowska, A; Ziółkowska, A; Jaszczyńska-Nowinka, K; Madry, R; Malendowicz, L K

    2009-01-01

    Both ghrelin and obestatin are derived from preproghrelin by post-translational processing. The two peptides are secreted into the blood but circulating levels of these peptides have not been assessed in women with ovarian tumours. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate peripheral blood concentrations of active and total ghrelin and obestatin in patients with benign ovarian tumours and those with ovarian cancer. The studies were conducted on 22 patients operated due to benign ovarian tumours, and 31 patients operated due to ovarian cancer. A control group consisted of 32 women, 24 to 65 years of age. Both in women with benign ovarian tumours and those with ovarian cancer blood concentrations of active ghrelin and obestatin were higher than in the control group (active ghrelin: 90 +/- 4, 84 +/- 4 and 56 +/- 9 pg/ml, respectively, obestatin: 660 +/- 36; 630 +/- 30 and 538 +/- 31 ng/ml (x +/- SE), respectively). In contrast, total ghrelin concentrations in blood were similar in the studied groups. The alterations resulted in increased values of active to total ghrelin concentration ratio in the peripheral blood of patients with benign ovarian tumours or with ovarian cancer (0.79 +/- 0.02 and 0.93 +/- 0.05, respectively vs 0.58 +/- 0.02 in the control group). Due to the absence of any convincing proof for the presence of a functional GHS-R-1a receptor for ghrelin in human ovaries it did not seem probable that the observed elevated levels of active ghrelin and obestatin were directly linked to development of ovarian tumours.

  18. Risk Factors for Ovarian Cancers with and without Microsatellite Instability

    PubMed Central

    Segev, Yakir; Pal, Tuya; Rosen, Barry; McLaughlin, John R.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Risch, Harvey A.; Zhang, Shiyu; Ping, Sun; Narod, Steven A.; Schildkraut, Joellen

    2013-01-01

    Objective In a population-based sample of epithelial ovarian cancers, to evaluate the association between microsatellite instability status and: 1) Ovarian cancer risk factors and 2) The distribution of the specific histologic subtypes. Patients and methods Participants were drawn from three population-based studies of primary epithelial ovarian cancer: Tumor DNA was analyzed using five standardized microsatellite markers to assess microsatellite instability (MSI) status. Patients were divided into three groups (MSI-high, MSI-low and MSI-stable) according to NCI criteria. We compared the prevalence of specific known risk and protective factors among the three subgroups, including BMI, smoking history, parity, BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status, past oral contraceptive use, and tubal ligation. Similarly, we compared the distribution of the histologic subtypes among the three subgroups. Results A total of 917 ovarian cancer patients were included. One hundred twenty seven (13.8%) cancers were MSI-high. Subgroup analyses according to smoking, BMI, parity, past oral contraceptive use and past tubal ligation did not reveal any statistically significance differences among the groups. Among the 29 patients with BRCA1 mutations, 20.7% had MSI-high cancers compared with 5.9% among 17 BRCA2-mutation patients. The proportions of different ovarian cancer histologies among the various microsatellite instability subgroups were similar. Conclusions The prevalence of risk and protective factors among ovarian cancer patients is similar for cancers with and without microsatellite instability. The distributions of microsatellite instability do not differ significantly among ovarian cancers with different histologies. Ovarian cancer patients with BRCA1 mutations had a 21% rate of MSI-high tumors, compared to 6% among patients with BRCA2 mutations, but this difference was not statistically significant. PMID:23748177

  19. MiR181c inhibits ovarian cancer metastasis and progression by targeting PRKCD expression

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lijuan; Wang, Li; Li, Fengxia; Gao, Xihai; Wei, Xuegong; Liu, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate many important cancer related gene expression in the posttranscriptional process. Dysregulated expression of miRNAs has been observed in numerous human cancers including ovarian cancer. In this study, we found that the expression of the miR-181c was significantly decreased in ovarian cancer tissue and in tissues with lymph node metastasis when compared with their control samples, respectively. Moreover, among pathological stages, the expression of miR-181c was significantly decreased in the tissues with IV stage compared with other stages. In vitro, miR-181c significantly inhibited the proliferation, metastasis of A2780 cell line, and induced G1 phase arrest. Through bioinformatics prediction, protein kinase C delta (PRKCD) was identified as a target gene of miR-181c. Western blot results showed that PRKCD was increased in ovarian cancer tissue, in tissues with lymph node metastasis and IV stage of ovarian cancer pathological samples. After knocking down PRKCD, the cell cycle of A2780 cells was also arrested in G1 phase. The proliferation and the metastasis of A2780 cells were reduced. The dual luciferase reporter experiments showed that miR-181c regulated the expression of PRKCD by combining with its 3’UTR. These results indicate that miR-181c inhibits ovarian cancer metastasis and progression by targeting PRKCD expression. PMID:26629004

  20. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab, and Veliparib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Fallopian Tube Carcinosarcoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Tumor; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  1. Evolving Paradigms in Research and Care in Ovarian Cancers.

    PubMed

    Karlan, Beth Y; Alvarez, Ronald D; Strauss, Jerome F

    2016-10-01

    The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened an expert committee to examine and summarize the state of the science in ovarian cancer research. An Executive Summary of the recently released report describing the key findings and specific recommendations to reduce the incidence of and morbidity and mortality from ovarian cancers is presented. Highlights include the recognition that ovarian cancer is not just one disease, but rather a constellation of distinct cancer types, some of which originate outside of the ovary. Furthermore, it was noted that our incomplete understanding of the basic biology of each subtype of ovarian cancer is an impediment to advances in prevention, screening, early detection, diagnosis, treatment, and supportive care. PMID:27607869

  2. A prospective study of dietary lactose and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Fairfield, Kathleen M; Hunter, David J; Colditz, Graham A; Fuchs, Charles S; Cramer, Daniel W; Speizer, Frank E; Willett, Walter C; Hankinson, Susan E

    2004-06-10

    The milk sugar lactose is an hypothesized risk factor for epithelial ovarian cancer because of possible direct toxic effects of its metabolites on oocytes or by compensatory gonadotropin stimulation. Women are presently encouraged to consume dairy products as a source of calcium to prevent osteoporosis. The objective of our study was to prospectively assess lactose, milk and milk product consumption in relation to ovarian cancer risk among 80326 participants in the Nurses' Health Study who had no history of cancer other than nonmelanoma skin cancer. Participants in the Nurses' Health Study reported on known and suspected ovarian cancer risk factors in questionnaires mailed biennially from 1976 to 1996. Food frequency questionnaires were included in the years 1980, 1984, 1986 and 1990. Newly reported ovarian cancer was documented by review of medical records. During 16 years of follow-up (1980-1996), 301 cases of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer were confirmed. Pooled logistic regression was used to control for age, body mass index (kg/m(2)), caffeine intake, oral contraceptive use, smoking history, parity and tubal ligation. For all subtypes of invasive ovarian cancer combined, we observed a nonsignificant 40% greater risk for women in the highest category of lactose consumption compared to the lowest (multivariate relative risk (RR) 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.98-2.01). We observed a 2-fold higher risk of the serous ovarian cancer subtype among those in the highest category of lactose consumption compared to the lowest (RR 2.07, 95% CI, 1.27-3.40). For each 11-gram increase in lactose consumption (the approximate amount in one glass of milk), we observed a 20% increase in risk of serous cancers (RR 1.20, 95% CI, 1.04-1.39). Skim and low-fat milk were the largest contributors to dietary lactose. Women who consumed one or more servings of skim or low-fat milk daily had a 32% higher risk of any ovarian cancer (RR 1.32, 95% CI, 0.97-1.82) and a 69% higher

  3. Quantitative analysis of cell-free DNA in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    SHAO, XUEFENG; He, YAN; JI, MIN; CHEN, XIAOFANG; QI, JING; SHI, WEI; HAO, TIANBO; JU, SHAOQING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between cell-free DNA (cf-DNA) levels and clinicopathological characteristics of patients with ovarian cancer using a branched DNA (bDNA) technique, and to determine the value of quantitative cf-DNA detection in assisting with the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Serum specimens were collected from 36 patients with ovarian cancer on days 1, 3 and 7 following surgery, and additional serum samples were also collected from 22 benign ovarian tumor cases, and 19 healthy, non-cancerous ovaries. bDNA techniques were used to detect serum cf-DNA concentrations. All data were analyzed using SPSS version 18.0. The cf-DNA levels were significantly increased in the ovarian cancer group compared with those of the benign ovarian tumor group and healthy ovarian group (P<0.01). Furthermore, cf-DNA levels were significantly increased in stage III and IV ovarian cancer compared with those of stages I and II (P<0.01). In addition, cf-DNA levels were significantly increased on the first day post-surgery (P<0.01), and subsequently demonstrated a gradual decrease. In the ovarian cancer group, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of cf-DNA and the sensitivity were 0.917 and 88.9%, respectively, which was higher than those of cancer antigen 125 (0.724, 75%) and human epididymis protein 4 (0.743, 80.6%). There was a correlation between the levels of serum cf-DNA and the occurrence and development of ovarian cancer in the patients evaluated. bDNA techniques possessed higher sensitivity and specificity than other methods for the detection of serum cf-DNA in patients exhibiting ovarian cancer, and bDNA techniques are more useful for detecting cf-DNA than other factors. Thus, the present study demonstrated the potential value for the use of bDNA as an adjuvant diagnostic method for ovarian cancer. PMID:26788153

  4. Genetic variation in telomere maintenance genes in relation to ovarian cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Harris, Holly R; Vivo, Immaculata De; Titus, Linda J; Vitonis, Allison F; Wong, Jason Y Y; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L

    2012-01-01

    Telomeres are repetitive non-coding DNA sequences at the ends of chromosomes that provide protection against chromosomal instability. Telomere length and stability are influenced by proteins, including telomerase which is partially encoded by the TERT gene. Genetic variation in the TERT gene is associated with ovarian cancer risk, and predicts survival in lung cancer and glioma. We investigated whether genetic variation in five telomere maintenance genes was associated with survival among 1480 cases of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer in the population-based New England Case-Control Study. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Overall we observed no significant associations between SNPs in telomere maintenance genes and mortality using a significance threshold of p=0.001. However, we observed some suggestive associations in subgroup analyses. Future studies with larger populations may further our understanding of what role telomeres play in ovarian cancer survival.

  5. Nectin 4 Overexpression in Ovarian Cancer Tissues and Serum

    PubMed Central

    DeRycke, Melissa S.; Pambuccian, Stefan E.; Gilks, C. Blake; Kalloger, Steve E.; Ghidouche, Abderrezak; Lopez, Marc; Bliss, Robin L.; Geller, Melissa A.; Argenta, Peter A.; Harrington, Katherine M.; Skubitz, Amy P.N.

    2011-01-01

    Early detection of ovarian cancer is difficult owing to the lack of specific and sensitive tests available. Previously, we found expression of nectin 4 to be increased in ovarian cancer compared with normal ovaries. Reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative RT-PCR validated the overexpression of nectin 4 messenger RNA in ovarian cancer compared with normal ovarian cell lines and tissues. Protein levels of nectin 4 were elevated in ovarian cancer cell lines and tissue compared with normal ovarian cell lines as demonstrated by Western immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarray slides. Cleaved nectin 4 was detectable in a number of patient serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In patients with benign gynecologic diseases with high serum CA125 levels, nectin 4 was not detected in the majority of cases, suggesting that nectin 4 may serve as a potential biomarker that helps discriminate benign gynecologic diseases from ovarian cancer in a panel with CA125. PMID:20959669

  6. Periodontal bone loss and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Babic, Ana; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Teles, Ricardo P.; Tworoger, Shelley S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Periodontitis, a chronic inflammatory response to pathogenic bacteria in the oral microbiome, is common among adults. It is associated with several medical conditions, including cardiovascular diseases, and potentially with esophageal, lung, oral and pancreatic cancer. One of the proposed mechanisms behind these associations is systemic inflammation, which has also been implicated in ovarian cancer etiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate association between ovarian cancer and periodontal bone loss. Methods The association between periodontal bone loss, a marker of periodontitis, and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer was estimated among 60,560 participants of the prospective Nurses’ Health Study using Cox proportional hazards analysis. Competing risks analysis was used to estimate association by histological subtype. Results We did not observe an increased risk of ovarian cancer among participants with periodontal bone loss (HR=0.86, 95% CI: 0.64–1.15). Among women younger than 69 years, periodontal bone loss was associated with a 40% (HR=0.60, 95% CI: 0.36–0.98) decreased ovarian cancer risk, while there was no association in women older than 69 (HR=1.09, 95% CI: 0.75–1.58), although this difference did not reach statistical significance (p-heterogeneity=0.06). We observed a suggestive decreased risk for serous tumors (HR=0.76, 95% CI: 0.53–1.09). The number of natural teeth and root canals, other metrics of oral health, were not associated with ovarian cancer risk. Conclusion Our results do not support an increased ovarian cancer risk in women with periodontal bone loss, however there was a significant decrease in risk in women younger than 69. Given the unexpected association between periodontal bone loss and ovarian cancer risk in younger women, further research is warranted. PMID:25837263

  7. Perineal Powder Use and Risk of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, Serena C.; Reeves, Katherine W.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Crawford, Lori; Lane, Dorothy; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Thomson, Cynthia A.; Ockene, Judith K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Case-control studies have reported an increased risk of ovarian cancer among talc users; however, the only cohort study to date found no association except for an increase in serous invasive ovarian cancers. The purpose of this analysis was to assess perineal powder use and risk of ovarian cancer prospectively in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study cohort. Methods Perineal powder use was assessed at baseline by self-report regarding application to genitals, sanitary napkins, or diaphragms and duration of use. The primary outcome was self-reported ovarian cancer centrally adjudicated by physicians. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate risk, adjusting for covariates, including person-time until diagnosis of ovarian cancer (n = 429), death, loss to follow-up, or September 17, 2012. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Among 61576 postmenopausal women, followed for a mean of 12.4 years without a history of cancer or bilateral oophorectomy, 52.6% reported ever using perineal powder. Ever use of perineal powder (hazard ratio [HR]adj = 1.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.87 to 1.28) was not associated with risk of ovarian cancer compared with never use. Individually, ever use of powder on the genitals (HRadj = 1.12, 95% CI = 0.92 to 1.36), sanitary napkins (HRadj = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.76 to 1.20), or diaphragms (HRadj = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.68 to 1.23) was not associated with risk of ovarian cancer compared with never use, nor were there associations with increasing durations of use. Estimates did not differ when stratified by age or tubal ligation status. Conclusion Based on our results, perineal powder use does not appear to influence ovarian cancer risk. PMID:25214560

  8. Granisetron, Aprepitant, and Dexamethasone in Preventing Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy for Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Nausea and Vomiting; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  9. Critical appraisal of bevacizumab in the treatment of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Yabuno, Akira; Fujiwara, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Bevacizumab is the first molecular-targeted agent to be used for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor. Two randomized Phase III trials evaluated the combination of bevacizumab plus standard cytotoxic chemotherapy for first-line treatment of advanced ovarian cancer. Additional Phase III trials evaluated bevacizumab combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy in platinum-sensitive and platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer. All these trials reported a statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival but not in overall survival. Furthermore, bevacizumab effectively improved the quality of life with regard to abdominal symptoms in recurrent ovarian cancer patients. Bevacizumab is associated with adverse events not commonly observed with cytotoxic agents used to treat gynecological cancers, such as hypertension, bleeding, thromboembolism, proteinuria, delayed wound healing, and gastrointestinal events. However, most of these events can be adequately managed by gynecologists. The clinical trial results with bevacizumab have supported its recent approval in Europe and the United States as a treatment for ovarian cancer. This review presents the latest evidence for bevacizumab therapy of ovarian cancer and describes selection of patients for personalized treatment. PMID:25960638

  10. Municipal distribution of ovarian cancer mortality in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Lope, Virginia; Pollán, Marina; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Aragonés, Nuria; Vidal, Enrique; Gómez-Barroso, Diana; Ramis, Rebeca; García-Pérez, Javier; Cabanes, Anna; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2008-01-01

    Background Spain was the country that registered the greatest increases in ovarian cancer mortality in Europe. This study describes the municipal distribution of ovarian cancer mortality in Spain using spatial models for small-area analysis. Methods Smoothed relative risks of ovarian cancer mortality were obtained, using the Besag, York and Molliè autoregressive spatial model. Standardised mortality ratios, smoothed relative risks, and distribution of the posterior probability of relative risks being greater than 1 were depicted on municipal maps. Results During the study period (1989–1998), 13,869 ovarian cancer deaths were registered in 2,718 Spanish towns, accounting for 4% of all cancer-related deaths among women. The highest relative risks were mainly concentrated in three areas, i.e., the interior of Barcelona and Gerona (north-east Spain), the north of Lugo and Asturias (north-west Spain) and along the Seville-Huelva boundary (in the south-west). Eivissa (Balearic Islands) and El Hierro (Canary Islands) also registered increased risks. Conclusion Well established ovarian cancer risk factors might not contribute significantly to the municipal distribution of ovarian cancer mortality. Environmental and occupational exposures possibly linked to this pattern and prevalent in specific regions, are discussed in this paper. Small-area geographical studies are effective instruments for detecting risk areas that may otherwise remain concealed on a more reduced scale. PMID:18789142

  11. Surgery and Chemotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Uterine, or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Recurrent Uterine Corpus Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  12. Combining Chemotherapy with Bevacizumab Improves Outcomes for Ovarian Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    Results from two phase III randomized clinical trials suggest that, at least for some patients with ovarian cancer, adding the antiangiogenesis agent bevacizumab to chemotherapy increases the time to disease progression and may improve survival.

  13. Defining Therapy for Recurrent Platinum-sensitive Ovarian Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III clinical trial, women with platinum-sensitive, recurrent ovarian epithelial, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer will be randomly assigned to undergo secondary cytoreductive surgery, if they are candidates for such surgery, and

  14. EGFR/HER-targeted therapeutics in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilken, Jason A; Badri, Tayf; Cross, Sarah; Raji, Rhoda; Santin, Alessandro D; Schwartz, Peter; Branscum, Adam J; Baron, Andre T; Sakhitab, Adam I; Maihle, Nita J

    2012-03-01

    Despite decades of research and evolving treatment modalities, survival among patients with epithelial ovarian cancer has improved only incrementally. During this same period, the development of biologically targeted therapeutics has improved survival for patients with diverse malignancies. Many of these new drugs target the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER/ErbB) family of tyrosine kinases, which play a major role in the etiology and progression of many carcinomas, including epithelial ovarian cancer. While several HER-targeted therapeutics are US FDA approved for the treatment of various malignancies, none have gained approval for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Here, we review the published literature on HER-targeted therapeutics for the treatment of ovarian cancer, including novel HER-targeted therapeutics in various stages of clinical development, as well as the challenges that have limited the use of these inhibitors in clinical settings.

  15. EGFR/HER-targeted therapeutics in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilken, Jason A; Badri, Tayf; Cross, Sarah; Raji, Rhoda; Santin, Alessandro D; Schwartz, Peter; Branscum, Adam J; Baron, Andre T; Sakhitab, Adam I; Maihle, Nita J

    2013-01-01

    Despite decades of research and evolving treatment modalities, survival among patients with epithelial ovarian cancer has improved only incrementally. During this same period, the development of biologically targeted therapeutics has improved survival for patients with diverse malignancies. Many of these new drugs target the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER/ErbB) family of tyrosine kinases, which play a major role in the etiology and progression of many carcinomas, including epithelial ovarian cancer. While several HER-targeted therapeutics are US FDA approved for the treatment of various malignancies, none have gained approval for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Here, we review the published literature on HER-targeted therapeutics for the treatment of ovarian cancer, including novel HER-targeted therapeutics in various stages of clinical development, as well as the challenges that have limited the use of these inhibitors in clinical settings. PMID:22416774

  16. Discovery – BRCA Connection to Breast and Ovarian Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    NCI-funded research helped identify inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutations and their connection to breast and ovarian cancer. From this research, a screening test was also developed to help patients make informed decisions about their health.

  17. Fertility drugs, reproductive strategies and ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Tomao, Federica; Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Spinelli, Gian Paolo; Stati, Valeria; Prete, Alessandra Anna; Prinzi, Natalie; Sinjari, Marsela; Vici, Patrizia; Papa, Anselmo; Chiotti, Maria Stefania; Benedetti Panici, Pierluigi; Tomao, Silverio

    2014-01-01

    Several adverse effects have been related to infertility treatments, such as cancer development. In particular, the relationship between infertility, reproductive strategies, and risk of gynecological cancers has aroused much interest in recent years. The evaluation of cancer risk among women treated for infertility is very complex, mainly because of many factors that can contribute to occurrence of cancer in these patients (including parity status). This article addresses the possible association between the use of fertility treatments and the risk of ovarian cancer, through a scrupulous search of the literature published thus far in this field. Our principal objective was to give more conclusive answers on the question whether the use of fertility drug significantly increases ovarian cancer risk. Our analysis focused on the different types of drugs and different treatment schedules used. This study provides additional insights regarding the long-term relationships between fertility drugs and risk of ovarian cancer.

  18. [Bone marrow involvement in ovarian cancer determined by immunohistochemical methods].

    PubMed

    Gabriel, M; Obrebowska, A; Spaczyński, M

    2000-01-01

    Atypical epithelial cells in the bone marrow of patients with ovarian cancer were evaluated using immunohistochemical techniques. We investigated cytospin preparations of bone marrow taken from 9 women with benign ovarian tumors and 59 women with malignant ovarian tumors. Two monoclonal antibodies (NCL-C11 and NCL-CA 125) were used. With both antibodies we were able to detect keratin and CA 125 antigen expression in the bone marrow of 9 (18.4%) of the patients with ovarian cancer. With regard to the wide histological differentiation of ovarian carcinomas, the presence of atypical epithelial cells in the bone marrow was required as a prognostic factor for survival and relapses. This should be investigated in a larger study group. PMID:11326158

  19. A Molecularly Targeted Theranostic Probe for Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenxue; Bardhan, Rizia; Bartels, Marc; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Pautler, Robia G.; Halas, Naomi J.; Joshi, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family has been implicated in ovarian cancer because of its participation in signaling pathway regulating cellular proliferation, differentiation, motility, and survival. Currently, effective diagnostic and therapeutic schemes are lacking for treating ovarian cancer and consequently ovarian cancer has a high mortality rate. While HER2 receptor expression does not usually affect the survival rates of ovarian cancer to the same extent as in breast cancer, it can be employed as a docking site for directed nanotherapies in cases with de novo or acquired chemotherapy resistance. In this study, we have exploited a novel gold nanoshell-based complex (nanocomplex) for targeting, dual modal imaging, and photothermal therapy of HER2 overexpressing and drug resistant ovarian cancer OVCAR3 cells in vitro. The nanocomplexes are engineered to simultaneously provide contrast as fluorescence optical imaging probe and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agent. Both immunofluorescence staining and MRI successfully demonstrate that nanocomplex-anti-HER2 conjugates specifically bind to OVCAR3 cells as opposed to the control, MDA-MB-231 cells, which have low HER2 expression. In addition, nanocomplexes targeted to OVCAR3 cells, when irradiated with near infrared (NIR) laser result in selective destruction of cancer cells through photothermal ablation. We also demonstrate that NIR light therapy and the nanocomplexes by themselves are non-cytotoxic in vitro. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a successful integration of dual modal bioimaging with photothermal cancer therapy for treatment of ovarian cancer. Based on their efficacy in vitro, these nanocomplexes are highly promising for image guided photo-thermal therapy of ovarian cancer as well as other HER2 overexpressing cancers. PMID:20371708

  20. Nuclear medicine for imaging of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Mardanshahi, Alireza; Shahhosseini, Roza; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2016-05-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Usually, the diagnosis of cancer at an early stage is important to facilitate proper treatment and survival. Nuclear medicine has been successfully used in the diagnosis, staging, therapy and monitoring of cancers. Single-photon emission computed tomography and PET-based companion imaging agents are in development for use as a companion diagnostic tool for patients with ovarian cancer. The present review discusses the basic and clinical studies related to the use of radiopharmaceuticals in the diagnosis and management of ovarian cancer, focusing on their utility and comparing them with other imaging techniques such as computed tomography and MRI.

  1. Profile of olaparib in the treatment of advanced ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Dana M; Patel, Shreya; Shields, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Olaparib is a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor that received accelerated approval from the US Food and Drug Administration as monotherapy for patients with germline BRCA mutations and ovarian cancer treated with three or more prior lines of chemotherapy. This article summarizes the mechanism of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition, therapeutic profile and uses of olaparib, and current and ongoing literature pertaining to olaparib in advanced ovarian cancer. PMID:27186080

  2. Perineal use of talc and risk of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Langseth, H; Hankinson, S E; Siemiatycki, J; Weiderpass, E

    2008-04-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most common gynaecological neoplasms, especially in industrialised countries. The aetiology of the disease is not well understood, except that inherited mutations in the breast cancer genes BRCA-1 and BRCA-2 account for up to 10% of all cases, and child-bearing, oral contraceptive use and breast-feeding reduce the risk. Some environmental exposures, notably talc and asbestos, have been suspected as ovarian carcinogens.

  3. ABO blood group and incidence of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Margaret A.; Wolpin, Brian M.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Tworoger, Shelley S.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have observed an association between ABO blood group and risk of certain malignancies, including ovarian cancer; however, no prospective studies of the association with ovarian cancer risk are available. Using data from 49,153 women in the Nurses’ Health Study, we examined the association between ABO blood group and incidence of epithelial ovarian cancer. Study participants reported their blood type and Rh factor in 1996, and 234 women were diagnosed with incident ovarian cancer during 10 years of follow-up. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to model the incidence rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of ovarian cancer for each blood group category. Compared to women with blood group O, women with blood group AB or B had a non-significant 38% increase in ovarian cancer incidence (95% CI=0.88–2.16 for blood group AB and 0.96–1.99 for blood group B), while blood group A was not associated with risk (RR=0.95, 95% CI=0.70–1.30). Combining blood groups AB and B, we observed a statistically significant positive association with presence versus absence of the B antigen overall (RR=1.41, 95% CI=1.06–1.88) and for the serous invasive subtype (RR=1.53, 95% CI=1.08–2.17). In this large, prospective cohort of women, presence of the B antigen was positively associated with ovarian cancer incidence, while blood group A was not associated with risk. Additional studies are needed to confirm this association and to explore the mechanisms through which blood group may influence ovarian cancer risk. PMID:20309936

  4. Proteomics of ovarian cancer: functional insights and clinical applications

    DOE PAGES

    Elzek, Mohamed A.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2015-03-04

    In the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in applying proteomics to assist in understanding the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer, elucidating the mechanism of drug resistance, and in the development of biomarkers for early detection of ovarian cancer. Although ovarian cancer is a spectrum of different diseases, the strategies for diagnosis and treatment with surgery and adjuvant therapy are similar across ovarian cancer types, increasing the general applicability of discoveries made through proteomics research. While proteomic experiments face many difficulties which slow the pace of clinical applications, recent advances in proteomic technology contribute significantly to the identification ofmore » aberrant proteins and networks which can serve as targets for biomarker development and individualized therapies. This review provides a summary of the literature on proteomics’ contributions to ovarian cancer research and highlights the current issues, future directions, and challenges. In conclusion, we propose that protein-level characterization of primary lesion in ovarian cancer can decipher the mystery of this disease, improve diagnostic tools, and lead to more effective screening programs.« less

  5. Proteomics of ovarian cancer: functional insights and clinical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Elzek, Mohamed A.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2015-03-04

    In the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in applying proteomics to assist in understanding the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer, elucidating the mechanism of drug resistance, and in the development of biomarkers for early detection of ovarian cancer. Although ovarian cancer is a spectrum of different diseases, the strategies for diagnosis and treatment with surgery and adjuvant therapy are similar across ovarian cancer types, increasing the general applicability of discoveries made through proteomics research. While proteomic experiments face many difficulties which slow the pace of clinical applications, recent advances in proteomic technology contribute significantly to the identification of aberrant proteins and networks which can serve as targets for biomarker development and individualized therapies. This review provides a summary of the literature on proteomics’ contributions to ovarian cancer research and highlights the current issues, future directions, and challenges. In conclusion, we propose that protein-level characterization of primary lesion in ovarian cancer can decipher the mystery of this disease, improve diagnostic tools, and lead to more effective screening programs.

  6. The prognostic significance of specific HOX gene expression patterns in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Zoe; Moller-Levet, Carla; McGrath, Sophie; Butler-Manuel, Simon; Kavitha Madhuri, Thumuluru; Kierzek, Andrzej M; Pandha, Hardev; Morgan, Richard; Michael, Agnieszka

    2016-10-01

    HOX genes are vital for all aspects of mammalian growth and differentiation, and their dysregulated expression is related to ovarian carcinogenesis. The aim of the current study was to establish the prognostic value of HOX dysregulation as well as its role in platinum resistance. The potential to target HOX proteins through the HOX/PBX interaction was also explored in the context of platinum resistance. HOX gene expression was determined in ovarian cancer cell lines and primary EOCs by QPCR, and compared to expression in normal ovarian epithelium and fallopian tube tissue samples. Statistical analysis included one-way ANOVA and t-tests, using statistical software R and GraphPad. The analysis identified 36 of the 39 HOX genes as being overexpressed in high grade serous EOC compared to normal tissue. We detected a molecular HOX gene-signature that predicted poor outcome. Overexpression of HOXB4 and HOXB9 was identified in high grade serous cell lines after platinum resistance developed. Targeting the HOX/PBX dimer with the HXR9 peptide enhanced the cytotoxicity of cisplatin in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. In conclusion, this study has shown the HOX genes are highly dysregulated in ovarian cancer with high expression of HOXA13, B6, C13, D1 and D13 being predictive of poor clinical outcome. Targeting the HOX/PBX dimer in platinum-resistant cancer represents a potentially new therapeutic option that should be further developed and tested in clinical trials. PMID:27225067

  7. Predicting age of ovarian failure after radiation to a field that includes the ovaries

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W. Hamish B. . E-mail: Hamish.Wallace@ed.ac.uk; Thomson, Angela B.; Saran, Frank; Kelsey, Tom W.

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To predict the age at which ovarian failure is likely to develop after radiation to a field that includes the ovary in women treated for cancer. Methods and Materials: Modern computed tomography radiotherapy planning allows determination of the effective dose of radiation received by the ovaries. Together with our recent assessment of the radiosensitivity of the human oocyte, the effective surviving fraction of primordial oocytes can be determined and the age of ovarian failure, with 95% confidence limits, predicted for any given dose of radiotherapy. Results: The effective sterilizing dose (ESD: dose of fractionated radiotherapy [Gy] at which premature ovarian failure occurs immediately after treatment in 97.5% of patients) decreases with increasing age at treatment. ESD at birth is 20.3 Gy; at 10 years 18.4 Gy, at 20 years 16.5 Gy, and at 30 years 14.3 Gy. We have calculated 95% confidence limits for age at premature ovarian failure for estimated radiation doses to the ovary from 1 Gy to the ESD from birth to 50 years. Conclusions: We report the first model to reliably predict the age of ovarian failure after treatment with a known dose of radiotherapy. Clinical application of this model will enable physicians to counsel women on their reproductive potential following successful treatment.

  8. [Second surgery in the management of ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Scarabelli, C; Campagnutta, E; Zarrelli, A; De Piero, G; Sopracordevole, F; Visentin, M C; Giorda, G; Sasso, G M; Parin, A; Gallo, A

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of second surgery in the combined and multidisciplinary treatment of mullerian ovarian cancer. A retrospective study was carried out in 86 consecutive patients with advances stages of mullerian ovarian cancer (stage 3-4) referred to the Division of Gynecological Surgical Oncology of the Oncological Reference Centre at Aviano for continuation of treatment following initial surgery and chemotherapy performed in various peripheral institutions. Second surgery only revealed 11.6% of complete endocelomatic pathological responses (10 patients) to earlier treatments; among the 76 patients with persistent disease it was possible to achieve optimal redebulking in 50 (65.8%) (31 R0 and 19 R1 after second surgery), whereas it was not possible to perform adequate second surgery in 26 (34.2%). The impact of second surgery on the probability of survival (mean survival rate) was highly significant in the 50 patients in whom it was possible to perform adequate second surgery compared to the non-operated group (14.34 months versus 6.10, chi square = 12.671, p = 0.0004). The authors underline both the prognostic value of lymph node status with increased mortality among patients with positive retro-peritoneal lymph nodes (LN+), and the value of retroperitoneal re-evaluation in predicting endo-peritoneal recidivation in patients with free abdomen who subsequently relapsed.

  9. Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab And Adjuvant Intraperitoneal Carboplatin in Treating Patients Who Had Initial Debulking Surgery for Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  10. Ovarian Cancer and BRCA1/2 Testing: Opportunities to Improve Clinical Care and Disease Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Karakasis, Katherine; Burnier, Julia V.; Bowering, Valerie; Oza, Amit M.; Lheureux, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Without prevention or screening options available, ovarian cancer is the most lethal malignancy of the female reproductive tract. High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) is the most common histologic subtype, and the role of germline BRCA1/2 mutation in predisposition and prognosis is established. Given the targeted treatment opportunities with PARP inhibitors, a predictive role for BRCA1/2 mutation has emerged. Despite recommendations to provide BRCA1/2 testing to all women with histologically confirmed HGSOC, uniform implementation remains challenging. The opportunity to review and revise genetic screening and testing practices will identify opportunities, where universal adoption of BRCA1/2 mutation testing will impact and improve treatment of women with ovarian cancer. Improving education and awareness of genetic testing for women with cancer, as well as the broader general community, will help focus much-needed attention on opportunities to advance prevention and screening programs in ovarian cancer. This is imperative not only for women with cancer and those at risk of developing cancer but also for their first-degree relatives. In addition, BRCA1/2 testing may have direct implications for patients with other types of cancers, many of which are now being found to have BRCA1/2 involvement. PMID:27242959

  11. Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for ovarian cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  12. Integrin inhibitors as a therapeutic agent for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Kenjiro; Ohyagi-Hara, Chifumi; Kimura, Tadashi; Morishige, Ken-Ichirou

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a deadly disease, with a cure rate of only 30%. Despite aggressive treatments, relapse remains almost inevitable in patients with advanced-stage disease. In recent years, great progress has been made towards targeting integrins in cancer treatment, and clinical studies with various integrin inhibitors have demonstrated their effectiveness in blocking cancer progression. Given that the initial critical step of ovarian cancer metastasis is the attachment of cancer cells onto the peritoneum or omentum, in addition to the proven positive clinical results of anti-angiogenic therapy, targeting integrins is likely to be one of the most feasible approaches. This paper summarizes the current understanding of the integrin biology in ovarian cancer metastasis and the various therapeutic approaches attempted with integrin inhibitors. Although no integrin inhibitors have shown favorable results so far, integrin-targeted therapies continue to be a promising approach to be explored for further clinical investigation.

  13. Integrin Inhibitors as a Therapeutic Agent for Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Kenjiro; Ohyagi-Hara, Chifumi; Kimura, Tadashi; Morishige, Ken-ichirou

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a deadly disease, with a cure rate of only 30%. Despite aggressive treatments, relapse remains almost inevitable in patients with advanced-stage disease. In recent years, great progress has been made towards targeting integrins in cancer treatment, and clinical studies with various integrin inhibitors have demonstrated their effectiveness in blocking cancer progression. Given that the initial critical step of ovarian cancer metastasis is the attachment of cancer cells onto the peritoneum or omentum, in addition to the proven positive clinical results of anti-angiogenic therapy, targeting integrins is likely to be one of the most feasible approaches. This paper summarizes the current understanding of the integrin biology in ovarian cancer metastasis and the various therapeutic approaches attempted with integrin inhibitors. Although no integrin inhibitors have shown favorable results so far, integrin-targeted therapies continue to be a promising approach to be explored for further clinical investigation. PMID:22235205

  14. Task Force Reaffirms Recommendation against Ovarian Cancer Screening | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Women at average risk of ovarian cancer should not be screened for the disease, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has reaffirmed. Published in the Annals of Internal Medicine on September 11, the latest USPSTF clinical guideline does not apply to women who have symptoms of ovarian cancer or who have genetic mutations that increase their risk of ovarian cancer. |

  15. Ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles and risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ramus, Susan J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Aalfs, Cora M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van Asperen, Christi J; van Roozendaal, K E P; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E; Kennedy, M John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v O; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Issacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Iganacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B; Karlan, Beth Y; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A; Beattie, Mary S; Dorfling, Cecelia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D P; Gayther, Simon A; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Couch, Fergus J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2012-04-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs10088218 (at 8q24), rs2665390 (at 3q25), rs717852 (at 2q31), and rs9303542 (at 17q21), were genotyped in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 carriers, including 2,678 ovarian cancer cases. Associations were evaluated within a retrospective cohort approach. All four loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.67-0.98) P-trend = 0.033, rs2665390 HR = 1.48 (95% CI: 1.21-1.83) P-trend = 1.8 × 10(-4), rs717852 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10-1.42) P-trend = 6.6 × 10(-4), rs9303542 HR = 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02-1.33) P-trend = 0.026. Two loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele HR = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.81-0.99) P-trend = 0.029, rs2665390 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10-1.42) P-trend = 6.1 × 10(-4). The HR estimates for the remaining loci were consistent with odds ratio estimates for the general population. The identification of multiple loci modifying ovarian cancer risk may be useful for counseling women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations regarding their risk of ovarian cancer.

  16. Glycomics Laboratory for the Early Detection of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Ovarian cancer is a silent killer with few early symptoms and advanced disease present at the time of diagnosis. This cancer is the most lethal of all gynecologic malignancies with over 20,000 new cases diagnosed each year. The 5 year survival rates for ovarian cancer dramatically improve when the disease is diagnosed at an early stage. |

  17. Two cases of clear cell ovarian cancer in young patients

    PubMed Central

    Ranaee, Mohammad; Yazdani, Shahla; Modarres, Seyyed Reza; Rajabi-Moghaddam, Mahdieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of cancer death worldwide. Incidence of ovarian cancer is more common in postmenopausal women. Premenopausal onset is rare and the present study described two cases of ovarian clear cell tumors in young women. Case Presentation: The patients presented with pelvic mass which was confirmed by sonography and laparotomy and final diagnosis was made according to histologic examination. Both patients showed a solid mass with cystic components in adnexal areas and explorative laparotomy demonstrated extension of tumors to abdomen in both patients. The level of CA 125 increased in both patients. For both tumors, immunohistochemical stainings were positive for CK7 and CD15, but CK20 was negative. Conclusion: Although ovarian clear cell tumor is usually diagnosed in postmenopausal women but its diagnosis should be suspected in young women with pelvic mass.

  18. Second neoplasms after invasive and borderline ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Levi, Fabio; Randimbison, Lalao; Blanc-Moya, Rafael; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2009-06-01

    Excess risk of subsequent cancers has been documented in women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. We updated to 2006 data on second cancers in women diagnosed with invasive and borderline ovarian cancer in the Swiss canton of Vaud. Between 1974 and 2006, 304 borderline and 1530 invasive first ovarian tumours were abstracted from the Vaud Cancer Registry database and followed up till the end of 2006. Calculation of expected numbers of tumours in the cohorts was based on site-specific, age-specific and calendar-year-specific incidence rates. We computed the standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of second cancers, and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). There was no change in the incidence of malignant cancers, but that of borderline tumours increased over more recent years. Overall, 110 second neoplasms were observed versus 49.7 expected after invasive ovarian cancer (SIR 2.21; 95% CI: 1.82-2.67). Significant excess risks were observed for cancers of the breast, corpus uteri and leukaemias. When synchronous cancers were excluded, the overall SIR for all sites declined to 1.05. Thirty-one second neoplasms were observed after borderline tumours compared with 21.1 expected (SIR=1.47; 95% CI: 1.00-2.09). SIRs were above unity for ovary, colorectum and uterus. After exclusion of synchronous neoplasms, SIR for all neoplasms declined to 1.09, and remained significant only for second ovarian cancers (SIR=4.93). The present record linkage cohort study shows an excess risk for selected synchronous neoplasms in women diagnosed with both borderline and invasive ovarian cancer, likely because of shared genetic and perhaps environmental factors.

  19. Prevalence and contribution of BRCA1 mutations in breast cancer and ovarian cancer: Results from three US population-based case-control studies of ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Whittemore, A.S.; Gong, G.; Itnyre, J.

    1997-03-01

    We investigate the familial risks of cancers of the breast and ovary, using data pooled from three population-based case-control studies of ovarian cancer that were conducted in the United States. We base estimates of the frequency of mutations of BRCA1 (and possibly other genes) on the reported occurrence of breast cancer and ovarian cancer in the mothers and sisters of 922 women with incident ovarian cancer (cases) and in 922 women with no history of ovarian cancer (controls). Segregation analysis and goodness-of-fit testing of genetic models suggest that rare mutations (frequency .0014; 95% confidence interval .0002-.011) account for all the observed aggregation of breast cancer and ovarian cancer in these families. The estimated risk of breast cancer by age 80 years is 73.5% in mutation carriers and 6.8% in noncarriers. The corresponding estimates for ovarian cancer are 27.8% in carriers and 1.8% in noncarriers. For cancer risk in carriers, these estimates are lower than those obtained from families selected for high cancer prevalence. The estimated proportion of all U.S. cancer diagnoses, by age 80 years, that are due to germ-line BRCA1 mutations is 3.0% for breast cancer and 4.4% for ovarian cancer. Aggregation of breast cancer and ovarian cancer was less evident in the families of 169 cases with borderline ovarian cancers than in the families of cases with invasive cancers. Familial aggregation did not differ by the ethnicity of the probands, although the number of non-White and Hispanic cases (N = 99) was sparse. 14 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Ovarian Cancer Proteomic, Phosphoproteomic, and Glycoproteomic Data Released - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have just released a comprehensive dataset of the proteomic analysis of high grade serous ovarian tumor samples,

  1. Founding BRCA1 mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in southern Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Johannsson, O.; Hakansson, S.; Johannson, U.

    1996-03-01

    Nine different germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene were identified in 15 of 47 kindreds from southern Sweden, by use of SSCP and heteroduplex analysis of all exons and flanking intron region and by a protein-truncation test for exon 11, followed by direct sequencing. All but one of the mutations are predicted to give rise to premature translation termination and include seven frameshift insertions or deletions, a nonsense mutation, and a splice acceptor site mutation. The remaining mutation is a missense mutation (Cys61Gly) in the zinc-binding motif. Four novel Swedish founding mutations were identified: the nucleotide 2595 deletion A was found in five families, the C 1806 T nonsense mutation in three families, the 3166 insertion TGAGA in three families, and the nucleotide 1201 deletion 11 in two families. Analysis of the intragenic polymorphism D17S855 supports common origins of the mutations. Eleven of the 15 kindreds manifesting BRCA1 mutations were breast-ovarian cancer families, several of them with a predominant ovarian cancer phenotype. The set of 32 families in which no BRCA1 alterations were detected included 1 breast-ovarian cancer kindred manifesting clear linkage to the BRCA1 region and loss of the wild-type chromosome in associated tumors. Other tumor types found in BRCA1 mutation/haplotype carriers included prostatic, pancreas, skin, and lung cancer, a malignant melanoma, an oligodendroglioma, and a carcinosarcoma. In all, 12 of 16 kindreds manifesting BRCA1 mutation or linkage contained ovarian cancer, as compared with only 6 of the remaining 31 families (P < .001). The present study confirms the involvement of BRCA1 in disease predisposition for a subset of hereditary breast cancer families often characterized by ovarian cancers. 28 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Coordinately up-regulated genes in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hough, C D; Cho, K R; Zonderman, A B; Schwartz, D R; Morin, P J

    2001-05-15

    A better understanding of the molecular circuitry in normal ovarian tissues and in ovarian cancer will likely provide new targets for diagnosis and therapy. Recently, much has been learned about the genes expressed in ovarian cancer through studies with cDNA arrays and serial analysis of gene expression. However, these methods do not allow highly quantitative analysis of gene expression on a large number of specimens. Here, we have used quantitative real-time RT-PCR in a panel of 39 microdissected ovarian carcinomas of various subtypes to systematically analyze the expression of 13 genes, many of which were previously identified as up-regulated in a subset of ovarian cancers by serial analyses of gene expression. The genes analyzed are glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPX3), apolipoprotein J/clusterin, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2, epithelial cell adhesion molecule/GA733-2, Kop protease inhibitor, matrix gla protein, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3, folate receptor 1, S100A2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 1, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, apolipoprotein E, and ceruloplasmin. All of the genes were found overexpressed, some at extremely high levels, in the vast majority of ovarian carcinomas irrespective of the subtype. Interestingly, GPX3 was found at much higher levels in tumors with clear cell histology and may represent a biomarker for this subtype. Some of the genes studied here may thus represent targets for early detection ovarian cancer. The gene expression patterns were not associated with age at diagnosis, stage, or K-ras mutation status in ovarian cancer. We find that several genes are coordinately regulated in ovarian cancer, likely representing the fact that many genes are activated as part of common signaling pathways or that extensive cross-talk exists between several pathways in ovarian cancer. A statistical analysis shows that genes commonly up-regulated in ovarian cancer may result from the aberrant

  3. 3 CFR 8551 - Proclamation 8551 of August 31, 2010. National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2010

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2010 8551 Proclamation 8551 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8551 of August 31, 2010 Proc. 8551 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2010By the President... ovarian cancer, this disease continues to claim more lives than any other gynecologic cancer....

  4. Analysis of disseminated tumor cells before and after platinum based chemotherapy in primary ovarian cancer. Do stem cell like cells predict prognosis?

    PubMed Central

    Wimberger, Pauline; Neubauer, Hans; Fehm, Tanja; Kimmig, Rainer; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Background We recently reported that the presence of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in the bone marrow (BM) of primary ovarian cancer patients (POC pts) correlated with reduced progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Here we analyzed whether the negative prognostic influence was related to DTC persistence after platinum based chemotherapy and/or due to DTCs associated with stem cell character. Results DTCs were detected in 33/79 pts (42%) before and in 32/79 pts (41%) AT. Persistent DTCs were found in 13 pts, 20 pts were only positive BT, 19 pts AT and 27 pts had no DTCs. Whereas the presence of DTCs BT significantly correlated with reduced OS (p = 0.02), pts initially DTCneg BT but DTCpos AT had a significantly shorter PFS (p = 0.03). DTC persistence resulted in a shorter PFS and OS reaching borderline significance (p = 0.06; p = 0.07). LIN-28-and SOX-2 positive cells were detected in all eight pts AT. Patients and Methods 79 POC pts were studied for DTCs before therapy (BT) and after therapy (AT) using immunocytochemistry. Eight pts harboring at least five DTCs AT were further analyzed on two additional slides by four-fold immunofluorescence staining for DAPI, Cytokeratin (CK), SOX-2 or LIN-28, CD45 and CD34 (Cy5). A stem-like tumor cell was classified as Dapipos, CD45neg, CD34neg, SOX-2pos/LIN-28pos and CKpos or CKneg. Conclusions Stem cell associated proteins are expressed in DTCs that are present AT and their presence seem to be correlated with a worse outcome. Additional therapeutic regimens may be necessary to eliminate these cells. PMID:27049920

  5. Evaluating the ovarian cancer gonadotropin hypothesis: A candidate gene study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alice W.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Stram, Douglas A.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Myers, Emily J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Hein, Alexander; Vergote, Ignace; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Diether; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Odunsi, Kunle; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Goodman, Marc T.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Leminen, Arto; Edwards, Robert P.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Harter, Philipp; Schwaab, Ira; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth Y.; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Jensen, Allan; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Giles, Graham G.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Wu, Xifeng; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong; Bisogna, Maria; Levine, Douglas A.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Berchuck, Andrew; Terry, Kathryn L.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bjorge, Line; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Krakstad, Camilla; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Aben, Katja K.H.; van Altena, Anne M.; Bean, Yukie; Pejovic, Tanja; Kellar, Melissa; Le, Nhu D.; Cook, Linda S.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Jakubowska, Anna; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hannah; Nedergaard, Lotte; Lundvall, Lene; Hogdall, Claus; Song, Honglin; Campbell, Ian G.; Eccles, Diana; Glasspool, Rosalind; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Carty, Karen; Paul, James; McNeish, Iain A.; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Whittemore, Alice S.; McLaughlin, John R.; Risch, Harvey A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Harrington, Patricia; Pike, Malcolm C.; Modugno, Francesmary; Rossing, Mary Anne; Ness, Roberta B.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Stram, Daniel O.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ovarian cancer is a hormone-related disease with a strong genetic basis. However, none of its high-penetrance susceptibility genes and GWAS-identified variants to date are known to be involved in hormonal pathways. Given the hypothesized etiologic role of gonadotropins, an assessment of how variability in genes involved in the gonadotropin signaling pathway impacts disease risk is warranted. Methods Genetic data from 41 ovarian cancer study sites were pooled and unconditional logistic regression was used to evaluate whether any of the 2185 SNPs from 11 gonadotropin signaling pathway genes was associated with ovarian cancer risk. A burden test using the admixture likelihood (AML) method was also used to evaluate gene-level associations. Results We did not find any genome-wide significant associations between individual SNPs and ovarian cancer risk. However, there was some suggestion of gene-level associations for four gonadotropin signaling pathway genes: INHBB (p = 0.045, mucinous), LHCGR (p = 0.046, high-grade serous), GNRH (p = 0.041, high-grade serous), and FSHB (p = 0.036, overall invasive). There was also suggestive evidence for INHA (p = 0.060, overall invasive). Conclusions Ovarian cancer studies have limited sample numbers, thus fewer genome-wide susceptibility alleles, with only modest associations, have been identified relative to breast and prostate cancers. We have evaluated the majority of ovarian cancer studies with biological samples, to our knowledge, leaving no opportunity for replication. Using both our understanding of biology and powerful gene-level tests, we have identified four putative ovarian cancer loci near INHBB, LHCGR, GNRH, and FSHB that warrant a second look if larger sample sizes and denser genotype chips become available. PMID:25528498

  6. Vaccine Therapy With Sargramostim (GM-CSF) in Treating Patients With Her-2 Positive Stage III-IV Breast Cancer or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-02

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  7. GyneScan: an improved online paradigm for screening of ovarian cancer via tissue characterization.

    PubMed

    Acharya, U Rajendra; Sree, S Vinitha; Kulshreshtha, Sanjeev; Molinari, Filippo; En Wei Koh, Joel; Saba, Luca; Suri, Jasjit S

    2014-12-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth highest cause of cancer in women and the leading cause of death from gynecological cancers. Accurate diagnosis of ovarian cancer from acquired images is dependent on the expertise and experience of ultrasonographers or physicians, and is therefore, associated with inter observer variabilities. Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) techniques use a number of different data mining techniques to automatically predict the presence or absence of cancer, and therefore, are more reliable and accurate. A review of published literature in the field of CAD based ovarian cancer detection indicates that many studies use ultrasound images as the base for analysis. The key objective of this work is to propose an effective adjunct CAD technique called GyneScan for ovarian tumor detection in ultrasound images. In our proposed data mining framework, we extract several texture features based on first order statistics, Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix and run length matrix. The significant features selected using t-test are then used to train and test several supervised learning based classifiers such as Probabilistic Neural Networks (PNN), Support Vector Machine (SVM), Decision Tree (DT), k-Nearest Neighbor (KNN), and Naive Bayes (NB). We evaluated the developed framework using 1300 benign and 1300 malignant images. Using 11 significant features in KNN/PNN classifiers, we were able to achieve 100% classification accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value in detecting ovarian tumor. Even though more validation using larger databases would better establish the robustness of our technique, the preliminary results are promising. This technique could be used as a reliable adjunct method to existing imaging modalities to provide a more confident second opinion on the presence/absence of ovarian tumor.

  8. Geranylgeranylacetone inhibits ovarian cancer progression in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Kae; Morishige, Ken-ichirou . E-mail: mken@gyne.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Sawada, Kenjiro; Ogata, Seiji; Tahara, Masahiro; Shimizu, Shoko; Sakata, Masahiro; Tasaka, Keiichi; Kimura, Tadashi

    2007-04-27

    Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), an isoprenoid compound, is an anti-ulcer drug developed in Japan. In our previous study, GGA was shown to inhibit ovarian cancer invasion by attenuating Rho activation [K. Hashimoto, K. Morishige, K. Sawada, M. Tahara, S. Shimizu, M. Sakata, K. Tasaka, Y. Murata, Geranylgeranylacetone inhibits lysophosphatidic acid-induced invasion of human ovarian carcinoma cells in vitro. Cancer 103 (2005) 1529-1536.]. In the present study, GGA treatment inhibited ovarian cancer progression in vitro and suppressed the tumor growth and ascites in the in vivo ovarian cancer model. In vitro analysis, treatment of cancer cells by GGA resulted in the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, the inactivation of Ras, and the suppression of tyrosine phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). In conclusion, this is the first report that GGA inhibited ovarian cancer progression and the anti-tumor effect by GGA is, at least in part, derived not only from the suppression of Rho activation but also Ras-MAPK activation.

  9. Epacadostat Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III-IV Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-09

    Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  10. Role of epigenomics in ovarian and endometrial cancers.

    PubMed

    Balch, Curtis; Matei, Daniela E; Huang, Tim H-M; Nephew, Kenneth P

    2010-06-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy and while constituting only 3% of all female cancers, it causes 14,600 deaths in the USA annually. Endometrial cancer, the most diagnosed and second-most fatal gynecologic cancer, afflicts over 40,000 US women annually, causing an estimated 7780 deaths in 2009. In both advanced ovarian and endometrial carcinomas, the majority of initially therapy-responsive tumors eventually evolve to a fully drug-resistant phenotype. In addition to genetic mutations, epigenetic anomalies are frequent in both gynecologic malignancies, including aberrant DNA methylation, atypical histone modifications and dysregulated expression of distinct microRNAs, resulting in altered gene-expression patterns favoring cell survival. In this article, we summarize the most recent hypotheses regarding the role of epigenetics in ovarian and endometrial cancers, including a possible role in tumor 'stemness' and also evaluate the possible therapeutic benefits of reversal of these oncogenic chromatin aberrations.

  11. IKK inhibition increases bortezomib effectiveness in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singha, Bipradeb; Gatla, Himavanth Reddy; Phyo, Sai; Patel, Atish; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Vancurova, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is associated with increased expression of the pro-angiogenic chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL8), which induces tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Even though bortezomib (BZ) has shown remarkable anti-tumor activity in hematological malignancies, it has been less effective in ovarian cancer; however, the mechanisms are not understood. We have recently shown that BZ unexpectedly induces the expression of IL-8 in ovarian cancer cells in vitro, by IκB kinase (IKK)-dependent mechanism. Here, we tested the hypothesis that IKK inhibition reduces the IL-8 production and increases BZ effectiveness in reducing ovarian tumor growth in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the combination of BZ and the IKK inhibitor Bay 117085 significantly reduces the growth of ovarian tumor xenografts in nude mice when compared to either drug alone. Mice treated with the BZ/Bay 117085 combination exhibit smallest tumors, and lowest levels of IL-8. Furthermore, the reduced tumor growth in the combination group is associated with decreased tumor levels of S536P-p65 NFκB and its decreased recruitment to IL-8 promoter in tumor tissues. These data provide the first in vivo evidence that combining BZ with IKK inhibitor is effective, and suggest that using IKK inhibitors may increase BZ effectiveness in ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:26267322

  12. Paclitaxel, Polyglutamate Paclitaxel, or Observation in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  13. Molecular Profiling of Clear Cell Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Michael L.; Russell, Kenneth; Millis, Sherri; Gatalica, Zoran; Bender, Ryan; Voss, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced stage/recurrent clear cell ovarian cancers (CCOCs) are characterized by a low response to chemotherapy and a poor prognosis. There is growing interest in investigating novel/molecular targeted therapies in patients with CCOC in histotype-specific trials. However, CCOCs are not a uniform entity and comprise a number of molecular subtypes and it is unlikely that a single approach to treatment will be appropriate for all patients. The aim of this study was to analyze the results of a multiplatform profiling panel in CCOCs to identify potential therapeutic targets. Patients and Methods Tumor profiling was performed on 521 CCOCs. They were grouped into pure (n = 422) and mixed (n = 99) CCOC for analysis. Testing included a combination of DNA sequencing (including next-generation sequencing) using a 46-gene panel, immunohistochemistry, fluorescent or chromogenic in situ hybridization, and RNA fragment analysis. Results The most common findings were in the PIK3CA/Akt/mTOR pathway, with 61% of all CCOCs showing a molecular alteration in one of these pathway components. Next-generation sequencing revealed PIK3CA mutations in 50% of pure CCOCs. Significant differences were observed between pure and mixed CCOCs with respect to hormone receptor expression (9% vs 34.7% for ER, 13.45 vs 26.4% for PR), cMET (24.1% vs 11.6%), PD-1 tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (48.1% vs 100%), expression of PD-L1 (7.4% vs 25%), and TOPO1 (41% vs 27.1%) on immunohistochemistry, whereas next-generation sequencing revealed significant differences in mutation frequency in PIK3CA (50% vs 18.5%), TP53 (18.1% vs 57.7%), KRAS (12.4% vs 3.7%), and cMET (1.9% vs 11.1%). Conclusions This large study confirms that the PIK3CA/Akt/mTOR pathway is commonly altered in CCOCs, and highlights the significant differences between pure and mixed CCOCs. Clear cell ovarian cancers are molecularly heterogeneous and there are a number of potential therapeutic targets which could be tested in clinical

  14. Carboplatin and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without ATR Kinase Inhibitor VX-970 in Treating Patients With Recurrent and Metastatic Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-21

    High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  15. Decreased expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase A1 predicts an unfavorable prognosis in ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaqing; Huang, Ruixia; Li, Xiaoli; Li, Xiaoran; Yu, Dandan; Zhang, Mingzhi; Wen, Jianguo; Goscinski, Mariusz Adam; Trope, Claes G; Nesland, Jahn M; Suo, Zhenhe

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase A1 (PDHA1) serves as a gate-keeper enzyme link between glycolysis and the mitochondrial citric acid cycle. The inhibition of PDHA1 in cancer cells can result in an increased Warburg effect and a more aggressive phenotype in cancer cells. This study was conducted to investigate the expression of PDHA1 in ovarian cancer and the correlation between PDHA1 expression and the prognosis of patients. The PDHA1 protein expression in 3 ovarian cancer cell lines (OVCAR-3, SKOV-3 and ES-2) and 248 surgically removed ovarian carcinoma samples was immunocytochemically examined. Statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the correlations between PDHA1 expression and the clinicopathological characteristics of the patients as well as the predictive value of PDHA1. The results showed the presence of variable expression of PDHA1 in the three ovarian cancer cell lines. Of the 248 ovarian cancer tissue specimens, 45 cases (18.1%) were negative in tumor cells for PDHA1, 162 cases (65.3%) displayed a low expression level, and 41 cases (16.5%) had a relatively high PDHA1 staining. The expression of PDHA1 was associated with the histological subtype (P=0.004) and FIGO stage (P=0.002). The median OS time in the PDHA1 negative group, low expression group and high expression group were 0.939 years, 1.443 years and 9.900 years, respectively. The median PFS time in the above three groups were 0.287 years, 0.586 years and 9.900 years, respectively. Furthermore, the high expression of PDHA1 in ovarian carcinoma cells was significantly associated with better OS and PFS by statistical analyses. Multivariate analyses showed that PDHA1 expression was also an independent prognostic factor for higher OS in ovarian cancer patients (HR=0.705, 95% CI 0.541-0.918, P=0.01). Our study indicated that the decreased expression of PDHA1 might be an independent prognostic factor in unfavorable outcomes. PMID:27725912

  16. Targeting c-MYC in Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Reyes-González, Jeyshka M; Armaiz-Peña, Guillermo N; Mangala, Lingegowda S; Valiyeva, Fatma; Ivan, Cristina; Pradeep, Sunila; Echevarría-Vargas, Ileabett M; Rivera-Reyes, Adrian; Sood, Anil K; Vivas-Mejía, Pablo E

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the molecular and therapeutic effects of siRNA-mediated c-MYC silencing in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer. Statistical analysis of patient's data extracted from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) portal showed that the disease-free (DFS) and the overall (OS) survival were decreased in ovarian cancer patients with high c-MYC mRNA levels. Furthermore, analysis of a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines showed that c-MYC protein levels were higher in cisplatin-resistant cells when compared with their cisplatin-sensitive counterparts. In vitro cell viability, growth, cell-cycle progression, and apoptosis, as well as in vivo therapeutic effectiveness in murine xenograft models, were also assessed following siRNA-mediated c-MYC silencing in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. Significant inhibition of cell growth and viability, cell-cycle arrest, and activation of apoptosis were observed upon siRNA-mediated c-MYC depletion. In addition, single weekly doses of c-MYC-siRNA incorporated into 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000] (DSPE-PEG-2000)-based nanoliposomes resulted in significant reduction in tumor growth. These findings identify c-MYC as a potential therapeutic target for ovarian cancers expressing high levels of this oncoprotein. PMID:26227489

  17. Mass Spectrometric Screening of Ovarian Cancer with Serum Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Han; Park, Chang Won; Um, Dalho; Baek, Ki Hwang; Jo, Yohahn; An, Hyunjoo; Kim, Yangsun; Kim, Tae Jin

    2014-01-01

    Changes of glycosylation pattern in serum proteins have been linked to various diseases including cancer, suggesting possible development of novel biomarkers based on the glycomic analysis. In this study, N-linked glycans from human serum were quantitatively profiled by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) and compared between healthy controls and ovarian cancer patients. A training set consisting of 40 healthy controls and 40 ovarian cancer cases demonstrated an inverse correlation between P value of ANOVA and area under the curve (AUC) of each candidate biomarker peak from MALDI-TOF MS, providing standards for the classification. A multibiomarker panel composed of 15 MALDI-TOF MS peaks resulted in AUC of 0.89, 80~90% sensitivity, and 70~83% specificity in the training set. The performance of the biomarker panel was validated in a separate blind test set composed of 23 healthy controls and 37 ovarian cancer patients, leading to 81~84% sensitivity and 83% specificity with cut-off values determined by the training set. Sensitivity of CA-125, the most widely used ovarian cancer marker, was 74% in the training set and 78% in the test set, respectively. These results indicate that MALDI-TOF MS-mediated serum N-glycan analysis could provide critical information for the screening of ovarian cancer. PMID:24648610

  18. Gedunin, a novel natural substance, inhibits ovarian cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Siddharth G; Chen, Ning; Xiong, Yin; Wenham, Robert; Apte, Sachin; Humphrey, Marcia; Cragun, Janiel; Lancaster, Johnathan M

    2009-12-01

    The discovery of more active therapeutic compounds is essential if the outcome for patients with advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer is to be improved. Gedunin, an extract of the neem tree, has been used as a natural remedy for centuries in Asia. Recently, gedunin has been shown to have potential in vitro antineoplastic properties; however, its effect on ovarian cancer cells is unknown. We evaluated the in vitro effect of gedunin on SKOV3, OVCAR4, and OVCAR8 ovarian cancer cell lines proliferation, alone and in the presence of cisplatin. Furthermore, we analyzed in vitro gedunin sensitivity data, integrated with genome-wide expression data from 54 cancer cell lines in an effort to identify genes and molecular pathways that underlie the mechanism of gedunin action. In vitro treatment of ovarian cancer cell lines with gedunin alone produced up to an 80% decrease in cell proliferation (P < 0.01) and, combining gedunin with cisplatin, demonstrated up to a 47% (P < 0.01) decrease in cell proliferation compared with cisplatin treatment alone. Bioinformatic analysis of integrated gedunin sensitivity and gene expression data identified 52 genes to be associated with gedunin sensitivity. These genes are involved in molecular functions related to cell cycle control, carcinogenesis, lipid metabolism, and molecular transportation. We conclude that gedunin has in vitro activity against ovarian cancer cells and, further, may enhance the antiproliferative effect of cisplatin. The molecular determinants of in vitro gedunin response are complex and may include modulation of cell survival and apoptosis pathways. PMID:19955938

  19. Dihydroartiminisin inhibits the growth and metastasis of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Buchu; Hu, Ke; Li, Shu; Zhu, Jing; Gu, Liying; Shen, Haoran; Hambly, Brett D; Bao, Shisan; Di, Wen

    2012-01-01

    Dihydroartiminisin (DHA), the active component of a Chinese herb (Artemisia annua), has been utilised as an anti-malarial drug since ancient China. DHA has also been shown to inhibit proliferation of cancer in vitro. However, the capacity of DHA to inhibit the development of ovarian cancer is still unclear. The adhesion, invasion, and migration of human ovarian cancer cell line (HO8910PM) was determined following DHA treatment in vitro, using Matrigel coated plate, transwell membrane chamber, and wound healing models, respectively. A mouse ovarian cancer model was established by orthotopic inoculation of HO8910PM cell line in nude mice. The growth and metastasis in vivo was determined 8 weeks post-implantation in response to DHA treatment. The expression of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (pFAK) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) was evaluated using Western blotting. The expression of Von Willebrand factor (vWF) and infiltration of macrophages were determined, using immunohistochemistry. DHA inhibits ovarian cancer cell proliferation, adhesion, migration and invasion in vitro in a dose-dependent manner, consistent with decreased expression of pFAK and MMP-2, but not MMP-9. DHA inhibited metastasis significantly in vivo, associated with reduced vWF expression and macrophage infiltration. In conclusion, DHA inhibits the development of ovarian cancer, in part via down-regulating pFAK, MMP-2, vWF and macrophage infiltration. PMID:22025319

  20. Risk factors for ovarian cancer: an overview with emphasis on hormonal factors.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Fariba; Dunfield, Lesley; Phillips, Karen P; Krewski, Daniel; Vanderhyden, Barbara C

    2008-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth most frequently occurring cancer among women and leading cause of gynecological cancer deaths in North America. Although the etiology of ovarian cancer is not clear, certain factors are implicated in the etiology of this disease, such as ovulation, gonadotropic and steroid hormones, germ cell depletion, oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, growth factors, cytokines, and environmental agents. Family history of breast or ovarian cancer is a prominent risk factor for ovarian cancer, with 5-10% of ovarian cancers due to heritable risk. Reproductive factors such as age at menopause and infertility contribute to greater risk of ovarian cancer, whereas pregnancy, tubal ligation, and hysterectomy reduce risk. Oral contraceptive (OC) use has clearly been shown to be protective against ovarian cancer. In contrast, large epidemiologic studies found hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to be a greater risk factor for ovarian cancer. The marked influence of hormones and reproductive factors on ovarian cancer suggests that endocrine disrupters may impact risk; however, there is a notable lack of research in this area. Lifestyle factors such as cigarette smoking, obesity, and diet may affect ovarian cancer risk. Exposure to certain environmental agents such as talc, pesticides, and herbicides may increase risk of ovarian cancer; however, these studies are limited. Further research is needed to strengthen the database of information from which an assessment of environmental and toxicological risk factors for ovarian cancer can be made.

  1. Ovarian cancer, the coagulation pathway, and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xipeng; Wang, Ena; Kavanagh, John J; Freedman, Ralph S

    2005-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) represents the most frequent cause of death in the United States from a cancer involving the female genital tract. Contributing to the overall poor outcome in EOC patients, are the metastases to the peritoneum and stroma that are common in this cancer. In one study, cDNA microarray analysis was performed on fresh tissue to profile gene expression in patients with EOC. This study showed a number of genes with significantly altered expression in the pelvic peritoneum and stroma, and in the vicinity of EOC implants. These genes included those encoding coagulation factors and regulatory proteins in the coagulation cascade and genes encoding proteins associated with inflammatory responses. In addition to promoting the formation of blood clots, coagulation factors exhibit many other biologic functions as well as tumorigenic functions, the later including tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Coagulation pathway proteins involved in tumorigenesis consist of factor II (thrombin), thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptors), factor III (tissue factor), factor VII, factor X and factor I (fibrinogen), and fibrin and factor XIII. In a recent study we conducted, we found that factor XII, factor XI, and several coagulation regulatory proteins, including heparin cofactor-II and epithelial protein C receptor (EPCR), were also upregulated in the peritoneum of EOC. In this review, we summarize evidence in support of a role for these factors in promoting tumor cell progression and the formation of ascites. We also discuss the different roles of coagulation factor pathways in the tumor and peritumoral microenvironments as they relate to angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. . Since inflammatory responses are another characteristic of the peritoneum in EOC, we also discuss the linkage between the coagulation cascade and the cytokines/chemokines involved in inflammation. Interleukin-8, which is considered

  2. Ovarian cancer, the coagulation pathway, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xipeng; Wang, Ena; Kavanagh, John J; Freedman, Ralph S

    2005-06-21

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) represents the most frequent cause of death in the United States from a cancer involving the female genital tract. Contributing to the overall poor outcome in EOC patients, are the metastases to the peritoneum and stroma that are common in this cancer. In one study, cDNA microarray analysis was performed on fresh tissue to profile gene expression in patients with EOC. This study showed a number of genes with significantly altered expression in the pelvic peritoneum and stroma, and in the vicinity of EOC implants. These genes included those encoding coagulation factors and regulatory proteins in the coagulation cascade and genes encoding proteins associated with inflammatory responses. In addition to promoting the formation of blood clots, coagulation factors exhibit many other biologic functions as well as tumorigenic functions, the later including tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Coagulation pathway proteins involved in tumorigenesis consist of factor II (thrombin), thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptors), factor III (tissue factor), factor VII, factor X and factor I (fibrinogen), and fibrin and factor XIII. In a recent study we conducted, we found that factor XII, factor XI, and several coagulation regulatory proteins, including heparin cofactor-II and epithelial protein C receptor (EPCR), were also upregulated in the peritoneum of EOC. In this review, we summarize evidence in support of a role for these factors in promoting tumor cell progression and the formation of ascites. We also discuss the different roles of coagulation factor pathways in the tumor and peritumoral microenvironments as they relate to angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. Since inflammatory responses are another characteristic of the peritoneum in EOC, we also discuss the linkage between the coagulation cascade and the cytokines/chemokines involved in inflammation. Interleukin-8, which is considered an

  3. Targeting Stromal-Cancer Cell Crosstalk Networks in Ovarian Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Tsz-Lun; Leung, Cecilia S.; Li, Fuhai; Wong, Stephen T. C.; Mok, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a histologically, clinically, and molecularly diverse disease with a five-year survival rate of less than 30%. It has been estimated that approximately 21,980 new cases of epithelial ovarian cancer will be diagnosed and 14,270 deaths will occur in the United States in 2015, making it the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Ovarian tumor tissue is composed of cancer cells and a collection of different stromal cells. There is increasing evidence that demonstrates that stromal involvement is important in ovarian cancer pathogenesis. Therefore, stroma-specific signaling pathways, stroma-derived factors, and genetic changes in the tumor stroma present unique opportunities for improving the diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are one of the major components of the tumor stroma that have demonstrated supportive roles in tumor progression. In this review, we highlight various types of signaling crosstalk between ovarian cancer cells and stromal cells, particularly with CAFs. In addition to evaluating the importance of signaling crosstalk in ovarian cancer progression, we discuss approaches that can be used to target tumor-promoting signaling crosstalk and how these approaches can be translated into potential ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:26751490

  4. Minireview: Animal Models and Mechanisms of Ovarian Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Mullany, Lisa K.

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer in women is a complex and deadly disease, where the molecular events that initiate and control tumor formation remain poorly defined. Therefore, mouse models provide one approach for determining the mechanisms by which specific oncogenic factors cause ovarian surface epithelial cell and granulosa cell transformation. This minireview summarizes the phenotypes of current mouse models that have been generated and some of the underlying mechanisms they have provided. PMID:22396450

  5. Past, present and future targets for immunotherapy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Carlton L; English, Diana P; Roque, Dana M; Pasternak, Monica; Santin, Alessandro D

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the US. Treatments have improved with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy and advanced surgical techniques but disease recurrence is common and fatal in nearly all cases. Current evidence suggests that the immune system and its ability to recognize and eliminate microscopic disease is paramount in preventing recurrence. Ovarian cancer immunotherapy is targeting tumors through active, passive and adoptive approaches. The goal of immunotherapy is to balance the activation of the immune system against cancer while preventing the potential for tremendous toxicity elicited by immune modulation. In this paper we will review the different immunotherapies available for ovarian cancer as well as current ongoing studies and potential future directions.

  6. Past, present and future targets for immunotherapy in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Carlton L; English, Diana P; Roque, Dana M; Pasternak, Monica; Santin, Alessandro D

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the US. Treatments have improved with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy and advanced surgical techniques but disease recurrence is common and fatal in nearly all cases. Current evidence suggests that the immune system and its ability to recognize and eliminate microscopic disease is paramount in preventing recurrence. Ovarian cancer immunotherapy is targeting tumors through active, passive and adoptive approaches. The goal of immunotherapy is to balance the activation of the immune system against cancer while preventing the potential for tremendous toxicity elicited by immune modulation. In this paper we will review the different immunotherapies available for ovarian cancer as well as current ongoing studies and potential future directions. PMID:25524384

  7. Tissue factor expression as a possible determinant of thromboembolism in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Uno, K; Homma, S; Satoh, T; Nakanishi, K; Abe, D; Matsumoto, K; Oki, A; Tsunoda, H; Yamaguchi, I; Nagasawa, T; Yoshikawa, H; Aonuma, K

    2007-01-01

    Ovarian cancer, and clear cell carcinoma in particular, reportedly increases the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). However, the mechanisms remain unclear. Tissue factor (TF) supposedly represents a major factor in the procoagulant activities of cancer cells. The present study examined the involvement of TF expression in VTE for patients with ovarian cancer. Subjects comprised 32 consecutive patients (mean age 49.8 years) with histologically confirmed ovarian cancer. Presence of VTE was examined using a combination of clinical features, D-dimer levels and venous ultrasonography. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to evaluate TF expression into 4 degrees. Venous thromboembolism was identified in 10 of the 32 patients (31%), including five of the 11 patients with clear cell carcinoma. Tissue factor expression was detected in cancer tissues from 24 patients and displayed significant correlations with VTE development (P=0.0003), D-dimer concentration (P=0.003) and clear cell carcinoma (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis identified TF expression as an independent predictive factor of VTE development (P<0.05). Tissue factor (TF) expression is a possible determinant of VTE development in ovarian cancer. In particular, clear cell carcinoma may produce excessive levels of TF and is more likely to develop VTE. PMID:17211468

  8. How Ovarian Cancer Evades Immune Scrutiny.

    PubMed

    Poh, Alissa

    2016-04-01

    Although dendritic cells are abundant in ovarian tumors, scientists have been puzzled that these cells aren't immunostimulatory. New research reveals a role for the protein SATB1, which is transiently required during ovarian-associated dendritic cell maturation-its unremitting expression in these cells drives them to acquire an inflammatory, immunosuppressive phenotype.

  9. Cellular and molecular processes in ovarian cancer metastasis. A Review in the Theme: Cell and Molecular Processes in Cancer Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Tsz-Lun; Leung, Cecilia S; Yip, Kay-Pong; Au Yeung, Chi Lam; Wong, Stephen T C; Mok, Samuel C

    2015-10-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. It is usually diagnosed at a late stage, with a 5-yr survival rate of <30%. The majority of ovarian cancer cases are diagnosed after tumors have widely spread within the peritoneal cavity, limiting the effectiveness of debulking surgery and chemotherapy. Owing to a substantially lower survival rate at late stages of disease than at earlier stages, the major cause of ovarian cancer deaths is believed to be therapy-resistant metastasis. Although metastasis plays a crucial role in promoting ovarian tumor progression and decreasing patient survival rates, the underlying mechanisms of ovarian cancer spread have yet to be thoroughly explored. For many years, researchers have believed that ovarian cancer metastasizes via a passive mechanism by which ovarian cancer cells are shed from the primary tumor and carried by the physiological movement of peritoneal fluid to the peritoneum and omentum. However, the recent discovery of hematogenous metastasis of ovarian cancer to the omentum via circulating tumor cells instigated rethinking of the mode of ovarian cancer metastasis and the importance of the "seed-and-soil" hypothesis for ovarian cancer metastasis. In this review we discuss the possible mechanisms by which ovarian cancer cells metastasize from the primary tumor to the omentum, the cross-talk signaling events between ovarian cancer cells and various stromal cells that play crucial roles in ovarian cancer metastasis, and the possible clinical implications of these findings in the management of this deadly, highly metastatic disease.

  10. Study examines outcomes from surgery to prevent ovarian cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A new study looked at women at high risk of ovarian cancer who had no clinical signs of the disease and who underwent risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO). The study results showed cancer in the removed tissues of 2.6 percent (25 of 966) of the par

  11. Hereditary Ovarian Cancer: Molecular Genetics, Pathology, Management, and Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Henry T.; Casey, Murray Joseph; Snyder, Carrie L.; Bewtra, Chhanda; Lynch, Jane F.; Butts, Matthew; Godwin, Andrew K.

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary ovarian cancer accounts for at least 5% of the estimated 22,000 new cases of this disease during 2009. During this same time, over 15,000 will die from malignancy ascribed to ovarian origin. The bulk of these hereditary cases fit the hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome, while virtually all of the remainder will be consonant with the Lynch syndrome, disorders which are autosomal dominantly inherited. Advances in molecular genetics have led to the identification of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations which predispose to the hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome, and mutations in mismatch repair genes, the most common of which are MSH2 and MLH1, which predispose to Lynch syndrome. These discoveries enable relative certainty limited only by their variable penetrance, so that early diagnosis through a comprehensive cancer family history might be possible. This paper reviews the subject of hereditary ovarian cancer, with particular attention given to its molecular genetic basis, its pathology, and its phenotypic/genotypic heterogeneity. PMID:19383374

  12. A distinct molecular profile associated with mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heinzelmann-Schwarz, V A; Gardiner-Garden, M; Henshall, S M; Scurry, J P; Scolyer, R A; Smith, A N; Bali, A; Bergh, P Vanden; Baron-Hay, S; Scott, C; Fink, D; Hacker, N F; Sutherland, R L; O'Brien, P M

    2006-01-01

    Mucinous epithelial ovarian cancers (MOC) are clinically and morphologically distinct from the other histological subtypes of ovarian cancer. To determine the genetic basis of MOC and to identify potential tumour markers, gene expression profiling of 49 primary ovarian cancers of different histological subtypes was performed using a customised oligonucleotide microarray containing >59 000 probesets. The results show that MOC express a genetic profile that both differs and overlaps with other subtypes of epithelial ovarian cancer. Concordant with its histological phenotype, MOC express genes characteristic of mucinous carcinomas of varying epithelial origin, including intestinal carcinomas. Differences in gene expression between MOC and other histological subtypes of ovarian cancer were confirmed by RT–PCR and/or immunohistochemistry. In particular, galectin 4 (LGALS4) was highly and specifically expressed in MOC, but expressed at lower levels in benign mucinous cysts and borderline (atypical proliferative) tumours, supporting a malignant progression model of MOC. Hence LGALS4 may have application as an early and differential diagnostic marker of MOC. PMID:16508639

  13. Hereditary ovarian cancer: not only BRCA 1 and 2 genes.

    PubMed

    Toss, Angela; Tomasello, Chiara; Razzaboni, Elisabetta; Contu, Giannina; Grandi, Giovanni; Cagnacci, Angelo; Schilder, Russell J; Cortesi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    More than one-fifth of ovarian tumors have hereditary susceptibility and, in about 65-85% of these cases, the genetic abnormality is a germline mutation in BRCA genes. Nevertheless, several other suppressor genes and oncogenes have been associated with hereditary ovarian cancers, including the mismatch repair (MMR) genes in Lynch syndrome, the tumor suppressor gene, TP53, in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and several other genes involved in the double-strand breaks repair system, such as CHEK2, RAD51, BRIP1, and PALB2. The study of genetic discriminators and deregulated pathways involved in hereditary ovarian syndromes is relevant for the future development of molecular diagnostic strategies and targeted therapeutic approaches. The recent development and implementation of next-generation sequencing technologies have provided the opportunity to simultaneously analyze multiple cancer susceptibility genes, reduce the delay and costs, and optimize the molecular diagnosis of hereditary tumors. Particularly, the identification of mutations in ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in healthy women may result in a more personalized cancer risk management with tailored clinical and radiological surveillance, chemopreventive approaches, and/or prophylactic surgeries. On the other hand, for ovarian cancer patients, the identification of mutations may provide potential targets for biologic agents and guide treatment decision-making. PMID:26075229

  14. Chemotherapy in advanced ovarian cancer: an overview of randomised clinical trials. Advanced Ovarian Cancer Trialists Group.

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To consider the role of platinum and the relative merits of single agent and combination chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced ovarian cancer. DESIGN--Formal quantitative overview using updated individual patient data from all available randomised trials (published and unpublished). SUBJECTS--8139 patients (6408 deaths) included in 45 different trials. RESULTS--No firm conclusions could be reached. Nevertheless, the results suggest that in terms of survival immediate platinum based treatment was better than non-platinum regimens (overall relative risk 0.93; 95% confidence interval 0.83 to 1.05); platinum in combination was better than single agent platinum when used in the same dose (overall relative risk 0.85; 0.72 to 1.00); and cisplatin and carboplatin were equally effective (overall relative risk 1.05; 0.94 to 1.18). CONCLUSIONS--In the past, randomised clinical trials of chemotherapy in advanced ovarian cancer have been much too small to detect the degree of benefit which this overview suggests is realistic for currently available chemotherapeutic regimens. Hence a new trial comparing cisplatin, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (CAP) with carboplatin has been launched and plans to accrue 2000 patients. PMID:1834291

  15. Ovarian Cancer Screening Method Fails to Reduce Deaths from the Disease | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    New results from the NCI-sponsored Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial show that screening for ovarian cancer with transvaginal ultrasound (TVU) and the CA-125 blood test did not result in fewer deaths from the disease compared with usual care. |

  16. Founder BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in French Canadian breast and ovarian cancer families.

    PubMed Central

    Tonin, P N; Mes-Masson, A M; Futreal, P A; Morgan, K; Mahon, M; Foulkes, W D; Cole, D E; Provencher, D; Ghadirian, P; Narod, S A

    1998-01-01

    We have identified four mutations in each of the breast cancer-susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, in French Canadian breast cancer and breast/ovarian cancer families from Quebec. To identify founder effects, we examined independently ascertained French Canadian cancer families for the distribution of these eight mutations. Mutations were found in 41 of 97 families. Six of eight mutations were observed at least twice. The BRCA1 C4446T mutation was the most common mutation found, followed by the BRCA2 8765delAG mutation. Together, these mutations were found in 28 of 41 families identified to have a mutation. The odds of detection of any of the four BRCA1 mutations was 18.7x greater if one or more cases of ovarian cancer were also present in the family. The odds of detection of any of the four BRCA2 mutations was 5.3x greater if there were at least five cases of breast cancer in the family. Interestingly, the presence of a breast cancer case <36 years of age was strongly predictive of the presence of any of the eight mutations screened. Carriers of the same mutation, from different families, shared similar haplotypes, indicating that the mutant alleles were likely to be identical by descent for a mutation in the founder population. The identification of common BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations will facilitate carrier detection in French Canadian breast cancer and breast/ovarian cancer families. PMID:9792861

  17. 3 CFR 8703 - Proclamation 8703 of September 1, 2011. National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2011

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2011 8703 Proclamation 8703 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8703 of September 1, 2011 Proc. 8703 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2011By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Ovarian cancer continues to have one of the...

  18. 3 CFR 8853 - Proclamation 8853 of August 31, 2012. National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2012

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2012 8853 Proclamation 8853 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8853 of August 31, 2012 Proc. 8853 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2012By the President... lives to ovarian cancer. They are mothers and daughters, sisters and grandmothers, community members...

  19. 3 CFR 9008 - Proclamation 9008 of August 30, 2013. National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2013

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2013 9008 Proclamation 9008 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 9008 of August 30, 2013 Proc. 9008 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2013By the President... ovarian cancer, and more than half that number of women will die of this disease. During National...

  20. 3 CFR 8407 - Proclamation 8407 of August 31, 2009. National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2009

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2009 8407 Proclamation 8407 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8407 of August 31, 2009 Proc. 8407 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2009By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Ovarian cancer remains the leading cause of death...

  1. Clear cell ovarian cancer and endometriosis: is there a relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Suzin, Jacek; Obirek, Katarzyna; Sochacka, Amanda; Łoszakiewicz, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ovarian clear cell carcinoma is a rare type of ovarian cancer. In recent years, issues of the common genetic origin of endometriosis and ovarian clear cell carcinoma have been raised. Aim of this study Aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of this type of cancer, risk factors, prognosis and its potential aetiological association with endometriosis. Material and methods In a retrospective study, we analysed histopathological data of patients operated in the First Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (MU, Lodz) due to ovarian cancer in 2004-2014. Among the 394 patients operated on for ovarian cancer, clear cell carcinoma was found in 0.02% (9/394). Menstrual history, parity, comorbidities, data from physical examination, operational protocols and histopathological diagnoses were analysed. Follow-up was obtained from 77.8% of patients. Statistical analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel 2013. Results The mean age of patients at diagnosis was 57.6 years; the BMI in the study group was 27.2; the majority of patients were multiparous (77.8%). Clear cell carcinoma was detected mostly at stage Ia (n = 4). The concentration of Ca125 in the study group had an average of 142.75 U/ml and a median of 69.3 U/ml. The coexistence of endometriosis could not be clinically or histologically confirmed amongst our patients. The most common comorbidity in the study group was hypertension. Conclusions In our clinical material, ovarian clear cell carcinoma is a rare histopathological specimen with a prognostic value comparable to that of serous ovarian cancer. Due to the rarity of this histopathological subtype, proving a cause-and-effect relationship between it and endometriosis can only be elucidated through statistical studies of the entire population. PMID:27582682

  2. Harnessing Pandemonium: The Clinical Implications of Tumor Heterogeneity in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blagden, Sarah P.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneity has emerged as a key feature of ovarian cancer between different ovarian cancer subtypes; within single ovarian cancer subtypes; and within individual patient tumors. At the genomic level, with the advent of ultra-deep sequencing technologies alongside RNA-Seq, epigenomics, and proteomics, the complexity surrounding heterogeneity has deepened. Here, we summarize the emerging understanding of heterogeneity in cancer as a whole and the key discoveries in this area relating to ovarian cancer. We explore the therapeutic limitations and possibilities posed by heterogeneity and how these will influence the future of ovarian cancer treatment and research. PMID:26175968

  3. Harnessing Pandemonium: The Clinical Implications of Tumor Heterogeneity in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Blagden, Sarah P

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneity has emerged as a key feature of ovarian cancer between different ovarian cancer subtypes; within single ovarian cancer subtypes; and within individual patient tumors. At the genomic level, with the advent of ultra-deep sequencing technologies alongside RNA-Seq, epigenomics, and proteomics, the complexity surrounding heterogeneity has deepened. Here, we summarize the emerging understanding of heterogeneity in cancer as a whole and the key discoveries in this area relating to ovarian cancer. We explore the therapeutic limitations and possibilities posed by heterogeneity and how these will influence the future of ovarian cancer treatment and research.

  4. Dietary energy balance modulates ovarian cancer progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Al-Wahab, Zaid; Tebbe, Calvin; Chhina, Jasdeep; Dar, Sajad A; Morris, Robert T; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Giri, Shailendra; Munkarah, Adnan R; Rattan, Ramandeep

    2014-08-15

    A high energy balance, or caloric excess, accounts as a tumor promoting factor, while a negative energy balance via caloric restriction, has been shown to delay cancer progression. The effect of energy balance on ovarian cancer progression was investigated in an isogeneic immunocompetent mouse model of epithelial ovarian cancer kept on a regimen of regular diet, high energy diet (HED) and calorie restricted diet (CRD), prior to inoculating the animals intraperitoneally with the mouse ovarian surface epithelial ID8 cancer cells. Tumor evaluation revealed that mice group on HED displayed the most extensive tumor formation with the highest tumor score at all organ sites (diaphragm, peritoneum, bowel, liver, kidney, spleen), accompanied with increased levels of insulin, leptin, insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), VEGF and interleukin 6 (IL-6). On the other hand, the mice group on CRD exhibited the least tumor burden associated with a significant reduction in levels of insulin, IGF-1, leptin, MCP-1, VEGF and IL-6. Immunohistochemistry analysis of tumors from HED mice showed higher activation of Akt and mTOR with decreased adenosine monophosphate activated kinase (AMPK) and SIRT1 activation, while tumors from the CRD group exhibited the reverse profile. In conclusion, ovarian cancer growth and metastasis occurred more aggressively under HED conditions and was significantly curtailed under CRD. The suggested mechanism involves modulated secretion of growth factors, cytokines and altered regulation of AMPK and SIRT1 that converges on mTOR inhibition. While the role of a high energy state in ovarian cancer has not been confirnmed in the literature, the current findings support investigating the potential impact of diet modulation as adjunct to other anticancer therapies and as possible individualized treatment strategy of epithelial ovarian cancer.

  5. Frequency of mutations in mismatch repair genes in a population-based study of women with ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pal, T; Akbari, M R; Sun, P; Lee, J-H; Fulp, J; Thompson, Z; Coppola, D; Nicosia, S; Sellers, T A; McLaughlin, J; Risch, H A; Rosen, B; Shaw, P; Schildkraut, J; Narod, S A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mutations in genes for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) in ovarian cancer patients remains poorly defined. We sought to estimate the frequency and characteristics of HNPCC gene mutations in a population-based sample of women with epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods: The analysis included 1893 women with epithelial ovarian cancer ascertained from three population-based studies. Full-germline DNA sequencing of the coding regions was performed on three HNPCC genes, MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Collection of demographic, clinical and family history information was attempted in all women. Results: Nine clearly pathogenic mutations were identified, including five in MSH6, two each in MLH1 and MSH2. In addition, 28 unique predicted pathogenic missense variants were identified in 55 patients. Pathogenic mutation carriers had an earlier mean age at diagnosis of ovarian cancer, overrepresentation of cancers with non-serous histologies and a higher number of relatives with HNPCC-related cancers. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that fewer than 1% of women with ovarian cancer harbour a germline mutation in the HNPCC genes, with overrepresentation of MSH6 mutations. This represents a lower-range estimate due to the large number of predicted pathogenic variants in which pathogenicity could not definitively be determined. Identification of mismatch repair gene mutations has the potential to impact screening and treatment decisions in these women. PMID:23047549

  6. A Mass Spectrometric Analysis Method Based on PPCA and SVM for Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiang; Ji, Mengying; Ye, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Surfaced-enhanced laser desorption-ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) technology plays an important role in the early diagnosis of ovarian cancer. However, the raw MS data is highly dimensional and redundant. Therefore, it is necessary to study rapid and accurate detection methods from the massive MS data. Methods. The clinical data set used in the experiments for early cancer detection consisted of 216 SELDI-TOF-MS samples. An MS analysis method based on probabilistic principal components analysis (PPCA) and support vector machine (SVM) was proposed and applied to the ovarian cancer early classification in the data set. Additionally, by the same data set, we also established a traditional PCA-SVM model. Finally we compared the two models in detection accuracy, specificity, and sensitivity. Results. Using independent training and testing experiments 10 times to evaluate the ovarian cancer detection models, the average prediction accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of the PCA-SVM model were 83.34%, 82.70%, and 83.88%, respectively. In contrast, those of the PPCA-SVM model were 90.80%, 92.98%, and 88.97%, respectively. Conclusions. The PPCA-SVM model had better detection performance. And the model combined with the SELDI-TOF-MS technology had a prospect in early clinical detection and diagnosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:27642365

  7. Interleukin-6 and leptin as markers of energy metabolicchanges in advanced ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Macciò, Antonio; Madeddu, Clelia; Massa, Daniela; Astara, Giorgio; Farci, Daniele; Melis, Gian Benedetto; Mantovani, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    The progression of the neoplastic disease is characterized by specific alterations of energy metabolism and by symptoms like fatigue, anorexia, nausea, anaemia, immunodepression and poor performance status (PS). The main cause of these symptoms and metabolic abnormalities is the chronic action of proinflammatory cytokines released both by tumour and immune cells. The present study aimed to assess the relationship between markers of inflammation (C-Reactive Protein, Fibrinogen, proinflammatory cytokines) and energy metabolic status (BMI, leptin, oxidative stress) according to clinical parameters in 104 ovarian cancer patients at different stage and, moreover, to evaluate prospectively the changes of these parameters in accordance to tumour response in a subgroup of 70 advanced stage ovarian cancer patients. Advanced stage and poor PS were associated to high-grade inflammation and impaired energy metabolism. Among inflammatory mediators, interleukin (IL)-6 had a central role as predictive factor of leptin, reactive oxygen species and glutathione peroxidase. In turn, leptin considered the key marker of the nutritional status and energy metabolism, was independently determined from stage and IL-6, not only from BMI. Moreover, the evaluation of the changes of these parameters during the course of the neoplastic disease in the subgroup of advanced ovarian cancer patients clearly unveils the central role of IL-6 and leptin as early markers of the metabolic alterations and symptoms associated to disease progression in advanced stage ovarian cancer. Their assessment should be included in monitoring disease outcome, especially when cancer is no longer curable and quality of life becomes the primary endpoint. PMID:18624749

  8. Interleukin-6 and leptin as markers of energy metabolic changes in advanced ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Macciò, Antonio; Madeddu, Clelia; Massa, Daniela; Astara, Giorgio; Farci, Daniele; Melis, Gian Benedetto; Mantovani, Giovanni

    2009-09-01

    The progression of the neoplastic disease is characterized by specific alterations of energy metabolism and by symptoms like fatigue, anorexia, nausea, anaemia, immunodepression and poor performance status (PS). The main cause of these symptoms and metabolic abnormalities is the chronic action of proinflammatory cytokines released both by tumour and immune cells. The present study aimed to assess the relationship between markers of inflammation (C-Reactive Protein, Fibrinogen, proinflammatory cytokines) and energy metabolic status (BMI, leptin, oxidative stress) according to clinical parameters in 104 ovarian cancer patients at different stage and, moreover, to evaluate prospectively the changes of these parameters in accordance to tumour response in a subgroup of 70 advanced stage ovarian cancer patients. Advanced stage and poor PS were associated to high-grade inflammation and impaired energy metabolism. Among inflammatory mediators, interleukin (IL)-6 had a central role as predictive factor of leptin, reactive oxygen species and glutathione peroxidase. In turn, leptin considered the key marker of the nutritional status and energy metabolism, was independently determined from stage and IL-6, not only from BMI. Moreover, the evaluation of the changes of these parameters during the course of the neoplastic disease in the subgroup of advanced ovarian cancer patients clearly unveils the central role of IL-6 and leptin as early markers of the metabolic alterations and symptoms associated to disease progression in advanced stage ovarian cancer. Their assessment should be included in monitoring disease outcome, especially when cancer is no longer curable and quality of life becomes the primary endpoint. PMID:18624749

  9. A Mass Spectrometric Analysis Method Based on PPCA and SVM for Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiang; Ji, Mengying; Ye, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Surfaced-enhanced laser desorption-ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) technology plays an important role in the early diagnosis of ovarian cancer. However, the raw MS data is highly dimensional and redundant. Therefore, it is necessary to study rapid and accurate detection methods from the massive MS data. Methods. The clinical data set used in the experiments for early cancer detection consisted of 216 SELDI-TOF-MS samples. An MS analysis method based on probabilistic principal components analysis (PPCA) and support vector machine (SVM) was proposed and applied to the ovarian cancer early classification in the data set. Additionally, by the same data set, we also established a traditional PCA-SVM model. Finally we compared the two models in detection accuracy, specificity, and sensitivity. Results. Using independent training and testing experiments 10 times to evaluate the ovarian cancer detection models, the average prediction accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of the PCA-SVM model were 83.34%, 82.70%, and 83.88%, respectively. In contrast, those of the PPCA-SVM model were 90.80%, 92.98%, and 88.97%, respectively. Conclusions. The PPCA-SVM model had better detection performance. And the model combined with the SELDI-TOF-MS technology had a prospect in early clinical detection and diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

  10. A Mass Spectrometric Analysis Method Based on PPCA and SVM for Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang; Ji, Yanju; Zhao, Ling; Ji, Mengying; Ye, Zhuang; Li, Suyi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Surfaced-enhanced laser desorption-ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) technology plays an important role in the early diagnosis of ovarian cancer. However, the raw MS data is highly dimensional and redundant. Therefore, it is necessary to study rapid and accurate detection methods from the massive MS data. Methods. The clinical data set used in the experiments for early cancer detection consisted of 216 SELDI-TOF-MS samples. An MS analysis method based on probabilistic principal components analysis (PPCA) and support vector machine (SVM) was proposed and applied to the ovarian cancer early classification in the data set. Additionally, by the same data set, we also established a traditional PCA-SVM model. Finally we compared the two models in detection accuracy, specificity, and sensitivity. Results. Using independent training and testing experiments 10 times to evaluate the ovarian cancer detection models, the average prediction accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of the PCA-SVM model were 83.34%, 82.70%, and 83.88%, respectively. In contrast, those of the PPCA-SVM model were 90.80%, 92.98%, and 88.97%, respectively. Conclusions. The PPCA-SVM model had better detection performance. And the model combined with the SELDI-TOF-MS technology had a prospect in early clinical detection and diagnosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:27642365

  11. PIM2 kinase is induced by cisplatin in ovarian cancer cells and limits drug efficacy.

    PubMed

    Musiani, Daniele; Hammond, Dean E; Cirillo, Luca; Erriquez, Jessica; Olivero, Martina; Clague, Michael J; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2014-11-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapy is widely used to treat various cancers, but many patients ultimately relapse due to drug resistance. We employed phosphoproteomic analysis and functional assays of the response of SK-OV-3 ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin as a strategy to identify kinases as candidate druggable targets to sensitize cells to platinum. A SILAC-based approach combined with TiO2-based phosphopeptide enrichment allowed the direct identification of ERK1/2, p90RSK, and ERBB2 as kinases whose phosphorylation is regulated by cisplatin. Bioinformatic analysis revealed enrichment in linear phosphorylation motifs predicted to be targets of p38MAPK, CDK2, and PIM2. All three PIM kinases were found expressed in a panel of 10 ovarian cancer cell lines, with the oncogenic PIM2 being the most commonly induced by cisplatin. Targeting PIM2 kinase by either biochemical inhibitors or RNA interference impaired cell growth, decreased cisplatin-triggered BAD phosphorylation, and sensitized ovarian cancer cells to drug-induced apoptosis. Overexpression of PIM2 triggered anchorage-independent growth and resulted in increased BAD phosphorylation and cell resistance to DNA damaging agents. The data show that the PIM2 kinase plays a role in the response of ovarian cancer cells to platinum drugs and suggest that PIM inhibitors may find clinical application as an adjunct to platinum-based therapies. PMID:25099161

  12. Imaging of peritoneal deposits in ovarian cancer: A pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekhara, Sheragaru Hanumanthappa; Triveni, Gowramma Sannanaik; Kumar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    As per incidence, ovarian carcinoma is the second most common gynaecological malignancy in women. In spite of advanced technology, patient awareness and effective screening methods, epithelial ovarian cancer is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage (stage III). Surgical debulking of disease is mainstay of improving the patient survival even in advanced stages. Thus exact delineation of cancer spread in the abdominal cavity guides the surgeon prior to the surgery, help them to decide resectability of lesion and plan for further need of other surgical speciality or need of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Imaging particularly well-planned contrast-enhanced computed tomography answers most of the queries raised by the treating surgeon. The aim of this article is to review the way ovarian carcinoma spread in the peritoneal cavity and to stress the accurate interpretation of cancer deposits on imaging which can help the treating team to reach optimal management of patients. PMID:27247717

  13. The Immune System in the Pathogenesis of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charbonneau, Bridget; Goode, Ellen L.; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Knutson, Keith L.; DeRycke, Melissa S.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical outcomes in ovarian cancer are heterogeneous even when considering common features such as stage, response to therapy, and grade. This disparity in outcomes warrants further exploration into tumor and host characteristics. One compelling host characteristic is the immune response to ovarian cancer. While several studies have confirmed a prominent role for the immune system in modifying the clinical course of the disease, recent genetic and protein analyses also suggest a role in disease incidence. Recent studies also show that anti-tumor immunity is often negated by immune suppressive cells present in the tumor microenvironment. These suppressive immune cells also directly enhance the pathogenesis through the release of various cytokines and chemokines, which together form an integrated pathologic network. Thus, future research into immunotherapy targeting ovarian cancer will likely become increasingly focused on combination approaches that simultaneously augment immunity while preventing local immune suppression or by disrupting critical cytokine networks. PMID:23582060

  14. Searching for a system: The quest for ovarian cancer biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Rodland, Karin D.; Maihle, Nita J.

    2011-11-01

    The stark difference in clinical outcome for patients with ovarian cancer diagnosed at early stages (95% at 5 years) versus late stages (27.6% at 5 years) has driven a decades-long quest for effective biomarkers that will enable earlier detection of ovarian cancer. Yet despite intense efforts, including the application of modern high throughput technologies such as transcriptomics and proteomics, there has been little improvement in performance compared to the gold standard of quantifying serum CA125 immunoreactivity paired with transvaginal ultrasound. This review describes the strategies that have been used for identification of ovarian cancer biomarkers, including the recent introduction of novel bioinformatic approaches. Results obtained using high throughput-based vs. biologically rational approaches for the discovery of diagnostic early detection biomarkers are compared and analyzed for functional enrichment.

  15. OVARIAN RESERVE TESTS AND THEIR UTILITY IN PREDICTING RESPONSE TO CONTROLLED OVARIAN STIMULATION IN RHESUS MONKEYS

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Julie M.; Takahashi, Diana L; Ingram, Donald K.; Mattison, Julie A.; Roth, George; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Zelinski, Mary B.

    2010-01-01

    Controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) is an alternative to natural breeding in nonhuman primates; however, these protocols are costly with no guarantee of success. Toward the objective of predicting COS outcome in rhesus monkeys, the current study evaluated three clinically used ovarian reserve tests (ORTs): day 3 (d3) follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) with d3 inhibin B (INHB), the clomiphene citrate challenge test (CCCT), and the exogenous FSH Ovarian Reserve Test (EFORT). A COS was also performed and response was classified as either successful (COS+) or unsuccessful (COS−) and retrospectively compared to ORT predictions. FSH and INHB were assessed for best hormonal index in conjunction with the aforementioned tests. INHB was consistently more accurate than FSH in all ORTs used. Overall, a modified version of the CCCT using INHB values yielded the best percentage of correct predictions. This is the first report of ORT evaluation in rhesus monkeys and may provide a useful diagnostic test prior to costly follicle stimulations, as well as predicting the onset of menopause. PMID:20336797

  16. Cytokines and Prognostic Factors in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jammal, Millena Prata; Martins-Filho, Agrimaldo; Silveira, Thales Parenti; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido; Nomelini, Rosekeila Simões

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Ovarian cancer has a high mortality and delayed diagnosis. Inflammation is a risk factor for ovarian cancer, and the inflammatory response is involved in almost all stages of tumor development. Immunohistochemical staining in stroma and epithelium of a panel of cytokines in benign and malignant ovarian neoplasm was evaluated. In addition, immunostaining was related to prognostic factors in malignant tumors. METHOD The study group comprised 28 ovarian benign neoplasias and 28 ovarian malignant neoplasms. A panel of cytokines was evaluated by immunohistochemistry (Th1: IL-2 and IL-8; Th2: IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10; and TNFR1). Chi-square test with Yates’ correction was used, which was considered significant if less than 0.05. RESULTS TNFR1, IL-5, and IL-10 had more frequent immunostaining 2/3 in benign neoplasms compared with malignant tumors. Malignant tumors had more frequent immunostaining 2/3 for IL-2 in relation to benign tumors. The immunostaining 0/1 of IL 8 was more frequent in the stroma of benign neoplasms compared with malignant neoplasms. Evaluation of the ovarian cancer stroma showed that histological grade 3 was significantly correlated with staining 2/3 for IL-2 (P = 0.004). Women whose disease-free survival was less than 2.5 years had TNFR1 stromal staining 2/3 (P = 0.03) more frequently. CONCLUSION IL-2 and TNFR1 stromal immunostaining are related prognostic factors in ovarian cancer and can be the target of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:27512342

  17. [Erythropoietin and drug resistance in breast and ovarian cancers].

    PubMed

    Szenajch, Jolanta M; Synowiec, Agnieszka E

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) is used in breast and ovarian cancer patients to alleviate cancer- and chemotherapy-related anemia. Some clinical trials have reported that rhEPO may adversely impact survival and increase the risk of thrombovascular events in patients with breast cancer but not with ovarian cancer. The latter may potentially benefit the most from rhEPO treatment due to the nephrotoxic and myelosuppresive effects of standard platinum-based chemotherapy used in ovarian cancer disease. However, over the last decade the preclinical data have revealed that EPO is not only the principal growth factor and the hormone which regulates erythropoiesis, but also a cytokine with a pleiotropic activity which also can affect cancer cells. EPO can stimulate survival, ability to form metastases and drug resistance not only in continuous breast- and ovarian cancer cell lines but also in breast cancer stem-like cells. EPO receptor (EPOR) can also be constitutively active in both these cancers and, in breast cancer cells, may act in an interaction with estrogen receptor (ER) and epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2). EPOR, by an EPO-independent mechanism, promotes proliferation of breast cancer cells in cooperation with estrogen receptor, resulting in decreased effectiveness of tamoxifen treatment. In another interaction, as a result of the molecular antagonism between EPOR and HER2, rhEPO protects breast cancer cells against trastuzumab. Both clinical and preclinical evidence strongly suggest the urgent need to reevaluate the traditional use of rhEPO in the oncology setting.

  18. Overexpression of TAZ promotes cell proliferation, migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangyuan; Xie, Jiabin; Huang, Ping; Yang, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo pathway is dysregulated in multiple types of human cancer, including ovarian cancer. Nuclear expression of yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1), a downstream transcription coactivator of the Hippo pathway, has been demonstrated to promote tumorigenesis in ovarian cancer and may serve as a poor prognostic indicator. However, transcriptional coactivator with PDZ binding motif (TAZ), a downstream target of the Hippo pathway and paralog of YAP in mammalian cells, has not been fully investigated in ovarian cancer. The present study aimed to investigate the dysregulation and biological function of TAZ in ovarian cancer. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting revealed that TAZ mRNA and protein levels, respectively, were upregulated in ovarian cancer, and a meta-analysis of ovarian cancer microarray datasets identified that increased expression of TAZ mRNA is correlated with poor prognosis in patients with ovarian cancer. In addition, TAZ-knockdown in ovarian cancer cells demonstrated that TAZ regulates the migration, proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition of ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, pharmacological disruption of the YAP/TAZ/TEA domain protein complex resulted in a decrease in ovarian cancer cell migration, proliferation and vimentin expression. The results of the present study indicate that the overexpression of TAZ is important in the development and progression of ovarian cancer, and may function as a potential drug target for treatment of this disease entity. PMID:27588129

  19. Selective killing of ovarian cancer cells through induction of apoptosis by nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Iseki, Sachiko; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Kondo, Hiroki; Hori, Masaru; Nakamura, Kae; Hayashi, Moemi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Kano, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-12

    Two independent ovarian cancer cell lines and fibroblast controls were treated with nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). Most ovarian cancer cells were detached from the culture dish by continuous plasma treatment to a single spot on the dish. Next, the plasma source was applied over the whole dish using a robot arm. In vitro cell proliferation assays showed that plasma treatments significantly decreased proliferation rates of ovarian cancer cells compared to fibroblast cells. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis showed that plasma treatment of ovarian cancer cells induced apoptosis. NEAPP could be a promising tool for therapy for ovarian cancers.

  20. Can advanced-stage ovarian cancer be cured?

    PubMed

    Narod, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Approximately 20% of women with advanced-stage ovarian cancer survive beyond 12 years after treatment and are effectively cured. Initial therapy for ovarian cancer comprises surgery and chemotherapy, and is given with the goal of eradicating as many cancer cells as possible. Indeed, the three phases of therapy are as follows: debulking surgery to remove as much of the cancer as possible, preferably to a state of no visible residual disease; chemotherapy to eradicate any microscopic disease that remains present after surgery; and second-line or maintenance therapy, which is given to delay disease progression among patients with tumour recurrence. If no cancer cells remain after initial therapy is completed, a cure is expected. By contrast, if residual cancer cells are present after initial treatment, then disease recurrence is likely. Thus, the probability of cure is contingent on the combination of surgery and chemotherapy effectively eliminating all cancer cells. In this Perspectives article, I present the case that the probability of achieving a cancer-free state is maximized through a combination of maximal debulking surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. I discuss the evidence indicating that by taking this approach, cures could be achieved in up to 50% of women with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. PMID:26787282

  1. NPPB is a Novel Candidate Biomarker Expressed by Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts In Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawrenson, Kate; Grun, Barbara; Lee, Nathan; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Kan, Jenny; Swenson, Steve; Lin, Yvonne G.; Pejovic, Tanja; Millstein, Joshua; Gayther, Simon A

    2014-01-01

    Most solid tumours contain cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) that support tumourigenesis and malignant progression. However the cellular origins of CAFs in epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs) remain poorly understood, and their utility as a source of clinical biomarkers for cancer diagnosis has not been explored in great depth. Here, we report establishing in vitro and in vivo models of CAFs in ovarian cancer development. Normal ovarian fibroblasts and mesenchymal stem cells cultured in the presence of EOC cells acquired a CAF-like phenotype, and promoted EOC cell migration in vitro. CAFs also promoted ovarian cancer growth in vivo in both subcutaneous and intraperitoneal murine xenograft assays. Molecular profiling of CAFs identified gene expression signatures that were highly enriched for extracellular and secreted proteins. We identified novel candidate CAF specific biomarkers for ovarian cancer including NPPB, which was expressed in the stroma of 60% primary ovarian cancer tissues (n=145) but not in the stroma of normal ovaries (n=4). NPPB is a secreted protein that was also elevated in the blood of 50% of women with ovarian cancer (n=8). Taken together these data suggest that the tumor stroma is a novel source of biomarkers, including NPPB, that may be of clinical utility for detection of EOC. PMID:25047817

  2. Shared genetics underlying epidemiological association between endometriosis and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Painter, Jodie N.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Morris, Andrew P.; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Alexander; Burghaus, Stefanie; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Lambrechts, Diether; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vanderstichele, Adriaan; Doherty, Jennifer Anne; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Eilber, Ursula; Rudolph, Anja; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Goodman, Marc T.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Antonenkova, Natalia; Butzow, Ralf; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Edwards, Robert P.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Ness, Roberta B.; Cannioto, Rikki; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Giles, Graham G.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Liang, Dong; Lu, Karen H.; Wu, Xifeng; Bisogna, Maria; Dao, Fanny; Levine, Douglas A.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Missmer, Stacey; Bjorge, Line; Salvesen, Helga B.; Kopperud, Reidun K.; Bischof, Katharina; Aben, Katja K.H.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Olson, Sara H.; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Sieh, Weiva; Whittemore, Alice S.; Cook, Linda S.; Le, Nhu D.; Gilks, C. Blake; Gronwald, Jacek; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Gawełko, Jan; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise; Trabert, Britton; Lissowska, Jolanta; Mclaughlin, John R.; Narod, Steven A.; Phelan, Catherine; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Eccles, Diana; Gayther, Simon A.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J.; Wu, Anna H.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Timorek, Agnieszka; Szafron, Lukasz; Cunningham, Julie M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Winham, Stacey J.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Morgan, Terry K.; Risch, Harvey A.; Goode, Ellen L.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Webb, Penelope M.; Pearce, Celeste L.; Berchuck, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Zondervan, Krina T.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; MacGregor, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between endometriosis and certain histotypes of ovarian cancer, including clear cell, low-grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas. We aimed to determine whether the observed associations might be due to shared genetic aetiology. To address this, we used two endometriosis datasets genotyped on common arrays with full-genome coverage (3194 cases and 7060 controls) and a large ovarian cancer dataset genotyped on the customized Illumina Infinium iSelect (iCOGS) arrays (10 065 cases and 21 663 controls). Previous work has suggested that a large number of genetic variants contribute to endometriosis and ovarian cancer (all histotypes combined) susceptibility. Here, using the iCOGS data, we confirmed polygenic architecture for most histotypes of ovarian cancer. This led us to evaluate if the polygenic effects are shared across diseases. We found evidence for shared genetic risks between endometriosis and all histotypes of ovarian cancer, except for the intestinal mucinous type. Clear cell carcinoma showed the strongest genetic correlation with endometriosis (0.51, 95% CI = 0.18–0.84). Endometrioid and low-grade serous carcinomas had similar correlation coefficients (0.48, 95% CI = 0.07–0.89 and 0.40, 95% CI = 0.05–0.75, respectively). High-grade serous carcinoma, which often arises from the fallopian tubes, showed a weaker genetic correlation with endometriosis (0.25, 95% CI = 0.11–0.39), despite the absence of a known epidemiological association. These results suggest that the epidemiological association between endometriosis and ovarian adenocarcinoma may be attributable to shared genetic susceptibility loci. PMID:26231222

  3. SSRI use and clinical outcomes in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Desiré K; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N; Ramirez, Edgardo; Matsuo, Koji; Zimmerman, Bridget; Zand, Behrouz; Shinn, Eileen; Goodheart, Michael J; Bender, David; Thaker, Premal H; Ahmed, Amina; Penedo, Frank J; DeGeest, Koen; Mendez, Luis; Domann, Frederick; Sood, Anil K; Lutgendorf, Susan K

    2016-05-31

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use is common among ovarian cancer patients. We examined the effect of SSRIs on survival and progression in ovarian cancer patients and effects of 5-HT on ovarian cancer cell (OCC) proliferation. Ovarian cancer patients from a 6-site study between 1994 and 2010 were included. Cox proportional hazards models were used for multivariate analysis. SSRI use was associated with decreased time to disease recurrence (HR 1.3, CI 1.0-1.6, p=0.03), but not overall survival (HR 1.1, CI 0.9-1.3, p=0.56). Compared to normal ovarian cells, most OCCs had elevated 5-HT2A receptor mRNA expression (up to 1600 fold greater expression). Clonogenic survival increased in cells treated with 10 uM (1.6 fold, p<0.001) and 20uM (1.9 fold, p=0.018) 5-HT. Mice receiving 5-HT injections had increases in tumor weight (p=0.07) and nodules (p=0.08) with increased Ki67 expression. Injections with sertraline doubled mean tumor weight in mice (p=0.16). 5-HT and sertraline both increased Ki67 expression in mouse tumors (p < 0.001).Patients using SSRIs had significantly decreased time to disease progression. It is possible that SSRIs alter serotonin levels in the tumor microenvironment, resulting in activation of proliferation pathways. Further characterization of serotonergic pathways in ovarian cancer is recommended to demonstrate safety of these medications. PMID:27121207

  4. Shared genetics underlying epidemiological association between endometriosis and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Painter, Jodie N; Nyholt, Dale R; Morris, Andrew P; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Burghaus, Stefanie; Beckmann, Matthias W; Lambrechts, Diether; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vanderstichele, Adriaan; Doherty, Jennifer Anne; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wicklund, Kristine G; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Eilber, Ursula; Rudolph, Anja; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Goodman, Marc T; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Antonenkova, Natalia; Butzow, Ralf; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M; Edwards, Robert P; Kelley, Joseph L; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Cannioto, Rikki; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Giles, Graham G; Bruinsma, Fiona; Kjaer, Susanne K; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Liang, Dong; Lu, Karen H; Wu, Xifeng; Bisogna, Maria; Dao, Fanny; Levine, Douglas A; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Tworoger, Shelley S; Missmer, Stacey; Bjorge, Line; Salvesen, Helga B; Kopperud, Reidun K; Bischof, Katharina; Aben, Katja K H; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Olson, Sara H; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H; Sieh, Weiva; Whittemore, Alice S; Cook, Linda S; Le, Nhu D; Gilks, C Blake; Gronwald, Jacek; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Gawełko, Jan; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise; Trabert, Britton; Lissowska, Jolanta; Mclaughlin, John R; Narod, Steven A; Phelan, Catherine; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Eccles, Diana; Gayther, Simon A; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J; Wu, Anna H; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Timorek, Agnieszka; Szafron, Lukasz; Cunningham, Julie M; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Bandera, Elisa V; Poole, Elizabeth M; Morgan, Terry K; Risch, Harvey A; Goode, Ellen L; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Webb, Penelope M; Pearce, Celeste L; Berchuck, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D P; Montgomery, Grant W; Zondervan, Krina T; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; MacGregor, Stuart

    2015-10-15

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between endometriosis and certain histotypes of ovarian cancer, including clear cell, low-grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas. We aimed to determine whether the observed associations might be due to shared genetic aetiology. To address this, we used two endometriosis datasets genotyped on common arrays with full-genome coverage (3194 cases and 7060 controls) and a large ovarian cancer dataset genotyped on the customized Illumina Infinium iSelect (iCOGS) arrays (10 065 cases and 21 663 controls). Previous work has suggested that a large number of genetic variants contribute to endometriosis and ovarian cancer (all histotypes combined) susceptibility. Here, using the iCOGS data, we confirmed polygenic architecture for most histotypes of ovarian cancer. This led us to evaluate if the polygenic effects are shared across diseases. We found evidence for shared genetic risks between endometriosis and all histotypes of ovarian cancer, except for the intestinal mucinous type. Clear cell carcinoma showed the strongest genetic correlation with endometriosis (0.51, 95% CI = 0.18-0.84). Endometrioid and low-grade serous carcinomas had similar correlation coefficients (0.48, 95% CI = 0.07-0.89 and 0.40, 95% CI = 0.05-0.75, respectively). High-grade serous carcinoma, which often arises from the fallopian tubes, showed a weaker genetic correlation with endometriosis (0.25, 95% CI = 0.11-0.39), despite the absence of a known epidemiological association. These results suggest that the epidemiological association between endometriosis and ovarian adenocarcinoma may be attributable to shared genetic susceptibility loci.

  5. Temsirolimus and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Endometrial, Ovarian, Liver, Carcinoid, or Islet Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  6. YKL-40 in Serum Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-19

    Fallopian Tube Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mucinous Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Neoplasm; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Transitional Cell Tumor; Ovarian Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  7. Preclinical evaluation of a nanoformulated antihelminthic, niclosamide, in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chi-Kang; Bai, Meng-Yi; Hu, Teh-Min; Wang, Yu-Chi; Chao, Tai-Kuang; Weng, Shao-Ju; Huang, Rui-Lan; Su, Po-Hsuan; Lai, Hung-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer treatment remains a challenge and targeting cancer stem cells presents a promising strategy. Niclosamide is an “old” antihelminthic drug that uncouples mitochondria of intestinal parasites. Although recent studies demonstrated that niclosamide could be a potential anticancer agent, its poor water solubility needs to be overcome before further preclinical and clinical investigations can be conducted. Therefore, we evaluated a novel nanosuspension of niclosamide (nano-NI) for its effect against ovarian cancer. Nano-NI effectively inhibited the growth of ovarian cancer cells in which it induced a metabolic shift to glycolysis at a concentration of less than 3 μM in vitro and suppressed tumor growth without obvious toxicity at an oral dose of 100 mg/kg in vivo. In a pharmacokinetic study after oral administration, nano-NI showed rapid absorption (reaching the maximum plasma concentration within 5 min) and improved the bioavailability (the estimated bioavailability for oral nano-NI was 25%). In conclusion, nano-NI has the potential to be a new treatment modality for ovarian cancer and, therefore, further clinical trials are warranted. PMID:26848771

  8. Correlation analysis of urine metabolites and clinical staging in patients with ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ting; Lin, Yunliang; Yin, Haiqin; Wang, Shanshan; Sun, Qinglei; Zhang, Peihai; Bi, Wenxiang

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the correlation between urine metabolites and clinical staging in patients with ovarian cancer. The urina sanguinis from 56 cases of primary epithelial ovarian cancer patients and 15 healthy volunteers was collected and the urine metabolites were extracted. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS) analysis was performed. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to analyze the mass spectrometry data. Database retrieval and comparison of the screened metabolites were performed and one-way ANOVA and least significant difference (LSD) t test were carried out. PCA analysis of UPLC-Q-TOF-MS results showed that the score plots of samples from healthy people and patients with ovarian cancer at different clinical stages were separated. Further PLS-DA analysis significantly improved the classification results. The R(2)X was 0.757, the R(2)Y was 0.977 and the Q(2)Y was 0.87, indicating that the model stability and predictability were good. Eight metabolites, including N-acetylneuraminic acid-9-phosphate, 5'-methioadenosine, uric acid-3-nucleoside, pseudouridine, L-valine, succinic acid, L-proline and β-nicotinamide mononucleotide were identified. The contents of these metabolites increased with the development of the disease. There was correlation between urine metabolites and clinical staging in patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:26770415

  9. Microsatellite instability is rare in sporadic ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.; Han, H.; Schwartz, P.E.

    1994-09-01

    Microsatellite instability was first demonstrated to be a common underlying mechanism in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and has recently been implicated in the development of several other human cancers. Although numerous genetic changes have been documented in ovarian cancer, their molecular bases are poorly understood. In investigating the molecular genetics of ovarian cancer, we analyzed twelve short tandem repeats that were amplified by PCR from DNA of 48 tumors and their corresponding lymphocyte samples. All of the 48 cases studied have no noticeable family history and, of them, 42 are epithelial (benign/borderline, 5; grade I, 4; GII, 4; GIII, 29) and 6 are nonepithelial. A microsatellite instability has been shown to be inversely correlated with the occurrence of allelic losses, half of those cases chosen have a fractional allele loss of {le}15 (median = .18 of 50 tumors tested for 86 loci from every chromosomal arm). The loci examined included eight dinucleotide repeats (D2S123, D9S104, D10S197, D11S904, D16S408, D16S421, D17S250, and D17S579), two trinucleotide repeats (DM and AR) and two tetranucleotide repeats (DXS981 and VWF). Despite the fact that HNPCC phenotype includes ovarian cancer and that microsatellite instability has been shown in one ovarian cancer from an HNPCC family, the allele sizes of 12 loci were found to be identical in all paired tumor and normal samples we studied except for one tumor at a single locus. The band shift displayed on polyacrylamide gel representing an additional allele of VWF was only observed in one grade III tumor. Our results are thus a strong indication that the alteration of microsatellite repeats may not play a major role in the development of sporadic ovarian cancer.

  10. Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Alleles and Risk of Ovarian Cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ramus, Susan J.; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van Roozendaal, K.E.P.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Dorfling, Cecelia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Gayther, Simon A.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs10088218 (at 8q24), rs2665390 (at 3q25), rs717852 (at 2q31), and rs9303542 (at 17q21), were genotyped in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 carriers, including 2,678 ovarian cancer cases. Associations were evaluated within a retrospective cohort approach. All four loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.67–0.98) P-trend = 0.033, rs2665390 HR = 1.48 (95% CI: 1.21–1.83) P-trend = 1.8 × 10−4, rs717852 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10–1.42) P-trend = 6.6 × 10−4, rs9303542 HR = 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02–1.33) P-trend = 0.026. Two loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele HR = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.81–0.99) P-trend = 0.029, rs2665390 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10–1.42) P-trend = 6.1 × 10−4. The HR estimates for the remaining loci were consistent with odds ratio estimates for the general population. The identification of multiple loci modifying ovarian cancer risk may be useful for counseling women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations regarding their risk of ovarian cancer. PMID:22253144

  11. Neferine induces autophagy of human ovarian cancer cells via p38 MAPK/ JNK activation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Limei; Zhang, Xiyu; Li, Yinuo; Lu, Shuhua; Lu, Shan; Li, Jieyin; Wang, Yuqiong; Tian, Xiaoxue; Wei, Jian-Jun; Shao, Changshun; Liu, Zhaojian

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Patients usually have poor prognosis because of late diagnosis, relapse, and chemoresistance. It is pressing to seek novel agent for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Neferine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the embryos of lotus (Nelumbo nucifera). In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of neferine on ovarian cancer cells. We found that neferine exhibited growth-inhibitory effect on human ovarian cancer cells, whereas showing less cytotoxic to non-malignant fallopian tube epithelial cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that neferine induced autophagy and inactivated the mTOR pathway. Finally, we found that both p38 MAPK and JNK signaling pathways were activated by neferine treatment and contributed to the induction of autophagy in ovarian cancer cells. In conclusion, our findings showed that neferine induced autophagy of human ovarian cancer cells via p38 MAPK/JNK activation. Neferine may be explored as a promising antitumoral agent in ovarian cancer. PMID:26738868

  12. BCL6 is a negative prognostic factor and exhibits pro-oncogenic activity in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Qin; Xu, Mi-Die; Weng, Wei-Wei; Wei, Ping; Yang, Yu-Si; Du, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dysregulation of BCL6 plays critical oncogenic roles and facilitates tumorigenesis in various malignancies. However, whether the aberrant expression of BCL6 in ovarian carcinoma is associated with malignancy, metastasis or prognosis remains unknown. Our study aimed to investigate the expression of BCL6 in ovarian carcinoma and its possible correlation with clinicopathological features as well as patient survival to reveal its biological effects in ovarian tumor progression. Methods: Immunochemistry analysis was performed in 105 cases of ovarian carcinoma covering the histological types of serous, endometrioid and clear cell. Spearman analysis was used to calculate the correlation between pathological parameters and the expression of BCL6. Kaplan–Meier method and Cox proportional hazards analysis were used to analyze the disease-specific survival (DSS) and disease-free survival (DFS). We also assessed whether overexpression and knockdown of BCL6 influence in vitro cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, as well as tumor cell invasion and migration. Results: The expression of BCL6 was higher in all three major kinds of ovarian cancer in comparison with paratumorous epithelium. BCL6 expression was tightly correlated with FIGO staging, lymph node metastasis and recurrence. Higher expression of BCL6 led to a significantly poorer DSS and DFS and multivariate analysis revealed that BCL6 was an independent risk factor of DSS and DFS. Enforced overexpression of BCL6 in ovarian tumor cells stimulated proliferation by inducing G1–S transition, and promoted tumor cell invasion and migration. Conversely, RNA interference–mediated silencing BCL6 expression inhibited proliferation by altered cell cycle progression and reduced the ability of the cells to migrate, and invade the extracellular matrix in culture. Conclusions: Our study suggests that the inappropriate activation of BCL6 predicts poor prognosis and promotes tumor progression in ovarian carcinoma

  13. Human papillomavirus genotyping and integration in ovarian cancer Saudi patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with different malignancies but its role in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is controversial. This study investigated the prevalence, genotyping and physical state of HPV in ovarian cancer Saudi patients. Methods Hundred formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) ovarian carcinoma tissues and their normal adjacent tissues (NAT) were included in the study. HPV was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using degenerated HPVL1 consensus primer pairs MY09/MY11 and GP5+/GP6 + to amplify a broad spectrum of HPV genotypes in a single reaction. The HPV positive samples were further genotyped using DNA sequencing. The physical state of the virus was identified using Amplification of Papillomavirus Oncogene Transcripts (APOT) assay in the samples positive for HPV16 and/or HPV18. Results High percentage of HPV (42%) was observed in ovarian carcinoma compared to 8% in the NAT. The high-risk HPV types 16, 18 and 45 were highly associated with the advanced stages of tumor, while low-risk types 6 and 11 were present in NAT. In malignant tissues, HPV-16 was the most predominant genotype followed by HPV-18 and -45. The percentage of viral integration into the host genome was significantly high (61.1%) compared to 38.9% episomal in HPV positive tumors tissues. In HPV18 genotype the percentage of viral integration was 54.5% compared to 45.5% episomal. Conclusion The high risk HPV genotypes in ovarian cancer may indicate its role in ovarian carcinogenesis. The HPV vaccination is highly recommended to reduce this type of cancer. PMID:24252426

  14. DDX4 (DEAD box polypeptide 4) colocalizes with cancer stem cell marker CD133 in ovarian cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ki Hyung; Kang, Yun-Jeong; Jo, Jin-Ok; Ock, Mee Sun; Moon, Soo Hyun; Suh, Dong Soo; Yoon, Man Soo; Park, Eun-Sil; Jeong, Namkung; Eo, Wan-Kyu; Kim, Heung Yeol; Cha, Hee-Jae

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Germ cell marker DDX4 was significantly increased in ovarian cancer. • Ovarian cancer stem cell marker CD133 was significantly increased in ovarian cancer. • DDX4 and CD133 were mostly colocalized in various types of ovarian cancer tissues. • CD133 positive ovarian cancer cells also express DDX4 whereas CD133-negative cells did not possess DDX4. • Germ cell marker DDX4 has the potential of ovarian cancer stem cell marker. - Abstract: DDX4 (DEAD box polypeptide 4), characterized by the conserved motif Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp (DEAD), is an RNA helicase which is implicated in various cellular processes involving the alteration of RNA secondary structure, such as translation initiation, nuclear and mitochondrial splicing, and ribosome and spliceosome assembly. DDX4 is known to be a germ cell-specific protein and is used as a sorting marker of germline stem cells for the production of oocytes. A recent report about DDX4 in ovarian cancer showed that DDX4 is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer and disrupts a DNA damage-induced G2 checkpoint. We investigated the relationship between DDX4 and ovarian cancer stem cells by analyzing the expression patterns of DDX4 and the cancer stem cell marker CD133 in ovarian cancers via tissue microarray. Both DDX4 and CD133 were significantly increased in ovarian cancer compared to benign tumors, and showed similar patterns of expression. In addition, DDX4 and CD133 were mostly colocalized in various types of ovarian cancer tissues. Furthermore, almost all CD133 positive ovarian cancer cells also express DDX4 whereas CD133-negative cells did not possess DDX4, suggesting a strong possibility that DDX4 plays an important role in cancer stem cells, and/or can be used as an ovarian cancer stem cell marker.

  15. Ruxolitinib Phosphate, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Fallopian Tube Carcinosarcoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  16. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  17. Brain metastasis from ovarian cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pakneshan, Shabnam; Safarpour, Damoun; Tavassoli, Fattaneh; Jabbari, Bahman

    2014-08-01

    To review the existing literature on brain metastasis (BM) from ovarian cancer and to assess the frequency, anatomical, clinical and paraclinical information and factors associated with prognosis. Ovarian cancer is a rare cause of brain metastasis with a recently reported increasing prevalence. Progressive neurologic disability and poor prognosis is common. A comprehensive review on this subject has not been published previously. This systematic literature search used the Pubmed and Yale library. A total of 66 publications were found, 57 of which were used representing 591 patients with BM from ovarian cancer. The median age of the patients was 54.3 years (range 20-81). A majority of patients (57.3 %) had multiple brain lesions. The location of the lesion was cerebellar (30 %), frontal (20 %), parietal (18 %) and occipital (11 %). Extracranial metastasis was present in 49.8 % of cases involving liver (20.7 %), lung (20.4 %), lymph nodes (12.6 %), bones (6.6 %) and pelvic organs (4.3 %). The most common symptoms were weakness (16 %), seizures (11 %), altered mentality (11 %) visual disturbances (9 %) and dizziness (8 %). The interval from diagnosis of breast cancer to BM ranged from 0 to 133 months (median 24 months) and median survival was 8.2 months. Local radiation, surgical resection, stereotactic radiosurgery and medical therapy were used. Factors that significantly increased the survival were younger age at the time of ovarian cancer diagnosis and brain metastasis diagnosis, lower grade of the primary tumor, higher KPS score and multimodality treatment for the brain metastases. Ovarian cancer is a rare cause of brain metastasis. Development of brain metastasis among older patients and lower KPS score correlate with less favorable prognosis. The more prolonged survival after using multimodality treatment for brain metastasis is important due to potential impact on management of brain metastasis in future.

  18. Analgesic drug use and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Charlotte G; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wicklund, Kristine G; Cushing-Haugen, Kara L

    2008-06-15

    Analgesic use may reduce ovarian cancer risk, possibly through antiinflammatory or antigonadotropic effects. The authors conducted a population-based, case-control study in Washington State that included 812 women aged 35-74 years who were diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer between 2002 and 2005 and 1,313 controls. Use of analgesics, excluding use within the previous year, was assessed via in-person interviews. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Overall, acetaminophen and aspirin were associated with weakly increased risks of ovarian cancer. These associations were stronger after more than 10 years of use (acetaminophen: odds ratio (OR) = 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3, 2.6; aspirin: OR = 1.6, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.2) and were present for indications of headache, menstrual pain, and other pain/injury. Reduced risk was observed among aspirin users who began regular use within the previous 5 years (OR = 0.6, 95% CI: 0.4, 1.0) or used this drug for prevention of heart disease (OR = 0.7, 95% CI: 0.5, 1.0). These results, in the context of prior findings, do not provide compelling evidence of a true increase in risk of ovarian cancer among women who use these drugs. However, they add to the weight of evidence that, in the aggregate, provides little support for the use of analgesic drugs as chemoprevention for this disease.

  19. Survival and prognostic factors of early ovarian cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Villa, A.; Parazzini, F.; Acerboni, S.; Guarnerio, P.; Bolis, G.

    1998-01-01

    Survival and prognostic factors were analysed in 150 patients with histologically confirmed epithelial ovarian cancer stage IA-IIA. The relapse-free and overall survival rates were, respectively, 81% and 88% after 3 and 74% and 84% after 5 years. The analysis of various prognostic factors indicates as the main factor the grade differentiation of the tumour. PMID:9459156

  20. Drug combination may be highly effective in recurrent ovarian cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Significant improvement with the use of a combination drug therapy for recurrent ovarian cancer was reported at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago. The trial compared the activity of a combination of the dru

  1. Ovarian cancer and talc: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cramer, D W; Welch, W R; Scully, R E; Wojciechowski, C A

    1982-07-15

    Opportunities for genital exposure to talc were assessed in 215 white females with epithelial ovarian cancers and in 215 control women from the general population matched by age, race, and residence. Ninety-two (42.8%) cases regularly used talc either as a dusting powder on the perineum or on sanitary napkins compared with 61 (28.4%) controls. Adjusted for parity and menopausal status, this difference yielded a relative risk of 1.92 (P less than 0.003) for ovarian cancer associated with these practices. Women who had regularly engaged in both practices had an adjusted relative risk of 3.28 (P less than 0.001) compared to women with neither exposure. This provides some support for an association between talc and ovarian cancer hypothesized because of the similarity of ovarian cancer to mesotheliomas and the chemical relation of talc to asbestos, a known cause of mesotheliomas. The authors also investigated opportunities for potential talc exposure from rubber products such as condoms or diaphragms or from pelvic surgery. No significant differences were noted between cases and controls in these exposures, although the intensity of talc exposure from these sources was likely affected by variables not assessed in this study.

  2. The evaluation of the omentum in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, J J; Demopoulos, R I; Bigelow, B

    1986-07-01

    Little published data exists on omental evaluation in ovarian cancer. In a retrospective study we reviewed 334 consecutive operations for adnexal masses; 159 had ovarian cancer, and 119 omentectomies were performed, with complete information available on 109. Mean omentectomy was 203.5 cm2 (normal omentum = 792 cm2) and 190 g, with a significant correlation of weight to size. Secondary ovarian cancer was present in 66 omenta (61%). All 32 omenta examined in the pathology laboratories and described as grossly involved with tumor had ovarian cancer histologically. Of the 55 grossly negative omenta, 12 had histologically proven tumor (22%). Slide review of the grossly negative, histologically positive omenta revealed the mean tumor diameter to measure 6.7 mm. Lymph node dissection occurred in 16 patients and was positive in 10, with simultaneous absence of tumor in the omenta of 3 of these patients. Conversely, 2 patients with positive omenta had negative lymph nodes. The optimal extent of omental resection and histological examination remains undetermined.

  3. Characteristics of Long-Term Survivors of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cress, Rosemary D.; Chen, Yingjia S.; Morris, Cyllene R.; Petersen, Megan; Leiserowitz, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify characteristics associated with long-term survival forepithelial ovarian cancer patients using the California Cancer Registry. Methods A descriptive analysis of survival of all California residents diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer between 1994 and 2001 was conducted using patients identified through the cancer registry with follow up through 2011. Characteristics of the patients who survived more than 10 years (long-term survivors) were compared to three other cohorts: patients who survived less than 2 years, those who survived at least 2 but no more than 5 years, and those who survived at least 5 but no more than 10 years. Results A total of 3,582 out of 11,541 (31% CI=30.2%, 31.8%) of the patients survived more than 10 years. Younger age, early stage, low-grade, and non-serous histology were significant predictors of long-term survival, but long-term survivors also included women with high-risk cancer. Conclusion Long-term survival is not unusual in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer, even in those with high-risk disease. Many of the prognostic factors are well known, but it remains to be determined why some patients with advanced stage high-grade cancers survive longer than others with the same histology. These findings are important for patient counseling. PMID:26244529

  4. Overcoming cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer cells by targeting HIF-1-regulated cancer metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ai, Zhihong; Lu, Yang; Qiu, Songbo; Fan, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Cisplatin is currently one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs used for treating ovarian cancer; however, resistance to cisplatin is common. In this study, we explored an experimental strategy for overcoming cisplatin resistance of human ovarian cancer from the new perspective of cancer cell metabolism. By using two pairs of genetically matched cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines, we tested the hypothesis that downregulating hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), which regulates metabolic enzymes involved in glycolysis, is a promising strategy for overcoming cisplatin resistance of human ovarian cancer cells. We found that cisplatin downregulated the level of the regulatable α subunit of HIF-1, HIF-1α, in cisplatin-sensitive ovarian cancer cells through enhancing HIF-1α degradation but did not downregulate HIF-1α in their cisplatin-resistant counterparts. Overexpression of a degradation-resistant HIF-1α (HIF-1α ΔODD) reduced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in cisplatin-sensitive cells, whereas genetic knockdown of HIF-1α or pharmacological promotion of HIF-1α degradation enhanced response to cisplatin in both cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. We further demonstrated that knockdown of HIF-1α improved the response of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin by redirecting the aerobic glycolysis in the resistant cancer cells toward mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, leading to cell death through overproduction of reactive oxygen species. Our findings suggest that the HIF-1α-regulated cancer metabolism pathway could be a novel target for overcoming cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer.

  5. Conditions associated with antibodies against the tumor-associated antigen MUC1 and their relationship to risk for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Daniel W; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; McKolanis, John R; Welch, William R; Vitonis, Allison F; Berkowitz, Ross S; Finn, Olivera J

    2005-05-01

    Many cancers, including ovarian, overexpress epithelial mucin (MUC1) and promote anti-MUC1 antibodies that may correlate with more favorable prognosis. By extension, risk for ovarian cancer might be reduced by preexisting MUC1-specific immunity. We measured anti-MUC1 antibodies in 705 control women, identified events predicting antibodies, and estimated ovarian cancer risk by comparing profiles of events generating antibodies in controls with those in 668 ovarian cancer cases. Factors predicting antibodies included oral contraceptive use, breast mastitis, bone fracture or osteoporosis, pelvic surgeries, nonuse of talc in genital hygiene, and to a lesser extent intrauterine device use and current smoking. There was a significant increase in the likelihood of having anti-MUC1 antibodies from 24.2% in women with 0 or 1 condition, to 51.4% in those with five or more conditions. By the same index of events, the risk for ovarian cancer was inversely associated with number of conditions predisposing to anti-MUC1 antibodies. Compared with having experienced 0 or 1 event, the adjusted risk for ovarian cancer decreased progressively with relative risks (and 95% confidence limits) of 0.69 (0.52-0.92), 0.64 (0.47-0.88), 0.49 (0.34-0.72), and 0.31 (0.16-0.61), respectively for women with two, three, four, and five or more events related to the presence of antibodies (P(trend) < 0.0001.) We conclude that several traditional and new risk factors for ovarian cancer may be explained by their ability to induce MUC1 immunity through exposure of MUC1 to immune recognition in the context of inflammatory or hormonal processes in various MUC1-positive tissues.

  6. First-line therapy in ovarian cancer trials.

    PubMed

    Thigpen, Tate; duBois, Andreas; McAlpine, Jessica; DiSaia, Philip; Fujiwara, Keiichi; Hoskins, William; Kristensen, Gunnar; Mannel, Robert; Markman, Maurie; Pfisterer, Jacobus; Quinn, Michael; Reed, Nick; Swart, Ann Marie; Berek, Jonathan; Colombo, Nicoletta; Freyer, Gilles; Gallardo, Dolores; Plante, Marie; Poveda, Andres; Rubinstein, Lawrence; Bacon, Monica; Kitchener, Henry; Stuart, Gavin C E

    2011-05-01

    At the 4th Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference of the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG) held in Vancouver, Canada, in June 2010, representatives of 23 cooperative research groups studying gynecologic cancers gathered to establish international consensus on issues critical to the conduct of large randomized trials. The process focused on 13 predetermined questions. Group A, 1 of the 3 discussion groups, addressed the first 5 questions, examining first-line therapies in newly diagnosed ovarian cancer patients. A1: What are the appropriate end points for different trials (maintenance, upfront chemotherapy trials including molecular drugs)? A2: Are there any subgroups defined by tumor biology who need specific treatment options/trials? A3: Is the 2004 GCIG-recommended standard comparator arm still valid? A4: What is the role of modifying dose, schedule, and delivery of chemotherapy? A5: What role does surgery play today?

  7. Scared witless about death--ovarian cancer narratives compared.

    PubMed

    van Duin, Isabella A J; Kaptein, Ad A

    2013-12-01

    Fifty years ago, doctors did not tell their patients they had cancer. Improved patient-physician communication, feminization of the medical profession and increased patient empowerment may have improved matters. However, death is still a subject many doctors find difficult to deal with. We explore this issue in the context of medical humanities. In order to examine the different strategies in coping with illness and death, we compared illness perceptions in a literary text, W;t by Margaret Edson, about a woman who dies of ovarian cancer, with a personal narrative of a patient with ovarian cancer. Although there are many differences between the two patients in historical and cultural background, similarities were found in the way they cope with illness and death anxiety. Insight into illness perceptions and coping strategies of patients with cancer is important for raising awareness in clinicians, leading to improved understanding and better treatment of patients.

  8. A strong candidate for the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Miki, Y.; Swenson, J.; Yakumo, K.; Lewis, C.; Neuhausen, S.; Goldgar, D.; Shattuck-Eidens, D.; Harshman, K.; Tavtigian, S.; Liu, Q.

    1994-10-07

    A strong candidate for the 17q-linked BRCA1 gene, which influences susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer, has been identified by positional cloning methods. Probable predisposing mutations have been detected in five of eight kindreds presumed to segregate BRCA1 susceptibility alleles. The mutations include an 11-base pair deletion, a 1-base pair insertion, a stop codon, a missense substitution, and an inferred regulatory mutation. The BRCA1 gene is expressed in numerous tissues, including breast and ovary, and encodes a predicted protein of 1863 amino acids. This protein contains a zinc finger domain in its amino-terminal region, but is otherwise unrelated to previously described proteins. Identification of BRCA1 should facilitate early diagnosis of breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility in some individuals as well as a better understanding of breast cancer biology.

  9. Perineal powder exposure and the risk of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Cook, L S; Kamb, M L; Weiss, N S

    1997-03-01

    This case-control study evaluated the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer associated with genital exposure to various forms of powder application. Cases included all women aged 20-79 years in three counties of western Washington who were diagnosed with borderline or invasive ovarian cancer from 1986 through 1988; 64.3% of eligible cases were interviewed. A sample of similarly aged women who lived in these counties, identified by random digit dialing, served as controls. The overall response among control women was 68.0%. Information on powder application and other potential risk factors was ascertained during the in-person interview. Overall, ovarian cancer cases (n = 313) were more likely than controls (n = 422) to ever have used powder (age-adjusted relative risk (RR) = 1.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-2.0). After adjustment for age and other methods of genital powder application (none vs. any), an elevated relative risk of ovarian cancer was noted only for women with a history of perineal dusting (RR = 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.3) or use of genital deodorant spray (RR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.1). These results offer support for the hypothesis, raised by prior epidemiologic studies, that powder exposure from perineal dusting contributes to the development of ovarian cancer, and they suggest that use of genital deodorant sprays may do so as well. Limitations of the present study include the fairly low proportion of eligible women who participated and the potential differential recall of powder usage.

  10. The Association Between Talc Use and Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vitonis, Allison F.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Welch, William R.; Titus, Linda J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple studies of ovarian cancer and genital talc use have led only to consensus about possible carcinogenicity. Seeking greater clarity, we examined this association in 2,041 cases with epithelial ovarian cancer and 2,100 age- and-residence-matched controls. Methods: We defined genital talc use as regular application to the genital/rectal area directly, on sanitary napkins, tampons, or underwear. To estimate “talc-years,” we multiplied applications per year by years used. Unconditional logistic regression, Wald statistics, likelihood-ratio tests, and polytomous logistic regression were used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), trends, effect-modification, and heterogeneity by ovarian cancer histologic subtype. Results: Overall, genital talc use was associated with an OR (95% CI) of 1.33 (1.16, 1.52), with a trend for increasing risk by talc-years. Women who used talc were more likely to be older, heavier, asthma sufferers, and regular analgesic users—none of which was a confounder. Dose–responses were more apparent for premenopausal women, especially nonsmokers and those heavier or postmenopausal users of menopausal hormones (hormone therapy [HT]). Subtypes of ovarian cancer more likely to be associated with talc included invasive serous and endometrioid tumors and borderline serous and mucinous tumors. Premenopausal women and postmenopausal HT users with these subtypes who had accumulated >24 talc-years had ORs (95% CI) of 2.33 (1.32, 4.12) and 2.57 (1.51, 4.36), respectively. Conclusion: Risks for epithelial ovarian cancer from genital talc use vary by histologic subtype, menopausal status at diagnosis, HT use, weight, and smoking. These observations suggest that estrogen and/or prolactin may play a role via macrophage activity and inflammatory response to talc. PMID:26689397

  11. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIIC-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer Following Surgery and Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-12

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Tumor; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Neoplasm; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  12. Drug conjugation to hyaluronan widens therapeutic indications for ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Montagner, Isabella Monia; Merlo, Anna; Carpanese, Debora; Zuccolotto, Gaia; Renier, Davide; Campisi, Monica; Pasut, Gianfranco; Zanovello, Paola; Rosato, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Management of ovarian cancer still requires improvements in therapeutic options. A drug delivery strategy was tested that allows specific targeting of tumor cells in combination with a controlled release of a cytotoxic molecule. To this aim, the efficacy of a loco-regional intraperitoneal treatment with a bioconjugate (ONCOFID-S) derived by chemical linking of SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan (CPT-11), to hyaluronan was assessed in a mouse model of ovarian carcinomatosis. In vitro, the bioconjugate selectively interacted with ovarian cancer cells through the CD44 receptor, disclosed a dose-dependent tumor growth inhibition efficacy comparable to that of free SN-38 drug, and inhibited Topoisomerase I function leading to apoptosis by a mechanism involving caspase-3 and -7 activation and PARP cleavage. In vivo, the intraperitoneal administration of ONCOFID-S in tumor-bearing mice did not induce inflammation, and evidenced an improved therapeutic efficacy compared with CPT-11. In conclusion, SN-38 conjugation to hyaluronan significantly improved the profile of in vivo tolerability and widened the field of application of irinotecan. Therefore, this approach can be envisaged as a promising therapeutic strategy for loco-regional treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:26097871

  13. [Multiple cavitary pulmonary metastases from ovarian cancer: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, S; Takechi, A; Kashiyama, T

    2001-06-01

    Cavitation in pulmonary metastases is thought to be uncommon. To date, few cases of pulmonary metastases originating from ovarian cancer and showing cavitation have been reported. We report a patient with multiple cavitation in pulmonary metastases from ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. A 28-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital presenting with cough and fever. The patient had undergone right ovariectomy for ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma at the age of 23 years. Her chest radiograph on admission showed multiple cavities associated with infiltration in both lungs. Histological sections obtained by transbronchial lung biopsy revealed mucus-secreting adenocarcinoma, and a diagnosis of metastatic lung cancer from the ovary was made. Computed tomographic (CT) scans of the chest demonstrated various findings, including multiple thick-walled cavities, thin-walled cavities, air-space consolidations, ground glass opacities, and centrilobular nodular shadows formed by aspiration of the mucinous secretions. It is important to recognize that cavitation can occur in pulmonary metastases from ovarian cancer. PMID:11530393

  14. Activated T-cell Therapy, Low-Dose Aldesleukin, and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That is Stage III-IV, Refractory, or Recurrent

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-15

    Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  15. YY1 modulates taxane response in epithelial ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Noriomi; Huang, Zhiqing; Baba, Tsukasa; Lee, Paula S.; Barnett, Jason C.; Mori, Seiichi; Chang, Jeffrey T.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Gusberg, Alison H.; Whitaker, Regina S.; Gray, JoeW.; Fujii, Shingo; Berchuck, Andrew; Murphy, Susan K.

    2008-10-10

    The results of this study show that a high YY1 gene signature (characterized by coordinate elevated expression of transcription factor YY1 and putative YY1 target genes) within serous epithelial ovarian cancers is associated with enhanced response to taxane-based chemotherapy and improved survival. If confirmed in a prospective study, these results have important implications for the potential future use of individualized therapy in treating patients with ovarian cancer. Identification of the YY1 gene signature profile within a tumor prior to initiation of chemotherapy may provide valuable information about the anticipated response of these tumors to taxane-based drugs, leading to better informed decisions regarding chemotherapeutic choice. Survival of ovarian cancer patients is largely dictated by their response to chemotherapy, which depends on underlying molecular features of the malignancy. We previously identified YIN YANG 1 (YY1) as a gene whose expression is positively correlated with ovarian cancer survival. Herein we investigated the mechanistic basis of this association. Epigenetic and genetic characteristics of YY1 in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC) were analyzed along with YY1 mRNA and protein. Patterns of gene expression in primary SEOC and in the NCI60 database were investigated using computational methods. YY1 function and modulation of chemotherapeutic response in vitro was studied using siRNA knockdown. Microarray analysis showed strong positive correlation between expression of YY1 and genes with YY1 and transcription factor E2F binding motifs in SEOC and in the NCI60 cancer cell lines. Clustering of microarray data for these genes revealed that high YY1/E2F3 activity positively correlates with survival of patients treated with the microtubule stabilizing drug paclitaxel. Increased sensitivity to taxanes, but not to DNA crosslinking platinum agents, was also characteristic of NCI60 cancer cell lines with a high YY1/E2F signature. YY1

  16. A novel biomarker ARMc8 promotes the malignant progression of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guiyang; Yang, Dalei; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Xiupeng; Xu, Hongtao; Miao, Yuan; Wang, Enhua; Zhang, Yong

    2015-10-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy worldwide, and the survival rates have remained low in spite of medical advancements. More research is dedicated to the identification of novel biomarkers for this deadly disease. The association between ARMc8 and ovarian cancer remained unraveled. In this study, immunohistochemical staining was used to examine ARMc8 expression in 247 cases of ovarian cancer, 19 cases of borderline ovarian tumors, 41 cases of benign ovarian tumors, and 9 cases of normal ovarian tissues. It was shown that ARMc8 was predominantly located in the cytoplasm of tumor cells, and its expression was up-regulated in the ovarian cancer (61.9%) and the borderline ovarian tumor tissues (57.9%), in comparison with the benign ovarian tumors (12.2%; P < .05) and the normal ovarian tissues (11.1%; P < .05). In ovarian cancer, ARMc8 expression was closely related to International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages (P = .002), histology grade (P < .001), lymph node metastasis (P = .008), and poor prognosis (P < .001). Univariate and multivariate Cox analyses revealed that ARMc8 expression was an independent prognostic factor for ovarian cancer (P = .039 and P = .005). In addition, ARMc8 could promote the invasion and migration of ovarian cancer cells. Overexpressing ARMc8 enhanced the invasion and metastasis capacity of ARMc8-low Cavo-3 cells (P < .001), whereas interfering ARMc8 significantly reduced cell invasion and metastasis in ARMc8-high SK-OV-3 cells (P < .001). Furthermore, ARMc8 could up-regulate matrix metalloproteinase-7 and snail and down-regulate α-catenin, p120ctn, and E-cadherin. Collectively, ARMc8 may enhance the invasion and metastasis of ovarian cancer cells and likely to become a potential therapeutic target for ovarian cancer. PMID:26232863

  17. Low 25-OH vitamin D levels at time of diagnosis and recurrence of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Granato, Teresa; Manganaro, Lucia; Petri, Luca; Porpora, Maria Grazia; Viggiani, Valentina; Angeloni, Antonio; Anastasi, Emanuela

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between 25-OH vitamin D and ovarian cancer as a diagnostic marker or recurrence disease marker. We studied the following: (1) 61 women without gynecologic diseases, (2) 45 women affected by benign ovarian disease, (3) 46 women with recent diagnosis of ovarian cancer, (4) 26 follow-up women with recurrent ovarian cancer, and (5) 32 follow-up women with stable ovarian cancer. The 25-OH vitamin D was quantified with LUMIPULSE® G 25-OH vitamin D on LUMIPULSE® G 1200 (Fujirebio, Japan). As a threshold value, identified by ROC curve analysis, 20.2 ng/mL (sensitivity 73.3 %, specificity 84 %) was chosen corresponding to the limit between sufficient and insufficient 25-OH vitamin D according to the WHO. Low 25-OH vitamin D levels were observed in 26 % of women without gynecologic diseases, in 80 % of women with recent diagnosis of ovarian cancer and in 24 % women affected by benign ovarian diseases (p < 0.001). The follow-up study showed an insufficient level of 25-OH vitamin D in 73 % women with recurrent ovarian cancer and in 47 % women with stable ovarian cancer (p < 0.0003). This study showed that patients with ovarian cancer are often insufficient in 25-OH vitamin D compared to women with benign ovarian diseases. The women with recurrent ovarian cancer presented more often low levels compared to women with stable ovarian cancer. This study suggests that 25-OH vitamin D, due to its antiproliferative properties, can be a good marker for ovarian cancer also.

  18. MiR-197 induces Taxol resistance in human ovarian cancer cells by regulating NLK.

    PubMed

    Zou, Dongling; Wang, Dong; Li, Rong; Tang, Ying; Yuan, Li; Long, Xingtao; Zhou, Qi

    2015-09-01

    Chemotherapy is the preferred therapeutic approach for the therapy of advanced ovarian cancer, but 5-year survival rate remains low due to the development of drug resistance. Increasing evidence has documented that microRNAs (miRNAs) act important roles in drug resistance in a variety types of cancer. However, the roles of miRNA in regulating Taxol resistance in ovarian cancer and the detailed mechanism are less reported. We used Taqman probe stem loop real-time PCR to accurately measure the levels of miR-197 in normal ovarian cells, ovarian cancer cells, and Taxol-resistant ovarian cancer cells and found that miR-197 was significantly increased in Taxol-resistant ovarian cancer cells. Enforced expression of miR-197 can promote Taxol resistance, cell proliferation, and invasion of ovarian cancer cells. Meanwhile, repression of miR-197 in ovarian cancer cells can sensitize its response to Taxol and also induced attenuated cell proliferation and invasion ability. Furthermore, investigation of the detailed mechanism showed that the promotion of miR-197 on drug resistance in ovarian cancer cells was partially mediated by downregulating NLK, a negative regulator of WNT signaling pathway. Taken together, our work first demonstrated that miR-197 can confer drug resistance to Taxol, by regulating tumor suppressor, NLK expression in ovarian cancer cells.

  19. Research Progress of MicroRNA in Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ze-Hua; Xu, Cong-Jian

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This review aimed to update the progress of microRNA (miRNA) in early detection of ovarian cancer. We discussed the current clinical diagnosis methods and biomarkers of ovarian cancer, especially the methods of miRNA in early detection of ovarian cancer. Data Sources: We collected all relevant studies about miRNA and ovarian cancer in PubMed and CNKI from 1995 to 2015. Study Selection: We included all relevant studies concerning miRNA in early detection of ovarian cancer, and excluded the duplicated articles. Results: miRNAs play a key role in various biological processes of ovarian cancer, such as development, proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and metastasis, and these phenomena appear in the early-stage. Therefore, miRNA can be used as a new biomarker for early diagnosis of ovarian cancer, intervention on miRNA expression of known target genes, and potential target genes can achieve the effect of early prevention. With the development of nanoscience and technology, analysis methods of miRNA are also quickly developed, which may provide better characterization of early detection of ovarian cancer. Conclusions: In the near future, miRNA therapy could be a powerful tool for ovarian cancer prevention and treatment, and combining with the new analysis technology and new nanomaterials, point-of-care tests for miRNA with high throughput, high sensitivity, and strong specificity are developed to achieve the application of diagnostic kits in screening of early ovarian cancer. PMID:26668153

  20. [Dualistic classification of epithelial ovarian cancer: Is it clinically relevant?].

    PubMed

    Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan; Genestie, Catherine; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    Malignant epithelial tumors (carcinomas) are the most common ovarian cancers and the most lethal gynecological malignancies. Based on their heterogeneous morphology, a dualistic model of carcinogenesis was proposed in 2004. Type I carcinomas, composed of low grade serous, endometrioid, mucinous, clear cell carcinomas and malignant Brenner tumors, were distinct from type II carcinomas (high grade serous, undifferentiated carcinomas and carcinosarcomas). However, clinical studies failed to demonstrate the prognostic value of such a classification. The main reproach to this dualistic model was that it lumped together in type I tumors, heterogeneous lesions such as clear cell and mucinous carcinomas. Recent advances on molecular genetic alterations and precursor lesions favor the classification of ovarian carcinomas as five distinct diseases. The dualistic model of carcinogenesis in type I and II can finally be applied only to serous ovarian carcinomas (low grade and high grade).

  1. PIK3CA alterations in Middle Eastern ovarian cancers

    PubMed Central

    Abubaker, Jehad; Bavi, Prashant; Al-Haqawi, Wael; Jehan, Zeenath; Munkarah, Adnan; Uddin, Shahab; Al-Kuraya, Khawla S

    2009-01-01

    Background PI3K/AKTsignaling pathway plays an important role in cell growth, proliferation, and tumorgenesis of various malignancies. This signaling pathway has been shown to be frequently altered in several human cancers including ovarian cancers. However the role of this oncogenic signaling pathway has not been explored in the Middle Eastern epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Therefore, we investigated PI3K/AKT genetic alterations such as PIK3CA amplification, PIK3CA mutation, PTEN protein loss and their relationships with various clinicopathological characteristics in 156 EOCs. Results Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique and DNA sequencing were used to analyze PIK3CA amplification and mutation respectively. Expression of PIK3CA protein expression (p110 α), PTEN, p-AKT and Ki-67 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. PIK3CA amplification was seen in 54 of 152 (35.5%) EOC cases analyzed; PIK3CA gene mutations in 6/153 EOC (3.9%); KRAS mutations in 3/154 EOC (1.9%), BRAF mutations in 3/156 EOC (1.9%), p53 mutation in 50/154 EOC (32.5%), and loss of PTEN protein expression in 33/144 EOC (22.9%). p110 α overexpression was associated with increased phosphorylation of AKT-Ser 473 and with the proliferation marker Ki-67. Conclusion Our data showed mutual exclusivity between the molecular event of PIK3CA amplification and mutations in PIK3CA, KRAS, BRAF genes, which suggests that each of these alterations may individually be sufficient to drive ovarian tumor pathogenesis independently. High prevalence of genetic alterations in PI3K/AKT pathway in a Middle Eastern ovarian carcinoma provides genetic evidence supporting the notion that dysregulated PI3K/AKT pathways play an important role in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancers. PMID:19638206

  2. Contrary to Evidence, Some Doctors Recommend Ovarian Cancer Screening | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    One in three doctors believes that screening for ovarian cancer is effective, according to a recently published survey of practicing physicians, even though substantial evidence to the contrary exists. |

  3. Multispectral fluorescence imaging of human ovarian and Fallopian tube tissue for early stage cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Tyler; Baggett, Brenda; Rice, Photini; Watson, Jennifer; Orsinger, Gabe; Nymeyer, Ariel C.; Welge, Weston A.; Keenan, Molly; Saboda, Kathylynn; Roe, Denise J.; Hatch, Kenneth; Chambers, Setsuko; Black, John; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer

    2015-03-01

    With early detection, five year survival rates for ovarian cancer are over 90%, yet no effective early screening method exists. Emerging consensus suggests that perhaps over 50% of the most lethal form of the disease, high grade serous ovarian cancer, originates in the Fallopian tube. Cancer changes molecular concentrations of various endogenous fluorophores. Using specific excitation wavelengths and emissions bands on a Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging (MFI) system, spatial and spectral data over a wide field of view can be collected from endogenous fluorophores. Wavelength specific reflectance images provide additional information to normalize for tissue geometry and blood absorption. Ratiometric combination of the images may create high contrast between neighboring normal and abnormal tissue. Twenty-six women undergoing oophorectomy or debulking surgery consented the use of surgical discard tissue samples for MFI imaging. Forty-nine pieces of ovarian tissue and thirty-two pieces of Fallopian tube tissue were collected and imaged with excitation wavelengths between 280 nm and 550 nm. After imaging, each tissue sample was fixed, sectioned and HE stained for pathological evaluation. Comparison of mean intensity values between normal, benign, and cancerous tissue demonstrate a general trend of increased fluorescence of benign tissue and decreased fluorescence of cancerous tissue when compared to normal tissue. The predictive capabilities of the mean intensity measurements are tested using multinomial logistic regression and quadratic discriminant analysis. Adaption of the system for in vivo Fallopian tube and ovary endoscopic imaging is possible and is briefly described.

  4. Ascertainment of familial ovarian cancer in the Aberdeen Genetic Clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, H; Schofield, A; de Silva, D; Semper, J; Milner, B; Allan, L; Haites, N

    1996-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common malignancy in women in the UK. Patients with a family history including ovarian cancer make up nearly 15% of family cancer referrals to the Genetic Clinic in Aberdeen. To date, only one pedigree has been suitable for linkage studies, which has enabled us to target screening more accurately at those people at highest risk. Following discovery of a strong candidate for the BRCA1 gene, direct mutation testing may soon be possible. People who seek testing will require further counselling. Therefore we anticipate an increased demand on both clinical and laboratory resources, but more accurate ascertainment of high risk subjects should lead to more appropriate targeting of screening services. PMID:8728689

  5. Small molecule inhibitor of the bone morphogenetic protein pathway DMH1 reduces ovarian cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Hover, Laura D; Young, Christian D; Bhola, Neil E; Wilson, Andrew J; Khabele, Dineo; Hong, Charles C; Moses, Harold L; Owens, Philip

    2015-11-01

    The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway belonging to the Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGFβ) family of secreted cytokines/growth factors is an important regulator of cancer. BMP ligands have been shown to play both tumor suppressive and promoting roles in human cancers. We have found that BMP ligands are amplified in human ovarian cancers and that BMP receptor expression correlates with poor progression-free-survival (PFS). Furthermore, active BMP signaling has been observed in human ovarian cancer tissue. We also determined that ovarian cancer cell lines have active BMP signaling in a cell autonomous fashion. Inhibition of BMP signaling with a small molecule receptor kinase antagonist is effective at reducing ovarian tumor sphere growth. Furthermore, BMP inhibition can enhance sensitivity to Cisplatin treatment and regulates gene expression involved in platinum resistance in ovarian cancer. Overall, these studies suggest targeting the BMP pathway as a novel source to enhance chemo-sensitivity in ovarian cancer.

  6. Zinc is a potential therapeutic for chemoresistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bastow, Max; Kriedt, Christopher L; Baldassare, Joseph; Shah, Maulik; Klein, Claudette

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecological cancer. The high mortality rate reflets the lack of early diagnosis and limited treatment alternatives. We have observed a number of properties of zinc cytotoxicity that make it attractive from a therapeutic standpoint. Using SKOV3 and ES2 cells, ovarian cancer cell lines that demonstrate varied degrees of resistance to known therapeutics, we show that zinc killing is time and concentration dependent. Death is preceded by distinct changes in cell shape and size. The effects of zinc are additive with cisplatin or doxorubicin, whose morphological effects are distinct from those of zinc. Cytotoxicity of paclitaxel is minimal, making it difficult to determine additivity with zinc. Paclitaxel results in changes in cell shape and size similar to those of zinc but has different effects on cell cycle progression and cyclin expression. The data indicate that the means by which zinc kills ovarian cancer cells is distinct from currently used chemotherapeutics. Based on the properties reported here, zinc has the potential to be developed as either a primary treatment or as a second line of defense against cancers that have developed resistance to currently used chemotherapeutics. PMID:22070048

  7. Perineal talc use and ovarian cancer: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Muscat, Joshua E; Huncharek, Michael S

    2008-04-01

    Talc, like asbestos, is a silicate that has been studied in relation to cancer risk. Several studies conducted over the past 25 years found an association between perineal talc powders and ovarian cancer. The summary relative risk is about 1.3 (95% confidence intervals 1.2-1.5) and these data have been interpreted as supporting a causal role. In this review article, we discuss the chemical and morphological features of talc and asbestos, and explain why despite their similar chemical classification talc does not possess asbestos-like carcinogenic properties. The heterogeneity in the perineal dusting studies has raised important concerns over the validity of the exposure measurements, and the lack of a consistent dose-response effect limits making causal inferences. Perhaps more importantly, whereas it is unknown whether external talc dust enters the female reproductive tract, measures of internal talc exposure such as talc-dusted diaphragms and latex condoms show no relationship with ovarian cancer risk. In addition, the therapeutic use of high dose cosmetic grade talc for pleurodesis has not been shown to cause cancer in patients receiving these treatment modalities. Talc is not genotoxic. Mechanistic, pathology and animal model studies have not found evidence for a carcinogenic effect. In summary, these data collectively do not indicate that cosmetic talc causes ovarian cancer.

  8. Development of Nanoscale Approaches for Ovarian Cancer Therapeutics and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Engelberth, Sarah A.; Hempel, Nadine; Bergkvist, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest of all gynecological cancers and the fifth leading cause of death due to cancer in women. This is largely due to late-stage diagnosis, poor prognosis related to advanced-stage disease, and the high recurrence rate associated with development of chemoresistance. Survival statistics have not improved significantly over the last three decades, highlighting the fact that improved therapeutic strategies and early detection require substantial improvements. Here, we review and highlight nanotechnology-based approaches that seek to address this need. The success of Doxil, a PEGylated liposomal nanoencapsulation of doxorubicin, which was approved by the FDA for use on recurrent ovarian cancer, has paved the way for the current wave of nanoparticle formulations in drug discovery and clinical trials. We discuss and summarize new nanoformulations that are currently moving into clinical trials and highlight novel nanotherapeutic strategies that have shown promising results in preclinical in vivo studies. Further, the potential for nanomaterials in diagnostic imaging techniques and the ability to leverage nanotechnology for early detection of ovarian cancer are also discussed. PMID:25271436

  9. Identification of candidate epigenetic biomarkers for ovarian cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YI-WEN; JANSEN, RACHEL A.; FABBRI, ENRICA; POTTER, DUSTIN; LIYANARACHCHI, SANDYA; CHAN, MICHAEL W.Y.; LIU, JOSEPH C.; CRIJNS, ANNE P.G.; BROWN, ROBERT; NEPHEW, KENNETH P.; VAN DER ZEE, ATE G.J.; COHN, DAVID E.; YAN, PEARLLY S.; HUANG, TIM H.-M.; LIN, HUEY-JEN L.

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian cancer ranks the most lethal among gynecologic neoplasms in women. To develop potential bio-markers for diagnosis, we have identified five novel genes (CYP39A1, GTF2A1, FOXD4L4, EBP, and HAAO) that are hypermethylated in ovarian tumors, compared with the non-malignant normal ovarian surface epithelia, using the quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reactions. Interestingly enough, multivariate Cox regression analysis has identified hypermethylation of CYP39A1 correlated with an increase rate of relapsing (P=0.032, hazard ratio >1). Concordant hypermethylation in at least three loci was observed in 50 out of 55 (91%) of ovarian tumors examined. The test sensitivity and specificity were assessed to be 96 and 67% for CYP39A1; 95 and 88% for GTF2A1; 93 and 67% for FOXD4L4; 81 and 67% for EBP; 89 and 82% for HAAO, respectively. Our data have identified, for the first time, GTF2A1 alone, or GTF2A1 plus HAAO are excellent candidate biomarkers for detecting this disease. Moreover, the known functions of these gene products further implicate dys-regulated transcriptional control, cholesterol metabolism, or synthesis of quinolinic acids, may play important roles in attributing to ovarian neoplasm. Molecular therapies, by reversing the aberrant epigenomes using inhibitory agents or by abrogating the upstream signaling pathways that convey the epigenomic perturbations, may be developed into promising treatment regimens. PMID:19724865

  10. The use of HE4, CA125 and CA72-4 biomarkers for differential diagnosis between ovarian endometrioma and epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Endometriosis is frequently associated with high levels of CA125. This marker is therefore not useful for discriminating ovarian endometrioma from ovarian malignancy. The aim of this study was to establish a panel of complementary biomarkers that could be helpful in the differential diagnosis between ovarian endometriosis or other ovarian benign masses and ovarian cancer. Methods Blood samples from 50 healthy women, 17 patients with benign ovarian tumors, 57 patients with ovarian endometrioma and 39 patients with ovarian cancer were analyzed and serum values were measured for the following biomarkers: CA125, HE4 and CA72-4. Results Serum CA125 concentration was elevated in both patients with ovarian endometriosis and ovarian cancer but not in patients with other benign ovarian masses. HE4 was never increased in patients with endometriosis or benign masses whereas it was significantly higher in all patients with ovarian cancer (p < 0.05). A marked difference in CA72-4 values was observed between women with ovarian cancer (67%) and those with endometriosis (p < 0.05). Conclusions The results of the study suggest that HE4 and CA72-4 determination is the best approach to confirm the benign nature of ovarian endometrioma in women with high CA125 levels. PMID:23816286

  11. TRPM7 is required for ovarian cancer cell growth, migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Liao, Qian-jin; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Hui; Luo, Chen-hui; Tang, Jie; Wang, Ying; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Min; Zhao, Xue-heng; Zhang, Qiong-yu; Xiao, Ling

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Silence of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cells inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Silence of TRPM7 decreases phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 in ovarian cancer cells. • Silence of TRPM7 increases expression of filamentous actin and number of focal adhesions in ovarian cancer cells. - Abstract: Our previous study demonstrated that the melastatin-related transient receptor potential channel 7 (TRPM7) was highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and its overexpression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer patients. However, the function of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer is mostly unknown. In this study, we examined the roles of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We found that short hairpin RNA interference-mediated silence of TRPM7 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in multiple ovarian cancer cell lines. Mechanistic investigation revealed that silence of TRPM7 decreased phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 and increased filamentous actin and focal adhesion number in ovarian cancer cells. Thus, our results suggest that TRPM7 is required for proliferation, migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells through regulating multiple signaling transduction pathways and the formation of focal adhesions.

  12. Erlotinib Plus Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Ovarian Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-29

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  13. Predicting cancer outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Fernandes, M

    2005-03-24

    We read with interest the paper by Michiels et al on the prediction of cancer with microarrays and the commentary by Ioannidis listing the potential as well as the limitations of this approach (February 5, p 488 and 454). Cancer is a disease characterized by complex, heterogeneous mechanisms and studies to define factors that can direct new drug discovery and use should be encouraged. However, this is easier said than done. Casti teaches that a better understanding does not necessarily extrapolate to better prediction, and that useful prediction is possible without complete understanding (1). To attempt both, explanation and prediction, in a single nonmathematical construct, is a tall order (Figure 1).

  14. OVSCORE - a validated score to identify ovarian cancer patients not suitable for primary surgery

    PubMed Central

    DORN, JULIA; BRONGER, HOLGER; KATES, RONALD; SLOTTA-HUSPENINA, JULIA; SCHMALFELDT, BARBARA; KIECHLE, MARION; DIAMANDIS, ELEFTHERIOS P.; SOOSAIPILLAI, ANTONINUS; SCHMITT, MANFRED; HARBECK, NADIA

    2015-01-01

    Following primary debulking surgery, the presence of a residual tumor mass is one of the most important prognostic factors in ovarian cancer. In a previous study, we established the OVSCORE, an algorithm to predict surgical outcome, based on the clinical factors of nuclear grading and ascitic fluid volume, plus the cancer biomarkers, kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs), KLK6 and KLK13. In the present study, OVSCORE performance was tested in an independent ovarian cancer patient cohort consisting of 87 patients. The impact of KLKs, KLK5, 6, 7 and 13 and other clinical factors on patient prognosis and outcome was also evaluated. The OVSCORE proved to be a strong and statistically significant predictor of surgical success in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC AUC, 0.777), as well as positive and negative predictive value in this independent study group. KLK6 and 13 individually did not show clinical relevance in this cohort, but two other KLKs, KLK5 and KLK7, were associated with advanced FIGO stage, higher nuclear grade and positive lymph node status. In the multivariate Cox regression analysis for overall survival (OS), KLK7 had a protective impact on OS. This study confirms the role of KLKs in ovarian cancer for surgical success and survival, and validates the novel OVSCORE algorithm in an independent collective. As a key clinical application, the OVSCORE could aid gynecological oncologists in identifying those ovarian cancer patients unlikely to benefit from radical surgery who could be candidates for alternative therapeutic approaches. PMID:25436002

  15. Diet and Physical Activity Change or Usual Care in Improving Progression-Free Survival in Patients With Previously Treated Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  16. Psychological distress related to BRCA testing in ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bjørnslett, Merete; Dahl, Alv A; Sørebø, Øystein; Dørum, Anne

    2015-12-01

    An increasing demand for genetic testing has moved the procedure from highly selected at-risk individuals, now also including cancer patients for treatment associated testing. The heritable fraction of ovarian cancer is more than 10%, and our department has offered BRCA testing to such patients irrespective of family history since 2002. This study examined potential psychosocial distress associated with this procedure using The Multidimensional Impact of Cancer Risk Assessment (MICRA) questionnaire and other patient-rated generic distress instruments. Patients were divided into four groups according to cancer risk: mutation carriers, own history of breast cancer and ovarian cancer, family history of breast cancer and/or ovarian cancer, and patients without family history. In a postal survey, 354 patients responded. Good acceptance of the MICRA was observed, and previously described good psychometric properties were confirmed. A significant association between MICRA total score and receiving a positive BRCA test result was found. No significant between-group differences were observed with generic distress instruments. Time since cancer diagnosis, test result, and survey showed no significant associations with MICRA scores. Internal consistencies of instruments were adequate. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses showed adequate fit indices for a three factor solution of the MICRA, but further refinement of the items should be considered. In conclusion, the specific types of worry and distress most relevant to receiving genetic testing irrespective of family history were not captured by the generic distress instruments. The MICRA was supported as a useful tool for detection of mental distress related to genetic testing and risk evaluation.

  17. In silico analyses identify gene-sets, associated with clinical outcome in ovarian cancer: role of mitotic kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ocaña, Alberto; Pérez-Peña, Javier; Alcaraz-Sanabria, Ana; Sánchez-Corrales, Verónica; Nieto-Jiménez, Cristina; Templeton, Arnoud J.; Seruga, Bostjan; Pandiella, Atanasio; Amir, Eitan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Accurate assessment of prognosis in early stage ovarian cancer is challenging resulting in suboptimal selection of patients for adjuvant therapy. The identification of predictive markers for cytotoxic chemotherapy is therefore highly desirable. Protein kinases are important components in oncogenic transformation and those relating to cell cycle and mitosis control may allow for identification of high-risk early stage ovarian tumors. Methods Genes with differential expression in ovarian surface epithelia (OSE) and ovarian cancer epithelial cells (CEPIs) were identified from public datasets and analyzed with dChip software. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) associated with these genes in stage I/II and late stage ovarian cancer was explored using the Kaplan Meier Plotter online tool. Results Of 2925 transcripts associated with modified expression in CEPIs compared to OSE, 66 genes coded for upregulated protein kinases. Expression of 9 of these genes (CDC28, CHK1, NIMA, Aurora kinase A, Aurora kinase B, BUB1, BUB1βB, CDKN2A and TTK) was associated with worse PFS (HR:3.40, log rank p<0.001). The combined analyses of CHK1, CDKN2A, AURKA, AURKB, TTK and NEK2 showed the highest magnitude of association with PFS (HR:4.62, log rank p<0.001). Expression of AURKB predicted detrimental OS in stage I/II ovarian cancer better than all other combinations Conclusion Genes linked to cell cycle control are associated with worse outcome in early stage ovarian cancer. Incorporation of these biomarkers in clinical studies may help in the identification of patients at high risk of relapse for whom optimizing adjuvant therapeutic strategies is needed. PMID:26992217

  18. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  19. A novel protease homolog differentially expressed in breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Anisowicz, A.; Sotiropoulou, G.; Stenman, G.; Mok, S. C.; Sager, R.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Using differential display (DD), we discovered a new member of the serine protease family of protein-cleaving enzymes, named protease M. The gene is most closely related by sequence to the kallikreins, to prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and to trypsin. The diagnostic use of PSA in prostate cancer suggested that a related molecule might be a predictor for breast or ovarian cancer. This, in turn, led to studies designed to characterize the protein and to screen for its expression in cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The isolation of protease M by DD, the cloning and sequencing of the cDNA, and the comparison of the predicted protein structure with related proteins are described, as are methods to produce recombinant proteins and polyclonal antibody preparations. Protease M expression was examined in mammary, prostate, and ovarian cancer, as well as normal, cells and tissues. Stable transfectants expressing the protease M gene were produced in mammary carcinoma cells. RESULTS: Protease M was localized by fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis to chromosome 19q13.3, in a region to which other kallikreins and PSA also map. The gene is expressed in the primary mammary carcinoma lines tested but not in the corresponding cell lines of metastatic origin. It is strongly expressed in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines. The enzyme activity could not be established, because of difficulties in producing sufficient recombinant protein, a common problem with proteases. Transfectants were selected that overexpress the mRNA, but the protein levels remained very low. CONCLUSIONS: Protease M expression (mRNA) may be a useful marker in the detection of primary mammary carcinomas, as well as primary ovarian cancers. Other medical applications are also likely, based on sequence relatedness to trypsin and PSA. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 PMID:8898378

  20. MicroRNA Expression and Identification of Putative miRNA Targets in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dahiya, Neetu; Sherman-Baust, Cheryl A.; Wang, Tian-Li; Davidson, Ben; Shih, Ie-Ming; Zhang, Yongqing; Wood, William; Becker, Kevin G.; Morin, Patrice J.

    2008-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNAs that control gene expression by targeting mRNAs and triggering either translation repression or RNA degradation. Emerging evidence suggests the potential involvement of altered regulation of miRNA in the pathogenesis of cancers, and these genes are thought to function as both tumor suppressors and oncogenes. Methodology/Principal Findings Using microRNA microarrays, we identify several miRNAs aberrantly expressed in human ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines. miR-221 stands out as a highly elevated miRNA in ovarian cancer, while miR-21 and several members of the let-7 family are found downregulated. Public databases were used to reveal potential targets for the highly differentially expressed miRNAs. In order to experimentally identify transcripts whose stability may be affected by the differentially expressed miRNAs, we transfected precursor miRNAs into human cancer cell lines and used oligonucleotide microarrays to examine changes in the mRNA levels. Interestingly, there was little overlap between the predicted and the experimental targets or pathways, or between experimental targets/pathways obtained using different cell lines, highlighting the complexity of miRNA target selection. Conclusion/Significance Our results identify several differentially expressed miRNAs in ovarian cancer and identify potential target transcripts that may be regulated by these miRNAs. These miRNAs and their targets may have important roles in the initiation and development of ovarian cancer. PMID:18560586

  1. Dasatinib enhances antitumor activity of paclitaxel in ovarian cancer through Src signaling

    PubMed Central

    XIAO, JUAN; XU, MANMAN; HOU, TENG; HUANG, YONGWEN; YANG, CHENLU; LI, JUNDONG

    2015-01-01

    Src family tyrosine kinase (SFK) activation is associated with ovarian cancer progression. Therefore, SFKs are targets for the development of potential treatments of ovarian cancer. Dasatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets SFK activity, and is used for the treatment of B cell and Abelson lymphomas. At the present time, the potential effect of dasatinib on ovarian cancer is not clear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antitumor activity of dasatinib, alone and in combination with paclitaxel, in ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, the expression of Src and phospho-Src-Y416 (p-Src) was measured in six ovarian cancer cell lines using western blotting and immunohistochemistry. In addition, cell viability and apoptosis were measured using an MTT assay and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate staining. An ovarian cancer murine xenograft model was established, in order to evaluate the antitumor effect of dasatinib alone and in combination with paclitaxel in ovarian cancer. High levels of p-Src protein expression were observed in all cell lines, as compared with healthy cells, which indicated activation of the Src signaling pathway. p-Src expression increased in ovarian cancer cells following paclitaxel treatment. Dasatinib treatment demonstrated anti-ovarian cancer properties, by downregulating p-Src expression and by inducing cancer cell apoptosis. Combined treatment with dasatinib and paclitaxel markedly inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells, compared with control cells. Combined dasatinib and paclitaxel treatment exhibited antitumor activities in vivo and in vitro (combination indices, 0.25–0.93 and 0.31–0.75; and tumor growth inhibitory rates, 76.7% and 58.5%, in A2780 and HO8910 cell lines, respectively), compared with paclitaxel treatment alone. Dasatinib monotherapy demonstrated anti-ovarian cancer activities. The effects of dasatinib and paclitaxel treatments on ovarian

  2. Carboplatin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Mifepristone in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer or Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-28

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  3. Genital talc exposure and risk of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Cramer, D W; Liberman, R F; Titus-Ernstoff, L; Welch, W R; Greenberg, E R; Baron, J A; Harlow, B L

    1999-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies have suggested an increased risk for ovarian cancer associated with the use of talcum powder in genital hygiene, but the biologic credibility of the association has been questioned. We conducted a population-based case-control study in eastern Massachusetts and New Hampshire involving 563 women with newly diagnosed epithelial ovarian cancer and 523 control women selected either by random digit dialing or through lists of residents. Use of body powders was assessed through personal interview and the exposure odds ratio (OR) for the use of talc in genital hygiene was calculated. Cases were more likely than controls (45% vs. 36%) to have used talc as a body powder in some manner, and the excess was confined to patients who used talc on the perineum directly or as a dusting powder to underwear or sanitary napkins. Relative to women who never used body powder or used it only in non-genital areas, the OR (and 95% confidence interval) associated with genital exposure to talc was 1.60 (1.18 and 2. 15) after adjustment for age, study location, parity, oral contraceptive use, body mass index and family history of breast or ovarian cancer. Exposure prior to rather than after a first livebirth appeared to be more harmful, and the association was most apparent for women with invasive serous cancers and least apparent for those with mucinous tumors. We conclude that there is a significant association between the use of talc in genital hygiene and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer that, when viewed in perspective of published data on this association, warrants more formal public health warnings.

  4. Dasatinib (BMS-35482) has synergistic activity with paclitaxel and carboplatin in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Deanna; Ayeni, Tina A.; Rubatt, Jennifer M.; Adams, David J.; Grace, Lisa; Starr, Mark D.; Barry, William T; Berchuck, Andrew; Murphy, Susan K.; Secord, Angeles Alvarez

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To explore the activity of dasatinib alone and in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin in ovarian cancer cells and to determine if dasatinib activity can be predicted based on evaluation of the SRC pathway. Experimental Design Microarray analysis was performed for IGROV1, OVCAR3, A2780 and SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells and the status of the genomic SRC signature pathway was determined. Cells were treated with carboplatin, paclitaxel and dasatinib individually and in combination. Pre- and post-treatment phospho-SRC (pSRC) and SRC protein expression was determined. Dose-response curves were constructed, and drug interaction was assessed by the Combination Index (CI) method. Results SRC protein expression levels reflected the SRC pathway genomic signature in the cell lines with the lowest (SKOV3) and highest (IGROV1) pathway expression, but not in those with intermediate expression (OVCAR3, A2780). Dasatinib treatment caused loss of pSRC in all cell lines, with 50% growth inhibition for IGROV1 at 70nM, OVCAR3 at 34nM, A2780 at 4.1μM and SKOV3 at 530nM. Dasatinib combined with cytotoxics yielded a synergistic effect (CI=0.46 to 0.79) in all cell lines except SKOV3. Conclusion Dasatinib in combination with standard chemotherapeutic agents appears to interact in a synergistic manner in some ovarian cancer cell lines. Further research is needed to evaluate tumor cell characteristics which predict response to dasatinib. PMID:21208651

  5. Sirolimus and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-25

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  6. Minireview: Human Ovarian Cancer: Biology, Current Management, and Paths to Personalizing Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    More than 90% of ovarian cancers have been thought to arise from epithelial cells that cover the ovarian surface or, more frequently, line subserosal cysts. Recent studies suggest that histologically similar cancers can arise from the fimbriae of Fallopian tubes and from deposits of endometriosis. Different histotypes are observed that resemble epithelial cells from the normal Fallopian tube (serous), endometrium (endometrioid), cervical glands (mucinous), and vaginal rests (clear cell) and that share expression of relevant HOX genes which drive normal gynecological differentiation. Two groups of epithelial ovarian cancers have been distinguished: type I low-grade cancers that present in early stage, grow slowly, and resist conventional chemotherapy but may respond to hormonal manipulation; and type II high-grade cancers that are generally diagnosed in advanced stage and grow aggressively but respond to chemotherapy. Type I cancers have wild-type p53 and BRCA1/2, but have frequent mutations of Ras and Raf as well as expression of IGFR and activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. Virtually all type II cancers have mutations of p53, and almost half have mutation or dysfunction of BRCA1/2, but other mutations are rare, and oncogenesis appears to be driven by amplification of several growth-regulatory genes that activate the Ras/MAPK and PI3K pathways. Cytoreductive surgery and combination chemotherapy with platinum compounds and taxanes have improved 5-yr survival, but less than 40% of all stages can be cured. Novel therapies are being developed that target high-grade serous cancer cells with PI3Kness or BRCAness as well as the tumor vasculature. Both in silico and animal models are needed that more closely resemble type I and type II cancers to facilitate the identification of novel targets and to predict response to combinations of new agents. PMID:22416079

  7. The immunobiology and immunotherapy of ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bookman, M.A.; Bast, R.C. Jr. )

    1991-06-01

    Small volume residual peritoneal disease in patients undergoing therapy for ovarian carcinoma remains an attractive, but elusive, target for immunobiological therapy. Hypothetical advantages and disadvantages of regional peritoneal therapy are being better defined through increased clinical experience and more sophisticated animal models. Developments in cytokine biology, adoptive cellular therapy, monoclonal antibody conjugation, and molecular biology continue to provide an exciting, and nearly overwhelming, array of reagents for clinical evaluation. Ongoing and anticipated investigational trials should provide intriguing data in years to follow.198 references.

  8. Ovarian Cancer During Pregnancy: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hummeida, Moawia E; Hamad, Kamal; Gadir, Abdel Fatah Abdel; Ali, AbdelAziem A

    2015-04-24

    Ovarian cancer during pregnancy is a rare event. Little is known about the treatment of this condition due to lack of prospective randomized trials and cohort studies. In this paper the authors reported a rare case of small cells ovarian cancer, diagnosed at 16 weeks of gestation, treated with conservative surgery at 18 weeks and chemotherapy. At week 38, the patient underwent caesarean section and delivered a healthy baby girl. Staging surgery was then carried out followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. Thus the findings from this case concluded that prognosis and quality of the patient's life should be a priority, chemotherapy during the second trimester seems to be safe however, potential risks of this interventions still has to be considered.

  9. Epidemiology and etiology of ovarian cancer: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Heintz, A.P.; Hacker, N.F.; Lagasse, L.D.

    1985-07-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most frequent cause of death from gynecologic malignancies in the western world. Much effort has been put into attempts to correlate differences in incidence rates with environmental, endocrinologic, and genetic factors. A review of the literature reveals that there is currently no evidence to incriminate any single etiologic factor for this group of tumors. There is growing evidence of familial predisposition in a small group of patients and of a relationship with reproductive history. If current knowledge of the epidemiology of ovarian cancer is to be translated into disease prevention, more attention should be paid to women at risk because of their family history, and more awareness should be made of the protective effect of oral contraceptives. 79 references.

  10. New developments with carboplatin in the treatment of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ozols, R F

    1992-02-01

    On the basis of prospective randomized comparisons, carboplatin now can be considered to have replaced cisplatin as the induction chemotherapy of choice for patients with advanced ovarian cancer. While its equal efficacy and lesser toxicity are encouraging features of carboplatin therapy, the primary goal of chemotherapy for ovarian cancer remains to improve cure rates. It is in this regard that new experimental studies with carboplatin have the potential for improving survival. In particular, studies of dose intensity of platinum compounds are now possible with high-dose carboplatin together with autologous bone marrow transplantation and cytokines. The dose-limiting toxicity of carboplatin is myelosuppression, particularly thrombocytopenia. It is hoped that the new cytokine, interleukin-3, will be useful in reversing this particular toxicity and permitting further dose escalation. Additional studies are in progress to evaluate the benefits of combining carboplatin and cisplatin in an effort to maximize dose intensity and avoid overlapping toxicities.

  11. [Ultrasound semiotics in recurrent ovarian cancer after optimal cytoreductive surgery].

    PubMed

    Baklanova, N S; Kolomiets, L A; Frolova, I G; Viatkina, N V; Krasil'nikov, S É

    2014-01-01

    Features of ultrasound picture of morphologically verified recurrence of ovarian cancer in 21 patients are presented, who received combined treatment including cytoreductive surgery in the form of hysterectomy with oophorectomy, resection of the greater omentum and 6 courses of chemotherapy CAP for ovarian cancer stage III (FIGO). In all patients cytoreductive surgery was optimal--without residual tumor. Recurrence of the disease was detected in 12-48 months in 80.9% of the cases. Three variants of recurrence was revealed by ultrasonography: isolated peritoneal dissemination, in 14.2% of the cases, which was mainly detected during the first 12 months; single entities in the projection of the small pelvis (61.9%) and mixed form (local lesions of small pelvis and peritoneal dissemination) in 23.8% of the cases. PMID:25033684

  12. Protective Effect of Progesterone during Pregnancy against Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyung Hee; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Kim, Hee Seung; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Song, Yong Sang

    2013-01-01

    There have been several epidemiologic studies supporting the protective role of pregnancy, although the mechanism is not clear. High level of progesterone, which is crucial in maintaining pregnancy, has been supposed to be one of the causative factors. Progesterone is produced at the corpus luteum in the early pregnancy and the placenta in the late pregnancy period. In several experimental studies, progesterone was reported to induce apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells through intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. In addition, progesterone has been shown to exert its anticancer effect through genomic and non-genomic action. The objective of this review is to discuss the protective mechanism of pregnancy against ovarian cancer focusing on the steroid hormone, progesterone. PMID:25337537

  13. Dermatomyositis as a paraneoplastic phenomenon in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Ilyas; Barton, Desmond

    2016-01-01

    A 60-year-old woman diagnosed with papillary serous ovarian cancer had Klean-Prep and MRI contrast preoperatively. Afterwards, she developed swelling and an urticarial rash around her eye as she proceeded to have planned debulking surgery. Postoperatively the swelling and rash had spread over her face, neck, back and chest. Dermatology advised a possible allergy to Klean-Prep and MRI contrast. Subsequently over the next few months, the patient became severely debilitated from proximal myopathy of the upper and lower limbs, suffered severe pain restricting mobility and small bowel obstruction. Medical oncologist reviewed the patient, clinically diagnosed dermatomyositis and initiated treatment with high-dose intravenous steroids, resulting in remission of the patient's condition. The main purpose of this study is to describe the severity, diagnostic challenges and underline the clinical significance of dermatomyositis manifestations as a paraneoplastic effect in patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:27402586

  14. [Ultrasound semiotics in recurrent ovarian cancer after optimal cytoreductive surgery].

    PubMed

    Baklanova, N S; Kolomiets, L A; Frolova, I G; Viatkina, N V; Krasil'nikov, S É

    2014-01-01

    Features of ultrasound picture of morphologically verified recurrence of ovarian cancer in 21 patients are presented, who received combined treatment including cytoreductive surgery in the form of hysterectomy with oophorectomy, resection of the greater omentum and 6 courses of chemotherapy CAP for ovarian cancer stage III (FIGO). In all patients cytoreductive surgery was optimal--without residual tumor. Recurrence of the disease was detected in 12-48 months in 80.9% of the cases. Three variants of recurrence was revealed by ultrasonography: isolated peritoneal dissemination, in 14.2% of the cases, which was mainly detected during the first 12 months; single entities in the projection of the small pelvis (61.9%) and mixed form (local lesions of small pelvis and peritoneal dissemination) in 23.8% of the cases.

  15. Methylseleninic acid sensitizes Notch3-activated OVCA429 ovarian cancer cells to carboplatin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ovarian cancer, the deadliest of gynecologic cancers, is usually diagnosed at advanced stage due to invalidated screening test and non-specific symptoms presented. Although carboplatin has been popular for treating ovarian cancer for decades, patients eventually develop resistance to this platinum-c...

  16. Aberrant Lipid Metabolism: An Emerging Diagnostic and Therapeutic Target in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pyragius, Carmen E.; Fuller, Maria; Ricciardelli, Carmela; Oehler, Martin K.

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer remains the most lethal gynaecological cancer. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is of critical importance to develop early detection tests and identify new therapeutic targets that would increase survival. Cancer cells depend on de novo lipid synthesis for the generation of fatty acids to meet the energy requirements for increased tumour growth. There is increasing evidence that lipid metabolism is deregulated in cancers, including ovarian cancer. The increased expression and activity of lipogenic enzymes is largely responsible for increased lipid synthesis, which is regulated by metabolic and oncogenic signalling pathways. This article reviews the latest knowledge on lipid metabolism and the alterations in the expression of lipogenic enzymes and downstream signalling pathways in ovarian cancer. Current developments for exploiting lipids as biomarkers for the detection of early stage ovarian cancer and therapeutic targets are discussed. Current research targeting lipogenic enzymes and lipids to increase the cytotoxicity of chemotherapy drugs is also highlighted. PMID:23574936

  17. Predictive and Prognostic Factors in Ovarian and Uterine Carcinosarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Cicin, İrfan; Özatlı, Tahsin; Türkmen, Esma; Özturk, Türkan; Özçelik, Melike; Çabuk, Devrim; Gökdurnalı, Ayşe; Balvan, Özlem; Yıldız, Yaşar; Şeker, Metin; Özdemir, Nuriye; Yapar, Burcu; Tanrıverdi, Özgür; Günaydin, Yusuf; Menekşe, Serkan; Öksüzoğlu, Berna; Aksoy, Asude; Erdogan, Bülent; Bekir Hacıoglu, M.; Arpaci, Erkan; Sevinç, Alper

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prognostic factors and the standard treatment approach for gynaecological carcinosarcomas have not yet been clearly defined. Although carcinosarcomas are more aggressive than pure epithelial tumours, they are treated similarly. Serous/clear cell and endometrioid components may be predictive factors for the efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) or radiotherapy (RT) or RT in patients with uterine and ovarian carcinosarcomas. Heterologous carcinosarcomas may benefit more from adjuvant CT. Aims: We aimed to define the prognostic and predictive factors associated with treatment options in ovarian (OCS) and uterine carcinosarcoma (UCS). Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with ovarian and uterine carcinosarcoma from 2000 to 2013, and 127 women were included in this study (24 ovarian and 103 uterine). Patients admitted to seventeen oncology centres in Turkey between 2000 and December 2013 with a histologically proven diagnosis of uterine carcinosarcoma with FIGO 2009 stage I–III and patients with sufficient data obtained from well-kept medical records were included in this study. Stage IV tumours were excluded. The patient records were retrospectively reviewed. Data from 104 patients were evaluated for this study. Results: Age (≥70 years) was a poor prognostic factor for UCS (p=0.036). Pelvic±para aortic lymph node dissection did not affect overall survival (OS) (p=0.35). Macroscopic residual disease was related with OS (p<0.01). The median OS was significantly longer in stage I–II patients than stage III patients (p=0.03). Adjuvant treatment improved OS (p=0.013). Adjuvant radiotherapy tended to increase the median OS (p=0.075). However, this tendency was observed in UCS (p=0.08) rather than OCS (p=0.6).Adjuvant chemotherapy had no effect on OS (p=0.15).Adjuvant radiotherapy significantly prolonged the median OS in patients with endometrioid component (p=0.034). A

  18. Optimizing Molecular-Targeted Therapies in Ovarian Cancer: The Renewed Surge of Interest in Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers and Cell Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hiss, Donavon

    2012-01-01

    The hallmarks of ovarian cancer encompass the development of resistance, disease recurrence and poor prognosis. Ovarian cancer cells express gene signatures which pose significant challenges for cancer drug development, therapeutics, prevention and management. Despite enhancements in contemporary tumor debulking surgery, tentative combination regimens and abdominal radiation which can achieve beneficial response rates, the majority of ovarian cancer patients not only experience adverse effects, but also eventually relapse. Therefore, additional therapeutic possibilities need to be explored to minimize adverse events and prolong progression-free and overall response rates in ovarian cancer patients. Currently, a revival in cancer drug discovery is devoted to identifying diagnostic and prognostic ovarian cancer biomarkers. However, the sensitivity and reliability of such biomarkers may be complicated by mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes, diverse genetic risk factors, unidentified initiation and progression elements, molecular tumor heterogeneity and disease staging. There is thus a dire need to expand existing ovarian cancer therapies with broad-spectrum and individualized molecular targeted approaches. The aim of this review is to profile recent developments in our understanding of the interrelationships among selected ovarian tumor biomarkers, heterogeneous expression signatures and related molecular signal transduction pathways, and their translation into more efficacious targeted treatment rationales. PMID:22481932

  19. Vaccine Therapy and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Breast or Stage II-IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  20. Effect of taxol on the expression of FoxM1 ovarian cancer-associated gene

    PubMed Central

    LIU, ZENG; XIAO, YU; NING, SIQING; LI, ZHAO YUAN; ZHU, YUANYUAN; HU, GANG

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of ovarian cancer in women has been on the increase in recent years. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of taxol on the expression of ovarian cancer-associated gene forkhead box transcription factor M1 (FoxM1) and its therapeutic effects for ovarian cancer. The expression of FoxM1 gene was examined in patients with or without ovarian cancer. RNA and protein levels of FoxM1 gene of ovarian cancer patients were detected at different time periods (1, 3, 6, 8, 12 and 24 months) after treatment with taxol. The results showed that the mRNA level of FoxM1 gene in patients with ovarian cancer was significantly higher than that in normal women (P<0.05). With time and progression of the disease, the expression of FoxM1 gene significantly increased in the patients not being administered taxol, whereas the expression of FoxM1 in the patients administered taxol was significantly lower comparatively (P<0.05). In conclusion, an asssociation was identified between the FoxM1 gene and ovarian cancer. The FoxM1 gene therefore promotes the generation and deterioration of ovarian cancer, whereas taxol reduces it. These findings provide a certain theoretical basis for the later treatment of ovarian cancer disease. PMID:27313736

  1. Pentamethylpyrromethene boron difluoride complexes in human ovarian cancer photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Lee R.; Chaudhuri, Aulena; Gillen, Laura E.; Boyer, Joseph H.; Wolford, Lionel T.

    1990-07-01

    Quasiaromatic heterocycles (QAM) such as substituted 1 , 3 , 5 , 7 , 8-pentamethylpyrromethene boron difluorides (PMP-BF2) and - (dimethoxyphosphinylmethyl, methyl) bimane have been evaluated for their abilities to produce cellular toxicities when used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) for ovarian cancer. The most active QAH tested to date has been the disodiuxn salt of PMP-2,6-disulfonate--BF2 (PMPDS-BF2). Human ovarian cancer cells from fifteen different patients have been grown in culture. Cells were obtained from biopsy material and grown in RPMI medium with 10% FBA plus penicillin and streptomycin. Cells were harvested and as single cell suspensions exposed to PMP-BF2 complexes or bimanes in concentrations of 0.004-0.4 ug/106 cells/ml of medium. Initially the cells were exposed to the chemicals for 30 minutes in a 5% CO2 incubator (37°C) with gentle shaking. The cells were washed with plain RPMI medium, then resuspended in the enriched RPMI medium and exposed to a sunlamp for 10-20 minutes. Cells were then allowed to grow in an soft agar culture media at 37°C (5% C02) for 14 days. When compared to controls (only light or only chemicals) there was 100% inhibition of all cellular growth for PMPDSBF2 at the 0.4 ug/mi concentrations. There was variations in concentrations of the chemical needed to produce 100% inhibition when the 15 different ovarian cancer cell specimens were compared at all concentrations. PMP-BF2 complexes are characterized by extremely high extinction coefficients, superior laser activity and little if any triplet-triplet absorption. The biamanes share these properties however are less active in ovarian cancer cell The lasing properties of PMP-BF2, and bimanes will be compared to their PDT effectiveness.

  2. Laparoscopic optical coherence tomography imaging of human ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Lida P.; Bonnema, Garret T.; Schmidt, Kathy; Winkler, Amy M.; Korde, Vrushali; Hatch, Kenneth D.; Davis, John R.; Brewer, Molly A.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Ovarian cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death among women in the US largely due to late detection secondary to unreliable symptomology and screening tools without adequate resolution. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a recently emerging imaging modality with promise in ovarian cancer diagnostics, providing non-destructive subsurface imaging at imaging depths up to 2 mm with near-histological grade resolution (10–20 μm). In this study, we developed the first ever laparoscopic OCT (LOCT) device, evaluated the safety and feasibility of LOCT, and characterized the microstructural features of human ovaries in vivo. Methods A custom LOCT device was fabricated specifically for laparoscopic imaging of the ovaries in patients undergoing oophorectomy. OCT images were compared with histopathology to identify preliminary architectural imaging features of normal and pathologic ovarian tissue. Results Thirty ovaries in 17 primarily peri or post-menopausal women were successfully imaged with LOCT: 16 normal, 5 endometriosis, 3 serous cystadenoma, and 4 adenocarcinoma. Preliminary imaging features developed for each category reveal qualitative differences in the homogeneous character of normal post-menopausal ovary, the ability to image small subsurface inclusion cysts, and distinguishable features for endometriosis, cystadenoma, and adenocarcinoma. Conclusions We present the development and successful implementation of the first laparoscopic OCT probe. Comparison of OCT images and corresponding histopathology allowed for the description of preliminary microstructural features for normal ovary, endometriosis, and benign and malignant surface epithelial neoplasms. These results support the potential of OCT both as a diagnostic tool and imaging modality for further evaluation of ovarian cancer pathogenesis. PMID:19481241

  3. First experiences with intraperitoneal chemotherapy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Gitsch, E; Sevelda, P; Schmidl, S; Salzer, H

    1990-01-01

    The Authors report their experience with intraperitoneal chemotherapy in post surgical management of ovarian cancer. 24 patients were evaluable for the study and the results indicate that in patients with bulky disease the complication rate was high and the therapeutical outcome very poor. Only in patients with microscopic disease and residual tumor smaller than 2 cm seemed to benefit from intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Despite pharmacological advantages, Mitoxantrone causes local discomfort up to peritonitis. PMID:2347331

  4. EF5 in Finding Oxygen in Tumor Cells of Patients Who Are Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Cervical, Endometrial, or Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage I Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  5. Prognostic Significance and Predictors of the Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kristina A.; Labidi-Galy, S. Intidhar; Terry, Kathryn L.; Vitonis, Allison F.; Welch, William R.; Goodman, Annekathryn; Cramer, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) from peripheral blood, a general measure of inflammation, in ovarian cancer. Methods White cell counts and CA125 levels before treatment, tumor features, and questionnaire data on 519 women with ovarian cancer at two Boston hospitals were recorded. Counts were log-transformed and effects on these by tumor features and epidemiologic variables assessed by analysis of variance and generalized linear models. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess effects on overall survival. Results Greater NLR was associated with higher tumor stage and grade, presence of ascites, and bilateral disease and correlated with risk factors including Jewish ethnicity, taller height, more ovulatory cycles, and family history of cancer in premenopausal women and talc use in all women. CA125 was positively correlated with neutrophil count, monocyte count, and NLR and inversely correlated with lymphocyte count. In a multivariate adjusted analysis, high NLR predicted poorer survival and high lymphocyte count better survival. Conclusion An elevated NLR before treatment signals more aggressive disease and correlates with risk factors for ovarian cancer. CA125 directly correlates with neutrophils which may reflect secretion of both CA125 and neutrophilic growth factors by the tumor. CA125 inversely correlates with lymphocytes which may reflect the ability of some neutrophilic factors to induce lymphopenia and/or binding of CA125 to lymphocytes removing CA125 from the serum pool. Links between NLR, CA125, and epidemiologic factors may provide new clues about the pathogenesis and progression of ovarian cancer. PMID:24462730

  6. Exosomes mediated pentose phosphate pathway in ovarian cancer metastasis: a proteomics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Huan; Zheng, Xiangqin; Song, Jianrong; Shen, Rongkai; Su, Yanzhao; Lin, Danmei

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancies for readily metastasis. Exosomes have played an influential role in carcinogenicity and cancer progression. Our aim is to discover exosome-related mechanisms in ovarian cancer progress and explore potential diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets of ovarian cancer. We initially presented the proteomic profiles of exosomes derived from two late-stage ovarian cell lines, OVCA429 and HO8910PM. A total of 2940 exosomal proteins were recorded by MS. FunRich appropriately processed these exosomal proteins, manifesting some superiority in contrast to Blast2go. Moreover, we demonstrated the pentose phosphate pathway was a dominant mechanism in exosome mediated intracellular communication. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, transketolase and transaldolase 1, three key enzymes regulated pentose phosphate pathway, were all marked in the same exosomal parts of proteins between two ovarian cell lines. Moreover, these key proteins might become diagnostic, prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets of ovarian cancer. PMID:26884841

  7. Risk factors for epithelial ovarian cancer in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Wu, P C; Lang, J H; Ge, W J; Hartge, P; Brinton, L A

    1992-02-01

    A study in Beijing, China of 112 pathologically confirmed epithelial ovarian cancer cases and 224 age-matched community controls enabled evaluation of risk in relation to reproductive, medical, familial, and selected lifestyle factors. An inverse relationship was observed between the number of full-term pregnancies and ovarian cancer risk. Compared to nulliparous women, subjects with one, two, or three full-term pregnancies were at 50%, 70%, or 90% reduced risks, respectively (P for trend less than 0.01). A positive correlation was found between the number of ovulatory years and risk, with a 2.6-fold increased risk for women with 30 or more compared to less than 10 ovulatory years (P for trend less than 0.01). Infertility, as estimated in various ways, was also found to be an important risk factor. When parity was taken into account, age at first pregnancy was not related to ovarian cancer risk. No protective effect was associated with mumps virus infection. In contrast, risk increased significantly as serum mumps virus antibody titres increased (P for trend less than 0.01). An elevated risk was found in women with a history of long-term (greater than 3 months) application of talc-containing dusting powder to the lower abdomen and perineum (Relative risk 3.9, 95% confidence interval: 0.9-10.63). These findings suggest that Chinese women have risk factors similar to those of occidental women.

  8. [Optimization of infusion therapy in patients with ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Tumanyan, S V; Yartseva, D V

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the clinical observations and the results of a comprehensive survey of 70 patients with ovarian cancer stage III-IV aged 30 to 70 years with the presence of endotoxemia. Integral assessment of prognosis and severity of the condition was performed according to SAPS II and SOFA. Infusion program included a preliminary correction of hypovolemia prior to surgery on the operating table in equal parts, HES and balanced crystalloid solutions, with in- creased infusion of 15% of blood volume based on the method of anesthesia. In the early postoperative period, infusion programs were complemented by various embodiments of metabolic correction. Patients of group-1 (n = 35) received remaxol in a dose of 800 mI/day. Patients of group-2 (n = 35) received ademethionine (heptral) 800 mg/day. Analysis of the results revealed that premorbid background in patients with ovarian cancer stage III-IV was characterized by hypovolemia, phenomena hepatopathy, and endotoxemia, and mixed forms of hypoxia of varying severity. Differentiated approach to the choice of pathogenesis-based perioperative infusion according to premorbid condition, anesthesia and blood loss contributed to the elimination of hypovolemia, favored efficient oxygen delivery and consumption, the ade- quacy of tissue oxygenation. Remaxol inclusion in the perioperative infusion programs in patients with ovarian cancer enhanced their clinical efficiency, reduced cytolytic and cholestatic syndromes, recovered of protein and synthetic liver function, reduced the appearance of mixedforms of hypoxia and endogenous intoxication. PMID:26027227

  9. Role of primary surgery in advanced ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Münstedt, Karsten; Franke, Folker E

    2004-01-01

    Background Major issues in surgery for advanced ovarian cancer remain unresolved. Existing treatment guidelines are supported by a few published reports and fewer prospective randomized clinical trials. Methods We reviewed published reports on primary surgical treatment, surgical expertise, inadequate primary surgery/quality assurance, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, interval debulking, and surgical prognostic factors in advanced ovarian cancer to help resolve outstanding issues. Results The aim of primary surgery is a well-planned and complete intervention with optimal staging and surgery. Surgical debulking is worthwhile as there are further effective treatments available to control unresectable residual disease. Patients of gynecologic oncology specialist surgeons have better survival rates. This may reflect a working 'culture' rather than better technical skills. One major problem though, is that despite pleas to restrict surgery to experienced surgeons, specialist centers are often left to cope with the results of inadequate primary surgical resections. Patients with primary chemotherapy or those who have had suboptimal debulking may benefit from interval debulking. A proposal for a better classification of residual tumor is given. Conclusions Optimal surgical interventions have definite role to play in advanced ovarian cancers. Improvements in surgical treatment in the general population will probably improve patients' survival when coupled with improvements in current chemotherapeutic approaches. PMID:15461788

  10. A Decision Tree Based Classifier to Analyze Human Ovarian Cancer cDNA Microarray Datasets.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Meng-Hsiun; Wang, Hsin-Chieh; Lee, Guan-Wei; Lin, Yi-Chen; Chiu, Sheng-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynaecological disease because of the high mortality rate and there is no any symptom in cancer early stage. It was often the terminal cancer period when patients were diagnosed with ovarian cancer and thus delays a good opportunity of treatment. The current common method for detecting ovarian cancer is blood testing for analyzing the tumor marker CA-125 of serum. However, specificity and sensitivity of CA-125 are insufficient for early detection. Therefore, it has become an urgent issue to look for an efficient method which precisely detects the tumor markers for ovarian cancer. This study aims to find the target genes of ovarian cancer by different algorithms of information science. Feature selection and decision tree were applied to analyze 9600 ovarian cancer-related genes. After screening the target genes, candidate genes will be analyzed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software to create a genetic pathway model and to understand the interactive relationship in the different pathological stages of ovarian cancer. Finally, this research found 9 oncogenes associated with ovarian cancer and some genes had not been discovered in previous studies. This system will assist medical staffs in diagnosis and treatment at cancer early stage and improve the patient's survival. PMID:26531754

  11. Novel and recurrent BRCA2 mutations in Italian breast/ovarian cancer families widen the ovarian cancer cluster region boundaries to exons 13 and 14.

    PubMed

    Coppa, Anna; Buffone, Amelia; Capalbo, Carlo; Nicolussi, Arianna; D'Inzeo, Sonia; Belardinilli, Francesca; Colicchia, Valeria; Petroni, Marialaura; Granato, Teresa; Midulla, Cecilia; Zani, Massimo; Ferraro, Sergio; Screpanti, Isabella; Gulino, Alberto; Giannini, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer are mainly linked to mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes which confer a similar cumulative risk of developing breast cancer. Importantly, while BRCA2 mutation carriers generally have a lower cumulative risk for ovarian cancer, mutations clustered in the central portion of BRCA2 are associated with a higher proportion of ovarian compared with breast cancer cases. The boundaries of this ovarian cancer cluster region (OCCR) have been tentatively defined within a 3.3 kb region of BRCA2 exon 11, and herein, we reassessed these boundaries using our series of Italian breast/ovarian cancer families. We used direct sequencing to investigate BRCA mutations in 367 breast/ovarian cancer families. We also studied the association between the location of the mutations and the ovarian cancer phenotype in our cohort of BRCA2-mutated families. We observed the novel c.7309_7309delA frameshift mutation and the c.7007G>A deleterious mutation in BRCA2 exons 14 and 13, respectively, in five independent Italian families characterized by a high proportion of ovarian cancer cases. Of note, a significantly higher proportion of ovarian versus breast cancer cases was associated not only with mutations in the previously defined OCCR (OR = 5.91; p = 0.004), but also with the exon 13-14 region (OR = 7.37; p = 0.001) in our BRCA2-mutated families. Our data provide initial evidence for a novel putative OCCR in BRCA2 exons 13-14.

  12. Genome-wide association study in BRCA1 mutation carriers identifies novel loci associated with breast and ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Lee, Adam; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V O; Neuhausen, Susan L; Szabo, Csilla I; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H; Karlan, Beth Y; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L; Godwin, Andrew K; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria A; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S; Southey, Melissa C; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Arun, Banu K; Rennert, Gad; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Gille, Johannes J P; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Blok, Marinus J; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Rookus, Matti A; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A M; Wijnen, Juul T; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J; Side, Lucy E; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Léoné, Mélanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H F; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Blank, Stephanie V; Cohn, David E; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon Paluch, Shani; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C; Jønson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Mai, Phuong L; Loud, Jennifer T; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Buys, Saundra S; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B; Sokolenko, Anna P; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Lu, Karen H; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M; Tessier, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie; Slager, Susan L; Wang, Chen; Hart, Steven; Stevens, Kristen; Simard, Jacques; Pastinen, Tomi; Pankratz, Vernon S; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7 × 10(-8), HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09-1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4 × 10(-8), HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4 × 10(-8), HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10(-4)). These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%-50% compared to 81%-100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers.

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M.; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Lee, Adam; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Investigators, kConFab; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J.; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Caligo, Maria A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M.; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Arun, Banu K.; Rennert, Gad; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A. M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M.; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T.; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Léoné, Mélanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Cohn, David E.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M.; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon Paluch, Shani; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Jønson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A.; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R.; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Buys, Saundra S.; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A.; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K.; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B.; Sokolenko, Anna P.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Lu, Karen H.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A.; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M.; Tessier, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie; Slager, Susan L.; Wang, Chen; Hart, Steven; Stevens, Kristen; Simard, Jacques; Pastinen, Tomi; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Offit, Kenneth; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7×10−8, HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09–1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4×10−8, HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4×10−8, HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10−4). These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%–50% compared to 81%–100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers. PMID:23544013

  14. Evaluation of chemotherapy response in ovarian cancer treatment using quantitative CT image biomarkers: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Tan, Maxine; McMeekin, Scott; Thai, Theresa; Moore, Kathleen; Ding, Kai; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and apply quantitative image biomarkers for early prediction of the tumor response to the chemotherapy among the ovarian cancer patients participated in the clinical trials of testing new drugs. In the experiment, we retrospectively selected 30 cases from the patients who participated in Phase I clinical trials of new drug or drug agents for ovarian cancer treatment. Each case is composed of two sets of CT images acquired pre- and post-treatment (4-6 weeks after starting treatment). A computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme was developed to extract and analyze the quantitative image features of the metastatic tumors previously tracked by the radiologists using the standard Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) guideline. The CAD scheme first segmented 3-D tumor volumes from the background using a hybrid tumor segmentation scheme. Then, for each segmented tumor, CAD computed three quantitative image features including the change of tumor volume, tumor CT number (density) and density variance. The feature changes were calculated between the matched tumors tracked on the CT images acquired pre- and post-treatments. Finally, CAD predicted patient's 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) using a decision-tree based classifier. The performance of the CAD scheme was compared with the RECIST category. The result shows that the CAD scheme achieved a prediction accuracy of 76.7% (23/30 cases) with a Kappa coefficient of 0.493, which is significantly higher than the performance of RECIST prediction with a prediction accuracy and Kappa coefficient of 60% (17/30) and 0.062, respectively. This study demonstrated the feasibility of analyzing quantitative image features to improve the early predicting accuracy of the tumor response to the new testing drugs or therapeutic methods for the ovarian cancer patients.

  15. Patient-derived xenograft models to improve targeted therapy in epithelial ovarian cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Scott, Clare L; Becker, Marc A; Haluska, Paul; Samimi, Goli

    2013-12-04

    Despite increasing evidence that precision therapy targeted to the molecular drivers of a cancer has the potential to improve clinical outcomes, high-grade epithelial ovarian cancer (OC) patients are currently treated without consideration of molecular phenotype, and predictive biomarkers that could better inform treatment remain unknown. Delivery of precision therapy requires improved integration of laboratory-based models and cutting-edge clinical research, with pre-clinical models predicting patient subsets that will benefit from a particular targeted therapeutic. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) are renewable tumor models engrafted in mice, generated from fresh human tumors without prior in vitro exposure. PDX models allow an invaluable assessment of tumor evolution and adaptive response to therapy. PDX models have been applied to pre-clinical drug testing and biomarker identification in a number of cancers including ovarian, pancreatic, breast, and prostate cancers. These models have been shown to be biologically stable and accurately reflect the patient tumor with regards to histopathology, gene expression, genetic mutations, and therapeutic response. However, pre-clinical analyses of molecularly annotated PDX models derived from high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HG-SOC) remain limited. In vivo response to conventional and/or targeted therapeutics has only been described for very small numbers of individual HG-SOC PDX in conjunction with sparse molecular annotation and patient outcome data. Recently, two consecutive panels of epithelial OC PDX correlate in vivo platinum response with molecular aberrations and source patient clinical outcomes. These studies underpin the value of PDX models to better direct chemotherapy and predict response to targeted therapy. Tumor heterogeneity, before and following treatment, as well as the importance of multiple molecular aberrations per individual tumor underscore some of the important issues addressed in PDX models.

  16. Chlamydia Peritonitis and Ascites Mimicking Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Macer, Matthew; Azodi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) rarely results in diffuse ascites. Severe adhesive disease secondary to PID may lead to the formation of inclusion cysts and even pelvic peritoneal nodularity due to postinflammatory scarring and cause an elevation of serum CA-125 levels. The constellation of these findings may mimic an ovarian neoplasm. Case. We report a case of a 22-year-old female who presented with multiple pelvic cysts and diffuse ascites due to Chlamydia trachomatis infection. The initial gynecologic exam did not reveal obvious evidence of PID; however, a positive Chlamydia trachomatis test, pathologic findings, and the exclusion of other etiologies facilitated the diagnosis. Conclusion. Chlamydia trachomatis and other infectious agents should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a young sexually active female with abdominal pain, ascites, and pelvic cystic masses. Thorough workup in such a population may reduce the number of more invasive procedures as well as unnecessary repeat surgical procedures. PMID:27747116

  17. Duarte GALT genotypes are not associated with ovarian cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Melissa A.; Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Cramer, Daniel W.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Tworoger, Shelley S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) variant genotypes were associated with epithelial ovarian cancer risk and to determine if this association was modified by lactose intake. Design two prospective cohort studies and a case-control study. Setting Academic institution. Patient(s) 992 cases and 1050 population-based controls from a New England case-control study and 240 cases and 900 controls from the Nurses’ Health Studies. Intervention(s) None. Main Outcome Measure(s) Genotyping of the N314D variant and the 4-bp deletion (-119delGTCA) of GALT using the Taqman 5′ nuclease assay. Duarte1 (D1) genotype individuals have a missense mutation (N314D) associated with normal GALT activity unless it occurs together with an associated 4-bp deletion leading to reduced GALT activity (Duarte2 or D2). Result(s) Logistic regression analysis identified no association between D1/D2 genotypes and ovarian cancer risk (pooled RR, 1.1 (95% CI, 0.8–1.5) for D1 and 1.0 (95% CI, 0.7–1.4) for D2). We did not observe a significant interaction between D1 and D2 genotypes in analyses stratified by level of lactose intake (Pinteraction ≥ 0.3). Conclusion(s) D1 and D2 genotypes do not appear to play a role in the association between galactose intake, possible ovarian dysfunction and the link with ovarian cancer. PMID:22749219

  18. Rad6 upregulation promotes stem cell-like characteristics and platinum resistance in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Somasagara, Ranganatha R; Tripathi, Kaushlendra; Spencer, Sebastian M; Clark, David W; Barnett, Reagan; Bachaboina, Lavanya; Scalici, Jennifer; Rocconi, Rodney P; Piazza, Gary A; Palle, Komaraiah

    2016-01-15

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth most deadly cancer in women in the United States and despite advances in surgical and chemotherapeutic treatments survival rates have not significantly improved in decades. The poor prognosis for ovarian cancer patients is largely due to the extremely high (80%) recurrence rate of ovarian cancer and because the recurrent tumors are often resistant to the widely utilized platinum-based chemotherapeutic drugs. In this study, expression of Rad6, an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, was found to strongly correlate with ovarian cancer progression. Furthermore, in ovarian cancer cells Rad6 was found to stabilize β-catenin promoting stem cell-related characteristics, including expression of stem cell markers and anchorage-independent growth. Cancer stem cells can promote chemoresistance, tumor recurrence and metastasis, all of which are limiting factors in treating ovarian cancer. Thus it is significant that Rad6 overexpression led to increased resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug carboplatin and correlated with tumor cell invasion. These findings show the importance of Rad6 in ovarian cancer and emphasize the need for further studies of Rad6 as a potential target for the treatment of ovarian cancer.

  19. A quantitative proteomics-based signature of platinum sensitivity in ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Gaofeng; Wrzeszczynski, Kazimierz O.; Fu, Cexiong; Pappin, Darryl J.; Lucito, Robert; Tonks, Nicholas K.; Su, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Although DNA encodes the molecular instructions that underlie control of cell function, it is the proteins that are primarily responsible for implementing those instructions. Therefore, quantitative analyses of the proteome would be expected to yield insights into important candidates for the detection and treatment of disease. We present an iTRAQ (Isobaric Tagging for Relative and Absolute Quantification)-based proteomic analysis of 10 ovarian cancer cell lines and 2 normal ovarian surface epithelial cell lines. We profiled the abundance of 2659 cellular proteins, of which 1273 were common to all 12 cell lines. Of the 1273, 75 proteins exhibited elevated expression, and 164 proteins had diminished expression in the cancerous cells compared to the normal cell lines. The iTRAQ expression profiles allowed us to segregate cell lines based upon sensitivity and resistance to carboplatin. Importantly, we observed no substantial correlation between protein abundance and RNA expression or epigenetic, DNA methylation data. Furthermore, we could not discriminate between sensitivity and resistance to carboplatin on the basis of RNA expression and DNA methylation data alone. This study illustrates the importance of proteomics-based discovery for defining the basis for the carboplatin response in ovarian cancer and highlights candidate proteins, particularly involved in cellular redox regulation, homologous recombination and DNA damage repair, that otherwise could not have been predicted from whole genome and expression data sources alone. PMID:25406946

  20. Multispectral fluorescence imaging of human ovarian and fallopian tube tissue for early-stage cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Tyler H.; Baggett, Brenda; Rice, Photini F. S.; Koevary, Jennifer Watson; Orsinger, Gabriel V.; Nymeyer, Ariel C.; Welge, Weston A.; Saboda, Kathylynn; Roe, Denise J.; Hatch, Kenneth D.; Chambers, Setsuko K.; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer Kehlet

    2016-05-01

    With early detection, 5-year survival rates for ovarian cancer exceed 90%, yet no effective early screening method exists. Emerging consensus suggests over 50% of the most lethal form of the disease originates in the fallopian tube. Twenty-eight women undergoing oophorectomy or debulking surgery provided informed consent for the use of surgical discard tissue samples for multispectral fluorescence imaging. Using multiple ultraviolet and visible excitation wavelengths and emissions bands, 12 fluorescence and 6 reflectance images of 47 ovarian and 31 fallopian tube tissue samples were recorded. After imaging, each sample was fixed, sectioned, and stained for pathological evaluation. Univariate logistic regression showed cancerous tissue samples had significantly lower intensity than noncancerous tissue for 17 image types. The predictive power of multiple image types was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression (MLR) and quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA). Two MLR models each using two image types had receiver operating characteristic curves with area under the curve exceeding 0.9. QDA determined 56 image type combinations with perfect resubstituting using as few as five image types. Adaption of the system for future in vivo fallopian tube and ovary endoscopic imaging is possible, which may enable sensitive detection of ovarian cancer with no exogenous contrast agents.

  1. Olaparib recommendations for ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Peter; Westcott, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    Peter Johnson speaks to Gemma Westcott, Commissioning Editor: Peter Johnson is Professor of Medical Oncology at the University of Southampton and Chief Clinician for Cancer Research UK. He graduated from Cambridge University and St Thomas's Medical School (UK). He trained in oncology at St Bartholomew's Hospital, London, where he was an Imperial Cancer Research Fund (ICRF) Clinical Research Fellow and completed his doctoral research on the Bcl-2 gene, its potential as a therapeutic target in lymphoma and the effects of CD40 ligation on the B-cell surface. He was subsequently a Senior Lecturer in Medical Oncology in the ICRF Cancer Medicine Research Unit, Leeds and took up the Chair of Medical Oncology in Southampton (UK) in 1998. He is responsible for bringing together a broad multidisciplinary group of basic, translational and clinical researchers, and linking the research of the academic unit to the extensive clinical practice in cancer treatment in the Southampton Cancer Centre. His research interests are in applied immunology and immunotherapy, lymphoma biology and clinical trials. He is Chief Investigator for lymphoma trials ranging from first in man novel antibody therapeutics to international randomized studies, and for the Cancer Research UK Stratified Medicine Programme. He was Chair of the UK National Cancer Research Institute Lymphoma Group from 2005 to 2011 and has been a member of national trials committees for the Medical Research Council, Cancer Research UK and Leukaemia and Lymphoma Research.

  2. An inverse association between ovarian cysts and breast cancer in the breast cancer family registry.

    PubMed

    Knight, Julia A; John, Esther M; Milne, Roger L; Dite, Gillian S; Balbuena, Ron; Shi, Ellen J Q; Giles, Graham G; Ziogas, Argyrios; Andrulis, Irene L; Whittemore, Alice S; Hopper, John L

    2006-01-01

    Ovarian cysts of several types are common in women of reproductive age. Their etiology is not well understood but is likely related to perturbations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The relationship of ovarian cysts to breast cancer risk is not known, although a negative association with polycystic ovarian syndrome has been reported. Incident, invasive female breast cancer cases, population-based controls and unaffected sisters of cases were studied from 3 countries participating in the Breast Cancer Family Registry: Melbourne and Sydney, Australia; the San Francisco Bay Area, USA; and Ontario, Canada. Using the same questionnaire, information was collected on self-reported history of ovarian cysts and other risk factors. Analyses were based on 3,049 cases, 2,344 population controls and 1,934 sister controls from all sites combined. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using both unconditional and conditional logistic regression using an offset term to account for sampling fractions at 2 of the sites. A significantly reduced risk of breast cancer was observed for women reporting a history of ovarian cysts (OR = 0.70, 95% CI 0.59-0.82, among all cases and all controls). This risk estimate was similar regardless of control group used, within all 3 sites and in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women (ORs ranging from 0.68-0.75, all 95% CI excluded 1.00). A self-reported history of ovarian cysts was strongly and consistently associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer. Further study of ovarian cysts may increase our understanding of hormonal and other mechanisms of breast cancer etiology.

  3. Ovarian cancer screening and mortality in the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS): a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Ian J; Menon, Usha; Ryan, Andy; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Burnell, Matthew; Kalsi, Jatinderpal K; Amso, Nazar N; Apostolidou, Sophia; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Cruickshank, Derek; Crump, Danielle N; Davies, Susan K; Dawnay, Anne; Dobbs, Stephen; Fletcher, Gwendolen; Ford, Jeremy; Godfrey, Keith; Gunu, Richard; Habib, Mariam; Hallett, Rachel; Herod, Jonathan; Jenkins, Howard; Karpinskyj, Chloe; Leeson, Simon; Lewis, Sara J; Liston, William R; Lopes, Alberto; Mould, Tim; Murdoch, John; Oram, David; Rabideau, Dustin J; Reynolds, Karina; Scott, Ian; Seif, Mourad W; Sharma, Aarti; Singh, Naveena; Taylor, Julie; Warburton, Fiona; Widschwendter, Martin; Williamson, Karin; Woolas, Robert; Fallowfield, Lesley; McGuire, Alistair J; Campbell, Stuart; Parmar, Mahesh; Skates, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Ovarian cancer has a poor prognosis, with just 40% of patients surviving 5 years. We designed this trial to establish the effect of early detection by screening on ovarian cancer mortality. Methods In this randomised controlled trial, we recruited postmenopausal women aged 50–74 years from 13 centres in National Health Service Trusts in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Exclusion criteria were previous bilateral oophorectomy or ovarian malignancy, increased risk of familial ovarian cancer, and active non-ovarian malignancy. The trial management system confirmed eligibility and randomly allocated participants in blocks of 32 using computer-generated random numbers to annual multimodal screening (MMS) with serum CA125 interpreted with use of the risk of ovarian cancer algorithm, annual transvaginal ultrasound screening (USS), or no screening, in a 1:1:2 ratio. The primary outcome was death due to ovarian cancer by Dec 31, 2014, comparing MMS and USS separately with no screening, ascertained by an outcomes committee masked to randomisation group. All analyses were by modified intention to screen, excluding the small number of women we discovered after randomisation to have a bilateral oophorectomy, have ovarian cancer, or had exited the registry before recruitment. Investigators and participants were aware of screening type. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00058032. Findings Between June 1, 2001, and Oct 21, 2005, we randomly allocated 202 638 women: 50 640 (25·0%) to MMS, 50 639 (25·0%) to USS, and 101 359 (50·0%) to no screening. 202 546 (>99·9%) women were eligible for analysis: 50 624 (>99·9%) women in the MMS group, 50 623 (>99·9%) in the USS group, and 101 299 (>99·9%) in the no screening group. Screening ended on Dec 31, 2011, and included 345 570 MMS and 327 775 USS annual screening episodes. At a median follow-up of 11·1 years (IQR 10·0–12·0), we diagnosed ovarian cancer in

  4. Expanded metabolomics approach to profiling endogenous carbohydrates in the serum of ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Li, Li; Zhu, Bangjie; Liu, Feng; Wang, Yan; Gu, Xue; Yan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    We applied hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry to the quantitative analysis of serum from 58 women, including ovarian cancer patients, ovarian benign tumor patients, and healthy controls. All of these ovarian cancer and ovarian benign tumor patients have elevated cancer antigen 125, which makes them clinically difficult to differentiate the malignant from the benign. All of the 16 endogenous carbohydrates were quantitatively detected in the human sera, of which, eight endogenous carbohydrates were significantly different (P-value < 0.05) between the ovarian cancer and healthy control. According to the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, arabitol was the most potentially specific biomarker for discriminating ovarian cancer from healthy control, having an area under the curve of 0.911. A panel of metabolite markers composed of maltose, maltotriose, raffinose, and mannitol was selected, which was able to discriminate the ovarian cancer from the benign ovarian tumor counterparts, with an area under concentration-time curve value of 0.832. Endogenous carbohydrates in the expanded metabolomics approach after the global metabolic profiling are characterized and are potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

  5. EphA2 overexpression promotes ovarian cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chunhua; Shahzad, Mian M.K.; Wang, Hua; Landen, Charles N.; Kim, Seung W.; Allen, Julie; Nick, Alpa M.; Jennings, Nicholas; Kinch, Michael S.; Bar-Eli, Menashe; Sood, Anil K.

    2009-01-01

    Background Silencing EphA2 has been shown to result in anti-tumor efficacy. However, it is not known whether increasing EphA2 expression specifically results in increased tumor growth and progression. We examined the effects of stable EphA2 transfection into poorly invasive ovarian cancer cells with regard to in vitro invasive and in vivo metastatic potential. Results In low cell density, EphA2-overexpressing A2780 cells (A2780-EphA2) displayed less cell-cell contact, increased cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) attachment and anchorage-independent cell growth compared to empty vector controls. There was no significant effect on anchorage-dependent cell proliferation, migration or invasion. Increased expression of EphA2 promoted tumor growth and enhanced the metastatic potential in A2780-EphA2 human ovarian cancer xenografts. The overexpression of EphA2 resulted in enhanced microvessel density (MVD), but had no effect on tumor cell proliferation. Methods EphA2 gene was introduced into A2780 cells by retroviral infection. The effects of increased EphA2 expression were examined on cellular morphology, and anchorage-dependent and independent cell growth. Furthermore, the effect of EphA2 overexpression on metastatic ability was determined using an orthotopic nude mouse model of ovarian carcinoma. Conclusions EphA2 promotes tumor growth by enhancing cell-ECM adhesion, increasing anchorage-independent growth and promoting angiogenesis. PMID:18443431

  6. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin or Ifosfamide in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Persistent or Recurrent Uterine, Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Sarcoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVB Uterine Sarcoma; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  7. Quantification of photoacoustic microscopy images for ovarian cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianheng; Yang, Yi; Alqasemi, Umar; Kumavor, Patrick D.; Wang, Xiaohong; Sanders, Melinda; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, human ovarian tissues with malignant and benign features were imaged ex vivo by using an opticalresolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) system. Several features were quantitatively extracted from PAM images to describe photoacoustic signal distributions and fluctuations. 106 PAM images from 18 human ovaries were classified by applying those extracted features to a logistic prediction model. 57 images from 9 ovaries were used as a training set to train the logistic model, and 49 images from another 9 ovaries were used to test our prediction model. We assumed that if one image from one malignant ovary was classified as malignant, it is sufficient to classify this ovary as malignant. For the training set, we achieved 100% sensitivity and 83.3% specificity; for testing set, we achieved 100% sensitivity and 66.7% specificity. These preliminary results demonstrate that PAM could be extremely valuable in assisting and guiding surgeons for in vivo evaluation of ovarian tissue.

  8. Ovarian Cancer: Deaf and Hearing Women’s Knowledge Before and After an Educational Video

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Lindsay G.; Nakaji, Melanie; Harry, Kadie M.; Gallegos, Nick; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2013-01-01

    Members of the Deaf community report language and cultural barriers to accessing health information and care. This study evaluated whether an ovarian cancer education video in American Sign Language with English captioning and voiceover could close the anticipated knowledge gap between Deaf and hearing women’s cancer knowledge. Consented Deaf (n = 55) and hearing (n = 52) women’s General, Ovarian, and Total Cancer Knowledge were assessed before and after viewing the video. At baseline, hearing women demonstrated significantly higher General, Ovarian, and Total Cancer Knowledge scores than Deaf women. By the post-test, all of Deaf women’s knowledge scores had increased, closing the baseline gap. However, hearing women’s post-video knowledge had also increased, thereby creating a new knowledge gap. The ovarian cancer education video offers an effective method to increase ovarian and general cancer knowledge for Deaf and hearing women. PMID:23975658

  9. A6 in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-27

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  10. Palliative Surgical Approach in Advanced Nonresponsive Mucinous Ovarian Cancer: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Manika; Kumar, Ritesh; Topno, Noor; Mishra, Shweta; Dhirasaria, Ashish; Singh, A Santa

    2016-01-01

    Advanced mucinous ovarian cancer is a separate entity and has different biological behaviour. There is a wide range of therapeutic challenges and dilemmas in the management of these patients. The authors present a case of advanced ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma with pseudomyxoma peritonei who had poor response to standard neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This case is highlighted to emphasize the challenges in the decision making for the management of advanced mucinous ovarian cancer. PMID:27162429

  11. Prognostic B-Cell Signatures using mRNA-Seq in Patients with Subtype-Specific Breast and Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iglesia, Michael D.; Vincent, Benjamin G.; Parker, Joel S.; Hoadley, Katherine; Carey, Lisa A.; Perou, Charles M.; Serody, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Lymphocytic infiltration of tumors predicts improved survival in breast cancer patients. Previous studies have suggested that this survival benefit is confined predominantly to the basal-like subtype. Immune infiltration in ovarian tumors is also associated with improved prognosis. Currently, it is unclear what aspects of the immune response mediate this improved outcome. Experimental Design Using The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) mRNA-seq data and a large microarray data set, we evaluated adaptive immune gene expression by genomic subtype in breast and ovarian cancer. To investigate B-cells observed to be prognostic within specific subtypes, we developed methods to analyze B-cell population diversity and degree of somatic hypermutation (SHM) from B-cell receptor (BCR) sequences in mRNA-seq data. Results Improved metastasis-free/progression-free survival was correlated with B-cell gene expression signatures, which were restricted mainly to the basal-like and HER2-enriched breast cancer subtypes and the immunoreactive ovarian cancer subtype. Consistent with a restricted epitope-driven response, a subset of basal-like and HER2-enriched breast tumors and immunoreactive ovarian tumors showed high expression of a low-diversity population of BCR gene segments. More BCR segments showed improved prognosis with increased expression in basal-like breast tumors and immunoreactive ovarian tumors compared with other subtypes. Basal-like and HER2-enriched tumors exhibited more BCR sequence variants in regions consistent with somatic hypermutation. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest the presence of a productive and potentially restricted anti-tumor B-cell response in basal-like breast and immunoreactive ovarian cancers. Immunomodulatory therapies that support B-cell responses may be a promising therapeutic approach to targeting these B-cell infiltrated tumors. PMID:24916698

  12. Pathological Characterization of Ovarian Cancer Patients Who Underwent Debulking Surgery in Combination With Diaphragmatic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Takeshi; Oshiro, Hisashi; Sagawa, Yasukazu; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Terauchi, Fumitoshi; Nagao, Toshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Despite exhaustive efforts to detect early-stage ovarian cancers, greater than two-thirds of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage. Although diaphragmatic metastasis is not rare in advanced ovarian cancer patients and often precludes optimal cytoreductive surgery, little is known about the mechanisms and predictive factors of metastasis to the diaphragm. Thus, as an initial step toward investigating such factors, the present study was conducted to characterize the pathological status of ovarian cancer patients who underwent debulking surgery in combination with diaphragmatic surgery. This is a retrospective and cross-sectional study of patients who underwent debulking surgery in combination with diaphragmatic surgery at our institution between January 2005 and July 2015. Clinicopathological data were reviewed by board-certified gynecologists, pathologists, and cytopathologists. The rates of various pathological findings were investigated and compared by Fisher exact test between 2 groups: 1 group that was pathologically positive for diaphragmatic metastasis (group A) and another group that was pathologically negative for diaphragmatic metastasis (group B). Forty-six patients were included: 41 patients pathologically positive and 5 pathologically negative for diaphragmatic metastasis. The rates of metastasis to the lymph node (95.8% vs 20%, P = 0.001) and metastasis to the peritoneum except for the diaphragm (97.6% vs 60.0%, P = 0.028) were significantly increased in group A compared with group B. However, no significant differences between the 2 groups were found for rates of histological subtypes (high-grade serous or non-high-grade serous), the presence of ascites, the presence of malignant ascites, exposure of cancer cells on the ovarian surface, blood vascular invasion in the primary lesion, and lymphovascular invasion in the primary lesion. Our study demonstrated that metastasis to the lymph node and nondiaphragmatic metastasis to the

  13. Response to microtubule-interacting agents in primary epithelial ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ovarian cancer constitutes nearly 4% of all cancers among women and is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancies in the Western world. Standard first line adjuvant chemotherapy treatments include Paclitaxel (Taxol) and platinum-based agents. Taxol, epothilone B (EpoB) and discodermolide belong to a family of anti-neoplastic agents that specifically interferes with microtubules and arrests cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Despite initial success with chemotherapy treatment, many patients relapse due to chemotherapy resistance. In vitro establishment of primary ovarian cancer cells provides a powerful tool for better understanding the mechanisms of ovarian cancer resistance. We describe the generation and characterization of primary ovarian cancer cells derived from ascites fluids of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods Chemosensitivity of these cell lines to Taxol, EpoB and discodermolide was tested, and cell cycle analysis was compared to that of immortalized ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3 and Hey. The relationship between drug resistance and αβ-tubulin and p53 status was also investigated. Results All newly generated primary cancer cells were highly sensitive to the drugs. αβ-tubulin mutation was not found in any primary cell lines tested. However, one cell line that harbors p53 mutation at residue 72 (Arg to Pro) exhibits altered cell cycle profile in response to all drug treatments. Immortalized ovarian cancer cells respond differently to EpoB treatment when compared to primary ovarian cancer cells, and p53 polymorphism suggests clinical significance in the anti-tumor response in patients. Conclusions The isolation and characterization of primary ovarian cancer cells from ovarian cancer patients’ specimens contribute to further understanding the nature of drug resistance to microtubule interacting agents (MIAs) currently used in clinical settings. PMID:23574945

  14. Ovarian cancer-induced immunosuppression: relationship to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) release from ovarian tissue.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M I; Kassim, S K; Saeda, L; Laban, M; Khalifa, A

    1999-01-01

    Cytokines have been reported to be potential biological markers of, disease status in cancer patients. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a key cytokine released from monocytes and macrophages. TNF-alpha is involved in essential biological functions such as immunoregulation, modulation of cell growth and differentiation. In this work, the role of TNF-alpha release in ovarian cancer patients was investigated. Fifty-five patients with ovarian cancer and 20 controls of matched age and parity were included in this study. TNF-alpha concentrations were measured in sera and cytosolic fractions of both groups. The results demonstrated a significant increase in TNF-alpha concentrations among patients compared to the control subjects (P < 0.001). Furthermore, a non-significant increase (P = 0.05, was observed between the different types (serous, Mucinous, and endometrioid) of epithelial ovarian cancers. Also TNF-alpha concentrations did not correlate with the disease stage. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of tissue specimens stained for TNF-alpha was positive in malignant lesions and negative for the normal ovarian tissue. These findings confirmed the TNF-alpha kinetics obtained by ELISA assays. Interestingly, TNF-alpha levels were also elevated in culture supernatants of PBMC stimulated by cytosolic fractions from malignant ovarian tissues. Blastogenic assays using cytosolic fractions from malignant ovarian specimens to stimulate healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) showed a marked decrease in 3H-thymidine uptake compared to the cells stimulated by normal cytosols. To establish a cause-effect relationship between TNF-alpha release and inhibition of cell proliferation, the experiments showed that 3H-thymidine uptake by PBMC was markedly inhibited by recombinant human TNF-alpha (rh TNF-alpha) and that inhibition was significantly reversed when TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody was added to the cells. The data presented in this work indicate that

  15. Diurnal Cortisol and Survival in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schrepf, Andrew; Thaker, Premal H.; Goodheart, Michael J.; Bender, David; Slavich, George M.; Dahmoush, Laila; Penedo, Frank; DeGeest, Koen; Mendez, Luis; Lubaroff, David M.; Cole, Steven W.; Sood, Anil K.; Lutgendorf, Susan K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) deregulation is commonly observed in cancer patients, but its clinical significance is not well understood. We prospectively examined the association between HPA activity, tumor-associated inflammation, and survival in ovarian cancer patients prior to treatment. Materials and Methods Participants were 113 women with ovarian cancer who provided salivary cortisol for three days prior to treatment for calculation of cortisol slope, variability, and night cortisol. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were used to examine associations between cortisol and survival in models adjusting for disease stage, tumor grade, cytoreduction and age. On a subsample of 41 patients with advanced disease ascites fluid was assayed for levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and correlated with cortisol variables. Results Each cortisol measure was associated with decreased survival time, adjusting for covariates (all p<.041). A one standard deviation increase in night cortisol was associated with a 46% greater likelihood of death. Patients in the high night cortisol group survived an estimated average of 3.3 years compared to 7.3 years for those in the low night cortisol group. Elevated ascites IL-6 was associated with each cortisol measure (all r >.36, all p<.017). Discussion Abnormal cortisol rhythms assessed prior to treatment are associated with decreased survival in ovarian cancer and increased inflammation in the vicinity of the tumor. HPA abnormalities may reflect poor endogenous control of inflammation, dysregulation caused by tumor-associated inflammation, broad circadian disruption, or some combination of these factors. Nocturnal cortisol may have utility as a non-invasive measure of HPA function and/or disease severity. PMID:25647344

  16. TXNDC17 promotes paclitaxel resistance via inducing autophagy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song-Fa; Wang, Xin-Yu; Fu, Zhi-Qin; Peng, Qiao-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Yang; Ye, Feng; Fu, Yun-Feng; Zhou, Cai-Yun; Lu, Wei-Guo; Cheng, Xiao-Dong; Xie, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Paclitaxel is recommended as a first-line chemotherapeutic agent against ovarian cancer, but drug resistance becomes a major limitation of its success clinically. The key molecule or mechanism associated with paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer still remains unclear. Here, we showed that TXNDC17 screened from 356 differentially expressed proteins by LC-MS/MS label-free quantitative proteomics was more highly expressed in paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cells and tissues, and the high expression of TXNDC17 was associated with poorer prognostic factors and exhibited shortened survival in 157 ovarian cancer patients. Moreover, paclitaxel exposure induced upregulation of TXNDC17 and BECN1 expression, increase of autophagosome formation, and autophagic flux that conferred cytoprotection for ovarian cancer cells from paclitaxel. TXNDC17 inhibition by siRNA or enforced overexpression by a pcDNA3.1(+)-TXNDC17 plasmid correspondingly decreased or increased the autophagy response and paclitaxel resistance. Additionally, the downregulation of BECN1 by siRNA attenuated the activation of autophagy and cytoprotection from paclitaxel induced by TXNDC17 overexpression in ovarian cancer cells. Thus, our findings suggest that TXNDC17, through participation of BECN1, induces autophagy and consequently results in paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer. TXNDC17 may be a potential predictor or target in ovarian cancer therapeutics.

  17. NIH Study Finds Regular Aspirin Use May Reduce Ovarian Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... studies examining whether use of these agents may influence ovarian cancer risk have been largely inconclusive. This is the largest study to date to assess the relationship between these drugs and ovarian cancer risk. Britton Trabert, Ph.D., and Nicolas Wentzensen, M.D., Ph.D., ...

  18. Milk, yogurt, and lactose intake and ovarian cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Tang, Wenru; Sang, Lei; Dai, Xiaoli; Wei, Danping; Luo, Ying; Zhang, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    Inconclusive information for the role of dairy food intake in relation to ovarian cancer risk may associate with adverse effects of lactose, which has been hypothesized to increase gonadotropin levels in animal models and ecological studies. Up to now, several studies have indicated the association between dairy food intake and risk of ovarian cancer, but no identified founding was reported. We performed this meta-analysis to derive a more precise estimation of the association between dairy food intake and ovarian cancer risk. Using the data from 19 available publications, we examined dairy food including low-fat/skim milk, whole milk, yogurt and lactose in relation to risk of ovarian cancer by meta-analysis. Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to assess the association. We observed a slightly increased risk of ovarian cancer with high intake of whole milk, but has no statistical significance (OR = 1.228, 95% CI = 1.031-1.464, P = 0.022). The results of other milk models did not provide evidence of positive association with ovarian cancer risk. This meta-analysis suggests that low-fat/skim milk, whole milk, yogurt and lactose intake has no associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer. Further studies with larger participants worldwide are needed to validate the association between dairy food intake and ovarian cancer.

  19. Anti-Sp17 monoclonal antibody with antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity activities against human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Jia-xi; Cao, Wang-li; Li, Fang-qiu; Shi, Li-ning; Jia, Xuan

    2012-12-01

    Sperm protein 17 (Sp17) is a cancer testis antigen that has been shown to be overexpressed in a variety of gynecologic malignancies, in particular ovarian cancer. Emerging evidences indicate that Sp17 is involved in tumorigenesis and in the migration of malignant cells. It has been proposed as a useful target for tumor-vaccine strategies and a novel marker to define tumor subsets and predict drug response. However, the antitumor activity of anti-Sp17 monoclonal antibody (anti-Sp17 mAb) has not been investigated. In this study, the in vitro cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) activities of anti-Sp17 mAb were evaluated using Sp17-positive ovarian cancer cells as targets, Sp17-negative ovarian cancer cells as the control, and healthy human peripheral blood monocytes and healthy human serum as effectors. Our preliminary results indicate that the direct cytotoxicity of anti-Sp17 mAb against the investigated ovarian cancer cells was very weak. However, the cytotoxicity of anti-Sp17 mAb, mediated by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), as ADCC, or by human serum, as CDC, was relatively strong in the Sp17-positive ovarian cancer cells. This finding suggested that anti-Sp17 mAb could be a useful tool against ovarian cancer and may provide insight into the development of low side-effect targeting therapy for this malignant disease.

  20. Long-term follow-up of patients with advanced ovarian cancer treated in randomised clinical trials.

    PubMed Central

    Warwick, J.; Kehoe, S.; Earl, H.; Luesley, D.; Redman, C.; Chan, K. K.

    1995-01-01

    The data from two prospective randomised phase III trials that were initiated by the West Midlands Ovarian Cancer Study Group (WMOCSG) in 1981 and 1986, recruiting 167 and 195 patients respectively, have been pooled and the survival patterns of the 362 patients treated for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer within clinical trials in the West Midlands over the 10 year period (1981-91) have been explored. All patients had histologically proven epithelial ovarian cancer and all had residual disease after primary surgery, with the majority having stage III/IV disease. The primary treatment for all patients was debulking surgery followed by platinum-based chemotherapy. Eligible patients were further randomised to undergo a second debulking operation. The main end point, survival, was assessed using Kaplan-Meier curves and the log-rank test. A Cox proportional hazards model identified performance status (P = 0.002), residual disease (P = 0.005) and albumin level (P = 0.04) as independent prognostic factors. A multivariate model to predict survival curves for patients with the best and worst prognoses was developed with predicted 5 year survival of 30% and 3% for those in the best and worst prognostic groups respectively. The identification of clinical interventions to improve outcome is an urgent matter since the prognosis for patients with advanced ovarian cancer remains poor. PMID:8519669

  1. Fertility Preservation Among the Cancer Patients by Ovarian Tissue Cryopreservation, Transplantation, and Follicular Development

    PubMed Central

    Abedelahi, Ali; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Mohammadnejad, Daryosh

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian tissue freezing or cryopreservation might be the only acceptable method for preserving the young women fertility, before radiotherapy or chemotherapy. This technology might be used for patients with recurrent ovarian cysts or endometriosis, without ovarian stimulation. Many efforts have made to improve cryopreservation conditions that should be seriously considered for cancer patients. Vitrification is a process which prevents ovarian tissue from cryo damage, then preserves cell viability. Both methods have used for evaluating not only the follicular development, but also the fertility after freezing and thawing. In this manuscript, we have discussed the techniques of ovarian tissue vitrification, then graft and maturation or follicular development is also mentioned. PMID:25250122

  2. Ovarian Cancer Screening Method Fails to Reduce Deaths from the Disease

    Cancer.gov

    New results from the NCI-sponsored PLCO Cancer Screening Trial show that screening for ovarian cancer with transvaginal ultrasound (TVU) and the CA-125 blood test did not result in fewer deaths from the disease compared with usual care.

  3. Women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations survive ovarian cancer at higher rates

    Cancer.gov

    Results from a National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored multicenter study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on January 25, 2012, provides strong evidence that BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers with ovarian cancer were more

  4. Expression of CD133 and CD117 in 64 Serous Ovarian Cancer Cases.

    PubMed

    Stemberger-Papić, Snjezana; Vrdoljak-Mozetic, Danijela; Ostojić, Damjana Versa; Rubesa-Mihaljević, Roberta; Krigtofić, Ines; Brncić-Fisher, Alemka; Kragević, Maja; Eminović, Senija

    2015-09-01

    The cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a minority of tumor cells that are able to proliferate and self-renew and might be responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. The CD133 and CD117 are the most commonly used markers for the putative CSCs, especially for the ovarian CSCs, but its clinical significance remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to compare the immunohistochemical expression of CD133 and CD117 in 64 primary ovarian high grade serous carcinoma and peritoneal metastasis, and to examine their potential clinical role. CD133 expression was mainly seen in the apical/endoluminal cell surface of tumor cells and was found in 61% of the carcinoma samples and 41% of the metastasis. The median of CD133 positive cells in tumors was 1 (0.1-7)%, and in metastases was 0.6 (0.1-6)%. CD117 expression appeared as a cytoplasmic and/or membranous stain and was found in 81% of the carcinoma samples and 77% of the metastasis. The median of CD117 positive cells in tumors was 1 (0.1-8)%, and in metastases was 0.1 (0.1-7)%. Multivariate analysis has shown that patients with high CD133 expression in tumor cells have significantly shorter disease free survival and overall survival (p=0.025 and p=0.014, respectively). Patients with high CD117 expression in tumor cells have significantly shorter disease free survival (p=0.031). Cox's proportional hazards model identified expression of CD133 protein in tumor as an independent prognostic factor. Our study indicates that the immunohistochemical assessment of CD133 and CD117 expression may have potential clinical value in predicting disease progression and prognosis in the high grade serous ovarian cancer. CD133 proved to be an independent prognostic factor in the high grade serous ovarian cancer patients. PMID:26898076

  5. Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for treatment of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Polom, Karol; Roviello, Giandomenico; Generali, Daniele; Marano, Luigi; Petrioli, Roberto; Marsili, Stefania; Caputo, Edda; Marrelli, Daniele; Roviello, Franco

    2016-05-01

    Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC), a strategy combining maximal cytoreductive surgery and maximal regional chemotherapy, has been applied to treat ovarian cancer resulting in long-term survival rates in selected patients. However, the status of HIPEC in ovarian cancer remains an experimental procedure, given the many variables among the data and trials reviewed, to enable us to derive strong conclusions about its role from this overview. In this review we discuss treatment with HIPEC in patients with ovarian cancer and future prospective of its use in clinical setting. HIPEC is an effective tool in the treatment of selected patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis from ovarian cancer. Unfortunately, due to the lack of randomised trials, the evidence of HIPEC is very limited. Future randomised studies are awaited to define the role and clinical impact of HIPEC in ovarian cancer. PMID:26984715

  6. Cancer stem cell marker CD90 inhibits ovarian cancer formation via β3 integrin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Ching; Hsu, Hui-Ping; Li, Chung-Yen; Yang, Ya-Ju; Hung, Yu-Hsuan; Cho, Chien-Yu; Wang, Chih-Yang; Weng, Tzu-Yang; Lai, Ming-Derg

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cell (CSC) markers have been identified for CSC isolation and proposed as therapeutic targets in various types of cancers. CD90, one of the characterized markers in liver and gastric cancer, is shown to promote cancer formation. However, the underexpression level of CD90 in ovarian cancer cells and the evidence supporting the cellular mechanism have not been investigated. In the present study, we found that the DNA copy number of CD90 is correlated with mRNA expression in ovarian cancer tissue and the ovarian cancer patients with higher CD90 have good prognosis compared to the patients with lower CD90. Although the expression of CD90 in human ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells enhances the cell proliferation by MTT and anchorage-dependent growth assay, CD90 inhibits the anchorage-independent growth ability in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. CD90 overexpression suppresses the sphere-forming ability and ALDH activity and enhances the cell apoptosis, indicating that CD90 may reduce the cell growth by the properties of CSC and anoikis. Furthermore, CD90 reduces the expression of other CSC markers, including CD133 and CD24. The inhibition of CD133 is attenuated by the mutant CD90, which is replaced with RLE domain into RLD domain. Importantly, the CD90-regulated inhibition of CD133 expression, anchorage-independent growth and signal transduction of mTOR and AMPK are restored by the β3 integrin shRNA. Our results provide evidence that CD90 mediates the antitumor formation by interacting with β3 integrin, which provides new insight that can potentially be applied in the development of therapeutic strategies in ovarian cancer. PMID:27633757

  7. An evaluation of genetic heterogeneity in 145 breast-ovarian cancer families

    SciTech Connect

    Narod, S.A.; Ford, D.; Devilee, P.; Barkardottir, R.B.; Lynch, H.T.; Smith, S.A.; Ponder, B.A.J.; Weber, B.L.; Garber, J.E.; Birch, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The breast-ovary cancer-family syndrome is a dominant predisposition to cancer of the breast and ovaries which has been mapped to chromosome region 17q12-q21. The majority, but not all, of breast-ovary cancer families show linkage to this susceptibility locus, designated BRCA1. We report the results of a linkage analysis of 145 families with both breast and ovarian cancer. These families contain either a total of three or more cases of early-onset (before age 60 years) breast cancer or ovarian cancer. All families contained at least one case of ovarian cancer. Overall, an estimated 76% of the 145 families are linked to the BRCA1 locus. None of the 13 families with cases of male breast cancer appear to be linked, but it is estimated that 92% (95% confidence interval 76%-100%) of families with no male breast cancer and with two or more ovarian cancers are linked to BRCA1. These data suggest that the breast-ovarian cancer-family syndrome is genetically heterogeneous. However, the large majority of families with early-onset breast cancer and with two or more cases of ovarian cancer are likely to be due to BRCA1 mutations. 39 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Ovarian Cyst

    MedlinePlus

    ... accurate way to tell if a woman has ovarian cancer. For example, some women who do have ovarian cancer have a normal CA-125 level. Also, this ... for women who show signs or symptoms of ovarian cancer or who have genetic mutations that increase the ...

  9. Association Between IHC and MSI Testing to Identify Mismatch Repair–Deficient Patients with Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Cragun, Deborah; Thompson, Zachary; Coppola, Domenico; Nicosia, Santo V.; Akbari, Mohammad; Zhang, Shiyu; McLaughlin, John; Narod, Steven; Schildkraut, Joellen; Sellers, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In epithelial ovarian cancer, concordance between results of microsatellite instability (MSI) and immunohistochemical (IHC) testing has not been demonstrated. This study evaluated the association of MSI-high (MSI-H) status with loss of expression (LoE) of mismatch repair (MMR) proteins on IHC and assessed for potential factors affecting the strength of the association. Methods: Tumor specimens from three population-based studies of epithelial ovarian cancer were stained for MMR proteins through manual or automated methods, and results were interpreted by one of two pathologists. Tumor and germline DNA was extracted and MSI testing performed. Multivariable logistic regression models were fitted to predict loss of IHC expression based on MSI status after adjusting for staining method and reading pathologist. Results: Of 834 cases, 564 (67.6%) were concordant; 41 were classified as MSI-H with LoE and 523 as microsatellite stable (MSS) with no LoE. Of the 270 discordant cases, 83 were MSI-H with no LoE and 187 were MSS with LoE. Both IHC staining method and reading pathologist were strongly associated with discordant results. Conclusions: Lack of concordance in the current study may be related to inconsistencies in IHC testing methods and interpretation. Results support the need for validation studies before routine screening of ovarian tumors is implemented in clinical practice for the purpose of identifying Lynch syndrome. PMID:24592941

  10. Connective tissue growth factor as a novel therapeutic target in high grade serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moran-Jones, Kim; Gloss, Brian S.; Murali, Rajmohan; Chang, David K.; Colvin, Emily K.; Jones, Marc D.; Yuen, Samuel; Howell, Viive M.; Brown, Laura M.; Wong, Carol W.; Spong, Suzanne M.; Scarlett, Christopher J.; Hacker, Neville F.; Ghosh, Sue; Mok, Samuel C.; Birrer, Michael J.; Samimi, Goli

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of death among women with gynecologic cancer. We examined molecular profiles of fibroblasts from normal ovary and high-grade serous ovarian tumors to identify novel therapeutic targets involved in tumor progression. We identified 2,300 genes that are significantly differentially expressed in tumor-associated fibroblasts. Fibroblast expression of one of these genes, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. CTGF protein expression in ovarian tumor fibroblasts significantly correlated with gene expression levels. CTGF is a secreted component of the tumor microenvironment and is being pursued as a therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer. We examined its effect in in vitro and ex vivo ovarian cancer models, and examined associations between CTGF expression and clinico-pathologic characteristics in patients. CTGF promotes migration and peritoneal adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. These effects are abrogated by FG-3019, a human monoclonal antibody against CTGF, currently under clinical investigation as a therapeutic agent. Immunohistochemical analyses of high-grade serous ovarian tumors reveal that the highest level of tumor stromal CTGF expression was correlated with the poorest prognosis. Our findings identify CTGF as a promoter of peritoneal adhesion, likely to mediate metastasis, and a potential therapeutic target in high-grade serous ovarian cancer. These results warrant further studies into the therapeutic efficacy of FG-3019 in high-grade serous ovarian cancer. PMID:26575166

  11. Connective tissue growth factor as a novel therapeutic target in high grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Moran-Jones, Kim; Gloss, Brian S; Murali, Rajmohan; Chang, David K; Colvin, Emily K; Jones, Marc D; Yuen, Samuel; Howell, Viive M; Brown, Laura M; Wong, Carol W; Spong, Suzanne M; Scarlett, Christopher J; Hacker, Neville F; Ghosh, Sue; Mok, Samuel C; Birrer, Michael J; Samimi, Goli

    2015-12-29

    Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of death among women with gynecologic cancer. We examined molecular profiles of fibroblasts from normal ovary and high-grade serous ovarian tumors to identify novel therapeutic targets involved in tumor progression. We identified 2,300 genes that are significantly differentially expressed in tumor-associated fibroblasts. Fibroblast expression of one of these genes, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. CTGF protein expression in ovarian tumor fibroblasts significantly correlated with gene expression levels. CTGF is a secreted component of the tumor microenvironment and is being pursued as a therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer. We examined its effect in in vitro and ex vivo ovarian cancer models, and examined associations between CTGF expression and clinico-pathologic characteristics in patients. CTGF promotes migration and peritoneal adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. These effects are abrogated by FG-3019, a human monoclonal antibody against CTGF, currently under clinical investigation as a therapeutic agent. Immunohistochemical analyses of high-grade serous ovarian tumors reveal that the highest level of tumor stromal CTGF expression was correlated with the poorest prognosis. Our findings identify CTGF as a promoter of peritoneal adhesion, likely to mediate metastasis, and a potential therapeutic target in high-grade serous ovarian cancer. These results warrant further studies into the therapeutic efficacy of FG-3019 in high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

  12. MicroRNA-181b promotes ovarian cancer cell growth and invasion by targeting LATS2

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Ying; Gao, Yan

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • miR-181b is upregulated in human ovarian cancer tissues. • miR-181b promotes ovarian cancer cell proliferation and invasion. • LATS2 is a direct target of miR-181b. • LATS2 is involved in miR-181b-induced ovarian cancer cell growth and invasion. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are strongly implicated in tumorigenesis and metastasis. In this study, we showed significant upregulation of miR-181b in ovarian cancer tissues, compared with the normal ovarian counterparts. Forced expression of miR-181b led to remarkably enhanced proliferation and invasion of ovarian cancer cells while its knockdown induced significant suppression of these cellular events. The tumor suppressor gene, LATS2 (large tumor suppressor 2), was further identified as a novel direct target of miR-181b. Specifically, miR-181b bound directly to the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of LATS2 and suppressed its expression. Restoration of LATS2 expression partially reversed the oncogenic effects of miR-181b. Our results indicate that miR-181b promotes proliferation and invasion by targeting LATS2 in ovarian cancer cells. These findings support the utility of miR-181b as a potential diagnostic and therapeutic target for ovarian cancer.

  13. Vaccine Therapy and IDO1 Inhibitor INCB024360 in Treating Patients With Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer Who Are in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-17

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  14. Integration and bioinformatics analysis of DNA-methylated genes associated with drug resistance in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    YAN, BINGBING; YIN, FUQIANG; WANG, QI; ZHANG, WEI; LI, LI

    2016-01-01

    The main obstacle to the successful treatment of ovarian cancer is the development of drug resistance to combined chemotherapy. Among all the factors associated with drug resistance, DNA methylation apparently plays a critical role. In this study, we performed an integrative analysis of the 26 DNA-methylated genes associated with drug resistance in ovarian cancer, and the genes were further evaluated by comprehensive bioinformatics analysis including gene/protein interaction, biological process enrichment and annotation. The results from the protein interaction analyses revealed that at least 20 of these 26 methylated genes are present in the protein interaction network, indicating that they interact with each other, have a correlation in function, and may participate as a whole in the regulation of ovarian cancer drug resistance. There is a direct interaction between the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene and at least half of the other genes, indicating that PTEN may possess core regulatory functions among these genes. Biological process enrichment and annotation demonstrated that most of these methylated genes were significantly associated with apoptosis, which is possibly an essential way for these genes to be involved in the regulation of multidrug resistance in ovarian cancer. In addition, a comprehensive analysis of clinical factors revealed that the methylation level of genes that are associated with the regulation of drug resistance in ovarian cancer was significantly correlated with the prognosis of ovarian cancer. Overall, this study preliminarily explains the potential correlation between the genes with DNA methylation and drug resistance in ovarian cancer. This finding has significance for our understanding of the regulation of resistant ovarian cancer by methylated genes, the treatment of ovarian cancer, and improvement of the prognosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:27347118

  15. Accelerated geroncogenesis in hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Javier A; Folguera-Blasco, Núria; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Joven, Jorge; Alarcón, Tomás

    2016-03-15

    The geroncogenesis hypothesis postulates that the decline in metabolic cellular health that occurs naturally with aging drives a "field effect" predisposing normal tissues for cancer development. We propose that mutations in the cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1/2 might trigger "accelerated geroncogenesis" in breast and ovarian epithelia. By speeding up the rate at which the metabolic threshold becomes "permissive" with survival and expansion of genomically unstable pre-tumoral epithelial cells, BRCA haploinsufficiency-driven metabolic reprogramming would operate as a bona fide oncogenic event enabling malignant transformation and tumor formation in BRCA carriers. The metabolic facet of BRCA1 one-hit might involve tissue-specific alterations in acetyl-CoA, α-ketoglutarate, NAD+, FAD, or S-adenosylmethionine, critical factors for de/methylation or de/acetylation dynamics in the nuclear epigenome. This in turn might induce faulty epigenetic reprogramming at the "install phase" that directs cell-specific differentiation of breast/ovarian epithelial cells, which can ultimately determine the penetrance of BRCA defects during developmental windows of susceptibility. This model offers a framework to study whether metabolic drugs that prevent or revert metabolic reprogramming induced by BRCA haploinsufficiency might displace the "geroncogenic risk" of BRCA carriers to the age typical for those without the mutation. The identification of the key nodes that directly communicate changes in cellular metabolism to the chromatin in BRCA haploinsufficient cells may allow the epigenetic targeting of genomic instability using exclusively metabolic means. The validation of accelerated geroncogenesis as an inherited "one-hit" metabolic "field effect" might offer new strategies to therapeutically revisit the apparently irreversible genetic-hereditary fate of women with hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome. PMID:26943589

  16. Accelerated geroncogenesis in hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Javier A.; Folguera-Blasco, Núria; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Joven, Jorge; Alarcón, Tomás

    2016-01-01

    The geroncogenesis hypothesis postulates that the decline in metabolic cellular health that occurs naturally with aging drives a “field effect” predisposing normal tissues for cancer development. We propose that mutations in the cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1/2 might trigger “accelerated geroncogenesis” in breast and ovarian epithelia. By speeding up the rate at which the metabolic threshold becomes “permissive” with survival and expansion of genomically unstable pre-tumoral epithelial cells, BRCA haploinsufficiency-driven metabolic reprogramming would operate as a bona fide oncogenic event enabling malignant transformation and tumor formation in BRCA carriers. The metabolic facet of BRCA1 one-hit might involve tissue-specific alterations in acetyl-CoA, α-ketoglutarate, NAD+, FAD, or S-adenosylmethionine, critical factors for de/methylation or de/acetylation dynamics in the nuclear epigenome. This in turn might induce faulty epigenetic reprogramming at the “install phase” that directs cell-specific differentiation of breast/ovarian epithelial cells, which can ultimately determine the penetrance of BRCA defects during developmental windows of susceptibility. This model offers a framework to study whether metabolic drugs that prevent or revert metabolic reprogramming induced by BRCA haploinsufficiency might displace the “geroncogenic risk” of BRCA carriers to the age typical for those without the mutation. The identification of the key nodes that directly communicate changes in cellular metabolism to the chromatin in BRCA haploinsufficient cells may allow the epigenetic targeting of genomic instability using exclusively metabolic means. The validation of accelerated geroncogenesis as an inherited “one-hit” metabolic “field effect” might offer new strategies to therapeutically revisit the apparently irreversible genetic-hereditary fate of women with hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome. PMID:26943589

  17. Choline Metabolism Alteration: A Focus on Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bagnoli, Marina; Granata, Anna; Nicoletti, Roberta; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Canese, Rossella; Podo, Franca; Canevari, Silvana; Iorio, Egidio; Mezzanzanica, Delia

    2016-01-01

    Compared with normal differentiated cells, cancer cells require a metabolic reprograming to support their high proliferation rates and survival. Aberrant choline metabolism is a fairly new metabolic hallmark reflecting the complex reciprocal interactions between oncogenic signaling and cellular metabolism. Alterations of the involved metabolic network may be sustained by changes in activity of several choline transporters as well as of enzymes such as choline kinase-alpha (ChoK-α) and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipases C and D. Of note, the net outcome of these enzymatic alterations is an increase of phosphocholine and total choline-containing compounds, a "cholinic phenotype" that can be monitored in cancer by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This review will highlight the molecular basis for targeting this pathway in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), a highly heterogeneous and lethal malignancy characterized by late diagnosis, frequent relapse, and development of chemoresistance. Modulation of ChoK-α expression impairs only EOC but not normal ovarian cells, thus supporting the hypothesis that "cholinic phenotype" is a peculiar feature of transformed cells and indicating ChoK-α targeting as a novel approach to improve efficacy of standard EOC chemotherapeutic treatments. PMID:27446799

  18. Choline Metabolism Alteration: A Focus on Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bagnoli, Marina; Granata, Anna; Nicoletti, Roberta; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Canese, Rossella; Podo, Franca; Canevari, Silvana; Iorio, Egidio; Mezzanzanica, Delia

    2016-01-01

    Compared with normal differentiated cells, cancer cells require a metabolic reprograming to support their high proliferation rates and survival. Aberrant choline metabolism is a fairly new metabolic hallmark reflecting the complex reciprocal interactions between oncogenic signaling and cellular metabolism. Alterations of the involved metabolic network may be sustained by changes in activity of several choline transporters as well as of enzymes such as choline kinase-alpha (ChoK-α) and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipases C and D. Of note, the net outcome of these enzymatic alterations is an increase of phosphocholine and total choline-containing compounds, a “cholinic phenotype” that can be monitored in cancer by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This review will highlight the molecular basis for targeting this pathway in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), a highly heterogeneous and lethal malignancy characterized by late diagnosis, frequent relapse, and development of chemoresistance. Modulation of ChoK-α expression impairs only EOC but not normal ovarian cells, thus supporting the hypothesis that “cholinic phenotype” is a peculiar feature of transformed cells and indicating ChoK-α targeting as a novel approach to improve efficacy of standard EOC chemotherapeutic treatments. PMID:27446799

  19. Homologous recombination deficiency: Exploiting the fundamental vulnerability of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A.; Ceccaldi, Raphael; Shapiro, Geoffrey I.; D’Andrea, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 50% of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs) exhibit defective DNA repair via homologous recombination (HR) due to genetic and epigenetic alterations of HR pathway genes. Defective HR is an important therapeutic target in EOC as exemplified by the efficacy of platinum analogues in this disease, as well as the advent of poly-ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors which exhibit synthetic lethality when applied to HR deficient cells. Here, we describe the genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of HR deficient EOCs, discuss current and emerging approaches for targeting these tumors, and present challenges associated with these approaches focusing on development and overcoming resistance. PMID:26463832

  20. Crowdsourcing Awareness: Exploration of the Ovarian Cancer Knowledge Gap through Amazon Mechanical Turk

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Rebecca R.; DiFeo, Analisa; Bogie, Kath; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Sun, Jiayang

    2014-01-01

    Background Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic disease in the United States, with more women dying from this cancer than all gynecological cancers combined. Ovarian cancer has been termed the “silent killer” because some patients do not show clear symptoms at an early stage. Currently, there is a lack of approved and effective early diagnostic tools for ovarian cancer. There is also an apparent severe knowledge gap of ovarian cancer in general and of its indicative symptoms among both public and many health professionals. These factors have significantly contributed to the late stage diagnosis of most ovarian cancer patients (63% are diagnosed at Stage III or above), where the 5-year survival rate is less than 30%. The paucity of knowledge concerning ovarian cancer in the United States is unknown. Methods The present investigation examined current public awareness and knowledge about ovarian cancer. The study implemented design strategies to develop an unbiased survey with quality control measures, including the modern application of multiple statistical analyses. The survey assessed a reasonable proxy of the US population by crowdsourcing participants through the online task marketplace Amazon Mechanical Turk, at a highly condensed rate of cost and time compared to traditional recruitment methods. Conclusion Knowledge of ovarian cancer was compared to that of breast cancer using repeated measures, bias control and other quality control measures in the survey design. Analyses included multinomial logistic regression and categorical data analysis procedures such as correspondence analysis, among other statistics. We confirmed the relatively poor public knowledge of ovarian cancer among the US population. The simple, yet novel design should set an example for designing surveys to obtain quality data via Amazon Mechanical Turk with the associated analyses. PMID:24465580

  1. PGPIPN, a Therapeutic Hexapeptide, Suppressed Human Ovarian Cancer Growth by Targeting BCL2

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Cai; Tang, Yigui; Zheng, Xin; Ren, Mingqiang; Qin, Yide

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive peptides, either derived from nature resources or synthesized by rational design, have been demonstrated potential for therapeutic agents against numerous human diseases, including cancer. However, the mechanism of therapeutic peptides against cancer has not been well elucidated. Here we show that PGPIPN, a hexapeptide derived from bovine β-casein, inhibited the proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells line SKOV3 as well as the primary ovarian cancer cells in vitro. Consistently, PGPIPIN also decreased tumor growth rate in xenograft ovarian cancer model mice in a dose-dependent manner. Further study demonstrated that the anti-tumor effect of PGPIPN is partially through promoting cell apoptosis by inhibiting BCL2 pathway. Thus, our study suggests that PGPIPN is a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of ovarian cancer or other types of cancer. PMID:23593287

  2. Essential gene profiles in breast, pancreas and ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sayad, Azin; Karamboulas, Konstantina; Krzyzanowski, Paul M.; Sircoulomb, Fabrice; Medrano, Mauricio; Fedyshyn, Yaroslav; Koh, Judice L.Y.; van Dyk, Dewald; Fedyshyn, Bodhana; Luhova, Marianna; Brito, Glauber C.; Vizeacoumar, Franco J.; Vizeacoumar, Frederick S.; Datti, Alessandro; Kasimer, Dahlia; Buzina, Alla; Mero, Patricia; Misquitta, Christine; Normand, Josee; Haider, Maliha; Ketela, Troy; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; Rottapel, Robert; Neel, Benjamin G.; Moffat, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Genomic analyses are yielding a host of new information on the multiple genetic abnormalities associated with specific types of cancer. A comprehensive description of cancer-associated genetic abnormalities can improve our ability to classify tumors into clinically relevant subgroups, and, on occasion, identify mutant genes that drive the cancer phenotype (“drivers”). More often, though, the functional significance of cancer-associated mutations is difficult to discern. Genome-wide pooled shRNA screens enable global identification of the genes essential for cancer cell survival and proliferation, providing a “functional genomic” map of human cancer to complement genomic studies. Using a lentiviral shRNA library targeting ~16,000 genes and a newly developed, dynamic scoring approach, we identified essential gene profiles in 72 breast, pancreatic, and ovarian cancer cell lines. Integrating our results with current and future genomic data should facilitate the systematic identification of drivers, unanticipated synthetic lethal relationships, and functional vulnerabilities of these tumor types. PMID:22585861

  3. BRCA-associated ovarian cancer: from molecular genetics to risk management.

    PubMed

    Girolimetti, Giulia; Perrone, Anna Myriam; Santini, Donatella; Barbieri, Elena; Guerra, Flora; Ferrari, Simona; Zamagni, Claudio; De Iaco, Pierandrea; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Turchetti, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) mostly arises sporadically, but a fraction of cases are associated with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The presence of a BRCA mutation in OC patients has been suggested as a prognostic and predictive factor. In addition, the identification of asymptomatic carriers of such mutations offers an unprecedented opportunity for OC prevention. This review is aimed at exploring the current knowledge on epidemiological and molecular aspects of BRCA-associated OC predisposition, on pathology and clinical behavior of OC occurring in BRCA mutation carriers, and on the available options for managing asymptomatic carriers.

  4. BRCA-Associated Ovarian Cancer: From Molecular Genetics to Risk Management

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Anna Myriam; Santini, Donatella; Ferrari, Simona; Zamagni, Claudio; De Iaco, Pierandrea

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) mostly arises sporadically, but a fraction of cases are associated with mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The presence of a BRCA mutation in OC patients has been suggested as a prognostic and predictive factor. In addition, the identification of asymptomatic carriers of such mutations offers an unprecedented opportunity for OC prevention. This review is aimed at exploring the current knowledge on epidemiological and molecular aspects of BRCA-associated OC predisposition, on pathology and clinical behavior of OC occurring in BRCA mutation carriers, and on the available options for managing asymptomatic carriers. PMID:25136623

  5. The Extracellular Matrix in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer – A Piece of a Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Angela; Howell, Viive M.; Colvin, Emily K.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women and the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Extracellular matrix (ECM) is an integral component of both the normal and tumor microenvironment. ECM composition varies between tissues and is crucial for maintaining normal function and homeostasis. Dysregulation and aberrant deposition or loss of ECM components is implicated in ovarian cancer progression. The mechanisms by which tumor cells induce ECM remodeling to promote a malignant phenotype are yet to be elucidated. A thorough understanding of the role of the ECM in ovarian cancer is needed for the development of effective biomarkers and new therapies. PMID:26579497

  6. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) inhibitor ibrutinib suppresses stem-like traits in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zucha, Muhammad Ary; Wu, Alexander T.H.; Lee, Wei-Hwa; Wang, Liang-Shun; Lin, Wan-Wan; Yuan, Chiou-Chung; Yeh, Chi-Tai

    2015-01-01

    According to a Prognoscan database, upregulation of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is associated with low overall survival in ovarian cancer patients. We found that spheroids-forming ovarian cancer cell, which highly expressed cancer stem-like cell (CSC) markers and Btk, were cisplatin resistant. We next treated CSCs and non-CSCs by a combination of ibrutinib and cisplatin. We found that chemoresistance was dependent on Btk and JAK2/STAT3, which maintained CSC by inducing Sox-2 and prosurvival genes. We suggest that addition of ibrutinib to cisplatin may improve treatment outcome in ovarian cancer. PMID:26036311

  7. Incidence rate of ovarian cancer cases in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from Saudi Cancer Registry 2001–2008

    PubMed Central

    Alghamdi, Ibrahim G; Hussain, Issam I; Alghamdi, Mohamed S; Alghamdi, Mansour M; Dohal, Ahlam A; El-Sheemy, Mohammed A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study provides descriptive epidemiological data, such as the percentage of cases diagnosed, crude incidence rate (CIR), and age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR) of ovarian cancer in Saudi Arabia from 2001–2008. Patients and methods A retrospective descriptive epidemiological analysis of all ovarian cancer cases recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry (SCR) from January 2001–December 2008 was performed. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance tests, Poisson regression, and simple linear modeling. Results A total of 991 ovarian cancer cases were recorded in the SCR from January 2001–December 2008. The region of Riyadh had the highest overall ASIR at 3.3 cases per 100,000 women, followed by the Jouf and Asir regions at 3.13 and 2.96 cases per 100,000 women. However, Hail and Jazan had the lowest rates at 1.4 and 0.6 cases per 100,000 women, respectively. Compared to Jazan, the incidence rate ratio for the number of ovarian cancer cases was significantly higher (P<0.001) in the Makkah region at 6.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.13–9.83), followed by Riyadh at 6.3 (95% CI: 4.10–9.82), and the eastern region of Saudi Arabia at 4.52 (95% CI: 2.93–6.98). The predicted annual CIR and ASIR for ovarian cancer in Saudi Arabia could be defined by the equations 0.9 + (0.07× years) and 1.71 + (0.09× years), respectively. Conclusion We observed a slight increase in the CIRs and ASIRs for ovarian cancer in Saudi Arabia from 2001–2008. Riyadh, Jouf, and Asir had the highest overall ASIR, while Jazan and Hail had the lowest rates. Makkah, Riyadh, and the eastern region of Saudi Arabia had the highest incidence rate ratio for the number of ovarian cancer cases. Further analytical studies are required to determine the potential risk factors of ovarian cancer among Saudi women. PMID:25028565

  8. Interleukin 6 Receptor Is an Independent Prognostic Factor and a Potential Therapeutic Target of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Isobe, Aki; Sawada, Kenjiro; Kinose, Yasuto; Ohyagi-Hara, Chifumi; Nakatsuka, Erika; Makino, Hiroshi; Ogura, Tomonori; Mizuno, Tomoko; Suzuki, Noriko; Morii, Eiichi; Nakamura, Koji; Sawada, Ikuko; Toda, Aska; Hashimoto, Kae; Mabuchi, Seiji; Ohta, Tsuyoshi; Morishige, Ken-ichirou; Kurachi, Hirohisa; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer remains the most lethal gynecologic cancer and new targeted molecular therapies against this miserable disease continue to be challenging. In this study, we analyzed the expressional patterns of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and its receptor (IL-6R) expression in ovarian cancer tissues, evaluated the impact of these expressions on clinical outcomes of patients, and found that a high-level of IL-6R expression but not IL-6 expression in cancer cells is an independent prognostic factor. In in vitro analyses using ovarian cell lines, while six (RMUG-S, RMG-1, OVISE, A2780, SKOV3ip1 and OVCAR-3) of seven overexpressed IL-6R compared with a primary normal ovarian surface epithelium, only two (RMG-1, OVISE) of seven cell lines overexpressed IL-6, suggesting that IL-6/IL-6R signaling exerts in a paracrine manner in certain types of ovarian cancer cells. Ovarian cancer ascites were collected from patients, and we found that primary CD11b+CD14+ cells, which were predominantly M2-polarized macrophages, are the major source of IL-6 production in an ovarian cancer microenvironment. When CD11b+CD14+ cells were co-cultured with cancer cells, both the invasion and the proliferation of cancer cells were robustly promoted and these promotions were almost completely inhibited by pretreatment with anti-IL-6R antibody (tocilizumab). The data presented herein suggest a rationale for anti-IL-6/IL-6R therapy to suppress the peritoneal spread of ovarian cancer, and represent evidence of the therapeutic potential of anti-IL-6R therapy for ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:25658637

  9. Interleukin 6 receptor is an independent prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Aki; Sawada, Kenjiro; Kinose, Yasuto; Ohyagi-Hara, Chifumi; Nakatsuka, Erika; Makino, Hiroshi; Ogura, Tomonori; Mizuno, Tomoko; Suzuki, Noriko; Morii, Eiichi; Nakamura, Koji; Sawada, Ikuko; Toda, Aska; Hashimoto, Kae; Mabuchi, Seiji; Ohta, Tsuyoshi; Morishige, Ken-ichirou; Kurachi, Hirohisa; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer remains the most lethal gynecologic cancer and new targeted molecular therapies against this miserable disease continue to be challenging. In this study, we analyzed the expressional patterns of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and its receptor (IL-6R) expression in ovarian cancer tissues, evaluated the impact of these expressions on clinical outcomes of patients, and found that a high-level of IL-6R expression but not IL-6 expression in cancer cells is an independent prognostic factor. In in vitro analyses using ovarian cell lines, while six (RMUG-S, RMG-1, OVISE, A2780, SKOV3ip1 and OVCAR-3) of seven overexpressed IL-6R compared with a primary normal ovarian surface epithelium, only two (RMG-1, OVISE) of seven cell lines overexpressed IL-6, suggesting that IL-6/IL-6R signaling exerts in a paracrine manner in certain types of ovarian cancer cells. Ovarian cancer ascites were collected from patients, and we found that primary CD11b+CD14+ cells, which were predominantly M2-polarized macrophages, are the major source of IL-6 production in an ovarian cancer microenvironment. When CD11b+CD14+ cells were co-cultured with cancer cells, both the invasion and the proliferation of cancer cells were robustly promoted and these promotions were almost completely inhibited by pretreatment with anti-IL-6R antibody (tocilizumab). The data presented herein suggest a rationale for anti-IL-6/IL-6R therapy to suppress the peritoneal spread of ovarian cancer, and represent evidence of the therapeutic potential of anti-IL-6R therapy for ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:25658637

  10. RNAi-Mediated Downregulation of FKBP14 Suppresses the Growth of Human Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Meng; Miao, Yi; Qi, Lan; Bai, Mingzhu; Zhang, Jiarong; Feng, Youji

    2016-01-01

    FKBP14 belongs to the family of FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs). Altered expression of FKBPs has been reported in several malignancies. This study aimed to reveal the expression profile of FKBP14 in ovarian cancer and evaluate whether FKBP14 is a molecular target for cancer therapy. We found that the FKBP14 mRNA level was significantly higher in ovarian cancer tissues than in normal tissues. FKBP14 expression was then knocked down in two ovarian cancer cell lines, SKOV3 and HO8910 cells, by a lentiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA) delivery system. Reduced expression of FKBP14 markedly impaired the proliferative ability of ovarian cancer cells. Additionally, ovarian cancer cells infected with FKBP14 shRNA lentivirus tended to arrest in the G0/G1 phase and undergo apoptosis. Moreover, knockdown of FKBP14 induced cell apoptosis via increasing the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2. These results indicated that FKBP14 might be a diagnostic marker for ovarian cancer and could be a potential molecular target for the therapy of ovarian cancer. PMID:27131312

  11. Serial Patterns of Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers in a Prediagnosis Longitudinal Dataset.

    PubMed

    Blyuss, Oleg; Gentry-Maharaj, Alex; Fourkala, Evangelia-Orania; Ryan, Andy; Zaikin, Alexey; Menon, Usha; Jacobs, Ian; Timms, John F

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of ovarian cancer through screening may have impact on mortality from the disease. Approaches based on CA125 cut-off have not been effective. Longitudinal algorithms such as the Risk of Ovarian Cancer Algorithm (ROCA) to interpret CA125 have been shown to have higher sensitivity and specificity than a single cut-off. The aim of this study was to investigate whether other ovarian cancer-related biomarkers, Human Epididymis 4 (HE4), glycodelin, mesothelin, matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7), and cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1), could improve the performance of CA125 in detecting ovarian cancer earlier. Serum samples (single and serial) predating diagnosis from 47 women taking part in the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS) who went on to develop primary invasive ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer (index cancer) (170 samples) and 179 matched controls (893 samples) were included in the study. A multiplex immunobased assay platform (Becton Dickinson) allowing simultaneous measurement of the six serum markers was used. The area under the ROC curve for the panel of three biomarkers (CA125, HE4, and glycodelin) was higher than for CA125 alone for all analysed time groups, indicating that these markers can improve on sensitivity of CA125 alone for ovarian cancer detection.

  12. Serial Patterns of Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers in a Prediagnosis Longitudinal Dataset.

    PubMed

    Blyuss, Oleg; Gentry-Maharaj, Alex; Fourkala, Evangelia-Orania; Ryan, Andy; Zaikin, Alexey; Menon, Usha; Jacobs, Ian; Timms, John F

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of ovarian cancer through screening may have impact on mortality from the disease. Approaches based on CA125 cut-off have not been effective. Longitudinal algorithms such as the Risk of Ovarian Cancer Algorithm (ROCA) to interpret CA125 have been shown to have higher sensitivity and specificity than a single cut-off. The aim of this study was to investigate whether other ovarian cancer-related biomarkers, Human Epididymis 4 (HE4), glycodelin, mesothelin, matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7), and cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1), could improve the performance of CA125 in detecting ovarian cancer earlier. Serum samples (single and serial) predating diagnosis from 47 women taking part in the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS) who went on to develop primary invasive ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer (index cancer) (170 samples) and 179 matched controls (893 samples) were included in the study. A multiplex immunobased assay platform (Becton Dickinson) allowing simultaneous measurement of the six serum markers was used. The area under the ROC curve for the panel of three biomarkers (CA125, HE4, and glycodelin) was higher than for CA125 alone for all analysed time groups, indicating that these markers can improve on sensitivity of CA125 alone for ovarian cancer detection. PMID:26819954

  13. Epidemiology of Patients with Ovarian Cancer with and Without a BRCA1/2 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Weiderpass, Elisabete; Tyczynski, Jerzy E

    2015-12-01

    Ovarian cancer survival rates have improved only slightly in recent decades; however, treatment of this disease is expected to undergo rapid change as strategies incorporating molecular-targeted therapies enter clinical practice. Carriers of deleterious mutations (defined as a harmful mutation) in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene (BRCAm) have a significantly increased risk of developing ovarian cancer. Epidemiology data in large (>500 patients) unselected ovarian cancer populations suggest that the expected incidence rate for BRCAm in this population is 12-14 %. Patients with a BRCAm are typically diagnosed at a younger age than those without a BRCAm. Associations with BRCAm vary according to ethnicity, with women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent being 10 times more likely to have a BRCAm than the general population. In terms of survival, patients with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer who have a BRCAm may have improved overall survival compared with patients who do not carry a BRCAm. Although genetic testing for BRCAm remains relatively uncommon in ovarian cancer patients, testing is becoming cheaper and increasingly accessible; however, this approach is not without numerous social, ethical and policy issues. Current guidelines recommend BRCAm testing in specific ovarian cancer patients only; however, with the emergence of treatments that are targeted at patients with a BRCAm, genetic testing of all patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer may lead to improved patient outcomes in this patient population. Knowledge of BRCAm status could, therefore, help to inform treatment decisions and identify relatives at increased risk of developing cancer.

  14. High-grade ovarian cancer secreting effective exosomes in tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yi, Huan; Ye, Jun; Yang, Xiao-Mei; Zhang, Li-Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Chen, Ya-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecological cancer, related closely to tumor stage. High-grade ovarian cancer always results in a late diagnose and high recurrence, which reduce survival within five years. Until recently, curable therapy is still under research and anti-angiogenesis proves a promising way. Tumor-derived exosomes are essential in tumor migration and metastases such as angiogenesis is enhanced by exosomes. In our study, we have made comparison between high-grade and unlikely high-grade serous ovarian cancer cells on exosomal function of endothelial cells proliferation, migration and tube formation. Exosomes derived from high-grade ovarian cancer have a profound impact on angiogenesis with comparison to unlikely high-grade ovarian cancer. Proteomic profiles revealed some potential proteins involved in exosomal function of angiogenesis such as ATF2, MTA1, ROCK1/2 and so on. Therefore, exosomes plays an influential role in angiogenesis in ovarian serous cancer and also function more effectively in high-grade ovarian cancer cells.

  15. MicroRNA and transcription factor mediated regulatory network for ovarian cancer: regulatory network of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ying, Huanchun; Lv, Jing; Ying, Tianshu; Li, Jun; Yang, Qing; Ma, Yuan

    2013-10-01

    A better understanding on the regulatory interactions of microRNA (miRNA) target genes and transcription factor (TF) target genes in ovarian cancer may be conducive for developing early diagnosis strategy. Thus, gene expression data and miRNA expression data were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas in this study. Differentially expressed genes and miRNAs were selected out with t test, and Gene Ontology enrichment analysis was performed with DAVID tools. Regulatory interactions were retrieved from miRTarBase, TRED, and TRANSFAC, and then networks for miRNA target genes and TF target genes were constructed to globally present the mechanisms. As a result, a total of 1,939 differentially expressed genes were identified, and they were enriched in 28 functions, among which cell cycle was affected to the most degree. Besides, 213 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified. Two regulatory networks for miRNA target genes and TF target genes were established and then both were combined, in which E2F transcription factor 1, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A, cyclin E1, and miR-16 were the hub genes. These genes may be potential biomarkers for ovarian cancer.

  16. The breast cancer susceptibility genes (BRCA) in breast and ovarian cancers

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Arindam; Paul, Soumen

    2015-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Susceptibility Genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are the dynamic regulators of genomic integrity. Inherited mutations in these genes are associated with the development of cancer in multiple organs including the breast and ovary. Mutations of BRCA1/2 genes greatly increase lifetime risk to develop breast and ovarian cancer and these mutations are frequently observed in hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. In addition, misregulation and altered expressions of BRCA1/2 proteins potentiate sporadic forms of breast cancer. In particular, both genes contribute to DNA repair and transcriptional regulation in response to DNA damage. Thus, deficiencies of BRCA1/2 functions lead to the accumulation of genetic alterations and ultimately influence the development of cancer. Studies since identification of both BRCA1 and BRCA2 have provided strong evidences for their tumor suppressor activities specifically for breast and ovarian cancer and this article aims to review the current state of knowledge regarding the BRCAs and associated cancer risk. PMID:24389207

  17. Insights from HuR biology point to potential improvement for second-line ovarian cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Hung; Peng, Weidan; Furuuchi, Narumi; DuHadaway, James B.; Jimbo, Masaya; Pirritano, Andrea; Dunton, Charles J.; Daum, Gary S.; Leiby, Benjamin E.; Brody, Jonathan R.; Sawicki, Janet A.

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study aimed to investigate the role that an RNA-binding protein, HuR, plays in the response of high-grade serous ovarian tumors to chemotherapeutics. We immunohistochemically stained sections of 31 surgically-debulked chemo-naïve ovarian tumors for HuR and scored the degree of HuR cytoplasmic staining. We found no correlation between HuR intracellular localization in tumor sections and progression free survival (PFS) of these patients, 29 of whom underwent second-line gemcitabine/platin combination therapy for recurrent disease. Ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation (RNP-IP) analysis of ovarian cancer cells in culture showed that cytoplasmic HuR increases deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), a metabolic enzyme that activates gemcitabine. The effects of carboplatin treatment on HuR and WEE1 (a mitotic inhibitor) expression, and on cell cycle kinetics, were also examined. Treatment of ovarian cancer cells with carboplatin results in increased HuR cytoplasmic expression and elevated WEE1 expression, arresting cell cycle G2/M transition. This may explain why HuR cytoplasmic localization in chemo-naïve tumors is not predictive of therapeutic response and PFS following second-line gemcitabine/platin combination therapy. These results suggest treatment of recurrent ovarian tumors with a combination of gemcitabine, carboplatin, and a WEE1 inhibitor may be potentially advantageous as compared to current clinical practices. PMID:26943573

  18. Insights from HuR biology point to potential improvement for second-line ovarian cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Hung; Peng, Weidan; Furuuchi, Narumi; DuHadaway, James B; Jimbo, Masaya; Pirritano, Andrea; Dunton, Charles J; Daum, Gary S; Leiby, Benjamin E; Brody, Jonathan R; Sawicki, Janet A

    2016-04-19

    This retrospective study aimed to investigate the role that an RNA-binding protein, HuR, plays in the response of high-grade serous ovarian tumors to chemotherapeutics. We immunohistochemically stained sections of 31 surgically-debulked chemo-naïve ovarian tumors for HuR and scored the degree of HuR cytoplasmic staining. We found no correlation between HuR intracellular localization in tumor sections and progression free survival (PFS) of these patients, 29 of whom underwent second-line gemcitabine/platin combination therapy for recurrent disease. Ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation (RNP-IP) analysis of ovarian cancer cells in culture showed that cytoplasmic HuR increases deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), a metabolic enzyme that activates gemcitabine. The effects of carboplatin treatment on HuR and WEE1 (a mitotic inhibitor) expression, and on cell cycle kinetics, were also examined. Treatment of ovarian cancer cells with carboplatin results in increased HuR cytoplasmic expression and elevated WEE1 expression, arresting cell cycle G2/M transition. This may explain why HuR cytoplasmic localization in chemo-naïve tumors is not predictive of therapeutic response and PFS following second-line gemcitabine/platin combination therapy. These results suggest treatment of recurrent ovarian tumors with a combination of gemcitabine, carboplatin, and a WEE1 inhibitor may be potentially advantageous as compared to current clinical practices. PMID:26943573

  19. Insights from HuR biology point to potential improvement for second-line ovarian cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Hung; Peng, Weidan; Furuuchi, Narumi; DuHadaway, James B; Jimbo, Masaya; Pirritano, Andrea; Dunton, Charles J; Daum, Gary S; Leiby, Benjamin E; Brody, Jonathan R; Sawicki, Janet A

    2016-04-19

    This retrospective study aimed to investigate the role that an RNA-binding protein, HuR, plays in the response of high-grade serous ovarian tumors to chemotherapeutics. We immunohistochemically stained sections of 31 surgically-debulked chemo-naïve ovarian tumors for HuR and scored the degree of HuR cytoplasmic staining. We found no correlation between HuR intracellular localization in tumor sections and progression free survival (PFS) of these patients, 29 of whom underwent second-line gemcitabine/platin combination therapy for recurrent disease. Ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation (RNP-IP) analysis of ovarian cancer cells in culture showed that cytoplasmic HuR increases deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), a metabolic enzyme that activates gemcitabine. The effects of carboplatin treatment on HuR and WEE1 (a mitotic inhibitor) expression, and on cell cycle kinetics, were also examined. Treatment of ovarian cancer cells with carboplatin results in increased HuR cytoplasmic expression and elevated WEE1 expression, arresting cell cycle G2/M transition. This may explain why HuR cytoplasmic localization in chemo-naïve tumors is not predictive of therapeutic response and PFS following second-line gemcitabine/platin combination therapy. These results suggest treatment of recurrent ovarian tumors with a combination of gemcitabine, carboplatin, and a WEE1 inhibitor may be potentially advantageous as compared to current clinical practices.

  20. Age at menarche and risk of ovarian cancer: a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ting-Ting; Wu, Qi-Jun; Vogtmann, Emily; Lin, Bei; Wang, Yong-Lai

    2013-06-15

    Epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent associations between menarcheal age and ovarian cancer risk. To our knowledge, a meta-analysis for the association between menarcheal age and ovarian cancer has not been reported. Relevant published studies of menarcheal age and ovarian cancer were identified using MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science through the end of April 2012. Two authors (T-T.G. and Q-J.W.) independently assessed eligibility and extracted data. We pooled the relative risks (RRs) from individual studies using a random-effects model and performed heterogeneity and publication bias analyses. A total of 27 observational studies consisting of 22 case-control and five cohort studies were included in our analysis. In a pooled analysis of all studies, a statistically significant inverse association was observed between menarcheal age (for the oldest compared to the youngest category) and ovarian cancer risk (RR = 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.75-0.97). The pooled RRs of ovarian cancer for the oldest versus the youngest categories of menarcheal age in prospective and case-control studies were 0.89 (95% CI = 0.76-1.03) and 0.84 (95% CI = 0.70-0.99), respectively. Inverse associations between menarcheal age and ovarian cancer risk were observed in most subgroups; however, the significant association was restricted to invasive and borderline serous ovarian cancer. In conclusion, findings from this meta-analysis support that menarcheal age was inversely associated with the risk of ovarian cancer. More large studies are warranted to stratify these results by different cancer grading and histotype of ovarian cancer.

  1. Aspirin, Nonaspirin Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug, and Acetaminophen Use and Risk of Invasive Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: A Pooled Analysis in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Regular aspirin use is associated with reduced risk of several malignancies. Epidemiologic studies analyzing aspirin, nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and acetaminophen use and ovarian cancer risk have been inconclusive. Methods We analyzed pooled data from 12 population-based case–control studies of ovarian cancer, including 7776 case patients and 11843 control subjects accrued between 1992 and 2007. Odds ratios (ORs) for associations of medication use with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer were estimated in individual studies using logistic regression and combined using random effects meta-analysis. Associations between frequency, dose, and duration of analgesic use and risk of ovarian cancer were also assessed. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Aspirin use was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer (OR = 0.91; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.84 to 0.99). Results were similar but not statistically significant for nonaspirin NSAIDs, and there was no association with acetaminophen. In seven studies with frequency data, the reduced risk was strongest among daily aspirin users (OR = 0.80; 95% CI = 0.67 to 0.96). In three studies with dose information, the reduced risk was strongest among users of low dose (<100mg) aspirin (OR = 0.66; 95% CI = 0.53 to 0.83), whereas for nonaspirin NSAIDs, the reduced risk was strongest for high dose (≥500mg) usage (OR = 0.76; 95% CI = 0.64 to 0.91). Conclusions Aspirin use was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer, especially among daily users of low-dose aspirin. These findings suggest that the same aspirin regimen proven to protect against cardiovascular events and several cancers could reduce the risk of ovarian cancer 20% to 34% depending on frequency and dose of use. PMID:24503200

  2. Intraoperative Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Oseledchyk, Anton; Zivanovic, Oliver

    2015-09-01

    Ovarian cancer, because it is largely confined to the peritoneal cavity, has a unique tumor biology and metastatic spread pattern. Its metastatic potential comes from detached tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity that re-attach to the mesothelial lining of the peritoneal surface. It is proposed that these micrometastases without neovasculature, as well as floating malignant cells, are drivers of early recurrence, since they can be neither resected nor adequately treated by systemic chemotherapy. This represents the major rationale for local treatment by means of postoperative intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy, which is the standard of care in the United States in patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer who have minimal residual disease following cytoreductive surgery. An alternative loco-regional treatment strategy is the "HIPEC" procedure--hyperthermic IP chemoperfusion that is performed during the operation immediately following completion of gross tumor resection, and which provides improved tissue penetration and distribution of the chemotherapeutics. However, prospective data are limited and an outcomes benefit has yet to be shown. Here we discuss the advantages and pitfalls of HIPEC, as well as current data and ongoing prospective trials. PMID:26384807

  3. Relationship between RANTES and dendritic cells in ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wertel, Iwona; Tarkowski, Rafal; Bednarek, Wieslawa; Kotarski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate RANTES levels in the peritoneal fluid (PF) and plasma of patients with ovarian cancer (n=73), serous cystadenoma (n=32) or normal controls (n=9). RANTES levels were correlated to myeloid and lymphoid dendritic cells (DCs). RANTES levels were evaluated using the ELISA assay. DCs were quantified using flow cytometry. The PF and plasma RANTES concentrations were elevated in the ovarian cancer (OVC) patients when compared to the patients with benign tumor (the reference group). Plasma levels of RANTES were higher in OVC patients compared with the reference group and with the controls. There were no significant differences in the plasma RANTES levels based on tumor stage, grade or histology. Women with serous cystadenocarcinoma, clear cell carcinoma and endometrioid cystadenocarcinoma had significantly higher PF RANTES levels than patients with undifferentiated carcinoma. Women with clear cell carcinoma and patients with endometrioid cystadenocarcinoma had higher PF RANTES levels than women with mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. We concluded that RANTES production in the peritoneal cavities of OVC patients depends on the histological type of the tumor cells.

  4. Vaccinia Virus Induces Programmed Necrosis in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Whilding, Lynsey M; Archibald, Kyra M; Kulbe, Hagen; Balkwill, Frances R; Öberg, Daniel; McNeish, Iain A

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which oncolytic vaccinia virus induces tumor cell death are poorly understood. We have evaluated cell death pathways following infection of ovarian cancer cells with both wild-type and thymidine kinase-deleted (dTK) Lister strain vaccinia. We show that death does not rely upon classical apoptosis despite the appearances of some limited apoptotic features, including phosphatidylserine externalization and appearance of sub-G1 DNA populations. Vaccinia infection induces marked lipidation of LC3 proteins, but there is no general activation of the autophagic process and cell death does not rely upon autophagy induction. We show that vaccinia induces necrotic morphology on transmission electron microscopy, accompanied by marked by reductions in intracellular adenosine triphosphate, altered mitochondrial metabolism, and release of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein. This necrotic cell death appears regulated, as infection induces formation of a receptor interacting protein (RIP1)/caspase-8 complex. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of both RIP1 and substrates downstream of RIP1, including MLKL, significantly attenuate cell death. Blockade of TNF-α, however, does not alter virus efficacy, suggesting that necrosis does not result from autocrine cytokine release. Overall, these results show that, in ovarian cancer cells, vaccinia virus causes necrotic cell death that is mediated through a programmed series of events. PMID:23985697

  5. Autophagy protects ovarian cancer-associated fibroblasts against oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Xue, Liang; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Bu, Shixia; Zhu, Xueliang; Lai, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA-Seq and gene set enrichment anylysis revealed that ovarian cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are mitotically active compared with normal fibroblasts (NFs). Cellular senescence is observed in CAFs treated with H2O2 as shown by elevated SA-β-gal activity and p21 (WAF1/Cip1) protein levels. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and p21 (WAF1/Cip1) elevation may account for H2O2-induced CAFs cell cycle arrest in S phase. Blockage of autophagy can increase ROS production in CAFs, leading to cell cycle arrest in S phase, cell proliferation inhibition and enhanced sensitivity to H2O2-induced cell death. ROS scavenger NAC can reduce ROS production and thus restore cell viability. Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), monocarboxylic acid transporter 4 (MCT4) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) were up-regulated in CAFs compared with NFs. There was relatively high lactate content in CAFs than in NFs. Blockage of autophagy decreased LDHA, MCT4 and SOD2 protein levels in CAFs that might enhance ROS production. Blockage of autophagy can sensitize CAFs to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin, implicating that autophagy might possess clinical utility as an attractive target for ovarian cancer treatment in the future. PMID:27074587

  6. Blue light-activated hypocrellin B damages ovarian cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.; Leung, A. W. N.; Xiang, J. Y.; Xu, C. S.

    2011-10-01

    In the present study, a novel blue light source from LED was used to activate hypocrellin B in ovarian cancer HO-8910 cells. Hyppcrellin B concentration was kept at 2.5 μM and light doses from 0.5-4.0 J/cm2. Photocytotoxicity was investigated using MTT reduction assay and light microscopy after light irradiation. Cellular morphology was observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). MTT assay showed that the cytotoxicity of blue light-activated hypocrellin B in HO-8910 cells increased along with light dose. The observations from light microscopy reinforced the above results. TEM showed that microvillin disappearance, vacuole formation, chromatin condensation, and topical apoptotic body were observed in the cells treated by both light and hypocrellin B. The findings demonstrated that blue light from LED source could effectively activate hypocrellin B to cause the destruction of HO-8910 cells, indicating that Blue light-activated hypocrellin B might be potential therapeutic strategy in the management of ovarian cancer.

  7. The Prevention of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer: A Personal View

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Options for the prevention of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer include screening, preventive surgery and chemoprevention. Screening studies with magnetic resonance imaging of the breast are promising but the technology is not widespread and MRI is unlikely to be available as a screening tool in the near future. Prophylactic oophorectomy and mastectomy are effective preventive measures and are gaining in acceptance by patients and physicians. Preventive mastectomy is effective against both primary and contralateral breast cancer. Oophorectomy prevents ovarian cancer, and if done prior to menopause, will prevent breast cancer as well. Tamoxifen has been shown to prevent contralateral breast cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers but is not widely accepted as a means of primary prevention. Oral contraceptives and tubal ligation will reduce the risk of hereditary ovarian cancer and should be considered in women who wish to retain ovarian function. PMID:20233484

  8. MV-NIS Infected Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  9. Quality of life in female cancer survivors: Is it related to ovarian reserve?

    PubMed Central

    Kondapalli, Laxmi A.; Dillon, Katherine E.; Sammel, Mary D.; Ray, Anushree; Prewitt, Maureen; Ginsberg, Jill P.; Gracia, Clarisa R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess quality of life scores and possible association with measures of ovarian reserve in female cancer survivors compared to healthy controls of similar age. Methods In this prospective cohort study, fifty-nine cancer survivors aged 16–39 years and 66 healthy, similarly aged unexposed women were recruited at the University of Pennsylvania. The primary outcome measures are the generic and cancer-specific domain scores on the Quality of Life in Adult Cancer Survivors (QLACS) instruments, early follicular phase serum hormones (follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol (E2), inhibin B (INH), anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) and ovarian ultrasound measurements (ovarian volu